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Sample records for antigens tumor-associated carbohydrate

  1. Cancer vaccine with mimotopes of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens.

    PubMed

    Kozbor, Danuta

    2010-03-01

    The GD2 ganglioside, displayed by five carbohydrate Neu5Acalpha2-8Neu5Acalpha2-3(GalNAcbeta1-4)Galbeta1-4Glcbeta residues attached to a ceramide chain that anchors the ganglioside in the cell membrane, is expressed on neuroectodermally derived tumors. GD2 has been used as a target for passive and active immunotherapy in patients with malignant melanoma and neuroblastoma. We have generated 47-LDA mimotope of GD2 by screening a phage display peptide library with anti-GD2 mAb 14G2a and reported that vaccination with the 47-LDA mimotope elicited GD2 cross-reactive IgG antibody responses as well as MHC class I-restricted CD8(+) T cells to syngeneic neuroblastoma tumor cells. The cytotoxic activity of the vaccine-induced CTLs was independent of GD2 expression, suggesting recognition of a novel tumor-associated antigen cross-reacting with 47-LDA. Immunoblotting studies using 14G2a mAb demonstrated that this antibody cross-reacts with a 105 kDa glycoprotein expressed by GD2(+) and GD2(-) neuroblastoma and melanoma cells. Functional studies of tumor cells grown in three-dimensional (3D) collagen cultures with 14G2a mAb showed decreases in matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation, a process regulated by 105 kDa activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecules (ALCAM/CD166). The CD166 glycoprotein was shown to be recognized by 14G2a antibody, and inhibition of CD166 expression by RNA interference ablated the cell sensitivity to lysis by 47-LDA-induced CD8(+) T cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that the vaccine-induced CTLs recognize a 47-LDA cross-reactive epitope expressed by CD166 and reveal a novel mechanism of induction of potent tumor-specific cellular responses by mimotopes of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens.

  2. Recent Advance in Tumor-associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs)-based Antitumor Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Feng, Danyang; Shaikh, Abdul Sami; Wang, Fengshan

    2016-04-15

    Cancer cells can be distinguished from normal cells by displaying aberrant levels and types of carbohydrate structures on their surfaces. These carbohydrate structures are known as tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs). TACAs were considered as promising targets for the design of anticancer vaccines. Unfortunately, carbohydrates alone can only evoke poor immunogenicity because they are unable to induce T-cell-dependent immune responses, which is critical for cancer therapy. Moreover, immunotolerance and immunosuppression are easily induced by using natural occurring TACAs as antigens due to their endogenous property. This review summarizes the recent strategies to overcome these obstacles: (1) covalently coupling TACAs to proper carriers to improve immunogenicity, including clustered or multivalent conjugate vaccines, (2) coupling TACAs to T-cell peptide epitopes or the built-in adjuvant to form multicomponent glycoconjugate vaccines, and (3) developing vaccines based on chemically modified TACAs, which is combined with metabolic engineering of cancer cells.

  3. Tobacco Mosaic Virus as a New Carrier for Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhaojun; Nguyen, Huong Giang; Chowdhury, Sudipa; Bentley, Philip; Bruckman, Michael A.; Miermont, Adeline; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) are being actively studied as targets for anti-tumor vaccine development. One serious challenge was the low immunogenecity of these antigens. Herein, we report the results on using the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) capsid as a promising carrier of a weakly immunogenic TACA, the monomeric Tn antigen. The copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction was highly efficient in covalently linking Tn onto the TMV capsid without resorting to a large excess of the Tn antigen. The location of Tn attachment turned out to be important. Tn introduced at the N terminus of TMV was immunosilent, while that attached to tyrosine 139 elicited strong immune responses. Both Tn specific IgG and IgM antibodies were generated as determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and a glycan microarray screening study. The production of high titers of IgG antibodies suggested that the TMV platform contained the requisite epitopes for helper T cells and was able to induce antibody isotype switching. The antibodies exhibited strong reactivities towards Tn antigen displayed in its native environment, i.e., cancer cell surface, thus highlighting the potential of TMV as a promising TACA carrier. PMID:22812480

  4. Tobacco mosaic virus as a new carrier for tumor associated carbohydrate antigens.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhaojun; Nguyen, Huong Giang; Chowdhury, Sudipa; Bentley, Philip; Bruckman, Michael A; Miermont, Adeline; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Wang, Qian; Huang, Xuefei

    2012-08-15

    Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) are being actively studied as targets for antitumor vaccine development. One serious challenge was the low immunogenecity of these antigens. Herein, we report the results of using the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) capsid as a promising carrier of a weakly immunogenic TACA, the monomeric Tn antigen. The copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction was highly efficient in covalently linking Tn onto the TMV capsid without resorting to a large excess of the Tn antigen. The location of Tn attachment turned out to be important. Tn introduced at the N terminus of TMV was immunosilent, while that attached to tyrosine 139 elicited strong immune responses. Both Tn specific IgG and IgM antibodies were generated as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a glycan microarray screening study. The production of high titers of IgG antibodies suggested that the TMV platform contained the requisite epitopes for helper T cells and was able to induce antibody isotype switching. The antibodies exhibited strong reactivities toward Tn antigen displayed in its native environment, i.e., cancer cell surface, thus highlighting the potential of TMV as a promising TACA carrier.

  5. Biosignals modulated by tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens: novel targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Koichi; Hamamura, Kazunori; Aixinjueluo, Wei; Furukawa, Keiko

    2006-11-01

    Based on the remodeling of glycosphingolipids on the human tumor cell lines with manipulation of glycosyltransferase genes, roles of sugar moieties in tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens have been analyzed. Two main topics, that is, the roles of ganglioside GD3 in human malignant melanomas and those of GD2 in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were reported. GD3 enhances tyrosine phosphorylation of two adaptor molecules, p130Cas and paxillin, resulting in the increased cell growth and invasion in melanoma cells. GD2 also enhances the proliferation and invasion of SCLC cells. GD2 also mediates apoptosis with anti-GD2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) via dephosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase. These approaches have promoted further understanding of mechanisms by which gangliosides modulate malignant properties of human cancer, and the results obtained here propose novel targets for cancer therapy.

  6. Immune activation with peptide assemblies carrying Lewis y tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yuji; Watabe, Naoki; Obata, Hiroaki; Hara, Eri; Ohmae, Masashi; Kimura, Shunsaku

    2017-02-01

    Molecular assemblies varying morphologies in a wide range from spherical micelle, nanosheet, curved sheet, nanotube and vesicle were prepared and loaded with Lewis y (Le(y) ) tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen on the assembly surface. The molecular assemblies were composed of poly(sarcosine)m -block-poly(L-lactic acid)30 (m = 15 or 50, Lactosome), poly(sarcosine)m -block-(D/L-Leu-Aib)n (m = 22 or 30, n = 6 or 8) and their combinations. The molecular assemblies carrying Le(y) on the surface were administered in BALB/c nu/nu mice. The major epitopes of the molecular assemblies are commonly Le(y) and poly(sarcosine). IgM productions upon administrations of the molecular assemblies were assayed by ELISA, showing that anti-poly(sarcosine) IgM was highly produced by Lactosome of spherical micelle but with a negligible amount of anti-Le(y) IgM. On the other hand, the nanosheet of the interdigitated monolayer triggered the production of anti-Le(y) IgM but with less anti-poly(sarcosine) IgM production. Taken together, IgM specificity differs according to the molecular environment of the epitopes in the molecular assemblies. The antigenicity of poly(sarcosine) was augmented in polymeric micelle providing loose environment for B cells to penetrate in, whereas a high density of Le(y) on the molecular assembly was required for anti-Le(y) IgM production. The antigenicity of Le(y) is therefore dependent on the molecular assemblies on which Le(y) is displayed on the surface. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Aberrant expression of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen Globo H in thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shih-Ping; Yang, Po-Sheng; Chien, Ming-Nan; Chen, Ming-Jen; Lee, Jie-Jen; Liu, Chien-Liang

    2016-12-01

    The induction of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen results from altered glycosylation in transformed cells. Globo H is a hexasaccharide glycosphingolipid overexpressed on malignancies of epithelial origin and has become an attractive vaccine target. We aimed to investigate the expression patterns and prognostic value of Globo H in thyroid neoplasms. Globo H expression was examined by immunohistochemical analysis using commercial and in-house tissue microarrays. The expression was correlated with clinicopathologic characteristics in papillary thyroid cancer. Normal or benign thyroid lesions were negative for Globo H expression. Globo H was positive in 33% medullary, 24% papillary, 11% undifferentiated, and 8% follicular thyroid cancer. Globo H expression in papillary thyroid cancer was associated with extrathyroidal invasion (P = 0.017), BRAF mutation (P = 0.010), AMES high risk (P = 0.045), and increased ATA risk of recurrence (P = 0.022). Globo H is specifically expressed in a subset of thyroid malignancies. In papillary thyroid cancer, Globo H expression is associated with invasiveness and BRAF mutation. Immunotherapy targeting Globo H may have potential applications in thyroid cancer. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:853-858. © 2016 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The cytokine-cosmc signaling axis upregulates the tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen Tn

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Hsiao-Ling; Chin, Yu-Tang; Huang, Rui-Lan; Lai, Hung-Cheng; Hsu, Yaw-Wen; Kuo, Po-Jan; Chen, Chiao-En; Lin, Hung-Yun; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Nieh, Shin; Fu, Earl; Liu, Leroy F.; Hwang, Jaulang

    2016-01-01

    Tn antigen (GalNAc-α-O-Ser/Thr), a mucin-type O-linked glycan, is a well-established cell surface marker for tumors and its elevated levels have been correlated with cancer progression and prognosis. There are also reports that Tn is elevated in inflammatory tissues. However, the molecular mechanism for its elevated levels in cancer and inflammation is unclear. In the current studies, we have explored the possibility that cytokines may be one of the common regulatory molecules for elevated Tn levels in both cancer and inflammation. We showed that the Tn level is elevated by the conditioned media of HrasG12V-transformed-BEAS-2B cells. Similarly, the conditioned media obtained from LPS-stimulated monocytes also elevated Tn levels in primary human gingival fibroblasts, suggesting the involvement of cytokines and/or other soluble factors. Indeed, purified inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6 up-regulated Tn levels in gingival fibroblasts. Furthermore, TNF-α was shown to down-regulate the COSMC gene as evidenced by reduced levels of the COSMC mRNA and protein, as well as hypermethylation of the CpG islands of the COSMC gene promoter. Since Cosmc, a chaperone for T-synthase, is known to negatively regulate Tn levels, our results suggest elevated Tn levels in cancer and inflammation may be commonly regulated by the cytokine-Cosmc signaling axis. PMID:27542280

  9. Synthesis of a Monophosphoryl Derivative of Escherichia coli Lipid A and Its Efficient Coupling to a Tumor-Associated Carbohydrate Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shouchu; Wang, Qianli

    2010-01-01

    Monophosphoryl lipid A is a safe and potent immunostimulant and vaccine adjuvant, which is potentially useful for the development of effective carbohydrate-based conjugate vaccines. This paper presented a convergent and efficient synthesis of a monophosphoryl derivative of E. coli lipid A having an alkyne functionality at the reducing end, which is suitable for the coupling with various molecules. The coupling of this derivative to an N-modified analog of tumor-associated antigen GM3 by click chemistry is also presented. PMID:19943286

  10. Integrating ReSET with glycosyl iodide glycosylation in step-economy syntheses of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens and immunogenic glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hsiao-Wu; Schombs, Matthew W; Gervay-Hague, Jacquelyn

    2014-02-21

    Carbohydrates mediate a wide range of biological processes, and understanding these events and how they might be influenced is a complex undertaking that requires access to pure glycoconjugates. The isolation of sufficient quantities of carbohydrates and glycolipids from biological samples remains a significant challenge that has redirected efforts toward chemical synthesis. However, progress toward complex glycoconjugate total synthesis has been slowed by the need for multiple protection and deprotection steps owing to the large number of similarly reactive hydroxyls in carbohydrates. Two methodologies, regioselective silyl exchange technology (ReSET) and glycosyl iodide glycosylation have now been integrated to streamline the synthesis of the globo series trisaccharides (globotriaose and isoglobotriaose) and α-lactosylceramide (α-LacCer). These glycoconjugates include tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) and immunostimulatory glycolipids that hold promise as immunotherapeutics. Beyond the utility of the step-economy syntheses afforded by this synthetic platform, the studies also reveal a unique electronic interplay between acetate and silyl ether protecting groups. Incorporation of acetates proximal to silyl ethers attenuates their reactivity while reducing undesirable side reactions. This phenomenon can be used to fine-tune the reactivity of silylated/acetylated sugar building blocks.

  11. Boosting immunity to small tumor-associated carbohydrates with bacteriophage qβ capsids.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhaojun; Comellas-Aragones, Marta; Chowdhury, Sudipa; Bentley, Philip; Kaczanowska, Katarzyna; Benmohamed, Lbachir; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Finn, M G; Huang, Xuefei

    2013-01-01

    The development of an effective immunotherapy is an attractive strategy toward cancer treatment. Tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) are overexpressed on a variety of cancer cell surfaces, which present tempting targets for anticancer vaccine development. However, such carbohydrates are often poorly immunogenic. To overcome this challenge, we show here that the display of a very weak TACA, the monomeric Tn antigen, on bacteriophage Qβ virus-like particles elicits powerful humoral responses to the carbohydrate. The effects of adjuvants, antigen display pattern, and vaccine dose on the strength and subclasses of antibody responses were established. The local density of antigen rather than the total amount of antigen administered was found to be crucial for induction of high Tn-specific IgG titers. The ability to display antigens in an organized and high density manner is a key advantage of virus-like particles such as Qβ as vaccine carriers. Glycan microarray analysis showed that the antibodies generated were highly selective toward Tn antigens. Furthermore, Qβ elicited much higher levels of IgG antibodies than other types of virus-like particles, and the IgG antibodies produced reacted strongly with the native Tn antigens on human leukemia cells. Thus, Qβ presents a highly attractive platform for the development of carbohydrate-based anticancer vaccines.

  12. 75 FR 16490 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of PANVAC and Tumor Associated Antigens as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... PANVAC and Tumor Associated Antigens as Cancer Vaccines AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public.... Licensing and Patenting Associate, Cancer Branch, Office of Technology Transfer, National Institutes of... technology, TRICOM, in conjunction with tumor associated antigens (TAAs). The TRICOM technology...

  13. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Tumor Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6010 Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. (a) Identification....

  14. Structure-based peptide mimicry of tumor-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Ohtaki, Akashi; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas; Murali, Ramachandran

    2013-02-01

    Two major obstacles in developing cancer vaccines are identifying unique tumor-associated antigens (TAA) and overcoming the lack of structural information about TAAs. Unlike progress with T cell-based vaccines, B cell vaccines are less well developed due to discontinuous or spatially disposed B cell epitopes. Synthetic peptides that emulate B cell epitopes are nevertheless proposed to induce immune responses to TAA. Currently, such antigen-mimicking peptides are identified using informatics approaches, by screening of random peptide libraries against an isolating antibody without any regard to structural principles and by rationale design methodologies. In our own studies we have developed various peptide mimics of TAAs based on combining the structural analysis of antibody-antigen complexes with the peptide library screening process. Understanding the structural context of antigen mimicry is key, as our studies show that mimicry depends on the structural and conformational features of the combining region of antibody-antigen surface amino acids. The ability of a mimic to contact the same set of amino acids found on a template antibody dictates whether or not it is a functional antigenic mimic capable of inducing TAA cross-reactive antibodies. Presented here is an overview of our current rationale and status of structure-based tumor antigenic mimics relevant for breast cancer TAAs.

  15. Maximizing Immune Response to Carbohydrate Antigens on Breast Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    antigens expressed on breast tumors. Towards this end we are developing peptide mimotopes of tumor associated carbohydrate antigens as they are T cell...dependent antigens. In our progress to date we have shown the 1) immunization with peptide mimotope activates a specific cellular response to a model murine...tumor cell line; 2) vaccination of mice with peptide eradicates established tumor; 3) Immunization with DNA format of the peptide suppresses tumor

  16. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. 866.6010 Section 866.6010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... immunological Test Systems § 866.6010 Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. (a) Identification....

  17. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. 866.6010 Section 866.6010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... immunological Test Systems § 866.6010 Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. (a) Identification....

  18. Proteome Serological Determination of Tumor-Associated Antigens in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Forgber, Michael; Trefzer, Uwe; Sterry, Wolfram; Walden, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Proteome serology may complement expression library-based approaches as strategy utilizing the patients' immune responses for the identification pathogenesis factors and potential targets for therapy and markers for diagnosis. Melanoma is a relatively immunogenic tumor and antigens recognized by melanoma-specific T cells have been extensively studied. The specificities of antibody responses to this malignancy have been analyzed to some extent by molecular genetic but not proteomics approaches. We screened sera of 94 melanoma patients for anti-melanoma reactivity and detected seropositivity in two-thirds of the patients with 2–6 antigens per case detected by 1D and an average of 2.3 per case by 2D Western blot analysis. For identification, antigen spots in Western blots were aligned with proteins in 2-DE and analyzed by mass spectrometry. 18 antigens were identified, 17 of which for the first time for melanoma. One of these antigens, galectin-3, has been related to various oncogenic processes including metastasis formation and invasiveness. Similarly, enolase has been found deregulated in different cancers. With at least 2 of 18 identified proteins implicated in oncogenic processes, the work confirms the potential of proteome-based antigen discovery to identify pathologically relevant proteins. PMID:19381273

  19. Natural and adaptive IgM antibodies in the recognition of tumor-associated antigens of breast cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    DÍAZ-ZARAGOZA, MARIANA; HERNÁNDEZ-ÁVILA, RICARDO; VIEDMA-RODRÍGUEZ, RUBÍ; ARENAS-ARANDA, DIEGO; OSTOA-SALOMA, PEDRO

    2015-01-01

    For early detection of cancer, education and screening are important, but the most critical factor is the development of early diagnostic tools. Methods that recognize the warning signs of cancer and take prompt action lead to an early diagnosis; simple tests can identify individuals in a healthy population who have the disease but have not developed symptoms. Early detection of cancer is significant and is one of the most promising approaches by which to reduce the growing cancer burden and guide curative treatment. The early diagnosis of patients with breast cancer is challenging, since it is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Despite the advent of mammography in screening for breast cancer, low-resource, low-cost alternative tools must be implemented to complement mammography findings. IgM is part of the first line of defense of an organism and is responsible for recognizing and eliminating infectious particles and removing transformed cells. Most studies on breast cancer have focused on the development of IgG-like molecules as biomarkers or as a treatment for the advanced stages of cancer, but autoantibodies (IgM) and tumor-associated antigens (proteins or carbohydrates with aberrant structures) have not been examined as early diagnostic tools for breast cancer. The present review summarizes the function of natural and adaptive IgM in eliminating cancer cells in the early stages of pathology and their value as early diagnostic tools. IgM, as a component of the immune system, is being used to identify tumor-associated antigens and tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens. PMID:26133558

  20. Targeting carbohydrate antigens in HIV vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Pashov, Anastas; Canziani, Gabriela; Macleod, Stewart; Plaxco, Jason; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2005-03-18

    Peptide mimotopes provide a strategy to augment human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) specific carbohydrate reactive immune responses. Their antigenic and immunological properties will depend on the optimization of motif clustering and multimerization. We observe that structural variants of the same mimetic motif, linear versus cyclic, can be used to tune the properties of the antibodies elicited. The expansion of the database of mimotope sequence motifs can be increased by analyzing structures that bind to HIV directed monoclonal antibody 2G12 and the lectin Concanavalin A (Con A), fostering new mimotope designs. Such analysis indicates that these reagents bind to subsets of mannosyl antigens on the envelope (env) protein.

  1. 78 FR 11895 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of MUC-1 Tumor Associated Antigens as Cancer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ...-1 Tumor Associated Antigens as Cancer Vaccines for Bladder Cancer, Breast Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Gastric Cancer, Kidney Cancer, Liver Cancer, Lung Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Prostate Cancer and Pancreatic... Rights for development of Pox-virus based vaccines for bladder cancer, breast cancer,......

  2. Molecular characterization of a fully human chimeric T-cell antigen receptor for tumor-associated antigen EpCAM.

    PubMed

    Shirasu, Naoto; Yamada, Hiromi; Shibaguchi, Hirotomo; Kuroki, Motomu; Kuroki, Masahide

    2012-01-01

    The transduction of T cells to express chimeric T-cell antigen receptor (CAR) is an attractive strategy for adaptive immunotherapy for cancer, because the CAR can redirect the recognition specificity of T cells to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) on the surface of target cells, thereby avoiding the limitations of HLA restriction. However, there are considerable problems with the clinical application of CAR, mostly due to its xenogeneic components, which could be immunogenic in humans. Moreover, while extensive studies on the CARs have been performed, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of CAR-grafted T cells remain unclear. In order to eliminate potential immunogenicity and investigate the molecular basis of the CAR-mediated T-cell activation, we constructed a novel CAR (CAR57-28ζ) specific for one of the most important TAAs, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), using only human-derived genes. We revealed that in Jurkat T cells, lentivirally expressed CAR57-28ζ can transmit the T-cell-activating signals sufficient to induce IL-2 production upon EpCAM stimulation. An immunofluorescent analysis clearly showed that the CAR57-28ζ induces the formation of signaling clusters containing endogenous CD3ζ at the CAR/EpCAM interaction interface. These results suggest that this CAR gene may be safely and effectively applied for adaptive T-cell immunotherapy.

  3. Molecular Characterization of a Fully Human Chimeric T-Cell Antigen Receptor for Tumor-Associated Antigen EpCAM

    PubMed Central

    Shirasu, Naoto; Yamada, Hiromi; Shibaguchi, Hirotomo; Kuroki, Motomu; Kuroki, Masahide

    2012-01-01

    The transduction of T cells to express chimeric T-cell antigen receptor (CAR) is an attractive strategy for adaptive immunotherapy for cancer, because the CAR can redirect the recognition specificity of T cells to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) on the surface of target cells, thereby avoiding the limitations of HLA restriction. However, there are considerable problems with the clinical application of CAR, mostly due to its xenogeneic components, which could be immunogenic in humans. Moreover, while extensive studies on the CARs have been performed, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of CAR-grafted T cells remain unclear. In order to eliminate potential immunogenicity and investigate the molecular basis of the CAR-mediated T-cell activation, we constructed a novel CAR (CAR57-28ζ) specific for one of the most important TAAs, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), using only human-derived genes. We revealed that in Jurkat T cells, lentivirally expressed CAR57-28ζ can transmit the T-cell-activating signals sufficient to induce IL-2 production upon EpCAM stimulation. An immunofluorescent analysis clearly showed that the CAR57-28ζ induces the formation of signaling clusters containing endogenous CD3ζ at the CAR/EpCAM interaction interface. These results suggest that this CAR gene may be safely and effectively applied for adaptive T-cell immunotherapy. PMID:22547929

  4. Monoclonal antibodies to human colorectal tumor-associated antigens: improved elicitation and subclass restriction.

    PubMed

    Morgan, A C; Woodhouse, C S; Knost, J A; Abrams, P G; Clarke, G C; Arthur, L O; McIntyre, R; Ochs, J J; Foon, K A; Oldham, R K

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to tumor-associated antigens (TAA) of human colorectal cancer were elicited using immunosorbents of lectins combined with peripheral protein extracts of xenografted colon adenocarcinoma. This method of immunization was compared with whole cells from surgical specimens and to crude membranes from xenografted tumors. The immunosorbent immunogens were superior to the other immunogens in three ways: (1) the number of hybrids reactive with colon tumor cells or extracts, but not with lymphoid cells or extracts, (2) the number of stable hybrids after cloning, and (3) the number of hybridoma clones reactive with tissue sections of colon tumors, but not normal colonic mucosa. In addition, lectin immunosorbents elicited primarily IgG antibodies, especially IgG3, with almost 50% of the clones of interest reacting to seemingly less immunogenic glycoproteins. The improved elicitation of monoclonal antibodies to TAA by the use of lectin immunosorbents and peripheral protein extracts has considerable potential for generating reagents useful in diagnosis and therapy of human tumors.

  5. A panel of autoantibodies against multiple tumor-associated antigens for detecting gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Isamu; Nagata, Matsuo; Takiguchi, Nobuhiro; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Atsushi; Yokoi, Sana; Kuwajima, Akiko; Tagawa, Masatoshi; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Satoshi, Yajima; Hideaki, Shimada

    2017-01-08

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the world, and effective diagnosis is extremely important for good outcome. We assessed the diagnostic potential of an autoantibody panel that may provide a novel tool for the early detection of gastric cancer. We analyzed data from patients with gastric cancer and normal controls in a test and validation cohorts. Autoantibody levels were measured against a panel of six tumor-associated antigens [TAAs; p53, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), HCC-22-5, peroxiredoxin VI (Prx VI), KM-HN-1, and p90 TAA (CYP2A)] via ELISA. We assessed serum autoantibodies in 100 participants in the test cohort. The validation cohort comprised 248 participants. Autoantibodies to at least one of the six antigens demonstrated a sensitivity/specificity of 49.0% [95% confidence interval (CI), 39.2-58.8%]/92.4% (95% CI, 87.2-97.6%) and 52.0% (95% CI, 42.2-61.8%)/90.5% (95% CI, 84.8-96.3%) in the test and validation cohorts, respectively. In the validation cohort, no significant differences were seen when patients were subdivided based on age, sex, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, peritoneal dissemination, and TNM stage. Patients who were positive for more than two antibodies in the panel tended to have a worse prognosis than those who were positive for one or no antibody. Measurement of autoantibody response to multiple TAAs in an optimized panel assay to discriminate patients with early stage gastric cancer from normal controls may aid in the early detection of gastric cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Maximizing Immune Response to Carbohydrate Antigens on Breast Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    means to eradicate tumor cells would therefore be an advantage in vaccine development (manuscript #2 submitted). Choice of peptide mimotope Arrays of...peptide mimotopes of carbohydrate antigens formulated as multiple antigen peptides or as DNA vaccines can elicit carbohydrate reactive IgM serum...specific CTL. Immunity 1999; 10:51-61. 1. Kieber-Emmons T, Luo P, Qiu J, et al. Vaccination with carbohydrate peptide mimotopes promotes anti-tumor

  7. Making an avipoxvirus encoding a tumor-associated antigen and a costimulatory molecule.

    PubMed

    Howley, Paul M; Diener, Kerrilyn R; Hayball, John D

    2014-01-01

    Fowlpox virus (FPV) is a double-stranded DNA virus with a history of use as a live attenuated vaccine in commercial poultry production systems. FPV is also highly amenable to genetic engineering, with a large cloning capacity and many nonessential sites available for integration, meaning that in recombinant form, several transgenes can be expressed simultaneously. Recombinant FPV has proven an effective prophylactic vaccine vector for other diseases of birds, as well as other animal species (Brun et al., Vaccine 26:6508-6528, 2008). These vectors do not integrate into the host genome nor do they undergo productive replication in mammalian cells; thus they have a proven and impeccable safety profile and have been progressed as prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine vectors for use in humans (Beukema et al., Expert Rev Vaccines 5:565-577, 2006; Lousberg et al., Expert Rev Vaccines 10:1435-1449, 2011). Furthermore, repeated immunization with FPV does not blunt subsequent vaccine responses, presumably because it is replication-defective, and thus larger doses can be routinely administered (Brun et al., Vaccine 26:6508-6528, 2008). This strengthens the case for FPV as a viable platform vaccine vector, as it means it can be used repeatedly in an individual to achieve different immunological outcomes. Here we describe in detail the construction of a recombinant variant of FPV expressing the prostate tumor-associated antigen prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) in conjunction with the immunostimulatory cytokine, interleukin-2 (IL-2), which, if undertaken under the appropriate regulatory conditions and with approvals in place, would theoretically be amenable to clinical trial applications.

  8. Detection of tumor-associated glycopeptides by lectins: the peptide context modulates carbohydrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Madariaga, David; Martínez-Sáez, Nuria; Somovilla, Víctor J; Coelho, Helena; Valero-González, Jessika; Castro-López, Jorge; Asensio, Juan L; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Busto, Jesús H; Avenoza, Alberto; Marcelo, Filipa; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón; Corzana, Francisco; Peregrina, Jesús M

    2015-03-20

    Tn antigen (α-O-GalNAc-Ser/Thr) is a convenient cancer biomarker that is recognized by antibodies and lectins. This work yields remarkable results for two plant lectins in terms of epitope recognition and reveals that these receptors show higher affinity for Tn antigen when it is incorporated in the Pro-Asp-Thr-Arg (PDTR) peptide region of mucin MUC1. In contrast, a significant affinity loss is observed when Tn antigen is located in the Ala-His-Gly-Val-Thr-Ser-Ala (AHGVTSA) or Ala-Pro-Gly-Ser-Thr-Ala-Pro (APGSTAP) fragments. Our data indicate that the charged residues, Arg and Asp, present in the PDTR sequence establish noteworthy fundamental interactions with the lectin surface as well as fix the conformation of the peptide backbone, favoring the presentation of the sugar moiety toward the lectin. These results may help to better understand glycopeptide-lectin interactions and may contribute to engineer new binding sites, allowing novel glycosensors for Tn antigen detection to be designed.

  9. Molecular cloning of cDNA for the human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 and identification of related transmembrane antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Szala, S.; Kasai, Yasushi; Steplewski, Z.; Rodeck, U.; Koprowski, H.; Linnenbach, A.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 is a monoclonal antibody-defined cell surface glycoprotein of 27-34 kDa. By using the high-efficiency COS cell expression system, a full-length cDNA clone for CO-029 was isolated. When transiently expressed in COS cells, the cDNA clone directed the synthesis of an antigen reactive to monoclonal antibody CO-029 in mixed hemadsorption and immunoblot assays. Sequence analysis revealed that CO-029 belongs to a family of cell surface antigens that includes the melanoma-associated antigen ME491, the leukocyte cell surface antigen CD37, and the Sm23 antigen of the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni. CO-029 and ME491 antigen expression and the effect of their corresponding monoclonal antibodies on cell growth were compared in human tumor cell lines of various histologic origins.

  10. Influenza virus-like particles engineered by protein transfer with tumor-associated antigens induces protective antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jaina M; Vartabedian, Vincent F; Kim, Min-Chul; He, Sara; Kang, Sang-Moo; Selvaraj, Periasamy

    2015-06-01

    Delivery of antigen in particulate form using either synthetic or natural particles induces stronger immunity than soluble forms of the antigen. Among naturally occurring particles, virus-like particles (VLPs) have been genetically engineered to express tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and have shown to induce strong TAA-specific immune responses due to their nano-particulate size and ability to bind and activate antigen-presenting cells. In this report, we demonstrate that influenza VLPs can be modified by a protein transfer technology to express TAAs for induction of effective antitumor immune responses. We converted the breast cancer HER-2 antigen to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored form and incorporated GPI-HER-2 onto VLPs by a rapid protein transfer process. Expression levels on VLPs depended on the GPI-HER-2 concentration added during protein transfer. Vaccination of mice with protein transferred GPI-HER-2-VLPs induced a strong Th1 and Th2-type anti-HER-2 antibody response and protected mice against a HER-2-expressing tumor challenge. The Soluble form of GPI-HER-2 induced only a weak Th2 response under similar conditions. These results suggest that influenza VLPs can be enriched with TAAs by protein transfer to develop effective VLP-based subunit vaccines against cancer without chemical or genetic modifications and thus preserve the immune stimulating properties of VLPs for easier production of antigen-specific therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  11. Thermodynamic Switch in Binding of Adhesion/Growth Regulatory Human Galectin-3 to Tumor-Associated TF Antigen (CD176) and MUC1 Glycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A shift to short-chain glycans is an observed change in mucin-type O-glycosylation in premalignant and malignant epithelia. Given the evidence that human galectin-3 can interact with mucins and also weakly with free tumor-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) antigen (CD176), the study of its interaction with MUC1 (glyco)peptides is of biomedical relevance. Glycosylated MUC1 fragments that carry the TF antigen attached through either Thr or Ser side chains were synthesized using standard Fmoc-based automated solid-phase peptide chemistry. The dissociation constants (Kd) for interaction of galectin-3 and the glycosylated MUC1 fragments measured by isothermal titration calorimetry decreased up to 10 times in comparison to that of the free TF disaccharide. No binding was observed for the nonglycosylated control version of the MUC1 peptide. The most notable feature of the binding of MUC1 glycopeptides to galectin-3 was a shift from a favorable enthalpy to an entropy-driven binding process. The comparatively diminished enthalpy contribution to the free energy (ΔG) was compensated by a considerable gain in the entropic term. 1H–15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence spectroscopy nuclear magnetic resonance data reveal contact at the canonical site mainly by the glycan moiety of the MUC1 glycopeptide. Ligand-dependent differences in binding affinities were also confirmed by a novel assay for screening of low-affinity glycan–lectin interactions based on AlphaScreen technology. Another key finding is that the glycosylated MUC1 peptides exhibited activity in a concentration-dependent manner in cell-based assays revealing selectivity among human galectins. Thus, the presentation of this tumor-associated carbohydrate ligand by the natural peptide scaffold enhances its affinity, highlighting the significance of model studies of human lectins with synthetic glycopeptides. PMID:26129647

  12. Profiling human serum antibodies with a carbohydrate antigen microarray

    PubMed Central

    Oyelaran, Oyindasola; McShane, Lisa M.; Dodd, Lori; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2009-01-01

    Carbohydrate antigen arrays (glycan arrays) have been recently developed for the high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate macromolecule interactions. When profiling serum, information about experimental variability, inter-individual biological variability, and intra-individual temporal variability is critical. In this report, we describe the characterization of a carbohydrate antigen array and assay for profiling human serum. Through optimization of assay conditions and development of a normalization strategy, we obtain highly reproducible results with a within-experiment coefficient of variation (CV) of 10.8% and an overall CV (across multiple batches of slides and days) of 28.5%. We also report antibody profiles for 48 human subjects and evaluate for the first time the effects of age, race, sex, geographic location, and blood type on antibody profiles for a large set of carbohydrate antigens. We found significant dependence on age and blood type of antibody levels for a variety of carbohydrates. Finally, we conducted a longitudinal study with a separate group of 7 serum donors to evaluate the variation in anti-carbohydrate antibody levels within an individual over a period ranging from 3 to 13 weeks and found that, for nearly all antigens on our array, antibody levels are generally stable over this period. The results presented here provide the most comprehensive evaluation of experimental and biological variation reported to date for a glycan array and have significant implications for studies involving human serum profiling. PMID:19624168

  13. Gold nanoparticles displaying tumor-associated self-antigens as a potential vaccine for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sukyung; Lee, In-Hyun; Kang, Sukmo; Kim, Daejin; Choi, Minsuk; Saw, Phei Er; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Jon, Sangyong

    2014-08-01

    Golden vaccine for cancers. Gold nanoparticles enable efficient antigen delivery to dendritic cells and then activate the cells to facilitate cross-presentation, inducing antigen-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses for effective cancer therapy. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Lessons from Responses to Tumor-Associated Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Westdorp, Harm; Sköld, Annette E.; Snijer, Berit A.; Franik, Sebastian; Mulder, Sasja F.; Major, Pierre P.; Foley, Ronan; Gerritsen, Winald R.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer in men and the second most common cause of cancer-related death in men. In recent years, novel therapeutic options for PCa have been developed and studied extensively in clinical trials. Sipuleucel-T is the first cell-based immunotherapeutic vaccine for treatment of cancer. This vaccine consists of autologous mononuclear cells stimulated and loaded with an immunostimulatory fusion protein containing the prostate tumor antigen prostate acid posphatase. The choice of antigen might be key for the efficiency of cell-based immunotherapy. Depending on the treatment strategy, target antigens should be immunogenic, abundantly expressed by tumor cells, and preferably functionally important for the tumor to prevent loss of antigen expression. Autoimmune responses have been reported against several antigens expressed in the prostate, indicating that PCa is a suitable target for immunotherapy. In this review, we will discuss PCa antigens that exhibit immunogenic features and/or have been targeted in immunotherapeutic settings with promising results, and we highlight the hurdles and opportunities for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24834066

  15. Proteome-Based Analysis of Serologically Defined Tumor-Associated Antigens in Cutaneous Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Forgber, Michael; Gellrich, Sylke; Sharav, Tumenjargal; Sterry, Wolfram; Walden, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Information on specificities of serological responses against tumor cells in cutaneous lymphoma patients is relatively restricted. To advance the knowledge of serological immune responses against and to assess the scope of tumor antigenicity of cutaneous lymphoma, 1- and 2-dimensional Western blot analyses with sera from patients were combined with proteomics-based protein identification. Testing sera from 87 cutaneous lymphoma patients by 1-dimensional Western blot analysis, 64 cases of seroreactivity against lymphoma cells were found. The positive responses were relatively weak, restricted to few antigens in each case, and heterogeneous. To identify the antigens, proteins of the mycosis fungoides cell line MyLa and primary tumor cells were separated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, Western-blotted and probed with heterogeneous and autologous patient sera. The antigens were identified from silver-stained replica gels by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. 14 different antigens were assigned and identified with this proteome-serological approach. Only one, vimentin, had been reported before, the other 13 are new antigens for cutaneous lymphomas. PMID:20020065

  16. Development of a Monoclonal Antibody against a Tumor-Associated Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, W. W.; Bressler, J. P.; Tiffany-Castiglioni, E.; de Vellis, J.

    1982-02-01

    A monoclonal antibody-producing hybrid cell line was obtained by fusing mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from a mouse immunized with C6 glioma cells. This antibody binds to a specific cell-surface antigen that is present on C6 rat glioma cells, transformed astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, and a human glioma cell line but is absent on a normal glial cell line, fibroblasts, and primary cultures of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The antigen also appears on tumor tissue of transformed oligodendrocytes but not on normal brain tissue.

  17. Identification of tumor-associated antigens on ultraviolet light-induced tumors using antitumor antibodies developed in ascites fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, G.W.; Takemoto, L.J.; Shehi, L.; Hansen, J.S.

    1982-06-01

    A method is described which leads to the production of large amounts of ascites containing antitumor antibody in small numbers of mice. The antibody was then used to identify and characterize tumor-associated antigens on an ultraviolet light-induced murine skin fibrosarcoma. The antibody showed specific complement-dependent cytotoxicity to the homologous tumor and to an allogeneic tumor line which displayed a glycoprotein viral determinant with a molecular weight of 70,000 on its surface. Absorption of the immune ascites with other tumor cell lines removed the cytotoxicity in relation to the presence of the glycoprotein. Isolation of the tumor cell surface components binding antibody revealed two components with molecular weights of approximately 70,000 and 60,000. The Mr 70,000 component was identified as viral gp70 by peptide mapping.

  18. Multidrug-resistance proteins are weak tumor associated antigens for colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a clinically, highly relevant phenomenon. Under chemotherapy many tumors show an increasing resistance towards the applied substance(s) and to a certain extent also towards other agents. An important molecular cause of this phenomenon is an increased expression of transporter proteins. The functional relationship between high expression levels and chemotherapy resistance makes these MDR and MRP (MDR related protein) proteins to interesting therapeutic targets. We here wanted to systematically analyze, whether these proteins are tumor specific antigens which could be targeted immunologically. Results Using the reverse immunology approach, 30 HLA-A2.1 restricted MDR and MRP derived peptides (MDP) were selected. Stimulated T cell lines grew well and mainly contained activated CD8+ cells. Peptide specificity and HLA-A2.1 restriction were proven in IFN-γ-ELISpot analyses and in cytotoxicity tests against MDP loaded target cells for a total of twelve peptides derived from MDR-1, MDR-3, MRP-1, MRP-2, MRP-3 and MRP-5. Of note, two of these epitopes are shared between MDR-1 and MDR-3 as well as MRP-2 and MRP-3. However, comparably weak cytotoxic activities were additionally observed against HLA-A2.1+ tumor cells even after upregulation of MDR protein expression by in vitro chemotherapy. Conclusions Taken together, these data demonstrate that human T cells can be sensitised towards MDPs and hence, there is no absolute immunological tolerance. However, our data also hint towards rather low endogenous tumor cell processing and presentation of MDPs in the context of HLA-A2.1 molecules. Consequently, we conclude that MDR and MRP proteins must be considered as weak tumor specific antigens-at least for colorectal carcinoma. Their direct contribution to therapy-failure implies however, that it is worth to further pursue this approach. PMID:21740599

  19. TCL1: a shared tumor-associated antigen for immunotherapy against B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Jinsheng; Rawal, Seema; Chu, Fuliang; Park, Hyun Jun; Sharma, Rakesh; Delgado, David A.; Fayad, Luis; Fanale, Michelle; Romaguera, Jorge; Luong, Amber; Kwak, Larry W.

    2012-01-01

    Immunotherapy with therapeutic idiotype vaccines offers promise for treatment of B-cell malignancies. However, identification of novel immunogenic lymphoma-associated antigens that are universally expressed is necessary to overcome the barriers of patient-specific idiotype vaccines. Here, we determined whether T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1 (TCL1) oncoprotein encoded by the TCL1 gene could be a target for immunotherapy of B-cell malignancies. We show that TCL1 mRNA and protein are selectively expressed in normal B cells but markedly hyperexpressed in multiple human B-cell lymphomas, including follicular lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, mantle cell lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and splenic marginal zone B-cell lymphoma. We demonstrated that TCL1-specific CD8+ T cells can be generated from HLA-A*0201 (HLA-A2)+ normal donors and identified TCL171-78 (LLPIMWQL) as the minimal epitope recognized by these T cells. More importantly, TCL171-78 peptide-specific T cells were present in the peripheral blood and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes of lymphoma patients, could be expanded in vitro, and lysed autologous tumor cells but not normal B cells in an HLA-A2–restricted manner. Our results suggest that TCL1 is naturally processed and presented on the surface of lymphoma cells for recognition by cytotoxic T cells and can serve as a novel target for development of immunotherapeutic strategies against common B-cell lymphomas. PMID:22645177

  20. Murine responses to recombinant MVA versus ALVAC vaccines against tumor-associated antigens, gp100 and 5T4.

    PubMed

    Hanwell, David G; McNeil, Bryan; Visan, Lucian; Rodrigues, Lauren; Dunn, Pamela; Shewen, Patricia E; Macallum, Grace E; Turner, Patricia V; Vogel, Thorsten U

    2013-05-01

    Virally vectored cancer vaccines comprise a new form of immunotherapy that aim to generate anti-tumor immune responses with potential for tumor clearance and enhanced patient survival. Here, we compared 2 replication-deficient poxviruses modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and ALVAC(2) in their ability to induce antigen expression and immunogenicity of the tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) 5T4 and gp100. To facilitate the comparison, recombinant MVA-gp100M and ALVAC(2)-5T4 were constructed to complement existing ALVAC(2)-gp100M and MVA-5T4 vectors. Recombinant TAA expression in chicken embryo fibroblast cells was confirmed by Western blot analysis. 5T4 expression was approximately equal for both viruses, whereas ALVAC-derived gp100 was quickly degraded, at a time point when MVA-derived gp100 was still stable and expressed at high levels. Human leukocyte antigen-A2 transgenic mice were vaccinated with recombinant viruses and the CD8 T-cell responses elicited against each TAA were monitored by interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot. No 5T4 peptide responses were detected using splenocytes from mice vaccinated with either vector, whereas vaccination with MVA elicited a significantly higher gp100-specific response than ALVAC(2) at 10 PFU (P<0.001). In CD-1 mice, each vector elicited similar 5T4 antibody responses, whereas MVA was more potent and induced gp100 antibody responses at a lower immunization dose than ALVAC (P<0.001). In this study, immunogenicity varied depending on the viral vector used and reflected vector-associated differences in in vitro TAA expression and stability. These findings suggest that novel vector-transgene combinations must be assessed individually when designing vaccines, and that stability of vector-encoded proteins produced in vitro may be useful as a predictor for in vitro immunogenicity.

  1. Classification of 27 Tumor-Associated Antigens by Histochemical Analysis of 36 Freshly Resected Lung Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Gene; Sugiura, Mototaka; Hattori, Yoshinobu; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    In previous studies, we identified 29 tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and isolated 488 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that specifically bind to one of the 29 TAAs. In the present study, we performed histochemical analysis of 36 freshly resected lung cancer tissues by using 60 mAbs against 27 TAAs. Comparison of the staining patterns of tumor cells, bronchial epithelial cells, and normal pulmonary alveolus cells and interalveolar septum allowed us to determine the type and location of cells that express target molecules, as well as the degree of expression. The patterns were classified into 7 categories. While multiple Abs were used against certain TAAs, the differences observed among them should be derived from differences in the binding activity and/or the epitope. Thus, such data indicate the versatility of respective clones as anti-cancer drugs. Although the information obtained was limited to the lung and bronchial tube, bronchial epithelial cells represent normal growing cells, and therefore, the data are informative. The results indicate that 9 of the 27 TAAs are suitable targets for therapeutic Abs. These 9 Ags include EGFR, HER2, TfR, and integrin α6β4. Based on our findings, a pharmaceutical company has started to develop anti-cancer drugs by using Abs to TfR and integrin α6β4. HGFR, PTP-LAR, CD147, CDCP1, and integrin αvβ3 are also appropriate targets for therapeutic purposes. PMID:27834817

  2. Classification of 27 Tumor-Associated Antigens by Histochemical Analysis of 36 Freshly Resected Lung Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Gene; Sugiura, Mototaka; Hattori, Yoshinobu; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu

    2016-11-08

    In previous studies, we identified 29 tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and isolated 488 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that specifically bind to one of the 29 TAAs. In the present study, we performed histochemical analysis of 36 freshly resected lung cancer tissues by using 60 mAbs against 27 TAAs. Comparison of the staining patterns of tumor cells, bronchial epithelial cells, and normal pulmonary alveolus cells and interalveolar septum allowed us to determine the type and location of cells that express target molecules, as well as the degree of expression. The patterns were classified into 7 categories. While multiple Abs were used against certain TAAs, the differences observed among them should be derived from differences in the binding activity and/or the epitope. Thus, such data indicate the versatility of respective clones as anti-cancer drugs. Although the information obtained was limited to the lung and bronchial tube, bronchial epithelial cells represent normal growing cells, and therefore, the data are informative. The results indicate that 9 of the 27 TAAs are suitable targets for therapeutic Abs. These 9 Ags include EGFR, HER2, TfR, and integrin α6β4. Based on our findings, a pharmaceutical company has started to develop anti-cancer drugs by using Abs to TfR and integrin α6β4. HGFR, PTP-LAR, CD147, CDCP1, and integrin αvβ3 are also appropriate targets for therapeutic purposes.

  3. Cancer immunotherapy using novel tumor-associated antigenic peptides identified by genome-wide cDNA microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yasuharu; Tomita, Yusuke; Yuno, Akira; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Shinohara, Masanori

    2015-05-01

    Recent genome-wide cDNA microarray analysis of gene expression profiles in comprehensive tumor types coupled with isolation of cancer tissues by laser-microbeam microdissection have revealed ideal tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) that are frequently overexpressed in various cancers including head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and lung cancer, but not in most normal tissues except for testis, placenta, and fetal organs. Preclinical studies using HLA-transgenic mice and human T cells in vitro showed that TAA-derived CTL-epitope short peptides (SPs) are highly immunogenic and induce HLA-A2 or -A24-restricted CTLs. Based on the accumulated evidence, we carried out a phase II clinical trial of the TAA-SP vaccine in advanced 37 HNSCC patients. This study showed a significant induction of TAA-specific CTLs in the majority of patients without serious adverse effects. Importantly, clinical responses including a complete response were observed in this study. Another phase II clinical trial of therapeutic TAA-SP vaccine, designed to evaluate the ability of prevention of recurrence, is ongoing in HNSCC patients who have received curative operations. Further studies in human preclinical studies and in vivo studies using HLA class I transgenic mice showed TAA-derived long peptides (TAA-LPs) have the capacity to induce not only promiscuous HLA class II-restricted CD4(+) T helper type 1 cells but also tumor-specific CTLs through a cross-presentation mechanism. Moreover, we observed an augmentation of TAA-LP-specific T helper type 1 cell responses and tumor antigen-spreading in HNSCC patients vaccinated with TAA-SPs. This accumulated evidence suggests that therapeutic TAA-SPs and LPs vaccines may provide a promising cancer immunotherapy.

  4. [Prognostic value of carcinoembryonic antigen, alpha fetoprotein, carbohydrate antigen 125 and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Chen, Luohai; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Minhu; Chen, Jie

    2017-09-25

    To study the rate of elevated common biomarkers of digestive tumors, including carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), alpha fetoprotein (AFP), carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm (GEP-NEN) and their prognostic values in GEP-NEN. Clinicopathological data of patients with GEP-NEN treated in The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University from January 2011 to December 2016 were retrospectively studied. The inclusion criteria were as follows: patients with complete clinicopathological data including AFP, CEA, CA125 and CA19-9 level before treatment; patients without previous or other concomitant cancer; patients diagnosed as sporadic but not familial NEN. Serum AFP level >30 μg/L, CEA level >7.5 μg/L, CA125 level >52.5 μg/L and CA19-9 level >52.5 kU/L were defined as elevation respectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Log-rank test were applied to investigate the prognostic role of these biomarkers. A total of 170 patients with GEP-NEN were enrolled, and 105 (61.8%) patients were male with median age of 52.5 years. Thirty-six (21.2%), 77 (45.3%) and 57 (33.5%) cases were gastric, intestinal and pancreatic NEN respectively. Elevated AFP, CEA, CA125 and CA19-9 were found in 3(1.8%), 19(11.2%), 22(12.9%) and 21(12.4%) patients. Elevated CEA was related with G3 disease (OR=4.78, 95%CI:1.28-17.85, P=0.020) and elevated CA125 was related with distant metastasis (OR=51.60, 95%CI:5.76-462.44, P=0.000) while elevated CA19-9 was related with both G3 disease (OR=3.81; 95%CI:1.21-11.99, P=0.022) and distant metastasis(OR=4.87; 95%CI:1.41-16.75, P=0.012). The median follow-up was 22.5 months. Forty-six patients (27.1%) died during the follow-up. Patients with elevated CEA, CA125 or CA19-9 had worse overall survival compared with their counterparts with the median survivals of 14 months (95%CI:5.4 to 22.6 months, χ(2)=15.582, P=0.000), 6 months (95%CI:3.2 to 8.8 months, χ(2)=37.627, P=0.001) and

  5. THE INDIVIDUAL ANTIGENIC SPECIFICITY OF ANTIBODIES TO STREPTOCOCCAL CARBOHYDRATES

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Dietmar G.; Krause, Richard M.

    1968-01-01

    Although a single electrophoretically uniform antibody component with specificity for the group carbohydrate may comprise the bulk of the γ-globulin in rabbits immunized with streptococcal vaccines, this is not always the case. Not infrequently, electrophoresis may reveal multiple antibody components. Nevertheless, it has been feasible by various preparative procedures to isolate from a single antiserum at least two antibody components with similar reactivity for the carbohydrate both of which are electrophoretically monodisperse. Light chains from such antibodies reveal a restricted pattern when examined by disc electrophoresis. Antibodies to streptococcal carbohydrates have been examined for their individual antigenic specificity. Goats were immunized with isolated Group C and Group A-variant antibodies raised in rabbits. Individual antigenic specificity of these antibodies was brought out by absorption of the goat anti-antiserum with Fr II of pooled normal rabbit sera. Additional absorption of the goat anti-antisera with Fr II diminished but did not eliminate the reactivity for the homologous antibody. Immunoelectrophoretic studies with papain fragments of purified streptococcal antibodies localized the specificity to the Fab fragment. Specificity was not confined to the isolated light chains of the antibody. PMID:4176226

  6. Quantitative detection of the tumor-associated antigen large external antigen in colorectal cancer tissues and cells using quantum dot probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Li, Wanming; Yuan, Dezheng; Song, Jindan; Fang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The large external antigen (LEA) is a cell surface glycoprotein that has been proven to be highly expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) as a tumor-associated antigen. To evaluate and validate the relationship between LEA expression and clinical characteristics of CRC with high efficiency, LEA expression levels were detected in 85 tissue blocks from CRC patients by quantum dot-based immunohistochemistry (QD-IHC) combined with imaging quantitative analysis using quantum dots with a 605 nm emission wavelength (QD605) conjugated to an ND-1 monoclonal antibody against LEA as a probe. Conventional IHC was performed in parallel for comparison. Both QD-IHC and conventional IHC showed that LEA was specifically expressed in CRC, but not in non-CRC tissues, and high LEA expression was significantly associated with a more advanced T-stage (P<0.05), indicating that LEA is likely to serve as a CRC prognostic marker. Compared with conventional IHC, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that QD-IHC possessed higher sensitivity, resulting in an increased positive detection rate of CRC, from 70.1% to 89.6%. In addition, a simpler operation, objective analysis of results, and excellent repeatability make QD-IHC an attractive alternative to conventional IHC in clinical practice. Furthermore, to explore whether the QD probes can be utilized to quantitatively detect living cells or single cells, quantum dot-based immunocytochemistry (QD-ICC) combined with imaging quantitative analysis was developed to evaluate LEA expression in several CRC cell lines. It was demonstrated that QD-ICC could also predict the correlation between LEA expression and the T-stage characteristics of the cell lines, which was confirmed by flow cytometry. The results of this study indicate that QD-ICC has the potential to noninvasively detect rare circulating tumor cells in clinical samples in real clinical applications.

  7. Functional balance between T cell chimeric receptor density and tumor associated antigen density: CTL mediated cytolysis and lymphokine production.

    PubMed

    Weijtens, M E; Hart, E H; Bolhuis, R L

    2000-01-01

    Genetically engineered expression of tumor-specific single chain antibody chimeric receptors (ch-Rec) on human T lymphocytes endow these cells with the parental monoclonal antibody (mAb) dictated tumor specificity and may be useful for clinical immuno-genetherapy. Therefore it was of importance to assess how the densities of tumor-specific receptors and tumor associated antigens (TAA), respectively, affect primary human T lymphocyte functions in relation to target cell susceptibilities to lysis. We therefore studied the functional balance between ch-Rec densities on human T lymphocytes and TAA on tumor cells. The gene construct encoding a ch-Rec derived from (1) a renal carcinoma cell (RCC) specific mouse mAb (G250), and (2) the human signal transducing Fc(epsilon)RI gamma-chain was used. To obtain ch-RecHIGH-POS and ch-RecLOW-POS T lymphocytes, two distinct retroviral vectors were used to introduce the gene constructs into primary human T lymphocytes. Levels of ch-Rec-redirected T lymphocyte mediated tumor cell lysis, as well as lymphokine production were determined using RCC lines as target/stimulator cells, which express either no or increasing densities of the TAA. A functional and dynamic balance between ch-Rec densities on cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) on the one hand and TAA densities on RCCs on the other, was found. In short, ch-RecHIGH-POS CTLs are triggered by TAAHIGH-POS as well as TAALOW-POS RCCs to lyse tumor cells and produce (IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha) lymphokine. In contrast, ch-RecLOW-POS T lymphocytes are only triggered for cytolysis and lymphokine production by relatively TAAHIGH-POS RCCs. In conclusion, (1) the activation of T lymphocyte responses is co-determined by the expression levels of the ch-Rec on T lymphocytes and the TAA on tumor cells and (2) at relatively high T lymphocyte ch-Rec expression levels the CTLs lyse tumor cells with a wide range of TAA densities. Gene Therapy (2000) 7, 35-42.

  8. Spatial separation of the processing and MHC class I loading compartments for cross-presentation of the tumor-associated antigen HER2/neu by human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Rietscher, René; Diedrich, Andrea; Czaplewska, Justyna A; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Scherließ, Regina; Hanefeld, Andrea; Gottschaldt, Michael; Walden, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Cross-presentation is the process by which professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) (B cells, dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages) present endocytosed antigens (Ags) via MHC-I to CD8(+) T cells. This process is crucial for induction of adaptive immune responses against tumors and infected cells. The pathways and cellular compartments involved in cross-presentation are unresolved and controversial. Among the cells with cross-presenting capacity, DCs are the most efficient, which was proposed to depend on prevention of endosomal acidification to block degradation of the epitopes. Contrary to this view, we show in this report that some cargoes induce strong endosomal acidification following uptake by human DCs, while others not. Moreover, processing of the tumor-associated antigen HER2/neu delivered in nanoparticles (NP) for cross-presentation of the epitope HER2/neu369-377 on HLA-A2 depended on endosomal acidification and cathepsin activity as well as proteasomes, and newly synthesized HLA class I. However, the HLA-A*0201/HER2/neu369-377 complexes were not found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) nor in endolysosomes but in hitherto not described vesicles. The data thus indicate spatial separation of antigen processing and loading of MHC-I for cross-presentation: antigen processing occurs in the uptake compartment and the cytosol whereas MHC-I loading with peptide takes place in a distinct subcellular compartment. The findings further elucidate the cellular pathways involved in the cross-presentation of a full-length, clinically relevant tumor-associated antigen by human DCs, and the impact of the vaccine formulation on antigen processing and CD8(+) T cell induction.

  9. Spatial separation of the processing and MHC class I loading compartments for cross-presentation of the tumor-associated antigen HER2/neu by human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Rietscher, René; Diedrich, Andrea; Czaplewska, Justyna A; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Scherließ, Regina; Hanefeld, Andrea; Gottschaldt, Michael; Walden, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cross-presentation is the process by which professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) (B cells, dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages) present endocytosed antigens (Ags) via MHC-I to CD8+ T cells. This process is crucial for induction of adaptive immune responses against tumors and infected cells. The pathways and cellular compartments involved in cross-presentation are unresolved and controversial. Among the cells with cross-presenting capacity, DCs are the most efficient, which was proposed to depend on prevention of endosomal acidification to block degradation of the epitopes. Contrary to this view, we show in this report that some cargoes induce strong endosomal acidification following uptake by human DCs, while others not. Moreover, processing of the tumor-associated antigen HER2/neu delivered in nanoparticles (NP) for cross-presentation of the epitope HER2/neu369–377 on HLA-A2 depended on endosomal acidification and cathepsin activity as well as proteasomes, and newly synthesized HLA class I. However, the HLA-A*0201/HER2/neu369–377 complexes were not found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) nor in endolysosomes but in hitherto not described vesicles. The data thus indicate spatial separation of antigen processing and loading of MHC-I for cross-presentation: antigen processing occurs in the uptake compartment and the cytosol whereas MHC-I loading with peptide takes place in a distinct subcellular compartment. The findings further elucidate the cellular pathways involved in the cross-presentation of a full-length, clinically relevant tumor-associated antigen by human DCs, and the impact of the vaccine formulation on antigen processing and CD8+ T cell induction. PMID:26985398

  10. Specificity for the tumor-associated self-antigen WT1 drives the development of fully functional memory T cells in the absence of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Pospori, Constandina; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Voisine, Cecile; Perro, Mario; King, Judith; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Flutter, Barry; Chakraverty, Ronjon; Stauss, Hans J; Morris, Emma C

    2011-06-23

    Recently, vaccines against the Wilms Tumor antigen 1 (WT1) have been tested in cancer patients. However, it is currently not known whether physiologic levels of WT1 expression in stem and progenitor cells of normal tissue result in the deletion or tolerance induction of WT1-specific T cells. Here, we used an human leukocyte antigen-transgenic murine model to study the fate of human leukocyte antigen class-I restricted, WT1-specific T cells in the thymus and in the periphery. Thymocytes expressing a WT1-specific T-cell receptor derived from high avidity human CD8 T cells were positively selected into the single-positive CD8 population. In the periphery, T cells specific for the WT1 antigen differentiated into CD44-high memory phenotype cells, whereas T cells specific for a non-self-viral antigen retained a CD44(low) naive phenotype. Only the WT1-specific T cells, but not the virus-specific T cells, displayed rapid antigen-specific effector function without prior vaccination. Despite long-term persistence of WT1-specific memory T cells, the animals did not develop autoimmunity, and the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells was unimpaired. This is the first demonstration that specificity for a tumor-associated self-antigen may drive differentiation of functionally competent memory T cells.

  11. Archaeosome Adjuvant Overcomes Tolerance to Tumor-Associated Melanoma Antigens Inducing Protective CD8+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Lakshmi; Deschatelets, Lise; Stark, Felicity C.; Gurnani, Komal; Sprott, G. Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Vesicles comprised of the ether glycerolipids of the archaeon Methanobrevibacter smithii (archaeosomes) are potent adjuvants for evoking CD8+ T cell responses. We therefore explored the ability of archaeosomes to overcome immunologic tolerance to self-antigens. Priming and boosting of mice with archaeosome-antigen evoked comparable CD8+ T cell response and tumor protection to an alternate boosting strategy utilizing live bacterial vectors for antigen delivery. Vaccination with melanoma antigenic peptides TRP181-189 and Gp10025-33 delivered in archaeosomes resulted in IFN-γ producing antigen-specific CD8+ T cells with strong cytolytic capability and protection against subcutaneous B16 melanoma. Targeting responses against multiple antigens afforded prolonged median survival against melanoma challenge. Entrapment of multiple peptides within the same vesicle or admixed formulations were both effective at evoking CD8+ T cells against each antigen. Melanoma-antigen archaeosome formulations also afforded therapeutic protection against established B16 tumors when combined with depletion of T-regulatory cells. Overall, we demonstrate that archaeosome adjuvants constitute an effective choice for formulating cancer vaccines. PMID:21318177

  12. Carbohydrate-Mediated Targeting of Antigen to Dendritic Cells Leads to Enhanced Presentation of Antigen to T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Eddie W.; Ratner, Daniel M.; Seeberger, Peter H.; Hacohen, Nir

    2009-01-01

    The unique therapeutic value of dendritic cells (DCs) for the treatment of allergy, autoimmunity and transplant rejection is predicated upon our ability to selectively deliver antigens, drugs or nucleic acids to DCs in vivo. Here we describe a method for delivering whole protein antigens to DCs based on carbohydrate-mediated targeting of DC-expressed lectins. A series of synthetic carbohydrates was chemically-coupled to a model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA), and each conjugate was evaluated for its ability to increase the efficiency of antigen presentation by murine DCs to OVA-specific T cells (CD4+ and CD8+). In vitro data are presented that demonstrate that carbohydrate modification of OVA leads to a 50-fold enhancement of presentation of antigenic peptide to CD4+ T cells. A tenfold enhancement is observed for CD8+ T cells; this indicates that the targeted lectin(s) can mediate cross-presentation of antigens on MHC class I. Our data indicate that the observed enhancements in antigen presentation are unique to OVA that is conjugated to complex oligosaccharides, such as a high-mannose nonasaccharide, but not to monosaccharides. Taken together, our data suggest that a DC targeting strategy that is based upon carbohydrate-lectin interactions is a promising approach for enhancing antigen presentation via class I and class II molecules. PMID:18186095

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CARBOHYDRATE COMPONENTS OF Taenia solium ONCOSPHERE PROTEINS AND THEIR ROLE IN THE ANTIGENICITY

    PubMed Central

    Arana, Yanina; Verastegui, Manuela; Tuero, Iskra; Grandjean, Louis; Garcia, Hector H.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the carbohydrate composition of Taenia solium whole oncosphere antigens (WOAs), in order to improve the understanding of the antigenicity of the T. solium. Better knowledge of oncosphere antigens is crucial to accurately diagnose previous exposure to T. solium eggs and thus predict the development of neurocysticercosis. A set of seven lectins conjugates with wide carbohydrate specificity were used on parasite fixations and somatic extracts. Lectin fluorescence revealed that D-mannose, D-glucose, D-galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residues were the most abundant constituents of carbohydrate chains on the surface of T. solium oncosphere. Lectin blotting showed that post-translational modification with N-glycosylation was abundant while little evidence of O-linked carbohydrates was observed. Chemical oxidation and enzymatic deglycosylation in situ were performed to investigate the immunoreactivity of the carbohydrate moieties. Linearizing or removing the carbohydrate moieties from the protein backbones did not diminish the immunoreactivity of these antigens, suggesting that a substantial part of the host immune response against T. solium oncosphere is directed against the peptide epitopes on the parasite antigens. Finally, using carbohydrate probes, we demonstrated for the first time that the presence of several lectins on the surface of the oncosphere was specific to carbohydrates found in intestinal mucus, suggesting a possible role in initial attachment of the parasite to host cells. PMID:23982308

  14. Characterization of the carbohydrate components of Taenia solium oncosphere proteins and their role in the antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Arana, Yanina; Verastegui, Manuela; Tuero, Iskra; Grandjean, Louis; Garcia, Hector H; Gilman, Robert H

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the carbohydrate composition of Taenia solium whole oncosphere antigens (WOAs), in order to improve the understanding of the antigenicity of the T. solium. Better knowledge of oncosphere antigens is crucial to accurately diagnose previous exposure to T. solium eggs and thus predict the development of neurocysticercosis. A set of seven lectins conjugates with wide carbohydrate specificity were used on parasite fixations and somatic extracts. Lectin fluorescence revealed that D-mannose, D-glucose, D-galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residues were the most abundant constituents of carbohydrate chains on the surface of T. solium oncosphere. Lectin blotting showed that posttranslational modification with N-glycosylation was abundant while little evidence of O-linked carbohydrates was observed. Chemical oxidation and enzymatic deglycosylation in situ were performed to investigate the immunoreactivity of the carbohydrate moieties. Linearizing or removing the carbohydrate moieties from the protein backbones did not diminish the immunoreactivity of these antigens, suggesting that a substantial part of the host immune response against T. solium oncosphere is directed against the peptide epitopes on the parasite antigens. Finally, using carbohydrate probes, we demonstrated for the first time that the presence of several lectins on the surface of the oncosphere was specific to carbohydrates found in intestinal mucus, suggesting a possible role in initial attachment of the parasite to host cells.

  15. Cancer Vaccines and Carbohydrate Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Lum, Michelle; Vijay, Geraldine; Jain, Miten; Almogren, Adel; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACA) result from the aberrant glycosylation that is seen with transformation to a tumor cell. The carbohydrate antigens that have been found to be tumor-associated include the mucin related Tn, Sialyl Tn, and Thomsen-Friedenreich antigens, the blood group Lewis related LewisY, Sialyl LewisX and Sialyl LewisA, and LewisX, (also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1, SSEA-1), the glycosphingolipids Globo H and stage-specific embryonic antigen-3 (SSEA-3), the sialic acid containing glycosphingolipids, the gangliosides GD2, GD3, GM2, fucosyl GM1, and Neu5GcGM3, and polysialic acid. Recent developments have furthered our understanding of the T-independent type II response that is seen in response to carbohydrate antigens. The selection of a vaccine target antigen is based on not only the presence of the antigen in a variety of tumor tissues but also on the role this antigen plays in tumor growth and metastasis. These roles for TACAs are being elucidated. Newly acquired knowledge in understanding the T-independent immune response and in understanding the key roles that carbohydrates play in metastasis are being applied in attempts to develop an effective vaccine response to TACAs. The role of each of the above mentioned carbohydrate antigens in cancer growth and metastasis and vaccine attempts using these antigens will be described. PMID:21964054

  16. Increased production of the soluble tumor-associated antigens CA19-9, CA125, and CA15-3 in rheumatoid arthritis: potential adhesion molecules in synovial inflammation?

    PubMed

    Szekanecz, Eva; Sándor, Zsuzsa; Antal-Szalmás, Péter; Soós, Lilla; Lakos, Gabriella; Besenyei, Timea; Szentpétery, Agnes; Simkovics, Enikö; Szántó, János; Kiss, Emese; Koch, Alisa E; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2007-06-01

    Some tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are expressed on inflammatory cells. We previously detected carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA; CD66) in the rheumatoid (RA) synovium. The production of CEA, CA19-9, CA125, and CA15.3, may be increased in patients with RA, scleroderma, lupus, and Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Some of these TAAs contain sialylated carbohydrate motifs and they are involved in tumor-associated cell adhesion and metastasis. We assessed levels of TAAs in the sera of RA patients and healthy subjects. Serum TAA levels were correlated with disease markers including serum rheumatoid factor (RF), C-reactive protein (CRP), and anti-CCP antibody levels, DAS28, age disease duration. TAAs including CEA, CA15-3, CA72-4, CA125, and CA19-9, and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) were assessed by immunoassay in the sera of 75 patients with RA and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Normal upper limits for these TAAs were 3.4 microg/L, 25 kU/L, 6.9 kU/L, 35 kU/L, 34 kU/L, and 16.3 microg/L, respectively. There were significantly more RA patients showing abnormally high levels of CA125 (10.8% versus 7.1%), CA19-9 (8.1% versus 0%), and CA15-3 (17.6% versus 14.3%) in comparison to controls (P < 0.05). The mean absolute serum levels of CA125 (23.9 +/- 1.8 versus 16.8 +/- 2.2 kU/L) and CA19-9 (14.2 +/- 1.2 versus 10.5 +/- 1.6 kU/L) were also significantly higher in RA compared to controls (P < 0.05). Among RA patients, serum CEA showed significant correlation with RF (r = 0.270; P < 0.05). None of the assessed TAAs showed any correlation with CRP, anti-CCP, DAS28, age or disease duration. The concentration of some TAAs may be elevated in the sera of patients with established RA in comparison to healthy subjects. CEA, CA19-9, CA125, and CA15-3 contain carbohydrate motifs and thus they may be involved in synovitis-associated adhesive events. Furthermore, some TAAs, such as CEA, may also correlate with prognostic factors, such as serum RF levels.

  17. HCA519/TPX2: a potential T-cell tumor-associated antigen for human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Aref, Ahmed M; Hoa, Neil T; Ge, Lisheng; Agrawal, Anshu; Dacosta-Iyer, Maria; Lambrecht, Nils; Ouyang, Yi; Cornforth, Andrew N; Jadus, Martin R

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunotherapy for human hepatocellular cancer (HCC) is slowly making progress towards treating these fatal cancers. The identification of new antigens can improve this approach. We describe a possible new antigen, hepatocellular carcinoma‐associated antigen‐519/targeting protein for Xklp‐2 (HCA519/TPX2), for HCC that might be beneficial for T‐cell specific HCC immunotherapy. Methods HCC was studied for the expression for 15 tumor‐associated antigens considered useful for immunotherapy within three HCC cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, and PLC/PRF/5), lymphocytes, non‐cancerous livers, and clinical HCC. The expression of tumor antigenic precursor proteins (TAPPs) messenger RNA was first screened by reverse transcriptase quantitative real‐time polymerase chain reaction. Results Four antigens (alpha fetoprotein, aspartyl/asparaginyl β­hydroxylase, glypican­3 and HCA519/TPX2) proved to be the best expressed TAPPs within the HCC specimens by molecular analyses. HCA519/TPX2 was detected by intracellular cell flow cytometry within HCC cell lines by using a specific antibody towards this TAPP. This antibody also detected the protein within primary HCCs. We synthesized two HCA519/TPX2 peptides (HCA519464–472 and HCA519351–359) which can bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA)‐A*0201. Dendritic cells pulsed with these peptides stimulated cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs). These killer T‐cells lysed HLA‐A*0201+ T2 cells exogenously loaded with the correct specific peptide. The CTLs killed HepG2 (HLA‐A2+ and HCA519+), but not the Hep3B and PLC/PRF/5 cell lines, which are HCA519+ but HLA‐A2‐negative. In silico analysis reveals that HCA519/TPX2 has the inherent ability to bind to a very wide variety of HLA antigens. Conclusion HCA519/TPX2 is a viable immunotarget that should be further investigated within HCC patients. PMID:24966688

  18. Targeting TARP, a novel breast and prostate tumor-associated antigen, with T cell receptor-like human recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Epel, Malka; Carmi, Irit; Soueid-Baumgarten, Sharon; Oh, Sang Kon; Bera, Tapan; Pastan, Ira; Berzofsky, Jay; Reiter, Yoram

    2008-06-01

    MHC class I molecules are important components of immune surveillance. There are no available methods to directly visualize and determine the quantity and distribution of MHC/peptide complexes on individual cells or to detect such complexes on antigen-presenting cells in tissues. MHC-restricted recombinant antibodies with the same specificity of T cell receptors (TCR) may become a valuable tool to address these questions. They may also serve as valuable targeting molecules that mimic the specificity of cytotoxic T cells. We isolated by phage display a panel of human recombinant Fab antibodies with peptide-specific, MHC-restricted TCR-like reactivity directed toward HLA-A2-restricted T cell epitopes derived from a novel antigen termed TCRgamma alternative reading frame protein (TARP) which is expressed on prostate and breast cancer cells. We have characterized one of these recombinant antibodies and demonstrated its capacity to directly detect specific HLA-A2/TARP T cell epitopes on antigen-presenting cells that have complexes formed by naturally occurring active intracellular processing of the antigen, as well as on the surface of tumor cells. Moreover, by genetic fusion we armed the TCR-like antibody with a potent toxin and demonstrated that it can serve as a targeting moiety killing tumor cells in a peptide-specific, MHC-restricted manner similar to cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

  19. Allogeneic nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation in metastatic colon cancer: tumor-specific T cells directed to a tumor-associated antigen are generated in vivo during GVHD.

