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Sample records for antigens tumor-associated carbohydrate

  1. Cancer vaccine with mimotopes of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens.

    PubMed

    Kozbor, Danuta

    2010-03-01

    The GD2 ganglioside, displayed by five carbohydrate Neu5Acalpha2-8Neu5Acalpha2-3(GalNAcbeta1-4)Galbeta1-4Glcbeta residues attached to a ceramide chain that anchors the ganglioside in the cell membrane, is expressed on neuroectodermally derived tumors. GD2 has been used as a target for passive and active immunotherapy in patients with malignant melanoma and neuroblastoma. We have generated 47-LDA mimotope of GD2 by screening a phage display peptide library with anti-GD2 mAb 14G2a and reported that vaccination with the 47-LDA mimotope elicited GD2 cross-reactive IgG antibody responses as well as MHC class I-restricted CD8(+) T cells to syngeneic neuroblastoma tumor cells. The cytotoxic activity of the vaccine-induced CTLs was independent of GD2 expression, suggesting recognition of a novel tumor-associated antigen cross-reacting with 47-LDA. Immunoblotting studies using 14G2a mAb demonstrated that this antibody cross-reacts with a 105 kDa glycoprotein expressed by GD2(+) and GD2(-) neuroblastoma and melanoma cells. Functional studies of tumor cells grown in three-dimensional (3D) collagen cultures with 14G2a mAb showed decreases in matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation, a process regulated by 105 kDa activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecules (ALCAM/CD166). The CD166 glycoprotein was shown to be recognized by 14G2a antibody, and inhibition of CD166 expression by RNA interference ablated the cell sensitivity to lysis by 47-LDA-induced CD8(+) T cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that the vaccine-induced CTLs recognize a 47-LDA cross-reactive epitope expressed by CD166 and reveal a novel mechanism of induction of potent tumor-specific cellular responses by mimotopes of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens.

  2. Cancer vaccine with mimotopes of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens

    PubMed Central

    Kozbor, Danuta

    2009-01-01

    The GD2 ganglioside, displayed by five carbohydrate Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Acα2-3(GalNAcβ1-4)Galβ1-4Glcβ residues attached to a ceramide chain that anchors the ganglioside in the cell membrane, is expressed on neuroectodermally derived tumors. GD2 has been used as a target for passive and active immunotherapy in patients with malignant melanoma and neuroblastoma. We have generated 47-LDA mimotope of GD2 by screening a phage display peptide library with anti-GD2 mAb 14G2a and reported that vaccination with the 47-LDA mimotope elicited GD2 cross-reactive IgG antibody responses as well as MHC class I-restricted CD8+ T cells to syngeneic neuroblastoma tumor cells. The cytotoxic activity of the vaccine-induced CTLs was independent of GD2 expression, suggesting recognition of a novel tumor-associated antigen cross-reacting with 47-LDA. Immunoblotting studies using 14G2a mAb demonstrated that this antibody cross-reacts with a 105 kDa glycoprotein expressed by GD2+ and GD2− neuroblastoma and melanoma cells. Functional studies of tumor cells grown in three-dimensional (3D) collagen cultures with 14G2a mAb showed decreases in matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation, a process regulated by 105 kDa activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecules (ALCAM/CD166). The CD166 glycoprotein was shown to be recognized by 14G2a antibody, and inhibition of CD166 expression by RNA interference ablated the cell sensitivity to lysis by 47-LDA-induced CD8+ T cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that the vaccine-induced CTLs recognize a 47-LDA cross-reactive epitope expressed by CD166 and reveal a novel mechanism of induction of potent tumor-specific cellular responses by mimotopes of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens. PMID:19763891

  3. Cancer vaccine with mimotopes of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens.

    PubMed

    Kozbor, Danuta

    2010-03-01

    The GD2 ganglioside, displayed by five carbohydrate Neu5Acalpha2-8Neu5Acalpha2-3(GalNAcbeta1-4)Galbeta1-4Glcbeta residues attached to a ceramide chain that anchors the ganglioside in the cell membrane, is expressed on neuroectodermally derived tumors. GD2 has been used as a target for passive and active immunotherapy in patients with malignant melanoma and neuroblastoma. We have generated 47-LDA mimotope of GD2 by screening a phage display peptide library with anti-GD2 mAb 14G2a and reported that vaccination with the 47-LDA mimotope elicited GD2 cross-reactive IgG antibody responses as well as MHC class I-restricted CD8(+) T cells to syngeneic neuroblastoma tumor cells. The cytotoxic activity of the vaccine-induced CTLs was independent of GD2 expression, suggesting recognition of a novel tumor-associated antigen cross-reacting with 47-LDA. Immunoblotting studies using 14G2a mAb demonstrated that this antibody cross-reacts with a 105 kDa glycoprotein expressed by GD2(+) and GD2(-) neuroblastoma and melanoma cells. Functional studies of tumor cells grown in three-dimensional (3D) collagen cultures with 14G2a mAb showed decreases in matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation, a process regulated by 105 kDa activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecules (ALCAM/CD166). The CD166 glycoprotein was shown to be recognized by 14G2a antibody, and inhibition of CD166 expression by RNA interference ablated the cell sensitivity to lysis by 47-LDA-induced CD8(+) T cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that the vaccine-induced CTLs recognize a 47-LDA cross-reactive epitope expressed by CD166 and reveal a novel mechanism of induction of potent tumor-specific cellular responses by mimotopes of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens. PMID:19763891

  4. Ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical immunoassay of antibody against tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen amplified by functionalized graphene derivates and enzymatic biocatalytic precipitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Liu, Mingshuai; Mao, Yaning; Xu, Yunpeng; Niu, Shuyan

    2014-09-15

    Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) are often found on the surface of cancer cells. The determination of the carbohydrate components of glycoconjugates is challenging because of the chemical complexity of glycan chains. Through monitoring corresponding antibody, we can get a good solution for clinical diagnosis. Here breast tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens Tn were used as a model and a new photoelectrochemical biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of antibody against Tn was developed. To enhance the sensitivity, both graphene oxide and graphene were used during the construction of biosensor. Through the formation of immunocomplex and the insoluble biocatalytic precipitation (BCP) product, photocurrent intensity was decreased greatly and the antibody could be detected from 0.5 to 500 pg/mL with a detection limit of 1.0×10(-13) g/mL. At the same time, the developed biosensor showed acceptable selectivity and could be used in the complex matrix. Compared with the traditional glycoarray method, this PEC method is more sensitive (5 orders of magnitude), and thus provides another platform to monitor the immune response to carbohydrate epitopes at different stages during differentiation, metastasis, or treatment.

  5. Valency and density matter: Deciphering impacts of immunogen structures on immune responses against a tumor associated carbohydrate antigen using synthetic glycopolymers.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qian; Yin, Zhaojun; Wu, Xuanjun; Haas, Karen M; Huang, Xuefei

    2016-09-01

    For successful carbohydrate based anti-cancer vaccines, it is critical that B cells are activated to secret antibodies targeting the tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs). Despite the availability of many TACA based constructs, systematic understanding of the effects of structural features on anti-glycan antibody responses is lacking. In this study, a series of defined synthetic glyco-polymers bearing a representative TACA, i.e., the Thomsen-nouveau (Tn) antigen, have been prepared to probe the induction of early B cell activation and antibody production via a T cell independent mechanism. Valency and density of the antigen in the polymers turned out to be critical. An average of greater than 6 Tn per chain was needed to induce antibody production. Glycopolymers with 40 antigens per chain and backbone molecular weight of 450 kDa gave the strongest stimulation to B cells in vitro, which correlated well with its in vivo activity. Deviations from the desired valency and density led to decreased antibody production or even antigen specific B cell non-responsiveness. These findings provide important insights on how to modulate anti-TACA immune responses facilitating the development of TACA based anti-cancer vaccines using glycopolymers. PMID:27294537

  6. Tumor-associated antigens in gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    DiSaia, P J

    1975-12-01

    If the study of tumor immunology is to have a profound impact on clinical medicine, certain hypotheses must be proven to be valid. First and foremost, it must be demonstrated that malignant tissue possesses antigenic substances (probably protein moieties) that are unique to that particular malignant process. In addition, these antigenic substances must be very similar in histologically similar tumors. Second, the host defense mechanisms must be capable of reacting to these tumor-associated antigens. The reaction is, of course, necessary in order to develop both diagnostic and therapeutic routes of application. The reaction of the immunologic system to these tumor-associated antigens could be monitored as an early serodiagnostic tool for subclinical cancer, and the cytotoxic reaction holds great promise as an immunotherapeutic tool. The essence of tumor immunologic research can thus be stated in the form of the following questions: 1. Do histologically similar cancers from identical primary sites share common tumor-associated antigens? 2. Does the immunologic system react to these antigens? 3. Can this reaction be assayed on one hand for serodiagnosis and augmented on the other for immunotherapy? Specific antigens have been found in animal tumors and have been divided into two classes: the viral induced tumors, which share common antigens when caused by the same viral agent, and carcinogen-induced tumors, which appear to have unique antigenic determinants for each tumor. In recent years a great many human tumors have been found to have tumor-associated antigens; these include colonic carcinoma, neuroblastoma, melanoma, soft tissue and osteogenic sarcoma, bladder carcinoma and Burkitt's lymphoma. This report includes evidence for the existence of such antigens in adenocarcinoma of the ovary and squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. The laboratory evidence that has been presented would suggest that there are both a cell-mediated response and humoral response to the

  7. Boosting Immunity to Small Tumor-Associated Carbohydrates with Bacteriophage Qβ Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhaojun; Comellas-Aragones, Marta; Chowdhury, Sudipa; Bentley, Philip; Kaczanowska, Katarzyna; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    The development of an effective immunotherapy is an attractive strategy towards cancer treatment. Tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) are overexpressed on a variety of cancer cell surfaces, which present tempting targets for anti-cancer vaccine development. However, such carbohydrates are often poorly immunogenic. To overcome this challenge, we show here that the display of a very weak TACA, the monomeric Tn antigen, on bacteriophage Qβ virus-like particles elicits powerful humoral responses to the carbohydrate. The effects of adjuvants, antigen display pattern and vaccine dose on the strength and subclasses of antibody responses were established. The local density of antigen rather than the total amount of antigen administered was found to be crucial for induction of high Tn-specific IgG titers. The ability to display antigens in an organized and high density manner is a key advantage of virus like particles such as Qβ as vaccine carriers. Glycan microarray analysis showed that the antibodies generated were highly selective towards Tn antigens. Furthermore, Qβ elicited much higher levels of IgG antibodies than other types of virus like particles and the IgG antibodies produced reacted strongly with the native Tn antigens on human leukemia cells. Thus, Qβ presents a highly attractive platform for the development of carbohydrate based anti-cancer vaccines. PMID:23505965

  8. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Tumor Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6010 Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. (a) Identification....

  9. Autoantibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens in metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, Martin; Taylor, Samuel; Shaffer, James

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the well-established effector functions of IgGs, including direct cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, some populations of IgGs may exert anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we describe a population of antibodies that form in the natural course of metastatic cancer and contain glycans that terminate with sialic acid. We demonstrate that both the titer of these antibodies and their level of sialylation are relatively stable throughout the progression of metastatic melanoma. The sialylation pattern of these antibodies somehow correlates with their specificity for tumor-associated antigens, as IgGs targeting several antigens associated with infectious agents are relatively poor of sialic acid. We also show that some antibodies targeting the melanoma-associated antigen NY-ESO-1 bind to the human C-type lectin CD209 (DC-SIGN). We propose that these antibodies are candidate anti-inflammatory antibodies. The presence of anti-inflammatory antibodies in cancer patients may explain, at least in part, why tumors persist and spread in the host despite strong tumor-specific humoral responses. The elucidation of the cellular and molecular pathways involved in the induction of anti-inflammatory antibodies specific for tumor-associated antigens and their function may yield important insights into how tumors evade immune detection and progress. PMID:23894724

  10. Cholesterol masks membrane glycosphingolipid tumor-associated antigens to reduce their immunodetection in human cancer biopsies.

    PubMed

    Novak, Anton; Binnington, Beth; Ngan, Bo; Chadwick, Karen; Fleshner, Neil; Lingwood, Clifford A

    2013-11-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are neoplastic and normal/cancer stem cell markers and GSL/cholesterol-containing membrane rafts are increased in cancer cell plasma membranes. We define a novel means by which cancer cells can restrict tumor-associated GSL immunoreactivity. The GSL-cholesterol complex reorients GSL carbohydrate to a membrane parallel, rather than perpendicular conformation, largely unavailable for antibody recognition. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin cholesterol extraction of all primary human tumor frozen sections tested (ovarian, testicular, neuroblastoma, prostate, breast, colon, pheochromocytoma and ganglioneuroma), unmasked previously "invisible" membrane GSLs for immunodetection. In ovarian carcinoma, globotriaosyl ceramide (Gb3), the GSL receptor for the antineoplastic Escherichia coli-derived verotoxin, was increased throughout the tumor. In colon carcinoma, Gb3 detection was vastly increased within the neovasculature and perivascular stroma. In tumors considered Gb3 negative (neuroblastoma, Leydig testicular tumor and pheochromocytoma), neovascular Gb3 was unmasked. Tumor-associated GSL stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4 and globoH were unmasked according to tumor: SSEA-1 in prostate/colon; SSEA-3 in prostate; SSEA-4 in pheochromocytoma/some colon tumors; globoH in prostate/some colon tumors. In colon, anti-SSEA-1 was tumor cell specific. Within the GSL-cholesterol complex, filipin-cholesterol binding was also reduced. These results may relate to the ill-defined benefit of statins on cancer prognosis, for example, prostate carcinoma. We found novel anti-tumor GSL antibodies circulating in 3/5 statin-treated, but not untreated, prostate cancer patients. Lowering tumor membrane cholesterol may permit immune recognition of otherwise unavailable tumor-associated GSL carbohydrate, for more effective immunosurveillance and active/passive immunotherapy. Our results show standard immunodetection of tumor GSLs significantly under assesses

  11. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. 866.6010 Section 866.6010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... immunological Test Systems § 866.6010 Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. (a) Identification....

  12. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. 866.6010 Section 866.6010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... immunological Test Systems § 866.6010 Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. (a) Identification....

  13. MYCN: from oncoprotein to tumor-associated antigen.

    PubMed

    Pistoia, Vito; Morandi, Fabio; Pezzolo, Annalisa; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Prigione, Ignazia

    2012-01-01

    MYCN is a well-known oncogene over-expressed in different human malignancies including neuroblastoma (NB), rhabdomyosarcoma, medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, Wilms' tumor, and small cell lung cancer. In the case of NB, MYCN amplification is an established biomarker of poor-prognosis. MYCN belongs to a family of transcription factors (the most important of which is C-MYC) that show a high degree of homology. Down-regulation of MYC protein expression leads to tumor regression in animal models, indicating that MYC proteins represent interesting therapeutic targets. Pre-requisites for a candidate tumor-associated antigen (TAA) to be targeted by immunotherapeutic approaches are the following, (i) expression should be tumor-restricted, (ii) the putative TAA should be up-regulated in cancer cells, and (iii) protein should be processed into immunogenic peptides capable of associating to major histocompatibility complex molecules with high affinity. Indeed, the MYCN protein is not expressed in human adult tissues and up-regulated variably in NB cells, and MYCN peptides capable of associating to HLA-A1 or HLA-A2 molecules with high affinity have been identified. Thus the MYCN protein qualifies as putative TAA in NB. Additional issues that determine the feasibility of targeting a putative TAA with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and will be here discussed are the following, (i) the inadequacy of tumor cells per se to act as antigen-presenting cells witnessed, in the case of NB cells, by the low to absent expression of HLA class I molecules, the lack of co-stimulatory molecules and multiple defects in the HLA class I related antigen processing machinery, and (ii) the immune evasion mechanisms operated by cancer cells to fool the host immune system, such as up-regulation of soluble immunosuppressive molecules (e.g., soluble MICA and HLA-G in the case of NB) or generation of immunosuppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment. A final issue that deserves consideration is the

  14. Natural and adaptive IgM antibodies in the recognition of tumor-associated antigens of breast cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    DÍAZ-ZARAGOZA, MARIANA; HERNÁNDEZ-ÁVILA, RICARDO; VIEDMA-RODRÍGUEZ, RUBÍ; ARENAS-ARANDA, DIEGO; OSTOA-SALOMA, PEDRO

    2015-01-01

    For early detection of cancer, education and screening are important, but the most critical factor is the development of early diagnostic tools. Methods that recognize the warning signs of cancer and take prompt action lead to an early diagnosis; simple tests can identify individuals in a healthy population who have the disease but have not developed symptoms. Early detection of cancer is significant and is one of the most promising approaches by which to reduce the growing cancer burden and guide curative treatment. The early diagnosis of patients with breast cancer is challenging, since it is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Despite the advent of mammography in screening for breast cancer, low-resource, low-cost alternative tools must be implemented to complement mammography findings. IgM is part of the first line of defense of an organism and is responsible for recognizing and eliminating infectious particles and removing transformed cells. Most studies on breast cancer have focused on the development of IgG-like molecules as biomarkers or as a treatment for the advanced stages of cancer, but autoantibodies (IgM) and tumor-associated antigens (proteins or carbohydrates with aberrant structures) have not been examined as early diagnostic tools for breast cancer. The present review summarizes the function of natural and adaptive IgM in eliminating cancer cells in the early stages of pathology and their value as early diagnostic tools. IgM, as a component of the immune system, is being used to identify tumor-associated antigens and tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens. PMID:26133558

  15. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. 866.6010 Section 866.6010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., plasma, urine, or other body fluids. This device is intended as an aid in monitoring patients for...

  16. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. 866.6010 Section 866.6010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., plasma, urine, or other body fluids. This device is intended as an aid in monitoring patients for...

  17. Demonstration of a tumor-associated surface antigen in Marek's disease.

    PubMed

    Witter, R L; Stephens, E A; Sharma, J M; Nazerian, K

    1975-07-01

    Surface antigenic markers were detected on three classes of Marek's disease (MD) tumor cells, i.e., MD lymphoma cells, cultured cells of the MSB-1 lymphoblastoid cell line, and JMV lymphoblastic leukemia cells, by indirect membrane immunofluorescent staining with serum from chickens immunized with JMV cells or from rabbits immunized with MSB-1 cells. This surface antigen was not detected on normal chicken lymphocytes, RPL-16 tumor cells (tranedormed by an avian RNA virus, or MD virus-infected fibroblasts that were positive for viral membrane antigen (MA). Furthermore, the surface antigen appeared unrelated to embryonic or histocompatibility antigens. This antigen is provisionally designated as a Marek's disease tumor-associated surface antigen (MATSA). The MATSA's on JMV, MSB-1 and MD lymphoma cells were related but not identical as demonstrated by antiserum titration, absorption and blocking tests with homologous and heterologous systems.

  18. Identification of tumor-associated antigens as diagnostic and predictive biomarkers in cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Ying; Looi, Kok Sun; Tan, Eng M

    2009-01-01

    Many studies demonstrated that cancer sera contain antibodies which react with autologous cellular antigens generally known as tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). In our laboratories, the approach used in the identification of TAAs has involved initially examining the sera of cancer patients using extracts of tissue culture cells as source of antigens in Western blotting and by indirect immunofluorescence on whole cells. With these two techniques, we identify sera which have high-titer fluorescent staining or strong signals to cell extracts on Western blotting and subsequently use these sera as probes in immunoscreening cDNA expression libraries, and also in proteomic approaches to isolate and identify targeted antigens which might potentially be involved in malignant transformation. In this manner, several novel TAAs including HCC1, p62, p90, and others have been identified. In extension of these studies, we evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of different antigen-antibody systems as markers in cancer in order to develop "tumor-associated antigen array" systems for cancer diagnosis, cancer prediction, and for following the response of patients to treatment. PMID:19381943

  19. Using immunoproteomics to identify tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) as biomarkers in cancer immunodiagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing; Liu, Mei; Dai, Liping; Ye, Hua; Han, Suxia; Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Since intracellular proteins involved in carcinogenesis have been shown to provoke autoantibody responses, autoantibodies can be used as probes in immunoproteomics to isolate, identify, and characterize potential tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Once a TAA is identified, several approaches will be used to comprehensively characterize and validate the identified TAA/anti-TAA systems that are potential biomarkers in certain types of cancer. Our ultimate goal is to establish rigorous criteria for designation of an autoantibody to a TAA as a cancer biomarker, examine candidate TAAs for sensitivity and specificity of anti-TAA antibody response, and further develop customized TAA arrays that can be used to enhance anti-TAA antibody detection in cancer. This review will mainly focus on the recent advances in our studies using immunoproteomic approach to identify and characterize TAAs as biomarkers in cancer. PMID:23806562

  20. Molecular detection of tumor-associated antigens shared by human cutaneous melanomas and gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, D. D.; Merchant, R. E.; Rand, R.; Conrad, A. J.; Garrison, D.; Turner, R.; Morton, D. L.; Hoon, D. S.

    1997-01-01

    Both melanocytes and glial cells are derived embryologically from the neural ectoderm. Their malignant transformed counterparts, melanoma and glioma cells, respectively, may share common antigens. Numerous tumor-associated antigens have been identified in melanomas but only a few a gliomas. Using an established reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction plus Southern blot assay, we compared the mRNA expression of melanoma-associated antigens (MAAs) of melanomas to brain tumors primarily derived from glial cells. The MAAs studied included tyrosinase (Tyr), tyrosinase-related protein-1 and -2 (TRP-1 and TRP-2), gp100, human melanoma antigen-encoding genes 1 and 3 (MAGE-1 and MAGE-3), and melanotransferrin (p97). Glioblastoma multiforme (n = 21), anaplastic astrocytoma (n = 3), ependymoma (n = 2), meningioma (n = 3), oligodendroglioma (n = 1), and melanoma (n = 12) tumor specimens were assayed for MAA mRNA expression. Glioblastoma multiforme, astrocytoma, and melanoma cell lines were also assayed. We observed that individual MAA mRNAs were expressed in these brain tumors and cell lines at varying frequencies. The melanogenesis-pathway-related MAAs Tyr, TRP-1, TRP-2, and gp100 mRNAs were also expressed at different levels in normal brain tissues but at a much lower frequency than in glioblastoma multiforme and melanoma. MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 mRNA were expressed in different types of tumor specimens and cell lines but never in normal brain tissue. Tumor antigen p97 was expressed in all types of tumors and also in normal brain tissues. These studies demonstrate that melanomas and primary brain tumors express common MAAs and could be exploited in patients with malignant glioma by active specific immunotherapy against these common MAAs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9176405

  1. Targeting tumor-associated antigens to the MHC class I presentation pathway.

    PubMed

    Gross, G; Margalit, A

    2007-06-01

    There is little doubt that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can kill tumor cells in-vivo. However, most CTL-inducing immunization protocols examined so far in cancer patients have yielded only limited clinical benefits, underscoring the urge to improve current approaches for the effective induction of tumor-reactive CTLs. The tumor side of the immunological frontline is armed with large masses, high mutability and an arsenal of immune evasion and suppression mechanisms. Accordingly, the confronting CTLs should come in large numbers, recognize an assortment of MHC class I (MHC-I) bound tumor-associated peptides and be brought into action under effective immunostimulatory conditions. Naïve CTLs are activated to become effector cells in secondary lymphoid organs, following their productive encounter with MHC-I-bound peptides at the surface of dendritic cells (DCs). Therefore, many cancer vaccines under development focus on the optimization of peptide presentation by DCs at this critical stage. The elucidation of discrete steps and the subsequent identification of inherent bottlenecks in the MHC-I antigen presentation pathway have fueled elaborate efforts to enhance vaccine efficacy by the rational targeting of proteins or peptides, formulated into these vaccines, to this pathway. Protein- and gene-based strategies are accordingly devised to deliver tumor-associated peptides to selected cellular compartments, which are essential for the generation of functional CTL ligands. Many of these strategies target the conventional, endogenous route, while others harness the unique pathways that enable DCs to present exogenous antigens, known as cross-presentation. Here we dissect the intricate machinery that produces CTL ligands and examine how knowledge-based cancer vaccines can target the sequence of workstations, biochemical utensils and molecular intermediates comprising this production line.

  2. Role of tumor-associated antigen expression in radioimmunoguided surgery for colorectal and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertoglio, S; Percivale, P; Schenone, F; Peressini, A; Murolo, C; Badellino, F

    1998-12-01

    One hundred thirty-six patients with colorectal and breast cancer were enrolled in a retrospective study using radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) with Iodine-125 (I125) radiolabeled B72.3 (Group A, 73 patients) and F023C5 (Group B, 63 patients) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The correlation between intraoperative tumor-to-normal tissue (T/NT) gamma-detecting probe (GDP) counts ratio and the expression of tumor-associated glycoprotein (TAG)-72 (GroupA patients) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA; Group B patients) tumor-associated antigens (TAA) expression of 209 resected or biopsy tumor specimens was assessed. Ex vivo radioimmunolocalization index (R.I.) was carried out on the same specimens as a control of intraoperative GDP ratio values. RIGS positive definition of tumor occurred in 80/113 (70.8%) tumor sites of Group A patients and in 84/96 (87.5%) tumor sites of Group B patients. Mean percent B72.3 TAA expression of 113 tumor sites of Group A patients was 62.74 +/- 28.79% vs. 73.00 +/- 26.28% of 96 tumor sites of Group B patients (P < 0.05). The higher incidence of positive RIGS results was observed in tumor sites with the higher expression of the relative TAA. A statistically significant correlation between RIGS ratios and B72.3 and CEA expression was observed in the 113 tumor sites of Group A (P < 0.05) and in the 96 tumor sites of Group B (P < 0.01), respectively. The role of a preoperative evaluation of TAA expression in patients undergoing RIGS is discussed. Its assessment, whenever possible, may help to select those patients who will benefit more from this immunodiagnostic technique.

  3. Prostate-specific membrane antigen expression in tumor-associated vasculature of breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Wernicke, Alla Gabriella; Varma, Sonal; Greenwood, Eleni A; Christos, Paul J; Chao, K S Clifford; Liu, He; Bander, Neil H; Shin, Sandra J

    2014-06-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been found to be expressed in the tumor-associated neovasculature of multiple solid tumor types including breast cancers. However, thus far, the number of cases studied from some tumor types has been limited. In this study, we set out to assess PSMA expression in the tumor-associated vasculature associated with invasive breast carcinomas in a sizable cohort of patients. One hundred and six patients with AJCC stage 0-IV breast cancer were identified. Ninety-two of these patients had primary breast cancer [invasive breast carcinoma with or without co-existing ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (74) or DCIS alone (18)]. In addition, 14 patients with breast cancer metastases to the brain were identified. Immunohistochemical staining for PSMA and CD31 was performed on parallel representative tumor sections in each case. Tumor-associated vascular endothelial cell PSMA immunoreactivity was semi-quantitatively assessed based on two parameters: overall percent of endothelial positivity and staining intensity. PSMA expression for tumor-associated vascular endothelial cells was scored 0 if there was no detectable PSMA expression, 1 if PSMA staining was detectable in 5-50%, and 2 if PSMA expression was positive in >50% of microvessels. CD 31 staining was concurrently reviewed to confirm the presence of vasculature in each case. Tumor-associated vasculature was PSMA-positive in 68/92 (74%) of primary breast cancers and in 14/14 (100%) of breast cancers metastatic to brain. PSMA was not detected in normal breast tissue or carcinoma cells. All but 2 cases (98%) showed absence of PSMA expression in normal breast tissue-associated vasculature. The 10-year overall survival was 88.7% (95% CI = 80.0%, 93.8%) in patients without brain metastases. When overall survival (OS) was stratified based on PSMA score group, patients with PSMA scores of 0, 1, and 2 had 10-year OS of 95.8%, 96.0%, and 79.7%, respectively (p = 0.12). When PSMA scores

  4. T-cell response to p53 tumor-associated antigen in patients with colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bueter, Marco; Gasser, Martin; Schramm, Nicolai; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Tocco, Georges; Gerstlauer, Christiane; Grimm, Martin; Nichiporuk, Ekaterina; Thalheimer, Andreas; Thiede, Arnulf; Meyer, Detlef; Benichou, Gilles; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria

    2006-02-01

    Despite the radical surgical resection performed in patients with colorectal carcinoma, there is a high rate of tumor recurrence. Over an observation period of 3 years, 18% of the patients in our collective suffered a tumor relapse with local or distinct metastases after initial R0-resection. Some evidence suggests that this may be due to suppression of anti-tumor responses, a phenomenon that might be attributed to regulatory T cells. The aim of our study was to investigate the tumor-specific immune response depending on the UICC stage of patients with colorectal cancer. The cellular immune responses against defined antigens that are overexpressed in most of the patients with colorectal cancer were characterized. For this purpose, the tumor suppressor gene, p53, was chosen as the tumor-associated antigen that exhibits mutations and overexpression in up to 60% of colorectal carcinoma. We observed that p53 induced both IFN-gamma and IL-10 secretion. The predominance of IL-10 production indicated that regulatory T cells directly participate in modulating the anti-tumor immune response. IL-10 levels in the blood as well as the expression of regulatory T-cell specific genes at the tumor site correlate with the UICC stage of the disease. These results may provide an explanation for the poor prognosis and increased recurrence rate in patients with advanced carcinoma.

  5. LAPTM4B-35 protein is a weak tumor-associated antigen candidate

    PubMed Central

    SHI, GUILAN; ZHOU, CHUNXIA; WANG, DONGMEI; MA, WENBO; ZHANG, SHUREN

    2014-01-01

    Lysosome-associated protein transmembrane 4β (LAPTM4B) is a gene that has been indicated to be involved in cancer. It is located at chromosome 8q22 and is composed of seven exons and six introns. LAPTM4B encodes two protein isoforms: LAPTM4B-35 and LAPTM4B-24. LAPTM4B-35 is markedly upregulated and LAPTM4B-24 is downregulated in several types of cancer. LAPTM4B-35 is 91 amino acids (N91) longer than LAPTM4B-24 at the N-terminus. In the present study, western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot analysis and the B16F10-N91 tumor bearing-mice experiments were used to evaluate whether the overexpression of N91 indicates its potential as a candidate tumor-associated antigen. The results revealed that N91 was expressed in a wide range of normal mouse tissues and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, with varying expression levels. The weak immunogenicity of N91 protein suggested it was a weak candidate antigen; however, the N91 protein was associated with cell proliferation. PMID:24396432

  6. Autoantibodies to tumor-associated antigens as biomarkers in cancer immunodiagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weihong; Peng, Bo; Lu, Yumin; Xu, Weijia; Qian, Wei; Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2011-01-01

    Cancer sera contain antibodies that react with a unique group of autologous cellular antigens called tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), and therefore these autoantibodies can be considered as reporters from the immune system, to identify authentic TAAs involved in the malignant transformation. Once a TAA is identified, different approaches would be used to comprehensively characterize and validate the identified TAA/anti-TAA systems that are potential biomarkers in cancer immunodiagnosis. In this manner, several novel TAAs such as p62 and p90 have been identified in our previous studies. p62, a member of IGF-II mRNA binding proteins (IMPs), is an oncofetal protein absent in adult tissues, the presence of anti-p62 autoantibodies relates to abnormal expression of p62 in tumor cells. p90 was recently characterized as an inhibitor of the tumor suppressor PP2A (protein phosphatase 2A), and an autoantibody to p90 appears in high frequency in prostate cancer. The present review will focus on the recent advances in studies mainly associated with these two novel TAAs as biomarkers in cancer immunodiagnosis. PMID:21167321

  7. 78 FR 11895 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of MUC-1 Tumor Associated Antigens as Cancer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ...-1 Tumor Associated Antigens as Cancer Vaccines for Bladder Cancer, Breast Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Gastric Cancer, Kidney Cancer, Liver Cancer, Lung Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Prostate Cancer and Pancreatic Cancer AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY:...

  8. [Gangliosides as carbohydrate antigens associated with cancer and their possible use in tumor immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Horwacik, Irena

    2004-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation is a universal feature of a cancer cell. The examples of such differences are the observed quantitative and qualitative changes in the expression of gangliosides of the tumors of the neuroectodermal origin. The role of gangliosides in cancer progression has been described, as well as their abilities to act as immunosuppressors. The presence of large amounts of these tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACA) on cancer cells, as compared to normal cells, opens the possibilities to use them in diagnosis and immunotherapeutic approaches which engage the immune system to fight with a tumor disease. The passive immunotherapy of neuroblastoma with anti-gangliosides monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives has been reviewed. The advantages and the disadvantages of using carbohydrate antigens as vaccines have been summarized. The examples of use of active specific immunotherapy with gangliosides have been described, as well as the approaches to modify the immunogenic potential of these antigens with carbohydrate-protein conjugate vaccines, and antiidiotypic antibodies used with immunomodulators such as QA-21. Finally, in a separate paragraph, the application of anti-carbohydrate antibodies to screen phage display peptide libraries for mimotopes has been described. The perspectives of using carbohydrate mimicking surrogate antigens in the immunotherapy of cancer have been discussed.

  9. Thermodynamic Switch in Binding of Adhesion/Growth Regulatory Human Galectin-3 to Tumor-Associated TF Antigen (CD176) and MUC1 Glycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A shift to short-chain glycans is an observed change in mucin-type O-glycosylation in premalignant and malignant epithelia. Given the evidence that human galectin-3 can interact with mucins and also weakly with free tumor-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) antigen (CD176), the study of its interaction with MUC1 (glyco)peptides is of biomedical relevance. Glycosylated MUC1 fragments that carry the TF antigen attached through either Thr or Ser side chains were synthesized using standard Fmoc-based automated solid-phase peptide chemistry. The dissociation constants (Kd) for interaction of galectin-3 and the glycosylated MUC1 fragments measured by isothermal titration calorimetry decreased up to 10 times in comparison to that of the free TF disaccharide. No binding was observed for the nonglycosylated control version of the MUC1 peptide. The most notable feature of the binding of MUC1 glycopeptides to galectin-3 was a shift from a favorable enthalpy to an entropy-driven binding process. The comparatively diminished enthalpy contribution to the free energy (ΔG) was compensated by a considerable gain in the entropic term. 1H–15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence spectroscopy nuclear magnetic resonance data reveal contact at the canonical site mainly by the glycan moiety of the MUC1 glycopeptide. Ligand-dependent differences in binding affinities were also confirmed by a novel assay for screening of low-affinity glycan–lectin interactions based on AlphaScreen technology. Another key finding is that the glycosylated MUC1 peptides exhibited activity in a concentration-dependent manner in cell-based assays revealing selectivity among human galectins. Thus, the presentation of this tumor-associated carbohydrate ligand by the natural peptide scaffold enhances its affinity, highlighting the significance of model studies of human lectins with synthetic glycopeptides. PMID:26129647

  10. 75 FR 16490 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of PANVAC and Tumor Associated Antigens as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... tumor-specific immune response. Specifically, these antigens serve as targets for the host immune system and elicit responses that results in tumor destruction. The initiation of an effective T-cell immune... antigens (TAAs) to activate T-cells and break the immune systems tolerance towards cancer cells. This...

  11. A new human tumor-associated antigen (TLP) is naturally expressed in rat DHD-K12 colorectal tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Rasi, G; Sinibaldi-Vallebona, P; Serafino, A; Bernard, P; Pierimarchi, P; Guarino, E; Faticanti-Scucchi, L; Graziano, P; Guadagni, F; Garci, E

    2000-02-15

    Renewed interest in cancer immunotherapy has been raised by the availability of a variety of tumor-associated antigens and animal models. We have recently described the presence of a new antigen, TLP, in sera and cancer tissue from lung and colorectal cancer patients. In order to develop an experimental model suitable for preclinical studies on cancer vaccines, we investigated the presence of TLP antigen in vitro, in the DHD-K12 cell line and in vivo, in metastases induced in syngeneic BDIX rats by DHD-K12 cell injection. TLP was not detected in any tissue of healthy rats nor in normal tissues of tumor-bearing rats. This is in agreement with our previous studies, in which we had demonstrated that TLP is expressed in human colorectal cancer and adenomas but not in normal colonic mucosa. Our results indicate TLP as a possible human tumor-specific antigen naturally expressed in DHD-K12 tumor syngeneic to immunocompetent BDIX rats.

  12. Cathepsin-D and tumor associated antigen DF3 in salivary gland neoplasia. Differential diagnostic and prognostic applications.

    PubMed

    Vigneswaran, N; Müller, S; DeRose, P; Cohen, C

    1994-12-01

    Salivary gland tumors pose considerable difficulty in diagnostic and prognostic assessment based on the histopathologic features alone. Cathepsin-D is overexpressed in cancer cells where its concentration in the primary tumor is correlated with increased risk of metastasis. DF3 antigen is a tumor associated glycoprotein that is specific for malignant cells of glandular origin. We examined the distribution patterns of cathepsin-D and DF3 antigens in benign (n = 11) and malignant (n = 44) salivary gland tumors of various histologic types. The frequency of cathepsin-D expression is significantly increased (p < 0.001) in salivary gland carcinomas compared to benign mixed tumors (BMT). High levels of cathepsin-D expression was frequent in carcinomas ex BMT, mucoepidermoid carcinomas, poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas-NOS and adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC). Acinic cell carcinomas and polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas were mostly negative. Intense cytoplasmic staining for DF3 antigen was noted in the tumor cells of mucoepidermoid carcinomas, carcinomas ex BMT and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas-NOS whereas other types of salivary gland carcinomas exhibited either negative or only focal membrane staining. The noted differences in the reactive patterns of cathepsin-D and DF3 antigen among various histologic types of salivary gland carcinomas may have differential diagnostic and prognostic applications.

  13. Cloning and expression of the tumor-associated antigen L6.

    PubMed Central

    Marken, J S; Schieven, G L; Hellström, I; Hellström, K E; Aruffo, A

    1992-01-01

    The L6 cell surface antigen, which is highly expressed on lung, breast, colon, and ovarian carcinomas, has attracted attention as a therapeutic target for murine monoclonal antibodies and their humanized counterparts. Its molecular nature has, however, remained elusive. Here we describe the expression cloning of a cDNA encoding the L6 antigen. COS cells transfected with this cDNA direct the expression of an approximately 24-kDa surface protein that reacts with the two anti-L6 monoclonal antibodies available. The predicted L6 peptide sequence is 202 amino acids long and contains three predicted NH2-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane regions, which are followed by a hydrophilic region containing two potential N-linked glycosylation sites and a COOH-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane region. The L6 antigen is related to a number of cell surface proteins with similar predicted membrane topology that have been implicated in cell growth. Two other members of this family of proteins, CD63 (ME491) and CO-029, are also highly expressed on tumor cells. The present findings should make it possible to further study the role of the L6-defined antigen in normal and neoplastic cells and to construct animal models for development of improved agents for active and passive cancer immunotherapy. Images PMID:1565644

  14. Identification of tumor-associated antigens on ultraviolet light-induced tumors using antitumor antibodies developed in ascites fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, G.W.; Takemoto, L.J.; Shehi, L.; Hansen, J.S.

    1982-06-01

    A method is described which leads to the production of large amounts of ascites containing antitumor antibody in small numbers of mice. The antibody was then used to identify and characterize tumor-associated antigens on an ultraviolet light-induced murine skin fibrosarcoma. The antibody showed specific complement-dependent cytotoxicity to the homologous tumor and to an allogeneic tumor line which displayed a glycoprotein viral determinant with a molecular weight of 70,000 on its surface. Absorption of the immune ascites with other tumor cell lines removed the cytotoxicity in relation to the presence of the glycoprotein. Isolation of the tumor cell surface components binding antibody revealed two components with molecular weights of approximately 70,000 and 60,000. The Mr 70,000 component was identified as viral gp70 by peptide mapping.

  15. Differential expression of a new tumor-associated antigen, TLP, during human colorectal cancer tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Guadagni, F; Graziano, P; Roselli, M; Mariotti, S; Bernard, P; Sinibaldi-Vallebona, P; Rasi, G; Garaci, E

    1999-04-01

    Tumour liberated particles (TLP) have been proposed as a potential new serum tumor marker. In particular, a high percentage of patients with early stages of lung cancer scored positive for serum TLP, suggesting its possible role as a marker for early diagnosis of disease. The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression of TLP in the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence in order to determine whether its expression correlates with the various stages of cancer transformation. TLP distribution was assessed by immunohistochemistry in normal, premalignant, and malignant colorectal lesions. Normal colonic mucosa and hyperplastic polyps showed no positive staining, whereas adenomas and adenocarcinomas reacted to anti-TLP serum. The percentage of positive tumor cells increased from adenomas with mild dysplasia to adenomas with severe dysplasia. Moreover, a supranuclear staining pattern was observed mainly in adenomas with mild dysplasia, whereas adenomas with severe dysplasia as well as adenocarcinomas showed a characteristic diffuse staining pattern and a strong staining intensity. Only a few cases of adenocarcinoma were found to be TLP-negative and all were poorly differentiated. Our results suggest that TLP antigen expression may be considered as a marker of epithelial atypia in the colorectal tract and as a potential target for new diagnostic and/or therapeutic approaches to human colorectal cancer.

  16. Biofunctionalizing nanofibers with carbohydrate blood group antigens.

    PubMed

    Barr, Katie; Kannan, Bhuvaneswari; Korchagina, Elena; Popova, Inna; Ryzhov, Ivan; Henry, Stephen; Bovin, Nicolai

    2016-11-01

    A rapid and simple method of biofunctionalising nylon, cellulose acetate, and polyvinyl butyral electrospun nanofibers with blood group glycans was achieved by preparing function-spacer-lipid constructs and simply contacting them to fibers with a piezo inkjet printer. A series of water dispersible amphipathic glycan-spacer constructs were synthesized representing a range ABO and related blood group antigens. After immediate contact of the amphipathic glycan-spacer constructs with nanofiber surfaces they self-assembled and were detectable by enzyme immunoassays with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27388774

  17. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Vela Ramirez, J.E.; Roychoudhury, R.; Habte, H.H.; Cho, M. W.; Pohl, N. L. B.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells, and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by dendritic cells. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and antigen presenting cells and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  18. DARPins recognizing the tumor-associated antigen EpCAM selected by phage and ribosome display and engineered for multivalency.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Nikolas; Martin-Killias, Patricia; Wyss-Stoeckle, Sascha; Honegger, Annemarie; Zangemeister-Wittke, Uwe; Plückthun, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (DARPins) represent a novel class of binding molecules. Their favorable biophysical properties such as high affinity, stability and expression yields make them ideal candidates for tumor targeting. Here, we describe the selection of DARPins specific for the tumor-associated antigen epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), an approved therapeutic target on solid tumors. We selected DARPins from combinatorial libraries by both phage display and ribosome display and compared their binding on tumor cells. By further rounds of random mutagenesis and ribosome display selection, binders with picomolar affinity were obtained that were entirely monomeric and could be expressed at high yields in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli. One of the binders, denoted Ec1, bound to EpCAM with picomolar affinity (K(d)=68 pM), and another selected DARPin (Ac2) recognized a different epitope on EpCAM. Through the use of a variety of bivalent and tetravalent arrangements with these DARPins, the off-rate on cells was further improved by up to 47-fold. All EpCAM-specific DARPins were efficiently internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, which is essential for intracellular delivery of anticancer agents to tumor cells. Thus, using EpCAM as a target, we provide evidence that DARPins can be conveniently selected and rationally engineered to high-affinity binders of various formats for tumor targeting.

  19. Mini-Array of Multiple Tumor-Associated Antigens to Enhance Autoantibody Detection for Immunodiagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2009-01-01

    Liver cancer, especially hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is particularly prevalent in Africa and Asia. HCC affects the Hispanic population of the United States at a rate double that of the white population. The majority of people with HCC will die within 1 year of its detection. This high case-fatality rate can in part be attributed to lack of diagnostic methods that allow early detection. How to establish a methodology to identify the high-risk individuals for HCC remains to be investigated. The multi-factorial and multi-step nature in the molecular pathogenesis of human cancers must be taken into account in both the design and interpretation of studies to identify markers which will be useful for early detection of cancer. Our recent studies demonstrated that a mini-array of multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) might enhance autoantibody detection for diagnosis of HCC, especially for the alpha fetoprotein (AFP)-negative cases. It also suggested that different types of cancer might require different panels of TAAs to achieve the sensitivity and specificity required to make immunodiagnosis a feasible adjunct to tumor diagnosis. PMID:17289549

  20. Cancer immunotherapy using novel tumor-associated antigenic peptides identified by genome-wide cDNA microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yasuharu; Tomita, Yusuke; Yuno, Akira; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Shinohara, Masanori

    2015-05-01

    Recent genome-wide cDNA microarray analysis of gene expression profiles in comprehensive tumor types coupled with isolation of cancer tissues by laser-microbeam microdissection have revealed ideal tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) that are frequently overexpressed in various cancers including head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and lung cancer, but not in most normal tissues except for testis, placenta, and fetal organs. Preclinical studies using HLA-transgenic mice and human T cells in vitro showed that TAA-derived CTL-epitope short peptides (SPs) are highly immunogenic and induce HLA-A2 or -A24-restricted CTLs. Based on the accumulated evidence, we carried out a phase II clinical trial of the TAA-SP vaccine in advanced 37 HNSCC patients. This study showed a significant induction of TAA-specific CTLs in the majority of patients without serious adverse effects. Importantly, clinical responses including a complete response were observed in this study. Another phase II clinical trial of therapeutic TAA-SP vaccine, designed to evaluate the ability of prevention of recurrence, is ongoing in HNSCC patients who have received curative operations. Further studies in human preclinical studies and in vivo studies using HLA class I transgenic mice showed TAA-derived long peptides (TAA-LPs) have the capacity to induce not only promiscuous HLA class II-restricted CD4(+) T helper type 1 cells but also tumor-specific CTLs through a cross-presentation mechanism. Moreover, we observed an augmentation of TAA-LP-specific T helper type 1 cell responses and tumor antigen-spreading in HNSCC patients vaccinated with TAA-SPs. This accumulated evidence suggests that therapeutic TAA-SPs and LPs vaccines may provide a promising cancer immunotherapy.

  1. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  2. [Immunoglobulin genes encoding antibodies directed to oncodevelopmental carbohydrate antigens].

    PubMed

    Zenita, K; Yago, K; Fujimoto, E; Kannagi, R

    1990-07-01

    We investigated the immunoglobulin genes which encode the variable region of the monoclonal antibodies directed to the onco-developmental carbohydrate antigens such SSEA-1, fucosyl SSEA-1, SSEA-3 and SSEA-4. The VH region of these antibodies was preferentially encoded by the gene members of the X24, VH7183 and Q52 families, the families which are known to be located at the 3'-end region of the murine germ line VH gene. This result is interesting particularly when considering that the members of the 3'-end VH families are known to be preferentially expressed in embryonic B lymphocytes by an intrinsic genetic program. The comparative study of the nucleic acid sequences of mRNAs encoding these antibodies and the sequences of the corresponding germ line VH genes disclosed that the sequences encoding the antibodies contain no mutation from the germ line VH genes, or contain only a few somatic mutations, which are thought to be insignificant for the reactivity of the antibodies to the nominal antigens. These results imply that some of the embryonic B lymphocytes that express the unmutated germ line VH genes of the 3'-end families can be reactive with embryonic carbohydrate antigens, albeit rearranged with appropriate D-JH gene segments, and coupled with proper light chains. The VH region of the syngenic monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies directed to these anti-carbohydrate antibodies were also encoded preferentially by the members of the 3'-end VH families. We propose here that a part of the virgin embryonic B lymphocytes, which express the antibody encoded by the gene members of the 3'-end VH families at the cell surface, will be stimulated by the embryonic carbohydrate antigens which are abundantly present in the internal milieu of the embryo. The clonally expanded B lymphocytes, in turn, will facilitate the proliferation of other populations of embryonic B lymphocytes expressing the corresponding anti-idiotypic antibodies, which are also encoded by the gene members

  3. Artificial antigen-presenting cells expressing CD80, CD70, and 4-1BB ligand efficiently expand functional T cells specific to tumor-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wanyong; Su, Mei; Anderson, Karen S; Sasada, Tetsuro

    2014-08-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), notably dendritic cells (DCs), are the most potent for expanding antigen-specific T cells ex vivo. However, the labor-intensive and expensive procedure for customized preparation of autologous APCs has hampered their broad clinical application. Artificial APC (aAPC) systems, which can be readily prepared from off-the-shelf components, have been proposed as a promising alternative to custom-made professional APCs. Here, in order to develop a novel aAPC system, we established K562 erythroleukemia cells expressing different combinations of co-stimulatory molecule ligands, CD80, CD70, and/or 4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL). When nucleofected with in vitro-generated mRNA encoding a tumor-associated antigen, MART-1, the K562 cells expressing all of CD80, CD70, and 4-1BBL were the most efficient for expansion of functional T cells specific to an HLA-A2-restricted immunodominant epitope, MART-126-35. In addition, only the K562 cells expressing all three of these co-stimulatory molecule ligands could clearly expand T cells specific to other less immunogenic antigen epitopes, gp100154-162 and Cyp1B1239-247, through transfection with in vitro generated gp100 and Cyp1B1 mRNA, respectively. These results indicated that non-redundant and synergistic effects of co-stimulation via CD28/CD80, CD27/CD70, and 4-1BB/4-1BBL might be critical for eliciting efficient expansion of T cells; co-stimulation via the 4-1BB/4-1BBL interaction might expand antigen-specific T cells by preventing apoptotic cell death triggered by specific antigens in the presence of the CD28/CD80 and CD27/CD70 signaling. Taken together, our findings suggested that this K562-based aAPC system expressing CD80, CD70, and 4-1BBL would be useful for efficiently stimulating functional antigen-specific T cells ex vivo, in particular when detailed information on the epitope specificities is unavailable. PMID:24713579

  4. Tumor-associated antigen/IL-21-transduced dendritic cell vaccines enhance immunity and inhibit immunosuppressive cells in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Aravindaram, K; Wang, P-H; Yin, S-Y; Yang, N-S

    2014-05-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine approaches are being actively evaluated for developing immunotherapeutic agents against cancers. In this study, we investigated the use of engineered DCs expressing transgenic tumor-associated antigen hgp100 and the regulatory cytokine interleukin-21, namely DC-hgp100/mIL-21, as a therapeutic vaccine against melanoma. Tumor-bearing mice were injected intratumorally with transgenic DCs followed by three booster injections. Transgenic DC-hgp100/mIL-21 showed significant reduction in primary tumor growth and metastasis compared with DC-hgp100 alone and DC-mIL-21 alone. In vivo depletion of specific immune cell types (CD8(+) T, CD4(+) T and Natural killer (NK)-1.1(+) cells) effectively blocked the protective effect of this combinational vaccine. In adoptive transfer experiments, a survival rate of nearly 90% was observed at 60 days post-tumor inoculation for the combinational vaccine group. In contrast, all mice in the DC-hgp100 and DC-mIL-21-only groups died within 43-46 days after tumor challenge. Considerably increased levels of interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were detected with the combination vaccine group compared with other individual treatment groups. In comparison with the DC-hgp100 or mIL-21 groups, the combinational DC-hgp100/mIL-21 vaccine also drastically suppressed the myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and T-regulatory (Treg) cell populations. Our findings suggest that a combinational DC- and gene-based hgp100 and mIL-21 vaccine therapy strategy warrants further evaluation as a clinically relevant cancer vaccine approach for human melanoma patients.

  5. Functional balance between T cell chimeric receptor density and tumor associated antigen density: CTL mediated cytolysis and lymphokine production.

    PubMed

    Weijtens, M E; Hart, E H; Bolhuis, R L

    2000-01-01

    Genetically engineered expression of tumor-specific single chain antibody chimeric receptors (ch-Rec) on human T lymphocytes endow these cells with the parental monoclonal antibody (mAb) dictated tumor specificity and may be useful for clinical immuno-genetherapy. Therefore it was of importance to assess how the densities of tumor-specific receptors and tumor associated antigens (TAA), respectively, affect primary human T lymphocyte functions in relation to target cell susceptibilities to lysis. We therefore studied the functional balance between ch-Rec densities on human T lymphocytes and TAA on tumor cells. The gene construct encoding a ch-Rec derived from (1) a renal carcinoma cell (RCC) specific mouse mAb (G250), and (2) the human signal transducing Fc(epsilon)RI gamma-chain was used. To obtain ch-RecHIGH-POS and ch-RecLOW-POS T lymphocytes, two distinct retroviral vectors were used to introduce the gene constructs into primary human T lymphocytes. Levels of ch-Rec-redirected T lymphocyte mediated tumor cell lysis, as well as lymphokine production were determined using RCC lines as target/stimulator cells, which express either no or increasing densities of the TAA. A functional and dynamic balance between ch-Rec densities on cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) on the one hand and TAA densities on RCCs on the other, was found. In short, ch-RecHIGH-POS CTLs are triggered by TAAHIGH-POS as well as TAALOW-POS RCCs to lyse tumor cells and produce (IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha) lymphokine. In contrast, ch-RecLOW-POS T lymphocytes are only triggered for cytolysis and lymphokine production by relatively TAAHIGH-POS RCCs. In conclusion, (1) the activation of T lymphocyte responses is co-determined by the expression levels of the ch-Rec on T lymphocytes and the TAA on tumor cells and (2) at relatively high T lymphocyte ch-Rec expression levels the CTLs lyse tumor cells with a wide range of TAA densities. Gene Therapy (2000) 7, 35-42. PMID:10680014

  6. Quantitative detection of the tumor-associated antigen large external antigen in colorectal cancer tissues and cells using quantum dot probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Li, Wanming; Yuan, Dezheng; Song, Jindan; Fang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The large external antigen (LEA) is a cell surface glycoprotein that has been proven to be highly expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) as a tumor-associated antigen. To evaluate and validate the relationship between LEA expression and clinical characteristics of CRC with high efficiency, LEA expression levels were detected in 85 tissue blocks from CRC patients by quantum dot-based immunohistochemistry (QD-IHC) combined with imaging quantitative analysis using quantum dots with a 605 nm emission wavelength (QD605) conjugated to an ND-1 monoclonal antibody against LEA as a probe. Conventional IHC was performed in parallel for comparison. Both QD-IHC and conventional IHC showed that LEA was specifically expressed in CRC, but not in non-CRC tissues, and high LEA expression was significantly associated with a more advanced T-stage (P<0.05), indicating that LEA is likely to serve as a CRC prognostic marker. Compared with conventional IHC, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that QD-IHC possessed higher sensitivity, resulting in an increased positive detection rate of CRC, from 70.1% to 89.6%. In addition, a simpler operation, objective analysis of results, and excellent repeatability make QD-IHC an attractive alternative to conventional IHC in clinical practice. Furthermore, to explore whether the QD probes can be utilized to quantitatively detect living cells or single cells, quantum dot-based immunocytochemistry (QD-ICC) combined with imaging quantitative analysis was developed to evaluate LEA expression in several CRC cell lines. It was demonstrated that QD-ICC could also predict the correlation between LEA expression and the T-stage characteristics of the cell lines, which was confirmed by flow cytometry. The results of this study indicate that QD-ICC has the potential to noninvasively detect rare circulating tumor cells in clinical samples in real clinical applications.

  7. Transgenic antigen-specific, HLA-A*02:01-allo-restricted cytotoxic T cells recognize tumor-associated target antigen STEAP1 with high specificity.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, David; Grünewald, Thomas G P; Klar, Richard; Schmidt, Oxana; Wohlleber, Dirk; Rubío, Rebeca Alba; Uckert, Wolfgang; Thiel, Uwe; Bohne, Felix; Busch, Dirk H; Krackhardt, Angela M; Burdach, Stefan; Richter, Günther H S

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric cancers, including Ewing sarcoma (ES), are only weakly immunogenic and the tumor-patients' immune system often is devoid of effector T cells for tumor elimination. Based on expression profiling technology, targetable tumor-associated antigens (TAA) are identified and exploited for engineered T-cell therapy. Here, the specific recognition and lytic potential of transgenic allo-restricted CD8(+) T cells, directed against the ES-associated antigen 6-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate 1 (STEAP1), was examined. Following repetitive STEAP1(130) peptide-driven stimulations with HLA-A*02:01(+) dendritic cells (DC), allo-restricted HLA-A*02:01(-) CD8(+) T cells were sorted with HLA-A*02:01/peptide multimers and expanded by limiting dilution. After functional analysis of suitable T cell clones via ELISpot, flow cytometry and xCELLigence assay, T cell receptors' (TCR) α- and β-chains were identified, cloned into retroviral vectors, codon optimized, transfected into HLA-A*02:01(-) primary T cell populations and tested again for specificity and lytic capacity in vitro and in a Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mouse model. Initially generated transgenic T cells specifically recognized STEAP1(130)-pulsed or transfected cells in the context of HLA-A*02:01 with minimal cross-reactivity as determined by specific interferon-γ (IFNγ) release, lysed cells and inhibited growth of HLA-A*02:01(+) ES lines more effectively than HLA-A*02:01(-) ES lines. In vivo tumor growth was inhibited more effectively with transgenic STEAP1(130)-specific T cells than with unspecific T cells. Our results identify TCRs capable of recognizing and inhibiting growth of STEAP1-expressing HLA-A*02:01(+) ES cells in vitro and in vivo in a highly restricted manner. As STEAP1 is overexpressed in a wide variety of cancers, we anticipate these STEAP1-specific TCRs to be potentially useful for immunotherapy of other STEAP1-expressing tumors. PMID:27471654

  8. Specificity for the tumor-associated self-antigen WT1 drives the development of fully functional memory T cells in the absence of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Pospori, Constandina; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Voisine, Cecile; Perro, Mario; King, Judith; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Flutter, Barry; Chakraverty, Ronjon; Stauss, Hans J; Morris, Emma C

    2011-06-23

    Recently, vaccines against the Wilms Tumor antigen 1 (WT1) have been tested in cancer patients. However, it is currently not known whether physiologic levels of WT1 expression in stem and progenitor cells of normal tissue result in the deletion or tolerance induction of WT1-specific T cells. Here, we used an human leukocyte antigen-transgenic murine model to study the fate of human leukocyte antigen class-I restricted, WT1-specific T cells in the thymus and in the periphery. Thymocytes expressing a WT1-specific T-cell receptor derived from high avidity human CD8 T cells were positively selected into the single-positive CD8 population. In the periphery, T cells specific for the WT1 antigen differentiated into CD44-high memory phenotype cells, whereas T cells specific for a non-self-viral antigen retained a CD44(low) naive phenotype. Only the WT1-specific T cells, but not the virus-specific T cells, displayed rapid antigen-specific effector function without prior vaccination. Despite long-term persistence of WT1-specific memory T cells, the animals did not develop autoimmunity, and the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells was unimpaired. This is the first demonstration that specificity for a tumor-associated self-antigen may drive differentiation of functionally competent memory T cells.

  9. Specificity for the tumor-associated self-antigen WT1 drives the development of fully functional memory T cells in the absence of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Pospori, Constandina; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Voisine, Cecile; Perro, Mario; King, Judith; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Flutter, Barry; Chakraverty, Ronjon; Stauss, Hans J; Morris, Emma C

    2011-06-23

    Recently, vaccines against the Wilms Tumor antigen 1 (WT1) have been tested in cancer patients. However, it is currently not known whether physiologic levels of WT1 expression in stem and progenitor cells of normal tissue result in the deletion or tolerance induction of WT1-specific T cells. Here, we used an human leukocyte antigen-transgenic murine model to study the fate of human leukocyte antigen class-I restricted, WT1-specific T cells in the thymus and in the periphery. Thymocytes expressing a WT1-specific T-cell receptor derived from high avidity human CD8 T cells were positively selected into the single-positive CD8 population. In the periphery, T cells specific for the WT1 antigen differentiated into CD44-high memory phenotype cells, whereas T cells specific for a non-self-viral antigen retained a CD44(low) naive phenotype. Only the WT1-specific T cells, but not the virus-specific T cells, displayed rapid antigen-specific effector function without prior vaccination. Despite long-term persistence of WT1-specific memory T cells, the animals did not develop autoimmunity, and the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells was unimpaired. This is the first demonstration that specificity for a tumor-associated self-antigen may drive differentiation of functionally competent memory T cells. PMID:21447831

  10. Therapeutic Strategies for Human IgM Antibodies Directed at Tumor-Associated Ganglioside Antigens: Discoveries Made During the Morton Era and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter C; Irie, Reiko F

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated gangliosides have been investigated for their potential as antigenic targets for more than 35 years, culminating in the recent Food and Drug Administration approval of dinutuximab (Unituxin), an IgG antibody targeted against GD2, for the treatment of neuroblastoma in children. This review is focused on discoveries and development of therapeutic approaches involving human IgM antibodies directed against gangliosides, which occurred over the past 40 years at University of California-Los Angeles and the John Wayne Cancer Institute, where Dr. Donald Morton led the surgical oncology department until his death. PMID:27481004

  11. Immunohistochemical analysis of carbohydrate antigens in chronic inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Motohiro; Nakayama, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Over the last four decades, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has become an invaluable technique to detect antigens in tissue sections. Compared to Western blotting analysis, IHC is advantageous in determining histological distribution and localization of the antigen. Another advantage, if one can access human formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks of disease tissues, is that IHC makes it possible to analyze diseases retrospectively from archived pathological tissue specimens. In this chapter, we describe protocols used for both conventional and multiple immunostainings using FFPE tissue sections, which have been used for quantitative analysis of high endothelial venule (HEV)-like vessels and lymphocyte subsets attached to HEV-like vessels in our studies of chronic inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. We also describe in detail a protocol using an L-selectinIgM chimera in situ binding assay on FFPE tissue sections for functional detection of L-selectin ligand carbohydrates expressed on HEV-like vessels. After presenting each protocol, we provide practical examples for its use obtained from our studies.

  12. Origin and Role of a Subset of Tumor-Associated Neutrophils with Antigen-Presenting Cell Features in Early-Stage Human Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sunil; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik S; O'Brien, Shaun; Moon, Edmund K; Garfall, Alfred L; Rao, Abhishek S; Quatromoni, Jon G; Stephen, Tom Li; Litzky, Leslie; Deshpande, Charuhas; Feldman, Michael D; Hancock, Wayne W; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R; Albelda, Steven M; Eruslanov, Evgeniy B

    2016-07-11

    Based on studies in mouse tumor models, granulocytes appear to play a tumor-promoting role. However, there are limited data about the phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in humans. Here, we identify a subset of TANs that exhibited characteristics of both neutrophils and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in early-stage human lung cancer. These APC-like "hybrid neutrophils," which originate from CD11b(+)CD15(hi)CD10(-)CD16(low) immature progenitors, are able to cross-present antigens, as well as trigger and augment anti-tumor T cell responses. Interferon-γ and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor are requisite factors in the tumor that, working through the Ikaros transcription factor, synergistically exert their APC-promoting effects on the progenitors. Overall, these data demonstrate the existence of a specialized TAN subset with anti-tumor capabilities in human cancer.

  13. Increased production of the soluble tumor-associated antigens CA19-9, CA125, and CA15-3 in rheumatoid arthritis: potential adhesion molecules in synovial inflammation?

    PubMed

    Szekanecz, Eva; Sándor, Zsuzsa; Antal-Szalmás, Péter; Soós, Lilla; Lakos, Gabriella; Besenyei, Timea; Szentpétery, Agnes; Simkovics, Enikö; Szántó, János; Kiss, Emese; Koch, Alisa E; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2007-06-01

    Some tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are expressed on inflammatory cells. We previously detected carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA; CD66) in the rheumatoid (RA) synovium. The production of CEA, CA19-9, CA125, and CA15.3, may be increased in patients with RA, scleroderma, lupus, and Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Some of these TAAs contain sialylated carbohydrate motifs and they are involved in tumor-associated cell adhesion and metastasis. We assessed levels of TAAs in the sera of RA patients and healthy subjects. Serum TAA levels were correlated with disease markers including serum rheumatoid factor (RF), C-reactive protein (CRP), and anti-CCP antibody levels, DAS28, age disease duration. TAAs including CEA, CA15-3, CA72-4, CA125, and CA19-9, and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) were assessed by immunoassay in the sera of 75 patients with RA and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Normal upper limits for these TAAs were 3.4 microg/L, 25 kU/L, 6.9 kU/L, 35 kU/L, 34 kU/L, and 16.3 microg/L, respectively. There were significantly more RA patients showing abnormally high levels of CA125 (10.8% versus 7.1%), CA19-9 (8.1% versus 0%), and CA15-3 (17.6% versus 14.3%) in comparison to controls (P < 0.05). The mean absolute serum levels of CA125 (23.9 +/- 1.8 versus 16.8 +/- 2.2 kU/L) and CA19-9 (14.2 +/- 1.2 versus 10.5 +/- 1.6 kU/L) were also significantly higher in RA compared to controls (P < 0.05). Among RA patients, serum CEA showed significant correlation with RF (r = 0.270; P < 0.05). None of the assessed TAAs showed any correlation with CRP, anti-CCP, DAS28, age or disease duration. The concentration of some TAAs may be elevated in the sera of patients with established RA in comparison to healthy subjects. CEA, CA19-9, CA125, and CA15-3 contain carbohydrate motifs and thus they may be involved in synovitis-associated adhesive events. Furthermore, some TAAs, such as CEA, may also correlate with prognostic factors, such as serum RF levels.

  14. Cancer Vaccines and Carbohydrate Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Lum, Michelle; Vijay, Geraldine; Jain, Miten; Almogren, Adel; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACA) result from the aberrant glycosylation that is seen with transformation to a tumor cell. The carbohydrate antigens that have been found to be tumor-associated include the mucin related Tn, Sialyl Tn, and Thomsen-Friedenreich antigens, the blood group Lewis related LewisY, Sialyl LewisX and Sialyl LewisA, and LewisX, (also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1, SSEA-1), the glycosphingolipids Globo H and stage-specific embryonic antigen-3 (SSEA-3), the sialic acid containing glycosphingolipids, the gangliosides GD2, GD3, GM2, fucosyl GM1, and Neu5GcGM3, and polysialic acid. Recent developments have furthered our understanding of the T-independent type II response that is seen in response to carbohydrate antigens. The selection of a vaccine target antigen is based on not only the presence of the antigen in a variety of tumor tissues but also on the role this antigen plays in tumor growth and metastasis. These roles for TACAs are being elucidated. Newly acquired knowledge in understanding the T-independent immune response and in understanding the key roles that carbohydrates play in metastasis are being applied in attempts to develop an effective vaccine response to TACAs. The role of each of the above mentioned carbohydrate antigens in cancer growth and metastasis and vaccine attempts using these antigens will be described. PMID:21964054

  15. Carbohydrate-Mediated Targeting of Antigen to Dendritic Cells Leads to Enhanced Presentation of Antigen to T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Eddie W.; Ratner, Daniel M.; Seeberger, Peter H.; Hacohen, Nir

    2009-01-01

    The unique therapeutic value of dendritic cells (DCs) for the treatment of allergy, autoimmunity and transplant rejection is predicated upon our ability to selectively deliver antigens, drugs or nucleic acids to DCs in vivo. Here we describe a method for delivering whole protein antigens to DCs based on carbohydrate-mediated targeting of DC-expressed lectins. A series of synthetic carbohydrates was chemically-coupled to a model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA), and each conjugate was evaluated for its ability to increase the efficiency of antigen presentation by murine DCs to OVA-specific T cells (CD4+ and CD8+). In vitro data are presented that demonstrate that carbohydrate modification of OVA leads to a 50-fold enhancement of presentation of antigenic peptide to CD4+ T cells. A tenfold enhancement is observed for CD8+ T cells; this indicates that the targeted lectin(s) can mediate cross-presentation of antigens on MHC class I. Our data indicate that the observed enhancements in antigen presentation are unique to OVA that is conjugated to complex oligosaccharides, such as a high-mannose nonasaccharide, but not to monosaccharides. Taken together, our data suggest that a DC targeting strategy that is based upon carbohydrate-lectin interactions is a promising approach for enhancing antigen presentation via class I and class II molecules. PMID:18186095

  16. Lung adenocarcinoma with clear cell features producing carbohydrate antigen 19-9.

    PubMed

    Goto, Taichiro; Hada, Masao; Oyama, Toshio

    2015-10-01

    A 76-year-old man underwent surgery for lung cancer. Histopathologically, most of the resected tumor was composed of polygonal cells with foamy cytoplasm, and the cells were arranged predominantly in acinar patterns. In this case, although the carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level was high before surgery, it normalized after resection. The tumor was considered a carbohydrate antigen 19-9-producing tumor, which was further supported by the results of immunohistochemical analysis. Adenocarcinoma with clear cell features, producing carbohydrate antigen 19-9, is an exceedingly rare entity.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CARBOHYDRATE COMPONENTS OF Taenia solium ONCOSPHERE PROTEINS AND THEIR ROLE IN THE ANTIGENICITY

    PubMed Central

    Arana, Yanina; Verastegui, Manuela; Tuero, Iskra; Grandjean, Louis; Garcia, Hector H.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the carbohydrate composition of Taenia solium whole oncosphere antigens (WOAs), in order to improve the understanding of the antigenicity of the T. solium. Better knowledge of oncosphere antigens is crucial to accurately diagnose previous exposure to T. solium eggs and thus predict the development of neurocysticercosis. A set of seven lectins conjugates with wide carbohydrate specificity were used on parasite fixations and somatic extracts. Lectin fluorescence revealed that D-mannose, D-glucose, D-galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residues were the most abundant constituents of carbohydrate chains on the surface of T. solium oncosphere. Lectin blotting showed that post-translational modification with N-glycosylation was abundant while little evidence of O-linked carbohydrates was observed. Chemical oxidation and enzymatic deglycosylation in situ were performed to investigate the immunoreactivity of the carbohydrate moieties. Linearizing or removing the carbohydrate moieties from the protein backbones did not diminish the immunoreactivity of these antigens, suggesting that a substantial part of the host immune response against T. solium oncosphere is directed against the peptide epitopes on the parasite antigens. Finally, using carbohydrate probes, we demonstrated for the first time that the presence of several lectins on the surface of the oncosphere was specific to carbohydrates found in intestinal mucus, suggesting a possible role in initial attachment of the parasite to host cells. PMID:23982308

  18. Characterization of the carbohydrate components of Taenia solium oncosphere proteins and their role in the antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Arana, Yanina; Verastegui, Manuela; Tuero, Iskra; Grandjean, Louis; Garcia, Hector H; Gilman, Robert H

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the carbohydrate composition of Taenia solium whole oncosphere antigens (WOAs), in order to improve the understanding of the antigenicity of the T. solium. Better knowledge of oncosphere antigens is crucial to accurately diagnose previous exposure to T. solium eggs and thus predict the development of neurocysticercosis. A set of seven lectins conjugates with wide carbohydrate specificity were used on parasite fixations and somatic extracts. Lectin fluorescence revealed that D-mannose, D-glucose, D-galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residues were the most abundant constituents of carbohydrate chains on the surface of T. solium oncosphere. Lectin blotting showed that posttranslational modification with N-glycosylation was abundant while little evidence of O-linked carbohydrates was observed. Chemical oxidation and enzymatic deglycosylation in situ were performed to investigate the immunoreactivity of the carbohydrate moieties. Linearizing or removing the carbohydrate moieties from the protein backbones did not diminish the immunoreactivity of these antigens, suggesting that a substantial part of the host immune response against T. solium oncosphere is directed against the peptide epitopes on the parasite antigens. Finally, using carbohydrate probes, we demonstrated for the first time that the presence of several lectins on the surface of the oncosphere was specific to carbohydrates found in intestinal mucus, suggesting a possible role in initial attachment of the parasite to host cells.

  19. Carbohydrate Biopolymers Enhance Antibody Responses to Mucosally Delivered Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, A.; Makin, J.; Sizer, P. J.; Jabbal-Gill, I.; Hinchcliffe, M.; Illum, L.; Chatfield, S.; Roberts, M.

    2000-01-01

    We have evaluated the ability of two carbohydrate biopolymers, chitosan and gellan, to enhance antibody responses to subunit influenza virus vaccines delivered to the respiratory tracts of mice. Groups of mice were vaccinated three times intranasally (i.n.) with 10 μg of purified influenza B/Panama virus surface antigens (PSAs), which consist of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), either alone or admixed with chitosan or gellan solutions. Separate groups were vaccinated subcutaneously (s.c.) with PSAs adsorbed to Alhydrogel or chitosan or gellan alone i.n. Serum antibody responses were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for influenza virus-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and by HA inhibition (HAI) and NA inhibition (NAI) assays. The local respiratory immune response was measured by assaying for influenza virus-specific IgA antibody in nasal secretions and by enumerating nasal and pulmonary lymphocytes secreting IgA, IgG, and IgM anti-influenza virus-specific antibodies by enzyme-linked immunospotting (ELISPOT). When administered alone i.n., B/Panama PSA was poorly immunogenic. Parenteral immunization with B/Panama PSA with Alhydrogel elicited high titers of anti-B/Panama antibodies in serum but a very poor respiratory anti-B/Panama IgA response. In contrast, i.n. immunization with PSA plus chitosan stimulated very strong local and systemic anti-B/Panama responses. Gellan also enhanced the local and serum antibody responses to i.n. PSA but not to the same extent as chitosan. The ability of chitosan to augment the immunogenicity of influenza vaccines given i.n. was confirmed using PSA prepared from an influenza A virus (A/Texas H1N1). PMID:10992483

  20. Thymic expression of a T-cell receptor targeting a tumor-associated antigen coexpressed in the thymus induces T-ALL.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yongzhi; Onozawa, Masahiro; Garber, Haven R; Samsel, Leigh; Wang, Ziyao; McCoy, J Philip; Burkett, Sandra; Wu, Xiaolin; Aplan, Peter D; Mackall, Crystal L

    2015-05-01

    T-cell receptors (TCRs) and chimeric antigen receptors recognizing tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) can now be engineered to be expressed on a wide array of immune effectors. Engineered receptors targeting TAAs have most commonly been expressed on mature T cells, however, some have postulated that receptor expression on immune progenitors could yield T cells with enhanced potency. We generated mice (survivin-TCR-transgenic [Sur-TCR-Tg]) expressing a TCR recognizing the immunodominant epitope (Sur20-28) of murine survivin during early stages of thymopoiesis. Spontaneous T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) occurred in 100% of Sur-TCR-Tg mice derived from 3 separate founders. The leukemias expressed the Sur-TCR and signaled in response to the Sur20-28 peptide. In preleukemic mice, we observed increased cycling of double-negative thymocytes expressing the Sur-TCR and increased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells, consistent with TCR signaling induced by survivin expression in the murine thymus. β2M(-/-) Sur-TCR-Tg mice, which cannot effectively present survivin peptides on class I major histocompatibility complex, had significantly diminished rates of leukemia. We conclude that TCR signaling during the early stages of thymopoiesis mediates an oncogenic signal, and therefore expression of signaling receptors on developing thymocytes with specificity for TAAs expressed in the thymus could pose a risk for neoplasia, independent of insertional mutagenesis.

