Science.gov

Sample records for antihydrogen formation dynamics

  1. Formation of low-energy antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; ATHENA Collaboration

    1999-03-01

    Antihydrogen atoms, produced near rest, trapped in a magnetic well, and cooled to the lowest possible temperature (kinetic energy) could provide an extremely powerful tool for the search of violations of CPT and Lorentz invariance. The author describes plans to trap antiprotons and positrons in a combined Penning trap and to form a significant number of cold antihydrogen atoms for comparative precision spectroscopy of hydrogen and antihydrogen.

  2. Antihydrogen formation in laser-assisted positron-antiproton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shu-Min; Miao, Yan-Gang; Zhou, Zi-Fang; Chen, Ji; Liu, Yao-Yang

    1998-09-01

    Antihydrogen formation in the laser-assisted positron-antiproton (nonrelativistic) radiative recombination is investigated. The state of incident positron is given by the Coulomb-Volkov wave function. The perturbative dressed wave function of the atom is obtained in the soft-photon approximation. Our calculation shows that for a geometry of laser polarization parallel to the incident direction, the formation cross section of antihydrogen is greatly reduced. Especially at high impact energy, the reduction is remarkable.

  3. Formation of Antihydrogen Rydberg atoms in strong magnetic field traps

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, T.; Sadeghpour, H. R.

    2008-08-08

    It is shown that several features of antihydrogen production in nested Penning traps can be described with accurate and efficient Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that cold deeply-bound Rydberg states of antihydrogen (H-bar) are produced in three-body capture in the ATRAP experiments and an additional formation mechanism -Rydberg charge transfer-, particular to the nested Penning trap geometry, is responsible for the observed fast (hot) H-bar atoms. Detailed description of the numerical propagation technique for following extreme close encounters is given. An analytic derivation of the power law behavior of the field ionization spectrum is provided.

  4. Formation Of A Cold Antihydrogen Beam in AEGIS For Gravity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Testera, G.; Carraro, C.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G.; Zavatarelli, S.; Belov, A. S.; Gninenko, S. N.; Matveev, V. A.; Bonomi, G.; Fontana, A.; Rotondi, A.; Zenoni, A.; Boscolo, I.; Brambilla, N.; Castelli, F.; Cialdi, S.; Formaro, L.; Gervasini, A.; Giammarchi, M. G.; Vairo, A.

    2008-08-08

    The formation of the antihydrogen beam in the AEGIS experiment through the use of inhomogeneous electric fields is discussed and simulation results including the geometry of the apparatus and realistic hypothesis about the antihydrogen initial conditions are shown. The resulting velocity distribution matches the requirements of the gravity experiment. In particular it is shown that the inhomogeneous electric fields provide radial cooling of the beam during the acceleration.

  5. Antihydrogen formation in collisions of positronium with antiprotons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humberston, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    Antihydrogen, consisting of a positron orbiting around an antiproton, is the simplest few body system consisting entirely of antimatter and as such is of considerable importance in providing additional tests of the validity of charge conjugation invariance. In addition, the nature of the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter might more readily be investigated for an electrically neutral system than one which is charged. Before such studies can be undertaken the antihydrogen must, of course, be produced by attachment of a positron to an antipositron. Several production mechanisms have been proposed, the two most favored of which are radiative capture (spontaneous or stimulated) and charge exchange in positronium-antiproton collisions. The cross section for radiative capture is very much less than that for charge exchange, so that it might be thought that the latter process is greatly to be preferred. Various calculations of the cross section for the charge exchange process are briefly reviewed.

  6. Trapping and Probing Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    2013-03-27

    Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is a promising path to sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The most direct route to achieve this goal is to create and probe antihydrogen in a magnetic minimum trap. Antihydrogen has been synthesized and trapped for 1000s at CERN by the ALPHA Collaboration. Some of the challenges associated with achieving these milestones will be discussed, including mixing cryogenic positron and antiproton plasmas to synthesize antihydrogen with kinetic energy less than the trap potential of .5K. Recent experiments in which hyperfine transitions were resonantly induced with microwaves will be presented. The opportunity for gravitational measurements in traps based on detailed studies of antihydrogen dynamics will be described. The talk will conclude with a discussion future antihydrogen research that will use a new experimental apparatus, ALPHA-I.

  7. Trapped antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, E.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kemp, S. L.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif el Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ˜1 T (˜0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be `born' inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been trapped for at least 172 ms and then released—the first instance of a purely antimatter atomic system confined for any length of time (Andresen et al., Nature 468:673, 2010). We present a description of the main components of the ALPHA traps and detectors that were key to realising this result. We discuss how the antihydrogen atoms were identified and how they were discriminated from the background processes. Since the results published in Andresen et al. (Nature 468:673, 2010), refinements in the antihydrogen production technique have allowed many more antihydrogen atoms to be trapped, and held for much longer times. We have identified antihydrogen atoms that have been trapped for at least 1,000 s in the apparatus (Andresen et al., Nature Physics 7:558, 2011). This is more than sufficient time to interrogate the atoms spectroscopically, as well as to ensure that they have relaxed to their ground state.

  8. Trapped antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, E.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kemp, S. L.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif el Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ˜1 T (˜0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be `born' inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been trapped for at least 172 ms and then released—the first instance of a purely antimatter atomic system confined for any length of time (Andresen et al., Nature 468:673, 2010). We present a description of the main components of the ALPHA traps and detectors that were key to realising this result. We discuss how the antihydrogen atoms were identified and how they were discriminated from the background processes. Since the results published in Andresen et al. (Nature 468:673, 2010), refinements in the antihydrogen production technique have allowed many more antihydrogen atoms to be trapped, and held for much longer times. We have identified antihydrogen atoms that have been trapped for at least 1,000 s in the apparatus (Andresen et al., Nature Physics 7:558, 2011). This is more than sufficient time to interrogate the atoms spectroscopically, as well as to ensure that they have relaxed to their ground state.

  9. Antihydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzini, Evandro Lodi; Venturelli, Luca; Zurlo, Nicola

    2008-08-08

    Antihydrogen production in ATHENA is analyzed more carefully. The most important peculiarities of the different experimental situations are discussed. The protonium production via the first matter-antimatter chemical reaction is commented too.

  10. Antihydrogen Trapped in the ALPHA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-25

    In 2010 the ALPHA collaboration succeeded in trapping antihydrogen atoms for the first time.[i]  Stored antihydrogen promises to be a unique tool for making high precision measurements of the structure of this first anti-atom. Achieving this milestone presented several substantial experimental challenges and this talk will describe how they were overcome.   The unique design features of the ALPHA apparatus will be explained.[ii]  These allow a high intensity positron source and an antiproton imaging detector similar to the one used in the ATHENA[iii] experiment to be combined with an innovative magnet design of the anti-atom trap. This seeks to minimise the perturbations to trapped charged particles which may cause particle loss and heating[iv].   The diagnostic techniques used to measure the diameter, number, density, and temperatures of both plasmas will be presented as will the methods developed to actively compress and cool of both plasma species to sizes and temperatures [v],[vi], [vii] where trapping attempts with a reasonable chance of success can be tried.   The results of the successful trapping experiments will be outlined as well as some subsequent experiments to improve the trapping rate and storage time. [i] 'Trapped antihydrogen' G.B. Andresen et al., Nature 468, 673 (2010) [ii]'A Magnetic Trap for Antihydrogen Confinement' W. Bertsche et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. Phys. Res. A566, 746 (2006) [iii] Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms M.Amoretti et al., Nature 419, 456 (2002). [iv]' Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap' G.B. Andresen et al., Phys. Lett. B 685, 141 (2010) [v]' Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures',                                   G.B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 105, 013003 (2010) [vi]'Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping' G. B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 100, 203401 (2008) [vii]  'Autoresonant

  11. Antihydrogen Trapped in the ALPHA Experiment

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In 2010 the ALPHA collaboration succeeded in trapping antihydrogen atoms for the first time.[i]  Stored antihydrogen promises to be a unique tool for making high precision measurements of the structure of this first anti-atom. Achieving this milestone presented several substantial experimental challenges and this talk will describe how they were overcome.   The unique design features of the ALPHA apparatus will be explained.[ii]  These allow a high intensity positron source and an antiproton imaging detector similar to the one used in the ATHENA[iii] experiment to be combined with an innovative magnet design of the anti-atom trap. This seeks to minimise the perturbations to trapped charged particles which may cause particle loss and heating[iv].   The diagnostic techniques used to measure the diameter, number, density, and temperatures of both plasmas will be presented as will the methods developed to actively compress and cool of both plasma species to sizes and temperatures [v],[vi], [vii] where trapping attempts with a reasonable chance of success can be tried.   The results of the successful trapping experiments will be outlined as well as some subsequent experiments to improve the trapping rate and storage time. [i] 'Trapped antihydrogen' G.B. Andresen et al., Nature 468, 673 (2010) [ii]'A Magnetic Trap for Antihydrogen Confinement' W. Bertsche et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. Phys. Res. A566, 746 (2006) [iii] Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms M.Amoretti et al., Nature 419, 456 (2002). [iv]' Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap' G.B. Andresen et al., Phys. Lett. B 685, 141 (2010) [v]' Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures',                                   G.B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 105, 013003 (2010) [vi]'Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping' G. B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 100, 203401 (2008) [vii]  'Autoresonant

  12. Physics with antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsche, W. A.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Madsen, N.

    2015-12-01

    Performing measurements of the properties of antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, and comparing the results with those for ordinary hydrogen, has long been seen as a route to test some of the fundamental principles of physics. There has been much experimental progress in this direction in recent years, and antihydrogen is now routinely created and trapped and a range of exciting measurements probing the foundations of modern physics are planned or underway. In this contribution we review the techniques developed to facilitate the capture and manipulation of positrons and antiprotons, along with procedures to bring them together to create antihydrogen. Once formed, the antihydrogen has been detected by its destruction via annihilation or field ionization, and aspects of the methodologies involved are summarized. Magnetic minimum neutral atom traps have been employed to allow some of the antihydrogen created to be held for considerable periods. We describe such devices, and their implementation, along with the cusp magnetic trap used to produce the first evidence for a low-energy beam of antihydrogen. The experiments performed to date on antihydrogen are discussed, including the first observation of a resonant quantum transition and the analyses that have yielded a limit on the electrical neutrality of the anti-atom and placed crude bounds on its gravitational behaviour. Our review concludes with an outlook, including the new ELENA extension to the antiproton decelerator facility at CERN, together with summaries of how we envisage the major threads of antihydrogen physics will progress in the coming years.

  13. Physics with antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsche, W. A.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Madsen, N.

    2014-12-01

    Performing measurements of the properties of antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, and comparing the results with those for ordinary hydrogen, has long been seen as a route to test some of the fundamental principles of physics. There has been much experimental progress in this direction in recent years, and antihydrogen is now routinely created and trapped and a range of exciting measurements probing the foundations of modern physics are planned or underway. In this contribution we review the techniques developed to facilitate the capture and manipulation of positrons and antiprotons, along with procedures to bring them together to create antihydrogen. Once formed, the antihydrogen has been detected by its destruction via annihilation or field ionization, and aspects of the methodologies involved are summarized. Magnetic minimum neutral atom traps have been employed to allow some of the antihydrogen created to be held for considerable periods. We describe such devices, and their implementation, along with the cusp magnetic trap used to produce the first evidence for a low-energy beam of antihydrogen. The experiments performed to date on antihydrogen are discussed, including the first observation of a resonant quantum transition and the analyses that have yielded a limit on the electrical neutrality of the anti-atom and placed crude bounds on its gravitational behaviour. Our review concludes with an outlook, including the new ELENA extension to the antiproton decelerator facility at CERN, together with summaries of how we envisage the major threads of antihydrogen physics will progress in the coming years.

  14. Antihydrogen on tap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Plentiful quantities of antihydrogen, the bound state system of the antiparticles the positron and the antiproton, have recently been made under very controlled conditions in experiments at the European Laboratory of Particle Physics (CERN) near Geneva. In this article I describe how that was done, and why.

  15. Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Blanford, Glenn DelFosse

    1998-01-01

    An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {bar H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +} e{sup -} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

  16. ANTIHYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND PRECISION SPECTROSCOPY WITH ATHENA/AD-1

    SciTech Connect

    M. HOLZSCHEITER; C. AMSLER; ET AL

    2000-11-01

    CPT invariance is a fundamental property of quantum field theories in flat space-time. Principal consequences include the predictions that particles and their antiparticles have equal masses and lifetimes, and equal and opposite electric charges and magnetic moments. It also follows that the fine structure, hyperfine structure, and Lamb shifts of matter and antimatter bound systems should be identical. It is proposed to generate new stringent tests of CPT using precision spectroscopy on antihydrogen atoms. An experiment to produce antihydrogen at rest has been approved for running at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. We describe the fundamental features of this experiment and the experimental approach to the first phase of the program, the formation and identification of low energy antihydrogen.

  17. Measuring the antihydrogen Lamb shift with a relativistic antihydrogen beam

    SciTech Connect

    Blanford, G.; Gollwitzer, K.; Mandelkern, M.; Schultz, J.; Takei, G.; Zioulas, G.; Christian, D.C.; Munger, C.T.

    1998-06-01

    We propose an experiment to measure the Lamb shift and fine structure (the intervals 2s{sub 1/2}{minus}2p{sub 1/2} and 2p{sub 1/2}{minus}2p{sub 3/2}) in antihydrogen. A sample of 10000 antihydrogen atoms at a momentum of 8.85GeV/c suffices to measure the Lamb shift to 5{percent} and the fine structure to 1{percent}. Atomic collisions excite antihydrogen atoms to states with n=2; field ionization in a Lorentz-transformed laboratory magnetic field then prepares a particular n=2 state, and is used again to analyze that state after it is allowed to oscillate in a region of zero field. This experiment is feasible at Fermilab. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. GBAR. Gravitational behavior of antihydrogen at rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debu, Pascal

    2012-12-01

    The GBAR project aims to perform the first test of the Equivalence Principle with antimatter by measuring the free fall of ultra-cold antihydrogen atoms. The objective is to measure the gravitational acceleration to better than a percent in a first stage, with a long term perspective to reach a much higher precision using gravitational quantum states of antihydrogen. The production of 20 μK atoms proceeds via sympathetic cooling of overline{H^+} ions by Be + ions. overline{H^+} ions are produced via a two-step process, involving the interaction of bursts of 107 slow antiprotons from the AD (or ELENA upgrade) at CERN with a dense positronium cloud. In order to produce enough positronium, it is necessary to realize an intense source of slow positrons, a few 108 per second. This is done with a small electron linear accelerator. A few 1010 positrons are accumulated every cycle in a Penning-Malmberg trap before they are ejected onto a positron-to-positronium converter. The overall scheme of the experiment is described and the status of the installation of the prototype positron source at Saclay is shown. The accumulation scheme of positrons is given, and positronium formation results are presented. The estimated performance and efficiency of the various steps of the experiment are given.

  19. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-08-08

    The ALPHA apparatus is designed to produce and trap antihydrogen atoms. The device comprises a multifunction Penning trap and a superconducting, neutral atom trap having a minimum-B configuration. The atom trap features an octupole magnet for transverse confinement and solenoidal mirror coils for longitudinal confinement. The magnetic trap employs a fast shutdown system to maximize the probability of detecting the annihilation of released antihydrogen. In this article we describe the first attempts to observe antihydrogen trapping.

  20. Collaborative Research: Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Plasma Physics of Antihydrogen Generation and Trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Robicheaux, Francis

    2013-03-29

    Ever since Dirac predicted the existence of antimatter in 1928, it has excited our collective imagination. Seventy-four years later, two collaborations at CERN, ATHENA and ATRAP, created the first slow antihydrogen. This was a stunning achievement, but the most important antimatter experiments require trapped, not just slow, antihydrogen. The velocity, magnetic moment, and internal energy and state of the antihydrogen depend strongly on how it is formed. To trap antihydrogen, physicists face two broad challenges: (1) Understanding the behavior of the positron and antiprotons plasmas from which the antihydrogen is synthesized; and (2) Understanding the atomic processes by which positrons and antiprotons recombine. Recombination lies on the boundary between atomic and plasma physics, and cannot be studied properly without employing tools from both fields. The proposed collaborative research campaign will address both of these challenges. The collaboration members have unique experience in the relevant fields of experimental and theoretical non-neutral plasma physics, numerical modeling, nonlinear dynamics and atomic physics. This expertise is not found elsewhere amongst antihydrogen researchers. The collaboration members have strong ties already, and seek to formalize them with this proposal. Three of the four PIs are members of the ALPHA collaboration, an international collaboration formed by most of the principal members of the ATHENA collaboration.

  1. Antihydrogen production and precision experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, M.M.; Goldman, T.; Holzscheiter, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    The study of CPT invariance with the highest achievable precision in all particle sectors is of fundamental importance for physics. Equally important is the question of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. In recent years, impressive progress has been achieved in capturing antiprotons in specially designed Penning traps, in cooling them to energies of a few milli-electron volts, and in storing them for hours in a small volume of space. Positrons have been accumulated in large numbers in similar traps, and low energy positron or positronium beams have been generated. Finally, steady progress has been made in trapping and cooling neutral atoms. Thus the ingredients to form antihydrogen at rest are at hand. Once antihydrogen atoms have been captured at low energy, spectroscopic methods can be applied to interrogate their atomic structure with extremely high precision and compare it to its normal matter counterpart, the hydrogen atom. Especially the 1S-2S transition, with a lifetime of the excited state of 122 msec and thereby a natural linewidth of 5 parts in 10{sup 16}, offers in principle the possibility to directly compare matter and antimatter properties at a level of 1 part in 10{sup 16}.

  2. Physics: Optical transition seen in antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Precise measurements of antimatter systems might cast light on why the Universe is dominated by matter. The observation of a transition in an antihydrogen atom heralds the next wave of high-precision antimatter studies. See Letter p.506

  3. Direct detection of antihydrogen atoms using a BGO crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Y.; Kuroda, N.; Ohtsuka, M.; Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V.; Tajima, M.; Torii, H. A.; Zurlo, N.; Matsuda, Y.; Venturelli, L.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed a detector consisting of a large size BGO crystal to detect an atomic antihydrogen beam, and performed the direct detection of antihydrogen atoms. Energy spectra from antihydrogen annihilation on the BGO crystal are discussed in comparison to simulation results from the GEANT4 toolkit. Background mainly originating from cosmic rays were strongly suppressed by analyzing the energy deposited in the BGO and requiring a multiplicity of charged pions. Thus antihydrogen events were identified.

  4. Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.

    2008-05-23

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  5. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  6. Rearrangement and annihilation in antihydrogen-atom scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsell, Svante

    2008-08-08

    I review some results for annihilation and rearrangement processes in low-energy antihydrogen-hydrogen and antihydrogen-helium scattering. For the strong nuclear force results using a {delta}-function potential are compared to a scattering length approach. It is found that the {delta}-function potential does not give correct annihilation cross sections in the case of antihydrogen-helium scattering. Problem associated with the use of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for rearrangement calculations are reviewed.

  7. s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen off atomic alkali-metal targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Ghosh, A. S.

    2006-03-15

    We have investigated the s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen atoms off atomic alkali-metal targets (Li, Na, K, and Rb) at thermal energies (10{sup -16}-10{sup -4} a.u.) using an atomic orbital expansion technique. The elastic cross sections of these systems at thermal energies are found to be very high compared to H-H and H-He systems. The theoretical models employed in this study are so chosen to consider long-range forces dynamically in the calculation. The mechanism of cooling suggests that Li may be considered to be a good candidate as a buffer gas for enhanced cooling of antihydrogen atoms to ultracold temperature.

  8. Characteristic coupling time between axial and transverse energy modes for anti-hydrogen in magnetostatic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Mike; Fajans, Joel

    2016-10-01

    For upcoming ALPHA collaboration laser spectroscopy and gravity experiments, the nature of the chaotic trajectories of individual antihydrogen atoms trapped in the octupole Ioffe magnetic trap is of importance. Of particular interest for experimental design is the coupling time between the axial and transverse modes of energy for the antihydrogen atoms. Using Monte Carlo simulations of semiclassical dynamics of antihydrogen trajectories, we quantify this characteristic coupling time between axial and transverse modes of energy. There appear to be two classes of trajectories: for orbits whose axial energy is higher than 10% of the total energy, the axial energy varies chaotically on the order of 1-10 seconds, whereas for orbits whose axial energy is around 10% of the total energy, the axial energy remains nearly constant on the order of 1000 seconds or longer. Furthermore, we search through parameter -space to find parameters of the magnetic trap that minimize and maximize this characteristic coupling time. This work was supported by the UC Berkeley Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship, the Berkeley Research Computing program, the Department of Energy contract DE-FG02-06ER54904, and the National Science Foundation Grant 1500538-PHY.

  9. Cold antihydrogen: a new frontier in fundamental physics.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Niels

    2010-08-13

    The year 2002 heralded a breakthrough in antimatter research when the first low energy antihydrogen atoms were produced. Antimatter has inspired both science and fiction writers for many years, but detailed studies have until now eluded science. Antimatter is notoriously difficult to study as it does not readily occur in nature, even though our current understanding of the laws of physics have us expecting that it should make up half of the universe. The pursuit of cold antihydrogen is driven by a desire to solve this profound mystery. This paper will motivate the current effort to make cold antihydrogen, explain how antihydrogen is currently made, and how and why we are attempting to trap it. It will also discuss what kind of measurements are planned to gain new insights into the unexplained asymmetry between matter and antimatter in the universe.

  10. The Dynamics of Latifundia Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Luis Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Land tenure inequity is a major social problem in developing nations worldwide. In societies, where land is a commodity, inequities in land tenure are associated with gaps in income distribution, poverty and biodiversity loss. A common pattern of land tenure inequities through the history of civilization has been the formation of latifundia [Zhuāngyuán in chinese], i.e., a pattern where land ownership is concentrated by a small fraction of the whole population. Here, we use simple Markov chain models to study the dynamics of latifundia formation in a heterogeneous landscape where land can transition between forest, agriculture and recovering land. We systematically study the likelihood of latifundia formation under the assumption of pre-capitalist trade, where trade is based on the average utility of land parcels belonging to each individual landowner during a discrete time step. By restricting land trade to that under recovery, we found the likelihood of latifundia formation to increase with the size of the system, i.e., the amount of land and individuals in the society. We found that an increase of the transition rate for land use changes, i.e., how quickly land use changes, promotes more equitable patterns of land ownership. Disease introduction in the system, which reduced land profitability for infected individual landowners, promoted the formation of latifundia, with an increased likelihood for latifundia formation when there were heterogeneities in the susceptibility to infection. Finally, our model suggests that land ownership reforms need to guarantee an equitative distribution of land among individuals in a society to avoid the formation of latifundia. PMID:24376597

  11. Mantle dynamics following supercontinent formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Philip J.

    This thesis presents mantle convection numerical simulations of supercontinent formation. Approximately 300 million years ago, through the large-scale subduction of oceanic sea floor, continental material amalgamated to form the supercontinent Pangea. For 100 million years after its formation, Pangea remained relatively stationary, and subduction of oceanic material featured on its margins. The present-day location of the continents is due to the rifting apart of Pangea, with supercontinent dispersal being characterized by increased volcanic activity linked to the generation of deep mantle plumes. The work presented here investigates the thermal evolution of mantle dynamics (e.g., mantle temperatures and sub-continental plumes) following the formation of a supercontinent. Specifically, continental insulation and continental margin subduction are analyzed. Continental material, as compared to oceanic material, inhibits heat flow from the mantle. Previous numerical simulations have shown that the formation of a stationary supercontinent would elevate sub-continental mantle temperatures due to the effect of continental insulation, leading to the break-up of the continent. By modelling a vigorously convecting mantle that features thermally and mechanically distinct continental and oceanic plates, this study shows the effect of continental insulation on the mantle to be minimal. However, the formation of a supercontinent results in sub-continental plume formation due to the re-positioning of subduction zones to the margins of the continent. Accordingly, it is demonstrated that continental insulation is not a significant factor in producing sub-supercontinent plumes but that subduction patterns control the location and timing of upwelling formation. A theme throughout the thesis is an inquiry into why geodynamic studies would produce different results. Mantle viscosity, Rayleigh number, continental size, continental insulation, and oceanic plate boundary evolution are

  12. Quantum ballistic experiment on antihydrogen fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, A. Yu; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Dufour, G.; Reynaud, S.

    2016-03-01

    We propose an approach to measuring gravitational mass of antihydrogen (\\bar{{{H}}}) based on interferometry of time distribution of free-fall events of antiatoms. Our method consists of preparing a coherent superposition of quantum states of \\bar{{{H}}} localized near a material surface in the gravitational field of the Earth, and then observing the time distribution of annihilation events after the free-fall of the initially prepared superposition from a given height to a detector plate. We show that the time distribution of interest is mapped to a precisely predictable velocity distribution of the initial wave packet. This approach is combined with production of a coherent superposition of gravitational states by inducing a resonant transition using an oscillating gradient magnetic field. We show that the relative accuracy of measuring the \\bar{{{H}}} atom gravitational mass can be achieved with this approach is 10-4, with 103 antiatoms settled in lowest gravitational states.