    PubMed

    Carnevale-Schianca, Fabrizio; Cignetti, Alessandro; Capaldi, Antonio; Vitaggio, Katiuscia; Vallario, Antonella; Ricchiardi, Alberto; Sperti, Elisa; Ferraris, Renato; Gatti, Marco; Grignani, Giovanni; Rota-Scalabrini, Delia; Geuna, Massimo; Fizzotti, Marco; Sangiolo, Dario; Sottile, Antonino; De Rosa, Giovanni; Bucci, Anna Rosa; Lambertenghi-Deliliers, Giorgio; Benedetti, Edoardo; Nash, Richard; Aglietta, Massimo

    2006-05-01

    A pilot study was conducted to evaluate safety and activity of nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and to determine whether a T-cell response to a tumor-associated antigen (TAA) was induced. Fifteen patients with metastatic CRC underwent HCT from human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched siblings after a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen. All patients engrafted with a median donor T-cell chimerism of 72% at day +56. Eight patients experienced grades II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Despite progressive disease before HCT, partial remission and disease stabilization longer than 90 days were observed in 1 and 3 patients, respectively. Induction of TAA-specific T cells was evaluated with a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific HLA-A(*)0201 pentamer in 6 patients with CRC. CEA-specific CD8(+) T cells were detected in 3 of 3 patients concomitant with GHVD onset, but not in 3 of 3 patients without GVHD. They were also not detected in 9 of 9 control patients with GVHD who received transplants for diagnoses other than CRC. Antitumor activity of CEA-specific T cells was also validated in vitro. In one patient, the induction of CEA-specific T cells was associated with a decrease of serum CEA levels and a partial response. Thus, graft-versus-host reactions associated with allogeneic HCT can trigger the generation of T cells specific for CEA, and this may be associated with a clinical response.

  20. The tumor-associated antigen RHAMM (HMMR/CD168) is expressed by monocyte-derived dendritic cells and presented to T cells

    PubMed Central

    Willemen, Yannick; Van den Bergh, Johan M.J.; Bonte, Sarah M.; Anguille, Sébastien; Heirman, Carlo; Stein, Barbara M.H.; Goossens, Herman; Kerre, Tessa; Thielemans, Kris; Peeters, Marc; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F.I.

    2016-01-01

    We formerly demonstrated that vaccination with Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT1)-loaded autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mo-DCs) can be a well-tolerated effective treatment in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Here, we investigated whether we could introduce the receptor for hyaluronic acid-mediated motility (RHAMM/HMMR/CD168), another clinically relevant tumor-associated antigen, into these mo-DCs through mRNA electroporation and elicit RHAMM-specific immune responses. While RHAMM mRNA electroporation significantly increased RHAMM protein expression by mo-DCs, our data indicate that classical mo-DCs already express and present RHAMM at sufficient levels to activate RHAMM-specific T cells, regardless of electroporation. Moreover, we found that RHAMM-specific T cells are present at vaccination sites in AML patients. Our findings implicate that we and others who are using classical mo-DCs for cancer immunotherapy are already vaccinating against RHAMM. PMID:27659531

  1. The interaction between Siglec-15 and tumor-associated sialyl-Tn antigen enhances TGF-β secretion from monocytes/macrophages through the DAP12-Syk pathway.

    PubMed

    Takamiya, Rina; Ohtsubo, Kazuaki; Takamatsu, Shinji; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Angata, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that Siglec-15, a member of the Siglec family of glycan-recognition proteins, is expressed on a subset of macrophages and preferentially recognizes the sialyl-Tn (sTn) antigen, a tumor-associated glycan structure. In this study, we report on the biological significance of the Siglec-15-mediated interaction between monocytes/macrophages and cancer cells. Siglec-15 is expressed on tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in various human tumor tissues. We further demonstrated that its expression is substantially elevated in macrophage colony-stimulating factor-induced M2-like macrophages, which produced more transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in response to sTn-positive cells than to negative cells. We designed a co-culture model of THP-1 (human monocytic leukemia) cells and H157 (human lung carcinoma) cells mimicking the interaction between monocytes/macrophages and cancer cells that recapitulated the enhanced TGF-β production in Siglec-15 expressing THP-1 cells by the cellular interaction with sTn expressing H157 cells. The enhanced TGF-β production required a direct interaction between the two cell lines through sialic acids. Siglec-15 associates with adaptor protein DNAX activation protein of 12 kDa (DAP12) at the binding determinant Lys(274) in the transmembrane domain and transduces a signal to spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). The enhanced TGF-β secretion was significantly attenuated by Syk inhibitor treatment of THP-1 cells or by substitution of the Siglec-15 Lys(274) to Ala, which disrupts the molecular interaction between Siglec15 and DAP12. These findings indicate that Siglec-15 recognizes the tumoral sTn antigen and transduces a signal for enhanced TGF-β secretion in TAMs and further suggest that Siglec-15 on macrophages may contribute to tumor progression by the TGF-β-mediated modulation of intratumoral microenvironments.

  2. Multivalent immunity targeting tumor-associated antigens by intra-lymph node DNA-prime, peptide-boost vaccination.

    PubMed

    Smith, K A; Qiu, Z; Wong, R; Tam, V L; Tam, B L; Joea, D K; Quach, A; Liu, X; Pold, M; Malyankar, U M; Bot, A

    2011-01-01

    Active immunotherapy of cancer has yet to yield effective therapies in the clinic. To evaluate the translatability of DNA-based vaccines we analyzed the profile of T-cell immunity by plasmid vaccination in a murine model, using transcriptome microarray analysis and flow cytometry. DNA vaccination resulted in specific T cells expressing low levels of co-inhibitory molecules (most notably PD-1), strikingly different from the expression profile elicited by peptide immunization. In addition, the T-cell response primed through this dual-antigen-expressing plasmid (MART-1/Melan-A and tyrosinase) translated into a substantial proliferation capacity and functional conversion to antitumor effector cells after tyrosinase and MART-1/Melan-A peptide analog boost. Furthermore, peptide boost rescued the immune response against the subdominant tyrosinase epitope. This immunization approach could be adapted to elicit potent immunity against multiple tumor antigens, resulting in a broader immune response that was more effective in targeting human tumor cells. Finally, this study sheds light on a novel mechanism of immune homeostasis through synchronous regulation of co-inhibitory molecules on T cells, highly relevant to heterologous prime boost approaches involving DNA vaccines as priming agents.

  3. A multi-antigen vaccine in combination with an immunotoxin targeting tumor-associated fibroblast for treating murine melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jinxu; Hu, Biliang; Li, Si; Zhang, Chupei; Liu, Yarong; Wang, Pin

    2016-01-01

    A therapeutically effective cancer vaccine must generate potent antitumor immune responses and be able to overcome tolerance mechanisms mediated by the progressing tumor itself. Previous studies showed that glycoprotein 100 (gp100), tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP1), and tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2) are promising immunogens for melanoma immunotherapy. In this study, we administered these three melanoma-associated antigens via lentiviral vectors (termed LV-3Ag) and found that this multi-antigen vaccine strategy markedly increased functional T-cell infiltration into tumors and generated protective and therapeutic antitumor immunity. We also engineered a novel immunotoxin, αFAP-PE38, capable of targeting fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-expressing fibroblasts within the tumor stroma. When combined with αFAP-PE38, LV-3Ag exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor effects on tumor growth in an established B16 melanoma model. The mechanism of action underlying this combination treatment likely modulates the immune suppressive tumor microenvironment and, consequently, activates cytotoxic CD8+ T cells capable of specifically recognizing and destroying tumor cells. Taken together, these results provide a strong rationale for combining an immunotoxin with cancer vaccines for the treatment of patients with advanced cancer. PMID:27119119

  4. Evaluation of a novel ELISA for the tumor-associated antigen CA 72–4 in patients with ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Buderath, Paul; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine; Aktas, Bahriye; Rasch, Jens; Kimmig, Rainer; Zeller, Thomas; Heubner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Cancer antigen 72–4 (CA 72–4) is an established tumor marker in ovarian cancer. We evaluated a new solid-phase ELISA (DRG TM-CA 72–4 ELISA). Materials & methods: Repeated measures of test samples and controls were performed to evaluate reliability and reproducibility. Afterward, we performed analyses on the sera of 150 patients with primarily diagnosed ovarian cancer. Results were compared with those of the Cobas CA 72–4 kit. Results were correlated with clinical patient data. Results: Results of the DRG TM-CA 72–4 ELISA were reproducible with acceptable deviations within measures, and the measured CA 72–4 serum concentrations were well in accordance with the references. High concentrations were significantly associated with grading, tumor stage and tumor residuals after surgery. PMID:28116127

  5. Comprehensive Identification of Tumor-associated Antigens via Isolation of Human Monoclonal Antibodies that may be Therapeutic

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Although the success of trastuzumab and rituximab for treatment of breast cancer and non-Hodgkins lymphoma, respectively, suggests that monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) will become important therapeutic agents against a wider range of cancers, useful therapeutic Abs are not yet available for the majority of the human cancers because of our lack of knowledge of which antigens (Ags) are likely to become useful targets. We established a procedure for comprehensive identification of such Ags through the extensive isolation of human mAbs that may be therapeutic. Using the phage-display Ab library we isolated a large number of human mAbs that bind to the surface of tumor cells. They were individually screened by immunostaining, and clones that preferentially and strongly stained the malignant cells were chosen. The Ags recognized by those clones were isolated by immunoprecipitation and identified by mass spectrometry (MS). We isolated 2,114 mAbs with unique sequences and identified 25 distinct Ags highly expressed on several carcinomas. Of those 2,114 mAbs 434 bound to specifically to one of the 25 Ags. I am going to discuss how we could select proper target Ags for therapeutic Abs and candidate clones as therapeutic agents. PMID:20107531

  6. Comprehensive Identification of Tumor-associated Antigens via Isolation of Human Monoclonal Antibodies that may be Therapeutic.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Yoshikazu

    2009-02-01

    Although the success of trastuzumab and rituximab for treatment of breast cancer and non-Hodgkins lymphoma, respectively, suggests that monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) will become important therapeutic agents against a wider range of cancers, useful therapeutic Abs are not yet available for the majority of the human cancers because of our lack of knowledge of which antigens (Ags) are likely to become useful targets. We established a procedure for comprehensive identification of such Ags through the extensive isolation of human mAbs that may be therapeutic. Using the phage-display Ab library we isolated a large number of human mAbs that bind to the surface of tumor cells. They were individually screened by immunostaining, and clones that preferentially and strongly stained the malignant cells were chosen. The Ags recognized by those clones were isolated by immunoprecipitation and identified by mass spectrometry (MS). We isolated 2,114 mAbs with unique sequences and identified 25 distinct Ags highly expressed on several carcinomas. Of those 2,114 mAbs 434 bound to specifically to one of the 25 Ags. I am going to discuss how we could select proper target Ags for therapeutic Abs and candidate clones as therapeutic agents.

  7. The multi-epitope approach for immunotherapy for cancer: identification of several CTL epitopes from various tumor-associated antigens expressed on solid epithelial tumors.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, I; Hudson, S J; Tsai, V; Southwood, S; Takesako, K; Appella, E; Sette, A; Celis, E

    1998-01-01

    One approach to development of specific cancer immunotherapy relies on the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAA). Induction of TAA-specific CTL could be used towards the eradication of established tumors, or to prevent their dissemination or recurrence after primary treatment. The present study identifies a set of CTL epitopes from TAA frequently found on solid epithelial tumors such as breast, lung and gastro-intestinal tumors. Specifically, HLA-A2.1 binding peptides from the MAGE2, MAGE3, HER-2/neu and CEA antigens were tested for their capacity to elicit in vitro anti-tumor CTL using lymphocytes from normal volunteers and autologous dendritic cells as antigen-presenting cells. A total of 6 new epitopes (MAGE2[10(157)], MAGE3[9(112)], CEA[9(691)], CEA[9(24)], HER2[9(435)] and HER2[9(5)]) were identified which were capable of specifically recognizing tumor cell lines lines expressing HLA-A2.1 and the corresponding TAA. In one case (CEA[9(24)]), induction of vigorous anti-tumor CTL responses required epitope engineering to increase HLA-A2.1 binding affinity. Finally, most of the newly identified epitopes (5 out of 6) were found to be highly crossreactive with other common HLA alleles of the A2 supertype (A2.2, A2.3, A2.6 and A6802), thus demonstrating their potential in providing broad and non-ethnically biased population coverage. The results are discussed in the context of the development of multi-epitope-based therapies with broad applicability for patients suffering from commonly found tumors.

  8. Human Ly9 (CD229) as novel tumor-associated antigen (TAA) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) recognized by autologous CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Bund, Dagmar; Mayr, Christine; Kofler, David M; Hallek, Michael; Wendtner, Clemens-Martin

    2006-07-01

    CD229, a cell-surface molecule being involved in cell adhesion, is overexpressed in B-CLL cells. In this study we wanted to explore whether CD229 might function as B-CLL-specific tumor-associated antigen (TAA). Autologous, CD229-specific HLA-A2-restricted T cells were identified using IFN-gamma-ELISPOT assays and HLA-A2/dimer-peptide staining after 4 weeks of in vitro culture. We were able to expand autologous T cells from 9/11 B-CLL patients using native B-CLL cells as antigen presenting cells (APCs) in 5 cases, whereas for 4 samples an autologous T-cell response could only be evoked by use of CD40L-stimulated B-CLL cells as APCs. The number of CD8+ T cells could be expanded during 4 weeks of in vitro culture with native or CD40L-activated B-CLL cells while the amount of specific T cells recognizing CD229 peptides bound to HLA-A2 dimers increased on average 12-fold (native CLL) and 13-fold (CD40L-activated CLL), respectively. Using IFN-gamma-ELISPOT assays we could demonstrate that the expanded T cells were able to secrete IFN-gamma upon recognition of the antigen. These T cells not only recognized HLA-A0201-binding CD229-derived peptides presented by T2 cells, but also CD229-overexpressing autologous B-CLL cells in an MHC-I-restricted manner. In summary, CD229 was shown to be naturally processed and presented as TAA in primary B-CLL cells, enabling the expansion of autologous tumor-specific T cells.

  9. Cloning of the murine counterpart of the tumor-associated antigen H-L6: Epitope mapping of the human and murine L6 antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.P.; Farr, A.G.; Marken, J.S. |

    1995-10-03

    The murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) L6 was raised against human lung carcinoma cells and found to recognize an antigen which is highly expressed on lung, breast, colon, and ovarian carcinomas. Promising results in phase 1 clinical studies with this antibody or its chimerized counterpart suggest the antigen recognized by mAb L6 (H-L6) is an attractive target for monoclonal antibody-based cancer therapy. Further development of L6 as an anti-tumor-targeting agent would benefit from the development of a murine model. However, initial attempts to develop such a model were hampered by our inability to generate antibodies against the murine homologue of the L6 antigen, M-L6. Here we describe the preparation of the mAb 12A8, which was raised against murine thymic epithelial cells, the tissue distribution of the murine antigen recognized by 12A8, the cloning of a cDNA encoding the 12A8 target antigen, and the demonstration that this antigen is M-L6. Using H-L6/M-L6 chimeric proteins, we show that the region of the M-L6 protein recognized by mAb 12A8 corresponds to the region of H-L6 recognized by mAb L6. There are five amino acid differences in the regions of the H-L6 and M-L6 proteins recognized by L6 and 12A8, respectively. We further mapped the protein epitope recognized by L6 by individually exchanging each of these residues in H-L6 with the corresponding residue found in M-L6. Substitution of the single H-L6 residue Leu122 with Ser resulted in the H-L6 mutant HL6-L122S which failed to bind L6. The HL6-L122S mutant also failed to bind 12A8. Substituting residue Ser122 in M-L6 with Leu did not prevent 12A8 binding and did not result in L6 binding. The availability of mAb 12A8 and the finding that it recognizes the same region of M-L6 that is recognized by L6 on H-L6 might allow the development of a murine tumor model in which the L6 antigen can be further evaluated as a therapeutic target. 31 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Tumor-Associated Glycans and Immune Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Changes in cell surface glycosylation are a hallmark of the transition from normal to inflamed and neoplastic tissue. Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) challenge our understanding of immune tolerance, while functioning as immune targets that bridge innate immune surveillance and adaptive antitumor immunity in clinical applications. T-cells, being a part of the adaptive immune response, are the most popular component of the immune system considered for targeting tumor cells. However, for TACAs, T-cells take a back seat to antibodies and natural killer cells as first-line innate defense mechanisms. Here, we briefly highlight the rationale associated with the relative importance of the immune surveillance machinery that might be applicable for developing therapeutics. PMID:26343966

  11. Helper T cells against tumor-associated antigens (TAA): preferential induction of helper T cell activities involved in anti-TAA cytotoxic T lymphocyte and antibody responses

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, H.; Yoshioka, T.; Shima, J.; Kosugi, A.; Itoh, K.; Hamaoka, T.

    1986-04-01

    This study establishes assay systems for helper T cell activities assisting cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and antibody responses to tumor-associated antigens (TAA) and demonstrates the existence of TAA that induce preferentially anti-TAA CTL helper and B cell helper T cell activities in two syngeneic tumor models. C3H/HeN mice were immunized to the syngeneic X5563 plasmacytoma or MH135 hepatoma. Spleen cells from these mice were tested for anti-TAA helper T cell activity capable of augmenting anti-trinitrophenyl(TNP) CTL and anti-TNP antibody responses from anti-TNP CTL and B cell precursors (responding cells) by stimulation with TNP-modified X5563 or MH134 tumor cells. The results demonstrate that cultures of responding cells plus 850R X-irradiated tumor-immunized spleen cells (helper cells) failed to enhance anti-TNP CTL or antibody responses when in vitro stimulation was provided by either unmodified tumor cells or TNP-modified syngeneic spleen cells (TNP-self). In contrast, these cultures resulted in appreciable augmentation of anti-TNP CTL or antibody response when stimulated by TNP-modified tumor cells. The results are discussed in the light of cellular mechanisms underlying the preferential anti-TAA immune responses, and the interrelationship between various types of cell functions including CTL- and B cell-help.

  12. Spontaneous peripheral T-cell responses toward the tumor-associated antigen cyclin D1 in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dannenmann, Stefanie R; Hermanns, Thomas; Bransi, Ali; Matter, Claudia; von Boehmer, Lotta; Stevanovic, Stefan; Schraml, Peter; Moch, Holger; Knuth, Alexander; van den Broek, Maries

    2013-11-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a heterogeneous group of kidney cancers with clear cell RCC (ccRCC) as the major subgroup. To expand the number of clinically relevant tumor-associated antigens (TAA) that can be targeted by immunotherapy, we analyzed samples from 23 patients with primary ccRCC for the expression and immunogenicity of various TAAs. We found high-frequency expression of MAGE-A9 and NY-ESO-1 in 36% and 55% of samples, respectively, and overexpression of PRAME, RAGE-1, CA-IX, Cyclin D1, ADFP, C-MET, and RGS-5 in many of the tumor samples. We analyzed the blood of patients with HLA-A2(+) ccRCC for the presence of CD8(+) T cells specific for TAA-derived HLA-A2-restricted peptides and found spontaneous responses to cyclin D1 in 5 of 6 patients with Cyclin D1-positive tumors. Cyclin D1-specific CD8(+) T cells secreted TNF-α, IFN-γ, and interleukin-2 (IL-2), and degranulated, indicating the presence of polyfunctional tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells in the blood of these patients with ccRCC. The high frequency (43%) of Cyclin D1 overexpression and the presence of functional cyclin D1-specific T cells in 83% of these patients with ccRCC suggest that cyclin D1 may be a target for immunotherapeutic strategies.

  13. An optimized predictor panel for colorectal cancer diagnosis based on the combination of tumor-associated antigens obtained from protein and phage microarrays.

    PubMed

    Barderas, Rodrigo; Babel, Ingrid; Díaz-Uriarte, Ramón; Moreno, Víctor; Suárez, Adolfo; Bonilla, Felix; Villar-Vázquez, Roi; Capellá, Gabriel; Casal, J Ignacio

    2012-08-03

    Humoral response in cancer patients appears early in cancer progression and can be used for diagnosis, including early detection. By using human recombinant protein and T7 phage microarrays displaying colorectal cancer (CRC)-specific peptides, we previously selected 6 phages and 6 human recombinant proteins as tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) with high diagnostic value. After completing validation in biological samples, TAAs were classified according to their correlation, redundancy in reactivity patterns and multiplex diagnostic capabilities. For predictor model optimization, TAAs were reanalyzed with a new set of samples. A combination of three phages displaying peptides homologous to GRN, NHSL1 and SREBF2 and four proteins PIM1, MAPKAPK3, FGFR4 and ACVR2B, achieved an area under the curve (AUC) of 94%, with a sensitivity of 89.1% and specificity of 90.0%, to correctly predict the presence of cancer. For early colorectal cancer stages, the AUC was 90%, with a sensitivity of 88.2% and specificity of 82.6%. In summary, we have defined an optimized predictor panel, combining TAAs from different sources, with highly improved accuracy and diagnostic value for colorectal cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translational Proteomics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The translation elongation factor eEF2 is a novel tumor-associated antigen overexpressed in various types of cancers

    PubMed Central

    OJI, YUSUKE; TATSUMI, NAOYA; FUKUDA, MARI; NAKATSUKA, SHIN-ICHI; AOYAGI, SAYAKA; HIRATA, ERIKA; NANCHI, ISAMU; FUJIKI, FUMIHIRO; NAKAJIMA, HIROKO; YAMAMOTO, YUMIKO; SHIBATA, SYOHEI; NAKAMURA, MICHIYO; HASEGAWA, KANA; TAKAGI, SAYAKA; FUKUDA, IKUYO; HOSHIKAWA, TOMOKO; MURAKAMI, YUI; MORI, MASAHIDE; INOUE, MASAYOSHI; NAKA, TETSUJI; TOMONAGA, TAKESHI; SHIMIZU, YOSHIFUMI; NAKAGAWA, MASASHI; HASEGAWA, JUNICHI; NEZU, RIICHIRO; INOHARA, HIDENORI; IZUMOTO, SHUICHI; NONOMURA, NORIO; YOSHIMINE, TOSHIKI; OKUMURA, MEINOSHIN; MORII, EIICHI; MAEDA, HAJIME; NISHIDA, SUMIYUKI; HOSEN, NAOKI; TSUBOI, AKIHIRO; OKA, YOSHIHIRO; SUGIYAMA, HARUO

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that cancer immunotherapy could be a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. In the present study, to identify novel tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), the proteins expressed in a panel of cancer cells were serologically screened by immunoblot analysis and the eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) was identified as an antigen that was recognized by IgG autoantibody in sera from a group of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) or colon cancer. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that serum eEF2 IgG Ab levels were significantly higher in colorectal and gastric cancer patients compared to healthy individuals. Immunohistochemistry experiments showed that the eEF2 protein was overexpressed in the majority of lung, esophageal, pancreatic, breast and prostate cancers, HNSCC, glioblastoma multiforme and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Knockdown of eEF2 by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) significantly inhibited the growth in four eEF2-expressing cell lines, PC14 lung cancer, PCI6 pancreatic cancer, HT1080 fibrosarcoma and A172 glioblastoma cells, but not in eEF2-undetectable MCF7 cells. Furthermore, eEF2-derived 9-mer peptides, EF786 (eEF2 786–794 aa) and EF292 (eEF2 292–300 aa), elicited cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from an HLA-A*24:02- and an HLA-A*02:01-positive healthy donor, respectively, in an HLA-A-restricted manner. These results indicated that the eEF2 gene is overexpressed in the majority of several types of cancers and plays an oncogenic role in cancer cell growth. Moreover, the eEF2 gene product is immunogenic and a promising target molecule of cancer immunotherapy for several types of cancers. PMID:24589652

  15. O-antigen and Core Carbohydrate of Vibrio fischeri Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Post, Deborah M. B.; Yu, Liping; Krasity, Benjamin C.; Choudhury, Biswa; Mandel, Mark J.; Brennan, Caitlin A.; Ruby, Edward G.; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Apicella, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri exists in a symbiotic relationship with the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, where the squid provides a home for the bacteria, and the bacteria in turn provide camouflage that helps protect the squid from night-time predators. Like other Gram-negative organisms, V. fischeri expresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on its cell surface. The structure of the O-antigen and the core components of the LPS and their possible role in colonization of the squid have not previously been determined. In these studies, an O-antigen ligase mutant, waaL, was utilized to determine the structures of these LPS components and their roles in colonization of the squid. WaaL ligates the O-antigen to the core of the LPS; thus, LPS from waaL mutants lacks O-antigen. Our results show that the V. fischeri waaL mutant has a motility defect, is significantly delayed in colonization, and is unable to compete with the wild-type strain in co-colonization assays. Comparative analyses of the LPS from the wild-type and waaL strains showed that the V. fischeri LPS has a single O-antigen repeat composed of yersiniose, 8-epi-legionaminic acid, and N-acetylfucosamine. In addition, the LPS from the waaL strain showed that the core structure consists of l-glycero-d-manno-heptose, d-glycero-d-manno-heptose, glucose, 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid, N-acetylgalactosamine, 8-epi-legionaminic acid, phosphate, and phosphoethanolamine. These studies indicate that the unusual V. fischeri O-antigen sugars play a role in the early phases of bacterial colonization of the squid. PMID:22247546

  16. Maximizing Immune Response to Carbohydrate Antigens on Breast Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    DO containing 0.05% TSP with 200 R1 ot lectins at monoclonal antibodies (10 .g/ml) for 30 mia on seruit that had been thawed after storage at -80’C...5309- cinema in vivo: the importance of surface sialyl Lewi?0 antigen. tnt. IS1. Cancer 1996:69:290-4. 37. 1-akomori S. Glycosylation defining cancer

  17. The B-cell tumor-associated antigen ROR1 can be targeted with T cells modified to express a ROR1-specific chimeric antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Hudecek, Michael; Schmitt, Thomas M; Baskar, Sivasubramanian; Lupo-Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Nishida, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Tori N; Bleakley, Marie; Turtle, Cameron J; Chang, Wen-Chung; Greisman, Harvey A; Wood, Brent; Maloney, David G; Jensen, Michael C; Rader, Christoph; Riddell, Stanley R

    2010-11-25

    Monoclonal antibodies and T cells modified to express chimeric antigen receptors specific for B-cell lineage surface molecules such as CD20 exert antitumor activity in B-cell malignancies, but deplete normal B cells. The receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) was identified as a highly expressed gene in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), but not normal B cells, suggesting it may serve as a tumor-specific target for therapy. We analyzed ROR1-expression in normal nonhematopoietic and hematopoietic cells including B-cell precursors, and in hematopoietic malignancies. ROR1 has characteristics of an oncofetal gene and is expressed in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells, B-CLL and mantle cell lymphoma, but not in major adult tissues apart from low levels in adipose tissue and at an early stage of B-cell development. We constructed a ROR1-specific chimeric antigen receptor that when expressed in T cells from healthy donors or CLL patients conferred specific recognition of primary B-CLL and mantle cell lymphoma, including rare drug effluxing chemotherapy resistant tumor cells that have been implicated in maintaining the malignancy, but not mature normal B cells. T-cell therapies targeting ROR1 may be effective in B-CLL and other ROR1-positive tumors. However, the expression of ROR1 on some normal tissues suggests the potential for toxi-city to subsets of normal cells.

  18. Hidden IgG Antibodies to the Tumor-Associated Thomsen-Friedenreich Antigen in Gastric Cancer Patients: Lectin Reactivity, Avidity, and Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Kurtenkov, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    Natural antibodies to the tumor-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF) are related to tumor immunosurveillance and cancer patients' survival. Hidden IgG antibodies (HAbs) to TF, their lectin reactivity, avidity, and clinical relevance were studied. HAbs were present in cancer patients and controls. A decreased level of IgG HAbs was detected in cancer. The HAbs level positively correlated with the sialospecific SNA lectin binding in purified total IgG (tIgG) in donors and cancer patients, indicating that HAbs are higher sialylated. The avidity of anti-TF IgG in tIgG samples was lower in cancer patients (P = 0.025) while no difference in the avidity of free anti-TF IgG was established. A negative correlation between the avidity of anti-TF IgG in tIgG and SNA binding in both groups was observed (P < 0.0001). The HAbs level negatively correlated with the anti-TF IgG avidity in tIgG only in donors (P = 0.003). Changes in the level of HAbs and Abs avidity showed a rather good stage- and gender-dependent diagnostic accuracy. Cancer patients with a lower anti-TF IgG avidity in tIgG showed a benefit in survival. Thus the TF-specific HAbs represent a particular subset of anti-TF IgG that differ from free serum anti-TF IgG in SNA reactivity, avidity, diagnostic potential, and relation to survival. PMID:28316982

  19. Alpha 2HS-glycoprotein, a tumor-associated antigen (TAA) detected in Mexican patients with early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Grijalva, A L; Aguilar-Lemarroy, A; Jave-Suarez, L F; Gutiérrez-Ortega, A; Godinez-Melgoza, P A; Herrera-Rodríguez, S E; Mariscal-Ramírez, I; Martínez-Velázquez, M; Gawinowicz, M A; Martínez-Silva, M G; Cruz-Ramos, J A; Hernández-Gutiérrez, R

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the serum of patients with cancer contains antibodies that react with a group of autoantigens denominated tumor-associated antigens (TAA). TAA can be detected prior to clinical diagnosis; thus, they would be ideal biomarkers for early detection of cancer, using only a few microliters of a patient's serum. In the current study, we used an immune proteomic approach, combining two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis, Western blot, and matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) methods to identify TAA in the sera of patients diagnosed with breast cancer. Sera were obtained from 36 newly diagnosed patients with stage II breast cancer and those from 36 healthy volunteers were evaluated for the presence of the TAA. Alpha 2HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) antibodies were detected in 33 of 36 patients with breast cancer (91.7%) and in only 3 of 36 healthy patients (controls, 8.3%). Sensitivity of detection of autoantibodies against AHSG in patients with breast cancer was 91.7%. AHSG was detected in cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry. Our results strongly suggest that the presence of serum autoantibodies against AHSG protein may be useful as serum biomarkers for early-stage breast cancer screening and minimally invasive diagnosis in Mexican populations. In the present study, 2D immunoblot analysis was used to make a screening in samples of sera from patients with a diagnosis of early-stage breast cancer, in order to identify some autoantibodies that react against TAA. Proteins identified in the present study, particularly alpha 2HS-glycoprotein (AHSG), might be useful as potential biomarkers for breast cancer in early stages for Mexican populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Personalized ex vivo multiple peptide enrichment and detection of T cells reactive to multiple tumor-associated antigens in prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Taborska, Pavla; Stakheev, Dmitry; Strizova, Zuzana; Vavrova, Katerina; Podrazil, Michal; Bartunkova, Jirina; Smrz, Daniel

    2017-09-02

    Personalized peptide vaccination is a promising immunotherapeutic approach in prostate cancer (PCa). We therefore examined whether an approach, utilizing personalized multiple peptide-mediated ex vivo enrichment with effector T cells reactive to multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), could be employed as a basis for the development of T cell immunotherapy of PCa. In this study, we used the non-adherent fraction (lymphocytes) of cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a leukapheretic product of biochemically recurrent (BR, n = 14) and metastatic hormone-refractory (HR, n = 12) PCa patients. The lymphocytes were primed with a pool of mixed overlapping peptides derived from 6 PCa TAAs-PSA, PAP, NY-ESO-1, MAGE-A1, MAGE-A3 and MAGE-A4. After 2 weeks of culture, the cells were stimulated with the peptides and T cell reactivity determined by externalization of CD107a. No TAAs-reactive effector T cells were detected in the patient's lymphocytes after their reconstitution. However, following their priming with the TAAs-derived peptides and 2-week culturing, the lymphocytes became enriched with polyclonal TAAs-reactive effector CD8(+) T cells in 8 out of 14 BR and 5 out of 12 HR patients. No such reactive CD8(+) T cells were detected in cultured lymphocytes without the peptide priming. Stimulation of the responding cultures with peptides derived from individual TAAs revealed a unique repertoire of the reactive CD8(+) T cells. Our strategy revealed that the personalized multiple peptide-mediated ex vivo enrichment with multiple TAAs-reactive T cells in the PCa patient's lymphocytes is a viable approach for development of T cell immunotherapy of PCa.

  1. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... glossary girlshealth.gov home http://www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Carbohydrates Carbohydrates Carbohydrates (say: kar-boh-HEYE-drayts) are the body's main source of energy. They are sometimes called "carbs" for short. If ...

  2. Differential Recognition and Hydrolysis of Host Carbohydrate Antigens by Streptococcus pneumoniae Family 98 Glycoside Hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.; Whitworth, G; El Warry, N; Randriantsoa, M; Samain, E; Burke, R; Vocadlo, D; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a fucose utilization operon in the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome and its established importance in virulence indicates a reliance of this bacterium on the harvesting of host fucose-containing glycans. The identities of these glycans, however, and how they are harvested is presently unknown. The biochemical and high resolution x-ray crystallographic analysis of two family 98 glycoside hydrolases (GH98s) from distinctive forms of the fucose utilization operon that originate from different S. pneumoniae strains reveal that one enzyme, the predominant type among pneumococcal isolates, has a unique endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity on the LewisY antigen. Altered active site topography in the other species of GH98 enzyme tune its endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity to the blood group A and B antigens. Despite their different specificities, these enzymes, and by extension all family 98 glycoside hydrolases, use an inverting catalytic mechanism. Many bacterial and viral pathogens exploit host carbohydrate antigens for adherence as a precursor to colonization or infection. However, this is the first evidence of bacterial endoglycosidase enzymes that are known to play a role in virulence and are specific for distinct host carbohydrate antigens. The strain-specific distribution of two distinct types of GH98 enzymes further suggests that S. pneumoniae strains may specialize to exploit host-specific antigens that vary from host to host, a factor that may feature in whether a strain is capable of colonizing a host or establishing an invasive infection.

  3. Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Carbohydrate Antigen Series Biomarkers in Non-neoplastic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiang; Tian, Chenglin; Huang, Xusheng; Pu, Chuanqiang

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate antigen series biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are important for the diagnosis of brain metastasis and meningeal carcinomatosis. Its relationship with CSF and serum in non-neoplastic diseases may be beneficial for earlier diagnosis and treatment. 161 pairs of CSF and serum samples were obtained and compared. The 97.5th percentile and maximum value of carbohydrate antigen series biomarkers were obtained. The 97.5th percentile and maximum value of CSF CA125, CA15-3 and CA19-9 concentration for overall participants was 4.31 u/ml and 4.59 u/ml, 2.01 and 3.65 u/ml, 2.71 u/ml and 3.00 u/ml, respectively. Gender had no significant effect on these three CSF biomarkers. The concentration of these three biomarkers in CSF were all lower than the paired serum concentration. The ratio of CA125, CA15-3 and CA19-9 level (CSF / serum) were from 0.018 to 0.69, 0.038 to 0.893, 0.017 to1, respectively. Evaluation of intrathecal tumor markers synthesis is a specific, sensitive, reliable, and reproducible diagnostic tool. The values determined in this study of CSF carbohydrate antigen series biomarkers are significantly lower than what is usually used in clinical practice. © 2015 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  4. Chemical modification of carbohydrates in tissue sections may unmask mucin antigens.

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, S

    2013-01-01

    Expression of mucins in cells and tissues is of great diagnostic and prognostic importance, and immunohistochemistry frequently is used to detect them. Reports concerning mucin localization in sections sometimes are conflicting, however, partly because immunogenic regions of the mucin molecule may be masked and thus not available for binding to an antibody. We modified carbohydrates in tissue sections chemically to enhance the binding of monoclonal mucin antibodies and of the lectin, Vicia villosa B4, to human tissue. The immunohistochemical localization of MUC1 and the simple mucin-type antigens, Tn and sialyl-Tn, was influenced by oxidation with periodic acid and by β-elimination before incubation. In some epithelial cells the staining was prevented by these procedures while in other cells it was evident. It appears that chemical modification can either destroy some antigen binding sites or unmask cryptic antigen binding sites in the mucin molecule and thereby make them accessible for immunohistochemical detection.

  5. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    Carbohydrates are one of the main types of nutrients. They are the most important source of energy for your body. Your digestive system changes carbohydrates into glucose (blood sugar). Your body uses this ...

  6. A general strategy to optimize immunogenicity of HLA-B*0702 restricted cryptic peptides from tumor associated antigens: Design of universal neo-antigen like tumor vaccines for HLA-B*0702 positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Gallou, Catherine; Rougeot, Aude; Graff-Dubois, Stéphanie; Kosmatopoulos, Kostas; Menez-Jamet, Jeanne

    2016-01-01

    Tumor Associated Antigens (TAAs) are the privileged targets of almost all the cancer vaccines tested to date. Unfortunately all these vaccines failed to show a clinical efficacy. The main reason for this failure is the immune tolerance to TAAs that are self-proteins expressed by normal and cancer cells. Self-tolerance to TAAs is directed against their dominant rather than against their cryptic epitopes. The best way to overcome self-tolerance to TAAs would therefore be to target their cryptic epitopes. However, because of their low HLA-I affinity, cryptic peptides are non-immunogenic and cannot be used to stimulate an antitumor immune response unless their immunogenicity has been previously enhanced. In this paper we describe a general approach to enhance immunogenicity of almost all the HLA-B*0702 restricted cryptic peptides derived from TAAs. It consists in substituting residues at position 1 or 9 of low HLA-B*0702 affinity cryptic peptides by an Alanine or a Leucine respectively. These substitutions increase affinity of peptides for HLA-B*0702. These optimized cryptic peptides are strongly immunogenic and very importantly CTL they stimulate recognize their native counterparts. TAAs derived optimized cryptic peptides can be considered as universal antitumor vaccine since they escape self-tolerance, are immunogenic and are not patient specific. PMID:27506946

  7. Some immunogenic acid biochemical properties of tumor-associated transplantation antigens (TATA) obtained in soluble form or solubilized from two methylcholanthrene-induced sarcomas, Meth A and CI-4.

    PubMed

    Rogers, M J; Law, L W

    1981-06-15

    The subcellular distribution of the tumor-associated transplantation antigens (TATAs) of two highly immunogenic methylcholanthrene-induced sarcomas, Meth A and CI-4, were compared. Most of the TATA of CI-4 was found in the soluble fraction (cytosol) of the cell while the TATA from Meth A was variably distributed between the membrane and cytosol. The soluble fraction TATAs from both tumors were very immunogenic and their strong immunity could not be influenced by administering antigen in a variety of protocols that altered the immune response in other systems. The soluble fraction and membrane-associated TATAs from both tumors could be specifically bound to liposomes in reconstitution experiments and the antigenicity of all of the TATAs was significantly enhanced when they were incorporated into these artificial membranes.

  8. Inhibitory effects of thymus-independent type 2 antigens on MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation: comparative analysis of carbohydrate structures and the antigen presenting cell.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, M; Carrasco-Marín, E; Alvarez-Domínguez, C; Outschoorn, I M; Leyva-Cobián, F

    1997-02-25

    The role of thymus-independent type 2 (TI-2) antigens (polysaccharides) on the MHC-II-restricted processing of protein antigens was studied in vitro. In general, antigen presentation is inhibited when both peritoneal and splenic macrophages (M phi) as well as Küpffer cells (KC) are preincubated with acidic polysaccharides or branched dextrans. However, the inhibitory effect of neutral polysaccharides was minimal when KC were used as antigen presenting cells (APC). Morphological evaluation of the uptake of fluoresceinated polysaccharides clearly correlates with this selective and differential interference. Polysaccharides do not block MHC-I-restricted antigen presentation. Some chemical characteristics shared by different saccharides seem to be specially related to their potential inhibitory abilities: (i) those where two anomeric carbon atoms of two interlinked sugars and (ii) those containing several sulfate groups per disaccharide repeating unit. No polysaccharide being inhibitory in M phi abrogated antigen processing in other APC: lipopolysaccharide-activated B cells, B lymphoma cells, or dendritic cells (DC). Using radiolabeled polysaccharides it was observed that DC and B cells incorporated less radioactivity as a function of time than M phi. Morphological evaluation of these different APC incubated for extended periods of time with inhibitory concentrations of polysaccharides revealed intense cytoplasmic vacuolization in M phi but not in B cells or DC. The large majority of M phi lysosomes containing polysaccharides fail to fuse with incoming endocytic vesicles and delivery of fluid-phase tracers was reduced, suggesting that indigestible carbohydrates reduced the fusion of these loaded lysosomes with endosomes containing recently internalized tracers. It is suggested that the main causes of this antigen presentation blockade are (i) the chemical characteristics of certain carbohydrates and whether the specific enzymatic machinery for their intracellular

  9. Intramuscular myxoma associated with an increased carbohydrate antigen 19.9 level in a woman: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Intramuscular myxoma is a rare benign soft tissue tumor. The lack of specific symptoms and widely used laboratory tests makes the diagnosis quite difficult. We present a case of an Intramuscular myxoma associated with an increased carbohydrate antigen 19.9 level. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been any reported cases of an association of Intramuscular myxoma with tumor markers in the literature. Case presentation A 45-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our department for resection of a mass in her left groin area, discovered incidentally on a triplex ultrasonography of her lower extremities. The diagnosis of Intramuscular myxoma was confirmed on histopathology after the complete surgical excision of the tumor. On laboratory examination, the serum level of carbohydrate antigen 19.9 was found to be elevated, but it returned to normal six months after resection of the mass. Conclusion Carbohydrate antigen 19.9 is a tumor marker that increases in a variety of malignant and benign conditions. After the exclusion of all other possible reasons for carbohydrate antigen 19.9 elevation, we assumed a possible connection of carbohydrate antigen 19.9 elevation and Intramuscular myxoma, an issue that requires needs further investigation. PMID:21569608

  10. American Brain Tumor Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Molecule Read More ABTA News April 6, 2017 Chicago-Based American Brain Tumor Association’s Breakthrough for Brain ... Association 8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave. Ste 550 Chicago, IL 60631 © 2014 American Brain Tumor Association Phone: ...

  11. Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Cocinero, Emilio J; Çarçabal, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Although carbohydrates represent one of the most important families of biomolecules, they remain under-studied in comparison to the other biomolecular families (peptides, nucleobases). Beyond their best-known function of energy source in living systems, they act as mediator of molecular recognition processes, carrying molecular information in the so-called "sugar code," just to name one of their countless functions. Owing to their high conformational flexibility, they encode extremely rich information conveyed via the non-covalent hydrogen bonds within the carbohydrate and with other biomolecular assemblies, such as peptide subunits of proteins. Over the last decade there has been tremendous progress in the study of the conformational preferences of neutral oligosaccharides, and of the interactions between carbohydrates and various molecular partners (water, aromatic models, and peptide models), using vibrational spectroscopy as a sensitive probe. In parallel, other spectroscopic techniques have recently become available to the study of carbohydrates in the gas phase (microwave spectroscopy, IRMPD on charged species).

  12. Induction of an antitumor response using dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructs encoding the HLA-A*02:01-restricted epitopes of tumor-associated antigens in culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sennikov, Sergey Vital'evich; Shevchenko, Julia Alexandrovna; Kurilin, Vasilii Vasil'evich; Khantakova, Julia Nikolaevna; Lopatnikova, Julia Anatol'evna; Gavrilova, Elena Vasil'evna; Maksyutov, Rinat Amirovich; Bakulina, Anastasiya Yur'evna; Sidorov, Sergey Vasil'evich; Khristin, Alexander Alexandrovich; Maksyutov, Amir Zakievich

    2016-02-01

    Advances in oncoimmunology related to the definition of the basic mechanisms of the formation of antitumor immune response, as well as the opening of tumor-associated antigens recognized by immune cells, allowed to start developing ways to influence the effector cells of the immune system to generate effective antitumor cytotoxic response. We investigated the possibility to stimulate an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients by dendritic cells transfected with HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs. We isolated dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes and delivered our constructs to these cells by magnetic transfection. Additionally, a series of experiments with loading of dendritic cells with autologous tumor cell lysate antigens was conducted. We have shown that dendritic cells transfected with the HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs are effective in inducing an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients. Dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructor dendritic cells loaded with lysate antigens revealed a comparable stimulated cytotoxic response of mononuclear cells to these two ways of antigen delivery. We conclude that using DNA constructs in conjunction with patient stratification by HLA type allows the application of transfected DCs as an effective method to stimulate antitumor immunity in vitro.

  13. GTL001 and bivalent CyaA-based therapeutic vaccine strategies against human papillomavirus and other tumor-associated antigens induce effector and memory T-cell responses that inhibit tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Esquerré, Michaël; Momot, Marie; Goubier, Anne; Gonindard, Christophe; Leung-Theung-Long, Stéphane; Misseri, Yolande; Bissery, Marie-Christine

    2017-03-13

    GTL001 is a bivalent therapeutic vaccine containing human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and HPV18 E7 proteins inserted in the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase (CyaA) vector intended to prevent cervical cancer in HPV-infected women with normal cervical cytology or mild abnormalities. To be effective, therapeutic cervical cancer vaccines should induce both a T cell-mediated effector response against HPV-infected cells and a robust CD8(+) T-cell memory response to prevent potential later infection. We examined the ability of GTL001 and related bivalent CyaA-based vaccines to induce, in parallel, effector and memory CD8(+) T-cell responses to both vaccine antigens. Intradermal vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with GTL001 adjuvanted with a TLR3 agonist (polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid) or a TLR7 agonist (topical 5% imiquimod cream) induced strong HPV16 E7-specific T-cell responses capable of eradicating HPV16 E7-expressing tumors. Tumor-free mice also had antigen-specific memory T-cell responses that protected them against a subsequent challenge with HPV18 E7-expressing tumor cells. In addition, vaccination with bivalent vaccines containing CyaA-HPV16 E7 and CyaA fused to a tumor-associated antigen (melanoma-specific antigen A3, MAGEA3) or to a non-viral, non-tumor antigen (ovalbumin) eradicated HPV16 E7-expressing tumors and protected against a later challenge with MAGEA3- and ovalbumin-expressing tumor cells, respectively. These results show that CyaA-based bivalent vaccines such as GTL001 can induce both therapeutic and prophylactic anti-tumor T-cell responses. The CyaA platform can be adapted to different antigens and adjuvants, and therefore may be useful for developing other therapeutic vaccines.

  14. Recognition of the Thomsen-Friedenreich Pancarcinoma Carbohydrate Antigen by a Lamprey Variable Lymphocyte Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming; Velikovsky, C. Alejandro; Yang, Xinbo; Siddiqui, Maqbool A.; Hong, Xia; Barchi, Joseph J.; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.; Pancer, Zeev; Mariuzza, Roy A.

    2013-01-01

    Variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) are leucine-rich repeat proteins that mediate adaptive immunity in jawless vertebrates. VLRs were recently shown to recognize glycans, such as the tumor-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TFα; Galβ1–3GalNAcα), with a selectivity rivaling or exceeding that of lectins and antibodies. To understand the basis for TFα recognition by one such VLR (VLRB.aGPA.23), we measured thermodynamic parameters for the binding interaction and determined the structure of the VLRB.aGPA.23-TFα complex to 2.2 Å resolution. In the structure, four tryptophan residues form a tight hydrophobic cage encasing the TFα disaccharide that completely excludes buried water molecules. This cage together with hydrogen bonding of sugar hydroxyls to polar side chains explains the exquisite selectivity of VLRB.aGPA.23. The topology of the glycan-binding site of VLRB.aGPA.23 differs markedly from those of lectins or antibodies, which typically consist of long, convex grooves for accommodating the oligosaccharide. Instead, the TFα disaccharide is sandwiched between a variable loop and the concave surface of the VLR formed by the β-strands of the leucine-rich repeat modules. Longer oligosaccharides are predicted to extend perpendicularly across the β-strands, requiring them to bend to match the concavity of the VLR solenoid. PMID:23782692

  15. Correlation between ovarian chocolate cyst and serum carbohydrate antigen 125 level and the effect of ultrasound-guided interventional sclerotherapy on serum carbohydrate antigen 125 level.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si-Ming; Cai, Huai-Qiu; Dong, Xiao-Qiu; Fan, Qiu-Lan; Wang, Lu-Lu; Shao, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Li-Wei

    2015-01-01

    This study was to investigate the correlation between ovarian chocolate cysts and serum carbohydrate antigen (CA)-125 levels and to demonstrate the effect of ultrasound-guided interventional sclerotherapy (UGIS) on serum CA-125 levels. Based on the serum CA-125 level, as determined by chemiluminescence detection prior to UGIS, 105 patients with ovarian chocolate cysts were divided into the normal group (CA-125 ≤ 35 U/mL, 45 patients) and the abnormal group (35 U/mL < CA-125 ≤ 200 U/mL, 60 patients). There were six clinical indicators including age, disease duration, dysmenorrhea history, child-bearing history, abortion history and surgical history. The ultrasonography characteristics were cyst diameter, cyst wall thickness and the side on which the cyst occurred. The correlations between serum CA-125 levels pretreatment and the clinical indicators and ultrasonography characteristics was analyzed. The serum CA-125 levels pretreatment, 3 months post-treatment and 6 months post-treatment were compared. The pretreatment serum CA-125 levels of the 105 patients positively correlated with disease duration (r = 0.3932, P = 0.0040), dysmenorrhea history (r = 0.2351, P = 0.0111), cyst diameter (r = 0.3415, P < 0.0001) and cyst wall thickness (r = 0.4263, P < 0.0001). Compared with the pretreatment level, the mean serum CA-125 level in the abnormal group at 3 months post-treatment was significantly lower (P < 0.01), and at 6 months post-treatment, the mean serum CA-125 level had decreased to a normal level (P < 0.01). UGIS significantly decreased abnormal serum CA-125 levels in patients with ovarian chocolate cysts. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  16. Carbohydrate Sequence of the Prostate Cancer-associated Antigen F77 Assigned by a Mucin O-Glycome Designer Array*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chao; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhang, Yibing; Fukuda, Michiko N.; Palma, Angelina S.; Kozak, Radoslaw P.; Childs, Robert A.; Nonaka, Motohiro; Li, Zhen; Siegel, Don L.; Hanfland, Peter; Peehl, Donna M.; Chai, Wengang; Greene, Mark I.; Feizi, Ten

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody F77 was previously raised against human prostate cancer cells and has been shown to recognize a carbohydrate antigen, but the carbohydrate sequence of the antigen was elusive. Here, we make multifaceted approaches to characterize F77 antigen, including binding analyses with the glycolipid extract of the prostate cancer cell line PC3, microarrays with sequence-defined glycan probes, and designer arrays from the O-glycome of an antigen-positive mucin, in conjunction with mass spectrometry. Our results reveal F77 antigen to be expressed on blood group H on a 6-linked branch of a poly-N-acetyllactosamine backbone. We show that mAb F77 can also bind to blood group A and B analogs but with lower intensities. We propose that the close association of F77 antigen with prostate cancers is a consequence of increased blood group H expression together with up-regulated branching enzymes. This is in contrast to other epithelial cancers that have up-regulated branching enzymes but diminished expression of H antigen. With knowledge of the structure and prevalence of F77 antigen in prostate cancer, the way is open to explore rationally its application as a biomarker to detect F77-positive circulating prostate cancer-derived glycoproteins and tumor cells. PMID:24753245

  17. Carbohydrate sequence of the prostate cancer-associated antigen F77 assigned by a mucin O-glycome designer array.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhang, Yibing; Fukuda, Michiko N; Palma, Angelina S; Kozak, Radoslaw P; Childs, Robert A; Nonaka, Motohiro; Li, Zhen; Siegel, Don L; Hanfland, Peter; Peehl, Donna M; Chai, Wengang; Greene, Mark I; Feizi, Ten

    2014-06-06

    Monoclonal antibody F77 was previously raised against human prostate cancer cells and has been shown to recognize a carbohydrate antigen, but the carbohydrate sequence of the antigen was elusive. Here, we make multifaceted approaches to characterize F77 antigen, including binding analyses with the glycolipid extract of the prostate cancer cell line PC3, microarrays with sequence-defined glycan probes, and designer arrays from the O-glycome of an antigen-positive mucin, in conjunction with mass spectrometry. Our results reveal F77 antigen to be expressed on blood group H on a 6-linked branch of a poly-N-acetyllactosamine backbone. We show that mAb F77 can also bind to blood group A and B analogs but with lower intensities. We propose that the close association of F77 antigen with prostate cancers is a consequence of increased blood group H expression together with up-regulated branching enzymes. This is in contrast to other epithelial cancers that have up-regulated branching enzymes but diminished expression of H antigen. With knowledge of the structure and prevalence of F77 antigen in prostate cancer, the way is open to explore rationally its application as a biomarker to detect F77-positive circulating prostate cancer-derived glycoproteins and tumor cells. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. The glycosphingolipid P1 is an ovarian cancer-associated carbohydrate antigen involved in migration

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, F; Anugraham, M; Pochechueva, T; Tse, B W C; Alam, S; Guertler, R; Bovin, N V; Fedier, A; Hacker, N F; Huflejt, M E; Packer, N; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, V A

    2014-01-01

    Background: The level of plasma-derived naturally circulating anti-glycan antibodies (AGA) to P1 trisaccharide has previously been shown to significantly discriminate between ovarian cancer patients and healthy women. Here we aim to identify the Ig class that causes this discrimination, to identify on cancer cells the corresponding P1 antigen recognised by circulating anti-P1 antibodies and to shed light into the possible function of this glycosphingolipid. Methods: An independent Australian cohort was assessed for the presence of anti-P1 IgG and IgM class antibodies using suspension array. Monoclonal and human derived anti-glycan antibodies were verified using three independent glycan-based immunoassays and flow cytometry-based inhibition assay. The P1 antigen was detected by LC-MS/MS and flow cytometry. FACS-sorted cell lines were studied on the cellular migration by colorimetric assay and real-time measurement using xCELLigence system. Results: Here we show in a second independent cohort (n=155) that the discrimination of cancer patients is mediated by the IgM class of anti-P1 antibodies (P=0.0002). The presence of corresponding antigen P1 and structurally related epitopes in fresh tissue specimens and cultured cancer cells is demonstrated. We further link the antibody and antigen (P1) by showing that human naturally circulating and affinity-purified anti-P1 IgM isolated from patients ascites can bind to naturally expressed P1 on the cell surface of ovarian cancer cells. Cell-sorted IGROV1 was used to obtain two study subpopulations (P1-high, 66.1% and P1-low, 33.3%) and observed that cells expressing high P1-levels migrate significantly faster than those with low P1-levels. Conclusions: This is the first report showing that P1 antigen, known to be expressed on erythrocytes only, is also present on ovarian cancer cells. This suggests that P1 is a novel tumour-associated carbohydrate antigen recognised by the immune system in patients and may have a role in cell

  19. The glycosphingolipid P₁ is an ovarian cancer-associated carbohydrate antigen involved in migration.

    PubMed

    Jacob, F; Anugraham, M; Pochechueva, T; Tse, B W C; Alam, S; Guertler, R; Bovin, N V; Fedier, A; Hacker, N F; Huflejt, M E; Packer, N; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, V A

    2014-10-14

    The level of plasma-derived naturally circulating anti-glycan antibodies (AGA) to P1 trisaccharide has previously been shown to significantly discriminate between ovarian cancer patients and healthy women. Here we aim to identify the Ig class that causes this discrimination, to identify on cancer cells the corresponding P1 antigen recognised by circulating anti-P1 antibodies and to shed light into the possible function of this glycosphingolipid. An independent Australian cohort was assessed for the presence of anti-P1 IgG and IgM class antibodies using suspension array. Monoclonal and human derived anti-glycan antibodies were verified using three independent glycan-based immunoassays and flow cytometry-based inhibition assay. The P1 antigen was detected by LC-MS/MS and flow cytometry. FACS-sorted cell lines were studied on the cellular migration by colorimetric assay and real-time measurement using xCELLigence system. Here we show in a second independent cohort (n=155) that the discrimination of cancer patients is mediated by the IgM class of anti-P1 antibodies (P=0.0002). The presence of corresponding antigen P1 and structurally related epitopes in fresh tissue specimens and cultured cancer cells is demonstrated. We further link the antibody and antigen (P1) by showing that human naturally circulating and affinity-purified anti-P1 IgM isolated from patients ascites can bind to naturally expressed P1 on the cell surface of ovarian cancer cells. Cell-sorted IGROV1 was used to obtain two study subpopulations (P1-high, 66.1%; and P1-low, 33.3%) and observed that cells expressing high P1-levels migrate significantly faster than those with low P1-levels. This is the first report showing that P1 antigen, known to be expressed on erythrocytes only, is also present on ovarian cancer cells. This suggests that P1 is a novel tumour-associated carbohydrate antigen recognised by the immune system in patients and may have a role in cell migration. The clinical value of our data

  20. THE INHERITANCE OF INDIVIDUAL ANTIGENIC SPECIFICITIES OF RABBIT ANTIBODIES TO STREPTOCOCCAL CARBOHYDRATES

    PubMed Central

    Eichmann, Klaus; Kindt, Thomas J.

    1971-01-01

    The inheritance of individual antigenic specificities (IAS) of rabbit antibodies to the Group C streptococcal carbohydrate was demonstrated in a selectively bred rabbit family. The IAS of the antibodies from 3 proband rabbits were also observed in the Group C antibodies in as many as 7 out of 42 related rabbits, but in none of the Group C antibodies from 48 unrelated rabbits, Immunodiffusion analyses and quantitative radioprecipitin experiments revealed that this cross-specificity may be either partial or complete. Quantitative inhibition of the precipitin reaction between the proband antibody and its antiserum by preimmune IgG revealed 30-fold differences in the proportion of molecules with cross-specificity for the proband antibody. This proportion is higher in the preimmune IgG of the proband rabbit and of those relatives which produced cross-precipitating antibodies than it is in the IgG of rabbits which had the same group a allotype, but did not produce cross-precipitating antibodies. The proportion is much lower in the IgG of rabbits with a group a allotype different from that of the proband antibody. These data suggest that serologically detected individual antigenic specificities are inherited markers of immunoglobulins. PMID:4104426

  1. Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria lactamica and Moraxella catarrhalis share cross-reactive carbohydrate antigens.

    PubMed

    Braun, Jan M; Beuth, Josef; Blackwell, C Caroline; Giersen, Sonja; Higgins, Paul G; Tzanakaki, Georgina; Unverhau, Heike; Weir, Donald M

    2004-02-17

    Carriage of commensal bacteria species is associated with the development of natural immunity to meningococcal disease, with lipo-oligosaccharides (LOS) of meningococci being one of the main virulence factors associated with severity of meningococcal disease. Meningococcal reference strains and isolates from the commensal species Neisseria lactamica and Moraxella catarrhalis were assessed for the presence of cross-reactive glycoconjugate antigens. Binding of human blood group antibodies of the P and Ii system to meningococcal immunotype reference strains were in accordance with the presence of known LOS carbohydrate structures. Binding studies with meningococcal immunotyping antibodies and blood group phenotyping antibodies to N. lactamica strains from different European countries showed, that a greater number of isolates obtained from native Greek and Scottish adults and children bound anti-meningococcal L(3, 7, 9) immunotyping (P < 0.001), pK (P = 0.035) and paragloboside (P < 0.001) blood group typing antibodies compared to isolates obtained from children of Russian immigrants in Greece. A greater number of M. catarrhalis strains isolated from children in Scotland bound anti-L(3, 7, 9) antibodies (38.2%) compared to strains isolated from adults (22.2%) (P = 0.017). These findings provide evidence that blood group like glycoconjugate antigens found on the commensal species N. lactamica and M. catarrhalis might be involved in the development of natural immunity to meningococcal endotoxins during childhood, and might be exploited as anti-meningococcal vaccine candidates.

  2. Ciliated hepatic foregut cyst with high intra-cystic carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level.

    PubMed

    Ben Ari, Ziv; Cohen-Ezra, Oranit; Weidenfeld, Jonathan; Bradichevsky, Tania; Weitzman, Ella; Rimon, Uri; Inbar, Yael; Amitai, Michal; Bar-Zachai, Barak; Eshkenazy, Roni; Ariche, Arie; Azoulay, Daniel

    2014-11-21

    A ciliated hepatic foregut cyst (CHFC) is a rare foregut developmental malformation usually diagnosed in adulthood. Five percent of reported cases of CHFC transform into squamous cell carcinoma. We report the presentation, evaluation, and surgical management of a symptomatic 45-year-old male found to have a 6.2 cm CHFC. Contrast tomography-guided fine-needle aspiration demonstrated columnar, ciliated epithelium consistent with the histologic diagnosis of CHFC. The intracystic levels of carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were extremely high (978118 U/mL and 973 μg/L, respectively). Histologically, the wall of the cyst showed characteristic pseudopapillae lined with a ciliated stratified columnar epithelium, underlying smooth muscle, an outer fibrous layer and no atypia. Immunohistochemistry for CA19-9 and CEA was positive. This is the first case report of a CHFC in which levels of CA 19-9 and CEA were measured. Our findings suggest that a large sized multilocular cyst and elevated cyst CA19-9 and CEA levels do not exclude a CHFC from consideration in the diagnosis. CHFCs should be included in the differential diagnosis of hepatic lesions. Accurate diagnosis of a CHFC is necessary given its potential for malignant transformation, and surgical excision is recommended.

  3. Diagnostic value of carbohydrate antigens in supernatants and sediments of pleural effusions

    PubMed Central

    TERRACCIANO, DANIELA; MAZZARELLA, CLAUDIA; CICALESE, MARCELLINO; GALZERANO, SONIA; APOSTOLICO, GIANFRANCO; DI CARLO, ANGELINA; MARIANO, ANGELA; CECERE, CIRIACO; MACCHIA, VINCENZO

    2010-01-01

    A panel of tumour markers including carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen (Ca)15-3, Ca125 and Ca19-9 were measured in the lysate of sediments and in the supernatants of pleural effusions of patients with benign and malignant disease. The tumour markers were also measured in the serum of the same patients. Of these patients, 32 had benign diseases (12 trasudative effusions associated with cirrhosis and 20 with non-malignant exudates: 12 pleuritis and 8 other inflammations) and 103 had malignant effusions (37 breast cancers, 29 lung cancers, 10 ovary cancers, 6 kidney cancers, 11 mesotheliomas and 10 lymphomas). We showed the highest level of CEA in pleural effusions of lung cancer followed by that in pleural effusions of breast cancer; whereas Ca15-3 was very high in the pleural effusions of breast and lung cancer. Concerning the lysate of sediment, CEA was high in the pleural effusions of patients with lung cancer and Ca15-3 in those of patients with breast cancer. The other markers are much less useful. For the remaining tumours, none of the markers tested appear to aid in the diagnosis of disease. In conclusion, our data suggest that the combined determination of tumour markers on supernatants and sediments of pleural effusion may provide additional information on the nature of pleural effusion, especially for cases with negative cytology. PMID:22966327

  4. Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicon immunization overcomes intrinsic tolerance and elicits effective anti-tumor immunity to the 'self' tumor-associated antigen, neu in a rat mammary tumor model.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Edward L; Prieto, Darue; Alexander, Terri G; Pushko, Peter; Lofts, Loreen A; Rayner, Jonathan O; Kamrud, Kurt I; Fralish, Bolyn; Smith, Jonathan F

    2003-12-01

    Many tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) represent 'self' antigens and as such, are subject to the constraints of immunologic tolerance. There are significant barriers to eliciting anti-tumor immune responses of sufficient magnitude. We have taken advantage of a Venezuelan equine encephalitis-derived alphavirus replicon vector system with documented in vivo tropism for immune system dendritic cells. We have overcome the intrinsic tolerance to the 'self' TAA rat neu and elicited an effective anti-tumor immune response using this alphavirus replicon vector system and a designed target antigen in a rigorous rat mammary tumor model. We have demonstrated the capacity to generate 50% protection in tumor challenge experiments (p = 0.004) and we have confirmed the establishment of immunologic memory by both second tumor challenge and Winn Assay (p = 0.009). Minor antibody responses were identified and supported the establishment of T helper type 1 (Th1) anti-tumor immune responses by isotype. Animals surviving in excess of 300 days with established effective anti-tumor immunity showed no signs of autoimmune phenomena. Together these experiments support the establishment of T lymphocyte dependent, Th1-biased anti-tumor immune responses to a non-mutated 'self' TAA in an aggressive tumor model. Importantly, this tumor model is subject to the constraints of immunologic tolerance present in animals with normal developmental, temporal, and anatomical expression of a non-mutated TAA. These data support the continued development and potential clinical application of this alphaviral replicon vector system and the use of appropriately designed target antigen sequences for anti-tumor immunotherapy.

  5. Carbohydrate Antigen-125-Guided Therapy in Acute Heart Failure: CHANCE-HF: A Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Julio; Llàcer, Pau; Bertomeu-González, Vicente; Bosch, Maria José; Merlos, Pilar; García-Blas, Sergio; Montagud, Vicente; Bodí, Vicent; Bertomeu-Martínez, Vicente; Pedrosa, Valle; Mendizábal, Andrea; Cordero, Alberto; Gallego, Jorge; Palau, Patricia; Miñana, Gema; Santas, Enrique; Morell, Salvador; Llàcer, Angel; Chorro, Francisco J; Sanchis, Juan; Fácila, Lorenzo

    2016-11-01

    This study sought to evaluate the prognostic effect of carbohydrate antigen-125 (CA125)-guided therapy (CA125 strategy) versus standard of care (SOC) after a hospitalization for acute heart failure (AHF). CA125 has emerged as a surrogate of fluid overload and inflammatory status in AHF. After an episode of AHF admission, elevated values of this marker at baseline as well as its longitudinal profile relate to adverse outcomes, making it a potential tool for treatment guiding. In a prospective multicenter randomized trial, 380 patients discharged for AHF and high CA125 were randomly assigned to the CA125 strategy (n = 187) or SOC (n = 193). The aim in the CA125 strategy was to reduce CA125 to ≤35 U/ml by up or down diuretic dose, enforcing the use of statins, and tightening patient monitoring. The primary endpoint was 1-year composite of death or AHF readmission. Treatment strategies were compared as a time to first event and longitudinally. Patients allocated to the CA125 strategy were more frequently visited, and treated with ambulatory intravenous loop diuretics and statins. Likewise, doses of oral loop diuretics and aldosterone receptor blockers were more frequently modified. The CA125 strategy resulted in a significant reduction of the primary endpoint, whether evaluated as time to first event (66 events vs. 84 events; p = 0.017) or as recurrent events (85 events vs. 165 events; incidence rate ratio: 0.49; 95% confidence interval: 0.28 to 0.82; p = 0.008). The effect was driven by significantly reducing rehospitalizations but not mortality. The CA125 strategy was superior to the SOC in terms of reducing the risk of the composite of 1-year death or AHF readmission. This effect was mainly driven by significantly reducing the rate of rehospitalizations. (Carbohydrate Antigen-125-guided Therapy in Heart Failure [CHANCE-HF]; NCT02008110). Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Structural Diversity of Carbohydrate Antigens of Selected Gram-Negative Marine Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nazarenko, Evgeny L.; Crawford, Russell J.; Ivanova, Elena P.

    2011-01-01

    Marine microorganisms have evolved for millions of years to survive in the environments characterized by one or more extreme physical or chemical parameters, e.g., high pressure, low temperature or high salinity. Marine bacteria have the ability to produce a range of biologically active molecules, such as antibiotics, toxins and antitoxins, antitumor and antimicrobial agents, and as a result, they have been a topic of research interest for many years. Among these biologically active molecules, the carbohydrate antigens, lipopolysaccharides (LPSs, O-antigens) found in cell walls of Gram-negative marine bacteria, show great potential as candidates in the development of drugs to prevent septic shock due to their low virulence. The structural diversity of LPSs is thought to be a reflection of the ability for these bacteria to adapt to an array of habitats, protecting the cell from being compromised by exposure to harsh environmental stress factors. Over the last few years, the variety of structures of core oligosaccharides and O-specific polysaccharides from LPSs of marine microrganisms has been discovered. In this review, we discuss the most recently encountered structures that have been identified from bacteria belonging to the genera Aeromonas, Alteromonas, Idiomarina, Microbulbifer, Pseudoalteromonas, Plesiomonas and Shewanella of the Gammaproteobacteria phylum; Sulfitobacter and Loktanella of the Alphaproteobactera phylum and to the genera Arenibacter, Cellulophaga, Chryseobacterium, Flavobacterium, Flexibacter of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum. Particular attention is paid to the particular chemical features of the LPSs, such as the monosaccharide type, non-sugar substituents and phosphate groups, together with some of the typifying traits of LPSs obtained from marine bacteria. A possible correlation is then made between such features and the environmental adaptations undertaken by marine bacteria. PMID:22073003

  7. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 for differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Si-Biao; Qin, Shan-Yu; Chen, Wen; Luo, Wei; Jiang, Hai-Xing

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the utility of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) for differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. METHODS: We searched the literature for studies reporting the sensitivity, specificity, and other accuracy measures of serum CA19-9 levels for differentiating pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. Pooled analysis was performed using random-effects models, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated. Study quality was assessed using Standards for Reporting Diagnostic Accuracy and Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy tools. RESULTS: A total of 34 studies involving 3125 patients with pancreatic carcinoma and 2061 patients with chronic pancreatitis were included. Pooled analysis of the ability of CA19-9 level to differentiate pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis showed the following effect estimates: sensitivity, 0.81 (95%CI: 0.80-0.83); specificity, 0.81 (95%CI: 0.79-0.82); positive likelihood ratio, 4.08 (95%CI: 3.39-4.91); negative likelihood ratio, 0.24 (95%CI: 0.21-0.28); and diagnostic odds ratio, 19.31 (95%CI: 14.40-25.90). The area under the ROC curve was 0.88. No significant publication bias was detected. CONCLUSION: Elevated CA19-9 by itself is insufficient for differentiating pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis, however, it increases suspicion of pancreatic carcinoma and may complement other clinical findings to improve diagnostic accuracy. PMID:25892884

  8. IMMUNOCHEMICAL STUDIES ON THE GROUP AND TYPE ANTIGENS OF GROUP F STREPTOCOCCI AND THE IDENTIFICATION OF A GROUPLIKE CARBOHYDRATE IN A TYPE II STRAIN WITH AN UNDESIGNATED GROUP ANTIGEN

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Marc F.; Krause, Richard M.

    1967-01-01

    Two antigens, the group-specific carbohydrate and the Type II carbohydrate, have been isolated by cellulose column chromatography from a formamide extract of a Group F streptococcus. Chemical and immunologic analyses indicate that both antigens are free of other cellular components. Both antigens are components of the cell wall although the Type II antigen is probably more superficial than the group antigen. The Type II antigen is composed of rhamnose, glucose, galactose, and galactosamine. The Group F antigen is composed of rhamnose, glucose, galactosamine and a small percentage of glucosamine. A grouplike carbohydrate and the Type II carbohydrate have been isolated from a streptotoccal strain which lacks a serologically detectable streptococcal group antigen. This grouplike carbohydrate, which does not cross-react immunologically with Group F serum, is composed of rhamnose, galactose, and glucosamine. No chemical or immunological differences were observed between the Type II antigen isolated from the Group F strain and the Type II antigen isolated from the nongroupable strain. PMID:6025319

  9. Lysosome-associated membrane glycoprotein 1 predicts fratricide amongst T cell receptor transgenic CD8+ T cells directed against tumor-associated antigens

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Andreas; Thiede, Melanie; Blaeschke, Franziska; Richter, Günther H.S.; Gerke, Julia S.; Baldauf, Michaela C.; Grünewald, Thomas G.P.; Busch, Dirk H.; Burdach, Stefan; Thiel, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Aim Autologous as well as allogeneic CD8+ T cells transduced with tumor antigen specific T cell receptors (TCR) may cause significant tumor lysis upon adoptive transfer. Besides unpredictable life-threatening off-target effects, these TCRs may unexpectedly commit fratricide. We hypothesized lysosome-associated membrane glycoprotein 1 (LAMP1, CD107a) to be a marker for fratricide in TCR transgenic CD8+ T cells. Methods We identified HLA-A*02:01/peptide-restricted T cells directed against ADRB3295. After TCR identification, we generated HLA-A*02:01/peptide restricted TCR transgenic T cells by retroviral transduction and tested T cell expansion rates as well as A*02:01/peptide recognition and ES killing in ELISpot and xCELLigence assays. Expansion arrest was analyzed via Annexin and CD107a staining. Results were compared to CHM1319-TCR transgenic T cells. Results Beta-3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) as well as chondromodulin-1 (CHM1) are over-expressed in Ewing Sarcoma (ES) but not on T cells. TCR transgenic T cells demonstrated HLA-A*02:01/ADRB3295 mediated ES recognition and killing in ELISpot and xCELLigence assays. 24h after TCR transduction, CD107a expression correlated with low expansion rates due to apoptosis of ADRB3 specific T cells in contrast to CHM1 specific transgenic T cells. Amino-acid exchange scans clearly indicated the cross-reactive potential of HLA-A*02:01/ADRB3295- and HLA-A*02:01/CHM1319-TCR transgenic T cells. Comparison of peptide motive binding affinities revealed extended fratricide among ADRB3295 specific TCR transgenic T cells in contrast to CHM1319. Conclusion Amino-acid exchange scans alone predict TCR cross-reactivity with little specificity and thus require additional assessment of potentially cross-reactive HLA-A*02:01 binding candidates. CD107a positivity is a marker for fratricide of CD8+ TCR transgenic T cells. PMID:27447745

  10. High expression of prostate-specific membrane antigen in the tumor-associated neo-vasculature is associated with worse prognosis in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Michael C; Laimer, Johannes; Chaux, Alcides; Schäfer, Georg; Obrist, Peter; Brunner, Andrea; Kronberger, Irmgard E; Laimer, Klaus; Gurel, Bora; Koller, Johann-Benedikt; Seifarth, Christof; Zelger, Bettina; Klocker, Helmut; Rasse, Michael; Doppler, Wolfgang; Bander, Neil H

    2012-08-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a transmembrane protein expressed in prostate cancer as well as in the neo-vasculature of nonprostatic solid tumors. Here, we determined the expression pattern of PSMA in the vasculature of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Using a previously validated antibody, PSMA staining distribution and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expression status was evaluated in a cohort of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (n=96) using immunohistochemistry and was correlated with clinicopathological features as well as outcome. Twenty-four (25%) cases showed no detectable PSMA staining, 48 (50%) demonstrated positive immunoreactivity for PSMA in less than 50% of microvessels and 24 (25%) cases showed strong endothelial PSMA expression in more than 50% of tumor-associated microvessels. High endothelial PSMA expression was associated with greatly reduced survival (18.2 vs 77.3 months; P=0.0001) and maintained prognostic significance after adjusting for grade and stage in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio=2.19, P=0.007). Furthermore, we observed a strong association between endothelial PSMA and cancer cell-specific COX2 expression. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence for the prognostic significance of endothelial PSMA expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma and, suggest a potential interaction between arachidonic acid metabolites and endothelial PSMA expression in the tumor neo-vasculature.