  1. Thymic expression of a T-cell receptor targeting a tumor-associated antigen coexpressed in the thymus induces T-ALL

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yongzhi; Onozawa, Masahiro; Garber, Haven R.; Samsel, Leigh; Wang, Ziyao; McCoy, J. Philip; Burkett, Sandra; Wu, Xiaolin; Aplan, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    T-cell receptors (TCRs) and chimeric antigen receptors recognizing tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) can now be engineered to be expressed on a wide array of immune effectors. Engineered receptors targeting TAAs have most commonly been expressed on mature T cells, however, some have postulated that receptor expression on immune progenitors could yield T cells with enhanced potency. We generated mice (survivin-TCR-transgenic [Sur-TCR-Tg]) expressing a TCR recognizing the immunodominant epitope (Sur20-28) of murine survivin during early stages of thymopoiesis. Spontaneous T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) occurred in 100% of Sur-TCR-Tg mice derived from 3 separate founders. The leukemias expressed the Sur-TCR and signaled in response to the Sur20-28 peptide. In preleukemic mice, we observed increased cycling of double-negative thymocytes expressing the Sur-TCR and increased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells, consistent with TCR signaling induced by survivin expression in the murine thymus. β2M−/− Sur-TCR-Tg mice, which cannot effectively present survivin peptides on class I major histocompatibility complex, had significantly diminished rates of leukemia. We conclude that TCR signaling during the early stages of thymopoiesis mediates an oncogenic signal, and therefore expression of signaling receptors on developing thymocytes with specificity for TAAs expressed in the thymus could pose a risk for neoplasia, independent of insertional mutagenesis. PMID:25814528

  2. Mining the Melanosome for Tumor Vaccine Targets: P.polypeptide Is a Novel Tumor-associated Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Touloukian, Christopher E.; Leitner, Wolfgang W.; Robbins, Paul F.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01

    To identify novel, tumor-specific target antigens for vaccine development, we studied immune responses to P.polypeptide, an Mr 110,000 integral melanosomal membrane protein associated with the Prader-Willi syndrome. Together with expressed sequence tag (EST) and serial analyses of gene expression (SAGE) library analyses, reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blotting verified that P.polypeptide expression was limited to melanoma and melanocytes. A single dominant epitope corresponding to positions 427–435 (IMLCLIAAV) was identified using allele-specific epitope forecasting combined with work in HLA-A*0201/Kb transgenic mice. This epitope was then used to generate de novo human P.polypeptide-specific CD8+ T cells capable of recognizing P.polypeptide expressing human tumor cell lines in an HLA-A*0201-restricted fashion. Thus, P.polypeptide may be valuable in the creation of novel therapeutic anticancer vaccines. PMID:11719435

  3. Proteomics-based identification of a tumor-associated antigen and its corresponding autoantibody in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsunemi, Soichiro; Nakanishi, Toyofumi; Fujita, Yoshihisa; Bouras, George; Miyamoto, Yoshiharu; Miyamoto, Akiko; Nomura, Eiji; Takubo, Takayuki; Tanigawa, Nobuhiko

    2010-04-01

    Identification of novel tumor-related antigens and autoantibodies will lead to early diagnosis of cancer and the development of more effective immunotherapies. The purpose of this study was to identify novel tumor antigens from the gastric cancer cell lines MkN-1, MkN-45 and KATOIII, and their related autoantibodies in sera of patients with gastric cancer using a proteomics-based approach. Proteins from the gastric cancer cell lines (MkN-1, MkN-45 and KATOIII) were separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, followed by Western blotting and antibody reaction with sera from patients with gastric cancer, healthy individuals and patients with other cancers. Positive spots were excised from Coomassie blue stained gels and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Sera from patients with gastric cancer yielded multiple spots, one of which was identified as the 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Western blots against recombinant GRP78 showed reactivity in sera from 17/60 (28.3%) patients with gastric cancer and 0/20 (0.0%) of healthy individuals. Autoantibodies against GRP78 were found in 4/15 (26.7%) and 3/15 (20.0%) patients with esophageal and colon cancer, respectively. We identified for the first time an autoantibody against GRP78 in gastric cancer patients. The proteomic approach implemented in this study offers a powerful tool for identifying novel serum markers that may display clinical usefulness in cancer. PMID:20204278

  4. Improvement of the immune efficacy of carbohydrate vaccines by chemical modification on the GM3 antigen.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiu-Jing; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Mingwei; Huo, Chang-Xin; Zhang, Ye; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2015-06-14

    Tumor cells often display aberrant levels and patterns of cell surface glycosylation, which provides a potential opportunity to develop carbohydrate-based anticancer vaccines for cancer immunotherapy. However, one of the most addressed challenges in this field is the low efficiency of the carbohydrate vaccination due to poor immunogenicity of carbohydrate antigens. In this article, a number of structure-modified GM3 antigen analogues were designed and chemically synthesized. The modified GM3 antigens were conjugated to protein carriers for vaccination. The vaccination results on mice show that the modification on the GM3 antigen could improve the efficiency of the vaccination, and in particular, two glycoconjugates (3-KLH and 8-KLH) elicited higher titers of anti-GM3 antibodies than the unmodified GM3-protein conjugate (2-KLH) did.

  5. Chimeric peptide containing both B and T cells epitope of tumor-associated antigen L6 enhances anti-tumor effects in HLA-A2 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Su-I; Huang, Ming-Hsi; Chang, Yu-Wen; Chen, I-Hua; Roffler, Steve; Chen, Bing-Mae; Sher, Yuh-Pyng; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2016-07-28

    Synthetic peptides are attractive for cancer immunotherapy because of their safety and flexibility. In this report, we identified a new B cell epitope of tumor-associated antigen L6 (TAL6) that could induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vivo. We incorporated the B cell epitope with a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and a helper T (Th) epitope to form a chimeric long peptide. We formulated the chimeric peptide with different adjuvants to immunize HLA-A2 transgenic mice and evaluate their immunogenicity. The chimeric peptide formulated with an emulsion type nanoparticle (PELC) adjuvant and a toll-like receptor 9 agonist (CpG ODN) (PELC/CpG) induced the greatest ADCC and CTL responses. The induced anti-tumor immunity inhibited the growth of TAL6-positive cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that immunization with the chimeric peptide inhibited cancer cell migration in vitro and metastasis in vivo. These data suggest that a chimeric peptide containing both B and T cell epitopes of TAL6 formulated with PELC/CpG adjuvant is feasible for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27130449

  6. β-Hemolytic Streptococci with Group A and Type II Carbohydrate Antigens1

    PubMed Central

    Jablon, James M.; Brust, Betty; Saslaw, Milton S.

    1965-01-01

    Jablon, James M. (National Children's Cardiac Hospital, Miami, Fla.), Betty Brust, and Milton S. Saslaw. β-Hemolytic streptococci with group A and type II carbohydrate antigens. J. Bacteriol. 89:529–534. 1965.—Ten strains of β-hemolytic streptococci with unusual somatic antigens were isolated from excised tonsils or throat cultures or both. Acid extracts of these strains reacted with commercial group A and group F antisera, but gave no reaction when tested with 35 type-specific group A antisera. Serum cross-absorption and agar-gel diffusion studies established the identity of the reactive antigens as the specific carbohydrates of group A and of type II. The latter antigen has been found in many strains of group F streptococci. The organisms do not possess the group-specific carbohydrate of group F, and the reaction with the commercial group F antiserum is due to the presence of type II antibody in the antiserum. The organisms give a stronger reaction to fluorescein-conjugated type II antiserum than to group A. However, the organisms have only one group-specific carbohydrate, that of group A, and, tentatively, should be classified as such. Images PMID:14255723

  7. American Brain Tumor Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the Ear Canals Read More ABTA News October 5, 2016 Largest American Brain Tumor Association Team Running in Bank of America Chicago Marathon Sunday, October 9 September 21, 2016 American Brain Tumor Association Awards 16 Grants to Support ...

  8. Recent Development in Carbohydrate Based Anti-cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhaojun; Huang, Xuefei

    2012-01-01

    The development of carbohydrate based anti-cancer vaccines is of high current interests. Herein, the latest development in this exciting field is reviewed. After a general introduction about tumor associated carbohydrate antigens and immune responses, the review is focused on the various strategies that have been developed to enhance the immunogenecity of these antigens. The results from animal studies and clinical trials are presented. PMID:22468019

  9. Differential Recognition and Hydrolysis of Host Carbohydrate Antigens by Streptococcus pneumoniae Family 98 Glycoside Hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.; Whitworth, G; El Warry, N; Randriantsoa, M; Samain, E; Burke, R; Vocadlo, D; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a fucose utilization operon in the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome and its established importance in virulence indicates a reliance of this bacterium on the harvesting of host fucose-containing glycans. The identities of these glycans, however, and how they are harvested is presently unknown. The biochemical and high resolution x-ray crystallographic analysis of two family 98 glycoside hydrolases (GH98s) from distinctive forms of the fucose utilization operon that originate from different S. pneumoniae strains reveal that one enzyme, the predominant type among pneumococcal isolates, has a unique endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity on the LewisY antigen. Altered active site topography in the other species of GH98 enzyme tune its endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity to the blood group A and B antigens. Despite their different specificities, these enzymes, and by extension all family 98 glycoside hydrolases, use an inverting catalytic mechanism. Many bacterial and viral pathogens exploit host carbohydrate antigens for adherence as a precursor to colonization or infection. However, this is the first evidence of bacterial endoglycosidase enzymes that are known to play a role in virulence and are specific for distinct host carbohydrate antigens. The strain-specific distribution of two distinct types of GH98 enzymes further suggests that S. pneumoniae strains may specialize to exploit host-specific antigens that vary from host to host, a factor that may feature in whether a strain is capable of colonizing a host or establishing an invasive infection.

  10. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    Carbohydrates are one of the main types of nutrients. They are the most important source of energy for your body. Your digestive system changes carbohydrates into glucose (blood sugar). Your body uses this ...

  11. Chemical modification of carbohydrates in tissue sections may unmask mucin antigens.

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, S

    2013-01-01

    Expression of mucins in cells and tissues is of great diagnostic and prognostic importance, and immunohistochemistry frequently is used to detect them. Reports concerning mucin localization in sections sometimes are conflicting, however, partly because immunogenic regions of the mucin molecule may be masked and thus not available for binding to an antibody. We modified carbohydrates in tissue sections chemically to enhance the binding of monoclonal mucin antibodies and of the lectin, Vicia villosa B4, to human tissue. The immunohistochemical localization of MUC1 and the simple mucin-type antigens, Tn and sialyl-Tn, was influenced by oxidation with periodic acid and by β-elimination before incubation. In some epithelial cells the staining was prevented by these procedures while in other cells it was evident. It appears that chemical modification can either destroy some antigen binding sites or unmask cryptic antigen binding sites in the mucin molecule and thereby make them accessible for immunohistochemical detection.

  12. Benign Hydronephrosis and Elevated of Serum Levels of Carbohydrate Antigen CA 19-9: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Filipovic, Branka; Milinić, Nikola; Gacic, Jasna; Markovic, Olivera; Djokovic, Aleksandra; Filipovic, Branislav

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 58 Final Diagnosis: Hydronephrosis Symptoms: Blunt abdominal pain • constipation • constipation Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and percutaneous nephrostolithotomy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Carbohydrate tumor-associated antigen (CA 19-9) has been shown to be upregulated in other malignant tumors including gastric, ovarian, hepatocellular, and colorectal carcinoma as well as benign diseases of the biliary track such as pancreatitis, cholangitis, and choledocholithiasis. According to the available literature, in several cases of benign hydronephrosis and in a few cases of benign renal diseases, elevated CA 19-9 has been noted. Case Report: A 58-year-old Caucasian male patient was admitted in our clinic with complaints about blunt abdominal pain in the past two-month period localized in the right lumbar region and irradiating into the right inguinal area, constipation, abdominal bloating, and intermittent hematuria. The concentration of serum CA 19-9 was 3500 U/mL. Urine cytology provided no signs of abnormality. Intravenous urography visualized right-sided pyelon and ureter duplex with the defect in contrast shade of the pyelon, caused by a stag horn calculus. Contrast added computerized axial tomography of the abdomen and pelvis visualized the pyelon casted concretion spreading throughout the right pyelon, with ureterohydronephrosis with the distal block for passage of the contrast to the distal part of the ureter. Conclusions: There is no doubt that CA 19-9 level is occasionally elevated in patients with obstructive urolithiasis as it was in our case. In the routine medical praxis, urolithiasis should not be neglected in the differential diagnosis of elevated concentrations of CA 19-9 marker. PMID:27287959

  13. The overall architecture and receptor binding of pneumococcal carbohydrate-antigen-hydrolyzing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Melanie A; Ficko-Blean, Elizabeth; Meloncelli, Peter J; Lowary, Todd L; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2011-09-01

    The TIGR4 and SP3-BS71 strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae each produce family 98 glycoside hydrolases, called Sp4GH98 and Sp3GH98, respectively, which have different modular architectures and substrate specificities. Sp4GH98 degrades the Lewis(Y) antigen and possesses three C-terminal family 47 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) that bind to this substrate. Sp3GH98 degrades the blood group A/B antigens and has two N-terminal family 51 CBMs that are of unknown function. Here, we examine the complex carbohydrate-binding specificity of the family 51 CBMs from Sp3GH98 (referred to as CBM51-1 and CBM51-2), the structural basis of this interaction, and the overall solution conformations of both Sp3GH98 and Sp4GH98, which are shown to be fully secreted proteins. Through glycan microarray binding analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry, CBM51-1 is found to bind specifically to the blood group A/B antigens. However, due to a series of relatively small structural rearrangements that were revealed in structures determined by X-ray crystallography, CBM51-2 appears to be incapable of binding carbohydrates. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data in combination with the available high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of the Sp3GH98 and Sp4GH98 catalytic modules and their CBMs yielded models of the biological solution structures of the full-length enzymes. These studies reveal the complex architectures of the two enzymes and suggest that carbohydrate recognition by the CBMs and the activity of the catalytic modules are not directly coupled. PMID:21767550

  14. Vaccination with a mixed vaccine of autogenous and allogeneic breast cancer cells and tumor associated antigens CA15-3, CEA and CA125--results in immune and clinical responses in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X P; Yang, D C; Elliott, R L; Head, J F

    2000-10-01

    In breast cancer there is often overexpression of the breast cancer antigen CA15-3, the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and the ovarian cancer antigen CA125, which makes them potential target antigens for immunotherapy. In this study, we used a multi-antigen vaccine, which included the following antigens: autologous breast cancer cells (AUTOC), allogeneic breast cancer MCF-7 cells (ALLOC), and the tumor associated antigens CA15-3, CEA and CA125, plus low doses of granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin 2 (IL-2). Forty-two breast cancer patients received weekly subcutaneous vaccination at the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 7th, 11th and 15th weeks. Their lymphocyte proliferative responses to AUTOC, ALLOC, CA15-3, CEA and CA125 were tested in lymphocyte blastogenesis assays (LBA) before and after vaccination. The disease stage and serum CA15-3, CEA and CA125 concentrations were also determined pre- and post-vaccination. We found that the vaccine was safe, and the only major side effects were swelling at the site of injection, muscle pain, and weakness or fatigue. The vaccine induced a significant increase in post-vaccination lymphocyte proliferative responses to AUTOC, CA15-3, CEA and CA125 but not ALLOC, compared to pre-vaccination (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, p < 0.05, p < 0.01 and p > 0.05, respectively, a paired t Test). Computed tomography (CT), ultrasound or bone scan showed evidence of disease improvement in 2 (12%) patients after vaccination. Hepatic metastases were reduced in size and number and some actually disappeared one patient. Metastatic disease in the L5 vertebra and the skull decreased in size and some osteolytic sites completely healed in a second patient. In addition, 7 patients (44%) had stable disease and 7 patients (44%) had disease progression. We did not find vaccination significantly reduced serum tumor markers CA15-3, CEA and CA125 of these breast cancer patients. These results suggest that the vaccine mixture of autologous and

  15. Clinical significance of serum carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, and squamous cell carcinoma antigen levels in esophageal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Nishimaki, Tadashi; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakagawa, Satoru; Ohashi, Manabu; Hatakeyama, Katsuyoshi

    2004-07-01

    Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9, and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) antigen levels were assessed to determine if their levels are useful for staging esophageal cancer preoperatively and for predicting patient survival after esophagectomy. Hence their seropositivity was investigated for a correlation with resectability, clinicopathologic parameters of tumor progression, and treatment outcomes in patients with unresectable esophageal cancer ( n = 63) and those undergoing esophagectomy for resectable disease ( n = 267). Abnormal elevation of serum SCC antigen levels showed a significant correlation with resectability ( p< 0.0001), depth of tumor invasion ( p < 0.0001), lymph node status ( p = 0.0015), TNM stage ( p < 0.0001), lymphatic invasion ( p = 0.0019), blood vessel invasion ( p = 0.0079), and poor survival after esophagectomy ( p = 0.0061). A significant relation ( p = 0.0145) was found between elevated serum CEA levels and distant metastasis, whereas the seropositivity of CA 19-9 showed no association with resectability, tumor progression, or patient survival. These results indicate that abnormal elevation of serum SCC antigen is a useful predictor of advanced esophageal cancer associated with poor survival after esophagectomy.

  16. Liver Abscess With a Markedly High Level of Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Yusuke; Seo, Kazunori; Koga, Ichiro; Matsunaga, Naohisa; Kitazawa, Takatoshi; Takamori, Yoriyuki; Ota, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    Serological tumor markers are useful for detection of malignancies and evaluation of disease progression. However, some markers are rarely elevated in patients with benign diseases and without malignancies. We herein present a case of a liver abscess with a highly elevated carbohydrate antigen (CA 19-9) level in both the serum and abscess fluid. The serological level of CA 19-9 decreased with treatment. Although CA 19-9 is known to be a specific tumor marker, high serum levels of CA 19-9 can be observed in patients with pyogenic liver abscesses. CA 19-9 may also be a marker for treatment response in patients with liver abscesses.

  17. Nitrogen-Containing and Carbohydrate-Containing Antigen from Actinomyces bovis

    PubMed Central

    Pirtle, E. C.; Rebers, P. A.; Weigel, W. W.

    1965-01-01

    Pirtle, E. C. (National Animal Disease Laboratory, Ames, Iowa), P. A. Rebers, and W. W. Weigel. Nitrogen-containing and carbohydrate-containing antigen from Actinomyces bovis. J. Bacteriol. 89:880–888. 1965.—Water-soluble, heat-stable antigens have been isolated from the supernatant fluids of broth cultures of Actinomyces bovis ATCC 10048 after 8 days of growth in a broth medium composed of Casamino Acids, yeast extract, Tween 80 (polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate), sodium thioglycolate, dextrose, and sodium chloride. The antigens were precipitated from the culture supernatant fluid with alcohol and purified by fractional precipitation with alcohol in the presence of calcium or zinc and by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl Sephadex. Two serologically active substances which differed in chemical composition and size were characterized. The larger one contained 71% hexose and 2.8% nitrogen, and the smaller one contained 45% hexose and 5.4% nitrogen. Heterogeneity of these fractions could not be demonstrated by electrophoresis in free solution at pH 7.8 or 2, by ultracentrifugal analysis, by double diffusion in agar, or by immunoelectrophoresis. Despite their differences in chemical composition and size, they appeared identical in activity as antigens in complement fixation and in double-diffusion tests in agar. Each was found to contain mannose as its chief component after hydrolysis and paper chromatography with three solvent systems. A small percentage of the total nitrogen may be attributed to the presence of amino sugars but the remainder is as yet unidentified. Images PMID:14273674

  18. Induction of an antitumor response using dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructs encoding the HLA-A*02:01-restricted epitopes of tumor-associated antigens in culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sennikov, Sergey Vital'evich; Shevchenko, Julia Alexandrovna; Kurilin, Vasilii Vasil'evich; Khantakova, Julia Nikolaevna; Lopatnikova, Julia Anatol'evna; Gavrilova, Elena Vasil'evna; Maksyutov, Rinat Amirovich; Bakulina, Anastasiya Yur'evna; Sidorov, Sergey Vasil'evich; Khristin, Alexander Alexandrovich; Maksyutov, Amir Zakievich

    2016-02-01

    Advances in oncoimmunology related to the definition of the basic mechanisms of the formation of antitumor immune response, as well as the opening of tumor-associated antigens recognized by immune cells, allowed to start developing ways to influence the effector cells of the immune system to generate effective antitumor cytotoxic response. We investigated the possibility to stimulate an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients by dendritic cells transfected with HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs. We isolated dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes and delivered our constructs to these cells by magnetic transfection. Additionally, a series of experiments with loading of dendritic cells with autologous tumor cell lysate antigens was conducted. We have shown that dendritic cells transfected with the HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs are effective in inducing an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients. Dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructor dendritic cells loaded with lysate antigens revealed a comparable stimulated cytotoxic response of mononuclear cells to these two ways of antigen delivery. We conclude that using DNA constructs in conjunction with patient stratification by HLA type allows the application of transfected DCs as an effective method to stimulate antitumor immunity in vitro.

  19. Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Cocinero, Emilio J; Çarçabal, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Although carbohydrates represent one of the most important families of biomolecules, they remain under-studied in comparison to the other biomolecular families (peptides, nucleobases). Beyond their best-known function of energy source in living systems, they act as mediator of molecular recognition processes, carrying molecular information in the so-called "sugar code," just to name one of their countless functions. Owing to their high conformational flexibility, they encode extremely rich information conveyed via the non-covalent hydrogen bonds within the carbohydrate and with other biomolecular assemblies, such as peptide subunits of proteins. Over the last decade there has been tremendous progress in the study of the conformational preferences of neutral oligosaccharides, and of the interactions between carbohydrates and various molecular partners (water, aromatic models, and peptide models), using vibrational spectroscopy as a sensitive probe. In parallel, other spectroscopic techniques have recently become available to the study of carbohydrates in the gas phase (microwave spectroscopy, IRMPD on charged species).

  20. Effective antitumor therapy based on a novel antibody-drug conjugate targeting the Tn carbohydrate antigen.

    PubMed

    Sedlik, Christine; Heitzmann, Adèle; Viel, Sophie; Ait Sarkouh, Rafik; Batisse, Cornélie; Schmidt, Frédéric; De La Rochere, Philippe; Amzallag, Nathalie; Osinaga, Eduardo; Oppezzo, Pablo; Pritsch, Otto; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Hubert, Pascale; Amigorena, Sebastian; Piaggio, Eliane

    2016-07-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC), combining the specificity of tumor recognition by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and the powerful cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs, are currently under growing interest and development. Here, we studied the potential of Chi-Tn, a mAb directed to a glyco-peptidic tumor-associated antigen, to be used as an ADC for cancer treatment. First, we demonstrated that Chi-Tn specifically targeted tumor cells in vivo. Also, using flow cytometry and deconvolution microscopy, we showed that the Chi-Tn mAb is rapidly internalized - condition necessary to ensure the delivery of conjugated cytotoxic drugs in an active form, and targeted to early and recycling endosomes. When conjugated to saporin (SAP) or to auristatin F, the Chi-Tn ADC exhibited effective cytotoxicity to Tn-positive tumor cells in vitro, which correlated with the level of tumoral Tn expression. Furthermore, the Chi-Tn mAb conjugated to auristatin F also exhibited efficient antitumor activity in vivo, validating for the first time the use of an anti-Tn antibody as an effective ADC. PMID:27622021

  1. Identification of a naturally processed HLA-A*02:01-restricted CTL epitope from the human tumor-associated antigen Nectin-4.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Marc; Ghidouche, Abderrezak; Rochas, Caroline; Godelaine, Danièle; Carrasco, Javier; Colau, Didier; Hames, Gérald; Montero-Julian, Félix A; Coulie, Pierre G; Olive, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Nectin-4 is a tumor antigen present on the surface of breast, ovarian and lung carcinoma cells. It is rarely present in normal adult tissues and is therefore a candidate target for cancer immunotherapy. Here, we identified a Nectin-4 antigenic peptide that is naturally presented to T cells by HLA-A2 molecules. We first screened the 502 nonamer peptides of Nectin-4 (510 amino acids) for binding to and off-rate from eight different HLA class I molecules. We then combined biochemical, cellular and algorithmic assays to select 5 Nectin-4 peptides that bound to HLA-A*02:01 molecules. Cytolytic T lymphocytes were obtained from healthy donors, that specifically lyzed HLA-A2(+) cells pulsed with 2 out of the 5 peptides, indicating the presence of anti-Nectin-4 CD8(+) T lymphocytes in the human T cell repertoire. Finally, an HLA-A2-restricted cytolytic T cell clone derived from a breast cancer patient recognized peptide Nectin-4145-153 (VLVPPLPSL) and lyzed HLA-A2(+) Nectin-4(+) breast carcinoma cells. These results indicate that peptide Nectin-4145-153 is naturally processed for recognition by T cells on HLA-A2 molecules. It could be used to monitor antitumor T cell responses or to immunize breast cancer patients.

  2. Identification of an immunogenic CD8+ T-cell epitope derived from γ-globin, a putative tumor-associated antigen for juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Naoto; Butler, Marcus O.; Xia, Zhinan; Berezovskaya, Alla; Murray, Andrew P.; Ansén, Sascha; Kojima, Seiji; Nadler, Lee M.

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare clonal myeloproliferative disorder. Although allogeneic stem cell transplantation can induce long-term remissions, relapse rates remain high and innovative approaches are needed. Since donor lymphocyte infusions have clinical activity in JMML, T-cell-mediated immunotherapy could provide a nonredundant treatment approach to compliment current therapies. γ-Globin, an oncofetal protein overexpressed by clonogenic JMML cells, may serve as a target of an antitumor immune response. We predicted 5 γ-globin-derived peptides as potential human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes and showed that 4 (g031, g071, g105, and g106) bind A2 molecules in vitro. Using an artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) that can process both the N- and C-termini of endogenously expressed proteins, we biochemically confirmed that g105 is naturally processed and presented by cell surface A2. Furthermore, g105-specific CD8+ CTLs generated from A2-positive healthy donors were able to specifically cytolyze γ-globin+, but not γ-globin- JMML cells in an A2-restricted manner. These results suggest that this aAPC-based approach enables the biochemical identification of CD8+ T-cell epitopes that are processed and presented by intact cells, and that CTL immunotherapy of JMML could be directed against the γ-globin-derived epitope g105. PMID:16778141

  3. The efficacy of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer antigen 125 (CA125), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) levels in determining the malignancy of solitary pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    Bekci, T T; Senol, T; Maden, E

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the utility of the tumour markers carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer antigen 125 (CA125), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant solitary pulmonary nodules in 42 hospitalized patients. Routine medical history and physical examination of each patient was performed and each patient also had a chest X-ray and a thoracic computed tomography scan. The following diagnostic procedures were also undertaken: bronchoscopy, transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy, sputum cytology and culture, analysis of sputum acid-fast bacilli and thoracotomy. Measurement of serum levels of tumour antigens by Immulite 2000 radioimmunoassay found that three tumour markers, CEA, CA125 and CA15-3, could be used in the diagnosis of malignant solitary pulmonary nodules. More research is now required involving a larger group of patients.

  4. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 negatively regulates granulocyte colony-stimulating factor production by breast tumor-associated macrophages that mediate tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Samineni, Sridhar; Zhang, Zhifang; Shively, John E

    2013-07-15

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1), a cell adhesion molecule expressed on epithelial cells and activated immune cells, is downregulated in many cancers and plays a role in inhibition of inflammation in part by inhibition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) production by myeloid cells. As macrophages are associated with a poor prognosis in breast cancer, but play important roles in normal breast, we hypothesized that CEACAM1 downregulation would lead to tumor promotion under inflammatory conditions. Cocultures of proinflammatory M1 macrophages with CEACAM1 negative MCF7 breast cells produced high levels of G-CSF (10 ng/mL) compared to CEACAM1-transfected MCF7/4S cells (1 ng/mL) or anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage cocultures (0.5 or 0.1 ng/mL, MCF7 or MCF7/4S, respectively). The expression of CEACAM1 on M1s was much greater than for M2s and was observed only in cocultures with either MCF7 or MCF7/4S cells. When M1 macrophages were mixed with MCF7 cells and implanted in murine mammary fat pads of nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice, tumor size and blood vessel density were significantly greater than MCF7 or MCF7/4S only tumors which were hardly detected after 8 weeks of growth. In contrast, M1 cells had a much reduced effect on MCF7/4S tumor growth and blood vessel density, indicating that the tumor inhibitory effect of CEACAM1 is most likely related to its anti-inflammatory action on inflammatory macrophages. These results support our previous finding that CEACAM1 inhibits both G-CSF production by myeloid cells and G-CSF-stimulated tumor angiogenesis.

  5. The novel panel assay to define tumor-associated antigen-binding antibodies in patients with metastatic melanomas may have diagnostic value.

    PubMed

    Kotlan, Beatrix; Liszkay, Gabriella; Blank, Miri; Csuka, Orsolya; Balatoni, Timea; Toth, Laszlo; Eles, Klara; Horvath, Szabolcs; Naszados, Gyorgy; Olasz, Judit; Banky, Balazs; Toth, Jozsef; Godeny, Maria; Marincola, Francesco M; Kasler, Miklos; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-02-01

    We aim to harness the natural humoral immune response by various technologies to get novel biomarkers. A complex antibody analysis in sera and in the tumor microenvironment leads to reveal tumor-specific antibodies. More strategies were introduced to select the most effective one to identify potential tumor antigen-binding capacity of the host. Epstein-Barr virus transformation and cloning with limiting dilution assay, magnetic cell sorting and antibody phage display with further methodological improvements were used in epithelial and neuroectodermal cancers. Column-purified sera of patient with melanoma were tested by immunofluorescence assay, while sera of further melanoma patients were processed for membrane-binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Some supernatants of selected B cell clones and purified antibodies showed considerable cancer cell binding capacity by immunofluorescence FACS analysis and confocal laser microscopy. Our native tumor cell membrane preparations helped to test soluble scFv and patients' sera for tumor binder antibodies. A complex tumor immunological study was introduced for patients with melanoma (ethical permission: ETT TUKEB 16462-02/2010); peripheral blood (n = 57) and surgically removed primary or metastatic tumors (n = 44) were gathered and processed at cellular immunological level. The technological developments proved to be important steps forward to the next antibody profile analyses at DNA sequence level. Cancer cell binding of patient-derived antibodies and natural immunoglobulin preparations of pooled plasma product intravenous immunoglobulins support the importance of natural human antibodies. Important cancer diagnostics and novel anticancer strategies are going to be built on these tools.

  6. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 is a useful prognostic marker in esophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Ryuma; Imamura, Yu; Nakamura, Kenichi; Uchihara, Tomoyuki; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Baba, Yoshifumi; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Yuji; Yoshida, Naoya; Oyama, Shinichiro; Shono, Takashi; Naoe, Hideaki; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Watanabe, Masayuki; Sasaki, Yutaka; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Baba, Hideo

    2015-11-01

    The incidence rate of esophagogastric junction (EGJ) adenocarcinoma has been rapidly increasing worldwide. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) are major serum tumor markers in gastrointestinal cancers. However, the role of these markers in EGJ adenocarcinoma has not been thoroughly investigated. A total of 211 patients with EGJ adenocarcinoma who underwent surgery or endoscopic submucosal dissection at two academic institutions, Kumamoto University Hospital or Kyushu University Hospital between January 1996 and March 2014, were eligible for this study. Serum CEA and CA19-9 were examined within 1 month before resection. The cut-off values for CEA and CA19-9 were set at 5.0 ng/mL and 37 U/mL, respectively. The clinicopathological features and prognostic roles of the markers were examined using univariate and multivariate analyses. The positive ratios for preoperative CEA (>5.0 ng/mL) and CA19-9 (>37 U/mL) were 20.3% and 12.9%, respectively. The positive ratio of CEA and CA19-9 was significantly higher in patients with tumors invading muscular or deeper layers (P = 0.002 and <0.001, respectively). Cox proportional hazards model revealed that CA19-9 positivity, but not CEA positivity, was an independent prognostic factor in patients with EGJ adenocarcinoma for cancer-specific survival (multivariate hazard ratio [HR] = 3.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41-10.33; P = 0.010) and overall survival (multivariate HR = 2.43, 95% CI 1.03-5.35; P = 0.043). Preoperative serum CA19-9 is a useful prognostic marker in patients with EGJ adenocarcinoma.

  7. The Structural Diversity of Carbohydrate Antigens of Selected Gram-Negative Marine Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nazarenko, Evgeny L.; Crawford, Russell J.; Ivanova, Elena P.

    2011-01-01

    Marine microorganisms have evolved for millions of years to survive in the environments characterized by one or more extreme physical or chemical parameters, e.g., high pressure, low temperature or high salinity. Marine bacteria have the ability to produce a range of biologically active molecules, such as antibiotics, toxins and antitoxins, antitumor and antimicrobial agents, and as a result, they have been a topic of research interest for many years. Among these biologically active molecules, the carbohydrate antigens, lipopolysaccharides (LPSs, O-antigens) found in cell walls of Gram-negative marine bacteria, show great potential as candidates in the development of drugs to prevent septic shock due to their low virulence. The structural diversity of LPSs is thought to be a reflection of the ability for these bacteria to adapt to an array of habitats, protecting the cell from being compromised by exposure to harsh environmental stress factors. Over the last few years, the variety of structures of core oligosaccharides and O-specific polysaccharides from LPSs of marine microrganisms has been discovered. In this review, we discuss the most recently encountered structures that have been identified from bacteria belonging to the genera Aeromonas, Alteromonas, Idiomarina, Microbulbifer, Pseudoalteromonas, Plesiomonas and Shewanella of the Gammaproteobacteria phylum; Sulfitobacter and Loktanella of the Alphaproteobactera phylum and to the genera Arenibacter, Cellulophaga, Chryseobacterium, Flavobacterium, Flexibacter of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum. Particular attention is paid to the particular chemical features of the LPSs, such as the monosaccharide type, non-sugar substituents and phosphate groups, together with some of the typifying traits of LPSs obtained from marine bacteria. A possible correlation is then made between such features and the environmental adaptations undertaken by marine bacteria. PMID:22073003

  8. Increased serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 in relapsed ductal breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Papantoniou, Vassilios; Tsiouris, Spyridon; Koutsikos, John; Ptohis, Nikolaos; Lazaris, Dimitrios; Zerva, Cherry

    2006-01-01

    Increased serum carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 is a quite uncommon manifestation of breast cancer both on early disease and on relapse. A 53-year-old woman with invasive ductal breast carcinoma underwent left-sided mastectomy. Two years later she palpated a subcutaneous mass at the mastectomy scar, arousing suspicion of local relapse. Surgery and histopathology revealed infiltration by breast adenocarcinoma and she was treated with chemotherapy. At that time serum tumor markers, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and CA 15-3 were within normal range. Over the next six months she displayed an increase of serum CEA while serum CA 15-3 remained within normal range. In an attempt to search for a second neoplasm possibly of gastrointestinal (GI) origin, abdominal computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP), endoscopy of the upper GI tract and colonoscopy were performed, as well as measurement of serum CA 19-9. While no indication of a GI neoplasm was detected, she displayed an over 10-fold increase of serum CA 19-9. The patient had also an X-ray mammography and technetium-99m hexakis-2-methoxyisobutylisonitrile ((99m)Tc-MIBI) scintimammography (SM). Whilst mammography was negative for contralateral disease recurrence, SM was suggestive of axillary lymph node involvement. Axillary lymph node dissection confirmed an extensive metastatic infiltration of these nodes by breast adenocarcinoma. Three months later serum CA 19-9 and CEA became normal. The interest of this case lies on the unexpected high serum CA 19-9 values found in a breast relapsed adenocarcinoma and in the important contribution of SM in diagnosing the axillary lymph node metastatic infiltration. PMID:16617392

  9. Serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 and prognosis of patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiuchang; He, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zengyan; Hu, Jiying; Sun, Fang; Qi, Feng; Yang, Shugang; Xiao, Zhenyu

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have assessed the prognostic role of serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) concentration in patients with gastric cancer, but the findings from those studies were inconsistent. We searched the PubMed and Web of Science databases to find eligible studies assessing the prognostic role of CA 19-9 in patients with gastric cancer. Twelve studies with a total of 5,072 gastric cancer patients were finally included into the meta-analysis. The pooled hazard ratio (HR) with corresponding 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) for overall survival were calculated to assess the prognostic role of CA 19-9 in patients with gastric cancer. Overall, elevated serum concentration of CA 19-9 (>37 U/mL) was associated with poorer overall survival in patients with gastric cancer (fixed-effects HR = 1.36, 95 % CI 1.24-1.48, P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis by study design further showed that elevated serum concentration of CA 19-9 was associated with poorer overall survival in patients with gastric cancer. There was no obvious risk of publication bias. Elevated concentration of serum CA 19-9 is associated with poorer overall survival in patients with gastric cancer.

  10. In Vitro Assessment of the Expression and T Cell Immunogenicity of the Tumor-Associated Antigens BORIS, MUC1, hTERT, MAGE-A3 and Sp17 in Uterine Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vanderstraeten, Anke; Tuyaerts, Sandra; Everaert, Tina; Van Bree, Rieta; Verbist, Godelieve; Luyten, Cathérine; Amant, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Background: While immunotherapy moved to the forefront of treatment of various cancers, it remains underexplored for uterine cancer. This might be due to the small patient population with advanced endometrial carcinoma and uterine sarcoma. Data about immunotherapeutic targets are scarce in endometrial carcinoma and lacking in uterine sarcoma. Methods: Expression of five tumor-associated antigens (TAA) (BORIS, MUC1, hTERT, MAGE-A3 and Sp17) was validated in uterine tumor samples by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and/or quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). TAA immunogenicity was analyzed by determining spontaneous T cell responses towards overlapping peptide pools covering the whole TAA in patient blood. Results: At mRNA level, MAGE-A3 and Sp17 were overexpressed in a minority of patients and BORIS was moderately overexpressed (26% in endometrial carcinoma and 62% in uterine sarcoma). hTERT was overexpressed in the vast majority of tumors. On protein level, MUC1 was upregulated in primary, recurrent and metastatic EMCAR and in metastatic US tumors. hTERT protein was highly expressed in both normal and malignant tissue. Spontaneous TAA-specific T cell responses were detected in a minority of patients, except for hTERT to which T cell responses occurred more frequently. Conclusions: These data point to MUC1 and hTERT as most suitable targets based on expression levels and T cell immunogenicity for use in immunotherapeutic regimens. PMID:27618037

  11. Construction and characterization of DNA vaccines encoding the single-chain variable fragment of the anti-idiotype antibody 1A7 mimicking the tumor-associated antigen disialoganglioside GD2.

    PubMed

    Zeytin, H E; Tripathi, P K; Bhattacharya-Chatterjee, M; Foon, K A; Chatterjee, S K

    2000-11-01

    Anti-idiotype antibody, 1A7, functionally mimics the tumor-associated antigen disialoganglioside GD2, which is overexpressed on the surface of a number of neuroectodermal tumors such as melanoma, neuroblastoma, soft tissue sarcoma, and small cell carcinoma of the lung. Immunization of mice with 1A7 generated the production of anti-GD2 antibodies. In a phase I clinical trial, immunization of patients with 1A7, mixed with the adjuvant QS21, demonstrated that 1A7 could act as a surrogate antigen for GD2 and induce strong humoral immune responses in advanced stage melanoma patients. DNA vaccines have recently been shown to invoke humoral as well as cellular responses in injected hosts against the transgene product. To evaluate the efficiency of DNA vaccines encoding anti-idiotype antibodies, we constructed expression plasmids encoding the variable heavy (VH) and variable light (VL) chains of 1A7. The plasmids were made in two configurations, expressing either the VH (pc1A7VHLnVL) or the VL (pc1A7VLLnVH) chain of 1A7 at the amino terminus, linked together by a 15-amino acid linker (Ln). In vitro transcription/translation assays and transfection of CHO-K1 cells with the plasmids demonstrated that a approximately 30-kDa protein was expressed by both configurations of the single-chain variable fragment. This protein can be specifically precipitated by monoclonal anti-GD2 antibody, 14G2a. Following intramuscular injection in mice, the plasmids were detectable in the injected tissues for at least 3 months and the injected plasmids actively transcribed the single-chain variable fragment 1A7 gene at the injected site. A single, intramuscular immunization of a group of C57BL/6 mice with pc1A7VLLnVH in phosphate-buffered saline induced humoral immune responses against 1A7 as well as GD2, the nominal antigen. Multiple immunizations, however, were required to elicit stronger immune responses. PMID:11129285

  12. Acute Cholecystitis with Significantly Elevated Levels of Serum Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Shuji; Banshodani, Masataka; Nishihara, Masahiro; Nambu, Junko; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Shimamoto, Fumio; Dohi, Kiyohiko; Sugino, Keizo; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), a marker of malignant tumors, is generally slightly elevated in benign conditions. We report a case of acute cholecystitis with a significantly elevated level of serum CA 19-9 based on positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) findings. A 65-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain and fever. A CT image revealed an enlarged gallbladder without tumor shadows. The C-reactive protein (CRP) level was elevated to 7.66 mg/dl. Moreover, the serum CA 19-9 level was significantly elevated to 19,392 U/ml. We started antibiotic treatment, because we suspected acute cholecystitis, but still, we could not ignore the possible presence of malignant tumors. After 11 days of antibiotic treatment, serum CRP and CA 19-9 levels decreased to 0.11 mg/dl and 1,049 U/ml, respectively. There was an accumulation of fluorine 18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (maximum standardized uptake value, 9.3) without tumor shadows in the liver, near the gallbladder, on the PET-CT examination. We considered the possibility that the inflammation had spread from the gallbladder to the liver, made a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis, and performed a cholecystectomy 33 days after treatment initiation. The serum CA 19-9 level decreased to 45 U/ml after the surgery. One year after the surgery, the patient was alive, and the serum CA 19-9 level was 34 U/ml. Acute cholecystitis with a significantly high elevation of the serum CA 19-9 level is rare. In such cases, it is important to confirm the change in the serum CA 19-9 level over time after antibiotic treatment and perform imaging studies to distinguish between inflammation and malignancy. PMID:27721726

  13. Prognostic Value of the Interaction between Galectin-3 and Antigen Carbohydrate 125 in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Julio; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Sandino, Justo; Mainar, Luis; Palau, Patricia; Santas, Enrique; Villanueva, Maria Pilar; Núñez, Eduardo; Bodí, Vicent; Chorro, Francisco J.; Miñana, Gema; Sanchis, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Aims Galectin-3 (Gal-3) and carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) have emerged as robust prognostic biomarkers in heart failure. Experimental data have also suggested a potential molecular interaction between CA125 and Gal-3; however, the biological and clinical relevance of this interaction is still uncertain. We sought to evaluate, in patients admitted for acute heart failure, the association between plasma Gal-3 with all-cause mortality and the risk for rehospitalizations among high and low levels of CA125. Methods and Results We included 264 consecutive patients admitted for acute heart failure to the Cardiology Department in a third-level center. Both biomarkers were measured on admission. Negative binomial and Cox regression models were used to evaluate the prognostic effect of the interaction between Gal-3 and CA125 (dichotomized by its median) with hospital readmission and all-cause mortality, respectively. During a median follow-up of 2 years (IQR = 1-2.8), 108 (40.9%) patients deaths and 365 rehospitalizations in 171 (69.5%) patients were registered. In a multivariable setting, the effect of Gal-3 on mortality and rehospitalization was differentially mediated by CA125 (p = 0.007 and p<0.001, respectively). Indeed, in patients with CA125 above median (>67 U/ml), values across the continuum of Gal-3 showed a positive and almost linear relationship with either the risk of death or rehospitalization. Conversely, when CA125 was below median (≤67 U/ml), Gal-3 lacked any prognostic effect on both endpoints. Conclusion In patients with acute heart failure, Gal-3 was strongly associated with higher risk of long-term mortality and repeated rehospitalizations, but only in those patients exhibiting higher values of CA125 (above 67 U/ml). PMID:25875367

  14. Application of an enzyme-labeled antigen method for visualizing plasma cells producing antibodies against Strep A, a carbohydrate antigen of Streptococcus pyogenes, in recurrent tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Onouchi, Takanori; Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Shiogama, Kazuya; Inada, Ken-ichi; Okada, Tatsuyoshi; Naito, Kensei; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is the main causative pathogen of recurrent tonsillitis. Histologically, lesions of recurrent tonsillitis contain numerous plasma cells. Strep A is an antigenic carbohydrate molecule on the cell wall of S. pyogenes. As expected, plasma cells in subjects with recurrent tonsillitis secrete antibodies against Strep A. The enzyme-labeled antigen method is a novel histochemical technique that visualizes specific antibody-producing cells in tissue sections by employing a biotin-labeled antigen as a probe. The purpose of the present study was to visualize plasma cells producing antibodies reactive with Strep A in recurrent tonsillitis. Firstly, the lymph nodes of rats immunized with boiled S. pyogenes were paraformaldehyde-fixed and specific plasma cells localized in frozen sections with biotinylated Strep A. Secondly, an enzyme-labeled antigen method was used on human tonsil surgically removed from 12 patients with recurrent tonsillitis. S. pyogenes genomes were PCR-detected in all 12 specimens. The emm genotypes belonged to emm12 in nine specimens and emm1 in three. Plasma cells producing anti-Strep A antibodies were demonstrated in prefixed frozen sections of rat lymph nodes, 8/12 human specimens from patients with recurrent tonsillitis but not in two control tonsils. In human tonsils, Strep A-reactive plasma cells were observed within the reticular squamous mucosa and just below the mucosa, and the specific antibodies belonged to either IgA or IgG classes. Our technique is effective in visualizing immunocytes producing specific antibodies against the bacterial carbohydrate antigen, and is thus a novel histochemical tool for analyzing immune reactions in infectious disorders.

  15. Induction of IgG antibodies against the GD2 carbohydrate tumor antigen by vaccination with peptide mimotopes.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Angelika B; Förster-Waldl, Elisabeth; Brämswig, Kira H; Pollak, Arnold; Zielinski, Christoph C; Pehamberger, Hubert; Lode, Holger N; Scheiner, Otto; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2006-05-01

    The disialoganglioside GD2, a carbohydrate antigen, is expressed on all tumors of neuroectodermal origin, including melanoma, neuroblastoma, sarcoma and small cell lung cancer. Due to its specific expression on tumor surfaces, GD2 is an attractive target for immunotherapies. The mouse/human chimeric anti-GD2 mAb ch14.18 is already applied in melanoma and neuroblastoma trials as a passive immunotherapy. To establish an active immunotherapy alternative, we aimed to replace the poorly immunogenic ganglioside with immunogenic peptides. Previously, we used the ch14.18 antibody to select GD2 peptide mimics from a phage display library. In the present study, two mimics of the ch14.18 epitope were coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and used for immunizing BALB/c mice. Induction of a specific humoral immune response towards the original antigen GD2, both purified and expressed on neuroblastoma and melanoma cells, could be demonstrated in ELISA, Western blot, and immunofluorohistochemistry. As the elicited antibodies were of the IgG isotype, the mimotope conjugates were capable of recruiting T cell help and inducing memory phenomena. In conclusion, we show that an epitope of the carbohydrate antigen GD2 can successfully be translated into immunogenic peptide mimotopes. Our immunization experiments indicate that GD2 mimotopes are suitable for active immunotherapy of GD2-expressing tumors.

  16. Prognostic value of increased carbohydrate antigen in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Ana B; Ordoñez-Llanos, Jordi; Ferrero, Andreu; Noguero, Mariana; Mir, Teresa; Mora, Josefina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Mirabet, Sònia; Cinca, Juan; Roig, Eulàlia

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the prognostic value of carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) and whether it adds prognostic information to N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in stable heart failure (HF) patients. METHODS: The predictive value of CA125 was retrospectively assessed in 156 patients with stable HF remitted to the outpatient HF unit for monitoring from 2009 to 2011. Patients were included in the study if they had a previous documented episode of HF and received HF treatment. CA125 and NT-proBNP concentrations were measured. The independent association between NT-proBNP or CA125 and mortality was assessed with Cox regression analysis, and their combined predictive ability was tested by the integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) index. RESULTS: The mean age of the 156 patients was 72 ± 12 years. During follow-up (17 ± 8 mo), 27 patients died, 1 received an urgent heart transplantation and 106 required hospitalization for HF. Higher CA125 values were correlated with outcomes: 58 ± 85 KU/L if hospitalized vs 34 ± 61 KU/L if not (P < 0.05), and 94 ± 121 KU/L in those who died or needed urgent heart transplantation vs 45 ± 78 KU/L in survivors (P < 0.01). After adjusting for propensity scores, the highest risk was observed when both biomarkers were elevated vs not elevated (HR = 8.95, 95%CI: 3.11-25.73; P < 0.001) and intermediate when only NT-proBNP was elevated vs not elevated (HR = 4.15, 95%CI: 1.41-12.24; P < 0.01). Moreover, when CA125 was added to the clinical model with NT-proBNP, a 4% (P < 0.05) improvement in the IDI was found. CONCLUSION: CA125 > 60 KU/L identified patients in stable HF with poor survival. Circulating CA125 level adds prognostic value to NT-proBNP level in predicting HF outcomes. PMID:24772260

  17. Carbohydrates as a tool for oriented immobilization of antigens and antibodies.

    PubMed

    Turková, J; Petkov, L; Sajdok, J; Kás, J; Benes, M J

    1990-02-01

    A biospecific sorbent for the isolation of ovalbumin antibodies was prepared by coupling of ovalbumin via its periodate-oxidized carbohydrate moiety to bead cellulose modified with adipic acid dihydrazide. The anti-ovalbumin IgG fraction isolated on this sorbent from immune rabbit serum contained only antibodies against protein determinants of ovalbumin. Thus, when these IgG were immobilized through their carbohydrate moieties to cellulose beads it became possible to prepare a biospecific sorbent for concanavalin A by oriented adsorption of ovalbumin. Ovalbumin was specifically adsorbed via its protein moiety and its carbohydrate part remained free for interaction with concanavalin A. PMID:2329151

  18. Recognition of Histo-Blood Group Antigen-Like Carbohydrates in Lettuce by Human GII.4 Norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Esseili, Malak A.; Lu, Zhongyan; Saif, Linda J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human norovirus (HuNoV) genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) strains account for about 80% of the gastroenteritis outbreaks in the United States. Contaminated food is a major transmission vehicle for this virus. In humans, pigs, and oysters, histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) act as attachment factors for HuNoVs. In lettuce, although the virus-like particles (VLPs) of a GII.4 HuNoV were found to bind to cell wall carbohydrates, the exact binding site has not been investigated. Here, we show the presence of HBGA-like carbohydrates in the cell wall of lettuce. The digestion of lettuce leaves with cell wall-degrading enzymes exposed more binding sites and significantly increased the level of binding of GII.4 HuNoV VLPs. Competition assays showed that both the HBGA monoclonal antibody, recognizing the H type, and plant lectins, recognizing α-l-fucose in the H type, effectively inhibited VLP binding to lettuce tissues. Lettuce cell wall components were isolated and their NoV VLP binding characteristics were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The binding was inhibited by pretreatment of the lettuce cell wall materials with α-1,2-fucosidase. Collectively, our results indicate that H-type HBGA-like carbohydrates exist in lettuce tissues and that GII.4 HuNoV VLPs can bind the exposed fucose moiety, possibly in the hemicellulose component of the cell wall. IMPORTANCE Salad crops and fruits are increasingly recognized as vehicles for human norovirus (HuNoV) transmission. A recent study showed that HuNoVs specifically bind to the carbohydrates of the lettuce cell wall. Histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are carbohydrates and are known as the attachment factors for HuNoV infection in humans. In this study, we show the presence of HBGA-like carbohydrates in lettuce, to which HuNoVs specifically bind. These results suggest that specifically bound HuNoVs cannot be removed by simple washing, which may allow viral transmission to consumers. Our findings provide new

  19. Invasive breast cancer in Argentine women: association between risk and prognostic factors with antigens of a peptidic and carbohydrate nature

    PubMed Central

    Demichelis, Sandra O; Isla-Larrain, Marina T; Cermignani, Luciano; Alberdi, Cecilio G; Segal-Eiras, Amada; Croce, María Virginia

    2011-01-01

    Objective In breast cancer, several tumor markers have been identified. The marker most extensively associated with breast cancer is MUC1. The objective of the study was to analyze prognostic and risk factors in relation to tumor markers in order to clarify breast cancer biology. A total of 349 primary tumor samples and lymph nodes from breast cancer patients were studied. Risk and prognostic factors were considered. An immunohistochemical approach was applied and an extensive statistical analysis was performed, including frequency analysis and analysis of variance. Correlation among variables was performed with principal component analysis. Results All the antigens showed an increased expression according to tumor size increment; moreover, sialyl Lewis x expression showed a significant increase in relation to disease stage, whereas Tn and TF presented a positive tendency. Vascular invasion was related to sialyl Lewis x expression and number of metastatic lymph nodes. Taking into account risk factors, when a patient had at least one child, Lewis antigens diminished their expression. In relation to breastfeeding, sialyl Lewis x expression diminished, although its apical expression increased. Conclusion Associations between MUC1 and carbohydrate antigens and risk and prognostic factors show the complexity of the cellular biological behavior that these antigens modulate in breast cancer. PMID:24367185

  20. Establishment and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to carbohydrate antigens on peanut agglutinin receptor glycoprotein of gastric cancer KATO-III.

    PubMed

    Uetsuki, S; Kato, A; Nagakura, H; Fujimoto, K; Kato, Y; Itsuki, Y; Adachi, M; Nakayama, Y

    1992-08-01

    Eight mouse monoclonal antibodies, GOM-1, GOM-2, GOM-3, GOM-5, GOM-6, GOM-7, GOM-8 and GOM-9 were established that recognized carbohydrate antigens on the human gastric cancer cell line KATO-III. Their binding specificities were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry analysis and thin layer chromatography immunostaining. All these monoclonal antibodies bound to peanut agglutinin receptor glycoproteins and neutral glycolipids extracted from KATO-III cells, but they could be divided into three groups, namely GOM-1, -3, -9 group, GOM-5 and GOM-2, -6, -7, -8 group. GOM-3 specifically bound to the Le(a) structure, Gal beta 1-3 (Fuc alpha 1-4) GlcNAc beta 1-, and GOM-5 specifically bound to the Lec structure, Gal beta 1-3GlcNAc beta-. GOM-2 showed specific binding to KATO-III, but little or no binding to various other cell lines examined or to normal human leukocytic cells. It also did not bind to the synthetic glycoconjugates tested, carrying 10 different terminal sugar chains including T, Tn, Le(a), Lec and Le(x) structures. The binding specificity of GOM-2 was also different from those of the monoclonal antibodies anti-Le(x), anti-Leb and anti-Ley. These results suggest that GOM-2 recognizes a new carbohydrate antigen on KATO-III cells that is distinct from Le(a), Leb, Lec, Le(x), Ley, T and Tn structures. PMID:1398682

  1. Major role for carbohydrate epitopes preferentially recognized by chronically infected mice in the determination of Schistosoma mansoni schistosomulum surface antigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Omer-ali, P.; Magee, A.I.; Kelly, C.; Simpson, A.J.G.

    1986-12-01

    A radioimmunoassay that makes use of whole Schistosomula and /sup 125/I-labeled protein A has been used to characterize and to quantify the binding of antisera to the surface of 3 hr mechanically transformed schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni. This technique facilitates the determination of epitopes on the schistosomula in addition to those detected by surface labeling and immunoprecipitation. By using this technique, it has been demonstrated that there is a much greater binding to the parasite surface of antibodies from chronically infected mice (CMS) than of antibodies from mice infected with highly irradiated cercariae (VMS), and CMS recognizes epitopes that VMS does not. Treatment of the surface of the schistosomula with trifluoromethanesulphonic acid and sodium metaperiodate has suggested that the discrepancy of the binding between the two sera is due to the recognition of a large number of additional epitopes by CMS, which are carbohydrate in nature. Some of the carbohydrate epitopes are expressed on the previously described surface glycoprotein antigens of M/sub r/ 200,000, 38,000, and 17,000.

  2. Entirely Carbohydrate-Based Vaccines: An Emerging Field for Specific and Selective Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Nishat, Sharmeen; Andreana, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates are regarded as promising targets for vaccine development against infectious disease because cell surface glycans on many infectious agents are attributed to playing an important role in pathogenesis. In addition, oncogenic transformation of normal cells, in many cases, is associated with aberrant glycosylation of the cell surface glycan generating tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs). Technological advances in glycobiology have added a new dimension to immunotherapy when considering carbohydrates as key targets in developing safe and effective vaccines to combat cancer, bacterial infections, viral infections, etc. Many consider effective vaccines induce T-cell dependent immunity with satisfactory levels of immunological memory that preclude recurrence. Unfortunately, carbohydrates alone are poorly immunogenic as they do not bind strongly to the MHCII complex and thus fail to elicit T-cell immunity. To increase immunogenicity, carbohydrates have been conjugated to carrier proteins, which sometimes can impede carbohydrate specific immunity as peptide-based immune responses can negate antibodies directed at the targeted carbohydrate antigens. To overcome many challenges in using carbohydrate-based vaccine design and development approaches targeting cancer and other diseases, zwitterionic polysaccharides (ZPSs), isolated from the capsule of commensal anaerobic bacteria, will be discussed as promising carriers of carbohydrate antigens to achieve desired immunological responses. PMID:27213458

  3. Discrimination of rat Brunner's gland carbohydrate antigens by site-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chimuro, Tomoyuki; Kuroyama, Hiroyuki; Goso, Yukinobu; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Kurihara, Makoto

    2016-09-01

    Mucus produced and secreted by gastrointestinal mucosa contains various types of mucins equipped with unique sugar chains considered to play critical roles in protecting mucous membranes; therefore, the identification and verification of mucin sugar chains is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms. In our previous work, we generated three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), RGM22, RGM26, and RGM42, which recognize sugar chains in rat gastric mucin. Here, we immunohistochemically analyzed the rat gastrointestinal mucosa and found that the antigens recognized by RGM22 and RGM42 were expressed in the rat antrum and Brunner's glands, whereas that recognized by RGM26 was detected in the antrum, but rarely in Brunner's glands. We found that these antibodies reacted with porcine gastric mucin-derived oligosaccharides bearing a common structure: GalNAcα1-3(Fucα1-2)Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-6GalNAc-ol. Moreover, epitope analysis revealed that RGM42 and RGM22 recognized α-linked GalNAc and GalNAcα1-3Gal, respectively, on the GalNAcα1-3(Fucα1-2)Gal structure, whereas RGM26 was specific for GalNAcα1-3(Fucα1-2)Gal. These results indicate that rat Brunner's glands express specific antigens bearing GalNAcα1-3Gal that are recognized by RGM22 and RGM42. Thus, RGM22, RGM26, and RGM42 with their unique antigen specificities could be useful tools for investigation of oligosaccharide diversity among mucins. PMID:27454489

  4. Serum levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-III and their relation with carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 in cases of esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, O; Eroglu, A; Dag, E; Karaoglanoglu, N; Yilmaz, A

    2006-12-01

    Tumour markers are used for diagnosis, staging, evaluation of response to treatment, prognosis and detection of recurrences in clinical oncology. In this study, we aim to investigate the levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-III in cases with oesophageal carcinoma. We investigated their possible use as tumour markers and their relation to other tumour markers. Forty patients who were diagnosed as having oesophageal carcinoma by histopathological evaluation of endoscopic biopsies between January 2003 and July 2004 and 40 healthy people as the control group were included in the study. The serum levels of tumour markers including IGF-I, IGFBP-III, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 were measured in both groups. Data were compared statistically, and the importance of IGF-I and IGFBP-III levels were investigated in cases with oesophageal carcinoma. IGF-I levels were significantly higher in patients with oesophageal carcinoma when compared with the control group (p < 0.05), whereas IGFBP-III levels were significantly lower (p < 0.05). The increase in CEA levels was not statistically significant when compared with the control group. The increase in CA 19-9 levels was statistically significant when compared with the control group (p < 0.05). No correlation was detected between levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-III and levels of CEA and CA 19-9. We suggest that the serum IGF-I level may be used as a tumour marker in oesophageal carcinoma. A low level of serum IGFBP-III is also significant in cases with oesophageal carcinoma. We believe that drugs which inhibit IGF-I function or which stimulate the function of IGFBP-III may open new horizons in extra-surgical modalities for the treatment of oesophageal cancer.

  5. Measurement of serum carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, cytokeratin-19 fragment and matrix metalloproteinase-7 for detecting cholangiocarcinoma: a preliminary case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lumachi, Franco; Lo Re, Giovanni; Tozzoli, Renato; D'Aurizio, Federica; Facomer, Flavio; Chiara, Giordano B; Basso, Stefano M M

    2014-11-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a malignant tumor of the liver arising from the bile duct epithelium, accounting for 10-25% of all primary hepatic cancers. The clinical presentation of this tumor is not specific and the diagnosis of early cholangiocarcinoma is difficult, especially in patients with other biliary diseases. Measurement of serum carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) are commonly used to monitor response to therapy, but are also useful for confirming the presence of a cholangiocarcinoma. In this setting, other biomarkers have been previously tested, including cytokeratin-19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1) and the matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7). The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the clinical usefulness of the assay of serum CEA, CA 19-9, CYFRA 21-1 and MMP7, individually and together, as tumor markers for the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma. Twenty-four patients (14 men, 10 women, 62.6±8.2 years of age) with histologically-confirmed cholangiocarcinoma (cases) and 25 age- and sex-matched patients with benign liver disease (controls) underwent measurement of these biomarkers. The mean values of all serum markers of patients with cholangiocarcinoma were significantly higher (p<0.01) than that of the controls. No correlation was found between serum tumor markers and total bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were: CEA: 52%, 55%, and 58%; CA 19-9: 74%, 82% and 78%; CYFRA 21-1: 76%, 79% and 78%; MMP7: 78%, 77% and 80%, respectively. The combination of all serum markers afforded 92.0% sensitivity and 96% specificity in detecting cholangiocarcinoma, showing the highest diagnostic accuracy (94%). In conclusion, our preliminary results suggest that the measurement of all four biomarkers together can help in the early detection of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:25368272

  6. Aluminum nanopyramid array with tunable ultraviolet-visible-infrared wavelength plasmon resonances for rapid detection of carbohydrate antigen 199.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanbo; Qiu, Yongcai; Zhang, Li; Jiang, Lelun; Zhou, Zhangkai; Chen, Huanjun; Zhou, Jianhua

    2016-05-15

    Aluminum-based localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) holds attractive properties include low cost, high natural abundance, and ease of processing by a wide variety of methods including complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, making itself having an edge over conventional ones induced by noble metal. However, the inherent drawbacks of plasmonic mode limited on UV-green wavelength, low refractive index sensitivity, as well as heavy-shape-dependence greatly prevent aluminum plasmonics from real-life biosensing. Here, we demonstrated a uniform quasi-3-dimensional Al nanopyramid array (NPA) structure with tunable ultraviolet-visible-infrared (UV-vis-NIR) plasmon resonances for biosensing. By changing the reflection measuring angle, we could easily obtain typical peaks simultaneously exhibited on the reflectance spectrum across UV-vis-NIR wave region. The Al NPAs carried out high refractive index sensitivities which even comparable with that of noble metal, and can be used as a biosensor for directly detecting cytochrome c and carbohydrate antigen 199 in air after the sensing surface was washed cleanly and dried; the limits of detection were determined to be 800 nM and 29 ng/mL, respectively. Our proposed work therefore initiates the low-cost, high-performance biosensing using aluminum plasmonics, which would find wide applications in rapid diagnosis, mobile-healthcare and environmental monitoring.

  7. Hollow PDA-Au nanoparticles-enabled signal amplification for sensitive nonenzymatic colorimetric immunodetection of carbohydrate antigen 125.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Yiqun; Zhao, Caiyun; You, Jinmao; Qu, Fengli

    2015-09-15

    A novel colorimetric immunoassay was designed for the sensitive detection of carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125). The success of this immunoassay relies on the use of hollow polydopamine-gold nanoparticles (PDA-Au) for signal amplification to achieve sensitive nonenzymatic colorimetric detection. In particular, PDA-Au was used as a stable and sensitive label and aminated-Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) were employed to immobilize capture antibody (Ab1) and acted as a separable immunosensing probe. PDA-Au exhibited high catalytic performance towards p-nitrophenol reduction and thus resulted in significant color change and UV/vis signal variations. The immunoassay was performed based on sandwich protocol. As compared to pure Au nanoparticles, the signal amplification and sensitivity of PDA-Au-based assay was significantly improved. For instance, the dynamic range of the developed colorimetric immunoassay for CA125 was 0.1-100 U/mL with a detection limit of 0.1 U/mL at S/N=3. In addition, this immunoassay was also tested for the analysis of clinical serum samples, which demonstrated its potential for practical diagnostic applications.

  8. Expression of the carcinoma markers: the sialylated Lewis A and X carbohydrate antigens in normal laryngeal surface epithelium and submucosal glands from old humans.

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, Svend; Moe, Dennis

    2013-03-01

    Aberrant surface expression of the carbohydrate ABH and Lewis antigens are often used as markers for the diagnosis of cancer, but while the distribution of these histo-blood group antigens is relatively well-described in tissues and organs from young and middle-aged humans little is known of their expression in old age. The objective for this study was to estimate if the Lewis A and X antigens together with their sialylated modifications, are expressed in sections of normal laryngeal tissue from old humans. Antibodies directed against the tumor markers Sialyl Lewis A and Sialyl Lewis X showed positive reaction in the surface epithelia from normal larynx autopsies obtained from people aged 77-90 years. The sialylated and non-sialylated Lewis A antigens were more frequently expressed in the pseudostratified epithelium than in squamous surface epithelium. Both the sialylated and the non-sialylated carbohydrates were stained in the submucosal glands in all the autopsies. In conclusion, visualization of Lewis tumor markers in the larynx should be interpreted with great care, as they may be present in normal laryngeal epithelial cells from old humans.

  9. Carbohydrate antigen expression in primary tumors, metastatic lesions, and serous effusions from patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian carcinoma: evidence of up-regulated Tn and Sialyl Tn antigen expression in effusions.

    PubMed

    Davidson, B; Berner, A; Nesland, J M; Risberg, B; Kristensen, G B; Tropé, C G; Bryne, M

    2000-09-01

    The object of this study was the investigation of carbohydrate antigen expression in malignant epithelial cells and benign mesothelial cells in serous effusions from patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian carcinomas. In addition, to compare antigen expression in carcinoma cells in effusions with those of corresponding primary tumors and metastatic lesions. Sections from 63 malignant effusions from ovarian carcinoma patients and 15 reactive effusions were immunohistochemically stained, using 5 monoclonal antibodies for Lewis(y), Sialyl Lewis(x), Tn, and Sialyl Tn antigens. Tissue sections (n = 97) from corresponding primary ovarian carcinomas and metastatic lesions, as well as from 12 malignant mesotheliomas, were additionally stained using the above panel. Staining for the 4 antigens was seen in carcinoma cells in serous effusions in the majority of cases (range = 71% to 85%). In contrast, immunoreactivity was detected in mesothelial cells in only 6% to 23% of the specimens studied (P < .001 for all 5 markers). With the exception of B3 antibody against Lewis(y) antigen, malignant mesotheliomas stained negative, infrequently showing focal immunoreactivity. An up-regulation of Tn and Sialyl Tn expression was detected in carcinoma cells in effusions when compared with both primary tumors (P < .003 and P < .007, respectively) and metastatic lesions (P < .034 and .041, respectively). Cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens can thus be used as an adjunct in the differentiation between malignant epithelial and reactive mesothelial cells. Ovarian carcinoma cells in effusions show up-regulation of Tn and Sialyl Tn, possibly representing a transient phenotypic alteration facilitating metastasis. PMID:11014575

  10. Recognition of carbohydrate epitopes specific for electron-dense granule antigens from Entamoeba histolytica by monoclonal antibodies in the cecal content of infected hamsters.

    PubMed

    Arias-Negrete, S; León, G; Anaya-Velázquez, F; Tovar, R; Moreno, M A; Hernández, J M; Munoz, M L

    2001-12-01

    The pathogenic trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica produce and secrete electron-dense granules (EDG) containing collagenase, considered a virulence factor. Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (L7.1 and L1.1) anti-EDG antigens were raised. MAb L7.1 has been reported to recognize proteic EDG antigens and MAb L1.1 reacted with a carbohydrate epitope. These epitopes were present in axenic and xenic amoebas. To detect EDG antigens by a enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a experimental model of early intestinal amoebiasis, both MAbs were employed. E. histolytica HM1 axenic and monoxenic trophozoites were inoculated into the cecum according to the washed-closed cecal loop technique. The cecal content was recovered at 8, 24, and 48 h post-inoculation. Antigens from EDG in whole trophozoites and cell-free supernatants were detected. Our results indicate that it is possible to detect EDG antigens in the cecal content of hamsters in the early phase of the invasive amoebiasis.

  11. Cross-Reactivity between Schistosoma mansoni Antigens and the Latex Allergen Hev b 7: Putative Implication of Cross-Reactive Carbohydrate Determinants (CCDs).

    PubMed

    Doenhoff, Michael J; El-Faham, Marwa; Liddell, Susan; Fuller, Heidi R; Stanley, Ronald G; Schramm, Gabriele; Igetei, Joseph E

    2016-01-01

    IgG antibodies produced by rabbits immunized against S. mansoni antigens cross-reacted with aqueous soluble constituents of a variety of allergens. The antibody cross-reactivity was largely sensitive to degradation by treatment of the target antigens with sodium meta-periodate, suggesting the cross-reactivity was due to carbohydrate determinants that were common to both the schistosome and the allergens (CCDs). The reaction between the rabbit antibodies and a 43 kDa molecule in a rubber latex extract was analysed further: tandem mass spectrometry identified the latex molecule as allergen Hev b 7. Rabbit anti-schistosome IgG antibodies purified by acid-elution from solid-phase latex Hev b 7 reacted with the S. mansoni egg antigens IPSE/alpha-1 and kappa-5 and cercarial antigens SPO-1 and a fatty acid-binding protein. Moreover, purified anti-S. mansoni egg, latex cross-reactive antibodies reacted with antigenic constituents of some fruits, a result of potential relevance to the latex-fruit syndrome of allergic reactions. We propose that IgG anti-schistosome antibodies that cross-react with allergens may be able to block IgE-induced allergic reactions and thus provide a possible explanation for the hygiene hypothesis. PMID:27467385

  12. Cross-Reactivity between Schistosoma mansoni Antigens and the Latex Allergen Hev b 7: Putative Implication of Cross-Reactive Carbohydrate Determinants (CCDs)

    PubMed Central

    Doenhoff, Michael J.; El-Faham, Marwa; Liddell, Susan; Fuller, Heidi R.; Stanley, Ronald G.; Schramm, Gabriele; Igetei, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    IgG antibodies produced by rabbits immunized against S. mansoni antigens cross-reacted with aqueous soluble constituents of a variety of allergens. The antibody cross-reactivity was largely sensitive to degradation by treatment of the target antigens with sodium meta-periodate, suggesting the cross-reactivity was due to carbohydrate determinants that were common to both the schistosome and the allergens (CCDs). The reaction between the rabbit antibodies and a 43 kDa molecule in a rubber latex extract was analysed further: tandem mass spectrometry identified the latex molecule as allergen Hev b 7. Rabbit anti-schistosome IgG antibodies purified by acid-elution from solid-phase latex Hev b 7 reacted with the S. mansoni egg antigens IPSE/alpha-1 and kappa-5 and cercarial antigens SPO-1 and a fatty acid-binding protein. Moreover, purified anti-S. mansoni egg, latex cross-reactive antibodies reacted with antigenic constituents of some fruits, a result of potential relevance to the latex-fruit syndrome of allergic reactions. We propose that IgG anti-schistosome antibodies that cross-react with allergens may be able to block IgE-induced allergic reactions and thus provide a possible explanation for the hygiene hypothesis. PMID:27467385

  13. Carbohydrate-Mimetic Peptides for Pan Anti-Tumor Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kieber-Emmons, Thomas; Saha, Somdutta; Pashov, Anastas; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Murali, Ramachandran

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mimicry is fundamental to biology and transcends to many disciplines ranging from immune pathology to drug design. Structural characterization of molecular partners has provided insight into the origins and relative importance of complementarity in mimicry. Chemical complementarity is easy to understand; amino acid sequence similarity between peptides, for example, can lead to cross-reactivity triggering similar reactivity from their cognate receptors. However, conformational complementarity is difficult to decipher. Molecular mimicry of carbohydrates by peptides is often considered one of those. Extensive studies of innate and adaptive immune responses suggests the existence of carbohydrate mimicry, but the structural basis for this mimicry yields confounding details; peptides mimicking carbohydrates in some cases fail to exhibit both chemical and conformational mimicry. Deconvolution of these two types of complementarity in mimicry and its relationship to biological function can nevertheless lead to new therapeutics. Here, we discuss our experience examining the immunological aspects and implications of carbohydrate–peptide mimicry. Emphasis is placed on the rationale, the lessons learned from the methodologies to identify mimics, a perspective on the limitations of structural analysis, the biological consequences of mimicking tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens, and the notion of reverse engineering to develop carbohydrate-mimetic peptides in vaccine design strategies to induce responses to glycan antigens expressed on cancer cells. PMID:25071769

  14. Chemical Synthesis of the Tumor-Associated Globo H Antigen†

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Satadru S.; Liao, Guochao; Guo, Zhongwu

    2015-01-01

    A derivative of the tumor-associated globo H antigen, a complex hexasaccharide, was synthesized by a convergent and efficient [3+2+1] strategy using various glycosylation methods. All glycosylation reactions afforded good to excellent yields and outstanding stereoselectivity, including the installation of cis α-linked D-galactose and L-fucose. The longest linear sequence for this synthesis was 11 steps from a galactose derivative 11 to give an overall yield of 2.6%. The synthetic target had a free and reactive amino group at the glycan reducing end, facilitating its conjugation with other molecules for various applications. PMID:26257889

  15. High-throughput carbohydrate microarray profiling of 27 antibodies demonstrates widespread specificity problems.

    PubMed

    Manimala, Joseph C; Roach, Timothy A; Li, Zhitao; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C

    2007-08-01

    Progress toward understanding the biological roles of carbohydrates has been remarkably slow, and efforts to exploit this class of biopolymers as diagnostic and therapeutic targets have proven extremely challenging. Both basic and clinical research rely heavily on identifying and monitoring expression levels of carbohydrates. Over the last 30 years, the majority of expression information has been derived from antibody- and lectin-binding studies. Using a carbohydrate microarray containing 80 different glycans and glycoproteins, the specificities of 27 antiglycan antibodies were evaluated, including antibodies to histo-blood group A, B, and H antigens (81FR2.2, CLCP-19B, B389, 92FR-A2, B480, B460, B376, and B393), Lewis antigens (7LE, 15C02, 28, ZC-18C, 121SLE, CA199.02, PR.5C5, 2-25LE, BR55, T174, T218, F3, A70-C/C8, FR4A5, and K21), and other tumor-associated antigens (B389, 1A4, B1.1, and 5B5). In total, evaluation of over 2000 individual carbohydrate-protein interactions was carried out. More than half of the antibodies considered to be specific for their designated antigen were found to cross-react with other glycans. The cross-reactive glycans could be mistaken for the designated antigen in biopsy samples or other biological samples, leading to inaccurate conclusions. PMID:17483136

  16. Carbohydrates as allergens.

    PubMed

    Commins, Scott P

    2015-01-01

    Complex carbohydrates are effective inducers of Th2 responses, and carbohydrate antigens can stimulate the production of glycan-specific antibodies. In instances where the antigen exposure occurs through the skin, the resulting antibody production can contain IgE class antibody. The glycan-stimulated IgE may be non-specific but may also be antigen specific. This review focuses on the production of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants, the recently identified IgE antibody response to a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), as well as discusses practical implications of carbohydrates in allergy. In addition, the biological effects of carbohydrate antigens are reviewed in setting of receptors and host recognition.