  13. Dynamics of heteromolecular filament formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dear, Alexander J.; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-11-01

    The self-assembly of molecular building blocks into linear filaments is a common form of self-organization in nature and underlies the formation of supra-molecular polymers in a variety of contexts, including in both functional and aberrant biology. To date, attention has focused mainly on homomolecular assembly phenomena; however, it has recently become apparent that heteromolecular assemblies can be common, and, for instance, pathological protein filaments such as amyloid aggregates form in vivo in environments supporting copolymerization. Here, we present a general kinetic scheme for heteromolecular filament formation and derive closed-form analytical expressions that describe the dynamics of such systems. Our results reveal the existence of a demixing transition time controlled by the relative rates of depletion of the different aggregating species, after which predominantly homomolecular polymers are formed even when the initial solution is heteromolecular. Furthermore, these results may be applied to the analysis of experimental kinetic data on the aggregation of mixtures of proteins, to determine which fundamental reaction steps occur between unlike proteins, and to provide accurate estimates of their rate constants.

  14. Positron plasma control techniques for the production of cold antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Funakoshi, R.; Hayano, R. S.; Amoretti, M.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Bonomi, G.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Madsen, N.; Canali, C.; Carraro, C.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L. V.; Mitchard, D.; Werf, D. P. van der; Doser, M.

    2007-07-15

    An observation of a clear dependence of antihydrogen production on positron plasma shapes is reported. For this purpose a plasma control method has been developed combining the plasma rotating-wall technique with a mode diagnostic system. With the help of real-time and nondestructive observations, the rotating-wall parameters have been optimized. The positron plasma can be manipulated into a wide range of shapes (aspect ratio 6.5{<=}{alpha} < or approx. 80) and densities (1.5x10{sup 8}{<=}n < or approx. 7x10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) within a short duration (25 s) compatible with the ATHENA antihydrogen production cycle.

  15. The GBAR experiment: gravitational behaviour of antihydrogen at rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, P.; Sacquin, Y.

    2012-09-01

    The recently recommended experiment GBAR is foreseen to run at CERN at the AD/ELENA antiproton source. It aims at performing the first measurement of the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antimatter by observing the free-fall of antihydrogen atoms. This requires creating anti-atoms at an unprecedented low energy. The different steps of the experiment and their present status are reviewed.

  16. An experimental limit on the charge of antihydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Amole, C.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Isaac, C. A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Little, A.; Madsen, N.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Napoli, S. C.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C.Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Tharp, T. D.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Vendeiro, Z.; Wurtele, J. S.; Zhmoginov, A. I.; Charman, A. E.

    2014-01-01

    The properties of antihydrogen are expected to be identical to those of hydrogen, and any differences would constitute a profound challenge to the fundamental theories of physics. The most commonly discussed antiatom-based tests of these theories are searches for antihydrogen-hydrogen spectral differences (tests of CPT (charge-parity-time) invariance) or gravitational differences (tests of the weak equivalence principle). Here we, the ALPHA Collaboration, report a different and somewhat unusual test of CPT and of quantum anomaly cancellation. A retrospective analysis of the influence of electric fields on antihydrogen atoms released from the ALPHA trap finds a mean axial deflection of 4.1±3.4 mm for an average axial electric field of 0.51 V mm−1. Combined with extensive numerical modelling, this measurement leads to a bound on the charge Qe of antihydrogen of Q=(−1.3±1.1±0.4) × 10−8. Here, e is the unit charge, and the errors are from statistics and systematic effects. PMID:24892800

  17. Experimental and computational study of autoresonant injection of antiprotons into positron plasma in antihydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Chukman; Wurtele, Jonathan; Fajans, Joel; Friedland, Lazar; Bertsche, William

    2012-10-01

    The injection of antiprotons into positron plasma during antihydrogen synthesis in ALPHA is simulated numerically and compared with experimental measurements. The antiprotons and positrons are initially confined in adjacent axial potential wells in a nested Penning-Malmberg trap. The antiproton plasma is excited autoresonantly and partially injected into the adjacent positron plasma, creating antihydrogen. The excitation and injection process is modeled numerically with a hybrid code in which the antiproton plasma responds to the autoresonant drive fully dynamically, and the positrons respond quasi-statically. The strong axial magnetic field suppresses radial transport on the timescales of interest. The antiproton plasma is thus assumed to consist of concentric cylindrical tubes within which antiprotons move only in the axial direction, and the evolution of the phase space distributions in each tube obeys a one-dimensional Vlasov equation. The antiproton self-field is obtained by solving the Poisson equation in two-dimensions, thereby coupling the tubes. Alternative injection schemes and the effect of varying antiproton number and temperature are also examined.

  18. Dynamics of rock varnish formation

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Reneau, S.L.; Guthrie, G.D. Jr.; Bish, D.L.; Harrington, C.D.

    1991-01-01

    Our studies of rock varnish from the southwestern United States suggest that the Mn-phase in rock varnish has neither the chemistry nor the crystal structure of birnessite. Rather, the Mn-rich phase is non-crystalline and contains Ba, Ca, Fe, Al, and P. Unknowns concerning the formation of this non-crystalline Mn phase must be resolved before researchers are able to define chemical parameters of rock varnish formation based upon conditions of formation of the Mn phase. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  19. The dynamics of city formation*

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, J. Vernon; Venables, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines city formation in a country whose urban population is growing steadily over time, with new cities required to accommodate this growth. In contrast to most of the literature there is immobility of housing and urban infrastructure, and investment in these assets is taken on the basis of forward-looking behavior. In the presence of these fixed assets cities form sequentially, without the population swings in existing cities that arise in current models, but with swings in house rents. Equilibrium city size, absent government, may be larger or smaller than is efficient, depending on how urban externalities vary with population. Efficient formation of cities with internalization of externalities involves local government intervention and borrowing to finance development. The paper explores the institutions required for successful local government intervention. PMID:25089087

  20. On the temperature of antihydrogen formed in magnetic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Bronin, S. Y.; Manykin, E. A.; Zelener, B. B.; Zelener, B. V.

    2016-11-01

    Kinetic processes taking place after injection of antiprotons in cold positron cloud are discussed. Mixture of antiparticles is considered as low temperature non neutral weakly coupled plasma. Simple estimations of energy of antihydrogen atoms that may be formed due to three body recombination in the system are made. Dependence of atom energy on initial particles temperatures and influence of strong confining magnetic field are discussed.

  1. Antihydrogen Production within a Penning-Ioffe Trap (ATRAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessels, E. A.

    2008-05-01

    Slow antihydrogen atoms are produced in a Penning trap that is located within a quadrupole Ioffe trap. 5-MeV antiprotons provided by the CERN Antiproton Decelerator are slowed in a Be degrader and captured in the Penning trap where they are further cooled by collisions with cold trapped photoelectrons produced using a 20-mJ excimer laser pulse. Positrons from a Na-22 source are cooled with gas molecules and are trapped in a separate Penning trap and then transferred through a small aperture into the 1-T field of the main Penning trap where they are also cooled by electrons. Typically, 60 million positrons and 0.5 million antiprotons are collected within 15 minutes. Antihydrogen is formed as the positrons and antiprotons are mixed in a slowly-ramped nested well, and is detected by Stark-field ionization. The Ioffe trap, intended to ultimately confine extremely cold, ground-state H atoms, results in divergent magnetic fields, and we demonstrate that antihydrogen can be formed by combining its constituents in these fields. In fact, the number of detected antihydrogen atoms increases when the 400-mK Ioffe trap is turned on. This work is done by the ATRAP collaboration: G. Gabrielse (spokesperson), P. Larochelle, D. Le Sage, B. Levitt, W.S. Kolthammer, R. McConnell, P. Richerme, J. Wrubel, A. Speck, M.C. George, D. Grzonka, W. Oelert, T. Sefzick, Z. Zhang, A. Carew, D. Comeau, E.A. Hessels, C.H. Storry, M. Weel and J. Walz.

  2. Antihydrogen Production within a Penning-Ioffe Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Larochelle, P.; Le Sage, D.; Levitt, B.; Kolthammer, W. S.; McConnell, R.; Richerme, P.; Wrubel, J.; Speck, A.; George, M. C.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.; Zhang, Z.; Carew, A.; Comeau, D.; Hessels, E. A.; Storry, C. H.; Weel, M.; Walz, J.

    2008-03-21

    Slow antihydrogen (H) is produced within a Penning trap that is located within a quadrupole Ioffe trap, the latter intended to ultimately confine extremely cold, ground-state H atoms. Observed H atoms in this configuration resolve a debate about whether positrons and antiprotons can be brought together to form atoms within the divergent magnetic fields of a quadrupole Ioffe trap. The number of detected H atoms actually increases when a 400 mK Ioffe trap is turned on.

  3. Quenching of antihydrogen gravitational states by surface charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, A. Yu; Kupriyanova, E. A.; Lambrecht, A.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Reynaud, S.

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of the quenching of antihydrogen quantum states near the surface of a material in the Earth's gravitational field by local charges randomly distributed along a mirror surface. The quenching reduces the probability of quantum reflection because of the additional atom-charge interaction, and thus the nonadiabatic transitions to excited gravitational states. Our approach is suitable when accounting for quenching caused by any kind of additional interaction with a characteristic range much smaller than the typical gravitational state wavelength.

  4. CPT tests with antihydrogen and antiprotonic helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayano, Ryugo

    2014-09-01

    Recent progress of the CPT tests with antihydrogen and antiprotonic helium atoms by the ASACUSA collaboration at CERN's antiproton decelerator will be presented. The antiprotonic helium atom (antiproton+electron+helium nucleus) is a serendipitously discovered metastable three-body system, whose energy levels can now be studied by laser spectroscopy techniques to a relative precision of ~10-9. By comparing these precise experimental results with the result of three-body QED calculation, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined to a relative precision of 1 . 2 ×10-9 . While this can be used as a precise test of the CPT symmetry, CODATA instead assumed the CPT, and combined our results with the proton-to-electron mass ratio measured by the Penning trap method in their adjustment of the fundamental physical constants. In addition to the laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium, ASACUSA collaboration also aims at measuring the ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen using the (anti)-atomic beam method. Extraction of antihydrogen atoms from a ``cusp'' trap has so far been demonstrated. Both of these experiments will benefit from the completing of a new antiproton decelerator-cooler ring called ELENA, which is under construction at CERN.

  5. Quantum pattern formation dynamics of photoinduced nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Kunio; Nasu, Keiichiro

    2008-06-01

    We study the dynamics of quantum pattern formation processes in molecular crystals which is concomitant with photoinduced nucleation. Since the nucleation process in coherent regime is driven by the nonadiabatic transition in each molecule followed by the propagation of phonons, it is necessary to take into account the quantum nature of both electrons and phonons in order to pursue the dynamics of the system. Therefore, we employ a model of localized electrons coupled with a quantized phonon mode and solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation numerically. We found that there is a minimal size of clusters of excited molecules which triggers the photoinduced nucleation process; i.e., nucleation does not take place unless sufficient photoexcitation energy is concentrated within a narrow area of the system. We show that this result means that the spatial distribution of photoexcited molecules plays an important role in the nonlinearity of the dynamics and also in the optical properties observed in experiments. We calculate the conversion ratio, the rate of cluster formation, and correlation functions to reveal the dynamical properties of the pattern formation process; the initial dynamics of the photoinduced structural change is discussed from the viewpoint of pattern formation.

  6. Trapping of antiprotons -- a first step on the way to antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Holzscheiter, M.H.

    1993-07-01

    A first step towards producing and effectively utilizing antihydrogen atoms consists of trapping antiprotons. The immediate next step must then be to control, i.e. trap the produced antihydrogen. The current state of the art in trapping antiprotons and positrons is reviewed, and the challenges in trapping the resulting neutral particles are discussed.

  7. Dynamic models of lateritic bauxite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, V. V.; Bogatyrev, B. A.

    2012-09-01

    2D dynamic models of bauxite formation in the weathering mantle covering denudation areas drained by river systems are discussed. The role of relief-forming factors (tectonic uplift, river erosion and denudation of drainage divides), the interrelation of hydrogeological and lithologic structure of the bauxitebearing weathering mantle, and the dynamics of zoning formation above and below groundwater level are described in the models. Creative and destructive epochs of lateritic bauxite formation differing in tectonic regime are distinguished. During the creative epochs, lateritic weathering develops against a background of decreasing denudation and an increase in areas of bauxite formation. The destructive epochs are characterized by intense denudation, cutting down the areas of lateritic bauxite formation and eventually leading to the complete removal of the weathering mantle. Different morphogenetic types and varieties of bauxite-bearing weathering mantles develop during creative and destructive epochs. The morphology of the weathering mantle sections at the deposits of Cenozoic lateritic bauxite in the present-day tropical zone of the Earth corresponds to the destructive epoch, which is characterized by declining areas of lateritic bauxite formation and will end with complete denudation of lateritic bauxite.

  8. Parametric Study of Radiative Cooling of Solid Antihydrogen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    modeled is a sphere of solid anti-parahydrogen at 1.5 K or below levitated in a spherical cryogenic vacuum chamber. The free matter gas in the chamber is...problem is under way. 2 If a solid antihydrogen pellet can be created, the ice ball can be placed in a cryogenic vacuum chamber and levitated elec...sublimation rate. An upper bound can be placed on the sublimation rate if one assumes that the lattice is vibrating at its maximum frequency, that

  9. TIME-VARYING DYNAMICAL STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eve J.; Chang, Philip; Murray, Norman

    2015-02-10

    We present numerical evidence of dynamic star formation in which the accreted stellar mass grows superlinearly with time, roughly as t {sup 2}. We perform simulations of star formation in self-gravitating hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is continuously driven. By turning the self-gravity of the gas in the simulations on or off, we demonstrate that self-gravity is the dominant physical effect setting the mass accretion rate at early times before feedback effects take over, contrary to theories of turbulence-regulated star formation. We find that gravitational collapse steepens the density profile around stars, generating the power-law tail on what is otherwise a lognormal density probability distribution function. Furthermore, we find turbulent velocity profiles to flatten inside collapsing regions, altering the size-line width relation. This local flattening reflects enhancements of turbulent velocity on small scales, as verified by changes to the velocity power spectra. Our results indicate that gas self-gravity dynamically alters both density and velocity structures in clouds, giving rise to a time-varying star formation rate. We find that a substantial fraction of the gas that forms stars arrives via low-density flows, as opposed to accreting through high-density filaments.

  10. Spacecraft formation flying: Dynamics, control and navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfriend, Kyle Terry; Vadali, Srinivas Rao; Gurfil, Pini; How, Jonathan; Breger, Louis S.

    2009-12-01

    Space agencies are now realizing that much of what has previously been achieved using hugely complex and costly single platform projects - large unmanned and manned satellites (including the present International Space Station) - can be replaced by a number of smaller satellites networked together. The key challenge of this approach, namely ensuring the proper formation flying of multiple craft, is the topic of this second volume in Elsevier's Astrodynamics Series, Spacecraft Formation Flying: Dynamics, control and navigation. In this unique text, authors Alfriend et al. provide a coherent discussion of spacecraft relative motion, both in the unperturbed and perturbed settings, explain the main control approaches for regulating relative satellite dynamics, using both impulsive and continuous maneuvers, and present the main constituents required for relative navigation. The early chapters provide a foundation upon which later discussions are built, making this a complete, standalone offering. Intended for graduate students, professors and academic researchers in the fields of aerospace and mechanical engineering, mathematics, astronomy and astrophysics, Spacecraft Formation Flying is a technical yet accessible, forward-thinking guide to this critical area of astrodynamics.

  11. Dynamics of gradient formation by intracellular shuttling

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2015-08-21

    A number of important cellular functions rely on the formation of intracellular protein concentration gradients. Experimental studies discovered a number of mechanisms for the formation of such gradients. One of the mechanisms relies on the intracellular shuttling of a protein that interconverts between the two states with different diffusivities, under the action of two enzymes, one of which is localized to the plasma membrane, whereas the second is uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. Recent work reported an analytical solution for the steady state gradient in this mechanism, obtained in the framework of a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion model. Here, we study the dynamics in this model and derive analytical expressions for the Laplace transforms of the time-dependent concentration profiles in terms of elementary transcendental functions. Inverting these transforms numerically, one can obtain time-dependent concentration profiles of the two forms of the protein.

  12. Settlement formation. Part I: a dynamic theory.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, W; Munz, M

    1990-01-01

    "The dynamic process of settlement formation is a fundamental issue in regional science. Our proposed model integrates the economic and migratory sectors in terms of endogenous variables in order to describe the evolution of continuous population distributions as a self-organising process.... The purpose...is to show that under strongly idealised conditions, a population consisting of different subpopulations with different economic activities will evolve into a differentiated population pattern. Each member of the subpopulations has the possibility to migrate between locations stimulated by rational economic reasons. This idea, which seems almost self-evident on the level of qualitative argumentation, [will] be cast into a mathematically self-contained quantitative dynamic model."

  13. Solid-state continuous Lyman-alpha source for laser-cooling of antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, Jochen; Beyer, Thomas; Kolbe, Daniel; Markert, Frank; Muellers, Andreas; Scheid, Martin

    2008-08-08

    Cooling antihydrogen atoms is important for future experiments both to test the fundamental CPT symmetry by high-resolution laser spectroscopy and also to measure the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Laser-cooling of antihydrogen can be done on the strong 1 S-2 P transition at the wavelength of Lyman-alpha (121.6 nm). Ongoing work to set up a solid-state continuous-wave laser source at Lyman-alpha is described.

  14. Progress towards antihydrogen production by the reaction of cold antiprotons with positronium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, M.; Laricchia, G.; Deutch, B.I.

    1995-03-01

    An experiment aimed at producing antihydrogen atoms by the reaction of cold antiprotons stored in a Penning trap with injected ground state positronium atoms is described. The apparatus developed in an attempt to observe the charge conjugate reaction using proton projectiles is discussed. Technically feasible upgrades to this apparatus are identified which may allow, in conjunction with the PS200 trap, antihydrogen production at LEAR.

  15. Pore Scale Dynamics of Microemulsion Formation.

    PubMed

    Unsal, Evren; Broens, Marc; Armstrong, Ryan T

    2016-07-19

    Experiments in various porous media have shown that multiple parameters come into play when an oleic phase is displaced by an aqueous solution of surfactant. In general, the displacement efficiency is improved when the fluids become quasi-miscible. Understanding the phase behavior oil/water/surfactant systems is important because microemulsion has the ability to generate ultralow interfacial tension (<10(-2) mN m(-1)) that is required for miscibility to occur. Many studies focus on microemulsion formation and the resulting properties under equilibrium conditions. However, the majority of applications where microemulsion is present also involve flow, which has received relatively less attention. It is commonly assumed that the characteristics of an oil/water/surfactant system under flowing conditions are identical to the one under equilibrium conditions. Here, we show that this is not necessarily the case. We studied the equilibrium phase behavior of a model system consisting of n-decane and an aqueous solution of olefin sulfonate surfactant, which has practical applications for enhanced oil recovery. The salt content of the aqueous solution was varied to provide a range of different microemulsion compositions and oil-water interfacial tensions. We then performed microfluidic flow experiments to study the dynamic in situ formation of microemulsion by coinjecting bulk fluids of n-decane and surfactant solution into a T-junction capillary geometry. A solvatochromatic fluorescent dye was used to obtain spatially resolved compositional information. In this way, we visualized the microemulsion formation and the flow of it along with the excess phases. A complex interaction between the flow patterns and the microemulsion properties was observed. The formation of microemulsion influenced the flow regimes, and the flow regimes affected the characteristics of the microemulsion formation. In particular, at low flow rates, slug flow was observed, which had profound

  16. Towards the production of an ultra cold antihydrogen beam with the AEGIS apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, James William

    The AEGIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) experiment is an international collaboration, based at CERN, with the experimental goal of performing the first direct measurement of the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antihydrogen. In the first phase of the experiment, a gravity measurement with 1% precision will be performed by passing a beam of ultra cold antihydrogen atoms through a classical Moiré deflectometer coupled to a position sensitive detector. The key requirements for this measurement are the production of ultra cold (T˜100 mK) Rydberg state antihydrogen and the subsequent Stark acceleration of these atoms. The aim is to produce Rydberg state antihydrogen by means of the charge exchange reaction between ultra cold antiprotons (T˜100 mK) and Rydberg state positronium. This paper will present details of the developments necessary for the successful production of the ultra cold antihydrogen beam, with emphasis on the detector that is required for the development of these techniques. Issues covered will include the detection of antihydrogen production and temperature, as well as detection of the effects of Stark acceleration.

  17. Towards the production of an ultra cold antihydrogen beam with the AEGIS apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, James William

    2012-12-01

    The AEGIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) experiment is an international collaboration, based at CERN, with the experimental goal of performing the first direct measurement of the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antihydrogen. In the first phase of the experiment, a gravity measurement with 1% precision will be performed by passing a beam of ultra cold antihydrogen atoms through a classical Moiré deflectometer coupled to a position sensitive detector. The key requirements for this measurement are the production of ultra cold (T˜100 mK) Rydberg state antihydrogen and the subsequent Stark acceleration of these atoms. The aim is to produce Rydberg state antihydrogen by means of the charge exchange reaction between ultra cold antiprotons (T˜100 mK) and Rydberg state positronium. This paper will present details of the developments necessary for the successful production of the ultra cold antihydrogen beam, with emphasis on the detector that is required for the development of these techniques. Issues covered will include the detection of antihydrogen production and temperature, as well as detection of the effects of Stark acceleration.

  18. Dynamical Models of Terrestrial Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.; O'brien, David P.; Raymond, Sean N.; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Quinn, Thomas; Graps, Amara L.

    2011-02-01

    We review the problem of the formation of terrestrial planets, with particular emphasis on the interaction of dynamical and geochemical models. The lifetime of gas around stars in the process of formation is limited to a few million years based on astronomical observations, while isotopic dating of meteorites and the Earth-Moon system suggest that perhaps 50-100 million years were required for the assembly of the Earth. Therefore, much of the growth of the terrestrial planets in our own system is presumed to have taken place under largely gas-free conditions, and the physics of terrestrial planet formation is dominated by gravitational interactions and collisions. The earliest phase of terrestrial-planet formation involve the growth of km-sized or larger planetesimals from dust grains, followed by the accumulations of these planetesimals into ∼100 lunar- to Mars-mass bodies that are initially gravitationally isolated from one-another in a swarm of smaller planetesimals, but eventually grow to the point of significantly perturbing one-another. The mutual perturbations between the embryos, combined with gravitational stirring by Jupiter, lead to orbital crossings and collisions that drive the growth to Earth-sized planets on a timescale of 107-108 years. Numerical treatment of this process has focussed on the use of symplectic integrators which can rapidy integrate the thousands of gravitationally-interacting bodies necessary to accurately model planetary growth. While the general nature of the terrestrial planets-their sizes and orbital parameters-seem to be broadly reproduced by the models, there are still some outstanding dynamical issues. One of these is the presence of an embryo-sized body, Mars, in our system in place of the more massive objects that simulations tend to yield. Another is the effect such impacts have on the geochemistry of the growing planets; re-equilibration of isotopic ratios of major elements during giant impacts (for example) must be

  19. Nonlinear Dynamics of Banded Iron Formation Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Xu, H.; Merino, E.

    2010-12-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) carry important information on the early evolution of the Earth. The actual mechanisms for their formation remain controversial. We have shown that the passage from predominant occurrence of BIFs in the Archaean-Early Proterozoic to their absence thereafter may have reflected compositional changes in the oceanic crust. Fe-Si-rich geologic fluids can be generated only from Al-poor oceanic crust through hydrothermal leaching by seawater. Al enrichment in the oceanic crust after ~ 1.7 Ga ago tends to prevent BIF formation. We have further shown that periodic precipitation of iron and silica minerals in alternating bands can be induced by positive feedbacks among relevant chemical reactions as a Fe-Si-rich hydrothermal fluid mixes with ambient seawater. Complexation of dissolved Fe(II) with silicic acid plays a crucial role in the self-organized process. Small-scale (< 1 cm) BIF bandings are thus attributed to the internal dynamics of the chemical system, rather than to an outside force such as surface temperature variations. In this presentation, we provide a detailed stability analysis of the model we developed to clarify the physical and chemical conditions for oscillatory precipitation of BIFs.

  20. Compact cryogenic system with mechanical cryocoolers for antihydrogen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, M; Mohri, A; Kanai, Y; Enomoto, Y; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a compact cryogenic system which cools a vacuum chamber housing multi-ring trap electrodes (MRTs) of an antihydrogen synthesis trap using mechanical cryocoolers to achieve background pressure less than 10(-12) Torr. The vacuum chamber and the cryocoolers are thermally connected by copper strips of 99.9999% in purity. All components are installed within a diametric gap between the MRT of phi108 mm and a magnet bore of phi160 mm. An adjusting mechanism is prepared to align the MRT axis to the magnet axis. The vacuum chamber was successfully cooled down to 4.0 K after 14 h of cooling with heat load of 0.8 W.

  1. Antihydrogen synthesis in a double-CUSP trap towards test of the CPT-symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radics, B.; Ishikawa, S.; Kuroda, N.; Murtagh, D. J.; Nagata, Y.; Tajima, M.; Van Gorp, S.; Abo, Y.; Dupre, P.; Higashi, Y.; Kaga, C.; Leali, M.; Mascagna, V.; Venturelli, L.; Zurlo, N.; Breuker, H.; Higaki, H.; Kanai, Y.; Rizzini, E. Lodi; Matsuda, Y.; Ulmer, S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the ASACUSA-CUSP experiment at CERN is to produce a cold, polarised antihydrogen beam and perform a high precision measurement of the ground-state hyperfine transition frequency of the antihydrogen atom and compare it with that of the hydrogen atom using the same spectroscopic beam line. Towards this goal a significant step was successfully accomplished: synthesised antihydrogen atoms have been produced in a CUSP magnetic configuration and detected at the end of our spectrometer beam line in 2012 [1]. During a long shut down at CERN the ASACUSA-CUSP experiment had been renewed by introducing a new double-CUSP magnetic configuration and a new semi-cylindrical tracking detector (AMT) [2], and by improving the transport feature of low energy antiproton beams. The new tracking detector monitors the antihydrogen synthesis during the mixing cycle of antiprotons and positrons. In this work the latest results and improvements of the antihydrogen synthesis will be presented including highlights from the last beam time.