  11. In Vitro Assessment of the Expression and T Cell Immunogenicity of the Tumor-Associated Antigens BORIS, MUC1, hTERT, MAGE-A3 and Sp17 in Uterine Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vanderstraeten, Anke; Tuyaerts, Sandra; Everaert, Tina; Van Bree, Rieta; Verbist, Godelieve; Luyten, Cathérine; Amant, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Background: While immunotherapy moved to the forefront of treatment of various cancers, it remains underexplored for uterine cancer. This might be due to the small patient population with advanced endometrial carcinoma and uterine sarcoma. Data about immunotherapeutic targets are scarce in endometrial carcinoma and lacking in uterine sarcoma. Methods: Expression of five tumor-associated antigens (TAA) (BORIS, MUC1, hTERT, MAGE-A3 and Sp17) was validated in uterine tumor samples by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and/or quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). TAA immunogenicity was analyzed by determining spontaneous T cell responses towards overlapping peptide pools covering the whole TAA in patient blood. Results: At mRNA level, MAGE-A3 and Sp17 were overexpressed in a minority of patients and BORIS was moderately overexpressed (26% in endometrial carcinoma and 62% in uterine sarcoma). hTERT was overexpressed in the vast majority of tumors. On protein level, MUC1 was upregulated in primary, recurrent and metastatic EMCAR and in metastatic US tumors. hTERT protein was highly expressed in both normal and malignant tissue. Spontaneous TAA-specific T cell responses were detected in a minority of patients, except for hTERT to which T cell responses occurred more frequently. Conclusions: These data point to MUC1 and hTERT as most suitable targets based on expression levels and T cell immunogenicity for use in immunotherapeutic regimens. PMID:27618037

  12. Carbohydrate antigen sialyl Lewis a--its pathophysiological significance and induction mechanism in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Kannagi, Reiji

    2007-01-01

    Carbohydrate antigen sialyl Lewis a (CA19-9) is the most frequently applied serum tumor marker for diagnosis of cancers in the digestive organs. Recent progress disclosed the presence of a normal counterpart of the determinant, namely disialyl Lewis a, which is predominantly expressed in non-malignant epithelial cells of the digestive organs, while sialyl Lewis a is preferentially expressed in cancers. The disialyl Lewis a determinant carries one extra sialic residue attached through a 2 --> 6 linkage to the GlcNAc moiety compared to cancer-associated sialyl Lewis a, which carries only one 2 --> 3 linked sialic acid residue (monosialyl Lewis a). Disialyl Lewis a in normal epithelial cells serves as a ligand for immunosuppressive receptors such as sialic acid binding immunoglobulin (Ig)-like lectins (siglec-7) and -9 expressed on resident monocytes/macrophages and maintains immunological homeostasis of mucosal membranes in digestive organs. Epigenetic silencing of a gene for a 2 --> 6 sialyl-transferase in the early stages of carcinogenesis results in an impairment of 2 --> 6 sialylation, leading to incomplete synthesis and accumulation of sialyl Lewis a, which lacks the 2 --> 6 linked sialic acid residue, in cancer cells. Simultaneous determination of serum levels of sialyl- and disialyl Lewis a, and calculation of the monosialyl/disialyl Lewis a ratio provide information useful for excluding a false-positive serum diagnosis, and also for averting the undesired influence of the Lewis blood group of patients on serum antigen levels. During the course of cancer progression in locally advanced cancers, tumor hypoxia induces transcription of several glycogenes involved in sialyl Lewis a synthesis. Expression of the determinant, consequently, is further accelerated in more malignant hypoxia-resistant cancer cell clones, which become predominant clones in advanced stage cancers and frequently develop hematogenous metastasis. Sialyl Lewis a, as well as its positional

  13. Prognostic Value of the Interaction between Galectin-3 and Antigen Carbohydrate 125 in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Julio; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Sandino, Justo; Mainar, Luis; Palau, Patricia; Santas, Enrique; Villanueva, Maria Pilar; Núñez, Eduardo; Bodí, Vicent; Chorro, Francisco J.; Miñana, Gema; Sanchis, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Aims Galectin-3 (Gal-3) and carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) have emerged as robust prognostic biomarkers in heart failure. Experimental data have also suggested a potential molecular interaction between CA125 and Gal-3; however, the biological and clinical relevance of this interaction is still uncertain. We sought to evaluate, in patients admitted for acute heart failure, the association between plasma Gal-3 with all-cause mortality and the risk for rehospitalizations among high and low levels of CA125. Methods and Results We included 264 consecutive patients admitted for acute heart failure to the Cardiology Department in a third-level center. Both biomarkers were measured on admission. Negative binomial and Cox regression models were used to evaluate the prognostic effect of the interaction between Gal-3 and CA125 (dichotomized by its median) with hospital readmission and all-cause mortality, respectively. During a median follow-up of 2 years (IQR = 1-2.8), 108 (40.9%) patients deaths and 365 rehospitalizations in 171 (69.5%) patients were registered. In a multivariable setting, the effect of Gal-3 on mortality and rehospitalization was differentially mediated by CA125 (p = 0.007 and p<0.001, respectively). Indeed, in patients with CA125 above median (>67 U/ml), values across the continuum of Gal-3 showed a positive and almost linear relationship with either the risk of death or rehospitalization. Conversely, when CA125 was below median (≤67 U/ml), Gal-3 lacked any prognostic effect on both endpoints. Conclusion In patients with acute heart failure, Gal-3 was strongly associated with higher risk of long-term mortality and repeated rehospitalizations, but only in those patients exhibiting higher values of CA125 (above 67 U/ml). PMID:25875367

  14. Application of an enzyme-labeled antigen method for visualizing plasma cells producing antibodies against Strep A, a carbohydrate antigen of Streptococcus pyogenes, in recurrent tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Onouchi, Takanori; Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Shiogama, Kazuya; Inada, Ken-ichi; Okada, Tatsuyoshi; Naito, Kensei; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is the main causative pathogen of recurrent tonsillitis. Histologically, lesions of recurrent tonsillitis contain numerous plasma cells. Strep A is an antigenic carbohydrate molecule on the cell wall of S. pyogenes. As expected, plasma cells in subjects with recurrent tonsillitis secrete antibodies against Strep A. The enzyme-labeled antigen method is a novel histochemical technique that visualizes specific antibody-producing cells in tissue sections by employing a biotin-labeled antigen as a probe. The purpose of the present study was to visualize plasma cells producing antibodies reactive with Strep A in recurrent tonsillitis. Firstly, the lymph nodes of rats immunized with boiled S. pyogenes were paraformaldehyde-fixed and specific plasma cells localized in frozen sections with biotinylated Strep A. Secondly, an enzyme-labeled antigen method was used on human tonsil surgically removed from 12 patients with recurrent tonsillitis. S. pyogenes genomes were PCR-detected in all 12 specimens. The emm genotypes belonged to emm12 in nine specimens and emm1 in three. Plasma cells producing anti-Strep A antibodies were demonstrated in prefixed frozen sections of rat lymph nodes, 8/12 human specimens from patients with recurrent tonsillitis but not in two control tonsils. In human tonsils, Strep A-reactive plasma cells were observed within the reticular squamous mucosa and just below the mucosa, and the specific antibodies belonged to either IgA or IgG classes. Our technique is effective in visualizing immunocytes producing specific antibodies against the bacterial carbohydrate antigen, and is thus a novel histochemical tool for analyzing immune reactions in infectious disorders. © 2014 The Authors. Microbiology and Immunology Published by The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Comparative immunohistochemical study of MUC1 and carbohydrate antigens in breast benign disease and normal mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Demichelis, Sandra O; Alberdi, Cecilio G; Servi, Walter J; Isla-Larrain, Marina T; Segal-Eiras, Amada; Croce, María Virginia

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to compare the expression of MUC1 and carbohydrate antigens in 124 tissue samples; 42 fibroadenoma (FA), 23 nonproliferative benign diseases (NPF), 25 usual epithelial hyperplasia (UEH), 7 atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), and 27 breast normal tissues. An immunohistochemical approach was adopted, using the following antibodies: reactive with MUC1 variable number of tandem repeats (C595, HMFG2, and SM3 monoclonal antibodies), anti-MUC1-cytoplasmic tail polyclonal antibody (CT33), and anti-carbohydrate antigens (sialyl Lewis x, Lewis x, Lewis y, Tn, and Thomsen-Friedenreich epitopes). Positive area of reaction, intensity, and pattern of expression were considered. A reactivity index was calculated as intensity (I) x 100+percentage of positive area (A). Statistical analysis comprised frequency analysis, P < 0.05, analysis of variance, and multiple correlation with principal component analysis. All samples expressed MUC1, detected by at least one anti-MUC1 antibody whereas Lewis x was the carbohydrate antigen most frequently found in all groups whereas variable number of tandem repeats MUC1 and Lewis x showed the highest correlation: 93% of normal samples, 62.5% of NPF, 87% of FA, 85% of UEH, and finally 80% of ADH. Although principal component analysis using reactivity indexes explained only 39% of data variability, normal samples appeared grouped and separated from benign breast diseases, which remained spread. Thomsen-Friedenreich was the only antigen that showed an increased tendency for positive expression and intensity from NPF through FA, UEH to ADH, whereas it was not detected in normals. With respect to the pattern of expression, an apical pattern was predominantly found in all the groups.

  16. Serological proteome analysis approach-based identification of ENO1 as a tumor-associated antigen and its autoantibody could enhance the sensitivity of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 in the detection of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Liping; Qu, Yanhong; Li, Jitian; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Kaijuan; Wang, Peng; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Zhang, Jianying

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Lung cancer (LC) is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths for both male and female worldwide. Early detection of LC could improve five-year survival rate up to 48.8% compared to 3.3% of late/distant stage. Autoantibodies to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been described as being present before clinical symptoms in lung and other cancers. We aimed to identify more TAAs to improve the performance for discovering non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients from healthy individuals. Methods Two independent sets were included in this study. Serological proteome analysis (SERPA) was used to identify TAAs from NSCLC cell line H1299 in a discovery set. In validation study, anti-ENO1 autoantibody was examined by immunoassay in sera from 242 patients with NSCLC and 270 normal individuals. Results A 47 KDa protein was identified to be alpha-enolase (ENO1) by using SERPA. Analysis of sera from 512 participants by ELISA showed significantly higher frequency of anti-ENO1 autoantibodies in NSCLC sera compared with the sera from normal individuals, with AUC (95%CI) of 0.589 (0.539-0.638, P=0.001). There was no significant difference in frequency of anti-ENO1 in different stages, histological or metastasis status of NSCLC. When anti-ENO1 detection was combined with other two tumor protein biomarkers (CEA and CYFRA 21-1), the sensitivity of NSCLC increased to 84%. Conclusions ENO1 can elicit humoral immune response in NSCLC and its autoantibody has association with the tumorigenesis of NSCLC. Furthermore, these intriguing results suggest the possibility of autoantibody against ENO1 serving as a potential diagnostic biomarker in NSCLC and have implications for defining novel histological determinants of NSCLC. PMID:28456790

  17. Prognostic effect of carbohydrate antigen 125-guided therapy in patients recently discharged for acute heart failure (CHANCE-HF). Study design.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Julio; Merlos, Pilar; Fácila, Lorenzo; Llàcer, Pau; Bosch, Maria José; Bertomeu-Martínez, Vicente; García-Blas, Sergio; Montagud, Vicente; Pedrosa, Valle; Mendizábal, Andrea; Cordero, Alberto; Miñana, Gema; Sanchis, Juan; Bertomeu-González, Vicente

    2015-02-01

    Morbidity and mortality after admission for acute heart failure remain prohibitively high. In that setting, plasma levels of antigen carbohydrate 125 have shown to correlate with the severity of fluid overload and the risk of mortality and readmission. Preliminary data suggests a potential role of antigen carbohydrate 125 to guide therapy. The objective of this study is to evaluate the prognostic effect of an antigen carbohydrate 125-guided management strategy vs standard therapy in patients recently discharged for acute heart failure. This is a multicenter, randomized, single-blind, efficacy trial study of patients recently discharged from acute heart failure (< 180 days), New York Heart Association functional class II-IV and antigen carbohydrate 125 > 35 U/ml. A randomization scheme was used to allocate participants (in a 1:1 ratio) to receive therapy guided by antigen carbohydrate 125 (aiming to keep normal values) or standard treatment. Mainly, antigen carbohydrate 125-guided therapy is focused on the frequency of monitoring and titration of decongestive therapies and statins. As of December 10, 2013, there were 383 patients enrolled. The primary outcome was the composite of 1-year all-cause mortality or rehospitalization for acute heart failure. Analysis was planned to be intention-to-treat. Discovering novel therapeutic strategies or finding better ways of optimizing established treatments have become a health care priority in heart failure. This study will add important knowledge about the potential of antigen carbohydrate 125 as a management tool for monitoring and titration of therapies where optimal utilization has not been well defined, such as diuretics and statins. ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT02008110. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. The expanding roles of the Sd(a)/Cad carbohydrate antigen and its cognate glycosyltransferase B4GALNT2.

    PubMed

    Dall'Olio, Fabio; Malagolini, Nadia; Chiricolo, Mariella; Trinchera, Marco; Harduin-Lepers, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The histo-blood group antigens are carbohydrate structures present in tissues and body fluids, which contribute to the definition of the individual immunophenotype. One of these, the Sd(a) antigen, is expressed on the surface of erythrocytes and in secretions of the vast majority of the Caucasians and other ethnic groups. We describe the multiple and unsuspected aspects of the biology of the Sd(a) antigen and its biosynthetic enzyme β1,4-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 (B4GALNT2) in various physiological and pathological settings. The immunodominant sugar of the Sd(a) antigen is a β1,4-linked N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc). Its cognate glycosyltransferase B4GALNT2 displays a restricted pattern of tissue expression, is regulated by unknown mechanisms - including promoter methylation, and encodes at least two different proteins, one of which with an unconventionally long cytoplasmic portion. In different settings, the Sd(a) antigen plays multiple and unsuspected roles. 1) In colon cancer, its dramatic down-regulation plays a potential role in the overexpression of sialyl Lewis antigens, increasing metastasis formation. 2) It is involved in the lytic function of murine cytotoxic T lymphocytes. 3) It prevents the development of muscular dystrophy in various dystrophic murine models, when overexpressed in muscular fibers. 4) It regulates the circulating half-life of the von Willebrand factor (vWf), determining the onset of a bleeding disorder in a murine model. The expression of the Sd(a) antigen has a wide impact on the physiology and the pathology of different biological systems. © 2013.

  19. Recognition of Histo-Blood Group Antigen-Like Carbohydrates in Lettuce by Human GII.4 Norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Esseili, Malak A.; Lu, Zhongyan; Saif, Linda J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human norovirus (HuNoV) genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) strains account for about 80% of the gastroenteritis outbreaks in the United States. Contaminated food is a major transmission vehicle for this virus. In humans, pigs, and oysters, histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) act as attachment factors for HuNoVs. In lettuce, although the virus-like particles (VLPs) of a GII.4 HuNoV were found to bind to cell wall carbohydrates, the exact binding site has not been investigated. Here, we show the presence of HBGA-like carbohydrates in the cell wall of lettuce. The digestion of lettuce leaves with cell wall-degrading enzymes exposed more binding sites and significantly increased the level of binding of GII.4 HuNoV VLPs. Competition assays showed that both the HBGA monoclonal antibody, recognizing the H type, and plant lectins, recognizing α-l-fucose in the H type, effectively inhibited VLP binding to lettuce tissues. Lettuce cell wall components were isolated and their NoV VLP binding characteristics were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The binding was inhibited by pretreatment of the lettuce cell wall materials with α-1,2-fucosidase. Collectively, our results indicate that H-type HBGA-like carbohydrates exist in lettuce tissues and that GII.4 HuNoV VLPs can bind the exposed fucose moiety, possibly in the hemicellulose component of the cell wall. IMPORTANCE Salad crops and fruits are increasingly recognized as vehicles for human norovirus (HuNoV) transmission. A recent study showed that HuNoVs specifically bind to the carbohydrates of the lettuce cell wall. Histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are carbohydrates and are known as the attachment factors for HuNoV infection in humans. In this study, we show the presence of HBGA-like carbohydrates in lettuce, to which HuNoVs specifically bind. These results suggest that specifically bound HuNoVs cannot be removed by simple washing, which may allow viral transmission to consumers. Our findings provide new

  20. Recognition of Histo-Blood Group Antigen-Like Carbohydrates in Lettuce by Human GII.4 Norovirus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Esseili, Malak A; Lu, Zhongyan; Saif, Linda J; Wang, Qiuhong

    2016-05-15

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) strains account for about 80% of the gastroenteritis outbreaks in the United States. Contaminated food is a major transmission vehicle for this virus. In humans, pigs, and oysters, histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) act as attachment factors for HuNoVs. In lettuce, although the virus-like particles (VLPs) of a GII.4 HuNoV were found to bind to cell wall carbohydrates, the exact binding site has not been investigated. Here, we show the presence of HBGA-like carbohydrates in the cell wall of lettuce. The digestion of lettuce leaves with cell wall-degrading enzymes exposed more binding sites and significantly increased the level of binding of GII.4 HuNoV VLPs. Competition assays showed that both the HBGA monoclonal antibody, recognizing the H type, and plant lectins, recognizing α-l-fucose in the H type, effectively inhibited VLP binding to lettuce tissues. Lettuce cell wall components were isolated and their NoV VLP binding characteristics were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The binding was inhibited by pretreatment of the lettuce cell wall materials with α-1,2-fucosidase. Collectively, our results indicate that H-type HBGA-like carbohydrates exist in lettuce tissues and that GII.4 HuNoV VLPs can bind the exposed fucose moiety, possibly in the hemicellulose component of the cell wall. Salad crops and fruits are increasingly recognized as vehicles for human norovirus (HuNoV) transmission. A recent study showed that HuNoVs specifically bind to the carbohydrates of the lettuce cell wall. Histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are carbohydrates and are known as the attachment factors for HuNoV infection in humans. In this study, we show the presence of HBGA-like carbohydrates in lettuce, to which HuNoVs specifically bind. These results suggest that specifically bound HuNoVs cannot be removed by simple washing, which may allow viral transmission to consumers. Our findings provide new information needed

  1. Invasive breast cancer in Argentine women: association between risk and prognostic factors with antigens of a peptidic and carbohydrate nature

    PubMed Central

    Demichelis, Sandra O; Isla-Larrain, Marina T; Cermignani, Luciano; Alberdi, Cecilio G; Segal-Eiras, Amada; Croce, María Virginia

    2011-01-01

    Objective In breast cancer, several tumor markers have been identified. The marker most extensively associated with breast cancer is MUC1. The objective of the study was to analyze prognostic and risk factors in relation to tumor markers in order to clarify breast cancer biology. A total of 349 primary tumor samples and lymph nodes from breast cancer patients were studied. Risk and prognostic factors were considered. An immunohistochemical approach was applied and an extensive statistical analysis was performed, including frequency analysis and analysis of variance. Correlation among variables was performed with principal component analysis. Results All the antigens showed an increased expression according to tumor size increment; moreover, sialyl Lewis x expression showed a significant increase in relation to disease stage, whereas Tn and TF presented a positive tendency. Vascular invasion was related to sialyl Lewis x expression and number of metastatic lymph nodes. Taking into account risk factors, when a patient had at least one child, Lewis antigens diminished their expression. In relation to breastfeeding, sialyl Lewis x expression diminished, although its apical expression increased. Conclusion Associations between MUC1 and carbohydrate antigens and risk and prognostic factors show the complexity of the cellular biological behavior that these antigens modulate in breast cancer. PMID:24367185

  2. Investigating the immunodominance of carbohydrate antigens in a bivalent unimolecular glycoconjugate vaccine against serogroup A and C meningococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Roberto; Nilo, Alberto; Harfouche, Carole; Brogioni, Barbara; Pecetta, Simone; Brogioni, Giulia; Balducci, Evita; Pinto, Vittoria; Filippini, Sara; Mori, Elena; Tontini, Marta; Romano, Maria Rosaria; Costantino, Paolo; Berti, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    Multicomponent constructs, obtained by coupling different glycans to the carrier protein, have been proposed as a way to co-deliver multiple surface carbohydrates targeting different strains of one pathogen and reduce the number of biomolecules in the formulation of multivalent vaccines. To assess the feasibility of this approach for anti-microbial vaccines and investigate the potential immunodominance of one carbohydrate antigen over the others in these constructs, we designed a bivalent unimolecular vaccine against serogroup A (MenA) and C (MenC) meningococci, with the two different oligomers conjugated to same molecule of carrier protein (CRM197). The immune response elicited in mice by the bivalent MenAC construct was compared with the ones induced by the monovalent MenA and MenC vaccines and their combinations. After the second dose, the bivalent construct induced good levels of anti-MenA and anti-MenC antibodies with respect to the controls. However, the murine sera from the MenAC construct exhibited good anti-MenC bactericidal activity, and very low anti-MenA functionality when compared to the monovalent controls. This result was explained with the diverse relative avidities against MenA and MenC polysaccharides, which were measured in the generated sera. The immunodominant effect of the MenC antigen was fully overcome following the third immunization, when sera endowed with higher avidity and excellent bactericidal activity against both MenA and MenC expressing strains were elicited. Construction of multicomponent glycoconjugate vaccines against microbial pathogens is a feasible approach, but particular attention should be devoted to study and overcome possible occurrence of immune interference among the carbohydrates.

  3. Mirrizi Syndrome and Markedly Elevated Levels of Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in the Absence of Malignant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tetangco, Eula; Raddawi, Hareth

    2017-01-01

    Elevated carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) beyond 1000 U/L occurs in nonneoplastic conditions which is causing questioning of the use of CA19-9 as a marker for screening. We report a case where a 51-year-old male with Mirrizi Syndrome (MS) presented with markedly increased CA19-9 level (4,618 U/mL). MS is a rare complication characterized by compression of the common bile or hepatic duct caused by an impacted gallstone in the cystic duct or neck of the gallbladder. Biliary epithelial cells secrete CA19-9: it is hypothesized that increased proliferation of such cells caused by inflammation leads to increased secretion. CA19-9 should not be used as a diagnostic tool, but rather for surveillance. PMID:28529808

  4. Role of Urinary and Serum Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 as a Biomarker in Diagnosis of Adult Giant Hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Vinay; Yadav, Sher Singh; Vyas, Nachiket; Yadav, Suresh; Sathian, Brijesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The most common cause of adult Giant Hydronephrosis (GH) is congenital Uretero-Pelvic Junction (UPJ) obstruction. Conventional imaging modalities, like Intravenous Urography (IVU) and Computed Tomography Urography (CTU) and radionuclide renal scan can be fallacious. Serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) is a useful tumour marker for gastrointestinal and pancreatic cancer. Only a few studies and case reports have shown raised serum levels due to benign hydronephrosis and GH. Aim To investigate the prognostic role of urine and serum CA19-9 in the diagnosis and follow-up of adult GH due to UPJ obstruction. Materials and Methods The present hospital based observational study was conducted on 24 adult patients (Group 1) with unilateral GH due to UPJ obstruction. Twenty four healthy adults were included as control (Group 2). Serum and voided urine samples were collected to evaluate Carbohydrate Antigen (CA) 19-9 in each group. During surgery, urine from the affected pelvis was collected to determine CA19-9 level. Patients were followed up after surgery at 3 and 9 months with serum and voided urine samples for CA19-9 level. Results Preoperative Serum and voided urine CA19-9 were significantly greater in Group1 than in controls, which significantly correlated inversely with preoperative percentage renal function and glomerular filtration rate. Postoperative improvement in renal function significantly correlated inversely with serum and voided urine CA19-9 at 3 and 9 months. Conclusion Voided urine CA19-9 can be a non-invasive clinical marker in adult GH due to UPJ obstruction. The clinical implications of these data for diagnosis and follow-up of these patients are significant. Our findings suggest, significant decrease in urinary Ca19-9 level during follow-up is predictive of excellent surgical outcome and resolution of renal damage. PMID:27790508

  5. [Carbohydrate antigens CA 19-9, CA 242, CA 50 in liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Nowak, J; Jakubowska, D; Wiczkowski, A; Sprzaczkowska, K; Stechły, T; Zmudziński, W; Grzesik, P; Walas, R; Jarzab, B

    1998-01-01

    Serum concentrations of CA 19-9, CA 242, and CA 50 were determined in patients with hepatitis and liver cirrhosis without cholestasis. The study included 63 patients with chronic persistent hepatitis (group A), chronic active hepatitis (group B), and liver cirrhosis (group C). The control group (K) consisted of 82 patients with: peptic ulcer, colorectal polypi or diverticulosis of the colon. CA 19-9 level normal in the majority of patients with liver diseases, however, it was found to be increased in 4 (23%) of patients with liver cirrhosis. There was no statistically significant difference in the frequency of increased level of CA 19-9 between liver diseases and the control group. The rate of elevated serum level of CA 242 in patients with liver diseases and in control group was similar respectively 12%; 8.5%). The elevated CA 50 levels were most frequently found in patients with liver pathology (50% in liver cirrhosis and chronic active hepatitis; 36% in chronic persistent hepatitis). The elevation of CA 50 serum level occurs very often in liver diseases, even when they are going without cholestasis. Thus, the antigen is not useful for differentiating between benign and cancer diseases of gastrointestinal tract. Antigen CA 50 is to be taken into account only after exclusion of the pathology of liver, especially cirrhosis. Other investigated antigens: CA 19-9 and CA 242 are influenced by liver diseases to a minor and neglectable extent. Antigen CA 19-9 is the marker of choice in gastrointestinal cancers.

  6. Major role for carbohydrate epitopes preferentially recognized by chronically infected mice in the determination of Schistosoma mansoni schistosomulum surface antigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Omer-ali, P.; Magee, A.I.; Kelly, C.; Simpson, A.J.G.

    1986-12-01

    A radioimmunoassay that makes use of whole Schistosomula and /sup 125/I-labeled protein A has been used to characterize and to quantify the binding of antisera to the surface of 3 hr mechanically transformed schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni. This technique facilitates the determination of epitopes on the schistosomula in addition to those detected by surface labeling and immunoprecipitation. By using this technique, it has been demonstrated that there is a much greater binding to the parasite surface of antibodies from chronically infected mice (CMS) than of antibodies from mice infected with highly irradiated cercariae (VMS), and CMS recognizes epitopes that VMS does not. Treatment of the surface of the schistosomula with trifluoromethanesulphonic acid and sodium metaperiodate has suggested that the discrepancy of the binding between the two sera is due to the recognition of a large number of additional epitopes by CMS, which are carbohydrate in nature. Some of the carbohydrate epitopes are expressed on the previously described surface glycoprotein antigens of M/sub r/ 200,000, 38,000, and 17,000.

  7. Carbohydrate antigens in nipple aspirate fluid predict the presence of atypia and cancer in women requiring diagnostic breast biopsy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The goal of this prospective study was to determine (a) concentrations of the carbohydrate biomarkers Thomsen Friedenreich (TF) antigen and its precursor, Tn antigen, in nipple discharge (ND) collected from women requiring biopsy because of a suspicious breast lesion; and (b) if concentration levels predicted pathologic diagnosis. Methods Adult women requiring biopsy to exclude breast cancer were enrolled and ND obtained. The samples from 124 women were analyzed using an anti-TF and anti-Tn monoclonal antibodies in direct immunoassay. Results The highest median concentration in ND for TF and Tn was in women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). TF was higher in women with 1) cancer (DCIS or invasive) vs. either no cancer (atypia or benign pathology, p = .048), or benign pathology (p = .018); and 2) abnormal (atypia or cancer) versus benign pathology (p = .016); and was more predictive of atypia or cancer in post- compared to premenopausal women. Tn was not predictive of disease. High TF concentration and age were independent predictors of disease, correctly classifying either cancer or abnormal vs. benign pathology 83% of the time in postmenopausal women. Conclusions TF concentrations in ND were higher in women with precancer and cancer compared to women with benign disease, and TF was an independent predictor of breast atypia and cancer. TF may prove useful in early breast cancer detection. PMID:20920311

  8. A new human cholangiocellular carcinoma cell line (HuCC-T1) producing carbohydrate antigen 19/9 in serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Miyagiwa, M; Ichida, T; Tokiwa, T; Sato, J; Sasaki, H

    1989-06-01

    A human cholangiocellular carcinoma cell line, HuCC-T1, was established in vitro from the malignant cells of ascites of a 56-yr-old patient. Histologic findings of the primary liver tumor revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Tumor cells from the ascites have been cultured with RPMI 1640 medium containing 0.2% lactalbumin hydrolysate and the cultured cells grew as monolayers with a population doubling time of 74 h during exponential growth at Passage 25. They had an epithelial-like morphology and were positive for mucine staining. Ultrastructural studies revealed the presence of microvilli on the cell surface and poorly developed organelles in the cytoplasm. The HuCC-T1 cell was tumorigenic in nude mice. The number of chromosomes in HuCC-T1 ranged from 61 to 80. These human cholangiocellular carcinoma cells in serum-free medium secreted several tumor markers, including carbohydrate antigen 19/9, carbohydrate antigen 125, carcinoembryonic antigen, and tissue polypeptide antigen. The carbohydrate antigen 19/9 secretion level of HuCC-T1 cells cultured in RPMI 1640 medium with 1% fetal bovine serum was sixfold higher than that with 0.2% lactalbumin hydrolysate. These findings suggest that HuCC-T1 will provide useful information to clarify the mechanism of tumor marker secretion and tumor cell growth in the human cholangiocellular carcinoma.

  9. The relationship between Lewis/Secretor genotypes and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 levels in a Korean population.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung-Doo; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Ki, Chang-Seok; Han, Kyou Sup; Kim, Jin Q

    2010-02-01

    The Lewis histo-blood group system consists of 2 major antigens-Lea and Leb-and a sialyl Lewis antigen-carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9. We investigated the distribution of Lewis genotypes and evaluated the relationship between the Lewis/Secretor genotypes and the serum level of CA 19-9 in a Korean population to identify whether the serum CA 19-9 levels are influenced by the Lewis/Secretor genotypes. The study included 242 individuals who had no malignancies. Lewis genotyping was performed for the 59T>G, 508G>A and 1067T>A polymorphic sites. The Secretor genotype was determined through analysis of the 357C>T and 385A>T polymorphic sites and the fusion gene. Serum CA 19-9 level was analyzed using an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Individuals carrying the 3 common genotypes-Le/Le, Le/le(59,508), and Le/le(59,1067)-accounted for 95% of the study population. In the Korean population, the allelic frequencies of Le, Le(59), le(59,508), and le(59,1067) were 0.731, 0.010, 0.223, and 0.035, respectively. We found a significant difference in serum CA 19-9 concentrations among the 9 Lewis/Secretor genotype groups (P<0.001). The serum CA 19-9 levels in subjects with genotype groups 1 and 2 (Le/- and se/se) were higher than those with genotype groups 3-6 (Le/- and Se/-; 15.63 vs 6.64 kU/L, P<0.001). Le/Le, Le/le(59,508), and Le/le(59,1067) are frequent Lewis genotypes in Koreans. Because serum CA 19-9 levels are significantly influenced by the Lewis/Secretor genotypes, caution is suggested when interpreting the serum CA 19-9 levels.

  10. Entirely Carbohydrate-Based Vaccines: An Emerging Field for Specific and Selective Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Nishat, Sharmeen; Andreana, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates are regarded as promising targets for vaccine development against infectious disease because cell surface glycans on many infectious agents are attributed to playing an important role in pathogenesis. In addition, oncogenic transformation of normal cells, in many cases, is associated with aberrant glycosylation of the cell surface glycan generating tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs). Technological advances in glycobiology have added a new dimension to immunotherapy when considering carbohydrates as key targets in developing safe and effective vaccines to combat cancer, bacterial infections, viral infections, etc. Many consider effective vaccines induce T-cell dependent immunity with satisfactory levels of immunological memory that preclude recurrence. Unfortunately, carbohydrates alone are poorly immunogenic as they do not bind strongly to the MHCII complex and thus fail to elicit T-cell immunity. To increase immunogenicity, carbohydrates have been conjugated to carrier proteins, which sometimes can impede carbohydrate specific immunity as peptide-based immune responses can negate antibodies directed at the targeted carbohydrate antigens. To overcome many challenges in using carbohydrate-based vaccine design and development approaches targeting cancer and other diseases, zwitterionic polysaccharides (ZPSs), isolated from the capsule of commensal anaerobic bacteria, will be discussed as promising carriers of carbohydrate antigens to achieve desired immunological responses. PMID:27213458

  11. Carbohydrate-based cancer vaccines: target cancer with sugar bullets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Cheng; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2012-08-01

    With the booming development of glycobiology and glycochemistry, more and more structures of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) are identified. Their broad expression and high specificity in cancer make them important targets to develop cancer vaccines or immunotherapies. However, most of the TACAs are T cell-independent antigens, they cannot elicit a powerful enough immune response to prevent or treat cancer. Immunotolerance and immunosuppression are more easily induced due to their endogenous properties and the declining immunity of the patients. This review summarizes the recent efforts to overcome these obstacles: coupling the carbohydrate antigens to proper carriers such as proteins or some small molecule carriers, and chemically modifying the structures of the TACAs to enhance the immunogenicity of TACAs and break the immunotolerance.

  12. Major Histocompatibility Complex–independent Recognition of a Distinctive Pollen Antigen, Most Likely a Carbohydrate, by Human CD8+ α/β T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Corinti, Silvia; Palma, Raffaele De; Fontana, Angelo; Gagliardi, Maria Cristina; Pini, Carlo; Sallusto, Federica

    1997-01-01

    We have isolated CD8+ α/β T cells from the blood of atopic and healthy individuals which recognize a nonpeptide antigen present in an allergenic extract from Parietaria judaica pollen. This antigen appears to be a carbohydrate because it is resistant to proteinase K and alkaline digestion, is hydrophilic, and is sensitive to trifluoromethane-sulphonic and periodic acids. In addition, on a reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography column the antigen recognized by CD8+ T cells separates in a fraction which contains >80% hexoses (glucose and galactose) and undetectable amounts of proteins. Presentation of this putative carbohydrate antigen (PjCHOAg) to CD8+ T cell clones is dependent on live antigen presenting cells (APCs) pulsed for >1 h at 37°C, suggesting that the antigen has to be internalized and possibly processed. Indeed, fixed APCs or APCs pulsed at 15°C were both unable to induce T cell response. Remarkably, PjCHOAg presentation is independent of the expression of classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules or CD1. CD8+ T cells stimulated by PjCHOAg-pulsed APCs undergo a sustained [Ca2+]i increase and downregulate their T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) in an antigen dose– and time-dependent fashion, similar to T cells stimulated by conventional ligands. Analysis of TCR Vβ transcripts shows that six independent PjCHOAg-specific T cell clones carry the Vβ8 segment with a conserved motif in the CDR3 region, indicating a structural requirement for recognition of this antigen. Finally, after activation, the CD8+ clones from the atopic patient express CD40L and produce high levels of interleukins 4 and 5, suggesting that the clones may have undergone a Th2-like polarization in vivo. These results reveal a new class of antigens which triggers T cells in an MHC-independent way, and these antigens appear to be carbohydrates. We suggest that this type of antigen may play a role in the immune response in vivo. PMID:9294144

  13. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma-associated expression of MUC5AC, MUC5B and mucin-type carbohydrate antigen sialyl-Tn in the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Matse, Johannes H; Bharos, Wiresh K; Veerman, Enno C I; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Bolscher, Jan G M

    2017-10-01

    The aberrant expression of mucins and mucin-type carbohydrates has been described in many types of cancer, including mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC), a malignant salivary gland tumor. In this study, we examined the aberrant expression patterns of mucins (MUC1, MUC4, MUC5AC and MUC5B), simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens (Tn, sialyl-Tn and T) and mature carbohydrate antigens (Lewis(a) and sulfo-Lewis(a) antigens) in MEC originating from the parotid gland, which normally does not secrete mucins. We conducted an immunohistochemical study to investigate the presence of mucins and carbohydrates in 24 MEC samples originating from the parotid gland and in surrounding normal tissue of the same gland in comparison 6 samples of normal salivary glands. The expression levels were compared with respect to the histological grading. Furthermore, 24 MEC samples from non-parotid salivary glands were included. We observed loss of topology of membrane-bound MUC1 and MUC4, and de novo expression of MUC5AC, MUC5B and sialyl-Tn in MEC that originated in the parotid gland. Furthermore, mucins MUC1, MUC4 and carbohydrate antigens Tn, sialyl-Tn, T, Lewis(a) and sulfo-Lewis(a) were overexpressed in MEC samples compared to surrounding normal salivary gland tissues. MUC1 was expressed in both low- and high grade MECs, whereas MUC4 was not expressed in high grade MECs of the parotid gland. During the development of MEC in the parotid gland, the genes for gel-forming secretory mucins are switched on. Besides these MEC tissues overexpress short oligosaccharides, suggesting that the glycosylation machinery is altered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Simultaneous in vitro generation of CD8 and CD4 T cells specific to three universal tumor associated antigens of WT1, survivin and TERT and adoptive T cell transfer for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Joo; Sohn, Dae-Hee; Cho, Hyun-Il; Kim, Hee-Je; Kim, Tai-Gyu

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we found that most patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) expressed at least one of the leukemic associated antigens (LAAs) WT1, survivin and TERT, and different combinations of the three LAAs predicted negative clinical outcomes. Multi-tumor antigen-specific T cells were generated to overcome antigenic variation and may be sufficient to maximize antitumoral effects. To generate triple antigen-specific (Tri)-T cells that recognize three LAAs, dendritic cells (DCs) were transfected with three tumor antigen-encoding RNAs. These DCs were used to stimulate both CD8 and CD4 T cells and to overcome the limitation of known human leukocyte antigen-restricted epitopes. The sum of the antigen-specific T cell frequencies was higher in the Tri-T cells than in the T cells that recognized a single antigen. Furthermore, the Tri-T cells were more effective against leukemic blasts that expressed all three LAAs compared with blasts that expressed one or two LAAs, suggesting a proportional correlation between IFN-γ secretion and LAA expression. Engrafted leukemic blasts in the bone marrow of mice significantly decreased in the presence of Tri-T cells. This technique represents an effective immunotherapeutic strategy in AML. PMID:28477011

  15. Aluminum nanopyramid array with tunable ultraviolet-visible-infrared wavelength plasmon resonances for rapid detection of carbohydrate antigen 199.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanbo; Qiu, Yongcai; Zhang, Li; Jiang, Lelun; Zhou, Zhangkai; Chen, Huanjun; Zhou, Jianhua

    2016-05-15

    Aluminum-based localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) holds attractive properties include low cost, high natural abundance, and ease of processing by a wide variety of methods including complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, making itself having an edge over conventional ones induced by noble metal. However, the inherent drawbacks of plasmonic mode limited on UV-green wavelength, low refractive index sensitivity, as well as heavy-shape-dependence greatly prevent aluminum plasmonics from real-life biosensing. Here, we demonstrated a uniform quasi-3-dimensional Al nanopyramid array (NPA) structure with tunable ultraviolet-visible-infrared (UV-vis-NIR) plasmon resonances for biosensing. By changing the reflection measuring angle, we could easily obtain typical peaks simultaneously exhibited on the reflectance spectrum across UV-vis-NIR wave region. The Al NPAs carried out high refractive index sensitivities which even comparable with that of noble metal, and can be used as a biosensor for directly detecting cytochrome c and carbohydrate antigen 199 in air after the sensing surface was washed cleanly and dried; the limits of detection were determined to be 800 nM and 29 ng/mL, respectively. Our proposed work therefore initiates the low-cost, high-performance biosensing using aluminum plasmonics, which would find wide applications in rapid diagnosis, mobile-healthcare and environmental monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Serum Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Differential Diagnosis of Benign and Malignant Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shaobo; Hu, Ya; Gao, Xiang; Liao, Quan; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Background Using serum carbohydrate antigen 19–9 (CA 19–9) in discriminating between benign and malignant pancreatic disease remains controversial. We aim to evaluate the diagnostic value of serum CA 19–9 in predicting malignant pancreatic cystic lesions. Methods Eligible studies were identified through searching MEDLINE and EMBASE prior to March 2016. Studies were assessed for quality using the Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy, 2nd version (QUADAS-2). Pooled sensitivity and specificity with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using random-effects models. Summary receiver operator characteristic (SROC) curves and the area under curve (AUC) were performed. Results A total of thirteen studies including 1437 patients were enrolled in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.47(95% CI: 0.35–0.59), and 0.88(95% CI: 0.86–0.91), respectively, and the AUC was 0.87(95% CI, 0.84–0.90). Meta-regression analysis showed that sample size, region and reference standards were not the main sources of heterogeneity. Conclusions Serum CA 19–9 has satisfying pooled specificity while poor pooled sensitivity for discriminating benign from malignant PCNs. It deserves to be widely used as complementary to other clinical diagnostic methods. PMID:27835676

  17. The immunodominant outer membrane antigen of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is located in the serotype-specific high-molecular-mass carbohydrate moiety of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Page, R C; Sims, T J; Engel, L D; Moncla, B J; Bainbridge, B; Stray, J; Darveau, R P

    1991-01-01

    Most patients with juvenile periodontitis manifest serum antibodies, sometimes at very high titers, to antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, but the antigens inducing the immune response have been only partly characterized. We separated A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype b cells into protein, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and soluble polysaccharide fractions and characterized them. Coomassie blue- and silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels were used to detect protein and LPS components, and gas-liquid chromatography was used to determine their carbohydrate and fatty acid composition. Western blots, dot blots, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition with high-titer sera from juvenile periodontitis patients revealed which components were highest in antibody binding activity. These results showed that the major portion of the immunoglobulin G binding activity resides in the purified mannan-free LPS, with lesser amounts in the total protein fraction. Using Sephacryl S-300 chromatography, we separated LPS into high-molecular-mass components with high carbohydrate contents by gas-liquid chromatography and a low-molecular-mass component consisting mainly of lipid A and the inner core sugar heptulose. The results of quantitative dot blot assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition show that the serotype-specific antibody binding activity is highly concentrated in the high-molecular-mass carbohydrate-rich LPS fraction and is almost completely absent in the low-molecular-weight lipid-rich fraction. Our observations contrast with previous reports that the predominant serotype antigen of A. actinomycetemcomitans resides in a mannan-rich polysaccharide isolated from spent culture medium. These observations support the conclusion that the immunodominant antigen of the outer membrane is the O antigen of the LPS. Images PMID:1716610

  18. Carbohydrate-mimetic peptides for pan anti-tumor responses.

    PubMed

    Kieber-Emmons, Thomas; Saha, Somdutta; Pashov, Anastas; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Murali, Ramachandran

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mimicry is fundamental to biology and transcends to many disciplines ranging from immune pathology to drug design. Structural characterization of molecular partners has provided insight into the origins and relative importance of complementarity in mimicry. Chemical complementarity is easy to understand; amino acid sequence similarity between peptides, for example, can lead to cross-reactivity triggering similar reactivity from their cognate receptors. However, conformational complementarity is difficult to decipher. Molecular mimicry of carbohydrates by peptides is often considered one of those. Extensive studies of innate and adaptive immune responses suggests the existence of carbohydrate mimicry, but the structural basis for this mimicry yields confounding details; peptides mimicking carbohydrates in some cases fail to exhibit both chemical and conformational mimicry. Deconvolution of these two types of complementarity in mimicry and its relationship to biological function can nevertheless lead to new therapeutics. Here, we discuss our experience examining the immunological aspects and implications of carbohydrate-peptide mimicry. Emphasis is placed on the rationale, the lessons learned from the methodologies to identify mimics, a perspective on the limitations of structural analysis, the biological consequences of mimicking tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens, and the notion of reverse engineering to develop carbohydrate-mimetic peptides in vaccine design strategies to induce responses to glycan antigens expressed on cancer cells.

  19. Diuretic Strategies in Acute Heart Failure and Renal Dysfunction: Conventional vs Carbohydrate Antigen 125-guided Strategy. Clinical Trial Design.

    PubMed

    García-Blas, Sergio; Bonanad, Clara; Llàcer, Pau; Ventura, Silvia; Núñez, José María; Sánchez, Ruth; Chamorro, Carlos; Fácila, Lorenzo; de la Espriella, Rafael; Vaquer, Juana María; Cordero, Alberto; Roqué, Mercè; Ortiz, Víctor; Racugno, Paolo; Bodí, Vicent; Valero, Ernesto; Santas, Enrique; Moreno, María Del Carmen; Miñana, Gema; Carratalá, Arturo; Bondanza, Lourdes; Payá, Ana; Cardells, Ingrid; Heredia, Raquel; Pellicer, Mauricio; Valls, Guillermo; Palau, Patricia; Bosch, María José; Raso, Rafael; Sánchez, Andrés; Bertomeu-González, Vicente; Bertomeu-Martínez, Vicente; Montagud-Balaguer, Vicente; Albiach-Montañana, Cristina; Pendás-Meneau, Jezabel; Marcaida, Goitzane; Cervantes-García, Sonia; San Antonio, Rodolfo; de Mingo, Elisabet; Chorro, Francisco J; Sanchis, Juan; Núñez, Julio

    2017-03-21

    The optimal treatment of patients with acute heart failure (AHF) and cardiorenal syndrome type 1 (CRS-1) is far from being well-defined. Arterial hypoperfusion in concert with venous congestion plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of CRS-I. Plasma carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) has emerged as a surrogate of fluid overload in AHF. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of CA125 for tailoring the intensity of diuretic therapy in patients with CRS-1. Multicenter, open-label, parallel clinical trial, in which patients with AHF and serum creatinine ≥ 1.4mg/dL on admission will be randomized to: a) standard diuretic strategy: titration-based on conventional clinical and biochemical evaluation, or b) diuretic strategy based on CA125: high dose if CA125 > 35 U/mL, and low doses otherwise. The main endpoint will be renal function changes at 24 and 72hours after therapy initiation. Secondary endpoints will include: a) clinical and biochemical changes at 24 and 72hours, and b) renal function changes and major clinical events at 30 days. The results of this study will add important knowledge on the usefulness of CA125 for guiding diuretic treatment in CRS-1. In addition, it will pave the way toward a better knowledge of the pathophysiology of this challenging situation. We hypothesize that higher levels of CA125 will identify a patient population with CRS-1 who could benefit from the use of a more intense diuretic strategy. Conversely, low levels of this glycoprotein could select those patients who would be harmed by high diuretic doses. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Predictive Value of Carcinoembryonic and Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 Related to Some Clinical, Endoscopic and Histological Colorectal Cancer Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Milosavljević, Tomica; Stojanović, Dragoš; Gluvić, Zoran; Dugalić, Predrag; Ilić, Ivan; Vidaković, Radosav

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important oncological and public health problem worldwide, including Serbia. Unfortunately, half of the patients are recognized in an advanced stage of the disease, therefore, early detection through specific tumor biomarkers, such as carcinoembryonic (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), is the only way to cope with CRC expansion. Methods Our cross-sectional study evaluated the influence of some clinical, endoscopic and histological characteristics of CRC on CEA and CA 19-9 serum levels, to determine whether these biomarkers could be related to CRC detection. The study included 372 participants: 181 suffered from CRC and 191 participants were controls. Endoscopic and histological examinations were used for CRC diagnosis, while additional ultrasound and abdominal computerised tomography imaging were used for staging the disease. Measurement of CEA and CA 19-9 was performed after CRC confirmation. Results Age, gender, tumor localization, macro-morphological and histological characteristics did not influence biomarkers serum levels. Both were significantly higher (p<0.01) in patients with Dukes D stage of CRC compared with controls. Sensitivity (76.8%) and specificity (76.6%) of CEA alone were higher than for CA 19-9, but with no statistical significance. Furthermore, sensitivity of CEA alone in the Dukes A/B group was similar to the entire CRC patient group. Conclusions Although not recommended as a screening method for the general population, elevated values of each biomarker indicate further diagnostic procedures and their simultaneous testing can improve the diagnostic sensitivity in early detection of CRC, as shown by the united analysis (AUC 0.842). PMID:28356884

  1. Heart failure in patients with aortic stenosis: clinical and prognostic significance of carbohydrate antigen 125 and brain natriuretic peptide measurement.

    PubMed

    Antonini-Canterin, Francesco; Popescu, Bogdan A; Popescu, Andreea C; Beladan, Carmen C; Korcova, Renata; Piazza, Rita; Cappelletti, Piero; Rubin, Daniela; Cassin, Matteo; Faggiano, Pompilio; Nicolosi, Gian Luigi

    2008-08-29

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is related to symptomatic status and outcome in aortic stenosis (AS) patients. Carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) demonstrated recently a BNP-like behaviour in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) but has never been studied in AS patients. We aimed to assess the role of CA125 and BNP in AS patients. CA125 and BNP blood levels, transthoracic echocardiography and independent evaluation of CHF symptoms were obtained in 64 consecutive patients (76+/-9 years; 35 males) with AS (valve area 0.9+/-0.3 cm(2)). A pre-specified combined end-point consisting of cardiac mortality, urgent aortic valve replacement and hospitalization for CHF was considered. The median follow-up was 8 months (interquartile range 4.5-10 months). Both CA125 and BNP have accurately identified patients with III-IV NYHA class: area under the ROC curve was 0.85 for CA125 and 0.78 for BNP (best cut-offs of 10.3 U/mL and 254.64 pg/mL respectively) and were independently correlated to left ventricular ejection fraction. Fifty-two percent of patients with CA125>or=10.3 U/mL vs. 13% with CA125<10.3 U/mL (p<0.01) and 65% patients with BNP>or=254 pg/mL vs. 7% with BNP<254 pg/mL (p<0.001) have reached the end-point. Both CA125 and BNP levels are significantly correlated with NYHA class and outcome in patients with AS. CA125 blood level assessment (less expensive) may improve the clinical management in this setting.

  2. Definition of pre- and postsynaptic forms of the CT carbohydrate antigen at the neuromuscular junction: ubiquitous expression of the CT antigens and the CT GalNAc transferase in mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Hoyte, Kwame; Kang, Christine; Martin, Paul T

    2002-12-30

    At the rodent neuromuscular junction, the synaptic expression of the CT carbohydrate antigens is defined by the binding of two monoclonal antibodies, CT1 and CT2. CT1 preferentially stains the presynaptic membrane, while CT2 preferentially stains the postsynaptic apparatus. Here we show that the differential subsynaptic distribution of these antigens is due to a preference of CT1 for structures containing N-acetyl neuraminic acid (NeuAc) and a preference of CT2 for structures containing N-glycolyl neuraminic acid (NeuGc). This was found to be the case both in binding to cultured myotubes, where NeuAc/NeuGc levels were manipulated by feeding acetylated N-acetyl mannosamine precursors, and in binding to purified GM2 ganglioside containing either NeuAc or NeuGc. At human neuromuscular junctions, where the enzymatic machinery to make NeuGc is absent [Proc. Natl. Acac. Sci. USA 95 (1998) 11751], CT1 and GM2(NeuAc) antibodies stained, while CT2 did not. Thus, the N-glycolyl modification of sialic acid helps to define the differential distribution of the CT antigens at the rodent neuromuscular junction, and this difference is lost in humans. In addition, sulfatase and 9-O-acetylesterase treatment of cells or tissues increased the amount of CT1 and CT2 antibody binding, with sulfatase differentially unmasking CT antigen expression on particular glycoproteins. Despite its uniquely synaptic localization in skeletal muscle, the CT antigens and the CT GalNAc transferase are ubiquitously expressed in other mouse tissues, including brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerve. One of the proteins that can be co-purified with a CT-reactive glycoprotein is alpha dystroglycan. These data better define the sub-synaptic structures of the CT carbohydrate antigens at the neuromuscular junction and demonstrate their ubiquitous presence in mouse tissues, including the brain.

  3. Antigenic cross-reactivity between Schistosoma mansoni and peanut: a role for cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCDs) and implications for the hygiene hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Igetei, Joseph E; El-Faham, Marwa; Liddell, Susan; Doenhoff, Michael J

    2017-04-01

    The antigenic reactivity of constituents of Schistosoma mansoni and peanut (Arachis hypogaea) was investigated to determine whether identical antigenic epitopes possessed by both organisms provided a possible explanation for the negative correlation between chronic schistosome infection and atopy to allergens. Aqueous extracts of peanuts were probed in Western immunoblots with rabbit IgG antibodies raised against the egg, cercarial and adult worm stages of S. mansoni. Several molecules in the peanut extract were antigenically reactive with antibodies from the various rabbit anti-schistosome sera. A pair of cross-reactive peanut molecules at ~30 000-33 000 molecular weight was purified and both proteins were identified by mass spectrometric analysis as the peanut allergen Ara h 1. Anti-S. mansoni soluble egg antigen antibodies that were eluted off the peanut molecules reacted with two S. mansoni egg antigens identified by mass spectrometry as IPSE/α-1 and κ-5. Alignments of the amino acid sequences of Ara h 1 and either IPSE/α-1 or κ-5 revealed a low level of peptide sequence identity. Incubation of nitrocellulose paper carrying electrophoresed peanut molecules, six constituents of other allergic plants and S. mansoni egg antigens in a mild solution of sodium metaperiodate before probing with antibodies, inhibited most of the cross-reactivities. The results are consistent with the antigenic cross-reactive epitopes of S. mansoni egg antigens, peanut and other allergic plants being cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCDs). These findings are novel and an explanation based on 'blocking antibodies' could provide an insight for the inverse relationship observed between schistosome infection and allergies.

  4. Cross-Reactivity between Schistosoma mansoni Antigens and the Latex Allergen Hev b 7: Putative Implication of Cross-Reactive Carbohydrate Determinants (CCDs).

    PubMed

    Doenhoff, Michael J; El-Faham, Marwa; Liddell, Susan; Fuller, Heidi R; Stanley, Ronald G; Schramm, Gabriele; Igetei, Joseph E

    2016-01-01

    IgG antibodies produced by rabbits immunized against S. mansoni antigens cross-reacted with aqueous soluble constituents of a variety of allergens. The antibody cross-reactivity was largely sensitive to degradation by treatment of the target antigens with sodium meta-periodate, suggesting the cross-reactivity was due to carbohydrate determinants that were common to both the schistosome and the allergens (CCDs). The reaction between the rabbit antibodies and a 43 kDa molecule in a rubber latex extract was analysed further: tandem mass spectrometry identified the latex molecule as allergen Hev b 7. Rabbit anti-schistosome IgG antibodies purified by acid-elution from solid-phase latex Hev b 7 reacted with the S. mansoni egg antigens IPSE/alpha-1 and kappa-5 and cercarial antigens SPO-1 and a fatty acid-binding protein. Moreover, purified anti-S. mansoni egg, latex cross-reactive antibodies reacted with antigenic constituents of some fruits, a result of potential relevance to the latex-fruit syndrome of allergic reactions. We propose that IgG anti-schistosome antibodies that cross-react with allergens may be able to block IgE-induced allergic reactions and thus provide a possible explanation for the hygiene hypothesis.

  5. Cross-Reactivity between Schistosoma mansoni Antigens and the Latex Allergen Hev b 7: Putative Implication of Cross-Reactive Carbohydrate Determinants (CCDs)

    PubMed Central

    Doenhoff, Michael J.; El-Faham, Marwa; Liddell, Susan; Fuller, Heidi R.; Stanley, Ronald G.; Schramm, Gabriele; Igetei, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    IgG antibodies produced by rabbits immunized against S. mansoni antigens cross-reacted with aqueous soluble constituents of a variety of allergens. The antibody cross-reactivity was largely sensitive to degradation by treatment of the target antigens with sodium meta-periodate, suggesting the cross-reactivity was due to carbohydrate determinants that were common to both the schistosome and the allergens (CCDs). The reaction between the rabbit antibodies and a 43 kDa molecule in a rubber latex extract was analysed further: tandem mass spectrometry identified the latex molecule as allergen Hev b 7. Rabbit anti-schistosome IgG antibodies purified by acid-elution from solid-phase latex Hev b 7 reacted with the S. mansoni egg antigens IPSE/alpha-1 and kappa-5 and cercarial antigens SPO-1 and a fatty acid-binding protein. Moreover, purified anti-S. mansoni egg, latex cross-reactive antibodies reacted with antigenic constituents of some fruits, a result of potential relevance to the latex-fruit syndrome of allergic reactions. We propose that IgG anti-schistosome antibodies that cross-react with allergens may be able to block IgE-induced allergic reactions and thus provide a possible explanation for the hygiene hypothesis. PMID:27467385

  6. Carbohydrate-Mimetic Peptides for Pan Anti-Tumor Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kieber-Emmons, Thomas; Saha, Somdutta; Pashov, Anastas; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Murali, Ramachandran

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mimicry is fundamental to biology and transcends to many disciplines ranging from immune pathology to drug design. Structural characterization of molecular partners has provided insight into the origins and relative importance of complementarity in mimicry. Chemical complementarity is easy to understand; amino acid sequence similarity between peptides, for example, can lead to cross-reactivity triggering similar reactivity from their cognate receptors. However, conformational complementarity is difficult to decipher. Molecular mimicry of carbohydrates by peptides is often considered one of those. Extensive studies of innate and adaptive immune responses suggests the existence of carbohydrate mimicry, but the structural basis for this mimicry yields confounding details; peptides mimicking carbohydrates in some cases fail to exhibit both chemical and conformational mimicry. Deconvolution of these two types of complementarity in mimicry and its relationship to biological function can nevertheless lead to new therapeutics. Here, we discuss our experience examining the immunological aspects and implications of carbohydrate–peptide mimicry. Emphasis is placed on the rationale, the lessons learned from the methodologies to identify mimics, a perspective on the limitations of structural analysis, the biological consequences of mimicking tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens, and the notion of reverse engineering to develop carbohydrate-mimetic peptides in vaccine design strategies to induce responses to glycan antigens expressed on cancer cells. PMID:25071769

  7. Blood-group-related carbohydrate antigens are expressed on human milk galactosyltransferase and are immunogenic in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Childs, R A; Berger, E G; Thorpe, S J; Aegerter, E; Feizi, T

    1986-01-01

    Immunochemical evidence is presented for the presence of blood-group-related carbohydrate structures on human milk galactosyltransferase and for the occurrence of the corresponding specificities among rabbit antibodies to this enzyme. Although these carbohydrate specificities constitute minor populations among antisera and affinity-purified antibodies to galactosyltransferase, their presence is important in the immunohistochemical approach to enzyme localization, since they give rise to strong reactivities with epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:2432884

  8. Carbohydrates as allergens.

    PubMed

    Commins, Scott P

    2015-01-01

    Complex carbohydrates are effective inducers of Th2 responses, and carbohydrate antigens can stimulate the production of glycan-specific antibodies. In instances where the antigen exposure occurs through the skin, the resulting antibody production can contain IgE class antibody. The glycan-stimulated IgE may be non-specific but may also be antigen specific. This review focuses on the production of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants, the recently identified IgE antibody response to a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), as well as discusses practical implications of carbohydrates in allergy. In addition, the biological effects of carbohydrate antigens are reviewed in setting of receptors and host recognition.

  9. Regioselective monodeprotection of peracetylated carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Filice, Marco; Guisan, Jose M; Terreni, Marco; Palomo, Jose M

    2012-10-01

    This protocol describes the regioselective deprotection of single hydroxyls in peracetylated monosaccharides and disaccharides by enzymatic or chemoenzymatic strategies. The introduction of a one-pot enzymatic step by using immobilized biocatalysts obviates the requirement to carry out tedious workups and time-consuming purifications. By using this straightforward protocol, different per-O-acetylated glycopyranosides (mono- or disaccharides, 1-substituted or glycals) can be transformed into a whole set of differentially monodeprotected 1-alcohols, 3-alcohols, 4-alcohols and 6-alcohols in high yields. These tailor-made glycosyl acceptors can then be used for stereoselective glycosylation for oligosaccharide and glycoderivative synthesis. They have been successfully used as building blocks to synthesize tailor-made di- and trisaccharides involved in the structure of lacto-N-neo-tetraose and precursors of the tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen T and the antitumoral drug peracetylated β-naphtyl-lactosamine. We are able to prepare a purified monoprotected carbohydrate in between 1 and 4 d. With this protocol, the small library of monodeprotected products can be synthesized in 1-2 weeks.

  10. CD1b-mediated T cell recognition of a glycolipid antigen generated from mycobacterial lipid and host carbohydrate during infection.

    PubMed

    Moody, D B; Guy, M R; Grant, E; Cheng, T Y; Brenner, M B; Besra, G S; Porcelli, S A

    2000-10-02

    T cells recognize microbial glycolipids presented by CD1 proteins, but there is no information regarding the generation of natural glycolipid antigens within infected tissues. Therefore, we determined the molecular basis of CD1b-restricted T cell recognition of mycobacterial glycosylated mycolates, including those produced during tissue infection in vivo. Transfection of the T cell receptor (TCR) alpha and beta chains from a glucose monomycolate (GMM)-specific T cell line reconstituted GMM recognition in TCR-deficient T lymphoblastoma cells. This TCR-mediated response was highly specific for natural mycobacterial glucose-6-O-(2R, 3R) monomycolate, including the precise structure of the glucose moiety, the stereochemistry of the mycolate lipid, and the linkage between the carbohydrate and the lipid. Mycobacterial production of antigenic GMM absolutely required a nonmycobacterial source of glucose that could be supplied by adding glucose to media at concentrations found in mammalian tissues or by infecting tissue in vivo. These results indicate that mycobacteria synthesized antigenic GMM by coupling mycobacterial mycolates to host-derived glucose. Specific T cell recognition of an epitope formed by interaction of host and pathogen biosynthetic pathways provides a mechanism for immune response to those pathogenic mycobacteria that have productively infected tissues, as distinguished from ubiquitous, but innocuous, environmental mycobacteria.

  11. Application of carbon nanotubes layered on silicon wafer for the detection of breast cancer marker carbohydrate antigen 15-3 by immuno-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Sadhasivam, S; Chen, Jung-Chih; Savitha, S; Chang, Chun-Wei; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2014-01-01

    A highly sensitive detection of breast cancer marker, carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3) by carbon nanotube (CNT) based immuno-polymerase chain reaction was reported. The study was aimed to develop a precise and sensitive method to diagnose breast cancer and its recurrence. The hydrofluoric acid (HF) treated silicon wafer layered with bundled CNT was used as the substrate. The surface was treated with HNO3/H2SO4 to graft carboxyl groups on the tips of CNT. Subsequently, polyoxyethylene bis-amine was grafted to conjugate anti human CA 15-3 antibodies. Water contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, Raman spectrometer and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were employed to confirm the surface modification. The captured antibodies on the CNT were used to capture the target antigen CA 15-3 and the biotinylated secondary antibodies were subsequently bound with the target antigen. A bi-functional streptavidin was used to link biotinylated DNA to the biotinylated detection antibodies. The biotinylated target DNA was amplified by PCR, and then analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The lower limit of detection of CA 15-3 by the proposed immuno-PCR system was 0.001 U/mL, which is extremely sensitive than the other bioanalytical techniques.

  12. Immunization of fucose-containing polysaccharides from Reishi mushroom induces antibodies to tumor-associated Globo H-series epitopes.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shih-Fen; Liang, Chi-Hui; Ho, Ming-Yi; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Tsai, Tsung-I; Hsieh, Yves S-Y; Tsai, Chih-Ming; Li, Shiou-Ting; Cheng, Yang-Yu; Tsao, Shu-Ming; Lin, Tung-Yi; Lin, Zong-Yan; Yang, Wen-Bin; Ren, Chien-Tai; Lin, Kuo-I; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Lin, Chun-Hung; Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Wu, Chung-Yi; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2013-08-20

    Carbohydrate-based vaccines have shown therapeutic efficacy for infectious disease and cancer. The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) containing complex polysaccharides has been used as antitumor supplement, but the mechanism of immune response has rarely been studied. Here, we show that the mice immunized with a l-fucose (Fuc)-enriched Reishi polysaccharide fraction (designated as FMS) induce antibodies against murine Lewis lung carcinoma cells, with increased antibody-mediated cytotoxicity and reduced production of tumor-associated inflammatory mediators (in particular, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1). The mice showed a significant increase in the peritoneal B1 B-cell population, suggesting FMS-mediated anti-glycan IgM production. Furthermore, the glycan microarray analysis of FMS-induced antisera displayed a high specificity toward tumor-associated glycans, with the antigenic structure located in the nonreducing termini (i.e., Fucα1-2Galβ1-3GalNAc-R, where Gal, GalNAc, and R represent, respectively, D-galactose, D-N-acetyl galactosamine, and reducing end), typically found in Globo H and related tumor antigens. The composition of FMS contains mainly the backbone of 1,4-mannan and 1,6-α-galactan and through the Fucα1-2Gal, Fucα1-3/4Man, Fucα1-4Xyl, and Fucα1-2Fuc linkages (where Man and Xyl represent d-mannose and d-xylose, respectively), underlying the molecular basis of the FMS-induced IgM antibodies against tumor-specific glycans.

  13. Delayed radiation-induced inflammation accompanying a marked carbohydrate antigen 19-9 elevation in a patient with resected pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Cardinal, Jon S.; Jacobson, Geraldine M.

    2016-01-01

    Although carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 is a useful tumor marker for pancreatic cancer, it can also become elevated from a variety of benign and malignant conditions. Herein we describe an unusual presentation of elevated CA 19-9 in an asymptomatic patient who had previously undergone adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy for resected early stage pancreatic cancer. The rise in CA 19-9 might be due to delayed radiation-induced inflammation related to previous intra-abdominal radiation therapy with or without radiation recall induced by gemcitabine. After treatment with corticosteroids the CA 19-9 level decreased to normal, and the patient has not developed any evidence of recurrent cancer to date. PMID:27306770

  14. Parasite Carbohydrate Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Jaurigue, Jonnel A.; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination is an efficient means of combating infectious disease burden globally. However, routine vaccines for the world's major human parasitic diseases do not yet exist. Vaccines based on carbohydrate antigens are a viable option for parasite vaccine development, given the proven success of carbohydrate vaccines to combat bacterial infections. We will review the key components of carbohydrate vaccines that have remained largely consistent since their inception, and the success of bacterial carbohydrate vaccines. We will then explore the latest developments for both traditional and non-traditional carbohydrate vaccine approaches for three of the world's major protozoan parasitic diseases—malaria, toxoplasmosis, and leishmaniasis. The traditional prophylactic carbohydrate vaccine strategy is being explored for malaria. However, given that parasite disease biology is complex and often arises from host immune responses to parasite antigens, carbohydrate vaccines against deleterious immune responses in host-parasite interactions are also being explored. In particular, the highly abundant glycosylphosphatidylinositol molecules specific for Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, and Leishmania spp. are considered exploitable antigens for this non-traditional vaccine approach. Discussion will revolve around the application of these protozoan carbohydrate antigens for vaccines currently in preclinical development. PMID:28660174

  15. Autoantibody detection to tumor-associated antigens of P53, IMP1, P16, cyclin B1, P62, C-myc, Survivn, and Koc for the screening of high-risk subjects and early detection of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, S L; Yue, W B; Fan, Z M; Du, F; Liu, B C; Li, B; Han, X N; Ku, J W; Zhao, X K; Zhang, P; Cui, J; Zhou, F Y; Zhang, L Q; Fan, X P; Zhou, Y F; Zhu, L L; Liu, H Y; Wang, L D

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic values by detecting sera autoantibodies to eight tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) of P53, IMP1, P16, cyclin B1, P62, C-myc, Survivn and Koc full-length recombinant proteins for the screening of high-risk subjects and early detection of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect autoantibodies against the eight selected TAAs in 567 sera samples from four groups, including 200 individuals with normal esophageal epithelia (NOR), 214 patients with esophageal basal cell hyperplasia (BCH), 65 patients with esophageal dysplasia (DYS), and 88 patients with ESCC. In addition, the expression of the eight antigens in esophageal tissues was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Statistically significant distribution differences were identified among the four groups for each of the individual autoantibodies to six TAAs (P53, IMP1, P16, cyclin B1, P62, and C-myc); the detection rates of antoantibodies were positively correlated with the progression of ESCC. When autoantibody assay successively accumulated to six TAAs (P53, IMP1, P16, cyclin B1, P62, and C-myc), a stepwise increased detection frequency of autoantibodies was found in the four sera groups (6% in NOR, 18% in BCH, 38% in DYS, and 64% in ESCC, respectively), the risks to BHC, DYS, and ESCC steadily increased about 3-, 9-, and 27-folds. The sensitivity and the specificity for autoantibodies against the six TAAs in diagnosing ESCC reached up to 64% and 94%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the six anti-TAA autoantibodies was 0.78 (95% confidence interval 0.74-0.83). No more increasing in sensitivity was found with the addition of new anti-TAA autoantibodies. A combination detection of autoantibodies to TAAs might distinguish ESCC patients from normal individuals and the patients with esophageal precancerous lesions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society

  16. The Lewis-Y carbohydrate antigen is expressed by many human tumors and can serve as a target for genetically redirected T cells despite the presence of soluble antigen in serum.

    PubMed

    Westwood, Jennifer A; Murray, William K; Trivett, Melanie; Haynes, Nicole M; Solomon, Benjamin; Mileshkin, Linda; Ball, David; Michael, Michael; Burman, Angela; Mayura-Guru, Preethi; Trapani, Joseph A; Peinert, Stefan; Hönemann, Dirk; Miles Prince, H; Scott, Andrew M; Smyth, Mark J; Darcy, Phillip K; Kershaw, Michael H

    2009-04-01

    In this study we aimed to determine the suitability of the Lewis-Y carbohydrate antigen as a target for immunotherapy using genetically redirected T cells. Using the 3S193 monoclonal antibody and immunohistochemistry, Lewis-Y was found to be expressed on a range of tumors including 42% squamous cell lung carcinoma, 80% lung adenocarcinoma, 25% ovarian carcinoma, and 25% colorectal adenocarcinoma. Expression levels varied from low to intense on between 1% and 90% of tumor cells. Lewis- was also found in soluble form in sera from both normal donors and cancer patients using a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum levels in patients was often less than 1 ng/mL, similar to normal donors, but approximately 30% of patients had soluble Lewis-Y levels exceeding 1 ng/mL and up to 9 ng/mL. Lewis-Y-specific human T cells were generated by genetic modification with a chimeric receptor encoding a single-chain humanized antibody linked to the T-cell signaling molecules, T-cell receptor-zeta, and CD28. T cells responded against the Lewis-Y antigen by cytokine secretion and cytolysis in response to tumor cells. Importantly, the T-cell response was not inhibited by patient serum containing soluble Lewis-Y. This study demonstrates that Lewis-Y is expressed on a large number of tumors and Lewis-Y-specific T cells can retain antitumor function in the presence of patient serum, indicating that this antigen is a suitable target for this form of therapy.

  17. Tumor-Associated Lymphatic Vessels Upregulate PDL1 to Inhibit T-Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Lothar C; Ikenberg, Kristian; Cetintas, Timur; Kapaklikaya, Kübra; Hutmacher, Cornelia; Detmar, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-associated lymphatic vessels (LVs) play multiple roles during tumor progression, including promotion of metastasis and regulation of antitumor immune responses by delivering antigen from the tumor bed to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Under steady-state conditions, LN resident lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) have been found to maintain peripheral tolerance by directly inhibiting autoreactive T-cells. Similarly, tumor-associated lymphatic endothelium has been suggested to reduce antitumor T-cell responses, but the mechanisms that mediate this effect have not been clarified. Using two distinct experimental tumor models, we found that tumor-associated LVs gain expression of the T-cell inhibitory molecule PDL1, similar to LN resident LECs, whereas tumor-associated blood vessels downregulate PDL1. The observed lymphatic upregulation of PDL1 was likely due to IFN-g released by stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, we found that blocking PDL1 results in increased T-cell stimulation by antigen-presenting LECs in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that peripheral, tumor-associated lymphatic endothelium contributes to T-cell inhibition, by a mechanism similar to peripheral tolerance maintenance described for LN resident LECs. These findings may have clinical implications for cancer therapy, as lymphatic expression of PDL1 could represent a new biomarker to select patients for immunotherapy with PD1 or PDL1 inhibitors.