  17. Immunization of fucose-containing polysaccharides from Reishi mushroom induces antibodies to tumor-associated Globo H-series epitopes.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shih-Fen; Liang, Chi-Hui; Ho, Ming-Yi; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Tsai, Tsung-I; Hsieh, Yves S-Y; Tsai, Chih-Ming; Li, Shiou-Ting; Cheng, Yang-Yu; Tsao, Shu-Ming; Lin, Tung-Yi; Lin, Zong-Yan; Yang, Wen-Bin; Ren, Chien-Tai; Lin, Kuo-I; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Lin, Chun-Hung; Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Wu, Chung-Yi; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2013-08-20

    Carbohydrate-based vaccines have shown therapeutic efficacy for infectious disease and cancer. The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) containing complex polysaccharides has been used as antitumor supplement, but the mechanism of immune response has rarely been studied. Here, we show that the mice immunized with a l-fucose (Fuc)-enriched Reishi polysaccharide fraction (designated as FMS) induce antibodies against murine Lewis lung carcinoma cells, with increased antibody-mediated cytotoxicity and reduced production of tumor-associated inflammatory mediators (in particular, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1). The mice showed a significant increase in the peritoneal B1 B-cell population, suggesting FMS-mediated anti-glycan IgM production. Furthermore, the glycan microarray analysis of FMS-induced antisera displayed a high specificity toward tumor-associated glycans, with the antigenic structure located in the nonreducing termini (i.e., Fucα1-2Galβ1-3GalNAc-R, where Gal, GalNAc, and R represent, respectively, D-galactose, D-N-acetyl galactosamine, and reducing end), typically found in Globo H and related tumor antigens. The composition of FMS contains mainly the backbone of 1,4-mannan and 1,6-α-galactan and through the Fucα1-2Gal, Fucα1-3/4Man, Fucα1-4Xyl, and Fucα1-2Fuc linkages (where Man and Xyl represent d-mannose and d-xylose, respectively), underlying the molecular basis of the FMS-induced IgM antibodies against tumor-specific glycans.

  18. Delayed radiation-induced inflammation accompanying a marked carbohydrate antigen 19-9 elevation in a patient with resected pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Cardinal, Jon S.; Jacobson, Geraldine M.

    2016-01-01

    Although carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 is a useful tumor marker for pancreatic cancer, it can also become elevated from a variety of benign and malignant conditions. Herein we describe an unusual presentation of elevated CA 19-9 in an asymptomatic patient who had previously undergone adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy for resected early stage pancreatic cancer. The rise in CA 19-9 might be due to delayed radiation-induced inflammation related to previous intra-abdominal radiation therapy with or without radiation recall induced by gemcitabine. After treatment with corticosteroids the CA 19-9 level decreased to normal, and the patient has not developed any evidence of recurrent cancer to date. PMID:27306770

  19. The Lewis-Y carbohydrate antigen is expressed by many human tumors and can serve as a target for genetically redirected T cells despite the presence of soluble antigen in serum.

    PubMed

    Westwood, Jennifer A; Murray, William K; Trivett, Melanie; Haynes, Nicole M; Solomon, Benjamin; Mileshkin, Linda; Ball, David; Michael, Michael; Burman, Angela; Mayura-Guru, Preethi; Trapani, Joseph A; Peinert, Stefan; Hönemann, Dirk; Miles Prince, H; Scott, Andrew M; Smyth, Mark J; Darcy, Phillip K; Kershaw, Michael H

    2009-04-01

    In this study we aimed to determine the suitability of the Lewis-Y carbohydrate antigen as a target for immunotherapy using genetically redirected T cells. Using the 3S193 monoclonal antibody and immunohistochemistry, Lewis-Y was found to be expressed on a range of tumors including 42% squamous cell lung carcinoma, 80% lung adenocarcinoma, 25% ovarian carcinoma, and 25% colorectal adenocarcinoma. Expression levels varied from low to intense on between 1% and 90% of tumor cells. Lewis- was also found in soluble form in sera from both normal donors and cancer patients using a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum levels in patients was often less than 1 ng/mL, similar to normal donors, but approximately 30% of patients had soluble Lewis-Y levels exceeding 1 ng/mL and up to 9 ng/mL. Lewis-Y-specific human T cells were generated by genetic modification with a chimeric receptor encoding a single-chain humanized antibody linked to the T-cell signaling molecules, T-cell receptor-zeta, and CD28. T cells responded against the Lewis-Y antigen by cytokine secretion and cytolysis in response to tumor cells. Importantly, the T-cell response was not inhibited by patient serum containing soluble Lewis-Y. This study demonstrates that Lewis-Y is expressed on a large number of tumors and Lewis-Y-specific T cells can retain antitumor function in the presence of patient serum, indicating that this antigen is a suitable target for this form of therapy.

  20. Urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma with concurrent plasmacytoid and micropapillary differentiations: A report of two cases with an emphasis on serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9.

    PubMed

    Makise, Naohiro; Morikawa, Teppei; Takeshima, Yuta; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Homma, Yukio; Fukayama, Masashi

    2015-09-01

    We report two cases of urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma (UC). In both, histological examination of a transurethral resection specimen of the bladder tumor revealed UC with plasmacytoid and micropapillary differentiations. In Case 1, residual plasmacytoid UC deeply invaded the extravesical fat tissue of the radical cystectomy specimen, and metastatic carcinoma was found in almost all the dissected lymph nodes. Despite adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the patient died 25 months postdiagnosis. Elevated serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) returned to near normal levels after radical cystectomy, but they increased shortly before death. In Case 2, no residual carcinoma was found in the radical cystectomy specimen or lymph nodes. Postoperative serum CA19-9 was maintained at normal levels, and the patient remains alive without recurrence or metastasis. Although plasmacytoid and micropapillary UC are known aggressive variants of UC, plasmacytoid UC may be more aggressive. Serum CA19-9 could serve as a useful biomarker to monitor progression of plasmacytoid UC.

  1. Novel redox species polyaniline derivative-Au/Pt as sensing platform for label-free electrochemical immunoassay of carbohydrate antigen 199.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyuan; Shan, Jiao; Feng, Feng; Ma, Zhanfang

    2016-03-10

    A novel electrochemical redox-active nanocomposite was synthesized by a one-pot method using N,N'-diphenyl-p-phenylediamine as monomer, and HAuCl4 and K2PtCl4 as co-oxidizing agents. The as-prepared poly(N,N'-diphenyl-p-phenylediamine)-Au/Pt exhibited admirable electrochemical redox activity at 0.15 V, excellent H2O2 electrocatalytic ability and favorable electron transfer ability. Based on these, the evaluation of the composite as sensing substrate for label-free electrochemical immunosensing to the sensitive detection of carbohydrate antigen 199 was described. This technique proved to be a prospective detection tool with a wide liner range from 0.001 U mL(-1) to 40 U mL(-1), and a low detection limit of 2.3 × 10(-4) U mL(-1) (S/N = 3). In addition, this method was used for the analysis of human serum sample, and good agreement was obtained between the values and those of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, implying the potential application in clinical research. Importantly, the strategy of the present substrate could be extended to other polymer-based nanocomposites such as polypyrrole derivatives or polythiophene derivatives, and this could be of great significance for the electrochemical immunoassay.

  2. Novel redox species polyaniline derivative-Au/Pt as sensing platform for label-free electrochemical immunoassay of carbohydrate antigen 199.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyuan; Shan, Jiao; Feng, Feng; Ma, Zhanfang

    2016-03-10

    A novel electrochemical redox-active nanocomposite was synthesized by a one-pot method using N,N'-diphenyl-p-phenylediamine as monomer, and HAuCl4 and K2PtCl4 as co-oxidizing agents. The as-prepared poly(N,N'-diphenyl-p-phenylediamine)-Au/Pt exhibited admirable electrochemical redox activity at 0.15 V, excellent H2O2 electrocatalytic ability and favorable electron transfer ability. Based on these, the evaluation of the composite as sensing substrate for label-free electrochemical immunosensing to the sensitive detection of carbohydrate antigen 199 was described. This technique proved to be a prospective detection tool with a wide liner range from 0.001 U mL(-1) to 40 U mL(-1), and a low detection limit of 2.3 × 10(-4) U mL(-1) (S/N = 3). In addition, this method was used for the analysis of human serum sample, and good agreement was obtained between the values and those of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, implying the potential application in clinical research. Importantly, the strategy of the present substrate could be extended to other polymer-based nanocomposites such as polypyrrole derivatives or polythiophene derivatives, and this could be of great significance for the electrochemical immunoassay. PMID:26893092

  3. Aire-dependent thymic development of tumor-associated regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Malchow, Sven; Leventhal, Daniel S; Nishi, Saki; Fischer, Benjamin I; Shen, Lynn; Paner, Gladell P; Amit, Ayelet S; Kang, Chulho; Geddes, Jenna E; Allison, James P; Socci, Nicholas D; Savage, Peter A

    2013-03-01

    Despite considerable interest in the modulation of tumor-associated Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (T(regs)) for therapeutic benefit, little is known about the developmental origins of these cells and the nature of the antigens that they recognize. We identified an endogenous population of antigen-specific T(regs) (termed MJ23 T(regs)) found recurrently enriched in the tumors of mice with oncogene-driven prostate cancer. MJ23 T(regs) were not reactive to a tumor-specific antigen but instead recognized a prostate-associated antigen that was present in tumor-free mice. MJ23 T(regs) underwent autoimmune regulator (Aire)-dependent thymic development in both male and female mice. Thus, Aire-mediated expression of peripheral tissue antigens drives the thymic development of a subset of organ-specific T(regs), which are likely coopted by tumors developing within the associated organ.

  4. Aire-dependent thymic development of tumor-associated regulatory T cells*

    PubMed Central

    Malchow, Sven; Leventhal, Daniel S.; Nishi, Saki; Fischer, Benjamin I.; Shen, Lynn; Paner, Gladell P.; Amit, Ayelet S.; Kang, Chulho; Geddes, Jenna E.; Allison, James P.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Savage, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable interest in the modulation of tumor-associated Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) for therapeutic benefit, little is known about the developmental origins of these cells and the nature of the antigens that they recognize. Here, we identified an endogenous population of antigen-specific Tregs (termed “MJ23” Tregs) found recurrently enriched in the tumors of mice with oncogene-driven prostate cancer. MJ23 Tregs were not reactive to a tumor-specific antigen, but instead recognized a prostate-associated antigen that was present in tumor-free mice. MJ23 Tregs underwent Aire-dependent thymic development in both male and female mice. Thus Aire-mediated expression of peripheral tissue antigens drives the thymic development of a subset of organ-specific Tregs, which are likely co-opted by tumors developing within the associated organ. PMID:23471412

  5. Silver-functionalized g-C3N4 nanohybrids as signal-transduction tags for electrochemical immunoassay of human carbohydrate antigen 19-9.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ai-Li; Qi, Qing-An

    2016-07-21

    A simple and feasible electrochemical immunosensing platform was developed for highly efficient screening of a disease-related protein (human carbohydrate antigen 19-9, CA 19-9 used in this case) using silver-functionalized g-C3N4 nanosheets (Ag/g-C3N4) as signal-transduction tags. Initially, Ag/g-C3N4 nanohybrids were synthesized by combining thermal polymerization of the melamine precursor with the photo-assisted reduction method. Thereafter, the as-synthesized Ag/g-C3N4 nanohybrids were utilized for the labeling of the anti-CA 19-9 detection antibody by using a typical carbodiimide coupling method. The assay was carried out on a capture antibody-modified glassy carbon electrode in a sandwich-type detection mode. The detectable signal mainly derived from the voltammetric characteristics of the immobilized nanosilver particles on the g-C3N4 nanosheets within the applied potentials. Under the optimal conditions, the voltammetric peak currents increased with the increasing amount of target CA 19-9, and exhibited a wide linear range from 5.0 mU mL(-1) to 50 U mL(-1) with a detection limit of 1.2 mU mL(-1). Our strategy also displayed good reproducibility, precision and specificity. The results of the analysis of clinical serum specimens were in good accordance with the results obtained by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. The newly developed immunosensing system is promising for enzyme-free and cost-effective analysis of low-abundance proteins. PMID:27183220

  6. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dot-Labeled Lateral Flow Strips for Rapid and Quantitative Detection of Gastric Cancer Carbohydrate Antigen 72-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xinyu; Wang, Kan; Lu, Wenting; Qin, Weijian; Cui, Daxiang; He, Jinghua

    2016-03-01

    Carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA72-4) is an important biomarker associated closely with diagnosis and prognosis of early gastric cancer. How to realize quick, sensitive, specific, and quantitative detection of CA72-4 in clinical specimens has become a great requirement. Herein, we reported a CdSe/ZnS quantum dot-labeled lateral flow test strip combined with a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based reader was developed for rapid, sensitive, and quantitative detection of CA72-4. Two mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against CA72-4 were employed. One of them was coated as a test line, while another mAb was labeled with quantum dots and coated onto conjugate pad. The goat anti-mouse IgG was immobilized as a control line. After sample was added, a sandwich structure was formed with CA72-4 and these two mAbs. The fluorescent signal from quantum dots (QD)-labeled mAb in sandwich structure was related to the amount of detected CA72-4. A CCD-based reader was used to realize quantitative detection of CA72-4. Results showed that developed QD-labeled lateral flow strips to detect CA72-4 biomarker with the sensitivity of 2 IU/mL and 10 min detection time. One hundred sera samples from clinical patients with gastric cancer and healthy people were used to confirm specificity of this strip method; results showed that established strip method own 100 % reproducibility and 100 % specificity compared with Roche electrochemiluminescence assay results. In conclusion, CdSe/ZnS quantum dot-labeled lateral flow strips for detection of CA72-4 could realize rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of clinical samples and could own great potential in clinical translation in near future.

  7. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dot-Labeled Lateral Flow Strips for Rapid and Quantitative Detection of Gastric Cancer Carbohydrate Antigen 72-4.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xinyu; Wang, Kan; Lu, Wenting; Qin, Weijian; Cui, Daxiang; He, Jinghua

    2016-12-01

    Carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA72-4) is an important biomarker associated closely with diagnosis and prognosis of early gastric cancer. How to realize quick, sensitive, specific, and quantitative detection of CA72-4 in clinical specimens has become a great requirement. Herein, we reported a CdSe/ZnS quantum dot-labeled lateral flow test strip combined with a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based reader was developed for rapid, sensitive, and quantitative detection of CA72-4. Two mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against CA72-4 were employed. One of them was coated as a test line, while another mAb was labeled with quantum dots and coated onto conjugate pad. The goat anti-mouse IgG was immobilized as a control line. After sample was added, a sandwich structure was formed with CA72-4 and these two mAbs. The fluorescent signal from quantum dots (QD)-labeled mAb in sandwich structure was related to the amount of detected CA72-4. A CCD-based reader was used to realize quantitative detection of CA72-4. Results showed that developed QD-labeled lateral flow strips to detect CA72-4 biomarker with the sensitivity of 2 IU/mL and 10 min detection time. One hundred sera samples from clinical patients with gastric cancer and healthy people were used to confirm specificity of this strip method; results showed that established strip method own 100 % reproducibility and 100 % specificity compared with Roche electrochemiluminescence assay results. In conclusion, CdSe/ZnS quantum dot-labeled lateral flow strips for detection of CA72-4 could realize rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of clinical samples and could own great potential in clinical translation in near future. PMID:26969591

  8. Pretreatment Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 Level Indicates Tumor Response, Early Distant Metastasis, Overall Survival, and Therapeutic Selection in Localized and Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Tae; Lee, Woo Jin; Woo, Sang Myung; Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae; Moon, Sung Ho; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Sang Soo; Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Joong-Won

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The use of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer has been disputed because of high probability of distant metastasis. Thus, we analyzed the effect of clinical parameters on tumor response, early distant metastasis within 3 months (DM{sup 3m}), and overall survival to identify an indicator for selecting patients who would benefit from CRT. Methods and Materials: This study retrospectively analyzed the data from 84 patients with localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer who underwent CRT between August 2002 and October 2009. Sex, age, tumor size, histological differentiation, N classification, pre- and post-treatment carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 level, and CA 19-9 percent decrease were analyzed to identify risk factors associated with tumor response, DM{sup 3m}, and overall survival. Results: For all 84 patients, the median survival time was 12.5 months (range, 2-31.9 months), objective response (complete response or partial response) to CRT was observed in 28 patients (33.3%), and DM{sup 3m} occurred in 24 patients (28.6%). Multivariate analysis showed that pretreatment CA 19-9 level ({<=}400 vs. >400 U/ml) was significantly associated with tumor response (45.1% vs. 15.2%), DM{sup 3m} (19.6% vs. 42.4%), and median overall survival time (15.1 vs. 9.7 months) (p < 0.05 for all three parameters). Conclusion: For patients with localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer, pretreatment CA 19-9 level could be helpful in predicting tumor response, DM{sup 3m}, and overall survival and identifying patients who will benefit from CRT.

  9. A novel sandwich electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 based on immobilizing luminol on Ag@BSA core/shell microspheres.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Amin; Xiang, Hongkun; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Weiwei; Yuan, Enhui; Huang, Chusen; Jia, Nengqin

    2016-01-15

    A novel sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence immunosensor based on immobilizing luminol on Ag@BSA core/shell microspheres (Ag@BSA-luminol) for ultrasensitive detection of tumor marker carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) has been developed. Herein, magnetic carbon nanotubes (MAGCNTs) decorated with polyethylenimine (PEI) was used to construct the base of the immunosensor. MAGCNTs with prominent electrical conductivity and high surface area could be beneficial for promoting the electron transfer and loading plenty of primary antibodies (Ab1) via glutaraldehyde (GA). Meanwhile, the magnetic property of MAGCNTs makes it easy to be attached to the surface of magnetic glass carbon electrode (MGCE) through magnetism interaction, which provides an outstanding platform for this immunosensor. Moreover, Ag@BSA microspheres with large surface area, good stability, and excellent biocompatibility were desirable candidates for effective cross-link of CA19-9 detection antibodies (Ab2). A more interesting thing was that ELISA color reaction was used as an ultrasensitive strategy for identifying Ab2 was successfully coated on Ag@BSA with the naked eye. Additionally, we immobilized the luminol on the surface of Ag@BSA to prepare the target immunosensor. Immobilization of luminol on the surface of Ag@BSA could decrease the distance between luminophores and the electrode surface, leading to great enhancement of the ECL intensity of luminol in the present of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Under the optimal conditions, the intensity of the ECL immunosensor increased linearly with the logarithm of CA19-9 concentration in a wide linear range from 0.0005 to 150UmL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.0002UmL(-1) (S/N=3). All the results suggested the prepared CA19-9 immunosensor displayed high sensitivity, excellent stability and good specificity. The developed method opened a new avenue to clinical bioassay.

  10. Silver-functionalized g-C3N4 nanohybrids as signal-transduction tags for electrochemical immunoassay of human carbohydrate antigen 19-9.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ai-Li; Qi, Qing-An

    2016-07-21

    A simple and feasible electrochemical immunosensing platform was developed for highly efficient screening of a disease-related protein (human carbohydrate antigen 19-9, CA 19-9 used in this case) using silver-functionalized g-C3N4 nanosheets (Ag/g-C3N4) as signal-transduction tags. Initially, Ag/g-C3N4 nanohybrids were synthesized by combining thermal polymerization of the melamine precursor with the photo-assisted reduction method. Thereafter, the as-synthesized Ag/g-C3N4 nanohybrids were utilized for the labeling of the anti-CA 19-9 detection antibody by using a typical carbodiimide coupling method. The assay was carried out on a capture antibody-modified glassy carbon electrode in a sandwich-type detection mode. The detectable signal mainly derived from the voltammetric characteristics of the immobilized nanosilver particles on the g-C3N4 nanosheets within the applied potentials. Under the optimal conditions, the voltammetric peak currents increased with the increasing amount of target CA 19-9, and exhibited a wide linear range from 5.0 mU mL(-1) to 50 U mL(-1) with a detection limit of 1.2 mU mL(-1). Our strategy also displayed good reproducibility, precision and specificity. The results of the analysis of clinical serum specimens were in good accordance with the results obtained by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. The newly developed immunosensing system is promising for enzyme-free and cost-effective analysis of low-abundance proteins.

  11. A novel sandwich electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 based on immobilizing luminol on Ag@BSA core/shell microspheres.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Amin; Xiang, Hongkun; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Weiwei; Yuan, Enhui; Huang, Chusen; Jia, Nengqin

    2016-01-15

    A novel sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence immunosensor based on immobilizing luminol on Ag@BSA core/shell microspheres (Ag@BSA-luminol) for ultrasensitive detection of tumor marker carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) has been developed. Herein, magnetic carbon nanotubes (MAGCNTs) decorated with polyethylenimine (PEI) was used to construct the base of the immunosensor. MAGCNTs with prominent electrical conductivity and high surface area could be beneficial for promoting the electron transfer and loading plenty of primary antibodies (Ab1) via glutaraldehyde (GA). Meanwhile, the magnetic property of MAGCNTs makes it easy to be attached to the surface of magnetic glass carbon electrode (MGCE) through magnetism interaction, which provides an outstanding platform for this immunosensor. Moreover, Ag@BSA microspheres with large surface area, good stability, and excellent biocompatibility were desirable candidates for effective cross-link of CA19-9 detection antibodies (Ab2). A more interesting thing was that ELISA color reaction was used as an ultrasensitive strategy for identifying Ab2 was successfully coated on Ag@BSA with the naked eye. Additionally, we immobilized the luminol on the surface of Ag@BSA to prepare the target immunosensor. Immobilization of luminol on the surface of Ag@BSA could decrease the distance between luminophores and the electrode surface, leading to great enhancement of the ECL intensity of luminol in the present of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Under the optimal conditions, the intensity of the ECL immunosensor increased linearly with the logarithm of CA19-9 concentration in a wide linear range from 0.0005 to 150UmL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.0002UmL(-1) (S/N=3). All the results suggested the prepared CA19-9 immunosensor displayed high sensitivity, excellent stability and good specificity. The developed method opened a new avenue to clinical bioassay. PMID:26319163

  12. Counting carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    Carb counting; Carbohydrate-controlled diet; Diabetic diet; Diabetes-counting carbohydrates ... Many foods contain carbohydrates (carbs), including: Fruit and fruit juice Cereal, bread, pasta, and rice Milk and milk products, soy milk Beans, legumes, ...

  13. Endocrine tumors associated with the vagus nerve.

    PubMed

    Varoquaux, Arthur; Kebebew, Electron; Sebag, Fréderic; Wolf, Katherine; Henry, Jean-François; Pacak, Karel; Taïeb, David

    2016-09-01

    The vagus nerve (cranial nerve X) is the main nerve of the parasympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system. Vagal paragangliomas (VPGLs) are a prime example of an endocrine tumor associated with the vagus nerve. This rare, neural crest tumor constitutes the second most common site of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs), most often in relation to mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit D (SDHD) gene. The treatment paradigm for VPGL has progressively shifted from surgery to abstention or therapeutic radiation with curative-like outcomes. Parathyroid tissue and parathyroid adenoma can also be found in close association with the vagus nerve in intra or paravagal situations. Vagal parathyroid adenoma can be identified with preoperative imaging or suspected intraoperatively by experienced surgeons. Vagal parathyroid adenomas located in the neck or superior mediastinum can be removed via initial cervicotomy, while those located in the aortopulmonary window require a thoracic approach. This review particularly emphasizes the embryology, molecular genetics, and modern imaging of these tumors. PMID:27406876

  14. Composite Tumor Associating Trichoblastoma and Seborrheic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Seung-Hee; Sim, Woo-Young

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis is a common benign epidermal tumor histologically composed of basaloid and squamous cells. It mainly occurs on the face, scalp, and trunk, and presents clinically as a well-circumscribed, brownish to black papule, nodule, or plaque. Trichoblastoma is a relatively rare benign, slow-growing tumor showing differentiation toward the primitive hair follicle. It clinically manifests as a solitary, skin to erythematous colored, well-circumscribed dermal nodule located predominantly on the head and neck with a predilection for the scalp. Histologically, a well-demarcated mass of follicular germinative cells that show various degrees of differentiation, arranged in lobules, sheets, and nests, is located in the dermis or subcutaneous fat layer. We report the case of a 28-year-old female patient with a solitary, 2.0×4.0-cm black plaque with a 0.7-cm skin-colored nodule on the scalp. Histologically, the entire black plaque had prominent hyperkeratosis, acanthosis, and papillomatosis with horn cysts. The central nodule showed well-circumscribed, various-sized dermal tumor lobules without a connection to the overlying epidermis. The lobular aggregation was composed of numerous basaloid epithelial nests and multiple primitive papillary structures with distinct peripheral palisading of nuclei. According to these findings, the scalp lesion was diagnosed as a composite tumor associating trichoblastoma and seborrheic keratosis. PMID:26512175

  15. Tumor Associated Macrophages in Kidney Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleva, Olga V.; Samoilova, Daria V.; Shitova, Maria S.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are an important element of tumor stroma. They originate from blood monocytes attracted by chemokines and cytokines produced by tumor cells and, being instructed by tumor microenvironment, develop into potent tumor-supporting cell population. TAMs were demonstrated to directly stimulate tumor cell proliferation and to promote angiogenesis. Further TAMs provide for efficient immune escape by producing immunosuppressive cytokines and facilitate tumor dissemination by producing extracellular matrix remodeling enzymes. In renal cell carcinoma (RCC), numerous studies were performed for elucidation of the role of TAM in tumor progression. Using pan-macrophages marker CD68 and type 2 macrophage (M2) markers CD163 and CD206, it was demonstrated that increased density of TAMs is associated with poor survival of patients. Although most of the studies are focused on M2 population in RCC, several markers rather typical for type 1 macrophages (M1) were also characterized. Macrophages isolated from RCC tumors were shown to produce proinflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and CCL2. It can be concluded that RCC is an excellent example of a tumor with hybrid phenotype of TAMs that share both M1 and M2 properties. Moreover, TAMs seem to be an attractive therapeutic target as well. Further investigations are needed for identification of RCC-specific TAM markers with high predictive capacity and/or suitable for therapeutic targeting. PMID:27807511

  16. Endocrine tumors associated with the vagusnerve

    PubMed Central

    Varoquaux, Arthur; Kebebew, Electron; Sebag, Fréderic; Wolf, Katherine; Henry, Jean-François; Pacak, Karel; Taïeb, David

    2016-01-01

    The vagus nerve (cranial nerve X) is the main nerve of the parasympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system. Vagal paragangliomas (VPGLs) are a prime example of an endocrine tumor associated with the vagus nerve. This rare, neural-crest tumor constitutes the second most common site of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs), most often in relation to mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase subunit D (SDHD) gene. The treatment paradigm for VPGL has progressively shifted from surgery to abstention or therapeutic radiation with curative-like outcomes. Parathyroid tissue and parathyroid adenoma can also be found in close association with the vagus nerve in intra or paravagal situations. Vagal parathyroid adenoma can be identified with preoperative imaging or suspected intraoperatively by experienced surgeons. Vagal parathyroid adenomas located in the neck or superior mediastinum can be removed via initial cervicotomy, while those located in the aorto-pulmonary window require a thoracic approach. This review particularly emphasizes the embryology, molecular genetics, and modern imaging of these tumors. PMID:27406876

  17. The entirely carbohydrate immunogen Tn-PS A1 induces a cancer cell selective immune response and cytokine IL-17.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Ravindra A; Appulage, Dananjaya K; Pietraszkiewicz, Halina; Bobbitt, Kevin R; Media, Joe; Shaw, JiaJiu; Valeriote, Fred A; Andreana, Peter R

    2012-04-01

    The tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen/hapten Thomsen-nouveau (Tn; a-D-GalpNAc-ONH2) was conjugated to a zwitterionic capsular polysaccharide, PS A1, from commensal anaerobe Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 25285/NCTC 9343 for the development of an entirely carbohydrate cancer vaccine construct and probed for immunogenicity. This communication discloses that murine anti-Tn IgG3 antibodies both bind to and recognize human tumor cells that display the Tn hapten. Furthermore, the sera from immunization of mice with Tn-PS A1 contain cytokine interleukin 17 (IL-17A), which is known to possess anti-tumor function and represents a striking difference to an IL-2, and IL-6 profile obtained with anti-PS A1 sera.

  18. The entirely carbohydrate immunogen Tn-PS A1 induces a cancer cell selective immune response and cytokine IL-17

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Ravindra A.; Appulage, Dananjaya K.; Pietraszkiewicz, Halina; Bobbitt, Kevin R.; Media, Joe; Shaw, JiaJiu; Valeriote, Fred A.

    2012-01-01

    The tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen/hapten Thomsen-nouveau (Tn; α-D-GalpNAc-ONH2) was conjugated to a zwitterionic capsular polysaccharide, PS A1, from commensal anaerobe Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 25285/NCTC 9343 for the development of an entirely carbohydrate cancer vaccine construct and probed for immunogenicity. This communication discloses that murine anti-Tn IgG3 antibodies both bind to and recognize human tumor cells that display the Tn hapten. Furthermore, the sera from immunization of mice with Tn-PS A1 contain cytokine interleukin 17 (IL-17A), which is known to possess anti-tumor function and represents a striking difference to an IL-2, and IL-6 profile obtained with anti-PS A1 sera. PMID:22297566

  19. [Recent advance in carbohydrate-based cancer vaccines].

    PubMed

    Huo, Chang-Xin; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2012-03-01

    The abnormal glycans expressing on the surface of tumor cells are good targets to develop carbohydrate-based anti-cancer vaccines. However, one of the major problems is that carbohydrate antigens possess weak immunogenicity. This review summarizes the recent efforts to overcome this problem: glycoconjugates produced by coupling the carbohydrate antigens and proper carrier proteins improve their immunogenicity, many glycoconjugates have entered clinical trials; the vaccines become chemically well-defined when coupling the carbohydrate antigens with a T-cell peptide epitope and an immunostimulant to form fully synthetic multi-component glycoconjugate vaccines; the modification of carbohydrate antigens in combination with the technology of metabolic oligosaccharide engineering of tumor cells induces a strong immune response; and the fact that the antibodies elicited against the unnatural carbohydrate antigens can recognize the native carbohydrate antigens on tumor cells provides a new promising strategy for the development of anti-cancer vaccines.

  20. Bioengineering T cells to target carbohydrate to treat opportunistic fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Kumaresan, Pappanaicken R.; Manuri, Pallavi R.; Albert, Nathaniel D.; Maiti, Sourindra; Singh, Harjeet; Mi, Tiejuan; Roszik, Jason; Rabinovich, Brian; Olivares, Simon; Krishnamurthy, Janani; Zhang, Ling; Najjar, Amer M.; Huls, M. Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Champlin, Richard E.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical-grade T cells are genetically modified ex vivo to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) to redirect their specificity to target tumor-associated antigens in vivo. We now have developed this molecular strategy to render cytotoxic T cells specific for fungi. We adapted the pattern-recognition receptor Dectin-1 to activate T cells via chimeric CD28 and CD3-ζ (designated “D-CAR”) upon binding with carbohydrate in the cell wall of Aspergillus germlings. T cells genetically modified with the Sleeping Beauty system to express D-CAR stably were propagated selectively on artificial activating and propagating cells using an approach similar to that approved by the Food and Drug Administration for manufacturing CD19-specific CAR+ T cells for clinical trials. The D-CAR+ T cells exhibited specificity for β-glucan which led to damage and inhibition of hyphal growth of Aspergillus in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of D-CAR+ T cells with steroids did not compromise antifungal activity significantly. These data support the targeting of carbohydrate antigens by CAR+ T cells and provide a clinically appealing strategy to enhance immunity for opportunistic fungal infections using T-cell gene therapy. PMID:25002471

  1. Antibody induction directed against the tumor-associated MUC4 glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hui; Palitzsch, Björn; Hartmann, Sebastian; Stergiou, Natascha; Kunz, Horst; Schmitt, Edgar; Westerlind, Ulrika

    2015-04-13

    Mucin glycoproteins are important diagnostic and therapeutic targets for cancer treatment. Although several strategies have been developed to explore anti-tumor vaccines based on MUC1 glycopeptides, only few studies have focused on vaccines directed against the tumor-associated MUC4 glycoprotein. MUC4 is an important tumor marker overexpressed in lung cancer and uniquely expressed in pancreatic ductual adenocarcinoma. The aberrant glycosylation of MUC4 in tumor cells results in an exposure of its peptide backbone and the formation of tumor-associated glycopeptide antigens. Due to the low immunogenicity of these endogenous structures, their conjugation with immune stimulating peptide or protein carriers are required. In this study, MUC4 tandem-repeat glycopeptides were conjugated to the tetanus toxoid and used for vaccination of mice. Immunological evaluations showed that our MUC4-based vaccines induced very strong antigen-specific immune responses. In addition, antibody binding epitope analysis on glycopeptide microarrays, were demonstrating a clear glycosylation site dependence of the induced antibodies.

  2. Carbohydrate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemiller, James N.

    Carbohydrates are important in foods as a major source of energy, to impart crucial textural properties, and as dietary fiber which influences physiological processes. Digestible carbohydrates, which are converted into monosaccharides, which are absorbed, provide metabolic energy. Worldwide, carbohydrates account for more than 70% of the caloric value of the human diet. It is recommended that all persons should limit calories from fat (the other significant source) to not more than 30% and that most of the carbohydrate calories should come from starch. Nondigestible polysaccharides (all those other than starch) comprise the major portion of dietary fiber (Sect. 10.5). Carbohydrates also contribute other attributes, including bulk, body, viscosity, stability to emulsions and foams, water-holding capacity, freeze-thaw stability, browning, flavors, aromas, and a range of desirable textures (from crispness to smooth, soft gels). They also provide satiety. Basic carbohydrate structures, chemistry, and terminology can be found in references (1, 2).

  3. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  4. Simian Virus 40 Large-T-Antigen-Specific Rejection of mKSA Tumor Cells in BALB/c Mice Is Critically Dependent on both Strictly Tumor-Associated, Tumor-Specific CD8+ Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes and CD4+ T Helper Cells

    PubMed Central

    Utermöhlen, Olaf; Schulze-Garg, Christine; Warnecke, Gabriele; Gugel, Roland; Löhler, Jürgen; Deppert, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    Protective immunity of BALB/c mice immunized with simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (TAg) against SV40-transformed, TAg-expressing mKSA tumor cells is critically dependent on both CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes. By depleting mice of T-cell subsets at different times before and after tumor challenge, we found that at all times, CD4+ and CD8+ cells both were equally important in establishing and maintaining a protective immune response. CD4+ cells do not contribute to tumor eradication by directly lysing mKSA cells. However, CD4+ lymphocytes provide help to CD8+ cells to proliferate and to mature into fully active cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Depletion of CD4+ cells by a single injection of CD4-specific monoclonal antibody at any time from directly before injection of the vaccinating antigen to up to 7 days after tumor challenge inhibited the generation of cytolytic CD8+ lymphocytes. T helper cells in this system secrete the typical Th-1 cytokines interleukin 2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon. Because in this system TAg-specific CD8+ cells secrete only minute amounts of IL-2, it appears that T helper cells provide these cytokines for CD8+ T cells. Moreover, this helper effect of CD4+ T cells in mKSA tumor rejection in BALB/c mice does not simply improve the activity of TAg-specific CD8+ CTL but actually enables them to mature into cytolytic effector cells. Beyond this activity, the presence of T helper cells is necessary even in the late phase of tumor cell rejection in order to maintain protective immunity. However, despite the support of CD4+ T helper cells, the tumor-specific CTL response is so weak that only at the site of tumor cell inoculation and not in the spleen or in the regional lymph nodes can TAg-specific CTL be detected. PMID:11602701

  5. [Carbohydrates in clinical nutrition].

    PubMed

    Lysikov, Iu A

    2013-01-01

    The article presents data on role of carbohydrate in clinical nutrition. The review described carbohydrate metabolism, hormonal regulation of carbohydrate, carbohydrate energy source role, carbohydrate requirements in critical study.

  6. Novel glycosaminoglycan biosynthetic inhibitors affect tumor-associated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Karthik; Ninomiya, Masayuki; Nguyen, Thao Kim Nu; Tsuzuki, Yasuhiro; Koketsu, Mamoru; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2011-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are essential players in several steps of tumor-associated angiogenesis. As co-receptors for several pro-angiogenic factors such as VEGF and FGF, HSPGs regulate receptor-ligand interactions and play a vital role in signal transduction. Previously, we have employed an enzymatic strategy to show the importance of cell surface HSPGs in endothelial tube formation in vitro. We have recently found several fluoro-xylosides that can selectively inhibit proteoglycan synthesis in endothelial cells. The current study demonstrates that these fluoro-xylosides are effective inhibitors of endothelial tube formation in vitro using a matrigel based assay to simulate tumor-associated angiogenesis. These first generation scaffolds offer a promising stepping-stone to the discovery of more potent fluoro-xylosides that can effectively neutralize tumor growth. PMID:21094131

  7. Compromised GABAergic inhibition contributes to tumor-associated epilepsy.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Georgina; O'Toole, Kate K; Moss, Stephen J; Maguire, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common form of primary brain tumor with 30-50% of patients presenting with epilepsy. These tumor-associated seizures are often resistant to traditional antiepileptic drug treatment and persist after tumor resection. This suggests that changes in the peritumoral tissue underpin epileptogenesis. It is known that glioma cells extrude pathological concentrations of glutamate which is thought to play a role in tumor progression and the development of epilepsy. Given that pathological concentrations of glutamate have been shown to dephosphorylate and downregulate the potassium chloride cotransporter KCC2, we hypothesized that glioma-induced alterations in KCC2 in the peritumoral region may play a role in tumor-associated epilepsy. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observe a decrease in total KCC2 expression and a dephosphorylation of KCC2 at residue Ser940 in a glioma model which exhibits hyperexcitability and the development of spontaneous seizures. To determine whether the reduction of KCC2 could potentially contribute to tumor-associated epilepsy, we generated mice with a focal knockdown of KCC2 by injecting AAV2-Cre-GFP into the cortex of floxed KCC2 mice. The AAV2-Cre-mediated knockdown of KCC2 was sufficient to induce the development of spontaneous seizures. Further, blocking NKCC1 with bumetanide to offset the loss of KCC2 reduced the seizure susceptibility in glioma-implanted mice. These findings support a mechanism of tumor-associated epilepsy involving downregulation of KCC2 in the peritumoral region leading to compromised GABAergic inhibition and suggest that modulating chloride homeostasis may be useful for seizure control. PMID:27513374

  8. Extra-abdominal desmoid tumors associated with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Calvert, George T; Monument, Michael J; Burt, Randall W; Jones, Kevin B; Randall, R Lor

    2012-01-01

    Extra-abdominal desmoid tumors are a significant cause of morbidity in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome. Understanding of the basic biology and natural history of these tumors has increased substantially over the past decade. Accordingly, medical and surgical management of desmoid tumors has also evolved. This paper analyzes recent evidence pertaining to the epidemiology, molecular biology, histopathology, screening, and treatment of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors associated with familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome.

  9. The clinical utility of normal range carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level as a surrogate marker in evaluating response to treatment in pancreatic cancer-a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Al-Shamsi, Humaid O; Alzahrani, Mohammed; Wolff, Robert A

    2016-06-01

    Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) is a tumor marker that is has been has been intensely studied and investigated as a surrogate marker in pancreatic cancer (PC). It is also commonly utilized in the clinical management of PC. We report two cases where normal range CA 19-9 level has been shown to be useful as a surrogate marker for following PC progression and response to treatment. Initially in our cases, both patients had a resectable tumor and their tumor markers were within normal range. In both cases the normal range CA 19-9 increase from the baseline was associated with corresponding progressive disease on imaging studies and CA 19-9 decline was in keeping with response to systemic and local therapy despite being within the normal range. To our knowledge, this is the first case report where we report the utility of serial normal values of CA 19-9 as a useful tool in following PC disease activity and in response to treatment. Clinicians should consider measuring serial normal values of CA 19-9 in patients with PC and normal range CA 19-9 which may help in assessing response to treatment in subset of this population.

  10. Healthy carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional foods include dietary fiber consisting of health-promoting carbohydrates. We have produced novel prebiotics from orange peel and observed that they extend the shelf life of probiotic bacteria in synbiotics. Some pectic-oligosaccharides and xyloglucan-oligosaccharides also have anti-adhesi...

  11. Moving a Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptide into the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Makhoul, Issam; Hutchins, Laura; Emanuel, Peter D; Pennisi, Angela; Siegel, Eric; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs) are broad-spectrum targets for immunotherapy. Immunization with Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides (CMPs) is a strategy to induce broad-spectrum TACA-reactive antibodies hypothesized to interfere with cellular pathways involved in tumor cell survival. A Phase I study was conducted with a first-in-man CMP referred to as P10s, conjugated to the Pan T cell carrier PADRE, along with MONTANIDE™ ISA 51 VG as adjuvant over a course of 5 immunizations. While designed as a safety and tolerability study, the potential for therapeutic impact was observed in a subject with metastatic lesions as evaluated before and after vaccine treatment. The subject received Vinorelbine and Trastuzumab (VT) for two months prior to study eligibility. PET scans showed partial response in the lungs and complete resolution of a previously enlarged subpectoral lymph node. Immunization with P10s vaccine resulted in responses to P10s, with serum and plasma antibodies reactive with and cytotoxic to human breast cancer cells in vitro, including the Trastuzumab-resistant HCC1954 cell line. However, the patient developed cystic masses in the brain parenchyma with no apparent evidence of metastases. The subject was switched to Docetaxel, Pertuzumab and Trastuzumab a year later, and her last PET scan showed a complete response in the lungs and lymph nodes. Incubation of cancer cells with a combination of vaccine-induced serum and docetaxel suggests that the induced antibodies sensitize tumor cells for more efficient killing upon administration of docetaxel. The data suggest that P10s-PADRE induces anti-tumor antibody response that in combination with chemotherapy can affect metastatic lesions in breast cancer patients. PMID:25483513

  12. CTLA4 aptamer delivers STAT3 siRNA to tumor-associated and malignant T cells

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Andreas; Priceman, Saul J.; Kujawski, Maciej; Xin, Hong; Cherryholmes, Gregory A.; Zhang, Wang; Zhang, Chunyan; Lahtz, Christoph; Kowolik, Claudia; Forman, Steve J.; Kortylewski, Marcin; Yu, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular therapeutic targets that define tumor immunosuppression in both tumor cells and T cells remain intractable. Here, we have shown that administration of a covalently linked siRNA to an aptamer (apt) that selectively binds cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA4apt) allows gene silencing in exhausted CD8+ T cells and Tregs in tumors as well as CTLA4-expressing malignant T cells. CTLA4 expression was upregulated in CD8+ T cells in the tumor milieu; therefore, CTLA4apt fused to a STAT3-targeting siRNA (CTLA4apt–STAT3 siRNA) resulted in internalization into tumor-associated CD8+ T cells and silencing of STAT3, which activated tumor antigen–specific T cells in murine models. Both local and systemic administration of CTLA4apt–STAT3 siRNA dramatically reduced tumor-associated Tregs. Furthermore, CTLA4apt–STAT3 siRNA potently inhibited tumor growth and metastasis in various mouse tumor models. Importantly, CTLA4 expression is observed in T cells of patients with blood malignancies, and CTLA4apt–STAT3 siRNA treatment of immunodeficient mice bearing human T cell lymphomas promoted tumor cell apoptosis and tumor growth inhibition. These data demonstrate that a CTLA4apt-based siRNA delivery strategy allows gene silencing in both tumor-associated T cells and tumor cells and inhibits tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:24892807

  13. Learning about Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Learning About Carbohydrates KidsHealth > For Kids > Learning About Carbohydrates Print A ... of energy for the body. Two Types of Carbohydrates There are two major types of carbohydrates (or ...

  14. T Cells Expressing Constitutively Active Akt Resist Multiple Tumor-associated Inhibitory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiali; Dotti, Gianpietro; Huye, Leslie E; Foster, Aaron E; Savoldo, Barbara; Gramatges, Maria M; Spencer, David M; Rooney, Cliona M

    2010-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes has shown promise for the therapy of cancer. However, tumor-specific T cells are susceptible to diverse inhibitory signals from the tumor microenvironment. The Akt/protein kinase B plays a central role in T-cell proliferation, function, and survival and we hypothesized that expression of constitutively active Akt (caAkt) in T cells could provide resistance to many of these tumor-associated inhibitory mechanisms. caAkt expression in activated human T cells increased proliferation and cytokine production, a likely result of their sustained expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and provided resistance to apoptosis by upregulating antiapoptotic molecules. caAkt expressing T cells (caAkt-T-cells) were also relatively resistant to suppression by and conversion into regulatory T cells (Tregs). These characteristics provided a survival advantage to T cells cocultured with tumor cells in vitro; CD3/28-stimulated T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for disialoganglioside (GD2) that redirected their activity to the immunosuppressive, GD2-expressing neuroblastoma cell line, LAN-1, resisted tumor-induced apoptosis when co-expressing transgenic caAkt. In conclusion, caAkt-transduced T cells showed resistance to several evasion strategies employed by tumors and may therefore enhance the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred T lymphocytes. PMID:20842106

  15. Modulation of MUC1 and blood group antigen expression in gastric adenocarcinoma cells by cytokines.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, Georg P M; Schirmacher, Peter; Manzke, Oliver; Hanisch, Franz Georg; Dienes, Hans P; Baldus, Stephan E

    2003-08-01

    Immunohistological studies demonstrated that MUC1 expression in gastric cancer is associated with a poor prognosis. As a mediator of cell-cell interactions, MUC1 may also be involved in metastasis. However, these aspects are of relevance since cytokine levels are locally increased as a consequence of peritumorous inflammatory response and coexisting chronic gastritis. Therefore we analyzed the potential influence of several cytokines on the expression of tumor-associated MUC1 and Lewis blood group antigens in gastric carcinoma cells. Gastric cancer cell lines AGS and KATOIII were incubated with the cytokines interleukin-1beta, interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and hepatocyte growth factor over a period of 72 h. Expressions of mucin antigens and cytokine secretion were measured by immunocytochemistry and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Analysis by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) demonstrated that MUC1 and sialyl Lewis A reactivities of AGS cells were increased significantly following TNF-alpha stimulation but not by other cytokines. Expression of mucin-associated antigens by cell line KATOIII was not affected by any of the employed cytokines. These data provide evidence that TNF-alpha can raise the expression of important mucin peptide as well as mucin-associated carbohydrate antigens and thereby potentially influence the progression of gastric carcinomas. PMID:12906871

  16. Carbohydrate intake.

    PubMed

    Leturque, Armelle; Brot-Laroche, Edith; Le Gall, Maude

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrates represent more than 50% of the energy sources present in most human diets. Sugar intake is regulated by metabolic, neuronal, and hedonic factors, and gene polymorphisms are involved in determining sugar preference. Nutrigenomic adaptations to carbohydrate availability have been evidenced in metabolic diseases, in the persistence of lactose digestion, and in amylase gene copy number. Furthermore, dietary oligosaccharides, fermentable by gut flora, can modulate the microbiotal diversity to the benefit of the host. Genetic diseases linked to mutations in the disaccharidase genes (sucrase-isomaltase, lactase) and in sugar transporter genes (sodium/glucose cotransporter 1, glucose transporters 1 and 2) severely impact carbohydrate intake. These diseases are revealed upon exposure to food containing the offending sugar, and withdrawal of this sugar from the diet prevents disease symptoms, failure to thrive, and premature death. Tailoring the sugar composition of diets to optimize wellness and to prevent the chronic occurrence of metabolic diseases is a future goal that may yet be realized through continued development of nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics approaches. PMID:22656375

  17. Carbohydrates and T cells: a sweet twosome.

    PubMed

    Avci, Fikri Y; Li, Xiangming; Tsuji, Moriya; Kasper, Dennis L

    2013-04-01

    Carbohydrates as T cell-activating antigens have been generating significant interest. For many years, carbohydrates were thought of as T-independent antigens, however, more recent research had demonstrated that mono- or oligosaccharides glycosidically linked to peptides can be recognized by T cells. T cell recognition of these glycopeptides depends on the structure of both peptide and glycan portions of the antigen. Subsequently, it was discovered that natural killer T cells recognized glycolipids when presented by the antigen presenting molecule CD1d. A transformative insight into glycan-recognition by T cells occurred when zwitterionic polysaccharides were discovered to bind to and be presented by MHCII to CD4+ T cells. Based on this latter observation, the role that carbohydrate epitopes generated from glycoconjugate vaccines had in activating helper T cells was explored and it was found that these epitopes are presented to specific carbohydrate recognizing T cells through a unique mechanism. Here we review the key interactions between carbohydrate antigens and the adaptive immune system at the molecular, cellular and systems levels exploring the significant biological implications in health and disease.

  18. 78 FR 50425 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Brachyury Tumor Associated Antigens as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    .... Dr. Jeffrey Schlom et al. at NCI have demonstrated for the first time that a T-box transcription factor and a molecule implicated in EMT, namely the Brachyury protein, appears to be highly expressed...

  19. Novel Tumor-Associated Antigen for Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutics | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute on Aging's Laboratory of Immunology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize the use of SPANX-B-based therapeutic approaches to combat cancers.

  20. Larynx carcinoma regulates tumor-associated macrophages through PLGF signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xu; Qi, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Cancer neovascularization plays an essential role in the metastasis of larynx carcinoma (LC). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not completely understood. Recently, we reported that placental growth factor (PLGF) regulates expression of matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) through ERK/MAPK signaling pathway in LC. Here, we show that MMP9 upregulated in LC, and appeared to be mainly produced by M2 macrophages (tumor-associated macrophages (TAM)). In a transwell co-culture system, PLGF secreted by LC cells triggered macrophage polarization to a TAM subtype that releases MMP9. Moreover, MMP9 was found to be activated in the PLGF-polarized TAM via transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) receptor signaling activation. Furthermore, PLGF in LC cells induced macrophage polarization in vivo, and significantly promoted the growth of LC. Thus, together with our previous work, our study highlights a pivotal role of cross-talk between TAM and LC in regulating the metastasis of LC. PMID:25961789

  1. Tumor-associated macrophages: unwitting accomplices in breast cancer malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Carly Bess; Yeh, Elizabeth S; Soloff, Adam C

    2016-01-01

    Deleterious inflammation is a primary feature of breast cancer. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that macrophages, the most abundant leukocyte population in mammary tumors, have a critical role at each stage of cancer progression. Such tumor-associated macrophages facilitate neoplastic transformation, tumor immune evasion and the subsequent metastatic cascade. Herein, we discuss the dynamic process whereby molecular and cellular features of the tumor microenvironment act to license tissue-repair mechanisms of macrophages, fostering angiogenesis, metastasis and the support of cancer stem cells. We illustrate how tumors induce, then exploit trophic macrophages to subvert innate and adaptive immune responses capable of destroying malignant cells. Finally, we discuss compelling evidence from murine models of cancer and early clinical trials in support of macrophage-targeted intervention strategies with the potential to dramatically reduce breast cancer morbidity and mortality. PMID:26998515

  2. Serum osteocalcin (BGP) in tumor-associated hypercalcemia.

    PubMed

    Body, J J; Cleeren, A; Pot, M; Borkowski, A

    1986-12-01

    Serum osteocalcin (BGP) is a new marker of bone turnover that reportedly evaluates bone formation. Thus, its measurement could assess the bone formation rate in tumor-associated hypercalcemia. We measured concentrations of BGP and other parameters of bone metabolism in 54 untreated hypercalcemic cancer patients as compared to 109 healthy subjects. Primary tumor sites were breast (19), lung (11), head and neck (6), multiple myeloma (3), kidney (2), and various (11) or multiple (2). Mean BGP levels were higher in the hypercalcemic subjects, 4.6 +/- 0.4 (SEM) ng/ml, than in the normal subjects, 3.6 +/- 0.1 ng/ml (p less than .05), and were normalized in the 22 patients who could be reevaluated after successful treatment of hypercalcemia with intravenous aminohydroxypropylidene diphosphonate (APD). There was no correlation of BGP levels with age, sex, or renal function. Compared with the Gaussian distribution in the normal subjects, there was a considerable scatter of the data in hypercalcemic patients, suggesting the existence of defined subgroups with abnormally low or abnormally high values. However, we found no significant relationship of BGP concentrations with tumor site or histology or with bone metastatic involvement. We found also no significant correlation between concentrations of serum BGP and total or ionized calcium, alkaline phosphatase, parameters of bone resorption, and indices of parathyroid function. In summary, serum BGP levels were slightly elevated in tumor-associated hypercalcemia and were normalized after successful treatment of hypercalcemia. More importantly, BGP concentrations varied widely even in the subgroups of patients with hypercalcemia accompanying massive bone metastatic involvement or in the patients without detectable skeletal metastases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Carbohydrates are sugars. ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism NOTE: This is ...

  4. Prognostic Significance of Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine: Analysis of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Dose Escalation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Schipper, Matthew; Zalupski, Mark M.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Abrams, Ross; Francis, Isaac R.; Khan, Gazala; Leslie, William; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Although established in the postresection setting, the prognostic value of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is less clear. We examined the prognostic utility of CA19-9 in patients with unresectable LAPC treated on a prospective trial of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with unresectable LAPC were treated at the University of Michigan on a phase 1/2 trial of IMRT dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. CA19-9 was obtained at baseline and during routine follow-up. Cox models were used to assess the effect of baseline factors on freedom from local progression (FFLP), distant progression (FFDP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Stepwise forward regression was used to build multivariate predictive models for each endpoint. Results: Thirty-eight patients were eligible for the present analysis. On univariate analysis, baseline CA19-9 and age predicted OS, CA19-9 at baseline and 3 months predicted PFS, gross tumor volume (GTV) and black race predicted FFLP, and CA19-9 at 3 months predicted FFDP. On stepwise multivariate regression modeling, baseline CA19-9, age, and female sex predicted OS; baseline CA19-9 and female sex predicted both PFS and FFDP; and GTV predicted FFLP. Patients with baseline CA19-9 ≤90 U/mL had improved OS (median 23.0 vs 11.1 months, HR 2.88, P<.01) and PFS (14.4 vs 7.0 months, HR 3.61, P=.001). CA19-9 progression over 90 U/mL was prognostic for both OS (HR 3.65, P=.001) and PFS (HR 3.04, P=.001), and it was a stronger predictor of death than either local progression (HR 1.46, P=.42) or distant progression (HR 3.31, P=.004). Conclusions: In patients with unresectable LAPC undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy, baseline CA19-9 was independently prognostic even after established prognostic factors were controlled for, whereas CA19-9 progression

  5. Application of 18F-FDG PET/CT combined with carbohydrate antigen 19-9 for differentiating pancreatic carcinoma from chronic mass-forming pancreatitis in Chinese elderly

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xinjin; Liu, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The current study was designed to analyze the value of 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) combined with carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in differentiating pancreatic carcinoma (PC) from chronic mass-forming pancreatitis (CMFP) in Chinese elderly. Methods As it is impossible to differentially diagnose PC from CMFP, 60 participants older than 65 years with focal pancreatic lesions were scanned by 18F-FDG PET/CT and their CA19-9 levels were tested. Diagnoses of all participants were confirmed by comprehensive methods including aspiration biopsy, surgical pathology, and clinical follow-up of 12 months. Twenty participants with CMFP were included in CMFP group and 40 participants with PC in PC group. Results In CMFP and PC groups, 46 participants showed increased 18F-FDG uptake, 43 had elevated CA19-9 levels, and 38 participants had both increased 18F-FDG uptake and elevated CA19-9 levels. Standardized uptake value maximum of PC group (5.98±2.27) was significantly different from CMFP group (2.58±1.81, P<0.05). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT in differentiating PC from CMFP were 95%, 60%, and 83.3%, respectively. CA19-9 levels of PC group (917.44±1,088.24) were significantly different from CMFP group (19.09±19.54, P<0.05). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of CA19-9 levels in differentiating PC from CMFP were 87.5%, 60%, and 78.3%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT combined with CA19-9 levels in differentiating PC from CMFP were 90%, 90%, and 90%, respectively. Conclusion 18F-FDG PET/CT had reliable sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in differentiating PC from CMFP, and CA19-9 levels could be helpful in 18F-FDG PET/CT for differentiating PC from CMFP in Chinese elderly. Moreover, 18F-FDG PET/CT combined with CA19-9 levels was found to be an effective method to differentially diagnose PC from CMFP and has paved the way for the timely and safe treatment of

  6. IL-15 protects NKT cells from inhibition by tumor-associated macrophages and enhances antimetastatic activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daofeng; Song, Liping; Wei, Jie; Courtney, Amy N; Gao, Xiuhua; Marinova, Ekaterina; Guo, Linjie; Heczey, Andras; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Kim, Eugene; Dotti, Gianpietro; Metelitsa, Leonid S

    2012-06-01

    Vα24-invariant NKT cells inhibit tumor growth by targeting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Tumor progression therefore requires that TAMs evade NKT cell activity through yet-unknown mechanisms. Here we report that a subset of cells in neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines and primary tumors expresses membrane-bound TNF-α (mbTNF-α). These proinflammatory tumor cells induced production of the chemokine CCL20 from TAMs via activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, an effect that was amplified in hypoxia. Flow cytometry analyses of human primary NB tumors revealed selective accumulation of CCL20 in TAMs. Neutralization of the chemokine inhibited in vitro migration of NKT cells toward tumor-conditioned hypoxic monocytes and localization of NKT cells to NB grafts in mice. We also found that hypoxia impaired NKT cell viability and function. Thus, CCL20-producing TAMs served as a hypoxic trap for tumor-infiltrating NKT cells. IL-15 protected antigen-activated NKT cells from hypoxia, and transgenic expression of IL-15 in adoptively transferred NKT cells dramatically enhanced their antimetastatic activity in mice. Thus, tumor-induced chemokine production in hypoxic TAMs and consequent chemoattraction and inhibition of NKT cells represents a mechanism of immune escape that can be reversed by adoptive immunotherapy with IL-15-transduced NKT cells.

  7. Intravital imaging reveals distinct responses of depleting dynamic tumor-associated macrophage and dendritic cell subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Lohela, Marja; Casbon, Amy-Jo; Olow, Aleksandra; Bonham, Lynn; Branstetter, Daniel; Weng, Ning; Smith, Jeffrey; Werb, Zena

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells comprise a major part of the stromal microenvironment and support cancer progression by multiple mechanisms. High numbers of tumor myeloid cells correlate with poor prognosis in breast cancer and are coupled with the angiogenic switch and malignant progression. However, the specific roles and regulation of heterogeneous tumor myeloid populations are incompletely understood. CSF-1 is a major myeloid cell mitogen, and signaling through its receptor CSF-1R is also linked to poor outcomes. To characterize myeloid cell function in tumors, we combined confocal intravital microscopy with depletion of CSF-1R–dependent cells using a neutralizing CSF-1R antibody in the mouse mammary tumor virus long-terminal region-driven polyoma middle T antigen breast cancer model. The depleted cells shared markers of tumor-associated macrophages and dendritic cells (M-DCs), matching the phenotype of tumor dendritic cells that take up antigens and interact with T cells. We defined functional subgroups within the M-DC population by imaging endocytic and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Anti–CSF-1R treatment altered stromal dynamics and impaired both survival of M-DCs and accumulation of new M-DCs, but did not deplete Gr-1+ neutrophils or block doxorubicin-induced myeloid cell recruitment, and had a minimal effect on lung myeloid cells. Nevertheless, prolonged treatment led to delayed tumor growth, reduced vascularity, and decreased lung metastasis. Because the myeloid infiltrate in metastatic lungs differed significantly from that in mammary tumors, the reduction in metastasis may result from the impact on primary tumors. The combination of functional analysis by intravital imaging with cellular characterization has refined our understanding of the effects of experimental targeted therapies on the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25385645

  8. Structural Basis for Distinct Binding Properties of the Human Galectins to Thomsen-Friedenreich Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Cheng-Feng; Zhang, Ying; Sun, Hui; Li, De-Feng; Wang, Da-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    The Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF or T) antigen, Galβ1-3GalNAcα1-O-Ser/Thr, is the core 1 structure of O-linked mucin type glycans appearing in tumor-associated glycosylation. The TF antigen occurs in about 90% of human cancer cells and is a potential ligand for the human endogenous galectins. It has been reported that human galectin-1 (Gal-1) and galectin-3 (Gal-3) can perform their cancer-related functions via specifically recognizing TF antigen. However, the detailed binding properties have not been clarified and structurally characterized. In this work, first we identified the distinct TF-binding abilities of Gal-1 and Gal-3. The affinity to TF antigen for Gal-3 is two orders of magnitude higher than that for Gal-1. The structures of Gal-3 carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) complexed with TF antigen and derivatives, TFN and GM1, were then determined. These structures show a unique Glu-water-Arg-water motif-based mode as previously observed in the mushroom galectin AAL. The observation demonstrates that this recognition mode is commonly adopted by TF-binding galectins, either as endogenous or exogenous ones. The detailed structural comparisons between Gal-1 and Gal-3 CRD and mutagenesis experiments reveal that a pentad residue motif (51AHGDA55) at the loop (g1-L4) connecting β-strands 4 and 5 of Gal-1 produces a serious steric hindrance for TF binding. This motif is the main structural basis for Gal-1 with the low affinity to TF antigen. These findings provide the intrinsic structural elements for regulating the TF-binding activity of Gal-1 in some special conditions and also show certain target and approach for mediating some tumor-related bioactivities of human galectins. PMID:21949831

  9. CDDO-Me Redirects Activation of Breast Tumor Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Michael S.; Shipman, Emilie P.; Kim, Hyunjung; Liby, Karen T.; Pioli, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages can account for up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer patients and high TAM density is associated with poor clinical prognosis. Because TAMs enhance tumor growth, development, and metastatic potential, redirection of TAM activation may have significant therapeutic benefit. Our studies in primary human macrophages and murine breast TAMs suggest that the synthetic oleanane triterpenoid CDDO-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) reprograms the activation profile of TAMs from tumor-promoting to tumor-inhibiting. We show that CDDO-Me treatment inhibits expression of IL-10 and VEGF in stimulated human M2 macrophages and TAMs but increases expression of TNF-α and IL-6. Surface expression of CD206 and CD163, which are characteristic of M2 activation, is significantly attenuated by CDDO-Me. In contrast, CDDO-Me up-regulates surface expression of HLA-DR and CD80, which are markers of M1 activation, and importantly potentiates macrophage activation of autologous T cells but inhibits endothelial cell vascularization. These results show for the first time that CDDO-Me redirects activation of M2 macrophages and TAMs from immune-suppressive to immune-stimulatory, and implicate a role for CDDO-Me as an immunotherapeutic in the treatment of breast and potentially other types of cancer. PMID:26918785

  10. Isolation of Mouse and Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cassetta, Luca; Noy, Roy; Swierczak, Agnieszka; Sugano, Gaël; Smith, Harriet; Wiechmann, Lisa; Pollard, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex network of cells that support tumor progression and malignancy. It has been demonstrated that tumor cells can educate the immune system to promote a tumor-friendly environment. Among all these immune cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are well represented and their presence in mouse models has been shown to promote tumor progression and metastasis. These effects are through the stimulation of angiogenesis, enhancement of tumor cell invasion and intravasation, immunosuppression, and at the metastatic site tumor cell extravasation and growth. However, the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Furthermore there is limited information on TAMs derived from human cancers. For this reason it is important to be able to extract TAMs from tumors in order to compare their phenotypes, functions, and transcriptomes with normal resident tissue macrophages. Isolation of these cells is challenging due to the lack of markers and standardized protocols. Here we show an optimized protocol for the efficient isolation and extraction of resident macrophages and TAMs from human and mouse tissues by using multicolor flow cytometry. These protocols allow for the extraction of thousands of macrophages in less than 5 h from tissues as small as half a gram. The isolated macrophages can then be used for both "omics" and in vitro studies. PMID:27325269

  11. Isolation of Mouse and Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cassetta, Luca; Noy, Roy; Swierczak, Agnieszka; Sugano, Gaël; Smith, Harriet; Wiechmann, Lisa; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex network of cells that support tumor progression and malignancy. It has been demonstrated that tumor cells can educate the immune system to promote a tumor-friendly environment. Among all these immune cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are well represented and their presence in mouse models has been shown to promote tumor progression and metastasis. These effects are through the stimulation of angiogenesis, enhancement of tumor cell invasion and intravasation, immunosuppression, and at the metastatic site tumor cell extravasation and growth. However, the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Furthermore there is limited information on TAMs derived from human cancers. For this reason it is important to be able to extract TAMs from tumors in order to compare their phenotypes, functions, and transcriptomes with normal resident tissue macrophages. Isolation of these cells is challenging due to the lack of markers and standardized protocols. Here we show an optimized protocol for the efficient isolation and extraction of resident macrophages and TAMs from human and mouse tissues by using multicolor flow cytometry. These protocols allow for the extraction of thousands of macrophages in less than 5 h from tissues as small as half a gram. The isolated macrophages can then be used for both “omics” and in vitro studies. PMID:27325269

  12. Intracavitary use of two radiolabeled tumor-associated monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Malamitsi, J.; Skarlos, D.; Fotiou, S.; Papakostas, P.; Aravantinos, G.; Vassilarou, D.; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J.; Koutoulidis, K.; Hooker, G.; Snook, D.

    1988-12-01

    Six patients with metastatic breast cancer and malignant pleural effusions and 13 patients with known or suspected ovarian cancer, underwent immunoscintigraphy after intracavitary (intrapleural or intraperitoneal) administration of iodine-131-(131I) or indium-111-(111In) labeled tumor associated monoclonal antibodies HMFG2 and H17E2. This method proved to be sensitive and specific with a true-positive result in 13 out of 14 patients with tumor and a true-negative result in five out of five patients without tumor. At any one time, 65%-80% of the whole-body radioactivity was closely associated with the cavity into which the radiolabeled antibody was administered while the radioactivity in the blood was always low, (approximately 4 X 10(-3) of administered dose/ml of blood). Concentrations of radiolabeled antibody (per gram of tumor tissue) ranged from 0.02%-0.1% of the injected dose in intracavitary tumors, but only 0.002% in a retroperitoneal metastasis. The specificity of this approach was documented in four control patients with benign ovarian cysts and in two patients who were imaged using both specific and nonspecific radiolabeled antibody. We conclude that the intracavitary administration of 131I- or 111In-labeled HMFG2 and H17E2 is a favorable route of administration and offers significant advantages over previously reported intravenous administration for the localization of breast or ovarian metastases confined to the pleural or peritoneal cavities.

  13. Intracavitary use of two radiolabeled tumor-associated monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Malamitsi, J; Skarlos, D; Fotiou, S; Papakostas, P; Aravantinos, G; Vassilarou, D; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J; Koutoulidis, K; Hooker, G; Snook, D

    1988-12-01

    Six patients with metastatic breast cancer and malignant pleural effusions and 13 patients with known or suspected ovarian cancer, underwent immunoscintigraphy after intracavitary (intrapleural or intraperitoneal) administration of iodine-131-(131I) or indium-111-(111In) labeled tumor associated monoclonal antibodies HMFG2 and H17E2. This method proved to be sensitive and specific with a true-positive result in 13 out of 14 patients with tumor and a true-negative result in five out of five patients without tumor. At any one time, 65%-80% of the whole-body radioactivity was closely associated with the cavity into which the radiolabeled antibody was administered while the radioactivity in the blood was always low, (approximately 4 X 10(-3) of administered dose/ml of blood). Concentrations of radiolabeled antibody (per gram of tumor tissue) ranged from 0.02%-0.1% of the injected dose in intracavitary tumors, but only 0.002% in a retroperitoneal metastasis. The specificity of this approach was documented in four control patients with benign ovarian cysts and in two patients who were imaged using both specific and nonspecific radiolabeled antibody. We conclude that the intracavitary administration of 131I- or 111In-labeled HMFG2 and H17E2 is a favorable route of administration and offers significant advantages over previously reported intravenous administration for the localization of breast or ovarian metastases confined to the pleural or peritoneal cavities.

  14. Carbohydrates and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Teens > Carbohydrates and Diabetes Print A A A Text Size ... that you should keep track of how many carbohydrates (carbs) you eat. But what exactly are carbohydrates ...

  15. Regulatory T Cells in Tumor-Associated Tertiary Lymphoid Structures Suppress Anti-tumor T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Nikhil S; Akama-Garren, Elliot H; Lu, Yisi; Lee, Da-Yae; Chang, Gregory P; Li, Amy; DuPage, Michel; Tammela, Tuomas; Kerper, Natanya R; Farago, Anna F; Robbins, Rebecca; Crowley, Denise M; Bronson, Roderick T; Jacks, Tyler

    2015-09-15

    Infiltration of regulatory T (Treg) cells into many tumor types correlates with poor patient prognoses. However, mechanisms of intratumoral Treg cell function remain to be elucidated. We investigated Treg cell function in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma and found that Treg cells suppressed anti-tumor responses in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures (TA-TLSs). TA-TLSs have been described in human lung cancers, but their function remains to be determined. TLSs in this model were spatially associated with >90% of tumors and facilitated interactions between T cells and tumor-antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Costimulatory ligand expression by DCs and T cell proliferation rates increased in TA-TLSs upon Treg cell depletion, leading to tumor destruction. Thus, we propose that Treg cells in TA-TLSs can inhibit endogenous immune responses against tumors, and targeting these cells might provide therapeutic benefit for cancer patients.