  2. Nanoscale pore formation dynamics during aluminum anodization.

    PubMed

    Thamida, Sunil Kumar; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2002-03-01

    A theoretical analysis of nanoscale pore formation during anodization reveals its fundamental instability mechanism to be a field focusing phenomenon when perturbations on the minima of the two oxide interfaces are in phase. Lateral leakage of the layer potential at high wave number introduces a layer tension effect that balances the previous destabilizing effect to produce a long-wave instability and a selected pore separation that scales linearly with respect to voltage. At pH higher than 1.77, pores do not form due to a very thick barrier layer. A weakly nonlinear theory based on long-wave expansion of double free surface problem yields two coupled interface evolution equations that can be reduced to one without altering the dispersion relationship by assuming an equal and in-phase amplitude for the two interfaces. This interface evolution equation faithfully reproduces the initial pore ordering and their dynamics. A hodograph transformation technique is then used to determine the interior dimension of the well-developed pores in two dimensions. The ratio of pore diameter to pore separation is found to be a factor independent of voltage but varies with the pH of the electrolyte. Both the predicted pH range where pores are formed and the predicted pore dimensions are favorably compared to experimental data. (c) 2002 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Description and first application of a new technique to measure the gravitational mass of antihydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Amole, C.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Isaac, C. A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Little, A.; Madsen, N.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Napoli, S. C.; Nolan, P.; Olin, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Zhmoginov, A. I.; Charman, A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Physicists have long wondered whether the gravitational interactions between matter and antimatter might be different from those between matter and itself. Although there are many indirect indications that no such differences exist and that the weak equivalence principle holds, there have been no direct, free-fall style, experimental tests of gravity on antimatter. Here we describe a novel direct test methodology; we search for a propensity for antihydrogen atoms to fall downward when released from the ALPHA antihydrogen trap. In the absence of systematic errors, we can reject ratios of the gravitational to inertial mass of antihydrogen >75 at a statistical significance level of 5%; worst-case systematic errors increase the minimum rejection ratio to 110. A similar search places somewhat tighter bounds on a negative gravitational mass, that is, on antigravity. This methodology, coupled with ongoing experimental improvements, should allow us to bound the ratio within the more interesting near equivalence regime. PMID:23653197

  4. Description and first application of a new technique to measure the gravitational mass of antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpha Collaboration; Amole, C.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Isaac, C. A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Little, A.; Madsen, N.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Napoli, S. C.; Nolan, P.; Olin, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Zhmoginov, A. I.; Charman, A. E.

    2013-04-01

    Physicists have long wondered whether the gravitational interactions between matter and antimatter might be different from those between matter and itself. Although there are many indirect indications that no such differences exist and that the weak equivalence principle holds, there have been no direct, free-fall style, experimental tests of gravity on antimatter. Here we describe a novel direct test methodology; we search for a propensity for antihydrogen atoms to fall downward when released from the ALPHA antihydrogen trap. In the absence of systematic errors, we can reject ratios of the gravitational to inertial mass of antihydrogen >75 at a statistical significance level of 5% worst-case systematic errors increase the minimum rejection ratio to 110. A similar search places somewhat tighter bounds on a negative gravitational mass, that is, on antigravity. This methodology, coupled with ongoing experimental improvements, should allow us to bound the ratio within the more interesting near equivalence regime.

  5. Experimental limit on the ratio of the gravitational mass to the inertial mass of antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajans, Joel; Wurtele, Jonathan; Charman, Andrew; Zhmoginov, Andrey

    2012-10-01

    Physicists have long wondered if the gravitational interactions between matter and antimatter might be different from those between matter and itself. While there are many indirect indications that no such differences exist, i.e., that the weak equivalence principle holds, there have been no direct, free-fall style, experimental tests of gravity on antimatter. By searching for a propensity for antihydrogen atoms to fall downward when released from the ALPHA antihydrogen trap, we have determined that we can reject ratios of the gravitational mass to the inertial mass of antihydrogen greater than about 100 at a statistical significance level of 5%. A similar search places somewhat lower limits on a negative gravitational mass, i.e., on antigravity.

  6. An experimental test of the weak equivalence principle for antihydrogen at the future FLAIR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaum, Klaus; Raizen, Mark G.; Quint, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    We present new experimental ideas to investigate the gravitational interaction of antihydrogen. The experiment can first be performed in an off-line mirror measurement on hydrogen atoms, as a testing ground for our methods, before the implementation with antihydrogen atoms. A beam of hydrogen atoms is formed by launching a cold beam of protons through a cloud of trapped electrons in a nested Penning trap arrangement. In the next step, the atoms are stopped in a series of pulsed electromagnetic coils — so-called atomic coilgun. The stopped atoms are confined in a magnetic quadrupole trap and cooled by single-photon laser cooling. We intend to employ the method of Raman interferometry to study the gravitational interaction of atomic hydrogen — and later on antihydrogen at the FLAIR facility — with high sensitivity.

  7. An improved limit on the charge of antihydrogen from stochastic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, M.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Carruth, C.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Charman, A. E.; Eriksson, S.; Evans, L. T.; Evetts, N.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Isaac, C. A.; Ishida, A.; Jones, S. A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Maxwell, D.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Michan, J. M.; Momose, T.; Munich, J. J.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sacramento, R. L.; Sameed, M.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Tharp, T. D.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Zhmoginov, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Antimatter continues to intrigue physicists because of its apparent absence in the observable Universe. Current theory requires that matter and antimatter appeared in equal quantities after the Big Bang, but the Standard Model of particle physics offers no quantitative explanation for the apparent disappearance of half the Universe. It has recently become possible to study trapped atoms- of antihydrogen to search for possible, as yet unobserved, differences in the physical behaviour of matter and antimatter. Here we consider the charge neutrality of the antihydrogen atom. By applying stochastic acceleration to trapped antihydrogen atoms, we determine an experimental bound on the antihydrogen charge, Qe, of |Q| < 0.71 parts per billion (one standard deviation), in which e is the elementary charge. This bound is a factor of 20 less than that determined from the best previous measurement of the antihydrogen charge. The electrical charge of atoms and molecules of normal matter is known to be no greater than about 10-21e for a diverse range of species including H2, He and SF6. Charge-parity-time symmetry and quantum anomaly cancellation demand that the charge of antihydrogen be similarly small. Thus, our measurement constitutes an improved limit and a test of fundamental aspects of the Standard Model. If we assume charge superposition and use the best measured value of the antiproton charge, then we can place a new limit on the positron charge anomaly (the relative difference between the positron and elementary charge) of about one part per billion (one standard deviation), a 25-fold reduction compared to the current best measurement.

  8. An improved limit on the charge of antihydrogen from stochastic acceleration.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, M; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Capra, A; Carruth, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Charman, A E; Eriksson, S; Evans, L T; Evetts, N; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Isaac, C A; Ishida, A; Jones, S A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Maxwell, D; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Michan, J M; Momose, T; Munich, J J; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sacramento, R L; Sameed, M; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Tharp, T D; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Zhmoginov, A I

    2016-01-21

    Antimatter continues to intrigue physicists because of its apparent absence in the observable Universe. Current theory requires that matter and antimatter appeared in equal quantities after the Big Bang, but the Standard Model of particle physics offers no quantitative explanation for the apparent disappearance of half the Universe. It has recently become possible to study trapped atoms of antihydrogen to search for possible, as yet unobserved, differences in the physical behaviour of matter and antimatter. Here we consider the charge neutrality of the antihydrogen atom. By applying stochastic acceleration to trapped antihydrogen atoms, we determine an experimental bound on the antihydrogen charge, Qe, of |Q| < 0.71 parts per billion (one standard deviation), in which e is the elementary charge. This bound is a factor of 20 less than that determined from the best previous measurement of the antihydrogen charge. The electrical charge of atoms and molecules of normal matter is known to be no greater than about 10(-21)e for a diverse range of species including H2, He and SF6. Charge-parity-time symmetry and quantum anomaly cancellation demand that the charge of antihydrogen be similarly small. Thus, our measurement constitutes an improved limit and a test of fundamental aspects of the Standard Model. If we assume charge superposition and use the best measured value of the antiproton charge, then we can place a new limit on the positron charge anomaly (the relative difference between the positron and elementary charge) of about one part per billion (one standard deviation), a 25-fold reduction compared to the current best measurement.

  9. Towards measuring the ground state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen - a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerzopf, C.; Capon, A. A.; Diermaier, M.; Dupré, P.; Higashi, Y.; Kaga, C.; Kolbinger, B.; Leali, M.; Lehner, S.; Rizzini, E. Lodi; Malbrunot, C.; Mascagna, V.; Massiczek, O.; Murtagh, D. J.; Nagata, Y.; Radics, B.; Simon, M. C.; Suzuki, K.; Tajima, M.; Ulmer, S.; Vamosi, S.; Gorp, S. van; Zmeskal, J.; Breuker, H.; Higaki, H.; Kanai, Y.; Kuroda, N.; Matsuda, Y.; Venturelli, L.; Widmann, E.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2016-12-01

    We report the successful commissioning and testing of a dedicated field-ioniser chamber for measuring principal quantum number distributions in antihydrogen as part of the ASACUSA hyperfine spectroscopy apparatus. The new chamber is combined with a beam normalisation detector that consists of plastic scintillators and a retractable passivated implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detector.

  10. Collisional and dynamical processes in moon and planet formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. R.; Davis, D. R.; Weidenschilling, S. J.; Hartmann, W. K.; Spaute, D.

    1987-01-01

    Research on a variety of dynamical processes relevant to the formation of planets, satellites and ring systems is discussed. The main focus is on studies of accretionary formation of early protoplanets using a numerical model, structures and evolution of ring systems and individual bodies within planetary rings, and theories of lunar origin.

  11. Planetary Formation and Dynamics in Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    As of today, over 500 exoplanets have been detected since the first exoplanet was discovered around a solar-like star in 1995. The planets in binaries could be common as stars are usually born in binary or multiple star systems. Although current observations show that the planet host rate in multiple star systems is around 17%, this fraction should be considered as a lower limit because of noticeable selection effects against binaries in planet searches. Most of the current known planet-bearing binary systems are S-types, meaning the companion star acts as a distant satellite, typically orbiting the inner star-planet system over 100 AU away. Nevertheless, there are four systems with a smaller separation of 20 AU, including the Gamma Cephei, GJ 86, HD 41004, and HD 196885. In addition to the planets in circumprimary (S-type) orbits discussed above, planets in circumbinary (P-type) orbits have been found in only two systems. In this thesis, we mainly study the planet formation in the S-type binary systems. In chapter 1, we first summarize current observational facts of exoplanets both in single-star and binary systems, then review the theoretical models of planet formation, with special attention to the application in binary systems. Perturbative effects from stellar companions render the planet formation process in binary systems even more complex than that in single-star systems. The perturbations from a binary companion can excite planetesimal orbits, and increase their mutual impact velocities to the values that might exceed their escape velocity or even the critical velocity for the onset of eroding collisions. The intermediate stage of the formation process---from planetesimals to planetary embryos---is thus the most problematic. In the following chapters, we investigate whether and how the planet formation goes through such a problematic stage. In chapter 2, we study the effects of gas dissipation on the planetesimals' mutual accretion. We find that in a

  12. Brownian dynamics simulations of amelogenin microribbons formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Perez Lopez, Anthony; Liu, Ya; Chakrabarti, Amit; Gunton, James

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in chemical particle synthesis have emphasized the fundamental role of surface colloidal heterogeneities and their detailed chemical composition, which is particularly significant for an important subclass of colloidal systems, namely, proteins. Recently, the process of self-assembly of amelogenin monomers with a hydrophobic/hydrophilic bipolar nature into ordered ribbon structures has been studied experimentally. In this work, we study this dynamical process by means of a Brownian dynamic simulation of a simple model which represents the bipolar character of the globular amelogenin molecule and the hydrophilic C-terminal tail. We monitor the kinetics of self-assembly through a study of the structure factor. We also calculate the phase diagram of the model using Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulation and thermodynamic perturbation theory. This work is supported by grants from the NSF and Mathers Foundation.

  13. Gas dynamic simulations of galaxy formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evrard, August E.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented from a simulation modeling the formation of a group of galaxies in a 'standard' cold, dark matter universe with delta = 1, h sub 0 = 50 km/(s(Mpc)), baryon fraction omega sub b = 0.1 and spectrum normalization sigma sub 8 = 0.6 (bias parameter b = 1.7). Initial conditions are generated within a periodic box with comoving length 16 Mpc in a manner constrained to produce a small cluster of total mass approximately 10 exp 14 solar mass. Two sets of 643 particles are used to model the dark matter and baryon fluids. Each gas particle represents 1.08 x 10 exp -8 solar mass, implying an L* galaxy is resolved by approximately 1000 particles. The system is evolved self-consistently in three dimensions using the combined N-body/hydrodynamic scheme P3MSPH up to a final redshift z = 1. Evolving to the present is prohibited by the fact that the mean density in the simulated volume is above critical and the entire volume would be going nonlinear beyond this point, We are currently analyzing another run with somewhat poorer mass resolution which was evolved to the present.

  14. Nebkha flow dynamics and shadow dune formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesp, Patrick A.; Smyth, Thomas A. G.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, wind flow is simulated via CFD over five 'nebkha' dune forms that range in shape from a cone, to a hemisphere (approximately) and to a dome in order to examine the structure of the wake zone formed downwind and the effect on the leeward flow separation zone and shadow dune formation. Dune height was fixed at 0.5 m while the nebkha diameter increased in 0.25 m increments from 0.5 m to 1.5 m and aspect ratio (h/D) from 1.0 to 0.3. The mean flow comprises an upwind region of reduced velocity which expands as nebkha width increases, high velocity marginal wings, and paired counter-rotating reversing vortices leeward of the nebkha. The point at which flow separation occurs moves further downwind as the nebkha diameter increases. The core regions of the reversing vortices are situated further downwind behind the smaller nebkha than in the case of the larger nebkha. These factors in combination allow for higher velocity perturbations (TKE) and narrower wake behind the smaller nebkha, and the suppression of downwind wake development in the case of the increasingly larger nebkha. Shadow dune length increases as nebkha width increases for lower incident velocity flow and is barely affected by nebkha width at higher flows. The extent of the leeward separation or wake zone, and hence shadow dune length, more strongly varies as a function of wind velocity.

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of unicycles in leader-follower formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Siming; Halder, Abhishek; Kalmár-Nagy, Tamás

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, a dynamical systems analysis is presented for characterizing the motion of a group of unicycles in leader-follower formation. The equilibrium formations are characterized along with their local stability analysis. It is demonstrated that with the variation in control gain, the collective dynamics might undergo Andronov-Hopf and Fold-Hopf bifurcations. The vigor of quasi-periodicity in the regime of Andronov-Hopf bifurcation and heteroclinic bursts between quasi-periodic and chaotic behavior in the regime of Fold-Hopf bifurcation increases with the number of unicycles. Numerical simulations also suggest the occurrence of global bifurcations involving the destruction of heteroclinic orbit.

  16. Dynamic tubulation of mitochondria drives mitochondrial network formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Du, Wanqing; Su, Qian Peter; Zhu, Mingli; Feng, Peiyuan; Li, Ying; Zhou, Yichen; Mi, Na; Zhu, Yueyao; Jiang, Dong; Zhang, Senyan; Zhang, Zerui; Sun, Yujie; Yu, Li

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondria form networks. Formation of mitochondrial networks is important for maintaining mitochondrial DNA integrity and interchanging mitochondrial material, whereas disruption of the mitochondrial network affects mitochondrial functions. According to the current view, mitochondrial networks are formed by fusion of individual mitochondria. Here, we report a new mechanism for formation of mitochondrial networks through KIF5B-mediated dynamic tubulation of mitochondria. We found that KIF5B pulls thin, highly dynamic tubules out of mitochondria. Fusion of these dynamic tubules, which is mediated by mitofusins, gives rise to the mitochondrial network. We further demonstrated that dynamic tubulation and fusion is sufficient for mitochondrial network formation, by reconstituting mitochondrial networks in vitro using purified fusion-competent mitochondria, recombinant KIF5B, and polymerized microtubules. Interestingly, KIF5B only controls network formation in the peripheral zone of the cell, indicating that the mitochondrial network is divided into subzones, which may be constructed by different mechanisms. Our data not only uncover an essential mechanism for mitochondrial network formation, but also reveal that different parts of the mitochondrial network are formed by different mechanisms.

  17. Narrowband solid state vuv coherent source for laser cooling of antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michan, J. Mario; Polovy, Gene; Madison, Kirk W.; Fujiwara, Makoto C.; Momose, Takamasa

    2015-11-01

    We describe the design and performance of a solid-state pulsed source of narrowband (< 100 MHz) Lyman- α radiation designed for the purpose of laser cooling magnetically trapped antihydrogen. Our source utilizes an injection seeded Ti:Sapphire amplifier cavity to generate intense radiation at 729.4 nm, which is then sent through a frequency doubling stage and a frequency tripling stage to generate 121.56 nm light. Although the pulse energy at 121.56 nm is currently limited to 12 nJ with a repetition rate of 10 Hz, we expect to obtain greater than 0.1 μJ per pulse at 10 Hz by further optimizing the alignment of the pulse amplifier and the efficiency of the frequency tripling stage. Such a power will be sufficient for cooling a trapped antihydrogen atom from 500 mK to 20mK.

  18. On the production of the positive antihydrogen ion {{\\bar{H}}^{+}} via radiative attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, C. M.; Charlton, M.; Straton, Jack C.

    2014-11-01

    We provide an estimate of the cross section for the radiative attachment of a second positron into the (1{{S}2}{{ }1}{{S}e}) state of the {{\\bar{H}}+} ion using Ohmura and Ohmura’s (1960 Phys. Rev. 118 154) effective range theory and the principle of detailed balance. The {{\\bar{H}}+} ion can potentially be created using interactions of positrons with trapped antihydrogen, and our analysis includes a discussion in which estimates of production rates are given. Motivations to produce {{\\bar{H}}+} include its potential use as an intermediary to cool antihydrogen to ultra-cold (sub-mK) temperatures for a variety of studies, including spectroscopy and probing the gravitational interaction of the anti-atom.

  19. Dynamic phases, pinning, and pattern formation for driven dislocation assemblies

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Caizhi; Reichhardt, Charles; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J.; ...

    2015-01-23

    We examine driven dislocation assemblies and show that they can exhibit a set of dynamical phases remarkably similar to those of driven systems with quenched disorder such as vortices in superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and charge density wave materials. These phases include pinned-jammed, fluctuating, and dynamically ordered states, and each produces distinct dislocation patterns as well as specific features in the noise fluctuations and transport properties. Lastly, our work suggests that many of the results established for systems with quenched disorder undergoing plastic depinning transitions can be applied to dislocation systems, providing a new approach for understanding pattern formation andmore » dynamics in these systems.« less

  20. Dynamic phases, pinning, and pattern formation for driven dislocation assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Caizhi; Reichhardt, Charles; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J.; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2015-01-23

    We examine driven dislocation assemblies and show that they can exhibit a set of dynamical phases remarkably similar to those of driven systems with quenched disorder such as vortices in superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and charge density wave materials. These phases include pinned-jammed, fluctuating, and dynamically ordered states, and each produces distinct dislocation patterns as well as specific features in the noise fluctuations and transport properties. Lastly, our work suggests that many of the results established for systems with quenched disorder undergoing plastic depinning transitions can be applied to dislocation systems, providing a new approach for understanding pattern formation and dynamics in these systems.

  1. Dynamical Formation and Merger of Binary Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    The advent of gravitational wave (GW) astronomy began with Advanced LIGO's 2015 discovery of GWs from coalescing black hole (BH) binaries. GW astronomy holds great promise for testing general relativity, but also for investigating open astrophysical questions not amenable to traditional electromagnetic observations. One such question concerns the origin of stellar mass BH binaries in the universe: do these form primarily from evolution of isolated binaries of massive stars, or do they form through more exotic dynamical channels? The best studied dynamical formation channel involves multibody interactions of BHs and stars in dense globular cluster environments, but many other dynamical scenarios have recently been proposed, ranging from the Kozai effect in hierarchical triple systems to BH binary formation in the outskirts of Toomre-unstable accretion disks surrounding supermassive black holes. The BH binaries formed through these processes will have different distributions of observable parameters (e.g. mass ratios, spins) than BH binaries formed through the evolution of isolated binary stars. In my talk I will overview these and other dynamical formation scenarios, and summarize the key observational tests that will enable Advanced LIGO or other future detectors to determine what formation pathway creates the majority of binary BHs in the universe. NCS thanks NASA, which has funded his work through Einstein postdoctoral grant PF5-160145.

  2. Dynamical formation of cataclysmic variables in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jongsuk; Vesperini, Enrico; Belloni, Diogo; Giersz, Mirek

    2017-01-01

    The formation and evolution of X-ray sources in globular clusters is likely to be affected by the cluster internal dynamics and the stellar interactions in the cluster dense environment. Several observational studies have revealed a correlation between the number of X-ray sources and the stellar encounter rate, and provided evidence of the role of dynamics in the formation of X-ray binaries. We have performed a survey of Monte Carlo simulations aimed at exploring the connection between the dynamics and formation of cataclysmic variables (CVs) and the origin of the observed correlation between the number of these objects, Ncv, and the stellar encounter rate, Γ. The results of our simulations show a correlation between Ncv and Γ, as found in observational data, illustrate the essential role played by the dynamics, and shed light on the dynamical history behind this correlation. CVs in our simulations are more centrally concentrated than single stars with masses close to those of turn-off stars, although this trend is stronger for CVs formed from primordial binaries undergoing exchange encounters, which include a population of more massive CVs absent in the group of CVs formed from binaries not suffering any component exchange.

  3. Memory formation: from network structure to neural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Feldt, Sarah; Wang, Jane X; Hetrick, Vaughn L; Berke, Joshua D; Zochowski, Michal

    2010-05-13

    Understanding the neural correlates of brain function is an extremely challenging task, since any cognitive process is distributed over a complex and evolving network of neurons that comprise the brain. In order to quantify observed changes in neuronal dynamics during hippocampal memory formation, we present metrics designed to detect directional interactions and the formation of functional neuronal ensembles. We apply these metrics to both experimental and model-derived data in an attempt to link anatomical network changes with observed changes in neuronal dynamics during hippocampal memory formation processes. We show that the developed model provides a consistent explanation of the anatomical network modifications that underlie the activity changes observed in the experimental data.

  4. Brownian dynamics simulation of fission yeast mitotic spindle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelmaier, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The mitotic spindle segregates chromosomes during mitosis. The dynamics that establish bipolar spindle formation are not well understood. We have developed a computational model of fission-yeast mitotic spindle formation using Brownian dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods. Our model includes rigid, dynamic microtubules, a spherical nuclear envelope, spindle pole bodies anchored in the nuclear envelope, and crosslinkers and crosslinking motor proteins. Crosslinkers and crosslinking motor proteins attach and detach in a grand canonical ensemble, and exert forces and torques on the attached microtubules. We have modeled increased affinity for crosslinking motor attachment to antiparallel microtubule pairs, and stabilization of microtubules in the interpolar bundle. We study parameters controlling the stability of the interpolar bundle and assembly of a bipolar spindle from initially adjacent spindle-pole bodies.

  5. Dynamics of drops – Formation, growth, oscillation, detachment, and coalescence.

    PubMed

    Karbaschi, M; Taeibi Rahni, M; Javadi, A; Cronan, C L; Schano, K H; Faraji, S; Won, J Y; Ferri, J K; Krägel, J; Miller, R

    2015-08-01

    Single drops or bubbles are frequently used for the characterization of liquid-fluid interfaces. Their advantage is the small volume and the various protocols of their formation. Thus, several important methods are based on single drops and bubbles, such as capillary pressure and profile analysis tensiometry. However, these methods are often applied under dynamic conditions, although their principles are defined under equilibrium conditions. Thus, specific attention has to be paid when these methods are used beyond certain limits. In many cases, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations have allowed researchers, to extend these limits and to gain important information on the interfacial dynamics. Examples discussed here are the capillary pressure tensiometry used for short time and profile analysis tensiometry for long time dynamic interfacial tension measurements, the oscillating drop methods for measuring dilational visco-elasticity. For measuring the coalescence of two drops the liquid dynamics of the subsequently formed liquid bridges have to be considered. In this paper, a thorough review of important experimental and computational findings, related to the dynamics of drops, including its formation, growth, oscillation, detachment, and coalescence is presented. Emphasis is however on some selected important developments. In addition, the paper tries to predict the main directions of advancement in interfacial research for the near future.

  6. Energy Transfer Dynamics of Formate Decomposition on Cu(110).

    PubMed

    Quan, Jiamei; Kondo, Takahiro; Wang, Guichang; Nakamura, Junji

    2017-03-20

    Energy transfer dynamics of formate (HCOOa ) decomposition on a Cu(110) surface has been studied by measuring the angle-resolved intensity and translational energy distributions of CO2 emitted from the surface in a steady-state reaction of HCOOH and O2 . The angular distribution of CO2 shows a sharp collimation with the direction perpendicular to the surface, as represented by cos(n) θ (n=6). The mean translational energy of CO2 is measured to be as low as 100 meV and is independent of the surface temperature (Ts ). These results clearly indicate that the decomposition of formate is a thermal non-equilibrium process in which a large amount of energy released by the decomposition reaction of formate is transformed into the internal energies of CO2 molecules. The thermal non-equilibrium features observed in the dynamics of formate decomposition support the proposed Eley-Rideal (ER)-type mechanism for formate synthesis on copper catalysts.