  18. Tumor-Associated Lymphatic Vessels Upregulate PDL1 to Inhibit T-Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Dieterich, Lothar C.; Ikenberg, Kristian; Cetintas, Timur; Kapaklikaya, Kübra; Hutmacher, Cornelia; Detmar, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-associated lymphatic vessels (LVs) play multiple roles during tumor progression, including promotion of metastasis and regulation of antitumor immune responses by delivering antigen from the tumor bed to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Under steady-state conditions, LN resident lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) have been found to maintain peripheral tolerance by directly inhibiting autoreactive T-cells. Similarly, tumor-associated lymphatic endothelium has been suggested to reduce antitumor T-cell responses, but the mechanisms that mediate this effect have not been clarified. Using two distinct experimental tumor models, we found that tumor-associated LVs gain expression of the T-cell inhibitory molecule PDL1, similar to LN resident LECs, whereas tumor-associated blood vessels downregulate PDL1. The observed lymphatic upregulation of PDL1 was likely due to IFN-g released by stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, we found that blocking PDL1 results in increased T-cell stimulation by antigen-presenting LECs in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that peripheral, tumor-associated lymphatic endothelium contributes to T-cell inhibition, by a mechanism similar to peripheral tolerance maintenance described for LN resident LECs. These findings may have clinical implications for cancer therapy, as lymphatic expression of PDL1 could represent a new biomarker to select patients for immunotherapy with PD1 or PDL1 inhibitors. PMID:28217128

  19. Evaluating strategies to enhance the anti-tumor immune response to a carbohydrate mimetic peptide vaccine.

    PubMed

    Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Jousheghany, Fariba; Artaud, Cecile; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2006-06-01

    Carbohydrate mimetic peptides of tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACA) are T-cell-dependent antigens and, therefore, immunization with these surrogates is predicted to overcome the low immunogenicity of carbohydrate antigens. Consistent with this hypothesis, we show that among the potential immune cells involved, peptide immunization led to an increase in T-cell populations. While peptide mimetics may also function as TLR binding ligands, we did not observe evidence of involvement of NK cells. Examining tumor challenged animals, we observed that peptide immunization and not tumor cells rendered IL-12 responsiveness to T-cells, as T-cells from peptide-immunized mice produced IFN-gamma upon stimulation with IL-12. Cyclophosphamide administration enhanced the anti-tumor efficacy of the vaccine, which was achieved by enhancing T-cell responses with no effect on NK cell population. Prophylactic immunization of mice with a DNA construct encoding carbohydrate mimetic peptides indicated a specific role for the mimotope vaccine in anti-tumor immune responses. These data suggest a role for both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells induced by mimotopes of TACA in protective immunity against tumor cells.

  20. Microarrays with Varying Carbohydrate Density Reveal Distinct Subpopulations of Serum Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Oyelaran, Oyindasola; Li, Qian; Farnsworth, David; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2009-01-01

    Antigen arrays have become important tools for profiling complex mixtures of proteins such as serum antibodies. These arrays can be used to better understand immune responses, discover new biomarkers, and guide the development of vaccines. Nevertheless, they are not perfect and improved array designs would enhance the information derived from this technology. In this study, we describe and evaluate a strategy for varying antigen density on an array and then use the array to study binding of lectins, monoclonal antibodies, and serum antibodies. To vary density, neoglycoproteins containing differing amounts of carbohydrate were synthesized and used to make a carbohydrate microarray with variations in both structure and density. We demonstrate that this method provides variations in density on the array surface within a range that is relevant for biological recognition events. The array was used to evaluate density dependent binding properties of three lectins (Vicia villosa lectin B4, Helix pomatia agglutinin, and soybean agglutinin) and three monoclonal antibodies (HBTn-1, B1.1, and Bric111) that bind the tumor-associated Tn antigen. In addition, serum antibodies were profiled from 30 healthy donors. The results show that variations in antigen density are required to detect the full spectrum of antibodies that bind a particular antigen and can be used to reveal differences in antibody populations between individuals that are not detectable using a single antigen density. PMID:19366269

  1. Serological characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and its differential diagnosis from pancreatic cancer by using a combination of carbohydrate antigen 19-9, globulin, eosinophils and hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Xu, Chengfu; Yu, Chaohui; Li, Youming

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a special type of chronic pancreatitis, which may be misdiagnosed as pancreatic carcinoma. This study aims to verify new biomarkers for AIP and propose a serological pattern to differentiate AIP from pancreatic adenocarcinoma with routinely performed tests. In this study, data of serum samples were collected and compared between 25 patients with AIP and 100 patients with pancreatic carcinoma. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression was performed to evaluate the diagnostic effect of serum parameters in differentiating AIP from pancreatic carcinoma alone or in combination. Among several serum markers observed in the two groups, carbohydrate antigen 19–9 (Ca19-9), globulin, eosinophils and hemoglobin were selected as the independent markers. Serum levels of Globulin, Eosinophil percentage in AIP group were significantly higher than in pancreatic cancer group (P<0.05), while hemoglobin and tumor marker CA19-9 levels were lower (P <0.05). The combination of these markers identified patients with AIP with 92% sensitivity and 79% specificity, which indicated relatively high diagnostic value. Elevated serum eosinophils, globulin, together with decreased hemoglobin level can be used as a preoperative indicator for AIP and can help to initiate diagnosis of AIP in time. PMID:28369140

  2. Serological characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and its differential diagnosis from pancreatic cancer by using a combination of carbohydrate antigen 19-9, globulin, eosinophils and hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tianlian; Ke, Yini; Chen, Yi; Xu, Chengfu; Yu, Chaohui; Li, Youming

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a special type of chronic pancreatitis, which may be misdiagnosed as pancreatic carcinoma. This study aims to verify new biomarkers for AIP and propose a serological pattern to differentiate AIP from pancreatic adenocarcinoma with routinely performed tests. In this study, data of serum samples were collected and compared between 25 patients with AIP and 100 patients with pancreatic carcinoma. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression was performed to evaluate the diagnostic effect of serum parameters in differentiating AIP from pancreatic carcinoma alone or in combination. Among several serum markers observed in the two groups, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (Ca19-9), globulin, eosinophils and hemoglobin were selected as the independent markers. Serum levels of Globulin, Eosinophil percentage in AIP group were significantly higher than in pancreatic cancer group (P<0.05), while hemoglobin and tumor marker CA19-9 levels were lower (P <0.05). The combination of these markers identified patients with AIP with 92% sensitivity and 79% specificity, which indicated relatively high diagnostic value. Elevated serum eosinophils, globulin, together with decreased hemoglobin level can be used as a preoperative indicator for AIP and can help to initiate diagnosis of AIP in time.

  3. Novel redox species polyaniline derivative-Au/Pt as sensing platform for label-free electrochemical immunoassay of carbohydrate antigen 199.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyuan; Shan, Jiao; Feng, Feng; Ma, Zhanfang

    2016-03-10

    A novel electrochemical redox-active nanocomposite was synthesized by a one-pot method using N,N'-diphenyl-p-phenylediamine as monomer, and HAuCl4 and K2PtCl4 as co-oxidizing agents. The as-prepared poly(N,N'-diphenyl-p-phenylediamine)-Au/Pt exhibited admirable electrochemical redox activity at 0.15 V, excellent H2O2 electrocatalytic ability and favorable electron transfer ability. Based on these, the evaluation of the composite as sensing substrate for label-free electrochemical immunosensing to the sensitive detection of carbohydrate antigen 199 was described. This technique proved to be a prospective detection tool with a wide liner range from 0.001 U mL(-1) to 40 U mL(-1), and a low detection limit of 2.3 × 10(-4) U mL(-1) (S/N = 3). In addition, this method was used for the analysis of human serum sample, and good agreement was obtained between the values and those of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, implying the potential application in clinical research. Importantly, the strategy of the present substrate could be extended to other polymer-based nanocomposites such as polypyrrole derivatives or polythiophene derivatives, and this could be of great significance for the electrochemical immunoassay.

  4. Urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma with concurrent plasmacytoid and micropapillary differentiations: A report of two cases with an emphasis on serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9.

    PubMed

    Makise, Naohiro; Morikawa, Teppei; Takeshima, Yuta; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Homma, Yukio; Fukayama, Masashi

    2015-09-01

    We report two cases of urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma (UC). In both, histological examination of a transurethral resection specimen of the bladder tumor revealed UC with plasmacytoid and micropapillary differentiations. In Case 1, residual plasmacytoid UC deeply invaded the extravesical fat tissue of the radical cystectomy specimen, and metastatic carcinoma was found in almost all the dissected lymph nodes. Despite adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the patient died 25 months postdiagnosis. Elevated serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) returned to near normal levels after radical cystectomy, but they increased shortly before death. In Case 2, no residual carcinoma was found in the radical cystectomy specimen or lymph nodes. Postoperative serum CA19-9 was maintained at normal levels, and the patient remains alive without recurrence or metastasis. Although plasmacytoid and micropapillary UC are known aggressive variants of UC, plasmacytoid UC may be more aggressive. Serum CA19-9 could serve as a useful biomarker to monitor progression of plasmacytoid UC.

  5. Pretreatment Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 Level Indicates Tumor Response, Early Distant Metastasis, Overall Survival, and Therapeutic Selection in Localized and Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Tae; Lee, Woo Jin; Woo, Sang Myung; Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae; Moon, Sung Ho; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Sang Soo; Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Joong-Won

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The use of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer has been disputed because of high probability of distant metastasis. Thus, we analyzed the effect of clinical parameters on tumor response, early distant metastasis within 3 months (DM{sup 3m}), and overall survival to identify an indicator for selecting patients who would benefit from CRT. Methods and Materials: This study retrospectively analyzed the data from 84 patients with localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer who underwent CRT between August 2002 and October 2009. Sex, age, tumor size, histological differentiation, N classification, pre- and post-treatment carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 level, and CA 19-9 percent decrease were analyzed to identify risk factors associated with tumor response, DM{sup 3m}, and overall survival. Results: For all 84 patients, the median survival time was 12.5 months (range, 2-31.9 months), objective response (complete response or partial response) to CRT was observed in 28 patients (33.3%), and DM{sup 3m} occurred in 24 patients (28.6%). Multivariate analysis showed that pretreatment CA 19-9 level ({<=}400 vs. >400 U/ml) was significantly associated with tumor response (45.1% vs. 15.2%), DM{sup 3m} (19.6% vs. 42.4%), and median overall survival time (15.1 vs. 9.7 months) (p < 0.05 for all three parameters). Conclusion: For patients with localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer, pretreatment CA 19-9 level could be helpful in predicting tumor response, DM{sup 3m}, and overall survival and identifying patients who will benefit from CRT.

  6. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dot-Labeled Lateral Flow Strips for Rapid and Quantitative Detection of Gastric Cancer Carbohydrate Antigen 72-4.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xinyu; Wang, Kan; Lu, Wenting; Qin, Weijian; Cui, Daxiang; He, Jinghua

    2016-12-01

    Carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA72-4) is an important biomarker associated closely with diagnosis and prognosis of early gastric cancer. How to realize quick, sensitive, specific, and quantitative detection of CA72-4 in clinical specimens has become a great requirement. Herein, we reported a CdSe/ZnS quantum dot-labeled lateral flow test strip combined with a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based reader was developed for rapid, sensitive, and quantitative detection of CA72-4. Two mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against CA72-4 were employed. One of them was coated as a test line, while another mAb was labeled with quantum dots and coated onto conjugate pad. The goat anti-mouse IgG was immobilized as a control line. After sample was added, a sandwich structure was formed with CA72-4 and these two mAbs. The fluorescent signal from quantum dots (QD)-labeled mAb in sandwich structure was related to the amount of detected CA72-4. A CCD-based reader was used to realize quantitative detection of CA72-4. Results showed that developed QD-labeled lateral flow strips to detect CA72-4 biomarker with the sensitivity of 2 IU/mL and 10 min detection time. One hundred sera samples from clinical patients with gastric cancer and healthy people were used to confirm specificity of this strip method; results showed that established strip method own 100 % reproducibility and 100 % specificity compared with Roche electrochemiluminescence assay results. In conclusion, CdSe/ZnS quantum dot-labeled lateral flow strips for detection of CA72-4 could realize rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of clinical samples and could own great potential in clinical translation in near future.

  7. Nanoparticle-based sandwich electrochemical immunoassay for carbohydrate antigen 125 with signal enhancement using enzyme-coated nanometer-sized enzyme-doped silica beads.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dianping; Su, Biling; Tang, Juan; Ren, Jingjing; Chen, Guonan

    2010-02-15

    A novel nanoparticle-based electrochemical immunoassay of carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) as a model was designed to couple with a microfluidic strategy using anti-CA125-functionalized magnetic beads as immunosensing probes. To construct the immunoassay, thionine-horseradish peroxidase conjugation (TH-HRP) was initially doped into nanosilica particles using the reverse micelle method, and then HRP-labeled anti-CA125 antibodies (HRP-anti-CA125) were bound onto the surface of the synthesized nanoparticles, which were used as recognition elements. Different from conventional nanoparticle-based electrochemical immunoassays, the recognition elements of the immunoassay simultaneously contained electron mediator and enzyme labels and simplified the electrochemical measurement process. The sandwich-type immunoassay format was used for the online formation of the immunocomplex in an incubation cell and captured in the detection cell with an external magnet. The electrochemical signals derived from the carried HRP toward the reduction of H(2)O(2) using the doped thionine as electron mediator. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical immunoassay exhibited a wide working range from 0.1 to 450 U/mL with a detection limit of 0.1 U/mL CA125. The precision, reproducibility, and stability of the immunoassay were acceptable. The assay was evaluated for clinical serum samples, receiving in excellent accordance with results obtained from the standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Concluding, the nanoparticle-based assay format provides a promising approach in clinical application and thus represents a versatile detection method.

  8. Silver-functionalized g-C3N4 nanohybrids as signal-transduction tags for electrochemical immunoassay of human carbohydrate antigen 19-9.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ai-Li; Qi, Qing-An

    2016-07-21

    A simple and feasible electrochemical immunosensing platform was developed for highly efficient screening of a disease-related protein (human carbohydrate antigen 19-9, CA 19-9 used in this case) using silver-functionalized g-C3N4 nanosheets (Ag/g-C3N4) as signal-transduction tags. Initially, Ag/g-C3N4 nanohybrids were synthesized by combining thermal polymerization of the melamine precursor with the photo-assisted reduction method. Thereafter, the as-synthesized Ag/g-C3N4 nanohybrids were utilized for the labeling of the anti-CA 19-9 detection antibody by using a typical carbodiimide coupling method. The assay was carried out on a capture antibody-modified glassy carbon electrode in a sandwich-type detection mode. The detectable signal mainly derived from the voltammetric characteristics of the immobilized nanosilver particles on the g-C3N4 nanosheets within the applied potentials. Under the optimal conditions, the voltammetric peak currents increased with the increasing amount of target CA 19-9, and exhibited a wide linear range from 5.0 mU mL(-1) to 50 U mL(-1) with a detection limit of 1.2 mU mL(-1). Our strategy also displayed good reproducibility, precision and specificity. The results of the analysis of clinical serum specimens were in good accordance with the results obtained by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. The newly developed immunosensing system is promising for enzyme-free and cost-effective analysis of low-abundance proteins.

  9. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dot-Labeled Lateral Flow Strips for Rapid and Quantitative Detection of Gastric Cancer Carbohydrate Antigen 72-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xinyu; Wang, Kan; Lu, Wenting; Qin, Weijian; Cui, Daxiang; He, Jinghua

    2016-03-01

    Carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA72-4) is an important biomarker associated closely with diagnosis and prognosis of early gastric cancer. How to realize quick, sensitive, specific, and quantitative detection of CA72-4 in clinical specimens has become a great requirement. Herein, we reported a CdSe/ZnS quantum dot-labeled lateral flow test strip combined with a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based reader was developed for rapid, sensitive, and quantitative detection of CA72-4. Two mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against CA72-4 were employed. One of them was coated as a test line, while another mAb was labeled with quantum dots and coated onto conjugate pad. The goat anti-mouse IgG was immobilized as a control line. After sample was added, a sandwich structure was formed with CA72-4 and these two mAbs. The fluorescent signal from quantum dots (QD)-labeled mAb in sandwich structure was related to the amount of detected CA72-4. A CCD-based reader was used to realize quantitative detection of CA72-4. Results showed that developed QD-labeled lateral flow strips to detect CA72-4 biomarker with the sensitivity of 2 IU/mL and 10 min detection time. One hundred sera samples from clinical patients with gastric cancer and healthy people were used to confirm specificity of this strip method; results showed that established strip method own 100 % reproducibility and 100 % specificity compared with Roche electrochemiluminescence assay results. In conclusion, CdSe/ZnS quantum dot-labeled lateral flow strips for detection of CA72-4 could realize rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of clinical samples and could own great potential in clinical translation in near future.

  10. A novel sandwich electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 based on immobilizing luminol on Ag@BSA core/shell microspheres.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Amin; Xiang, Hongkun; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Weiwei; Yuan, Enhui; Huang, Chusen; Jia, Nengqin

    2016-01-15

    A novel sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence immunosensor based on immobilizing luminol on Ag@BSA core/shell microspheres (Ag@BSA-luminol) for ultrasensitive detection of tumor marker carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) has been developed. Herein, magnetic carbon nanotubes (MAGCNTs) decorated with polyethylenimine (PEI) was used to construct the base of the immunosensor. MAGCNTs with prominent electrical conductivity and high surface area could be beneficial for promoting the electron transfer and loading plenty of primary antibodies (Ab1) via glutaraldehyde (GA). Meanwhile, the magnetic property of MAGCNTs makes it easy to be attached to the surface of magnetic glass carbon electrode (MGCE) through magnetism interaction, which provides an outstanding platform for this immunosensor. Moreover, Ag@BSA microspheres with large surface area, good stability, and excellent biocompatibility were desirable candidates for effective cross-link of CA19-9 detection antibodies (Ab2). A more interesting thing was that ELISA color reaction was used as an ultrasensitive strategy for identifying Ab2 was successfully coated on Ag@BSA with the naked eye. Additionally, we immobilized the luminol on the surface of Ag@BSA to prepare the target immunosensor. Immobilization of luminol on the surface of Ag@BSA could decrease the distance between luminophores and the electrode surface, leading to great enhancement of the ECL intensity of luminol in the present of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Under the optimal conditions, the intensity of the ECL immunosensor increased linearly with the logarithm of CA19-9 concentration in a wide linear range from 0.0005 to 150UmL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.0002UmL(-1) (S/N=3). All the results suggested the prepared CA19-9 immunosensor displayed high sensitivity, excellent stability and good specificity. The developed method opened a new avenue to clinical bioassay. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 represents a marker of response to neoadjuvant therapy in patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Ching-Wei D; Balachandran, Aparna; Ahmad, Mediha; Lee, Jeffrey E; Krishnan, Sunil; Wang, Huamin; Crane, Christopher H; Wolff, Robert A; Varadhachary, Gauri R; Pisters, Peter W T; Aloia, Thomas A; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Fleming, Jason B; Katz, Matthew H G

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 levels and outcome in patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapy (NT). Methods This study included all patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer, a serum CA 19-9 level of ≥40 U/ml and bilirubin of ≤2 mg/dl, in whom NT was initiated at one institution between 2001 and 2010. The study evaluated the associations between pre- and post-NT CA 19-9, resection and overall survival. Results Among 141 eligible patients, CA 19-9 declined during NT in 116. Following NT, 84 of 141 (60%) patients underwent resection. For post-NT resection, the positive predictive value of a decline and the negative predictive value of an increase in CA 19-9 were 70% and 88%, respectively. The normalization of CA 19-9 (post-NT <40 U/ml) was associated with longer median overall survival among both non-resected (15 months versus 11 months; P = 0.022) and resected (38 months versus 26 months; P = 0.020) patients. Factors independently associated with shorter overall survival were no resection [hazard ratio (HR) 3.86, P < 0.001] and failure to normalize CA 19-9 (HR 2.13, P = 0.001). Conclusions The serum CA 19-9 level represents a dynamic preoperative marker of tumour biology and response to NT, and provides prognostic information in both non-resected and resected patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:23991810

  12. Development of quantitative immunochromatographic assay for rapid and sensitive detection of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Baryeh, Kwaku; Takalkar, Sunitha; Lund, Michelle; Liu, Guodong

    2017-09-05

    A quantitative immunochromatographic assay (QIA) was developed by using gold nanoparticle (GNP)-based lateral flow strip biosensor (LFSB) and a portable strip reader for rapid and sensitive quantitation of Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) in human plasma. CA 19-9 is a biomarker that has been associated with cancers (such as pancreatic and colorectal cancers) and various non-cancerous diseases. The principle is based on sandwich-type immunoreactions between gold nanoparticle (GNP)-labelled detection antibody, anti-CA 19-9 capture antibody and CA 19-9to capture the GNPs on the test zone of LFSB. The accumulation of GNPs on the test zone gave a red line whose intensity was read with a portable strip reader to quantify the concentration of CA 19-9. Assay parameters including the membrane type, antibody concentration, amount of GNP-anti-CA 19-9 conjugates and the components of the running buffer were optimized to obtain the best sensitivity and reproducibility of the assay. The detection limit of the assay was determined to be 5UmL(-1) (S/N=3) with a linear range of 5UmL(-1)-100UmL(-1). CA 19-9 concentrations in healthy human and pancreatic cancer patient plasma samples were successfully evaluated using the developed quantitative immunochromatographic assay (QIA), and the results were in accordance with that obtained with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The developed assay shows great promise for clinical application and biomedical diagnosis, particularly in limited resource settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Higher carbohydrate antigen 125 levels are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease in elderly chinese: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaorong; He, Meian; Zhu, Jiang; Yao, Ping; Li, Xiulou; Yuan, Jing; Min, Xinwen; Lang, Mingjian; Yang, Handong; Hu, Frank B; Wu, Tangchun; Wei, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    High carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA-125) level was reported to be associated with some cardiac dysfunctions, such as chronic heart failure, but the relationship between CA-125 level and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk remains unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the potential association in a Chinese older population. In a population-based case-control study conducted in a Chinese older population, serum CA-125 levels were measured in 1177 diagnosed CHD patients and 3531 age and sex matched control subjects without CHD. Serum CA-125 level was significantly higher in CHD patients than controls (P < 0.001) with adjustment for age, gender, smoking, drinking, BMI, physical activity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, medication history and family history of CHD and myocardial infarction. CHD risk was doubled (OR: 2.10, 95%CI: 1.69-2.60) among subjects in the highest quartile compared to those in the lowest quartile of CA-125 level (P trend < 0.001). Furthermore, CA-125 levels were associated with CHD risks in subjects with age over 60 years (OR: 2.19, 95%CI: 1.75-2.73), current smokers (OR: 2.29, 95%CI: 1.50-3.49), current drinkers (OR: 2.35, 95%CI: 1.57-3.53) and subjects with hypertension (OR: 2.04, 95%CI: 1.71-2.43). Elevated serum CA-125 level might be associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease in the Chinese older population. Further investigations are needed to identify the possible biological role of CA-125 in CHD development in the future.

  14. Recent Development in Carbohydrate-Based Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhongwu; Wang, Qianli

    2009-01-01

    Summary Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) are important molecular markers on the cancer cell surface, useful for the development of therapeutic cancer vaccines or cancer immunotherapies. However, due to their poor immunogenicity and/or immunotolerance, most TACAs fail to induce T cell-mediated immunity that is critical for cancer therapy. This review summarizes the recent effort to overcome this problem via constructing TACA conjugates with improved immunogenicity, such as by covalently coupling TACAs to proper carrier molecules to form clustered or multi-epitopic conjugate vaccines, coupling TACAs to a T cell peptide epitope and/or an immunostimulant epitope to form fully synthetic multi-component glycoconjugate vaccines, and developing vaccines based on chemically modified TACAs, which is combined with metabolic engineering of cancer cells. PMID:19766052

  15. Aire-dependent thymic development of tumor-associated regulatory T cells*

    PubMed Central

    Malchow, Sven; Leventhal, Daniel S.; Nishi, Saki; Fischer, Benjamin I.; Shen, Lynn; Paner, Gladell P.; Amit, Ayelet S.; Kang, Chulho; Geddes, Jenna E.; Allison, James P.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Savage, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable interest in the modulation of tumor-associated Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) for therapeutic benefit, little is known about the developmental origins of these cells and the nature of the antigens that they recognize. Here, we identified an endogenous population of antigen-specific Tregs (termed “MJ23” Tregs) found recurrently enriched in the tumors of mice with oncogene-driven prostate cancer. MJ23 Tregs were not reactive to a tumor-specific antigen, but instead recognized a prostate-associated antigen that was present in tumor-free mice. MJ23 Tregs underwent Aire-dependent thymic development in both male and female mice. Thus Aire-mediated expression of peripheral tissue antigens drives the thymic development of a subset of organ-specific Tregs, which are likely co-opted by tumors developing within the associated organ. PMID:23471412

  16. Understanding Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Understanding Carbohydrates How much and what type of carbohydrate foods ... glucose levels in your target range. Explore: Understanding Carbohydrates Glycemic Index and Diabetes Learn about the glycemic ...

  17. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hennings, Leah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I), and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses. PMID:24213131

  18. Endocrine tumors associated with the vagusnerve

    PubMed Central

    Varoquaux, Arthur; Kebebew, Electron; Sebag, Fréderic; Wolf, Katherine; Henry, Jean-François; Pacak, Karel; Taïeb, David

    2016-01-01

    The vagus nerve (cranial nerve X) is the main nerve of the parasympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system. Vagal paragangliomas (VPGLs) are a prime example of an endocrine tumor associated with the vagus nerve. This rare, neural-crest tumor constitutes the second most common site of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs), most often in relation to mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase subunit D (SDHD) gene. The treatment paradigm for VPGL has progressively shifted from surgery to abstention or therapeutic radiation with curative-like outcomes. Parathyroid tissue and parathyroid adenoma can also be found in close association with the vagus nerve in intra or paravagal situations. Vagal parathyroid adenoma can be identified with preoperative imaging or suspected intraoperatively by experienced surgeons. Vagal parathyroid adenomas located in the neck or superior mediastinum can be removed via initial cervicotomy, while those located in the aorto-pulmonary window require a thoracic approach. This review particularly emphasizes the embryology, molecular genetics, and modern imaging of these tumors. PMID:27406876

  19. Endocrine tumors associated with the vagus nerve.

    PubMed

    Varoquaux, Arthur; Kebebew, Electron; Sebag, Fréderic; Wolf, Katherine; Henry, Jean-François; Pacak, Karel; Taïeb, David

    2016-09-01

    The vagus nerve (cranial nerve X) is the main nerve of the parasympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system. Vagal paragangliomas (VPGLs) are a prime example of an endocrine tumor associated with the vagus nerve. This rare, neural crest tumor constitutes the second most common site of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs), most often in relation to mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit D (SDHD) gene. The treatment paradigm for VPGL has progressively shifted from surgery to abstention or therapeutic radiation with curative-like outcomes. Parathyroid tissue and parathyroid adenoma can also be found in close association with the vagus nerve in intra or paravagal situations. Vagal parathyroid adenoma can be identified with preoperative imaging or suspected intraoperatively by experienced surgeons. Vagal parathyroid adenomas located in the neck or superior mediastinum can be removed via initial cervicotomy, while those located in the aortopulmonary window require a thoracic approach. This review particularly emphasizes the embryology, molecular genetics, and modern imaging of these tumors.

  20. Tumor Associated Macrophages in Kidney Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleva, Olga V.; Samoilova, Daria V.; Shitova, Maria S.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are an important element of tumor stroma. They originate from blood monocytes attracted by chemokines and cytokines produced by tumor cells and, being instructed by tumor microenvironment, develop into potent tumor-supporting cell population. TAMs were demonstrated to directly stimulate tumor cell proliferation and to promote angiogenesis. Further TAMs provide for efficient immune escape by producing immunosuppressive cytokines and facilitate tumor dissemination by producing extracellular matrix remodeling enzymes. In renal cell carcinoma (RCC), numerous studies were performed for elucidation of the role of TAM in tumor progression. Using pan-macrophages marker CD68 and type 2 macrophage (M2) markers CD163 and CD206, it was demonstrated that increased density of TAMs is associated with poor survival of patients. Although most of the studies are focused on M2 population in RCC, several markers rather typical for type 1 macrophages (M1) were also characterized. Macrophages isolated from RCC tumors were shown to produce proinflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and CCL2. It can be concluded that RCC is an excellent example of a tumor with hybrid phenotype of TAMs that share both M1 and M2 properties. Moreover, TAMs seem to be an attractive therapeutic target as well. Further investigations are needed for identification of RCC-specific TAM markers with high predictive capacity and/or suitable for therapeutic targeting. PMID:27807511

  1. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaehong; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors. PMID:26966341

  2. Clustered Carbohydrates in Synthetic Vaccines†

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Are there general rules to achieve efficient immunization against carbohydrate antigens? Thanks to technological advances in glycobiology and glycochemistry we entered in a new era in which the rational design of carbohydrate vaccines has become an achievable goal. Aim of this Tutorial Review is to present the most recent achievements in the field of semi and fully synthetic carbohydrate vaccines against viruses, bacteria and cancer. It is also pointed out that the understanding of the chemical and biochemical processes related to immunization allows the modern chemist to rationally design carbohydrate vaccines with improved efficiency. PMID:23250562

  3. Selectin ligands and tumor-associated carbohydrate structures: specificities of alpha 2,3-sialyltransferases in the assembly of 3'-sialyl-6-sialyl/sulfo Lewis a and x, 3'-sialyl-6'-sulfo Lewis x, and 3'-sialyl-6-sialyl/sulfo blood group T-hapten.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, E V; Jain, R K; Larsen, R D; Wlasichuk, K; Matta, K L

    1995-03-07

    The sequence in the assembly of the functional unit of selectin ligands containing sulfate, sialic acid, and fucose and also tumor-associated O-glycan structures was studied by examining the specificities of alpha 2,3-sialyltransferases (ST). The first enzyme, porcine liver ST, was 57, 37, and 79% active (Km: 0.105, 0.420, and 0.200 mM), respectively, toward 6-sulfo, 6-sialyl, or 6-O-methyl derivatives of the Gal beta 1,3GalNAc alpha- unit; C-3 or C-6 substitution on Gal abolished sialylation. An acrylamide copolymer (MW approximately 40,000) containing approximately 40 T-haptens and asialo Cowper's gland mucin (MW approximately 200,000) containing approximately 48 T-haptens was 5-fold more active as an acceptor as compared to Gal beta 1, 3GalNAc alpha-O-Al on a molecular weight basis. The second enzyme, a cloned alpha-2,3-ST specific for lactose-based structure, was 70, 102, and 108% active (Km: 0.500, 0.210, and 0.330 mM), respectively, toward 6-sialyl, 6-sulfo, or 6-O-methyl derivatives of the Gal beta 1,3GlcNAc beta- unit; C-3 and C-6 substitution on Gal abolished sialylation. Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc beta- and its 6-sulfo derivative were approximately 20% active; the Lewis a structure, Gal beta 1,3- (Fuc alpha 1,4)GlcNAc beta-, was not an acceptor. The acrylamide copolymers containing approximately 40 units of Gal beta 1,3GlcNAc beta-, Gal beta 1,3(6-sulfo)GlcNAc beta-, or fetuin triantennary asialo or bovine IgG diantennary glycopeptides were respectively 5.9-, 5.4-, 0.7-, and 0.1-fold as active. A transfer of 7-9 mol of NeuAc per mole of the above copolymers was catalyzed by this ST, the sialyl linkage being susceptible to alpha 2,3-specific sialidase. A partially purified Colo 205 Lewis type (alpha 1, 3/4) fucosyltransferase catalyzed the formation of 3'-sialyl-6-sulfo Lewis a from [9-3H]NeuAc alpha 2, 3Gal beta 1, 3(6-sulfo)GlcNAc beta-O-Allyl and copolymer containing [9-3H]NeuAc alpha 2, 3Gal beta 1, 3(6-sulfo)GlcNAc beta- units, using GDP[14C]Fuc as fucosyl

  4. Galectin-3 Expression Correlates with Apoptosis of Tumor-Associated Lymphocytes in Human Melanoma Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Zubieta, Mariana Rodríguez; Furman, David; Barrio, Marcela; Bravo, Alicia Inés; Domenichini, Enzo; Mordoh, José

    2006-01-01

    The immune system recognizes diverse melanoma antigens. However, tumors can evade the immune response, therefore growing and progressing. It has been reported that galectin-3 and galectin-1 can induce apoptosis of activated lymphocytes. However, there is strong evidence indicating that the regulation of galectins function in the human tumor microenvironment is a complex process that is influenced by diverse biological circumstances. Here, we have investigated 33 biopsies (eight primary and 25 metastases) from 24 melanoma patients (15–72 years old) and describe the correlation between the expression of galectin-3 or galectin-1 and the level of apoptosis of tumor-associated lymphocytes using immunohistochemistry and an in situ nick translation assay. The range of galectin-3-positive tumor cells varied between 0% and 93% and that of galectin-1-positive tumor cells varied between 5% and 97%. In addition, 23 ± 27% of tumor-associated lymphocytes were apoptotic. Although our results show a correlation between galectin-3 expression and apoptosis of tumor-associated lymphocytes, we could not find such correlation with galectin-1. Considering the complex process of cancer immunoediting, various interacting factors must be considered. PMID:16651632

  5. Carbohydrate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemiller, James N.

    Carbohydrates are important in foods as a major source of energy, to impart crucial textural properties, and as dietary fiber which influences physiological processes. Digestible carbohydrates, which are converted into monosaccharides, which are absorbed, provide metabolic energy. Worldwide, carbohydrates account for more than 70% of the caloric value of the human diet. It is recommended that all persons should limit calories from fat (the other significant source) to not more than 30% and that most of the carbohydrate calories should come from starch. Nondigestible polysaccharides (all those other than starch) comprise the major portion of dietary fiber (Sect. 10.5). Carbohydrates also contribute other attributes, including bulk, body, viscosity, stability to emulsions and foams, water-holding capacity, freeze-thaw stability, browning, flavors, aromas, and a range of desirable textures (from crispness to smooth, soft gels). They also provide satiety. Basic carbohydrate structures, chemistry, and terminology can be found in references (1, 2).

  6. Carbohydrates in xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Ayares, David; Cooper, David K C

    2005-08-01

    The success of allotransplantation has led to an increasing shortage of human organs from deceased donors. This crisis could be resolved by the use of organs from an anatomically suitable animal, such as the pig. The pig and human have, however, been evolving differently for approximately 80 million years, and numerous immunological and physiological barriers have developed that need to be overcome. Differences in carbohydrate epitopes on pig and human cells have been found to play a major role in some of the immunological barriers that have been identified to date. The rejection caused by the presence of galactose-alpha1,3-galactose (Gal) on the pig vascular endothelium and of natural anti-Gal antibodies in humans has recently been prevented by the breeding of pigs that do not express Gal, achieved by knocking out the gene for the enzyme alpha1,3-galactosyltransferase, which was made possible by the introduction of nuclear transfer/embryo transfer techniques. N-glycolylneuraminic acid (the so-called Hanganutziu-Deicher antigen) has been identified as another carbohydrate antigen present in pigs that may need to be deleted if xenotransplantation is to be successful, although some doubt remains regarding its importance. There remain other antipig antibodies against hitherto unidentified antigenic targets that may well be involved in graft destruction; their possible carbohydrate target epitopes are discussed.

  7. Carbohydrate bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Englyst, Klaus N; Englyst, Hans N

    2005-07-01

    There is consensus that carbohydrate foods, in the form of fruit, vegetables and whole-grain products, are beneficial to health. However, there are strong indications that highly processed, fibre-depleted, and consequently rapidly digestible, energy-dense carbohydrate food products can lead to over-consumption and obesity-related diseases. Greater attention needs to be given to carbohydrate bioavailability, which is determined by the chemical identity and physical form of food. The objective of the present concept article is to provide a rational basis for the nutritional characterisation of dietary carbohydrates. Based on the properties of carbohydrate foods identified to be of specific relevance to health, we propose a classification and measurement scheme that divides dietary carbohydrates into glycaemic carbohydrates (digested and absorbed in the small intestine) and non-glycaemic carbohydrates (enter the large intestine). The glycaemic carbohydrates are characterised by sugar type, and by the likely rate of digestion described by in vitro measurements for rapidly available glucose and slowly available glucose. The main type of non-glycaemic carbohydrates is the plant cell-wall NSP, which is a marker of the natural fibre-rich diet recognised as beneficial to health. Other non-glycaemic carbohydrates include resistant starch and the resistant short-chain carbohydrates (non-digestible oligosaccharides), which should be measured and researched in their own right. The proposed classification and measurement scheme is complementary to the dietary fibre and glycaemic index concepts in the promotion of healthy diets with low energy density required for combating obesity-related diseases.

  8. Expression of the carbohydrate tumour marker SLeX, SLeA (CA19-9), LeY and Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) antigen on normal squamous epithelial tissue of the penis and vagina.

    PubMed

    Wiest, Irmi; Schulze, Sandra; Kuhn, Christina; Seliger, Christian; Hausmann, Roland; Betz, Peter; Mayr, Doris; Friese, Klaus; Jeschke, Udo

    2007-01-01

    Sialyl Lewis x (SLeX), sialyl Lewis a (SLeA), Lewis Y (LeY) and the Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) antigen are carbohydrate motifs that mediate the adhesion between tumour cells and the endothelium. These antigens are usually not expressed in non-malignant tissue. Overexpression of SLeX and SLeA is combined with poor prognosis and malignant relapse. In this study, we analysed the combined expression of SLeX, SLeA, LeY and TF in normal squamous epithelium tissue of the penis shaft, glans and foreskin and in addition of the vagina and vulva. Paraffin-embedded slides of vaginal tissue (8), vulva tissue (8) and penis shaft (8) and glans tissue (8) were fixed and incubated with monoclonal antibodies against SLeX (IgM), SLeA (IgM), LeY (IgM) and TF (IgM). Staining reaction was performed with ABC reagent. The intensity of immunohistochemical reaction on images of the slides was analyzed using a semiquantitative score. Strong focal expression of both sialyl Lewis antigens was found in the uretra of the penis shaft and on epithelial tissue of the glans, and permanent moderate expression of SLeX and SLeA in squamous epithelial tissue of the vagina. Moderate expression of TF was observed in male squamous epithelial tissues of the glans and foreskin and faint expression of TF was found in vulval epithelial tissue. Faint expression of Le Y was observed in female vulval epithelial tissue. Expression of SLeX, SLeA, LeY and especially of the TF antigen in normal non malignant epithelial tissue is surprising and can be explained by the function of this tissue in human reproduction. In addition, moderate TF expression seems to be restricted to epithelial tissue of the penis glans and foreskin.

  9. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1, and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 in pancreatic juice: pathobiologic implications in diagnosing benign and malignant disease of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sukhwinder; Baine, Michael J; Guha, Sushovan; Ochi, Nobuo; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Mallya, Kavita; Thomas, Colleen; Crook, Julia; Wallace, Michael B; Woodward, Timothy A; Jain, Maneesh; Singh, Shailender; Sasson, Aaron R; Skinner, Verna; Raimondo, Massimo; Batra, Surinder K

    2013-04-01

    Pancreatic diseases pose significant diagnostic challenge as signs and symptoms often overlap. We investigated the potential of pancreatic juice neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1 (MIC-1), and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) to aid in the diagnosis of patients with symptoms suggestive of pancreatic diseases. A total of 105 chronic pancreatitis (CP), pancreatic cancer (PC), and nonpancreatic nonhealthy (patients with symptoms mimicking pancreatic disease but found to be free of any pancreatic disease) patients underwent endoscopic pancreatic juice collection after secretin stimulation. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and MIC-1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas CA19-9 was measured by radioimmunoassay. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, MIC-1, and CA19-9 were significantly elevated in the pancreatic juice of patients with CP and patients with PC as compared with nonpancreatic nonhealthy controls (P ≤ 0.034). Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin seemed most promising in differentiating diseased versus nondiseased pancreata (areas under the curve, 0.88-0.91), whereas MIC-1 was found to be higher in patients with PC than in patients with CP (P = 0.043). Interestingly, MIC-1 levels in diabetic patients with PC were higher than in nondiabetic patients with PC (P = 0.030) and diabetic patients with CP (P = 0.087). Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 showed the least ability to distinguish patient groups (areas under the curve, 0.61-0.76). Pancreatic juice neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin shows potential utility in establishing pancreatic etiology in the context of nonspecific symptoms, whereas MIC-1 may aid in differentiating PC from CP.

  10. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  11. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  12. Clostridium difficile carbohydrates: glucan in spores, PSII common antigen in cells, immunogenicity of PSII in swine and synthesis of a dual C. difficile-ETEC conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bertolo, Lisa; Boncheff, Alexander G; Ma, Zuchao; Chen, Yu-Han; Wakeford, Terra; Friendship, Robert M; Rosseau, Joyce; Weese, J Scott; Chu, Michele; Mallozzi, Michael; Vedantam, Gayatri; Monteiro, Mario A

    2012-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is responsible for severe diarrhea in humans that may cause death. Spores are the infectious form of C. difficile, which germinate into toxin-producing vegetative cells in response to bile acids. Recently, we discovered that C. difficile cells possess three complex polysaccharides (PSs), named PSI, PSII, and PSIII, in which PSI was only associated with a hypervirulent ribotype 027 strain, PSII was hypothesized to be a common antigen, and PSIII was a water-insoluble polymer. Here, we show that (i) C. difficile spores contain, at least in part, a D-glucan, (ii) PSI is not a ribotype 027-unique antigen, (iii) common antigen PSII may in part be present as a low molecular weight lipoteichoic acid, (iv) selective hydrolysis of PSII yields single PSII repeat units, (v) the glycosyl diester-phosphate linkage affords high flexibility to PSII, and (vi) that PSII is immunogenic in sows. Also, with the intent of creating a dual anti-diarrheal vaccine against C. difficile and enterotoxin Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections in humans, we describe the conjugation of PSII to the ETEC-associated LTB enterotoxin.

  13. Chemical biology approaches to designing defined carbohydrate vaccines.

    PubMed

    Anish, Chakkumkal; Schumann, Benjamin; Pereira, Claney Lebev; Seeberger, Peter H

    2014-01-16

    Carbohydrate antigens have shown promise as important targets for developing effective vaccines and pathogen detection strategies. Modifying purified microbial glycans through synthetic routes or completely synthesizing antigenic motifs are attractive options to advance carbohydrate vaccine development. However, limited knowledge on structure-property correlates hampers the discovery of immunoprotective carbohydrate epitopes. Recent advancements in tools for glycan modification, high-throughput screening of biological samples, and 3D structural analysis may facilitate antigen discovery process. This review focuses on advances that accelerate carbohydrate-based vaccine development and various technologies that are driving these efforts. Herein we provide a critical overview of approaches and resources available for rational design of better carbohydrate antigens. Structurally defined and fully synthetic oligosaccharides, designed based on molecular understanding of antigen-antibody interactions, offer a promising alternative for developing future carbohydrate vaccines.

  14. Prognostic significance of tumor-associated macrophages in endometrial adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kübler, Kirsten; Ayub, Tiyasha H; Weber, Sarah K; Zivanovic, Oliver; Abramian, Alina; Keyver-Paik, Mignon-Denise; Mallmann, Michael R; Kaiser, Christina; Serçe, Nuran Bektas; Kuhn, Walther; Rudlowski, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Endometrial adenocarcinoma is one of the most common gynecologic malignancies worldwide and in stages confined to the uterus considered to have an excellent prognosis. However, in advanced or recurrent cases when surgery fails to achieve disease control other treatment options are less effective. Thus, new therapeutic avenues are needed. To provide the rationale for the use of novel agents that target immune checkpoints 163 type I endometrial cancer samples were immunohistochemically screened for the presence of CD163(+) tumor-associated macrophages and Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells. Further, a D2-40-based evaluation of lymph vessel density and lymphovascular space invasion was carried out. Correlation analysis with clinicopathological parameters was performed; Kaplan-Meier curves were generated; multivariate analysis was undertaken as appropriate. A substantial amount of tumor-associated macrophages and regulatory T cells was detected in all specimens characterizing endometrial cancer as an immunogenic tumor. However, only the increased infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages was proportionally associated with advanced FIGO stages, high tumor grade, increased lymph vessel density, lymphovascular space invasion and lymph node metastasis. Thus, the presence of tumor-associated macrophages indicates aggressive tumor behavior and appeared to be an independent prognostic factor for recurrence-free survival. Our results make future therapeutic approaches that target tumor-associated macrophages reasonable to improve the outcome of women with advanced or recurrent endometrial adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Counting carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are 3 major types of carbohydrates: Sugars Starches Fiber Sugars are found naturally in some foods ... syrups, such as those added to canned fruit Starches are found naturally in foods. Your body breaks ...

  16. Blood brothers: carbohydrates in xenotransplantation and cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ramsland, Paula

    2005-08-01

    Carbohydrate antigens have a central role in the hyperacute rejection of animal-to-human organ grafts (xenotransplantation) and they are emerging in importance in the immunotherapy of cancer. This article traces the historical origins of the discovery of key carbohydrate antigens and explores the future impact of recent technological advances of the field of glycobiology as it relates to xenotransplantation and cancer.

  17. Combining synthetic carbohydrate vaccines with cancer cell glycoengineering for effective cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Gong, Xi; Wang, Qianli; Li, Jie; Hu, Honggang; Wu, Qiuye; Zhang, Junping; Guo, Zhongwu

    2012-11-01

    Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) are useful targets for the development of cancer vaccines or immunotherapies. However, a major obstacle in this application of TACAs is their poor immunogenicity. To overcome the problem, a new immunotherapeutic strategy combining synthetic vaccines made of artificial TACA derivatives and metabolic glycoengineering of cancer cells to express the artificial TACA derivatives was explored. Using a murine leukemia model FBL3 with GM3 antigen as the target, it was shown that artificial GM3 N-phenylacetyl derivative (GM3NPhAc) elicited robust antigen-specific T cell-dependent immunity and that N-phenylacetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNPhAc) as the biosynthetic precursor of GM3NPhAc selectively glycoengineered cancer cells to express GM3NPhAc both in vitro and in vivo. It was also demonstrated that GM3NPhAc-specific antisera and antibodies mediated strong cytotoxicity to ManNPhAc-treated FBL3 cell. Furthermore, vaccination with a conjugate vaccine made of GM3NPhAc followed by ManNPhAc treatment could significantly suppress tumor growth and prolong the survival of tumor-bearing mouse. These results have proved the feasibility of the new cancer immunotherapeutic strategy, as well as its efficacy to cure cancer, which is of general significance.

  18. Healthy carbohydrates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Functional foods include dietary fiber consisting of health-promoting carbohydrates. We have produced novel prebiotics from orange peel and observed that they extend the shelf life of probiotic bacteria in synbiotics. Some pectic-oligosaccharides and xyloglucan-oligosaccharides also have anti-adhesi...

  19. Novel glycosaminoglycan biosynthetic inhibitors affect tumor-associated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Karthik; Ninomiya, Masayuki; Nguyen, Thao Kim Nu; Tsuzuki, Yasuhiro; Koketsu, Mamoru; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2011-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are essential players in several steps of tumor-associated angiogenesis. As co-receptors for several pro-angiogenic factors such as VEGF and FGF, HSPGs regulate receptor-ligand interactions and play a vital role in signal transduction. Previously, we have employed an enzymatic strategy to show the importance of cell surface HSPGs in endothelial tube formation in vitro. We have recently found several fluoro-xylosides that can selectively inhibit proteoglycan synthesis in endothelial cells. The current study demonstrates that these fluoro-xylosides are effective inhibitors of endothelial tube formation in vitro using a matrigel based assay to simulate tumor-associated angiogenesis. These first generation scaffolds offer a promising stepping-stone to the discovery of more potent fluoro-xylosides that can effectively neutralize tumor growth. PMID:21094131

  20. Learning about Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? Learning About Carbohydrates KidsHealth > For Kids > Learning About Carbohydrates A A ... of energy for the body. Two Types of Carbohydrates There are two major types of carbohydrates (or ...

  1. Learning about Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Learning About Carbohydrates KidsHealth > For Kids > Learning About Carbohydrates Print A ... source of energy for the body. What Are Carbohydrates? There are two major types of carbohydrates (or ...

  2. Moving a Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptide into the clinic.

    PubMed

    Makhoul, Issam; Hutchins, Laura; Emanuel, Peter D; Pennisi, Angela; Siegel, Eric; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs) are broad-spectrum targets for immunotherapy. Immunization with Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides (CMPs) is a strategy to induce broad-spectrum TACA-reactive antibodies hypothesized to interfere with cellular pathways involved in tumor cell survival. A Phase I study was conducted with a first-in-man CMP referred to as P10s, conjugated to the Pan T cell carrier PADRE, along with MONTANIDE(™) ISA 51 VG as adjuvant over a course of 5 immunizations. While designed as a safety and tolerability study, the potential for therapeutic impact was observed in a subject with metastatic lesions as evaluated before and after vaccine treatment. The subject received Vinorelbine and Trastuzumab (VT) for two months prior to study eligibility. PET scans showed partial response in the lungs and complete resolution of a previously enlarged subpectoral lymph node. Immunization with P10s vaccine resulted in responses to P10s, with serum and plasma antibodies reactive with and cytotoxic to human breast cancer cells in vitro, including the Trastuzumab-resistant HCC1954 cell line. However, the patient developed cystic masses in the brain parenchyma with no apparent evidence of metastases. The subject was switched to Docetaxel, Pertuzumab and Trastuzumab a year later, and her last PET scan showed a complete response in the lungs and lymph nodes. Incubation of cancer cells with a combination of vaccine-induced serum and docetaxel suggests that the induced antibodies sensitize tumor cells for more efficient killing upon administration of docetaxel. The data suggest that P10s-PADRE induces anti-tumor antibody response that in combination with chemotherapy can affect metastatic lesions in breast cancer patients.

  3. Moving a Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptide into the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Makhoul, Issam; Hutchins, Laura; Emanuel, Peter D; Pennisi, Angela; Siegel, Eric; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs) are broad-spectrum targets for immunotherapy. Immunization with Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides (CMPs) is a strategy to induce broad-spectrum TACA-reactive antibodies hypothesized to interfere with cellular pathways involved in tumor cell survival. A Phase I study was conducted with a first-in-man CMP referred to as P10s, conjugated to the Pan T cell carrier PADRE, along with MONTANIDE™ ISA 51 VG as adjuvant over a course of 5 immunizations. While designed as a safety and tolerability study, the potential for therapeutic impact was observed in a subject with metastatic lesions as evaluated before and after vaccine treatment. The subject received Vinorelbine and Trastuzumab (VT) for two months prior to study eligibility. PET scans showed partial response in the lungs and complete resolution of a previously enlarged subpectoral lymph node. Immunization with P10s vaccine resulted in responses to P10s, with serum and plasma antibodies reactive with and cytotoxic to human breast cancer cells in vitro, including the Trastuzumab-resistant HCC1954 cell line. However, the patient developed cystic masses in the brain parenchyma with no apparent evidence of metastases. The subject was switched to Docetaxel, Pertuzumab and Trastuzumab a year later, and her last PET scan showed a complete response in the lungs and lymph nodes. Incubation of cancer cells with a combination of vaccine-induced serum and docetaxel suggests that the induced antibodies sensitize tumor cells for more efficient killing upon administration of docetaxel. The data suggest that P10s-PADRE induces anti-tumor antibody response that in combination with chemotherapy can affect metastatic lesions in breast cancer patients. PMID:25483513

  4. Carbohydrate vaccines as immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Slovin, Susan F; Keding, Stacy J; Ragupathi, Govind

    2005-08-01

    Carbohydrates have established themselves as the most clinically relevant antigens of those tested and subsequently developed for vaccines against infectious diseases. However, in cancer patients, many of the defined carbohydrate antigens are really altered 'self' antigens and for unclear reasons, the body does not react to them immunologically. Although these self antigens have been found to be potentially suitable targets for immune recognition and killing, the development of vaccines for cancer treatment is actually more challenging compared with those for infectious diseases mainly because of the difficulty associated with breaking the body's immunological tolerance to the antigen. These antigens lack the inherent immunogenicity associated with bacterial antigens and, therefore, methods to enhance immunological recognition and induction of immunity in vivo are under investigation. These include defining the appropriate tumour-associated antigen, successfully synthesizing the antigen to mimic the original molecule, inducing an immune response, and subsequently enhancing the immunological reactivity so that all components can work together. This has been successfully accomplished with several glycolipid and glycoprotein antigens using carriers such as keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) together with a saponin adjuvant, QS-21. Not only can high titre IgM and IgG antibodies be induced, which are specific for the antigen used for immunization, but the antibodies can mediate complement lysis. The approaches for synthesis, conjugation, clinical administration and immunological potential are discussed.

  5. Carbohydrates and T cells: a sweet twosome.

    PubMed

    Avci, Fikri Y; Li, Xiangming; Tsuji, Moriya; Kasper, Dennis L

    2013-04-01

    Carbohydrates as T cell-activating antigens have been generating significant interest. For many years, carbohydrates were thought of as T-independent antigens, however, more recent research had demonstrated that mono- or oligosaccharides glycosidically linked to peptides can be recognized by T cells. T cell recognition of these glycopeptides depends on the structure of both peptide and glycan portions of the antigen. Subsequently, it was discovered that natural killer T cells recognized glycolipids when presented by the antigen presenting molecule CD1d. A transformative insight into glycan-recognition by T cells occurred when zwitterionic polysaccharides were discovered to bind to and be presented by MHCII to CD4+ T cells. Based on this latter observation, the role that carbohydrate epitopes generated from glycoconjugate vaccines had in activating helper T cells was explored and it was found that these epitopes are presented to specific carbohydrate recognizing T cells through a unique mechanism. Here we review the key interactions between carbohydrate antigens and the adaptive immune system at the molecular, cellular and systems levels exploring the significant biological implications in health and disease.

  6. Carbohydrates and T cells: A sweet twosome

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Fikri Y.; Li, Xiangming; Tsuji, Moriya; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrates as T cell-activating antigens have been generating significant interest. For many years, carbohydrates were thought of as T-independent antigens, however, more recent research had demonstrated that mono- or oligosaccharides glycosidically-linked to peptides can be recognized by T cells. T cell recognition of these glycopeptides depends on the structure of both peptide and glycan portions of the antigen. Subsequently, it was discovered that natural killer T cells recognized glycolipids when presented by the antigen presenting molecule CD1d. A transformative insight into glycan-recognition by T cells occurred when zwitterionic polysaccharides were discovered to bind to and be presented by MHCII to CD4+ T cells. Based on this latter observation, the role that carbohydrate epitopes generated from glycoconjugate vaccines had in activating helper T cells was explored and it was found that these epitopes are presented to specific carbohydrate recognizing T cells through a unique mechanism. Here we review the key interactions between carbohydrate antigens and the adaptive immune system at the molecular, cellular and systems levels exploring the significant biological implications in health and disease. PMID:23757291

  7. The interaction of anticancer therapies with tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are essential components of the inflammatory microenvironment of tumors. Conventional treatment modalities (chemotherapy and radiotherapy), targeted drugs, antiangiogenic agents, and immunotherapy, including checkpoint blockade, all profoundly influence or depend on the function of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can have dual influences on TAMs in that a misdirected macrophage-orchestrated tissue repair response can result in chemoresistance, but in other circumstances, TAMs are essential for effective therapy. A better understanding of the interaction of anticancer therapies with innate immunity, and TAMs in particular, may pave the way to better patient selection and innovative combinations of conventional approaches with immunotherapy. PMID:25753580

  8. Fluorescence-based endoscopic imaging of Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen to improve early detection of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Shinji; Yu, James Y H; Quang, Timothy; Hiwatari, Ken-Ichiro; Kumagai, Hironori; Kao, Stephanie; Holt, Alex; Erskind, Jalysa; McClure, Richard; Siuta, Michael; Kitamura, Tokio; Tobita, Etsuo; Koike, Seiji; Wilson, Kevin; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Liu, Eric; Washington, Kay; Omary, Reed; Gore, John C; Pham, Wellington

    2015-03-01

    Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) antigen belongs to the mucin-type tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen. Notably, TF antigen is overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) but is rarely expressed in normal colonic tissue. Increased TF antigen expression is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. In this study, we sought to validate a novel nanobeacon for imaging TF-associated CRC in a preclinical animal model. We developed and characterized the nanobeacon for use with fluorescence colonoscopy. In vivo imaging was performed on an orthotopic rat model of CRC. Both white light and fluorescence colonoscopy methods were utilized to establish the ratio-imaging index for the probe. The nanobeacon exhibited specificity for TF-associated cancer. Fluorescence colonoscopy using the probe can detect lesions at the stage which is not readily confirmed by conventional visualization methods. Further, the probe can report the dynamic change of TF expression as tumor regresses during chemotherapy. Data from this study suggests that fluorescence colonoscopy can improve early CRC detection. Supplemented by the established ratio-imaging index, the probe can be used not only for early detection, but also for reporting tumor response during chemotherapy. Furthermore, since the data obtained through in vivo imaging confirmed that the probe was not absorbed by the colonic mucosa, no registered toxicity is associated with this nanobeacon. Taken together, these data demonstrate the potential of this novel probe for imaging TF antigen as a biomarker for the early detection and prediction of the progression of CRC at the molecular level. © 2014 UICC.

  9. RABBIT ANTIBODIES TO STREPTOCOCCAL CARBOHYDRATES

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Dietmar G.; Eichmann, Klaus; Krause, Richard M.

    1969-01-01

    In a search for possible genetic factors which may influence the immune response to the streptococcal carbohydrates, over 100 rabbits have been immunized with streptococcal vaccines, and representative examples of high and low response pairs mated. The concentration of precipitins to the group—specific carbohydrates has been measured in the antisera following primary intravenous immunization with heat-killed streptococcal vaccines, Group A, Group A-variant, and Group C. For the majority of rabbits, the concentration of precipitins varied between 1 and 10 mg/ml of antiserum; while in the minority, it was between 11 and 32 mg/ml. The offspring of rabbits with high antibody levels had a significantly higher concentration of antibody than was seen in the offspring of rabbits of low response parents. Such data suggest that the magnitude of the immune response to these carbohydrate antigens is under some form of genetic control. Not uncommonly in rabbits with hyper-γ-globulinemia following primary immunization, the group-specific precipitins are the predominant component of the γ-globulin. An unusual feature of such components is that they are electrophoretically monodisperse, and possess individual antigenic specificity. In this respect they resemble the myeloma proteins. When a response of this sort is not seen after primary immunization, it may occur after secondary immunization. Therefore, prior exposure to the same or closely related antigen may also have an influence on the occurrence of high concentrations of such uniform antibodies. PMID:5766948

  10. Control of tumor-associated macrophage alternative activation by MIF

    PubMed Central

    Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Putty, Kalyani; Rendon, Beatriz E.; Lamont, Gwyneth J.; Faughn, Jonathan D.; Satoskar, Abhay; Lasnik, Amanda; Eaton, John W.; Mitchell, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor stromal alternatively activated macrophages are important determinants of anti-tumor T lymphocyte responses, intratumoral neovascularization and metastatic dissemination. Our recent efforts to investigate the mechanism of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in antagonizing anti-melanoma immune responses reveal that macrophage-derived MIF participates in macrophage alternative activation in melanoma-bearing mice. Both peripheral and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) isolated from melanoma bearing MIF-deficient mice display elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and reduced anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive and pro-angiogenic gene products compared to macrophages from tumor bearing MIF wildtype mice. Moreover, TAMs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) from MIF-deficient mice exhibit reduced T lymphocyte immunosuppressive activities than do those from their wildtype littermates. Corresponding with reduced tumor immunosuppression and neoangiogenic potential by TAMs, MIF-deficiency confers protection against transplantable subcutaneous melanoma outgrowth and melanoma lung metastatic colonization. Finally, we report for the first time that our previously discovered MIF small molecule antagonist, 4-iodo-6-phenylpyrimidine (4-IPP), recapitulates MIF-deficiency in vitro and in vivo and attenuates tumor polarized macrophage alternative activation, immunosuppression, neoangiogenesis and melanoma tumor outgrowth. These studies describe an important functional contribution by MIF to tumor-associated macrophage alternative activation and provide justification for immunotherapeutic targeting of MIF in melanoma patients. PMID:23390297

  11. Aberrant Cosmc genes result in Tn antigen expression in human colorectal carcinoma cell line HT-29

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaofeng; Du, Zhenzhen; Sun, Xuhong; Shi, Chuanqin; Zhang, Huaixiang; Hu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The Tn antigen, which arises from mutation in the Cosmc gene is one of the most common tumor associated carbohydrate antigens. Cosmc resides in X24 encoded by a single gene and functions as a specific molecular chaperone for T-synthase. While the Tn antigen cannot be detected in normal cells, Cosmc mutations inactivate T-synthase and consequently result in Tn antigen expression within certain cancers. In addition to this Cosmc mutation-induced expression, the Tn antigen is also expressed in such cell lines as Jurkat T, LSC and LS174T. Whether the Cosmc mutation is present in the colon cancer cell line HT-29 is still unclear. Here, we isolate HT-29-Tn+ cells from HT-29 cells derived from a female colon cancer patient. These HT-29-Tn+ cells show a loss of the Cosmc gene coding sequence (CDS) leading to an absence of T-synthase activity and Tn antigen expression. Additionally, almost no methylation of Cosmc CpG islands was detected in HT-29-Tn+ as well as in HT-29-Tn- and Tn- tumor cells from male patients. In contrast, the methylation frequency of CpG island of Cosmc in normal female cells was ~50%. Only one active allele of Cosmc existed in HT-29-Tn+ and HT-29-Tn- cells as based upon detection of SNP sites. These results indicate that Tn antigens expression and T-synthase inactivity in HT-29-Tn+ cells can be related to the absence of CDS in Cosmc active alleles, while an inactive allele deletion of Cosmc in HT-29 cells has no influence on Cosmc function. PMID:26045765

  12. 78 FR 50425 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Brachyury Tumor Associated Antigens as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... Rights for development of pox virus-based immunotherapeutics for colorectal cancer. DATES: Only written... to the development of cancer vaccines utilizing pox virus vectors encoding proteins involved in...

  13. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., plasma, urine, or other body fluids. This device is intended as an aid in monitoring patients for disease progress or response to therapy or for the detection of recurrent or residual disease. (b) Classification...

  14. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., plasma, urine, or other body fluids. This device is intended as an aid in monitoring patients for disease progress or response to therapy or for the detection of recurrent or residual disease. (b) Classification...

  15. GBP-5 splicing variants: New guanylate-binding proteins with tumor-associated expression and antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Fellenberg, Friederike; Hartmann, Tanja B; Dummer, Reinhard; Usener, Dirk; Schadendorf, Dirk; Eichmüller, Stefan

    2004-06-01

    We have identified a new gene, gbp-5, with high homology to the guanylate binding proteins (GBP) belonging to the GTPase superfamily including the ras gene. gbp-5 is transcribed at least into three splicing variants (gbp-5a, -5b, and -5ta) leading to two different proteins (GBP-5a/b, GBP-5ta). GBP-5ta is C-terminally truncated by 97aa and has therefore lost its isoprenylation site. Although RT-PCR results indicated expression of GBP-5 members in selected normal tissues, western blotting using two newly generated antibodies revealed that expression of both proteins is restricted to peripheral blood monocytes with GBP-5ta at lower levels. In contrast, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) tumor tissues (seven of seven) were positive solely for GBP-5ta, and four of four CTCL cell lines expressed both proteins. Eight of nine melanoma cell lines expressed GBP-5a/b and four of nine additionally low levels of GBP-5ta. SEREX retesting using CTCL sera indicated a higher immunogenicity for GBP-5ta (nine of 16) than for GBP-5a/b (two of 11). Treatment of CTCL cell lines with interferon-gamma did not alter protein expression of GBP-5ta or GBP-5a/b. The restricted expression pattern of both GBP-5ta and GBP-5a/b and the pivotal role of many known members of the GTP-binding proteins in proliferation and differentiation suggest possible cancer-related functions of gbp-5.

  16. Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus Vectors Fully Retargeted to Tumor-Associated Antigens.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Hiroaki; Hamada, Hirofumi; Nakano, Kenji; Kwon, Heechung; Tahara, Hideaki; Cohen, Justus B; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2017-02-05

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a novel therapeutic modality for malignant diseases that exploits selective viral replication in cancer cells. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a promising agent for oncolytic virotherapy due to its broad cell tropism and the identification of mutations that favor its replication in tumor over normal cells. However, these attenuating mutations also tend to limit the potency of current oncolytic HSV vectors that have entered clinical studies. As an alternative, vector retargeting to novel entry receptors has the potential to achieve tumor specificity at the stage of virus entry, eliminating the need for replication-attenuating mutations. Here we summarize the molecular mechanism of HSV entry and recent advances in the development of fully retargeted HSV vectors for oncolytic virotherapy. Retargeted HSV vectors offer an attractive platform for the creation of a new generation of oncolytic HSV with improved efficacy and specificity.

  17. Novel Tumor-Associated Antigen for Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutics | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute on Aging's Laboratory of Immunology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize the use of SPANX-B-based therapeutic approaches to combat cancers.

  18. Identification of Widely Applicable Tumor-Associated Antigens for Breast Cancer Immunotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    REPORT DATE: January 2006 TYPE OF REPORT: Final PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command...MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S...2 Body…………………………………………….……................................................ 2 Key Research Accomplishments

  19. Tumor associated CD70 expression is involved in promoting tumor migration and macrophage infiltration in GBM.

    PubMed

    Ge, Haitao; Mu, Luyan; Jin, Linchun; Yang, Changlin; Chang, Yifan Emily; Long, Yu; DeLeon, Gabriel; Deleyrolle, Loic; Mitchell, Duane A; Kubilis, Paul S; Lu, Dunyue; Qi, Jiping; Gu, Yunhe; Lin, Zhiguo; Huang, Jianping

    2017-10-01

    Tumor migration/metastasis and immunosuppression are major obstacles in effective cancer therapy. Incidentally, these 2 hurdles usually coexist inside tumors, therefore making therapy significantly more complicated, as both oncogenic mechanisms must be addressed for successful therapeutic intervention. Our recent report highlights that the tumor expression of a TNF family member, CD70, is correlated with poor survival for primary gliomas. In this study, we investigated how CD70 expression by GBM affects the characteristics of tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment. We found that the ablation of CD70 in primary GBM decreased CD44 and SOX2 gene expression, and inhibited tumor migration, growth and the ability to attract monocyte-derived M2 macrophages in vitro. In the tumor microenvironment, CD70 was associated with immune cell infiltrates, such as T cells; myeloid-derived suppressor cells; and monocytes/macrophages based on the RNA-sequencing profile. The CD163+ macrophages were far more abundant than T cells were. This overwhelming level of macrophages was identified only in GBM and not in low-grade gliomas and normal brain specimens, implying their tumor association. CD70 was detected only on tumor cells, not on macrophages, and was highly correlated with CD163 gene expression in primary GBM. Additionally, the co-expression of the CD70 and CD163 genes was found to correlate with decreased survival for patients with primary GBM. Together, these data suggest that CD70 expression is involved in promoting tumor aggressiveness and immunosuppression via tumor-associated macrophage recruitment/activation. Our current efforts to target this molecule using chimeric antigen receptor T cells hold great potential for treating patients with GBM. © 2017 UICC.

  20. Construction of scFv derived from a tumor-associated monoclonal antibody having tumoricidal activity on human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tungpradabkul, Sumalee; Sandee, Duanpen; Puthong, Songchan; Laohathai, Kingkarn

    2005-04-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody (Mab-HepTAA43), classified as an anti-tumor-associated antigen, was raised by immunizing BALB/c mice with the Thai human hepatocellular carcinoma S102 (HCC-S102) cell line cells using hybridoma techniques. The Mab-HepTAA43 reacted with and markedly inhibited the growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines as well as a tumor mass in an animal model. Human hepatoma transplanted into nude mice did not show metastasis after 20 injections amounting to a total of about 4 mg of the Mab over 1-month period. A single-chain variable fragment (scFv) molecule derived from the Mab was constructed by phage display method. DNA sequence analysis of the active variable regions of both heavy- and light-chains of the cDNA clone was subsequently performed. The scFv43 molecule contains a V(L) kappa type and a unique V(H) sequence having 88% amino acid homology to that of Mab-MAK B raised against tumor-associated antigen. Immunohistochemical staining on frozen sections of paired hepatoma (NCI-I) and normal liver tissue from the same individual showed that both scFv43 and Mab-HepTAA43 antibodies reacted with hepatoma but not with normal liver tissue. The results suggest that scFv43 may be useful in the immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  1. Tumor-associated macrophages: effectors of angiogenesis and tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Hughes, Russell; Lewis, Claire E

    2009-08-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are a prominent inflammatory cell population in many tumor types residing in both perivascular and avascular, hypoxic regions of these tissues. Analysis of TAMs in human tumor biopsies has shown that they express a variety of tumor-promoting factors and evidence from transgenic murine tumor models has provided unequivocal evidence for the importance of these cells in driving angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, immunosuppression, and metastasis. This review will summarize the mechanisms by which monocytes are recruited into tumors, their myriad, tumor-promoting functions within tumors, and the influence of the tumor microenvironment in driving these activities. We also discuss recent attempts to both target/destroy TAMs and exploit them as delivery vehicles for anti-cancer gene therapy.

  2. Tumor-associated macrophages: implications in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Petty, Amy J; Yang, Yiping

    2017-03-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), representing most of the leukocyte population in solid tumors, demonstrate great phenotypic heterogeneity and diverse functional capabilities under the influence of the local tumor microenvironment. These anti-inflammatory and protumorigenic macrophages modulate the local microenvironment to facilitate tumor growth and metastasis. In this review, we examine the origin of TAMs and the complex regulatory networks within the tumor microenvironment that facilitate the polarization of TAMs toward a protumoral phenotype. More extensively, we evaluate the mechanisms by which TAMs mediate angiogenesis, metastasis, chemotherapeutic resistance and immune evasion. Lastly, we will highlight novel interventional strategies targeting TAMs in preclinical studies and in early clinical trials that have significant potential in improving efficacy of current chemotherapeutic and/or immunotherapeutic approaches.

  3. Prognostic Significance of Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine: Analysis of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Dose Escalation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Schipper, Matthew; Zalupski, Mark M.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Abrams, Ross; Francis, Isaac R.; Khan, Gazala; Leslie, William; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Although established in the postresection setting, the prognostic value of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is less clear. We examined the prognostic utility of CA19-9 in patients with unresectable LAPC treated on a prospective trial of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with unresectable LAPC were treated at the University of Michigan on a phase 1/2 trial of IMRT dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. CA19-9 was obtained at baseline and during routine follow-up. Cox models were used to assess the effect of baseline factors on freedom from local progression (FFLP), distant progression (FFDP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Stepwise forward regression was used to build multivariate predictive models for each endpoint. Results: Thirty-eight patients were eligible for the present analysis. On univariate analysis, baseline CA19-9 and age predicted OS, CA19-9 at baseline and 3 months predicted PFS, gross tumor volume (GTV) and black race predicted FFLP, and CA19-9 at 3 months predicted FFDP. On stepwise multivariate regression modeling, baseline CA19-9, age, and female sex predicted OS; baseline CA19-9 and female sex predicted both PFS and FFDP; and GTV predicted FFLP. Patients with baseline CA19-9 ≤90 U/mL had improved OS (median 23.0 vs 11.1 months, HR 2.88, P<.01) and PFS (14.4 vs 7.0 months, HR 3.61, P=.001). CA19-9 progression over 90 U/mL was prognostic for both OS (HR 3.65, P=.001) and PFS (HR 3.04, P=.001), and it was a stronger predictor of death than either local progression (HR 1.46, P=.42) or distant progression (HR 3.31, P=.004). Conclusions: In patients with unresectable LAPC undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy, baseline CA19-9 was independently prognostic even after established prognostic factors were controlled for, whereas CA19-9 progression

  4. Carbohydrate Counting and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... targets, you will need to balance your carbohydrate intake with physical activity and diabetes medicines or insulin shots. How much carbohydrate do I need each day? The daily amount of carbohydrate, protein, and fat for people with diabetes has not ...