  16. Regulatory T cells in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures suppress anti-tumor T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Nikhil S.; Akama-Garren, Elliot H.; Lu, Yisi; Lee, Da-Yae; Chang, Gregory P.; Li, Amy; DuPage, Michel; Tammela, Tuomas; Kerper, Natanya R.; Farago, Anna F.; Robbins, Rebecca; Crowley, Denise M.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Infiltration of regulatory T (Treg) cells into many tumor types correlates with poor patient prognoses. However, mechanisms of intratumoral Treg cell function remain to be elucidated. We investigated Treg cell function in a genetically-engineered mouse lung adenocarcinoma model and found Treg cells suppress anti-tumor responses in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures (TA-TLS). TA-TLS have been described in human lung cancers, but their function remains to be determined. TLS in this model were spatially associated with >90% of tumors and facilitated interactions between T cells and tumor-antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Costimulatory ligand expression by DCs and T cell proliferation rates increased in TA-TLS upon Treg cell depletion, leading to tumor destruction. Thus, we propose Treg cells in TA-TLS can inhibit endogenous immune responses against tumors, and targeting these cells may provide therapeutic benefit for cancer patients. PMID:26341400

  17. Carbohydrate recognition factors of a Talpha (Galbeta1-->3GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr) and Tn (GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr) specific lectin isolated from the seeds of Artocarpus lakoocha.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tanuja; Chatterjee, Urmimala; Wu, June H; Chatterjee, Bishnu P; Wu, Albert M

    2005-01-01

    Artocarpus lakoocha agglutinin (ALA), isolated from the seeds of A. lakoocha fruit, is a galactose-binding lectin and a potent mitogen of T and B cells. Knowledge obtained from previous studies on the affinity of ALA was limited to molecular and submolecular levels of Galbeta1-->3GalNAc (T) and its derivatives. In the present study, the carbohydrate specificity of ALA was characterized at the macromolecular level according to the mammalian Gal/GalNAc structural units and corresponding glycoconjugates by an enzyme-linked lectinosorbent (ELLSA) and inhibition assays. The results indicate that ALA binds specifically to tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr (Tn) and Galbeta1-->3 GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr (Talpha). It barely cross-reacts with other common glycotopes on glycoproteins, including ABH blood group antigens, Galbeta1-->3/4GlcNAc (I/II) determinants, T/Tn covered by sialic acids, and N-linked plasma glycoproteins. Dense clustering structure of Tn/Talpha-containing glycoproteins tested resulted in 2.4 x 10(5)-6.7 x 10(5)-fold higher affinities to ALA than the respective GalNAc and Gal monomer. According to our results, the overall affinity of ALA for glycans can be ranked respectively: polyvalent Tn/Talpha glycotopes > monomeric Talpha and simple clustered Tn > monomeric Tn > GalNAc > Gal; while other glycotopes: Galalpha1-->3/4Gal (B/E), Galbeta1-->3/4GlcNAc (I/II), GalNAcalpha1-->3Gal/GalNAc (A/F), and GalNAcbeta1-->3/4Gal (P/S) were inactive. The strong specificity of ALA for Tn/Talpha cluster suggests the importance of glycotope polyvalency during carbohydrate-receptor interactions and emphasizes its value as an anti-Tn/T lectin for analysis of glycoconjugate mixtures or transformed carbohydrates.

  18. Complex carbohydrates (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... later. Complex carbohydrate foods provide vitamins, minerals, and fiber that are important to the health of an ... which do not have the vitamins, minerals, and fiber found in complex and natural carbohydrates. Refined sugars ...

  19. Tumor-Associated Glycans and Their Role in Gynecological Cancers: Accelerating Translational Research by Novel High-Throughput Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Pochechueva, Tatiana; Jacob, Francis; Fedier, Andre; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2012-01-01

    Glycans are important partners in many biological processes, including carcinogenesis. The rapidly developing field of functional glycomics becomes one of the frontiers of biology and biomedicine. Aberrant glycosylation of proteins and lipids occurs commonly during malignant transformation and leads to the expression of specific tumor-associated glycans. The appearance of aberrant glycans on carcinoma cells is typically associated with grade, invasion, metastasis and overall poor prognosis. Cancer-associated carbohydrates are mostly located on the surface of cancer cells and are therefore potential diagnostic biomarkers. Currently, there is increasing interest in cancer-associated aberrant glycosylation, with growing numbers of characteristic cancer targets being detected every day. Breast and ovarian cancer are the most common and lethal malignancies in women, respectively, and potential glycan biomarkers hold promise for early detection and targeted therapies. However, the acceleration of research and comprehensive multi-target investigation of cancer-specific glycans could only be successfully achieved with the help of a combination of novel high-throughput glycomic approaches. PMID:24957768

  20. A fully synthetic glycopeptide antitumor vaccine based on multiple antigen presentation on a hyperbranched polymer.

    PubMed

    Glaffig, Markus; Palitzsch, Björn; Hartmann, Sebastian; Schüll, Christoph; Nuhn, Lutz; Gerlitzki, Bastian; Schmitt, Edgar; Frey, Holger; Kunz, Horst

    2014-04-01

    For antitumor vaccines both the selected tumor-associated antigen, as well as the mode of its presentation, affect the immune response. According to the principle of multiple antigen presentation, a tumor-associated MUC1 glycopeptide combined with the immunostimulating T-cell epitope P2 from tetanus toxoid was coupled to a multi-functionalized hyperbranched polyglycerol by "click chemistry". This globular polymeric carrier has a flexible dendrimer-like structure, which allows optimal antigen presentation to the immune system. The resulting fully synthetic vaccine induced strong immune responses in mice and IgG antibodies recognizing human breast-cancer cells.

  1. Carbohydrates in Supramolecular Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Delbianco, Martina; Bharate, Priya; Varela-Aramburu, Silvia; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-02-24

    Carbohydrates are involved in a variety of biological processes. The ability of sugars to form a large number of hydrogen bonds has made them important components for supramolecular chemistry. We discuss recent advances in the use of carbohydrates in supramolecular chemistry and reveal that carbohydrates are useful building blocks for the stabilization of complex architectures. Systems are presented according to the scaffold that supports the glyco-conjugate: organic macrocycles, dendrimers, nanomaterials, and polymers are considered. Glyco-conjugates can form host-guest complexes, and can self-assemble by using carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions and other weak interactions such as π-π interactions. Finally, complex supramolecular architectures based on carbohydrate-protein interactions are discussed.

  2. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  3. Dietary carbohydrates for diabetics.

    PubMed

    Rivellese, Angela A; Giacco, Rosalba; Costabile, Giuseppina

    2012-12-01

    The literature on the impact of dietary carbohydrates in the regulation of blood glucose levels and other metabolic abnormalities in diabetic patients over the last 3 years is reviewed. We try to differentiate the metabolic effects due to the amount of carbohydrates from those due to their different types. The review comprises a part dealing with the effects of diets having low or high carbohydrate content on body weight reduction, and a part in which the amount and the quality of carbohydrates are discussed in relation to isoenergetic diets. Overall, the data accumulated in the period considered seem to confirm that the decrease in energy intake is more important than the qualitative composition of the diet to reduce body weight, but that both the amount and the quality of carbohydrates are important in modulating blood glucose levels and other cardiovascular risk factors in both the fasting and the postprandial phases in diabetic individuals. PMID:22847773

  4. Loss of CEACAM1, a Tumor-Associated Factor, Attenuates Post-infarction Cardiac Remodeling by Inhibiting Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Yanmei; Yan, Yi; Li, Xinzhong; Chen, Guojun; He, Nvqin; Shen, Shuxin; Chen, Gangbin; Zhang, Chuanxi; Liao, Wangjun; Liao, Yulin; Bin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule1 (CEACAM1) is a tumor-associated factor that is known to be involved in apoptosis, but the role of CEACAM1 in cardiovascular disease is unclear. We aims to investigate whether CEACAM1 influences cardiac remodeling in mice with myocardial infarction (MI) and hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte injury. Both serum in patients and myocardial CEACAM1 levels in mice were significantly increased in response to MI, while levels were elevated in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs) exposed to hypoxia. Eight weeks after MI, a lower mortality rate, improved cardiac function, and less cardiac remodeling in CEACAM1 knock-out (KO) mice than in their wild-type (WT) littermates were observed. Moreover, myocardial expression of mitochondrial Bax, cytosolic cytochrome C, and cleaved caspase-3 was significantly lower in CEACAM1 KO mice than in WT mice. In cultured NRCs exposed to hypoxia, recombinant human CEACAM1 (rhCEACAM1) reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, upregulated mitochondrial Bax, increased cytosolic cytochrome C and cleaved caspase-3, and consequently increased apoptosis. RhCEACAM1 also increased the levels of GRP78 and CHOP in NRCs with hypoxia. All of these effects were abolished by silencing CEACAM1. Our study indicates that CEACAM1 exacerbates hypoxic cardiomyocyte injury and post-infarction cardiac remodeling by enhancing cardiomyocyte mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. PMID:26911181

  5. Computerized molecular modeling of carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computerized molecular modleing continues to increase in capability and applicability to carbohydrates. This chapter covers nomenclature and conformational aspects of carbohydrates, perhaps of greater use to carbohydrate-inexperienced computational chemists. Its comments on various methods and studi...

  6. Carbohydrates and Diabetes (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Parents > Carbohydrates and Diabetes ... many kids with diabetes take to stay healthy. Carbohydrates and Blood Sugar The two main forms of ...

  7. An Ultrasensitive Electrochemiluminescence Immunoassay for Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Serum Based on Antibody Labeled Fe3O4 Nanoparticles as Capture Probes and Graphene/CdTe Quantum Dot Bionanoconjugates as Signal Amplifiers

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Ning; Zhou, Jing; Xiong, Ping; Li, Tianhua; Jiang, Shan; Cao, Yuting; Jiang, Qianli

    2013-01-01

    The CdTe quantum dots (QDs), graphene nanocomposite (CdTe-G) and dextran–Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles have been synthesized for developing an ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassay for Carcinoembryonic antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) in serums. Firstly, the capture probes (CA 19-9 Ab1/Fe3O4) for enriching CA 19-9 were synthesized by immobilizing the CA 19-9’s first antibody (CA 19-9 Ab1) on magnetic nanoparticles (dextran-Fe3O4). Secondly, the signal probes (CA 19-9 Ab2/CdTe-G), which can emit an ECL signal, were formed by attaching the secondary CA 19-9 antibody (CA 19-9 Ab2) to the surface of the CdTe-G. Thirdly, the above two probes were used for conjugating with a serial of CA 19-9 concentrations. Graphene can immobilize dozens of CdTe QDs on their surface, which can emit stronger ECL intensity than CdTe QDs. Based on the amplified signal, ultrasensitive antigen detection can be realized. Under the optimal conditions, the ECL signal depended linearly on the logarithm of CA 19-9 concentration from 0.005 to 100 pg/mL, and the detection limit was 0.002 pg/mL. Finally, five samples of human serum were tested, and the results were compared with a time-resolved fluorescence assay (TRFA). The novel immunoassay provides a stable, specific and highly sensitive immunoassay protocol for tumor marker detection at very low levels, which can be applied in early diagnosis of tumor. PMID:23685872

  8. Perspectives and limits of an immunoenzymatic assay (ELISA) for herpes simplex virus (HSV) tumor-associated antigen (TAA).

    PubMed

    Tarro, G; D'Alessandro, G; Esposito, C; Flaminio, G; Mascolo, A; Maturo, S

    1981-01-01

    An ELISA has been developed to detect specific antibodies for HSV-TAA in sera of patients with head, neck and urogenital tract carcinomas (Cancer, 45:1980). Further studies have shown that 64/800 controls (8.12%), i.e. healthy people, are positive against 312/425 patients with herpes associated tumors (73.41%). People with herpes recurrens show 18% positivity, precancerous lesions 44% and other cancers 6%. Immunodepression, chemo- and radio-therapy play an inhibitory role on the ELISA positivity for TAA. Radical surgery of the HSV-TAA positive cancers results in lack of specific antibody whereas relapse or metastasis of the tumor yields positive results. The reproducibility of the test is very good and the standard error is low (1.0655). The conclusions allow us to foresee the use of this ELISA for early detection of the HSV-TAA antibodies in certain human carcinomas.

  9. Radiolocalization of bovine lymphosarcoma cells in athymic mice, using a monoclonal antibody against tumor-associated antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Aida, Y.; Ochiai, K.; Ito, K.; Onuma, M.; Fujimori, F.; Fujimoto, Y.; Izawa, H.

    1987-08-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibody c 143 was purified and F(ab')2 fragments were generated by pepsin digestion and then radiolabeled with /sup 125/I. The /sup 125/I-labeled c 143 F(ab')2 fragments were injected into athymic mice bearing bovine lymphoid tumor cells. The fragments became preferentially localized in tumor tissues, but not in normal tissues, as determined by differential counting of tissue radioactivity. The fragments became localized specifically in those tumors that were reactive with c 143 in vitro, but did not become localized in unrelated tumors. Localization of labeled F(ab')2 fragments of a monoclonal antibody of the same isotype directed against Taka virus (a variant of Newcastle disease virus) was not observed in athymic mice bearing bovine lymphoid tumor cells. Tumors were detectable by radioimmunoscintigraphy, using radiolabeled c 143 F(ab')2 fragments, without background subtraction, and by use of silver-grain scattering in light microscopic autoradiography.

  10. Conditions associated with antibodies against the tumor-associated antigen MUC1 and their relationship to risk for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Daniel W; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; McKolanis, John R; Welch, William R; Vitonis, Allison F; Berkowitz, Ross S; Finn, Olivera J

    2005-05-01

    Many cancers, including ovarian, overexpress epithelial mucin (MUC1) and promote anti-MUC1 antibodies that may correlate with more favorable prognosis. By extension, risk for ovarian cancer might be reduced by preexisting MUC1-specific immunity. We measured anti-MUC1 antibodies in 705 control women, identified events predicting antibodies, and estimated ovarian cancer risk by comparing profiles of events generating antibodies in controls with those in 668 ovarian cancer cases. Factors predicting antibodies included oral contraceptive use, breast mastitis, bone fracture or osteoporosis, pelvic surgeries, nonuse of talc in genital hygiene, and to a lesser extent intrauterine device use and current smoking. There was a significant increase in the likelihood of having anti-MUC1 antibodies from 24.2% in women with 0 or 1 condition, to 51.4% in those with five or more conditions. By the same index of events, the risk for ovarian cancer was inversely associated with number of conditions predisposing to anti-MUC1 antibodies. Compared with having experienced 0 or 1 event, the adjusted risk for ovarian cancer decreased progressively with relative risks (and 95% confidence limits) of 0.69 (0.52-0.92), 0.64 (0.47-0.88), 0.49 (0.34-0.72), and 0.31 (0.16-0.61), respectively for women with two, three, four, and five or more events related to the presence of antibodies (P(trend) < 0.0001.) We conclude that several traditional and new risk factors for ovarian cancer may be explained by their ability to induce MUC1 immunity through exposure of MUC1 to immune recognition in the context of inflammatory or hormonal processes in various MUC1-positive tissues.

  11. Carbohydrate Counting and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... both energy and nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, and fiber. Fiber can help you prevent constipation, ... meet the body’s needs for energy, vitamins and minerals, and fiber. Experts suggest that carbohydrate intake for ...

  12. Carbohydrate Dehydration Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the impact of various factors on the "charring reaction" of a carbohydrate with concentrated sulfuric acid including the type of sugar, the degree of fineness of the sugar crystals, and the amount of water added. (JRH)

  13. Carbohydrates and Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtman, Richard J.; Wurtman, Judith J.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the symptoms, such as appetite change and mood fluctuation, basic mechanisms, and some treatments of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), Carbohydrate-Craving Obesity (CCO) and Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). Provides several tables and diagrams, and three reading references. (YP)

  14. Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. Normally ...

  15. Carbohydrate Dehydration Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolson, David A.; Battino, Rubin; Letcher, Trevor M.; Pegel, K. H.; Revaprasadu, N.

    1995-10-01

    The "charring reaction" of a carbohydrate with concentrated H2SO4 is a demonstration of the dehydrating power of H2SO4. In this paper several sugars and supermarket carbohydrates are systematically studied with respect to size of particles, addition of water, and amount of H2SO4 added. The results are tabulated as to the amount of time to blackening and to the attainment of a particular volume of the charred material. Detailed safety precautions are included.

  16. Monoclonal antibody-defined human pancreatic cancer-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Schmiegel, W H; Kalthoff, H; Arndt, R; Gieseking, J; Greten, H; Klöppel, G; Kreiker, C; Ladak, A; Lampe, V; Ulrich, S

    1985-03-01

    Three pancreatic cancer-associated antigens were characterized by use of monoclonal antibodies in immunobinding studies with various cellular and soluble target antigens, in immunoprecipitation, and in immunoperoxidase staining. C54-0 represents a tumor-associated Mr 122,000 antigen, which appears to be widely distributed on various epithelial tumors and to a lower extent on normal tissue. C1-N3 antigen exhibited a more restricted distribution, reacting with pancreatic and various gastrointestinal tract tumors as well as with chronically inflamed pancreatic tissue. The most specific antigen expression was observed for C1-P83 antigen, found on all exocrine tumors of the pancreas, but not on normal or chronically inflamed pancreatic tissue.

  17. Telomere profiles and tumor-associated macrophages with different immune signatures affect prognosis in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hung, Noelyn A; Eiholzer, Ramona A; Kirs, Stenar; Zhou, Jean; Ward-Hartstonge, Kirsten; Wiles, Anna K; Frampton, Chris M; Taha, Ahmad; Royds, Janice A; Slatter, Tania L

    2016-03-01

    Telomere maintenance is a hallmark of cancer and likely to be targeted in future treatments. In glioblastoma established methods of identifying telomerase and alternative lengthening of telomeres leave a significant proportion of tumors with no defined telomere maintenance mechanism. This study investigated the composition of these tumors using RNA-Seq. Glioblastomas with an indeterminate telomere maintenance mechanism had an increased immune signature compared with alternative lengthening of telomeres and telomerase-positive tumors. Immunohistochemistry for CD163 confirmed that the majority (80%) of tumors with an indeterminate telomere maintenance mechanism had a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages. The RNA-Seq and immunostaining data separated tumors with no defined telomere maintenance mechanism into three subgroups: alternative lengthening of telomeres like tumors with a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages and telomerase like tumors with a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages. The third subgroup had no increase in tumor-associated macrophages and may represent a distinct category. The presence of tumor-associated macrophages conferred a worse prognosis with reduced patient survival times (alternative lengthening of telomeres with and without macrophages P=0.0004, and telomerase with and without macrophages P=0.013). The immune signatures obtained from RNA-Seq were significantly different between telomere maintenance mechanisms. Alternative lengthening of telomeres like tumors with macrophages had increased expression of interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT1-3). Telomerase-positive tumors with macrophages had increased expression of macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), CXCL12 and sushi-repeat containing protein x-linked 2 (SRPX2). Telomerase-positive tumors with macrophages were also associated with a reduced frequency of total/near total resections (44% vs >76% for all other subtypes

  18. Immune recognition of tumor-associated mucin MUC1 is achieved by a fully synthetic aberrantly glycosylated MUC1 tripartite vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Vani; Thompson, Pamela; Wolfert, Margreet A.; Buskas, Therese; Bradley, Judy M.; Pathangey, Latha B.; Madsen, Cathy S.; Cohen, Peter A.; Gendler, Sandra J.; Boons, Geert-Jan

    2012-01-01

    The mucin MUC1 is typically aberrantly glycosylated by epithelial cancer cells manifested by truncated O-linked saccharides. The resultant glycopeptide epitopes can bind cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and are susceptible to recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), whereas aberrantly glycosylated MUC1 protein on the tumor cell surface can be bound by antibodies to mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Efforts to elicit CTLs and IgG antibodies against cancer-expressed MUC1 have not been successful when nonglycosylated MUC1 sequences were used for vaccination, probably due to conformational dissimilarities. Immunizations with densely glycosylated MUC1 peptides have also been ineffective due to impaired susceptibility to antigen processing. Given the challenges to immuno-target tumor-associated MUC1, we have identified the minimum requirements to consistently induce CTLs and ADCC-mediating antibodies specific for the tumor form of MUC1 resulting in a therapeutic response in a mouse model of mammary cancer. The vaccine is composed of the immunoadjuvant Pam3CysSK4, a peptide Thelper epitope and an aberrantly glycosylated MUC1 peptide. Covalent linkage of the three components was essential for maximum efficacy. The vaccine produced CTLs, which recognized both glycosylated and nonglycosylated peptides, whereas a similar nonglycosylated vaccine gave CTLs which recognized only nonglycosylated peptide. Antibodies elicited by the glycosylated tripartite vaccine were significantly more lytic compared with the unglycosylated control. As a result, immunization with the glycosylated tripartite vaccine was superior in tumor prevention. Besides its own aptness as a clinical target, these studies of MUC1 are likely predictive of a covalent linking strategy applicable to many additional tumor-associated antigens. PMID:22171012

  19. Mushroom β-Glucan May Immunomodulate the Tumor-Associated Macrophages in the Lewis Lung Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan-Jhen; Wu, Yu-Sheng; Chen, Sherwin; Liu, Chi-Feng; Chen, Shiu-Nan

    2015-01-01

    The present study showed that oral mushroom beta-glucan treatment significantly increased IFN-γ mRNA expression but significantly reduced COX-2 mRNA expression within the lung. For LLC tumor model, oral Ganoderma lucidum or Antrodia camphorata polysaccharides treatments significantly reduced TGF-β production in serum. In addition, IL-12 and IFN-γ mRNA expression were significantly increased, but IL-6, IL-10, COX-2, and TGF-β mRNA expression were substantially following oral mushroom polysaccharides treatments. The study highlights the efficacious effect of mushroom polysaccharides for ameliorating the immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. Increased M1 phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages and attenuated M2 phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages could be achieved by ingesting mushroom polysaccharides.

  20. Glutamate and tumor-associated epilepsy: glial cell dysfunction in the peritumoral environment

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Susan C.; Robel, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Seizures are a serious and debilitating co-morbidity of primary brain tumors that affect most patients, yet their etiology is poorly understood. In many CNS pathologies, including epilepsy and brain injury, high levels of extracellular glutamate have been implicated in seizure generation. It has been shown that gliomas release neurotoxic levels of glutamate through their high expression of system xc-. More recently it was shown that the surrounding peritumoral cortex is spontaneously hyperexcitable. In this review, we discuss how gliomas induce changes in the surrounding environment that may further contribute to elevated extracellular glutamate and tumor-associated seizures. Peritumoral astrocytes become reactive and lose their ability to remove glutamate, while microglia, in response to signals from glioma cells, may release glutamate. In addition, gliomas increase blood brain barrier permeability, allowing seizure-inducing serum components, including glutamate, into the peritumoral region. These factors, working together or alone, may influence the frequency and severity of tumor-associated epilepsy. PMID:23385090

  1. Tumor-associated lymphoid proliferation in the parotid gland. A potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Auclair, P L

    1994-01-01

    A substantial proportion of neoplastic and nonneoplastic parotid diseases have a prominent lymphoid component. The lymphoid element in lesions such as papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum, sebaceous lymphadenoma, and lymphoepithelial carcinoma are readily recognized as a required diagnostic element. However, when other types of benign and malignant salivary gland neoplasms demonstrate tumor-associated lymphoid proliferation, the tumor may be either misclassified or misinterpreted as metastatic disease. Examples of primary benign and malignant parotid neoplasms exhibiting tumor-associated lymphoid proliferation are documented and illustrated. Other parotid lesions that may have a lymphoid element include sialadenitis, cysts with associated lymphoid tissue, parenchymal neoplasms with an expected lymphoid component or those that arise within an intraparotid lymph node, autoimmune disease, malignant lymphoma, and metastatic disease. An approach to recognition and separation of these entities is discussed.

  2. Diarrhea caused by carbohydrate malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Heinz F; Hammer, Johann

    2012-09-01

    This article will focus on the role of the colon in the pathogenesis of diarrhea in carbohydrate malabsorption or physiologically incomplete absorption of carbohydrates, and on the most common manifestation of carbohydrate malabsorption, lactose malabsorption. In addition, incomplete fructose absorption, the role of carbohydrate malabsorption in other malabsorptive diseases, and congenital defects that lead to malabsorption will be covered. The article concludes with a section on diagnostic tools to evaluate carbohydrate malabsorption.

  3. Comparative activation states of tumor-associated and peritoneal macrophages from mice bearing an induced fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Valdez, J C; de Alderete, N; Meson, O E; Sirena, A; Perdigon, G

    1990-11-01

    Balb/c mice bearing a methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma were used to compare the activation levels of tumor-associated and peritoneal macrophages. Two stages of tumor growth were examined, namely "small" and "large" tumors, with average diameters of 10 and 30 mm, respectively. The activation state, determined by measurement of both phagocytic index and beta-glucuronidase content, was found to be markedly higher in tumor-associated macrophages than in their peritoneal counterparts and it was, in addition, independent of tumor progression. The percentage of tumor-associated macrophages, which were detected on the basis of Fc receptor expression, remained constant in the growing neoplasm, at approximately 23% of total cell population. None of these parameters were affected by inoculation with an immunopotentiating dose of heat-killed Candida albicans which, on the other hand, seemed not to alter the course of the tumor. These data suggest that within the tumor microenvironment macrophages would somehow be maintained at a constant proportion and at a highly activated state, while outside the tumor they would be at a lower activation level. Our results also suggest that TAM would not possess antitumor activity in vivo, although we have found this activity in vitro.

  4. Comparative activation states of tumor-associated and peritoneal macrophages from mice bearing an induced fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Valdez, J C; de Alderete, N; Meson, O E; Sirena, A; Perdigon, G

    1990-11-01

    Balb/c mice bearing a methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma were used to compare the activation levels of tumor-associated and peritoneal macrophages. Two stages of tumor growth were examined, namely "small" and "large" tumors, with average diameters of 10 and 30 mm, respectively. The activation state, determined by measurement of both phagocytic index and beta-glucuronidase content, was found to be markedly higher in tumor-associated macrophages than in their peritoneal counterparts and it was, in addition, independent of tumor progression. The percentage of tumor-associated macrophages, which were detected on the basis of Fc receptor expression, remained constant in the growing neoplasm, at approximately 23% of total cell population. None of these parameters were affected by inoculation with an immunopotentiating dose of heat-killed Candida albicans which, on the other hand, seemed not to alter the course of the tumor. These data suggest that within the tumor microenvironment macrophages would somehow be maintained at a constant proportion and at a highly activated state, while outside the tumor they would be at a lower activation level. Our results also suggest that TAM would not possess antitumor activity in vivo, although we have found this activity in vitro. PMID:2099903

  5. New mouse xenograft model modulated by tumor-associated fibroblasts for human multi-drug resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    MA, YAN; LIN, ZHIQIANG; FALLON, JOHN K.; ZHAO, QIANG; LIU, DAN; WANG, YONGJUN; LIU, FENG

    2015-01-01

    We developed an MDR tumor model that is modulated by tumor-associated fibroblasts. Studies on proliferation of tumor cell lines including paclitaxel-sensitive and resistant cell lines were performed. The expressions of P-gp and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) antigen were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Quantitative P-gp analyses of different cell lines were accomplished by nanoUPLC-MS/MS. Tumor cell colony formation assay and established xenograft model was used to investigate the relationship between P-gp expression, fibroblast levels and tumorigenesis. The mouse xenograft model was developed after co-inoculation with MDR tumor cells and NIH/3T3 fibroblast cells. There was no correlation between tumorigenesis in vivo and the growth rate of cells in vitro. The proliferation among different cell lines had no significant differences, but the P-gp expression and tumor growth in the xenograft model were fairly different. P-gp determination and α-SMA immunofluorescence staining clarified the relationship between P-gp expression, fibroblast levels and tumorigenesis. It was more difficult for tumor cells with higher P-gp levels to recruit fibroblasts in vivo, resulting in lower tumorigenesis due to the lack of structural and chemical support during tumor progression. In the established paclitaxel-resistant mouse xenograft model, no obvious antitumor effect was observed after Taxol treatment, but a significant decrease in tumor size for the group treated with gemcitabine sensitive to the model. The results show that the added fibroblasts do not disturb the applicability of the model in MDR. Therefore, this mouse xenograft MDR model could serve as an effective tool for MDR research. PMID:26352907

  6. Carbohydrates, pollinators, and cycads.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E; Lindström, Anders J

    2015-01-01

    Cycad biology, ecology, and horticulture decisions are not supported by adequate research, and experiments in cycad physiology in particular have been deficient. Our recent report on free sugar content in a range of cycad taxa and tissues sets the stage for developing continued carbohydrate research. Growth and development of cycad pollen, mediation of the herbivory traits of specialist pollinators, and support of expensive strobilus behavioral traits are areas of cycad pollination biology that would benefit from a greater understanding of the role of carbohydrate relations. PMID:26479502

  7. Carbohydrates, pollinators, and cycads

    PubMed Central

    Marler, Thomas E; Lindström, Anders J

    2015-01-01

    Cycad biology, ecology, and horticulture decisions are not supported by adequate research, and experiments in cycad physiology in particular have been deficient. Our recent report on free sugar content in a range of cycad taxa and tissues sets the stage for developing continued carbohydrate research. Growth and development of cycad pollen, mediation of the herbivory traits of specialist pollinators, and support of expensive strobilus behavioral traits are areas of cycad pollination biology that would benefit from a greater understanding of the role of carbohydrate relations. PMID:26479502

  8. Carbohydrates, pollinators, and cycads.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E; Lindström, Anders J

    2015-01-01

    Cycad biology, ecology, and horticulture decisions are not supported by adequate research, and experiments in cycad physiology in particular have been deficient. Our recent report on free sugar content in a range of cycad taxa and tissues sets the stage for developing continued carbohydrate research. Growth and development of cycad pollen, mediation of the herbivory traits of specialist pollinators, and support of expensive strobilus behavioral traits are areas of cycad pollination biology that would benefit from a greater understanding of the role of carbohydrate relations.

  9. Exosome-driven transfer of tumor-associated Pioneer Translation Products (TA-PTPs) for the MHC class I cross-presentation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Duvallet, Emilie; Boulpicante, Mathilde; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Daskalogianni, Chrysoula; Prado Martins, Rodrigo; Baconnais, Sonia; Manoury, Bénédicte; Fahraeus, Robin; Apcher, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cellular immune reactions against non-self-epitopes require activation of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells via cross-presentation of MHC class I-restricted peptides by professional antigen presenting cells (pAPCs), with the consequent detection and elimination of cells expressing the same antigens via the endogenous (direct) pathway. The source of peptides for the endogenous pathway is constituted of alternative mRNA translation products; however, it is still unclear which source of peptides is used for cross-presentation. Furthermore, the presentation of non-canonical translation products, produced during a non-conventional translation event, on class I molecules of tumor cells has been reported but how these peptides are generated, presented to pAPCs, and their capacity to stimulate CD8+ T cells is still not known. Here, we report that pioneer translation peptides (PTPs) derived from intron or exon pre-mRNAs can serve as tumor-associated antigens (TA-PTPs) and are delivered from the producing tumor cells to pAPCs via exosomes where they are processed by the cytosolic pathway. Injection of TA-PTPs and tumor-derived exosomes efficiently induce CD8+ T-cell proliferation and prevent tumor growth in mice. Our results show that TA-PTPs represent an efficient source of antigenic peptides for CD8+ T cell activation and that full-length proteins are not required for cross-presentation. These findings can have interesting implications for generating tolerance and for designing vectors to generate vaccines. PMID:27757298

  10. Understanding carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions by means of glyconanotechnology.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Jesus M; Penadés, Soledad

    2004-01-01

    Carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction is a reliable and versatile mechanism for cell adhesion and recognition. Glycosphingolipid (GSL) clusters at the cell membrane are mainly involved in this interaction. To investigate carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction an integrated strategy (Glyconanotechnology) was developed. This strategy includes polyvalent tools (gold glyconanoparticles) mimicking GSL clustering at the cell membrane as well as analytical techniques such as AFM, TEM, and SPR to evaluate the interactions. The results obtained by means of this strategy and current status are presented.

  11. Peptide mimotopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis carbohydrate immunodeterminants

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Cell-surface saccharides of Mycobacterium tuberculosis appear to be crucial factors in tuberculosis pathogenicity and could be useful antigens in tuberculosis immunodiagnosis. In the present study, we report the successful antigenic and immunogenic mimicry of mannose-containing cell-wall compounds of M. tuberculosis by dodecamer peptides identified by phage-display technology. Using a rabbit antiserum raised against M. tuberculosis cell-surface saccharides as a target for biopanning, peptides with three different consensus sequences were identified. Phage-displayed and chemically synthesized peptides bound to the anticarbohydrate antiserum. Rabbit antibodies elicited against the peptide QEPLMGTVPIRAGGGS recognize the mannosylated M. tuberculosis cell-wall antigens arabinomannan and lipoarabinomannan, and the glycosylated recombinant protein alanine/proline-rich antigen. Furthermore, antibodies were also able to react with mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not with phosphatidylinositol dimannosides or arabinogalactan from mycobacteria. These results suggest that the immunogenic peptide mimics oligomannosidic epitopes. Interestingly, this report provides evidence that, in contrast with previously known carbohydrate mimotopes, no aromatic residues are necessary in a peptide sequence for mimicking unusual glycoconjugates synthesized by mycobacteria. The possible usefulness of the identified peptide mimotopes as surrogate reagents for immunodiagnosis and for the study of functional roles of the native non-peptide epitopes is discussed. PMID:15560754

  12. Peptide mimotopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis carbohydrate immunodeterminants.

    PubMed

    Gevorkian, Goar; Segura, Erika; Acero, Gonzalo; Palma, José P; Espitia, Clara; Manoutcharian, Karen; López-Marín, Luz M

    2005-04-15

    Cell-surface saccharides of Mycobacterium tuberculosis appear to be crucial factors in tuberculosis pathogenicity and could be useful antigens in tuberculosis immunodiagnosis. In the present study, we report the successful antigenic and immunogenic mimicry of mannose-containing cell-wall compounds of M. tuberculosis by dodecamer peptides identified by phage-display technology. Using a rabbit antiserum raised against M. tuberculosis cell-surface saccharides as a target for biopanning, peptides with three different consensus sequences were identified. Phage-displayed and chemically synthesized peptides bound to the anticarbohydrate antiserum. Rabbit antibodies elicited against the peptide QEPLMGTVPIRAGGGS recognize the mannosylated M. tuberculosis cell-wall antigens arabinomannan and lipoarabinomannan, and the glycosylated recombinant protein alanine/proline-rich antigen. Furthermore, antibodies were also able to react with mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not with phosphatidylinositol dimannosides or arabinogalactan from mycobacteria. These results suggest that the immunogenic peptide mimics oligomannosidic epitopes. Interestingly, this report provides evidence that, in contrast with previously known carbohydrate mimotopes, no aromatic residues are necessary in a peptide sequence for mimicking unusual glycoconjugates synthesized by mycobacteria. The possible usefulness of the identified peptide mimotopes as surrogate reagents for immunodiagnosis and for the study of functional roles of the native non-peptide epitopes is discussed.

  13. T Cells as Antigen Carriers for Anti-tumor Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Traversari, Catia; Russo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the physiologic processing and presenting machinery of dendritic cells (DCs) by in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens may improve the immunogenic potential and clinical efficacy of DC-based cancer vaccines. The approach developed by our group was based on the clinical observation that some patients treated with the infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced to express the HSV-TK suicide gene for relapse of hematologic malignancies, after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, developed a T cell-mediated immune response specifically directed against the HSV-TK gene product.We demonstrated that lymphocytes genetically modified to express HSV-TK as well as self/tumor antigens, acting as antigen carriers, efficiently target DCs in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. The infusion of TRP-2-transduced lymphocytes induced the establishment of protective immunity and long-term memory in tumor-bearing mice by cross-presentation of the antigen mediated by the CD11c(+)CD8a(+) DCs subset. A similar approach was applied in a clinical setting. Ten patients affected by MAGE-3(+) metastatic melanoma were treated with autologous lymphocytes retrovirally transduced to express the MAGE-3 tumor antigen. In three patients, the treatment led to the increase of MAGE-3 specific CD8+ and CD4+ effectors and the development of long-term memory, which ultimately correlated with a favorable clinical outcome. Transduced lymphocytes represent an efficient way for in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens of DCs.

  14. Distinctive role of activated tumor-associated macrophages in photosensitizer accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-05-01

    Cells dissociated from tumors (carcinomas and sarcomas) growing subcutaneously in mice that have been administered Photofrin or other photosensitizers were analyzed by flow cytometry. Monoclonal antibodies were used for identification of major cellular populations contained in these tumors. The results demonstrate that a subpopulation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is unique among tumor cell populations in that it excels in the accumulation of very high levels of photosensitizers. These macrophages showed an increased expression of interleukin 2 receptor, which is indicative of their activated state. since macrophages were reported to concentrate in the periphery of human neoplasms, it is suggested that activates TAMs are the determinants of tumor-localized photosensitizer fluorescence.

  15. Tumor-associated macrophages and anti-tumor therapies: complex links.

    PubMed

    Belgiovine, Cristina; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Allavena, Paola; Frapolli, Roberta

    2016-07-01

    Myeloid cells infiltrating the tumor microenvironment, especially tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), are essential providers of cancer-related inflammation, a condition known to accelerate tumor progression and limit the response to anti-tumor therapies. As a matter of fact, TAMs may have a dual role while interfering with cancer treatments, as they can either promote or impair their functionality. Here we review the connection between macrophages and anticancer therapies; moreover, we provide an overview of the different strategies to target or re-program TAMs for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26956893

  16. Specific Carbohydrate Diet: Does It Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) Go Back The Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) Email Print + Share There is no ... diet that has received attention is the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. This diet limits poorly digestible carbohydrates to ...

  17. Immunohistochemical markers for tumor associated macrophages and survival in advanced classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Espiridión, Beatriz; Martin-Moreno, Ana M.; Montalbán, Carlos; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Vega, Francisco; Younes, Anas; Piris, Miguel A.; Garcia, Juan F.

    2012-01-01

    A subset of patients with advanced classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma is refractory to standard therapies. Therefore, it is relevant to identify new biologically-based prognostic markers. Recently, tumor associated macrophages have been proposed as a factor that predicts survival, although contradictory results have also been reported. Here we analyzed four macrophage markers (CD68, CD163, LYZ, and STAT1) using immunohistochemistry and automated quantification, in two independent series of advanced classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma (n=266 and 103 patients, respectively). Our results did not confirm that specific macrophage immunohistochemical markers could be used as surrogates for gene expression profiling studies. Survival analyses did not show correlation between CD163, LYZ or STAT1 and either failure-free or disease-specific survival. There was an association between CD68 and disease-specific survival, but it was not consistent in both series. In conclusion, individual tumor associated macrophage markers cannot be used to predict outcome before technical standardization and prospective validation in independent series of patients with comparable stages and treatments. PMID:22315492

  18. Tumor-associated stromal cells as key contributors to the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Bussard, Karen M; Mutkus, Lysette; Stumpf, Kristina; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Marini, Frank C

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a heterogeneous population of cells consisting of the tumor bulk plus supporting cells. It is becoming increasingly evident that these supporting cells are recruited by cancer cells from nearby endogenous host stroma and promote events such as tumor angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, as well as mediate mechanisms of therapeutic resistance. In addition, recruited stromal cells range in type and include vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, adipocytes, fibroblasts, and bone-marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. During normal wound healing and inflammatory processes, local stromal cells change their phenotype to become that of reactive stroma. Under certain conditions, however, tumor cells can co-opt these reactive stromal cells and further transition them into tumor-associated stromal cells (TASCs). These TASCs express higher levels of proteins, including alpha-smooth muscle actin, fibroblast activating protein, and matrix metalloproteinases, compared with their normal, non-reactive counterparts. TASCs are also known to secrete many pro-tumorigenic factors, including IL-6, IL-8, stromal-derived factor-1 alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, tenascin-C, and matrix metalloproteinases, among others, which recruit additional tumor and pro-tumorigenic cells to the developing microenvironment. Here, we review the current literature pertaining to the origins of recruited host stroma, contributions toward tumor progression, tumor-associated stromal cells, and mechanisms of crosstalk between endogenous host stroma and tumor cells. PMID:27515302

  19. Carbohydrate force fields

    PubMed Central

    Foley, B. Lachele; Tessier, Matthew B.; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates present a special set of challenges to the generation of force fields. First, the tertiary structures of monosaccharides are complex merely by virtue of their exceptionally high number of chiral centers. In addition, their electronic characteristics lead to molecular geometries and electrostatic landscapes that can be challenging to predict and model. The monosaccharide units can also interconnect in many ways, resulting in a large number of possible oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, both linear and branched. These larger structures contain a number of rotatable bonds, meaning they potentially sample an enormous conformational space. This article briefly reviews the history of carbohydrate force fields, examining and comparing their challenges, forms, philosophies, and development strategies. Then it presents a survey of recent uses of these force fields, noting trends, strengths, deficiencies, and possible directions for future expansion. PMID:25530813

  20. Carbohydrate post-glycosylational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrate modification is a common phenomenon in nature. Many carbohydrate modifications such as some epimerization, O-acetylation, O-sulfation, O-methylation, N-deacetylation, and N-sulfation, take place after the formation of oligosaccharide or polysaccharide backbones. These modifications can be categorized as carbohydrate post-glycosylational modifications (PGMs). Carbohydrate PGMs further extend the complexity of the structures and the synthesis of carbohydrates and glycoconjugates. They also increase the capacity of the biological information that can be controlled by finely tuning the structures of carbohydrates. Developing efficient methods to obtain structurally defined naturally occurring oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and glycoconjugates with carbohydrate PGMs is essential for understanding the biological significance of carbohydrate PGMs. Combine with high-throughput screening methods, synthetic carbohydrates with PGMs are invaluable probes in structure-activity relationship studies. We illustrate here several classes of carbohydrates with PGMs and their applications. Recent progress in chemical, enzymatic, and chemoenzymatic syntheses of these carbohydrates and their derivatives are also presented. PMID:17340000

  1. [Carbohydrates and fiber].

    PubMed

    Lajolo, F M; de Menezes, E W; Filisetti-Cozzi, T M

    1988-09-01

    Dietary carbohydrates comprise two fractions that may be classified as digestible, and which are useful as energy sources (simple and complex carbohydrates) and fiber, which is presumed to be of no use to the human body. There are insufficient epidemiologic data on the metabolic effects of simple carbohydrates and it is not advisable to make quantitative recommendations of intake. It is questionable to recommend in developing countries that a fixed proportion of dietary energy be derived from simple sugars, due to the high prevalence of deficient energy intake, cultural habits, and regional differences in food intake and physical activity. In relation to recommendations of complex carbohydrates, it should be considered that their absorption is influenced by many factors inherent to the individual and to the foods. Fiber is defined as a series of different substances derived from tissue structures, cellular residues and undigested chemical substances that may be partially utilized after intestinal bacteria have acted on them. There is not a clear definition of the chemical composition of fiber, but it consists mainly of polysaccharides (such as cellulose, hemicellulose and pectins), lignin and end products of the interactions of various food components. The effects of fiber, such as control of food intake, regulation of gastrointestinal transit, post-prandial blood concentrations of cholesterol, glucose and insulin, flatulence and alterations in nutrient bioavailability are due to various physical properties inherent to its chemical components. Impairment of nutrient absorption may be harmful, mainly among populations whose food intake is lower than their energy needs, and with a high fiber content. This may be particularly important in pregnant women, growing children and the elderly, and should be considered when making nutrient recommendations. A precise knowledge of fiber is also important to calculate the real energy value of foods, mainly for two reasons: 1

  2. Tecemotide: An antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wurz, Gregory T; Kao, Chiao-Jung; Wolf, Michael; DeGregorio, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) has made possible the development of antigen-specific cancer immunotherapies such as tecemotide. One of those is mucin 1 (MUC1), a cell membrane glycoprotein expressed on some epithelial tissues such as breast and lung. In cancer, MUC1 becomes overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated, exposing the immunogenic tandem repeat units in the extracellular domain of MUC1. Designed to target tumor associated MUC1, tecemotide is being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials for treatment of unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as maintenance therapy following chemoradiotherapy. Additional Phase II studies in other indications are ongoing. This review discusses the preclinical and clinical development of tecemotide, ongoing preclinical studies of tecemotide in human MUC1 transgenic mouse models of breast and lung cancer, and the potential application of these models for optimizing the timing of chemoradiotherapy and tecemotide immunotherapy to achieve the best treatment outcome for patients. PMID:25483673

  3. Tecemotide: an antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wurz, Gregory T; Kao, Chiao-Jung; Wolf, Michael; DeGregorio, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    The identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) has made possible the development of antigen-specific cancer immunotherapies such as tecemotide. One of those is mucin 1 (MUC1), a cell membrane glycoprotein expressed on some epithelial tissues such as breast and lung. In cancer, MUC1 becomes overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated, exposing the immunogenic tandem repeat units in the extracellular domain of MUC1. Designed to target tumor associated MUC1, tecemotide is being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials for treatment of unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as maintenance therapy following chemoradiotherapy. Additional Phase II studies in other indications are ongoing. This review discusses the preclinical and clinical development of tecemotide, ongoing preclinical studies of tecemotide in human MUC1 transgenic mouse models of breast and lung cancer, and the potential application of these models for optimizing the timing of chemoradiotherapy and tecemotide immunotherapy to achieve the best treatment outcome for patients. PMID:25483673

  4. The role of carbohydrates in infection strategies of enteric pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kentaro; Ishiwa, Akiko

    2015-03-01

    Enteric pathogens cause considerable public health concerns worldwide including tropical regions. Here, we review the roles of carbohydrates in the infection strategies of various enteric pathogens including viruses, bacteria and protozoa, which infect the epithelial lining of the human and animal intestine. At host cell entry, enteric viruses, including norovirus, recognize mainly histo-blood group antigens. At the initial step of bacterial infections, carbohydrates also function as receptors for attachment. Here, we describe the function of carbohydrates in infection by Salmonella enterica and several bacterial species that produce a variety of fimbrial adhesions. During invasion by enteropathogenic protozoa, apicomplexan parasites utilize sialic acids or sulfated glycans. Carbohydrates serve as receptors for infection by these microbes; however, their usage of carbohydrates varies depending on the microbe. On the surface of the mucosal tissues of the gastrointestinal tract, various carbohydrate moieties are present and play a crucial role in infection, representing the site of infection or route of access for most microbes. During the infection and/or invasion process of the microbes, carbohydrates function as receptors for various microbes, but they can also function as a barrier to infection. One approach to develop effective prophylactic and therapeutic antimicrobial agents is to modify the drug structure. Another approach is to modify the mode of inhibition of infection depending on the individual pathogen by using and mimicking the interactions with carbohydrates. In addition, similarities in mode of infection may also be utilized. Our findings will be useful in the development of new drugs for the treatment of enteric pathogens. PMID:25859152

  5. The Tumor-Associated Marker, PVRL4 (Nectin-4), is the Epithelial Receptor for Morbilliviruses

    PubMed Central

    Delpeut, Sebastien; Noyce, Ryan S.; Richardson, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    PVRL4 (nectin-4) was recently identified as the epithelial receptor for members of the Morbillivirus genus, including measles virus, canine distemper virus and peste des petits ruminants virus. Here, we describe the role of PVRL4 in morbillivirus pathogenesis and its promising use in cancer therapies. This discovery establishes a new paradigm for the spread of virus from lymphocytes to airway epithelial cells and its subsequent release into the environment. Measles virus vaccine strains have emerged as a promising oncolytic platform for cancer therapy in the last ten years. Given that PVRL4 is a well-known tumor-associated marker for several adenocarcinoma (lung, breast and ovary), the measles virus could potentially be used to specifically target, infect and destroy cancers expressing PVRL4. PMID:24892636

  6. Tumor-associated macrophages (not tumor cells) are the determinants of photosensitizer tumor localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-03-01

    The distribution of Photofrin and several other photosensitizers among major cellular populations contained in solid mouse tumors was examined using flow cytometry. Seven tumor models were included in the analysis: sarcomas EMT6, KHT, RIF, FsaR and FsaN, Lewis lung carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII. In all these tumors, the highest photosensitizer levels were found in a subpopulation of tumor associated macrophages consisting of activated cells (as suggested by their increased size, granularity, and the number of interleukin 2 receptors). There was no evidence of selective photosensitizer accumulation in malignant tumor cells. Results consistent with these observations were also obtained with the carcinogen induced squamous cell carcinoma growing in hamster cheek pouch.

  7. Ghost cell odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma--report of two rare cases.

    PubMed

    Hogge, Maritzabel; Velez, Ines; Kaltman, Steven; Movahed, Reza; Yeh, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The ghost cell odontogenic tumor (GCOT) is a neoplastic/cystic lesion with a diverse histopathological and clinical behavior It was formerly known as calcified odontogenic cyst, but in 2005 the World Health Organization categorized this lesion as an odontogenic, benign tumor rather than a cyst; nominating this neoplasm as calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor. A later comprehensive classification named it ghost cell odontogenic tumor because the most remarkable histopathologic characteristic is the presence of a mass of ghost cells embedded in the epithelium. We report two cases of a rare variant of a ghost cell odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma; to our knowledge, one is the youngest patient (four month old) reported in the English literature.

  8. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with an odontome – a diverse lesion encountered

    PubMed Central

    Radheshyam, Chourasia; Alokenath, Bandyopadhyay; Kumar, Harish; Abikshyeet, Panda

    2015-01-01

    The human jaw is an exclusive habitat for odontogenic lesions. Ghost cells associated odontogenic lesions are a diverse group with a variety of presentations in the jaws. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor is a benign cystic neoplasm of odontogenic origin which demonstrates ghost cells in the epithelial component. This tumor sometimes mimics the features of a cyst clinically and radiographically, but histopathologically as well as behavior-wise shows the features of a tumor. Many classification systems have been proposed and revised from time to time. Presently a dualistic concept is highlighted to classify this group of lesions. The present case highlights a case of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with a complex composite odontome, which appeared like a cyst clinically and radiographically. PMID:26345145

  9. The tumor-associated marker, PVRL4 (nectin-4), is the epithelial receptor for morbilliviruses.

    PubMed

    Delpeut, Sebastien; Noyce, Ryan S; Richardson, Christopher D

    2014-06-01

    PVRL4 (nectin-4) was recently identified as the epithelial receptor for members of the Morbillivirus genus, including measles virus, canine distemper virus and peste des petits ruminants virus. Here, we describe the role of PVRL4 in morbillivirus pathogenesis and its promising use in cancer therapies. This discovery establishes a new paradigm for the spread of virus from lymphocytes to airway epithelial cells and its subsequent release into the environment. Measles virus vaccine strains have emerged as a promising oncolytic platform for cancer therapy in the last ten years. Given that PVRL4 is a well-known tumor-associated marker for several adenocarcinoma (lung, breast and ovary), the measles virus could potentially be used to specifically target, infect and destroy cancers expressing PVRL4. PMID:24892636

  10. OK-432 Suppresses Proliferation and Metastasis by Tumor Associated Macrophages in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan-Feng; Tang, Kun; Guan, Wei; Yang, Tao; Xu, Hua; Zhuang, Qian-Yuan; Ye, Zhang-Qun

    2015-01-01

    OK-432, a Streptococcus-derived anticancer immunotherapeutic agent, has been applied in clinic for many years and achieved great progress in various cancers. In the present study, we investigated its anticancer effect on bladder cancer through tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). MTS assay validated OK-432 could inhibit proliferation in both T24 and EJ bladder cell lines. OK-432 also induced apoptosis of bladder cancer cells in vitro. Consequently, we demonstrated that OK-432 could suppress the bladder cancer cells migration and invasion by altering the EMT-related factors. Furthermore, using SD rat model, we revealed that OK-432 inhibited tumor growth, suppressed PCNA expression and inhibited metastasis in vivo. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that OK-432 inhibits cell proliferation and metastasis through inducing macrophages to secret cytokines in bladder cancer.

  11. OK-432 Suppresses Proliferation and Metastasis by Tumor Associated Macrophages in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan-Feng; Tang, Kun; Guan, Wei; Yang, Tao; Xu, Hua; Zhuang, Qian-Yuan; Ye, Zhang-Qun

    2015-01-01

    OK-432, a Streptococcus-derived anticancer immunotherapeutic agent, has been applied in clinic for many years and achieved great progress in various cancers. In the present study, we investigated its anticancer effect on bladder cancer through tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). MTS assay validated OK-432 could inhibit proliferation in both T24 and EJ bladder cell lines. OK-432 also induced apoptosis of bladder cancer cells in vitro. Consequently, we demonstrated that OK-432 could suppress the bladder cancer cells migration and invasion by altering the EMT-related factors. Furthermore, using SD rat model, we revealed that OK-432 inhibited tumor growth, suppressed PCNA expression and inhibited metastasis in vivo. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that OK-432 inhibits cell proliferation and metastasis through inducing macrophages to secret cytokines in bladder cancer. PMID:26107200

  12. Tumor-Derived CXCL1 Promotes Lung Cancer Growth via Recruitment of Tumor-Associated Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ha; Xu, Junfang; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils have a traditional role in inflammatory process and act as the first line of defense against infections. Although their contribution to tumorigenesis and progression is still controversial, accumulating evidence recently has demonstrated that tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) play a key role in multiple aspects of cancer biology. Here, we detected that chemokine CXCL1 was dramatically elevated in serum from 3LL tumor-bearing mice. In vitro, 3LL cells constitutively expressed and secreted higher level of CXCL1. Furthermore, knocking down CXCL1 expression in 3LL cells significantly hindered tumor growth by inhibiting recruitment of neutrophils from peripheral blood into tumor tissues. Additionally, tumor-infiltrated neutrophils expressed higher levels of MPO and Fas/FasL, which may be involved in TAN-mediated inhibition of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These results demonstrate that tumor-derived CXCL1 contributes to TANs infiltration in lung cancer which promotes tumor growth. PMID:27446967

  13. The metabolic interactions between tumor cells and tumor-associated stroma (TAS) in prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Koukourakis, Michael I; Koutsopoulos, Anastasios; Mendrinos, Savvas; Sivridis, Efthimios

    2012-11-01

    Tumor-associated stroma (TAS) is not simply a supporting element for cancer cells, but plays an important role in tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. Changes on the level of stromal constituents, such as loss of Caveolin-1 and increased thymidine phosphorylase (TP) expression, have been associated with tumor aggressiveness. The mutual cooperation between stromal fibroblasts and cancer cells is another distinguishing feature, which has recently emerged. In this investigation, both the loss of Caveolin-1 and the increased TP expression in the prostatic TAS was associated with high Gleason score (p = 0.0002 and 0.003, respectively); the two proteins were acting both independently and synergistically. In addition, TP was significantly associated with high stromal Ki-67 (MIB1) proliferation index (p = 0.03). Analysis of the metabolic interactions between stromal and epithelial elements showed that, while prostatic cancer cells express principally (> 91%) lactate dehydrogenase-5 (LDH-5) (anaerobic metabolism), the tumor-associated fibroblasts/myofibroblasts (TAFs) express largely (67.8%) LDH-1 (aerobic metabolism)-the terms TAFs and TAS are used interchangeably. These two isoenzyme pathways act complementary; the LDH-5 pathway converts pyruvate to lactate, whereas the LDH-1 enzyme system utilizes the secreted metabolite lactate to produce pyruvate, essential for continuous energy supply to tumor cells. Monocarboxylate transporter-1 (MCT-1)-the main facilitator of lactate uptake in tumor cells, was expressed exclusively in prostate cancer cells and related directly to LDH-5 overexpression. These findings support and extend our previous studies on energy recycling between the aerobic stroma and the anaerobic cancer cells within the framework of Warburg effect.

  14. Tumor associated macrophage expressing CD204 is associated with tumor aggressiveness of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shigeoka, Manabu; Urakawa, Naoki; Nakamura, Tetsu; Nishio, Mari; Watajima, Taketo; Kuroda, Daisuke; Komori, Takahide; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Semba, Shuho; Yokozaki, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are the most abundant cancer stromal cells educated by tumor microenvironment to acquire trophic functions facilitating angiogenesis, matrix breakdown and cancer cell motility. Tumor associated macrophages have anti-inflammatory properties or "alternatively" activated (M2) phenotype expressing CD204 and/or CD163. To know the role of TAMs in the growth and progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs), we calculated intratumoral CD204, CD163 or CD68 expressing macrophage count (MϕC) and CD34-positive microvessel density (MVD) by immunohistochemistry in 70 cases of surgically resected ESCCs and compared them with the clinicopathological factors and prognosis of patients. MϕC had positive linear association with MVD. High CD204(+) MϕC were significantly correlated with more malignant phenotypes including depth of tumor invasion, lymph and blood vessel invasion, lymph node metastasis as well as clinical stages. On the other hand, CD163(+) MϕC did not associate with these clinicopathological factors with the exception of depth of tumor invasion and blood vessel invasion. Patients with high CD204(+) MϕC ESCCs showed poor disease-free survival (P = 0.021). Conditioned media of five ESCC cell lines (TE-8, -9, -10, -11 and -15) induced mRNA as well as protein expression of CD204 but not of CD163 with upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor-A mRNA in TPA treated human acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1. These results overall indicate that CD204 is a useful marker for TAMs contributing to the angiogenesis, progression and prognosis of ESCCs whose specific tumor microenvironment may educate macrophages to be CD204(+) M2 TAMs.

  15. Detection and Characterization of Circulating Tumor Associated Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Zhaomei; Benali-Furet, Naoual; Uzan, Georges; Znaty, Anaëlle; Ye, Zhong; Paolillo, Carmela; Wang, Chun; Austin, Laura; Rossi, Giovanna; Fortina, Paolo; Yang, Hushan; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The availability of blood-based diagnostic testing using a non-invasive technique holds promise for real-time monitoring of disease progression and treatment selection. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been used as a prognostic biomarker for the metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The molecular characterization of CTCs is fundamental to the phenotypic identification of malignant cells and description of the relevant genetic alterations that may change according to disease progression and therapy resistance. However, the molecular characterization of CTCs remains a challenge because of the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs and technological difficulties in the enrichment, isolation and molecular characterization of CTCs. In this pilot study, we evaluated circulating tumor associated cells in one blood draw by size exclusion technology and cytological analysis. Among 30 prospectively enrolled MBC patients, CTCs, circulating tumor cell clusters (CTC clusters), CTCs of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer associated macrophage-like cells (CAMLs) were detected and analyzed. For molecular characterization of CTCs, size-exclusion method for CTC enrichment was tested in combination with DEPArray™ technology, which allows the recovery of single CTCs or pools of CTCs as a pure CTC sample for mutation analysis. Genomic mutations of TP53 and ESR1 were analyzed by targeted sequencing on isolated 7 CTCs from a patient with MBC. The results of genomic analysis showed heterozygous TP53 R248W mutation from one single CTC and pools of three CTCs, and homozygous TP53 R248W mutation from one single CTC and pools of two CTCs. Wild-type ESR1 was detected in the same isolated CTCs. The results of this study reveal that size-exclusion method can be used to enrich and identify circulating tumor associated cells, and enriched CTCs were characterized for genetic alterations in MBC patients, respectively. PMID:27706044

  16. Tumor-associated glycoprotein distribution detected by monoclonal antibody B72.3 in salivary neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Brandwein, M S; Huvos, A G; Patil, J; Jagirdar, J

    1992-06-01

    The expression of tumor-associated glycoprotein (TAG-72), an oncofetal mucin-like tumor-associated glycoprotein derived from membrane-enriched fractions of metastatic breast carcinoma, has been detected by monoclonal antibody (MoAb) B72.3 in adenocarcinomas of breast, colon, lung, endometrium, pancreas, and ovary. The authors reported the scope of TAG-72 expression detected by MoAb B72.3 in salivary neoplasia. They examined 96 salivary lesions (53 malignant and 37 benign primary tumors, 2 metastatic carcinomas, and 4 other benign lesions) and 17 normal tissues from parotid glands and found: diffuse TAG-72 expression in 29 of 55 (53%) malignant tumors and 6 of 36 (17%) benign tumors and in no normal tissue; focal TAG-72 expression in 10 of 55 (17%) malignant salivary tumors, 10 of 37 (25%) benign salivary tumors (all benign mixed tumors), and 1 of 17 (6%) histologically normal parotid gland ducts. Any expression of TAG-72, whether diffuse or focal, was found to have a 71% sensitivity for detecting salivary malignant tumors, but an unacceptably low specificity for malignant lesions (57%). Alternatively, if only diffuse TAG-72 expression was regarded as indicative of malignancy, the specificity of diffuse TAG-72 expression was 86%, but sensitivity of detection decreased to 53%. The authors studied a subset of benign and malignant mixed tumors (BMT and MMT) and found that 12 of 15 (80%) MMT diffusely and strongly expressed TAG-72, 2 of 15 MMT (13%) expressed TAG-72 focally, and 1 MMT (7%) was nonreactive. By contrast, most BMT did not express TAG-72; only sparse, focal TAG-72 expression was seen in 10 of 27 (37%) BMT. If diffuse TAG-72 expression is considered indicative of malignancy, its sensitivity and specificity for malignant mixed tumors is 80% and 100%, respectively. The authors suggest that diffuse TAG-72 expression may resolve conflicts in determining whether or not a mixed tumor is malignant.

  17. Understanding carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions by means of glyconanotechnology.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Jesus M; Penadés, Soledad

    2004-01-01

    Carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction is a reliable and versatile mechanism for cell adhesion and recognition. Glycosphingolipid (GSL) clusters at the cell membrane are mainly involved in this interaction. To investigate carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction an integrated strategy (Glyconanotechnology) was developed. This strategy includes polyvalent tools (gold glyconanoparticles) mimicking GSL clustering at the cell membrane as well as analytical techniques such as AFM, TEM, and SPR to evaluate the interactions. The results obtained by means of this strategy and current status are presented. PMID:15483380

  18. Immunodominant antigen of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 in high-responder patients.

    PubMed Central

    Califano, J V; Schenkein, H A; Tew, J G

    1989-01-01

    This study was undertaken to look for characteristics of the immunodominant antigen(s) of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 that might help explain the high antibody titers in periodontitis patients. Radioimmunoassays (RIA) were performed on sera from 481 patients; sera from the 32 patients with the highest anti-Y4 titers (above 128,000 RIA U/ml) were further analyzed. Y4 antigen was boiled for 45 min or treated with papain, and antibody responses were analyzed by RIA and Western blotting (immunoblotting). In addition, carbohydrate was purified from Y4 and examined by Western blotting. The results indicated that the immunodominant antigen of Y4 in high responders was stable after papain treatment or boiling for 45 min. Papain or boiling eliminated protein bands but a large diffuse band persisted on Western blots. With increasing dilutions of sera, bands on Western blots corresponding to protein antigens disappeared, while the large diffuse band resembling that of carbohydrate persisted. Partially purified Y4 carbohydrate contained the large diffuse band. Double-immunodiffusion analysis indicated that rabbit serotype b-specific antiserum and patient sera recognized the same antigen. When the carbohydrate extract was passed over a lipid A-binding column to remove lipopolysaccharide, the smear corresponding to the immunodominant antigen was still present on Western blots. The immunodominant antigen of Y4 in high-responder individuals appears to be a carbohydrate and is possibly the capsular polysaccharide. Images PMID:2496034

  19. Adhesion Forces between Lewis(X) Determinant Antigens as Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tromas, C; Rojo, J; de la Fuente, J M; Barrientos, A G; García, R; Penadés, S

    2001-01-01

    The adhesion forces between individual molecules of Lewis(X) trisaccharide antigen (Le(X) ) have been measured in water and in calcium solution by using atomic force microscopy (AFM, see graph). These results demonstrate the self-recognition capability of this antigen, and reinforce the hypothesis that carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction could be considered as the first step in the cell-adhesion process in nature. PMID:12203646

  20. Adhesion Forces between Lewis(X) Determinant Antigens as Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tromas, C; Rojo, J; de la Fuente, J M; Barrientos, A G; García, R; Penadés, S

    2001-01-01

    The adhesion forces between individual molecules of Lewis(X) trisaccharide antigen (Le(X) ) have been measured in water and in calcium solution by using atomic force microscopy (AFM, see graph). These results demonstrate the self-recognition capability of this antigen, and reinforce the hypothesis that carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction could be considered as the first step in the cell-adhesion process in nature.

  1. Impact of Dietary Carbohydrate and Protein Levels on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasker, Denise Ann

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to investigate the impact of changing dietary carbohydrate (CARB) intakes within recommended dietary guidelines on metabolic outcomes specifically associated with glycemic regulations and carbohydrate metabolism. This research utilized both human and animal studies to examine changes in metabolism across a wide…

  2. The statolith compartment in Chara rhizoids contains carbohydrate and protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang-Cahill, F.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to higher plants, the alga Chara has rhizoids with single membrane-bound compartments that function as statoliths in gravity perception. Previous work has demonstrated that these statoliths contain barium sulfate crystals. In this study, we show that statoliths in Chara rhizoids react with a Coomassie Brilliant Blue cytochemical stain for proteins. While statoliths did not react with silver methenamine carbohydrate cytochemistry, the monoclonal antibody CCRC-M2, which is against a carbohydrate (sycamore-maple rhamnogalacturonan I), labeled the statolith compartment. These results demonstrate that in addition to barium sulfate, statoliths in Chara rhizoids have an organic matrix that consists of protein and carbohydrate moieties. Since the statoliths were silver methenamine negative, the carbohydrate in this compartment could be a 3-linked polysaccharide. CCRC-M2 also labeled Golgi cisternae, Golgi-associated vesicles, apical vesicles, and cell walls in the rhizoids. The specificity of CCRC-M2 immunolabeling was verified by several control experiments, including the demonstration that labeling was abolished when the antibody was preabsorbed with its antigen. Since in this and a previous study (John Z. Kiss and L. Andrew Staehelin, American Journal of Botany 80: 273-282, 1993) antibodies against higher plant carbohydrates crossreacted with cell walls of Chara in a specific manner, Characean algae may be a useful model system in biochemical and molecular studies of cell walls.

  3. Five novel cell surface antigens of CNS neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Jennings, M T; Jennings, V D; Asadourian, L L; Rosenblum, M; Albino, A P; Cairncross, J G; Old, L J

    1989-01-01

    Optimal monoclonal antibody-mediated immunotherapy requires the identification of tumor-restricted cell surface antigens. We have identified and partially characterized 5 new monoclonal antibodies generated against malignant astrocytoma, medulloblastoma, neuroblastoma and melanoma which were used to define 5 neuroectodermal tumor antigenic systems. CNT/1 identifies a 57-kDa, heat-stable, trypsin-sensitive neuroblastoma surface antigen, which is expressed intracellularly in many malignant gliomas, medulloblastomas, ependymomas, breast and ovarian carcinomas. CNT/2 reacts with a 130-kDa, heat-labile, trypsin- and neuraminidase-resistant antigen restricted to low-grade astrocytomas and malignant gliomas. CNT/11 reacts with a 70-kDa, heat-labile, trypsin-sensitive antigen coded for by a gene on chromosome 12, and is restricted to astrocytomas, neuroblastomas and sarcomas. CNT/8 identifies a heat-labile, trypsin-sensitive antigen whose gene has been localized to chromosome 15 and is expressed by neuroectodermal and mesodermally derived tumors and few epithelial cancers. The B2.6 antigen is identified only in terms of serologic reactivity with a subset of cultured astrocytomas and melanomas. Neuroectodermal tumor-associated antigens may be categorized as lineage-consistent, lineage-independent and putatively tumor-restricted in their expression. These restricted antibodies may be potentially useful reagents to consider for monoclonal antibody-mediated immunotherapy of CNS neoplasms.

  4. Stereochemical Control in Carbohydrate Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchelor, Rhys; Northcote, Peter T.; Harvey, Joanne E.; Dangerfield, Emma M.; Stocker, Bridget L.

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrates, in the form of glycoconjugates, have recently been shown to control a wide range of cellular processes. Accordingly, students interested in the study of organic chemistry and biomedical sciences should be exposed to carbohydrate chemistry. To this end, we have developed a sequence of experiments that leads the student from the…

  5. Immune checkpoint blockade reveals the stimulatory capacity of tumor-associated CD103(+) dendritic cells in late-stage ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Flies, Dallas B; Higuchi, Tomoe; Harris, Jaryse C; Jha, Vibha; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Adams, Sarah F

    2016-08-01

    Although immune infiltrates in ovarian cancer are associated with improved survival, the ovarian tumor environment has been characterized as immunosuppressive, due in part to functional shifts among dendritic cells with disease progression. We hypothesized that flux in dendritic cell subpopulations with cancer progression were responsible for observed differences in antitumor immune responses in early and late-stage disease. Here we identify three dendritic cell subsets with disparate functions in the ovarian tumor environment. CD11c+CD11b(-)CD103(+) dendritic cells are absent in the peritoneal cavity of healthy mice but comprise up to 40% of dendritic cells in tumor-bearing mice and retain T cell stimulatory capacity in advanced disease. Among CD11c+CD11b+ cells, Lair-1 expression distinguishes stimulatory and immunoregulatory DC subsets, which are also enriched in the tumor environment. Notably, PD-L1 is expressed by Lair-1(hi) immunoregulatory dendritic cells, and may contribute to local tumor antigen-specific T cell dysfunction. Using an adoptive transfer model, we find that PD-1 blockade enables tumor-associated CD103(+) dendritic cells to promote disease clearance. These data demonstrate that antitumor immune capacity is maintained among local dendritic cell subpopulations in the tumor environment with cancer progression. Similar dendritic cell subsets are present in malignant ascites from women with ovarian cancer, supporting the translational relevance of these results. PMID:27622059

  6. Preferential Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8(+) T cells, supported by tumor-associated macrophages, is associated with worse prognosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Pinying; Yue, Rongxi; Tang, Jiahong; Si, Haige; Shen, Liqun; Guo, Changsheng; Zhang, Lixin; Han, Huaizhong; Song, Haihan K; Zhao, Pengfei; Wang, Ning; Song, Zongchang; Guo, Chunliang

    2016-01-01

    While infection with H. pylori is a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, most H. pylori-colonized individuals, even those with the high-risk CagA(+)VacA(+) strain, remain asymptomatic over their lifetime. We hypothesized that the discordant outcomes were due to differences in the host immune responses. Previously, Tim-3-mediated immune modulation was observed in H. pylori-challenged mice. In this study, we compared Tim-3-related responses in CagA(+)VacA(+) H. pylori-infected asymptomatic individuals and H. pylori-associated gastric adenocarcinoma patients. We showed that compared to H. pylori-uninfected individuals, both H. pylori-infected asymptomatic and gastric cancer patients upregulated Tim-3 overall. However, the Tim-3 upregulation was enriched on Th1 cells in asymptomatic patients and on Treg and CD8(+) T cells in gastric cancer patients, with respective differences in T cell subset functions. In gastric cancer patients, high Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8(+) T cells, but not on Th1 cells, was associated with worse prognosis. H. pylori-antigen presentation by tumor-associated macrophages upregulated Tim-3 expression more effectively than by blood monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. The upregulation of Tim-3 in vitro depended on the concentration of H. pylori antigen but not on whether the cells were from asymptomatic or cancer patients. These data suggest that the discrepancy in Tim-3 upregulation in asymptomatic and cancer subjects is induced by cancer but not the other way around. Once gastric cancer is developed, Tim-3 expression is associated with worse prognosis.

  7. Preferential Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8+ T cells, supported by tumor-associated macrophages, is associated with worse prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pinying; Yue, Rongxi; Tang, Jiahong; Si, Haige; Shen, Liqun; Guo, Changsheng; Zhang, Lixin; Han, Huaizhong; Song, Haihan K; Zhao, Pengfei; Wang, Ning; Song, Zongchang; Guo, Chunliang

    2016-01-01

    While infection with H. pylori is a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, most H. pylori-colonized individuals, even those with the high-risk CagA+VacA+ strain, remain asymptomatic over their lifetime. We hypothesized that the discordant outcomes were due to differences in the host immune responses. Previously, Tim-3-mediated immune modulation was observed in H. pylori-challenged mice. In this study, we compared Tim-3-related responses in CagA+VacA+ H. pylori-infected asymptomatic individuals and H. pylori-associated gastric adenocarcinoma patients. We showed that compared to H. pylori-uninfected individuals, both H. pylori-infected asymptomatic and gastric cancer patients upregulated Tim-3 overall. However, the Tim-3 upregulation was enriched on Th1 cells in asymptomatic patients and on Treg and CD8+ T cells in gastric cancer patients, with respective differences in T cell subset functions. In gastric cancer patients, high Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8+ T cells, but not on Th1 cells, was associated with worse prognosis. H. pylori-antigen presentation by tumor-associated macrophages upregulated Tim-3 expression more effectively than by blood monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. The upregulation of Tim-3 in vitro depended on the concentration of H. pylori antigen but not on whether the cells were from asymptomatic or cancer patients. These data suggest that the discrepancy in Tim-3 upregulation in asymptomatic and cancer subjects is induced by cancer but not the other way around. Once gastric cancer is developed, Tim-3 expression is associated with worse prognosis. PMID:27648132

  8. Preferential Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8+ T cells, supported by tumor-associated macrophages, is associated with worse prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pinying; Yue, Rongxi; Tang, Jiahong; Si, Haige; Shen, Liqun; Guo, Changsheng; Zhang, Lixin; Han, Huaizhong; Song, Haihan K; Zhao, Pengfei; Wang, Ning; Song, Zongchang; Guo, Chunliang

    2016-01-01

    While infection with H. pylori is a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, most H. pylori-colonized individuals, even those with the high-risk CagA+VacA+ strain, remain asymptomatic over their lifetime. We hypothesized that the discordant outcomes were due to differences in the host immune responses. Previously, Tim-3-mediated immune modulation was observed in H. pylori-challenged mice. In this study, we compared Tim-3-related responses in CagA+VacA+ H. pylori-infected asymptomatic individuals and H. pylori-associated gastric adenocarcinoma patients. We showed that compared to H. pylori-uninfected individuals, both H. pylori-infected asymptomatic and gastric cancer patients upregulated Tim-3 overall. However, the Tim-3 upregulation was enriched on Th1 cells in asymptomatic patients and on Treg and CD8+ T cells in gastric cancer patients, with respective differences in T cell subset functions. In gastric cancer patients, high Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8+ T cells, but not on Th1 cells, was associated with worse prognosis. H. pylori-antigen presentation by tumor-associated macrophages upregulated Tim-3 expression more effectively than by blood monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. The upregulation of Tim-3 in vitro depended on the concentration of H. pylori antigen but not on whether the cells were from asymptomatic or cancer patients. These data suggest that the discrepancy in Tim-3 upregulation in asymptomatic and cancer subjects is induced by cancer but not the other way around. Once gastric cancer is developed, Tim-3 expression is associated with worse prognosis.