  7. Closure of supporting cell scar formations requires dynamic actin mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hordichok, Andrew J.; Steyger, Peter S.

    2007-01-01

    In many vertebrate inner ear sensory epithelia, dying sensory hair cells are extruded, and the apices of surrounding supporting cells converge to re-seal the epithelial barrier between the electrochemically-distinct endolymph and perilymph. These cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Dynamic microtubular mechanisms have been proposed for hair cell extrusion; while contractile actomyosin-based mechanisms are required for cellular extrusion and closure in epithelial monolayers. The hypothesis that cytoskeletal mechanisms are required for hair cell extrusion and supporting cell scar formation was tested using bullfrog saccules incubated with gentamicin (6 hours), and allowed to recover (18 hours). Explants were then fixed, labeled for actin and cytokeratins, and viewed with confocal microscopy. To block dynamic cytoskeletal processes, disruption agents for microtubules (colchicine, paclitaxel) myosin (Y-27632, ML-9) or actin (cytochalasin D, latrunculin A) were added during treatment and recovery. Microtubule disruption agents had no effect on hair cell extrusion or supporting cell scar formation. Myosin disruption agents appeared to slow down scar formation but not hair cell extrusion. Actin disruption agents blocked scar formation, and largely prevented hair cell extrusion. These data suggest that actin-based cytoskeletal processes are required for hair cell extrusion and supporting cell scar formation in bullfrog saccules. PMID:17716843

  8. Perspective: network-guided pattern formation of neural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; Kaiser, Marcus; Hilgetag, Claus C

    2014-10-05

    The understanding of neural activity patterns is fundamentally linked to an understanding of how the brain's network architecture shapes dynamical processes. Established approaches rely mostly on deviations of a given network from certain classes of random graphs. Hypotheses about the supposed role of prominent topological features (for instance, the roles of modularity, network motifs or hierarchical network organization) are derived from these deviations. An alternative strategy could be to study deviations of network architectures from regular graphs (rings and lattices) and consider the implications of such deviations for self-organized dynamic patterns on the network. Following this strategy, we draw on the theory of spatio-temporal pattern formation and propose a novel perspective for analysing dynamics on networks, by evaluating how the self-organized dynamics are confined by network architecture to a small set of permissible collective states. In particular, we discuss the role of prominent topological features of brain connectivity, such as hubs, modules and hierarchy, in shaping activity patterns. We illustrate the notion of network-guided pattern formation with numerical simulations and outline how it can facilitate the understanding of neural dynamics.

  9. Trion formation dynamics in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Akashay; Moody, Galan; Schaibley, John R.; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, David G.; Xu, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqun; Tran, Kha; Scott, Marie E.; Overbeck, Vincent; Berghauser, Gunnar; Seifert, Edward J.; Pleskot, Dennis; Gabor, Nathaniel M.; Richter, Marten; Malic, Ermin

    2016-01-05

    Here, we report charged exciton (trion) formation dynamics in doped monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, specifically molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), using resonant two-color pump-probe spectroscopy. When resonantly pumping the exciton transition, trions are generated on a picosecond time scale through exciton-electron interaction. As the pump energy is tuned from the high energy to low energy side of the inhomogeneously broadened exciton resonance, the trion formation time increases by ~50%. This feature can be explained by the existence of both localized and delocalized excitons in a disordered potential and suggests the existence of an exciton mobility edge in transition metal dichalcogenides.

  10. Dynamics of multi-tethered pyramidal satellite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alary, D.; Andreev, K.; Boyko, P.; Ivanova, E.; Pritykin, D.; Sidorenko, V.; Tourneur, C.; Yarotsky, D.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the dynamics of a multi-tethered pyramidal satellite formation rotating about its axis of symmetry in the nominal mode. Whereas the combination of rotation and gravity-gradient forces is insufficient to maintain the mutual positions of satellites, they are assumed to be equipped with low-thrust rocket engines. We propose a control strategy that allows the stabilization of the nominal spin state and demonstrate the system's proper operation by numerically simulating its controlled motion. The discussed multi-tethered formations could be employed, for example, to provide co-location of several satellites at a slot in geostationary orbit.

  11. Trion formation dynamics in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Akashay; Moody, Galan; Schaibley, John R.; ...

    2016-01-05

    Here, we report charged exciton (trion) formation dynamics in doped monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, specifically molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), using resonant two-color pump-probe spectroscopy. When resonantly pumping the exciton transition, trions are generated on a picosecond time scale through exciton-electron interaction. As the pump energy is tuned from the high energy to low energy side of the inhomogeneously broadened exciton resonance, the trion formation time increases by ~50%. This feature can be explained by the existence of both localized and delocalized excitons in a disordered potential and suggests the existence of an exciton mobility edge in transition metal dichalcogenides.

  12. Formation and dynamical history of the beta Pictoris system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, M.

    2014-09-01

    The structure of the beta Pic disk holds many clues to its formation and dynamical history. In particular there is strong evidence for sculpting by the beta Pic-b planet. For example, a warp in the disk at 80au is thought to be driven by the secular perturbations of that planet, and scattering of comets by beta Pic-b is thought to be the origin of the Falling Evaporating Bodies. A clump in the disk coincident with the warp, also at ~80au, provides clues to the outer planetary system which for now is poorly constrained. One possible origin for the clump is in trapping of comets into resonance with an outer planet currently at ~60au, with an alternative scenario being a giant impact between planetary embryos. This talk will consider the various disk structures and what they tell us about the formation and dynamical history of the beta Pictoris system.

  13. Dynamical scalar hair formation around a Schwarzschild black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkel, Robert; Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Witek, Helvi

    2016-12-01

    Scalar fields coupled to the Gauss-Bonnet invariant evade the known no-hair theorems and have nontrivial configurations around black holes. We focus on a scalar field that couples linearly to the Gauss-Bonnet invariant and hence exhibits shift symmetry. We study its dynamical evolution and the formation of scalar hair in a Schwarzschild background. We show that the evolution eventually settles to the known static hairy solutions in the appropriate limit.

  14. Collisional and dynamical processes in moon and planet formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The collisional and dynamical processes in moon and planet formation are discussed. A hydrodynamic code of collision calculations, the orbital element changes due to gravitational scattering, a validation of the mass shifting algorithm, a theory of rotations, and the origin of asteroids are studied. A numerical model of planet growth is discussed and a methodology to evaluate the rate at which megaregolith increases its depth as a function of total accumulate number of impacts on an initially smooth, coherent surface is described.

  15. Ice formation on kaolinite: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosso, Gabriele C.; Tribello, Gareth A.; Zen, Andrea; Pedevilla, Philipp; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-12-01

    The formation of ice affects many aspects of our everyday life as well as important technologies such as cryotherapy and cryopreservation. Foreign substances almost always aid water freezing through heterogeneous ice nucleation, but the molecular details of this process remain largely unknown. In fact, insight into the microscopic mechanism of ice formation on different substrates is difficult to obtain even if state-of-the-art experimental techniques are used. At the same time, atomistic simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation frequently face extraordinary challenges due to the complexity of the water-substrate interaction and the long time scales that characterize nucleation events. Here, we have investigated several aspects of molecular dynamics simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation considering as a prototypical ice nucleating material the clay mineral kaolinite, which is of relevance in atmospheric science. We show via seeded molecular dynamics simulations that ice nucleation on the hydroxylated (001) face of kaolinite proceeds exclusively via the formation of the hexagonal ice polytype. The critical nucleus size is two times smaller than that obtained for homogeneous nucleation at the same supercooling. Previous findings suggested that the flexibility of the kaolinite surface can alter the time scale for ice nucleation within molecular dynamics simulations. However, we here demonstrate that equally flexible (or non flexible) kaolinite surfaces can lead to very different outcomes in terms of ice formation, according to whether or not the surface relaxation of the clay is taken into account. We show that very small structural changes upon relaxation dramatically alter the ability of kaolinite to provide a template for the formation of a hexagonal overlayer of water molecules at the water-kaolinite interface, and that this relaxation therefore determines the nucleation ability of this mineral.

  16. An experimental study of dynamics of drop formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Basaran, O.A.

    1995-06-01

    A liquid being ejected from a nozzle emanates from it as discrete, uniformly sized drops when the flow rate is sufficiently low. In this paper, an experimental study is presented of the dynamics of a viscous liquid drop that is being formed directly at the tip of a vertical tube into ambient air. The evolution in time of the drop shape and volume is monitored with a time resolution of 1/12 to 1 ms. Following the detachment of the previous drop, the profile of the new growing drop at first changes from spherical to pear-shaped. As time advances, the throat of the pear-shaped drop takes on the appearance of a liquid thread that connects the bottom portion of the drop that is about to detach to the rest of the liquid that is pendant from the tube. The focus here is on probing the effects of physical and geometric parameters on the universal features of drop formation, paying special attention to the development, extension, and breakup of the liquid thread and the satellite drops that are formed subsequent to its breakup. The role of surfactants in modifying the dynamics of drop formation is also studied. The effects of finite inertial, capillary, viscous, and gravitational forces are all accounted for to classify drastically different formation dynamics and to elucidate the fate of satellite drops following thread rupture.

  17. A Dynamical Study of the Formation of Peculiar Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, T. K.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Un estudlo de la formaci6n de diferentes tipos de galaxias peculiares (interactuantes) es conducido en base de la dina'mioa de la colisi6n lievando a su formaci6n usando la aproximaci6n impulsiva. Los resultados indican la existencia de una relaci6n caracteristica en base del camblo de la energia interna durante la colisi6n, cual determina el tipo de la galaxia peculiar formado. La relacion es analisada y valores criticos del camblo de Ia energia interna, ilevando a la interacci6n entre galaxias de varias intensidades y la formaci6n consecuente de varios tipos de sistemas peculiares es discutido. ABSTRACT. A study of the formation of different types of peculiar (interacting) galaxies is conducted based on the dynamics of the collision leading to their formation, using the impulsive approximation. Results indicate the existance of a characteristic relationship, based on the internal energy changes during the collision, governing the type of peculiar galaxy formed. The relationship is analysed and critical values of internal energy changes, leading to galaxy interaction of varying intensities and consequent formation of different types of peculiar galaxies is discussed. Key words: GALAXIES-DYNAMICS -- GALAXIES-FORMATION

  18. Progress Toward a Format Standard for Flight Dynamics Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce; Hildreth, Bruce L.

    2006-01-01

    In the beginning, there was FORTRAN, and it was... not so good. But it was universal, and all flight simulator equations of motion were coded with it. Then came ACSL, C, Ada, C++, C#, Java, FORTRAN-90, Matlab/Simulink, and a number of other programming languages. Since the halcyon punch card days of 1968, models of aircraft flight dynamics have proliferated in training devices, desktop engineering and development computers, and control design textbooks. With the rise of industry teaming and increased reliance on simulation for procurement decisions, aircraft and missile simulation models are created, updated, and exchanged with increasing frequency. However, there is no real lingua franca to facilitate the exchange of models from one simulation user to another. The current state-of-the-art is such that several staff-months if not staff-years are required to 'rehost' each release of a flight dynamics model from one simulation environment to another one. If a standard data package or exchange format were to be universally adopted, the cost and time of sharing and updating aerodynamics, control laws, mass and inertia, and other flight dynamic components of the equations of motion of an aircraft or spacecraft simulation could be drastically reduced. A 2002 paper estimated over $ 6 million in savings could be realized for one military aircraft type alone. This paper describes the efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) to develop a standard flight dynamic model exchange standard based on XML and HDF-5 data formats.

  19. Dynamics and pattern formation in a cancer network with diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qianqian; Shen, Jianwei

    2015-10-01

    Diffusion is ubiquitous inside cells, and it is capable of inducing spontaneous pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems on a spatially homogeneous domain. In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of a diffusive cancer network regulated by microRNA and obtain the condition that the network undergoes a Hopf bifurcation and a Turing pattern bifurcation. In addition, we also develop the amplitude equation of the network model by using Taylor series expansion, multi-scaling and further expansion in powers of a small parameter. As a result of these analyses, we obtain the explicit condition on how the dynamics of the diffusive cancer network evolve. These results reveal that this system has rich dynamics, such as spotted stripe and hexagon patterns. The bifurcation diagram helps us understand the biological mechanism in the cancer network. Finally, numerical simulations confirm our analytical results.

  20. Observation of the 1S-2S transition in trapped antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, M; Alves, B X R; Baker, C J; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Capra, A; Carruth, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Cohen, S; Collister, R; Eriksson, S; Evans, A; Evetts, N; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Isaac, C A; Ishida, A; Johnson, M A; Jones, S A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Mathers, M; Maxwell, D; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Michan, J M; Momose, T; Munich, J J; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sacramento, R L; Sameed, M; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; Stutter, G; So, C; Tharp, T D; Thompson, J E; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2017-01-26

    The spectrum of the hydrogen atom has played a central part in fundamental physics over the past 200 years. Historical examples of its importance include the wavelength measurements of absorption lines in the solar spectrum by Fraunhofer, the identification of transition lines by Balmer, Lyman and others, the empirical description of allowed wavelengths by Rydberg, the quantum model of Bohr, the capability of quantum electrodynamics to precisely predict transition frequencies, and modern measurements of the 1S-2S transition by Hänsch to a precision of a few parts in 10(15). Recent technological advances have allowed us to focus on antihydrogen-the antimatter equivalent of hydrogen. The Standard Model predicts that there should have been equal amounts of matter and antimatter in the primordial Universe after the Big Bang, but today's Universe is observed to consist almost entirely of ordinary matter. This motivates the study of antimatter, to see if there is a small asymmetry in the laws of physics that govern the two types of matter. In particular, the CPT (charge conjugation, parity reversal and time reversal) theorem, a cornerstone of the Standard Model, requires that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Here we report the observation of the 1S-2S transition in magnetically trapped atoms of antihydrogen. We determine that the frequency of the transition, which is driven by two photons from a laser at 243 nanometres, is consistent with that expected for hydrogen in the same environment. This laser excitation of a quantum state of an atom of antimatter represents the most precise measurement performed on an anti-atom. Our result is consistent with CPT invariance at a relative precision of about 2 × 10(-10).

  1. Low-energy scattering of antihydrogen by helium and molecular hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Armour, E. A. G.; Todd, A. C.; Liu, Y.; Gregory, M. R.; Jonsell, S.; Plummer, M.

    2008-08-08

    In this paper, we describe in detail calculations that we have carried out of cross sections for rearrangement processes in very low-energy helium+antihydrogen (H-bar) scattering that result in He{sup +}p-bar+Ps or Hep-bar+e{sup +} or {alpha}p-bar+Ps{sup -}. The interaction between the leptons is taken into account very accurately. Results are presented for all three processes. A description is also given of a preliminary calculation of elastic and antiproton annihilation cross sections for very low-energy H{sub 2}+H-bar scattering.

  2. On the high inclination KBOs common dynamical formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Oliveira Brasil, Pedro Ivo I.; Gomes, Rodney S.; Nesvorny, David

    2014-11-01

    The Kuiper belt is a dynamically intriguing region. Different "classes" of objects can be defined, according to their orbital properties. These are: the classic belt (with the subclasses of cold & hot objects), resonant objects, scattered disk and extended scattered disk. In this work, we seek to investigate possible common origins, during the orbital conformation of the giant planets, for the formation of classes of objects with moderate or high inclination. Interesting results were obtained for the hot objects of the Kuiper belt and the objects belonging to the extended scattered disk. The general mechanism found for the formation of these objects can be summarized as: (i) scattering phase due to the interaction with the giant planets, during the LHB; (ii) capture into mean motion resonances (MMR) with Neptune; (iii) capture into Kozai resonance/mode; (iv) escape FROM both resonances into a mode known as "hibernation mode", in which the object has low eccentricity and high inclination; (v) fossilization in an orbit outside the resonant semi-major axis due to residual migration of Neptune. The results show good consistency between known objects with the model of dynamical formation.

  3. A natural experiment of social network formation and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Phan, Tuan Q; Airoldi, Edoardo M

    2015-05-26

    Social networks affect many aspects of life, including the spread of diseases, the diffusion of information, the workers' productivity, and consumers' behavior. Little is known, however, about how these networks form and change. Estimating causal effects and mechanisms that drive social network formation and dynamics is challenging because of the complexity of engineering social relations in a controlled environment, endogeneity between network structure and individual characteristics, and the lack of time-resolved data about individuals' behavior. We leverage data from a sample of 1.5 million college students on Facebook, who wrote more than 630 million messages and 590 million posts over 4 years, to design a long-term natural experiment of friendship formation and social dynamics in the aftermath of a natural disaster. The analysis shows that affected individuals are more likely to strengthen interactions, while maintaining the same number of friends as unaffected individuals. Our findings suggest that the formation of social relationships may serve as a coping mechanism to deal with high-stress situations and build resilience in communities.

  4. A natural experiment of social network formation and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Tuan Q.; Airoldi, Edoardo M.

    2015-01-01

    Social networks affect many aspects of life, including the spread of diseases, the diffusion of information, the workers' productivity, and consumers' behavior. Little is known, however, about how these networks form and change. Estimating causal effects and mechanisms that drive social network formation and dynamics is challenging because of the complexity of engineering social relations in a controlled environment, endogeneity between network structure and individual characteristics, and the lack of time-resolved data about individuals' behavior. We leverage data from a sample of 1.5 million college students on Facebook, who wrote more than 630 million messages and 590 million posts over 4 years, to design a long-term natural experiment of friendship formation and social dynamics in the aftermath of a natural disaster. The analysis shows that affected individuals are more likely to strengthen interactions, while maintaining the same number of friends as unaffected individuals. Our findings suggest that the formation of social relationships may serve as a coping mechanism to deal with high-stress situations and build resilience in communities. PMID:25964337

  5. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, S.; Heitzig, J.; Kornek, U.; Schöll, E.; Kurths, J.

    2015-08-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation (“coalitions”) on an acquaintance network. We include both the network’s influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects.

  6. Dynamics of Research Team Formation in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Caihong; Wan, Yuzi; Chen, Yu

    Most organizations encourage the formation of teams to accomplish complicated tasks, and vice verse, effective teams could bring lots benefits and profits for organizations. Network structure plays an important role in forming teams. In this paper, we specifically study the dynamics of team formation in large research communities in which knowledge of individuals plays an important role on team performance and individual utility. An agent-based model is proposed, in which heterogeneous agents from research communities are described and empirically tested. Each agent has a knowledge endowment and a preference for both income and leisure. Agents provide a variable input (‘effort’) and their knowledge endowments to production. They could learn from others in their team and those who are not in their team but have private connections in community to adjust their own knowledge endowment. They are allowed to join other teams or work alone when it is welfare maximizing to do so. Various simulation experiments are conducted to examine the impacts of network topology, knowledge diffusion among community network, and team output sharing mechanisms on the dynamics of team formation.

  7. Brownian dynamics simulation of sickle hemoglobin bundle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya; Gunton, James; Chakrabarti, Amit

    2010-03-01

    The physical properties of biopolymer fibers, such as their stability and degree of aggregation, are implicated in many diseases, including sickle cell anemia. The natural chirality of protofilaments plays a crucial role in the formation of sickle hemoglobin fiber which leads to the permanent blockage of microvessels. We use Brownian dynamics to investigate the kinetics of fiber aggregation. The geometrical helical structure and chirality of the filaments are modeled by anisotropic patch-like interactions. We present the kinetics of fiber formation and study the possibility of a finite critical fiber bundle size. We compare our results with various experimental and theoretical results. This work is supported by grants from the NSF and the G. Harold and Leila Y. Mathers Foundation.

  8. Concept formation: 'object' attributes dynamically inhibited from conscious awareness.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Allan; Bossomaier, Terry; Mitchell, D John

    2004-03-01

    We advance a dominant neural strategy for facilitating conceptual thought. Concepts are groupings of "object" attributes. Once the brain learns such critical groupings, the "object" attributes are inhibited from conscious awareness. We see the whole, not the parts. The details are inhibited when the concept network is activated, ie. the inhibition is dynamic and can be switched on and off. Autism is suggested to be the state of retarded concept formation. Our model predicts the possibility of accessing nonconscious information by artificially disinhibiting (turning off) the inhibiting networks associated with concept formation, using transcranial magnetic brain stimulation (TMS). For example, this opens the door for the restoration of perfect pitch, for recalling detail, for acquiring accent-free second languages beyond puberty, and even for enhancing creativity. The model further shows how unusual autistic savant skills as well as certain psychopathologies can be due respectively to privileged or inadvertent access to information that is normally inhibited from conscious awareness.

  9. Explaining formation of Astronomical Jets using Dynamic Universe Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naga Parameswara Gupta, Satyavarapu

    2016-07-01

    Astronomical jets are observed from the centres of many Galaxies including our own Milkyway. The formation of such jet is explained using SITA simulations of Dynamic Universe Model. For this purpose the path traced by a test neutron is calculated and depicted using a set up of one densemass of the mass equivalent to mass of Galaxy center, 90 stars with similar masses of stars near Galaxy center, mass equivalents of 23 Globular Cluster groups, 16 Milkyway parts, Andromeda and Triangulum Galaxies at appropriate distances. Five different kinds of theoretical simulations gave positive results The path travelled by this test neutron was found to be an astronomical jet emerging from Galaxy center. This is another result from Dynamic Universe Model. It solves new problems like a. Variable Mass Rocket Trajectory Problem b. Explaining Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations c. Astronomical jets observed from Milkyway Center d. Prediction of Blue shifted Galaxies e. Explaining Pioneer Anomaly f. Prediction of New Horizons satellite trajectory etc. Dynamic Universe Model never reduces to General relativity on any condition. It uses a different type of mathematics based on Newtonian physics. This mathematics used here is simple and straightforward. As there are no differential equations present in Dynamic Universe Model, the set of equations give single solution in x y z Cartesian coordinates for every point mass for every time step

  10. Dynamic Membrane Formation in Anaerobic Dynamic Membrane Bioreactors: Role of Extracellular Polymeric Substances

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongguang; Wang, Zhiwei; Wu, Zhichao; Zhu, Chaowei

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic membrane (DM) formation in dynamic membrane bioreactors plays an important role in achieving efficient solid-liquid separation. In order to study the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to DM formation in anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR) processes, EPS extraction from and re-addition to bulk sludge were carried out in short-term filtration tests. DM formation behaviors could be well simulated by cake filtration model, and sludge with EPS re-addition showed the highest resistance coefficient, followed by sludge after EPS extraction. The DM layers exhibited a higher resistance and a lower porosity for the sludge sample after EPS extraction and for the sludge with EPS re-addition. Particle size of sludge flocs decreased after EPS extraction, and changed little with EPS re-addition, which was confirmed by interaction energy analysis. Further investigations by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis and batch tests suggested that the removal of in-situ EPS stimulated release of soluble EPS, and re-added EPS were present as soluble EPS rather than bound EPS, which thus improved the formation of DM. The present work revealed the role of EPS in anaerobic DM formation, and could facilitate the operation of AnDMBR processes. PMID:26436551

  11. Producing the positive antihydrogen ion {\\bar{{\\rm{H}}}}^{+} via radiative attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, C. M.; Pak, K. Y.; Straton, Jack C.

    2016-04-01

    We provide an estimate of the cross section for the radiative attachment of a second positron into the (1 {{{s}}}2 {}1{{{S}}}e) state of the {\\bar{{{H}}}}+ ion that uses a 200-term two-positron wave function composed of explicitly correlated exponentials. This is done by analytically integrating the six-dimensional, three body photoionization integrals that enter into this result (and those utilizing, the alternative, Hylleraas wave functions) and applying the principle of detailed balance. Finally, we obtain the rate coefficient {α }{RA} for attaching a second positron to antihydrogen as a function of temperature via a numerical integral that is a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of the product of positron velocity and cross section. Our motivation in studying the production of {\\bar{{{H}}}}+ lies in its potential use as an intermediate stage in the cooling of antihydrogen to ultra-cold (sub-mK) temperatures for spectroscopic studies and probing the gravitational interaction of the anti-atom. Estimates of the reaction rates are given for positron temperatures T e in the range from 50 K to 5 K.

  12. Formation and post-formation dynamics of bacterial biofilm streamers as highly viscous liquid jets

    PubMed Central

    Das, Siddhartha; Kumar, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently reported that in presence of low Reynolds number (Re ≪ 1) transport, preformed bacterial biofilms, several hours after their formation, may degenerate in form of filamentous structures, known as streamers. In this work, we explain that such streamers form as the highly viscous liquid states of the intrinsically viscoelastic biofilms. Such “viscous liquid” state can be hypothesized by noting that the time of appearance of the streamers is substantially larger than the viscoelastic relaxation time scale of the biofilms, and this appearance is explained by the inability of a viscous liquid to withstand external shear. Further, by identifying the post formation dynamics of the streamers as that of a viscous liquid jet in a surrounding flow field, we can interpret several unexplained issues associated with the post-formation dynamics of streamers, such as the clogging of the flow passage or the exponential time growth of streamer dimensions. Overall our manuscript provides a biophysical basis for understanding the evolution of biofilm streamers in creeping flows. PMID:25410423

  13. Stellar Dynamical Processes in Massive Star and Star Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan; Eyer, L.