  5. Serum osteocalcin (BGP) in tumor-associated hypercalcemia.

    PubMed

    Body, J J; Cleeren, A; Pot, M; Borkowski, A

    1986-12-01

    Serum osteocalcin (BGP) is a new marker of bone turnover that reportedly evaluates bone formation. Thus, its measurement could assess the bone formation rate in tumor-associated hypercalcemia. We measured concentrations of BGP and other parameters of bone metabolism in 54 untreated hypercalcemic cancer patients as compared to 109 healthy subjects. Primary tumor sites were breast (19), lung (11), head and neck (6), multiple myeloma (3), kidney (2), and various (11) or multiple (2). Mean BGP levels were higher in the hypercalcemic subjects, 4.6 +/- 0.4 (SEM) ng/ml, than in the normal subjects, 3.6 +/- 0.1 ng/ml (p less than .05), and were normalized in the 22 patients who could be reevaluated after successful treatment of hypercalcemia with intravenous aminohydroxypropylidene diphosphonate (APD). There was no correlation of BGP levels with age, sex, or renal function. Compared with the Gaussian distribution in the normal subjects, there was a considerable scatter of the data in hypercalcemic patients, suggesting the existence of defined subgroups with abnormally low or abnormally high values. However, we found no significant relationship of BGP concentrations with tumor site or histology or with bone metastatic involvement. We found also no significant correlation between concentrations of serum BGP and total or ionized calcium, alkaline phosphatase, parameters of bone resorption, and indices of parathyroid function. In summary, serum BGP levels were slightly elevated in tumor-associated hypercalcemia and were normalized after successful treatment of hypercalcemia. More importantly, BGP concentrations varied widely even in the subgroups of patients with hypercalcemia accompanying massive bone metastatic involvement or in the patients without detectable skeletal metastases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Carbohydrate markers of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of death from cancer in the world and the sixth in Europe. Pancreatic cancer is more frequent in males than females. Worldwide, following diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, <2% of patients survive for 5 years, 8% survive for 2 years and <50% survive for only approx. 3 months. The biggest risk factor in pancreatic cancer is age, with a peak of morbidity at 65 years. Difficulty in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer causes a delay in its detection. It is one of the most difficult cancers to diagnose and therefore to treat successfully. Additional detection of carbohydrate markers may offer a better diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Carbohydrate markers of cancer may be produced by the cancer itself or by the body in response to cancer, whose presence in body fluids suggests the presence and growth of the cancer. The most widely used, and best-recognized, carbohydrate marker of pancreatic cancer is CA 19-9 [CA (carbohydrate antigen) 19-9]. However, the relatively non-specific nature of CA 19-9 limits its routine use in the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, but it may be useful in monitoring treatment of pancreatic cancer (e.g. the effectiveness of chemotherapy), as a complement to other diagnostic methods. Some other carbohydrate markers of pancreatic cancer may be considered, such as CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen), CA 50 and CA 242, and the mucins MUC1, MUC2 and MUC5AC, but enzymes involved in the processing of glycoconjugates could also be involved. Our preliminary research shows that the activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases, including HEX (N-acetyl-β-D-hexosaminidase), GAL (β-D-galactosidase), FUC (α-L-fucosidase) and MAN (α-D-mannosidase), in serum and urine may be used in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.

  7. Coming of age: carbohydrates and immunity.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Brian A; Kasper, Dennis L

    2005-02-01

    Adaptive immune responses have long been considered the "territory" of antigenic proteins, whereas carbohydrates are characterized as T-cell-independent antigens that are not typically recognized by the complete adaptive machinery. The current modus operandi when searching for dominant epitopes is the use of synthetic peptides designed from the primary structure of interesting target proteins; however, there is growing evidence that sugars can also play a critical role in immune recognition. Findings reported in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology begin to shed light on the differences in protein glycosylation that can occur in association with disorders like rheumatoid arthritis and the effect these changes have on collagen recognition by the immune system. Other recent studies have shown that immunodominant glycopeptide "remnant" epitopes as well as glycosylation changes on self-proteins can generate autoimmunity. Finally, some types of carbohydrates are now known to be processed and presented to T cells by class II MHC. Taken together, these advances illustrate a clear importance for carbohydrate recognition in foreign and self antigens by the adaptive immune system. With the common presence of carbohydrate molecules on eukaryotic, prokaryotic, and viral surfaces, the impact of carbohydrates on adaptive immunity is now indisputable.

  8. Tumor Associated Macrophage: A Review on the Phenotypes, Traits and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Suhashini; Jagannathan, Nithya

    2014-01-01

    The macrophages role within the tumor microenvironment has amended by a variety of factors, thus serves a vital role in tissue morphogenesis. The role of macrophages in health and disease differs enormously as the macrophage has shown dual functions. Macrophage has a basic role in antigen presentation serving as the first line of defense in diseases. However the presence of cytokines and growth factors, both together have regulated the macrophage to become negative effectors promoting tumor activity. Hence macrophages are a double edged weapon, and any imbalance in the regulatory mechanisms caused a shift from tumoricidal to tumorigenic activities. TAMs would be the main reason of the invasion in tumor microenvironment enhancing as well as tumor invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis promoting tumor genesis. Macrophages are the multifunctional cells which have conducted by the tumor cells to produce tumor promoting factors that enable the stimulation of angiogenesis, and tumor cell invasion. This fact has resulted initiation or promotion of tumor genesis, where the tumor has progressed to an upper malignant stage. The present review has focused on the tumor associated macrophages and their roles in tumor genesis. PMID:25250141

  9. FOXO3 programs tumor-associated DCs to become tolerogenic in human and murine prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Stephanie K.; Zhu, Ziqiang; Riboldi, Elena; Shafer-Weaver, Kim A.; Stagliano, Katherine E.R.; Sklavos, Martha M.; Ambs, Stefan; Yagita, Hideo; Hurwitz, Arthur A.

    2011-01-01

    The limited success of cancer immunotherapy is often attributed to the loss of antigen-specific T cell function in situ. However, the mechanism for this loss of function is unknown. In this study, we describe a population of tumor-associated DCs (TADCs) in both human and mouse prostate cancer that tolerizes and induces suppressive activity in tumor-specific T cells. In tumors from human prostate cancer patients and transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice, TADCs expressed elevated levels of FOXO3 and Foxo3, respectively, which correlated with expression of suppressive genes that negatively regulate T cell function. Silencing FOXO3 and Foxo3 with siRNAs abrogated the ability of human and mouse TADCs, respectively, to tolerize and induce suppressive activity by T cells. Silencing Foxo3 in mouse TADCs was also associated with diminished expression of tolerogenic mediators, such as indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase, arginase, and TGF-β, and upregulated expression of costimulatory molecules and proinflammatory cytokines. Importantly, transfer of tumor-specific CD4+ Th cells into TRAMP mice abrogated TADC tolerogenicity, which was associated with reduced Foxo3 expression. These findings demonstrate that FOXO3 may play a critical role in mediating TADC-induced immune suppression. Moreover, our results identify what we believe to be a novel target for preventing CTL tolerance and enhancing immune responses to cancer by modulating the immunosuppressive activity of TADCs found in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:21436588

  10. All about Carbohydrate Counting

    MedlinePlus

    Toolkit No. 14 All About Carbohydrate Counting What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting is a way to plan your meals. It can help ... Diabetes Association, Inc. 2/14 Toolkit No. 14: All About Carbohydrate Counting continued The chart at the ...

  11. Carbohydrate and dietary fiber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carbohydrate provides 50 to 60% of the calories consumed by the average American. Although relatively little carbohydrate is needed in the diet, carbohydrate spares protein and fat being metabolized for calories. The principal dietary carbohydrates are sugars and starches. Sugars (simple carbohydrat...

  12. In Vivo Flow Cytometry of Circulating Tumor-Associated Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Kore, Rajshekhar A.

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) demonstrated the potential as prognostic markers of metastatic development. However, the incurable metastasis can already be developed at the time of initial diagnosis with the existing CTC assays. Alternatively, tumor-associated particles (CTPs) including exosomes can be a more valuable prognostic marker because they can be released from the primary tumor long before CTCs and in larger amount. However, little progress has been made in high sensitivity detection of CTPs, especially in vivo. We show here that in vivo integrated photoacoustic (PA) and fluorescence flow cytometry (PAFFC) platform can provide the detection of melanoma and breast-cancer-associated single CTPs with endogenously expressed melanin and genetically engineered proteins or exogenous dyes as PA and fluorescent contrast agents. The two-beam, time-of-light PAFFC can measure the sizes of CTCs and CTPs and identify bulk and rolling CTCs and CTC clusters, with no influence on blood flow instability. This technique revealed a higher concentration of CTPs than CTCs at an early cancer stage. Because a single tumor cell can release many CTPs and in vivo PAFFC can examine the whole blood volume, PAFFC diagnostic platform has the potential to dramatically improve (up to 105-fold) the sensitivity of cancer diagnosis. PMID:27965916

  13. Nanomedicine Strategies to Target Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Binnemars-Postma, Karin; Storm, Gert; Prakash, Jai

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the influence of the tumor microenvironment (TME) on cancer progression has been better understood. Macrophages, one of the most important cell types in the TME, exist in different subtypes, each of which has a different function. While classically activated M1 macrophages are involved in inflammatory and malignant processes, activated M2 macrophages are more involved in the wound-healing processes occurring in tumors. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) display M2 macrophage characteristics and support tumor growth and metastasis by matrix remodeling, neo-angiogenesis, and suppressing local immunity. Due to their detrimental role in tumor growth and metastasis, selective targeting of TAM for the treatment of cancer may prove to be beneficial in the treatment of cancer. Due to the plastic nature of macrophages, their activities may be altered to inhibit tumor growth. In this review, we will discuss the therapeutic options for the modulation and targeting of TAM. Different therapeutic strategies to deplete, inhibit recruitment of, or re-educate TAM will be discussed. Current strategies for the targeting of TAM using nanomedicine are reviewed. Passive targeting using different nanoparticle systems is described. Since TAM display a number of upregulated surface proteins compared to non-TAM, specific targeting using targeting ligands coupled to nanoparticles is discussed in detail. PMID:28471401

  14. CDDO-Me Redirects Activation of Breast Tumor Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Michael S.; Shipman, Emilie P.; Kim, Hyunjung; Liby, Karen T.; Pioli, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages can account for up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer patients and high TAM density is associated with poor clinical prognosis. Because TAMs enhance tumor growth, development, and metastatic potential, redirection of TAM activation may have significant therapeutic benefit. Our studies in primary human macrophages and murine breast TAMs suggest that the synthetic oleanane triterpenoid CDDO-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) reprograms the activation profile of TAMs from tumor-promoting to tumor-inhibiting. We show that CDDO-Me treatment inhibits expression of IL-10 and VEGF in stimulated human M2 macrophages and TAMs but increases expression of TNF-α and IL-6. Surface expression of CD206 and CD163, which are characteristic of M2 activation, is significantly attenuated by CDDO-Me. In contrast, CDDO-Me up-regulates surface expression of HLA-DR and CD80, which are markers of M1 activation, and importantly potentiates macrophage activation of autologous T cells but inhibits endothelial cell vascularization. These results show for the first time that CDDO-Me redirects activation of M2 macrophages and TAMs from immune-suppressive to immune-stimulatory, and implicate a role for CDDO-Me as an immunotherapeutic in the treatment of breast and potentially other types of cancer. PMID:26918785

  15. Pulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma with prominent tumor-associated lymphoid proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shilo, Konstantin; Foss, Robert D; Franks, Teri J; DePeralta-Venturina, Mariza; Travis, William D

    2005-03-01

    We report 6 cases of low-grade pulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma displaying a striking lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. All six tumors had a typical pulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma presentation as a polypoid endobronchial mass involving the proximal bronchi. The patients were 3 females and 3 males with a mean age of 33 years (range, 5-61 years). Half of the patients were asymptomatic, while half experienced mild symptoms of pneumonia, asthma-like symptoms, or hemoptysis. No tumor-related deaths were observed, with a mean follow-up of 51 months. The tumor size ranged from 2.1 to 3.4 cm (mean, 2.9 cm). The tumors characteristically displayed an elaborate tubulocystic epithelial component composed of intermediate, epidermoid, and mucus-producing cells, and variable numbers of clear cells, multinucleated giant cells, columnar cells, and oncocytic cells. The tumors' lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with occasional Russell bodies was sufficiently intense to raise concern of a low-grade lymphoma. All tested tumors were immunoreactive with CK7 while nonreactive with TTF-1 and CK20. Recognition of this histologic variant is important for a correct diagnosis of low-grade pulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma. The dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate is similar to that previously described in salivary glands as tumor-associated lymphoid proliferation.

  16. Intracavitary use of two radiolabeled tumor-associated monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Malamitsi, J.; Skarlos, D.; Fotiou, S.; Papakostas, P.; Aravantinos, G.; Vassilarou, D.; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J.; Koutoulidis, K.; Hooker, G.; Snook, D.

    1988-12-01

    Six patients with metastatic breast cancer and malignant pleural effusions and 13 patients with known or suspected ovarian cancer, underwent immunoscintigraphy after intracavitary (intrapleural or intraperitoneal) administration of iodine-131-(131I) or indium-111-(111In) labeled tumor associated monoclonal antibodies HMFG2 and H17E2. This method proved to be sensitive and specific with a true-positive result in 13 out of 14 patients with tumor and a true-negative result in five out of five patients without tumor. At any one time, 65%-80% of the whole-body radioactivity was closely associated with the cavity into which the radiolabeled antibody was administered while the radioactivity in the blood was always low, (approximately 4 X 10(-3) of administered dose/ml of blood). Concentrations of radiolabeled antibody (per gram of tumor tissue) ranged from 0.02%-0.1% of the injected dose in intracavitary tumors, but only 0.002% in a retroperitoneal metastasis. The specificity of this approach was documented in four control patients with benign ovarian cysts and in two patients who were imaged using both specific and nonspecific radiolabeled antibody. We conclude that the intracavitary administration of 131I- or 111In-labeled HMFG2 and H17E2 is a favorable route of administration and offers significant advantages over previously reported intravenous administration for the localization of breast or ovarian metastases confined to the pleural or peritoneal cavities.

  17. Cancer-promoting mechanisms of tumor-associated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Brian; Schulick, Richard; Edil, Barish; El Kasmi, Karim C; Barnett, Carlton

    2017-08-10

    Neutrophils have classically been considered to mount a defensive response against tumor cells, yet recent evidence suggests tumors modulate neutrophil function to support tumor growth and progression. Tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) are phenotypically distinct from circulating neutrophils in terms of their surface protein composition and cyto/chemokine activity and response. Although TANs have been shown to both promote and inhibit tumor advancement, the preponderant activity augments tumor progression. This review discusses these cancer-promoting molecular pathways, relevant diagnostic studies in patients, and subsequent treatment modalities. The tumor promoting mechanisms of TANs include dampening of CD8(+) response via Arginase-1; a neutrophil-secreted neutrophil elastase (NE) upregulation of tumor cellular proliferation pathways; degradation of basement membrane and ECM via NE and MMP-9; upregulation of angiogenesis by VEGF, and HGF; and ICAM-1 dependent tumor intravasation, immune protection in circulation, and extravasation into distant, metastatic tissue beds. Clinicians are constrained in treating TANs systemically as it may induce neutropenia, therefore targeting TANs-mediated tumor progression pathways surgically on a loco-regional level is a viable adjuvant treatment modality. TANs modulate the tumor microenvironment promoting tumor progression. Mechanistic understanding of TANs role in tumor progression will provide unique therapeutic alternatives. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. The impact of hypoxia on tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Henze, Anne-Theres; Mazzone, Massimiliano

    2016-10-03

    The role of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in cancer is often correlated with poor prognosis, even though this statement should be interpreted with care, as the effects of macrophages primarily depend on their localization within the tumor. This versatile cell type orchestrates a broad spectrum of biological functions and exerts very complex and even opposing functions on cell death, immune stimulation or suppression, and angiogenesis, resulting in an overall pro- or antitumoral effect. We are only beginning to understand the environmental cues that contribute to transient retention of macrophages in a specific phenotype. It has become clear that hypoxia shapes and induces specific macrophage phenotypes that serve tumor malignancy, as hypoxia promotes immune evasion, angiogenesis, tumor cell survival, and metastatic dissemination. Additionally, TAMs in the hypoxic niches within the tumor are known to mediate resistance to several anticancer treatments and to promote cancer relapse. Thus, a careful characterization and understanding of this macrophage differentiation state is needed in order to efficiently tailor cancer therapy.

  19. Dexamethasone Alleviates Tumor-Associated Brain Damage and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zheng; Sehm, Tina; Rauh, Manfred; Buchfelder, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Children and adults with the most aggressive form of brain cancer, malignant gliomas or glioblastoma, often develop cerebral edema as a life-threatening complication. This complication is routinely treated with dexamethasone (DEXA), a steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with pleiotropic action profile. Here we show that dexamethasone reduces murine and rodent glioma tumor growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations of DEXA are already capable of inhibiting glioma cell proliferation and at higher levels induce cell death. Further, the expression of the glutamate antiporter xCT (system Xc−; SLC7a11) and VEGFA is up-regulated after DEXA treatment indicating early cellular stress responses. However, in human gliomas DEXA exerts differential cytotoxic effects, with some human glioma cells (U251, T98G) resistant to DEXA, a finding corroborated by clinical data of dexamethasone non-responders. Moreover, DEXA-resistant gliomas did not show any xCT alterations, indicating that these gene expressions are associated with DEXA-induced cellular stress. Hence, siRNA-mediated xCT knockdown in glioma cells increased the susceptibility to DEXA. Interestingly, cell viability of primary human astrocytes and primary rodent neurons is not affected by DEXA. We further tested the pharmacological effects of DEXA on brain tissue and showed that DEXA reduces tumor-induced disturbances of the microenvironment such as neuronal cell death and tumor-induced angiogenesis. In conclusion, we demonstrate that DEXA inhibits glioma cell growth in a concentration and species-dependent manner. Further, DEXA executes neuroprotective effects in brains and reduces tumor-induced angiogenesis. Thus, our investigations reveal that DEXA acts pleiotropically and impacts tumor growth, tumor vasculature and tumor-associated brain damage. PMID:24714627

  20. Role of tumor associated macrophages in tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Riabov, Vladimir; Gudima, Alexandru; Wang, Nan; Mickley, Amanda; Orekhov, Alexander; Kzhyshkowska, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is an essential process for supplying rapidly growing malignant tissues with essential nutrients and oxygen. An angiogenic switch allows tumor cells to survive and grow, and provides them access to vasculature resulting in metastatic disease. Monocyte-derived macrophages recruited and reprogrammed by tumor cells serve as a major source of angiogenic factors boosting the angiogenic switch. Tumor endothelium releases angiopoietin-2 and further facilitates recruitment of TIE2 receptor expressing monocytes (TEM) into tumor sites. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) sense hypoxia in avascular areas of tumors, and react by production of angiogenic factors such as VEGFA. VEGFA stimulates chemotaxis of endothelial cells (EC) and macrophages. In some tumors, TAM appeared to be a major source of MMP9. Elevated expression of MMP9 by TAM mediates extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation and the release of bioactive VEGFA. Other angiogenic factors released by TAM include basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), thymidine phosphorylase (TP), urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), and adrenomedullin (ADM). The same factors used by macrophages for the induction of angiogenesis [like vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) and MMP9] support lymphangiogenesis. TAM can express LYVE-1, one of the established markers of lymphatic endothelium. TAM support tumor lymphangiogenesis not only by secretion of pro-lymphangiogenic factors but also by trans-differentiation into lymphatic EC. New pro-angiogenic factor YKL-40 belongs to a family of mammalian chitinase-like proteins (CLP) that act as cytokines or growth factors. Human CLP family comprises YKL-40, YKL-39, and SI-CLP. Production of all three CLP in macrophages is antagonistically regulated by cytokines. It was recently established that YKL-40 induces angiogenesis in vitro and in animal tumor models. YKL-40-neutralizing monoclonal antibody blocks tumor angiogenesis and progression. The role of YKL-39 and SI

  1. Dexamethasone alleviates tumor-associated brain damage and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zheng; Sehm, Tina; Rauh, Manfred; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y; Savaskan, Nicolai E

    2014-01-01

    Children and adults with the most aggressive form of brain cancer, malignant gliomas or glioblastoma, often develop cerebral edema as a life-threatening complication. This complication is routinely treated with dexamethasone (DEXA), a steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with pleiotropic action profile. Here we show that dexamethasone reduces murine and rodent glioma tumor growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations of DEXA are already capable of inhibiting glioma cell proliferation and at higher levels induce cell death. Further, the expression of the glutamate antiporter xCT (system Xc-; SLC7a11) and VEGFA is up-regulated after DEXA treatment indicating early cellular stress responses. However, in human gliomas DEXA exerts differential cytotoxic effects, with some human glioma cells (U251, T98G) resistant to DEXA, a finding corroborated by clinical data of dexamethasone non-responders. Moreover, DEXA-resistant gliomas did not show any xCT alterations, indicating that these gene expressions are associated with DEXA-induced cellular stress. Hence, siRNA-mediated xCT knockdown in glioma cells increased the susceptibility to DEXA. Interestingly, cell viability of primary human astrocytes and primary rodent neurons is not affected by DEXA. We further tested the pharmacological effects of DEXA on brain tissue and showed that DEXA reduces tumor-induced disturbances of the microenvironment such as neuronal cell death and tumor-induced angiogenesis. In conclusion, we demonstrate that DEXA inhibits glioma cell growth in a concentration and species-dependent manner. Further, DEXA executes neuroprotective effects in brains and reduces tumor-induced angiogenesis. Thus, our investigations reveal that DEXA acts pleiotropically and impacts tumor growth, tumor vasculature and tumor-associated brain damage.

  2. Regulatory T cells in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures suppress anti-tumor T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Nikhil S.; Akama-Garren, Elliot H.; Lu, Yisi; Lee, Da-Yae; Chang, Gregory P.; Li, Amy; DuPage, Michel; Tammela, Tuomas; Kerper, Natanya R.; Farago, Anna F.; Robbins, Rebecca; Crowley, Denise M.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Infiltration of regulatory T (Treg) cells into many tumor types correlates with poor patient prognoses. However, mechanisms of intratumoral Treg cell function remain to be elucidated. We investigated Treg cell function in a genetically-engineered mouse lung adenocarcinoma model and found Treg cells suppress anti-tumor responses in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures (TA-TLS). TA-TLS have been described in human lung cancers, but their function remains to be determined. TLS in this model were spatially associated with >90% of tumors and facilitated interactions between T cells and tumor-antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Costimulatory ligand expression by DCs and T cell proliferation rates increased in TA-TLS upon Treg cell depletion, leading to tumor destruction. Thus, we propose Treg cells in TA-TLS can inhibit endogenous immune responses against tumors, and targeting these cells may provide therapeutic benefit for cancer patients. PMID:26341400

  3. Postoperative seizure control in patients with tumor-associated epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Neal, Andrew; Morokoff, Andrew; O'Brien, Terence John; Kwan, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    The patterns of postoperative seizure control and response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in tumor-associated epilepsy (TAE) are poorly understood. We aim to document these characteristics in patients with supratentorial gliomas. This was a retrospective analysis of 186 patients with supratentorial gliomas. Seizure patterns were classified into four groups: A, no postoperative seizure; B, early postoperative seizure control within 6 months; C, fluctuating seizure control; and D, never seizure-free. Rates and duration of seizure freedom, subsequent seizure relapse, and response to AED were analyzed. Among patients included, 49 (26.3%) had grade II, 28 (15.1%) had grade III, and 109 (58.6%) had grade IV glioma. Outcome pattern A was observed in 95 (51.1%), B in 22 (11.8%), C in 45 (24.2%), and D in 24 (12.9%). One hundred nineteen patients had at least one seizure and were classified as having TAE. Compared to pattern A, pattern B was predicted by histologic progression; pattern C by tumor grade, preoperative seizure, and histologic progression, and pattern D by preoperative seizure and gross total resection. Among patients with TAE, 57.5% of grade II, 68.2% of grade III, and 26.3% of grade IV experienced a period of 12-month seizure freedom. After first 12-month seizure remission, 39.1%, 60.0%, and 13.3% of grade II, III, and IV gliomas, respectively, experienced subsequent seizure; 22.6% of those with TAE reached terminal seizure freedom of at least 12 months on their first postoperative AED regimen, 6.5% on their second regimen, and 5.4% on subsequent regimens. Distinct patterns of postoperative seizure control exist in gliomas; they have specific risk factor profiles, and we hypothesize these correspond to unique pathogenic mechanisms. Twelve-month seizure freedom with subsequent relapse is frequent in grade II-III gliomas. Response to AEDs is markedly poorer than with non-TAE, highlighting the complex epileptogenicity of gliomas. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016

  4. Carbohydrates and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Right Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Teens > Carbohydrates and Diabetes ... Los carbohidratos y la diabetes Carbs and Blood Sugar Keeping your blood sugar levels on track means ...

  5. Carbohydrates for fermentation.

    PubMed

    Peters, Dietmar

    2006-01-01

    Biomass accumulated by the photosynthetic fixation of carbon dioxide is the only renewable carbon source, and hence, the only renewable raw material for the chemical industry. Carbohydrates are the main constituents of biomass and occur as cell wall and storage carbohydrates, transportation carbohydrates and glycoconjugates. Cellulose, hemicelluloses and starch in particular as well as pectin, inulin and saccharose to a smaller extent are the most abundant carbohydrates. Glucose is the most important monosaccharide and monomer of polysaccharides in natural carbohydrates. Thus, it is the most abundant organic compound on earth. Production of pulp from wood cellulose, applications of starch for paper making as well as uses of glucose and saccharose for fermentation are the most important chemical and technical uses of carbohydrates. Carbohydrates used as fermentation feedstock are essential for the chemical industry. Their importance is steadily growing due to the increasing implementation of biotechnological processes.

  6. Tumor antigens as related to pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chu, T M; Holyoke, E D; Douglass, H O

    1980-01-01

    Data are presented suggesting the presence of pancreas tumor-associated antigens. Slow progress has been made during the past few years in the identification of pancreatic tumor antigens that may be of clinical usefulness and it seems unlikely that many of the practical problems now being faced in identification and isolation of these antigens and in development of a specific, sensitive assay will be solved by conventional immunochemical approaches. The study of antigen and/or antibody purified from immune complexes in the host and the application of leukocyte adherence inhibition techniques to immunodiagnosis of pancreatic cancer are among the new approaches that may provide effective alternatives in the study of pancreatic tumor antigens.

  7. Tumor associated CD8+ T-cell tolerance induced by bone marrow derived immature myeloid cells1

    PubMed Central

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Nagaraj, Srinivas; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2005-01-01

    T-cell tolerance is a critical element of tumor escape. However, the mechanism of tumor-associated T-cell tolerance remains unresolved. Using an experimental system employing the adoptive transfer of transgenic T cells into naïve recipients, we found that the population of Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells (ImC) from tumor-bearing mice was able to induce CD8+ T-cell tolerance. These ImC accumulate in large numbers in spleens, lymph nodes, and tumor tissues of tumor-bearing mice and are comprised of precursors of myeloid cells. Neither ImC from control mice nor progeny of tumor-derived ImC including tumor-derived CD11c+ DCs were able to render T cells non-responsive. ImC are able to take-up soluble protein in vivo, process it, and present antigenic epitopes on their surface and induce antigen-specific T-cell anergy. Thus, this is a first demonstration that in tumor-bearing mice CD8+ T-cell tolerance is induced primarily by ImC that may have direct implications for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:16177103

  8. Carbohydrates in Supramolecular Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Delbianco, Martina; Bharate, Priya; Varela-Aramburu, Silvia; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-02-24

    Carbohydrates are involved in a variety of biological processes. The ability of sugars to form a large number of hydrogen bonds has made them important components for supramolecular chemistry. We discuss recent advances in the use of carbohydrates in supramolecular chemistry and reveal that carbohydrates are useful building blocks for the stabilization of complex architectures. Systems are presented according to the scaffold that supports the glyco-conjugate: organic macrocycles, dendrimers, nanomaterials, and polymers are considered. Glyco-conjugates can form host-guest complexes, and can self-assemble by using carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions and other weak interactions such as π-π interactions. Finally, complex supramolecular architectures based on carbohydrate-protein interactions are discussed.

  9. T-cell receptors: tugging on the anchor for a tighter hold on the tumor-associated peptide.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Julian

    2015-02-01

    Although it has been shown that human tumor-associated, HLA anchor residue modified "heteroclitic" peptides may induce stronger immune responses than wild-type peptides in cancer vaccine trials, it has also been shown that some T cells primed with these heteroclitic peptides subsequently fail to recognize the natural, tumor-expressed peptide efficiently. This may provide a molecular reason for why clinical trials of these peptides have been thus far unsuccessful. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Madura et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 584-591] highlight a novel twist on T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of HLA-peptide complexes. Tumor-associated peptides often lack canonical anchor residues, which can be substituted for the optimal residue to improve their antigenicity. T-cell cross-reactivity between the natural and modified (heteroclitic) peptides is essential for this approach to work and depends on whether the anchor residue substitution influences peptide conformation. The Melan-A/MART-126-35 peptide epitope is an example where T cells can make this distinction, with the natural peptide stimulating higher affinity CD8(+) T cells than the heteroclitic peptide, despite the heteroclitic peptide's more stable association with HLA-A2. The molecular basis for peptide discrimination is identified through the structure of the TCR bound to the natural peptide; TCR engagement of the natural peptide "lifts" its amino-terminus partly away from the HLA peptide binding groove, forming a higher affinity interface with the TCR than is formed with the anchor residue "optimized" heteroclitic peptide, which cannot be "pulled" from the HLA groove.

  10. Discovery and design of carbohydrate-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Cipolla, Laura; Araújo, Ana C; Bini, Davide; Gabrielli, Luca; Russo, Laura; Shaikh, Nasrin

    2010-08-01

    Till now, the importance of carbohydrates has been underscored, if compared with the two other major classes of biopolymers such as oligonucleotides and proteins. Recent advances in glycobiology and glycochemistry have imparted a strong interest in the study of this enormous family of biomolecules. Carbohydrates have been shown to be implicated in recognition processes, such as cell-cell adhesion, cell-extracellular matrix adhesion and cell-intruder recognition phenomena. In addition, carbohydrates are recognized as differentiation markers and as antigenic determinants. Due to their relevant biological role, carbohydrates are promising candidates for drug design and disease treatment. However, the growing number of human disorders known as congenital disorders of glycosylation that are being identified as resulting from abnormalities in glycan structures and protein glycosylation strongly indicates that a fast development of glycobiology, glycochemistry and glycomedicine is highly desirable. The topics give an overview of different approaches that have been used to date for the design of carbohydrate-based therapeutics; this includes the use of native synthetic carbohydrates, the use of carbohydrate mimics designed on the basis of their native counterpart, the use of carbohydrates as scaffolds and finally the design of glyco-fused therapeutics, one of the most recent approaches. The review covers mainly literature that has appeared since 2000, except for a few papers cited for historical reasons. The reader will gain an overview of the current strategies applied to the design of carbohydrate-based therapeutics; in particular, the advantages/disadvantages of different approaches are highlighted. The topic is presented in a general, basic manner and will hopefully be a useful resource for all readers who are not familiar with it. In addition, in order to stress the potentialities of carbohydrates, several examples of carbohydrate-based marketed therapeutics are given

  11. A novel cancer immunotherapy based on the combination of a synthetic carbohydrate-pulsed dendritic cell vaccine and glycoengineered cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shichong; Wang, Qianli; Li, Yinghua; Hu, Zhenlin; Wu, Qiuye; Guo, Zhongwu; Zhang, Junping

    2015-01-01

    Immune tolerance to tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) has severely restricted the usefulness of most TACAs. To overcome this problem, we selected a sialylated trisaccharide TACA, GM3, as a target antigen, and tested a new immunotherapeutic strategy by combining metabolic bioengineering with dendritic cell (DC) vaccination. We engineered cancer cells to express an artificial structure, N-phenylacetyl-D-neuraminic acid, in place of the natural N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid of GM3 by using N-phenylacetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNPhAc) as a biosynthetic precursor. Next, we selectively targeted the bioengineered cancer cells by vaccination with DCs pulsed with the GM3 N-phenylacetyl derivative. Vaccination with GM3NPhAc-KLH-loaded DCs elicited robust GM3NPhAc-specific T cell-dependent immunity. The results showed that this strategy could significantly inhibit FBL3 tumor growth and prolong the survival of tumor-bearing mice; B16F10 lung metastases could also be reduced. These findings lay out a new strategy for overcoming immune tolerance to TACAs, such as GM3, for the development of effective tumor immunotherapies. PMID:25760071

  12. A novel cancer immunotherapy based on the combination of a synthetic carbohydrate-pulsed dendritic cell vaccine and glycoengineered cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Li, Jie; Yu, Shichong; Wang, Qianli; Li, Yinghua; Hu, Zhenlin; Wu, Qiuye; Guo, Zhongwu; Zhang, Junping

    2015-03-10

    Immune tolerance to tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) has severely restricted the usefulness of most TACAs. To overcome this problem, we selected a sialylated trisaccharide TACA, GM3, as a target antigen, and tested a new immunotherapeutic strategy by combining metabolic bioengineering with dendritic cell (DC) vaccination. We engineered cancer cells to express an artificial structure, N-phenylacetyl-D-neuraminic acid, in place of the natural N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid of GM3 by using N-phenylacetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNPhAc) as a biosynthetic precursor. Next, we selectively targeted the bioengineered cancer cells by vaccination with DCs pulsed with the GM3 N-phenylacetyl derivative. Vaccination with GM3NPhAc-KLH-loaded DCs elicited robust GM3NPhAc-specific T cell-dependent immunity. The results showed that this strategy could significantly inhibit FBL3 tumor growth and prolong the survival of tumor-bearing mice; B16F10 lung metastases could also be reduced. These findings lay out a new strategy for overcoming immune tolerance to TACAs, such as GM3, for the development of effective tumor immunotherapies.

  13. A fully synthetic glycopeptide antitumor vaccine based on multiple antigen presentation on a hyperbranched polymer.

    PubMed

    Glaffig, Markus; Palitzsch, Björn; Hartmann, Sebastian; Schüll, Christoph; Nuhn, Lutz; Gerlitzki, Bastian; Schmitt, Edgar; Frey, Holger; Kunz, Horst

    2014-04-07

    For antitumor vaccines both the selected tumor-associated antigen, as well as the mode of its presentation, affect the immune response. According to the principle of multiple antigen presentation, a tumor-associated MUC1 glycopeptide combined with the immunostimulating T-cell epitope P2 from tetanus toxoid was coupled to a multi-functionalized hyperbranched polyglycerol by "click chemistry". This globular polymeric carrier has a flexible dendrimer-like structure, which allows optimal antigen presentation to the immune system. The resulting fully synthetic vaccine induced strong immune responses in mice and IgG antibodies recognizing human breast-cancer cells.

  14. Engagement of the Mannose Receptor by Tumoral Mucins Activates an Immune Suppressive Phenotype in Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Allavena, P.; Chieppa, M.; Bianchi, G.; Solinas, G.; Fabbri, M.; Laskarin, G.; Mantovani, A.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAMs) are abundantly present in the stroma of solid tumors and modulate several important biological processes, such as neoangiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion, and suppression of adaptive immune responses. Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) constitute a large family of transmembrane carbohydrate-binding receptors that recognize pathogens as well as endogenous glycoproteins. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that some CLRs can inhibit the immune response. In this study we investigated TAM-associated molecules potentially involved in their immune suppressive activity. We found that TAMs isolated from human ovarian carcinoma samples predominantly express the CLRs Dectin-1, MDL-1, MGL, DCIR, and most abundantly the Mannose Receptor (MR). Components of carcinomatous ascites and purified tumoral mucins (CA125 and TAG-72) bound the MR and induced its internalization. MR engagement by tumoral mucins and by an agonist anti-MR antibody modulated cytokine production by TAM toward an immune-suppressive profile: increase of IL-10, absence of IL-12, and decrease of the Th1-attracting chemokine CCL3. This study highlights that tumoral mucin-mediated ligation of the MR on infiltrating TAM may contribute to their immune suppressive phenotype. PMID:21331365

  15. Mimotope vaccine efficacy gets a "boost" from native tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Jonathan D; Slansky, Jill E

    2013-04-01

    Tumor-associated antigen (TAA)-targeting mimotope peptides exert more prominent immunostimulatory functions than unmodified TAAs, with the caveat that some T-cell clones exhibit a relatively low affinity for TAAs. Combining mimotope-based vaccines with native TAAs in a prime-boost setting significantly improves antitumor immunity.

  16. Tumor-associated MUC5AC stimulates in vivo tumorigenicity of human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hirotaka; Sawada, Tetsuji; Uchida, Motoyuki; Saito, Hikaru; Iijima, Hiroko; Toda-Agetsuma, Mikako; Wada, Tsutomu; Yamazoe, Sadaaki; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Kakehashi, Anna; Wei, Min; Hirakawa, Kosei; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2011-03-01

    MUC5AC, a high molecular weight glycoprotein, is overexpressed in the ductal region of human pancreatic cancer but is not detectable in the normal pancreas, suggesting its association with disease development. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of MUC5AC knockdown by short interfering RNA (siRNA) in the MUC5AC-overexpressing SW1990 and BxPC3 human pancreatic cancer cell lines in order to clarify its function. Significant decreases in the expression levels of MUC5AC mRNA and protein were observed in SW1990 and BxPC3 cells that had been stably transfected with a MUC5AC siRNA expression vector (SW1990/si-MUC5AC and BxPC3/si-MUC5AC cells) compared to those in cells transfected with an si-mock vector (SW1990/si-mock and BxPC3/si-mock cells). In in vitro studies, neither type of MUC5AC-knockdown cell showed any difference in cell survival, proliferation, or morphology from the si-mock cells or parental cells. However, in vivo xenograft studies demonstrated that MUC5AC knockdown significantly reduced the tumorigenicity and suppressed the tumor growth of si-MUC5AC cells compared to those of the si-mock cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that CD45R/B220+ and Gr-1+ cells had infiltrated into the tumor tissue of the SW1990/si-MUC5AC cells. Furthermore, cancer-associated antigen specific antibodies were detected at high levels in the sera from the SW1990/si-MUC5AC cell-bearing mice. These results suggest that tumor-associated MUC5AC expressed on the surface of pancreatic cancer cells supports the escape of pancreatic cancer cells from immunosurveillance. The present findings highlight a new dimension of MUC5AC as a functional immunosuppressive agent and its important role in pancreatic cancer progression.

  17. Regulation of NK-cell function by mucins via antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Laskarin, G; Redzovic, A; Medancic, S Srsen; Rukavina, D

    2010-12-01

    Decidual antigen-presenting cells including dendritic cells (DCs) and CD14(+) macrophages, as mediators of the first encounter with fetal antigens, appear to be critically involved in the initiation of primary immune response by regulating innate- and adaptive immunity. Interleukin-15, produced by them, permits the proliferation and differentiation of CD3(-)CD16(-)CD94(+)NKG2A(+)CD56(+bright) decidual NK cells that identify trophoblast cells. These cells are able to kill them after Th1 cytokine overstimulation and by increasing the release of preformed cytotoxic mediators. Thus, the local microenvironment is a potent modulator of antigen-presenting cell functions. Tumor associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) and mucine 1 (MUC-1) are glycoproteins secreted by uterine epithelial cells. Our hypothesis is that TAG-72 and MUC-1 are the natural ligands for carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) of endocytic mannose receptor (MR or CD206) and DC-specific ICAM non-integrin (DC-SIGN or CD209) expressed on decidual CD14(+) macrophages and CD1a(+) DCs. They might be able to condition antigen-presenting cells to produce distinct profiles of cyto/chemokines with consequential reduction in NK-cell numbers and cytotoxic potential leading to insufficient control over trophoblast growth. This hypothesis could explain the disappearance of MUC-1 beneath the attached embryo during the process of successful implantation when tight regulation of trophoblast invasion is needed. As IL-15 is the earliest and the most important factor in NK-cell proliferation, differentiation, and maturation, we expected primarily an increase of IL-15 expression in antigen-presenting cells concomitant with the disappearance of mucins and the enhancement in NK cells numbers and of cytotoxic potential after their close contact with early pregnancy decidual antigen-presenting cells. If our hypothesis is correct, it would contribute to the understanding of the role of mucins in the redirection of immune response

  18. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  19. Carbohydrates and Diabetes (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Parents > Carbohydrates and Diabetes ... many kids with diabetes take to stay healthy. Carbohydrates and Blood Sugar The two main forms of ...

  20. Computerized molecular modeling of carbohydrates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Computerized molecular modleing continues to increase in capability and applicability to carbohydrates. This chapter covers nomenclature and conformational aspects of carbohydrates, perhaps of greater use to carbohydrate-inexperienced computational chemists. Its comments on various methods and studi...

  1. Psychobiological effects of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Spring, B; Chiodo, J; Harden, M; Bourgeois, M J; Mason, J D; Lutherer, L

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied whether the fatiguing effects of eating lunch are greater for carbohydrate-rich meals than for other meals, and related the time course of behavioral change to plasma glucose, insulin, and amino acids. On different occasions, in counterbalanced order, normal women (N = 7) fasted overnight, ate a standard breakfast, and at lunch either continued to fast or ate a high-carbohydrate, low-protein meal; a hedonically similar meal containing both carbohydrate and protein; or a high-protein, low-carbohydrate meal. Meals were isocaloric and equated for fat content. Only the carbohydrate meal significantly increased fatigue, which could not be attributed to hypoglycemia because plasma glucose remained elevated. Fatigue began approximately, when the carbohydrate meal elevated the plasma tryptophan ratio but ended even though the ratio remained elevated. Fatigue after a high-carbohydrate lunch could not be explained by reactive hypoglycemia or sweet taste, and could partially be explained by the hypothesis that fatigue parallels an elevation of the tryptophan ratio.

  2. An Ultrasensitive Electrochemiluminescence Immunoassay for Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Serum Based on Antibody Labeled Fe3O4 Nanoparticles as Capture Probes and Graphene/CdTe Quantum Dot Bionanoconjugates as Signal Amplifiers

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Ning; Zhou, Jing; Xiong, Ping; Li, Tianhua; Jiang, Shan; Cao, Yuting; Jiang, Qianli

    2013-01-01

    The CdTe quantum dots (QDs), graphene nanocomposite (CdTe-G) and dextran–Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles have been synthesized for developing an ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassay for Carcinoembryonic antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) in serums. Firstly, the capture probes (CA 19-9 Ab1/Fe3O4) for enriching CA 19-9 were synthesized by immobilizing the CA 19-9’s first antibody (CA 19-9 Ab1) on magnetic nanoparticles (dextran-Fe3O4). Secondly, the signal probes (CA 19-9 Ab2/CdTe-G), which can emit an ECL signal, were formed by attaching the secondary CA 19-9 antibody (CA 19-9 Ab2) to the surface of the CdTe-G. Thirdly, the above two probes were used for conjugating with a serial of CA 19-9 concentrations. Graphene can immobilize dozens of CdTe QDs on their surface, which can emit stronger ECL intensity than CdTe QDs. Based on the amplified signal, ultrasensitive antigen detection can be realized. Under the optimal conditions, the ECL signal depended linearly on the logarithm of CA 19-9 concentration from 0.005 to 100 pg/mL, and the detection limit was 0.002 pg/mL. Finally, five samples of human serum were tested, and the results were compared with a time-resolved fluorescence assay (TRFA). The novel immunoassay provides a stable, specific and highly sensitive immunoassay protocol for tumor marker detection at very low levels, which can be applied in early diagnosis of tumor. PMID:23685872

  3. Carbohydrate counting of food.

    PubMed

    Hegar, Karin; Heiber, Stefanie; Brändle, Michael; Christ, Emanuel; Keller, Ulrich

    2011-07-07

    Carbohydrate counting is a principal strategy in nutritional management of type 1 diabetes. The Nutri-Learn buffet (NLB) is a new computer-based tool for patient instruction in carbohydrate counting. It is based on food dummies made of plastic equipped with a microchip containing relevant food content data. The tool enables the dietician to assess the patient's food counting abilities and the patient to learn in a hands-on interactive manner to estimate food contents such as carbohydrate content. Multicentre randomised controlled trial in 134 patients with type 1 diabetes comparing the use of the Nutri-Learn buffet in determining and improving ability to estimate the carbohydrate content of food with the use of conventional counselling tools (i.e. pictures and tables). The NLB group showed significantly better carbohydrate estimation values than the control group. In particular, there was a significant improvement in estimation of starches, fruits and sweets. The NLB was preferred by patients and dieticians in that rating of carbohydrate was closer to reality than the use of conventional tools, and since the tool has a play element, is interactive and adjustable, and can be used with only minimal knowledge of a specific language. Adjustment of preprandial insulin doses to the amounts of dietary carbohydrates ingested during the subsequent meal resulted in improved metabolic control in previous studies. The present study demonstrated that the new tool (Nutri-Learn buffet) improved teaching and learning of carbohydrate counting. In addition, it allowed an objective assessment of the carbohydrate counting skills of patients by the dietician. The findings therefore suggest that the tool is helpful in nutritional counselling of patients with diabetes mellitus.

  4. Carbohydrates: functionality in foods.

    PubMed

    Chinachoti, P

    1995-04-01

    Many functional requirements are met by the use of simple and complex carbohydrates in food. Carbohydrates offer a wide range of rheological and other properties, including solubility, cryoprotection, sweetening effect, hygroscopicity, crystallization inhibition, flavor encapsulation, and coating ability. These properties are based on chemical structure and interactions with other molecules through hydrogen bonding, ionic effect, and the formation of complexes with lipids and proteins. The ability to understand these properties directly affects the development of food products and processes. Thus, the functionality of carbohydrates in foods integrates precise knowledge of chemical structure and behavior with practical applications in the development and preparation of foods.

  5. Structural and Functional Studies of Peptide-Carbohydrate Mimicry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Margaret A.; Pinto, B. Mario

    Certain peptides act as molecular mimics of carbohydrates in that they are specifically recognized by carbohydrate-binding proteins. Peptides that bind to anti-carbohydrate antibodies, carbohydrate-processing enzymes, and lectins have been identified. These peptides are potentially useful as vaccines and therapeutics; for example, immunologically functional peptide molecular mimics (mimotopes) can strengthen or modify immune responses induced by carbohydrate antigens. However, peptides that bind specifically to carbohydrate-binding proteins may not necessarily show the corresponding biological activity, and further selection based on biochemical studies is always required. The degree of structural mimicry required to generate the desired biological activity is therefore an interesting question. This review will discuss recent structural studies of peptide-carbohydrate mimicry employing NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and molecular modeling, as well as relevant biochemical data. These studies provide insights into the basis of mimicry at the molecular level. Comparisons with other carbohydrate-mimetic compounds, namely proteins and glycopeptides, will be drawn. Finally, implications for the design of new therapeutic compounds will also be presented.

  6. Tumor-associated CD8+ T cell tolerance induced by bone marrow-derived immature myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Nagaraj, Srinivas; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2005-10-01

    T cell tolerance is a critical element of tumor escape. However, the mechanism of tumor-associated T cell tolerance remains unresolved. Using an experimental system utilizing the adoptive transfer of transgenic T cells into naive recipients, we found that the population of Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells (ImC) from tumor-bearing mice was able to induce CD8+ T cell tolerance. These ImC accumulate in large numbers in spleens, lymph nodes, and tumor tissues of tumor-bearing mice and are comprised of precursors of myeloid cells. Neither ImC from control mice nor progeny of tumor-derived ImC, including tumor-derived CD11c+ dendritic cells, were able to render T cells nonresponsive. ImC are able to take up soluble protein in vivo, process it, and present antigenic epitopes on their surface and induce Ag-specific T cell anergy. Thus, this is a first demonstration that in tumor-bearing mice CD8+ T cell tolerance is induced primarily by ImC that may have direct implications for cancer immunotherapy.

  7. Tumor-associated macrophages mediate immunosuppression in the renal cancer microenvironment by activating the 15-lipoxygenase-2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Daurkin, Irina; Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Stoffs, Taryn; Perrin, George Q; Algood, Chester; Gilbert, Scott M; Rosser, Charles J; Su, Li-Ming; Vieweg, Johannes; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2011-10-15

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC), the most common human kidney cancer, is frequently infiltrated with tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) that can promote malignant progression. Here, we show that TAMs isolated from human RCC produce substantial amounts of the proinflammatory chemokine CCL2 and immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, in addition to enhanced eicosanoid production via an activated 15-lipoxygenase-2 (15-LOX2) pathway. TAMs isolated from RCC tumors had a high 15-LOX2 expression and secreted substantial amounts of 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, its major bioactive lipid product. Inhibition of lipoxygenase activity significantly reduced production of CCL2 and IL-10 by RCC TAMs. In addition, TAMs isolated from RCC were capable of inducing in T lymphocytes, the pivotal T regulatory cell transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FOXP3), and the inhibitory cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) coreceptor. However, this TAM-mediated induction of FOXP3 and CTLA-4 in T cells was independent of lipoxygenase and could not be reversed by inhibiting lipoxygenase activity. Collectively, our results show that TAMs, often present in RCCs, display enhanced 15-LOX2 activity that contributes to RCC-related inflammation, immunosuppression, and malignant progression. Furthermore, we show that TAMs mediate the development of immune tolerance through both 15-LOX2-dependent and 15-LOX2-independent pathways. We propose that manipulating LOX-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism in the tumor microenvironment could offer new strategies to block cancer-related inflammation and immune escape in patients with RCC.

  8. Transcriptomic Analysis Comparing Tumor-Associated Neutrophils with Granulocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Normal Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Fridlender, Zvi G.; Sun, Jing; Mishalian, Inbal; Singhal, Sunil; Cheng, Guanjun; Kapoor, Veena; Horng, Wenhwai; Fridlender, Gil; Bayuh, Rachel; Worthen, G. Scott; Albelda, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The role of myeloid cells in supporting cancer growth is well established. Most work has focused on myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) that accumulate in tumor-bearing animals, but tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN) are also known to be capable of augmenting tumor growth. However, little is known about their evolution, phenotype, and relationship to naïve neutrophils (NN) and to the granulocytic fraction of MDSC (G-MDSC). In the current study, a transcriptomics approach was used in mice to compare these cell types. Our data show that the three populations of neutrophils are significantly different in their mRNA profiles with NN and G-MDSC being more closely related to each other than to TAN. Structural genes and genes related to cell-cytotoxicity (i.e. respiratory burst) were significantly down-regulated in TAN. In contrast, many immune-related genes and pathways, including genes related to the antigen presenting complex (e.g. all six MHC-II complex genes), and cytokines (e.g. TNF-α, IL-1-α/β), were up-regulated in G-MDSC, and further up-regulated in TAN. Thirteen of the 25 chemokines tested were markedly up-regulated in TAN compared to NN, including striking up-regulation of chemoattractants for T/B-cells, neutrophils and macrophages. This study characterizes different populations of neutrophils related to cancer, pointing out the major differences between TAN and the other neutrophil populations. PMID:22348096

  9. Mouse models expressing human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a transgene: Evaluation of CEA-based cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hance, Kenneth W.; Zeytin, Hasan E.; Greiner, John W.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, investigators have carried out several studies designed to evaluate whether human tumor-associated antigens might be exploited as targets for active specific immunotherapy, specifically human cancer vaccines. Not too long ago such an approach would have been met with considerable skepticism because the immune system was believed to be a rigid discriminator between self and non-self which, in turn, protected the host from a variety of pathogens. That viewpoint has been challenged in recent years by a series of studies indicating that antigenic determinants of self have not induced absolute host immune tolerance. Moreover, under specific conditions that evoke danger signals, peptides from self-antigen can be processed by the antigen-presenting cellular machinery, loaded onto the major histocompatibility antigen groove to serve as targets for immune intervention. Those findings provide the rationale to investigate a wide range of tumor-associated antigens, including differentiation antigens, oncogenes, and tumor suppressor genes as possible immune-based targets. One of those tumor-associated antigens is the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Described almost 40 years ago, CEA is a Mr 180–200,000 oncofetal antigen that is one of the more widely studied human tumor-associated antigens. This review will provide: (i) a brief overview of the CEA gene family, (ii) a summary of early preclinical findings on overcoming immune tolerance to CEA, and (iii) the rationale to develop mouse models which spontaneously develop gastrointestinal tumors and express the CEA transgene. Those models have been used extensively in the study of overcoming host immune tolerance to CEA, a self, tumor-associated antigen, and the experimental findings have served as the rationale for the design of early clinical trials to evaluate CEA-based cancer vaccines. PMID:15888344

  10. Carbohydrates and Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtman, Richard J.; Wurtman, Judith J.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the symptoms, such as appetite change and mood fluctuation, basic mechanisms, and some treatments of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), Carbohydrate-Craving Obesity (CCO) and Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). Provides several tables and diagrams, and three reading references. (YP)

  11. Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... containing foods are long chains of simple sugar molecules. These longer molecules must also be broken down by the body. ... of carbohydrates. Glycogen is made of many glucose molecules linked together. The sugar glucose is the body’s ...

  12. Carbohydrate Dehydration Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the impact of various factors on the "charring reaction" of a carbohydrate with concentrated sulfuric acid including the type of sugar, the degree of fineness of the sugar crystals, and the amount of water added. (JRH)

  13. Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. Normally ...

  14. Carbohydrates and Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtman, Richard J.; Wurtman, Judith J.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the symptoms, such as appetite change and mood fluctuation, basic mechanisms, and some treatments of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), Carbohydrate-Craving Obesity (CCO) and Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). Provides several tables and diagrams, and three reading references. (YP)

  15. Carbohydrate Dehydration Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the impact of various factors on the "charring reaction" of a carbohydrate with concentrated sulfuric acid including the type of sugar, the degree of fineness of the sugar crystals, and the amount of water added. (JRH)

  16. Clinical trial tests drug for tumors associated with Krebs-cycle dysfunction | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Krebs cycle is part of the complex process where cells turn food into energy. One of the elements of the Krebs cycle is succinate dehydrogenase (SDH). Loss of SDH activity in cells has been linked to tumor formation. This new trial is studying guadecitabine for tumors associated with Krebs cycle dysfunction. Learn more...

  17. Immunogenicity of self tumor associated proteins is enhanced through protein truncation

    PubMed Central

    Kottke, Tim; Shim, Kevin G; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Zaidi, Shane; Maria Diaz, Rosa; Pulido, Jose; Thompson, Jill; Rajani, Karishma R; Evgin, Laura; Ilett, Elizabeth; Pandha, Hardev; Harrington, Kevin; Selby, Peter; Melcher, Alan; Vile, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We showed previously that therapy with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) expressing tumor-associated proteins eradicates established tumors. We show here that when cellular cDNA were cloned into VSV which retained their own poly-A signal, viral species emerged in culture which had deleted the cellular poly-A signal and also contained a truncated form of the protein coding sequence. Typically, the truncation occurred such that a Tyrosine-encoding codon was converted into a STOP codon. We believe that the truncation of tumor-associated proteins expressed from VSV in this way occurred to preserve the ability of the virus to replicate efficiently. Truncated cDNA expressed from VSV were significantly more effective than full length cDNA in treating established tumors. Moreover, tumor therapy with truncated cDNA was completely abolished by depletion of CD4+ T cells, whereas therapy with full length cDNA was CD8+ T cell dependent. These data show that the type/potency of antitumor immune responses against self-tumor-associated proteins can be manipulated in vivo through the nature of the self protein (full length or truncated). Therefore, in addition to generation of neoantigens through sequence mutation, immunological tolerance against self-tumor-associated proteins can be broken through manipulation of protein integrity, allowing for rational design of better self-immunogens for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27933315

  18. The role of prostaglandin E2 in tumor-associated immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dingzhi; DuBois, Raymond N.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated inflammation can create an immunosuppressive microenvironment allowing tumor cells to escape immunosurveillance. Inhibiting immunosuppression remains one of the major challenges in cancer immunotherapy via checkpoint inhibitors. Recent preclinical data from Reis e Sousa's group may provide a strong rationale for developing new therapeutics to subvert tumor-induced immunosuppression via prostaglandin inhibition. PMID:26711015

  19. Tumor-associated B-cells induce tumor heterogeneity and therapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Rajasekharan; Zhang, Gao; Fukunaga-Kalabis, Mizuho; Perego, Michela; Krepler, Clemens; Xu, Xiaowei; Wagner, Christine; Hristova, Denitsa; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Tian; Wei, Zhi; Liu, Qin; Garg, Kanika; Griss, Johannes; Hards, Rufus; Maurer, Margarita; Hafner, Christine; Mayerhöfer, Marius; Karanikas, Georgios; Jalili, Ahmad; Bauer-Pohl, Verena; Weihsengruber, Felix; Rappersberger, Klemens; Koller, Josef; Lang, Roland; Hudgens, Courtney; Chen, Guo; Tetzlaff, Michael; Wu, Lawrence; Frederick, Dennie Tompers; Scolyer, Richard A; Long, Georgina V; Damle, Manashree; Ellingsworth, Courtney; Grinman, Leon; Choi, Harry; Gavin, Brian J; Dunagin, Margaret; Raj, Arjun; Scholler, Nathalie; Gross, Laura; Beqiri, Marilda; Bennett, Keiryn; Watson, Ian; Schaider, Helmut; Davies, Michael A; Wargo, Jennifer; Czerniecki, Brian J; Schuchter, Lynn; Herlyn, Dorothee; Flaherty, Keith; Herlyn, Meenhard; Wagner, Stephan N

    2017-09-19

    In melanoma, therapies with inhibitors to oncogenic BRAF(V600E) are highly effective but responses are often short-lived due to the emergence of drug-resistant tumor subpopulations. We describe here a mechanism of acquired drug resistance through the tumor microenvironment, which is mediated by human tumor-associated B cells. Human melanoma cells constitutively produce the growth factor FGF-2, which activates tumor-infiltrating B cells to produce the growth factor IGF-1. B-cell-derived IGF-1 is critical for resistance of melanomas to BRAF and MEK inhibitors due to emergence of heterogeneous subpopulations and activation of FGFR-3. Consistently, resistance of melanomas to BRAF and/or MEK inhibitors is associated with increased CD20 and IGF-1 transcript levels in tumors and IGF-1 expression in tumor-associated B cells. Furthermore, first clinical data from a pilot trial in therapy-resistant metastatic melanoma patients show anti-tumor activity through B-cell depletion by anti-CD20 antibody. Our findings establish a mechanism of acquired therapy resistance through tumor-associated B cells with important clinical implications.Resistance to BRAFV600E inhibitors often occurs in melanoma patients. Here, the authors describe a potential mechanism of acquired drug resistance mediated by tumor-associated B cells-derived IGF-1.

  20. The Role of Tumor Associated Macrophage in Recurrent Growth of Tumor Stem Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Sica . Macrophage polarization: tumor-associated macrophages as a paradigm for polarized M2 mononuclear phagocytes. Trends Immunol. 23: 549-555...2002 3. Alberto Mantovani, Paola Allavena1, Antonio Sica and Frances Balkwill. Cancer-related inflammation. Nature. 454: 436-444, 2008 4. Karin E. de

  1. Inhibition of mouse B16 melanoma by sodium butyrate correlated to tumor associated macrophages differentiation suppression

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fen; Mou, Yun-Zhu; Xiang, Xiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: As one member of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) family, Sodium butyrate (NaB) was found out that could be used as a differentiation inducer of much cancer cell. But its effects on tumor microenvironment cells are not well recognized. The goal of this research is to investigate the effect of NaB on B16 melanoma and analysis its relevant mechanism. Methods: We observed the effect of sodium butyrate on B16 melanoma in vivo and in vitro. MTT method was performed to detect cell apoptosis rate after treatment. Tumor associated macrophage infiltration condition was detected by flow cytometry. Western-blotting and immunohistochemical method were used to detect the expression of tumor associated macrophage cytokines. Results: A certain concentration of sodium butyrate could effectively inhibit B16 melanoma growth in vivo and in vitro, and this inhibition effects related to the suppression of tumor associated macrophage differentiation. At the same time we observed the relevant macrophage factors were down-regulated compared to the control. Conclusion: Sodium butyrate could effectively inhibit B16 melanoma growth through suppressing tumor associated macrophage proliferation and reduce relevant pro-tumor macrophage factors expression, which may help to promote the clinical study of melanoma epigenetic therapy. PMID:26064327

  2. Carbohydrate intake and obesity.

    PubMed

    van Dam, R M; Seidell, J C

    2007-12-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased rapidly worldwide and the importance of considering the role of diet in the prevention and treatment of obesity is widely acknowledged. This paper reviews data on the effects of dietary carbohydrates on body fatness. Does the composition of the diet as related to carbohydrates affect the likelihood of passive over-consumption and long-term weight change? In addition, methodological limitations of both observational and experimental studies of dietary composition and body weight are discussed. Carbohydrates are among the macronutrients that provide energy and can thus contribute to excess energy intake and subsequent weight gain. There is no clear evidence that altering the proportion of total carbohydrate in the diet is an important determinant of energy intake. However, there is evidence that sugar-sweetened beverages do not induce satiety to the same extent as solid forms of carbohydrate, and that increases in sugar-sweetened soft drink consumption are associated with weight gain. Findings from studies on the effect of the dietary glycemic index on body weight have not been consistent. Dietary fiber is associated with a lesser degree of weight gain in observational studies. Although it is difficult to establish with certainty that fiber rather than other dietary attributes are responsible, whole-grain cereals, vegetables, legumes and fruits seem to be the most appropriate sources of dietary carbohydrate.

  3. Reduction of spontaneous metastases through induction of carbohydrate cross-reactive apoptotic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Hennings, Leah; Carcel-Trullols, Jaime; Shaaf, Saeid; Korourian, Soheila; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    The selective targeting of tumor-associated carbohydrate Ags by the induction of serum Abs that trigger apoptosis of tumor cells as a means to reduce circulating tumor cells and micrometastases would be an advantage in cancer vaccine development. Some plant lectins like Griffonia simplicifolia lectin I and wheat germ agglutinin mediate the apoptosis of tumor cells. We investigated the possibility of using these lectins as templates to select peptide mimotopes of tumor-associated carbohydrate Ags as immunogens to generate cross-reactive Abs capable of mediating apoptosis of tumor cells. In this study, we show that immunization with a mimotope selected based on its reactivity with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin I and wheat germ agglutinin induced serum IgM Abs in mice that mediated the apoptosis of murine 4T1 and human MCF7 cell lines in vitro, paralleling the apoptotic activity of the lectins. Vaccine-induced anti-carbohydrate Abs reduced the outgrowth of micrometastases in the 4T1 spontaneous tumor model, significantly increasing survival time of tumor-bearing animals. This finding parallels suggestions that carbohydrate-reactive IgM with apoptotic activity may have merit in the adjuvant setting if the right carbohydrate-associated targets are identified.

  4. Digestion and Absorption of Carbohydrates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carbohydrates are the major dietary sources of energy for humans. While most dietary carbohydrates are derived from multiple botanical sources, lactose and trehalose are the only animal-derived carbohydrates. Digestion of starch, the carbohydrate most abundantly consumed by humans, depends on the c...

  5. Radiolocalization of bovine lymphosarcoma cells in athymic mice, using a monoclonal antibody against tumor-associated antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Aida, Y.; Ochiai, K.; Ito, K.; Onuma, M.; Fujimori, F.; Fujimoto, Y.; Izawa, H.

    1987-08-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibody c 143 was purified and F(ab')2 fragments were generated by pepsin digestion and then radiolabeled with /sup 125/I. The /sup 125/I-labeled c 143 F(ab')2 fragments were injected into athymic mice bearing bovine lymphoid tumor cells. The fragments became preferentially localized in tumor tissues, but not in normal tissues, as determined by differential counting of tissue radioactivity. The fragments became localized specifically in those tumors that were reactive with c 143 in vitro, but did not become localized in unrelated tumors. Localization of labeled F(ab')2 fragments of a monoclonal antibody of the same isotype directed against Taka virus (a variant of Newcastle disease virus) was not observed in athymic mice bearing bovine lymphoid tumor cells. Tumors were detectable by radioimmunoscintigraphy, using radiolabeled c 143 F(ab')2 fragments, without background subtraction, and by use of silver-grain scattering in light microscopic autoradiography.

  6. Diarrhea caused by carbohydrate malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Heinz F; Hammer, Johann

    2012-09-01

    This article will focus on the role of the colon in the pathogenesis of diarrhea in carbohydrate malabsorption or physiologically incomplete absorption of carbohydrates, and on the most common manifestation of carbohydrate malabsorption, lactose malabsorption. In addition, incomplete fructose absorption, the role of carbohydrate malabsorption in other malabsorptive diseases, and congenital defects that lead to malabsorption will be covered. The article concludes with a section on diagnostic tools to evaluate carbohydrate malabsorption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Telomere profiles and tumor-associated macrophages with different immune signatures affect prognosis in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hung, Noelyn A; Eiholzer, Ramona A; Kirs, Stenar; Zhou, Jean; Ward-Hartstonge, Kirsten; Wiles, Anna K; Frampton, Chris M; Taha, Ahmad; Royds, Janice A; Slatter, Tania L

    2016-03-01

    Telomere maintenance is a hallmark of cancer and likely to be targeted in future treatments. In glioblastoma established methods of identifying telomerase and alternative lengthening of telomeres leave a significant proportion of tumors with no defined telomere maintenance mechanism. This study investigated the composition of these tumors using RNA-Seq. Glioblastomas with an indeterminate telomere maintenance mechanism had an increased immune signature compared with alternative lengthening of telomeres and telomerase-positive tumors. Immunohistochemistry for CD163 confirmed that the majority (80%) of tumors with an indeterminate telomere maintenance mechanism had a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages. The RNA-Seq and immunostaining data separated tumors with no defined telomere maintenance mechanism into three subgroups: alternative lengthening of telomeres like tumors with a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages and telomerase like tumors with a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages. The third subgroup had no increase in tumor-associated macrophages and may represent a distinct category. The presence of tumor-associated macrophages conferred a worse prognosis with reduced patient survival times (alternative lengthening of telomeres with and without macrophages P=0.0004, and telomerase with and without macrophages P=0.013). The immune signatures obtained from RNA-Seq were significantly different between telomere maintenance mechanisms. Alternative lengthening of telomeres like tumors with macrophages had increased expression of interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT1-3). Telomerase-positive tumors with macrophages had increased expression of macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), CXCL12 and sushi-repeat containing protein x-linked 2 (SRPX2). Telomerase-positive tumors with macrophages were also associated with a reduced frequency of total/near total resections (44% vs >76% for all other subtypes

  8. Glycan arrays containing synthetic Clostridium difficile lipoteichoic acid oligomers as tools toward a carbohydrate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christopher E; Broecker, Felix; Eller, Steffen; Oberli, Matthias A; Anish, Chakkumkal; Pereira, Claney L; Seeberger, Peter H

    2013-08-18

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of severe nosocomial infections. Cell-surface carbohydrate antigens are promising vaccine candidates. Here we report the first total synthesis of oligomers of the lipoteichoic acid antigen repeating unit. Synthetic glycan microarrays revealed anti-glycan antibodies in the blood of patients that help to define epitopes for vaccine development.

  9. T cell recognition of carbohydrates on type II collagen

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    A critical event in an immune response is the T cell recognition of peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on the surface of an antigen presenting cell (APC). Although the majority of eukaryotic proteins are glycosylated, it has not yet been shown that T cell recognition of such proteins involves recognition of the bound carbohydrates. Type II collagen (CII), the major protein constituent of joint cartilage, is posttranslationally modified by hydroxylation and glycosylation of lysines. In this report we show that posttranslational modifications of the immunodominant peptide CII(256-270) generate a structural determinant that is distinct from the determinant represented by the corresponding synthetic peptide. Elimination of carbohydrates, present on CII, by two different biochemical methods revealed that the carbohydrates, O-linked to the hydroxylysines within the CII(256-270) determinant, were crucial for the reactivity towards the posttranslationally modified peptide. Furthermore, a T cell hybridoma specific for the glycosylated determinant was stimulated by tryptic CII-peptides presented by fixed APCs, thus showing that the carbohydrates are involved in the trimolecular complex T cell receptor/peptide/MHC. Finally, the importance of the bound carbohydrates for the arthritogenicity of CII was investigated by comparing the development of arthritis after immunization with carbohydrate-depleted and glycosylated CII, respectively. Incidence, time of onset, and severity of the disease were significantly affected by the elimination of carbohydrates, whereas no significant difference in anti-CII antibody titers was seen. PMID:8046350

  10. Carbohydrate and exercise performance: the role of multiple transportable carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2010-07-01

    Carbohydrate feeding has been shown to be ergogenic, but recently substantial advances have been made in optimizing the guidelines for carbohydrate intake during prolonged exercise. It was found that limitations to carbohydrate oxidation were in the absorptive process most likely because of a saturation of carbohydrate transporters. By using a combination of carbohydrates that use different intestinal transporters for absorption it was shown that carbohydrate delivery and oxidation could be increased. Studies demonstrated increases in exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates of up to 65% of glucose: fructose compared with glucose only. Exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates reach values of 1.75 g/min whereas previously it was thought that 1 g/min was the absolute maximum. The increased carbohydrate oxidation with multiple transportable carbohydrates was accompanied by increased fluid delivery and improved oxidation efficiency, and thus the likelihood of gastrointestinal distress may be diminished. Studies also demonstrated reduced fatigue and improved exercise performance with multiple transportable carbohydrates compared with a single carbohydrate. Multiple transportable carbohydrates, ingested at high rates, can be beneficial during endurance sports in which the duration of exercise is 3 h or more.

  11. Organic chemistry and immunochemical strategies in the design of potent carbohydrate-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Roy, René; Shiao, Tze Chieh

    2011-01-01

    A brief overview of carbohydrate antigens processing and uptakes involved in the adaptive immune system is highlighted. To counter balance the poor immunogenicity and T-cell independent characteristics of carbohydrate antigens, chemists have developed original hybrid molecules aimed at targeting specific competent immune cell receptors. Amongst several potential vaccine candidates dedicated against diseases, this short report will focused on those most advance and state of the art organic chemistry involved therein. One case has led to the first example of a commercial vaccine entirely prepared from a synthetic carbohydrate antigen against infections caused by the Gram-negative bacteria Haemophilus influenza type b responsible for pneumonia and acute bacterial meningitis in infants. Other commendable examples will illustrate the immunochemical strategies engaged in the development of anticancer carbohydrate-based vaccines.

  12. Carbohydrates in therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, Michelle; Joshi, Lokesh

    2007-07-01

    Awareness of the importance of carbohydrates in living systems and medicine is growing due to the increasing understanding of their biological and pharmacological relevance. Carbohydrates are ubiquitous and perform a wide array of biological roles. Carbohydrate-based or -modified therapeutics are used extensively in cardiovascular and hematological treatments ranging from inflammatory diseases and anti-thrombotic treatments to wound healing. Heparin is a well-known and widely used example of a carbohydrate-based drug but will not be discussed as it has been extensively reviewed. We will detail carbohydrate-based and -modified therapeutics, both those that are currently marketed or in various stages of clinical trials and those that are potential therapeutics based on promising preclinical investigations. Carbohydrate-based therapeutics include polysaccharide and oligosaccharide anti-inflammatory, anti-coagulant and anti-thrombotic agents from natural and synthetic sources, some as an alternative to heparin and others which were designed based on known structure-functional relationships. Some of these compounds have multiple biological effects, showing anti-adhesive, anti-HIV and anti-arthrithic activities. Small molecules, derivatives or mimetics of complement inhibitors, are detailed for use in limiting ischemia/ reperfusion injuries. Monosaccharides, both natural and synthetic, have been investigated for their in vivo anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective properties. Modification by glycosylation of natural products, or glycosylation-mimicking modification, has a significant effect on the parent molecule including increased plasma half-life and refining or increasing desired functions. It is hoped that this review will highlight the vast therapeutic potential of these natural bioactive molecules.

  13. Organocatalytic synthesis of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Mlynarski, Jacek; Gut, Bartosz

    2012-01-21

    The key role of carbohydrates in biological processes and their visible existence in our everyday life have stimulated the interest of leading research groups on the smart and simple synthesis of common and rare sugar molecules. Now, more than 120 years after Fischer's first synthesis of (D)-glucose (1890), we are witnessing important development in this field of total synthesis. Using modern methods of direct activation of carbonyl compounds chemists can prepare sugars in an elegant and efficient way similar to that of Nature. This tutorial review presents recent impressive progress in the area of de novo synthesis of carbohydrates by using organocatalytic direct aldol reaction as a key step.

  14. Carbohydrates, pollinators, and cycads.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E; Lindström, Anders J

    2015-01-01

    Cycad biology, ecology, and horticulture decisions are not supported by adequate research, and experiments in cycad physiology in particular have been deficient. Our recent report on free sugar content in a range of cycad taxa and tissues sets the stage for developing continued carbohydrate research. Growth and development of cycad pollen, mediation of the herbivory traits of specialist pollinators, and support of expensive strobilus behavioral traits are areas of cycad pollination biology that would benefit from a greater understanding of the role of carbohydrate relations.