  9. Preferential Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8(+) T cells, supported by tumor-associated macrophages, is associated with worse prognosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Pinying; Yue, Rongxi; Tang, Jiahong; Si, Haige; Shen, Liqun; Guo, Changsheng; Zhang, Lixin; Han, Huaizhong; Song, Haihan K; Zhao, Pengfei; Wang, Ning; Song, Zongchang; Guo, Chunliang

    2016-01-01

    While infection with H. pylori is a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, most H. pylori-colonized individuals, even those with the high-risk CagA(+)VacA(+) strain, remain asymptomatic over their lifetime. We hypothesized that the discordant outcomes were due to differences in the host immune responses. Previously, Tim-3-mediated immune modulation was observed in H. pylori-challenged mice. In this study, we compared Tim-3-related responses in CagA(+)VacA(+) H. pylori-infected asymptomatic individuals and H. pylori-associated gastric adenocarcinoma patients. We showed that compared to H. pylori-uninfected individuals, both H. pylori-infected asymptomatic and gastric cancer patients upregulated Tim-3 overall. However, the Tim-3 upregulation was enriched on Th1 cells in asymptomatic patients and on Treg and CD8(+) T cells in gastric cancer patients, with respective differences in T cell subset functions. In gastric cancer patients, high Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8(+) T cells, but not on Th1 cells, was associated with worse prognosis. H. pylori-antigen presentation by tumor-associated macrophages upregulated Tim-3 expression more effectively than by blood monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. The upregulation of Tim-3 in vitro depended on the concentration of H. pylori antigen but not on whether the cells were from asymptomatic or cancer patients. These data suggest that the discrepancy in Tim-3 upregulation in asymptomatic and cancer subjects is induced by cancer but not the other way around. Once gastric cancer is developed, Tim-3 expression is associated with worse prognosis. PMID:27648132

  10. Neutrophil elastase enhances antigen presentation by upregulating human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Akhil; Alatrash, Gheath; Philips, Anne V; Qiao, Na; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Kerros, Celine; Diaconu, Iulia; Gall, Victor; Neal, Samantha; Peters, Haley L; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) is an innate immune cell-derived inflammatory mediator that we have shown increases the presentation of tumor-associated peptide antigens in breast cancer. In this study, we extend these observations to show that NE uptake has a broad effect on enhancing antigen presentation by breast cancer cells. We show that NE increases human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on the surface of breast cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. HLA class I upregulation requires internalization of enzymatically active NE. Western blots of NE-treated breast cancer cells confirm that the expression of total HLA class I as well as the antigen-processing machinery proteins TAP1, LMP2, and calnexin does not change following NE treatment. This suggests that NE does not increase the efficiency of antigen processing; rather, it mediates the upregulation of HLA class I by stabilizing and reducing membrane recycling of HLA class I molecules. Furthermore, the effects of NE extend beyond breast cancer since the uptake of NE by EBV-LCL increases the presentation of HLA class I-restricted viral peptides, as shown by their increased sensitivity to lysis by EBV-specific CD8+ T cells. Together, our results show that NE uptake increases the responsiveness of breast cancer cells to adaptive immunity by broad upregulation of membrane HLA class I and support the conclusion that the innate inflammatory mediator NE enhances tumor cell recognition and increases tumor sensitivity to the host adaptive immune response.

  11. MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

  12. Abuse potential of carbohydrates for overweight carbohydrate cravers

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bonnie; Schneider, Kristin; Smith, Malaina; Kendzor, Darla; Appelhans, Bradley; Hedeker, Donald; Pagoto, Sherry

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The long-rejected construct of food addiction is undergoing re-examination. Objectives . To evaluate whether a novel carbohydrate food shows abuse potential for rigorously defined carbohydrate cravers, as evidenced by selective self-administration and mood enhancement during double-blind discrimination testing. Methods Discrete trials choice testing was performed with 61 overweight (BMI m=27.64, SD=2.59) women (ages 18–45; 19.70% African American) whose diet records showed >4 weekly afternoon/evening emotional eating episodes confined to snacks with carbohydrate:protein ≥ 6:1. After being induced into a sad mood, participants were exposed, double-blind and in counterbalanced order, to taste-matched carbohydrate and protein beverages. They were asked to choose and self-administer the drink that made them feel better. Results Women overwhelmingly chose the carbohydrate beverage, even though blinded. Mixed-effects regression modeling, controlling for beverage order, revealed greater liking and greater reduction in dysphoria following the carbohydrate beverage compared to the protein beverage, but no differential effect on vigor. Conclusion For women who crave them, carbohydrates appear to display abuse potential, plausibly contributing to overconsumption and overweight. PMID:18273603

  13. Quantitative changes in tumor-associated M2 macrophages characterize cholangiocarcinoma and their association with metastasis.

    PubMed

    Thanee, Malinee; Loilome, Watcharin; Techasen, Anchalee; Namwat, Nisana; Boonmars, Thidarut; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Yongvanit, Puangrat

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) includes numerous non-neoplastic cells such as leukocytes and fibroblasts that surround the neoplasm and influence its growth. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are documented as key players in facilitating cancer appearance and progression. Alteration of the macrophage (CD68, CD163) and fibroblast (α-SMA, FSP-1) cells in Opisthorchis viverrini (Ov)-induced cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) was here assessed using liver tissues from an established hamster model and from 43 human cases using immunohistochemistry. We further investigated whether M2-activated TAMs influence CCA cell migration ability by wound healing assay and Western blot analysis. Macrophages and fibroblasts change their phenotypes to M2-TAMs (CD68+, CD163+) and CAFs (α-SMA+, FSP-1+), respectively in the early stages of carcinogenesis. Interestingly, a high density of the M2-TAMs CCA in patients is significantly associated with the presence of extrahepatic metastases (p=0.021). Similarly, CD163+ CCA cells are correlated with metastases (p=0.002), and they may be representative of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) with increased metastatic activity. We further showed that M2-TAM conditioned medium can induce CCA cell migration as well as increase N-cadherin expression (mesenchymal marker). The present work revealed that significant TME changes occur at an early stage of Ov-induced carcinogenesis and that M2-TAMs are key factors contributing to CCA metastasis, possibly via EMT processes. PMID:25854403

  14. CD86+/CD206+, Diametrically Polarized Tumor-Associated Macrophages, Predict Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patient Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Pingping; Ma, Lijie; Liu, Longzi; Zhao, Guangxi; Zhang, Si; Dong, Ling; Xue, Ruyi; Chen, She

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), the most abundant infiltrating immune cells in tumor microenvironment, have distinct functions in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression. CD68+ TAMs represent multiple polarized immune cells mainly containing CD86+ antitumoral M1 macrophages and CD206+ protumoral M2 macrophages. TAMs expression and density were assessed by immunohistochemical staining of CD68, CD86, and CD206 in tissue microarrays from 253 HCC patients. Clinicopathologic features and prognostic value of these markers were evaluated. We found that CD68+ TAMs were not associated with clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis in HCC. Low presence of CD86+ TAMs and high presence of CD206+ TAMs were markedly correlated with aggressive tumor phenotypes, such as multiple tumor number and advanced tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage; and were associated with poor overall survival (OS) (p = 0.027 and p = 0.024, respectively) and increased time to recurrence (TTR) (p = 0.037 and p = 0.031, respectively). In addition, combined analysis of CD86 and CD206 provided a better indicator for OS (p = 0.011) and TTR (p = 0.024) in HCC than individual analysis of CD86 and CD206. Moreover, CD86+/CD206+ TAMs predictive model also had significant prognosis value in α-fetoprotein (AFP)-negative patients (OS: p = 0.002, TTR: p = 0.005). Thus, these results suggest that combined analysis of immune biomarkers CD86 and CD206 could be a promising HCC prognostic biomarker. PMID:26938527

  15. Increased Survivin Expression Confers Chemoresistance to Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Virrey, Jenilyn J.; Guan, Shengxi; Li, Wei; Schönthal, Axel H.; Chen, Thomas C.; Hofman, Florence M.

    2008-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis gene family, is responsible for drug resistance in cancer cells, yet little is known about its role in the endothelial cells of the tumor vasculature. We have previously reported that tumor-associated endothelial cells derived from gliomas (TuBECs) are resistant to anticancer chemotherapy whereas normal brain endothelial cells (BECs) are sensitive. The focus of this study is to investigate the mechanism behind this chemoresistance. Here we show that survivin is constitutively overexpressed in the glioma vasculature but not in the blood vessels of normal brain. To determine whether survivin contributes to TuBEC chemoresistance, we used a lentiviral siRNA system or the drug roscovitine to down-regulate survivin expression. Reduced levels of survivin sensitized TuBECs to the chemotherapeutic agents VP-16, paclitaxel, thapsigargin, and temozolomide. This cell death was mediated through caspases 7 and 4. Conversely, forced expression of survivin in BECs was protective against drug cytotoxicity. These data suggest that overexpression of survivin in endothelial cells serves as a protective mechanism that defends the vasculature from drug cytotoxicity. Our studies demonstrate that targeting survivin may be an effective approach to chemosensitization and anti-vascular therapy for brain tumors. PMID:18599610

  16. Increased survivin expression confers chemoresistance to tumor-associated endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Virrey, Jenilyn J; Guan, Shengxi; Li, Wei; Schönthal, Axel H; Chen, Thomas C; Hofman, Florence M

    2008-08-01

    Growing evidence suggests that survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis gene family, is responsible for drug resistance in cancer cells, yet little is known about its role in the endothelial cells of the tumor vasculature. We have previously reported that tumor-associated endothelial cells derived from gliomas (TuBECs) are resistant to anticancer chemotherapy whereas normal brain endothelial cells (BECs) are sensitive. The focus of this study is to investigate the mechanism behind this chemoresistance. Here we show that survivin is constitutively overexpressed in the glioma vasculature but not in the blood vessels of normal brain. To determine whether survivin contributes to TuBEC chemoresistance, we used a lentiviral siRNA system or the drug roscovitine to down-regulate survivin expression. Reduced levels of survivin sensitized TuBECs to the chemotherapeutic agents VP-16, paclitaxel, thapsigargin, and temozolomide. This cell death was mediated through caspases 7 and 4. Conversely, forced expression of survivin in BECs was protective against drug cytotoxicity. These data suggest that overexpression of survivin in endothelial cells serves as a protective mechanism that defends the vasculature from drug cytotoxicity. Our studies demonstrate that targeting survivin may be an effective approach to chemosensitization and anti-vascular therapy for brain tumors.

  17. Huaier extract suppresses breast cancer via regulating tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaming; Qi, Wenwen; Song, Xiaojin; Lv, Shangge; Zhang, Hanwen; Yang, Qifeng

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages in tumor microenvironment are mostly M2-polarized - and have been reported to promote tumorigenesis, which are also defined as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Here, we examined the regulatory effects of Huaier extract on TAMs using RAW264.7 murine macrophage cell line. Our data demonstrated that Huaier extract could inhibit the infiltration of macrophages into tumor microenvironment in a dose-dependent manner. By performing RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and phagocytosis assay, we were able to find that Huaier extract could regulate the polarization of macrophages, with decreased M2-polarization and increased phagocytosis of RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, we identified that Huaier extract could suppress macrophages-induced angiogenesis by using HUVEC migration assay, tube formation and chorioallantoic membrane assay. Additionally, western blotting showed decreased expression of MMP2, MMP9 and VEGF with the use of Huaier extract. Finally, we found that Huaier extract could inhibit M2-macrophages infiltration and angiogenesis through treating 4T1 tumor bearing mice with Huaier extract. Our study revealed a novel mechanism of the anti-tumor effect of Huaier extract which inhibited angiogenesis by targeting TAMs. These findings provided that Huaier was a promising drug for clinical treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26831282

  18. Uniform brain tumor distribution and tumor associated macrophage targeting of systemically administered dendrimers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Mishra, Manoj K.; Mangraviti, Antonella; Hwang, Lee; Zhou, Jinyuan; Hanes, Justin; Brem, Henry; Olivi, Alessandro; Tyler, Betty; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2015-01-01

    Effective blood–brain tumor barrier penetration and uniform solid tumor distribution can significantly enhance therapeutic delivery to brain tumors. Hydroxyl-functionalized, generation-4 poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers, with their small size, near-neutral surface charge, and the ability to selectively localize in cells associated with neuroinflammation may offer new opportunities to address these challenges. In this study we characterized the intracranial tumor biodistribution of systemically delivered PAMAM dendrimers in an intracranial rodent gliosarcoma model using fluorescence-based quantification methods and high resolution confocal microscopy. We observed selective and homogeneous distribution of dendrimer throughout the solid tumor (~6 mm) and peritumoral area within fifteen minutes after systemic administration, with subsequent accumulation and retention in tumor associated microglia/macrophages (TAMs). Neuroinflammation and TAMs have important growth promoting and pro-invasive effects in brain tumors. The rapid clearance of systemically administered dendrimers from major organs promises minimal off-target adverse effects of conjugated drugs. Therefore, selective delivery of immunomodulatory molecules to TAM, using hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimers, may hold promise for therapy of glioblastoma. PMID:25818456

  19. Tumor-associated macrophages promote tumor cell proliferation in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yixiong; Fan, Linni; Wang, Yingmei; Li, Peifeng; Zhu, Jin; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Weichen; Zhang, Yuehua; Huang, Gaosheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between the number of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and proliferative activity of tumor cells and the relationship between two macrophage biomarkers CD68 and CD163 in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to reconfirm the diagnosis of nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma and detect the numbers of TAMs and the ki-67 label index of the tumor cells in all 31 cases. In addition, 12 cases of inflammatory cases were collected as controls, for which the immunostaining of CD68 and CD163 were done as well. Then staining results were analyzed with Pearson correlation and t test. Results: The number of TAMs was positively correlated with tumor proliferative activity (P = 0.024) in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma. The expression of CD68 and CD163 was closely related (P = 0.009), and the positive rate of CD68 was generally higher than CD163, however there is no statistical significance. Conclusion: The increase in numbers of TAMs in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma is related to higher proliferative index, indicating the TAMs play an important role in tumor proliferation. Meanwhile both CD68 and CD163 might be the markers for TAMs but CD163 would be the better one. PMID:25337185

  20. Characterization of Truncated Tumor-Associated NADH Oxidase (ttNOX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel J.; Malone, Christine C.; Burk, Melissa; Moore, Blake P.; Achari, Aniruddha; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial, plant and animal cells possess novel surface proteins that exhibit both NADH oxidation (NOX) or hydroquinone and protein disulfide-thiol interchange. These enzymatic activities alternate to yield oscillating patterns wjth period lengths of approximately 24 minutes. The catalytic period of NOX proteins are temperature compensated and gravity responsive. We report the cloning, expression and characterization of truncated tumor-associated NADH oxidase (ttNOX), in which the membrane spanning region has been deleted. The cDNA (originated from HeLa cells) was cloned into pET-34b and pET-14b (Novagen) vectors for E. coli expression. Optimized expression and purification protocols yielded greater than 300mg per liter of culture with greater than 95% purity. Circular dichroism data was collected from a 2.7mg/ml solution in a 0.1mm cuvette with variable scanning using an Olis RSM CD spectrophotometer. The ellipticity values were scanned from 190 to 260nm. The spectra recorded have characteristics for alpha proteins with band maxima at 216nm and a possible shoulder at 212nm at 12OC and 250 C. Protein crystal screens are in progress and, to date, only small crystals have been observed. The regular periodic oscillatory change in the ttNOX protein is indicative of a possible time-keeping functional role. A single protein possessing alternating catalytic activities, with a potential biological clock function, is unprecedented and structural determination is paramount to understanding this role.

  1. Biodistribution and in Vivo Activities of Tumor-Associated Macrophage-Targeting Nanoparticles Incorporated with Doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are increasingly considered a viable target for tumor imaging and therapy. Previously, we reported that innovative surface-functionalization of nanoparticles may help target them to TAMs. In this report, using poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles incorporated with doxorubicin (DOX) (DOX-NPs), we studied the effect of surface-modification of the nanoparticles with mannose and/or acid-sensitive sheddable polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the biodistribution of DOX and the uptake of DOX by TAMs in tumor-bearing mice. We demonstrated that surface-modification of the DOX-NPs with both mannose and acid-sensitive sheddable PEG significantly increased the accumulation of DOX in tumors, enhanced the uptake of the DOX by TAMs, but decreased the distribution of DOX in mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS), such as liver. We also confirmed that the acid-sensitive sheddable PEGylated, mannose-modified DOX-nanoparticles (DOX-AS-M-NPs) targeted TAMs because depletion of TAMs in tumor-bearing mice significantly decreased the accumulation of DOX in tumor tissues. Furthermore, in a B16-F10 tumor-bearing mouse model, we showed that the DOX-AS-M-NPs were significantly more effective than free DOX in controlling tumor growth but had only minimum effect on the macrophage population in mouse liver and spleen. The AS-M-NPs are promising in targeting cytotoxic or macrophage-modulating agents into tumors to improve tumor therapy. PMID:25314115

  2. Uniform brain tumor distribution and tumor associated macrophage targeting of systemically administered dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Mishra, Manoj K; Mangraviti, Antonella; Hwang, Lee; Zhou, Jinyuan; Hanes, Justin; Brem, Henry; Olivi, Alessandro; Tyler, Betty; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M

    2015-06-01

    Effective blood-brain tumor barrier penetration and uniform solid tumor distribution can significantly enhance therapeutic delivery to brain tumors. Hydroxyl-functionalized, generation-4 poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers, with their small size, near-neutral surface charge, and the ability to selectively localize in cells associated with neuroinflammation may offer new opportunities to address these challenges. In this study we characterized the intracranial tumor biodistribution of systemically delivered PAMAM dendrimers in an intracranial rodent gliosarcoma model using fluorescence-based quantification methods and high resolution confocal microscopy. We observed selective and homogeneous distribution of dendrimer throughout the solid tumor (∼6 mm) and peritumoral area within fifteen minutes after systemic administration, with subsequent accumulation and retention in tumor associated microglia/macrophages (TAMs). Neuroinflammation and TAMs have important growth promoting and pro-invasive effects in brain tumors. The rapid clearance of systemically administered dendrimers from major organs promises minimal off-target adverse effects of conjugated drugs. Therefore, selective delivery of immunomodulatory molecules to TAM, using hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimers, may hold promise for therapy of glioblastoma.

  3. Tumor-Associated CSF MicroRNAs for the Prediction and Evaluation of CNS Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a readily reachable body fluid that is reflective of the underlying pathological state of the central nervous system (CNS). Hence it has been targeted for biomarker discovery for a variety of neurological disorders. CSF is also the major route for seeding metastases of CNS malignancies and its analysis could be informative for diagnosis and risk stratification of brain cancers. Recently, modern high-throughput, microRNAs (miRNAs) measuring technology has enabled sensitive detection of distinct miRNAs that are bio-chemicallystable in the CSF and can distinguish between different types of CNS cancers. Owing to the fact that a CSF specimen can be obtained with relative ease, analysis of CSF miRNAs could be a promising contribution to clinical practice. In this review, we examine the current scientific knowledge on tumor associated CSF miRNAs that could guide diagnosis of different brain cancer types, or could be helpful in predicting disease progression and therapy response. Finally, we highlight their potential applications clinically as biomarkers and discuss limitations. PMID:26690130

  4. The incidence of cysts and tumors associated with impacted third molars

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswaran, A. T.; Shilpa, S.

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of cysts and tumors associated with lower impacted third molars are very low prevalence, which might be because of the fact that most pathologies go unnoticed as many practitioners discard the erupted tissue after surgical removal of the impacted teeth rather than sending the tissue for histopathological examination. Our aim was to evaluate the patients who came for third molar surgical removal with due therapeutic prophylacis and an incidental finding. A proper study protocol both inclusion and exclusion criteria was strictly followed for all the cases, which were included in the study. The period of study was 6 years and the total number of cases assessed were 2778 patients out of which 70 cases reported pathology associated with the impacted third molars. Among 70 cases 61.4% were reported as cyst and tumors and 38.6% of the cases had chronic inflammatory reaction, including two cases with normal dental follicle. High incidence rate of pathology associated with third molar occurred between age group of 20 and 30 years older age groups showed very low incidence. Most common site of impaction was found to be left side of mandible and positions were vertical and distoangular impactions. Thus was male predominance in the younger groups. The examination is necessary whether the third molars impacted cases were symptomatic or asymptomatic PMID:26015725

  5. Tumor-associated fibroblasts predominantly come from local and not circulating precursors.

    PubMed

    Arina, Ainhoa; Idel, Christian; Hyjek, Elizabeth M; Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Wang, Ying; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Schreiber, Hans

    2016-07-01

    Fibroblasts are common cell types in cancer stroma and lay down collagen required for survival and growth of cancer cells. Although some cancer therapy strategies target tumor fibroblasts, their origin remains controversial. Multiple publications suggest circulating mesenchymal precursors as a source of tumor-associated fibroblasts. However, we show by three independent approaches that tumor fibroblasts derive primarily from local, sessile precursors. First, transplantable tumors developing in a mouse expressing green fluorescent reporter protein (EGFP) under control of the type I collagen (Col-I) promoter (COL-EGFP) had green stroma, whereas we could not find COL-EGFP(+) cells in tumors developing in the parabiotic partner lacking the fluorescent reporter. Lack of incorporation of COL-EGFP(+) cells from the circulation into tumors was confirmed in parabiotic pairs of COL-EGFP mice and transgenic mice developing autochthonous intestinal adenomas. Second, transplantable tumors developing in chimeric mice reconstituted with bone marrow cells from COL-EGFP mice very rarely showed stromal fibroblasts expressing EGFP. Finally, cancer cells injected under full-thickness COL-EGFP skin grafts transplanted in nonreporter mice developed into tumors containing green stromal cells. Using multicolor in vivo confocal microscopy, we found that Col-I-expressing fibroblasts constituted approximately one-third of the stromal mass and formed a continuous sheet wrapping the tumor vessels. In summary, tumors form their fibroblastic stroma predominantly from precursors present in the local tumor microenvironment, whereas the contribution of bone marrow-derived circulating precursors is rare.

  6. The actin crosslinking protein palladin modulates force generation and mechanosensitivity of tumor associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Azatov, Mikheil; Goicoechea, Silvia M.; Otey, Carol A.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2016-01-01

    Cells organize actin filaments into higher-order structures by regulating the composition, distribution and concentration of actin crosslinkers. Palladin is an actin crosslinker found in the lamellar actin network and stress fibers, which are critical for mechanosensing of the environment. Palladin also serves as a molecular scaffold for α-actinin, another key actin crosslinker. By virtue of its close interactions with actomyosin structures in the cell, palladin may play an important role in cell mechanics. However, the role of palladin in cellular force generation and mechanosensing has not been studied. Here, we investigate the role of palladin in regulating the plasticity of the actin cytoskeleton and cellular force generation in response to alterations in substrate stiffness. Traction force microscopy revealed that tumor-associated fibroblasts generate larger forces on substrates of increased stiffness. Contrary to expectations, knocking down palladin increased the forces generated by cells and inhibited their ability to sense substrate stiffness for very stiff gels. This was accompanied by significant differences in actin organization, adhesion dynamics and altered myosin organization in palladin knock-down cells. Our results suggest that actin crosslinkers such as palladin and myosin motors coordinate for optimal cell function and to prevent aberrant behavior as in cancer metastasis. PMID:27353427

  7. The Metastasis-Promoting Roles of Tumor-Associated Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heath A.; Kang, Yibin

    2013-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is driven not only by the accumulation of intrinsic alterations in malignant cells, but also by the interactions of cancer cells with various stromal cell components of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, inflammation and infiltration of the tumor tissue by host immune cells, such as tumor-associated macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and regulatory T cells have been shown to support tumor growth in addition to invasion and metastasis. Each step of tumor development, from initiation through metastatic spread, is promoted by communication between tumor and immune cells via the secretion of cytokines, growth factors and proteases that remodel the tumor microenvironment. Invasion and metastasis requires neovascularization, breakdown of the basement membrane, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix for tumor cell invasion and extravasation into the blood and lymphatic vessels. The subsequent dissemination of tumor cells to distant organ sites necessitates a treacherous journey through the vasculature, which is fostered by close association with platelets and macrophages. Additionally, the establishment of the pre-metastatic niche and specific metastasis organ tropism is fostered by neutrophils and bone marrow-derived hematopoietic immune progenitor cells and other inflammatory cytokines derived from tumor and immune cells, which alter the local environment of the tissue to promote adhesion of circulating tumor cells. This review focuses on the interactions between tumor cells and immune cells recruited to the tumor microenvironment, and examines the factors allowing these cells to promote each stage of metastasis. PMID:23515621

  8. Killing Is Not Enough: How Apoptosis Hijacks Tumor-Associated Macrophages to Promote Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Weigert, Andreas; Mora, Javier; Sekar, Divya; Syed, Shahzad; Brüne, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are a group of heterogeneous cells of the innate immune system that are crucial to the initiation, progression, and resolution of inflammation. Moreover, they control tissue homeostasis in healthy tissue and command a broad sensory arsenal to detect disturbances in tissue integrity. Macrophages possess a remarkable functional plasticity to respond to irregularities and to initiate programs that allow overcoming them in order to return back to normal. Thus, macrophages kill malignant or transformed cells, rearrange extracellular matrix, take up and recycle cellular as well as molecular debris, initiate cellular growth cascades, and favor directed migration of cells. As an example, apoptotic death of bystander cells is sensed by macrophages, initiating functional responses that support all hallmarks of cancer. In this chapter, we describe how tumor cell apoptosis hijacks tumor-associated macrophages to promote tumor growth. We propose that tumor therapy should not only kill malignant cells but also target the interaction of the host with apoptotic cancer cells, as this might be efficient to limit the protumor action of apoptotic cells and boost the antitumor potential of macrophages. Leaving the apoptotic cell/macrophage interaction untouched might also limit the benefit of conventional tumor cell apoptosis-focused therapy since surviving tumor cells might receive overwhelming support by the wound healing response that apoptotic tumor cells will trigger in local macrophages, thereby enhancing tumor recurrence. PMID:27558823

  9. Mammary Tumor-Associated RNAs Impact Tumor Cell Proliferation, Invasion, and Migration.

    PubMed

    Diermeier, Sarah D; Chang, Kung-Chi; Freier, Susan M; Song, Junyan; El Demerdash, Osama; Krasnitz, Alexander; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Spector, David L

    2016-09-27

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent the largest and most diverse class of non-coding RNAs, comprising almost 16,000 currently annotated transcripts in human and 10,000 in mouse. Here, we investigated the role of lncRNAs in mammary tumors by performing RNA-seq on tumor sections and organoids derived from MMTV-PyMT and MMTV-Neu-NDL mice. We identified several hundred lncRNAs that were overexpressed compared to normal mammary epithelium. Among these potentially oncogenic lncRNAs we prioritized a subset as Mammary Tumor Associated RNAs (MaTARs) and determined their human counterparts, hMaTARs. To functionally validate the role of MaTARs, we performed antisense knockdown and observed reduced cell proliferation, invasion, and/or organoid branching in a cancer-specific context. Assessing the expression of hMaTARs in human breast tumors revealed that 19 hMaTARs are significantly upregulated and many of these correlate with breast cancer subtype and/or hormone receptor status, indicating potential clinical relevance. PMID:27681436

  10. The role of tumor-associated macrophages in breast carcinoma invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ju; Li, Xiaojing; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Yongjuan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in normal and malignant breast tissue and the draining lymph nodes, and to explore its effect on breast cancer invasion and metastasis. The infiltration densities of TAMs was observed using immunohistochemical staining of CD68 in 100 cases of breast cancer specimens and its paired adjacent non-cancer breast tissues and draining lymph modes, and then to evaluate the relation of TAMs to various clinicopathological features including patients prognosis in breast carcinoma. We observed the infiltration densities of TAMs were significantly higher in breast carcinoma tissue than in adjacent normal tissue and significantly higher in much larger size and higher stage cases. Furthermore, infiltration densities of TAMs have negative correlation with the 5-year survival rates of breast cancer patients. But in matched lymph-nodes, the infiltration densities of TAMs were significantly lower in cancerous metastatic lymph-node samples than in non-metastatic one. Therefore, our data suggests that TAMs infiltration in primary tumor promote invasion and lymphatic metastasis of breast cancer and have negative correlation with patients prognosis in breast cancer, but in lymph-node TAMs may play another role and need further study in the future.

  11. The incidence of cysts and tumors associated with impacted third molars.

    PubMed

    Vigneswaran, A T; Shilpa, S

    2015-04-01

    Incidence of cysts and tumors associated with lower impacted third molars are very low prevalence, which might be because of the fact that most pathologies go unnoticed as many practitioners discard the erupted tissue after surgical removal of the impacted teeth rather than sending the tissue for histopathological examination. Our aim was to evaluate the patients who came for third molar surgical removal with due therapeutic prophylacis and an incidental finding. A proper study protocol both inclusion and exclusion criteria was strictly followed for all the cases, which were included in the study. The period of study was 6 years and the total number of cases assessed were 2778 patients out of which 70 cases reported pathology associated with the impacted third molars. Among 70 cases 61.4% were reported as cyst and tumors and 38.6% of the cases had chronic inflammatory reaction, including two cases with normal dental follicle. High incidence rate of pathology associated with third molar occurred between age group of 20 and 30 years older age groups showed very low incidence. Most common site of impaction was found to be left side of mandible and positions were vertical and distoangular impactions. Thus was male predominance in the younger groups. The examination is necessary whether the third molars impacted cases were symptomatic or asymptomatic. PMID:26015725

  12. Ectonucleotidases in Tumor Cells and Tumor-Associated Immune Cells: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Bergamin, Letícia Scussel; Braganhol, Elizandra; Zanin, Rafael Fernandes; Edelweiss, Maria Isabel Albano; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence points out that genetic alteration does not guarantee the development of a tumor and indicates that complex interactions of tumor cells with the microenvironment are fundamental to tumorigenesis. Among the pathological alterations that give tumor cells invasive potential, disruption of inflammatory response and the purinergic signaling are emerging as an important component of cancer progression. Nucleotide/nucleoside receptor-mediated cell communication is orchestrated by ectonucleotidases, which efficiently hydrolyze ATP, ADP, and AMP to adenosine. ATP can act as danger signaling whereas adenosine, acts as a negative feedback mechanism to limit inflammation. Many tumors exhibit alterations in ATP-metabolizing enzymes, which may contribute to the pathological events observed in solid cancer. In this paper, the main changes occurring in the expression and activity of ectonucleotidases in tumor cells as well as in tumor-associated immune cells are discussed. Furthermore, we focus on the understanding of the purinergic signaling primarily as exemplified by research done by the group on gliomas. PMID:23118517

  13. Primary brain tumors associated with cerebral aneurysm: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Suslu, Hikmet Turan; Bozbuga, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    The primary brain tumors associated with cerebral aneurysms are rare in neurosurgical practice. The present article constitutes an evaluation of the management of coexistent primary brain tumor and cerebral aneurysm. A retrospective study of three cases of primary brain tumor with cerebral aneurysm was performed. We evaluated the complications and clinic outcomes by assessing the clinical and imaging findings. Case 1 presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage from an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery, with an incidental left frontal oligodendroglioma. Case 2 presented with chronic headache due to left frontal convexity meningioma, with proximal internal carotid artery aneurysm which was found incidentally during preoperative magnetic resonance angiography. Case 3 was admitted to our hospital complaining of headache, memory disturbance, and weakness in her left lower extremity. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed right frontal lymphoma and an unruptured aneurysm at the left middle cerebral artery. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging revealed right frontal lymphoma and unruptured left middle cerebral artery. The frequency of primary brain tumor and cerebral aneurysm coexistence is increasing due to improvements in high-resolution imaging. In these complicated cases, the management will differ according to each pathology present, and this is an important problem for a neurosurgeon.

  14. Update on a tumor-associated NADH oxidase in gastric cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hsiao-Ling; Lee, Yi-Hui; Yuan, Tein-Ming; Chen, Shi-Wen; Chueh, Pin-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common human malignancies, and its prevalence has been shown to be well-correlated with cancer-related deaths worldwide. Regrettably, the poor prognosis of this disease is mainly due to its late diagnosis at advanced stages after the cancer has already metastasized. Recent research has emphasized the identification of cancer biomarkers in the hope of diagnosing cancer early and designing targeted therapies to reverse cancer progression. One member of a family of growth-related nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH or hydroquinone) oxidases is tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX; ENOX2). Unlike its counterpart CNOX (ENOX1), identified in normal rat liver plasma membranes and shown to be stimulated by growth factors and hormones, tNOX activity purified from rat hepatoma cells is constitutively active. Its activity is detectable in the sera of cancer patients but not in those of healthy volunteers, suggesting its clinical relevance. Interestingly, tNOX expression was shown to be present in an array of cancer cell lines. More importantly, inhibition of tNOX was well correlated with reduced cancer cell growth and induction of apoptosis. RNA interference targeting tNOX expression in cancer cells effectively restored non-cancerous phenotypes, further supporting the vital role of tNOX in cancer cells. Here, we review the regulatory role of tNOX in gastric cancer cell growth. PMID:26973386

  15. Tumor-associated neutrophils stimulate T cell responses in early-stage human lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy B.; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik S.; Quatromoni, Jon G.; Stephen, Tom Li; Ranganathan, Anjana; Deshpande, Charuhas; Akimova, Tatiana; Vachani, Anil; Litzky, Leslie; Hancock, Wayne W.; Conejo-Garcia, José R.; Feldman, Michael; Albelda, Steven M.; Singhal, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Infiltrating inflammatory cells are highly prevalent within the tumor microenvironment and mediate many processes associated with tumor progression; however, the contribution of specific populations remains unclear. For example, the nature and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in the cancer microenvironment is largely unknown. The goal of this study was to provide a phenotypic and functional characterization of TANs in surgically resected lung cancer patients. We found that TANs constituted 5%–25% of cells isolated from the digested human lung tumors. Compared with blood neutrophils, TANs displayed an activated phenotype (CD62LloCD54hi) with a distinct repertoire of chemokine receptors that included CCR5, CCR7, CXCR3, and CXCR4. TANs produced substantial quantities of the proinflammatory factors MCP-1, IL-8, MIP-1α, and IL-6, as well as the antiinflammatory IL-1R antagonist. Functionally, both TANs and neutrophils isolated from distant nonmalignant lung tissue were able to stimulate T cell proliferation and IFN-γ release. Cross-talk between TANs and activated T cells led to substantial upregulation of CD54, CD86, OX40L, and 4-1BBL costimulatory molecules on the neutrophil surface, which bolstered T cell proliferation in a positive-feedback loop. Together our results demonstrate that in the earliest stages of lung cancer, TANs are not immunosuppressive, but rather stimulate T cell responses. PMID:25384214

  16. Oral carbohydrate loading with 18% carbohydrate beverage alleviates insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Takahiko; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Koichi; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative 12.6% oral carbohydrate loading is an element of the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) protocol aimed at alleviating postoperative insulin resistance; however, in Japan, beverages with 18% carbohydrate content are generally used for preoperative carbohydrate loading. We investigated the effect of 18% carbohydrate loading on alleviating insulin resistance. Six healthy volunteers participated in this crossover-randomized study and were segregated into 2 groups: volunteers in the carbohydrate-loading group (group A) who fasted from after 9 pm and ingested 375 mL of a beverage containing 18% carbohydrate (ArginaidWaterTM; Nestle, Tokyo, Japan) between 9 pm and 12 pm, and 250 mL of the same liquid at 6:30 am. Volunteers in control group (group B) drank only water. At 8:30 am, a hyperinsulinemic normoglycemic clamp was initiated. Glucose infusion rate (GIR) and levels of ketone bodies and cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) before clamping were evaluated. p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Levels of blood glucose, insulin, and cytokines at the start of the clamp were similar in both the groups. The GIR in group A was significantly higher than that in group B (11.5±2.4 vs 6.2±2.2 mg/kg/min, p=0.005), while blood ketone body levels were significantly lower in group A (22±4 vs 124±119 μmol/L, p=0.04). Preoperative 18% carbohydrate loading could prevent the decrease in insulin sensitivity and suppress catabolism in healthy volunteers. Thus, carbohydrate loading with a beverage with 18% carbohydrate content might contribute to improvements in perioperative management. PMID:23353610

  17. Decarbonylation and dehydrogenation of carbohydrates

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, Mark A.; Klaeren, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    Carbohydrates, especially aldose or ketose sugars, including those whose carbonyl group is masked by hemi-acetal or hemi-ketal formation, are decarbonylated by heating the feed carbohydrate together with a transition metal complex in a suitable solvent. Also, primary alcohols, including sugar alditols are simultaneously dehydrogenated and decarbonylated by heating a mixture of rhodium and ruthenium complexes and the alcohol and optionally a hydrogen acceptor in an acceptable solvent. Such defarbonylation and/or dehydrogenation of sugars provides a convenient procedure for the synthesis of certain carbohydrates and may provide a means for the conversion of biomass into useful products.

  18. Advanced antigen delivery of murine survivin: chimeric virus-like particles in cancer vaccine research.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Thomas; Ruehland, Claus; Schultheiss, Christine; Brinkman, Marc; Roedel, Franz; Reiser, Christian O A; Hess, Juergen; Reichel, Christoph

    2007-09-01

    Success in cancer immunotherapy depends on the identification and efficient targeting of specific tumor-associated antigens. Two pivotal strategies to prime patients' immune system against malignant cells are tumor-specific adoptive T-cell therapy and tumor-specific vaccination. Here, we will focus on immunotherapeutic vaccination and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different strategies to deliver tumor-specific T-cell epitopes. A particular focus will be put on virus-like particles (VLPs) as vehicle to deliver tumor-specific epitopes in the context of full-length proteins, as multi-epitope constructs or as individual tumor-associated T-cell epitopes. VLPs represent non-infectious and non-replicating antigen delivery systems devoid of any nucleic acid. They constitute innovative immunotherapeutic agents against cancer due to their superior, adjuvant-like antigenicity. We will present various tumor-associated antigens currently in different stages of development including survivin, as promising candidates for targeted tumor therapies. PMID:23675044

  19. Advanced Antigen Delivery of Murine Survivin: Chimeric Virus-Like Particles in Cancer Vaccine Research

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Thomas; Ruehland, Claus; Schultheiss, Christine; Brinkman, Marc; Roedel, Franz; Reiser, Christian O. A.; Hess, Juergen; Reichel, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Success in cancer immunotherapy depends on the identification and efficient targeting of specific tumor-associated antigens. Two pivotal strategies to prime patients’ immune system against malignant cells are tumor-specific adoptive T-cell therapy and tumor-specific vaccination. Here, we will focus on immunotherapeutic vaccination and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different strategies to deliver tumor-specific T-cell epitopes. A particular focus will be put on virus-like particles (VLPs) as vehicle to deliver tumor-specific epitopes in the context of full-length proteins, as multi-epitope constructs or as individual tumor-associated T-cell epitopes. VLPs represent non-infectious and non-replicating antigen delivery systems devoid of any nucleic acid. They constitute innovative immunotherapeutic agents against cancer due to their superior, adjuvant-like antigenicity. We will present various tumor-associated antigens currently in different stages of development including survivin, as promising candidates for targeted tumor therapies. PMID:23675044

  20. Advanced antigen delivery of murine survivin: chimeric virus-like particles in cancer vaccine research.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Thomas; Ruehland, Claus; Schultheiss, Christine; Brinkman, Marc; Roedel, Franz; Reiser, Christian O A; Hess, Juergen; Reichel, Christoph

    2007-09-01

    Success in cancer immunotherapy depends on the identification and efficient targeting of specific tumor-associated antigens. Two pivotal strategies to prime patients' immune system against malignant cells are tumor-specific adoptive T-cell therapy and tumor-specific vaccination. Here, we will focus on immunotherapeutic vaccination and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different strategies to deliver tumor-specific T-cell epitopes. A particular focus will be put on virus-like particles (VLPs) as vehicle to deliver tumor-specific epitopes in the context of full-length proteins, as multi-epitope constructs or as individual tumor-associated T-cell epitopes. VLPs represent non-infectious and non-replicating antigen delivery systems devoid of any nucleic acid. They constitute innovative immunotherapeutic agents against cancer due to their superior, adjuvant-like antigenicity. We will present various tumor-associated antigens currently in different stages of development including survivin, as promising candidates for targeted tumor therapies.

  1. Comparative mapping of the constitutional and tumor-associated 11;22 translocations.

    PubMed Central

    Budarf, M; Sellinger, B; Griffin, C; Emanuel, B S

    1989-01-01

    The reciprocal t(11;22)(q23;q11) is the most common non-Robertsonian constitutional translocation in humans. The tumor-associated 11;22 rearrangement of Ewing sarcoma (ES) and peripheral neuroepithelioma (NE) is cytologically very similar to the 11;22 constitutional rearrangement. Using immunoglobulin light-chain constant region, ETS1 probes, and the technique of in situ hybridization, we previously were able to show that the constitutional and ES/NE breakpoints are different. As a first step toward isolating these translocation junctions and to further distinguish between them, we have made somatic cell hybrids. Cells from a constitutional 46,XX,inv(9),t(11;22) carrier and from an ES cell line with a t(11;22) were separately fused to a hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient Chinese hamster cell line (RJK88). Resulting clones were screened with G-banding and Southern hybridization. Hybrid clones derived from the constitutional t(11;22) were established which contained the der(22) and both the der(22) and the der(11). Hybrid clones derived from the ES cell line containing the der(11) were isolated. Using the technique of Southern hybridization we have sublocalized the loci; ApoA1/C3, CD3D, ETS1, PBGD, THY1, D11S29, D11S34, and D11S147 to the region between the two breakpoints on chromosome 11 and V lambda I, V lambda VI, V lambda VII, and D22S10 to the region between the breakpoints on chromosome 22. Using anonymous DNA probes, we found that D22S9 and D22S24 map proximal to the constitutional breakpoint and that D22S15 and D22S32 map distal to the ES breakpoint on chromosome 22. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:2741943

  2. Tumor-associated macrophages are involved in tumor progression in papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Behnes, Carl Ludwig; Bremmer, Felix; Hemmerlein, Bernhard; Strauss, Arne; Ströbel, Philipp; Radzun, Heinz-Joachim

    2014-02-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play a key role in cancer development. Especially, the immunosuppressive M2 phenotype is associated with increased tumor growth, invasiveness and metastasis. The differentiation of macrophages to the alternative phenotype M2 is mediated, inter alia, by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). Papillary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) represents a rare tumor type which, based upon histological criteria, can be subdivided into two subtypes (I and II), of which type II is associated with poor prognosis. In both subtypes, typically, a dense infiltrate of macrophages is found. In the present study, the expression of CD68, CD163, M-CSF, Ki-67, and CD31 was examined in 30 type I and 30 type II papillary RCCs (n = 60). Both types of papillary RCCs contained an equally dense infiltrate of CD68-positive macrophages. Nearly all macrophages in papillary RCC type II expressed CD163, a characteristic for M2 macrophages. In type I papillary RCC, less than 30 % of macrophages expressed CD163. Furthermore, tumor cells in type II papillary RCC expressed significantly more M-CSF and showed increased (Ki-67 expression defined) proliferative activity in comparison with type I papillary RCC. In addition, the (CD31 defined) capillary density was higher in type II than in type I papillary RCC. A dense infiltrate of M2 phenotype TAM and high M-CSF expression in tumor cells are key features of type II papillary RCC. These findings might explain why the prognosis of papillary RCC type II is worse than that of type I. PMID:24327306

  3. Integrative Bioinformatics Links HNF1B with Clear Cell Carcinoma and Tumor-Associated Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Cuff, Justin; Salari, Keyan; Clarke, Nicole; Esheba, Ghada E.; Forster, Andrew D.; Huang, Stephanie; West, Robert B.; Higgins, John P.; Longacre, Teri A.; Pollack, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is a histologically distinct carcinoma subtype that arises in several organ systems and is marked by cytoplasmic clearing, attributed to abundant intracellular glycogen. Previously, transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-beta (HNF1B) was identified as a biomarker of ovarian CCC. Here, we set out to explore more broadly the relation between HNF1B and carcinomas with clear cell histology. HNF1B expression, evaluated by immunohistochemistry, was significantly associated with clear cell histology across diverse gynecologic and renal carcinomas (P<0.001), as was hypomethylation of the HNF1B promoter (P<0.001). From microarray analysis, an empirically-derived HNF1B signature was significantly enriched for computationally-predicted targets (with HNF1 binding sites) (P<0.03), as well as genes associated with glycogen metabolism, including glucose-6-phophatase, and strikingly the blood clotting cascade, including fibrinogen, prothrombin and factor XIII. Enrichment of the clotting cascade was also evident in microarray data from ovarian CCC versus other histotypes (P<0.01), and HNF1B-associated prothrombin expression was verified by immunohistochemistry (P = 0.015). Finally, among gynecologic carcinomas with cytoplasmic clearing, HNF1B immunostaining was linked to a 3.0-fold increased risk of clinically-significant venous thrombosis (P = 0.043), and with a 2.3-fold increased risk (P = 0.011) in a combined gynecologic and renal carcinoma cohort. Our results define HNF1B as a broad marker of clear cell phenotype, and support a mechanistic link to glycogen accumulation and thrombosis, possibly reflecting (for gynecologic CCC) derivation from secretory endometrium. Our findings also implicate a novel mechanism of tumor-associated thrombosis (a major cause of cancer mortality), based on the direct production of clotting factors by cancer cells. PMID:24040285

  4. Interferon gamma induced by resveratrol analog, HS-1793, reverses the properties of tumor associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soo Kyung; Yang, Kwangmo; Park, You Soo; Choi, You Jin; Oh, Su Jung; Lee, Chan Woo; Lee, Kyu Yeol; Jeong, Min Ho; Jo, Wol Soon

    2014-10-01

    Macrophages are capable of both inhibiting and promoting the growth and spread of cancers, depending on their activation state. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) are a kind of alternatively activated M2 macrophage, which may contribute to tumor progression. Following our previous study to evaluate the anti-tumor effect of a synthetic resveratrol analog HS-1793, the current study demonstrated that HS-1793 treatment significantly increased IFN-γ secreting cells in splenocytes and decreased CD206+ macrophage infiltration compared to CD68+ cells in the tumor site with a higher expression of IFN-γ. As these results suggested that IFN-γ increased locally at the tumor sites could modulate the status of TAM, we designed an in vitro model to study macrophage morphology and functions in relation to the tumor microenvironment. Human monocytic cell line THP-1 cells stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) differentiated to macrophages with M2-like phenotypes. TAM-like properties of CD206(high), CD204(high), IL-10(high), TGF-β(high), IL-6(low), IL-12(low), VEGF(high), and MMP-9(high) and promotion of tumor cell invasion were more pronounced in M-2-polarized THP-1 macrophages generated by differentiating THP-1 cells with PMA and subsequently polarizing them with Th2 cytokines (IL-4/IL-13). Upon IFN-γ exposure, THP-1-derived TAM changed their phenotypes to the M-1-like morphology and intracellular granular pattern with an expression of an increased level of proinflammatory and immunostimulatory cytokines and a reduced level of immunosuppressive and tumor progressive mediators. These results explain the underlying mechanism of the anti-tumor activity of HS-1793. The elevated level of IFN-γ production after HS-1793 treatment evoked reprogramming of M-2 phenotype TAM, which efficiently countered the immunosuppressive and tumor progressive influences of TAM.

  5. Fibroblast Activation Protein Expression by Stromal Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Julia, Tchou; Zhang Paul, J; Yingtao, Bi; Celine, Satija; Rajrupa, Marjumdar; Stephen, TL; Lo, A; Haiying, Chen; Carolyn, Mies; June, Carl H; Jose, Conejo-Garcia; Ellen, Puré

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) has long been known to be expressed in the stroma of breast cancer. However, very little is known if the magnitude of FAP expression within the stroma may have prognostic value and reflect the heterogeneous biology of the tumor cell. An earlier study had suggested that stromal FAP expression in breast cancer was inversely proportional to prognosis. We, therefore, hypothesized that stromal FAP expression may correlate with clinicopathologic variables and may serve as an adjunct prognostic factor in breast cancer. We evaluated the expression of FAP in a panel of breast cancer tissues (n=52) using a combination of immunostain analyses at the tissue and single cell level using freshly frozen or freshly digested human breast tumor samples respectively. Our results showed that FAP expression was abundantly expressed in the stroma across all breast cancer subtypes without significant correlation with clinicopathologic factors. We further identified a subset of FAP positive or FAP+ stromal cells that also expressed CD45, a pan-leukocyte marker. Using freshly dissociated human breast tumor specimens (n=5), we demonstrated that some of these FAP+ CD45+ cells were CD11b+CD14+MHC-II+ indicating that they were likely tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). Although FAP+CD45+ cells have been demonstrated in the mouse tumor stroma, our results demonstrating that human breast TAMs expressed FAP was novel and suggested that existing and future FAP directed therapy may have dual therapeutic benefits targeting both stromal mesenchymal cells and immune cells such as TAMs. More work is needed to explore the role of FAP as a potential targetable molecule in breast cancer treatment. PMID:24074532

  6. Occurrence and significance of tumor-associated neutrophils in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Bianchi, Paolo; Grizzi, Fabio; Di Caro, Giuseppe; Basso, Gianluca; Ponzetta, Andrea; Bonavita, Eduardo; Barbagallo, Marialuisa; Tartari, Silvia; Polentarutti, Nadia; Malesci, Alberto; Marone, Gianni; Roncalli, Massimo; Laghi, Luigi; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto; Jaillon, Sébastien

    2016-07-15

    Inflammatory cells are an essential component of the tumor microenvironment. Neutrophils have emerged as important players in the orchestration and effector phase of innate and adaptive immunity. The significance of tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN) in colorectal cancer (CRC) has been the subject of conflicting reports and the present study was designed to set up a reliable methodology to assess TAN infiltration in CRC and to evaluate their clinical significance. CD66b and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were assessed as candidate neutrophil markers in CRC using immunohistochemistry. CD66b was found to be a reliable marker to identify TAN in CRC tissues, whereas MPO also identified a subset of CD68(+) macrophages. CRC patients (n = 271) (Stages I-IV) were investigated retrospectively by computer-assisted imaging on whole tumor sections. TAN density dramatically decreases in Stage IV patients as compared to Stage I-III. At Cox analysis, higher TAN density was associated with better prognosis. Importantly, multivariate analysis showed that prognostic significance of TAN can be influenced by clinical stage and 5-fluorouracil(5-FU)-based chemotherapy. On separate analysis of Stage III patients (n = 178), TAN density had a dual clinical significance depending on the use of 5-FU-based chemotherapy. Unexpectedly, higher TAN density was associated with better response to 5-FU-based chemotherapy. Thus, TAN are an important component of the immune cell infiltrate in CRC and assessment of TAN infiltration may help identify patients likely to benefit from 5-FU-based chemotherapy. These results call for a reassessment of the role of neutrophils in cancer using rigorous quantitative methodology. PMID:26939802

  7. Carbohydrate drugs: current status and development prospect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, there has been a great effort devoted to the investigation of the roles of carbohydrates in various essential biological processes and the development of carbohydrates to therapeutic drugs. This review summarizes the carbohydrate drugs which have been recorded in several pharmacopoeias, marketed, and under development. A prospect of the future development of carbohydrate drugs is discussed as well.

  8. The National Tumor Association Foundation (ANT): A 30 year old model of home palliative care

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Models of palliative care delivery develop within a social, cultural, and political context. This paper describes the 30-year history of the National Tumor Association (ANT), a palliative care organization founded in the Italian province of Bologna, focusing on this model of home care for palliative cancer patients and on its evaluation. Methods Data were collected from the 1986-2008 ANT archives and documents from the Emilia-Romagna Region Health Department, Italy. Outcomes of interest were changed in: number of patients served, performance status at admission (Karnofsky Performance Status score [KPS]), length of participation in the program (days of care provided), place of death (home vs. hospital/hospice), and satisfaction with care. Statistical methods included linear and quadratic regressions. A linear and a quadratic regressions were generated; the independent variable was the year, while the dependent one was the number of patients from 1986 to 2008. Two linear regressions were generated for patients died at home and in the hospital, respectively. For each regression, the R square, the unstandardized and standardized coefficients and related P-values were estimated. Results The number of patients served by ANT has increased continuously from 131 (1986) to a cumulative total of 69,336 patients (2008), at a steady rate of approximately 121 additional patients per year and with no significant gender difference. The annual number of home visits increased from 6,357 (1985) to 904,782 (2008). More ANT patients died at home than in hospice or hospital; this proportion increased from 60% (1987) to 80% (2007). The rate of growth in the number of patients dying in hospital/hospice was approximately 40 patients/year (p < 0.01), vs. approximately 177 patients/year for patients who died at home. The percentage of patients with KPS < 40 at admission decreased from 70% (2003) to 30% (2008); the percentage of patients with KPS > 40 increased. Mean days of care

  9. Glycosylation of a VH residue of a monoclonal antibody against alpha (1- ---6) dextran increases its affinity for antigen

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have observed that antidextran hybridomas with potential N-linked glycosylation sites in VH have higher affinity for polymeric dextran and for isomaltoheptaose than those lacking potential glycosylation sites. In these studies we have used gene transfection and expression techniques to verify that the carbohydrate addition sites in VH were used. The carbohydrate of the VH region was accessible for binding by the lectin Con A. By ELISA analysis it was demonstrated that the aKa of the antibody for dextran was influenced by the presence of carbohydrate in VH, with the aglycosylated antibody having an aKa 15-fold lower than its untreated counterpart. The aKa for antigen of antibodies that contain carbohydrate only in their constant region was unaffected by lack of carbohydrate. Thus, not only the amino acid sequence of the variable region but also its carbohydrate moieties can determine the magnitude of the antigen-antibody interaction. PMID:2459288

  10. Electrophoretic and immunoblot analyses of Rhizopus arrhizus antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Wysong, D R; Waldorf, A R

    1987-01-01

    Four antigen preparations from Rhizopus arrhizus were made and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and column chromatography. Electrophoretic analyses of these antigens indicated that there are 18 to 28 component bands with a molecular mass range of approximately 10,500 to 83,000 daltons. Seven of these bands appear to be components common to three antigen preparations. Several of the bands identified by SDS-PAGE were composed of glycoproteins or carbohydrates as determined by their affinity for concanavalin A. Western blots, using sera from five patients with mucormycosis, consistently identified five different determinants in the R. arrhizus antigens separated by SDS-PAGE. This suggests that several of the Rhizopus antigens are present during mucormycosis. Four of the antigenic determinants recognized by patient sera reacted with the concanavalin A-peroxidase stain, indicating that they are composed of glycoproteins or carbohydrate. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays of sera from five patients with mucormycosis and with rabbit antisera resulted in antibody titers ranging from 1:64 to 1:32,000 for the R. arrhizus antigens. Images PMID:3546367

  11. Electrophoretic and immunoblot analyses of Rhizopus arrhizus antigens.

    PubMed

    Wysong, D R; Waldorf, A R

    1987-02-01

    Four antigen preparations from Rhizopus arrhizus were made and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and column chromatography. Electrophoretic analyses of these antigens indicated that there are 18 to 28 component bands with a molecular mass range of approximately 10,500 to 83,000 daltons. Seven of these bands appear to be components common to three antigen preparations. Several of the bands identified by SDS-PAGE were composed of glycoproteins or carbohydrates as determined by their affinity for concanavalin A. Western blots, using sera from five patients with mucormycosis, consistently identified five different determinants in the R. arrhizus antigens separated by SDS-PAGE. This suggests that several of the Rhizopus antigens are present during mucormycosis. Four of the antigenic determinants recognized by patient sera reacted with the concanavalin A-peroxidase stain, indicating that they are composed of glycoproteins or carbohydrate. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays of sera from five patients with mucormycosis and with rabbit antisera resulted in antibody titers ranging from 1:64 to 1:32,000 for the R. arrhizus antigens.

  12. The polar high molecular weight fraction of the Agaricus blazei Murill extract, AndoSan™, reduces the activity of the tumor-associated protease, legumain, in RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Berven, Lise; Karppinen, Pernille; Hetland, Geir; Samuelsen, Anne Berit C

    2015-04-01

    AndoSan™ is an extract of Agaricus blazei Murill (AbM; 82.4%), Hericium erinaceum (14.7%), and Grifola frondosa (2.9%). The main ingredient of AndoSan, AbM, is rich in different forms of β-glucans. Since these exhibit potent antitumor activity and have immunomodulatory effects, the stimulatory effect of AndoSan on the production of different cytokines, chemokines, and leukocyte growth factors has predominantly been attributed to β-glucans. AndoSan has been claimed to consist of 90% carbohydrate, of which 2.8% is β-glucans, but in this study, we show that the carbohydrate content is only 2% of the dry weight, corresponding to 0.09% β-glucan per mL of AndoSan. Fractionation of AndoSan, followed by carbohydrate analysis and HPLC analysis revealed that most of the glucose was concentrated in the polar high molecular weight fraction of AndoSan (ethanol insoluble water extract [EIWE]-A) and that this extract was able to significantly inhibit the activity of the tumor-associated protease, legumain, in RAW 264.7 cells. Legumain is synthesized as a zymogen and undergoes pH-dependent autoactivation of the proform to reach an enzymatically active form. In this study, we demonstrate that both the polar and nonpolar AndoSan fractions are able to inhibit the autoactivation of prolegumain, and that the polar fractions of AndoSan are the most potent inhibitors of the active form of the enzyme.

  13. Tumor-associated macrophages as a paradigm of macrophage plasticity, diversity, and polarization: lessons and open questions.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo

    2013-07-01

    Macrophages are present in all body compartments, including cancerous tissues, and their functions are profoundly affected by signals from the microenvironment under homeostatic and pathological conditions. Tumor-associated macrophages are a major cellular component of cancer-related inflammation and have served as a paradigm for the plasticity and functional polarization of mononuclear phagocytes. Tumor-associated macrophages can exert dual influence of cancer depending on the activation state, with classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) cells generally exerting antitumoral and protumoral functions, respectively. These are extremes in a continuum of polarization states in a universe of diversity. Tumor-associated macrophages affect virtually all aspects of tumor tissues, including stem cells, metabolism, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Progress has been made in defining signaling molecules, transcription factors, epigenetic changes, and repertoire of microRNAs underlying macrophage polarization. Preclinical and early clinical data suggest that macrophages may serve as tools for the development of innovative diagnostic and therapeutic strategies in cancer and chronic nonresolving inflammatory diseases.

  14. Glycolipid antigen processing for presentation by CD1d molecules.

    PubMed

    Prigozy, T I; Naidenko, O; Qasba, P; Elewaut, D; Brossay, L; Khurana, A; Natori, T; Koezuka, Y; Kulkarni, A; Kronenberg, M

    2001-01-26

    The requirement for processing glycolipid antigens in T cell recognition was examined with mouse CD1d-mediated responses to glycosphingolipids (GSLs). Although some disaccharide GSL antigens can be recognized without processing, the responses to three other antigens, including the disaccharide GSL Gal(alpha1-->2)GalCer (Gal, galactose; GalCer, galactosylceramide), required removal of the terminal sugars to permit interaction with the T cell receptor. A lysosomal enzyme, alpha-galactosidase A, was responsible for the processing of Gal(alpha1-->2)GalCer to generate the antigenic monosaccharide epitope. These data demonstrate a carbohydrate antigen processing system analogous to that used for peptides and an ability of T cells to recognize processed fragments of complex glycolipids.

  15. Interaction of sugar stabilized silver nanoparticles with the T-antigen specific lectin, jacalin from Artocarpus integrifolia.

    PubMed

    Ayaz Ahmed, Khan Behlol; Mohammed, Ansari Sulthan; Veerappan, Anbazhagan

    2015-06-15

    The advances in nanomedicine demonstrate the anticancer properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and considered as an alternative to the available chemotherapeutic agents. Owing to the preferential interaction of Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (jacalin) with Galβ1-3GalNAcα (a chemically well-defined tumor associated antigen), a study was undertaken to understand the interaction mechanism of AgNPs with jacalin in presence of specific sugar, galactose. Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis revealed that the AgNPs binding significantly quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of jacalin through a static quenching mechanism, and a non-radiative energy transfer occurred within the molecules. Association constants obtained from the interaction of different sugar-stabilized AgNPs with jacalin are in the order of 10(4)M(-1), this is in the same range as those obtained for the interaction of lectin with carbohydrate and hydrophobic ligand. Each subunit of the tetrameric jacalin binds one AgNPs, and the stoichiometry was unaffected by the presence of the specific sugar, galactose. Hemagglutination assay shows that sugar stabilized AgNPs interacts to jacalin at a site that is different from the saccharide-binding site. Analysis of the FTIR spectra of jacalin indicates that the binding of AgNPs does not alter the secondary structure of jacalin. More importantly, AgNPs exists in nano form even after interacting with the lectin. These results suggest that the development of lectin-AgNPs conjugate would be possible for diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  16. Interaction of sugar stabilized silver nanoparticles with the T-antigen specific lectin, jacalin from Artocarpus integrifolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayaz Ahmed, Khan Behlol; Mohammed, Ansari Sulthan; Veerappan, Anbazhagan

    2015-06-01

    The advances in nanomedicine demonstrate the anticancer properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and considered as an alternative to the available chemotherapeutic agents. Owing to the preferential interaction of Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (jacalin) with Galβ1-3GalNAcα (a chemically well-defined tumor associated antigen), a study was undertaken to understand the interaction mechanism of AgNPs with jacalin in presence of specific sugar, galactose. Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis revealed that the AgNPs binding significantly quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of jacalin through a static quenching mechanism, and a non-radiative energy transfer occurred within the molecules. Association constants obtained from the interaction of different sugar-stabilized AgNPs with jacalin are in the order of 104 M-1, this is in the same range as those obtained for the interaction of lectin with carbohydrate and hydrophobic ligand. Each subunit of the tetrameric jacalin binds one AgNPs, and the stoichiometry was unaffected by the presence of the specific sugar, galactose. Hemagglutination assay shows that sugar stabilized AgNPs interacts to jacalin at a site that is different from the saccharide-binding site. Analysis of the FTIR spectra of jacalin indicates that the binding of AgNPs does not alter the secondary structure of jacalin. More importantly, AgNPs exists in nano form even after interacting with the lectin. These results suggest that the development of lectin-AgNPs conjugate would be possible for diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  17. Interaction of sugar stabilized silver nanoparticles with the T-antigen specific lectin, jacalin from Artocarpus integrifolia.

    PubMed

    Ayaz Ahmed, Khan Behlol; Mohammed, Ansari Sulthan; Veerappan, Anbazhagan

    2015-06-15

    The advances in nanomedicine demonstrate the anticancer properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and considered as an alternative to the available chemotherapeutic agents. Owing to the preferential interaction of Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (jacalin) with Galβ1-3GalNAcα (a chemically well-defined tumor associated antigen), a study was undertaken to understand the interaction mechanism of AgNPs with jacalin in presence of specific sugar, galactose. Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis revealed that the AgNPs binding significantly quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of jacalin through a static quenching mechanism, and a non-radiative energy transfer occurred within the molecules. Association constants obtained from the interaction of different sugar-stabilized AgNPs with jacalin are in the order of 10(4)M(-1), this is in the same range as those obtained for the interaction of lectin with carbohydrate and hydrophobic ligand. Each subunit of the tetrameric jacalin binds one AgNPs, and the stoichiometry was unaffected by the presence of the specific sugar, galactose. Hemagglutination assay shows that sugar stabilized AgNPs interacts to jacalin at a site that is different from the saccharide-binding site. Analysis of the FTIR spectra of jacalin indicates that the binding of AgNPs does not alter the secondary structure of jacalin. More importantly, AgNPs exists in nano form even after interacting with the lectin. These results suggest that the development of lectin-AgNPs conjugate would be possible for diagnosis and treatment of cancer. PMID:25770933

  18. Identification of Novel Tumor-Associated Cell Surface Sialoglycoproteins in Human Glioblastoma Tumors Using Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Autelitano, François; Loyaux, Denis; Roudières, Sébastien; Déon, Catherine; Guette, Frédérique; Fabre, Philippe; Ping, Qinggong; Wang, Su; Auvergne, Romane; Badarinarayana, Vasudeo; Smith, Michael; Guillemot, Jean-Claude; Goldman, Steven A.; Natesan, Sridaran; Ferrara, Pascual; August, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) remains clinical indication with significant “unmet medical need”. Innovative new therapy to eliminate residual tumor cells and prevent tumor recurrences is critically needed for this deadly disease. A major challenge of GBM research has been the identification of novel molecular therapeutic targets and accurate diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers. Many of the current clinical therapeutic targets of immunotoxins and ligand-directed toxins for high-grade glioma (HGG) cells are surface sialylated glycoproteins. Therefore, methods that systematically and quantitatively analyze cell surface sialoglycoproteins in human clinical tumor samples would be useful for the identification of potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for malignant gliomas. In this study, we used the bioorthogonal chemical reporter strategy (BOCR) in combination with label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (LFQ-MS) to characterize and accurately quantify the individual cell surface sialoproteome in human GBM tissues, in fetal, adult human astrocytes, and in human neural progenitor cells (NPCs). We identified and quantified a total of 843 proteins, including 801 glycoproteins. Among the 843 proteins, 606 (72%) are known cell surface or secreted glycoproteins, including 156 CD-antigens, all major classes of cell surface receptor proteins, transporters, and adhesion proteins. Our findings identified several known as well as new cell surface antigens whose expression is predominantly restricted to human GBM tumors as confirmed by microarray transcription profiling, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining. This report presents the comprehensive identification of new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for the treatment of malignant gliomas using quantitative sialoglycoproteomics with clinically relevant, patient derived primary glioma cells. PMID:25360666

  19. Structure and function of the Ca antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Bramwell, M. E.; Bhavanandan, V. P.; Wiseman, G.; Harris, H.

    1983-01-01

    The Ca antigen, which can be detected in a wide range of malignant human tumours by means of the Cal antibody, is a glycoprotein of the mucin type. At least 95% of the carbohydrate is 0-glycosidically linked to the polypeptide which contains high proportions of glycine, serine and glutamic acid. The carbohydrate has a very simple structure: it is composed almost entirely of tetra- tri- and disaccharides having the general formula (NeuNac)n leads to [Gal leads to GalNac] alpha leads to, where n = 0, 1 or 2. In many malignant cell lines, the antigen is produced constitutively in vitro; but in one that has been examined, its synthesis can be induced by high concentrations of lactate. Evidence is presented for the view that a primary function of this glycoprotein is to shield the cells that produce it from hydrogen ion concentrations outside of the physiological range. The presence of the Ca antigen in malignant tumours may thus be a reflection of metabolic conditions that are known to be characteristics of such tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6349673

  20. Cell surface origin of antigens shed by Leishmania donovani during growth in axenic culture.

    PubMed Central

    Kaneshiro, E S; Gottlieb, M; Dwyer, D M

    1982-01-01

    Antisera against isolated cell surface preparations (PCSP-As) of Leishmania donovani promastigotes were used to detect extracellular antigens produced during the growth of these organisms in four different growth media. The PCSP-As precipitated two major antigenically identical but electrophoretically distinct components, in addition to several minor antigens. Immunoelectrophoretic studies employing PCSP-As, PCSP-As absorbed with intact, live promastigotes, and PCSP-As absorbed with a major extracellular antigen demonstrated the antigenic identity between the major extracellular antigens and two major components externally disposed at the surface of promastigotes. Growth curve kinetic investigations suggested that the major extracellular antigens did not appear in the growth media primarily as a result of cell lysis or damage. The carbohydrate nature of the major extracellular antigens was indicated by physicochemical characterization. Images PMID:7118250

  1. New carbohydrate-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Callstrom, M.R.

    1992-07-01

    We have prepared a series of new carbohydrate-based materials based on the use of carbohydrates as a template for the introduction of functionality to polymeric materials with complete regio- and stereochemical control. The synthesis of these new materials by the use of chemical and enzymatic methods allows for the rational design of new materials based on the properties of the monomeric subunit. These materials have potential applications that range from their use in enhanced oil recovery to biodegradable plastics to biological applications including targeted drug delivery and enzyme stabilization.

  2. Pasteurella haemolytica antigens associated with resistance to pneumonic pasteurellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, D A; Simons, K R; Confer, A W; Panciera, R J; Clinkenbeard, K D

    1989-01-01

    Antigens associated with whole Pasteurella haemolytica biotype A serotype 1, a capsular carbohydrate-protein extract of the organism, and P. haemolytica leukotoxin were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Antigens of the electrophoresed preparations were detected by Western blotting (immunoblotting) with sera from cattle which were either nonvaccinated or vaccinated with live or killed P. haemolytica vaccines and had variable degrees of resistance to experimental pneumonic pasteurellosis. Distinct, easily recognizable antigens of these preparations were identified, and the antibody responses to these antigens were quantified by densitometry. To determine their importance to disease resistance, we then compared antibody responses with experimental lesion scores. Antibody reactivity to surface antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance and present in two or more of the preparations were detected at 86, 66, 51, 49, 34, 31, and 16 kilodaltons (kDa). Of these, antibody responses to antigens at 86, 49, and 31 kDa appeared most important based on their concentration and significance levels. Antibody reactivity to leukotoxin antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance and common with important surface antigens were detected at 86, 66, and 49 kDa. Antibody responses to unique leukotoxin antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance were present at 92 and 58 kDa. Images PMID:2917783

  3. Carbohydrates - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Carbohydrates URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/carbohydrates.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  4. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuvants in human vaccines has been a matter of vigorous scientific debate, with the field hindered by the fact that for over 80 years, aluminum salts were the only adjuvants approved for human use. To this day, alum-based adjuvants, alone or combined with additional immune activators, remain the only adjuvants approved for use in the USA. This situation has not been helped by the fact that the mechanism of action of most adjuvants has been poorly understood. A relative lack of resources and funding for adjuvant development has only helped to maintain alum’s relative monopoly. To seriously challenge alum’s supremacy a new adjuvant has many major hurdles to overcome, not least being alum’s simplicity, tolerability, safety record and minimal cost. Carbohydrate structures play critical roles in immune system function and carbohydrates also have the virtue of a strong safety and tolerability record. A number of carbohydrate compounds from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources have emerged as promising vaccine adjuvant candidates. Carbohydrates are readily biodegradable and therefore unlikely to cause problems of long-term tissue deposits seen with alum adjuvants. Above all, the Holy Grail of human adjuvant development is to identify a compound that combines potent vaccine enhancement with maximum tolerability and safety. This has proved to be a tough challenge for many adjuvant contenders. Nevertheless, carbohydrate-based compounds have many favorable properties that could place them in a unique position to challenge alum’s monopoly over human vaccine usage. PMID:21506649

  5. Bispecific antibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens and neutralizing complement regulators increase the efficacy of antibody-based immunotherapy in mice.

    PubMed

    Macor, P; Secco, E; Mezzaroba, N; Zorzet, S; Durigutto, P; Gaiotto, T; De Maso, L; Biffi, S; Garrovo, C; Capolla, S; Tripodo, C; Gattei, V; Marzari, R; Tedesco, F; Sblattero, D

    2015-02-01

    The efficacy of antibody-based immunotherapy is due to the activation of apoptosis, the engagement of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). We developed a novel strategy to enhance CDC using bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) that neutralize the C-regulators CD55 and CD59 to enhance C-mediated functions. Two bsAbs (MB20/55 and MB20/59) were designed to recognize CD20 on one side. The other side neutralizes CD55 or CD59. Analysis of CDC revealed that bsAbs could kill 4-25 times more cells than anti-CD20 recombinant antibody in cell lines or cells isolated from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The pharmacokinetics of the bsAbs was evaluated in a human-SCID model of Burkitt lymphoma. The distribution profile of bsAbs mimics the data obtained by studying the pharmacokinetics of anti-CD20 antibodies, showing a peak in the tumor mass 3-4 days after injection. The treatment with bsAbs completely prevented the development of human/SCID lymphoma. The tumor growth was blocked by the activation of the C cascade and by the recruitment of macrophages, polymorphonuclear and natural killer cells. This strategy can easily be applied to the other anti-tumor C-fixing antibodies currently used in the clinic or tested in preclinical studies using the same vector with the appropriate modifications.