    2009-01-01

    We study how high precision astrometric measurements by SIM and GAIA of stars involved in dynamical ejection events from star clusters can constrain theories of massive star and star cluster formation. We focus on the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). First, we investigate the scientific potential associated with an accurate measurement of the distance and proper motion of Theta 1 Ori C, which is the most massive star in the cluster and was recently involved (about 4000 years ago) in the ejection of a B star: the Becklin-Neugebauer (BN) star. The motion of the BN star has taken it close to a massive protostar, known as source I, where it appears to have influenced the accretion and outflow activity, most likely by a tidal interaction with the accretion disk. An accurate proper motion measurement of Theta 1 Ori C will constrain BN's initial motion, allowing us to search for deflections caused by the gravitational potential of the massive protostar. Second, we search the Hipparcos catalog for candidate runaway stars, i.e. that have been dynamically ejected from the cluster over the course of the last several Myr. SIM and GAIA observations of these stars will be needed to confirm their origin from the ONC. The results of this study will constrain the star cluster formation timescale and the statistics of the population of ejected stars. JCT acknowledges support from from NSF CAREER grant AST-0645412 and a grant from NASA for SIM Science Studies.

  14. Spontaneous formation of polyglutamine nanotubes with molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laghaei, Rozita; Mousseau, Normand

    2010-04-01

    Expansion of polyglutamine (polyQ) beyond the pathogenic threshold (35-40 Gln) is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases including Huntington's disease, several forms of spinocerebellar ataxias and spinobulbar muscular atrophy. To determine the structure of polyglutamine aggregates we perform replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations coupled with the optimized potential for effective peptide forcefield. Using a range of temperatures from 250 to 700 K, we study the aggregation kinetics of the polyglutamine monomer and dimer with chain lengths from 30 to 50 residues. All monomers show a similar structural change at the same temperature from α-helical structure to random coil, without indication of any significant β-strand. For dimers, by contrast, starting from random structures, we observe spontaneous formation of antiparallel β-sheets and triangular and circular β-helical structures for polyglutamine with 40 residues in a 400 ns 50 temperature replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulation (total integrated time 20 μs). This ˜32 Å diameter structure reorganizes further into a tight antiparallel double-stranded ˜22 Å nanotube with 22 residues per turn close to Perutz' model for amyloid fibers as water-filled nanotubes. This diversity of structures suggests the existence of polymorphism for polyglutamine with possibly different pathways leading to the formation of toxic oligomers and to fibrils.

  15. Dynamics of biofilm formation during anaerobic digestion of organic waste.

    PubMed

    Langer, Susanne; Schropp, Daniel; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Othman, Maazuza; Kazda, Marian

    2014-10-01

    Biofilm-based reactors are effectively used for wastewater treatment but are not common in biogas production. This study investigated biofilm dynamics on biofilm carriers incubated in batch biogas reactors at high and low organic loading rates for sludge from meat industry dissolved air flotation units. Biofilm formation and dynamics were studied using various microscopic techniques. Resulting micrographs were analysed for total cell numbers, thickness of biofilms, biofilm-covered surface area, and the area covered by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Cell numbers within biofilms (10(11) cells ml(-1)) were up to one order of magnitude higher compared to the numbers of cells in the fluid reactor content. Further, biofilm formation and structure mainly correlated with the numbers of microorganisms present in the fluid reactor content and the organic loading. At high organic loading (45 kg VS m(-3)), the thickness of the continuous biofilm layer ranged from 5 to 160 μm with an average of 51 μm and a median of 26 μm. Conversely, at lower organic loading (15 kg VS m(-3)), only microcolonies were detectable. Those microcolonies increased in their frequency of occurrence during ongoing fermentation. Independently from the organic loading rate, biofilms were embedded completely in EPS within seven days. The maturation and maintenance of biofilms changed during the batch fermentation due to decreasing substrate availability. Concomitant, detachment of microorganisms within biofilms was observed simultaneously with the decrease of biogas formation. This study demonstrates that biofilms of high cell densities can enhance digestion of organic waste and have positive effects on biogas production.

  16. THE RELATION BETWEEN DYNAMICS AND STAR FORMATION IN BARRED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Garcia, Eric E.; Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A. E-mail: emartinez@cida.ve

    2011-06-20

    We analyze optical and near-infrared data of a sample of 11 barred spiral galaxies, in order to establish a connection between star formation and bar/spiral dynamics. We find that 22 regions located in the bars and 20 regions in the spiral arms beyond the end of the bar present azimuthal color/age gradients that may be attributed to star formation triggering. Assuming a circular motion dynamic model, we compare the observed age gradient candidates with stellar population synthesis models. A link can then be established with the disk dynamics that allows us to obtain parameters like the pattern speed of the bar or spiral as well as the positions of resonance radii. We subsequently compare the derived pattern speeds with those expected from theoretical and observational results in the literature (e.g., bars ending near corotation). We find a tendency to overestimate bar pattern speeds derived from color gradients in the bar at small radii, away from corotation; this trend can be attributed to non-circular motions of the young stars born in the bar region. In spiral regions, we find that {approx}50% of the color gradient candidates are 'inverse', i.e., with the direction of stellar aging contrary to that of rotation. The other half of the gradients found in spiral arms have stellar ages that increase in the same sense as rotation. Of the nine objects with gradients in both bars and spirals, six (67%) appear to have a bar and a spiral with similar {Omega}{sub p}, while three (33%) do not.

  17. Star Formation and Dynamics in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, Michela; Gualandris, Alessia

    The centre of our Galaxy is one of the most studied and yet enigmatic places in the Universe. At a distance of about 8 kpc from our Sun, the Galactic centre (GC) is the ideal environment to study the extreme processes that take place in the vicinity of a supermassive black hole (SMBH). Despite the hostile environment, several tens of early-type stars populate the central parsec of our Galaxy. A fraction of them lie in a thin ring with mild eccentricity and inner radius ˜ 0.04 pc, while the S-stars, i.e. the ˜ 30 stars closest to the SMBH ( lesssim 0.04 pc), have randomly oriented and highly eccentric orbits. The formation of such early-type stars has been a puzzle for a long time: molecular clouds should be tidally disrupted by the SMBH before they can fragment into stars. We review the main scenarios proposed to explain the formation and the dynamical evolution of the early-type stars in the GC. In particular, we discuss the most popular in situ scenarios (accretion disc fragmentation and molecular cloud disruption) and migration scenarios (star cluster inspiral and Hills mechanism). We focus on the most pressing challenges that must be faced to shed light on the process of star formation in the vicinity of a SMBH.

  18. The dynamics of radiation formation in a FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ognivenko, V.

    1995-12-31

    The dynamics of stimulated radiation formation from spontaneous emission of the relativistic electrons moving in a magnetic helical undulator is investigated theoretically. The total radiation field of the electron beam has been calculated by summating the spontaneous undulator radiation fields of its individual electrons. The nonlinear dynamics of pointed electrons motion in the total radiation field and the self-amplification of this radiation are considered for the finite length of the electron beam. We analyzed the linear and nonlinear regimes for the one dimensional model. In the linear regime, the longitudinal displacements of electrons relative to their equilibrium trajectories in the undulator have been obtained anallyticatly as functions of entry time, the beam length and axial position of electrons in the undulator. The dependence of the efficiency on the beam length is established. We determined the mechanisms of axial beam bunching in the case of the intense electron beam, where the average distance between electrons in the beam reference frame is smaller than the undulator radiation wavelength, and in the limit case of ultra-short wavelength radiation, where the number of particles over the wavelength is not very large. The one-dimensional numerical simulation of nonlinear dynamics of the beam electron motion in the undulator magnetic field and the total radiation field is carried out for the finite beam length. The expression obtained by the analytical methods well agrees with the numerical simulation.

  19. Pseudobulge Formation as a Dynamical Rather than a Secular Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedes, Javiera; Mayer, Lucio; Carollo, Marcella; Madau, Piero

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of the pseudobulge in "Eris," a high-resolution N-body + smoothed particle hydrodynamic cosmological simulation that successfully reproduces a Milky-Way-like massive late-type spiral in an cold dark matter universe. At the present epoch, Eris has a virial mass M vir ~= 8 × 1011 M ⊙, a photometric stellar mass M * = 3.2 × 1010 M ⊙, a bulge-to-total ratio B/T = 0.26, and a weak nuclear bar. We find that the bulk of the pseudobulge forms quickly at high redshift via a combination of non-axisymmetric disk instabilities and tidal interactions or mergers, both occurring on dynamical timescales, not through slow secular processes at lower redshift. Its subsequent evolution is not strictly secular either, and is closely intertwined with the evolution of the stellar bar. In fact, the structure that we recognize as a pseudobulge today evolved from a stellar bar that formed at high redshift due to tidal interactions with satellites, was destroyed by minor mergers at z ~ 3, re-formed shortly after, and weakened again following a steady gas inflow at z <~ 1. The gradual dissolution of the bar ensued at z ~ 1 and continues until the present without increasing the stellar velocity dispersion in the inner regions. In this scenario, the pseudobulge is not a separate component from the inner disk in terms of formation path; rather, it is the first step in the inside-out formation of the baryonic disk, in agreement with the fact that pseudobulges of massive spiral galaxies typically have a dominant old stellar population. If our simulations do indeed reproduce the formation mechanisms of massive spirals, then the progenitors of late-type galaxies should have strong bars and small photometric pseudobulges at high redshift.

  20. PSEUDOBULGE FORMATION AS A DYNAMICAL RATHER THAN A SECULAR PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Guedes, Javiera; Mayer, Lucio; Carollo, Marcella; Madau, Piero

    2013-07-20

    We investigate the formation and evolution of the pseudobulge in 'Eris', a high-resolution N-body + smoothed particle hydrodynamic cosmological simulation that successfully reproduces a Milky-Way-like massive late-type spiral in an cold dark matter universe. At the present epoch, Eris has a virial mass M{sub vir} {approx_equal} 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }, a photometric stellar mass M{sub *} = 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }, a bulge-to-total ratio B/T = 0.26, and a weak nuclear bar. We find that the bulk of the pseudobulge forms quickly at high redshift via a combination of non-axisymmetric disk instabilities and tidal interactions or mergers, both occurring on dynamical timescales, not through slow secular processes at lower redshift. Its subsequent evolution is not strictly secular either, and is closely intertwined with the evolution of the stellar bar. In fact, the structure that we recognize as a pseudobulge today evolved from a stellar bar that formed at high redshift due to tidal interactions with satellites, was destroyed by minor mergers at z {approx} 3, re-formed shortly after, and weakened again following a steady gas inflow at z {approx}< 1. The gradual dissolution of the bar ensued at z {approx} 1 and continues until the present without increasing the stellar velocity dispersion in the inner regions. In this scenario, the pseudobulge is not a separate component from the inner disk in terms of formation path; rather, it is the first step in the inside-out formation of the baryonic disk, in agreement with the fact that pseudobulges of massive spiral galaxies typically have a dominant old stellar population. If our simulations do indeed reproduce the formation mechanisms of massive spirals, then the progenitors of late-type galaxies should have strong bars and small photometric pseudobulges at high redshift.

  1. Mixing dynamics and pattern formation around flow stagnation points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Juan J.; Dentz, Marco

    2016-04-01

    We study the mixing of two reactive fluids in the presence of convective instabilities. Such system is characterized by the formation of unique porosity patterns and mixing dynamics linked to the evolution of vortices and stagnation points. Around them, the fluid-fluid interface is stretched and compressed, which enhances mixing and triggers chemical reactions, and the system can be analyzed using fluid deformation model. We consider velocity fields generated by a double gyre synthetic velocity field and Rayleigh-Bénard and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. The different flow structures can be visualized by the strain rate and the finite time Lyapunov exponents. We show that the mixing enhancement given by the scalar dissipation rate is controlled by the equilibrium between interface compression and diffusion, which depends on the velocity field configuration. Furthermore, we establish a quantitative relation between the mixing rate and the evolution of the potential energy of the fluid when convection is driven by density instabilities.

  2. In Situ Formation and Dynamical Evolution of Hot Jupiter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Bodenheimer, Peter H.; Laughlin, Gregory P.

    2016-10-01

    Hot Jupiters, giant extrasolar planets with orbital periods shorter than ˜10 days, have long been thought to form at large radial distances, only to subsequently experience long-range inward migration. Here, we offer the contrasting view that a substantial fraction of the hot Jupiter population formed in situ via the core-accretion process. We show that under conditions appropriate to the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, rapid gas accretion can be initiated by super-Earth-type planets, comprising 10-20 Earth masses of refractory material. An in situ formation scenario leads to testable consequences, including the expectation that hot Jupiters should frequently be accompanied by additional low-mass planets with periods shorter than ˜100 days. Our calculations further demonstrate that dynamical interactions during the early stages of planetary systems’ lifetimes should increase the inclinations of such companions, rendering transits rare. High-precision radial velocity monitoring provides the best prospect for their detection.

  3. Dynamical complexity in the perception-based network formation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Moon, Eunyoung

    2016-12-01

    Many link formation mechanisms for the evolution of social networks have been successful to reproduce various empirical findings in social networks. However, they have largely ignored the fact that individuals make decisions on whether to create links to other individuals based on cost and benefit of linking, and the fact that individuals may use perception of the network in their decision making. In this paper, we study the evolution of social networks in terms of perception-based strategic link formation. Here each individual has her own perception of the actual network, and uses it to decide whether to create a link to another individual. An individual with the least perception accuracy can benefit from updating her perception using that of the most accurate individual via a new link. This benefit is compared to the cost of linking in decision making. Once a new link is created, it affects the accuracies of other individuals' perceptions, leading to a further evolution of the actual network. As for initial actual networks, we consider both homogeneous and heterogeneous cases. The homogeneous initial actual network is modeled by Erdős-Rényi (ER) random networks, while we take a star network for the heterogeneous case. In any cases, individual perceptions of the actual network are modeled by ER random networks with controllable linking probability. Then the stable link density of the actual network is found to show discontinuous transitions or jumps according to the cost of linking. As the number of jumps is the consequence of the dynamical complexity, we discuss the effect of initial conditions on the number of jumps to find that the dynamical complexity strongly depends on how much individuals initially overestimate or underestimate the link density of the actual network. For the heterogeneous case, the role of the highly connected individual as an information spreader is also discussed.

  4. Complex formation dynamics in a single-molecule electronic device

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Huimin; Li, Wengang; Chen, Jiewei; He, Gen; Li, Longhua; Olson, Mark A.; Sue, Andrew C.-H.; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Guo, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule electronic devices offer unique opportunities to investigate the properties of individual molecules that are not accessible in conventional ensemble experiments. However, these investigations remain challenging because they require (i) highly precise device fabrication to incorporate single molecules and (ii) sufficient time resolution to be able to make fast molecular dynamic measurements. We demonstrate a graphene-molecule single-molecule junction that is capable of probing the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of a host-guest complex. By covalently integrating a conjugated molecular wire with a pendent crown ether into graphene point contacts, we can transduce the physical [2]pseudorotaxane (de)formation processes between the electron-rich crown ether and a dicationic guest into real-time electrical signals. The conductance of the single-molecule junction reveals two-level fluctuations that are highly dependent on temperature and solvent environments, affording a nondestructive means of quantitatively determining the binding and rate constants, as well as the activation energies, for host-guest complexes. The thermodynamic processes reveal the host-guest binding to be enthalpy-driven and are consistent with conventional 1H nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments. This electronic device opens up a new route to developing single-molecule dynamics investigations with microsecond resolution for a broad range of chemical and biochemical applications. PMID:28138528

  5. The Modified Dynamics is Conducive to Galactic Warp Formation.

    PubMed

    Brada; Milgrom

    2000-03-01

    There is an effect in the modified dynamics that is conducive to the formation of warps. Because of the nonlinearity of the theory, the internal dynamics of a galaxy is affected by a perturber over and above possible tidal effects. For example, a relatively distant and light companion or the mean influence of a parent cluster, with negligible tidal effects, could still produce a significant warp in the outer part of a galactic disk. We present results of numerical calculations for simplified models that show, for instance, that a satellite with the (baryonic) mass and distance of the Magellanic Clouds can distort the axisymmetric field of the Milky Way enough to produce a warp of the magnitude (and position) observed. Details of the warp geometry remain to be explained; we use a static configuration that can produce only warps with a straight line of nodes. In more realistic simulations, one must reckon with the motion of the perturbing body, which sometimes occurs on timescales not much longer than the response time of the disk.

  6. Kinetic and dynamic control for magmatic sulfide deposit formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Magmatic sulfide deposits form by the saturation and separation of sulfide liquid from silicate liquid due to immiscibility. As a silicate melt cools and fractionates under reducing conditions, S concentration increases and S solubility decreases. Hence, at some point, S may become supersaturated, and sulfide melt droplets would nucleate and grow. The droplets would sink through silicate melt due to higher density of the sulfide melt, and accumulate at the bottom of the magma body, possibly with other crystallizing and settling dense minerals such as olivine and chromite. The sulfide layer, if preserved, constitutes the sulfide deposits. Hence, the critical condition for magmatic sulfide deposit formation is for the droplets to settle enough distance to and accumulate at the bottom of a magma body. Otherwise, sulfide droplets would be dispersed in the rock and would not form ores. Because the settling velocity is related to the size of the droplets, the growth kinetics and settling dynamics therefore control the formation of such deposits. In this report, a parametric study of sulfide droplet growth and settling as a magma body cools is carried out using our convective growth and settling models. Single stage exponential cooling with a given time scale is adopted. Because no reliable nucleation theory is available, nucleation is roughly treated by assuming one single nucleation event leading to N critical nuclei once the degree of supersaturation reaches x (both N and x are parameters to be varied). Crystal fractionation that can alter melt composition and viscosity is ignored. Growth starts from the critical nucleus radius. Sulfide droplets are assumed to behave as rigid spheres similar to bubbles. A settling distance of 1 km is assigned as the critical condition for the formation of a sulfide ore deposit. The final result is expressed as the initial S concentration necessary for settling this distance. If cooling time scale is 1000 yr, N = 10000 per cubic meter

  7. Dynamics of Alliance Formation and the Egalitarian Revolution

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilets, Sergey; Duenez-Guzman, Edgar A.; Vose, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Arguably the most influential force in human history is the formation of social coalitions and alliances (i.e., long-lasting coalitions) and their impact on individual power. Understanding the dynamics of alliance formation and its consequences for biological, social, and cultural evolution is a formidable theoretical challenge. In most great ape species, coalitions occur at individual and group levels and among both kin and non-kin. Nonetheless, ape societies remain essentially hierarchical, and coalitions rarely weaken social inequality. In contrast, human hunter-gatherers show a remarkable tendency to egalitarianism, and human coalitions and alliances occur not only among individuals and groups, but also among groups of groups. These observations suggest that the evolutionary dynamics of human coalitions can only be understood in the context of social networks and cognitive evolution. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we develop a stochastic model describing the emergence of networks of allies resulting from within-group competition for status or mates between individuals utilizing dyadic information. The model shows that alliances often emerge in a phase transition-like fashion if the group size, awareness, aggressiveness, and persuasiveness of individuals are large and the decay rate of individual affinities is small. With cultural inheritance of social networks, a single leveling alliance including all group members can emerge in several generations. Conclusions/Significance We propose a simple and flexible theoretical approach for studying the dynamics of alliance emergence applicable where game-theoretic methods are not practical. Our approach is both scalable and expandable. It is scalable in that it can be generalized to larger groups, or groups of groups. It is expandable in that it allows for inclusion of additional factors such as behavioral, genetic, social, and cultural features. Our results suggest that a rapid transition from a

  8. Theoretical motivation for gravitation experiments on ultra-low energy antiprotons and antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    It is known that the generally accepted theories of gravity and quantum mechanics are fundamentally incompatible. Thus, when one tries to combine these theories, one must beware of physical pitfalls. Modern theories of quantum gravity are trying to overcome these problems. Any ideas must confront the present agreement with general relativity, but yet be free to wonder about not understood phenomena, such as the dark matter problem. This all has led some {open_quotes}intrepid{close_quotes} theorists to consider a new gravitational regime, that of antimatter. Even more {open_quotes}daring{close_quotes} experimentalists are attempting, or considering attempting, the measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter, including low-energy antiprotons and, perhaps most enticing, antihydrogen.

  9. Antihydrogen-hydrogen elastic scattering at thermal energies using an atomic-orbital technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Chaudhuri, Puspitapallab; Ghosh, A.S.

    2003-05-01

    In view of the recent interest in the trapping of antihydrogen atom H(bar sign), at very low temperatures, H-bar-H scattering has been investigated at low incident energies using a close-coupling model with the basis set H-bar(1s,2s,2p-bar)+H(1s,2s,2p-bar). The predicted s-wave elastic phase shifts, scattering length, and effective range are in a good agreement with the other recent predictions of Jonsell et al. and of Armour and Chamberlain. The results indicate that the atomic orbital expansion model is suitable to study the H-bar-H scattering at ultracold temperatures.

  10. A Scheme To Produce The Antihydrogen Ion H-bar{sup +} For Gravity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, P.; Liszkay, L.; Carty, M.; Curtoni, A.; Delferrierre, O.; Rey, J.-M.; Sauce, Y.; Boilot, J.-P.; Corbel, C.; Crivelli, P.; Etienne, M.; Walcarius, A.; Gendotti, U.; Rubbia, A.; Hassan, M.; Mohri, A.; Saitoh, H.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-08-08

    We propose to use the charge exchange reaction of antiprotons with positronium atoms in order to produce antihydrogen atoms, H-bar, and H-bar{sup +} ions. The ions can be cooled down to {mu}K temperatures and then ionized to recover an ultra slow neutral H-bar atom. Its acceleration is then measured by time of flight. Results on the conversion of slow positrons into positronium are presented. This is a first step towards the creation of a dense cloud of positronium atoms to be used as a target for the antiprotons. The source of positrons is based on a 6 MeV industrial electron linac with 0.2 mA average current to be installed in CEA-Saclay. Equipped with a tungsten target and a moderator, it is aimed at producing rates of order 10{sup 8} s{sup -1} slow positrons.

  11. Observation of the 1S–2S transition in trapped antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, M.; Alves, B. X. R.; Baker, C. J.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Carruth, C.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Cohen, S.; Collister, R.; Eriksson, S.; Evans, A.; Evetts, N.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Isaac, C. A.; Ishida, A.; Johnson, M. A.; Jones, S. A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Mathers, M.; Maxwell, D.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Michan, J. M.; Momose, T.; Munich, J. J.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sacramento, R. L.; Sameed, M.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; Stracka, S.; Stutter, G.; So, C.; Tharp, T. D.; Thompson, J. E.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    The spectrum of the hydrogen atom has played a central part in fundamental physics over the past 200 years. Historical examples of its importance include the wavelength measurements of absorption lines in the solar spectrum by Fraunhofer, the identification of transition lines by Balmer, Lyman and others, the empirical description of allowed wavelengths by Rydberg, the quantum model of Bohr, the capability of quantum electrodynamics to precisely predict transition frequencies, and modern measurements of the 1S–2S transition by Hänsch to a precision of a few parts in 1015. Recent technological advances have allowed us to focus on antihydrogen—the antimatter equivalent of hydrogen. The Standard Model predicts that there should have been equal amounts of matter and antimatter in the primordial Universe after the Big Bang, but today’s Universe is observed to consist almost entirely of ordinary matter. This motivates the study of antimatter, to see if there is a small asymmetry in the laws of physics that govern the two types of matter. In particular, the CPT (charge conjugation, parity reversal and time reversal) theorem, a cornerstone of the Standard Model, requires that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Here we report the observation of the 1S–2S transition in magnetically trapped atoms of antihydrogen. We determine that the frequency of the transition, which is driven by two photons from a laser at 243 nanometres, is consistent with that expected for hydrogen in the same environment. This laser excitation of a quantum state of an atom of antimatter represents the most precise measurement performed on an anti-atom. Our result is consistent with CPT invariance at a relative precision of about 2 × 10‑10.