  15. Carbohydrates, pollinators, and cycads

    PubMed Central

    Marler, Thomas E; Lindström, Anders J

    2015-01-01

    Cycad biology, ecology, and horticulture decisions are not supported by adequate research, and experiments in cycad physiology in particular have been deficient. Our recent report on free sugar content in a range of cycad taxa and tissues sets the stage for developing continued carbohydrate research. Growth and development of cycad pollen, mediation of the herbivory traits of specialist pollinators, and support of expensive strobilus behavioral traits are areas of cycad pollination biology that would benefit from a greater understanding of the role of carbohydrate relations. PMID:26479502

  16. Mushroom β-Glucan May Immunomodulate the Tumor-Associated Macrophages in the Lewis Lung Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wan-Jhen; Wu, Yu-Sheng; Chen, Sherwin; Liu, Chi-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The present study showed that oral mushroom beta-glucan treatment significantly increased IFN-γ mRNA expression but significantly reduced COX-2 mRNA expression within the lung. For LLC tumor model, oral Ganoderma lucidum or Antrodia camphorata polysaccharides treatments significantly reduced TGF-β production in serum. In addition, IL-12 and IFN-γ mRNA expression were significantly increased, but IL-6, IL-10, COX-2, and TGF-β mRNA expression were substantially following oral mushroom polysaccharides treatments. The study highlights the efficacious effect of mushroom polysaccharides for ameliorating the immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. Increased M1 phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages and attenuated M2 phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages could be achieved by ingesting mushroom polysaccharides. PMID:26167490

  17. Mushroom β-Glucan May Immunomodulate the Tumor-Associated Macrophages in the Lewis Lung Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan-Jhen; Wu, Yu-Sheng; Chen, Sherwin; Liu, Chi-Feng; Chen, Shiu-Nan

    2015-01-01

    The present study showed that oral mushroom beta-glucan treatment significantly increased IFN-γ mRNA expression but significantly reduced COX-2 mRNA expression within the lung. For LLC tumor model, oral Ganoderma lucidum or Antrodia camphorata polysaccharides treatments significantly reduced TGF-β production in serum. In addition, IL-12 and IFN-γ mRNA expression were significantly increased, but IL-6, IL-10, COX-2, and TGF-β mRNA expression were substantially following oral mushroom polysaccharides treatments. The study highlights the efficacious effect of mushroom polysaccharides for ameliorating the immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. Increased M1 phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages and attenuated M2 phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages could be achieved by ingesting mushroom polysaccharides.

  18. Structural diversity and biological importance of ABO, H, Lewis and secretor histo-blood group carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    ABO, H, secretor and Lewis histo-blood system genes control the expression of part of the carbohydrate repertoire present in areas of the body occupied by microorganisms. These carbohydrates, besides having great structural diversity, act as potential receptors for pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms influencing susceptibility and resistance to infection and illness. Despite the knowledge of some structural variability of these carbohydrate antigens and their polymorphic levels of expression in tissue and exocrine secretions, little is known about their biological importance and potential applications in medicine. This review highlights the structural diversity, the biological importance and potential applications of ABO, H, Lewis and secretor histo-blood carbohydrates.

  19. [Frequent allelic losses in tumor-associated stromal cells and tumor epitelium of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kekeeva, T V; Popova, O P; Shegaĭ, P V; Zavalishina, L E; Andreeva, Iu Iu; Zaletaev, D V; Nemtsova, M V

    2008-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Accumulation of genetic alterations is typical not only for cancer epithelial cells but tumor-associated fibroblasts as well. Tumor epithelia, tumor-associated stroma from prostatectomy specimens of patients with prostate cancer and cells from prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and adjacent stroma from males with PIN were isolated by using laser capture microdissection. Microsatellite allelotyping was evaluated using 4 highly polymorphic markers for chromosomal regions 8p22, 16q23-24 and 13q14. Incidences of alterations (loss of heterozygosity or allelic imbalance) were 48% for region 8p22, 72% for 16q23 and 37% for 13q14. The LOH frequencies in tumor-associated stroma cells were very similar. Alterations at chromosome 13q were significantly associated with advanced tumor stage, whereas AI at 16q was also associated with high Gleason score and lymph node metastasis. We find some incidences of allelic imbalance in premalignant lesions in epithelial (16-27%) and stromal (7-22%) components. Our results show that the frequencies of genetic aberrations are as high in stromal cells as in tumor cells.

  20. Inhibition of Lysyl Oxidases Impairs Migration and Angiogenic Properties of Tumor-Associated Pericytes.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Aline Lopes; Kaid, Carolini; Silva, Patrícia B G; Cortez, Beatriz A; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith

    2017-01-01

    Pericytes are important cellular components of the tumor microenviroment with established roles in angiogenesis and metastasis. These two cancer hallmarks are modulated by enzymes of the LOX family, but thus far, information about LOX relevance in tumor-associated pericytes is lacking. Here, we performed a comparative characterization of normal and tumoral pericytes and report for the first time the modulatory effects of LOX enzymes on activated pericyte properties. Tumoral pericytes isolated from childhood ependymoma and neuroblastoma specimens displayed angiogenic properties in vitro and expressed typical markers, including CD146, NG2, and PDGFRβ. Expression of all LOX family members could be detected in both normal and tumor-associated pericytes. In most pericyte samples, LOXL3 was the family member displaying the highest transcript levels. Inhibition of LOX/LOXL activity with the inhibitor β-aminopropionitrile (βAPN) significantly reduced migration of pericytes, while proliferation rates were kept unaltered. Formation of tube-like structures in vitro by pericytes was also significantly impaired upon inhibition of LOX/LOXL activity with βAPN, which induced more prominent effects in tumor-associated pericytes. These findings reveal a novel involvement of the LOX family of enzymes in migration and angiogenic properties of pericytes, with implications in tumor development and in therapeutic targeting tumor microenvironment constituents.

  1. Inhibition of Lysyl Oxidases Impairs Migration and Angiogenic Properties of Tumor-Associated Pericytes

    PubMed Central

    Kaid, Carolini; Silva, Patrícia B. G.; Cortez, Beatriz A.

    2017-01-01

    Pericytes are important cellular components of the tumor microenviroment with established roles in angiogenesis and metastasis. These two cancer hallmarks are modulated by enzymes of the LOX family, but thus far, information about LOX relevance in tumor-associated pericytes is lacking. Here, we performed a comparative characterization of normal and tumoral pericytes and report for the first time the modulatory effects of LOX enzymes on activated pericyte properties. Tumoral pericytes isolated from childhood ependymoma and neuroblastoma specimens displayed angiogenic properties in vitro and expressed typical markers, including CD146, NG2, and PDGFRβ. Expression of all LOX family members could be detected in both normal and tumor-associated pericytes. In most pericyte samples, LOXL3 was the family member displaying the highest transcript levels. Inhibition of LOX/LOXL activity with the inhibitor β-aminopropionitrile (βAPN) significantly reduced migration of pericytes, while proliferation rates were kept unaltered. Formation of tube-like structures in vitro by pericytes was also significantly impaired upon inhibition of LOX/LOXL activity with βAPN, which induced more prominent effects in tumor-associated pericytes. These findings reveal a novel involvement of the LOX family of enzymes in migration and angiogenic properties of pericytes, with implications in tumor development and in therapeutic targeting tumor microenvironment constituents. PMID:28553358

  2. Understanding carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions by means of glyconanotechnology.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Jesus M; Penadés, Soledad

    2004-01-01

    Carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction is a reliable and versatile mechanism for cell adhesion and recognition. Glycosphingolipid (GSL) clusters at the cell membrane are mainly involved in this interaction. To investigate carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction an integrated strategy (Glyconanotechnology) was developed. This strategy includes polyvalent tools (gold glyconanoparticles) mimicking GSL clustering at the cell membrane as well as analytical techniques such as AFM, TEM, and SPR to evaluate the interactions. The results obtained by means of this strategy and current status are presented.

  3. Peptide mimotopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis carbohydrate immunodeterminants

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Cell-surface saccharides of Mycobacterium tuberculosis appear to be crucial factors in tuberculosis pathogenicity and could be useful antigens in tuberculosis immunodiagnosis. In the present study, we report the successful antigenic and immunogenic mimicry of mannose-containing cell-wall compounds of M. tuberculosis by dodecamer peptides identified by phage-display technology. Using a rabbit antiserum raised against M. tuberculosis cell-surface saccharides as a target for biopanning, peptides with three different consensus sequences were identified. Phage-displayed and chemically synthesized peptides bound to the anticarbohydrate antiserum. Rabbit antibodies elicited against the peptide QEPLMGTVPIRAGGGS recognize the mannosylated M. tuberculosis cell-wall antigens arabinomannan and lipoarabinomannan, and the glycosylated recombinant protein alanine/proline-rich antigen. Furthermore, antibodies were also able to react with mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not with phosphatidylinositol dimannosides or arabinogalactan from mycobacteria. These results suggest that the immunogenic peptide mimics oligomannosidic epitopes. Interestingly, this report provides evidence that, in contrast with previously known carbohydrate mimotopes, no aromatic residues are necessary in a peptide sequence for mimicking unusual glycoconjugates synthesized by mycobacteria. The possible usefulness of the identified peptide mimotopes as surrogate reagents for immunodiagnosis and for the study of functional roles of the native non-peptide epitopes is discussed. PMID:15560754

  4. Carbohydrates, Sugar, and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Part of a Healthy Diet? en español Los carbohidratos, el azúcar y su hijo What Are Carbohydrates? ... a person's risk of developing health problems like diabetes. Some carbohydrate-dense foods are healthier than others. ...

  5. New mouse xenograft model modulated by tumor-associated fibroblasts for human multi-drug resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    MA, YAN; LIN, ZHIQIANG; FALLON, JOHN K.; ZHAO, QIANG; LIU, DAN; WANG, YONGJUN; LIU, FENG

    2015-01-01

    We developed an MDR tumor model that is modulated by tumor-associated fibroblasts. Studies on proliferation of tumor cell lines including paclitaxel-sensitive and resistant cell lines were performed. The expressions of P-gp and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) antigen were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Quantitative P-gp analyses of different cell lines were accomplished by nanoUPLC-MS/MS. Tumor cell colony formation assay and established xenograft model was used to investigate the relationship between P-gp expression, fibroblast levels and tumorigenesis. The mouse xenograft model was developed after co-inoculation with MDR tumor cells and NIH/3T3 fibroblast cells. There was no correlation between tumorigenesis in vivo and the growth rate of cells in vitro. The proliferation among different cell lines had no significant differences, but the P-gp expression and tumor growth in the xenograft model were fairly different. P-gp determination and α-SMA immunofluorescence staining clarified the relationship between P-gp expression, fibroblast levels and tumorigenesis. It was more difficult for tumor cells with higher P-gp levels to recruit fibroblasts in vivo, resulting in lower tumorigenesis due to the lack of structural and chemical support during tumor progression. In the established paclitaxel-resistant mouse xenograft model, no obvious antitumor effect was observed after Taxol treatment, but a significant decrease in tumor size for the group treated with gemcitabine sensitive to the model. The results show that the added fibroblasts do not disturb the applicability of the model in MDR. Therefore, this mouse xenograft MDR model could serve as an effective tool for MDR research. PMID:26352907

  6. T Cells as Antigen Carriers for Anti-tumor Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Traversari, Catia; Russo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the physiologic processing and presenting machinery of dendritic cells (DCs) by in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens may improve the immunogenic potential and clinical efficacy of DC-based cancer vaccines. The approach developed by our group was based on the clinical observation that some patients treated with the infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced to express the HSV-TK suicide gene for relapse of hematologic malignancies, after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, developed a T cell-mediated immune response specifically directed against the HSV-TK gene product.We demonstrated that lymphocytes genetically modified to express HSV-TK as well as self/tumor antigens, acting as antigen carriers, efficiently target DCs in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. The infusion of TRP-2-transduced lymphocytes induced the establishment of protective immunity and long-term memory in tumor-bearing mice by cross-presentation of the antigen mediated by the CD11c(+)CD8a(+) DCs subset. A similar approach was applied in a clinical setting. Ten patients affected by MAGE-3(+) metastatic melanoma were treated with autologous lymphocytes retrovirally transduced to express the MAGE-3 tumor antigen. In three patients, the treatment led to the increase of MAGE-3 specific CD8+ and CD4+ effectors and the development of long-term memory, which ultimately correlated with a favorable clinical outcome. Transduced lymphocytes represent an efficient way for in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens of DCs.

  7. Carbohydrates for training and competition.

    PubMed

    Burke, Louise M; Hawley, John A; Wong, Stephen H S; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2011-01-01

    An athlete's carbohydrate intake can be judged by whether total daily intake and the timing of consumption in relation to exercise maintain adequate carbohydrate substrate for the muscle and central nervous system ("high carbohydrate availability") or whether carbohydrate fuel sources are limiting for the daily exercise programme ("low carbohydrate availability"). Carbohydrate availability is increased by consuming carbohydrate in the hours or days prior to the session, intake during exercise, and refuelling during recovery between sessions. This is important for the competition setting or for high-intensity training where optimal performance is desired. Carbohydrate intake during exercise should be scaled according to the characteristics of the event. During sustained high-intensity sports lasting ~1 h, small amounts of carbohydrate, including even mouth-rinsing, enhance performance via central nervous system effects. While 30-60 g · h(-1) is an appropriate target for sports of longer duration, events >2.5 h may benefit from higher intakes of up to 90 g · h(-1). Products containing special blends of different carbohydrates may maximize absorption of carbohydrate at such high rates. In real life, athletes undertake training sessions with varying carbohydrate availability. Whether implementing additional "train-low" strategies to increase the training adaptation leads to enhanced performance in well-trained individuals is unclear.

  8. Carbohydrate and carbohydrate + protein for cycling time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Osterberg, Kristin L; Zachwieja, Jeffrey J; Smith, Johneric W

    2008-02-01

    Carbohydrate intake during endurance exercise delays the onset of fatigue and improves performance. Two recent cycling studies have reported increased time to exhaustion when protein is ingested together with carbohydrate. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that ingestion of a carbohydrate + protein beverage will lead to significant improvements in cycling time-trial performance relative to placebo and carbohydrate alone. Thirteen cyclists completed 120 min of constant-load ergometer cycling. Thereafter, participants performed a time-trial in which they completed a set amount of work (7 kJ kg(-1)) as quickly as possible. Participants completed four experimental trials, the first for familiarization and then three randomized, double-blind treatments consisting of a placebo, carbohydrate, and carbohydrate + protein. Participants received 250 ml of beverage every 15 min during the constant-load ride. Time-trial performance for carbohydrate (37.1 min, s = 3.8) was significantly (P < 0.05) faster than placebo (39.7 min, s = 4.6). Time-trial performance for carbohydrate + protein (38.8 min, s = 5.5) was not significantly different from either placebo or carbohydrate. Ingestion of a carbohydrate beverage during two hours of constant-load cycling significantly enhanced subsequent time-trial performance compared with placebo. The carbohydrate + protein beverage provided no additional performance benefit.

  9. Exosome-driven transfer of tumor-associated Pioneer Translation Products (TA-PTPs) for the MHC class I cross-presentation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Duvallet, Emilie; Boulpicante, Mathilde; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Daskalogianni, Chrysoula; Prado Martins, Rodrigo; Baconnais, Sonia; Manoury, Bénédicte; Fahraeus, Robin; Apcher, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cellular immune reactions against non-self-epitopes require activation of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells via cross-presentation of MHC class I-restricted peptides by professional antigen presenting cells (pAPCs), with the consequent detection and elimination of cells expressing the same antigens via the endogenous (direct) pathway. The source of peptides for the endogenous pathway is constituted of alternative mRNA translation products; however, it is still unclear which source of peptides is used for cross-presentation. Furthermore, the presentation of non-canonical translation products, produced during a non-conventional translation event, on class I molecules of tumor cells has been reported but how these peptides are generated, presented to pAPCs, and their capacity to stimulate CD8+ T cells is still not known. Here, we report that pioneer translation peptides (PTPs) derived from intron or exon pre-mRNAs can serve as tumor-associated antigens (TA-PTPs) and are delivered from the producing tumor cells to pAPCs via exosomes where they are processed by the cytosolic pathway. Injection of TA-PTPs and tumor-derived exosomes efficiently induce CD8+ T-cell proliferation and prevent tumor growth in mice. Our results show that TA-PTPs represent an efficient source of antigenic peptides for CD8+ T cell activation and that full-length proteins are not required for cross-presentation. These findings can have interesting implications for generating tolerance and for designing vectors to generate vaccines. PMID:27757298

  10. A newly generated functional antibody identifies Tn antigen as a novel determinant in the cancer cell–lymphatic endothelium interaction

    PubMed Central

    Danussi, Carla; Coslovi, Anna; Campa, Cristiana; Mucignat, Maria T; Spessotto, Paola; Uggeri, Fulvio; Paoletti, Sergio; Colombatti, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Malignant transformation of epithelial cells is frequently associated with the alteration of glycosylation pathways. Tn is a common tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen present in 90% of human carcinomas and its expression correlates with metastatic potential and poor prognosis. Despite its relevance, the functional role of Tn in tumor biology has not been firmly established probably for the lack of appropriate experimental tools. Our aims were to produce highly reactive monoclonal antibodies against Tn making use of synthetically produced Tn and to test their usefulness for in vivo imaging as well as to define their potential functional activity in tumor cell spread. We immunized mice with Tn clustered on cationized BSA and screened the positive hybridomas with Tn-biotinylated alginate. Enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay and immunofluorescence assays revealed that the most reactive anti-Tn IgM mAb (2154F12A4) selectively recognized Tn on the MCF7 breast cancer cell line since its binding to the cell membrane was completely abolished by preincubation with purified Tn. Importantly, QDot 800-conjugated mAb injected in MCF7-tumor bearing mice specifically bound to primary tumor lesions as well as to metastases in lymph nodes. In addition, this mAb was able to inhibit cancer cell adhesion to lymphatic endothelium suggesting a novel involvement of Tn in the lymphatic dissemination of cancer cells and hypothesizing future applications in inhibiting lymphatic metastases. PMID:19528665

  11. Carbohydrates as Fat Replacers.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xingyun; Yao, Yuan

    2017-02-28

    The overconsumption of dietary fat contributes to various chronic diseases, which encourages attempts to develop and consume low-fat foods. Simple fat reduction causes quality losses that impede the acceptance of foods. Fat replacers are utilized to minimize the quality deterioration after fat reduction or removal to achieve low-calorie, low-fat claims. In this review, the forms of fats and their functions in contributing to food textural and sensory qualities are discussed in various food systems. The connections between fat reduction and quality loss are described in order to clarify the rationales of fat replacement. Carbohydrate fat replacers usually have low calorie density and provide gelling, thickening, stabilizing, and other texture-modifying properties. In this review, carbohydrates, including starches, maltodextrins, polydextrose, gums, and fibers, are discussed with regard to their interactions with other components in foods as well as their performances as fat replacers in various systems.

  12. Carbohydrate force fields

    PubMed Central

    Foley, B. Lachele; Tessier, Matthew B.; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates present a special set of challenges to the generation of force fields. First, the tertiary structures of monosaccharides are complex merely by virtue of their exceptionally high number of chiral centers. In addition, their electronic characteristics lead to molecular geometries and electrostatic landscapes that can be challenging to predict and model. The monosaccharide units can also interconnect in many ways, resulting in a large number of possible oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, both linear and branched. These larger structures contain a number of rotatable bonds, meaning they potentially sample an enormous conformational space. This article briefly reviews the history of carbohydrate force fields, examining and comparing their challenges, forms, philosophies, and development strategies. Then it presents a survey of recent uses of these force fields, noting trends, strengths, deficiencies, and possible directions for future expansion. PMID:25530813

  13. Modeling protein recognition of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Laederach, Alain; Reilly, Peter J

    2005-09-01

    We have a limited understanding of the details of molecular recognition of carbohydrates by proteins, which is critical to a multitude of biological processes. Furthermore, carbohydrate-modifying proteins such as glycosyl hydrolases and phosphorylases are of growing importance as potential drug targets. Interactions between proteins and carbohydrates have complex thermodynamics, and in general the specific positioning of only a few hydroxyl groups determines their binding affinities. A thorough understanding of both carbohydrate and protein structures is thus essential to predict these interactions. An atomic-level view of carbohydrate recognition through structures of carbohydrate-active enzymes complexed with transition-state inhibitors reveals some of the distinctive molecular features unique to protein-carbohydrate complexes. However, the inherent flexibility of carbohydrates and their often water-mediated hydrogen bonding to proteins makes simulation of their complexes difficult. Nonetheless, recent developments such as the parameterization of specific force fields and docking scoring functions have greatly improved our ability to predict protein-carbohydrate interactions. We review protein-carbohydrate complexes having defined molecular requirements for specific carbohydrate recognition by proteins, providing an overview of the different computational techniques available to model them. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Carbohydrate post-glycosylational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrate modification is a common phenomenon in nature. Many carbohydrate modifications such as some epimerization, O-acetylation, O-sulfation, O-methylation, N-deacetylation, and N-sulfation, take place after the formation of oligosaccharide or polysaccharide backbones. These modifications can be categorized as carbohydrate post-glycosylational modifications (PGMs). Carbohydrate PGMs further extend the complexity of the structures and the synthesis of carbohydrates and glycoconjugates. They also increase the capacity of the biological information that can be controlled by finely tuning the structures of carbohydrates. Developing efficient methods to obtain structurally defined naturally occurring oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and glycoconjugates with carbohydrate PGMs is essential for understanding the biological significance of carbohydrate PGMs. Combine with high-throughput screening methods, synthetic carbohydrates with PGMs are invaluable probes in structure-activity relationship studies. We illustrate here several classes of carbohydrates with PGMs and their applications. Recent progress in chemical, enzymatic, and chemoenzymatic syntheses of these carbohydrates and their derivatives are also presented. PMID:17340000

  15. ANTIGENIC MODULATION

    PubMed Central

    Old, Lloyd J.; Stockert, Elisabeth; Boyse, Edward A.; Kim, Jae Ho

    1968-01-01

    Antigenic modulation (the loss of TL antigens from TL+ cells exposed to TL antibody in the absence of lytic complement) has been demonstrated in vitro. An ascites leukemia, phenotype TL.1,2,3, which modulates rapidly and completely when incubated with TL antiserum in vitro, was selected for further study of the phenomenon. Over a wide range of TL antibody concentrations modulation at 37°C was detectable within 10 min and was complete within approximately 1 hr. The cells were initially sensitized to C' by their contact with antibody, thereafter losing this sensitivity to C' lysis together with their sensitivity to TL antibody and C' in the cytotoxic test. The capacity of the cells to undergo modulation was abolished by actinomycin D and by iodoacetamide, and by reducing the temperature of incubation to 0°C. Thus modulation apparently is an active cellular process. Antigens TL. 1,2, and 3 are all modulated by anti-TL.1,3 serum and by anti-TL.3 serum. This modulation affects all three TL components together, even when antibody to one or two of them is lacking. aAnti-TL.2 serum does not induce modulation and in fact impairs modulation by the other TL antibodies. The influence of the TL phenotype of cells upon the demonstrable content of H-2 (D region) isoantigen, first shown in cells modulated in vivo, has been observed with cells modulated in vitro. Cells undergoing modulation show a progressive increase in H-2 (D region) antigen over a period of 4 hr, with no change in H-2 antigens of the K region. Restoration of the TL+ phenotype of modulated cells after removal of antibody is less rapid than TL+ → TL- modulation and may require several cell divisions. PMID:5636556

  16. Novel chemotactic-antigen DNA vaccine against cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuren; Zhang, Youhui

    2008-04-01

    Dendritic cells play a pivotal role in immune induction. Dendritic cells perform antigen uptake, processing and presentation to T cells only when they are matured and in the functional state. In the development of a vaccine, it is of utmost importance to consider how to make dendritic cells' functions immunologically adequate. In this paper, we report the development of a series of antitumor DNA vaccines with similar structural framework, in which a gene encoding tumor-associated antigenic peptide is ligated upstream to the gene coding secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine and downstream to the gene encoding the Fc portion of IgG (named chemotactic-antigen DNA vaccine [CADV]). CCR7(+) T, B, natural killer and dendritic cells can be attracted by secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine, and Fc facilitates antigen uptake via Fc receptors expressed on dendritic cells. In a series of experiments in mice vaccinated by CADV with such tumor-associated antigenic specificities as HPV-16 E7, PSA-PSM-PAP, HER-2/neu, p53 and hTERT, CADV can attract immune cells to the vaccine inoculation site, remarkably inhibit tumor growth and extend survival time in tumor-bearing mice. The antitumor effect is more efficacious than that in mice treated with SLC-Ag or Ag-Fc hybrid gene. Tumor-associated antigenic-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes can be induced by in vitro experiment in a human system. When combined with measures blocking the negative immune feedback circuits, the therapeutic effect of the vaccine can be further enhanced. Large-scale production of CADV is possible for clinical application.

  17. Tumor-associated fibrosis as a regulator of tumor immunity and response to immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Hegde, Samarth; DeNardo, David G

    2017-08-01

    Tumor-associated fibrosis is characterized by unchecked pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory signaling. The components of fibrosis including significant numbers of cancer-associated fibroblasts, dense collagen deposition, and extracellular matrix stiffness, are well appreciated regulators of tumor progression but may also be critical regulators of immune surveillance. While this suggests that the efficacy of immunotherapy may be limited in highly fibrotic cancers like pancreas, it also suggests a therapeutic opportunity to target fibrosis in these tumor types to reawaken anti-tumor immunity. This review discusses the mechanisms by which fibrosis might subvert tumor immunity and how to overcome these mechanisms.

  18. Distinctive role of activated tumor-associated macrophages in photosensitizer accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-05-01

    Cells dissociated from tumors (carcinomas and sarcomas) growing subcutaneously in mice that have been administered Photofrin or other photosensitizers were analyzed by flow cytometry. Monoclonal antibodies were used for identification of major cellular populations contained in these tumors. The results demonstrate that a subpopulation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is unique among tumor cell populations in that it excels in the accumulation of very high levels of photosensitizers. These macrophages showed an increased expression of interleukin 2 receptor, which is indicative of their activated state. since macrophages were reported to concentrate in the periphery of human neoplasms, it is suggested that activates TAMs are the determinants of tumor-localized photosensitizer fluorescence.

  19. Tumor-associated macrophages as an emerging target against tumors: Creating a new path from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Jinushi, Masahisa; Komohara, Yoshihiro

    2015-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages are a critical component of tumor microenvironments, which affect tumor growth, tumor angiogenesis, immune suppression, metastasis and chemoresistance. There is emerging evidence that many anticancer modalities currently used in the clinic have unique and distinct properties that modulate the recruitment, polarization and tumorigenic activities of macrophages in the tumor microenvironments. Educated tumor-associated macrophages significantly impact the clinical efficacies of and resistance to these anticancer modalities. Moreover, the development of drugs targeting tumor-associated macrophages, especially c-Fms kinase inhibitors and humanized antibodies targeting colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor, are in early clinical stages and show promising benefit for cancer patients. These experimental and clinical findings prompted us to further evaluate the potential targets that exhibit tumorigenic and immunosuppressive potential in a manner specific for tumor associated macrophages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Targeting of metastasis-promoting tumor-associated fibroblasts and modulation of pancreatic tumor-associated stroma with a carboxymethylcellulose-docetaxel nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Ernsting, Mark J; Hoang, Bryan; Lohse, Ines; Undzys, Elijus; Cao, Pinjiang; Do, Trevor; Gill, Bethany; Pintilie, Melania; Hedley, David; Li, Shyh-Dar

    2015-05-28

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas are characterized by the desmoplastic reaction, a dense fibrous stroma that has been shown to be supportive of tumor cell growth, invasion, and metastasis, and has been associated with resistance to chemotherapy and reduced patient survival. Here, we investigated targeted depletion of stroma for pancreatic cancer therapy via taxane nanoparticles. Cellax-DTX polymer is a conjugate of docetaxel (DTX), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and acetylated carboxymethylcellulose, a construct which condenses into well-defined 120nm particles in an aqueous solution, and is suitable for intravenous injection. We examined Cellax-DTX treatment effects in highly stromal primary patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenografts and in a metastatic PAN02 mouse model of pancreatic cancer, focusing on specific cellular interactions in the stroma, pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis. Greater than 90% of Cellax-DTX particles accumulate in smooth muscle actin (SMA) positive cancer-associated fibroblasts which results in long-term depletion of this stromal cell population, an effect not observed with Nab-paclitaxel (Nab-PTX). The reduction in stromal density leads to a >10-fold increase in tumor perfusion, reduced tumor weight and a reduction in metastasis. Consentingly, Cellax-DTX treatment increased survival when compared to treatment with gemcitabine or Nab-PTX in a metastatic PAN02 mouse model. Cellax-DTX nanoparticles interact with the tumor-associated stroma, selectively interacting with and depleting SMA positive cells and macrophage, effects of which are associated with significant changes in tumor progression and metastasis.

  1. Characterization of a novel bispecific antibody that mediates Fcgamma receptor type I-dependent killing of tumor-associated glycoprotein-72-expressing tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Russoniello, C; Somasundaram, C; Schlom, J; Deo, Y M; Keler, T

    1998-09-01

    A bispecific antibody was made by chemical conjugation of Fab' fragments from humanized antibodies specific for tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) and high-affinity immunoglobulin receptor, FcgammaA receptor type I (FcgammaRI). The purified anti-TAG-72 x anti-FcgammaRI (HCC49xH22) bispecific antibody had an approximate Mr of 111,000, consistent with a F(ab')2, and bound specifically to KLEB and LS174T tumor cell lines, which express the TAG-72 tumor antigen. Furthermore, HCC49x H22 was shown to simultaneously bind to KLEB cells and a soluble FcgammaRI fusion protein, demonstrating the bifunctional nature of the molecule. Using IFN-gamma-treated monocytes as effector cells, concentrations of the bispecific antibody in the range of 1-10,000 ng/ml mediated specific lysis of TAG-72-positive tumor cells. In contrast, the bispecific antibody did not promote antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of a cell line that was negative for TAG-72 antigen. Importantly, the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activity of the bispecific antibody was significantly greater than that of the monoclonal antibody HCC49. These in vitro data indicate that the humanized bispecific antibody HCC49xH22 has the appropriate specificity and functional activity for further evaluation as potential immunotherapy for TAG-72-positive malignancies.

  2. Human CTLs to wild-type and enhanced epitopes of a novel prostate and breast tumor-associated protein, TARP, lyse human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, SangKon; Terabe, Masaki; Pendleton, C David; Bhattacharyya, Anu; Bera, Tapan K; Epel, Malka; Reiter, Yoram; Phillips, John; Linehan, W Marston; Kasten-Sportes, Claude; Pastan, Ira; Berzofsky, Jay A

    2004-04-01

    Vaccine therapy for prostate and breast cancer may have potential for treating these major causes of death in males and females, respectively. Critical to the development of tumor-specific vaccines is finding and characterizing novel antigens to be recognized by CD8(+) T cells. To define new CD8(+) T-cell tumor antigens, we determined two wild-type HLA-A2 epitopes from a recently found tumor-associated protein, TARP (T-cell receptor gamma alternate reading frame protein), expressed in prostate and breast cancer cells. We were also able to engineer epitope-enhanced peptides by sequence modifications. Both wild-type and enhanced epitopes induced peptide-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses in A2K(b) transgenic mice. In vitro restimulation of human CD8(+) T cells from a prostate cancer patient resulted in CD8(+) T cells reactive to the peptide epitopes that could lyse HLA-A2(+) human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) expressing TARP. Epitope-specific human CD8(+) T cells were also enumerated in patients' peripheral blood by tetramer staining. Our data suggest that HLA-A2-binding TARP epitopes and enhanced epitopes discovered in this study could be incorporated into a potential vaccine for both breast and prostate cancer.

  3. The role of carbohydrates in infection strategies of enteric pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kentaro; Ishiwa, Akiko

    2015-03-01

    Enteric pathogens cause considerable public health concerns worldwide including tropical regions. Here, we review the roles of carbohydrates in the infection strategies of various enteric pathogens including viruses, bacteria and protozoa, which infect the epithelial lining of the human and animal intestine. At host cell entry, enteric viruses, including norovirus, recognize mainly histo-blood group antigens. At the initial step of bacterial infections, carbohydrates also function as receptors for attachment. Here, we describe the function of carbohydrates in infection by Salmonella enterica and several bacterial species that produce a variety of fimbrial adhesions. During invasion by enteropathogenic protozoa, apicomplexan parasites utilize sialic acids or sulfated glycans. Carbohydrates serve as receptors for infection by these microbes; however, their usage of carbohydrates varies depending on the microbe. On the surface of the mucosal tissues of the gastrointestinal tract, various carbohydrate moieties are present and play a crucial role in infection, representing the site of infection or route of access for most microbes. During the infection and/or invasion process of the microbes, carbohydrates function as receptors for various microbes, but they can also function as a barrier to infection. One approach to develop effective prophylactic and therapeutic antimicrobial agents is to modify the drug structure. Another approach is to modify the mode of inhibition of infection depending on the individual pathogen by using and mimicking the interactions with carbohydrates. In addition, similarities in mode of infection may also be utilized. Our findings will be useful in the development of new drugs for the treatment of enteric pathogens.

  4. The prognostic relevance of tumor associated macrophages in advanced stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jakovic, Ljubomir R; Mihaljevic, Biljana S; Perunicic Jovanovic, Maja D; Bogdanovic, Andrija D; Andjelic, Bosko M; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir Z

    2011-10-01

    Although the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) has been improved, distinguishing reliable prognostic biomarkers could better stratify patients for more effective treatment. We analyzed the prognostic relevance of CD68+ tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) by immunohistochemical analysis at diagnosis and standard clinical parameters in 52 ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine)-treated patients with advanced stage classical HL (cHL). Patients with >25% CD68+ TAMs compared to those with ≤25% had worse 5-year overall survival (45% vs. 77%, log-rank p = 0.019) and showed a trend toward shorter 5-year event-free survival (51% vs. 71%, log-rank p = 0.19). Additionally, no significant correlation with selected clinical features was found. Significantly shorter 5-year overall survival was associated with International Prognostic Score (IPS) >2, bulky disease, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (log-rank test, p = 0.003, p = 0.049, p = 0.007, respectively). In multivariate analysis, increased CD68+TAMs, IPS >2, and bulky disease were identified as independent prognostic factors for overall survival (Cox multivariate model, p = 0.006, p = 0.007, p = 0.013, respectively). Tumor-associated macrophages represent a potential prognostic biomarker which could contribute to better risk stratification of patients with cHL.

  5. Curcumin changes the polarity of tumor-associated microglia and eliminates glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sumit; Baidoo, Juliet; Fried, Angela; Atwi, Doaa; Dolai, Sukanta; Boockvar, John; Symons, Marc; Ruggieri, Rosamaria; Raja, Krishnaswami; Banerjee, Probal

    2016-12-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most pernicious forms of cancer and currently chances of survival from this malady are extremely low. We have used the noninvasive strategy of intranasal (IN) delivery of a glioblastoma-directed adduct of curcumin (CC), CC-CD68Ab, into the brain of mouse GBM GL261-implanted mice to study the effect of CC on tumor remission and on the phenotype of the tumor-associated microglial cells (TAMs). The treatment caused tumor remission in 50% of GL261-implanted GBM mice. A similar rescue rate was also achieved through intraperitoneal infusion of a lipid-encapsulated formulation of CC, Curcumin Phytosome, into the GL261-implanted GBM mice. Most strikingly, both forms of CC elicited a dramatic change in the tumor-associated Iba1+ TAMs, suppressing the tumor-promoting Arginase1(high) , iNOS(low) M2-type TAM population while inducing the Arginase1(low) , iNOS(high) M1-type tumoricidal microglia. Concomitantly, we observed a marked induction and activation of microglial NF-kB and STAT1, which are known to function in coordination to cause induction of iNOS. Therefore, our novel findings indicate that appropriately delivered CC can directly kill GBM cells and also repolarize the TAMs to the tumoricidal M1 state. © 2016 UICC.

  6. Clinical implication of tumor-associated and immunological parameters in melanoma patients treated with ipilimumab.

    PubMed

    Damuzzo, V; Solito, S; Pinton, L; Carrozzo, E; Valpione, S; Pigozzo, J; Arboretti Giancristofaro, R; Chiarion-Sileni, V; Mandruzzato, S

    2016-01-01

    Ipilimumab, the first immune-checkpoint inhibitor extending overall survival (OS) in metastatic melanoma patients, has a survival benefit only in a proportion of patients and the development of reliable predictive biomarkers is still an unmet need. To meet this request, we used a multivariate statistical approach to test whether myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) or other tumor-associated and immunological parameters may serve as predictive or prognostic biomarkers in melanoma patients receiving ipilimumab. By using a standardized approach to determine the circulating levels of four MDSC subsets, we observed a significant expansion of three MDSC subsets at baseline, as compared to controls and, upon treatment, that high levels of CD14(+)/IL4Rα(+) MDSCs were an independent prognostic factor of reduced OS. On the contrary, longer OS was associated to low levels of the proinflammatory proteins IL-6 and CRP and tumor-associated factors S100B and LDH both at baseline and after treatment. Increasing number of total T cells and especially of PD-1(+)/CD4(+) T cells were associated with better prognosis, and upregulation of PD-1(+) expression on CD4(+) T cells upon treatment was associated with lower toxicity. As several parameters were associated to OS, we included these factors in a multivariate survival model, and we identified IL-6 and ECOG PS as independent biomarkers associated with improved OS, whereas high levels of LDH and CD14(+)/IL4Rα(+) MDSCs were negative independent markers of reduced OS.

  7. Tecemotide: An antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wurz, Gregory T; Kao, Chiao-Jung; Wolf, Michael; DeGregorio, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) has made possible the development of antigen-specific cancer immunotherapies such as tecemotide. One of those is mucin 1 (MUC1), a cell membrane glycoprotein expressed on some epithelial tissues such as breast and lung. In cancer, MUC1 becomes overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated, exposing the immunogenic tandem repeat units in the extracellular domain of MUC1. Designed to target tumor associated MUC1, tecemotide is being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials for treatment of unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as maintenance therapy following chemoradiotherapy. Additional Phase II studies in other indications are ongoing. This review discusses the preclinical and clinical development of tecemotide, ongoing preclinical studies of tecemotide in human MUC1 transgenic mouse models of breast and lung cancer, and the potential application of these models for optimizing the timing of chemoradiotherapy and tecemotide immunotherapy to achieve the best treatment outcome for patients. PMID:25483673

  8. Heat capacity changes in carbohydrates and protein-carbohydrate complexes.

    PubMed

    Chavelas, Eneas A; García-Hernández, Enrique

    2009-05-13

    Carbohydrates are crucial for living cells, playing myriads of functional roles that range from being structural or energy-storage devices to molecular labels that, through non-covalent interaction with proteins, impart exquisite selectivity in processes such as molecular trafficking and cellular recognition. The molecular bases that govern the recognition between carbohydrates and proteins have not been fully understood yet. In the present study, we have obtained a surface-area-based model for the formation heat capacity of protein-carbohydrate complexes, which includes separate terms for the contributions of the two molecular types. The carbohydrate model, which was calibrated using carbohydrate dissolution data, indicates that the heat capacity contribution of a given group surface depends on its position in the saccharide molecule, a picture that is consistent with previous experimental and theoretical studies showing that the high abundance of hydroxy groups in carbohydrates yields particular solvation properties. This model was used to estimate the carbohydrate's contribution in the formation of a protein-carbohydrate complex, which in turn was used to obtain the heat capacity change associated with the protein's binding site. The model is able to account for protein-carbohydrate complexes that cannot be explained using a previous model that only considered the overall contribution of polar and apolar groups, while allowing a more detailed dissection of the elementary contributions that give rise to the formation heat capacity effects of these adducts.

  9. Noncaloric Benefits of Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B Ravinder

    2015-01-01

    Noncaloric benefits of carbohydrates are due to the presence of dietary fibers, which are a heterogeneous group of natural food sources and form an important component of a healthy diet. They differ in physiochemical properties such as solubility, fermentability and viscosity. They have a wide range of physiological effects resulting in gastrointestinal and systemic benefits. These include appetite, satiety, bowel transit time and function, production of short-chain fatty acids and certain vitamins, and effects on gut microbiota, immunity and inflammation, as well as mineral absorption. They also help to control the glycemic status and serum lipid levels, resulting in reduced incidence rates of atherosclerosis, hypertension, stroke and cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Immunostimulatory early phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages does not predict tumor growth outcome in an HLA-DR mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Riabov, Vladimir; Kim, David; Chhina, Surmeet; Alexander, Richard B; Klyushnenkova, Elena N

    2015-07-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) were shown to support the progression of many solid tumors. However, anti-tumor properties of TAM were also reported in several types of cancer. Here, we investigated the phenotype and functions of TAM in two transgenic mouse models of prostate cancer that display striking differences in tumor growth outcome. Mice expressing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as a self-antigen specifically in prostate (PSAtg mice) rejected PSA-expressing transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) tumors. However, the introduction of HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2b) transgene presenting PSA-derived peptides in a MHC class II-restricted manner exacerbated the growth of TRAMP-PSA tumors in DR2bxPSA F 1 mice. Despite the difference in tumor growth outcome, tumors in both strains were equally and intensively infiltrated by macrophages on the first week after tumor challenge. TAM exhibited mixed M1/M2 polarization and simultaneously produced pro-inflammatory (TNFα, IL1β) and anti-inflammatory (IL10) cytokines. TAM from both mouse strains demonstrated antigen-presenting potential and pronounced immunostimulatory activity. Moreover, they equally induced apoptosis of tumor cells. In vivo depletion of macrophages in DR2bxPSA F 1 but not PSAtg mice aggravated tumor growth suggesting that macrophages more strongly contribute to anti-tumor immunity when specific presentation of PSA to CD4+ T cells is possible. In summary, we conclude that in the early stages of tumor progression, the phenotype and functional properties of TAM did not predict tumor growth outcome in two transgenic prostate cancer models. Furthermore, we demonstrated that during the initial stage of prostate cancer development, TAM have the potential to activate T cell immunity and mediate anti-tumor effects.

  11. Gender-Specific Transfusion Affects Tumor-Associated Neutrophil: Macrophage Ratios in Murine Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Douglas D.; Kelher, Marguerite R.; Meng, Xianzhong; Fullerton, David A.; Lee, Joon H.; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Perioperative blood transfusion has been linked to decreased survival for pancreas cancer. Noting clinical data associating female blood products with increased morbidity, our lab has demonstrated that transfusion of female blood augments metastatic events compared to male blood in an immunocompetent murine pancreatic cancer model. It has been suggested that tumor-associated macrophages correlate with tumor progression by promoting angiogenesis. More recently, tumor-associated neutrophils have been implicated in aggressive tumor behavior. We hypothesize that differences in gender-specific transfusion-mediated pancreatic cancer progression are due to microenvironmental changes within the tumor. To test this hypothesis, we examined tumor-associated neutrophils and macrophage ratios in male and female mice with pancreatic cancer receiving blood transfusion from male or female donors. Methods C57/BL6 mice, age 7–9 weeks, underwent splenic inoculation with 2.5×105 PanO2 murine pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Mice were transfused on post-op day 7 with 1 ml/kg supernatant from day 42 male or female packed red cells. Necropsy was performed at 5 weeks or earlier for clinical deterioration, and tumors harvested. Frozen sections (5 μm) were stained for neutrophils and macrophages by immunofluorescence. Data were analyzed using ANOVA; p≤0.05 was used to determine significance; N≥3 per group. Results Clinically, male mice had greater morbidity and mortality than female mice when receiving female blood products, with roughened hair coat, development of ascites and death due to bowel obstruction. In evaluating the tumor microenvironment from mice receiving female blood products, male mice were noted to have a greater neutrophil to macrophage ratio than female mice, 0.176±0.028 vs. 0.073±0.012, p=0.03. When examining neutrophil to macrophage ratio in mice receiving male blood products, no difference was noted (p=0.48). Conclusions Male mice with pancreas

  12. Adhesion Forces between Lewis(X) Determinant Antigens as Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tromas, C; Rojo, J; de la Fuente, J M; Barrientos, A G; García, R; Penadés, S

    2001-01-01

    The adhesion forces between individual molecules of Lewis(X) trisaccharide antigen (Le(X) ) have been measured in water and in calcium solution by using atomic force microscopy (AFM, see graph). These results demonstrate the self-recognition capability of this antigen, and reinforce the hypothesis that carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction could be considered as the first step in the cell-adhesion process in nature. Copyright © 2001 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Fed. Rep. of Germany.

  13. Issues in Nutrition: Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Margaret E; Noel, Mary Barth

    2017-01-01

    Carbohydrates include sugars, starches, and dietary fibers. Resistant starches resemble fiber in their behavior in the intestinal tract, and may have positive effects on blood glucose levels and the gut microbiome. Fibers are classified as soluble and insoluble, but most fiber-containing foods contain a mixture of soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber has been shown to lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Many artificial sweeteners and other sugar substitutes are available. Most natural sources of sweeteners also are energy sources. Many artificial sweeteners contain no kilocalories in the amounts typically used. Sugar alcohols may have a laxative effect when consumed in large amounts. Glycemic index and glycemic load are measurements that help quantify serum glucose response after ingestion of particular foods. These measurements may be affected by the combination of foods consumed in a given meal, and the glycemic index may vary among individuals eating the same meal. Eating foods with a low glycemic index may help prevent development of type 2 diabetes. There is no definitive evidence to recommend low-carbohydrate diets over low-fat diets for long-term weight loss; they are equally effective. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  14. Impact of Dietary Carbohydrate and Protein Levels on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasker, Denise Ann

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to investigate the impact of changing dietary carbohydrate (CARB) intakes within recommended dietary guidelines on metabolic outcomes specifically associated with glycemic regulations and carbohydrate metabolism. This research utilized both human and animal studies to examine changes in metabolism across a wide…

  15. Impact of Dietary Carbohydrate and Protein Levels on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasker, Denise Ann

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to investigate the impact of changing dietary carbohydrate (CARB) intakes within recommended dietary guidelines on metabolic outcomes specifically associated with glycemic regulations and carbohydrate metabolism. This research utilized both human and animal studies to examine changes in metabolism across a wide…

  16. Purification and characterization of the major antigen WI-1 from Blastomyces dermatitidis yeasts and immunological comparison with A antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, B S; Jones, J M

    1994-01-01

    The lack of well-defined antigens from Blastomyces dermatitidis has hampered the ability to reliably diagnose human infection and study the immunobiology of blastomycosis. We recently discovered a novel surface protein on B. dermatitidis yeasts, designated WI-1, and demonstrated it to be a key antigenic target of humoral and cellular responses during infection. In the present article, we purified and characterized WI-1 and compared it immunologically with the only Blastomyces antigen commercially available, A antigen. WI-1 was purified by high-performance liquid chromatography over a DEAE-cellulose column. It eluted from the column at a point on the salt gradient corresponding to 460 to 490 mM NaCl, reflecting its acidic pI of approximately equal to 5.2. Purified WI-1 had a molecular mass of 120 kDa and contained a large amount of cysteine (85 residues) and aromatic amino acids but undetectable carbohydrate. In contrast, A antigen had a molecular mass of 135 kDa and contained 37% carbohydrate. Immunological comparison of the two antigens showed that, when radiolabeled, WI-1 was more reactive with anti-Blastomyces antisera than A antigen but did not cross-react with anti-Histoplasma antisera. Proteinase digestion of WI-1 eliminated its recognition by anti-WI-1 and anti-Blastomyces antisera. Proteinase treatment of A antigen had no effect on its recognition by anti-Blastomyces or anti-Histoplasma antisera, but periodate treatment abolished recognition by anti-Histoplasma antisera, indicating that the cross-reactive determinant(s) of A antigen is displayed on the accompanying carbohydrate. In further studies, anti-WI-1 antiserum reacted with A antigen and, conversely, anti-A antiserum and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) reacted with WI-1, indicating a shared determinant on the two antigens. A recombinant 25-amino-acid repeat, recently cloned from WI-1 and found to be the major target of antibody recognition of WI-1, reacted strongly with anti-A antiserum and MAbs. In MAb

  17. The statolith compartment in Chara rhizoids contains carbohydrate and protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang-Cahill, F.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to higher plants, the alga Chara has rhizoids with single membrane-bound compartments that function as statoliths in gravity perception. Previous work has demonstrated that these statoliths contain barium sulfate crystals. In this study, we show that statoliths in Chara rhizoids react with a Coomassie Brilliant Blue cytochemical stain for proteins. While statoliths did not react with silver methenamine carbohydrate cytochemistry, the monoclonal antibody CCRC-M2, which is against a carbohydrate (sycamore-maple rhamnogalacturonan I), labeled the statolith compartment. These results demonstrate that in addition to barium sulfate, statoliths in Chara rhizoids have an organic matrix that consists of protein and carbohydrate moieties. Since the statoliths were silver methenamine negative, the carbohydrate in this compartment could be a 3-linked polysaccharide. CCRC-M2 also labeled Golgi cisternae, Golgi-associated vesicles, apical vesicles, and cell walls in the rhizoids. The specificity of CCRC-M2 immunolabeling was verified by several control experiments, including the demonstration that labeling was abolished when the antibody was preabsorbed with its antigen. Since in this and a previous study (John Z. Kiss and L. Andrew Staehelin, American Journal of Botany 80: 273-282, 1993) antibodies against higher plant carbohydrates crossreacted with cell walls of Chara in a specific manner, Characean algae may be a useful model system in biochemical and molecular studies of cell walls.

  18. The statolith compartment in Chara rhizoids contains carbohydrate and protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang-Cahill, F.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to higher plants, the alga Chara has rhizoids with single membrane-bound compartments that function as statoliths in gravity perception. Previous work has demonstrated that these statoliths contain barium sulfate crystals. In this study, we show that statoliths in Chara rhizoids react with a Coomassie Brilliant Blue cytochemical stain for proteins. While statoliths did not react with silver methenamine carbohydrate cytochemistry, the monoclonal antibody CCRC-M2, which is against a carbohydrate (sycamore-maple rhamnogalacturonan I), labeled the statolith compartment. These results demonstrate that in addition to barium sulfate, statoliths in Chara rhizoids have an organic matrix that consists of protein and carbohydrate moieties. Since the statoliths were silver methenamine negative, the carbohydrate in this compartment could be a 3-linked polysaccharide. CCRC-M2 also labeled Golgi cisternae, Golgi-associated vesicles, apical vesicles, and cell walls in the rhizoids. The specificity of CCRC-M2 immunolabeling was verified by several control experiments, including the demonstration that labeling was abolished when the antibody was preabsorbed with its antigen. Since in this and a previous study (John Z. Kiss and L. Andrew Staehelin, American Journal of Botany 80: 273-282, 1993) antibodies against higher plant carbohydrates crossreacted with cell walls of Chara in a specific manner, Characean algae may be a useful model system in biochemical and molecular studies of cell walls.

  19. Ghost cell odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma--report of two rare cases.

    PubMed

    Hogge, Maritzabel; Velez, Ines; Kaltman, Steven; Movahed, Reza; Yeh, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The ghost cell odontogenic tumor (GCOT) is a neoplastic/cystic lesion with a diverse histopathological and clinical behavior It was formerly known as calcified odontogenic cyst, but in 2005 the World Health Organization categorized this lesion as an odontogenic, benign tumor rather than a cyst; nominating this neoplasm as calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor. A later comprehensive classification named it ghost cell odontogenic tumor because the most remarkable histopathologic characteristic is the presence of a mass of ghost cells embedded in the epithelium. We report two cases of a rare variant of a ghost cell odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma; to our knowledge, one is the youngest patient (four month old) reported in the English literature.

  20. [Primary retroperitoneal carcinoid tumor associated with multiple endcrine neoplasia (men) type 1: a case report].

    PubMed

    Chiba, Syuji; Numakura, Kazuyuki; Satoyoshi, Kiyofumi; Saito, Mitsuru; Horikawa, Yohei; Takayama, Koichiro; Nara, Taketoshi; Kanda, Sohei; Miura, Yoshiko; Maita, Shinya; Tsuruta, Hiroshi; Obara, Takashi; Kumazawa, Teruaki; Narita, Shintaro; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Satoh, Shigeru; Habuchi, Tomonori

    2011-11-01

    We report an extremely rare case of a 69-year-old man having a retroperitoneal carcinoid tumor associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 1. The patient whose son and daughter were previously diagnosed with MEN type 1 was admitted to the Department of Endocrinology at our hospital for evaluation of this disorder. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography revealed a parathyroid and retroperitoneal tumor (43 mm x 34 mm). The patient did not consent to surgical management of the tumor; however three years later, a follow-up CT revealed tumor enlargement (55 mm x 50 mm). We were unable to rule out a malignancy, and subsequently resected the tumor. A pathological diagnosis of retroperitoneal carcinoid was made. No local recurrence or metastasis have been observed for 21 months.

  1. Targeted delivery of nano-PTX to the brain tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Lei; Tao, Youhua; Payne, Gregory; Do, Linh; Thomas, Tima; Rodriguez, Juan; Dou, Huanyu

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles containing mixed lipid monolayer shell, biodegradable polymer core and rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) peptide as brain targeting ligand, were developed for brain targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to treat malignant glioma. RVG conjugated PTX loaded NPs (RVG-PTX-NPs) had the desirable size (~140 nm), narrow size distribution and spherical shape. RVG-PTX-NPs showed poor uptake by neurons and selective targeting to the brain tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) with controlled release and tumor specific toxicity. In vivo studies revealed that RVG-PTX-NPs were significant to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and had specific targeting to the brain. Most importantly, RVG-PTX-NPs showed effectiveness for anti-glioma therapy on human glioma of mice model. We concluded that RVG-PTX-NPs provided an effective approach for brain-TAMs targeted delivery for the treatment of glioma. PMID:28036254

  2. CCL18 from Tumor-Associated Macrophages Promotes Breast Cancer Metastasis via PITPNM3

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingqi; Yao, Yandan; Gong, Chang; Yu, Fengyan; Su, Shicheng; Chen, Jianing; Liu, Bodu; Deng, Hui; Wang, Fengsong; Lin, Ling; Yao, Herui; Su, Fengxi; Anderson, Karen S.; Liu, Qiang; Ewen, Mark E.; Yao, Xuebiao; Song, Erwei

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) can influence cancer progression and metastasis, but the mechanism remains unclear. Here, we show that breast TAMs abundantly produce CCL18, and its expression in blood or cancer stroma is associated with metastasis and reduced patient survival. CCL18 released by breast TAMs promotes the invasiveness of cancer cells by triggering integrin clustering and enhancing their adherence to extracellular matrix. Furthermore, we identify PITPNM3 as a functional receptor for CCL18 that mediates CCL18 effect and activates intracellular calcium signaling. CCL18 promotes the invasion and metastasis of breast cancer xenografts, whereas suppressing PITPNM3 abrogates these effects. These findings indicate that CCL18 derived from TAMs plays a critical role in promoting breast cancer metastasis via its receptor, PITPNM3. PMID:21481794

  3. Tumor-associated myeloid cells as guiding forces of cancer cell stemness.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Porta, Chiara; Amadori, Alberto; Pastò, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Due to their ability to differentiate into various cell types and to support tissue regeneration, stem cells simultaneously became the holy grail of regenerative medicine and the evil obstacle in cancer therapy. Several studies have investigated niche-related conditions that favor stemness properties and increasingly emphasized their association with an inflammatory environment. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are major orchestrators of cancer-related inflammation, able to dynamically express different polarized inflammatory programs that promote tumor outgrowth, including tumor angiogenesis, immunosuppression, tissue remodeling and metastasis formation. In addition, these myeloid populations support cancer cell stemness, favoring tumor maintenance and progression, as well as resistance to anticancer treatments. Here, we discuss inflammatory circuits and molecules expressed by TAMs and MDSCs as guiding forces of cancer cell stemness.

  4. Coumarins and other fused bicyclic heterocycles with selective tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase isoforms inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Bozdag, Murat; Alafeefy, Ahmed Mahmoud; Altamimi, Abdul Malik; Vullo, Daniela; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2017-01-15

    Herein we report for the first time a series of 2-benzamido-N-(2-oxo-4-(methyl/trifluoromethyl)-2H-chromen-7-yl) benzamide 3a-f and substituted quinazolin-4(3H)-ones and 2H-benzo[e][1,2,4]thiadiazin-3(4H)-one 1,1-dioxides (5, 6, 8 and 10a-c) as selective inhibitors of the tumor associated hCA IX and XII isoforms. Among the compounds reported the trifluoromethyl derivative 3d resulted the most potent against these CA isoforms with KIs of 10.9 and 6.7nM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Tumor-associated macrophages (not tumor cells) are the determinants of photosensitizer tumor localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-03-01

    The distribution of Photofrin and several other photosensitizers among major cellular populations contained in solid mouse tumors was examined using flow cytometry. Seven tumor models were included in the analysis: sarcomas EMT6, KHT, RIF, FsaR and FsaN, Lewis lung carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII. In all these tumors, the highest photosensitizer levels were found in a subpopulation of tumor associated macrophages consisting of activated cells (as suggested by their increased size, granularity, and the number of interleukin 2 receptors). There was no evidence of selective photosensitizer accumulation in malignant tumor cells. Results consistent with these observations were also obtained with the carcinogen induced squamous cell carcinoma growing in hamster cheek pouch.

  6. Tumor-associated macrophages induce capillary morphogenesis of lymphatic endothelial cells derived from human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tauchi, Yukie; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Kumamoto, Kanako; Tokumoto, Mao; Sakimura, Chie; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Kimura, Kenjiro; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Kubo, Naoshi; Muguruma, Kazuya; Yashiro, Masakazu; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Ohira, Masaichi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-08-01

    Tumor lymphangiogenesis is a major prognostic indicator of gastric cancer. Tumor-induced inflammation has been shown to attract tumor-associated macrophages that affect lymphangiogenesis. However, detailed mechanisms of macrophage-induced lymphangiogenesis have not been elucidated. Here, we evaluated the interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) derived from lymph nodes (LNs) of human gastric cancer. Lymphatic endothelial cells were directly or indirectly cocultured with macrophages from healthy human blood, with or without the supernatant of the gastric cancer cell line, OCUM-12. We analyzed the effect of cancer pretreated macrophages and of macrophages from metastatic LNs of gastric cancer on LECs. We observed morphological changes of LECs in coculture and assessed the gene expression of possible lymphangiogenic molecules of macrophages and LECs after contact coculture, and of cancer pretreated macrophages, by quantitative RT-PCR. Specimens of metastatic LN of gastric cancer were immunofluorescently stained. We found that tubulogenesis of LECs was observed only in the contact coculture model. OCUM-12 cells promoted macrophage-induced tubulogenesis of LECs. Relative gene expression of MMP and adhesion molecules was significantly upregulated in both capillary-forming LECs and cocultured macrophages. Cancer pretreated macrophages upregulated lymphangiogenic factors including inflammatory cytokines, MMPs, adhesion molecules, and vascular endothelial growth factor-C. Blocking of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and macrophage activation suppressed tubulogenesis of LECs. Immunohistochemistry showed macrophages localized around lymphatic vessels. Our results suggested that interaction between LECs and macrophages may be an important initial step of tumor lymphangiogenesis developing LN metastasis. Understanding of its mechanisms could be useful for future therapeutics of gastric cancer.

  7. Linking tumor-associated macrophages, inflammation, and intestinal tumorigenesis: role of MCP-1

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, Jamie L.; Davis, J. Mark; Steiner, Jennifer L.; Enos, Reilly T.; Jung, Seung H.; Carson, James A.; Pena, Maria M.; Carnevale, Kevin A.; Berger, Franklin G.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages are associated with poor prognosis in certain cancers. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is thought to be the most important chemokine for recruitment of macrophages to the tumor microenvironment. However, its role on tumorigenesis in a genetic mouse model of colon cancer has not been explored. We examined the role of MCP-1 on tumor-associated macrophages, inflammation, and intestinal tumorigenesis. Male ApcMin/+, ApcMin/+/MCP-1−/− or wild-type mice were euthanized at 18 wk of age and intestines were analyzed for polyp burden, apoptosis, proliferation, β-catenin, macrophage number and phenotype, markers for cytotoxic T lymphocytes and regulatory T cells, and inflammatory mediators. MCP-1 deficiency decreased overall polyp number by 20% and specifically large polyp number by 45% (P < 0.05). This was consistent with an increase in apoptotic cells (P < 0.05), but there was no change detected in proliferation or β-catenin. MCP-1 deficiency decreased F4/80-positive cells in both the polyp tissue and surrounding intestinal tissue (P < 0.05) as well as expression of markers associated with M1 (IL-12 and IL-23) and M2 macrophages (IL-13, CD206, TGF-β, and CCL17) (P < 0.05). MCP-1 knockout was also associated with increased cytotoxic T lymphocytes and decreased regulatory T cells (P < 0.05). In addition, MCP-1−/− offset the increased mRNA expression of IL-1β and IL-6 in intestinal tissue and IL-1β and TNF-α in polyp tissue (P < 0.05), and prevented the decrease in SOCS1 expression (P < 0.05). We demonstrate that MCP-1 is an important mediator of tumor growth and immune regulation that may serve as an important biomarker and/or therapeutic target in colon cancer. PMID:23019193

  8. Induction of Apoptosis in Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells and Therapy of Orthotopic Human Pancreatic Carcinoma in Nude Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Kenji; Kim, Sun-Jin; Thaker, Premal; Yazici, Sertac; Nam, Do-Hyun; He, Junqin; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Chiao, Paul J; Sclabas, Guido M; Abbruzzese, James L; Hamilton, Stanley R; Fidler, Isaiah J

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Although gemcitabine has been accepted as the first-line chemotherapeutic reagent for advanced pancreatic cancer, improvement of response rate and survival is not sufficient and patients often develop resistance. We hypothesized that the inhibition of phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) on tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells, combined with gemcitabine, would overcome the resistance to gemcitabine in orthotopic pancreatic tumor animal model. L3.6pl, human pancreatic cancer cells growing in the pancreas, and tumor-associated endothelial cells in microorgan environment highly expressed phosphorylated EGFR, VEGFR, and Akt, which regulates antiapoptotic mechanism. Oral administration of AEE788 (dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor against EGFR and VEGFR) inhibited the phosphorylation of EGFR, VEGFR, and Akt on tumor-associated endothelial cells as well as tumor cells. Although intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of gemcitabine showed limited inhibitory effect on tumor growth, combination with AEE788 and gemcitabine produced nearly 95% inhibition of tumor growth in parallel with a high level of apoptosis on tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells, and decreased microvascular density and proliferation rate. Collectively, these data indicate that dual inhibition of phosphorylation of EGFR and VEGFR, in combination with gemcitabine, produces apoptosis of tumor-associated endothelial cells and significantly suppresses human pancreatic cancer in nude mice. PMID:16026649

  9. Capillary electrophoresis of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Oefner, P J; Chiesa, C

    1994-08-01

    Capillary electrophoresis has emerged as a highly promising technique for the analysis of mono- and oligosaccharides. The approaches developed for overcoming the lack of chromophoric and fluorophoric functions in most carbohydrates involve the use of indirect photometric detection, amperometry, mass spectrometry, and precolumn derivatization with various tags. The merits and drawbacks of the derivatizing agents, including 2-aminopyridine, 4-amino-benzoic acid and its analogues, which for the first time permitted the reproducible determination of aldoses, uronic acids and even ketoses in the low femtomole range by means of readily available UV detection, and other agents such as 8-aminonaphthalene-1,3,6-trisulphonic acid, 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone and 3-(4-carboxybenzoyl)-2-quinoline-carboxaldehyde, are discussed in detail. Means to secure electromigration of the usually neutral carbohydrates are: (i) ionization of hydroxyl groups at high pH; (ii) complexation of vicinal or alternate hydroxyl groups with borate or other charged compounds such as alkaline earth metal ions; (iii) derivatization with a reagent possessing ionizable functions; and (iv) partitioning into a pseudostationary phase such as sodium dodecyl sulphate micelles. Each alternative has its own analytical rewards, and combinations of the above mechanisms allow the two-dimensional and perhaps even three-dimensional mapping of oligosaccharides. Pyridylaminated oligosaccharides, for instance, have been separated both according to size by exploiting differences in the charge-to-mass ratio, with the charge being identical for each oligomer under acidic conditions due to protonation of the imino group incorporated by precolumn derivatization, as well as on the basis of structural differences, as a consequence of differences in the ease of borate complexation of the peripheral monosaccharide residues. It is also shown that the 4-aminobenzonitrile derivatives of mono- and disaccharides can be separated

  10. An impression of coffee carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Arya, Meenakshi; Rao, L Jagan Mohan

    2007-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most popular beverages in the world. It is consumed for its refreshing and stimulating properties. Carbohydrates are the major constituents of coffee beans and serve various functions like binding of aroma, stabilization of foam, formation of sedimentation, and increased viscosity of the extract. The principal low molecular weight carbohydrate is sucrose and no evidence of other simple oligosaccharides has been found. Polysaccharide fraction from green coffee is dominated by arabinogalactan, galactomannan, and cellulose. The polysaccharide content is reduced during roasting due to degradation to low molecular weight carbohydrates (viz., mono and oligosaccharide) and become more extractable. Various methods that can be employed to extract the carbohydrate from roasted coffee are sequential extraction, acid hydroloysis, hot water extraction, enzymatic extraction etc. Carbohydrates from coffee can be quantitatively determined by liquid chromatography, high performance anion exchange chromatography, size exclusion chromatography, and high performance liquid chromatography. Besides improving the organoleptic quality of the coffee beverage, carbohydrates also possess various biological activities such as lowering colon cancer risk. Besides their sheer mass, a variety of evidences testify to the important contribution that the polysaccharide content makes to the character of the final brew. Although a number of chemical and enzymatic methods have been devised to isolate and quantify the carbohydrates of R&G coffee, till date hot water extraction is the only method which can be accepted as a most feasible process and hence, there is wide scope of further research for the efficient and economically viable technology for extraction of carbohydrates from coffee.

  11. Stereochemical Control in Carbohydrate Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchelor, Rhys; Northcote, Peter T.; Harvey, Joanne E.; Dangerfield, Emma M.; Stocker, Bridget L.

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrates, in the form of glycoconjugates, have recently been shown to control a wide range of cellular processes. Accordingly, students interested in the study of organic chemistry and biomedical sciences should be exposed to carbohydrate chemistry. To this end, we have developed a sequence of experiments that leads the student from the…

  12. Stereochemical Control in Carbohydrate Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchelor, Rhys; Northcote, Peter T.; Harvey, Joanne E.; Dangerfield, Emma M.; Stocker, Bridget L.

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrates, in the form of glycoconjugates, have recently been shown to control a wide range of cellular processes. Accordingly, students interested in the study of organic chemistry and biomedical sciences should be exposed to carbohydrate chemistry. To this end, we have developed a sequence of experiments that leads the student from the…

  13. METHODOLOGICAL CHALLENGES IN CARBOHYDRATE ANALYSIS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carbohydrates can provide up to 80% of the dry matter in animal diets, yet their specific evaluation for research and diet formulation is only now becoming a focus in the animal sciences. Partitioning of dietary carbohydrates for nutritional purposes should reflect differences in digestion and ferm...

  14. The new carbohydrate intake recommendations.

    PubMed

    Jeukendrup, Asker

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrate intake during prolonged exercise has been shown to increase endurance capacity and improve performance. Until recently, the advice was to ingest 30-60 g of carbohydrate per hour. The upper limit was based on studies that demonstrated that intakes greater than 60-70 g/h would not result in greater exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates. The lower limit was an estimated guess of the minimum amount of carbohydrate required for ergogenic effects. In addition, the advice was independent of the type, the duration or the intensity of the activity as well as the level of athlete. Since 2004, significant advances in the understanding of the effects of carbohydrate intake during exercise have made it possible to be much more prescriptive and individual with the advice. Studies revealed that oxidation rates can reach much higher values (up to 105 g/h) when multiple transportable carbohydrates are ingested (i.e. glucose:fructose). It has also been observed that carbohydrate ingested during shorter higher intensity exercise (1 h, 80%VO2max) can improve performance, although mechanisms are distinctly different. These findings resulted in new recommendations that are dependent on the duration and intensity of exercise and not only specify the quantity of carbohydrate to be ingested but also the type. Copyright © 2013 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. GROUP-SPECIFIC CARBOHYDRATE OF GROUP C-VARIANT HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCI

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Paulo; Krause, Richard M.

    1963-01-01

    The trypsinized cell walls of Group C hemolytic streptococci are composed of the specific carbohydrate antigen and a mucopeptide matrix. Certain phage resistant strains of Group C streptococci, isolated from organisms which survive exposure to Group C bacteriophage also possess carbohydrate and mucopeptide fractions, but the carbohydrate gives a precipitin reaction with Group A-variant antiserum and not with Group C antiserum. These strains have been termed Group C-variant. The C-variant carbohydrate contains 86 per cent rhamnose and only 2 per cent galactosamine, and is thus chemically and immunologically similar to Group A-variant carbohydrate. The evidence suggests that the antigenic determinants of Groups A-variant and C-variant carbohydrates are rhamnose-rhamnose linkages. These results strongly support the hypothesis that the carbohydrates of Groups A and C streptococci are composed of a similar rhamnose moiety but that the determinant amino sugar terminal to the rhamnose-rhamnose linkages in the case of Group A is N-acetylglucosamine whereas that of Group C is N-acetylgalactosamine. PMID:14112265

  16. Synthesis of carbohydrate-based surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Pemberton, Jeanne E.; Polt, Robin L.; Maier, Raina M.

    2016-11-22

    The present invention provides carbohydrate-based surfactants and methods for producing the same. Methods for producing carbohydrate-based surfactants include using a glycosylation promoter to link a carbohydrate or its derivative to a hydrophobic compound.

  17. Abuse potential of carbohydrates for overweight carbohydrate cravers

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bonnie; Schneider, Kristin; Smith, Malaina; Kendzor, Darla; Appelhans, Bradley; Hedeker, Donald; Pagoto, Sherry

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The long-rejected construct of food addiction is undergoing re-examination. Objectives . To evaluate whether a novel carbohydrate food shows abuse potential for rigorously defined carbohydrate cravers, as evidenced by selective self-administration and mood enhancement during double-blind discrimination testing. Methods Discrete trials choice testing was performed with 61 overweight (BMI m=27.64, SD=2.59) women (ages 18–45; 19.70% African American) whose diet records showed >4 weekly afternoon/evening emotional eating episodes confined to snacks with carbohydrate:protein ≥ 6:1. After being induced into a sad mood, participants were exposed, double-blind and in counterbalanced order, to taste-matched carbohydrate and protein beverages. They were asked to choose and self-administer the drink that made them feel better. Results Women overwhelmingly chose the carbohydrate beverage, even though blinded. Mixed-effects regression modeling, controlling for beverage order, revealed greater liking and greater reduction in dysphoria following the carbohydrate beverage compared to the protein beverage, but no differential effect on vigor. Conclusion For women who crave them, carbohydrates appear to display abuse potential, plausibly contributing to overconsumption and overweight. PMID:18273603

  18. Strengthened tumor antigen immune recognition by inclusion of a recombinant Eimeria antigen in therapeutic cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Dionisia; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Appledorn, Daniel M; Godbehere, Sarah; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The need for novel, effective adjuvants that are capable of eliciting stronger cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses to antigenic targets is well understood in the vaccine development field. Unfortunately, many adjuvants investigated thus far are either too toxic for human application or too weak to induce a substantial response against difficult antigens, such as tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). In spite of this trend, clinical investigations of recombinant Eimeria antigen (rEA) have revealed this protein to be a non-toxic immunogenic agent with the ability to trigger a Th1-predominant response in both murine and human subjects. Our past studies have shown that the injection of a rEA-encoding adenovirus (rAd5-rEA) alongside an HIV antigen-encoding adenovirus greatly improves the adaptive immune response against this pathogen-derived transgene. In this report, we investigated whether rAd5-rEA could promote and/or alter cytotoxic memory responses toward carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a colorectal cancer-related TAA. We found that the addition of rAd5-rEA to an Ad-based CEA vaccine induced a dose-dependent increase in several anti-CEA T and B cell responses. Moreover, inclusion of rAd5-rEA increased the number of CEA-derived antigenic epitopes that elicited significant cell-mediated and IgG-mediated recognition. These enhanced anti-CEA immune responses also translated into superior CEA-targeted cell killing, as evaluated by an in vivo cytotoxic T lymphocyte assay. Overall, these results suggest that co-administration of rAd5-rEA with a tumor antigen vaccine can substantially boost and broaden the TAA-specific adaptive memory response, thereby validating the potential of rAd5-rEA to be a beneficial adjuvant during therapeutic cancer vaccination.