  6. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy Augments Antigen-Specific PD-1-Mediated Anti-Tumor Immune Responses via Cross-Presentation of Tumor Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Sharabi, Andrew B.; Nirschl, Christopher J.; Kochel, Christina M.; Nirschl, Thomas R.; Francisca, Brian J.; Velarde, Esteban; Deweese, Theodore L.; Drake, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    The immune-modulating effects of radiation therapy have gained considerable interest recently and there have been multiple reports of synergy between radiation and immunotherapy. However, additional pre-clinical studies are needed to demonstrate the antigen-specific nature of radiation-induced immune responses and elucidate potential mechanisms of synergy with immunotherapy. Here we demonstrate the ability of stereotactic radiotherapy to induce endogenous antigen-specific immune responses when combined with anti-PD-1 checkpoint blockade immunotherapy. Using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP), image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy delivered to B16-OVA melanoma or 4T1-HA breast carcinoma tumors resulted in the development of antigen-specific T and B cell-mediated immune responses. These immune-stimulating effects of radiotherapy were significantly increased when combined with either anti-PD-1 therapy or regulatory T cell (Treg) depletion, resulting in improved local tumor control. Phenotypic analyses of antigen-specific CD8 T cells revealed that radiotherapy increased the percentage of antigen-experienced T cells and effector memory T cells. Mechanistically we found that radiotherapy up-regulates tumor-associated antigen-MHC complexes, enhances antigen cross-presentation in the draining lymph node, and increased T-cell infiltration into tumors. These findings demonstrate the ability of radiotherapy to prime an endogenous antigen-specific immune response and provide additional mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with PD-1 blockade in the clinic. PMID:25527358

  7. Neuroendocrine-like cells -derived CXCL10 and CXCL11 induce the infiltration of tumor-associated macrophage leading to the poor prognosis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu; Xu, He-Yang; Wang, Jie; Chu, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study revealed that neuroendocrine differentiation in colorectal cancer is one of the important factors leading to worse prognosis. In this study, we apply immunohistochemical staining, Western-blot, RT-PCR and ELISA to investigate the underlying mechanism that how the neuroendocrine differentiation to affect the prognosis of colorectal cancer. The interaction of colorectal cancer cells, neuroendocrine-like cells and tumor-associated macrophages in colorectal cancer progress is also investigated. By analyzing 82 cases of colorectal cancer patients treated in our institution, we found that colorectal adenocarcinoma with neuroendocrine differentiation had increasing number of tumor-associated macrophages and worse prognosis. Further evaluation of cytology showed that neuroendocrine cells have the ability to recruit tumor-associated macrophages to infiltrate the tumor tissue, and the tumor-associated macrophages enhance the proliferation and invasion abilities of the colon cancer cells. Moreover, we confirmed that CXCL10 and CXCL11 are the key chemokines in neuroendocrine-like cells and they promote the chemotaxis activity of tumor-associated macrophages. The secretion of CXCL10 and CXCL11 by neuroendocrine-like cells can recruit tumor-associated macrophages to infiltrate in tumor tissues. The latter enhances the proliferation and invasion of colorectal cancer cell and lead to poor prognosis. PMID:27034164

  8. Chimeric antigen receptor therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Barrett, David M; Singh, Nathan; Porter, David L; Grupp, Stephan A; June, Carl H

    2014-01-01

    Improved outcomes for patients with cancer hinge on the development of new targeted therapies with acceptable short-term and long-term toxicity. Progress in basic, preclinical, and clinical arenas spanning cellular immunology, synthetic biology, and cell-processing technologies has paved the way for clinical applications of chimeric antigen receptor-based therapies. This new form of targeted immunotherapy merges the exquisite targeting specificity of monoclonal antibodies with the potent cytotoxicity and long-term persistence provided by cytotoxic T cells. Although this field is still in its infancy, clinical trials have already shown clinically significant antitumor activity in neuroblastoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and B cell lymphoma, and trials targeting a variety of other adult and pediatric malignancies are under way. Ongoing work is focused on identifying optimal tumor targets and on elucidating and manipulating both cell- and host-associated factors to support expansion and persistence of the genetically engineered cells in vivo. The potential to target essentially any tumor-associated cell-surface antigen for which a monoclonal antibody can be made opens up an entirely new arena for targeted therapy of cancer.

  9. Advances in chimeric antigen receptor immunotherapy for neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Heczey, Andras; Louis, Chrystal U

    2013-12-01

    Neuroblastoma (NBL) is the most common extracranial pediatric solid tumor and has heterogeneous biology and behavior. Patients with high-risk disease have poor prognosis despite complex multimodal therapy; therefore, novel curative approaches are needed. Immunotherapy is a novel therapeutic approach that harnesses the inherent activity of the immune system to control and eliminate malignant cells. One form of immunotherapy uses chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) to target tumor-associated antigens. CARs are derived from the antigen-binding domain of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) coupled with the intracellular signaling portion of the T cell receptor. CARs can combine the specificity and effectiveness of MAbs with the active bio-distribution, direct cytotoxicity, and long-term persistence of T cells. NBL provides an attractive target for CAR immunotherapy as many of its tumor-associated antigens are not expressed at significant levels on normal tissues, thus decreasing potential treatment related toxicity. Two previous clinical trials utilizing L1-cell adhesion molecule (L1-CAM) and disialoganglioside (GD2) specific CARs (GD2-CAR) have demonstrated safety and anti-tumor efficacy in heavily pretreated relapsed/refractory neuroblastoma patients. Based on these promising results and on improved techniques that can further potentiate CAR therapies, two clinical trials are currently investigating the use of GD2-CARs in children with NBL. Several approaches may further enhance anti-tumor activity and persistence of CAR modified cells, and if these can be safely translated into the clinic, CAR-based immunotherapy could become a viable adjunct or potential alternative to conventional treatment options for patients with NBL.

  10. Advances in Chimeric Antigen Receptor Immunotherapy for Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Heczey, Andras; Louis, Chrystal U.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NBL) is the most common extracranial pediatric solid tumor and has heterogeneous biology and behavior. Patients with high-risk disease have poor prognosis despite complex multimodal therapy; therefore, novel curative approaches are needed. Immunotherapy is a novel therapeutic approach that harnesses the inherent activity of the immune system to control and eliminate malignant cells. One form of immunotherapy uses chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) to target tumor-associated antigens. CARs are derived from the antigen-binding domain of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) coupled with the intracellular signaling portion of the T cell receptor. CARs can combine the specificity and effectiveness of MAbs with the active bio-distribution, direct cytotoxicity, and long-term persistence of T cells. NBL provides an attractive target for CAR immunotherapy as many of its tumor-associated antigens are not expressed at significant levels on normal tissues, thus decreasing potential treatment related toxicity. Two previous clinical trials utilizing L1-cell adhesion molecule (L1-CAM) and disialoganglioside (GD2) specific CARs (GD2-CAR) have demonstrated safety and anti-tumor efficacy in heavily pretreated relapsed/refractory neuroblastoma patients. Based on these promising results and on improved techniques that can further potentiate CAR therapies, two clinical trials are currently investigating the use of GD2-CARs in children with NBL. Several approaches may further enhance anti-tumor activity and persistence of CAR modified cells, and if these can be safely translated into the clinic, CAR-based immunotherapy could become a viable adjunct or potential alternative to conventional treatment options for patients with NBL. PMID:24333408

  11. Accuracy of Carbohydrate Counting in Adults.

    PubMed

    Meade, Lisa T; Rushton, Wanda E

    2016-07-01

    In Brief This study investigates carbohydrate counting accuracy in patients using insulin through a multiple daily injection regimen or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. The average accuracy test score for all patients was 59%. The carbohydrate test in this study can be used to emphasize the importance of carbohydrate counting to patients and to provide ongoing education. PMID:27621531

  12. Carbohydrates as enantioinduction components in stereoselective catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate derivatives are readily available chiral molecules, yet they are infrequently employed as enantioinduction components in stereoselective catalysis. In this review, synthetic approaches to carbohydrate-based ligands and catalysts are outlined, along with example applications in enantioselective catalysis. A wide range of carbohydrate-based functionality is covered, and key trends and future opportunities are identified. PMID:27064817

  13. A Liposome-Based Approach to the Integrated Multi-Component Antigen Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Denong

    2015-01-01

    This report describes an experimental procedure for constructing integrated lipid, carbohydrate, and protein microarrays. In essence, it prints liposomes on nitrocellulose-coated micro-glass slides, a biochip substrate for spotting protein and carbohydrate microarrays, and the substances that can form liposomes (homo-liposomes) or can be incorporated into liposomes (hetero-liposomes) are suitable for microarray construction using existing microarray spotting devices. Importantly, this technology allows simultaneous detection of serum antibody activities among the three major classes of antigens, i.e., lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins. The potential of this technology is illustrated by its use in revealing a broad-spectrum of pre-existing anti-lipid antibodies in blood circulation and monitoring the epitope spreading of autoantibody reactivities among protein, carbohydrate, and lipid antigens in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).

  14. Design, synthesis and evaluation of N-substituted saccharin derivatives as selective inhibitors of tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase XII.

    PubMed

    D'Ascenzio, Melissa; Carradori, Simone; De Monte, Celeste; Secci, Daniela; Ceruso, Mariangela; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-03-15

    A series of N-alkylated saccharin derivatives were synthesized and tested for the inhibition of four different isoforms of human carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4. 2.1.1): the transmembrane tumor-associated CA IX and XII, and the cytosolic CA I and II. Most of the reported derivatives inhibited CA XII in the nanomolar/low micromolar range, hCA IX with KIs ranging between 11 and 390 nM, whereas they were inactive against both CA I (KIs >50 μM) and II (K(I)s ranging between 39.1 nM and 50 μM). Since CA I and II are off-targets of antitumor carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs), the obtained results represent an encouraging achievement for the development of new anticancer candidates without the common side effects of non-selective CAIs. Moreover, the lack of an explicit zinc binding function on these inhibitors opens the way towards the exploration of novel mechanisms of inhibition that could explain the high selectivity of these compounds for the inhibition of the transmembrane, tumor-associated isoforms over the cytosolic ones.

  15. TLR activation of tumor-associated macrophages from ovarian cancer patients triggers cytolytic activity of NK cells.

    PubMed

    Bellora, Francesca; Castriconi, Roberta; Dondero, Alessandra; Pessino, Anna; Nencioni, Alessio; Liggieri, Giovanni; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mantovani, Alberto; Moretta, Alessandro; Bottino, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    We analyzed the functional outcome of the interaction between tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and natural killer (NK) cells. TAMs from ascites of ovarian cancer patients displayed an alternatively activated functional phenotype (M2) characterized by a remarkably high frequency and surface density of membrane-bound IL-18. Upon TLR engagement, TAMs acquired a classically activated functional phenotype (M1), released immunostimulatory cytokines (IL-12, soluble IL-18), and efficiently triggered the cytolytic activity of NK cells. TAMs also induced the release of IFN-γ from NK cells, which however was significantly lower compared with that induced by in vitro-polarized M2 cells. Most tumor-associated NK cells displayed a CD56(bright) , CD16(neg) or CD56(bright) , CD16(dim) phenotype, and very poor cytolytic activities, despite an increased expression of the activation marker CD69. They also showed downregulation of DNAM-1, 2B4, and NTB-A activating receptors, and an altered chemokine receptor repertoire. Importantly however, when appropriately stimulated, NK cells from the patients, including those cells isolated from ascites, efficiently killed autologous TAMs that expressed low, "nonprotective" levels of HLA class I molecules. Overall, our data show the existence of a complex tumor microenvironment in which poorly cytolytic/immature NK cells deal with immunosuppressive tumor-educated macrophages.

  16. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 Is Confined to Tumor-Associated Myofibroblasts and Is Increased With Progression in Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Alpízar-Alpízar, Warner; Laerum, Ole Didrik; Christensen, Ib J; Ovrebo, Kjell; Skarstein, Arne; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla; Ploug, Michael; Illemann, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) inhibits the extracellular matrix-degrading activity of several matrix metalloproteinases, thereby regulating cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Studies describing the expression pattern and cellular localization of TIMP-1 in gastric cancer are, however, highly discordant. We addressed these inconsistencies by performing immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization analyses in a set of 49 gastric cancer lesions to reexamine the TIMP-1 localization. In addition, we correlated these findings to clinicopathological parameters. We show that strong expression of TIMP-1 protein and mRNA was observed in a subpopulation of stromal fibroblast-like cells at the periphery of the cancer lesions. In a few cases, a small fraction of cancer cells showed weak expression of TIMP-1 protein and mRNA. The stromal TIMP-1-expressing cells were mainly tumor-associated myofibroblasts. In the normal-appearing mucosa, scattered TIMP-1 protein was only found in chromogranin A positive cells. TIMP-1-positive myofibroblasts at the invasive front of the tumors were more frequently seen in intestinal than in diffuse histological subtype cases (p=0.009). A significant trend to a higher number of cases showing TIMP-1 staining in myofibroblasts with increasing tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) stage was also revealed (p=0.041). In conclusion, tumor-associated myofibroblasts are the main source of increased TIMP-1 expression in gastric cancer. PMID:27370797

  17. Effect of tumor-associated macrophages on gastric cancer stem cell in omental milky spots and lymph node micrometastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Hu, Xiang; Liu, Xiao-Yu; Liang, Pin; Zhang, Jian; Cao, Liang; Wang, Zheng-Lin; Liu, Huan-Ran; Yin, Xun-Guo; Dong, Cheng-Yong; Wang, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    We observed whether the effect of tumor-associated macrophages on gastric cancer stem cell in omental milky spots and lymph nodes micrometastasis and research its possible mechanism. Macrophage THP-1 cells and Human gastric adenocarcinoma SGC-7901 cells were collectively cultivated in vivo. We found macrophage could suppress the proliferation and accelerated cell death of MFC cell. Meanwhile, these effects may be concerned with many signaling pathways, and we detected MCP-1 and COX-2 miRNA expressions, PGE-2 release levels, IL-4 and IL-10 activities, and TGF-β, IFN-γ, VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein expressions in collectively cultivated cell. We found that MCP-1 and COX-2 miRNA expressions, and PGE-2 release levels were suppressed, IL-4 activity was inhibited and IL-10 activity was activated in collectively cultivated cell. Meanwhile, TGF-β, MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein expressions were inhibited and IFN-γ and VEGF protein expressions were activated in collectively cultivated cell. Taken together, these results suggest that the effect of tumor-associated macrophages on gastric cancer stem cell in omental milky spots and lymph nodes micrometastasis via COX-2/PGE-2/TGF-β/VEGF signal pathways. PMID:26823693

  18. Bacterial surface antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies used to detect beer spoilage pediococci.

    PubMed

    Whiting, M S; Ingledew, W M; Lee, S Y; Ziola, B

    1999-08-01

    Fourteen monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were isolated that react with surface antigens of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms, including P. damnosus, P. pentosaceous, P. acidilactici, and unspeciated isolates. Immunoblotting, enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) of protease- and neuraminidase-treated surface antigen extracts, carbohydrate competition EIAs, and cardiolipin EIAs were used to characterize the bacterial antigens involved in Mab binding. Antigen stability in situ was tested by protease treatment or surface antigen extraction of washed bacteria. In most cases, the Mabs bind to Pediococcus surface antigens that appear to be covalently bound cell wall polymers resistant to alteration or removal from the bacterial surface. These bacterial surface antigen reactive Mabs show good potential for rapid, sensitive, and specific immunoassay detection of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms.

  19. Photo-Generation of Carbohydrate Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Gregory T.; Wang, Denong; Turro, Nicholas J.; Koberstein, Jeffrey T.

    The unparalleled structural diversity of carbohydrates among biological molecules has been recognized for decades. Recent studies have highlighted carbohydrate signaling roles in many important biological processes, such as fertilization, embryonic development, cell differentiation and cellȁ4cell communication, blood coagulation, inflammation, chemotaxis, as well as host recognition and immune responses to microbial pathogens. In this chapter, we summarize recent progress in the establishment of carbohydrate-based microarrays and the application of these technologies in exploring the biological information content in carbohydrates. A newly established photochemical platform of carbohydrate microarrays serves as a model for a focused discussion.

  20. Carbohydrate Nanoparticles for Brain Delivery.

    PubMed

    Lalatsa, A; Barbu, E

    2016-01-01

    Many brain tumors and neurological diseases can greatly benefit from the use of emerging nanotechnologies based on targeted nanomedicines that are able to noninvasively transport highly potent and specific pharmaceuticals across the blood-brain barrier. Carbohydrates have received considerable interest as materials for drug carriers due to their natural origin and inherent biodegradability and biocompatibility, as well as due to their hydrophilic character and ease of chemical modification combined with low cost and the possibility for large-scale manufacturing. This chapter provides an overview of the latest research involving the use of carbohydrate-based nanoparticles for drug delivery to the central nervous system. After reviewing the challenges posed by delivering drugs into the brain, the current state-of-the-art approaches for delivery of actives across the blood-brain barrier, including invasive and noninvasive strategies, are presented. A particular focus has been placed on chitosan polymers as they are among the most promising carbohydrate nanocarriers for the preparation and testing of chitosan-based nanomedicines that led, in preclinical proof-of-concept studies, to enhanced brain drug levels and increased pharmacodynamics responses after intravenous, nasal, and oral administration. While chitosan nanoparticles are to date among the most studied and most promising carriers, approaches based on other polysaccharides such as dextran, pullulan, and cellulose warrant further research in the attempt to advance the existing technologies for overcoming the blood-brain barrier. PMID:27678176

  1. Characterization of the Streptococcus adjacens group antigen structure.

    PubMed Central

    Sieling, P A; Thomas, M J; van de Rijn, I

    1992-01-01

    Serological classification of bacteria requires the presence of an antigen unique to the organism of interest. Streptococci are serologically differentiated by group antigens, many of which are carbohydrates, although some are amphiphiles. This report describes the chemical characterization of the Streptococcus adjacens group antigen structure. Previous studies demonstrated that the amphiphile contained phosphorus, ribitol, galactose, galactosamine, alanine, and fatty acids. Phosphodiester bonds present in the purified group antigen were identified as part of a poly(ribitol phosphate), since ribitol phosphate was the only organic phosphate detected after acid hydrolysis. Hydrofluoric acid cleavage of the phosphodiester bonds generated oligosaccharide repeating units. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the methylated, acetylated oligosaccharide suggested that the repeating unit is a trisaccharide of Galp beta 1-3Galp beta 1-4GalNac with N-acetylgalactosamine attached in beta-linkage to either the number two or the number four carbon of ribitol. The lipid- and carbohydrate-substituted poly(ribitol phosphate) of the S. adjacens group antigen therefore is a unique amphiphile structure, differing in its repeating-unit structure from the polyglycerophosphate structure of the more common gram-positive amphiphile lipoteichoic acid. PMID:1309524

  2. Crystal structure of the jacalin-T-antigen complex and a comparative study of lectin-T-antigen complexes.

    PubMed

    Jeyaprakash, A Arockia; Geetha Rani, P; Banuprakash Reddy, G; Banumathi, S; Betzel, C; Sekar, K; Surolia, A; Vijayan, M

    2002-08-23

    Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (Galbeta1-3GalNAc), generally known as T-antigen, is expressed in more than 85% of human carcinomas. Therefore, proteins which specifically bind T-antigen have potential diagnostic value. Jacalin, a lectin from jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) seeds, is a tetramer of molecular mass 66kDa. It is one of the very few proteins which are known to bind T-antigen. The crystal structure of the jacalin-T-antigen complex has been determined at 1.62A resolution. The interactions of the disaccharide at the binding site are predominantly through the GalNAc moiety, with Gal interacting only through water molecules. They include a hydrogen bond between the anomeric oxygen of GalNAc and the pi electrons of an aromatic side-chain. Several intermolecular interactions involving the bound carbohydrate contribute to the stability of the crystal structure. The present structure, along with that of the Me-alpha-Gal complex, provides a reasonable qualitative explanation for the known affinities of jacalin to different carbohydrate ligands and a plausible model of the binding of the lectin to T-antigen O-linked to seryl or threonyl residues. Including the present one, the structures of five lectin-T-antigen complexes are available. GalNAc occupies the primary binding site in three of them, while Gal occupies the site in two. The choice appears to be related to the ability of the lectin to bind sialylated sugars. In either case, most of the lectin-disaccharide interactions are at the primary binding site. The conformation of T-antigen in the five complexes is nearly the same.

  3. Kinetic and docking studies of cytosolic/tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase isozymes I, II and IX with some hydroxylic compounds.

    PubMed

    Durdagi, Serdar; Korkmaz, Neslihan; Işık, Semra; Vullo, Daniela; Astley, Demet; Ekinci, Deniz; Salmas, Ramin E; Senturk, Murat; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    A series of hydroxylic compounds (1-10, NK-154 and NK-168) have been assayed for the inhibition of three physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase isozymes, the cytosolic isozymes I, II and tumor-associated isozyme IX. The investigated compounds showed inhibition constants in the range of 0.068-4003, 0.012-9.9 and 0.025-115 μm at the hCA I, hCA II and hCA IX enzymes, respectively. In order to investigate the binding mechanisms of these inhibitors, in silico studies were also applied. Molecular docking scores of the studied compounds are calculated using scoring algorithms, namely Glide/induced fit docking. The inhibitory potencies of the novel compounds were analyzed at the human isoforms hCA I, hCA II and hCA IX as targets and the KI values were calculated.

  4. Kinetic and docking studies of cytosolic/tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase isozymes I, II and IX with some hydroxylic compounds.

    PubMed

    Durdagi, Serdar; Korkmaz, Neslihan; Işık, Semra; Vullo, Daniela; Astley, Demet; Ekinci, Deniz; Salmas, Ramin E; Senturk, Murat; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    A series of hydroxylic compounds (1-10, NK-154 and NK-168) have been assayed for the inhibition of three physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase isozymes, the cytosolic isozymes I, II and tumor-associated isozyme IX. The investigated compounds showed inhibition constants in the range of 0.068-4003, 0.012-9.9 and 0.025-115 μm at the hCA I, hCA II and hCA IX enzymes, respectively. In order to investigate the binding mechanisms of these inhibitors, in silico studies were also applied. Molecular docking scores of the studied compounds are calculated using scoring algorithms, namely Glide/induced fit docking. The inhibitory potencies of the novel compounds were analyzed at the human isoforms hCA I, hCA II and hCA IX as targets and the KI values were calculated. PMID:26634620

  5. CD45 Phosphatase Inhibits STAT3 Transcription Factor Activity in Myeloid Cells and Promotes Tumor-Associated Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinit; Cheng, Pingyan; Condamine, Thomas; Mony, Sridevi; Languino, Lucia R; McCaffrey, Judith C; Hockstein, Neil; Guarino, Michael; Masters, Gregory; Penman, Emily; Denstman, Fred; Xu, Xiaowei; Altieri, Dario C; Du, Hong; Yan, Cong; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2016-02-16

    Recruitment of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and differentiation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the major factors contributing to tumor progression and metastasis. We demonstrated that differentiation of TAMs in tumor site from monocytic precursors was controlled by downregulation of the activity of the transcription factor STAT3. Decreased STAT3 activity was caused by hypoxia and affected all myeloid cells but was not observed in tumor cells. Upregulation of CD45 tyrosine phosphatase activity in MDSCs exposed to hypoxia in tumor site was responsible for downregulation of STAT3. This effect was mediated by the disruption of CD45 protein dimerization regulated by sialic acid. Thus, STAT3 has a unique function in the tumor environment in controlling the differentiation of MDSC into TAM, and its regulatory pathway could be a potential target for therapy. PMID:26885857

  6. Targeting tumor-associated macrophages with anti-CSF-1R antibody reveals a strategy for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ries, Carola H; Cannarile, Michael A; Hoves, Sabine; Benz, Jörg; Wartha, Katharina; Runza, Valeria; Rey-Giraud, Flora; Pradel, Leon P; Feuerhake, Friedrich; Klaman, Irina; Jones, Tobin; Jucknischke, Ute; Scheiblich, Stefan; Kaluza, Klaus; Gorr, Ingo H; Walz, Antje; Abiraj, Keelara; Cassier, Philippe A; Sica, Antonio; Gomez-Roca, Carlos; de Visser, Karin E; Italiano, Antoine; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Delord, Jean-Pierre; Levitsky, Hyam; Blay, Jean-Yves; Rüttinger, Dominik

    2014-06-16

    Macrophage infiltration has been identified as an independent poor prognostic factor in several cancer types. The major survival factor for these macrophages is macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1). We generated a monoclonal antibody (RG7155) that inhibits CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R) activation. In vitro RG7155 treatment results in cell death of CSF-1-differentiated macrophages. In animal models, CSF-1R inhibition strongly reduces F4/80(+) tumor-associated macrophages accompanied by an increase of the CD8(+)/CD4(+) T cell ratio. Administration of RG7155 to patients led to striking reductions of CSF-1R(+)CD163(+) macrophages in tumor tissues, which translated into clinical objective responses in diffuse-type giant cell tumor (Dt-GCT) patients.

  7. A systematic study of chemogenomics of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiangyong; Luo, Fang; Chen, Lirong; Yuan, Gu; Xu, Xiaojie

    2014-03-01

    Chemogenomics focuses on the interactions between biologically active molecules and protein targets for drug discovery. Carbohydrates are the most abundant compounds in natural products. Compared with other drugs, the carbohydrate drugs show weaker side effects. Searching for multi-target carbohydrate drugs can be regarded as a solution to improve therapeutic efficacy and safety. In this work, we collected 60 344 carbohydrates from the Universal Natural Products Database (UNPD) and explored the chemical space of carbohydrates by principal component analysis. We found that there is a large quantity of potential lead compounds among carbohydrates. Then we explored the potential of carbohydrates in drug discovery by using a network-based multi-target computational approach. All carbohydrates were docked to 2389 target proteins. The most potential carbohydrates for drug discovery and their indications were predicted based on a docking score-weighted prediction model. We also explored the interactions between carbohydrates and target proteins to find the pathological networks, potential drug candidates and new indications.

  8. Targeting tumor-associated immune suppression with selective protein kinase A type I (PKAI) inhibitors may enhance cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Muzammal; Shah, Zahir; Abbas, Nasir; Javeed, Aqeel; Mukhtar, Muhammad Mahmood; Zhang, Jiancun

    2016-01-01

    Despite the tremendous progress in last few years, the cancer immunotherapy has not yet improved disease-free because of the tumor-associated immune suppression being a major barrier. Novel trends to enhance cancer immunotherapy aims at harnessing the therapeutic manipulation of signaling pathways mediating the tumor-associated immune suppression, with the general aims of: (a) reversing the tumor immune suppression; (b) enhancing the innate and adaptive components of anti-tumor immunosurveillance, and (c) protecting immune cells from the suppressive effects of T regulatory cells (Tregs) and the tumor-derived immunoinhibitory mediators. A particular striking example in this context is the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A type I (PKAI) pathway. Oncogenic cAMP/PKAI signaling has long been implicated in the initiation and progression of several human cancers. Emerging data indicate that cAMP/PKAI signaling also contributes to tumor- and Tregs-derived suppression of innate and adaptive arms of anti-tumor immunosurveillance. Therapeutically, selective PKAI inhibitors have been developed which have shown promising anti-cancer activity in pre-clinical and clinical settings. Rp-8-Br-cAMPS is a selective PKAI antagonist that is widely used as a biochemical tool in signal transduction research. Collateral data indicate that Rp-8-Br-cAMPS has shown immune-rescuing potential in terms of enhancing the innate and adaptive anti-tumor immunity, as well as protecting adaptive T cells from the suppressive effects of Tregs. Therefore, this proposal specifically implicates that combining selective PKAI antagonists/inhibitors with cancer immunotherapy may have multifaceted benefits, such as rescuing the endogenous anti-tumor immunity, enhancing the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy, and direct anti-cancer effects.

  9. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... in fiber: Canned and dried beans, such as kidney beans, black beans, pinto beans, black-eyed peas, split ... crackers Beans and legumes, such as black beans, kidney beans, and garbanzo beans Vegetables, such as broccoli, Brussels ...

  10. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... Look for terms such as: Corn sweetener Corn syrup High-fructose corn syrup Dextrose Fructose Glucose Lactose Maltose Sucrose Honey Sugar Brown sugar Invert sugar Molasses Malt syrup Syrup You also should limit the amount of ...

  11. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... syrup If you are thinking about using a sugar substitute, you may wonder if they are safe. The ... with nutrients, such as fruits and vegetables. Some sugar substitutes you can buy include: Aspartame (say: ASS-per- ...

  12. Combinational targeting offsets antigen escape and enhances effector functions of adoptively transferred T cells in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Meenakshi; Corder, Amanda; Chow, Kevin K H; Mukherjee, Malini; Ashoori, Aidin; Kew, Yvonne; Zhang, Yi Jonathan; Baskin, David S; Merchant, Fatima A; Brawley, Vita S; Byrd, Tiara T; Krebs, Simone; Wu, Meng Fen; Liu, Hao; Heslop, Helen E; Gottschalk, Stephen; Gottachalk, Stephen; Yvon, Eric; Ahmed, Nabil

    2013-11-01

    Preclinical and early clinical studies have demonstrated that chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells are highly promising in cancer therapy. We observed that targeting HER2 in a glioblastoma (GBM) cell line results in the emergence of HER2-null tumor cells that maintain the expression of nontargeted tumor-associated antigens. Combinational targeting of these tumor-associated antigens could therefore offset this escape mechanism. We studied the single-cell coexpression patterns of HER2, IL-13Rα2, and EphA2 in primary GBM samples using multicolor flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, and applied a binomial routine to the permutations of antigen expression and the related odds of complete tumor elimination. This mathematical model demonstrated that cotargeting HER2 and IL-13Rα2 could maximally expand the therapeutic reach of the T cell product in all primary tumors studied. Targeting a third antigen did not predict an added advantage in the tumor cohort studied. We therefore generated bispecific T cell products from healthy donors and from GBM patients by pooling T cells individually expressing HER2 and IL-13Rα2-specific CARs and by making individual T cells to coexpress both molecules. Both HER2/IL-13Rα2-bispecific T cell products offset antigen escape, producing enhanced effector activity in vitro immunoassays (against autologous glioma cells in the case of GBM patient products) and in an orthotopic xenogeneic murine model. Further, T cells coexpressing HER2 and IL-13Rα2-CARs exhibited accentuated yet antigen-dependent downstream signaling and a particularly enhanced antitumor activity.

  13. Preoperative Oral Carbohydrate Loading in Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Son, Kum-Hee; Kim, So-Young; Cho, Yeong-Ah; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Overnight fasting before elective surgery has been the routine to reduce the risk of pulmonary aspiration. Recently, several international guidelines for preoperative fasting recommend to intake carbohydrate-containing fluids up to 2 to 3 hours before the induction of anesthesia to improve postoperative recovery. Based on the recommendations, we developed a "preoperative carbohydrate diet" provided for the preoperative patients. The purpose of this case report is to share our experience of applying preoperative carbohydrate loading prior to surgery. PMID:27482525

  14. Carbohydrate metabolism in Spirochaeta stenostrepta.

    PubMed

    Hespell, R B; Canale-Parola, E

    1970-07-01

    The pathways of carbohydrate metabolism in Spirochaeta stenostrepta, a free-living, strictly anaerobic spirochete, were studied. The organism fermented glucose to ethyl alcohol, acetate, lactate, CO(2), and H(2). Assays of enzymatic activities in cell extracts, and determinations of radioactivity distribution in products formed from (14)C-labeled glucose indicated that S. stenostrepta degraded glucose via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway. The spirochete utilized a clostridial-type clastic reaction to metabolize pyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A, CO(2), and H(2), without production of formate. Acetyl-coenzyme A was converted to ethyl alcohol by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent acetaldehyde and alcohol dehydrogenase activities. Phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase catalyzed the formation of acetate from acetyl-coenzyme A. Hydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were detected in cell extracts. A rubredoxin was isolated from cell extracts of S. stenostrepta. Preparations of this rubredoxin stimulated acetyl phosphate formation from pyruvate by diethylaminoethyl cellulose-treated extracts of S. stenostrepta, an indication that rubredoxin may participate in pyruvate cleavage by this spirochete. Nutritional studies showed that S. stenostrepta fermented a variety of carbohydrates, but did not ferment amino acids or other organic acids. An unidentified growth factor present in yeast extract was required by the organism. Exogenous supplements of biotin, riboflavin, and vitamin B(12) were either stimulatory or required for growth. PMID:5423371

  15. Potential of Peptides as Inhibitors and Mimotopes: Selection of Carbohydrate-Mimetic Peptides from Phage Display Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Teruhiko

    2012-01-01

    Glycoconjugates play various roles in biological processes. In particular, oligosaccharides on the surface of animal cells are involved in virus infection and cell-cell communication. Inhibitors of carbohydrate-protein interactions are potential antiviral drugs. Several anti-influenza drugs such as oseltamivir and zanamivir are derivatives of sialic acid, which inhibits neuraminidase. However, it is very difficult to prepare a diverse range of sugar derivatives by chemical synthesis or by the isolation of natural products. In addition, the pathogenic capsular polysaccharides of bacteria are carbohydrate antigens, for which a safe and efficacious method of vaccination is required. Phage-display technology has been improved to enable the identification of peptides that bind to carbohydrate-binding proteins, such as lectins and antibodies, from a large repertoire of peptide sequences. These peptides are known as “carbohydrate-mimetic peptides (CMPs)” because they mimic carbohydrate structures. Compared to carbohydrate derivatives, it is easy to prepare mono- and multivalent peptides and then to modify them to create various derivatives. Such mimetic peptides are available as peptide inhibitors of carbohydrate-protein interactions and peptide mimotopes that are conjugated with adjuvant for vaccination. PMID:23094142

  16. Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy of cancer using chimeric antigen receptor-grafted T cells.

    PubMed

    Davies, David Marc; Maher, John

    2010-06-01

    Harnessing the power of the immune system to target cancer has long been a goal of tumor immunologists. One avenue under investigation is the modification of T cells to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Expression of such a receptor enables T-cell specificity to be redirected against a chosen tumor antigen. Substantial research in this field has been carried out, incorporating a wide variety of malignancies and tumor-associated antigens. Ongoing investigations will ensure this area continues to expand at a rapid pace. This review will explain the evolution of CAR technology over the last two decades in addition to detailing the associated benefits and disadvantages. The outcome of recent phase I clinical trials and the impact that these have had upon the direction of future research in this field will also be addressed.

  17. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  18. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5(')-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C-C and C-O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results. PMID:25669546

  19. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5{sup ′}-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C–C and C–O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  20. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5(')-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C-C and C-O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  1. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5'-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C-C and C-O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  2. Determining a carbohydrate profile for Hansenula polymorpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    The determination of the levels of carbohydrates in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha required the development of new analytical procedures. Existing fractionation and analytical methods were adapted to deal with the problems involved with the lysis of whole cells. Using these new procedures, the complete carbohydrate profiles of H. polymorpha and selected mutant strains were determined and shown to correlate favourably with previously published results.

  3. Suppression of hamster lymphocyte reactivity to simian virus 40 tumor surface antigens by spleen cells from pregnant hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Weppner, W.A.; Adkinson, L.R.; Coggin, J.H.Jr

    1980-09-01

    SV40-transformed tumor cells in hamsters have been found to have cell surface antigens cross-reactive with antigens temporally expressed on fetal tissues. Using a lymphocyte transformation assay, spleen cells from pregnant hamsters were found to be incapable of responding to preparations of either hamster fetal tissue or SV40-transformed cells. However, a suppressor component can be demonstrated in spleen cell populations of both primi-and multiparous hamsters during pregnancy that is capable of reducing the response of lymphocytes sensitized against SV40 tumor-associated antigens. The degree of suppression is proportional to the ratio of responder cells to spleen cells from pregnant animals. These results suggest there is a subpopulation of spleen cells involved in immunoregulation during pregnancy that has the ability to suppress the reactivity of lymphocytes sensitized against SV40-associated oncofetal antigens.

  4. Industrial applications of marine carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Sudha, Prasad N; Aisverya, S; Nithya, R; Vijayalakshmi, K

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials have been used increasingly in various fields, such as drug delivery, imaging, and tissue engineering. The main reason justifying the widespread use of biomaterials relies on its valuable and low-cost source of new drugs. Current research goals are focused on identifying more potent and specific compounds with antitumor, immunomodulatory, antihyperlipidemic, anticoagulant, and antiviral activities. The increasing knowledge of structural analysis and chemical modifications enables the use of these marine carbohydrates in a newer way for the human welfare. This chapter focuses on the recent developments related to industrial and biomedical applications using chitin, chitosan, alginate, agar, and carrageenan derivatives and reports the main advances published over the last 10-15 years.

  5. HEPATOCYTE EXPRESION OF TUMOR ASSOCIATED ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE (ALDH-3) AND P21 RAS FOLLOWING DIETHYLNITROSAMINE (DEN) INITIATION AND CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO DI(2-ETHYLHEXYL) PHTHALATE (DHEP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phthalate esters such as di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP)either promote or inhibit rat liver tumorigenesis depending on the carcinogenesis protocol. In this study, we examined the expression of two histochemical markers, the tumor associated isozyme of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD...

  6. RNA Sequencing of Tumor-Associated Microglia Reveals Ccl5 as a Stromal Chemokine Critical for Neurofibromatosis-1 Glioma Growth.

    PubMed

    Solga, Anne C; Pong, Winnie W; Kim, Keun-Young; Cimino, Patrick J; Toonen, Joseph A; Walker, Jason; Wylie, Todd; Magrini, Vincent; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L; Ly, Amy; Ellisman, Mark H; Mardis, Elaine R; Gutmann, David H

    2015-10-01

    Solid cancers develop within a supportive microenvironment that promotes tumor formation and growth through the elaboration of mitogens and chemokines. Within these tumors, monocytes (macrophages and microglia) represent rich sources of these stromal factors. Leveraging a genetically engineered mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) low-grade brain tumor (optic glioma), we have previously demonstrated that microglia are essential for glioma formation and maintenance. To identify potential tumor-associated microglial factors that support glioma growth (gliomagens), we initiated a comprehensive large-scale discovery effort using optimized RNA-sequencing methods focused specifically on glioma-associated microglia. Candidate microglial gliomagens were prioritized to identify potential secreted or membrane-bound proteins, which were next validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction as well as by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization following minocycline-mediated microglial inactivation in vivo. Using these selection criteria, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (Ccl5) was identified as a chemokine highly expressed in genetically engineered Nf1 mouse optic gliomas relative to nonneoplastic optic nerves. As a candidate gliomagen, recombinant Ccl5 increased Nf1-deficient optic nerve astrocyte growth in vitro. Importantly, consistent with its critical role in maintaining tumor growth, treatment with Ccl5 neutralizing antibodies reduced Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth and improved retinal dysfunction in vivo. Collectively, these findings establish Ccl5 as an important microglial growth factor for low-grade glioma maintenance relevant to the development of future stroma-targeted brain tumor therapies. PMID:26585233

  7. Periostin Secreted by Glioblastoma Stem Cells Recruits M2 Tumor-associated Macrophages and Promotes Malignant Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenchao; Ke, Susan Q.; Huang, Zhi; Flavahan, William; Fang, Xiaoguang; Paul, Jeremy; Wu, Ling; Sloan, Andrew E.; McLendon, Roger E.; Li, Xiaoxia; Rich, Jeremy N.; Bao, Shideng

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are enriched in glioblastoma (GBM) that contains glioma stem cells (GSCs) at the apex of its cellular hierarchy. The correlation between TAM density and glioma grade suggests a supportive role of TAMs in tumor progression. Here we interrogated the molecular link between GSCs and TAM recruitment in GBMs and demonstrated that GSCs secrete Periostin (POSTN) to recruit TAMs. TAM density correlates with POSTN levels in human GBMs. Silencing POSTN in GSCs markedly reduced TAM density, inhibited tumor growth, and increased survival of mice bearing GSC-derived xenografts. We found that TAMs in GBMs are not brain-resident microglia, but mainly monocyte-derived macrophages from peripheral blood. Disrupting POSTN specifically attenuated the tumor supportive M2 type of TAMs in xenografts. POSTN recruits TAMs through integrin αvβ3 as blocking this signaling by an RGD peptide inhibited TAM recruitment. Our findings highlight the possibility of improving GBM treatment by targeting POSTN-mediated TAM recruitment. PMID:25580734

  8. Identification of tumor-associated cassette exons in human cancer through EST-based computational prediction and experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many evidences report that alternative splicing, the mechanism which produces mRNAs and proteins with different structures and functions from the same gene, is altered in cancer cells. Thus, the identification and characterization of cancer-specific splice variants may give large impulse to the discovery of novel diagnostic and prognostic tumour biomarkers, as well as of new targets for more selective and effective therapies. Results We present here a genome-wide analysis of the alternative splicing pattern of human genes through a computational analysis of normal and cancer-specific ESTs from seventeen anatomical groups, using data available in AspicDB, a database resource for the analysis of alternative splicing in human. By using a statistical methodology, normal and cancer-specific genes, splice sites and cassette exons were predicted in silico. The condition association of some of the novel normal/tumoral cassette exons was experimentally verified by RT-qPCR assays in the same anatomical system where they were predicted. Remarkably, the presence in vivo of the predicted alternative transcripts, specific for the nervous system, was confirmed in patients affected by glioblastoma. Conclusion This study presents a novel computational methodology for the identification of tumor-associated transcript variants to be used as cancer molecular biomarkers, provides its experimental validation, and reports specific biomarkers for glioblastoma. PMID:20813049

  9. Tristetraprolin limits inflammatory cytokine production in tumor-associated macrophages in an mRNA decay independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Kratochvill, Franz; Gratz, Nina; Qualls, Joseph E.; Van De Velde, Lee-Ann; Chi, Hongbo; Kovarik, Pavel; Murray, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is an inducible zinc finger AU-rich RNA binding protein essential for enforcing degradation of mRNAs encoding inflammatory chemokines and cytokines. Most studies on TTP center on the connection between mRNA half-life and inflammatory output, because loss of TTP amplifies inflammation by increasing stability of AU-rich mRNAs. Here we focused on how TTP controls cytokine and chemokine production in the non-resolving inflammation of cancer using tissue-specific approaches. By contrast to model in vitro macrophage systems, we found constitutive TTP expression in late stage tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). However, TTP’s effects on AU-rich mRNA stability were negligible and limited by constitutive p38α MAP kinase activity which was the main driver of pro-inflammatory cytokine production in TAMs at the posttranscriptional level. Instead elimination of TTP caused excessive protein production of inflammatory mediators suggesting TTP-dependent translational suppression of AU-rich mRNAs. Manipulation of the p38α-TTP axis in macrophages has significant effects on the growth of tumors, and therefore represents a means to manipulate inflammation in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26183929

  10. Renalase Expression by Melanoma and Tumor-Associated Macrophages Promotes Tumor Growth through a STAT3-Mediated Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Lindsay; Guo, Xiaojia; Velazquez, Heino; Chang, John; Safirstein, Robert; Kluger, Harriet; Cha, Charles; Desir, Gary V

    2016-07-01

    To sustain their proliferation, cancer cells overcome negative-acting signals that restrain their growth and promote senescence and cell death. Renalase (RNLS) is a secreted flavoprotein that functions as a survival factor after ischemic and toxic injury, signaling through the plasma calcium channel PMCA4b to activate the PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways. We show that RNLS expression is increased markedly in primary melanomas and CD163(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). In clinical specimens, RNLS expression in the tumor correlated inversely with disease-specific survival, suggesting a pathogenic role for RNLS. Attenuation of RNLS by RNAi, blocking antibodies, or an RNLS-derived inhibitory peptide decreased melanoma cell survival, and anti-RNLS therapy blocked tumor growth in vivo in murine xenograft assays. Mechanistic investigations showed that increased apoptosis in tumor cells was temporally related to p38 MAPK-mediated Bax activation and that increased cell growth arrest was associated with elevated expression of the cell-cycle inhibitor p21. Overall, our results established a role for the secreted flavoprotein RNLS in promoting melanoma cell growth and CD163(+) TAM in the tumor microenvironment, with potential therapeutic implications for the management of melanoma. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3884-94. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197188

  11. Quantitative Assessment of Tumor Associated Macrophages in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Using CD68 Marker: An Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Bagul, Neeta; Roy, Souparna; Ganjre, Anjali; Meher, Aishwarya; Singh, Pratibha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most prevalent cancers in India. Clear evidence regarding inflammation being an etiological factor of cancer was found only in the last few decades. A major inflammatory component in the tumor tissue is Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAMs). The CD68 antibody is a marker for staining TAMs. Aim The aim of this study is to quantify the macrophage count in healthy oral mucosa and OSCC and comparing TAMs in different histopathological grades of OSCC immunohistochemically. Materials and Methods Thirty archival specimens of OSCC patients and 10 healthy biopsy samples were collected. Immunohistochemical staining was done using a CD68 marker. Statistical analysis was done using Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U test. Results Comparing CD68 expression in various study groups showed a significant difference (p=0.000). The pair-wise analysis showed different grades of OSCC, which differed significantly for CD68 expression from the normal oral mucosa. Conclusion The most significant cells present in tumor stroma are TAMs, which remain in close proximity to neoplastic cells and interact with them via several chemical mediators, which may serve to increase the invasiveness of the malignant epithelium. Dense infiltration of TAMs adjacent to tumor cells and islands vividly implies their role in tumor progression. PMID:27190959

  12. Emerging role of tumor-associated macrophages as therapeutic targets in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Matteo; Massari, Francesco; Amantini, Consuelo; Nabissi, Massimo; Maines, Francesca; Burattini, Luciano; Berardi, Rossana; Santoni, Giorgio; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) derived from peripheral blood monocytes recruited into the renal cell carcinoma (RCC) microenvironment. In response to inflammatory stimuli, macrophages undergo M1 (classical) or M2 (alternative) activation. M1 cells produce high levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-12, IL-23 and IL-6, while M2 cells produce anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10, thus contributing to RCC-related immune dysfunction. The presence of extensive TAM infiltration in RCC microenvironment contributes to cancer progression and metastasis by stimulating angiogenesis, tumor growth, and cellular migration and invasion. Moreover, TAMs are involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition of RCC cancer cells and in the development of tumor resistance to targeted agents. Interestingly, macrophage autophagy seems to play an important role in RCC. Based on this scenario, TAMs represent a promising and effective target for cancer therapy in RCC. Several strategies have been proposed to suppress TAM recruitment, to deplete their number, to switch M2 TAMs into antitumor M1 phenotype and to inhibit TAM-associated molecules. In this review, we summarize current data on the essential role of TAMs in RCC angiogenesis, invasion, impaired anti-tumor immune response and development of drug resistance, thus describing the emerging TAM-centered therapies for RCC patients.

  13. Tumor-associated macrophages exhibit pro- and anti-inflammatory properties by which they impact on pancreatic tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Helm, Ole; Held-Feindt, Janka; Grage-Griebenow, Evelin; Reiling, Norbert; Ungefroren, Hendrik; Vogel, Ilka; Krüger, Uwe; Becker, Thomas; Ebsen, Michael; Röcken, Christoph; Kabelitz, Dieter; Schäfer, Heiner; Sebens, Susanne

    2014-08-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) still ranking 4th in the order of fatal tumor diseases is characterized by a profound tumor stroma with high numbers of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Driven by environmental factors, monocytes differentiate into M1- or M2-macrophages, the latter commonly regarded as being protumorigenic. Because a detailed analysis of TAMs in human PDAC development is still lacking, freshly isolated PDAC-derived TAMs were analyzed for their phenotype and impact on epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) of benign (H6c7) and malignant (Colo357) pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. TAMs exhibited characteristics of M1-macrophages (expression of HLA-DR, IL-1β, or TNF-α) and M2-macrophages (expression of CD163 and IL-10). In the presence of TAMs, H6c7, and Colo357 cells showed an elongated cell shape along with an increased expression of mesenchymal markers such as vimentin and reduced expression of epithelial E-cadherin. Similar to TAMs, in vitro generated M1- and M2-macrophages both mediated EMT in H6c7 and Colo357 cells. M1-macrophages acquired M2-characteristics during coculture that could be prevented by GM-CSF treatment. However, M1-macrophages still potently induced EMT in H6c7 and Colo357 cells although lacking M2-characteristics. Overall, these data demonstrate that TAMs exhibit anti- as well as proinflammatory properties that equally contribute to EMT induction in PDAC initiation and development. PMID:24458546

  14. Prognostic value of lymphocyte/monocyte ratio in advanced Hodgkin lymphoma: correlation with International Prognostic Score and tumor associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jakovic, Ljubomir R; Mihaljevic, Biljana S; Andjelic, Bosko M; Bogdanovic, Andrija D; Perunicic Jovanovic, Maja D; Babic, Dragan D; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir Z

    2016-08-01

    We studied the prognostic significance of the absolute lymphocyte/monocyte count ratio (ALC/AMC), its contribution to the prognostic value of the International Prognostic Score (IPS), and evaluated if ALC/AMC could serve as a proxy for the frequency of CD68 + tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in 101 patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve identified best cut-off values of 2.0 for ALC/AMC and 25% for CD68 + TAM. Patients with ALC/AMC < 2, IPS > 2 and > 25% CD68 + TAM had an inferior overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS). Spearman's test also uncovered a significant correlation between the ALC/AMC and TAM. Multivariate analysis identified ALC/AMC < 2, IPS > 2 and > 25% CD68 + TAM as poor prognostic factors of OS and EFS. After evaluating ALC/AMC and IPS, we stratified patients into three progressively-worse-outcome groups (low-risk: 0 risk factors; intermediate: 1 risk factor; high: 2 risk factors). Our study encourages the combination of ALC/AMC with IPS, for refining risk prediction in advanced HL patients.

  15. Tumor-associated mutations in a conserved structural motif alter physical and biochemical properties of human RAD51 recombinase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianhong; Morrical, Milagros D.; Donigan, Katherine A.; Weidhaas, Joanne B.; Sweasy, Joann B.; Averill, April M.; Tomczak, Jennifer A.; Morrical, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Human RAD51 protein catalyzes DNA pairing and strand exchange reactions that are central to homologous recombination and homology-directed DNA repair. Successful recombination/repair requires the formation of a presynaptic filament of RAD51 on ssDNA. Mutations in BRCA2 and other proteins that control RAD51 activity are associated with human cancer. Here we describe a set of mutations associated with human breast tumors that occur in a common structural motif of RAD51. Tumor-associated D149N, R150Q and G151D mutations map to a Schellman loop motif located on the surface of the RecA homology domain of RAD51. All three variants are proficient in DNA strand exchange, but G151D is slightly more sensitive to salt than wild-type (WT). Both G151D and R150Q exhibit markedly lower catalytic efficiency for adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis compared to WT. All three mutations alter the physical properties of RAD51 nucleoprotein filaments, with G151D showing the most dramatic changes. G151D forms mixed nucleoprotein filaments with WT RAD51 that have intermediate properties compared to unmixed filaments. These findings raise the possibility that mutations in RAD51 itself may contribute to genome instability in tumor cells, either directly through changes in recombinase properties, or indirectly through changes in interactions with regulatory proteins. PMID:25539919

  16. Depot delivery of dexamethasone and cediranib for the treatment of brain tumor associated edema in an intracranial rat glioma model.

    PubMed

    Ong, Qunya; Hochberg, Fred H; Cima, Michael J

    2015-11-10

    Treatments of brain tumor associated edema with systemically delivered dexamethasone, the standard of care, and cediranib, a novel anti-edema agent, are associated with systemic toxicities in brain tumor patients. A tunable, reservoir-based drug delivery device was developed to investigate the effects of delivering dexamethasone and cediranib locally in the brain in an intracranial 9L gliosarcoma rat model. Reproducible, sustained releases of both dexamethasone and solid dispersion of cediranib in polyvinylpyrrolidone (AZD/PVP) from these devices were achieved. The water-soluble AZD/PVP, which exhibited similar bioactivity as cediranib, was developed to enhance the release of cediranib from the device. Local and systemic administration of both dexamethasone and cediranib was equally efficacious in alleviating edema but had no effect on tumor growth. Edema reduction led to modest but significant improvement in survival. Local delivery of dexamethasone prevented dexamethasone-induced weight loss, an adverse effect seen in animals treated with systemic dexamethasone. Local deliveries of dexamethasone and cediranib via these devices used only 2.36% and 0.21% of the systemic doses respectively, but achieved similar efficacy as systemic drug deliveries without the side effects associated with systemic administration. Other therapeutic agents targeting brain tumor can be delivered locally in the brain to provide similar improved treatment outcomes.

  17. Low doses of gamma irradiation potentially modifies immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment by retuning tumor-associated macrophages: lesson from insulinoma.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Hridayesh; Klug, Felix; Nadella, Vinod; Mazumdar, Varadendra; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Hubertus; Umansky, Liudmila

    2016-03-01

    Tumor infiltrating iNOS+ macrophages under the influence of immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment gets polarized to tumor-promoting and immunosuppressive macrophages, known as tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). Their recruitment and increased density in the plethora of tumors has been associated with poor prognosis in cancer patients. Therefore, retuning of TAM to M1 phenotype would be a key for effective immunotherapy. Radiotherapy has been a potential non-invasive strategy to improve cancer immunotherapy and tumor immune rejection. Irradiation of late-stage tumor-bearing Rip1-Tag5 mice twice with 2 Gy dose resulted in profound changes in the inflammatory tumor micromilieu, characterized by induction of M1-associated effecter cytokines as well as reduction in protumorigenic and M2-associated effecter cytokines. Similarly, in vitro irradiation of macrophages with 2 Gy dose-induced expression of iNOS, NO, NFκBpp65, pSTAT3 and proinflammatory cytokines secretion while downregulating p38MAPK which are involved in iNOS translation and acquisition of an M1-like phenotype. Enhancement of various M2 effecter cytokines and angiogenic reprogramming in iNOs+ macrophage depleted tumors and their subsequent reduction by 2 Gy dose in Rip1-Tag5 transgenic mice furthermore demonstrated a critical role of peritumoral macrophages in the course of gamma irradiation mediated M1 retuning of insulinoma. PMID:26785731

  18. Functions of miR-146a and miR-222 in Tumor-associated Macrophages in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanshuang; Zhao, Lianmei; Shi, Bianhua; Ma, Sisi; Xu, Zhenbiao; Ge, Yehua; Liu, Yanxin; Zheng, Dexian; Shi, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play critical roles in promoting tumor progression and invasion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying TAM regulation remain to be further investigated and may make significant contributions to cancer treatment. Mammalian microRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been identified as important regulators of gene expression that function by repressing specific target genes mainly at the post-transcriptional level. However, systematic studies of the functions and mechanisms of miRNAs in TAMs in tumor tissues are rare. In this study, miR-146a and miR-222 were shown to be significantly decreased in TAMs associated with the up-regulated NF-κB p50 subunit. miR-146a promoted the expression of some M2 macrophage phenotype molecules, and miR-146a antagomir transfected RAW264.7 monocyte-macrophage cells inhibited 4T1 tumor growth in vivo. Meanwhile, overexpression of miR-222 inhibited TAM chemotaxis, and miR-222 in TAMs inhibited 4T1 tumor growth by targeting CXCL12 and inhibiting CXCR4. These data revealed that miRNAs influence breast tumor growth by promoting the M2 type polarization or regulating the recruitment of TAMs. These observations suggest that endogenous miRNAs may exert an important role in controlling the polarization and function of TAMs in breast cancer. PMID:26689540

  19. A think tank of TINK/TANKs: tumor-infiltrating/tumor-associated natural killer cells in tumor progression and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Antonino; Ferlazzo, Guido; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas M

    2014-08-01

    Tumor-infiltrating leukocytes are often induced by the cancer microenvironment to display a protumor, proangiogenic phenotype. This "polarization" has been described for several myeloid cells, in particular macrophages. Natural killer (NK) cells represent another population of innate immune cells able to infiltrate tumors. The role of NK in tumor progression and angiogenesis has not yet been fully investigated. Several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK (here referred to as "TINKs") and tumor-associated NK (altered peripheral NK cells, which here we call "TANKs") are compromised in their ability to lysew tumor cells. Recent data have suggested that they are potentially protumorigenic and can also acquire a proangiogenic phenotype. Here we review the properties of TINKs and TANKs and compare their activities to that of NK cells endowed with a physiological proangiogenic phenotype, in particular decidual NK cells. We speculate on the potential origins of TINKs and TANKs and on the immune signals involved in their differentiation and polarization. The TINK and TANK phenotype has broad implications in the immune response to tumors, ranging from a deficient control of cancer and cancer stem cells to an altered crosstalk with other relevant players of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, to induction of cancer angiogenesis. With this recently acquired knowledge that has not yet been put into perspective, we point out new potential avenues for therapeutic intervention involving NK cells as a target or an ally in oncology.

  20. A functional carbohydrate chip platform for analysis of carbohydrate-protein interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Chang Sup; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2010-05-01

    A carbohydrate chip based on glass or other transparent surfaces has been suggested as a potential tool for high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate-protein interactions. Here we proposed a facile, efficient, and cost-effective method whereby diverse carbohydrate types are modified in a single step and directly immobilized onto a glass surface, with retention of functional orientation. We modified various types of carbohydrates by reductive amination, in which reducing sugar groups were coupled with 4-(2-aminoethyl)aniline, which has di-amine groups at both ends. The modified carbohydrates were covalently attached to an amino-reactive NHS-activated glass surface by formation of stable amide bonds. This proposed method was applied for efficient construction of a carbohydrate microarray to analyze carbohydrate-protein interactions. The carbohydrate chip prepared using our method can be successfully used in diverse biomimetic studies of carbohydrates, including carbohydrate-biomolecule interactions, and carbohydrate sensor chip or microarray development for diagnosis and screening.

  1. An Adenovirus Vector Incorporating Carbohydrate Binding Domains Utilizes Glycans for Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masaharu; Ak, Ferhat; Ugai, Hideyo; Curiel, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5) continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene delivery. Aberrant glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids is a central feature of malignant transformation, and tumor-associated glycoforms are recognized as cancer biomarkers. On this basis, we hypothesized that cancer-specific cell-surface glycans could be the basis of a novel paradigm in HAdV-5-based vector targeting. Methodology/Principal Findings As a first step toward this goal, we constructed a novel HAdV-5 vector encoding a unique chimeric fiber protein that contains the tandem carbohydrate binding domains of the fiber protein of the NADC-1 strain of porcine adenovirus type 4 (PAdV-4). This glycan-targeted vector displays augmented CAR-independent gene transfer in cells with low CAR expression. Further, we show that gene transfer is markedly decreased in cells with genetic glycosylation defects and by inhibitors of glycosylation in normal cells. Conclusions/Significance These data provide the initial proof-of-concept for HAdV-5 vector-mediated gene delivery based on the presence of cell-surface carbohydrates. Further development of this new targeting paradigm could provide targeted gene delivery based on vector recognition of disease-specific glycan biomarkers. PMID:23383334

  2. Unique carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions are required for high affinity binding between FcgammaRIII and antibodies lacking core fucose.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Claudia; Grau, Sandra; Jäger, Christiane; Sondermann, Peter; Brünker, Peter; Waldhauer, Inja; Hennig, Michael; Ruf, Armin; Rufer, Arne Christian; Stihle, Martine; Umaña, Pablo; Benz, Jörg

    2011-08-01

    Antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), a key immune effector mechanism, relies on the binding of antigen-antibody complexes to Fcγ receptors expressed on immune cells. Antibodies lacking core fucosylation show a large increase in affinity for FcγRIIIa leading to an improved receptor-mediated effector function. Although afucosylated IgGs exist naturally, a next generation of recombinant therapeutic, glycoenginereed antibodies is currently being developed to exploit this finding. In this study, the crystal structures of a glycosylated Fcγ receptor complexed with either afucosylated or fucosylated Fc were determined allowing a detailed, molecular understanding of the regulatory role of Fc-oligosaccharide core fucosylation in improving ADCC. The structures reveal a unique type of interface consisting of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions between glycans of the receptor and the afucosylated Fc. In contrast, in the complex structure with fucosylated Fc, these contacts are weakened or nonexistent, explaining the decreased affinity for the receptor. These findings allow us to understand the higher efficacy of therapeutic antibodies lacking the core fucose and also suggest a unique mechanism by which the immune system can regulate antibody-mediated effector functions.

  3. Isolation of carbohydrate-metabolizing, extremely halophilic bacteria.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1972-01-01

    Four previously unrecognized strains of extremely halophilic bacteria that utilize carbohydrates have been isolated. Gas production proved an unreliable index of carbohydrate metabolism; therefore, carbohydrate utilization was measured by determining acid formation and sugar disappearance during growth. By these procedures, carbohydrate utilization was readily detected. The results suggest that carbohydrate dissimilation by extremely halophilic bacteria may be more common than previously thought and that the apparent rarity of carbohydrate-metabolizing halophiles may be an artifact of the isolation procedures used.

  4. Universal artificial antigen presenting cells to selectively propagate T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptor independent of specificity.

    PubMed

    Rushworth, David; Jena, Bipulendu; Olivares, Simon; Maiti, Sourindra; Briggs, Neima; Somanchi, Srinivas; Dai, Jianliang; Lee, Dean; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2014-05-01

    T cells genetically modified to stably express immunoreceptors are being assessed for therapeutic potential in clinical trials. T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) are endowed with a new specificity to target tumor-associated antigen (TAA) independent of major histocompatibility complex. Our approach to nonviral gene transfer in T cells uses ex vivo numeric expansion of CAR T cells on irradiated artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) bearing the targeted TAA. The requirement for aAPC to express a desired TAA limits the human application of CARs with multiple specificities when selective expansion through coculture with feeder cells is sought. As an alternative to expressing individual TAAs on aAPC, we expressed 1 ligand that could activate CAR T cells for sustained proliferation independent of specificity. We expressed a CAR ligand (designated CARL) that binds the conserved IgG4 extracellular domain of CAR and demonstrated that CARL aAPC propagate CAR T cells of multiple specificities. CARL avoids technical issues and costs associated with deploying clinical-grade aAPC for each TAA targeted by a given CAR. Using CARL enables 1 aAPC to numerically expand all CAR T cells containing the IgG4 domain, and simplifies expansion, testing, and clinical translation of CAR T cells of any specificity. PMID:24714354

  5. Universal Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells to Selectively Propagate T Cells Expressing Chimeric Antigen Receptor Independent of Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Rushworth, David; Jena, Bipulendu; Olivares, Simon; Maiti, Sourindra; Briggs, Neima; Somanchi, Srinivas; Dai, Jianliang; Lee, Dean; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-01-01

    T cells genetically modified to stably express immunoreceptors are being assessed for therapeutic potential in clinical trials. T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) are endowed with a new specificity to target tumor-associated antigen (TAA) independent of major histocompatibility complex. Our approach to non-viral gene transfer in T cells uses ex vivo numeric expansion of CAR+ T cells on irradiated artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) bearing the targeted TAA. The requirement for aAPC to express a desired TAA limits the human application of CARs with multiple specificities when selective expansion through co-culture with feeder cells is sought. As an alternative to expressing individual TAAs on aAPC, we expressed one ligand that could activate CAR+ T cells for sustained proliferation independent of specificity. We expressed a CAR ligand (designated CARL) that binds the conserved IgG4 extracellular domain of CAR and demonstrated CARL+ aAPC propagate CAR+ T cells of multiple specificities. CARL avoids technical issues and costs associated with deploying clinical-grade aAPC for each TAA targeted by a given CAR. Employing CARL enables one aAPC to numerically expand all CAR+ T cells containing the IgG4 domain, and simplifies expansion, testing, and clinical translation of CAR+ T cells of any specificity. PMID:24714354

  6. Carbohydrate Polymers for Nonviral Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sizovs, Antons; McLendon, Patrick M.; Srinivasachari, Sathya

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates have been investigated and developed as delivery vehicles for shuttling nucleic acids into cells. In this review, we present the state of the art in carbohydrate-based polymeric vehicles for nucleic acid delivery, with the focus on the recent successes in preclinical models, both in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric scaffolds based on the natural polysaccharides chitosan, hyaluronan, pullulan, dextran, and schizophyllan each have unique properties and potential for modification, and these results are discussed with the focus on facile synthetic routes and favorable performance in biological systems. Many of these carbohydrates have been used to develop alternative types of biomaterials for nucleic acid delivery to typical polyplexes, and these novel materials are discussed. Also presented are polymeric vehicles that incorporate copolymerized carbohydrates into polymer backbones based on polyethylenimine and polylysine and their effect on transfection and biocompatibility. Unique scaffolds, such as clusters and polymers based on cyclodextrin (CD), are also discussed, with the focus on recent successes in vivo and in the clinic. These results are presented with the emphasis on the role of carbohydrate and charge on transfection. Use of carbohydrates as molecular recognition ligands for cell-type specific delivery is also briefly reviewed. We contend that carbohydrates have contributed significantly to progress in the field of non-viral DNA delivery, and these new discoveries are impactful for developing new vehicles and materials for treatment of human disease. PMID:21504102

  7. Characterizing carbohydrate-protein interactions by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Carole A.; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between proteins and soluble carbohydrates and/or surface displayed glycans are central to countless recognition, attachment and signaling events in biology. The physical chemical features associated with these binding events vary considerably, depending on the biological system of interest. For example, carbohydrate-protein interactions can be stoichiometric or multivalent, the protein receptors can be monomeric or oligomeric, and the specificity of recognition can be highly stringent or rather promiscuous. Equilibrium dissociation constants for carbohydrate binding are known to vary from micromolar to millimolar, with weak interactions being far more prevalent; and individual carbohydrate binding sites can be truly symmetrical or merely homologous, and hence, the affinities of individual sites within a single protein can vary, as can the order of binding. Several factors, including the weak affinities with which glycans bind their protein receptors, the dynamic nature of the glycans themselves, and the non-equivalent interactions among oligomeric carbohydrate receptors, have made NMR an especially powerful tool for studying and defining carbohydrate-protein interactions. Here we describe those NMR approaches that have proven to be the most robust in characterizing these systems, and explain what type of information can (or cannot) be obtained from each. Our goal is to provide to the reader the information necessary for selecting the correct experiment or sets of experiments to characterize their carbohydrate-protein interaction of interest. PMID:23784792

  8. Identification of Tumor-associated Autoantigens for the Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer in Serum Using High Density Protein Microarrays*

    PubMed Central

    Babel, Ingrid; Barderas, Rodrigo; Díaz-Uriarte, Ramón; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge Luis; Sánchez-Carbayo, Marta; Casal, J. Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    There is a mounting evidence of the existence of autoantibodies associated to cancer progression. Antibodies are the target of choice for serum screening because of their stability and suitability for sensitive immunoassays. By using commercial protein microarrays containing 8000 human proteins, we examined 20 sera from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and healthy subjects to identify autoantibody patterns and associated antigens. Forty-three proteins were differentially recognized by tumoral and reference sera (p value <0.04) in the protein microarrays. Five immunoreactive antigens, PIM1, MAPKAPK3, STK4, SRC, and FGFR4, showed the highest prevalence in cancer samples, whereas ACVR2B was more abundant in normal sera. Three of them, PIM1, MAPKAPK3, and ACVR2B, were used for further validation. A significant increase in the expression level of these antigens on CRC cell lines and colonic mucosa was confirmed by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. A diagnostic ELISA based on the combination of MAPKAPK3 and ACVR2B proteins yielded specificity and sensitivity values of 73.9 and 83.3% (area under the curve, 0.85), respectively, for CRC discrimination after using an independent sample set containing 94 sera representative of different stages of progression and control subjects. In summary, these studies confirmed the presence of specific autoantibodies for CRC and revealed new individual markers of disease (PIM1, MAPKAPK3, and ACVR2B) with the potential to diagnose CRC with higher specificity and sensitivity than previously reported serum biomarkers. PMID:19638618

  9. Structural Basis for the Presentation of Tumor-Associated MHC Class II-Restricted Phosphopeptides to CD4+ T Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Depontieu, F; Sidney, J; Salay, T; Engelhard, V; Hunt, D; Sette, A; Topalian, S; Mariuzza, R

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulated protein phosphorylation is a hallmark of malignant transformation. Transformation can generate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-bound phosphopeptides that are differentially displayed on tumor cells for specific recognition by T cells. To understand how phosphorylation alters the antigenic identity of self-peptides and how MHC class II molecules present phosphopeptides for CD4{sup +} T-cell recognition, we determined the crystal structure of a phosphopeptide derived from melanoma antigen recognized by T cells-1 (pMART-1), selectively expressed by human melanomas, in complex with HLA-DR1. The structure revealed that the phosphate moiety attached to the serine residue at position P5 of pMART-1 is available for direct interactions with T-cell receptor (TCR) and that the peptide N-terminus adopts an unusual conformation orienting it toward TCR. This structure, combined with measurements of peptide affinity for HLA-DR1 and of peptide-MHC recognition by pMART-1-specific T cells, suggests that TCR recognition is focused on the N-terminal portion of pMART-1. This recognition mode appears to be distinct from that of foreign antigen complexes but is remarkably reminiscent of the way autoreactive TCRs engage self- or altered self-peptides, consistent with the tolerogenic nature of tumor-host immune interactions.

  10. Tumor antigen analysis in neuroblastoma by serological interrogation of bioinformatic data.

    PubMed

    Kohler, M Eric; Johnson, Bryon D; Palen, Katie; Chen, Qing-Rong; Khan, Javed; Orentas, Rimas J

    2010-11-01

    The identification of tumor antigens remains a major objective in tumor immunology, especially in pediatric malignancies where solid tumors often do not express a single dominant antigen. Methods such as the Serological Screening of Recombinant cDNA Expression Libraries (SEREX) have been used in the discovery of tumor-expressed proteins by virtue of their ability to induce an antibody response. To focus and accelerate this approach, we first identified candidate antigens by gene expression profiling data from clinical neuroblastoma specimens and then used an animal model to generate an antibody response to an engineered cell-based vaccine. Candidate tumor antigens were expressed as recombinant proteins in a mammalian system and screened for antibody recognition using serum from mice vaccinated with a neuroblastoma cell-based vaccine engineered to express CD80 and CD86, with or without Treg depletion. Through this procedure, the never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase NEK2 was identified as a tumor-associated antigen. Direct testing of serum from patients newly diagnosed with neuroblastoma showed specific serological responses in two of 20 patients. Although NEK2 was not universally recognized, it may serve as a tumor antigen for some patients.

  11. Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Glioblastoma Multiforme—A Suitable Target for Somatostatin Receptor-Based Imaging and Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Constantin; Linsenmann, Thomas; Lückerath, Katharina; Samnick, Samuel; Herrmann, Ken; Stoffer, Carolin; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo; Buck, Andreas K.; Löhr, Mario; Monoranu, Camelia-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) have been shown to promote malignant growth and to correlate with poor prognosis. [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-NN′,N″,N′″-tetraacetic acid]-d-Phe1,Tyr3-octreotate (DOTATATE) labeled with Gallium-68 selectively binds to somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A) which is specifically expressed and up-regulated in activated macrophages. On the other hand, the role of SSTR2A expression on the cell surface of glioma cells has not been fully elucidated yet. The aim of this study was to non-invasively assess SSTR2A expression of both glioma cells as well as macrophages in GBM. Methods 15 samples of patient-derived GBM were stained immunohistochemically for macrophage infiltration (CD68), proliferative activity (Ki67) as well as expression of SSTR2A. Anti-CD45 staining was performed to distinguish between resident microglia and tumor-infiltrating macrophages. In a subcohort, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using 68Ga-DOTATATE was performed and the semiquantitatively evaluated tracer uptake was compared to the results of immunohistochemistry. Results The amount of microglia/macrophages ranged from <10% to >50% in the tumor samples with the vast majority being resident microglial cells. A strong SSTR2A immunostaining was observed in endothelial cells of proliferating vessels, in neurons and neuropile. Only faint immunostaining was identified on isolated microglial and tumor cells. Somatostatin receptor imaging revealed areas of increased tracer accumulation in every patient. However, retention of the tracer did not correlate with immunohistochemical staining patterns. Conclusion SSTR2A seems not to be overexpressed in GBM samples tested, neither on the cell surface of resident microglia or infiltrating macrophages, nor on the surface of tumor cells. These data suggest that somatostatin receptor directed imaging and treatment strategies

  12. Glioblastoma cells induce differential glutamatergic gene expressions in human tumor-associated microglia/macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Judy; Stradmann-Bellinghausen, Beate; Yakubov, Eduard; Savaskan, Nicolai E; Régnier-Vigouroux, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma cells produce and release high amounts of glutamate into the extracellular milieu and subsequently can trigger seizure in patients. Tumor-associated microglia/macrophages (TAMs), consisting of both parenchymal microglia and monocytes-derived macrophages (MDMs) recruited from the blood, are known to populate up to 1/3 of the glioblastoma tumor environment and exhibit an alternative, tumor-promoting and supporting phenotype. However, it is unknown how TAMs respond to the excess extracellular glutamate in the glioblastoma microenvironment. We investigated the expressions of genes related to glutamate transport and metabolism in human TAMs freshly isolated from glioblastoma resections. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed (i) significant increases in the expressions of GRIA2 (GluA2 or AMPA receptor 2), SLC1A2 (EAAT2), SLC1A3 (EAAT1), (ii) a near-significant decrease in the expression of SLC7A11 (cystine-glutamate antiporter xCT) and (iii) a remarkable increase in GLUL expression (glutamine synthetase) in these cells compared to adult primary human microglia. TAMs co-cultured with glioblastoma cells also exhibited a similar glutamatergic profile as freshly isolated TAMs except for a slight increase in SLC7A11 expression. We next analyzed these genes expressions in cultured human MDMs derived from peripheral blood monocytes for comparison. In contrast, MDMs co-cultured with glioblastoma cells compared to MDMs co-cultured with normal astrocytes exhibited decreased expressions in the tested genes except for GLUL. This is the first study to demonstrate transcriptional changes in glutamatergic signaling of TAMs in a glioblastoma microenvironment, and the findings here suggest that TAMs and MDMs might potentially elicit different cellular responses in the presence of excess extracellular glutamate. PMID:26047211

  13. Prognostic Value of Tumor-Associated Macrophages According to Histologic Locations and Hormone Receptor Status in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gwak, Jae Moon; Jang, Min Hye; Kim, Dong Il; Seo, An Na; Park, So Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are involved in tumor progression by promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tumor cell invasion, migration and angiogenesis. However, in breast cancer, the clinical relevance of the TAM infiltration according to distinct histologic locations (intratumoral vs. stromal) and hormone receptor status is unclear. We investigated the significance of the levels of TAM infiltration in distinct histologic locations in invasive breast cancer. We also examined the relationship of the TAM levels with the clinicopathologic features of tumors, expression of EMT markers, and clinical outcomes. Finally, we analyzed the prognostic value of TAM levels according to hormone receptor status. High levels of infiltration of intratumoral, stromal and total TAMs were associated with high histologic grade, p53 overexpression, high Ki-67 proliferation index and negative hormone receptor status. Infiltration of TAMs was also correlated with overexpression of vimentin, smooth muscle actin and alteration of β-catenin. Overall, a high level of infiltration of intratumoral TAMs was associated with poor disease-free survival, and was found to be an independent prognostic factor. In subgroup analyses by hormone receptor status, a high level of infiltration of intratumoral TAM was an independent prognostic factor in the hormone receptor-positive subgroup, but not in the hormone-receptor negative subgroup. Our findings suggest that intratumoral TAMs play an important role in tumor progression in breast cancer, especially in the hormone receptor-positive group, and the level of TAM infiltration may be used as a prognostic factor and even a therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:25884955

  14. Cathepsin S-mediated autophagic flux in tumor-associated macrophages accelerate tumor development by promoting M2 polarization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the major component of tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. TAMs are heterogeneous, with distinct phenotypes influenced by the microenvironment surrounding tumor tissues, but relatively little is known about the key molecular in these cells that contribute to malignant phenotypes. Autophagic activity is a critical factor in tumor development that contributes to enhancing cellular fitness and survival in the hostile tumor microenvironment. However, the molecular basis and relations between autophagy and TAMs polarization remain unclear. Methods Cathepsin S (Cat S) expression was analyzed in human colon carcinoma and normal colon tissues. In vivo effects were evaluated using PancO2 subcutaneous tumor model and SL4 hepatic metastasis model. Immunofluorescence staining, flow cytometry and real-time PCR were done to examine TAMs polarization. Western blotting assay, transmission electron microscopy, mCherry-GFP-LC3 transfection and DQ-BSA degradation assays were carried out to determine its role in regulating autophagy. Results In the present study, we showed that the enhanced expression of Cat S correlated with the severity of histologic grade as well as clinical stage, metastasis, and recurrence, which are known indicators of a relatively poor prognosis of human colon carcinoma. Cat S knockout led to decreased tumor growth and metastasis. Moreover, Cat S knockout inhibited M2 macrophage polarization during tumor development. We further demonstrated that Cat S was required for not only autophagic flux but also the fusion processes of autophagosomes and lysosomes in TAMs. Importantly, we found that Cat S contributed to tumor development by regulating the M2 phenotype of TAMs through the activation of autophagy. Conclusions These results indicated that Cat S-mediated autophagic flux is an important mechanism for inducing M2-type polarization of TAMs, which leads to tumor development. These data provide strong evidence for a

  15. Activated CD69+ T cells foster immune privilege by regulating IDO expression in tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiyi; Kuang, Dong-Ming; Wu, Yan; Xiao, Xiao; Li, Xue-Feng; Li, Tuan-Jie; Zheng, Limin

    2012-02-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that immune activation at stroma can be rerouted in a tumor-promoting direction. CD69 is an immunoregulatory molecule expressed by early-activated leukocytes at sites of chronic inflammation, and CD69(+) T cells have been found to promote human tumor progression. In this study, we showed that, upon encountering autologous CD69(+) T cells, tumor macrophages (MΦs) acquired the ability to produce much greater amounts of IDO protein in cancer nests. The T cells isolated from the hepatocellular carcinoma tissues expressed significantly more CD69 molecules than did those on paired circulating and nontumor-infiltrating T cells; these tumor-derived CD69(+) T cells could induce considerable IDO in monocytes. Interestingly, the tumor-associated monocytes/MΦs isolated from hepatocellular carcinoma tissues or generated by in vitro culture effectively activated circulating T cells to express CD69. IL-12 derived from tumor MΦs was required for early T cell activation and subsequent IDO expression. Moreover, we found that conditioned medium from IDO(+) MΦs effectively suppressed T cell responses in vitro, an effect that could be reversed by adding extrinsic IDO substrate tryptophan or by pretreating MΦs with an IDO inhibitor 1-methyl-DL-tryptophan. These data revealed a fine-tuned collaborative action between different types of immune cells to counteract T cell responses in tumor microenvironment. Such an active induction of immune tolerance should be considered for the rational design of effective immune-based anticancer therapies.