  12. Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML): an open format for representing quantitative biological dynamics data

    PubMed Central

    Kyoda, Koji; Tohsato, Yukako; Ho, Kenneth H. L.; Onami, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Recent progress in live-cell imaging and modeling techniques has resulted in generation of a large amount of quantitative data (from experimental measurements and computer simulations) on spatiotemporal dynamics of biological objects such as molecules, cells and organisms. Although many research groups have independently dedicated their efforts to developing software tools for visualizing and analyzing these data, these tools are often not compatible with each other because of different data formats. Results: We developed an open unified format, Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML; current version: 0.2), which provides a basic framework for representing quantitative biological dynamics data for objects ranging from molecules to cells to organisms. BDML is based on Extensible Markup Language (XML). Its advantages are machine and human readability and extensibility. BDML will improve the efficiency of development and evaluation of software tools for data visualization and analysis. Availability and implementation: A specification and a schema file for BDML are freely available online at http://ssbd.qbic.riken.jp/bdml/. Contact: sonami@riken.jp Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25414366

  13. Star Formation and Cloud Dynamics in the Galactic Bar Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolls, Volker

    The Inner Galaxy (IG) that is the Galactic Bar Region (GBR) and the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) including the Galactic Center (GC) are, despite being the sites of dramatic processes and unique sources, still only incompletely understood. Detailed new datasets from the Herschel Space Observatory can be systematically combined with older archival material to enable a new and more complete analysis of the region, its large-scale dynamics, its unusual giant molecular clouds, and the likely influences of its bar and its supermassive black hole. Such a study is both timely and important: the region has affected the structure and evolution of the galaxy; its individual sources are opportunities to examine star formation (for example) under extreme conditions; the processes feeding the CMZ and, subsequently, its black hole are important; and not least, it is a nearby template for the inner regions of other galaxies. The Herschel Space Observatory has provided us with exciting new datasets including full FIR photometric maps and highand low-resolution far-infrared/submillimeter spectra of key sources and lines of the locations of dynamical importance. All these datasets are publicly available from the Herschel Science Archive. Our experienced team has already developed preliminary models, and we propose a thorough investigation to combine the Herschel datasets with Spitzer and WISE datasets. We will supplement them with ground-based observations in cases when it will improve the results. We will then analyze the data and use the results to refine the models and improve our understanding of this key region. Our specific goal is to characterize and model the 3 giant high-velocity molecular cloud clumps in the Galaxy Bar Region (GBR) in detail and to combine the conclusions to produce an improved model of the IG. We have seven tasks: (1) identify all smaller scale gas and dust cores using archival Herschel FIR photometric observations and obtain their physical characteristics

  14. Violent Relaxation, Dynamical Instabilities and the Formation of Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, L. A.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN: El problema de la formaci6n de galaxias elfpticas por medjo de colapso gravitacional sin disipaci6n de energfa es estudiado usando un gran numero de simulaciones numericas. Se muestra que este tipo de colapsos, partiendo de condiciones iniciales frfas donde la energfa cinetica inicial representa s6lo un 5%, 0 , de a potencial inicial, produce sistemas relajados de forma triaxial muy similares a las galaxias elfpticas reales en sus formas y perfiles de densidad en proyecci6i . La forina triaxial resulta de la acci6n de una inestabilidad dinamica que aparece en sistemas 'inicos dominados por movimientos radiales, mientras que el perfil de densidad final Cs debido al llamado relajamiento violento que tiende a producir una distribuci6n en espacio fase unica. Estos dos fen6menos tienden a borrar los detalles particulares sobre las condiciones iniciales y dan lugar a una evoluci6n convergente hacia sistemas realistas, esto innecesario el uso de condiciones iniciales especiales (excepto por Ia condici6i de que estas deben ser frfas). Las condiciones iniciales frfas producen los movimientos radiales y fluctuaciones de la energfa potencial requeridos por ambos fen6menos. ABSTRACT: The problem of formation of elliptical galaxies via dissipationless collapse is studied using a large set of numerical simulations. It is shown that dissipationless collapses from cold initial conditions, where the total initial kinetic energy is less than 5% ofthe initial potential energy, lead to relaxed triaxial systems ery similar to real elliptical galaxies ii projected shape and density profiles. The triaxial shape is due to the of a dynamical instability that appears on systems dominated by radial orbits, while final density profile is due to violent relaxation that tends to produce a unique distribution iii space. These two phenomena erase memory of the initial prodtice a convergent evolution toward realistic systems, thus making unnecessary use o[special initial conditions (other

  15. Development of mini linac-based positron source and an efficient positronium convertor for positively charged antihydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muranaka, T.; Debu, P.; Dupré, P.; Liszkay, L.; Mansoulie, B.; Pérez, P.; Rey, J. M.; Ruiz, N.; Sacquin, Y.; Crivelli, P.; Gendotti, U.; Rubbia, A.

    2010-04-01

    We have installed in Saclay a facility for an intense positron source in November 2008. It is based on a compact 5.5 MeV electron linac connected to a reaction chamber with a tungsten target inside to produce positrons via pair production. The expected production rate for fast positrons is 5·1011 per second. The study of moderation of fast positrons and the construction of a slow positron trap are underway. In parallel, we have investigated an efficient positron-positronium convertor using porous silica materials. These studies are parts of a project to produce positively charged antihydrogen ions aiming to demonstrate the feasibility of a free fall antigravity measurement of neutral antihydrogen.

  16. Characterizing Suspension Plasma Spray Coating Formation Dynamics through Curvature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidambaram Seshadri, Ramachandran; Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-12-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) enables the production of variety of microstructures with unique mechanical and thermal properties. In SPS, a liquid carrier (ethanol/water) is used to transport the sub-micrometric feedstock into the plasma jet. Considering complex deposition dynamics of SPS technique, there is a need to better understand the relationships among spray conditions, ensuing particle behavior, deposition stress evolution and resultant properties. In this study, submicron yttria-stabilized zirconia particles suspended in ethanol were sprayed using a cascaded arc plasma torch. The stresses generated during the deposition of the layers (termed evolving stress) were monitored via the change in curvature of the substrate measured using an in situ measurement apparatus. Depending on the deposition conditions, coating microstructures ranged from feathery porous to dense/cracked deposits. The evolving stresses and modulus were correlated with the observed microstructures and visualized via process maps. Post-deposition bi-layer curvature measurement via low temperature thermal cycling was carried out to quantify the thermo-elastic response of different coatings. Lastly, preliminary data on furnace cycle durability of different coating microstructures were evaluated. This integrated study involving in situ diagnostics and ex situ characterization along with process maps provides a framework to describe coating formation mechanisms, process parametrics and microstructure description.

  17. Dynamic phase separation: from coarsening to turbulence via structure formation.

    PubMed

    Golovin, A A; Pismen, L M

    2004-09-01

    We investigate some new two-dimensional evolution models belonging to the class of convective Cahn-Hilliard models: (i) a local model with a scalar order parameter, (ii) a nonlocal model with a scalar order parameter, and (iii) a model with a vector order parameter. These models are applicable to phase-separating system where concentration gradients cause hydrodynamic motion due to buoyancy or Marangoni effect. The numerical study of the models shows transition from coarsening, typical of Cahn-Hilliard systems, to spatiotemporally irregular behavior (turbulence), typical of the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, which is obtained in the limit of very strong driving. The transition occurs not in a straightforward way, but through the formation of spatial patterns that emerge for intermediate values of the driving intensity. As in driven one-dimensional models studied before, the mere presence of the driving force, however small, breaks the symmetry between the two separating phases, as well as increases the coarsening rate. With increasing driving, coarsening stops. The dynamics is generally irregular at strong driving, but exhibits specific structural features.

  18. Annihilation detector for an in-beam spectroscopy apparatus to measure the ground state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerzopf, Clemens; Capon, Aaron A.; Diermaier, Martin; Fleck, Markus; Kolbinger, Bernadette; Malbrunot, Chloé; Massiczek, Oswald; Simon, Martin C.; Vamosi, Stefan; Zmeskal, Johann; Widmann, Eberhard

    2017-02-01

    The matter-antimatter asymmetry observed in the universe today still lacks a quantitative explanation. One possible mechanism that could contribute to the observed imbalance is a violation of the combined Charge-, Parity- and Time symmetries (CPT). A test of CPT symmetry using anti-atoms is being carried out by the ASACUSA-CUSP collaboration at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator using a low temperature beam of antihydrogen-the most simple atomic system built only of antiparticles. While hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, antihydrogen is produced in very small quantities in a laboratory framework. A detector for in-beam measurements of the ground state hyperfine structure of antihydrogen has to be able to detect very low signal rates within high background. To fulfil this challenging task, a two layer barrel hodoscope detector was developed. It is built of plastic scintillators with double sided readout via Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). The SiPM readout is done using novel, compact and cost efficient electronics that incorporate power supply, amplifier and discriminator on a single board. This contribution will evaluate the performance of the new hodoscope detector.

  19. Formation and Dynamical Evolution of the Asteroid Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottke, William F.

    2015-08-01

    Asteroids are critical to our desire to unravel the origin of the Solar System because they supply unique, relatively pristine snapshots of the environment in which the Earth formed and evolved. This is due to the fact that, although the asteroids and Earth have followed very different evolutionary pathways, they all formed from the same set of physical processes and share a common ancestry. The asteroid belt presents a particular challenge to understanding terrestrial planet formation because of its small mass. Models of the protoplanetary disk suggest the region between 2-3 AU should contain roughly 3 Earth masses, while less than 0.001 of an Earth mass is actually found there.A long-standing explanation for the asteroid belt's small mass is that it is due to the gravitational influence of Jupiter and Saturn. Some have suggested protoplanets grew there before they were dynamically removed from the asteroid belt by resonances with the gas giants. This left the asteroid belt dynamically excited (which is observed) and heavily depleted in mass. More recently, however, detailed models have shown that this process produces an asteroid belt that is inconsistent with observations.Two recent models propose new ways to match asteroid belt constraints. The first, the so-called ‘Grand Tack’ scenario, uses the results of hydrodynamic simulations to show that Jupiter (and Saturn) migrated both inward and outward across the asteroid belt while interacting with the protoplanetary gas disk. The Grand Tack not only reproduces the mass and mixture of spectral types in the asteroid belt, but it also truncates the planetesimal disk from which the terrestrial planets form, potentially explaining why Mars is less massive than Earth. In a second scenario, planetesimals that form directly from cm- to meter-sized objects, known as “pebbles”, are rapidly converted to 100 to 1000 km asteroid-like object that subsequently grow by accreting even more pebbles. Pebble accretion models

  20. GVE-Based Dynamics and Control for Formation Flying Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breger, Louis; How, Jonathan P.

    2004-01-01

    Formation flying is an enabling technology for many future space missions. This paper presents extensions to the equations of relative motion expressed in Keplerian orbital elements, including new initialization techniques for general formation configurations. A new linear time-varying form of the equations of relative motion is developed from Gauss Variational Equations and used in a model predictive controller. The linearizing assumptions for these equations are shown to be consistent with typical formation flying scenarios. Several linear, convex initialization techniques are presented, as well as a general, decentralized method for coordinating a tetrahedral formation using differential orbital elements. Control methods are validated using a commercial numerical propagator.

  1. Rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of clathrin cage formation.

    PubMed

    Ilie, Ioana M; den Otter, Wouter K; Briels, Wim J

    2014-08-14

    The self-assembly of nearly rigid proteins into ordered aggregates is well suited for modeling by the patchy particle approach. Patchy particles are traditionally simulated using Monte Carlo methods, to study the phase diagram, while Brownian Dynamics simulations would reveal insights into the assembly dynamics. However, Brownian Dynamics of rotating anisotropic particles gives rise to a number of complications not encountered in translational Brownian Dynamics. We thoroughly test the Rotational Brownian Dynamics scheme proposed by Naess and Elsgaeter [Macromol. Theory Simul. 13, 419 (2004); Naess and Elsgaeter Macromol. Theory Simul. 14, 300 (2005)], confirming its validity. We then apply the algorithm to simulate a patchy particle model of clathrin, a three-legged protein involved in vesicle production from lipid membranes during endocytosis. Using this algorithm we recover time scales for cage assembly comparable to those from experiments. We also briefly discuss the undulatory dynamics of the polyhedral cage.

  2. Rotational Brownian Dynamics simulations of clathrin cage formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ilie, Ioana M.; Briels, Wim J.; Otter, Wouter K. den

    2014-08-14

    The self-assembly of nearly rigid proteins into ordered aggregates is well suited for modeling by the patchy particle approach. Patchy particles are traditionally simulated using Monte Carlo methods, to study the phase diagram, while Brownian Dynamics simulations would reveal insights into the assembly dynamics. However, Brownian Dynamics of rotating anisotropic particles gives rise to a number of complications not encountered in translational Brownian Dynamics. We thoroughly test the Rotational Brownian Dynamics scheme proposed by Naess and Elsgaeter [Macromol. Theory Simul. 13, 419 (2004); Naess and Elsgaeter Macromol. Theory Simul. 14, 300 (2005)], confirming its validity. We then apply the algorithm to simulate a patchy particle model of clathrin, a three-legged protein involved in vesicle production from lipid membranes during endocytosis. Using this algorithm we recover time scales for cage assembly comparable to those from experiments. We also briefly discuss the undulatory dynamics of the polyhedral cage.

  3. Oman metamorphic sole formation reveals early subduction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soret, Mathieu; Agard, Philippe; Dubacq, Benoît; Plunder, Alexis; Ildefonse, Benoît; Yamato, Philippe; Prigent, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    Metamorphic soles correspond to m to ~500m thick tectonic slices welded beneath most of the large-scale ophiolites. They typically show a steep inverted metamorphic structure where the pressure and temperature conditions of crystallization increase upward (from 500±100°C at 0.5±0.2 GPa to 800±100°C at 1.0±0.2 GPa), with isograds subparallel to the contact with the overlying ophiolitic peridotite. The proportion of mafic rocks in metamorphic soles also increases from the bottom (meta-sediments rich) to the top (approaching the ophiolite peridotites). These soles are interpreted as the result of heat transfer from the incipient mantle wedge toward the nascent slab (associated with large-scale fluid transfer and possible shear heating) during the first My of intra-oceanic subduction (as indicated by radiometric ages). Metamorphic soles provide therefore major constraints on early subduction dynamics (i.e., thermal structure, fluid migration and rheology along the nascent slab interface). We present a detailed structural and petrological study of the metamorphic sole from 4 major cross-sections along the Oman ophiolite. We show precise pressure-temperature estimates obtained by pseudosection modelling and EBSD measurements performed on both the garnet-bearing and garnet-free high-grade sole. Results allow quantification of the micro-scale deformation and highlight differences in pressure-temperature-deformation conditions between the 4 different locations, showing that the inverted metamorphic gradient through the sole is not continuous in all locations. Based on these new constraints, we suggest a new tectonic-petrological model for the formation of metamorphic soles below ophiolites. This model involves the stacking of several homogeneous slivers of oceanic crust leading to the present-day structure of the sole. In this view, these thrusts are the result of rheological contrasts between the sole and the peridotite as the plate interface progressively cools down

  4. Dynamic Group Formation Based on a Natural Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zedadra, Amina; Lafifi, Yacine; Zedadra, Ouarda

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach of learners grouping in collaborative learning systems. This grouping process is based on traces left by learners. The goal is the circular dynamic grouping to achieve collaborative projects. The proposed approach consists of two main algorithms: (1) the circular grouping algorithm and (2) the dynamic grouping…

  5. Construction and Operational Experience with a Superconducting Octupole Used to Trap Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wanderer P.; Escallier, J.; Marone, A.; Parker, B.

    2011-09-06

    A superconducting octupole magnet has seen extensive service as part of the ALPHA experiment at CERN. ALPHA has trapped antihydrogen, a crucial step towards performing precision measurements of anti-atoms. The octupole was made at the Direct Wind facility by the Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The magnet was wound with a six-around-one NbTi cable about 1 mm in diameter. It is about 300 mm long, with a radius of 25 mm and a peak field at the conductor of 4.04 T. Specific features of the magnet, including a minimal amount of material in the coil and coil ends with low multipole content, were advantageous to its use in ALPHA. The magnet was operated for six months a year for five years. During this time it underwent about 900 thermal cycles (between 4K and 100K). A novel operational feature is that during the course of data-taking the magnet was repeatedly shut off from its 950 A operating current. The magnet quenches during the shutoff, with a decay constant of 9 ms. Over the course of the five years, the magnet was deliberately quenched many thousands of times. It still performs well.

  6. Positrons for Antihydrogen with ATRAP: efficient transfer of large positron numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storry, Cody; Comeau, Daniel; Dror, Asaf; Fitzakerley, Daniel; George, Matthew; Hessels, Eric; Weel, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    Positrons accumulated in a room-temperature buffer-gas-cooled positron accumulator are efficiently transferred into a superconducting solenoid which houses the ATRAP cryogenic Penning trap for antihydrogen research. The positrons are guided along a 9-meter-long magnetic guide which connects the central field lines of the 0.15-tesla field in the positron accumulator to central magnetic field lines of the superconducting solenoid. Seventy independently-controllable electromagnets are required to overcome the fringing field of the large-bore superconducting solenoid. The guide includes both a 15 degree upward bend and a 105 degree downward bend to account for the orthogonal orientation of the accumulator with respect to the cryogenic Penning trap. Low-energy positrons ejected from the accumulator follow the magnetic field lines within the guide and are transferred into the superconducting solenoid with nearly 100% efficiency. 7 meters of 5-cm-diameter stainless-steel tube, and a 20-mm-long, 1.5-mm-diameter cryogenic pumping restriction ensure that the 10-2 mbar pressure in the accumulator is well isolated from the extreme vacuum required in the Penning trap to allow long antimatter storage times.

  7. Research on framework for formation control of multiple underwater robots in a dynamic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xian-Song; Xu, Hong-Gen; Zhang, Ming-Jun

    2004-12-01

    In this paper a practical framework is proposed to keep formation control of multiple underwater robots in a dynamic environment. The approach is a viable solution to solve formation problem. The approach allows online planning of the formation paths using a Dijkstra’s search algorithm based on the current sensor data. The formation is allowed to be dynamically changed in order to avoid obstacles in the environment. A controller is designed to keep the robots in their planned trajectories. It is shown that the approach is effective and feasible by the simulation of computer.

  8. Gas Dynamics and the Formation of Galaxies and Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, Abraham (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Below we enclose a list of papers that were written during 1995/96. These papers focus on structure formation in the universe at high redshifts, and accomplish various aspects of the research goals of this grant.

  9. Dynamic behavior of a social model for opinion formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordogna, Clelia M.; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2007-12-01

    The dynamic behavior of a social group influenced by both a strong leader and the mass media, which is modeled according to the social impact theory, is studied under two situations: (i) The strong leader changes his/her state of opinion periodically while the mass media are not considered. In this case, the leader is capable of driving the group between a dynamically ordered state with a weak leader-group coupling (high-frequency regime) and a dynamically disordered state where the group follows the opinion of the leader (low-frequency regime). (ii) The mass-media change periodically their message and have to compete with a strong leader that keeps his/her state of opinion unchanged. In this case, the mass media require an amplitude threshold in order to overcome the influence of the leader and drive the system into a dynamically disordered state. The dynamic behavior characteristic of the studied social opinion model shares many features of physical systems that are relevant in the fields of statistical mechanics and condensed matter.

  10. Dynamics and gravitational wave signature of collapsar formation.

    PubMed

    Ott, C D; Reisswig, C; Schnetter, E; O'Connor, E; Sperhake, U; Löffler, F; Diener, P; Abdikamalov, E; Hawke, I; Burrows, A

    2011-04-22

    We perform 3+1 general relativistic simulations of rotating core collapse in the context of the collapsar model for long gamma-ray bursts. We employ a realistic progenitor, rotation based on results of stellar evolution calculations, and a simplified equation of state. Our simulations track self-consistently collapse, bounce, the postbounce phase, black hole formation, and the subsequent early hyperaccretion phase. We extract gravitational waves from the spacetime curvature and identify a unique gravitational wave signature associated with the early phase of collapsar formation.

  11. Dynamics and Gravitational Wave Signature of Collapsar Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, C. D.; Reisswig, C.; Schnetter, E.; O'Connor, E.; Sperhake, U.; Löffler, F.; Diener, P.; Abdikamalov, E.; Hawke, I.; Burrows, A.

    2011-04-01

    We perform 3+1 general relativistic simulations of rotating core collapse in the context of the collapsar model for long gamma-ray bursts. We employ a realistic progenitor, rotation based on results of stellar evolution calculations, and a simplified equation of state. Our simulations track self-consistently collapse, bounce, the postbounce phase, black hole formation, and the subsequent early hyperaccretion phase. We extract gravitational waves from the spacetime curvature and identify a unique gravitational wave signature associated with the early phase of collapsar formation.

  12. Core Formation Under Dynamic Conditions: Physical Processes and Geochemical Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushmer, T.; Gaetani, G.; Jones, J. H.; Sparks, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated liquid metal segregation from a solid silicate matrix under conditions of applied stress. Liquid moves in fractures and formation of fayalitic olivine from orthopyroxene by migrating Fe-Ni-S-O liquids is observed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. MODELING OF PARTICLE FORMATION AND DYNAMICS IN A FLAME INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model has been developed to predict the formation and growth of metallic particles in a flame incinerator system. Flow fields and temperature profiles in a cylindrical laminar jet flame have been used to determine the position and physical conditions of the species along the fl...

  14. Flexible Virtual Structure Consideration in Dynamic Modeling of Mobile Robots Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kamel, A. Essghaier; Beji, L.; Lerbet, J.; Abichou, A.

    2009-03-01

    In cooperative mobile robotics, we look for formation keeping and maintenance of a geometric configuration during movement. As a solution to these problems, the concept of a virtual structure is considered. Based on this idea, we have developed an efficient flexible virtual structure, describing the dynamic model of n vehicles in formation and where the whole formation is kept dependant. Notes that, for 2D and 3D space navigation, only a rigid virtual structure was proposed in the literature. Further, the problem was limited to a kinematic behavior of the structure. Hence, the flexible virtual structure in dynamic modeling of mobile robots formation presented in this paper, gives more capabilities to the formation to avoid obstacles in hostile environment while keeping formation and avoiding inter-agent collision.

  15. Dynamics of filament formation in a Kerr medium

    SciTech Connect

    Centurion, Martin; Pu Ye; Tsang, Mankei; Psaltis, Demetri

    2005-06-15

    We have studied the large-scale beam breakup and filamentation of femtosecond pulses in a Kerr medium. We have experimentally monitored the formation of stable light filaments, conical emission, and interactions between filaments. Three major stages lead to the formation of stable light filaments: First the beam breaks up into a pattern of connected lines (constellation), then filaments form on the constellations, and finally the filaments release a fraction of their energy through conical emission. We observed a phase transition to a faster filamentation rate at the onset of conical emission. We attribute this to the interaction of conical emissions with the constellation which creates additional filaments. Numerical simulations show good agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Opinion Formation and the Collective Dynamics of Risk Perception

    PubMed Central

    Moussaïd, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    The formation of collective opinion is a complex phenomenon that results from the combined effects of mass media exposure and social influence between individuals. The present work introduces a model of opinion formation specifically designed to address risk judgments, such as attitudes towards climate change, terrorist threats, or children vaccination. The model assumes that people collect risk information from the media environment and exchange them locally with other individuals. Even though individuals are initially exposed to the same sample of information, the model predicts the emergence of opinion polarization and clustering. In particular, numerical simulations highlight two crucial factors that determine the collective outcome: the propensity of individuals to search for independent information, and the strength of social influence. This work provides a quantitative framework to anticipate and manage how the public responds to a given risk, and could help understanding the systemic amplification of fears and worries, or the underestimation of real dangers. PMID:24386398

  17. Dynamics of Aerial Tower Formation in Bacillus subtilis Biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Naveen; Seminara, Agnese; Wilking, James; Brenner, Michael; Weitz, Dave

    2012-02-01

    Biofilms are highly-organized colonies of bacteria that form on surfaces. These colonies form sophisticated structures which make them robust and difficult to remove from environments such as catheters, where they pose serious infection problems. Previous work has shown that sub-mm sized aerial towers form on the surface of Bacillus subtilis colony biofilms. Spore-formation is located preferentially at the tops of these towers, known as fruiting bodies, which aid in the dispersal and propagation of the colony to new sites. The formation of towers is strongly affected by the quorum-sensing molecule surfactin and the cannibalism pathway of the bacteria. In the present work, we use confocal fluorescence microscopy to study the development of individual fruiting bodies, allowing us to visualize the time-dependent spatial distribution of matrix-forming and sporulating bacteria within the towers. With this information, we investigate the physical mechanisms, such as surface tension and polymer concentration gradients, that drive the formation of these structures.

  18. Dynamics of oligomer formation by denatured carbonic anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Prokhorov, Dmitry A; Timchenko, Alexander A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Khristoforov, Vladimir S; Kihara, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kazumoto; Kutyshenko, Viktor P

    2008-05-01

    Aggregation and subsequent development of protein deposition diseases originate from conformational changes in corresponding amyloidogenic proteins. Many proteins unrelated to amyloidoses also fibrillate at the appropriate conditions. These proteins serve as a model for studying the processes of protein misfolding, oligomerization and fibril formation. The accumulated data support the model where protein fibrillogenesis proceeds via the formation of a relatively unfolded amyloidogenic conformation. The urea-induced unfolding of bovine carbonic anhydrase II, BCA II, is characterized by a combination of high-resolution NMR, circular dichroism spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering. It is shown that the formation of associates of protein molecules in complex with solvent (water and urea), APS, takes place in the presence of 4-6 M urea. The subsequent increase in urea concentration to 8 M is accompanied by a disruption of APS and leads to a complete unfolding of a protein molecule. Analysis of BCA II self-association in the presence of 4.2 M urea revealed that APS are relatively large mostly beta-structural blocks with the averaged molecular mass of 190-220 kDa. This work also demonstrates some novel NMR-based methodological approaches that provide useful information on protein self-association.

  19. The dynamics of continental extension and divergent margin formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, D.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Continental breakup is a highly variable process. Differences occur in the relative timing and extent of volcanism, uplift, and graben formation as well as in the mode and amount of continental extension before breakup. The authors propose a model that reconciles this variability with the previously recognized tendency for breakup to occur along preexisting weak trends. Continental lithosphere is viewed as a composite material composed of two strong layers, one in the upper mantle and one in the middle crust. Finite element simulation indicates that extensional failure at weaknesses in the mantle causes concentrated extension in the mantle and diffuse extension in the crust. This leads to early melt segregation and volcanism, margin uplift during the late stages of the extension process, and relatively narrow symmetrical extended margins. In contrast, failure at weaknesses in the crustal strong zone causes focused extension in the crust and diffuse extension in the mantle. This produces initial graben formation, cooling in the lower crust and upper mantle, and broad asymmetrical extended margins. Volcanism only occurs late in the process. Failure at laterally offset weaknesses within both strong layers, perhaps the most common case, leads to a deformation pattern dominated by simple shear. Thus, differences in the prerift configuration of the continental lithosphere can control the overall style of continental breakup. They find that certain features of the evolution of the US Atlantic margin, particularly the formation of the hinge zone and the distribution and timing of extension may be better explained using these models.

  20. Static and Dynamic Aspects of Black Silicon Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi Saab, David; Basset, Philippe; Pierotti, Matthew J.; Trawick, Matthew L.; Angelescu, Dan E.