  19. Antigenic characterization of the salmonid pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis.

    PubMed Central

    Kuzyk, M A; Thorton, J C; Kay, W W

    1996-01-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis, the etiological agent of salmonid rickettsial septicemia, was purified from infected immortal chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) embryo cells by a combination of differential and Percoll density gradient centrifugation. Immune sera from rabbits immunized with purified whole cells of P. salmonis reacted with four protein antigens and two carbohydrate antigens with relative molecular sizes of 65, 60, 54, 51, 16, and approximately 11 kDa, respectively. The carbohydrate antigens appear to be mainly core region lipo-oligosaccharide with lesser amounts of lipopolysaccharide. Serum from convalescent rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) reacted with several minor immunoreactive protein antigens between 10 and 70 kDa in size and a carbohydrate antigen with a relative molecular size of approximately 11 kDa. The salmonid immune system did not appear to elicit a strong humoral response against this intracellular pathogen. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunogold transmission electron microscopy, and biotin labeling of intact P. salmonis cells suggest that the immunoreactive antigens identified with rabbit antisera are surface exposed and differ significantly from those identified with salmonid antisera. PMID:8945567

  20. The antigens - Volume VII

    SciTech Connect

    Sela, M. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains four chapters. They are: Ir Genes: Antigen-Specific Genetic Regulation of the Immune Response; Molecular Genetics of Class II (Ia) Antigens; Antigen-Specific T Cell Clones and T Cell Factors; and Infection and Autoimmunity.

  1. MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

  2. Decarbonylation and dehydrogenation of carbohydrates

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, Mark A.; Klaeren, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    Carbohydrates, especially aldose or ketose sugars, including those whose carbonyl group is masked by hemi-acetal or hemi-ketal formation, are decarbonylated by heating the feed carbohydrate together with a transition metal complex in a suitable solvent. Also, primary alcohols, including sugar alditols are simultaneously dehydrogenated and decarbonylated by heating a mixture of rhodium and ruthenium complexes and the alcohol and optionally a hydrogen acceptor in an acceptable solvent. Such defarbonylation and/or dehydrogenation of sugars provides a convenient procedure for the synthesis of certain carbohydrates and may provide a means for the conversion of biomass into useful products.

  3. Monitoring lectin interactions with carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    de Bentzmann, Sophie; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Protein-carbohydrate interactions are often involved in the first step of infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces several proteins that are able to bind specifically to glycan epitopes present on host epithelia. The experimental approaches for studying protein-carbohydrate interaction have been inspired, with some adaptations, from those commonly used for protein-protein or protein-ligand interactions. A range of methods are described herein for detecting lectin activity, screening for monosaccharide or oligosaccharide specificity, determining the affinity of binding together with thermodynamics and kinetics parameters, and producing crystal of lectin-carbohydrate complexes for further structural studies.

  4. Tumor-associated macrophages promote Ezrin phosphorylation-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition in lung adenocarcinoma through FUT4/LeY up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aman; Lu, Chang; Ning, Zhen; Gao, Wei; Xie, Yunpeng; Zhang, Ningning; Liang, Jinxiao; Abbasi, Faisal S; Yan, Qiu; Liu, Jiwei

    2017-04-25

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are key components of tumor microenvironment (TME) during tumorigenesis and progression. However, the role of TAMs in lung adenocarcinoma is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to clarify the mechanism underlying the crosstalk between TAMs and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lung adenocarcinoma. Fucosyltransferase IV (FUT4) and its synthetic cancer sugar antigen Lewis Y (LeY) was aberrantly elevated in various solid tumors, it plays critical role in the invasion and metastasis. Here, we found that in lung adenocarcinoma samples, the density of TAMs correlates with E-cadherin level and LeY level. In vitro assays, M2 macrophages promoted FUT4/LeY expression through the transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1)/Smad2/3 signaling pathway. FUT4/LeY was indispensable in M2 macrophages-mediated cytoskeletal remodeling and EMT. Furthermore, fucosylation of Ezrin mediated by FUT4/LeY can promote the phosphorylation of Ezrin, which was the critical mechanism of M2 macrophages-induced EMT. In vivo assays confirmed that M2 macrophages promoted EMT through the up-regulation of LeY and phosphorylated Ezrin. Together, our results revealed that TAMs promote Ezrin phosphorylation-mediated EMT in lung adenocarcinoma through FUT4/LeY- mediated fucosylation. Targeting this newly identified signaling may offer new possibilities for immunotherapy in lung adenocarcinoma.

  5. Preferential Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8(+) T cells, supported by tumor-associated macrophages, is associated with worse prognosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Pinying; Yue, Rongxi; Tang, Jiahong; Si, Haige; Shen, Liqun; Guo, Changsheng; Zhang, Lixin; Han, Huaizhong; Song, Haihan K; Zhao, Pengfei; Wang, Ning; Song, Zongchang; Guo, Chunliang

    2016-01-01

    While infection with H. pylori is a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, most H. pylori-colonized individuals, even those with the high-risk CagA(+)VacA(+) strain, remain asymptomatic over their lifetime. We hypothesized that the discordant outcomes were due to differences in the host immune responses. Previously, Tim-3-mediated immune modulation was observed in H. pylori-challenged mice. In this study, we compared Tim-3-related responses in CagA(+)VacA(+) H. pylori-infected asymptomatic individuals and H. pylori-associated gastric adenocarcinoma patients. We showed that compared to H. pylori-uninfected individuals, both H. pylori-infected asymptomatic and gastric cancer patients upregulated Tim-3 overall. However, the Tim-3 upregulation was enriched on Th1 cells in asymptomatic patients and on Treg and CD8(+) T cells in gastric cancer patients, with respective differences in T cell subset functions. In gastric cancer patients, high Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8(+) T cells, but not on Th1 cells, was associated with worse prognosis. H. pylori-antigen presentation by tumor-associated macrophages upregulated Tim-3 expression more effectively than by blood monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. The upregulation of Tim-3 in vitro depended on the concentration of H. pylori antigen but not on whether the cells were from asymptomatic or cancer patients. These data suggest that the discrepancy in Tim-3 upregulation in asymptomatic and cancer subjects is induced by cancer but not the other way around. Once gastric cancer is developed, Tim-3 expression is associated with worse prognosis.

  6. Antibody responses to glycolipid-borne carbohydrates require CD4+ T cells but not CD1 or NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Dale; Vaughan, Hilary A; Milland, Julie; Miland, Julie; Dodge, Natalie; Mouhtouris, Effie; Smyth, Mark J; Godfrey, Dale I; Sandrin, Mauro S

    2011-05-01

    Naturally occurring anti-carbohydrate antibodies play a major role in both the innate and adaptive immune responses. To elicit an anti-carbohydrate immune response, glycoproteins can be processed to glycopeptides and presented by the classical antigen-presenting molecules, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I and II. In contrast, much less is known about the mechanism(s) for anti-carbohydrate responses to glycolipids, although it is generally considered that the CD1 family of cell surface proteins presents glycolipids to T cells or natural killer T (NKT) cells. Using model carbohydrate systems (isogloboside 3 and B blood group antigen), we examined the anti-carbohydrate response on glycolipids using both antibody neutralisation and knockout mouse-based experiments. These studies showed that CD4(+) T cells were required to generate antibodies to the carbohydrates expressed on glycolipids, and unexpectedly, these antibody responses were CD1d and NKT cell independent. They also did not require peptide help. These data provide new insight into glycolipid antigen recognition by the immune system and indicate the existence of a previously unrecognised population of glycolipid antigen-specific, CD1-independent, CD4(+) T cells.

  7. Applications of a catch and release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry assay for carbohydrate library screening.

    PubMed

    El-Hawiet, Amr; Shoemaker, Glen K; Daneshfar, Rambod; Kitova, Elena N; Klassen, John S

    2012-01-03

    Applications of a catch and release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay for screening carbohydrate libraries against target proteins are described. Direct ESI-MS measurements were performed on solutions containing a target protein (a single chain antibody, an antigen binding fragment, or a fragment of a bacterial toxin) and a library of carbohydrates containing multiple specific ligands with affinities in the 10(3) to 10(6) M(-1) range. Ligands with moderate affinity (10(4) to 10(6) M(-1)) were successfully detected from mixtures containing >200 carbohydrates (at concentrations as low as 0.25 μM each). Additionally, the absolute affinities were estimated from the abundance of free and ligand-bound protein ions determined from the ESI mass spectrum. Multiple low affinity ligands (~10(3) M(-1)) were successfully detected in mixtures containing >20 carbohydrates (at concentrations of ~10 μM each). However, identification of specific interactions required the use of the reference protein method to correct the mass spectrum for the occurrence of nonspecific carbohydrate-protein binding during the ESI process. The release of the carbohydrate ligands, as ions, was successfully demonstrated using collision-induced dissociation performed on the deprotonated ions of the protein-carbohydrate complexes. The use of ion mobility separation, performed on deprotonated carbohydrate ions following their release from the complex, allowed for the positive identification of isomeric ligands.

  8. SMC1A recruits tumor-associated-fibroblasts (TAFs) and promotes colorectal cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pengyang; Xiao, Nan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Zhanhuai; Zheng, Shuchun; Shan, Siyang; Wang, Jianping; Du, Jinlin; Wang, Jianwei

    2017-01-28

    Tumor-associated-fibroblasts (TAFs) are the most important host cells in the stroma and take part in extracellular matrix construction and cancer colony development. During cancer colonization, seed cells from primary tumor can reconstruct the microenvironment by recruiting circulating cancer cells and TAFs to the metastasis site. Previous studies have established that SMC1A, a subunit of cohesin, is an important trigger signal for liver metastasis in colorectal cancer. We investigated the particular effects as well as the underlying mechanism of SMC1A on TAFs recruitment during liver metastasis of colorectal cancer. Here, We found that: first, the high expression of SMC1A in colorectal cancer cells promotes the invasiveness and the viability of these cells by recruiting circulating TAFs, facilitating early tumor construction and tumorigenesis; second, different expression levels of SMC1A influenced the reformation of fibroblasts, which assisted tumorigenesis, and third, expression of SMC1A stimulated the secretion of the inflammatory mediators of TNF-α and IL-1β, and up-regulated the transcriptional expression of MMP2 and VEGF-β, both of which were involved in the tumor-related gene pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The actin crosslinking protein palladin modulates force generation and mechanosensitivity of tumor associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Azatov, Mikheil; Goicoechea, Silvia M.; Otey, Carol A.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2016-01-01

    Cells organize actin filaments into higher-order structures by regulating the composition, distribution and concentration of actin crosslinkers. Palladin is an actin crosslinker found in the lamellar actin network and stress fibers, which are critical for mechanosensing of the environment. Palladin also serves as a molecular scaffold for α-actinin, another key actin crosslinker. By virtue of its close interactions with actomyosin structures in the cell, palladin may play an important role in cell mechanics. However, the role of palladin in cellular force generation and mechanosensing has not been studied. Here, we investigate the role of palladin in regulating the plasticity of the actin cytoskeleton and cellular force generation in response to alterations in substrate stiffness. Traction force microscopy revealed that tumor-associated fibroblasts generate larger forces on substrates of increased stiffness. Contrary to expectations, knocking down palladin increased the forces generated by cells and inhibited their ability to sense substrate stiffness for very stiff gels. This was accompanied by significant differences in actin organization, adhesion dynamics and altered myosin organization in palladin knock-down cells. Our results suggest that actin crosslinkers such as palladin and myosin motors coordinate for optimal cell function and to prevent aberrant behavior as in cancer metastasis. PMID:27353427

  10. A distinct innate lymphoid cell population regulates tumor-associated T cells.

    PubMed

    Crome, Sarah Q; Nguyen, Linh T; Lopez-Verges, Sandra; Yang, S Y Cindy; Martin, Bernard; Yam, Jennifer Y; Johnson, Dylan J; Nie, Jessica; Pniak, Michael; Yen, Pei Hua; Milea, Anca; Sowamber, Ramlogan; Katz, Sarah Rachel; Bernardini, Marcus Q; Clarke, Blaise A; Shaw, Patricia A; Lang, Philipp A; Berman, Hal K; Pugh, Trevor J; Lanier, Lewis L; Ohashi, Pamela S

    2017-03-01

    Antitumor T cells are subject to multiple mechanisms of negative regulation. Recent findings that innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) regulate adaptive T cell responses led us to examine the regulatory potential of ILCs in the context of cancer. We identified a unique ILC population that inhibits tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from high-grade serous tumors, defined their suppressive capacity in vitro, and performed a comprehensive analysis of their phenotype. Notably, the presence of this CD56(+)CD3(-) population in TIL cultures was associated with reduced T cell numbers, and further functional studies demonstrated that this population suppressed TIL expansion and altered TIL cytokine production. Transcriptome analysis and phenotypic characterization determined that regulatory CD56(+)CD3(-) cells exhibit low cytotoxic activity, produce IL-22, and have an expression profile that overlaps with those of natural killer (NK) cells and other ILCs. NKp46 was highly expressed by these cells, and addition of anti-NKp46 antibodies to TIL cultures abrogated the ability of these regulatory ILCs to suppress T cell expansion. Notably, the presence of these regulatory ILCs in TIL cultures corresponded with a striking reduction in the time to disease recurrence. These studies demonstrate that a previously uncharacterized ILC population regulates the activity and expansion of tumor-associated T cells.

  11. Tumor-associated neutrophils stimulate T cell responses in early-stage human lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy B.; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik S.; Quatromoni, Jon G.; Stephen, Tom Li; Ranganathan, Anjana; Deshpande, Charuhas; Akimova, Tatiana; Vachani, Anil; Litzky, Leslie; Hancock, Wayne W.; Conejo-Garcia, José R.; Feldman, Michael; Albelda, Steven M.; Singhal, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Infiltrating inflammatory cells are highly prevalent within the tumor microenvironment and mediate many processes associated with tumor progression; however, the contribution of specific populations remains unclear. For example, the nature and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in the cancer microenvironment is largely unknown. The goal of this study was to provide a phenotypic and functional characterization of TANs in surgically resected lung cancer patients. We found that TANs constituted 5%–25% of cells isolated from the digested human lung tumors. Compared with blood neutrophils, TANs displayed an activated phenotype (CD62LloCD54hi) with a distinct repertoire of chemokine receptors that included CCR5, CCR7, CXCR3, and CXCR4. TANs produced substantial quantities of the proinflammatory factors MCP-1, IL-8, MIP-1α, and IL-6, as well as the antiinflammatory IL-1R antagonist. Functionally, both TANs and neutrophils isolated from distant nonmalignant lung tissue were able to stimulate T cell proliferation and IFN-γ release. Cross-talk between TANs and activated T cells led to substantial upregulation of CD54, CD86, OX40L, and 4-1BBL costimulatory molecules on the neutrophil surface, which bolstered T cell proliferation in a positive-feedback loop. Together our results demonstrate that in the earliest stages of lung cancer, TANs are not immunosuppressive, but rather stimulate T cell responses. PMID:25384214

  12. Characterization of Truncated Tumor-Associated NADH Oxidase (ttNOX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel J.; Malone, Christine C.; Burk, Melissa; Moore, Blake P.; Achari, Aniruddha; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial, plant and animal cells possess novel surface proteins that exhibit both NADH oxidation (NOX) or hydroquinone and protein disulfide-thiol interchange. These enzymatic activities alternate to yield oscillating patterns wjth period lengths of approximately 24 minutes. The catalytic period of NOX proteins are temperature compensated and gravity responsive. We report the cloning, expression and characterization of truncated tumor-associated NADH oxidase (ttNOX), in which the membrane spanning region has been deleted. The cDNA (originated from HeLa cells) was cloned into pET-34b and pET-14b (Novagen) vectors for E. coli expression. Optimized expression and purification protocols yielded greater than 300mg per liter of culture with greater than 95% purity. Circular dichroism data was collected from a 2.7mg/ml solution in a 0.1mm cuvette with variable scanning using an Olis RSM CD spectrophotometer. The ellipticity values were scanned from 190 to 260nm. The spectra recorded have characteristics for alpha proteins with band maxima at 216nm and a possible shoulder at 212nm at 12OC and 250 C. Protein crystal screens are in progress and, to date, only small crystals have been observed. The regular periodic oscillatory change in the ttNOX protein is indicative of a possible time-keeping functional role. A single protein possessing alternating catalytic activities, with a potential biological clock function, is unprecedented and structural determination is paramount to understanding this role.

  13. TIPE2 regulates tumor-associated macrophages in skin squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an essential role in the immunology, growth, invasion, and metastases of skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation and regulation of TAMs by SCC are not completely understood. Here, in a Transwell co-culture system, we found that SCC cells induced polarization of macrophages to a M2 phenotype, evident by expression of surface markers CD163, CD206, and CD301, as well as reduction of cellular iNOS levels and augmentation of cellular arginase levels. Moreover, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2) was induced in macrophages by co-culturing with SCC cells. Depletion of TIPE2 in macrophages abolished the effects of co-cultured SCC cells on phenotypic modification of macrophages. Furthermore, patients with SCC were divided into two groups based on TIPE2 levels in TAMs at the time of tumor resection. We found that patients with high-TIPE2 TAMs had an overall poor 5-year survival. Together, our data suggest a previously unappreciated role of TIPE2 in the crosstalk between skin SCC and TAMs and highlight TIPE2 as a promising novel target for skin SCC treatment.

  14. Depletion of tumor-associated macrophages slows the growth of chemically induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Jason M; Tennis, Meredith A; Orlicky, David J; Lin, Hao; Ju, Cynthia; Redente, Elizabeth F; Choo, Kevin S; Staab, Taylor A; Bouchard, Ronald J; Merrick, Daniel T; Malkinson, Alvin M; Dwyer-Nield, Lori D

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for lung cancer, and low-dose aspirin intake reduces lung cancer risk. However, the roles that specific inflammatory cells and their products play in lung carcinogenesis have yet to be fully elucidated. In mice, alveolar macrophage numbers increase as lung tumors progress, and pulmonary macrophage programing changes within 2 weeks of carcinogen exposure. To examine how macrophages specifically affect lung tumor progression, they were depleted in mice bearing urethane-induced lung tumors using clodronate-encapsulated liposomes. Alveolar macrophage populations decreased to ≤50% of control levels after 4-6 weeks of liposomal clodronate treatment. Tumor burden decreased by 50% compared to vehicle treated mice, and tumor cell proliferation, as measured by Ki67 staining, was also attenuated. Pulmonary fluid levels of insulin-like growth factor-I, CXCL1, IL-6, and CCL2 diminished with clodronate liposome treatment. Tumor-associated macrophages expressed markers of both M1 and M2 programing in vehicle and clodronate liposome-treated mice. Mice lacking CCR2 (the receptor for macrophage chemotactic factor CCL2) had comparable numbers of alveolar macrophages and showed no difference in tumor growth rates when compared to similarly treated wild-type mice suggesting that while CCL2 may recruit macrophages to lung tumor microenvironments, redundant pathways can compensate when CCL2/CCR2 signaling is inactivated. Depletion of pulmonary macrophages rather than inhibition of their recruitment may be an advantageous strategy for attenuating lung cancer progression.

  15. TGF-β-inducible microRNA-183 silences tumor-associated natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Donatelli, Sarah S; Zhou, Jun-Min; Gilvary, Danielle L; Eksioglu, Erika A; Chen, Xianghong; Cress, W Douglas; Haura, Eric B; Schabath, Matthew B; Coppola, Domenico; Wei, Sheng; Djeu, Julie Y

    2014-03-18

    Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β), enriched in the tumor microenvironment and broadly immunosuppressive, inhibits natural killer (NK) cell function by yet-unknown mechanisms. Here we show that TGF-β-treated human NK cells exhibit reduced tumor cytolysis and abrogated perforin polarization to the immune synapse. This result was accompanied by loss of surface expression of activating killer Ig-like receptor 2DS4 and NKp44, despite intact cytoplasmic stores of these receptors. Instead, TGF-β depleted DNAX activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12), which is critical for surface NK receptor stabilization and downstream signal transduction. Mechanistic analysis revealed that TGF-β induced microRNA (miR)-183 to repress DAP12 transcription/translation. This pathway was confirmed with luciferase reporter constructs bearing the DAP12 3' untranslated region as well as in human NK cells by use of sense and antisense miR-183. Moreover, we documented reduced DAP12 expression in tumor-associated NK cells in lung cancer patients, illustrating this pathway to be consistently perturbed in the human tumor microenvironment.

  16. Tumor Associated Tissue Eosinophilia in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Histo-Chemical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Priya; Patel, Anil; Md, Shylaja; Hallur, Jayadeva; Gujjar, Pavan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Tumor associated tissue eosinophilia (TATE) is believed to play a significant role in biological behavior of the carcinoma. Eosinophils are involved in immune reaction. Various studies have been carried out regarding their role in tumor progression or regulation. In oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), eosinophils are associated with favourable or unfavourable prognosis and hence their role is yet unclear. To compare the tissue eosinophils in OSCC and normal tissue and to correlate the expression of TATE in different grades of OSCC. Method Study comprised 30 cases, 6 normal and 24 histopathologically diagnosed with OSCC. 4 micron thick sections were stained using 1% congo red solution. The sections were examined under high power (×40) and 10 consecutive microscopic fields were studied. The average number of eosinophils were statistically analysed. Results The tabulated results showed that the median value of tissue eosinophils, increased in OSCC compared to normal mucosa. Analysis on different grades of carcinoma showed a higher TATE in Well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma as compared to other grades. Conclusion The higher eosinophil count in OSCC compare to normal tissue might have a role in stromal invasion and infiltration. TATE can be used as an indicator of favourable prognosis in OSCC. PMID:28223881

  17. STAT1 signaling regulates tumor-associated macrophage-mediated T cell deletion.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2005-04-15

    It is well established that tumor progression is associated with the accumulation of myeloid suppressive cells, which in mice include Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells and F4/80+ macrophages. The paradox is that with the exception of terminal stages of the disease or chemotherapy treatment, tumor-bearing mice or cancer patients do not display a profound systemic immune suppression. We therefore raised the question as to whether myeloid cell-mediated T cell suppression is controlled at a local level at the site of the tumor. We have demonstrated that after adoptive transfer to tumor-bearing recipients, Gr-1+ (immature myeloid cells) freshly isolated from spleens of tumor-bearing mice become F4/80+ tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). These TAM, but not F4/80+ macrophages or Gr-1+ cells freshly isolated from spleens of tumor-bearing or naive mice were able to inhibit T cell-mediated immune response in vitro via induction of T cell apoptosis. Arginase and NO were both responsible for the apoptotic mechanism, and were seen only in TAM, but not in freshly isolated Gr1+ cells. Using the analysis of STAT activity in combination with STAT knockout mice, we have determined that STAT1, but not STAT3 or STAT6, was responsible for TAM-suppressive activity.

  18. Mammary Tumor-Associated RNAs Impact Tumor Cell Proliferation, Invasion, and Migration.

    PubMed

    Diermeier, Sarah D; Chang, Kung-Chi; Freier, Susan M; Song, Junyan; El Demerdash, Osama; Krasnitz, Alexander; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Spector, David L

    2016-09-27

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent the largest and most diverse class of non-coding RNAs, comprising almost 16,000 currently annotated transcripts in human and 10,000 in mouse. Here, we investigated the role of lncRNAs in mammary tumors by performing RNA-seq on tumor sections and organoids derived from MMTV-PyMT and MMTV-Neu-NDL mice. We identified several hundred lncRNAs that were overexpressed compared to normal mammary epithelium. Among these potentially oncogenic lncRNAs we prioritized a subset as Mammary Tumor Associated RNAs (MaTARs) and determined their human counterparts, hMaTARs. To functionally validate the role of MaTARs, we performed antisense knockdown and observed reduced cell proliferation, invasion, and/or organoid branching in a cancer-specific context. Assessing the expression of hMaTARs in human breast tumors revealed that 19 hMaTARs are significantly upregulated and many of these correlate with breast cancer subtype and/or hormone receptor status, indicating potential clinical relevance. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Tumor-Associated CSF MicroRNAs for the Prediction and Evaluation of CNS Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a readily reachable body fluid that is reflective of the underlying pathological state of the central nervous system (CNS). Hence it has been targeted for biomarker discovery for a variety of neurological disorders. CSF is also the major route for seeding metastases of CNS malignancies and its analysis could be informative for diagnosis and risk stratification of brain cancers. Recently, modern high-throughput, microRNAs (miRNAs) measuring technology has enabled sensitive detection of distinct miRNAs that are bio-chemicallystable in the CSF and can distinguish between different types of CNS cancers. Owing to the fact that a CSF specimen can be obtained with relative ease, analysis of CSF miRNAs could be a promising contribution to clinical practice. In this review, we examine the current scientific knowledge on tumor associated CSF miRNAs that could guide diagnosis of different brain cancer types, or could be helpful in predicting disease progression and therapy response. Finally, we highlight their potential applications clinically as biomarkers and discuss limitations. PMID:26690130

  20. Biodistribution and in Vivo Activities of Tumor-Associated Macrophage-Targeting Nanoparticles Incorporated with Doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are increasingly considered a viable target for tumor imaging and therapy. Previously, we reported that innovative surface-functionalization of nanoparticles may help target them to TAMs. In this report, using poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles incorporated with doxorubicin (DOX) (DOX-NPs), we studied the effect of surface-modification of the nanoparticles with mannose and/or acid-sensitive sheddable polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the biodistribution of DOX and the uptake of DOX by TAMs in tumor-bearing mice. We demonstrated that surface-modification of the DOX-NPs with both mannose and acid-sensitive sheddable PEG significantly increased the accumulation of DOX in tumors, enhanced the uptake of the DOX by TAMs, but decreased the distribution of DOX in mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS), such as liver. We also confirmed that the acid-sensitive sheddable PEGylated, mannose-modified DOX-nanoparticles (DOX-AS-M-NPs) targeted TAMs because depletion of TAMs in tumor-bearing mice significantly decreased the accumulation of DOX in tumor tissues. Furthermore, in a B16-F10 tumor-bearing mouse model, we showed that the DOX-AS-M-NPs were significantly more effective than free DOX in controlling tumor growth but had only minimum effect on the macrophage population in mouse liver and spleen. The AS-M-NPs are promising in targeting cytotoxic or macrophage-modulating agents into tumors to improve tumor therapy. PMID:25314115

  1. Tumor-associated fibroblasts predominantly come from local and not circulating precursors

    PubMed Central

    Arina, Ainhoa; Idel, Christian; Hyjek, Elizabeth M.; Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Wang, Ying; Bindokas, Vytautas P.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Schreiber, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblasts are common cell types in cancer stroma and lay down collagen required for survival and growth of cancer cells. Although some cancer therapy strategies target tumor fibroblasts, their origin remains controversial. Multiple publications suggest circulating mesenchymal precursors as a source of tumor-associated fibroblasts. However, we show by three independent approaches that tumor fibroblasts derive primarily from local, sessile precursors. First, transplantable tumors developing in a mouse expressing green fluorescent reporter protein (EGFP) under control of the type I collagen (Col-I) promoter (COL-EGFP) had green stroma, whereas we could not find COL-EGFP+ cells in tumors developing in the parabiotic partner lacking the fluorescent reporter. Lack of incorporation of COL-EGFP+ cells from the circulation into tumors was confirmed in parabiotic pairs of COL-EGFP mice and transgenic mice developing autochthonous intestinal adenomas. Second, transplantable tumors developing in chimeric mice reconstituted with bone marrow cells from COL-EGFP mice very rarely showed stromal fibroblasts expressing EGFP. Finally, cancer cells injected under full-thickness COL-EGFP skin grafts transplanted in nonreporter mice developed into tumors containing green stromal cells. Using multicolor in vivo confocal microscopy, we found that Col-I–expressing fibroblasts constituted approximately one-third of the stromal mass and formed a continuous sheet wrapping the tumor vessels. In summary, tumors form their fibroblastic stroma predominantly from precursors present in the local tumor microenvironment, whereas the contribution of bone marrow-derived circulating precursors is rare. PMID:27317748

  2. Huaier extract suppresses breast cancer via regulating tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaming; Qi, Wenwen; Song, Xiaojin; Lv, Shangge; Zhang, Hanwen; Yang, Qifeng

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages in tumor microenvironment are mostly M2-polarized - and have been reported to promote tumorigenesis, which are also defined as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Here, we examined the regulatory effects of Huaier extract on TAMs using RAW264.7 murine macrophage cell line. Our data demonstrated that Huaier extract could inhibit the infiltration of macrophages into tumor microenvironment in a dose-dependent manner. By performing RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and phagocytosis assay, we were able to find that Huaier extract could regulate the polarization of macrophages, with decreased M2-polarization and increased phagocytosis of RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, we identified that Huaier extract could suppress macrophages-induced angiogenesis by using HUVEC migration assay, tube formation and chorioallantoic membrane assay. Additionally, western blotting showed decreased expression of MMP2, MMP9 and VEGF with the use of Huaier extract. Finally, we found that Huaier extract could inhibit M2-macrophages infiltration and angiogenesis through treating 4T1 tumor bearing mice with Huaier extract. Our study revealed a novel mechanism of the anti-tumor effect of Huaier extract which inhibited angiogenesis by targeting TAMs. These findings provided that Huaier was a promising drug for clinical treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26831282

  3. [A case of Krukenberg tumor associated with elevation in blood testosterone].

    PubMed

    Ike, K; Takai, Y; Shinjo, K; Imamura, F; Ueda, N; Namiki, M

    1985-05-01

    One case of Krukenberg tumor associated with elevation in blood testosterone levels was reported. The patient was a 31-year-old woman. She visited the outpatient service of our hospital with the chief complaint of uterine bleeding and infertility. She was diagnosed to have an anovulatory cycle associated with elevation in blood testosterone levels. However, after an examination at our hospital, a tumor of the left ovary was pointed out and she underwent bilateral ovariectomy. Postoperatively, tarry stool was passed, for which she received an examination at the department of internal medicine. Roentgenography of the stomach and examination by a gastric camera revealed undifferentiated carcinoma of Borrmann's type III in the greater curvature of the angular area. This lesion was diagnosed to be Krukenberg's tumor and a gastrectomy was performed. On the other hand, the blood testosterone level which had shown elevation before resection of the ovaries was restored to the normal range after the operation. Various reports have been published concerning the endocrinological activity of this tumor. It remains to be elucidated whether it is due to metastasis of the carcinoma or if it originates from other ovarian parenchyma. However, it has been reported that elevation in endocrinological activity is apt to occur when the tumor originates from the digestive tract.

  4. Ectonucleotidases in Tumor Cells and Tumor-Associated Immune Cells: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Bergamin, Letícia Scussel; Braganhol, Elizandra; Zanin, Rafael Fernandes; Edelweiss, Maria Isabel Albano; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence points out that genetic alteration does not guarantee the development of a tumor and indicates that complex interactions of tumor cells with the microenvironment are fundamental to tumorigenesis. Among the pathological alterations that give tumor cells invasive potential, disruption of inflammatory response and the purinergic signaling are emerging as an important component of cancer progression. Nucleotide/nucleoside receptor-mediated cell communication is orchestrated by ectonucleotidases, which efficiently hydrolyze ATP, ADP, and AMP to adenosine. ATP can act as danger signaling whereas adenosine, acts as a negative feedback mechanism to limit inflammation. Many tumors exhibit alterations in ATP-metabolizing enzymes, which may contribute to the pathological events observed in solid cancer. In this paper, the main changes occurring in the expression and activity of ectonucleotidases in tumor cells as well as in tumor-associated immune cells are discussed. Furthermore, we focus on the understanding of the purinergic signaling primarily as exemplified by research done by the group on gliomas. PMID:23118517

  5. The Metastasis-Promoting Roles of Tumor-Associated Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heath A.; Kang, Yibin

    2013-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is driven not only by the accumulation of intrinsic alterations in malignant cells, but also by the interactions of cancer cells with various stromal cell components of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, inflammation and infiltration of the tumor tissue by host immune cells, such as tumor-associated macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and regulatory T cells have been shown to support tumor growth in addition to invasion and metastasis. Each step of tumor development, from initiation through metastatic spread, is promoted by communication between tumor and immune cells via the secretion of cytokines, growth factors and proteases that remodel the tumor microenvironment. Invasion and metastasis requires neovascularization, breakdown of the basement membrane, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix for tumor cell invasion and extravasation into the blood and lymphatic vessels. The subsequent dissemination of tumor cells to distant organ sites necessitates a treacherous journey through the vasculature, which is fostered by close association with platelets and macrophages. Additionally, the establishment of the pre-metastatic niche and specific metastasis organ tropism is fostered by neutrophils and bone marrow-derived hematopoietic immune progenitor cells and other inflammatory cytokines derived from tumor and immune cells, which alter the local environment of the tissue to promote adhesion of circulating tumor cells. This review focuses on the interactions between tumor cells and immune cells recruited to the tumor microenvironment, and examines the factors allowing these cells to promote each stage of metastasis. PMID:23515621

  6. Malignant tumors associated with ovarian mature teratoma: A single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Trabzonlu, Levent; Durmaz, Guray; Vural, Cigdem; Muezzinoglu, Bahar; Corakci, Aydin

    2017-05-01

    The aims of this study are to present demographical features of cases diagnosed with malignant tumor associated with ovarian mature teratoma and to analyze histopathological features and clinical follow up of these tumors. Single-institution retrospective charts were reviewed to identify all cases of ovarian mature teratoma diagnosed from 1998 to 2015. Clinicopathological parameters that were analyzed include age, tumor size, tumor stage, histological type, laterality, IOC diagnosis and whether or not patient has received adjuvant chemotherapy. A total of 218 ovarian mature teratoma cases were identified during the study period. Of the 218 ovarian mature teratoma specimens, eight (3.7%) exhibited malignant tumors. The average age for cases of malignancy associated with ovarian mature teratoma was 44.6 years. The average size of tumors was 10.36cm. On final pathology, histological types of tumors were as follows: two cases each of squamous cell carcinoma and papillary thyroid carcinoma; one case each of mucinous adenocarcinoma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, sebaceous carcinoma and oligodendroglioma. Only one patient with Stage IIB tumor died of disease. One patient was alive with metastatic disease two months after initial diagnosis. Mean and median follow-up times were 64.1 and 49 months, respectively. An ovarian mass that has characteristics of a teratoma in a postmenopausal patient should alert for malignancy -regardless of tumor size. IOC is a valuable tool for the detection of malignancy and should be requested to determine the modality of surgical approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Update on a tumor-associated NADH oxidase in gastric cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hsiao-Ling; Lee, Yi-Hui; Yuan, Tein-Ming; Chen, Shi-Wen; Chueh, Pin-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common human malignancies, and its prevalence has been shown to be well-correlated with cancer-related deaths worldwide. Regrettably, the poor prognosis of this disease is mainly due to its late diagnosis at advanced stages after the cancer has already metastasized. Recent research has emphasized the identification of cancer biomarkers in the hope of diagnosing cancer early and designing targeted therapies to reverse cancer progression. One member of a family of growth-related nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH or hydroquinone) oxidases is tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX; ENOX2). Unlike its counterpart CNOX (ENOX1), identified in normal rat liver plasma membranes and shown to be stimulated by growth factors and hormones, tNOX activity purified from rat hepatoma cells is constitutively active. Its activity is detectable in the sera of cancer patients but not in those of healthy volunteers, suggesting its clinical relevance. Interestingly, tNOX expression was shown to be present in an array of cancer cell lines. More importantly, inhibition of tNOX was well correlated with reduced cancer cell growth and induction of apoptosis. RNA interference targeting tNOX expression in cancer cells effectively restored non-cancerous phenotypes, further supporting the vital role of tNOX in cancer cells. Here, we review the regulatory role of tNOX in gastric cancer cell growth. PMID:26973386

  8. Inflammation and Cancer: Extra- and Intracellular Determinants of Tumor-Associated Macrophages as Tumor Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Vizler, Csaba; Kitajka, Klara; Puskas, Laszlo G.

    2017-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer-related inflammation is the recruitment of monocyte-macrophage lineage cells to the tumor microenvironment. These tumor infiltrating myeloid cells are educated by the tumor milieu, rich in cancer cells and stroma components, to exert functions such as promotion of tumor growth, immunosuppression, angiogenesis, and cancer cell dissemination. Our review highlights the ontogenetic diversity of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and describes their main phenotypic markers. We cover fundamental molecular players in the tumor microenvironment including extra- (CCL2, CSF-1, CXCL12, IL-4, IL-13, semaphorins, WNT5A, and WNT7B) and intracellular signals. We discuss how these factors converge on intracellular determinants (STAT3, STAT6, STAT1, NF-κB, RORC1, and HIF-1α) of cell functions and drive the recruitment and polarization of TAMs. Since microRNAs (miRNAs) modulate macrophage polarization key miRNAs (miR-146a, miR-155, miR-125a, miR-511, and miR-223) are also discussed in the context of the inflammatory myeloid tumor compartment. Accumulating evidence suggests that high TAM infiltration correlates with disease progression and overall poor survival of cancer patients. Identification of molecular targets to develop new therapeutic interventions targeting these harmful tumor infiltrating myeloid cells is emerging nowadays. PMID:28197019

  9. Tumor-Associated Macrophages as Major Players in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chanmee, Theerawut; Ontong, Pawared; Konno, Kenjiro; Itano, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    During tumor progression, circulating monocytes and macrophages are actively recruited into tumors where they alter the tumor microenvironment to accelerate tumor progression. Macrophages shift their functional phenotypes in response to various microenvironmental signals generated from tumor and stromal cells. Based on their function, macrophages are divided broadly into two categories: classical M1 and alternative M2 macrophages. The M1 macrophage is involved in the inflammatory response, pathogen clearance, and antitumor immunity. In contrast, the M2 macrophage influences an anti-inflammatory response, wound healing, and pro-tumorigenic properties. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) closely resemble the M2-polarized macrophages and are critical modulators of the tumor microenvironment. Clinicopathological studies have suggested that TAM accumulation in tumors correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Consistent with that evidence, experimental and animal studies have supported the notion that TAMs can provide a favorable microenvironment to promote tumor development and progression. In this review article, we present an overview of mechanisms responsible for TAM recruitment and highlight the roles of TAMs in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, immunosuppression, and chemotherapeutic resistance. Finally, we discuss TAM-targeting therapy as a promising novel strategy for an indirect cancer therapy. PMID:25125485

  10. Macrophage Polarization: Anti-cancer Strategies to Target Tumor-associated Macrophage in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Muhammad; Zhang, Jieqiong; Liang, Guikai; Ding, Ling; He, Qiaojun; Yang, Bo

    2017-01-20

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the most abundant inflammatory cells and orchestrate different stages of breast cancer development. TAMs participate in the tumor angiogenesis, matrix remodeling, invasion, immunosuppression, metastasis, and chemoresistance in breast cancer. Several clinical studies indicate the association between the high influx of TAMs in tumor with poor prognosis in hepatocellular, ovarian, cervical, and breast cancer. Previously developed hypotheses have proposed that TAMs participate in antitumor responses of the body, while recently many clinical and experimental studies have revealed that TAMs in tumor microenvironment predominantly resemble with M2-like polarized macrophages and produce a high amount of anti-inflammatory factors which are directly responsible for the development of tumor. Various studies have shown that TAMs in tumor either enhance or antagonize the anti-tumor efficacy of cytotoxic agents, antibodies-targeting cancer cells, and therapeutic agents depending on the nature of treatment. Thereby, multiple roles of TAMs suggests that it is very important to develop novel therapeutic strategies to target TAMs in breast tumor. In this review, we have discussed the functional role of TAMs in breast cancer and summarized available recent advances potential therapeutic strategies that effectively target to TAMs cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition by tumor-associated macrophages in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia; Yao, Hongmei; Song, Ge; Liao, Xia; Xian, Yao; Li, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    It should be urgently better understood of the mechanism that contributes cancer aggressiveness. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a fundamental role in tumor progression and metastasis formation by invasion, resistance to cell death and senescence, resistance to chemotherapy and immunotherapy, immune surveillance, immunosuppression and inflammation, confers stem cell properties. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are key orchestrators and a set of macrophages in tumor microenvironment. They are major players in the connection between inflammation and cancer. TAMs could promote proliferation, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, stimulate tumor angiogenesis, and inhibit anti-tumor immune response mediated by T cell followed by promoting tumor progression. Recently, studies showed that TAMs played critical role in the regulation of EMT in cancer, although the underlying mechanism of TAMs-mediated acquisition of EMT has been largely unclear. This review will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the role of TAMs in the regulation of EMT during tumorigenesis and summarize the recent ongoing experimental and pre-clinical TAMs targeted studies. PMID:26692918

  12. Characterization of Truncated Tumor-Associated NADH Oxidase (ttNOX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel J.; Malone, Christine C.; Burk, Melissa; Moore, Blake P.; Achari, Aniruddha; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial, plant and animal cells possess novel surface proteins that exhibit both NADH oxidation (NOX) or hydroquinone and protein disulfide-thiol interchange. These enzymatic activities alternate to yield oscillating patterns wjth period lengths of approximately 24 minutes. The catalytic period of NOX proteins are temperature compensated and gravity responsive. We report the cloning, expression and characterization of truncated tumor-associated NADH oxidase (ttNOX), in which the membrane spanning region has been deleted. The cDNA (originated from HeLa cells) was cloned into pET-34b and pET-14b (Novagen) vectors for E. coli expression. Optimized expression and purification protocols yielded greater than 300mg per liter of culture with greater than 95% purity. Circular dichroism data was collected from a 2.7mg/ml solution in a 0.1mm cuvette with variable scanning using an Olis RSM CD spectrophotometer. The ellipticity values were scanned from 190 to 260nm. The spectra recorded have characteristics for alpha proteins with band maxima at 216nm and a possible shoulder at 212nm at 12OC and 250 C. Protein crystal screens are in progress and, to date, only small crystals have been observed. The regular periodic oscillatory change in the ttNOX protein is indicative of a possible time-keeping functional role. A single protein possessing alternating catalytic activities, with a potential biological clock function, is unprecedented and structural determination is paramount to understanding this role.

  13. Isatin-pyrazole benzenesulfonamide hybrids potently inhibit tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase isoforms IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hany S; Abou-Seri, Sahar M; Tanc, Muhammet; Elaasser, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-10-20

    New series of benzenesulfonamide derivatives incorporating pyrazole and isatin moieties were prepared using celecoxib as lead molecule. Biological evaluation of the target compounds was performed against the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) and more precisely against the human isoforms hCA I, II (cytosolic), IX and XII (transmembrane, tumor-associated enzymes). Most of the tested compounds efficiently inhibited hCA I, II and IX, with KIs of 2.5-102 nM, being more effective than the reference drug acetazolamide. Compounds 11e, 11f, 16e and 16f were found to inhibit hCA XII with Ki of 3.7, 6.5, 5.4 and 7.2 nM, respectively. Compounds 11e and 16e, with 5-NO2 substitution on the isatin ring, were found to be selective inhibitors of hCA IX and hCA XII. Docking studies revealed that the NO2 group of both compounds participate in interactions with Asp132 within the hCA IX active site, and with residues Lys67 and Asp130 in hCA XII, respectively.

  14. Tumor-associated macrophages drive spheroid formation during early transcoelomic metastasis of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Mingzhu; Li, Xia; Tan, Shu; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Bellone, Stefania; Xu, Xiaocao; Zhang, Haifeng; Santin, Alessandro D.; Lou, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) can influence ovarian cancer growth, migration, and metastasis, but the detailed mechanisms underlying ovarian cancer metastasis remain unclear. Here, we have shown a strong correlation between TAM-associated spheroids and the clinical pathology of ovarian cancer. Further, we have determined that TAMs promote spheroid formation and tumor growth at early stages of transcoelomic metastasis in an established mouse model for epithelial ovarian cancer. M2 macrophage–like TAMs were localized in the center of spheroids and secreted EGF, which upregulated αMβ2 integrin on TAMs and ICAM-1 on tumor cells to promote association between tumor cells and TAM. Moreover, EGF secreted by TAMs activated EGFR on tumor cells, which in turn upregulated VEGF/VEGFR signaling in surrounding tumor cells to support tumor cell proliferation and migration. Pharmacological blockade of EGFR or antibody neutralization of ICAM-1 in TAMs blunted spheroid formation and ovarian cancer progression in mouse models. These findings suggest that EGF secreted from TAMs plays a critical role in promoting early transcoelomic metastasis of ovarian cancer. As transcoelomic metastasis is also associated with many other cancers, such as pancreatic and colon cancers, our findings uncover a mechanism for TAM-mediated spheroid formation and provide a potential target for the treatment of ovarian cancer and other transcoelomic metastatic cancers. PMID:27721235

  15. Tumor-associated gastroparesis with esophageal carcinoma. Use of intravenous metoclopramide during radionuclide gastric emptying studies to predict clinical response

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, A.I.; Ziessman, H.A.; Fleischer, D.E.

    1989-07-01

    This case report describes a patient with esophageal carcinoma and tumor-associated gastroparesis. The radionuclide gastric emptying study diagnosed very delayed liquid and solid gastric emptying. Metoclopramide was administered intravenously during the study and was able to predict a good response to oral therapy.

  16. Computer aided selection of candidate vaccine antigens

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Immunoinformatics is an emergent branch of informatics science that long ago pullulated from the tree of knowledge that is bioinformatics. It is a discipline which applies informatic techniques to problems of the immune system. To a great extent, immunoinformatics is typified by epitope prediction methods. It has found disappointingly limited use in the design and discovery of new vaccines, which is an area where proper computational support is generally lacking. Most extant vaccines are not based around isolated epitopes but rather correspond to chemically-treated or attenuated whole pathogens or correspond to individual proteins extract from whole pathogens or correspond to complex carbohydrate. In this chapter we attempt to review what progress there has been in an as-yet-underexplored area of immunoinformatics: the computational discovery of whole protein antigens. The effective development of antigen prediction methods would significantly reduce the laboratory resource required to identify pathogenic proteins as candidate subunit vaccines. We begin our review by placing antigen prediction firmly into context, exploring the role of reverse vaccinology in the design and discovery of vaccines. We also highlight several competing yet ultimately complementary methodological approaches: sub-cellular location prediction, identifying antigens using sequence similarity, and the use of sophisticated statistical approaches for predicting the probability of antigen characteristics. We end by exploring how a systems immunomics approach to the prediction of immunogenicity would prove helpful in the prediction of antigens. PMID:21067543

  17. Carbohydrates and Diabetes (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... two main forms of carbohydrates are sugars and starches. Types of sugars include fructose (sugar found in ... sugar found in milk and yogurt). Types of starches include vegetables like potatoes, corn, and peas; grains, ...

  18. Carbohydrate composition of candy bars.

    PubMed

    Hurst, W J; Martin, R A; Zoumas, B L

    1983-07-01

    The data in Table 1 show a wide variation among products and when added to other available data provide a more complete picture of the carbohydrate composition of candy bars. Interestingly, the sucrose content of the bars in Table 1 ranges from a low of 19.12% to a high of 56.06%. Extensive use of corn syrup is clearly evident in ingrediated bar types (categories e and f). Although the higher saccharides of corn syrup were not quantitated, we think that this article adds to the knowledge of the carbohydrate composition of the best-selling candy bars, since previously only a carbohydrate by difference value was available. This report provides the health professional with an update on carbohydrate composition of a large number of candy bars.

  19. Protecting Groups in Carbohydrate Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétursson, Sigthór

    1997-11-01

    The most important protecting groups in carbohydrate chemistry are reviewed. The paper is aimed at those beginning to specialize in synthetic carbohydrate chemistry and at teachers with other specialties who wish to go beyond the content of general organic chemistry textbooks. Acetals and ketals are of fundamental importance in carbohydrate chemistry and their chemistry is presented first. In contrast to the base stability of the acetals, are the base labile esters. The complimentary use of these two protecting methods is illustrated. Methyl and benzyl ethers have a long history both in synthetic carbohydrate chemistry and in the structural studies of polysaccharides. In synthetic work benzyl ethers are the most useful. Silyl ethers are also well established in carbohydrate chemistry and the use of these protecting methods is illustrated. Phase transfer reactions and the use of cyclic stannylene derivatives to enhance the regioselectivity in the introduction of protecting groups, especially ethers, is discussed as well as some results optained with stannous chloride catalyzed reactions of diaryldiphenylmethanes with vicinal diols which gave unexpected results. The paper ends with illustrative examples of the use of protecting groups in modern synthetic carbohydrate chemistry, namely the synthesis of nitrogen containing compounds belonging to an important class of polyhydroxylated cyclic amines. Compounds of this class are potent inhibitors of glycosidase enzymes.

  20. Carbohydrate digestibility and metabolic effects.

    PubMed

    Wong, Julia M W; Jenkins, David J A

    2007-11-01

    There is a history of interest in the metabolic effects of alterations in small intestinal digestion and colonic fermentation of carbohydrate. It is believed that the rate of digestion of carbohydrate determines the place and form in which carbohydrate is absorbed. Slowly absorbed or lente carbohydrate sources may reduce postprandial glucose surges and the need for insulin with important implications for lowering coronary heart disease risk and reducing diabetes incidence. Carbohydrates that are not digested in the small intestine will enter the colon, and those that are fermentable will be salvaged as short-chain fatty acids in the colon and at the same time may stimulate colonic microflora, such as bifidobacteria. This process may have metabolic effects in the gut and throughout the host, possibly related to short-chain fatty acid products, although these effects are less well documented. One important aspect of colonic fermentation is the stimulation of certain populations of the colonic microflora, which may assist in the biotransformation of bioactive food components including the cleaving of plant phenolics from their glycone to produce the more rapidly absorbed aglycone. However, human studies have been limited. Therefore, further studies are required to explore these important aspects of metabolism related to the rate of carbohydrate absorption and fermentation and their implications in health and disease.

  1. Carbohydrate moieties as vaccine candidates: targeting the sweet spot in the immune response.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Christopher E; Cobb, Brian A; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate; Paulson, James C; Schreiber, John R

    2012-06-22

    Advances in the use of carbohydrates as vaccine candidates for the prevention of infectious and malignant diseases was the topic for a meeting in Rockville, MD, sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases involving a diverse group of scientists. Participants included research scientists and clinicians from academia and industry, and representatives from the National Institutes of Health and US Food and Drug Administration. This workshop was the third in a series of meetings designed to address issues relating to the immune response to carbohydrate antigens and how this information is used in the development of vaccines. Participants also identified roadblocks, research opportunities and resource needs. The meeting was organized into sessions that focused on recent advances in the immune response to microbial and cancer carbohydrate antigens, glycomics, novel vaccine approaches, novel adjuvants and delivery systems.

  2. Development of IgG responses to mycobacterial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Pilkington, C; Costello, A M; Rook, G A; Stanford, J L

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies link mycobacterial and human heat shock protein antigens with autoimmune diseases. Little is known about the development of antibody responses to these antigens in children. IgG responses to mycobacterial antigens were studied in children living in the UK (an environment low in mycobacteria) who had not received BCG vaccination. Age curves of IgG response to sonicates from different species of mycobacteria were similar suggesting that the greater part of the developing IgG response is to the common antigens shared by all mycobacteria. The major part of the IgG response was to carbohydrate antigens: lipoarabinomannan is a mycobacterial cell wall carbohydrate and was confirmed as a major immunodominant antigen. Infants showed a marked early response to the mycobacterial 65 kilodalton (kDa) and 70 kDa heat shock proteins, but not to the human 65 kDa heat shock protein. The early IgG response to heat shock proteins may reflect cross reactivity to proteins released by a wide variety of bacteria (possibly from breakdown in the gut) or recognition of other immunodominant antigens with high levels of cross reactivity to self. PMID:8285775

  3. Extraction of Cell-Wall Polysaccharide Antigen from Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Hutton D.

    1965-01-01

    Slade, Hutton D. (Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, Ill., and Max-Planck Institut für Immunbiologie, Freiburg, Germany). Extraction of cell-wall polysaccharide antigen from streptococci. J. Bacteriol. 90:667–672. 1965.—The carbohydrate grouping antigens in the cell walls of streptococci belonging to groups A, E, G, L, and T were extracted with 5% trichloroacetic acid at 90 C. The antigens were removed also from dry whole cells by extraction with trichloroacetic acid followed by treatment with phenol-water. Details of the methods are presented. The antigens obtained by use of either of these procedures were suitable for studies on immunological specificity and chemical structure. Quantitative enzymatic and chemical analyses of two group E antigens and one group T preparation showed the presence of l-rhamnose (22 to 44%), d-glucose (7 to 22%), d-galactose (T antigen only, 26%), glucosamine (2 to 16%), and galactosamine (T antigen only, 3%). In addition, analyses of A and G antigen preparations are presented. The protein and phosphate content of the A and E antigens were about 1% each. Quantitative precipitin curves of these antigens are presented. PMID:16562065

  4. HPMA-Copolymer Nanocarrier Targets Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Primary and Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zimel, Melissa N; Horowitz, Chloe B; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Christ, Alexander B; Wei, Xin; Wu, Jianbo; Wojnarowicz, Paulina M; Wang, Dong; Goldring, Steven R; Purdue, P Edward; Healey, John H

    2017-08-22

    Polymeric nanocarriers such as N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers deliver drugs to solid tumors and avoid the systemic toxicity of conventional chemotherapy. Because HPMA copolymers can target sites of inflammation and accumulate within innate immune cells, we hypothesized that HPMA copolymers could target tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in both primary and metastatic tumor microenvironments. We verified this hypothesis, first in preliminary experiments with isolated bone marrow macrophage cultures in vitro, and subsequently in a spontaneously metastatic murine breast cancer model generated from a well-established, cytogenetically characterized 4T1 breast cancer cell line. Using our standardized experimental conditions, we detected primary orthotopic tumor growth at 7 days and metastatic tumors at 28 days after orthotopic transplantation of 4T1 cells into the mammary fat pad. We investigated the uptake of HPMA copolymer conjugated with Alexa Fluor 647 and folic acid (P-Alexa647-FA) and HPMA copolymer conjugated with IRDye 800CW (P-IRDye), following their retroorbital injection into the primary and metastatic tumor-bearing mice. A significant uptake of P-IRDye was observed at all primary and metastatic tumor sites in these mice, and the P-Alexa647-FA signal was found specifically within CD11b+TAMs co-stained with pan macrophage marker CD68. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, a novel capacity of a P-Alexa647-FA conjugate to colocalize to CD11b+CD68+ TAMs in both primary and metastatic breast tumors. This underscores the potential of this HPMA nanocarrier to deliver functional therapeutics that specifically target tumor-promoting macrophage activation and/or polarization during tumor development. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Metformin Reduces Desmoplasia in Pancreatic Cancer by Reprogramming Stellate Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Shan M.; Vardam-Kaur, Trupti; Liu, Hao; Hato, Tai; Babykutty, Suboj; Chen, Ivy; Deshpande, Vikram; Jain, Rakesh K.; Fukumura, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly desmoplastic tumor with a dismal prognosis for most patients. Fibrosis and inflammation are hallmarks of tumor desmoplasia. We have previously demonstrated that preventing the activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and alleviating desmoplasia are beneficial strategies in treating PDAC. Metformin is a widely used glucose-lowering drug. It is also frequently prescribed to diabetic pancreatic cancer patients and has been shown to associate with a better outcome. However, the underlying mechanisms of this benefit remain unclear. Metformin has been found to modulate the activity of stellate cells in other disease settings. In this study, we examine the effect of metformin on PSC activity, fibrosis and inflammation in PDACs. Methods/Results In overweight, diabetic PDAC patients and pre-clinical mouse models, treatment with metformin reduced levels of tumor extracellular matrix (ECM) components, in particular hyaluronan (HA). In vitro, we found that metformin reduced TGF-ß signaling and the production of HA and collagen-I in cultured PSCs. Furthermore, we found that metformin alleviates tumor inflammation by reducing the expression of inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β as well as infiltration and M2 polarization of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in vitro and in vivo. These effects on macrophages in vitro appear to be associated with a modulation of the AMPK/STAT3 pathway by metformin. Finally, we found in our preclinical models that the alleviation of desmoplasia by metformin was associated with a reduction in ECM remodeling, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and ultimately systemic metastasis. Conclusion Metformin alleviates the fibro-inflammatory microenvironment in obese/diabetic individuals with pancreatic cancer by reprogramming PSCs and TAMs, which correlates with reduced disease progression. Metformin should be tested/explored as part of the treatment strategy in overweight

  6. Characterization of mitosis-specific phosphorylation of tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyung Uk; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Bae, Chang-Dae; Park, Joobae

    2009-11-30

    Tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein (TMAP), also known as cytoskeleton associated protein 2 (CKAP2), has been recently shown to be involved in the assembly and maintenance of mitotic spindle and also plays an essential role in maintaining the fidelity of chromosome segregation during mitosis. We have previously reported that TMAP is phosphorylated at multiple residues specifically during mitosis, and characterized the mechanism and functional importance of phosphorylation at one of the mitosis-specific phosphorylation residues (i.e., Thr-622). However, the phosphorylation events at the remaining mitotic phosphorylation sites of TMAP have not been fully characterized in detail. Here, we report on generation and characterization of phosphorylated Thr-578- and phosphorylated Thr-596-specific antibodies. Using the antibodies, we show that phosphorylation of TMAP at Thr-578 and Thr-596 indeed occurs specifically during mitosis. Immunofluorescent staining using the antibodies shows that these residues become phosphorylated starting at prophase and then become rapidly dephosphorylated soon after initiation of anaphase. Subtle differences in the kinetics of phosphorylation between Thr-578 and Thr-596 imply that they may be under different mechanisms of phosphorylation during mitosis. Unlike the phosphorylation-deficient mutant form for Thr-622, the mutant in which both Thr-578 and Thr-596 had been mutated to alanines did not induce significant delay in progression of mitosis. These results show that the majority of mitosis-specific phosphorylation of TMAP is limited to pre-anaphase stages and suggest that the multiple phosphorylation may not act in concert but serve diverse functions.

  7. Characterization of mitosis-specific phosphorylation of tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kyung Uk; Kim, Hyun-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein (TMAP), also known as cytoskeleton associated protein 2 (CKAP2), has been recently shown to be involved in the assembly and maintenance of mitotic spindle and also plays an essential role in maintaining the fidelity of chromosome segregation during mitosis. We have previously reported that TMAP is phosphorylated at multiple residues specifically during mitosis, and characterized the mechanism and functional importance of phosphorylation at one of the mitosis-specific phosphorylation residues (i.e., Thr-622). However, the phosphorylation events at the remaining mitotic phosphorylation sites of TMAP have not been fully characterized in detail. Here, we report on generation and characterization of phosphorylated Thr-578- and phosphorylated Thr-596-specific antibodies. Using the antibodies, we show that phosphorylation of TMAP at Thr-578 and Thr-596 indeed occurs specifically during mitosis. Immunofluorescent staining using the antibodies shows that these residues become phosphorylated starting at prophase and then become rapidly dephosphorylated soon after initiation of anaphase. Subtle differences in the kinetics of phosphorylation between Thr-578 and Thr-596 imply that they may be under different mechanisms of phosphorylation during mitosis. Unlike the phosphorylation-deficient mutant form for Thr-622, the mutant in which both Thr-578 and Thr-596 had been mutated to alanines did not induce significant delay in progression of mitosis. These results show that the majority of mitosis-specific phosphorylation of TMAP is limited to pre-anaphase stages and suggest that the multiple phosphorylation may not act in concert but serve diverse functions. PMID:19641375

  8. MR Imaging of Tumor Associated Macrophages with Clinically-Applicable Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E.; Golovko, Daniel; Ruffell, Brian; DeNardo, David G.; Castaneda, Rosalinda; Ansari, Celina; Rao, Jianghong; Tikhomirov, Grigory A.; Wendland, Mike; Corot, Claire; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The presence of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in breast cancer correlates strongly with poor outcome. The purpose of this study was to develop a clinically applicable, non-invasive diagnostic assay for selective targeting and visualization of TAMs in breast cancer, based on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinically applicable iron oxide nanoparticles. Experimental Design F4/80-negative mammary carcinoma cells and F4/80-positive TAMs were incubated with iron oxide nanoparticles and were compared regarding MR signal changes and iron uptake. MMTV-PyMT transgenic mice harboring mammary carcinomas underwent nanoparticle-enhanced MR up to 1 hour (h) and at 24 h post injection (p.i.). The tumor enhancement on MR images was correlated with the presence and location of TAMs and nanoparticles on confocal microscopy. Results In vitro studies revealed that iron oxide nanoparticles are preferentially phagocytosed by TAMs, but not by malignant tumor cells. In vivo, all tumors demonstrated an initial contrast agent perfusion on immediate postcontrast MR images with gradual transendothelial leakage into the tumor interstitium. At 24 h p.i., all tumors demonstrated a persistent signal decline on MR scans. TAM-depletion via αCSF1 mAb lead to significant inhibition of tumor nanoparticle enhancement. Detection of iron using DAB-enhanced Prussian Blue staining, and immunodetection of CD68 localized iron oxide nanoparticles to TAMs, indicating that the MR signal effects on delayed MR images were largely due to TAM-mediated uptake of contrast agent. Conclusion These data indicate that tumor-enhancement with clinically applicable iron oxide nanoparticles may serve as a new biomarker for long-term prognosis, related treatment decisions and the evaluation of new immune-targeted therapies. PMID:21791632

  9. CCL18 from tumor-associated macrophages promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ling; Chen, Yong-Song; Yao, Yan-Dan; Chen, Jing-Qi; Chen, Jia-Ning; Huang, Song-Yin; Zeng, Yun-Jie; Yao, He-Rui; Zeng, Si-Hai; Fu, Yong-Shui; Song, Er-Wei

    2015-10-27

    The infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is associated with extensive angiogenesis, which contributes to a poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, anti-angiogenic therapy with VEGF-specific monotherapy has been unsuccessful in treating breast cancer, and the molecular mechanisms associated with chemoresistance remain unclear. Here, we investigated whether CCL18, a chemokine produced by TAMs, can stimulate angiogenesis in breast cancer, as well as the underlying mechanisms. Double immunohistochemical staining for CCL18 and CD34/CD31/vWF was performed in 80 breast cancer samples to study the correlation between CCL18+ TAMs and microvascular density (MVD). Cocultures of TAMs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to model the inflammatory microenvironment, and CCL18-induced angiogenesis was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that CCL18+ TAM infiltration positively associated with MVD in breast cancer samples, which was correlated with tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. We confirmed, both in vitro and in vivo, that CCL18 and VEGF synergistically promoted endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. Conversely, blocking CCL18 or VEGF with neutralizing antibodies synergistically inhibited the promigratory effects of TAMs. Silencing PITPNM3, a putative CCL18 receptor, on the surface of HUVECs abrogated CCL18-mediated promigration and the enhancement of HUVEC tube formation, independently of VEGFR signaling. Moreover, CCL18 exposure induced the endothelial-mesenchymal transformation and activated ERK and Akt/GSK-3β/Snail signaling in HUVECs, thereby contributing to its pro-angiogenic effects. In conclusion, our findings suggest that CCL18 released from TAMs promotes angiogenesis and tumor progression in breast cancer; thus, CCL18 may serve as a novel target for anti-angiogenic therapies.

  10. Characterization of tumor-associated B-cell subsets in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gryschok, Luise; Malcher, Joke; Wennhold, Kerstin; Garcia-Marquez, Maria; Herbold, Till; Neuhaus, Laura S.; Becker, Hans J.; Fiedler, Anne; Scherwitz, Pascal; Koslowsky, Thomas; Hake, Roland; Stippel, Dirk L.; Hölscher, Arnulf H.; Eidt, Sebastian; Hallek, Michael; Theurich, Sebastian; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A precise understanding of the mechanisms by which human immune cell subsets affect tumor biology will be critical for successful treatment of cancer using immunotherapeutic approaches. Recent evidence suggests that B cells can both promote and inhibit the development and progression of tumors. The aim of this study was to characterize the composition of the B-cell infiltrates in colorectal cancers (CRC) in order to gain further insight into the role of B cells in CRC. Experimental Design: In this study we characterized B-cell subsets in primary tumors (n=38), metastases (n=6) and blood (n=46) of 51 patients with a diagnosis of CRC and blood of 10 healthy controls. B-cell subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry or immunohistochemistry. Results: Peripheral blood of CRC patients contained a higher percentage of memory B cells than that of age-matched healthy controls. Furthermore, the percentage of B cells within tumors was higher than that in the peripheral blood of CRC patients while metastases were typically devoid of tumor-infiltrating B cells. Tumor-associated B cells were enriched for activated and terminally differentiated B cells. Relevant proportions of regulatory B cells could only be detected in advanced cancer and metastases. Conclusion: B cells constitute a significant proportion of the immune infiltrate in CRC. The B-cell infiltrate of primary CRC is characterized by an accumulation of terminally differentiated memory B cells or plasma cells suggestive of a specific immune response against the tumor. However advanced tumors and metastases are also infiltrated by a considerable number of regulatory B cells. PMID:25026291

  11. A novel photodynamic therapy targeting cancer cells and tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Noriyuki; Kataoka, Hiromi; Yano, Shigenobu; Tanaka, Mamoru; Moriwaki, Kazuhiro; Akashi, Haruo; Suzuki, Shugo; Mori, Yoshinori; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Takahashi, Satoru; Joh, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) in cancer stroma play important roles for cancer cell growth, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastases. We synthesized a novel photosensitizer, mannose-conjugated chlorin (M-chlorin), designed to bind mannose receptors highly expressed on TAMs. We evaluated the newly available photodynamic therapy (PDT) with M-chlorin against gastric and colon cancer. We evaluated PDT with M-chlorin for in vitro cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction in cancer cells compared with chlorin alone and glucose-conjugated chlorin (G-chlorin). The subcellular localization of M-chlorin was observed by confocal microscopy, and the M-chlorin PDT effects against TAMs including THP-1-induced M2-polarized macrophages were evaluated. Anticancer effects were also investigated in an allograft model where cytotoxic effects against TAMs in the cancer cell stroma were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. M-chlorin PDT strongly induced cell death in cancer cells to almost the same extent as G-chlorin PDT by inducing apoptosis. M-chlorin was incorporated into cancer cells where it localized mainly in lysosomes and endoplasmic reticula. M-chlorin PDT revealed strong cytotoxicity for M2 macrophages induced from THP-1 cell lines, and it induced stronger cytotoxicity than G-chlorin PDT in the allograft model through killing both cancer cells and TAMs in the cancer stroma. The M-chlorin PDT produced strong cytotoxicity against cancer tissue by inducing apoptosis of both cancer cells and TAMs in the cancer stroma. This novel PDT thus stands as a new candidate for very effective, next-generation PDT.

  12. Non-Invasive In Vivo Imaging of Tumor-Associated CD133/Prominin

    PubMed Central

    Tsurumi, Chizuko; Esser, Norbert; Firat, Elke; Gaedicke, Simone; Follo, Marie; Behe, Martin; Elsässer-Beile, Ursula; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Graeser, Ralph; Niedermann, Gabriele

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer stem cells are thought to play a pivotal role in tumor maintenance, metastasis, tumor therapy resistance and relapse. Hence, the development of methods for non-invasive in vivo detection of cancer stem cells is of great importance. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we describe successful in vivo detection of CD133/prominin, a cancer stem cell surface marker for a variety of tumor entities. The CD133-specific monoclonal antibody AC133.1 was used for quantitative fluorescence-based optical imaging of mouse xenograft models based on isogenic pairs of CD133 positive and negative cell lines. A first set consisted of wild-type U251 glioblastoma cells, which do not express CD133, and lentivirally transduced CD133-overexpressing U251 cells. A second set made use of HCT116 colon carcinoma cells, which uniformly express CD133 at levels comparable to primary glioblastoma stem cells, and a CD133-negative HCT116 derivative. Not surprisingly, visualization and quantification of CD133 in overexpressing U251 xenografts was successful; more importantly, however, significant differences were also found in matched HCT116 xenograft pairs, despite the lower CD133 expression levels. The binding of i.v.-injected AC133.1 antibodies to CD133 positive, but not negative, tumor cells isolated from xenografts was confirmed by flow cytometry. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our results show that non-invasive antibody-based in vivo imaging of tumor-associated CD133 is feasible and that CD133 antibody-based tumor targeting is efficient. This should facilitate developing clinically applicable cancer stem cell imaging methods and CD133 antibody-based therapeutics. PMID:21187924

  13. Significance of interstitial tumor-associated macrophages in the progression of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bing-Sheng; Pei, Bao-Xiang; Zhang, Kang; Zhang, Lu-Chang; Zhang, Guang-Jing; Liu, Ji-Kuan; Cui, Hong-Wei; Pan, Fen; Zhang, Zhen-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Stepwise progression from adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) to lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma (LPA) was proposed by various scholars. Interstitial tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and various potential chemokines involved in the progression from AIS/MIA to LPA were hypothesized. In the present study, immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescent double staining was used to detect the expression of the TAMs marker cluster of differentiation (CD) 68, tumor-derived colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-1, interleukin (IL)-6, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, E-cadherin and Snail in lung adenocarcinoma specimens, including AIS/MIA, LPA and other types. It was observed that infiltrating TAMs were negatively associated with the prognosis of patients, and that the infiltration degree of interstitial TAMs was higher in LPA than that in AIS/MIA. In addition, E-cadherin, Snail and MMP-2 expression were significantly correlated with the infiltration degree of TAMs. Survival analysis revealed that co-expression of CD68, CSF-1 and IL-6 was an independent prognostic factor. Stratified analysis demonstrated that, in AIS/MIA patients, there was a statistically significant difference between the number of TAMs (TAMs ≤25 and TAMs >25) in the CD68+CSF-1+IL-6+ group compared with other groups (including CD68+CSF-1-IL-6-, CD68+CSF-1+IL-6-, CD68+CSF-1-IL-6+ and CD68- groups). By contrast, in patients with TAMs >25 and in patients with positive CD68, CSF-1 and IL-6 expression, the survival rates were not significantly different between AIS/MIA and LPA. These results suggested that co-expression of TAMs marker CD68, CSF-1 and IL-6 may be a valuable independent prognostic predictor in lung adenocarcinoma. TAMs may facilitate AIS/MIA progression to LPA, which may be closely associated with the induction of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:28101209

  14. Metastasis Suppressors Regulate the Tumor Microenvironment by Blocking Recruitment of Prometastatic Tumor-Associated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Frankenberger, Casey; Rabe, Daniel; Bainer, Russell; Sankarasharma, Devipriya; Chada, Kiran; Krausz, Thomas; Gilad, Yoav; Becker, Lev; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2015-10-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients have the highest risk of recurrence and metastasis. Because they cannot be treated with targeted therapies, and many do not respond to chemotherapy, they represent a clinically underserved group. TNBC is characterized by reduced expression of metastasis suppressors such as Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP), which inhibits tumor invasiveness. Mechanisms by which metastasis suppressors alter tumor cells are well characterized; however, their ability to regulate the tumor microenvironment and the importance of such regulation to metastasis suppression are incompletely understood. Here, we use species-specific RNA sequencing to show that RKIP expression in tumors markedly reduces the number and metastatic potential of infiltrating tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). TAMs isolated from nonmetastatic RKIP(+) tumors, relative to metastatic RKIP(-) tumors, exhibit a reduced ability to drive tumor cell invasion and decreased secretion of prometastatic factors, including PRGN, and shed TNFR2. RKIP regulates TAM recruitment by blocking HMGA2, resulting in reduced expression of numerous macrophage chemotactic factors, including CCL5. CCL5 overexpression in RKIP(+) tumors restores recruitment of prometastatic TAMs and intravasation, whereas treatment with the CCL5 receptor antagonist Maraviroc reduces TAM infiltration. These results highlight the importance of RKIP as a regulator of TAM recruitment through chemokines such as CCL5. The clinical significance of these interactions is underscored by our demonstration that a signature comprised of RKIP signaling and prometastatic TAM factors strikingly separates TNBC patients based on survival outcome. Collectively, our findings identify TAMs as a previously unsuspected mechanism by which the metastasis-suppressor RKIP regulates tumor invasiveness, and further suggest that TNBC patients with decreased RKIP activity and increased TAM infiltration may respond to macrophage

  15. Carbohydrate specificity of the recognition of diverse glycolipids by natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Zajonc, Dirk M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2009-07-01

    Most T lymphocytes recognize peptide antigens bound to or presented by molecules encoded in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The CD1 family of antigen-presenting molecules is related to the MHC-encoded molecules, but CD1 proteins present lipid antigens, mostly glycolipids. Here we review T-lymphocyte recognition of glycolipids, with particular emphasis on the subpopulation known as natural killer T (NKT) cells. NKT cells influence many immune responses, they have a T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) that is restricted in diversity, and they share properties with cells of the innate immune system. NKT cells recognize antigens presented by CD1d with hexose sugars in alpha-linkage to lipids, although other, related antigens are known. The hydrophobic alkyl chains are buried in the CD1d groove, with the carbohydrate exposed for TCR recognition, together with the surface of the CD1d molecule. Therefore, understanding the biochemical basis for antigen recognition by NKT cells requires an understanding of how the trimolecular complex of CD1d, glycolipid, and the TCR is formed, which is in part a problem of carbohydrate recognition by the TCR. Recent investigations from our laboratories as well as studies from other groups have provided important information on the structural basis for NKT-cell specificity.