  16. A Novel Copper Chelate Modulates Tumor Associated Macrophages to Promote Anti-Tumor Response of T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Paramita; Ganguly, Avishek; Adhikary, Arghya; Mukhopadhyay, Debanjan; Ganguli, Sudipta; Banerjee, Rajdeep; Ashraf, Mohammad; Biswas, Jaydip; Das, Pradeep K.; Sa, Gourisankar; Chatterjee, Mitali; Das, Tanya; Choudhuri, Soumitra Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Background At the early stages of carcinogenesis, the induction of tumor specific T cell mediated immunity seems to block the tumor growth and give protective anti-tumor immune response. However, tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) might play an immunosuppressive role and subvert this anti tumor immunity leading to tumor progression and metastasis. Methodology/Principal Findings The Cu (II) complex, (chelate), copper N-(2-hydroxy acetophenone) glycinate (CuNG), synthesized by us, has previously been shown to have a potential usefulness in immunotherapy of multiple drug resistant cancers. The current study demonstrates that CuNG treatment of TAMs modulates their status from immunosuppressive to proimmunogenic nature. Interestingly, these activated TAMs produced high levels of IL-12 along with low levels of IL-10 that not only allowed strong Th1 response marked by generation of high levels of IFN-γ but also reduced activation induced T cell death. Similarly, CuNG treatment of peripheral blood monocytes from chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy refractory cancer patients also modulated their cytokine status. Most intriguingly, CuNG treated TAMs could influence reprogramming of TGF-β producing CD4+CD25+ T cells toward IFN-γ producing T cells. Conclusion/Significance Our results show the potential usefulness of CuNG in immunotherapy of drug-resistant cancers through reprogramming of TAMs that in turn reprogram the T cells and reeducate the T helper function to elicit proper anti-tumorogenic Th1 response leading to effective reduction in tumor growth. PMID:19756150

  17. Development of Y-shaped peptide for constructing nanoparticle systems targeting tumor-associated macrophages in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lu; Gao, Yunxiang; Pierce, Ryan; Dai, Liming; Kim, Julian; Zhang, Mei

    2014-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) is increasingly being viewed as a target of great interest in tumor microenvironment due to its important role in the progression and metastasis of cancers. It has been shown that TAM indeed overexpresses unique surface marker legumain. In this study, we designed and synthesized a Y-shaped legumain-targeting peptide (Y-Leg) with functional groups allowing for further conjugation with imaging and therapeutic moieties (vide infra). The in vitro cell experiments using FITC-conjugated Y-Leg revealed its specific and selective interaction with M2-polarized macrophages (i.e., TAMs) with preference to M1 macrophages, and that the interaction was not interfered with by conjugating FITC to its functional group. Further, we constructed a nanotube system by grafting Y-Leg onto oxidized carbon nanotubes (OCNTs) loaded with paramagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The intravenous injection of the resultant Y-Leg-OCNT/Fe3O4 nanotubes to 4T1 mammary tumor-bearing mouse led to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of TAM-infiltrated tumor microenvironment, revealing the targeting specificity of Y-Leg-conjugated nanotubes in vivo. The Y shape of peptide and its functional groups containing amines and imidazole can protonate at different pHs, contributing to the in vitro and in vivo targeting specificity. This study represents the first development of novel peptide and peptide-grafted nanotube system targeting M2-polarized TAMs in vivo. The methodology developed in this study is applicable to the construction of various multifunctional nanoparticle systems for selectively targeting, imaging and manipulating of TAMs for the diagnosis and treatment of cancers and inflammatory diseases identified with macrophage-infiltrated disease tissue.

  18. Biocompatible mannosylated endosomal-escape nanoparticles enhance selective delivery of short nucleotide sequences to tumor associated macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ryan A.; Barham, Whitney J.; Kumar, Bharat; Tikhomirov, Oleg; McFadden, Ian D.; Yull, Fiona E.; Giorgio, Todd D.

    2014-12-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) can modify the tumor microenvironment to create a pro-tumor niche. Manipulation of the TAM phenotype is a novel, potential therapeutic approach to engage anti-cancer immunity. siRNA is a molecular tool for knockdown of specific mRNAs that is tunable in both strength and duration. The use of siRNA to reprogram TAMs to adopt an immunogenic, anti-tumor phenotype is an attractive alternative to ablation of this cell population. One current difficulty with this approach is that TAMs are difficult to specifically target and transfect. We report here successful utilization of novel mannosylated polymer nanoparticles (MnNP) that are capable of escaping the endosomal compartment to deliver siRNA to TAMs in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with MnNP-siRNA complexes did not significantly decrease TAM cell membrane integrity in culture, nor did it create adverse kidney or liver function in mice, even at repeated doses of 5 mg kg-1. Furthermore, MnNP effectively delivers labeled nucleotides to TAMs in mice with primary mammary tumors. We also confirmed TAM targeting in the solid tumors disseminated throughout the peritoneum of ovarian tumor bearing mice following injection of fluorescently labeled MnNP-nucleotide complexes into the peritoneum. Finally, we show enhanced uptake of MnNP in lung metastasis associated macrophages compared to untargeted particles when using an intubation delivery method. In summary, we have shown that MnNP specifically and effectively deliver siRNA to TAMs in vivo.

  19. The possible interaction between periostin expressed by cancer stroma and tumor-associated macrophages in developing mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Furudate, Sadanori; Fujimura, Taku; Kakizaki, Aya; Kambayashi, Yumi; Asano, Masayuki; Watabe, Akiko; Aiba, Setsuya

    2016-02-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) starts as an indolent disease, progresses from a patch stage to confluent plaques and ultimately develops skin tumors. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play roles in maintaining the tumor microenvironment in MF. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the involvement of TAMs in the lesional skin of different stages of MF. First, we immunohistologically examined the percentage of CD163+ macrophages and CD206+ cells, as well as the levels of periostin and IL-4 in cancer stroma. The percentage of CD206+ cells increased in parallel with tumor progression, while there was no significant difference in the percentage of CD163+ cells. Periostin was prominent in the stromal area at the patch and plaque stages but decreased at the tumor stage. In contrast, IL-4 was prominently stained at both plaque and tumor stages. To further elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the effects of these stromal factors on TAMs, we examined their effects on mRNA expression in monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. Based on microarray analysis and gene ontology, we examined a series of chemokines and MMPs whose expression was strongly connected with periostin stimulation. The DNA microarray results were verified in M2 macrophages using real-time PCR. We further examined the mRNA expression of these chemokines and MMPs in the presence of periostin and IL-4 to simulate the advanced stages of MF and validated their protein expression by ELISA. Our present report suggests possible roles of periostin on TAMs in establishing the tumor microenvironment in MF. PMID:26441016

  20. Carbohydrate functionalized carbon nanotubes and their applications.

    PubMed

    Gorityala, Bala Kishan; Ma, Jimei; Wang, Xin; Chen, Peng; Liu, Xue-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted tremendous attention in biomedical applications due to their molecular size and unique properties. This tutorial review summarizes the strategies to functionalize CNTs with bioactive carbohydrates, which improve their solubility, biocompatibility and biofunctionalities while preserving their desired properties. In addition, studies on the usage of carbohydrate functionalized CNTs to detect bacteria, to bind to specific lectins, to deliver glycomimetic drug molecules into cells and to probe cellular activities as biosensors are reviewed. Improvement in biocompatibility and introduction of bio-functionalities by integration of carbohydrate with CNTs are paving the way to glyconanotechnology and may provide new tools for glycobiological studies. PMID:20585681

  1. Reductive opening of carbohydrate phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetals.

    PubMed

    Chéry, Florence; Cabianca, Elena; Tatibouët, Arnaud; De Lucchi, Ottorino; Lindhorst, Thisbe K; Rollin, Patrick

    2015-11-19

    The phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetal is a relatively new protecting group in carbohydrate chemistry. However, carbohydrate-derived phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetals show a different behavior in reductive desulfonylation than simple symmetrical acetals. Here we have investigated various SET-type reaction conditions in order to open PSE acetals regioselectively and to produce chiral ω-hydroxyethenyl ethers. Whereas sodium amalgam leads to a mixture of regioisomeric vinyl ethers besides the ethylidene acetal, samarium iodide is suited for regioselective ring opening. This is shown with seven different carbohydrate PSE acetals, both of the 1,3-dioxane and the 1,3-dioxolane type. PMID:26469209

  2. Complex carbohydrates: the science and the label.

    PubMed

    1995-07-01

    This conference resulted in a foundation upon which consensus will be built in the future. Further, it provided a forum for the articulation of the critical need for carbohydrates in human nutrition. We have come a long way in the past 25 years in the food and nutrition sciences and this conference well illustrated that point. At the White House Conference on Nutrition in 1969, macronutrients were never even mentioned as being necessary to nutrition; only micronutrients were emphasized. In 1977 the term complex carbohydrate was used without definition in the Dietary Goals for the United States. This conference encapsulated the tremendous strides that have been made concerning the chemical, nutritional, biologic, and physiologic importance of carbohydrates in health and disease. It is fascinating to review the recommendations concerning complex carbohydrate from 1977 on. Recommendations were made by the Senate Select Committee in 1977; the Dietary Guidelines of 1980, 1985, and 1990; the Surgeon General's report of 1979 and 1988; the 10th edition of Recommended Dietary Allowances; the 1989 National Academy of Sciences Diet and Health: Implications for Reducing Chronic Disease Risk; the 1991 FDA proposal for labeling; and the 1992 Food Guide Pyramid. Indeed, as Dr. Joanne Slavin pointed out, "there is a wide range of consensus that increased complex carbohydrate is consistent with good health," and certainly as Dr. Gary Henderson said, "the term complex carbohydrate has equity with consumers." With this level of apparent clarity it is difficult at first to identify a problem for the food label. After all, if consumer health would benefit, why not simply do it? However, a problem does exist in that carbohydrates may be classified chemically in groups that are difficult to analyze and to define as to their physiologic function in the body. Indeed, complex carbohydrates defined by chain length may have molecular structures less complex than those of smaller units and may

  3. Utilization of carbohydrates by radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, T.; Nagasawa, N.; Yoshii, F.

    2002-03-01

    Upgrading and utilization of carbohydrates such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated for recycling these bio-resources and reducing the environmental pollution. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and various kinds of biological activities such as anti-microbial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress, phytoalexins induction, etc. were induced. On the other hand, some carbohydrate derivatives, carboxymethylcellulose and carboxymethylstarch, could be crosslinked under certain radiation condition and produce the biodegradable hydrogel for medical and agricultural use.

  4. Carbohydrate functionalized carbon nanotubes and their applications.

    PubMed

    Gorityala, Bala Kishan; Ma, Jimei; Wang, Xin; Chen, Peng; Liu, Xue-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted tremendous attention in biomedical applications due to their molecular size and unique properties. This tutorial review summarizes the strategies to functionalize CNTs with bioactive carbohydrates, which improve their solubility, biocompatibility and biofunctionalities while preserving their desired properties. In addition, studies on the usage of carbohydrate functionalized CNTs to detect bacteria, to bind to specific lectins, to deliver glycomimetic drug molecules into cells and to probe cellular activities as biosensors are reviewed. Improvement in biocompatibility and introduction of bio-functionalities by integration of carbohydrate with CNTs are paving the way to glyconanotechnology and may provide new tools for glycobiological studies.

  5. Conformational Dynamics of the Single Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen in Solution.

    PubMed

    Galochkina, Tatiana; Zlenko, Dmitry; Nesterenko, Alexey; Kovalenko, Ilya; Strakhovskaya, Marina; Averyanov, Alexander; Rubin, Andrey

    2016-09-19

    The O-antigen is the most variable and highly immunogenic part of the lipopolysaccharide molecule that covers the surface of Gram-negative bacteria and makes up the first line of cellular defense. To provide insight into the details of the O-antigen arrangement on the membrane surface, we simulated its behavior in solution by molecular dynamics. We developed the energetically favorable O-antigen conformation by analyzing free-energy distributions for its disaccharide fragments. Starting from this conformation, we simulated the behavior of the O-antigen chain on long timescales. Depending on the force field and temperature, the single molecule can undergo reversible or irreversible coil-to-globule transitions. The mechanism of these transitions is related either to the rotation of the carbohydrate residues around O-glycosidic bonds or to flips of the pyranose rings. We found that the presence of rhamnose in the O-antigen chain crucially increases its conformational mobility.

  6. Conformational Dynamics of the Single Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen in Solution.

    PubMed

    Galochkina, Tatiana; Zlenko, Dmitry; Nesterenko, Alexey; Kovalenko, Ilya; Strakhovskaya, Marina; Averyanov, Alexander; Rubin, Andrey

    2016-09-19

    The O-antigen is the most variable and highly immunogenic part of the lipopolysaccharide molecule that covers the surface of Gram-negative bacteria and makes up the first line of cellular defense. To provide insight into the details of the O-antigen arrangement on the membrane surface, we simulated its behavior in solution by molecular dynamics. We developed the energetically favorable O-antigen conformation by analyzing free-energy distributions for its disaccharide fragments. Starting from this conformation, we simulated the behavior of the O-antigen chain on long timescales. Depending on the force field and temperature, the single molecule can undergo reversible or irreversible coil-to-globule transitions. The mechanism of these transitions is related either to the rotation of the carbohydrate residues around O-glycosidic bonds or to flips of the pyranose rings. We found that the presence of rhamnose in the O-antigen chain crucially increases its conformational mobility. PMID:27304860

  7. A Phase 1 Study of a Vaccine Targeting Preferentially Expressed Antigen in Melanoma and Prostate-specific Membrane Antigen in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey S.; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Goodman, Oscar B.; Cranmer, Lee D.; Marshall, John L.; Miles, Sabrina; Rosario, Dar; Diamond, David C.; Qiu, Zhiyong; Obrocea, Mihail; Bot, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Summary Preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME) and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are tumor-associated antigens implicated in cellular differentiation, genetic stability, and angiogenesis. MKC1106-PP is an immunotherapeutic regimen cotargeting PRAME and PSMA, comprised of a recombinant plasmid (pPRA-PSM encoding fragments derived from both antigens) and 2 peptides (E-PRA and E-PSM derived from PRAME and PSMA, respectively). This multicenter study evaluated MKC1106-PP with a fixed plasmid dose and 2 different peptide doses, administered by intralymph node injection in a prime-boost sequence in human leukocyte antigen-A*0201 and tumor-antigen-positive patients with progressing metastatic solid tumors who had failed standard therapy. Immune monitoring was done by tetramer and enzymatic-linked immune spot analysis. The treatment was well tolerated, with no significant differences in safety, immune response, and clinical outcome relative to peptide doses. Fifteen of 24 evaluable patients showed an immune response, as defined by the expansion of PRAME-specific or PSMA-specific T cells in the blood. There were no partial or complete responses by the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Seven patients showed stable disease (SD) for 6 months or longer, or prostate specific antigen decline: 4 of 10 with prostate carcinoma, 2 of 2 with renal clear cell carcinoma, and 1 of 10 with metastatic melanoma. In addition, there was an association between the induction and persistence of antigen-specific T cells in blood above baseline levels and disease control, defined as SD for 6 months or longer. These results support further development of MKC1106-PP in specific clinical indications. PMID:21760528

  8. Carbohydrate feeding and exercise: effect of beverage carbohydrate content.

    PubMed

    Murray, R; Seifert, J G; Eddy, D E; Paul, G L; Halaby, G A

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ingesting fluids of varying carbohydrate content upon sensory response, physiologic function, and exercise performance during 1.25 h of intermittent cycling in a warm environment (Tdb = 33.4 degrees C). Twelve subjects (7 male, 5 female) completed four separate exercise sessions; each session consisted of three 20 min bouts of cycling at 65% VO2max, with each bout followed by 5 min rest. A timed cycling task (1200 pedal revolutions) completed each exercise session. Immediately prior to the first 20 min cycling bout and during each rest period, subjects consumed 2.5 ml.kg BW-1 of water placebo (WP), or solutions of 6%, 8%, or 10% sucrose with electrolytes (20 mmol.l-1 Na+, 3.2 mmol.l-1 K+). Beverages were administered in double blind, counterbalanced order. Mean (+/- SE) times for the 1200 cycling task differed significantly: WP = 13.62 +/- 0.33 min, *6% = 13.03 +/- 0.24 min, 8% = 13.30 +/- 0.25 min, 10% = 13.57 +/- 0.22 min (* = different from WP and 10%, P less than 0.05). Compared to WP, ingestion of the CHO beverages resulted in higher plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, and higher RER values during the final 20 min of exercise (P less than 0.05). Markers of physiologic function and sensory perception changed similarly throughout exercise; no differences were observed among subjects in response to beverage treatments for changes in plasma concentrations of lactate, sodium, potassium, for changes in plasma volume, plasma osmolality, rectal temperature, heart rate, oxygen uptake, rating of perceived exertion, or for indices of gastrointestinal distress, perceived thirst, and overall beverage acceptance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Workshop to establish databases of carbohydrate spectra

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The workshop was organized to formulate guidelines for establishing spectral databases of complex carbohydrates. The databases will enable the scientific community to avoid the great waste of research effort and funds that frequently occurs when carbohydrate chemists are forced to duplicate the structural characterization of previously characterized complex carbohydrates. Chemists waste their effort on repetitive characterizations because in the absence of spectral databases they are unaware they are analyzing a known molecule until they have completely determined its structure. Chemists will be able to avoid much of this wasted effort when the collections of mass and of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra initiated at the workshop are subsequently developed into searchable databases. Then scientists only need query the databases with the spectrum or with information defining the spectrum of an unidentified carbohydrate to find out if it has been previously characterized.

  10. Discriminating antigen and non-antigen using proteome dissimilarity: bacterial antigens

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Kamna; Flower, Darren R

    2010-01-01

    It has been postulated that immunogenicity results from the overall dissimilarity of pathogenic proteins versus the host proteome. We have sought to use this concept to discriminate between antigens and non-antigens of bacterial origin. Sets of 100 known antigenic and nonantigenic peptide sequences from bacteria were compared to human and mouse proteomes. Both antigenic and non-antigenic sequences lacked human or mouse homologues. Observed distributions were compared using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. The statistical null hypothesis was accepted, indicating that antigen and non-antigens did not differ significantly. Likewise, we were unable to determine a threshold able to separate meaningfully antigen from non-antigen. Thus, antigens cannot be predicted from pathogen genomes based solely on their dissimilarity to the human genome. PMID:20975907

  11. Presentation of hepatocellular antigens

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, Arash; Crispe, Ian Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The liver is an organ in which antigen-specific T-cell responses manifest a bias toward immune tolerance. This is clearly seen in the rejection of allogeneic liver transplants, and multiple other phenomena suggest that this effect is more general. These include tolerance toward antigens introduced via the portal vein, immune failure to several hepatotropic viruses, the lack of natural liver-stage immunity to malaria parasites, and the frequent metastasis of cancers to the liver. Here we review the mechanisms by which T cells engage with hepatocellular antigens, the context in which such encounters occur, and the mechanisms that act to suppress a full T-cell response. While many mechanisms play a role, we will argue that two important processes are the constraints on the cross-presentation of hepatocellular antigens, and the induction of negative feedback inhibition driven by interferons. The constant exposure of the liver to microbial products from the intestine may drive innate immunity, rendering the local environment unfavorable for specific T-cell responses through this mechanism. Nevertheless, tolerance toward hepatocellular antigens is not monolithic and under specific circumstances allows both effective immunity and immunopathology. PMID:26924525

  12. Carbohydrate Nutrition and Team Sport Performance.

    PubMed

    Williams, Clyde; Rollo, Ian

    2015-11-01

    The common pattern of play in 'team sports' is 'stop and go', i.e. where players perform repeated bouts of brief high-intensity exercise punctuated by lower intensity activity. Sprints are generally 2-4 s long and recovery between sprints is of variable length. Energy production during brief sprints is derived from the degradation of intra-muscular phosphocreatine and glycogen (anaerobic metabolism). Prolonged periods of multiple sprints drain muscle glycogen stores, leading to a decrease in power output and a reduction in general work rate during training and competition. The impact of dietary carbohydrate interventions on team sport performance have been typically assessed using intermittent variable-speed shuttle running over a distance of 20 m. This method has evolved to include specific work to rest ratios and skills specific to team sports such as soccer, rugby and basketball. Increasing liver and muscle carbohydrate stores before sports helps delay the onset of fatigue during prolonged intermittent variable-speed running. Carbohydrate intake during exercise, typically ingested as carbohydrate-electrolyte solutions, is also associated with improved performance. The mechanisms responsible are likely to be the availability of carbohydrate as a substrate for central and peripheral functions. Variable-speed running in hot environments is limited by the degree of hyperthermia before muscle glycogen availability becomes a significant contributor to the onset of fatigue. Finally, ingesting carbohydrate immediately after training and competition will rapidly recover liver and muscle glycogen stores.

  13. Carbohydrate Nutrition and Team Sport Performance.

    PubMed

    Williams, Clyde; Rollo, Ian

    2015-11-01

    The common pattern of play in 'team sports' is 'stop and go', i.e. where players perform repeated bouts of brief high-intensity exercise punctuated by lower intensity activity. Sprints are generally 2-4 s long and recovery between sprints is of variable length. Energy production during brief sprints is derived from the degradation of intra-muscular phosphocreatine and glycogen (anaerobic metabolism). Prolonged periods of multiple sprints drain muscle glycogen stores, leading to a decrease in power output and a reduction in general work rate during training and competition. The impact of dietary carbohydrate interventions on team sport performance have been typically assessed using intermittent variable-speed shuttle running over a distance of 20 m. This method has evolved to include specific work to rest ratios and skills specific to team sports such as soccer, rugby and basketball. Increasing liver and muscle carbohydrate stores before sports helps delay the onset of fatigue during prolonged intermittent variable-speed running. Carbohydrate intake during exercise, typically ingested as carbohydrate-electrolyte solutions, is also associated with improved performance. The mechanisms responsible are likely to be the availability of carbohydrate as a substrate for central and peripheral functions. Variable-speed running in hot environments is limited by the degree of hyperthermia before muscle glycogen availability becomes a significant contributor to the onset of fatigue. Finally, ingesting carbohydrate immediately after training and competition will rapidly recover liver and muscle glycogen stores. PMID:26553494

  14. Dietary Carbohydrates and Childhood Functional Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Shulman, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) affect a large number of children throughout the world. Carbohydrates (which provide the majority of calories consumed in the Western diet) have been implicated both as culprits for the etiology of symptoms and as potential therapeutic agents (e.g., fiber) in childhood FGIDs. In this review, we detail how carbohydrate malabsorption may cause gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g., bloating) via the physiologic effects of both increased osmotic activity and increased gas production from bacterial fermentation. Several factors may play a role, including: (1) the amount of carbohydrate ingested; (2) whether ingestion is accompanied by a meal or other food; (3) the rate of gastric emptying (how quickly the meal enters the small intestine); (4) small intestinal transit time (the time it takes for a meal to enter the large intestine after first entering the small intestine); (5) whether the meal contains bacteria with enzymes capable of breaking down the carbohydrate; (6) colonic bacterial adaptation to one's diet, and (7) host factors such as the presence or absence of visceral hypersensitivity. By detailing controlled and uncontrolled trials, we describe how there is a general lack of strong evidence supporting restriction of individual carbohydrates (e.g., lactose, fructose) for childhood FGIDs. We review emerging evidence suggesting that a more comprehensive restriction of fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) may be effective. Finally, we review how soluble fiber (a complex carbohydrate) supplementation via randomized controlled intervention trials in childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders has demonstrated efficacy. PMID:27355647

  15. Carbohydrate drinks and cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Bacharach, D W; von Duvillard, S P; Rundell, K W; Meng, J; Cring, M R; Szmedra, L; Castle, J M

    1994-06-01

    We compared the effects of similarly tasting orange flavored drinks containing 0% (P), 6.4% (E1), and 10% (E2) carbohydrate (CHO) using 12 well-trained cyclists (VO2max = 5.0 l/min-1) on metabolic responses to exercise (EX) and a sprint type performance ride (PR). Each subject completed 3 separate 2 h EX bouts at 65% VO2max followed by a PR identified as the time in sec to complete 500 revolutions at a constant belt resistance of 29.4 N (ANOVA*). The CHO feedings or placebo of 3 ml/kg body weight were given double blind and counter-balanced at 0 min and every 20 min thereafter during EX. Blood samples were drawn and core temperature (Tr) was recorded at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min of EX and 1 min post PR. Blood samples were analyzed for glucose (G) and lactate [LA-]. Blood G at 0 min were similar; however, at 120 min, G was 3.96 mM for P*, 4.57 mM for E1, and 4.77 mM for E2. Blood [LA-] remained similar throughout EX averaging (P, 2.6 mM; E1, 2.9 mM; E2, 2.5 mM). Tr at 120 min was also similar (P, 38.5 degrees C; E1, 38.6 degrees C; E2, 38.3 degrees C). Mean PR times for P(264.4 s)**, E1 (255.3 s)*, E2 (252.4 s)* indicate consumption of a CHO drink during EX improves PR. Furthermore, a 10% CHO drink improves PR more than a 6.4% CHO drink.

  16. Pathways of Antigen Processing

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Janice S.; Wearsch, Pamela A.; Cresswell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    T cell recognition of antigen presenting cells depends on their expression of a spectrum of peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) and class II (MHC-II) molecules. Conversion of antigens from pathogens or transformed cells into MHC-I and MHC-II-bound peptides is critical for mounting protective T cell responses, and similar processing of self proteins is necessary to establish and maintain tolerance. Cells use a variety of mechanisms to acquire protein antigens, from translation in the cytosol to variations on the theme of endocytosis, and to degrade them once acquired. In this review we highlight the aspects of MHC-I and MHC-II biosynthesis and assembly that have evolved to intersect these pathways and sample the peptides that are produced. PMID:23298205

  17. A novel mode of carbohydrate recognition in jacalin, a Moraceae plant lectin with a beta-prism fold.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, R; Sekar, K; Banerjee, R; Sharma, V; Surolia, A; Vijayan, M

    1996-07-01

    Jacalin, a tetrameric two-chain lectin (66,000 Mr) from jackfruit seeds, is highly specific for the tumour associated T-antigenic disaccharide. The crystal structure of jacalin with methyl-alpha-D-galactose reveals that each subunit has a three-fold symmetric beta-prism fold made up of three four-stranded beta-sheets. The lectin exhibits a novel carbohydrate-binding site involving the N terminus of the alpha-chain which is generated through a post-translational modification involving proteolysis, the first known instance where such a modification has been used to confer carbohydrate specificity. This new lectin fold may be characteristic of the Moraceae plant family. The structure provides an explanation for the relative affinities of the lectin for galactose derivatives and provides insights into the structural basis of its T-antigen specificity.

  18. PET Imaging of Tumor-Associated Macrophages with 89Zr-Labeled High-Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Tang, Jun; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Hogstad, Brandon; Merad, Miriam; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Lewis, Jason S.; Mulder, Willem J.M.; Reiner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are increasingly investigated in cancer immunology and are considered a promising target for better and tailored treatment of malignant growth. Although TAMs also have high diagnostic and prognostic value, TAM imaging still remains largely unexplored. Here, we describe the development of reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL)–facilitated TAM PET imaging in a breast cancer model. Methods Radiolabeled rHDL nanoparticles incorporating the long-lived positron-emitting nuclide 89Zr were developed using 2 different approaches. The nanoparticles were composed of phospholipids and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) in a 2.5:1 weight ratio. 89Zr was complexed with deferoxamine (also known as desferrioxamine B, desferoxamine B), conjugated either to a phospholipid or to apoA-I to generate 89Zr-PL-HDL and 89Zr-AI-HDL, respectively. In vivo evaluation was performed in an orthotopic mouse model of breast cancer and included pharmacokinetic analysis, biodistribution studies, and PET imaging. Ex vivo histologic analysis of tumor tissues to assess regional distribution of 89Zr radioactivity was also performed. Fluorescent analogs of the radiolabeled agents were used to determine cell-targeting specificity using flow cytometry. Results The phospholipid- and apoA-I–labeled rHDL were produced at 79% ± 13% (n = 6) and 94% ± 6% (n = 6) radiochemical yield, respectively, with excellent radiochemical purity (>99%). Intravenous administration of both probes resulted in high tumor radioactivity accumulation (16.5 ± 2.8 and 8.6 ± 1.3 percentage injected dose per gram for apoA-I– and phospholipid-labeled rHDL, respectively) at 24 h after injection. Histologic analysis showed good colocalization of radioactivity with TAM-rich areas in tumor sections. Flow cytometry revealed high specificity of rHDL for TAMs, which had the highest uptake per cell (6.8-fold higher than tumor cells for both DiO@Zr-PL-HDL and DiO@Zr-AI-HDL) and accounted for 40.7% and

  19. Co-evolution of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor neo-vessels during cervical cancer invasion

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuting; Yang, Yuehong; Fang, Min; Li, Xianglang; Yuan, Xiuxue; Yuan, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Considering the crucial significance of the tumor microenvironment in cancer development and progression, the present study aimed to investigate the changes in macrophages and angiogenesis during the cervical cancer (CC) progression process from chronic cervicitis to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades I–III (CIN I–III) to CC. This investigation included quantitative analysis and assessment of the spatial associations between tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and tumor neo-vessels. The conventional immunohistochemistry staining technique was used to detect cluster of differentiation (CD)68 and CD105 biomarker expression for TAMs and tumor neo-vessels, respectively. In addition, with the assistance of quantum dot (QD)-based two-component in situ imaging technology, the expression of the TAMs and tumor neo-vessels could be observed simultaneously. The quantitative analysis and co-evolution of the TAMs and tumor neo-vessels could then be processed. During the progression process from chronic cervicitis to cervical CIN I–III, and ultimately to invasive CC, the expression of the macrophages and neo-vessels in the tumor microenvironment increased synchronously. According to the quantitative analysis results, the median value of the TAM density was higher in the CC group (5,540.14) than in the CIN I–III group (2,502.17) and the chronic cervicitis group (1,403.31), with statistical significance in all three groups (P<0.001, for between-group comparisons). The number of neo-vessels was also much higher in the CC group (n=27) than in the CIN I–III group (n=17) or the chronic cervicitis group (n=6.5), with statistical significance in all three groups (P<0.001, for between-group comparisons). These findings demonstrated the great significance and close association of TAMs and tumor angiogenesis during CC development and progression. Thus, QDs-based in situ and simultaneous imaging of key cancer molecules may provide insights with regard to the biology of

  20. Co-evolution of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor neo-vessels during cervical cancer invasion

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuting; Yang, Yuehong; Fang, Min; Li, Xianglang; Yuan, Xiuxue; Yuan, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Considering the crucial significance of the tumor microenvironment in cancer development and progression, the present study aimed to investigate the changes in macrophages and angiogenesis during the cervical cancer (CC) progression process from chronic cervicitis to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades I–III (CIN I–III) to CC. This investigation included quantitative analysis and assessment of the spatial associations between tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and tumor neo-vessels. The conventional immunohistochemistry staining technique was used to detect cluster of differentiation (CD)68 and CD105 biomarker expression for TAMs and tumor neo-vessels, respectively. In addition, with the assistance of quantum dot (QD)-based two-component in situ imaging technology, the expression of the TAMs and tumor neo-vessels could be observed simultaneously. The quantitative analysis and co-evolution of the TAMs and tumor neo-vessels could then be processed. During the progression process from chronic cervicitis to cervical CIN I–III, and ultimately to invasive CC, the expression of the macrophages and neo-vessels in the tumor microenvironment increased synchronously. According to the quantitative analysis results, the median value of the TAM density was higher in the CC group (5,540.14) than in the CIN I–III group (2,502.17) and the chronic cervicitis group (1,403.31), with statistical significance in all three groups (P<0.001, for between-group comparisons). The number of neo-vessels was also much higher in the CC group (n=27) than in the CIN I–III group (n=17) or the chronic cervicitis group (n=6.5), with statistical significance in all three groups (P<0.001, for between-group comparisons). These findings demonstrated the great significance and close association of TAMs and tumor angiogenesis during CC development and progression. Thus, QDs-based in situ and simultaneous imaging of key cancer molecules may provide insights with regard to the biology of

  1. After insufficient radiofrequency ablation, tumor-associated endothelial cells exhibit enhanced angiogenesis and promote invasiveness of residual hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mechanism regarding rapid progression of residual hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after insufficient radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been preliminarily discussed. However, most studies have mainly focused on RFA-induced changes in the tumor cells. The present study was designed to determine whether tumor-associated endothelial cells (TAECs) could contribute to the invasiveness of HCC after insufficient RFA. Methods TAECs were isolated from fresh HCC tissue and characterized. Morphological changes were observed in TAECs after heat treatment for 10 min. TAEC proliferation, migration and tube formation after heat treatment for 10 min at 37°C (control group), and 42 and 47°C (insufficient RFA groups) were examined. The differences in TAECs interactions with HepG2-GFP or HCCLM3-GFP cells among the two insufficient RFA groups and control group were evaluated. The expression of E-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in TAECs was measured. The effects of TAECs on the invasiveness of HepG2-GFP or HCCLM3-GFP cells after insufficient RFA were analyzed. The IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and GRO-α concentrations in conditioned medium from TAECs were measured after insufficient RFA. The associated signaling pathways of Akt, ERK1/2, STAT3 and NF-κB were analyzed in TAECs after insufficient RFA. Results TAECs expressed the EC-specific markers and took up complexes of Dil-Ac-LDL. Relative to the control group, the proliferation of TAECs was significantly inhibited and their migration and tube formation were significantly enhanced in the insufficient RFA groups. Significantly more HepG2-GFP or HCCLM3-GFP cells adhered to TACEs in these groups than in the control group (all P<0.001), via up-regulated expression of E-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. TAECs promoted the invasiveness of HepG2-GFP or HCCLM3-GFP cells after insufficient RFA via the up-regulation of IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and GRO-α in conditioned medium (all P<0.05). Insufficient RFA enhanced the activities of Akt, ERK1/2 and NF

  2. Mechanism of dexamethasone suppression of brain tumor-associated vascular permeability in rats. Involvement of the glucocorticoid receptor and vascular permeability factor.

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, J D; Papavassiliou, E; Merrill, M J; Nieman, L; Knightly, J J; Walbridge, S; Edwards, N A; Oldfield, E H

    1996-01-01

    Brain tumor-associated cerebral edema arises because tumor capillaries lack normal blood-brain barrier function; vascular permeability factor (VPF, also known as vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF) is a likely mediator of this phenomenon. Clinically, dexamethasone reduces brain tumor-associated vascular permeability through poorly understood mechanisms. Our goals were to determine if suppression of permeability by dexamethasone might involve inhibition of VPF action or expression, and if dexamethasone effects in this setting are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In two rat models of permeability (peripheral vascular permeability induced by intradermal injection of 9L glioma cell-conditioned medium or purified VPF, and intracerebral vascular permeability induced by implanted 9L glioma), dexamethasone suppressed permeability in a dose-dependent manner. Since 80% of the permeability-inducing activity in 9L-conditioned medium was removed by anti-VPF antibodies, we examined dexamethasone effects of VPF expression in 9L cells. Dexamethasone inhibited FCS- and PDGF-dependent induction of VPF expression. At all levels (intradermal, intracranial, and cell culture), dexamethasone effects were reversed by the GR antagonist mifepristone (RU486). Dexamethasone may decrease brain tumor-associated vascular permeability by two GR-dependent mechanisms: reduction of the response of the vasculature to tumor-derived permeability factors (including VPF), and reduction of VPF expression by tumor cells. PMID:8823305

  3. Structural basis for the unusual carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin towards galactose and mannose.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Yves; Astoul, Corinne Houlès; Zamboni, Véronique; Peumans, Willy J; Menu-Bouaouiche, Laurence; Van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-05-15

    Evidence is presented that the specificity of jacalin, the seed lectin from jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia), is not directed exclusively against the T-antigen disaccharide Galbeta1,3GalNAc, lactose and galactose, but also against mannose and oligomannosides. Biochemical analyses based on surface-plasmon-resonance measurements, combined with the X-ray-crystallographic determination of the structure of a jacalin-alpha-methyl-mannose complex at 2 A resolution, demonstrated clearly that jacalin is fully capable of binding mannose. Besides mannose, jacalin also interacts readily with glucose, N-acetylneuraminic acid and N-acetylmuramic acid. Structural analyses demonstrated that the relatively large size of the carbohydrate-binding site enables jacalin to accommodate monosaccharides with different hydroxyl conformations and provided unambiguous evidence that the beta-prism structure of jacalin is a sufficiently flexible structural scaffold to confer different carbohydrate-binding specificities to a single lectin.

  4. Structural basis for the unusual carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin towards galactose and mannose.

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Yves; Astoul, Corinne Houlès; Zamboni, Véronique; Peumans, Willy J; Menu-Bouaouiche, Laurence; Van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the specificity of jacalin, the seed lectin from jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia), is not directed exclusively against the T-antigen disaccharide Galbeta1,3GalNAc, lactose and galactose, but also against mannose and oligomannosides. Biochemical analyses based on surface-plasmon-resonance measurements, combined with the X-ray-crystallographic determination of the structure of a jacalin-alpha-methyl-mannose complex at 2 A resolution, demonstrated clearly that jacalin is fully capable of binding mannose. Besides mannose, jacalin also interacts readily with glucose, N-acetylneuraminic acid and N-acetylmuramic acid. Structural analyses demonstrated that the relatively large size of the carbohydrate-binding site enables jacalin to accommodate monosaccharides with different hydroxyl conformations and provided unambiguous evidence that the beta-prism structure of jacalin is a sufficiently flexible structural scaffold to confer different carbohydrate-binding specificities to a single lectin. PMID:11988090

  5. Phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Postma, P W; Lengeler, J W; Jacobson, G R

    1993-01-01

    Numerous gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria take up carbohydrates through the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS). This system transports and phosphorylates carbohydrates at the expense of PEP and is the subject of this review. The PTS consists of two general proteins, enzyme I and HPr, and a number of carbohydrate-specific enzymes, the enzymes II. PTS proteins are phosphoproteins in which the phospho group is attached to either a histidine residue or, in a number of cases, a cysteine residue. After phosphorylation of enzyme I by PEP, the phospho group is transferred to HPr. The enzymes II are required for the transport of the carbohydrates across the membrane and the transfer of the phospho group from phospho-HPr to the carbohydrates. Biochemical, structural, and molecular genetic studies have shown that the various enzymes II have the same basic structure. Each enzyme II consists of domains for specific functions, e.g., binding of the carbohydrate or phosphorylation. Each enzyme II complex can consist of one to four different polypeptides. The enzymes II can be placed into at least four classes on the basis of sequence similarity. The genetics of the PTS is complex, and the expression of PTS proteins is intricately regulated because of the central roles of these proteins in nutrient acquisition. In addition to classical induction-repression mechanisms involving repressor and activator proteins, other types of regulation, such as antitermination, have been observed in some PTSs. Apart from their role in carbohydrate transport, PTS proteins are involved in chemotaxis toward PTS carbohydrates. Furthermore, the IIAGlc protein, part of the glucose-specific PTS, is a central regulatory protein which in its nonphosphorylated form can bind to and inhibit several non-PTS uptake systems and thus prevent entry of inducers. In its phosphorylated form, P-IIAGlc is involved in the activation of adenylate cyclase and thus in the

  6. Carbohydrate markers of organism purity and growth environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Fox, Alvin

    2012-01-01

    Recent experience with Bacillus spore characterization has demonstrated that carbohydrate content can provide potentially vital bioforensic information. Like other metabolites, the carbohydrate profiles of samples reflect variations in cellular structures as well as presence of residual carbohydrates from the medium found as trace components. The presence and characteristics of residual carbohydrates, such as agar, represent strong indicators of culturing method. The methods to detect residual carbohydrates can be extended to other compounds used in processing and preservation of microbes in a dry form.

  7. Carbohydrate Level and Growth of Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Gent, Martin P. N.

    1984-01-01

    To what extent can the influence of environment on greenhouse tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) be explained by a linear response of the growth rate to carbohydrate level? To answer this question, young tomato plants were transplanted in January and March and grown for one-month periods under natural light either with or without CO2 enrichment to 1000 microliters per liter and either under a constant minimum temperature of 15°C or a minimum temperature that fluctuated between 20°C for 12 hours including the photoperiod and 10°C for the remaining 12 hours. The carbohydrate levels were measured for plants under all growth conditions at several times in the diurnal cycle. At the average irradiance in January, 2.3 megajoules per square meter per day, plants under CO2 enrichment grew 15% faster and had, on average, total nonstructural carbohydrate levels 27 milligrams per gram greater and soluble carbohydrates 3 milligrams per gram greater at all hours of the day than did plants grown under ambient CO2. Plants grown under fluctuating diurnal temperature grew slightly faster and had total nonstructural carbohydrate levels on average 8 milligrams per gram greater than plants grown under a more constant temperature. At the average irradiance in March-April, 4.3 megajoules per square meter per day, growth and carbohydrate level increased with CO2 enrichment under the control temperature regime but not under fluctuating temperatures. Plants in all growth regimens grew faster than in January. Over all plantings and growth regimens, relative growth rates were more highly correlated to total nonstructural carbohydrate levels than they were to irradiance, CO2, or temperature. PMID:16663908

  8. Identification of Preferentially Expressed Antigen of Melanoma as a Potential Tumor Suppressor in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Quan; Li, Lin; Lin, Zaijun; Xu, Wei; Han, Shuai; Zhao, Chenglong; Li, Lei; Cao, Wenjiao; Yang, Xinghai; Wei, Haifeng; Xiao, Jianru

    2016-01-01

    Background Preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma (PRAME) is known as a tumor-associated antigen that is altered in a variety of malignancies, including lung cancer. However, the role of PRAME in lung cancer remains unclear. Material/Methods We analyzed the expression of PRAME in human lung adenocarcinomas and studied the function of PRAME using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced gene knockdown in lung cancer cell lines PC9 and A549. Results We found that PRAME expression is down-regulated in lung adenocarcinomas. Knockdown of PRAME promoted proliferation and suppressed apoptosis of PC9 and A549 cells. Conclusions In line with its roles in controlling cell growth, RPAME regulates multiple critical cell-growth related genes, including IGF1R oncogene. IGF1R up-regulation contributes to increase of cell growth upon the knockdown of PRAME. Taken together, our results suggest that PRAME has inhibitory roles in lung cancer. PMID:27241212

  9. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  10. A Truncated form of CD200 (CD200S) Expressed on Glioma Cells Prolonged Survival in a Rat Glioma Model by Induction of a Dendritic Cell-Like Phenotype in Tumor-Associated Macrophages12

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kana; Yano, Hajime; Umakoshi, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Shirabe; Mise, Ayano; Funahashi, Yu; Ueno, Yoshitomo; Kamei, Yoshiaki; Takada, Yasutsugu; Kumon, Yoshiaki; Ohnishi, Takanori; Tanaka, Junya

    2016-01-01

    CD200 induces immunosuppression in myeloid cells expressing its receptor CD200R, which may have consequences for tumor immunity. We found that human carcinoma tissues express not only full-length CD200 (CD200L) but also its truncated form, CD200S. Although CD200S is reported to antagonize the immunosuppressive actions of CD200L, the role of CD200S in tumor immunity has never been investigated. We established rat C6 glioma cell lines that expressed either CD200L or CD200S; the original C6 cell line did not express CD200 molecules. The cell lines showed no significant differences in growth. Upon transplantation into the neonatal Wistar rat forebrain parenchyma, rats transplanted with C6-CD200S cells survived for a significantly longer period than those transplanted with the original C6 and C6-CD200L cells. The C6-CD200S tumors were smaller than the C6-CD200L or C6-original tumors, and many apoptotic cells were found in the tumor cell aggregates. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in C6-CD200S tumors displayed dendritic cell (DC)-like morphology with multiple processes and CD86 expression. Furthermore, CD3+, CD4+ or CD8+ cells were more frequently found in C6-CD200S tumors, and the expression of DC markers, granzyme, and perforin was increased in C6-CD200S tumors. Isolated TAMs from original C6 tumors were co-cultured with C6-CD200S cells and showed increased expression of DC markers. These results suggest that CD200S activates TAMs to become DC-like antigen presenting cells, leading to the activation of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which induce apoptotic elimination of tumor cells. The findings on CD200S action may provide a novel therapeutic modality for the treatment of carcinomas. PMID:27108386

  11. Purification and characterization of the serotype c antigen from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, J J; Slots, J; Miyasaki, K; Linzer, R; Cohen, R; Levine, M; Genco, R J

    1984-01-01

    The serotype c antigen from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was purified with fractional ethanol precipitation of cell-free culture supernatant, sequential ion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography. The preparation obtained demonstrated a single precipitin line in immunodiffusion, immunoelectrophoresis, and crossed immunoelectrophoresis when rabbit antisera to serotype c whole bacterial cells were used. No immunological reaction was detected with antisera to serotype c lipopolysaccharide, indicating that lipopolysaccharide was not present in the preparation. The serotype c antigen was composed of 95% carbohydrate, 2% protein, and 3.1% phosphate. Gas chromatographic analysis of the antigen obtained from growth in either complex or chemically defined media revealed that the carbohydrate constituent was composed of 84 to 90.1% mannose, 4.8 to 16% glucose, 1.9% N-acetylglucosamine, 1.4% fucose, and 0.2% galactose. The present data suggest that A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype c antigen is predominantly a mannose-containing carbohydrate suggestive of a mannan. Images PMID:6423542

  12. Low-carbohydrate diets and performance.

    PubMed

    Cook, Chad M; Haub, Mark D

    2007-07-01

    Athletes are continually searching for means to optimize their performance. Within the past 20 years, athletes and scientists have reported or observed that consuming a carbohydrate-restricted diet may improve performance. The original theories explaining the purported benefits centered on the fact that fat oxidation increases, thereby "sparing" muscle glycogen. More recent concepts that explain the plausibility of the ergogenicity of low-carbohydrate, or high-fat, diets on exercise performance pertain to an effect similar to altitude training. We and others have observed that although fat oxidation may be increased, the ability to maintain high-intensity exercise (above the lactate threshold) seems to be compromised or at least indifferent when compared with consumption of more carbohydrate. That said, clinical studies clearly demonstrate that ad libitum low-carbohydrate diets elicit greater decreases in body weight and fat than energy-equivalent low-fat diets, especially over a short duration. Thus, although low-carbohydrate and high-fat diets appear detrimental or indifferent relative to performance, they may be a faster means to achieve a more competitive body composition.

  13. Potential effect of ultrasound on carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Bera, Smritilekha; Mondal, Dhananjoy; Martin, Jacob T; Singh, Man

    2015-06-17

    The use of ultrasound has emerged as one of the most useful alternative energy sources for the synthesis of carbohydrate-derived biologically and pharmaceutically potential compounds. Spectacular advances have been made in the field of sonication-assisted organic reactions, which are known for producing superior yields, enhanced reactivity of the reactant, improved stereoselectivity, and shortened reaction times. Orthogonal protection-deprotection reactions and/or modification and manipulation of functional groups in carbohydrates are common synthetic steps in carbohydrate chemistry. These reaction steps can be driven by the ultrasonic energy generated by acoustic cavitation via the formation and subsequent collapse of ultrasound-induced bubbles. The ultrasound-assisted synthesis of differently functionalised monosaccharides is useful in a wide variety of applications of carbohydrate chemistry such as the glycosylation of oligosaccharides, one pot domino reactions, thioglycoside syntheses, azidoglycoside syntheses, 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions, and syntheses of natural products. This review article covers ultrasound-mediated reactions on carbohydrates that have been described in the literature since 2000.

  14. A systematic review of humoral immune responses against tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2009-10-01

    This review summarizes studies on humoral immune responses against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) with a focus on antibody frequencies and the potential diagnostic, prognostic, and etiologic relevance of antibodies against TAAs. We performed a systematic literature search in Medline and identified 3,619 articles on humoral immune responses and TAAs. In 145 studies, meeting the inclusion criteria, humoral immune responses in cancer patients have been analyzed against over 100 different TAAs. The most frequently analyzed antigens were p53, MUC1, NY-ESO-1, c-myc, survivin, p62, cyclin B1, and Her2/neu. Antibodies against these TAAs were detected in 0-69% (median 14%) of analyzed tumor patients. Antibody frequencies were generally very low in healthy individuals, with the exception of few TAAs, especially MUC1. For several TAAs, including p53, Her2/neu, and NY-ESO-1, higher antibody frequencies were reported when tumors expressed the respective TAA. Antibodies against MUC1 were associated with a favorable prognosis while antibodies against p53 were associated with poor disease outcome. These data suggest different functional roles of endogenous antibodies against TAAs. Although data on prediagnostic antibody levels are scarce and antibody frequencies for most TAAs are at levels precluding use in diagnostic assays for cancer early detection, there is some promising data on achieving higher sensitivity for cancer detection using panels of TAAs.

  15. A systematic review of humoral immune responses against tumor antigens

    PubMed Central

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    This review summarizes studies on humoral immune responses against tumor associated antigens (TAA) with a focus on antibody frequencies and the potential diagnostic, prognostic, and etiologic relevance of antibodies against TAAs. We performed a systematic literature search in Medline and identified 3619 articles on humoral immune responses and TAAs. In 145 studies meeting the inclusion criteria, humoral immune responses in cancer patients have been analyzed against over 100 different TAAs. The most frequently analyzed antigens were p53, MUC1, NY-ESO-1, c-myc, survivin, p62, cyclin B1 and Her2/neu. Antibodies against these TAAs were detected in 0 to 69% (median 14%) of analyzed tumor patients. Antibody frequencies were generally very low in healthy individuals, with the exception of few TAAs, especially MUC1. For several TAAs, including p53, Her2/neu, and NY-ESO-1, higher antibody frequencies were reported when tumors expressed the respective TAA. Antibodies against MUC1 were associated with a favorable prognosis while antibodies against p53 were associated with poor disease outcome. These data suggest different functional roles of endogenous antibodies against TAAs. Although data on prediagnostic antibody levels is scarce and antibody frequencies for most TAAs are at levels precluding use in diagnostic assays for cancer early detection, there is some promising data on achieving higher sensitivity for cancer detection using panels of TAAs. PMID:19562338

  16. Vaccination with a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing a tumor antigen breaks immune tolerance and elicits therapeutic antitumor responses

    PubMed Central

    Wansley, Elizabeth K.; Chakraborty, Mala; Hance, Kenneth W.; Bernstein, Michael B.; Boehm, Amanda L.; Guo, Zhimin; Quick, Deborah; Franzusoff, Alex; Greiner, John W.; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a nonpathogenic yeast, has previously been used as a vehicle to elicit immune responses to foreign antigens, and tumor-associated antigens, and has been shown to reduce tumorburden in mice. Studies were designed to determine if vaccination of human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-transgenic mice (where CEA is a self-antigen) with a recombinant S. cerevisiae construct expressing human CEA (yeast-CEA) elicits CEA-specific T-cell responses and antitumor activity. Experimental Design CEA-transgenic mice were vaccinated with yeast-CEA, and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were assessed after one and multiple administrations or vaccinations at multiple sites per administration. Antitumor activity was determined by tumor growth and overall survival in both pulmonary metastasis and subcutaneous pancreatic tumor models. Results These studies demonstrate that recombinant yeast can break tolerance and that a) yeast-CEA constructs elicit both CEA-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses; b) repeated yeast-CEA administration causes increased antigen-specific T-cell responses after each vaccination; c) vaccination with yeast-CEA at multiple sites induces a greater T-cell response than the same dose given at a single site; d) tumor-bearing mice vaccinated with yeast-CEA show a reduction in tumor burden and increased overall survival compared to mock-treated or control yeast-vaccinated mice in both pulmonary metastasis and subcutaneous pancreatic tumor models. Conclusions Vaccination with a heat-killed recombinant yeast expressing the tumor-associated antigen CEA induces CEA-specific immune responses, reduces tumor burden, and extends overall survival in CEA-transgenic mice. These studies thus form the rationale for the incorporation of recombinant yeast-CEA and other recombinant yeast constructs in cancer immunotherapy protocols. PMID:18594015

  17. Non-labeled QCM Biosensor for Bacterial Detection using Carbohydrate and Lectin Recognitions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhihong; Huang, Mingchuan; Xiao, Caide; Zhang, Yun; Zeng, Xiangqun; Wang, Peng G.

    2008-01-01

    High percentages of harmful microbes or their secreting toxins bind to specific carbohydrate sequences on human cells at the recognition and attachment sites. A number of studies also show that lectins react with specific structures of bacteria and fungi. In this report, we take advantage of the fact that a high percentage of microorganisms have both carbohydrate and lectin binding pockets at their surface. We demonstrate here for the first time that a carbohydrate non-labeled mass sensor in combination with lectin-bacterial O-antigen recognition can be used for detection of high molecular weight bacterial targets with remarkably high sensitivity and specificity. A functional mannose self-assembled monolayer (SAM) in combination with lectin Con A was used as molecular recognition elements for the detection of E. coli W1485 using Quartz Crytsal Microbalance (QCM) as a transducer. The multivalent binding of Concanavalin A (Con A) to the Escherichia coli (E. coli) surface O-antigen favors the strong adhesion of E. coli to mannose modified QCM surface by forming bridges between these two. As a result, the contact area between cell and QCM surface increases that leads to rigid and strong attachment. Therefore it enhances the binding between E. coli and the mannose. Our results show a significant improvement of the sensitivity and specificity of carbohydrate QCM biosensor with a experimental detection limit of a few hundred bacterial cells. The linear range is from 7.5 × 102 to 7.5 × 107 cells/mL that is four decade wider than the mannose alone QCM sensor. The change of damping resistances for E. coli adhesion experiments was no more than 1.4% suggesting that the bacterial attachment was rigid, rather than a viscoelastic behavior. Little non-specific binding was observed for Staphylococcus aureus and other proteins (Fetal Bovine serum, Erythrina cristagalli lectin). Our approach not only overcomes the challenges of applying QCM technology for bacterial detection but

  18. Investigation of Carbohydrate Recognition via Computer Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Quentin R.; Lindsay, Richard J.; Petridis, Loukas; Shen, Tongye

    2015-04-28

    Carbohydrate recognition by proteins, such as lectins and other (bio)molecules, can be essential for many biological functions. Interest has arisen due to potential protein and drug design and future bioengineering applications. A quantitative measurement of carbohydrate-protein interaction is thus important for the full characterization of sugar recognition. Here, we focus on the aspect of utilizing computer simulations and biophysical models to evaluate the strength and specificity of carbohydrate recognition in this review. With increasing computational resources, better algorithms and refined modeling parameters, using state-of-the-art supercomputers to calculate the strength of the interaction between molecules has become increasingly mainstream. We review the current state of this technique and its successful applications for studying protein-sugar interactions in recent years.

  19. Investigation of Carbohydrate Recognition via Computer Simulation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Quentin R; Lindsay, Richard J; Petridis, Loukas; Shen, Tongye

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate recognition by proteins, such as lectins and other (bio)molecules, can be essential for many biological functions. Recently, interest has arisen due to potential protein and drug design and future bioengineering applications. A quantitative measurement of carbohydrate-protein interaction is thus important for the full characterization of sugar recognition. We focus on the aspect of utilizing computer simulations and biophysical models to evaluate the strength and specificity of carbohydrate recognition in this review. With increasing computational resources, better algorithms and refined modeling parameters, using state-of-the-art supercomputers to calculate the strength of the interaction between molecules has become increasingly mainstream. We review the current state of this technique and its successful applications for studying protein-sugar interactions in recent years. PMID:25927900

  20. Permethylation Linkage Analysis Techniques for Residual Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Neil P. J.

    Permethylation analysis is the classic approach to establishing the position of glycosidic linkages between sugar residues. Typically, the carbohydrate is derivatized to form acid-stable methyl ethers, hydrolyzed, peracetylated, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The position of glycosidic linkages in the starting carbohydrate are apparent from the mass spectra as determined by the location of acetyl residues. The completeness of permethylation is dependent upon the choice of base catalyst and is readily confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry mass spectrometry. For the permethylation of β-cyclodextrin, Hakomori dimsyl base is shown to be superior to the NaOH-dimethyl sulfoxide system, and the use of the latter resulted in selective under-methylation of the 3-hydroxy groups. These techniques are highly applicable to residual carbohydrates from biofuel processes.

  1. Nutraceutical and pharmacological implications of marine carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Pallela, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    Current day's research has been focusing much on the potential pharmacological or nutraceutical agents of selective health benefits with less toxicity. As a consequence of increased demand of nutritional supplements of great medicinal values, development of therapeutic agents from natural sources, in particular, marine environment are being considered much important. A diverse array of marine natural products containing medicinally useful nutritional substances, i.e., marine nutraceuticals have been focused to the benefit of mankind. Carbohydrates, by being constituted in considerable amount of many marine organisms display several nutraceutical and pharmaceutical behavior to defend from various diseases. Moreover, the carbohydrates from algae as well as from shellfish wastes, like chitosan and its derivatives, showed tremendous applications in biology and biomedicine. In the current chapter, several of marine carbohydrates from various marine flora and fauna have been covered with their applications and prospects in the development of nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. PMID:25300547

  2. Investigation of Carbohydrate Recognition via Computer Simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johnson, Quentin R.; Lindsay, Richard J.; Petridis, Loukas; Shen, Tongye

    2015-04-28

    Carbohydrate recognition by proteins, such as lectins and other (bio)molecules, can be essential for many biological functions. Interest has arisen due to potential protein and drug design and future bioengineering applications. A quantitative measurement of carbohydrate-protein interaction is thus important for the full characterization of sugar recognition. Here, we focus on the aspect of utilizing computer simulations and biophysical models to evaluate the strength and specificity of carbohydrate recognition in this review. With increasing computational resources, better algorithms and refined modeling parameters, using state-of-the-art supercomputers to calculate the strength of the interaction between molecules has become increasingly mainstream. We reviewmore » the current state of this technique and its successful applications for studying protein-sugar interactions in recent years.« less

  3. Investigation of Carbohydrate Recognition via Computer Simulation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Quentin R; Lindsay, Richard J; Petridis, Loukas; Shen, Tongye

    2015-04-28

    Carbohydrate recognition by proteins, such as lectins and other (bio)molecules, can be essential for many biological functions. Recently, interest has arisen due to potential protein and drug design and future bioengineering applications. A quantitative measurement of carbohydrate-protein interaction is thus important for the full characterization of sugar recognition. We focus on the aspect of utilizing computer simulations and biophysical models to evaluate the strength and specificity of carbohydrate recognition in this review. With increasing computational resources, better algorithms and refined modeling parameters, using state-of-the-art supercomputers to calculate the strength of the interaction between molecules has become increasingly mainstream. We review the current state of this technique and its successful applications for studying protein-sugar interactions in recent years.

  4. Heterogeneously-Catalyzed Conversion of Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigier, Karine De Oliveira; Jérôme, François

    Polyfunctionality of carbohydrates and their low solubility in conventional organic solvents make rather complex their conversion to higher value added chemicals. Therefore, innovative processes are now strongly needed in order to increase the selectivity of these reactions. Here, we report an overview of the different heterogeneously-catalyzed processes described in the literature. In particular, hydrolysis, dehydration, oxidation, esterification, and etherification of carbohydrates are presented. We shall discuss the main structural parameters that need to be controlled and that permit the conversion of carbohydrates to bioproducts with good selectivity. The conversion of monosaccharides and disaccharides over solid catalysts, as well as recent advances in the heterogeneously-catalyzed conversion of cellulose, will be presented.

  5. Boronic acids for fluorescence imaging of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaolong; Zhai, Wenlei; Fossey, John S; James, Tony D

    2016-02-28

    "Fluorescence imaging" is a particularly exciting and rapidly developing area of research; the annual number of publications in the area has increased ten-fold over the last decade. The rapid increase of interest in fluorescence imaging will necessitate the development of an increasing number of molecular receptors and binding agents in order to meet the demand in this rapidly expanding area. Carbohydrate biomarkers are particularly important targets for fluorescence imaging given their pivotal role in numerous important biological events, including the development and progression of many diseases. Therefore, the development of new fluorescent receptors and binding agents for carbohydrates is and will be increasing in demand. This review highlights the development of fluorescence imaging agents based on boronic acids a particularly promising class of receptors given their strong and selective binding with carbohydrates in aqueous media.

  6. Nutraceutical and pharmacological implications of marine carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Pallela, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    Current day's research has been focusing much on the potential pharmacological or nutraceutical agents of selective health benefits with less toxicity. As a consequence of increased demand of nutritional supplements of great medicinal values, development of therapeutic agents from natural sources, in particular, marine environment are being considered much important. A diverse array of marine natural products containing medicinally useful nutritional substances, i.e., marine nutraceuticals have been focused to the benefit of mankind. Carbohydrates, by being constituted in considerable amount of many marine organisms display several nutraceutical and pharmaceutical behavior to defend from various diseases. Moreover, the carbohydrates from algae as well as from shellfish wastes, like chitosan and its derivatives, showed tremendous applications in biology and biomedicine. In the current chapter, several of marine carbohydrates from various marine flora and fauna have been covered with their applications and prospects in the development of nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals.

  7. Cancer vaccine--Antigenics.

    PubMed

    2002-01-01

    Antigenics is developing a therapeutic cancer vaccine based on heat-shock proteins (HSPs). The vaccine [HSPPC-96, Oncophage] is in a pivotal phase III clinical trial for renal cancer at 80 clinical sites worldwide. The trial is enrolling at least 500 patients who are randomised to receive surgical removal of the primary tumour followed by out-patient treatment with Oncophage((R)) or surgery only. This study was initiated on the basis of results from a pilot phase I/II study and preliminary results from a phase II study in patients with renal cell cancer. In October 2001, Oncophage was designated as a fast-track product by the Food and Drug Administration in the US for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Oncophage is in phase I/II trials in Italy for colorectal cancer (30 patients) and melanoma. The trials in Italy are being conducted at the Istituto dei Tumouri, Milan (in association with Sigma-Tau). Preliminary data from the phase II trial for melanoma was presented at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference in Florida, USA, in October 2001. Oncophage is also in a phase I/II (42 patients) and a phase II trial (84 patients) in the US for renal cell cancer, a phase II trial in the US for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (35 patients), a phase II trial in the US for sarcoma (20-35 patients), a phase I/II trial in the US for melanoma (36 patients), and phase I/II trials in Germany for gastric (30 patients) and pancreatic cancers. A pilot phase I trial in patients with pancreatic cancer began in the US in 1997 with 5 patients enrolled. In November 2000, Antigenics announced that this trial had been expanded to a phase I/II study which would now include survival as an endpoint and would enroll 5 additional patients. The US trials are being performed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. The trials in Germany are being carried out at Johannes Gutenberg-University Hospital, Mainz. Oncophage is an autologous vaccine consisting of

  8. Oxygen solubility and permeability of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Whitcombe, Michael J; Parker, Roger; Ring, Stephen G

    2005-06-13

    The saturated oxygen concentration in a series of aqueous solutions of sorbitol (up to 35% w/w) and maltitol (up to 50% w/w) was measured using colorimetric reagent vials based on Rhodazine D. The results indicate that the solubility of oxygen in low-water carbohydrates is considerably lower than its solubility in pure water. It was concluded that the low-oxygen solubility is a major factor contributing to the barrier properties of low-water content carbohydrates used in the encapsulation of flavours, lipids, peptides and other oxidisable species.

  9. Synthesis of chiral dopants based on carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Toru; Koyama, Tetsuo; Yasutake, Mikio; Hatano, Ken; Matsuoka, Koji

    2014-07-01

    Chiral dopants based on carbohydrates for nematic liquid crystals were synthesized from D-glucose, and their helical twisting power (HTP) values were evaluated. The chiral dopants induced helices in the host nematic liquid crystals. An acetyl derivative having an ether-type glycosidic linkage between carbohydrate and a mesogenic moiety showed the highest HTP value of 10.4 μm(-1), while an acetyl derivative having an anomeric ester-type linkage did not show any HTP. It was surprising that this molecule had no HTP despite the presence of chirality in the molecule. A relationship between HTP and specific rotation was not observed in this study.

  10. Minimally refined biomass fuel. [carbohydrate-water-alcohol mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, R.K.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1981-03-26

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water-solubilizes the carbohydrate; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the viscosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  11. Antigens and allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.E.; Swanson, M.C.

    1987-06-01

    There are few reliable epidemiologic data on the overall frequency and importance of allergy. We describe a practical method for quantifying the concentration of both amorphous and morphologically defined antigens in the air. A high volume air sampler is used to collect airborne particles and has a facility to separate samples into different particle sizes. Samples are tested for allergenic activity by radioallergosorbent test inhibition assay. Preliminary findings from studies of community wide, amorphous and common household allergens are reported.

  12. Carbohydrate mouth rinse and caffeine improves high-intensity interval running capacity when carbohydrate restricted.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Andreas M; Cocking, Scott; Cockayne, Molly; Barnard, Marcus; Tench, Jake; Parker, Liam; McAndrew, John; Langan-Evans, Carl; Close, Graeme L; Morton, James P

    2016-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that carbohydrate mouth rinsing, alone or in combination with caffeine, augments high-intensity interval (HIT) running capacity undertaken in a carbohydrate-restricted state. Carbohydrate restriction was achieved by performing high-intensity running to volitional exhaustion in the evening prior to the main experimental trials and further refraining from carbohydrate intake in the post-exercise and overnight period. On the subsequent morning, eight males performed 45-min steady-state (SS) exercise (65% [Formula: see text]) followed by HIT running to exhaustion (1-min at 80% [Formula: see text]interspersed with 1-min walking at 6 km/h). Subjects completed 3 trials consisting of placebo capsules (administered immediately prior to SS and immediately before HIT) and placebo mouth rinse at 4-min intervals during HIT (PLACEBO), placebo capsules but 10% carbohydrate mouth rinse (CMR) at corresponding time-points or finally, caffeine capsules (200 mg per dose) plus 10% carbohydrate mouth rinse (CAFF + CMR) at corresponding time-points. Heart rate, capillary glucose, lactate, glycerol and NEFA were not different at exhaustion during HIT (P > 0.05). However, HIT capacity was different (P < 0.05) between all pair-wise comparisons such that CAFF + CMR (65 ± 26 min) was superior to CMR (52 ± 23 min) and PLACEBO (36 ± 22 min). We conclude that carbohydrate mouth rinsing and caffeine ingestion improves exercise capacity undertaken in carbohydrate-restricted states. Such nutritional strategies may be advantageous for those athletes who deliberately incorporate elements of training in carbohydrate-restricted states (i.e. the train-low paradigm) into their overall training programme in an attempt to strategically enhance mitochondrial adaptations of skeletal muscle. PMID:26035740

  13. Carbohydrate mouth rinse and caffeine improves high-intensity interval running capacity when carbohydrate restricted.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Andreas M; Cocking, Scott; Cockayne, Molly; Barnard, Marcus; Tench, Jake; Parker, Liam; McAndrew, John; Langan-Evans, Carl; Close, Graeme L; Morton, James P

    2016-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that carbohydrate mouth rinsing, alone or in combination with caffeine, augments high-intensity interval (HIT) running capacity undertaken in a carbohydrate-restricted state. Carbohydrate restriction was achieved by performing high-intensity running to volitional exhaustion in the evening prior to the main experimental trials and further refraining from carbohydrate intake in the post-exercise and overnight period. On the subsequent morning, eight males performed 45-min steady-state (SS) exercise (65% [Formula: see text]) followed by HIT running to exhaustion (1-min at 80% [Formula: see text]interspersed with 1-min walking at 6 km/h). Subjects completed 3 trials consisting of placebo capsules (administered immediately prior to SS and immediately before HIT) and placebo mouth rinse at 4-min intervals during HIT (PLACEBO), placebo capsules but 10% carbohydrate mouth rinse (CMR) at corresponding time-points or finally, caffeine capsules (200 mg per dose) plus 10% carbohydrate mouth rinse (CAFF + CMR) at corresponding time-points. Heart rate, capillary glucose, lactate, glycerol and NEFA were not different at exhaustion during HIT (P > 0.05). However, HIT capacity was different (P < 0.05) between all pair-wise comparisons such that CAFF + CMR (65 ± 26 min) was superior to CMR (52 ± 23 min) and PLACEBO (36 ± 22 min). We conclude that carbohydrate mouth rinsing and caffeine ingestion improves exercise capacity undertaken in carbohydrate-restricted states. Such nutritional strategies may be advantageous for those athletes who deliberately incorporate elements of training in carbohydrate-restricted states (i.e. the train-low paradigm) into their overall training programme in an attempt to strategically enhance mitochondrial adaptations of skeletal muscle.

  14. Neuroendoscopic biopsy and the treatment of tumor-associated hydrocephalus of the ventricular and paraventricular region in pediatric patients: a nationwide study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Tomoru; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Endo, Shunro; Ohira, Takayuki

    2015-10-01

    A neuroendoscopic biopsy is a minimally invasive and useful procedure for the diagnosis and initial management of tumor-associated hydrocephalus. We describe the nationwide investigation of the current status of neuroendoscopic biopsy for intra- and paraventricular tumors in children, as well as the treatment of tumor-associated hydrocephalus in pediatric patients. The main items examined included the patient's age and sex, location of the tumor, pathological diagnosis, complications, treatment and efficacy of treatment of the tumor-associated hydrocephalus, and the dissemination during the postoperative course. Two hundred twenty-one pediatric patients (mean 8.6 years) from 67 institutions were registered. Endoscopic tumor biopsies were performed in 206 patients (93.2 %), and a histopathological diagnosis could be performed in 195 of these 206 patients (94.7 %). The most frequently histopathologically diagnosed tumor was a germ cell tumor (41.5 %), followed by astrocytic tumors (24.1 %) and cystic lesions (15.9 %). Associated hydrocephalus was observed in 177 patients (80.1 %), 101 of whom underwent endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV). The efficacy rate of the ETV in the perioperative period was 99.0 %, and the long-term response rate was 90.1 %. Perioperative complications other than fever were found in 24 patients (10.9 %). In the statistical analysis, pediatric long-term response rate to ETV (p = 0.025) showed significantly more favorable results for pediatric than adult patients (p < 0.05). Neuroendoscopic procedures involving pediatric intra- and paraventricular tumors were considered to be very useful, with a low incidence of complication, and were associated with higher safety.

  15. Bypassing tumor-associated immune suppression with recombinant adenovirus constructs expressing membrane bound or secreted GITR-L.