    2014-12-01

    We present a combination of experimental data and modeling that explains some of the important characteristics of black silicon (BSi) developed in cryogenic reactive ion etching (RIE) processes, including static properties (dependence of resulting topography on process parameters) and dynamic aspects (evolution of topography with process time). We generate a phase diagram predicting the RIE parameter combinations giving rise to different BSi geometries and show that the topographic details of BSi explain the metamaterial characteristics that are responsible for its low reflectivity. In particular, the unique combination of needle and hole features of various heights and depths, which is captured by our model and confirmed by focused ion beam nanotomography, creates a uniquely smooth transition in refractive index. The model also correctly describes dynamical characteristics, such as the dependence of aspect ratio on process time, and the prediction of new etching fronts appearing at topographical saddle points during the incipient stages of BSi development—a phenomenon reported here for the first time.

  1. Dynamics of black hole formation: Evidence for nonextensivity

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, H.P. de; Soares, I. Damiao

    2005-06-15

    We study the dynamics of a bounded collapsing configuration emitting gravitational waves, whose exterior spacetime is described by the Robinson-Trautman metric. In this process mass is lost due to gravitational wave emission until the Schwarzschild black hole is formed. By performing a careful computation of the distribution of the mass fraction extracted by gravitational radiation, we have shown that it satisfies the distribution law of Tsallis nonextensive statistics, and this result is independent of the initial data considered.

  2. Formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam with additional deceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, E. N. Koronovskii, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Hramov, A. E.

    2013-11-15

    Results of numerical simulations and analysis of the formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam in a vircator with a magnetron injection gun as an electron source and with additional electron deceleration are presented. The ranges of control parameters where the squeezed state can form in such a system are revealed, and specific features of the system dynamics are analyzed. It is shown that the formation of a squeezed state of a nonrelativistic helical electron beam in a system with electron deceleration is accompanied by low-frequency longitudinal dynamics of the space charge.

  3. Dynamics of formation of the Exclusion Zone near hydrophilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Ninno, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    EZ water is unable to host solutes, what provides the root of the name Exclusion Zone, and its formation law points towards a diffusive process. These peculiarities have attracted the interest of scientists because it challenges all the theories which have tried to describe the structure of liquid water. The mixture of H-bond stable and H-bond distorted structures envisaged by very recent experimental findings, cannot account for the long-lived hexagonal configuration observed near the Nafion surface. A theoretical account for the phenomenology of H-bond is provided which looks able to explain many among the most striking feature of this water.

  4. Phase separation dynamics during Myxococcus xanthus fruiting body formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guannan; Bahar, Fatmagul; Patch, Adam; Thutupalli, Shashi; Yllanes, David; Marchetti, M. Cristina; Welch, Roy; Shaevitz, Joshua

    Many living systems take advantage of collective behavior for group survival. We use the soil-dwelling bacterium Myxococcus xanthus as a model to study out-of-equilibrium phase separation during fruiting body formation. M. xanthus cells have the ability to glide on solid surfaces and reverse their direction periodically. When starved, M. xanthus cells aggregate together and form structures called fruiting bodies, inside of which cells sporulate to survive stressful conditions. We show that at high cell density the formation of fruiting bodies is a phase separation process. From experimental data that combines single-cell tracking, population-scale imaging, mutants, and drug applications, we construct the phase diagram of M. xanthus in the space of Péclet number and cell density. When wild type cells are starved, we find that they actively increase their Péclet number by modulating gliding speed and reversal frequency which induces a phase separation from a gas-like state to an aggregated fruiting body state.

  5. Dynamics of polymer film formation during spin coating

    SciTech Connect

    Mouhamad, Y.; Clarke, N.; Jones, R. A. L.; Geoghegan, M.; Mokarian-Tabari, P.

    2014-09-28

    Standard models explaining the spin coating of polymer solutions generally fail to describe the early stages of film formation, when hydrodynamic forces control the solution behavior. Using in situ light scattering alongside theoretical and semi-empirical models, it is shown that inertial forces (which initially cause a vertical gradient in the radial solvent velocity within the film) play a significant role in the rate of thinning of the solution. The development of thickness as a function of time of a solute-free liquid (toluene) and a blend of polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) cast from toluene were fitted to different models as a function of toluene partial pressure. In the case of the formation of the polymer blend film, a concentration-dependent (Huggins) viscosity formula was used to account for changes in viscosity during spin coating. A semi-empirical model is introduced, which permits calculation of the solvent evaporation rate and the temporal evolution of the solute volume fraction and solution viscosity.

  6. Excess centrosomes perturb dynamic endothelial cell repolarization during blood vessel formation

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Erich J.; Ferro, Luke S.; Yu, Zhixian; Bautch, Victoria L.

    2016-01-01

    Blood vessel formation requires dynamic movements of endothelial cells (ECs) within sprouts. The cytoskeleton regulates migratory polarity, and centrosomes organize the microtubule cytoskeleton. However, it is not well understood how excess centrosomes, commonly found in tumor stromal cells, affect microtubule dynamics and interphase cell polarity. Here we find that ECs dynamically repolarize during sprouting angiogenesis, and excess centrosomes block repolarization and reduce migration and sprouting. ECs with excess centrosomes initially had more centrosome-derived microtubules but, paradoxically, fewer steady-state microtubules. ECs with excess centrosomes had elevated Rac1 activity, and repolarization was rescued by blockade of Rac1 or actomyosin blockers, consistent with Rac1 activity promoting cortical retrograde actin flow and actomyosin contractility, which precludes cortical microtubule engagement necessary for dynamic repolarization. Thus normal centrosome numbers are required for dynamic repolarization and migration of sprouting ECs that contribute to blood vessel formation. PMID:27099371

  7. Centralized Dynamics and Control of Novel Orbiting Formations of Tethered Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.

    acting as leader of the tethered formation. An application of this problem arises when a distributed sensor array formed by a chain of tethered data-gathering vehicles is being commanded to reconfigure from a remote location by the formation leader. Another application is in radar mapping where multiple free-flying vehicles synthesize multiple apertures with the main tethered vehicle for increased coverage. In this way, a centralized control architecture distributes the information flow among the members of the sensor array. Defining an orbiting formation as an ensemble of orbiting spacecraft performing a cooperative task, we point out that, until now, only spacecraft modeled as rigid bodies have been analyzed in the literature of orbiting formations and constellations. After the formation is in place, one may identify what is known as the virtual truss, i.e. the connection between the elements of the formation, which provides structural rigidity on account of the information flow between them. Our problem is different than conventional formation dynamics problems in that the presence of a tethered spacecraft within the formation demands an investigation of the dynamics coupling between spacecraft caused by tether viscoelasticity. The dynamics model takes into account the orbital and spacecraft dynamics of each vehicle. The control architecture features a separated spacecraft, which has visibility to the entire group of tethered vehicles. This vehicle is the leader of the formation, and ensures that the spacecraft on the tether remain connected and move according to a pre-specified program. The control system design consists of a proportional-derivative feedback plus acceleration feedforward. This ensures that modeling errors are compensated appropriately, and that the commanded slew is tracked accurately. The leader is also where the centralized estimator is located. This estimator continuously updates the state of the formation and estimates inter

  8. Microfluidic Studies of Biofilm Formation in Dynamic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jen; Stocker, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The advent of microscale technologies, such as microfluidics, has revolutionized many areas of biology yet has only recently begun to impact the field of bacterial biofilms. By enabling accurate control and manipulation of physical and chemical conditions, these new microscale approaches afford the ability to combine important features of natural and artificial microbial habitats, such as fluid flow and ephemeral nutrient sources, with an unprecedented level of flexibility and quantification. Here, we review selected case studies to exemplify this potential, discuss limitations, and suggest that this approach opens new vistas into biofilm research over traditional setups, allowing us to expand our understanding of the formation and consequences of biofilms in a broad range of environments and applications. PMID:27274032

  9. Dynamic approaches of mixed species biofilm formation using modern technologies.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Kim; Linossier, Isabelle; Fay, Fabienne; Yong, Julius; Abd Wahid, Effendy; Hadjiev, Dimitre; Bourgougnon, Nathalie

    2012-07-01

    Bacteria and diatoms exist in sessile communities and develop as biofilm on all surfaces in aqueous environments. The interaction between these microorganisms in biofilm was investigated with a bacterial genus Pseudoalteromonas sp. (strain 3J6) and two benthic diatoms Amphora coffeaeformis and Cylindrotheca closterium. Each biofilm was grown for 22 days. Images from the confocal microscopy show a difference of adhesion between Pseudoalteromonas 3J6 and diatoms. Indeed, a stronger adhesion is found with C. closterium suggesting cohabitation between Pseudoalteromonas 3J6 and C. closterium compared at an adaptation for bacteria and A. coffeaeformis. The cellular attachment and the growth evolution in biofilm formation depend on each species of diatoms in the biofilm. Behaviour of microalgae in presence of bacteria demonstrates the complexity of the marine biofilm.

  10. Social Influence and the Collective Dynamics of Opinion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Moussaïd, Mehdi; Kämmer, Juliane E.; Analytis, Pantelis P.; Neth, Hansjörg

    2013-01-01

    Social influence is the process by which individuals adapt their opinion, revise their beliefs, or change their behavior as a result of social interactions with other people. In our strongly interconnected society, social influence plays a prominent role in many self-organized phenomena such as herding in cultural markets, the spread of ideas and innovations, and the amplification of fears during epidemics. Yet, the mechanisms of opinion formation remain poorly understood, and existing physics-based models lack systematic empirical validation. Here, we report two controlled experiments showing how participants answering factual questions revise their initial judgments after being exposed to the opinion and confidence level of others. Based on the observation of 59 experimental subjects exposed to peer-opinion for 15 different items, we draw an influence map that describes the strength of peer influence during interactions. A simple process model derived from our observations demonstrates how opinions in a group of interacting people can converge or split over repeated interactions. In particular, we identify two major attractors of opinion: (i) the expert effect, induced by the presence of a highly confident individual in the group, and (ii) the majority effect, caused by the presence of a critical mass of laypeople sharing similar opinions. Additional simulations reveal the existence of a tipping point at which one attractor will dominate over the other, driving collective opinion in a given direction. These findings have implications for understanding the mechanisms of public opinion formation and managing conflicting situations in which self-confident and better informed minorities challenge the views of a large uninformed majority. PMID:24223805

  11. Dynamics of cluster formation in driven magnetic colloids dispersed on a monolayer.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Sebastian; Stark, Holger; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2013-05-15

    We report computer simulation results on the cluster formation of dipolar colloidal particles driven by a rotating external field in a quasi-two-dimensional setup. We focus on the interplay between permanent dipolar and hydrodynamic interactions and its influence on the dynamic behavior of the particles. This includes their individual as well as their collective motion. To investigate these characteristics, we employ Brownian dynamics simulations of a finite system with and without hydrodynamic interactions. Our results indicate that hydrodynamic interactions have a profound impact on the dynamic behavior of the clusters and the dynamics of the clustering process.

  12. The dynamics of secretion during sea urchin embryonic skeleton formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, Fred H.

    2008-05-01

    Skeleton formation involves secretion of massive amounts of mineral precursor, usually a calcium salt, and matrix proteins, many of which are deposited on, or even occluded within, the mineral. The cell biological underpinnings of this secretion and subsequent assembly of the biomineralized skeletal element is not well understood. We ask here what is the relationship of the trafficking and secretion of the mineral and matrix within the primary mesenchyme cells of the sea urchin embryo, cells that deposit the endoskeletal spicule. Fluorescent labeling of intracellular calcium deposits show mineral precursors are present in granules visible by light microscopy, from whence they are deposited in the endoskeletal spicule, especially at its tip. In contrast, two different matrix proteins tagged with GFP are present in smaller post-Golgi vesicles only seen by electron microscopy, and the secreted protein are only incorporated into the spicule in the vicinity of the cell of origin. The matrix protein, SpSM30B, is post-translationally modified during secretion, and this processing continues after its incorporation into the spicule. Our findings also indicate that the mineral precursor and two well characterized matrix proteins are trafficked by different cellular routes.

  13. Fusion-Fission Dynamics of Super-Heavy Element Formation and Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Zagrebaev, V.I.

    2004-04-12

    The paper is focused on reaction dynamics of super-heavy nucleus formation and decay at beam energies near the Coulomb barrier. The aim is to review the things we have learned from recent experiments on fusion-fission reactions leading to the formation of compound nuclei with Z {>=} 102 and from their extensive theoretical analysis. Main attention is paid to the dynamics of formation of very heavy compound nuclei taking place in strong competition with the process of fast fission (quasi-fission). The choice of collective degrees of freedom playing a principal role, finding the multi-dimensional driving potential and the corresponding dynamic equation regulating the whole process are discussed. Theoretical predictions are made for synthesis of SH nuclei up to Z=120 in the asymmetric 'hot' fusion reactions basing on use of the heavy transactinide targets.

  14. The fluid dynamics of xenocryst formation in mafic enclaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Paul; Blundy, Jon; Cashman, Katharine; Huppert, Herbert; Mader, Heidy

    2014-05-01

    Mafic enclaves produced by the mingling of felsic and mafic magmas commonly contain xenocrysts; crystals akin to those in the felsic host. These crystals are interpreted as having crossed the interface between the two magmas at some stage during the rock evolution. An understanding of the physical conditions that allow this exchange would give insight into the state of the system at the time of assimilation, providing information about the magmatic history of the rock. Using both numerical models and analogue experiments, the low Reynolds number gravitational settling of spheres on to fluid-fluid interfaces is studied as an analogue to this problem. Theoretical treatment suggests that whether or not a particle sinks or floats at an interface depends on four dimensionless parameters; Bond number, the viscosity ratio, a modified density ratio and the contact angle. Spheres are allowed to settle onto an interface for different values of the dimensionless groups and the behavioural regime boundaries are determined. Experimentally this consists of dropping spheres of varying radii and density onto an interface between two density stratified fluids (silicon oil and polyethylene glycol solution), both of which are lighter than the sphere. The spheres are sputter coated in gold to ensure a constant surface interaction. The numerical models are used to validate these results and apply them in geologic settings. Early results suggest that the presence of even a small interfacial tension between the two magmas is sufficient to inhibit the passage of crystals across interfaces in magmatic systems. An interesting feature of note in mafic enclaves is that the xenocrysts often occur in clusters. This can be compared with observations from the analogue experiments where 6mm nylon spheres were dropped onto the fluid interface. Although the spheres are light and small enough to individually be supported by the interface, the successive addition of spheres leads to the formation of

  15. Large-scale molecular-dynamics simulation of nanoscale hydrophobic interaction and nanobubble formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koishi, Takahiro; Yasuoka, Kenji; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Yoo, S.; Zeng, X. C.

    2005-11-01

    We performed large-scale molecular-dynamics simulation of nanoscale hydrophobic interaction manifested by the formation of nanobubble between nanometer-sized hydrophobic clusters at constrained equilibrium. Particular attention is placed on the tendency of formation and stability of nanobubbles in between model nanoassemblies which are composed of hydrophobic clusters (or patches) embedded in a hydrophilic substrate. On the basis of physical behavior of nanobubble formation, we observed a change from short-range molecular hydrophobic interaction to midrange nanoscopic interaction when the length scale of hydrophobe approaches to about 1 nm. We investigated the behavior of nanobubble formation with several different patterns of nonpolar-site distribution on the nanoassemblies but always keeping a constant ratio of nonpolar to polar monomer sites. Dynamical properties of confined water molecules in between nanoassemblies are also calculated.

  16. Dynamics of the current filament formation and its steady-state characteristics in chalcogenide based PCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoslovskiy, Nikita; Tsendin, Konstantin

    2017-03-01

    In the phase-change memory (PCM) crystallization occurs in the high-current filament which forms during switching to the conductive state. In the present paper we conduct a numerical modeling of the current filament formation dynamics in thin chalcogenide films using an electronic-thermal model based on negative-U centers tunnel ionization and Joule heating. The key role of inhomogeneities in the filament formation process is shown. Steady-state filament parameters were obtained from the analysis of the stationary heat conduction equation. The filament formation dynamics and the steady-state filament radius and temperature could be controlled by material parameters and contact resistance. Consequently it is possible to control the size of the region wherein crystallization occurs. A good agreement with numerous experimental data leads to the conclusion that thermal effects play a significant role in CGS conduction and high-current filament formation while switching.

  17. Dynamics of multi-tethered satellite formations containing a parent body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizarro-Chong, Ary; Misra, Arun K.

    2008-12-01

    The dynamics of certain multi-tethered satellite formations containing a parent (or central) body are examined in this paper. Some simplifications are made prior to the analysis: the satellites are point-masses, the tethers are massless and straight, and the motion of the parent body of the formations is prescribed. First, planar formations are investigated: these are termed "hub-and-spoke"—which comprises a parent body located at the center (hub) of the formation, from which stem tethers (spokes), each having a satellite at its end—and "closed-hub-and-spoke" (which has the same description but also has, in addition, tethers joining successive satellites). These formations are placed in the orbital plane, or in the Earth-facing plane normal to the orbit, and are given an initial spin rate about an axis orthogonal to their nominal plane. The ensuing motion is studied in order to ascertain the conditions under which the formations remain in dynamic stability. Later, the motion of three-dimensional configurations, whose initial spin vector is along the radial direction, is examined. These formations are deployed along the local vertical. They are a "closed-hub-and-spoke" formation, which is found to be unstable and a "double-pyramid" configuration, which is found to be stable.

  18. Dynamic Star Formation in the Massive DR21 Filament

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Hennebelle, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-25

    The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. By studying one of the most massive and dense star-forming regions in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing the well-known sources DR21 and DR21(OH), we attempt to obtain observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. We use molecular line data from our {sup 13}CO 1 {yields} 0, CS 2 {yields} 1, and N{sub 2}H{sup +} 1 {yields} 0 survey of the Cygnus X region obtained with the FCRAO and CO, CS, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CO data obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. We observe a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in the DR21 filament in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e., dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO{sup +} and {sup 12}CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of {approx}0.6 km s{sup -1} and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10{sup -3} M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1} for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M{sub {circle_dot}} at densities of around 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting. The more massive of the clumps, DR21(OH), is connected to a sub-filament, apparently 'falling' onto the clump. This filament runs parallel to the magnetic field. Conclusions. All observed kinematic features in the DR21 filament (velocity field, velocity dispersion, and infall), its filamentary morphology, and the existence of (a) sub-filament(s) can be explained if the DR21 filament was formed by the convergence of flows on large

  19. Dynamics of nanopore structure formation in the carbonization of carbon-containing materials

    SciTech Connect

    V.N. Antsiferov; V.N. Strel'nikov; V.F. Olontsev; I.A. Borisova

    2009-04-15

    The dynamics of nanopore structure formation in the carbonization of carbon-containing materials with various volatile matter contents was determined using physicochemical methods of analysis. The main stages of the formation of the nanopore structure of carbon adsorbents upon carbonization were demonstrated using black coals from the Kuznetsk Basin, brown coals from the Kansk-Achinsk Basin, Textolite wastes, nut shell wastes, woods and gazwarine.

  20. Understanding Visual Map Formation through Vortex Dynamics of Spin Hamiltonian Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myoung Won; Kim, Seunghwan

    2004-01-01

    The pattern formation in orientation and ocular dominance columns is one of the most investigated problems in the brain. From a known cortical structure, we build spinlike Hamiltonian models with long-range interactions of the Mexican hat type. These Hamiltonian models allow a coherent interpretation of the diverse phenomena in the visual map formation with the help of relaxation dynamics of spin systems. In particular, we explain various phenomena of self-organization in orientation and ocular dominance map formation including the pinwheel annihilation and its dependency on the columnar wave vector and boundary conditions.

  1. Ultrafast dynamics of periodic nanostructure formation on diamondlike carbon films irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, Godai; Miyazaki, Kenzo

    2006-11-01

    Using a pump-probe technique the authors have measured reflectivity of diamondlike carbon (DLC) film irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses to understand dynamic processes responsible for periodic nanostructure formation. The results have shown that characteristic reflectivity change observed as a function of superimposed laser shots is closely associated with the nanostructure formation and the bonding structure change to induce surface swelling, leading to a conclusion that the nanostructure formation on the DLC surface is certainly preceded by the bonding structure change. The nanoscale ablation to produce the nanostructure is discussed based on the local field generation on the surface.

  2. Plasma ion dynamics and beam formation in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mascali, D.; Neri, L.; Miracoli, R.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gambino, N.; Chikin, S.

    2010-02-15

    In electron cyclotron resonance ion sources it has been demonstrated that plasma heating may be improved by means of different microwave to plasma coupling mechanisms, including the ''frequency tuning'' and the ''two frequency heating''. These techniques affect evidently the electron dynamics, but the relationship with the ion dynamics has not been investigated in details up to now. Here we will try to outline these relations: through the study of ion dynamics we may try to understand how to optimize the electron cyclotron resonance ion sources brightness. A simple model of the ion confinement and beam formation will be presented, based on particle-in-cell and single particle simulations.

  3. Cryogenic Particle Accumulation In ATRAP And The First Antihydrogen Production Within A Magnetic Gradient Trap For Neutral Antimatter

    SciTech Connect

    Storry, C. H.; Carew, A.; Comeau, D.; Hessels, E. A.; Weel, M.; George, M. C.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.; Zhang, Z.; Gabrielse, G.; Larochelle, P.; LeSage, D.; Levitt, B.; Kolthammer, W. S.; McConnell, R.; Richerme, P.; Wrubel, J.; Speck, A.; Markert, F.

    2008-08-08

    ATRAP has made many important improvements since CERN's Antiproton Decelerator (AD) was restarted in 2006. These include substantial increases in the number of positrons (e{sup +}) and antiprotons (Pbars) used to make antihydrogen (Hbar) atoms, a new technique for loading electrons (e{sup -}) that are used to cool Pbars and e{sup +}, implementation of a completely new, larger and more robust apparatus in our second experimental zone and the inclusion of a quadrupole Ioffe trap intended to trap the coldest Hbar atoms produced. Using this new apparatus we have produced large numbers of Hbar atoms within a Penning trap that is located within this quadrupole Ioffe trap using a new technique which shows promise for producing even colder atoms. These observed Hbar atoms resolve a debate about whether positrons and antiprotons can be brought together to form atoms within the divergent magnetic fields of a quadrupole Ioffe trap.

  4. Phase 1 user instruction manual. A geological formation - drill string dynamic interaction finite element program (GEODYN)

    SciTech Connect

    Tinianow, M.A.; Rotelli, R.L. Jr.; Baird, J.A.

    1984-06-01

    User instructions for the GEODYN Interactive Finite Element Computer Program are presented. The program is capable of performing the analysis of the three-dimensional transient dynamic response of a Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bit - Bit Sub arising from the intermittent contact of the bit with the downhole rock formations. The program accommodates non-linear, time dependent, loading and boundary conditions.

  5. Geological formation - drill string dynamic interaction finite-element program (GEODYN). Phase 1. Theoretical description

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, J.A.; Apostal, M.C.; Rotelli, R.L. Jr.; Tinianow, M.A.; Wormley, D.N.

    1984-06-01

    The Theoretical Description for the GEODYN interactive finite-element computer program is presented. The program is capable of performing the analysis of the three-dimensional transient dynamic response of a Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bit-Bit Sub arising from the intermittent contact of the bit with the downhole rock formations. The program accommodates nonlinear, time-dependent, loading and boundary conditions.

  6. Dust formation and dynamic in magnetized and non-magnetized microwave discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouaras, Karim; Lombardi, Guillaume; Hassouni, Khaled

    2016-09-01

    Dusty plasmas studies are conducted for several decades to answer to various issues from microelectronic, nanotechnology, astrophysics and thermonuclear fusion devices. These studies are usually conducted in RF discharges at low pressure in which the major physics concerning dust formation mechanisms and dynamic is now well known. In our case, we focus on dust formation and dynamic in (i) microwave plasma under typical pressure conditions of RF discharges (50 Pa) and (ii) in magnetized (ECR: Electron Cyclotron Resonance) microwave plasma under very low pressure condition (0.1 to 1 Pa). The aim of this study is not only for fundamental purpose but also for respond to some issues concerning dust in fusion devices. Thus, we investigate the dust formation mechanisms and dynamic using laser extinction method and laser light scattering imaging coupling with SEM imaging in hydrocarbon plasma and with PVD system with using tungsten target (according to fusion device). We observed that dust formation occurs even if the very low pressure conditions are generally not suitable for nucleation growth in gas phase (the influence of the magnetic field will be discussed). We will also discuss about the particular dust dynamic behavior in microwave discharge in comparison with RF discharge.

  7. Characterization of dynamic droplet impaction and deposit formation on leaf surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elucidation of droplet dynamic impaction and deposition formation on leaf surfaces would assist to optimize application strategies, improve biological control efficiency, and minimize pesticide waste. A custom-designed system consisting of two high-speed digital cameras and a uniform-size droplet ge...

  8. Water network dynamics at the critical moment of a peptide's beta-turn formation: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Karvounis, George; Nerukh, Dmitry; Glen, Robert C

    2004-09-08

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations for a single molecule of Leu-Enkephalin in aqueous solution have been used to study the role of the water network during the formation of beta-turns. We give a detailed account of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding, the water-peptide hydrogen bonding, and the orientation and residence times of water molecules focusing on the short critical periods of transition to the stable beta-turns. These studies suggest that, when intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the first and fourth residue of the beta-turn is not present, the disruption of the water network and the establishment of water bridges constitute decisive factors in the formation and stability of the beta-turn. Finally, we provide possible explanations and mechanisms for the formations of different kinds of beta-turns.