  16. Foreword: Carbohydrate Research: a half century of carbohydrate science.

    PubMed

    Horton, Derek

    2015-02-11

    The article traces the history of the journal Carbohydrate Research from its debut in 1964 and its subsequent evolution to the present day, viewed from the perspective of one of the founding editors who served as a receiving editor until 2005. The concept of an international journal focused on the broad aspects of carbohydrate science found ready acceptance in the research community, and its volumes now serve as a unified archive of a significant proportion of published research data on all molecular aspects of carbohydrates. Changes in the editor line-up over the years are noted, along with the transition to electronic publishing, and the role of key people in the Elsevier Company toward the success of the journal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cancer Immunotherapy Utilized Bubble Liposomes and Ultrasound as Antigen Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Yusuke; Otake, Shota; Suzuki, Ryo; Otake, Shota; Nishiie, Norihito; Hirata, Keiichi; Taira, Yuichiro; Utoguchi, Naoki; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2010-03-01

    In dendritic cells (DCs)-based cancer immunotherapy, it is important to present the epitope peptide derived from tumor associated antigens (TAAs) on MHC class I in order to induce tumor specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, MHC class I molecules generally present the epitope peptides derived from endogenous antigens for DCs but not exogenous ones such as TAAs. Recently, we developed the novel liposomal bubbles (Bubble liposomes) encapsulating perfluoropropane nanobubbles. In this study, we attempted to establish the novel antigen delivery system to induce MHC class I presentation using the combination of ultrasound and Bubble liposomes. Using ovalbumin (OVA) as model antigen, the combination of Bubble liposomes and ultrasound exposure for the DC could induce MHC class I presentation. In addition, the viability of DCs was more than 80%. These results suggest that Bubble liposomes might be a novel ultrasound enhanced antigen delivery tool in DC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  18. Carbohydrate chemistry in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Galan, M Carmen; Benito-Alifonso, David; Watt, Gregory M

    2011-05-21

    The multitude of roles that carbohydrates and their glyco-conjugates play in biological processes has stimulated great interest in determining the nature of their interactions in both normal and diseased states. Manipulating such interactions will provide leads for drug discovery. Of the major classes of biomolecule, carbohydrates are the most structurally diverse. This hetereogeneity makes isolation of pure samples, and in sufficient amounts, from biological sources extremely difficult. Chemical synthesis offers the advantage of producing pure and structurally defined oligosaccharides for biological investigations. Although the complex nature of carbohydrates means that this is challenging, recent advances in the field have facilitated access to these molecules. The synthesis and isolation of oligosaccharides combined with progress in glycoarray technology have aided the identification of new carbohydrate-binding drug targets. This review aims to provide an overview of the latest advancements in carbohydrate chemistry and the role of these complex molecules in drug discovery, focusing particularly on synthetic methodologies, glycosaminoglycans, glycoprotein synthesis and vaccine development over the last few years.

  19. Aminooxylated Carbohydrates: Synthesis and Applications.

    PubMed

    Pifferi, Carlo; Daskhan, Gour Chand; Fiore, Michele; Shiao, Tze Chieh; Roy, René; Renaudet, Olivier

    2017-08-09

    Among other classes of biomolecules, carbohydrates and glycoconjugates are widely involved in numerous biological functions. In addition to addressing the related synthetic challenges, glycochemists have invested intense efforts in providing access to structures that can be used to study, activate, or inhibit these biological processes. Over the past few decades, aminooxylated carbohydrates have been found to be key building blocks for achieving these goals. This review provides the first in-depth overview covering several aspects related to the syntheses and applications of aminooxylated carbohydrates. After a brief introduction to oxime bonds and their relative stabilities compared to related C═N functions, synthetic aspects of oxime ligation and methodologies for introducing the aminooxy functionality onto both glycofuranosyls and glycopyranosyls are described. The subsequent section focuses on biological applications involving aminooxylated carbohydrates as components for the construcion of diverse architectures. Mimetics of natural structures represent useful tools for better understanding the features that drive carbohydrate-receptor interaction, their biological output and they also represent interesting structures with improved stability and tunable properties. In the next section, multivalent structures such as glycoclusters and glycodendrimers obtained through oxime ligation are described in terms of synthetic design and their biological applications such as immunomodulators. The second-to-last section discusses miscellaneous applications of oxime-based glycoconjugates, such as enantioselective catalysis and glycosylated oligonucleotides, and conclusions and perspectives are provided in the last section.

  20. Exosome targeting of tumor antigens expressed by cancer vaccines can improve antigen immunogenicity and therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rountree, Ryan B; Mandl, Stefanie J; Nachtwey, James M; Dalpozzo, Katie; Do, Lisa; Lombardo, John R; Schoonmaker, Peter L; Brinkmann, Kay; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Laus, Reiner; Delcayre, Alain

    2011-08-01

    MVA-BN-PRO (BN ImmunoTherapeutics) is a candidate immunotherapy product for the treatment of prostate cancer. It encodes 2 tumor-associated antigens, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), and is derived from the highly attenuated modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus stock known as MVA-BN. Past work has shown that the immunogenicity of antigens can be improved by targeting their localization to exosomes, which are small, 50- to 100-nm diameter vesicles secreted by most cell types. Exosome targeting is achieved by fusing the antigen to the C1C2 domain of the lactadherin protein. To test whether exosome targeting would improve the immunogenicity of PSA and PAP, 2 additional versions of MVA-BN-PRO were produced, targeting either PSA (MVA-BN-PSA-C1C2) or PAP (MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2) to exosomes, while leaving the second transgene untargeted. Treatment of mice with MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2 led to a striking increase in the immune response against PAP. Anti-PAP antibody titers developed more rapidly and reached levels that were 10- to 100-fold higher than those for mice treated with MVA-BN-PRO. Furthermore, treatment with MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2 increased the frequency of PAP-specific T cells 5-fold compared with mice treated with MVA-BN-PRO. These improvements translated into a greater frequency of tumor rejection in a PAP-expressing solid tumor model. Likewise, treatment with MVA-BN-PSA-C1C2 increased the antigenicity of PSA compared with treatment with MVA-BN-PRO and resulted in a trend of improved antitumor efficacy in a PSA-expressing tumor model. These experiments confirm that targeting antigen localization to exosomes is a viable approach for improving the therapeutic potential of MVA-BN-PRO in humans.

  1. The polar high molecular weight fraction of the Agaricus blazei Murill extract, AndoSan™, reduces the activity of the tumor-associated protease, legumain, in RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Berven, Lise; Karppinen, Pernille; Hetland, Geir; Samuelsen, Anne Berit C

    2015-04-01

    AndoSan™ is an extract of Agaricus blazei Murill (AbM; 82.4%), Hericium erinaceum (14.7%), and Grifola frondosa (2.9%). The main ingredient of AndoSan, AbM, is rich in different forms of β-glucans. Since these exhibit potent antitumor activity and have immunomodulatory effects, the stimulatory effect of AndoSan on the production of different cytokines, chemokines, and leukocyte growth factors has predominantly been attributed to β-glucans. AndoSan has been claimed to consist of 90% carbohydrate, of which 2.8% is β-glucans, but in this study, we show that the carbohydrate content is only 2% of the dry weight, corresponding to 0.09% β-glucan per mL of AndoSan. Fractionation of AndoSan, followed by carbohydrate analysis and HPLC analysis revealed that most of the glucose was concentrated in the polar high molecular weight fraction of AndoSan (ethanol insoluble water extract [EIWE]-A) and that this extract was able to significantly inhibit the activity of the tumor-associated protease, legumain, in RAW 264.7 cells. Legumain is synthesized as a zymogen and undergoes pH-dependent autoactivation of the proform to reach an enzymatically active form. In this study, we demonstrate that both the polar and nonpolar AndoSan fractions are able to inhibit the autoactivation of prolegumain, and that the polar fractions of AndoSan are the most potent inhibitors of the active form of the enzyme.

  2. 7-Aryl-triazolyl-substituted sulfocoumarins are potent, selective inhibitors of the tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Nocentini, Alessio; Ceruso, Mariangela; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    Sulfocoumarins behave as interesting inhibitors of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). Here, we report a new series of 7-substituted derivatives which were obtained by the click chemistry approach from 7-propargyloxy-sulfocoumarin and aryl azides incorporating halogens, hydroxy, methoxy and carboxyl moieties in their molecules. The new compounds were screened for the inhibition on four physiologically relevant human CA (hCA) isoforms, the cytosolic hCA I and II and the transmembrane tumor-associated hCA IX and XII. The new compounds did not inhibit the cytosolic isoforms but were low nanomolar inhibitors of the tumor-associated ones hCA IX and XII.

  3. N-Substituted and ring opened saccharin derivatives selectively inhibit transmembrane, tumor-associated carbonic anhydrases IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Jekaterīna; Carta, Fabrizio; Vullo, Daniela; Leitans, Janis; Kazaks, Andris; Tars, Kaspars; Žalubovskis, Raivis; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2017-07-01

    A series of N-substituted saccharins incorporating aryl, alkyl and alkynyl moieties, as well as some ring opened derivatives were prepared and investigated as inhibitors of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). The widespread cytosolic isoforms CA I and II were not inhibited by these sulfonamides whereas transmembrane, tumor-associated ones were effectively inhibited, with KIs in the range of 22.1-481nM for CA IX and of 3.9-245nM for hCA XII. Although the inhibition mechanism of these tertiary/secondary sulfonamides is unknown for the moment, the good efficacy and especially selectivity for the inhibition of the tumor-associated over the cytosolic, widespread isoforms, make these derivatives of considerable interest as enzyme inhibitors with various pharmacologic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tumor associated endothelial expression of B7-H3 predicts survival in ovarian carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Xingxing; Sullivan, Peggy S; Soslow, Robert A; Waitz, Rebecca; Reuter, Victor E; Wilton, Andrew; Thaler, Howard T; Arul, Manonmani; Slovin, Susan F; Wei, Joyce; Spriggs, David R; Dupont, Jakob; Allison, James P

    2010-01-01

    B7-H3 and B7x are members of the B7 family of immune regulatory ligands that are thought to attenuate peripheral immune responses through co-inhibition. Previous studies have correlated their overexpression with poor prognosis and decreased tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in various carcinomas including uterine endometrioid carcinomas, and mounting evidence supports an immuno-inhibitory role in ovarian cancer prognosis. We sought to examine the expression of B7-H3 and B7x in 103 ovarian borderline tumors and carcinomas and study associations with clinical outcome. Using immunohistochemical tissue microarray analysis on tumor specimens, we found that 93 and 100% of these ovarian tumors express B7-H3 and B7x, respectively, with expression found predominantly on cell membranes and in cytoplasm. In contrast, only scattered B7-H3- and B7x-positive cells were detected in non-neoplastic ovarian tissues. B7-H3 was also expressed in the endothelium of tumor-associated vasculature in 44% of patients, including 78% of patients with high-stage tumors (FIGO stages III and IV), nearly all of which were high-grade serous carcinomas, and 26% of patients with low-stage tumors (FIGO stages I and II; P<0.001), including borderline tumors. Analysis of cumulative survival time and recurrence incidence revealed that carcinomas with B7-H3-positive tumor vasculature were associated with a significantly shorter survival time (P=0.02) and a higher incidence of recurrence (P=0.03). The association between B7-H3-positive tumor vasculature and poor clinical outcome remained significant even when the analysis was limited to the high-stage subgroup. These results show that ovarian borderline tumors and carcinomas aberrantly express B7-H3 and B7x, and that B7-H3-positive tumor vasculature is associated with high-grade serous histological subtype, increased recurrence and reduced survival. B7-H3 expression in tumor vasculature may be a reflection of tumor aggressiveness and has diagnostic and

  5. CYP4A in tumor-associated macrophages promotes pre-metastatic niche formation and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X W; Yu, T J; Zhang, J; Li, Y; Chen, H L; Yang, G F; Yu, W; Liu, Y Z; Liu, X X; Duan, C F; Tang, H L; Qiu, M; Wang, C L; Zheng, H; Yue, J; Guo, A M; Yang, J

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an essential role in metastasis. However, what enables TAMs to have a superior capacity to establish pre-metastatic microenvironment in distant organs is unclear. Here we have begun to uncover the effects of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A in TAMs on lung pre-metastatic niche formation and metastasis. CYP4A+ TAM infiltration was positively associated with metastasis, pre-metastatic niche formation and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. The pharmacological inhibition of CYP4A reduced lung pre-metastatic niche formation (evidenced by a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 positive (VEGFR1+) myeloid cell recruitment and pro-metastatic protein expression) and metastatic burden, accompanied with TAM polarization away from the M2 phenotype in spontaneous metastasis models of 4T1 breast cancer and B16F10 melanoma. Co-implantation of 4T1 cells with CYP4A10high macrophages promoted lung pre-metastatic niche formation and metastasis. Depletion of TAMs disrupted lung pre-metastatic niches and thereby prevented metastasis. Treatment with the CM from CYP4A10high M2 macrophages (M2) increased pre-metastatic niche formation and metastatic burden in the lungs, whereas CYP4A inhibition attenuated these effects. In vitro TAM polarization away from the M2 phenotype induced by CYP4A inhibition decreased VEGFR1+ myeloid cell migration and fibronectin expression, accompanied with downregulation of STAT3 signaling. Conversely, overexpression of CYP4A or exogenous addition of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid promoted M2 polarization and cytokine production of macrophages and thereby enhanced migration of VEGFR1+ myeloid cells, which were reversed by siRNA or pharmacological inhibition of STAT3. Importantly, a combined blocking M2 macrophage-derived factors TGF-β, VEGF and SDF-1 abolished VEGFR1+ myeloid cell migration and fibroblast activation induced by CYP4A. In summary, CYP4A in TAMs is crucial for lung pre-metastatic niche

  6. [Tumor Associated Fibroblasts Promote PD-L1 Expression in Lung Cancer Cells].

    PubMed

    He, Haiyang; Qi, Luyu; Xiao, Yongsheng; Hou, Yiling

    2017-05-20

    Tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAF) is an important part of TME, which inhibits the function of immune cells. CD8+ T cells play a significant role in tumor immunity. T-cell membrane possesses a distinct type of molecule with a negative regulatory function. Upon interaction with its corresponding ligand [programmed death factor ligand 1 (PD-L1)], programmed death factor 1 (PD-1) is activated and thus inhibits the kinase activity of T cells. This study aims to explore the possible effects of TAF on PD-L1 expression in lung cancer cells. Lung cancer cell lines H1975 and H520 were co-cultured with (experiment) or without TAF (control) via Transwell assay for through 48 hours under the same culture condition. H1975 and H520 cells were counted using a microscope. The protein and mRNA expression levels of PD-L1 were detected by FCM assay and PCR analysis, respectively. The numbers of lung cancer cells in 100 μm2 for H1975 and H520 cells are (46±21) and (38±10) in the experiment group, respectively, and (16±5) and (12±5) in the control group, respectively (P<0.05). The expression levels of the PD-L1 protein in H1975 and H520 cells are (20.93%±3.54%) and (19.26%±3.04%) in the experiment group, respectively, and (12.58%±2.52%) and (11.60%±2.65%) in the control group, respectively (P<0.05). The mRNA expression levels in H1975 and H520 cells are (16.45±1.25) and (15.38±2.02) pg/mL in the experiment group, respectively, and (7.78±1.27) and (7.20±1.58) pg/mL (P<0.05) in the control group, respectively (P<0.05). TAF promotes the growth and increases the expression of PD-L1 in H1975 and H520 cells.
.

  7. Challenges with nonfiber carbohydrate methods.

    PubMed

    Hall, M B

    2003-12-01

    Nonfiber carbohydrates (NFC) encompass a compositionally and nutritionally diverse group exclusive of those carbohydrates found in NDF. Their content in feeds has often been described as a single value estimated by difference as 100% of dry matter minus the percentages of CP, NDF (adjusted for CP in NDF), ether extract, and ash. A calculated value was used because of difficulties with assays for individual NFC, but it does not differentiate among nutritionally distinct NFC. Errors in NFC estimation can arise from not accounting for CP in NDF and when multipliers other than 6.25 are appropriate to estimate CP. Analyses that begin to distinguish among NFC are those for starch, soluble fiber (non-NDF, nonstarch polysaccharides), and low molecular weight carbohydrates (mono- and oligosaccharides). Many starch analyses quantify alpha-glucans through specific hydrolysis of alpha-(1 --> 4) and alpha-(1 --> 6) linkages in the glucan, and measurement of released glucose. Incomplete gelatinization and hydrolysis will lead to underestimation of starch content. Starch values are inflated by enzyme preparations that hydrolyze carbohydrates other than alpha-glucan, measurement of all released monosaccharides without specificity for glucose, and failure to exclude free glucose present in the unhydrolyzed sample. Soluble fiber analyses err in a fashion similar to NFC if estimation of CP requires multipliers other than 6.25, or if contaminants such as CP and starch have not been properly accounted. Depolymerization and incomplete precipitation can also decrease soluble fiber estimates. The low molecular weight carbohydrates have been defined as carbohydrates soluble in 78 to 80% ethanol, which separates them from polysaccharides. They can be measured in extracts using broad-spectrum colorimetric assays (phenol-sulfuric acid assay or reducing sugar analysis of acid hydrolyzed samples) or chromatographic methods. Limitations of the colorimetric assays include lack of differentiation

  8. New carbohydrate-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Callstrom, M.R.

    1992-07-01

    We have prepared a series of new carbohydrate-based materials based on the use of carbohydrates as a template for the introduction of functionality to polymeric materials with complete regio- and stereochemical control. The synthesis of these new materials by the use of chemical and enzymatic methods allows for the rational design of new materials based on the properties of the monomeric subunit. These materials have potential applications that range from their use in enhanced oil recovery to biodegradable plastics to biological applications including targeted drug delivery and enzyme stabilization.

  9. Pasteurella haemolytica antigens associated with resistance to pneumonic pasteurellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, D A; Simons, K R; Confer, A W; Panciera, R J; Clinkenbeard, K D

    1989-01-01

    Antigens associated with whole Pasteurella haemolytica biotype A serotype 1, a capsular carbohydrate-protein extract of the organism, and P. haemolytica leukotoxin were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Antigens of the electrophoresed preparations were detected by Western blotting (immunoblotting) with sera from cattle which were either nonvaccinated or vaccinated with live or killed P. haemolytica vaccines and had variable degrees of resistance to experimental pneumonic pasteurellosis. Distinct, easily recognizable antigens of these preparations were identified, and the antibody responses to these antigens were quantified by densitometry. To determine their importance to disease resistance, we then compared antibody responses with experimental lesion scores. Antibody reactivity to surface antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance and present in two or more of the preparations were detected at 86, 66, 51, 49, 34, 31, and 16 kilodaltons (kDa). Of these, antibody responses to antigens at 86, 49, and 31 kDa appeared most important based on their concentration and significance levels. Antibody reactivity to leukotoxin antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance and common with important surface antigens were detected at 86, 66, and 49 kDa. Antibody responses to unique leukotoxin antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance were present at 92 and 58 kDa. Images PMID:2917783

  10. Interaction of sugar stabilized silver nanoparticles with the T-antigen specific lectin, jacalin from Artocarpus integrifolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayaz Ahmed, Khan Behlol; Mohammed, Ansari Sulthan; Veerappan, Anbazhagan

    2015-06-01

    The advances in nanomedicine demonstrate the anticancer properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and considered as an alternative to the available chemotherapeutic agents. Owing to the preferential interaction of Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (jacalin) with Galβ1-3GalNAcα (a chemically well-defined tumor associated antigen), a study was undertaken to understand the interaction mechanism of AgNPs with jacalin in presence of specific sugar, galactose. Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis revealed that the AgNPs binding significantly quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of jacalin through a static quenching mechanism, and a non-radiative energy transfer occurred within the molecules. Association constants obtained from the interaction of different sugar-stabilized AgNPs with jacalin are in the order of 104 M-1, this is in the same range as those obtained for the interaction of lectin with carbohydrate and hydrophobic ligand. Each subunit of the tetrameric jacalin binds one AgNPs, and the stoichiometry was unaffected by the presence of the specific sugar, galactose. Hemagglutination assay shows that sugar stabilized AgNPs interacts to jacalin at a site that is different from the saccharide-binding site. Analysis of the FTIR spectra of jacalin indicates that the binding of AgNPs does not alter the secondary structure of jacalin. More importantly, AgNPs exists in nano form even after interacting with the lectin. These results suggest that the development of lectin-AgNPs conjugate would be possible for diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  11. Interaction of sugar stabilized silver nanoparticles with the T-antigen specific lectin, jacalin from Artocarpus integrifolia.

    PubMed

    Ayaz Ahmed, Khan Behlol; Mohammed, Ansari Sulthan; Veerappan, Anbazhagan

    2015-06-15

    The advances in nanomedicine demonstrate the anticancer properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and considered as an alternative to the available chemotherapeutic agents. Owing to the preferential interaction of Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (jacalin) with Galβ1-3GalNAcα (a chemically well-defined tumor associated antigen), a study was undertaken to understand the interaction mechanism of AgNPs with jacalin in presence of specific sugar, galactose. Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis revealed that the AgNPs binding significantly quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of jacalin through a static quenching mechanism, and a non-radiative energy transfer occurred within the molecules. Association constants obtained from the interaction of different sugar-stabilized AgNPs with jacalin are in the order of 10(4)M(-1), this is in the same range as those obtained for the interaction of lectin with carbohydrate and hydrophobic ligand. Each subunit of the tetrameric jacalin binds one AgNPs, and the stoichiometry was unaffected by the presence of the specific sugar, galactose. Hemagglutination assay shows that sugar stabilized AgNPs interacts to jacalin at a site that is different from the saccharide-binding site. Analysis of the FTIR spectra of jacalin indicates that the binding of AgNPs does not alter the secondary structure of jacalin. More importantly, AgNPs exists in nano form even after interacting with the lectin. These results suggest that the development of lectin-AgNPs conjugate would be possible for diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An immuno-enzymatic assay for herpes simplex virus tumour associated antigen in gynecological oncology.

    PubMed

    Magli, G; Scimone, C; Flaminio, G; D'Alessandro, G; Mascolo, A; Magli, R; Saladino, I

    1982-01-01

    The authors studied the HSV-TAA (Herpes Simplex Virus Tumor Associated Antigen) in patients affected by female genitale tract tumors, using the immunoenzymatic assay (ELISA). They found a positive frequence of 65% in sera of patients affected by uterine cervical carcinoma and of the 80% in sera of patients affected by vulvar carcinoma. The authors suggest that this enzymatic method has a real value and propose its use in the early diagnosis of the female genital tract neoplasms.

  13. Expression of cancer-testis antigens in stem cells: is it a potential drawback or an advantage in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) are a group of tumor associated antigens with a restricted expression pattern in normal gametogenic tissues but expression in a broad range of malignancies. Their expression pattern has made them potential targets for immunotherapy. However, expression of some of these antigens has been demonstrated in normal stem cells as well as cancer stem cells (CSCs). As CSCs have been shown to be sources of metastasis and tumor recurrence, novel therapies are being focused on their eradication. On the other hand, CTA expression in normal stem cells raises the possibility that CTA based immunotherapies cause side effects in normal tissues.

  14. Carbohydrate-Aromatic Interactions in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Kieran L; Bartlett, Gail J; Diehl, Roger C; Agirre, Jon; Gallagher, Timothy; Kiessling, Laura L; Woolfson, Derek N

    2015-12-09

    Protein-carbohydrate interactions play pivotal roles in health and disease. However, defining and manipulating these interactions has been hindered by an incomplete understanding of the underlying fundamental forces. To elucidate common and discriminating features in carbohydrate recognition, we have analyzed quantitatively X-ray crystal structures of proteins with noncovalently bound carbohydrates. Within the carbohydrate-binding pockets, aliphatic hydrophobic residues are disfavored, whereas aromatic side chains are enriched. The greatest preference is for tryptophan with an increased prevalence of 9-fold. Variations in the spatial orientation of amino acids around different monosaccharides indicate specific carbohydrate C-H bonds interact preferentially with aromatic residues. These preferences are consistent with the electronic properties of both the carbohydrate C-H bonds and the aromatic residues. Those carbohydrates that present patches of electropositive saccharide C-H bonds engage more often in CH-π interactions involving electron-rich aromatic partners. These electronic effects are also manifested when carbohydrate-aromatic interactions are monitored in solution: NMR analysis indicates that indole favorably binds to electron-poor C-H bonds of model carbohydrates, and a clear linear free energy relationships with substituted indoles supports the importance of complementary electronic effects in driving protein-carbohydrate interactions. Together, our data indicate that electrostatic and electronic complementarity between carbohydrates and aromatic residues play key roles in driving protein-carbohydrate complexation. Moreover, these weak noncovalent interactions influence which saccharide residues bind to proteins, and how they are positioned within carbohydrate-binding sites.

  15. Preliminary study of thyroid and colon cancers-associated antigens and their cognate autoantibodies as potential cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Kiyamova, Ramziya; Garifulin, Oleg; Gryshkova, Vitalina; Kostianets, Olga; Shyian, Maksym; Gout, Ivan; Filonenko, Valeriy

    2012-06-01

    Autoantibodies, which are produced against tumor-associated antigens, are potential tumor markers and attract a growing interest for cancer detection, differential diagnostics and prognosis. To evaluate the diagnostic significance of 40 antigens identified by immunoscreening of cDNA libraries from thyroid and colon cancers by allogenic screening with different tumor types patients' sera. Plaque-spot serological assay. Increased frequency of antibody response in sera of cancer patients compared with that of healthy donors was shown toward 14 antigens, 8 of which (CG016, BTN3A3, FKBP4, XRCC4, TSGA2, ACTR1A, FXYD3 and CTSH) have revealed exclusively cancer-related serological profile. Allogenic screening of 40 SEREX-antigens with sera from cancer patients and healthy donors allowed us to reveal 14 antigens with potential diagnostic significance. These antigens and their cognate autoantibodies could be considered as valuable targets for further analysis as potential cancer biomarkers.

  16. Polyethylenimine-based siRNA nanocomplexes reprogram tumor-associated dendritic cells via TLR5 to elicit therapeutic antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cubillos-Ruiz, Juan R.; Engle, Xavier; Scarlett, Uciane K.; Martinez, Diana; Barber, Amorette; Elgueta, Raul; Wang, Li; Nesbeth, Yolanda; Durant, Yvon; Gewirtz, Andrew T.; Sentman, Charles L.; Kedl, Ross; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2009-01-01

    The success of clinically relevant immunotherapies requires reversing tumor-induced immunosuppression. Here we demonstrated that linear polyethylenimine-based (PEI-based) nanoparticles encapsulating siRNA were preferentially and avidly engulfed by regulatory DCs expressing CD11c and programmed cell death 1–ligand 1 (PD-L1) at ovarian cancer locations in mice. PEI-siRNA uptake transformed these DCs from immunosuppressive cells to efficient antigen-presenting cells that activated tumor-reactive lymphocytes and exerted direct tumoricidal activity, both in vivo and in situ. PEI triggered robust and selective TLR5 activation in vitro and elicited the production of hallmark TLR5-inducible cytokines in WT mice, but not in Tlr5–/– littermates. Thus, PEI is a TLR5 agonist that, to our knowledge, was not previously recognized. In addition, PEI-complexed nontargeting siRNA oligonucleotides stimulated TLR3 and TLR7. The nonspecific activation of multiple TLRs (specifically, TLR5 and TLR7) reversed the tolerogenic phenotype of human and mouse ovarian tumor–associated DCs. In ovarian carcinoma–bearing mice, this induced T cell–mediated tumor regression and prolonged survival in a manner dependent upon myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88; i.e., independent of TLR3). Furthermore, gene-specific siRNA-PEI nanocomplexes that silenced immunosuppressive molecules on mouse tumor-associated DCs elicited discernibly superior antitumor immunity and enhanced therapeutic effects compared with nontargeting siRNA-PEI nanocomplexes. Our results demonstrate that the intrinsic TLR5 and TLR7 stimulation of siRNA-PEI nanoparticles synergizes with the gene-specific silencing activity of siRNA to transform tumor-infiltrating regulatory DCs into DCs capable of promoting therapeutic antitumor immunity. PMID:19620771

  17. Low-digestible carbohydrates in practice.

    PubMed

    Grabitske, Hollie A; Slavin, Joanne L

    2008-10-01

    Low-digestible carbohydrates are carbohydrates that are incompletely or not absorbed in the small intestine but are at least partly fermented by bacteria in the large intestine. Fiber, resistant starch, and sugar alcohols are types of low-digestible carbohydrates. Given potential health benefits (including a reduced caloric content, reduced or no effect on blood glucose levels, non-cariogenic effect), the prevalence of low-digestible carbohydrates in processed foods is increasing. Low-digestible carbohydrate fermentation in the gut causes gastrointestinal effects, especially at higher intakes. We review the wide range of low-digestible carbohydrates in food products, offer advice on identifying low-digestible carbohydrates in foods and beverages, and make suggestions for intakes of low-digestible carbohydrates.

  18. Carbohydrates - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Carbohydrates URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/carbohydrates.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  19. [Expression of CD10 in tumor-associated fibroblast of cancerized or recurrent colorectal adenomas].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiangjiang; Zhu, Yin; Li, Changshui; Li, Yinya; Nie, Qianqian; Zhu, Ziling; Deng, Hong

    2016-05-25

    Objective: To investigate the expression of CD10 in tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAF) in colorectal adenomas and its relation to cancerization and recurrence of adenoma. Methods: Tissue samples of low-grade adenoma (n=50), high-grade adenoma (n=50) and colorectal adenocarcinoma (n=50) were collected, and tissue samples at the distal margin of corresponding colorectal lesions were taken as controls. The expression of CD10 in the stromal TAFs, and the expressions of β-catenin, Ki-67, p53 and CyclinD1 in tumor cells were detected by immunohistochemistry (Envision). The correlation of CD10 expression in stromal TAFs with the expressions of β-catenin, Ki-67, p53 and CyclinD1 in tumor cells was analyzed by Spearmen. One hundred samples of low-grade colorectal adenoma were collected, including 57 non-recurrent cases and 43 recurrent cases (16 cases of recurrent adenoma and 27 cases of recurrent adenocarcinoma); the expression of stromal TAF CD10 were determined and compared among groups. Results: There was no TAF in normal colorectal mucosa. The expression rates of TAF CD10 in low-grade adenoma, high-grade adenoma and colorectal adenocarcinoma were 22%, 50% and 78%, respectively (all P<0.05). The expression of Ki-67 and β-catenin in low-grade adenoma, high-grade adenoma, colorectal adenocarcinoma was on a rising trend (all P<0.01). The expression of CyclinD1 in high-grade adenoma was higher than that in colorectal adenocarcinoma and low-grade adenoma (all P>0.05). The expression of p53 in colorectal adenocarcinoma and high-grade adenoma was higher than that in low grade adenoma (all P<0.01). The expression of TAF CD10 was correlated with the expression of p53, Ki-67 and β-catenin-nucleus(r=0.264、0.307、0.320, all P<0.01),but not correlated with CyclinD1 and β-catenin-membrane (r=0.012、-0.073, all P>0.05). The TAF CD10 level was significantly higher in low-grade adenoma with recurrence than that in those without recurrence (P<0.05).The expression of CD10 in

  20. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuvants in human vaccines has been a matter of vigorous scientific debate, with the field hindered by the fact that for over 80 years, aluminum salts were the only adjuvants approved for human use. To this day, alum-based adjuvants, alone or combined with additional immune activators, remain the only adjuvants approved for use in the USA. This situation has not been helped by the fact that the mechanism of action of most adjuvants has been poorly understood. A relative lack of resources and funding for adjuvant development has only helped to maintain alum’s relative monopoly. To seriously challenge alum’s supremacy a new adjuvant has many major hurdles to overcome, not least being alum’s simplicity, tolerability, safety record and minimal cost. Carbohydrate structures play critical roles in immune system function and carbohydrates also have the virtue of a strong safety and tolerability record. A number of carbohydrate compounds from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources have emerged as promising vaccine adjuvant candidates. Carbohydrates are readily biodegradable and therefore unlikely to cause problems of long-term tissue deposits seen with alum adjuvants. Above all, the Holy Grail of human adjuvant development is to identify a compound that combines potent vaccine enhancement with maximum tolerability and safety. This has proved to be a tough challenge for many adjuvant contenders. Nevertheless, carbohydrate-based compounds have many favorable properties that could place them in a unique position to challenge alum’s monopoly over human vaccine usage. PMID:21506649

  1. Carbohydrates as enantioinduction components in stereoselective catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate derivatives are readily available chiral molecules, yet they are infrequently employed as enantioinduction components in stereoselective catalysis. In this review, synthetic approaches to carbohydrate-based ligands and catalysts are outlined, along with example applications in enantioselective catalysis. A wide range of carbohydrate-based functionality is covered, and key trends and future opportunities are identified. PMID:27064817

  2. HLA class II antigen presentation by prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Younger, A R; Amria, S; Jeffrey, W A; Mahdy, A E M; Goldstein, O G; Norris, J S; Haque, A

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men. Recent evidence suggests that reduced expression of target protein antigens and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules is the predominant immune escape mechanism of malignant prostate tumor cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prospect of antigen specific immunotherapy against prostate cancer via the HLA class II pathway of immune recognition. Here, we show for the first time that prostate cancer cells express HLA class II proteins that are recognized by CD4+ T cells. Prostate tumor cells transduced with class II molecules efficiently presented tumor-associated antigens/peptides to CD4+ T cells. This data suggests that malignant prostate tumors can be targeted via the HLA class II pathway, and that class II-positive tumors could be employed for direct antigen presentation, and CD4+ T-cell mediated tumor immunotherapy.Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases (2008) 11, 334-341; doi:10.1038/sj.pcan.4501021; published online 16 October 2007.

  3. Chimeric Antigen Receptor Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, David M.; Singh, Nathan; Porter, David L.; Grupp, Stephan A.; June, Carl H.

    2014-01-01

    Improved outcomes for patients with cancer hinge on the development of new targeted therapies with acceptable short-term and long-term toxicity. Progress in basic, preclinical, and clinical arenas spanning cellular immunology, synthetic biology, and cell-processing technologies has paved the way for clinical applications of chimeric antigen receptor– based therapies. This new form of targeted immunotherapy merges the exquisite targeting specificity of monoclonal antibodies with the potent cytotoxicity and long-term persistence provided by cytotoxic T cells. Although this field is still in its infancy, clinical trials have already shown clinically significant antitumor activity in neuroblastoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and B cell lymphoma, and trials targeting a variety of other adult and pediatric malignancies are under way. Ongoing work is focused on identifying optimal tumor targets and on elucidating and manipulating both cell- and host-associated factors to support expansion and persistence of the genetically engineered cells in vivo. The potential to target essentially any tumor-associated cell-surface antigen for which a monoclonal antibody can be made opens up an entirely new arena for targeted therapy of cancer. PMID:24274181

  4. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy Augments Antigen-Specific PD-1-Mediated Anti-Tumor Immune Responses via Cross-Presentation of Tumor Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Sharabi, Andrew B.; Nirschl, Christopher J.; Kochel, Christina M.; Nirschl, Thomas R.; Francisca, Brian J.; Velarde, Esteban; Deweese, Theodore L.; Drake, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    The immune-modulating effects of radiation therapy have gained considerable interest recently and there have been multiple reports of synergy between radiation and immunotherapy. However, additional pre-clinical studies are needed to demonstrate the antigen-specific nature of radiation-induced immune responses and elucidate potential mechanisms of synergy with immunotherapy. Here we demonstrate the ability of stereotactic radiotherapy to induce endogenous antigen-specific immune responses when combined with anti-PD-1 checkpoint blockade immunotherapy. Using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP), image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy delivered to B16-OVA melanoma or 4T1-HA breast carcinoma tumors resulted in the development of antigen-specific T and B cell-mediated immune responses. These immune-stimulating effects of radiotherapy were significantly increased when combined with either anti-PD-1 therapy or regulatory T cell (Treg) depletion, resulting in improved local tumor control. Phenotypic analyses of antigen-specific CD8 T cells revealed that radiotherapy increased the percentage of antigen-experienced T cells and effector memory T cells. Mechanistically we found that radiotherapy up-regulates tumor-associated antigen-MHC complexes, enhances antigen cross-presentation in the draining lymph node, and increased T-cell infiltration into tumors. These findings demonstrate the ability of radiotherapy to prime an endogenous antigen-specific immune response and provide additional mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with PD-1 blockade in the clinic. PMID:25527358

  5. Targeting cancer testis antigens for biomarkers and immunotherapy in colorectal cancer: Current status and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Anil; Jagadish, Nirmala; Saini, Shikha; Gupta, Namita

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer ranks third among the estimated cancer cases and cancer related mortalities in United States in 2014. Early detection and efficient therapy remains a significant clinical challenge for this disease. Therefore, there is a need to identify novel tumor associated molecules to target for biomarker development and immunotherapy. In this regard, cancer testis antigens have emerged as a potential targets for developing novel clinical biomarkers and immunotherapy for various malignancies. These germ cell specific proteins exhibit aberrant expression in cancer cells and contribute in tumorigenesis. Owing to their unique expression profile and immunogenicity in cancer patients, cancer testis antigens are clinically referred as the most promising tumor associated antigens. Several cancer testis antigens have been studied in colorectal cancer but none of them could be used in clinical practice. This review is an attempt to address the promising cancer testis antigens in colorectal cancer and their possible clinical implications as biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets with particular focus on challenges and future interventions. PMID:26691579

  6. New strategy for large-scale preparation of the extracellular domain of tumor-associated antigen HAb18G/CD147 (HAb18GED).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Yang, Xiangmin; Yang, Hushan; Yu, Xiaoling; Li, Yu; Xing, Jinliang; Chen, Zhinan

    2011-01-01

    HAb18G/CD147, a cancer-associated biomarker, can promote tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. Here, we established a new strategy to express the extracellular domain of HAb18G/CD147 (HAb18GED) by using the FRT/Flp-In recombinase-based site-directed integration system. Two clones expressing HAb18GED were established, and 600 mg HAb18GED was obtained with more than 95% purity. Our results showed that purified HAb18GED exhibited strong activities to stimulate the secretion of pro-MMP2 and MMP-2 and promote the invasion of HCC cells. Overall, our study effectively overcame the difficulty of large-scale HAb18GED preparation and laid a solid foundation for the further studies on structure and functions of HAb18G/CD147. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Bispecific antibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens and neutralizing complement regulators increase the efficacy of antibody-based immunotherapy in mice.

    PubMed

    Macor, P; Secco, E; Mezzaroba, N; Zorzet, S; Durigutto, P; Gaiotto, T; De Maso, L; Biffi, S; Garrovo, C; Capolla, S; Tripodo, C; Gattei, V; Marzari, R; Tedesco, F; Sblattero, D

    2015-02-01

    The efficacy of antibody-based immunotherapy is due to the activation of apoptosis, the engagement of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). We developed a novel strategy to enhance CDC using bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) that neutralize the C-regulators CD55 and CD59 to enhance C-mediated functions. Two bsAbs (MB20/55 and MB20/59) were designed to recognize CD20 on one side. The other side neutralizes CD55 or CD59. Analysis of CDC revealed that bsAbs could kill 4-25 times more cells than anti-CD20 recombinant antibody in cell lines or cells isolated from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The pharmacokinetics of the bsAbs was evaluated in a human-SCID model of Burkitt lymphoma. The distribution profile of bsAbs mimics the data obtained by studying the pharmacokinetics of anti-CD20 antibodies, showing a peak in the tumor mass 3-4 days after injection. The treatment with bsAbs completely prevented the development of human/SCID lymphoma. The tumor growth was blocked by the activation of the C cascade and by the recruitment of macrophages, polymorphonuclear and natural killer cells. This strategy can easily be applied to the other anti-tumor C-fixing antibodies currently used in the clinic or tested in preclinical studies using the same vector with the appropriate modifications.

  8. In vitro induction of specific CD8+ T lymphocytes by tumor-associated antigenic peptides in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Takeshi; Kumamaru, Wataru; Hayashida, Jun-nosuke; Moriyama, Masahumi; Kitamura, Ryoji; Tanaka, Hideaki; Yamada, Akira; Itoh, Kyogo; Nakamura, Seiji

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify candidate peptides for peptide-based specific immunotherapy of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Thirteen peptides were examined for in vitro induction of peptide-specific CD8(+) T lymphocyte (CD8(+)TL) activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 35 patients with oral SCC. A correlation between the induction ability of CD8(+)TL and in vivo immune response of host was carried out immunohistochemically in 23 patients. Peptide-specific activities of CD8(+)TL for at least one peptide were detectable in 21/35 patients (60.0%). The potent peptides were SART-1(690) in 9/35 (25.7%), SART-2(93), and ART4(75) in 7/35 (20.0%), respectively. In the 9 patients with SART-1(690)-specific activity, the whole of activities was significantly inducible for more number of other peptides compared to that in 26 patients without the activity (P=0.035). Cellular responses in 7 patients with SART-1(690)-specific activity were significantly stronger than those in 16 patients without the activity (P=0.027). Furthermore, the number of CD3(+) T cells around the SCC was also significantly different between the 2 groups of patients (P=0.041). In conclusion, SART-1(690), SART-2(93), and ART4(75) could be applicable as peptide-based specific immunotherapies for the majority of patients with oral SCC.

  9. Evidence for glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchoring of Toxoplasma gondii major surface antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Tomavo, S.; Schwarz, R.T.; Dubremetz, J.F. )

    1989-10-01

    The four major surface antigens of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites (P43, P35, P30, and P22) were made water soluble by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). These antigens were biosynthetically labeled with {sup 3}H-fatty acids, ({sup 3}H)ethanolamine, and ({sup 3}H)carbohydrates. Treatment of {sup 3}H-fatty-acid-labeled parasite lysates with PI-PLC removed the radioactive label from these antigens. A cross-reacting determinant was exposed on these antigens after PI-PLC treatment.

  10. Evidence for glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchoring of Toxoplasma gondii major surface antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Tomavo, S; Schwarz, R T; Dubremetz, J F

    1989-01-01

    The four major surface antigens of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites (P43, P35, P30, and P22) were made water soluble by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). These antigens were biosynthetically labeled with 3H-fatty acids, [3H]ethanolamine, and [3H]carbohydrates. Treatment of 3H-fatty-acid-labeled parasite lysates with PI-PLC removed the radioactive label from these antigens. A cross-reacting determinant was exposed on these antigens after PI-PLC treatment. Images PMID:2531282

  11. Roles of cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfei; Li, Jun; Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Yanhong; Chu, Jiahui; Sun, Chunxiao; Fu, Ziyi; Huang, Yi; Zhang, Hansheng; Yuan, Hongyan; Yin, Yongmei

    2017-07-28

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed and is the second leading cause of cancer death among women in the US. For breast cancer, early diagnosis and efficient therapy remains a significant clinical challenge. Therefore, it is necessary to identify novel tumor associated molecules to target for biomarker development and immunotherapy. In this regard, cancer testis antigens (CTAs) have emerged as a potential clinical biomarker targeting immunotherapy for various malignancies due to the nature of its characteristics. CTAs are a group of tumor associated antigens (TAAs) that display normal expression in immune-privileged organs, but display aberrant expression in several types of cancers, particularly in advanced cancers. Investigation of CTAs for the clinical management of breast malignancies indicates that these TAAs have potential roles as novel biomarkers, with increased specificity and sensitivity compared to those currently used in the clinic. Moreover, TAAs could be therapeutic targets for cancer immunotherapy. This review is an attempt to address the promising CTAs in breast cancer and their possible clinical implications as biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets with particular focus on challenges and future interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Serine Proteases Enhance Immunogenic Antigen Presentation on Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Peters, Haley L; Tripathi, Satyendra C; Kerros, Celine; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Garber, Haven R; St John, Lisa S; Federico, Lorenzo; Meraz, Ismail M; Roth, Jack A; Sepesi, Boris; Majidi, Mourad; Ruisaard, Kathryn; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Roszik, Jason; Gibbons, Don L; Heymach, John V; Swisher, Stephen G; Bernatchez, Chantale; Alatrash, Gheath; Hanash, Samir; Molldrem, Jeffrey J

    2017-03-02

    Immunotherapies targeting immune checkpoints have proven efficacious in reducing the burden of lung cancer in patients; however, the antigenic targets of these reinvigorated T cells remain poorly defined. Lung cancer tumors contain tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and neutrophils, which release the serine proteases neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3 (P3) into the tumor microenvironment. NE and P3 shape the antitumor adaptive immune response in breast cancer and melanoma. In this report, we demonstrate that lung cancer cells cross-presented the tumor-associated antigen PR1, derived from NE and P3. Additionally, NE and P3 enhanced the expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules on lung cancer cells and induced unique, endogenous peptides in the immunopeptidome, as detected with mass spectrometry sequencing. Lung cancer patient tissues with high intratumoral TAMs were enriched for MHC class I genes and T-cell markers, and patients with high TAM and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) infiltration had improved overall survival. We confirmed the immunogenicity of unique, endogenous peptides with cytotoxicity assays against lung cancer cell lines, using CTLs from healthy donors that had been expanded against select peptides. Finally, CTLs specific for serine proteases-induced endogenous peptides were detected in lung cancer patients using peptide/HLA-A2 tetramers and were elevated in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Thus, serine proteases in the tumor microenvironment of lung cancers promote the presentation of HLA class I immunogenic peptides that are expressed by lung cancer cells, thereby increasing the antigen repertoire that can be targeted in lung cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(4); 1-11. ©2017 AACR.

  13. T cells expressing CD19/CD20 bi-specific chimeric antigen receptors prevent antigen escape by malignant B cells

    PubMed Central

    Zah, Eugenia; Lin, Meng-Yin; Silva-Benedict, Anne; Jensen, Michael C.; Chen, Yvonne Y.

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of T cells expressing anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown remarkable curative potential against advanced B-cell malignancies, but multiple trials have also reported patient relapses due to the emergence of CD19-negative leukemic cells. Here, we report the design and optimization of single-chain, bi-specific CARs that trigger robust cytotoxicity against target cells expressing either CD19 or CD20, two clinically validated targets for B-cell malignancies. We determined the structural parameters required for efficient dual-antigen recognition, and we demonstrate that optimized bi-specific CARs can control both wild-type B-cell lymphoma and CD19− mutants with equal efficiency in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first bi-specific CAR capable of preventing antigen escape by performing true OR-gate signal computation on a clinically relevant pair of tumor-associated antigens. The CD19-OR-CD20 CAR is fully compatible with existing T-cell manufacturing procedures and implementable by current clinical protocols. These results present an effective solution to the challenge of antigen escape in CD19 CAR T-cell therapy, and they highlight the utility of structure-based rational design in the development of receptors with higher-level complexity. PMID:27059623

  14. Onchocerca gibsoni: increase of circulating egg antigen with chemotherapy in bovines.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, K P; Mitchell, G F; Copeman, D B

    1984-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed to stage-specific surface antigens of Onchocerca gibsoni eggs were used in immunoradiometric assays to detect antigens in the sera of cattle infected with O. gibsoni. Two monoclonal antibodies detected antigens, presumably of egg origin, in sera. The target antigens appeared to be carbohydrate in nature and of variable molecular weights. Significant increases in levels of circulating egg antigens were found after treatment of infected cattle with benzimidazole compounds. These drugs cause disruption of embryogenesis and accelerated loss of worm uterine contents. In contrast, administration of either macrofilaricides or microfilaricides to infected cattle did not alter pretreatment levels of circulating egg antigens. Measurement of changes in levels of circulating antigens by immunoradiometric assays with stage-specific monoclonal antibodies provides a new means of assessing the efficacy of drugs and their site of action in onchocerciasis.

  15. Bacterial surface antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies used to detect beer spoilage pediococci.

    PubMed

    Whiting, M S; Ingledew, W M; Lee, S Y; Ziola, B

    1999-08-01

    Fourteen monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were isolated that react with surface antigens of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms, including P. damnosus, P. pentosaceous, P. acidilactici, and unspeciated isolates. Immunoblotting, enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) of protease- and neuraminidase-treated surface antigen extracts, carbohydrate competition EIAs, and cardiolipin EIAs were used to characterize the bacterial antigens involved in Mab binding. Antigen stability in situ was tested by protease treatment or surface antigen extraction of washed bacteria. In most cases, the Mabs bind to Pediococcus surface antigens that appear to be covalently bound cell wall polymers resistant to alteration or removal from the bacterial surface. These bacterial surface antigen reactive Mabs show good potential for rapid, sensitive, and specific immunoassay detection of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms.

  16. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome: similar behavior to sporadic type?

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Adriana; Correnti, Maria; Avila, Maira; Andea, Aleodor; DeVilliers, Patricia; Rivera, Helen

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the expression of proliferative markers and p53 in keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) sporadic type and KCOT associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). We performed a cross-sectional study. A total of 19 patients with KCOT were selected from the Oral Pathology Laboratory archives, Central University of Venezuela, from 1995 to 2005. Twelve cases corresponded to sporadic KCOT, and seven cases were associated with NBCCS. Immunohistochemical analysis for p53, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and Ki-67 was performed in all 19 cases. Of the seven cases associated with NBCCS, six (86%) were positive for PCNA. From the 12 sporadic cases, nine (75%) were positive for PCNA. Only one case of sporadic KCOT showed Ki-67 positivity. Five of 12 (42%) cases of sporadic KCOT were positive for p53, and only one (14%) case associated with NBCCS was positive for p53. On the basis of the analysis of the expression of PCNA, Ki-67, and p53, there appears to be no evidence to indicate higher aggressiveness in growth and infiltrative behavior in syndromic KCOT compared with the sporadic type. Therefore, surgical treatment may be approached in the same manner in KCOT sporadic and syndromic with the goal of minimizing recurrence. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Berberine suppresses tumorigenicity and growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by inhibiting STAT3 activation induced by tumor associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cortidis rhizoma (Huanglian) and its major therapeutic component, berberine, have drawn extensive attention in recent years for their anti-cancer properties. Growth inhibitory effects of berberine on multiple types of human cancer cells have been reported. Berberine inhibits invasion, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human cancer cells. The anti-inflammatory property of berberine, involving inhibition of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) activation, has also been documented. Methods In this study, we have examined the effects of berberine on tumorigenicity and growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells and their relationship to STAT3 signaling using both in vivo and in vitro models. Results Berberine effectively inhibited the tumorigenicity and growth of an EBV-positive NPC cell line (C666-1) in athymic nude mice. Inhibition of tumorigenic growth of NPC cells in vivo was correlated with effective inhibition of STAT3 activation in NPC cells inside the tumor xenografts grown in nude mice. In vitro, berberine inhibited both constitutive and IL-6-induced STAT3 activation in NPC cells. Inhibition of STAT3 activation by berberine induced growth inhibition and apoptotic response in NPC cells. Tumor-associated fibroblasts were found to secret IL-6 and the conditioned medium harvested from the fibroblasts also induced STAT3 activation in NPC cells. Furthermore, STAT3 activation by conditioned medium of tumor-associated fibroblasts could be blocked by berberine or antibodies against IL-6 and IL-6R. Conclusions Our observation that berberine effectively inhibited activation of STAT3 induced by tumor-associated fibroblasts suggests a role of berberine in modulating the effects of tumor stroma on the growth of NPC cells. The effective inhibition of STAT3 activation in NPC cells by berberine supports its potential use in the treatment of NPC. PMID:24380387

  18. Disorders of carbohydrate digestion and absorption.

    PubMed

    Heitlinger, L A; Lebenthal, E

    1988-04-01

    The carbohydrate malabsorptive syndromes are frequently seen by pediatricians. The congenital deficiency states are quite rare, but adult type hypolactasia and lactose intolerance following rotavirus infection are recognized with increasing frequency by primary care physicians. Therapy for these disorders involves identification of the offending carbohydrate, removal of the carbohydrate from the diet, and exclusion of other entities that may result in carbohydrate malabsorption but not respond to its removal from the diet. Prognosis for both the primary and secondary carbohydrate malabsorption syndromes is excellent. Compliance with diets for those pediatric patients who will require lifelong therapy remains problematic.

  19. Antigenic mosaic of Methanosarcinaceae: partial characterization of Methanosarcina barkeri 227 surface antigens by monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Garberi, J.C.; Macario, A.J.L.; De Macario, E.C.

    1985-10-01

    Hybridomas were constructed with spleen cells from mice immunized against Methanosarcina barkeri 227. The reaction with the resulting monoclonal antibodies identified two antigenic determinants. Determinant 8A is present in M. barkeri 227, where it is accessible to antibody on whole bacterial cells. 8A is undetectable in (or absent from) M. barkeri R1M3, an immunologically closely related strain. Determinant 8C is present in both strains, but with M. barkeri 227 it is found only in extracts and cannot be demonstrated in whole cells. It therefore appears to be hidden. A soluble form of antigen 8A (antigen 227) was obtained treating whole M. barkeri 227 cells with absolute methanol. This antigen was further purified by affinity chromatography with antibody 8A. Chemical and immunochemical analyses of these preparations showed that antigen 227 is a high-molecular-weight (4 x 10/sup 5/) structure composed mainly of one carbohydrate, glucose, and small amounts of amino acids. Its solubility properties suggest that this molecule is associated with a lipid moiety.

  20. Solvent interactions determine carbohydrate conformation

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Karl N.; Woods, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between the three-dimensional structures of oligosaccharides and polysaccharides and their biological properties has been the focus of many recent studies. The overall conformation of an oligosaccharide depends primarily on the orientation of the torsion angles (φ, ψ, and ω) between glycosyl residues. Numerous experimental studies have shown that in glucopyranosides the ω-torsion angle (O6-C6-C5-O5) displays a preference for gauche orientations, in disagreement with predictions based on gas-phase quantum mechanics calculations. In contrast, the ω-angle in galactopyranosides displays a high proportion of the anti-orientation. For oligosaccharides containing glycosidic linkages at the 6-position (1→6 linked), variations in rotamer population have a direct effect on the oligosaccharides' structure and function, and yet the physical origin of these conformational preferences remains unclear. Although it is generally recognized that the gauche effect in carbohydrates is a solvent-dependent phenomenon, the mechanism through which solvent induces the gauche preference is not understood. In the present work, quantum mechanics and solvated molecular dynamics calculations were performed on two representative carbohydrates, methyl α-d-glucopyranoside and methyl α-d-galactopyranoside. We show that correct reproduction of the experimental rotamer distributions about the ω-angles is obtained only after explicit water is included in the molecular dynamics simulations. The primary role of the water appears to be to disrupt the hydrogen bonding within the carbohydrate, thereby allowing the rotamer populations to be determined by internal electronic and steric repulsions between the oxygen atoms. The results reported here provide a quantitative explanation of the conformational behavior of (1→6)-linked carbohydrates. PMID:11526221

  1. Carbohydrates in peptide and protein design.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Knud J; Brask, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    Monosaccharides and amino acids are fundamental building blocks in the assembly of nature's polymers. They have different structural aspects and, to a significant extent, different functional groups. Oligomerization gives rise to oligosaccharides and peptides, respectively. While carbohydrates and peptides can be found conjoined in nature, e.g., in glycopeptides, the aim of this review is the radical redesign of peptide structures using carbohydrates, particularly monosaccharides and cyclic oligosaccharides, to produce novel peptides, peptidomimetics, and abiotic proteins. These hybrid molecules, chimeras, have properties arising largely from the combination of structural characteristics of carbohydrates with the functional group diversity of peptides. This field includes de novo designed synthetic glycopeptides, sugar (carbohydrate) amino acids, carbohydrate scaffolds for nonpeptidal peptidomimetics of cyclic peptides, cyclodextrin functionalized peptides, and carboproteins, i.e., carbohydrate-based proteinmimetics. These successful applications demonstrate the general utility of carbohydrates in peptide and protein architecture.

  2. Serodiagnosis of American trypanosomosis by using nonpathogenic trypanosomatid antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Monteón, V M; Guzmán-Rojas, L; Negrete-García, C; Rosales-Encina, J L; Lopez, P A

    1997-01-01

    Crithidia luciliae, a nonpathogenic trypanosomatid, could provide a good alternative source of antigen for serodiagnosis of Chagas' disease. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed 100% sensitivity and 83% specificity when 91 human serum samples from Chagas' disease patients and 127 human serum samples from people suffering from toxoplasmosis (21 samples), leishmaniasis (32 samples), systemic rheumatic diseases (33 samples), and heart diseases (41 samples) were tested simultaneously with Trypanosoma cruzi and C. luciliae crude extracts. By Western blotting, an immunodominant band (30 kDa) was recognized by chagasic sera on the C. luciliae crude extract; specificity reached 97% with respect to this protein band. The carbohydrate moieties were not antigenic. PMID:9399545

  3. Carbohydrate Nanoparticles for Brain Delivery.

    PubMed

    Lalatsa, A; Barbu, E

    2016-01-01

    Many brain tumors and neurological diseases can greatly benefit from the use of emerging nanotechnologies based on targeted nanomedicines that are able to noninvasively transport highly potent and specific pharmaceuticals across the blood-brain barrier. Carbohydrates have received considerable interest as materials for drug carriers due to their natural origin and inherent biodegradability and biocompatibility, as well as due to their hydrophilic character and ease of chemical modification combined with low cost and the possibility for large-scale manufacturing. This chapter provides an overview of the latest research involving the use of carbohydrate-based nanoparticles for drug delivery to the central nervous system. After reviewing the challenges posed by delivering drugs into the brain, the current state-of-the-art approaches for delivery of actives across the blood-brain barrier, including invasive and noninvasive strategies, are presented. A particular focus has been placed on chitosan polymers as they are among the most promising carbohydrate nanocarriers for the preparation and testing of chitosan-based nanomedicines that led, in preclinical proof-of-concept studies, to enhanced brain drug levels and increased pharmacodynamics responses after intravenous, nasal, and oral administration. While chitosan nanoparticles are to date among the most studied and most promising carriers, approaches based on other polysaccharides such as dextran, pullulan, and cellulose warrant further research in the attempt to advance the existing technologies for overcoming the blood-brain barrier. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Definition of immunogenic carbohydrate epitopes.

    PubMed

    Paschinger, Katharina; Fabini, Gustáv; Schuster, David; Rendić, Dubravko; Wilson, Iain B H

    2005-01-01

    Carbohydrates are known as sources of immunological cross-reactivity of allergenic significance. In celery and in cypress pollen, the major allergens Api g 5 and Cup a 1 are recognised by antisera raised against anti-horseradish peroxidase and by patients' IgE which apparently bind carbohydrate epitopes; mass spectrometric analysis of the tryptic peptides and of their N-glycans showed the presence of oligosaccharides carrying both xylose and core alpha1,3-fucose residues. Core alpha1,3-fucose residues are also a feature of invertebrates: genetic and biochemical studies on the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, the parasitic trematode Schistosoma mansoni and the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans indicate that these organisms possess core alpha1,3-fucosyltransferases. Various experiments have shown that fucosyltransferases from both fly and worm are responsible in vivo and in vitro for the synthesis of N-glycans which cross-react with anti-horseradish peroxidase; thus, we can consider these enzymes as useful tools in generating standard compounds for testing cross-reactive carbohydrate epitopes of allergenic interest.

  5. Preparation and evaluation of unimolecular pentavalent and hexavalent antigenic constructs targeting prostate and breast cancer: a synthetic route to anticancer vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Ragupathi, Govind; Koide, Fusataka; Livingston, Philip O; Cho, Young Shin; Endo, Atsushi; Wan, Qian; Spassova, Maria K; Keding, Stacy J; Allen, Jennifer; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Wilson, Rebecca M; Danishefsky, Samuel J

    2006-03-01

    Several novel, fully synthetic, carbohydrate-based antitumor vaccines have been assembled. Each construct consists of multiple cancer-related antigens displayed on a single polypeptide backbone. Recent advances in synthetic methodology have allowed for the incorporation of a complex oligosaccharide terminating in a sialic acid residue (i.e., GM2) as one of the carbohydrate antigens. Details of the vaccine synthesis as well as the results of preliminary immunological investigations are described herein.

  6. Neuroendocrine-like cells -derived CXCL10 and CXCL11 induce the infiltration of tumor-associated macrophage leading to the poor prognosis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu; Xu, He-Yang; Wang, Jie; Chu, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study revealed that neuroendocrine differentiation in colorectal cancer is one of the important factors leading to worse prognosis. In this study, we apply immunohistochemical staining, Western-blot, RT-PCR and ELISA to investigate the underlying mechanism that how the neuroendocrine differentiation to affect the prognosis of colorectal cancer. The interaction of colorectal cancer cells, neuroendocrine-like cells and tumor-associated macrophages in colorectal cancer progress is also investigated. By analyzing 82 cases of colorectal cancer patients treated in our institution, we found that colorectal adenocarcinoma with neuroendocrine differentiation had increasing number of tumor-associated macrophages and worse prognosis. Further evaluation of cytology showed that neuroendocrine cells have the ability to recruit tumor-associated macrophages to infiltrate the tumor tissue, and the tumor-associated macrophages enhance the proliferation and invasion abilities of the colon cancer cells. Moreover, we confirmed that CXCL10 and CXCL11 are the key chemokines in neuroendocrine-like cells and they promote the chemotaxis activity of tumor-associated macrophages. The secretion of CXCL10 and CXCL11 by neuroendocrine-like cells can recruit tumor-associated macrophages to infiltrate in tumor tissues. The latter enhances the proliferation and invasion of colorectal cancer cell and lead to poor prognosis. PMID:27034164

  7. Measurement of tumor-associated mutations in the nasal mucosa of rats exposed to varying doses of formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanxue; Bermudez, Edilberto; McKinzie, Page B; Andersen, Melvin E; Clewell, Harvey J; Parsons, Barbara L

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the potential induction of tumor-associated mutations in formaldehyde-exposed rat nasal mucosa using a sensitive method, allele-specific competitive blocker-PCR (ACB-PCR). Levels of p53 codon 271 CGT to CAT and K-Ras codon 12 GGT to GAT mutations were quantified in nasal mucosa of rats exposed to formaldehyde. In addition, nasal mucosa cell proliferation was monitored because regenerative cell proliferation is considered a key event in formaldehyde-induced carcinogenesis. Male F344 rats (6-7 weeks old, 5 rats/group) were exposed to 0, 0.7, 2, 6, 10, and 15 ppm formaldehyde for 13 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). ACB-PCR was used to determine levels of p53 and K-Ras mutations. Although two of five untreated rats had measureable spontaneous p53 mutant fractions (MFs), most nasal mucosa samples had p53 MFs below 10(-5). All K-Ras MF measurements were below 10(-5). No dose-related increases in p53 or K-Ras MF were observed, even though significant increases in bromodeoxyuridine incorporation demonstrated induced cell proliferation in the 10 and 15 ppm formaldehyde-treatment groups. Therefore, induction of tumor-associated p53 mutation likely occurs after several other key events in formaldehyde-induced carcinogenesis.

  8. Effect of tumor-associated macrophages on gastric cancer stem cell in omental milky spots and lymph node micrometastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Hu, Xiang; Liu, Xiao-Yu; Liang, Pin; Zhang, Jian; Cao, Liang; Wang, Zheng-Lin; Liu, Huan-Ran; Yin, Xun-Guo; Dong, Cheng-Yong; Wang, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    We observed whether the effect of tumor-associated macrophages on gastric cancer stem cell in omental milky spots and lymph nodes micrometastasis and research its possible mechanism. Macrophage THP-1 cells and Human gastric adenocarcinoma SGC-7901 cells were collectively cultivated in vivo. We found macrophage could suppress the proliferation and accelerated cell death of MFC cell. Meanwhile, these effects may be concerned with many signaling pathways, and we detected MCP-1 and COX-2 miRNA expressions, PGE-2 release levels, IL-4 and IL-10 activities, and TGF-β, IFN-γ, VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein expressions in collectively cultivated cell. We found that MCP-1 and COX-2 miRNA expressions, and PGE-2 release levels were suppressed, IL-4 activity was inhibited and IL-10 activity was activated in collectively cultivated cell. Meanwhile, TGF-β, MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein expressions were inhibited and IFN-γ and VEGF protein expressions were activated in collectively cultivated cell. Taken together, these results suggest that the effect of tumor-associated macrophages on gastric cancer stem cell in omental milky spots and lymph nodes micrometastasis via COX-2/PGE-2/TGF-β/VEGF signal pathways. PMID:26823693

  9. Design, synthesis and evaluation of N-substituted saccharin derivatives as selective inhibitors of tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase XII.

    PubMed

    D'Ascenzio, Melissa; Carradori, Simone; De Monte, Celeste; Secci, Daniela; Ceruso, Mariangela; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-03-15

    A series of N-alkylated saccharin derivatives were synthesized and tested for the inhibition of four different isoforms of human carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4. 2.1.1): the transmembrane tumor-associated CA IX and XII, and the cytosolic CA I and II. Most of the reported derivatives inhibited CA XII in the nanomolar/low micromolar range, hCA IX with KIs ranging between 11 and 390 nM, whereas they were inactive against both CA I (KIs >50 μM) and II (K(I)s ranging between 39.1 nM and 50 μM). Since CA I and II are off-targets of antitumor carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs), the obtained results represent an encouraging achievement for the development of new anticancer candidates without the common side effects of non-selective CAIs. Moreover, the lack of an explicit zinc binding function on these inhibitors opens the way towards the exploration of novel mechanisms of inhibition that could explain the high selectivity of these compounds for the inhibition of the transmembrane, tumor-associated isoforms over the cytosolic ones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Tumor-Associated Monocytes/Macrophages Impair NK-Cell Function via TGFβ1 in Human Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liu-Sheng; Zhang, Jin-Yu; Teng, Yong-Sheng; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Wang, Ting-Ting; Mao, Fang-Yuan; Lv, Yi-Pin; Cheng, Ping; Li, Wen-Hua; Chen, Na; Duan, Mubing; Chen, Weisan; Guo, Gang; Zou, Quan-Ming; Zhuang, Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a major component of the host antitumor immune response in human cancer. However, the nature, functional regulation, and clinical relevance of NK cells in gastric cancer remain largely unknown. In this study, we showed that the percentages of NK cells in tumors were significantly decreased, and low percentages of tumor-infiltrating NK cells were positively correlated with poor survival and disease progression. Although the expression of activating and inhibitory receptors on NK cells was shown to be not different between tumor and nontumor tissues, NK cells in tumors had impaired effector functions, characterized by decreased IFNγ, TNFα, and Ki-67 expression. We found that tumor-infiltrating monocytes/macrophages were physically close to NK cells, and their percentages negatively correlated with IFNγ(+) and TNFα(+) NK-cell percentages. Ex vivo study showed that isolated tumor-associated monocytes/macrophages could impair NK-cell expression of IFNγ, TNFα, and Ki-67. Blockade of TGFβ1 attenuated such monocytes/macrophages-mediated impairment of NK-cell function. Our data suggest that human NK-cell function was impaired by tumor-associated monocytes/macrophages, and that restoring NK-cell function may be an important therapeutic strategy to prevent tumor immune escape in gastric cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(3); 248-56. ©2017 AACR.

  11. A systematic study of chemogenomics of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiangyong; Luo, Fang; Chen, Lirong; Yuan, Gu; Xu, Xiaojie

    2014-03-04

    Chemogenomics focuses on the interactions between biologically active molecules and protein targets for drug discovery. Carbohydrates are the most abundant compounds in natural products. Compared with other drugs, the carbohydrate drugs show weaker side effects. Searching for multi-target carbohydrate drugs can be regarded as a solution to improve therapeutic efficacy and safety. In this work, we collected 60 344 carbohydrates from the Universal Natural Products Database (UNPD) and explored the chemical space of carbohydrates by principal component analysis. We found that there is a large quantity of potential lead compounds among carbohydrates. Then we explored the potential of carbohydrates in drug discovery by using a network-based multi-target computational approach. All carbohydrates were docked to 2389 target proteins. The most potential carbohydrates for drug discovery and their indications were predicted based on a docking score-weighted prediction model. We also explored the interactions between carbohydrates and target proteins to find the pathological networks, potential drug candidates and new indications.

  12. AntigenMap 3D: an online antigenic cartography resource.

    PubMed

    Barnett, J Lamar; Yang, Jialiang; Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2012-05-01

    Antigenic cartography is a useful technique to visualize and minimize errors in immunological data by projecting antigens to 2D or 3D cartography. However, a 2D cartography may not be sufficient to capture the antigenic relationship from high-dimensional immunological data. AntigenMap 3D presents an online, interactive, and robust 3D antigenic cartography construction and visualization resource. AntigenMap 3D can be applied to identify antigenic variants and vaccine strain candidates for pathogens with rapid antigenic variations, such as influenza A virus. http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap3D

  13. JL1, a novel differentiation antigen of human cortical thymocyte

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Expression of a novel thymocyte differentiation antigen, JL1, defined by a monoclonal antibody (mAb) developed against human thymocytes showed a specificity for stage II double positive (CD4+CD8+) human cortical thymocytes. This antigen was not expressed at detectable levels on medullary thymocytes, mature peripheral leukocytes, bone marrow cells or on other types of tissues elsewhere in the human body. Immunohistologic analysis revealed that JL1 had a clear pattern of distribution on cortical thymocytes. Immunoprecipitation of 125I- labeled cell lysates from human thymocytes and Molt-4 leukemic cell line with anti-JL1 mAb yielded a 120-130-kD single chain glycoprotein. When immunoprecipitation of cell lysate was done after endoglycosidase F treatment, JL1 antigen was still detected by antibody but the band showed a reduction in apparent molecular mass of approximately 5 kD. This suggests that, although JL1 molecule contains carbohydrate group, this does not form a critical part of the antigenic determinant for anti-JL1 antibody. JL1 antigen appears to be the first double positive, stage-specific differentiation antigen of human thymocyte reported so far. This antigen would be a useful marker for lymphoblastic malignancy of stage II thymocyte origin and it may be involved in the thymocyte education process. PMID:8376947

  14. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... peas, and garbanzo beans Starchy vegetables, such as potatoes, corn, green peas, and parsnips Whole grains, such ... your daily fruit servings from whole fruits. Limit sweets, sugar-sweetened beverages, and alcohol. Limit added sugars ...

  15. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in certain vegetables, such as potatoes, beans, peas, and corn. They are also found in breads, ... Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, peas, nuts, seeds, and whole-grain foods (such as ...

  16. T cell tolerance and activation to a transgene-encoded tumor antigen.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, A; McCormick, D; Scott, D; Yeoman, H; Chandler, P; Mellor, A; Dyson, J

    1996-05-01

    Much has been learned in recent years concerning the nature of tumor antigens recognized by T cells. To apply this knowledge clinically, the nature of the host response to individual and multiple tumor antigens has to be characterized. This will help to define the efficacy of immune surveillance and the immune status of the host following exposure to tumor antigens expressed on pre-neoplastic tissue. To approach these questions, we have developed a transgenic mouse which expresses the tumor-specific antigen P91A. The single amino acid substitution in P91A results in the expression of a new MHC class I (H-2Ld)-binding peptide. In transgenic tissue, the H-2Ld/P91A complex is expressed in isolation from other tumor-associated antigens, allowing definition of the immune response to a single defined tumor antigen, a situation closely analogous to events during tumorigenesis. We show that CD8+ T cell immune surveillance of P91A is ineffective without the introduction of a helper determinant operating through stimulation of CD4+ T cells. Recognition of the isolated P91A tumor antigen on normal tissue by CD8+ T cells is a tolerogenic process. Induction of T cell tolerance suggests tumor antigen-T cell interactions occurring during tumorigenesis may elicit T cell tolerance and hence confound some immunotherapeutic approaches.

  17. Intracellular delivery of tumor antigenic peptides in biodegradable-polymer adjuvant for enhancing cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Ma, W

    2014-01-01

    Tumor antigenic peptides therapeutics is a promising field for cancer immunotherapy; advantages include convenient synthesis and modification of antigenic peptides, as well as little toxicity associated with its administration. Vaccination of the peptides derived from tumor-associated antigen (TAA) was specifically designed for T cells in the context of MHC molecules. In the past decades, tumor antigenic peptides have been examined in clinic but numbered success has been obtained because of the stability of peptide and delivery approaches, consequently leading to an inefficient antigen presentation and low response rates in cancer patients. Thus, the appropriate and efficient peptide vaccine carrier systems still continue to be a major obstacle. However, both sipuleucel-T vaccine and anti-CTLA-4 antibody have been approved by FDA for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer and melanoma, respectively. PLGA has been recently used as the adjuvant to elicit enhanced immune responses while delivering tumor antigenic peptides. Intracellular delivery of the peptides derived from TAA into DCs would prolong antigen presentation of APC to T cells. This article aims to describe a new delivery method regarding tumor antigenic peptides and rationales of DCs-based vaccination.

  18. Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR)-Engineered Lymphocytes for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Carlos A.; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) usually combine the antigen binding site of a monoclonal antibody with the signal activating machinery of a T cell, freeing antigen recognition from major histocompatibility complex restriction and thus breaking one of the barriers to more widespread application of cellular therapy. Similar to treatment strategies employing monoclonal antibodies, T cells expressing CARs are highly targeted, but additionally offer the potential benefits of active trafficking to tumor sites, in vivo expansion and long term persistence. Furthermore, gene transfer allows the introduction of countermeasures to tumor immune evasion and of safety mechanisms. Areas covered The authors review the basic structure of so-called first and later generation CARs and their potential advantages over other immune therapy systems. It is described how these molecules can be grafted into immune cells (including retroviral and non-retroviral transduction methods) and strategies to improve the in vivo persistence and function of immune cells expressing CARs are discussed. Examples of tumor associated antigens that have been targeted in preclinical models are presented and clinical experience with t