    PubMed

    Calmels, Bastien; Paul, Stéphane; Futin, Nicolas; Ledoux, Catherine; Stoeckel, Fabienne; Acres, Bruce

    2005-02-01

    Recent evidence has resurrected the concept of specialized populations of T lymphocytes that are able to suppress an antigen-specific immune response. T-regulatory cells (T-reg) have been characterized as CD4+ CD25+ T cells. Previous reports describing differential gene expression analysis have shown that the glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis family receptor family-related gene (GITR) is upregulated in these cells. Furthermore, antibodies specific for GITR have been shown to inhibit the T-suppressor function of CD4+ CD25+ T-reg. The ligands for both mouse and human GITR have been cloned recently. We have inserted the sequences for natural, membrane-bound GITR-ligand (GITR-L) and a truncated secreted form of GITR-L (GITR-Lsol) into the adenovirus-5 genome. Coculture experiments show that cells infected with Ad-GITR-L and supernatants from cells infected with Ad-GITR-Lsol can increase the proliferation of both CD4+ CD25- and CD8+ T cells in response to anti-CD3 stimulation, in the presence, as well as in the absence, of CD4+ CD25+ T cells. The virus constructs were injected into growing B16 melanoma tumors. Ad-GITR-L was shown to attract infiltration with both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Both constructs were shown to inhibit tumor growth. PMID:15472713

  16. Kiwifruit, carbohydrate availability, and the glycemic response.

    PubMed

    Monro, John A

    2013-01-01

    An appreciable proportion, about 10%, of the dry weight of kiwifruit consists of primary cell walls. About 80% of dry matter is available carbohydrate consisting of glucose, fructose, and sucrose, and about 10% is digestible protein. The cell wall component, being nonstarch polysaccharide, is undigested in the stomach and small intestine, so the component increases in relative concentration in the gut lumen where its physicochemical properties may be important in modulating carbohydrate digestion and absorption. Released from the constraint of fruit structure, the dietary fiber swells to four times its original volume during in vitro digestion. When the digested remnants are allowed to settle into a packed but uncompressed state, as in the gut, they reduce the rate of glucose diffusion by about 40% and profoundly reduce digesta mixing, especially in the presence of a low background of soluble viscous polysaccharide. An in vitro estimation of the glycemic index (GI) of carbohydrate in kiwifruit, and in vivo estimates show the carbohydrate to be of low GI. On a whole fruit basis because of the high water content of kiwifruit, a 100g kiwifruit would be equivalent to about 5g (1 teaspoon) of glucose in its effect on blood glucose; thus, kiwifruit have low glycemic impact and are suitable for those with diabetes.

  17. General Properties, Occurrence, and Preparation of Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robyt, John F.

    D-Glucose and its derivatives and analogues, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-muramic acid, D-glucopyranosyl uronic acid, and D-glucitol represent 99.9% of the carbohydrates on the earth. D-Glucose is found in the free state in human blood and in the combined state in disaccharides, sucrose, lactose, and α,α-trehalose, in cyclic dextrins, and in polysaccharides, starch, glycogen, cellulose, dextrans; N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and an analogue N-acetyl-D-muramic acid are found in bacterial cell wall polysaccharide, murein, along with teichoic acids made up of poly-glycerol or -ribitol phosphodiesters. Other carbohydrates, D-mannose, D-mannuronic acid, D-galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, D-galacturonic acid, D-iduronic acid, L-guluronic acid, L-rhamnose, L-fucose, D-xylose, and N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid are found in glycoproteins, hemicelluloses, glycosaminoglycans, and polysaccharides of plant exudates, bacterial capsules, alginates, and heparin. D-Ribofuranose-5-phosphate is found in many coenzymes and is the backbone of RNAs (ribonucleic acid), and 2-deoxy-D-ribofuranose-5-phosphate is the backbone of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid). D-Fructofuranose is found in sucrose, inulin, and levan. The general properties and occurrence of these carbohydrates and general methods of isolation and preparation of carbohydrates are presented.

  18. Carbohydrate Metabolism During Ascospore Development in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Sherwin M.; Roth, Robert

    1974-01-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism, under sporulation conditions, was compared in sporulating and non-sporulating diploids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Total carbohydrate was fractionated into trehalose, glycogen, mannan, and an alkali-insoluble fraction composed of glucan and insoluble glycogen. The behavior of three fractions was essentially the same in both sporulating and non-sporulating strains; trehalose, mannan, and the insoluble fraction were all synthesized to about the same extent regardless of a strain's ability to undergo meiosis or sporulation. In contrast, aspects of soluble glycogen metabolism depended on sporulation. Although glycogen synthesis took place in both sporulating and non-sporulating strains, only sporulating strains exhibited a period of glycogen degradation, which coincided with the final maturation of ascospores. We also determined the carbohydrate composition of spores isolated from mature asci. Spores contained all components present in vegetative cells, but in different proportions. In cells, the most abundant carbohydrate was mannan, followed by glycogen, then trehalose, and finally the alkali-insoluble fraction; in spores, trehalose was most abundant, followed by the alkali-insoluble fraction, glycogen, and mannan in that order. PMID:4595206

  19. Separation and quantification of microalgal carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Templeton, David W; Quinn, Matthew; Van Wychen, Stefanie; Hyman, Deborah; Laurens, Lieve M L

    2012-12-28

    Structural carbohydrates can constitute a large fraction of the dry weight of algal biomass and thus accurate identification and quantification is important for summative mass closure. Two limitations to the accurate characterization of microalgal carbohydrates are the lack of a robust analytical procedure to hydrolyze polymeric carbohydrates to their respective monomers and the subsequent identification and quantification of those monosaccharides. We address the second limitation, chromatographic separation of monosaccharides, here by identifying optimum conditions for the resolution of a synthetic mixture of 13 microalgae-specific monosaccharides, comprised of 8 neutral, 2 amino sugars, 2 uronic acids and 1 alditol (myo-inositol as an internal standard). The synthetic 13-carbohydrate mix showed incomplete resolution across 11 traditional high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods, but showed improved resolution and accurate quantification using anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) as well as alditol acetate derivatization followed by gas chromatography (for the neutral- and amino-sugars only). We demonstrate the application of monosaccharide quantification using optimized chromatography conditions after sulfuric acid analytical hydrolysis for three model algae strains and compare the quantification and complexity of monosaccharides in analytical hydrolysates relative to a typical terrestrial feedstock, sugarcane bagasse.

  20. Indicators of normal carbohydrate digestion in children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More research is needed to determine the nutritional and clinical significance of the intermediate values of low but not deficient duodenal disaccharidase activities, but the Dahlqvist-method biopsy assay of activity serves as a gnomon of carbohydrate digestion, in the sense that Anaximander used a ...

  1. Genogroup IV and VI Canine Noroviruses Interact with Histo-Blood Group Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human noroviruses (HuNV) are a significant cause of viral gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. HuNV attaches to cell surface carbohydrate structures known as histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) prior to internalization, and HBGA polymorphism among human populations is closely linked to susceptibility to HuNV. Noroviruses are divided into 6 genogroups, with human strains grouped into genogroups I (GI), II, and IV. Canine norovirus (CNV) is a recently discovered pathogen in dogs, with strains classified into genogroups IV and VI. Whereas it is known that GI to GIII noroviruses bind to HBGAs and GV noroviruses recognize terminal sialic acid residues, the attachment factors for GIV and GVI noroviruses have not been reported. This study sought to determine the carbohydrate binding specificity of CNV and to compare it to the binding specificities of noroviruses from other genogroups. A panel of synthetic oligosaccharides were used to assess the binding specificity of CNV virus-like particles (VLPs) and identified α1,2-fucose as a key attachment factor. CNV VLP binding to canine saliva and tissue samples using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and immunohistochemistry confirmed that α1,2-fucose-containing H and A antigens of the HBGA family were recognized by CNV. Phenotyping studies demonstrated expression of these antigens in a population of dogs. The virus-ligand interaction was further characterized using blockade studies, cell lines expressing HBGAs, and enzymatic removal of candidate carbohydrates from tissue sections. Recognition of HBGAs by CNV provides new insights into the evolution of noroviruses and raises concerns regarding the potential for zoonotic transmission of CNV to humans. IMPORTANCE Infections with human norovirus cause acute gastroenteritis in millions of people each year worldwide. Noroviruses can also affect nonhuman species and are divided into 6 different groups based on their capsid sequences. Human noroviruses in genogroups

  2. Force fields and scoring functions for carbohydrate simulation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiuming; Chen, Zhaoqiang; Cossins, Benjamin P; Xu, Zhijian; Shao, Qiang; Ding, Kai; Zhu, Weiliang; Shi, Jiye

    2015-01-12

    Carbohydrate dynamics plays a vital role in many biological processes, but we are not currently able to probe this with experimental approaches. The highly flexible nature of carbohydrate structures differs in many aspects from other biomolecules, posing significant challenges for studies employing computational simulation. Over past decades, computational study of carbohydrates has been focused on the development of structure prediction methods, force field optimization, molecular dynamics simulation, and scoring functions for carbohydrate-protein interactions. Advances in carbohydrate force fields and scoring functions can be largely attributed to enhanced computational algorithms, application of quantum mechanics, and the increasing number of experimental structures determined by X-ray and NMR techniques. The conformational analysis of carbohydrates is challengeable and has gone into intensive study in elucidating the anomeric, the exo-anomeric, and the gauche effects. Here, we review the issues associated with carbohydrate force fields and scoring functions, which will have a broad application in the field of carbohydrate-based drug design.

  3. High Carbohydrate-Fiber Nutrition for Running and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battinelli, Thomas

    1983-01-01

    The roles of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and fiber in producing energy for health and exercise are discussed. Long-distance runners should have a high intake of complex carbohydrates and fiber. (PP)

  4. Exercise and Regulation of Carbohydrate Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mul, Joram D; Stanford, Kristin I; Hirshman, Michael F; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates are the preferred substrate for contracting skeletal muscles during high-intensity exercise and are also readily utilized during moderate intensity exercise. This use of carbohydrates during physical activity likely played an important role during the survival of early Homo sapiens, and genes and traits regulating physical activity, carbohydrate metabolism, and energy storage have undoubtedly been selected throughout evolution. In contrast to the life of early H. sapiens, modern lifestyles are predominantly sedentary. As a result, intake of excessive amounts of carbohydrates due to the easy and continuous accessibility to modern high-energy food and drinks has not only become unnecessary but also led to metabolic diseases in the face of physical inactivity. A resulting metabolic disease is type 2 diabetes, a complex endocrine disorder characterized by abnormally high concentrations of circulating glucose. This disease now affects millions of people worldwide. Exercise has beneficial effects to help control impaired glucose homeostasis with metabolic disease, and is a well-established tool to prevent and combat type 2 diabetes. This chapter focuses on the effects of exercise on carbohydrate metabolism in skeletal muscle and systemic glucose homeostasis. We will also focus on the molecular mechanisms that mediate the effects of exercise to increase glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. It is now well established that there are different proximal signaling pathways that mediate the effects of exercise and insulin on glucose uptake, and these distinct mechanisms are consistent with the ability of exercise to increase glucose uptake in the face of insulin resistance in people with type 2 diabetes. Ongoing research in this area is aimed at defining the precise mechanism by which exercise increases glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity and the types of exercise necessary for these important health benefits.

  5. Exercise and Regulation of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mul, Joram D.; Stanford, Kristin I.; Hirshman, Michael F.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates are the preferred substrate for contracting skeletal muscles during high-intensity exercise and are also readily utilized during moderate intensity exercise. This use of carbohydrates during physical activity likely played an important role during the survival of early Homo sapiens, and genes and traits regulating physical activity, carbohydrate metabolism, and energy storage have undoubtedly been selected throughout evolution. In contrast to the life of early H. sapiens, modern lifestyles are predominantly sedentary. As a result, intake of excessive amounts of carbohydrates due to the easy and continuous accessibility to modern high-energy food and drinks has not only become unnecessary but also led to metabolic diseases in the face of physical inactivity. A resulting metabolic disease is type 2 diabetes, a complex endocrine disorder characterized by abnormally high concentrations of circulating glucose. This disease now affects millions of people worldwide. Exercise has beneficial effects to help control impaired glucose homeostasis with metabolic disease, and is a well-established tool to prevent and combat type 2 diabetes. This chapter focuses on the effects of exercise on carbohydrate metabolism in skeletal muscle and systemic glucose homeostasis. We will also focus on the molecular mechanisms that mediate the effects of exercise to increase glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. It is now well established that there are different proximal signaling pathways that mediate the effects of exercise and insulin on glucose uptake, and these distinct mechanisms are consistent with the ability of exercise to increase glucose uptake in the face of insulin resistance in people with type 2 diabetes. Ongoing research in this area is aimed at defining the precise mechanism by which exercise increases glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity and the types of exercise necessary for these important health benefits. PMID:26477909

  6. Energy and carbohydrate for training and recovery.

    PubMed

    Burke, Louise M; Loucks, Anne B; Broad, Nick

    2006-07-01

    Soccer players should achieve an energy intake that provides sufficient carbohydrate to fuel the training and competition programme, supplies all nutrient requirements, and allows manipulation of energy or nutrient balance to achieve changes in lean body mass, body fat or growth. Although the traditional culture of soccer has focused on carbohydrate intake for immediate match preparation, top players should adapt their carbohydrate intake on a daily basis to ensure adequate fuel for training and recovery between matches. For players with a mobile playing style, there is sound evidence that dietary programmes that restore and even super-compensate muscle glycogen levels can enhance activity patterns during matches. This will presumably also benefit intensive training, such as twice daily practices. As well as achieving a total intake of carbohydrate commensurate with fuel needs, the everyday diet should promote strategic intake of carbohydrate and protein before and after key training sessions to optimize the adaptations and enhance recovery. The achievement of the ideal physique for soccer is a long-term goal that should be undertaken over successive years, and particularly during the off-season and pre-season. An increase in lean body mass or a decrease in body fat is the product of a targeted training and eating programme. Consultation with a sports nutrition expert can assist soccer players to manipulate energy and nutrient intake to meet such goals. Players should be warned against the accidental or deliberate mismatch of energy intake and energy expenditure, such that energy availability (intake minus the cost of exercise) falls below 125 kJ (30 kcal) per kilogram of fat-free mass per day. Such low energy availability causes disturbances to hormonal, metabolic, and immune function. PMID:16766497

  7. Pyrrolic tripodal receptors for carbohydrates. Role of functional groups and binding geometry on carbohydrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Cacciarini, Martina; Nativi, Cristina; Norcini, Martina; Staderini, Samuele; Francesconi, Oscar; Roelens, Stefano

    2011-02-21

    The contribution from several H-bonding groups and the impact of geometric requirements on the binding ability of benzene-based tripodal receptors toward carbohydrates have been investigated by measuring the affinity of a set of structures toward octyl β-D-glucopyranoside, selected as a representative monosaccharide. The results reported in the present study demonstrate that a judicious choice of correct geometry and appropriate functional groups is critical to achieve the complementary hydrogen bonding interactions required for an effective carbohydrate recognition.

  8. Significant conformational changes in an antigenic carbohydrate epitope upon binding to a monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Glaudemans, C.P.J.; Lerner, L.; Daves, G.D. Jr.; Kovac, P.; Bax, A. ); Venable, R. )

    1990-12-01

    Transferred nulcear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (TRNOE) was used to observe changes in a ligand's conformation upon binding to its specific antibody. The ligands studied were methyl O-{beta}-D-galactopyranosyl(1{yields}6)-4-deoxy-4-fluoro-{beta}-D galactopyranoside (me4FGal{sub 2}) and its selectively deuteriated analogue, methyl O-{beta}-D-galactopyranosyl(1{yields}6)-4-deoxy-2-deuterio-4-fluoro-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (me4F2dGal{sub 2}). The monoclonal antibody was mouse IgA X24. The solution conformation of the free ligand me4F2dGal{sub 2} was inferred from measurements of vicinal {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H coupling constants, long-range {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C coupling constants, and NOE cross-peak intensities. For free ligand, both galactosyl residues adopt a regular chair conformation, but the NMR spectra are incompatible with a single unique conformation of the glycosidic linkage. Analysis of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C constants indicates that the major conformer has an extended conformation. TRNOE measurements on me4FGal{sub 2} and me4F2dGal{sub 2} in the presence of the specific antibody indicate that the pyranose ring pucker of each galactose ring remains unchanged, but rotations about the glycosidic linkage occur upon binding to X24. Computer calculations indicate that there are two sets of torsion angles that satisfy the observed NMR constraints. A new method, based on changes in the fluorine longitudinal relaxation rate, is used to measure the ligand-antibody dissociation rate constant.

  9. Expanded metabolomics approach to profiling endogenous carbohydrates in the serum of ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Li, Li; Zhu, Bangjie; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yan; Gu, Xue; Yan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    We applied hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry to the quantitative analysis of serum from 58 women, including ovarian cancer patients, ovarian benign tumor patients, and healthy controls. All of these ovarian cancer and ovarian benign tumor patients have elevated cancer antigen 125, which makes them clinically difficult to differentiate the malignant from the benign. All of the 16 endogenous carbohydrates were quantitatively detected in the human sera, of which, eight endogenous carbohydrates were significantly different (P-value < 0.05) between the ovarian cancer and healthy control. According to the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, arabitol was the most potentially specific biomarker for discriminating ovarian cancer from healthy control, having an area under the curve of 0.911. A panel of metabolite markers composed of maltose, maltotriose, raffinose, and mannitol was selected, which was able to discriminate the ovarian cancer from the benign ovarian tumor counterparts, with an area under concentration-time curve value of 0.832. Endogenous carbohydrates in the expanded metabolomics approach after the global metabolic profiling are characterized and are potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  10. Apoptin induces apoptosis in nude mice allograft model of human bladder cancer by altering multiple bladder tumor-associated gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhui; Wang, Wenju; Wang, Jiansong; Zhan, Hui; Jiang, Lihong; Yan, Ruping; Hou, Zongliu; Zhu, Huirong; Yu, Lirui; Shi, Yunqiang; Ding, Mingxia; Ke, Changxing

    2013-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is one of the most common human malignancies that account for major death in the world. Apoptin that is derived from chicken anemia virus (CAV) has displayed tumor-specific cytotoxic activity in a variety of human carcinomas. However, the magical function of apoptin in bladder carcinoma cell lines has not been identified yet. In our study, we delivered apoptin into bladder-originating T24, EJ, and HCV29 cell lines by adenovirus system. The selective cytotoxic effect of apoptin was determined by cell viability assay, active caspase-3 measurement, and annexin V/PI double staining. Importantly, we have examined the differential expression patterns of tumor-associated genes including Ki67, C-erbB-2, Rb, and nm23 by flow cytometry and western blot in vitro. In an animal study, apoptin was infused into animal models by AAV system, and immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were employed to validate results in vivo. The results indicated that apoptin could selectively induce apoptosis in bladder tumorigenic cells coupled with tumor-specific nucleus accumulation in vitro. Interestingly, apoptin could downregulate expression levels of Ki67 and C-erbB-2 and upregulate the expression of Rb both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the animal models treated with AAV-apoptin have shown smaller tumor volumes and displayed better prognosis than controls. In conclusion, apoptin could selectively induce apoptosis in bladder tumor cells through altering expression profiles of tumor-associated genes.

  11. Newly recruited CD11b+, GR-1+, Ly6C(high) myeloid cells augment tumor-associated immunosuppression immediately following the therapeutic administration of oncolytic reovirus.

    PubMed

    Clements, Derek R; Sterea, Andra M; Kim, Youra; Helson, Erin; Dean, Cheryl A; Nunokawa, Anna; Coyle, Krysta Mila; Sharif, Tanveer; Marcato, Paola; Gujar, Shashi A; Lee, Patrick W K

    2015-05-01

    Tumor-associated immunosuppression aids cancer cells to escape immune-mediated attack and subsequent elimination. Recently, however, many oncolytic viruses, including reovirus, have been reported to overturn such immunosuppression and promote the development of a clinically desired antitumor immunity, which is known to promote favorable patient outcomes. Contrary to this existing paradigm, in this article we demonstrate that reovirus augments tumor-associated immunosuppression immediately following its therapeutic administration. Our data show that reovirus induces preferential differentiation of highly suppressive CD11b(+), Gr-1(+), Ly6C(high) myeloid cells from bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells. Furthermore, reovirus administration in tumor-bearing hosts drives time-dependent recruitment of CD11b(+), Gr-1(+), Ly6C(high) myeloid cells in the tumor milieu, which is further supported by virus-induced increased expression of numerous immune factors involved in myeloid-derived suppressor cell survival and trafficking. Most importantly, CD11b(+), Gr-1(+), Ly6C(high) myeloid cells specifically potentiate the suppression of T cell proliferation and are associated with the absence of IFN-γ response in the tumor microenvironment early during oncotherapy. Considering that the qualitative traits of a specific antitumor immunity are largely dictated by the immunological events that precede its development, our findings are of critical importance and must be considered while devising complementary interventions aimed at promoting the optimum efficacy of oncolytic virus-based anticancer immunotherapies. PMID:25825443

  12. Optimized tumor cryptic peptides: the basis for universal neo-antigen-like tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Menez-Jamet, Jeanne; Gallou, Catherine; Rougeot, Aude; Kosmatopoulos, Kostas

    2016-07-01

    The very impressive clinical results recently obtained in cancer patients treated with immune response checkpoint inhibitors boosted the interest in immunotherapy as a therapeutic choice in cancer treatment. However, these inhibitors require a pre-existing tumor specific immune response and the presence of tumor infiltrating T cells to be efficient. This immune response can be triggered by cancer vaccines. One of the main issues in tumor vaccination is the choice of the right antigen to target. All vaccines tested to date targeted tumor associated antigens (TAA) that are self-antigens and failed to show a clinical efficacy because of the immune self-tolerance to TAA. A new class of tumor antigens has recently been described, the neo-antigens that are created by point mutations of tumor expressing proteins and are recognized by the immune system as non-self. Neo-antigens exhibit two main properties: they are not involved in the immune self-tolerance process and are immunogenic. However, the majority of the neo-antigens are patient specific and their use as cancer vaccines requires their previous identification in each patient individualy that can be done only in highly specialized research centers. It is therefore evident that neo-antigens cannot be used for patient vaccination worldwide. This raises the question of whether we can find neo-antigen like vaccines, which would not be patient specific. In this review we show that optimized cryptic peptides from TAA are neo-antigen like peptides. Optimized cryptic peptides are recognized by the immune system as non-self because they target self-cryptic peptides that escape self-tolerance; in addition they are strongly immunogenic because their sequence is modified in order to enhance their affinity for the HLA molecule. The first vaccine based on the optimized cryptic peptide approach, Vx-001, which targets the widely expressed tumor antigen telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), has completed a large phase I clinical

  13. The future is now: chimeric antigen receptors as new targeted therapies for childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel W; Barrett, David M; Mackall, Crystal; Orentas, Rimas; Grupp, Stephan A

    2012-05-15

    Improved outcomes for children with cancer hinge on the development of new targeted therapies with acceptable short-term and long-term toxicity. Progress in basic, preclinical, and clinical arenas spanning cellular immunology, gene therapy, and cell-processing technologies have paved the way for clinical applications of chimeric antigen receptor-based therapies. This is a new form of targeted immunotherapy that merges the exquisite targeting specificity of monoclonal antibodies with the potent cytotoxicity, potential for expansion, and long-term persistence provided by cytotoxic T cells. Although this field is still in its infancy, clinical trials have already shown clinically significant antitumor activity in neuroblastoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and B-cell lymphoma, and trials targeting a variety of other adult and pediatric malignancies are under way. Ongoing work is focused on identifying optimal tumor targets and elucidating and manipulating both cell- and host-associated factors to support expansion and persistence of the genetically engineered cells in vivo. In pediatric oncology, CD19 and GD2 are compelling antigens that have already been identified for targeting pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia and neuroblastoma, respectively, with this approach, but it is likely that other antigens expressed in a variety of childhood cancers will also soon be targeted using this therapy. The potential to target essentially any tumor-associated cell-surface antigen for which a monoclonal antibody can be made opens up an entirely new arena for targeted therapy of childhood cancer.

  14. Novel cancer antigens for personalized immunotherapies: latest evidence and clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Wurz, Gregory T.; Kao, Chiao-Jung; DeGregorio, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical success of monoclonal antibody immune checkpoint modulators such as ipilimumab, which targets cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4), and the recently approved agents nivolumab and pembrolizumab, which target programmed cell death receptor 1 (PD-1), has stimulated renewed enthusiasm for anticancer immunotherapy, which was heralded by Science as ‘Breakthrough of the Year’ in 2013. As the potential of cancer immunotherapy has been recognized since the 1890s when William Coley showed that bacterial products could be beneficial in cancer patients, leveraging the immune system in the treatment of cancer is certainly not a new concept; however, earlier attempts to develop effective therapeutic vaccines and antibodies against solid tumors, for example, melanoma, frequently met with failure due in part to self-tolerance and the development of an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Increased knowledge of the mechanisms through which cancer evades the immune system and the identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and negative immune checkpoint regulators have led to the development of vaccines and monoclonal antibodies targeting specific tumor antigens and immune checkpoints such as CTLA-4 and PD-1. This review first discusses the established targets of currently approved cancer immunotherapies and then focuses on investigational cancer antigens and their clinical potential. Because of the highly heterogeneous nature of tumors, effective anticancer immunotherapy-based treatment regimens will likely require a personalized combination of therapeutic vaccines, antibodies and chemotherapy that fit the specific biology of a patient’s disease. PMID:26753003

  15. Novel cancer antigens for personalized immunotherapies: latest evidence and clinical potential.

    PubMed

    Wurz, Gregory T; Kao, Chiao-Jung; DeGregorio, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    The clinical success of monoclonal antibody immune checkpoint modulators such as ipilimumab, which targets cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4), and the recently approved agents nivolumab and pembrolizumab, which target programmed cell death receptor 1 (PD-1), has stimulated renewed enthusiasm for anticancer immunotherapy, which was heralded by Science as 'Breakthrough of the Year' in 2013. As the potential of cancer immunotherapy has been recognized since the 1890s when William Coley showed that bacterial products could be beneficial in cancer patients, leveraging the immune system in the treatment of cancer is certainly not a new concept; however, earlier attempts to develop effective therapeutic vaccines and antibodies against solid tumors, for example, melanoma, frequently met with failure due in part to self-tolerance and the development of an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Increased knowledge of the mechanisms through which cancer evades the immune system and the identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and negative immune checkpoint regulators have led to the development of vaccines and monoclonal antibodies targeting specific tumor antigens and immune checkpoints such as CTLA-4 and PD-1. This review first discusses the established targets of currently approved cancer immunotherapies and then focuses on investigational cancer antigens and their clinical potential. Because of the highly heterogeneous nature of tumors, effective anticancer immunotherapy-based treatment regimens will likely require a personalized combination of therapeutic vaccines, antibodies and chemotherapy that fit the specific biology of a patient's disease.

  16. Immunogenetic Mechanisms Driving Norovirus GII.4 Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Eric F.; Corti, Davide; Swanstrom, Jesica; Debbink, Kari; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Baric, Ralph S.

    2012-01-01

    Noroviruses are the principal cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide with GII.4 strains accounting for 80% of infections. The major capsid protein of GII.4 strains is evolving rapidly, resulting in new epidemic strains with altered antigenic potentials. To test if antigenic drift may contribute to GII.4 persistence, human memory B cells were immortalized and the resulting human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) characterized for reactivity to a panel of time-ordered GII.4 virus-like particles (VLPs). Reflecting the complex exposure history of the volunteer, human anti-GII.4 mAbs grouped into three VLP reactivity patterns; ancestral (1987–1997), contemporary (2004–2009), and broad (1987–2009). NVB 114 reacted exclusively to the earliest GII.4 VLPs by EIA and blockade. NVB 97 specifically bound and blocked only contemporary GII.4 VLPs, while NBV 111 and 43.9 exclusively reacted with and blocked variants of the GII.4.2006 Minerva strain. Three mAbs had broad GII.4 reactivity. Two, NVB 37.10 and 61.3, also detected other genogroup II VLPs by EIA but did not block any VLP interactions with carbohydrate ligands. NVB 71.4 cross-neutralized the panel of time-ordered GII.4 VLPs, as measured by VLP-carbohydrate blockade assays. Using mutant VLPs designed to alter predicted antigenic epitopes, two evolving, GII.4-specific, blockade epitopes were mapped. Amino acids 294–298 and 368–372 were required for binding NVB 114, 111 and 43.9 mAbs. Amino acids 393–395 were essential for binding NVB 97, supporting earlier correlations between antibody blockade escape and carbohydrate binding variation. These data inform VLP vaccine design, provide a strategy for expanding the cross-blockade potential of chimeric VLP vaccines, and identify an antibody with broadly neutralizing therapeutic potential for the treatment of human disease. Moreover, these data support the hypothesis that GII.4 norovirus evolution is heavily influenced by antigenic variation of neutralizing epitopes

  17. Immune recognition of protein antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Laver, W.G.; Air, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 33 papers. Some of the titles are: Antigenic Structure of Influenze Virus Hemagglutinin; Germ-line and Somatic Diversity in the Antibody Response to the Influenza Virus A/PR/8/34 Hemagglutinin; Recognition of Cloned Influenza A Virus Gene Products by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes; Antigenic Structure of the Influenza Virus N2 Neuraminidase; and The Molecular and Genetic Basis of Antigenic Variation in Gonococcal Pillin.

  18. Immunoreactivity of Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) antigen in human neoplasms: the importance of carrier-specific glycotope expression on MUC1.

    PubMed

    Baldus, S E; Hanisch, F G; Monaca, E; Karsten, U R; Zirbes, T K; Thiele, J; Dienes, H P

    1999-10-01

    On the basis of their known fine specificities we evaluated the immunohistochemical marker qualities of two monoclonal antibodies (mabs) defining the tumor-associated TF disaccharide Gal beta 1-3 GalNAc. This antigen is expressed in certain tumors in correlation with prognosis and metastasis. The reactivity of one of these mabs (A78-G/A7) depends on clustered TF disaccharides (glycosylation at vicinal Ser/Thr positions) while the other--mab BW835--has been characterized to bind specifically to TF disaccharide linked to a motif within the MUC1 repeat. Therefore, mab BW835 represents an interesting tool for the identification of tumor-associated glycoforms of MUC1, which are involved in tumor progression and metastasis, but also in the recognition of tumor cells by cytotoxic T cells. As references the TF-binding lectins from peanut (PNA) and Artocarpus integrifolia (jacalin) were applied. The binding patterns of these immunoreagents were strikingly distinct. Mab BW835 showed a significantly stronger reactivity than mab A78-G/A7, especially in gastric, mammary, pancreatic, thyreoideal, renal and bladder carcinomas. PNA and jacalin receptors exhibited an expression in the majority of all cancer types, with the exception of seminoma and glioblastoma/sarcoma. These results can be explained by the broader fine specificities of the lectins. Furthermore, a strong expression of MUC1-bound TF antigen is indicated by the staining pattern of mab BW835. The marker qualities of both antigens, TF and MUC1, are combined in the binding specificity of BW835, and hence this antibody may have a high impact for the immunodetection of these tumor-associated antigens.

  19. Carbohydrate-based Cu(I) stabilizing ligands and their use in the synthesis of carbohydrate-ferrocene conjugates.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Magnus S; Leitner, Kim; Welter, Moritz; Wurmthaler, Lena A; Ringwald, Markus

    2014-03-31

    A series of carbohydrate-ferrocene conjugates have been synthesized by copper(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition of carbohydrate-azides and ethynylferrocene (CuAAC). Newly carbohydrate-based tris-triazoles have been used as Cu(I) stabilizing ligands and showed at least comparable, in some cases even better results compared to the use of tris-(benzyltriazolylmethyl)amine (TBTA).

  20. Organotin-catalyzed highly regioselective thiocarbonylation of nonprotected carbohydrates and synthesis of deoxy carbohydrates in a minimum number of steps.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Wataru; Tanigawa, Satoko; Takemoto, Yuki; Yoshimatsu, Hirofumi; Onomura, Osamu

    2012-04-16

    Nonprotected carbohydrates: The catalytic regioselective thiocarbonylation of carbohydrates by using organotin dichloride under mild conditions was demonstrated. The reaction afforded various deoxy saccharides in high yields and excellent regioselectivity in a minimum number of steps. The regioselectivity of the thiocarbonylation is attributed to the intrinsic character of the carbohydrates based on the stereorelationship of their hydroxy groups (see scheme).

  1. Noroviruses Distinguish between Type 1 and Type 2 Histo-Blood Group Antigens for Binding▿

    PubMed Central

    Shirato, Haruko; Ogawa, Satoko; Ito, Hiromi; Sato, Takashi; Kameyama, Akihiko; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Xiaofan, Zheng; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Wakita, Takaji; Ishii, Koji; Takeda, Naokazu

    2008-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is a causative agent of acute gastroenteritis. NoV binds to histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), namely, ABH antigens and Lewis (Le) antigens, in which type 1 and type 2 carbohydrate core structures constitute antigenically distinct variants. Norwalk virus, the prototype strain of norovirus, binds to the gastroduodenal junction, and this binding is correlated with the presence of H type 1 antigen but not with that of H type 2 antigen (S. Marionneau, N. Ruvoen, B. Le Moullac-Vaidye, M. Clement, A. Cailleau-Thomas, G. Ruiz-Palacois, P. Huang, X. Jiang, and J. Le Pendu, Gastroenterology 122:1967-1977, 2002). It has been unknown whether NoV distinguishes between the type 1 and type 2 chains of A and B antigens. In this study, we synthesized A type 1, A type 2, B type 1, and B type 2 pentasaccharides in vitro and examined the function of the core structures in the binding between NoV virus-like particles (VLPs) and HBGAs. The attachment of five genogroup I (GI) VLPs from 5 genotypes and 11 GII VLPs from 8 genotypes, GI/1, GI/2, GI/3, GI/4, GI/8, GII/1, GII/3, GII/4, GII/5, GII/6, GII/7, GII/12, and GII/14, to ABH and Le HBGAs was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based binding assays and Biacore analyses. GI/1, GI/2, GI/3, GI/4, GI/8, and GII/4 VLPs were more efficiently bound to A type 2 than A type 1, and GI/8 and GII/4 VLPs were more efficiently bound to B type 2 than B type 1, indicating that NoV VLPs distinguish between type 1 and type 2 carbohydrates. The dissociation of GII/4 VLPs from B type 1 was slower than that from B type 2 in the Biacore experiments; moreover, the binding to B type 1 was stronger than that to B type 2 in the ELISA experiments. These results indicated that the type 1 carbohydrates bind more tightly to NoV VLPs than the type 2 carbohydrates. This property may afford NoV tissue specificity. GII/4 is known to be a global epidemic genotype and binds to more HBGAs than other genotypes. This characteristic may be linked

  2. Antigenic variation in ciliates: antigen structure, function, expression.

    PubMed

    Simon, Martin C; Schmidt, Helmut J

    2007-01-01

    In the past decades, the major focus of antigen variation research has been on parasitic protists. However, antigenic variation occurs also in free-living protists. The antigenic systems of the ciliates Paramecium and Tetrahymena have been studied for more than 100 yr. In spite of different life strategies and distant phylogenetic relationships of free-living ciliates and parasitic protists, their antigenic systems have features in common, such as the presence of repeated protein motifs and multigene families. The function of variable surface antigens in free-living ciliates is still unknown. Up to now no detailed monitoring of antigen expression in free-living ciliates in natural habitats has been performed. Unlike stochastic switching in parasites, antigen expression in ciliates can be directed, e.g. by temperature, which holds great advantages for research on the expression mechanism. Regulated expression of surface antigens occurs in an exclusive way and the responsible mechanism is complex, involving both transcriptional and post-transcriptional features. The involvement of homology-dependent effects has been proposed several times but has not been proved yet.

  3. Solubility of carbohydrates in heavy water.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Marcus V C; Carvalho, Larissa V C; Sabadini, Edvaldo

    2012-05-15

    The solubility of several mono-(glucose and xylose), di-(sucrose and maltose), tri-(raffinose) and cyclic (α-cyclodextrin) saccharides in H(2)O and in D(2)O were measured over a range of temperatures. The solution enthalpies for the different carbohydrates in the two solvents were determined using the vant' Hoff equation and the values in D(2)O are presented here for the first time. Our findings indicate that the replacement of H(2)O by D(2)O remarkably decreases the solubilities of the less soluble carbohydrates, such as maltose, raffinose and α-cyclodextrin. On the other hand, the more soluble saccharides, glucose, xylose, and sucrose, are practically insensitive to the H/D replacement in water. PMID:22480785

  4. Carbohydrate Engineered Cells for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jian; Yarema, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    Carbohydrates are integral components of the stem cell niche on several levels; proteoglycans are a major constituent of the extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding a cell, glycosoaminoglycans (GAGs) help link cells to the ECM and the neighboring cells, and small but informationally-rich oligosaccharides provide a “sugar code” that identifies each cell and provides it with unique functions. This article samples roles that glycans play in development and then describes how metabolic glycoengineering – a technique where monosaccharide analogs are introduced into the metabolic pathways of a cell and are biosynthetically incorporated into the glycocalyx – is overcoming many of the long-standing barriers to manipulating carbohydrates in living cells and tissues and is becoming an intriguing new tool for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:20117158

  5. Pre-operative nutrition and carbohydrate loading.

    PubMed

    Kratzing, Caroline

    2011-08-01

    An optimal nutritional state is an important consideration in providing successful operative outcomes. Unfortunately, many aspects of surgery are not constructive to providing this. In addition, the metabolic and immune response to injury induces a catabolic state and insulin resistance, a known risk factor of post-operative complications. Aggressive insulin therapy post-operatively has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality but similar results can be achieved when insulin resistance is lessened by the use of pre-operative carbohydrate loading. Consuming carbohydrate-containing drinks up to 2 h before surgery has been found to be an effective way to attenuate insulin resistance, minimise protein losses, reduce hospital stays and improve patient comfort without adversely affecting gastric emptying. Enhanced recovery programmes have employed carbohydrate loading as one of several strategies aimed at reducing post-operative stress and improving the recovery process. Studies examining the benefits of these programmes have demonstrated significantly shorter post-operative hospital stays, faster return to normal functions and lower occurrences of surgical complications. As a consequence of the favourable evidence they are now being implemented in many surgical units. Further benefit to post-operative recovery may be found with the use of immune-enhancing diets, i.e. supplementation with n-3 fatty acids, arginine, glutamine and/or nucleotides. These have the potential to boost the immune system, improve wound healing and reduce inflammatory markers. Research exploring the benefits of immunonutrition and solidifying the use of carbohydrate loading is ongoing; however, there is strong evidence to link good pre-operative nutrition and improved surgical outcomes.

  6. Crystallisation and crystal forms of carbohydrate derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Lorna

    This thesis is focused on the synthesis and solid state analysis of carbohydrate derivatives, including many novel compounds. Although the synthetic chemistry surrounding carbohydrates is well established in the literature, the crystal chemistry of carbohydrates is less well studied. Therefore this research aims to improve understanding of the solid state properties of carbohydrate derivatives through gaining more information on their supramolecular bonding. Chapter One focuses on an introduction to the solid state of organic compounds, with a background to crystallisation, including issues that can arise during crystal growth. Chapter Two is based on glucopyranuronate derivatives which are understudied in terms of their solid state forms. This chapter reports on the formation of novel glucuronamides and utilising the functionality of the amide bond for crystallisation. TEMPO oxidation was completed to form glucopyranuronates by oxidation of the primary alcohol groups of glucosides to the carboxylic acid derivatives, to increase functionality for enhanced crystal growth. Chapter Three reports on the synthesis of glucopyranoside derivatives by O-glycosylation reactions and displays crystal structures, including a number of previously unsolved acetate protected and deprotected crystal structures. More complex glycoside derivatives were also researched in an aim to study the resultant supramolecular motifs. Chapter Four contains the synthesis of aryl cellobioside derivatives including the novel crystal structures that were solved for the acetate protected and deprotected compounds. Research was carried out to determine if 1-deoxycellodextrins could act as putative isostructures for cellulose. Our research displays the presence of isostructural references with 1-deoxycellotriose shown to be similar to cellulose III11, 1-deoxycellotetraose correlates with cellulose IV11 and 1-deoxycellopentose shows isostructurality similar to that of cellulose II. Chapter Five contains

  7. Direct synthesis of methyl phosphoramidates in carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Dhurandhare, Vijay M; Mishra, Girija Prasad; Lam, Sarah; Wang, Cheng-Chung

    2015-09-28

    A direct installation of a methyl phosphoramidate group by using methyl benzylphosphoramidochloridate into carbohydrates and amino acid is described. This one-step synthesis is efficient for both primary and secondary alcohols and exhibited excellent regioselectivity and functional group compatibility. Formation of a single diastereomer is observed in certain cases. The N-benzyl protecting group on methyl phosphoramidates is easily removed under mild conditions.

  8. Harvesting carbohydrate-rich Arthrospira platensis by spontaneous settling.

    PubMed

    Depraetere, Orily; Pierre, Guillaume; Deschoenmaeker, Frédéric; Badri, Hanène; Foubert, Imogen; Leys, Natalie; Markou, Giorgos; Wattiez, Ruddy; Michaud, Philippe; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2015-03-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis is an attractive feedstock for carbohydrate-based biofuels because it accumulated up to 74% of carbohydrates when nitrogen stressed. Nitrogen stressed A. platensis also settled spontaneously, and this occurred simultaneously with carbohydrates accumulation, suggesting a link between both phenomena. The increased settling velocity was neither due to production of extracellular carbohydrates, nor due to degradation of gas vacuoles, but was caused by an increase in the specific density of the filaments as a result of accumulation of carbohydrates under the form of glycogen. Settling velocities of carbohydrate-rich A. platensis reached 0.64mh(-1), which allowed the biomass to be harvested using a lamella separator. The biomass could be concentrated at least 15 times, allowing removal of 94% of the water using gravity settling, thus offering a potential application as a low-cost and high-throughput method for primary dewatering of carbohydrate-rich A. platensis.

  9. Harvesting carbohydrate-rich Arthrospira platensis by spontaneous settling.

    PubMed

    Depraetere, Orily; Pierre, Guillaume; Deschoenmaeker, Frédéric; Badri, Hanène; Foubert, Imogen; Leys, Natalie; Markou, Giorgos; Wattiez, Ruddy; Michaud, Philippe; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2015-03-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis is an attractive feedstock for carbohydrate-based biofuels because it accumulated up to 74% of carbohydrates when nitrogen stressed. Nitrogen stressed A. platensis also settled spontaneously, and this occurred simultaneously with carbohydrates accumulation, suggesting a link between both phenomena. The increased settling velocity was neither due to production of extracellular carbohydrates, nor due to degradation of gas vacuoles, but was caused by an increase in the specific density of the filaments as a result of accumulation of carbohydrates under the form of glycogen. Settling velocities of carbohydrate-rich A. platensis reached 0.64mh(-1), which allowed the biomass to be harvested using a lamella separator. The biomass could be concentrated at least 15 times, allowing removal of 94% of the water using gravity settling, thus offering a potential application as a low-cost and high-throughput method for primary dewatering of carbohydrate-rich A. platensis. PMID:25585253

  10. Analysis and validation of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lütteke, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    The article summarizes the information that is gained from and the errors that are found in carbohydrate structures in the Protein Data Bank. Validation tools that can locate these errors are described. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of the carbohydrate molecules is indispensable for a full understanding of the molecular processes in which carbohydrates are involved, such as protein glycosylation or protein–carbohydrate interactions. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is a valuable resource for three-dimensional structural information on glycoproteins and protein–carbohydrate complexes. Unfortunately, many carbohydrate moieties in the PDB contain inconsistencies or errors. This article gives an overview of the information that can be obtained from individual PDB entries and from statistical analyses of sets of three-dimensional structures, of typical problems that arise during the analysis of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures and of the validation tools that are currently available to scientists to evaluate the quality of these structures.

  11. Hearing Loss, Dizziness, and Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Albernaz, Pedro L. Mangabeira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  Metabolic activity of the inner ear is very intense, and makes it sensitive to changes in the body homeostasis. This study involves a group of patients with inner ear disorders related to carbohydrate metabolism disturbances, including hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, and episodes of vertigo. Objectives  To describe the symptoms of metabolic inner ear disorders and the examinations required to establish diagnoses. These symptoms are often the first to allow for an early diagnosis of metabolic disorders and diabetes. Methods  Retrospective study of 376 patients with inner ear symptoms suggestive of disturbances of carbohydrate metabolism. The authors present patientś clinical symptoms and clinical evaluations, with emphasis on the glucose and insulin essays. Results  Authors based their conclusions on otolaryngological findings, diagnostic procedures and treatment principles. They found that auditory and vestibular symptoms usually occur prior to other manifestations of metabolic changes, leading to an early diagnosis of hyperinsulinemia, intestinal sugar malabsorption or diabetes. Previously undiagnosed diabetes mellitus type II was found in 39 patients. Conclusions  The identification of carbohydrate metabolism disturbances is important not only to minimize the patients' clinical symptoms, but also to help maintain their general health. PMID:27413410

  12. Renewable Hydrogen Carrier Carbohydrate: Constructing the Carbon-Neutral Carbohydrate Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.-H. Percival; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The hydrogen economy presents an appealing energy future but its implementation must solve numerous problems ranging from low-cost sustainable production, high-density storage, costly infrastructure, to eliminating safety concern. The use of renewable carbohydrate as a high-density hydrogen carrier and energy source for hydrogen production is possible due to emerging cell-free synthetic biology technology called cell-free synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB). Assembly of numerous enzymes and co-enzymes in vitro can create complicated set of biological reactions or pathways that microorganisms cannot complete, for example, C6H10O5 (aq) + 7 H2O (l) 12 H2 (g) + 6 CO2 (g) (PLoS One 2007, 2:e456). Thanks to 100% selectivity of enzymes, modest reaction conditions, and high-purity of generated hydrogen, carbohydrate is a promising hydrogen carrier for end users. Gravimetric density of carbohydrate is 14.8 H2 mass% if water can be recycled from PEM fuel cells or 8.33% H2 mass% without water recycling. Renewable carbohydrate can be isolated from plant biomass or would be produced from a combination of solar electricity/hydrogen and carbon dioxide fixation mediated by high-efficiency artificial photosynthesis mediated by SyPaB. The construction of this carbon-neutral carbohydrate economy would address numerous sustainability challenges, such as electricity and hydrogen storage, CO2 fixation and long-term storage, water conservation, transportation fuel production, plus feed and food production.

  13. Novel antigen delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Maria; Berardinis, Piergiuseppe De

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the “E2 scaffold” of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  14. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen Print A A A Text Size ... en español Muestra de materia fecal: antígeno de H. pylori What It Is Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) ...

  15. Differentiation antigens in lymphohemopoietic tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Miyasaka, M.; Trnka, Z.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 15 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: In Situ Characterization of Human Lymphoid Cells Using Monoclonal Antibodies; Structural and Functional Aspects of HLA Clas II Genes; Cell-Surface Differentiation Antigens Expressed on Thymocytes and T Cells of the Mouse; and Differentiation Antigens on Lymphoid Cells of the Guinea Pig.

  16. A Genetically Engineered Adenovirus Vector Targeted to CD40 Mediates Transduction of Canine Dendritic Cells and Promotes Antigen-Specific Immune Responses In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Erin E.; Nakayama, Masaharu; Smith, Bruce F.; Bird, R. Curtis; Muminova, Zhanat; Strong, Theresa; Timares, Laura; Korokhov, Nikolay; O'Neill, Ann Marie; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Glasgow, Joel N.; Tani, Kenzaburo; Curiel, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Targeting viral vectors encoding tumor-associated antigens to dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo is likely to enhance the effectiveness of immunotherapeutic cancer vaccines. We have previously shown that genetic modification of adenovirus (Ad) 5 to incorporate CD40 ligand (CD40L) rather than native fiber allows selective transduction and activation of DCs in vitro. Here, we examine the capacity of this targeted vector to induce immune responses to the tumor antigen CEA in a stringent in vivo canine model. CD40-targeted Ad5 transduced canine DCs via the CD40-CD40L pathway in vitro, and following vaccination of healthy dogs, CD40-targeted Ad5 induced strong anti-CEA cellular and humoral responses. These data validate the canine model for future translational studies and suggest targeting of Ad5 vectors to CD40 for in vivo delivery of tumor antigens to DCs is a feasible approach for successful cancer therapy. PMID:19786146

  17. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-07-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure.

  18. Temporal changes in the carbohydrates expressed on BG01 human embryonic stem cells during differentiation as embryoid bodies.

    PubMed

    Wearne, Kimberly A; Winter, Harry C; Goldstein, Irwin J

    2008-02-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates present on BG01 human embryonic stem cells after 28 days of differentiation were examined using two classes of carbohydrate binding proteins: lectins and antibodies specific for carbohydrate epitopes. Specificity of lectin staining was verified using carbohydrate ligands to block lectin interaction, glycohydrolases to cleave specific sugar residues that are receptors for these proteins, and periodate oxidation to destroy susceptible sugar residues. Specific antibodies were used to identify various tissue types and germ layers present in the 12- and 28-day differentiating embryoid bodies. Results from 12 and 28-day differentiated embryoid bodies were compared to determine changes over time. A slight increase in the sialylation of alpha-GalNAc was seen between 12 and 28 days of differentiation due to the presence of sialyl Tn and/or other sialylated alpha-GalNAc residues. Increases were also observed in GalNAc, the T antigen (Gal beta1,3 GalNAc), and difucosylated LacNAc residues during this time interval. Additionally, some distinct differences in the pattern of lectin staining between 12 and 28 days were observed. Not unexpectedly, the presence of most differentiated cell-types increased during this time period with the exception of neural progenitors, which decreased. Undifferentiated cells, which were prevalent in the 12-day EBs, were undetectable after 28 days. We conclude that several changes in glycosylation occurred during the differentiation of embryonic stem cells, and that these changes may play a role in embryonic development.

  19. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: benzenesulfonamides incorporating cyanoacrylamide moieties are low nanomolar/subnanomolar inhibitors of the tumor-associated isoforms IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Alafeefy, Ahmed M; Isik, Semra; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Ashour, Abdelkader E; Vullo, Daniela; Al-Jaber, Nabila A; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-03-15

    A series of benzenesulfonamides incorporating cyanoacrylamide moieties (tyrphostine analogues) have been obtained by reaction of sulfanilamide with ethylcyanoacetate followed by condensation with aromatic/heterocyclic aldehydes, isothiocyanates or diazonium salts. The new compounds have been investigated as inhibitors of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4. 2.1.1), and more specifically against the cytosolic human (h) isoforms hCA I and II, as well as the transmembrane, tumor-associated ones CA IX and XII, which are validated antitumor targets. Most of the new benzenesulfonamides were low nanomolar or subnanomolar CA IX/XII inhibitors whereas they were less effective as inhibitors of CA I and II. The structure-activity relationship for this class of effective CA inhibitors is also discussed. Generally, electron donating groups in the starting aldehyde reagent favored CA IX and XII inhibition, whereas halogeno, methoxy and dimethylamino moieties led to very potent CA XII inhibitors. PMID:23290254

  20. Tumor-associated Endo180 requires stromal-derived LOX to promote metastatic prostate cancer cell migration on human ECM surfaces.

    PubMed

    Caley, Matthew P; King, Helen; Shah, Neel; Wang, Kai; Rodriguez-Teja, Mercedes; Gronau, Julian H; Waxman, Jonathan; Sturge, Justin

    2016-02-01

    The diverse composition and structure of extracellular matrix (ECM) interfaces encountered by tumor cells at secondary tissue sites can influence metastatic progression. Extensive in vitro and in vivo data has confirmed that metastasizing tumor cells can adopt different migratory modes in response to their microenvironment. Here we present a model that uses human stromal cell-derived matrices to demonstrate that plasticity in tumor cell movement is controlled by the tumor-associated collagen receptor Endo180 (CD280, CLEC13E, KIAA0709, MRC2, TEM9, uPARAP) and the crosslinking of collagen fibers by stromal-derived lysyl oxidase (LOX). Human osteoblast-derived and fibroblast-derived ECM supported a rounded 'amoeboid-like' mode of cell migration and enhanced Endo180 expression in three prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, VCaP, DU145). Genetic silencing of Endo180 reverted PC3 cells from their rounded mode of migration towards a bipolar 'mesenchymal-like' mode of migration and blocked their translocation on human fibroblast-derived and osteoblast-derived matrices. The concomitant decrease in PC3 cell migration and increase in Endo180 expression induced by stromal LOX inhibition indicates that the Endo180-dependent rounded mode of prostate cancer cell migration requires ECM crosslinking. In conclusion, this study introduces a realistic in vitro model for the study of metastatic prostate cancer cell plasticity and pinpoints the cooperation between tumor-associated Endo180 and the stiff microenvironment imposed by stromal-derived LOX as a potential target for limiting metastatic progression in prostate cancer. PMID:26567111

  1. The long underestimated carbonyl function of carbohydrates – an organocatalyzed shot into carbohydrate chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mahrwald, R

    2015-09-21

    The aggressive and strong development of organocatalysis provides several protocols for the convenient utilization of the carbonyl function of unprotected carbohydrates in C-C-bond formation processes. These amine-catalyzed mechanisms enable multiple cascade-protocols for the synthesis of a wide range of carbohydrate-derived compound classes. Several, only slightly different protocols, have been developed for the application of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds in the stereoselective chain-elongation of unprotected carbohydrates and the synthesis of highly functionalized C-glycosides of defined configuration. In addition, C-glycosides can also be accessed by amine-catalyzed reactions with methyl ketones. By a one-pot cascade reaction of isocyanides with unprotected aldoses and amino acids access to defined configured glycopeptide mimetics is achieved. Depending on the reaction conditions different origins to control the installation of configuration during the bond-formation process were observed.

  2. A combined approach of human leukocyte antigen ligandomics and immunogenicity analysis to improve peptide-based cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Peper, Janet Kerstin; Stevanović, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    The breakthrough development of immune checkpoint inhibitors as clinically effective novel therapies demonstrates the potential of cancer immunotherapy. The identification of suitable targets for specific immunotherapy, however, remains a challenging task. Most peptides previously used for vaccination in clinical trials were able to elicit strong immunological responses but failed with regard to clinical benefit. This might, at least partly, be caused by an inadequate peptide selection, usually derived from established tumor-associated antigens which are not necessarily presented as human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands. Recently, HLA ligandome analysis revealed cancer-associated peptides, which have been used in clinical trials showing encouraging impact on survival. To improve peptide-based cancer immunotherapy, our group established a combined approach of HLA ligandomics and immunogenicity analysis for the identification of vaccine peptides. This approach is based on the identification of naturally presented HLA ligands on tumor samples, the selection of tumor-associated/tumor-specific HLA ligands and their subsequent testing for immunogenicity in vitro. In this review, we want to present our pipeline for the identification of vaccine peptides, focusing on ovarian cancer, and want to discuss differences to other approaches. Furthermore, we want to give a short outlook of a potential multi-peptide vaccination trial using the novel identified peptides.

  3. NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Kovacs, Helena; Widmalm, Göran

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of (13)C-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly (13)C-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-(13)C)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight ((13)C-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, ~10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The (13)C resonances are traced using (13)C-(13)C correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the (13)C resonances, the (1)H chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond (1)H-(13)C correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J CC splitting of the (13)C resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either (13)C or (1)H detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the (1)H-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the (13)C-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with (15)N at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and (13)C-detected (H)CACO spectra.

  4. NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Kovacs, Helena; Widmalm, Göran

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of (13)C-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly (13)C-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-(13)C)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight ((13)C-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, ~10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The (13)C resonances are traced using (13)C-(13)C correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the (13)C resonances, the (1)H chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond (1)H-(13)C correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J CC splitting of the (13)C resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either (13)C or (1)H detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the (1)H-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the (13)C-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with (15)N at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and (13)C-detected (H)CACO spectra. PMID:24771296

  5. Reconstituted B cell receptor signaling reveals carbohydrate-dependent mode of activation

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Rina F.; Patel, Jinal; Weaver, Grant C.; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Wheatley, Adam K.; Yassine, Hadi M.; Costello, Catherine E.; Chandler, Kevin B.; McTamney, Patrick. M.; Nabel, Gary J.; McDermott, Adrian B.; Mascola, John R.; Carr, Steven A.; Lingwood, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Activation of immune cells (but not B cells) with lectins is widely known. We used the structurally defined interaction between influenza hemagglutinin (HA) and its cell surface receptor sialic acid (SA) to identify a B cell receptor (BCR) activation modality that proceeded through non-cognate interactions with antigen. Using a new approach to reconstitute antigen-receptor interactions in a human reporter B cell line, we found that sequence-defined BCRs from the human germline repertoire could be triggered by both complementarity to influenza HA and a separate mode of signaling that relied on multivalent ligation of BCR sialyl-oligosaccharide. The latter suggested a new mechanism for priming naïve B cell responses and manifested as the induction of SA-dependent pan-activation by peripheral blood B cells. BCR crosslinking in the absence of complementarity is a superantigen effect induced by some microbial products to subvert production of antigen-specific immune responses. B cell superantigen activity through affinity for BCR carbohydrate is discussed. PMID:27796362

  6. A platform to screen for C-type lectin receptor-binding carbohydrates and their potential for cell-specific targeting and immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Maglinao, Maha; Eriksson, Magdalena; Schlegel, Mark K; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Johannssen, Timo; Götze, Sebastian; Seeberger, Peter H; Lepenies, Bernd

    2014-02-10

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in innate immunity represent a superfamily of pattern recognition receptors that recognize carbohydrate structures on pathogens and self-antigens. The primary interaction of an antigen-presenting cell and a pathogen shapes the following immune response. Therefore, the identification of CLR ligands that can either enhance or modulate the immune response is of interest. We have developed a screening platform based on glycan arrays to identify immune modulatory carbohydrate ligands of CLRs. A comprehensive library of CLRs was expressed by fusing the extracellular part of each respective CLR, the part containing the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 molecules. CLR-Fc fusion proteins display the CRD in a dimeric form, are properly glycosylated, and can be detected by a secondary antibody with a conjugated fluorophore. Thus, they are valuable tools for high-throughput screening. We were able to identify novel carbohydrate binders of CLRs using the glycan array technology. These CLR-binding carbohydrates were then covalently attached to the model antigen ovalbumin. The ovalbumin neoglycoconjugates were used in a dendritic cell/T cell co-culture assay to stimulate transgenic T cells in vitro. In addition, mice were immunized with these conjugates to analyze the immune modulatory properties of the CLR ligands in vivo. The CLR ligands induced an increased Th1 cytokine production in vitro and modulated the humoral response in vivo. The platform described here allows for the identification of CLR ligands, as well as the evaluation of each ligand's cell-specific targeting and immune modulatory properties.

  7. A surface antigen influenza vaccine. 2. Pyrogenicity and antigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, M. I.; Furminger, I. G.

    1976-01-01

    Conventional influenza vaccine containing whole virus particles purified on a zonal centrifuge is pyrogenic and can cause systemic and local adverse side effects. An improved vaccine was therefore prepared which contained only the surface antigens of the virus adsorbed to aluminium hydroxide. The antigenicity of this vaccine was compared with conventional vaccine in chickens. Both vaccines induced similar titres of serum haemagglutination-inhibition and neuraminidase inhibition antibody. The dose response curves, however, were different. The surface antigens at vaccine strength without aluminium hydroxide were of negligible pyrogenicity in rabbits. PMID:1068196

  8. Swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) diversity in Sinclair and Hanford swine.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chak-Sum; Martens, Gregory W; Amoss, Max S; Gomez-Raya, Luis; Beattie, Craig W; Smith, Douglas M

    2010-03-01

    The swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) haplotype B is associated with increased penetrance of the tumor traits in Sinclair swine cutaneous melanoma (SSCM). We established a series of SinclairxHanford swine crosses to facilitate genetic mapping of the tumor-associated loci. In this study, the SLA diversity in the founding animals was characterized for effective selection of maximum tumor penetrance in the pedigrees. Using the sequence-based typing (SBT) method we identified a total of 29 alleles at five polymorphic SLA loci (SLA-1, SLA-3, SLA-2, DRB1 and DQB1) representing six class I and five class II haplotypes. We subsequently developed a rapid PCR-based typing assay using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) to efficiently follow the SLA types of the crossbred progeny. In a total of 469 animals we identified three crossovers within the class I region and three between the class I and class II regions, which corresponded to recombination frequencies of 0.39% and 0.56%, respectively. We also confirmed the presence of two expressed SLA-1 loci in three of the class I haplotypes and were able to determine the relative chromosomal arrangement of the duplicated loci in two haplotypes. This study furthers our understanding of the allelic architecture and polymorphism of the SLA system and will facilitate the mapping of loci associated with the expression of SSCM.

  9. Novel mouse model for carcinoembryonic antigen-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Carlos H F; Stanners, Clifford P

    2004-06-01

    Many novel cancer therapies, including immunotherapy and gene therapy, are specifically targeted to tumor-associated molecules, among which carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) represents a popular example. Discrepancies between preclinical experimental data in animal models and clinical outcome in terms of therapeutic response and toxicity, however, often arise. Preclinical testing can be compromised by the lack of CEA and other closely related human CEA family members in rodents, which lack analogous genes for most human CEA family members. Here, we report the construction of a transgenic mouse with a 187-kb human bacterial artificial chromosome (CEABAC) that contains part of the human CEA family gene cluster including complete human CEA (CEACAM5), CEACAM3, CEACAM6, and CEACAM7 genes. The spatiotemporal expression pattern of these genes in the CEABAC mice was found to be remarkably similar to that of humans. This novel mouse will ensure better assessment than previously utilized models for the preclinical testing of CEA-targeted therapies and perhaps allow the testing of CEACAM6, which is overexpressed in many solid tumors and leukemias, as a therapeutic target. Moreover, expression of CEA family genes in gastrointestinal, breast, hematopoietic, urogenital, and respiratory systems could facilitate other clinical applications, such as the development of therapeutic agents against Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections, which use CEA family members as major receptors. PMID:15194045

  10. Immunological features of idiopathic Addison's disease: characterization of the adrenocortical antigens

    PubMed Central

    Goudie, R. B.; McDonald, E.; Anderson, J. R.; Gray, Kathleen

    1968-01-01

    The antibodies in the sera of two patients with idiopathic Addison's disease, one reacting specifically with adrenocortical cells, the other with the various cell types which produce steroid hormones, have been found to be predominently IgG. The behaviour of the two antibodies in complement-fixation tests is in agreement with their reactivity, reported in the previous paper, in immunofluorescence tests. Cell fractionation studies suggest that both adrenal antigens are associated with the microsomal fraction. The biochemical properties of the antigens are consistent with the view that they are lipoproteins, possibly with associated carbohydrate. While the properties of the adrenal antigens are generally similar to those of the thyroid and gastric parietal cell organ-specific autoantigens, they differ from these, and from each other, in their susceptibility to destruction by certain enzymes and chemical treatments. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3 PMID:4171048

  11. [Antigenic response against PPD and antigen 60 in tubercular patients: single antigen versus the combined test].

    PubMed

    Máttar, S; Broquetas, J M; Gea, J; Aran, X; el-Banna, N; Sauleda, J; Torres, J M

    1992-05-01

    We analyze serum samples from 70 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 50 healthy individuals. The antigenic activity (IgG) against protein purified antigen (PPD) and antigen 60 (A60) from M. tuberculosis. Thirteen patients were also HIV infected, and three patients had AIDS defined by the presence of disseminated tuberculosis. The test using antigen alone showed a 77% sensitivity and 74% specificity when PPD is used. When A60 was used, both values improved (81% sensitivity, 94% specificity). The use of a combined test (PPD and A60) improves the sensitivity (89%) but reduces the specificity (82%). The HIV infected patients showed similar responses to those of other patients. The combined use of different antigens might be useful for diagnosing tuberculosis. PMID:1390996

  12. Carbohydrate modified ultrafine ceramic nanoparticles for allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ravi Shankar; Sahu, Satish; Sudheesh, M S; Madan, Jitender; Kumar, Manoj; Dixit, Vinod Kumar

    2011-08-01

    The uses of drug-delivery systems in allergen specific immunotherapy appear to be a promising approach due to their ability to act as adjuvants, transport the allergens to immune-competent cells and tissues and reduce the number of administrations. The aim of this work was to evaluate the carbohydrate modified ultrafine ceramic core based nanoparticles (aquasomes) as adjuvant/delivery vehicle in specific immunotherapy using ovalbumin (OVA) as an allergen model. Prepared nanoparticles were characterized for size, shape, zeta potential, antigen integrity, surface adsorption efficiency and in vitro release. The humoral and cellular-induced immune responses generated by OVA adsorbed aquasomes were studied by two intradermal immunizations in BALB/c mice. OVA sensitized mice were treated with OVA adsorbed aquasomes and OVA adsorbed aluminum hydroxide following established protocol. Fifteen days after therapy, animals were challenged with OVA and different signs of anaphylactic shock were evaluated. Developed aquasomes possessed a negative zeta potential (-11.3 mV) and an average size of 47 nm with OVA adsorption efficiency of ~60.2 μg mg(-1) of hydroxyapatite core. In vivo immune response after two intradermal injections with OVA adsorbed aquasomes resulted in a mixed Th1/Th2-type immune response. OVA-sensitized mice model, treatment with OVA adsorbed aquasomes elicited lower levels of IgE (p<0.05), serum histamine and higher survival rate in comparison with alum adsorbed OVA. Symptoms of anaphylactic shock in OVA aquasome-treated mice were weaker than the one induced in the alum adsorbed OVA group. Results from this study demonstrate the valuable use of aquasomes in allergen immunotherapy. PMID:21333772

  13. Serospecific antigens of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Otten, S; Iyer, S; Johnson, W; Montgomery, R

    1986-01-01

    Serospecific antigens isolated by EDTA extraction from four serogroups of Legionella pneumophila were analyzed for their chemical composition, molecular heterogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunological properties. The antigens were shown to be lipopolysaccharides and to differ from the lipopolysaccharides of other gram-negative bacteria. The serospecific antigens contained rhamnose, mannose, glucosamine, and two unidentified sugars together with 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, phosphate, and fatty acids. The fatty acid composition was predominantly branched-chain acids with smaller amounts of 3-hydroxymyristic acid. The antigens contain periodate-sensitive groups; mannosyl residues were completely cleaved by periodate oxidation. Hydrolysis of the total lipopolysaccharide by acetic acid resulted in the separation of a lipid A-like material that cross-reacted with the antiserum to lipid A from Salmonella minnesota but did not comigrate with it on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. None of the four antigens contained heptose. All of the antigen preparations showed endotoxicity when tested by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. The results of this study indicate that the serogroup-specific antigens of L. pneumophila are lipopolysaccharides containing an unusual lipid A and core structure and different from those of other gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:3017918

  14. Carbohydrate Recognition Properties of Human Ficolins

    PubMed Central

    Gout, Evelyne; Garlatti, Virginie; Smith, David F.; Lacroix, Monique; Dumestre-Pérard, Chantal; Lunardi, Thomas; Martin, Lydie; Cesbron, Jean-Yves; Arlaud, Gérard J.; Gaboriaud, Christine; Thielens, Nicole M.

    2010-01-01

    Ficolins are oligomeric innate immune recognition proteins consisting of a collagen-like region and a fibrinogen-like recognition domain that bind to pathogen- and apoptotic cell-associated molecular patterns. To investigate their carbohydrate binding specificities, serum-derived L-ficolin and recombinant H- and M-ficolins were fluorescently labeled, and their carbohydrate binding ability was analyzed by glycan array screening. L-ficolin preferentially recognized disulfated N-acetyllactosamine and tri- and tetrasaccharides containing terminal galactose or N-acetylglucosamine. Binding was sensitive to the position and orientation of the bond between N-acetyllactosamine and the adjacent carbohydrate. No significant binding of H-ficolin to any of the 377 glycans probed could be detected, providing further evidence for its poor lectin activity. M-ficolin bound preferentially to 9-O-acetylated 2-6-linked sialic acid derivatives and to various glycans containing sialic acid engaged in a 2-3 linkage. To further investigate the structural basis of sialic acid recognition by M-ficolin, point mutants were produced in which three residues of the fibrinogen domain were replaced by their counterparts in L-ficolin. Mutations G221F and A256V inhibited binding to the 9-O-acetylated sialic acid derivatives, whereas Y271F abolished interaction with all sialic acid-containing glycans. The crystal structure of the Y271F mutant fibrinogen domain was solved, showing that the mutation does not alter the structure of the ligand binding pocket. These analyses reveal novel ficolin ligands such as sulfated N-acetyllactosamine (L-ficolin) and gangliosides (M-ficolin) and provide precise insights into the sialic acid binding specificity of M-ficolin, emphasizing the essential role of Tyr271 in this respect. PMID:20032467

  15. Radiofluorinated carbohydrates for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Mun, Jiyoung

    2013-01-01

    2-Deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose (2-(18)FDG) has represented radiofluorinated carbohydrates as the most successful tracer for positron emission tomography (PET). 2-(18)FDG uptake depends on glucose metabolism, which is related to a disease progression. 2-(18)FDG has been widely used in oncology, neurology, cardiology, infectious diseases, and inflammation, to complement anatomical modalities such as CT and MRI. Followed by the success of 2-(18)FDG, various radiofluorinated carbohydrates have been evaluated as PET tracers, which include analogs of D-ribose, D-mannose, D-galactose, D-talose, D-fructose, D-allose, lactose, L-fucose, N-acetylneuraminic acid, and L-ascorbic acid. Among those radiofluorinated carbohydrates, several have implied potential for further development. 2-Deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-galactose has been developed to assess liver function and diagnose hepatic carcinoma. 6-Deoxy-6-[(18)F]fluoro-D-fructose showed promising characteristics for diagnosis of breast cancer. Three radiofluorinated analogs of lactose have been designed as the substrates of the overexpressed hepatocarcinoma-intestine-pancreas/pancreatitis-associated protein in peritumoral pancreatic tissue for early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. The metabolism of 6-[(18)F]fluoro-L-fucose suggested that it is a bioactive analog of L-fucose in the synthesis of glycoconjugate macromolecules. 6-Deoxy-6-[(18)F]fluoro-L-ascorbic acid was evaluated to assess antioxidant function of L-ascorbic acid in rodent models of transient global ischemia and glutathione deficiency.

  16. Antigen Retrieval Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shan-Rong; Shi, Yan; Taylor, Clive R.

    2011-01-01

    As a review for the 20th anniversary of publishing the antigen retrieval (AR) technique in this journal, the authors intend briefly to summarize developments in AR-immunohistochemistry (IHC)–based research and diagnostics, with particular emphasis on current challenges and future research directions. Over the past 20 years, the efforts of many different investigators have coalesced in extending the AR approach to all areas of anatomic pathology diagnosis and research and further have led to AR-based protein extraction techniques and tissue-based proteomics. As a result, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archival tissue collections are now seen as a literal treasure of materials for clinical and translational research to an extent unimaginable just two decades ago. Further research in AR-IHC is likely to focus on tissue proteomics, developing a more efficient protocol for protein extraction from FFPE tissue based on the AR principle, and combining the proteomics approach with AR-IHC to establish a practical, sophisticated platform for identifying and using biomarkers in personalized medicine. PMID:21339172

  17. Light period regulation of carbohydrate partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janes, Harry W.

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that the photosynthetic period is important in regulating carbon partitioning. Even when the same amount of carbon is fixed over a 24h period considerably more is translocated out of the leaf under the longer photosynthetic period. This is extremely important when parts of the plant other than the leaves are to be sold. It is also important to notice the amount of carbon respired in the short photosynthetic period. The light period effect on carbohydrate fixation, dark respiration, and translocation is shown in this report.

  18. Carbohydrates/nucleosides/RNA-DNA-ligand interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaptein, R.; McConnell, B.; Serianni, A.S.; Silks, L.A. III

    1994-12-01

    Carbohydrate and nucleotide structural determination using modern spectroscopic techniques is dependent on our ability to label oligonucleotides and oligosaccharides with stable isotopes. Uniform Carbon 13 and Nitrogen 15 labeling of oligonucleotides is important to present-day efforts, which are focused on determining the structure of relatively small oligosaccharides and oligonucleotides, which form the elements of larger structures. Because of the relatively recent interest in three-dimensional structure, the development of techniques used to label them has lagged behind parallel techniques used to label peptides and proteins. Therefore, this group`s discussion focused primarily on problems faced today in obtaining oligonucleotides labeled uniformly with carbon 13 and nitrogen 15.

  19. Multimodal CARS microscopy of structured carbohydrate biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Slepkov, Aaron D.; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pegoraro, Adrian F.; Moffatt, Douglas J.; Stolow, Albert

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy for the study of structured condensed carbohydrate systems. Simultaneous second-harmonic generation (SHG) and spectrally-scanned CARS microscopy was used to elucidate structure, alignment, and density in cellulose cotton fibers and in starch grains undergoing rapid heat-moisture swelling. Our results suggest that CARS response of the O-H stretch region (3000 cm−1–3400 cm−1), together with the commonly-measured C-H stretch (2750 cm−1–2970 cm−1) and SHG provide potentially important structural information and contrast in these materials. PMID:21258555

  20. Carbohydrate nanotechnology: hierarchical assembly using nature's other information carrying biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Zheng, Yeting; Munro, Catherine J; Ji, Yiwen; Braunschweig, Adam B

    2015-08-01

    Despite their central role in directing some of the most complex biological processes, carbohydrates--nature's other information carrying biopolymer--have been largely ignored as building blocks for synthetic hierarchical assemblies. The non-stoichiometric binding and astronomical diversity characteristic of carbohydrates could lead to tantalizingly complex assembly algorithms, but these attributes simultaneously increase the difficulty of preparing carbohydrate assemblies and anticipating their behavior. Convergences in biotechnology, nanotechnology, polymer chemistry, surface science, and supramolecular chemistry have led to many recent important breakthroughs in glycan microarrays and synthetic carbohydrate receptors, where the idiosyncrasies of carbohydrate structure and binding are increasingly considered. We hope to inspire more researchers to consider carbohydrate structure, diversity, and binding as attractive tools for constructing synthetic hierarchical assemblies.