  9. Asymptotic behavior of dynamical variables and naked singularity formation in spherically symmetric gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Hayato; Mitsuda, Eiji; Nambu, Yasusada; Tomimatsu, Akira

    2009-07-15

    In considering the gravitational collapse of matter, it is an important problem to clarify what kind of conditions leads to the formation of naked singularity. For this purpose, we apply the 1+3 orthonormal frame formalism introduced by Uggla et al. to the spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of a perfect fluid. This formalism allows us to construct an autonomous system of evolution and constraint equations for scale-invariant dynamical variables normalized by the volume expansion rate of the timelike orthonormal frame vector. We investigate the asymptotic evolution of such dynamical variables towards the formation of a central singularity and present a conjecture that the steep spatial gradient for the normalized density function is a characteristic of the naked singularity formation.

  10. Quick and inexpensive paraffin-embedding method for dynamic bone formation analyses

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Amy; Irwin, Regina; Miller, Josselyn; Horan, Daniel J.; Robling, Alexander G.; McCabe, Laura R.

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a straightforward method that uses paraffin-embedded bone for undemineralized thin sectioning, which is amenable to subsequent dynamic bone formation measurements. Bone has stiffer material properties than paraffin, and therefore has hereforto usually been embedded in plastic blocks, cured and sectioned with a tungsten carbide knife to obtain mineralized bone sections for dynamic bone formation measures. This process is expensive and requires special equipment, experienced personnel, and time for the plastic to penetrate the bone and cure. Our method utilizes a novel way to prepare mineralized bone that increases its compliance so that it can be embedded and easily section in paraffin blocks. The approach is simple, quick, and costs less than 10% of the price for plastic embedded bone sections. While not effective for static bone measures, this method allows dynamic bone analyses to be readily performed in laboratories worldwide which might not otherwise have access to traditional (plastic) equipment and expertise. PMID:28198415

  11. The AEgIS experiment at CERN: measuring antihydrogen free-fall in earth’s gravitational field to test WEP with antimatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusa, R. S.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, T.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Ereditato, A.; Evans, C.; Ferragut, R.; Fesel, J.; Fontana, A.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Guatieri, F.; Haider, S.; Holmestad, H.; Huse, T.; Kellerbauer, A.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lansonneur, P.; Lebrun, P.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Matveev, V.; Mazzotta, Z.; Nebbia, G.; Nedelec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pacifico, N.; Pagano, D.; Penasa, L.; Petracek, V.; Pistillo, C.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Ravelli, L.; Rienaecker, B.; Røhne, O. M.; Rotondi, A.; Sacerdoti, M.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Scampoli, P.; Smestad, L.; Sorrentino, F.; Strojek, I. M.; Testera, G.; Tietje, I. C.; Vamosi, S.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zmeskal, J.; Zurlo, N.

    2017-01-01

    The AEgIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) experiment is designed with the objective to test the weak equivalence principle with antimatter by studying the free fall of antihydrogen in the Earth’s gravitational field. A pulsed cold beam of antihydrogen will be produced by charge exchange between cold Ps excited in Rydberg state and cold antiprotons. Finally the free fall will be measured by a classical moiré deflectometer. The apparatus being assembled at the Antiproton Decelerator at CERN will be described, then the advancements of the experiment will be reported: positrons and antiprotons trapping measurements, Ps two-step excitation and a test-measurement of antiprotons deflection with a small scale moiré deflectometer.

  12. The Role of Dynamics in the Formation of Cataclysmic Variables in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesperini, Enrico; Hong, Jongsuk; Belloni, Diogo; Giersz, Mirek

    2017-01-01

    Internal dynamics and stellar interactions in the high-density environments of globular clusters are likely to play a key role in the formation and evolution of X-ray sources in these stellar systems.Observational evidence in support of the role dynamical interactions in the formation of X-ray sources comes from a number of observational studies showing that the number of X-ray sources in globular clusters is correlated with the cluster stellar encounter rate.We present here the results of a survey of Monte-Carlo simulations exploring the role of dynamics in the formation of cataclysmic variables (CVs). Our simulations show a correlation between the number of CVs and the stellar encounter rate as found in observational studies and illustrate the dynamical path leading to this correlation.We also study the spatial distribution of CVs in clusters and find that they are more concentrated than single stars with masses close to those of turn-off stars at 12 Gyr. This trend is stronger for the population of CVs formed from primordial binaries undergoing exchange encounters.

  13. Molecular dynamics in computational materials sciences: From the study of nanostructure formation to the design of fluorescent dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irle, Stephan

    2016-12-01

    On overview is given over the use of approximate density functional theory as basis for performing direct molecular dynamics simulations on ground and excited states. In the case of nanostructure formation, we discuss the relationship between fullerene, nanotube, and graphene formation. In the case of fluorescent molecules, we elucidate the importance of excited state dynamics for fluorescent properties.

  14. Robust optimization of a mathematical model to design a dynamic cell formation problem considering labor utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafaeinezhad, Moghadaseh; Kia, Reza; Shahnazari-Shahrezaei, Parisa

    2016-11-01

    Cell formation (CF) problem is one of the most important decision problems in designing a cellular manufacturing system includes grouping machines into machine cells and parts into part families. Several factors should be considered in a cell formation problem. In this work, robust optimization of a mathematical model of a dynamic cell formation problem integrating CF, production planning and worker assignment is implemented with uncertain scenario-based data. The robust approach is used to reduce the effects of fluctuations of the uncertain parameters with regards to all possible future scenarios. In this research, miscellaneous cost parameters of the cell formation and demand fluctuations are subject to uncertainty and a mixed-integer nonlinear programming model is developed to formulate the related robust dynamic cell formation problem. The objective function seeks to minimize total costs including machine constant, machine procurement, machine relocation, machine operation, inter-cell and intra-cell movement, overtime, shifting labors between cells and inventory holding. Finally, a case study is carried out to display the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed model. The tradeoff between solution robustness and model robustness is also analyzed in the obtained results.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of organohalide perovskite precursors: solvent effects in the formation of perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Sevillano, Juan José; Ahmad, Shahzada; Calero, Sofía; Anta, Juan A

    2015-09-21

    The stability and desirable crystal formation of organohalide perovskite semiconductors is of utmost relevance to ensure the success of perovskites in photovoltaic technology. Herein we have simulated the dynamics of ionic precursors toward the formation of embryonic organohalide perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 units in the presence of solvent molecules using Molecular Dynamics. The calculations involved, a variable amount of Pb(2+), I(-), and CH3NH3(+) ionic precursors in water, pentane and a mixture of these two solvents. Suitable force fields for solvents and precursors have been tested and used to carry out the simulations. Radial distribution functions and mean square displacements confirm the formation of basic perovskite crystalline units in pure pentane - taken as a simple and archetypal organic solvent. In contrast, simulations in water confirm the stability of the solvated ionic precursors, which prevents their aggregation to form the perovskite compound. We have found that in the case of a water/pentane binary solvent, a relatively small amount of water did not hinder the perovskite formation. Thus, our findings suggest that the cause of the poor stability of perovskite films in the presence of moisture is a chemical reaction, rather than the polar nature of the solvents. Based on the results, a set of force-field parameters to study from first principles perovskite formation and stability, also in the solid phase, is proposed.

  16. Formation of carbon nanoscrolls from graphene sheet: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Danhui; Yang, Houbo

    2016-12-01

    In recent year, carbon nanoscrolls have attracted intensive attention both in theory and experiments for their unique and excellent fundamental properties and the wide range of potential applications. In this paper, the fabrication of carbon nanoscrolls using graphene and carbon nanotubes has been studied by molecular dynamics (MD) method. The formation mechanism of carbon nanoscrolls has been presented convincing explanations. Furthermore, the position and number of carbon nanotubes also influence the formation of carbon nanoscrolls. Our theoretical results will provide researchers a powerful guide and helpful assistance in designing better targeted programs in experiments.

  17. Nanostructure formation by dynamic densification and recrystallization of amorphous Ti-Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counihan, P. J.; Crawford, A.; Thadhani, N. N.

    1998-07-01

    Dynamic densification was used to consolidate mechanically amorphized Ti-Si alloy powders, using a 3-capsule, plate-impact, gas-gun loading system at velocities of 300 and 500 m/s. The recovered amorphous compacts were subsequently annealed above the crystallization temperature. A single-phase nano-structured (50-90 nm) Ti5Si3 compound was produced, as revealed by TEM and XRD analysis. In this paper, the influence of dynamic densification on the crystallization behavior of amorphous Ti-Si, and the formation of nano-crystals will be discussed.

  18. Self-organised formation of nanotubes from graphene ribbons. A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fülep, Dávid; Zsoldos, Ibolya; László, István

    2016-10-01

    The conditions for self-organised formations of carbon nanotubes from two parallel graphene ribbons were studied in a density functional adjusted tight binding molecular dynamics simulation. We have found that the seemingly trivial process is significantly limited by the thermal motion of the carbon atoms. There are further difficulties as well, primarily the unfavourable position of the atoms at the edges of the zigzag graphene ribbons. In repeated molecular dynamics runs we analysed the conditions of perfect coalescences, the influence of the substrate and the impact of the zigzag graphene ribbon positions. We have obtained that contrary to the abovementioned unfavourable conditions perfect nanotube production can be obtained using substrates. As the positioning of the substrate can be made with piezoelectric devices, this can significantly help the experimental realisation of the nanotube formation as well.

  19. Static and dynamic descriptions of bond breaking/formation: A complementary view?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joubert, Laurent; Adamo, Carlo

    2005-12-01

    Ab initio molecular-dynamic simulations using density-functional theory and the recent atom-centered density-matrix propagation (ADMP) method were used to study the bond breaking and formation for a case-study substitution nucleophilic bimolecular reaction, namely, the Walden inversion. Using the atoms-in-molecule approach, we have performed a detailed analysis to investigate intra- and intermolecular charge transfer along the ADMP trajectory. These results were compared to those obtained considering a static approach, such as the intrinsic reaction path. In particular, the topological properties computed along the dynamic trajectory well evidence a stronger electron exchange tending to spontaneously maximize the rising covalent interaction. Furthermore, their analysis suggests that the bond formation mechanism involves a reactive intermediate with a bonding interaction stronger than in the final product.

  20. Vague-to-Crisp Dynamics of Percept Formation Modeled as Operant (Selectionist) Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-04

    framework with cognitive processing and the intentional neurodynamic cycle. Vague-to-crisp dynamics of percept formation m Approved for public...13: Supplementary Note © 2013 . Published in Cognitive Neurodynamics , Vol. Ed. 0 8, (1) (2013), (, (1). DoD Components reserve a royalty-free...operant (selectionist) process Roman Ilin, J un Zhang, Leonid Perlovsky & Robert Kozma Cognitive Neurodynamics ISSN 1871 4080 Cogn Neurodyn

  1. Exact formula of the distribution of Schmidt eigenvalues for dynamical formation of entanglement in quantum chaos.

    PubMed

    Kubotani, Hiroto; Adachi, Satoshi; Toda, Mikito

    2008-06-20

    The exact formula of the one-level distribution of the Schmidt eigenvalues is obtained for dynamical formation of entanglement in quantum chaos. The formula is based on the random matrix theory of the fixed-trace ensemble, and is derived using the theory of the holonomic system of differential equations. We confirm that the formula describes the universality of the distribution of the Schmidt eigenvalues in quantum chaos.

  2. He cluster dynamics in W in the presence of cluster induced formation of He traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Smirnov, R. D.

    2016-02-01

    The theoretical model describing spatiotemporal dynamics of He clusters in tungsten, which takes into account He trap generation associated with the growth of He clusters, is presented. Application of this model to the formation of the layer of nano-bubbles underneath of the surface of thick He irradiated sample, before surface morphology starts to change, gives very good agreement with currently available experimental data. The role of thermophoresis in a long-term evolution of nano-bubble containing structures is discussed.

  3. Observational Evidence of Dynamic Star Formation Rate in Milky Way Giant Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eve J.; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Murray, Norman W.

    2016-12-01

    Star formation on galactic scales is known to be a slow process, but whether it is slow on smaller scales is uncertain. We cross-correlate 5469 giant molecular clouds (GMCs) from a new all-sky catalog with 256 star-forming complexes (SFCs) to build a sample of 191 SFC-GMC complexes—collections of multiple clouds each matched to 191 SFCs. The total mass in stars harbored by these clouds is inferred from WMAP free-free fluxes. We measure the GMC mass, the virial parameter, the star formation efficiency ɛ and the star formation rate per freefall time ɛ ff. Both ɛ and ɛ ff range over 3-4 orders of magnitude. We find that 68.3% of the clouds fall within {σ }{logɛ }=0.79+/- 0.22 {dex} and {σ }{log{ɛ }{ff}}=0.91+/- 0.22 {dex} about the median. Compared to these observed scatters, a simple model with a time-independent ɛ ff that depends on the host GMC properties predicts {σ }{log{ɛ }{ff}}=0.12{--}0.24. Allowing for a time-variable ɛ ff, we can recover the large dispersion in the rate of star formation. This strongly suggests that star formation in the Milky Way is a dynamic process on GMC scales. We also show that the surface star formation rate profile of the Milky Way correlates well with the molecular gas surface density profile.

  4. On the dynamics of Liesegang-type pattern formation in a gaseous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Álvarez, Elizeth; Montoya, Fernando; Buhse, Thomas; Rios-Herrera, Wady; Torres-Guzmán, José; Rivera, Marco; Martínez-Mekler, Gustavo; Müller, Markus F.

    2016-03-01

    Liesegang pattern formations are widely spread in nature. In spite of a comparably simple experimental setup under laboratory conditions, a variety of spatio-temporal structures may arise. Presumably because of easier control of the experimental conditions, Liesegang pattern formation was mainly studied in gel systems during more than a century. Here we consider pattern formation in a gas phase, where beautiful but highly complex reaction-diffusion-convection dynamics are uncovered by means of a specific laser technique. A quantitative analysis reveals that two different, apparently independent processes, both highly correlated and synchronized across the extension of the reaction cloud, act on different time scales. Each of them imprints a different structure of salt precipitation at the tube walls.

  5. A Simple Dynamical Model for Filament Formation in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Filament formation in the solar corona is considered in the case of a slowly evolving force-free magnetic field. The strong-field approximation is used, which takes into account the magnetohydrodynamic equations of motion, induction, and compressibility. Methods for solving the relevant equations are presented and applied to filament modeling. A three-dimensional calculation is presented, which uses linear force-free magnetic fields. The boundary conditions are chosen to resemble the qualitative linkage model for the formation of filaments, suggested by Martens and Zwaan (2001). Consistent with this model, dense formations, reminiscent of filament pillars, are shown to appear in the corona above the region of converging and canceling magnetic bipoles. The results demonstrate the principal role of magnetic field in the dynamical processes of dense plasma accumulation and support in filaments. The model can be useful for clarifying the role of flux emergence in coronal mass ejection initiation.

  6. On the dynamics of Liesegang-type pattern formation in a gaseous system

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Álvarez, Elizeth; Montoya, Fernando; Buhse, Thomas; Rios-Herrera, Wady; Torres-Guzmán, José; Rivera, Marco; Martínez-Mekler, Gustavo; Müller, Markus F.

    2016-01-01

    Liesegang pattern formations are widely spread in nature. In spite of a comparably simple experimental setup under laboratory conditions, a variety of spatio-temporal structures may arise. Presumably because of easier control of the experimental conditions, Liesegang pattern formation was mainly studied in gel systems during more than a century. Here we consider pattern formation in a gas phase, where beautiful but highly complex reaction-diffusion-convection dynamics are uncovered by means of a specific laser technique. A quantitative analysis reveals that two different, apparently independent processes, both highly correlated and synchronized across the extension of the reaction cloud, act on different time scales. Each of them imprints a different structure of salt precipitation at the tube walls. PMID:27025405

  7. Cofilin-mediated actin dynamics promotes actin bundle formation during Drosophila bristle development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Heng; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    The actin bundle is an array of linear actin filaments cross-linked by actin-bundling proteins, but its assembly and dynamics are not as well understood as those of the branched actin network. Here we used the Drosophila bristle as a model system to study actin bundle formation. We found that cofilin, a major actin disassembly factor of the branched actin network, promotes the formation and positioning of actin bundles in the developing bristles. Loss of function of cofilin or AIP1, a cofactor of cofilin, each resulted in increased F-actin levels and severe defects in actin bundle organization, with the defects from cofilin deficiency being more severe. Further analyses revealed that cofilin likely regulates actin bundle formation and positioning by the following means. First, cofilin promotes a large G-actin pool both locally and globally, likely ensuring rapid actin polymerization for bundle initiation and growth. Second, cofilin limits the size of a nonbundled actin-myosin network to regulate the positioning of actin bundles. Third, cofilin prevents incorrect assembly of branched and myosin-associated actin filament into bundles. Together these results demonstrate that the interaction between the dynamic dendritic actin network and the assembling actin bundles is critical for actin bundle formation and needs to be closely regulated. PMID:27385345

  8. Patterns formation in ferrofluids and solid dissolutions using stochastic models with dissipative dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Marco A.; Fernández-Cervantes, Irving; Agustín-Serrano, Ricardo; Anzo, Andrés; Sampedro, Mercedes P.

    2016-08-01

    A functional with interactions short-range and long-range low coarse-grained approximation is proposed. This functional satisfies models with dissipative dynamics A, B and the stochastic Swift-Hohenberg equation. Furthermore, terms associated with multiplicative noise source are added in these models. These models are solved numerically using the method known as fast Fourier transform. Results of the spatio-temporal dynamic show similarity with respect to patterns behaviour in ferrofluids phases subject to external fields (magnetic, electric and temperature), as well as with the nucleation and growth phenomena present in some solid dissolutions. As a result of the multiplicative noise effect over the dynamic, some microstructures formed by changing solid phase and composed by binary alloys of Pb-Sn, Fe-C and Cu-Ni, as well as a NiAl-Cr(Mo) eutectic composite material. The model A for active-particles with a non-potential term in form of quadratic gradient explain the formation of nanostructured particles of silver phosphate. With these models is shown that the underlying mechanisms in the patterns formation in all these systems depends of: (a) dissipative dynamics; (b) the short-range and long-range interactions and (c) the appropiate combination of quadratic and multiplicative noise terms.

  9. Quantifying Thermal Disorder in Metal–Organic Frameworks: Lattice Dynamics and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Hybrid Formate Perovskites

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid organic–inorganic materials are mechanically soft, leading to large thermoelastic effects which can affect properties such as electronic structure and ferroelectric ordering. Here we use a combination of ab initio lattice dynamics and molecular dynamics to study the finite temperature behavior of the hydrazinium and guanidinium formate perovskites, [NH2NH3][Zn(CHO2)3] and [C(NH2)3][Zn(CHO2)3]. Thermal displacement parameters and ellipsoids computed from the phonons and from molecular dynamics trajectories are found to be in good agreement. The hydrazinium compound is ferroelectric at low temperatures, with a calculated spontaneous polarization of 2.6 μC cm–2, but the thermal movement of the cation leads to variations in the instantaneous polarization and eventually breakdown of the ferroelectric order. Contrary to this the guanidinium cation is found to be stationary at all temperatures; however, the movement of the cage atoms leads to variations in the electronic structure and a renormalization in the bandgap from 6.29 eV at 0 K to an average of 5.96 eV at 300 K. We conclude that accounting for temperature is necessary for quantitative modeling of the physical properties of metal–organic frameworks. PMID:28298951

  10. Cloud fluid models of gas dynamics and star formation in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struck-Marcell, Curtis; Scalo, John M.; Appleton, P. N.

    1987-01-01

    The large dynamic range of star formation in galaxies, and the apparently complex environmental influences involved in triggering or suppressing star formation, challenges the understanding. The key to this understanding may be the detailed study of simple physical models for the dominant nonlinear interactions in interstellar cloud systems. One such model is described, a generalized Oort model cloud fluid, and two simple applications of it are explored. The first of these is the relaxation of an isolated volume of cloud fluid following a disturbance. Though very idealized, this closed box study suggests a physical mechanism for starbursts, which is based on the approximate commensurability of massive cloud lifetimes and cloud collisional growth times. The second application is to the modeling of colliding ring galaxies. In this case, the driving processes operating on a dynamical timescale interact with the local cloud processes operating on the above timescale. The results is a variety of interesting nonequilibrium behaviors, including spatial variations of star formation that do not depend monotonically on gas density.

  11. Resolving the HONO formation mechanism in the ionosphere via ab initio molecular dynamic simulations

    PubMed Central

    He, Rongxing; Li, Lei; Zhong, Jie; Zhu, Chongqin; Francisco, Joseph S.; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Solar emission produces copious nitrosonium ions (NO+) in the D layer of the ionosphere, 60 to 90 km above the Earth’s surface. NO+ is believed to transfer its charge to water clusters in that region, leading to the formation of gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) and protonated water cluster. The dynamics of this reaction at the ionospheric temperature (200–220 K) and the associated mechanistic details are largely unknown. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations and transition-state search, key structures of the water hydrates—tetrahydrate NO+(H2O)4 and pentahydrate NO+(H2O)5—are identified and shown to be responsible for HONO formation in the ionosphere. The critical tetrahydrate NO+(H2O)4 exhibits a chain-like structure through which all of the lowest-energy isomers must go. However, most lowest-energy isomers of pentahydrate NO+(H2O)5 can be converted to the HONO-containing product, encountering very low barriers, via a chain-like or a three-armed, star-like structure. Although these structures are not the global minima, at 220 K, most lowest-energy NO+(H2O)4 and NO+(H2O)5 isomers tend to channel through these highly populated isomers toward HONO formation. PMID:27071120

  12. Resolving the HONO formation mechanism in the ionosphere via ab initio molecular dynamic simulations.

    PubMed

    He, Rongxing; Li, Lei; Zhong, Jie; Zhu, Chongqin; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-04-26

    Solar emission produces copious nitrosonium ions (NO(+)) in the D layer of the ionosphere, 60 to 90 km above the Earth's surface. NO(+) is believed to transfer its charge to water clusters in that region, leading to the formation of gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) and protonated water cluster. The dynamics of this reaction at the ionospheric temperature (200-220 K) and the associated mechanistic details are largely unknown. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations and transition-state search, key structures of the water hydrates-tetrahydrate NO(+)(H2O)4 and pentahydrate NO(+)(H2O)5-are identified and shown to be responsible for HONO formation in the ionosphere. The critical tetrahydrate NO(+)(H2O)4 exhibits a chain-like structure through which all of the lowest-energy isomers must go. However, most lowest-energy isomers of pentahydrate NO(+)(H2O)5 can be converted to the HONO-containing product, encountering very low barriers, via a chain-like or a three-armed, star-like structure. Although these structures are not the global minima, at 220 K, most lowest-energy NO(+)(H2O)4 and NO(+)(H2O)5 isomers tend to channel through these highly populated isomers toward HONO formation.

  13. Effect of Neck Formation on the Measurement of Dynamic Interfacial Tension in a Drop Volume Tensiometer

    PubMed

    Campanelli; Wang

    1997-06-15

    Dynamic interfacial tension values obtained by drop volume tensiometry will be affected under certain experimental conditions by the formation of a neck between the drop and the capillary tip. This phenomenon must be accounted for to obtain accurate values of interfacial tension. In this work, neck formation for a water-mineral oil system is studied under conditions where hydrodynamic effects can be neglected. A model originally developed for the determination of the surface tension of a suspended drop is modified for application to dynamic interfacial tensions of surfactant-containing liquids. The model relates apparent values of interfacial tension calculated from drops possessing necks to actual values. Experiments with Span 80 (sorbitan monooleate) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactants in a mineral oil-water system are used to test the validity of the developed model. For the small tip diameter used, good agreement is obtained for Span 80 up to the critical micelle concentration, and for low concentrations of SDS, when the surfactant adsorption is diffusion-limited. In both cases, the neck diameter of the growing drop can be considered constant over the range of dynamic interfacial tensions tested.

  14. Dynamical Formation of Low-mass Merging Black Hole Binaries like GW151226

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Rodriguez, Carl L.; Kalogera, Vicky; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2017-02-01

    Using numerical models for star clusters spanning a wide range in ages and metallicities (Z) we study the masses of binary black holes (BBHs) produced dynamically and merging in the local universe (z ≲ 0.2). After taking into account cosmological constraints on star formation rate and metallicity evolution, which realistically relate merger delay times obtained from models with merger redshifts, we show here for the first time that while old, metal-poor globular clusters can naturally produce merging BBHs with heavier components, as observed in GW150914, lower-mass BBHs like GW151226 are easily formed dynamically in younger, higher-metallicity clusters. More specifically, we show that the mass of GW151226 is well within 1σ of the mass distribution obtained from our models for clusters with Z/Z⊙ ≳ 0.5. Indeed, dynamical formation of a system like GW151226 likely requires a cluster that is younger and has a higher metallicity than typical Galactic globular clusters. The LVT151012 system, if real, could have been created in any cluster with Z/Z⊙ ≲ 0.25. On the other hand, GW150914 is more massive (beyond 1σ) than typical BBHs from even the lowest-metallicity (Z/Z⊙ = 0.005) clusters we consider, but is within 2σ of the intrinsic mass distribution from our cluster models with Z/Z⊙ ≲ 0.05 of course, detection biases also push the observed distributions toward higher masses.

  15. Propagation dynamics and X-pulse formation in phase-mismatched second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Valiulis, G.; Jukna, V.; Jedrkiewicz, O.; Clerici, M.; Rubino, E.; DiTrapani, P.

    2011-04-15

    This paper concerns the theoretical, numerical, and experimental study of the second-harmonic-generation (SHG) process under conditions of phase and group-velocity mismatch and aims to demonstrate the dimensionality transition of the SHG process caused by the change of the fundamental wave diameter. We show that SHG from a narrow fundamental beam leads to the spontaneous self-phase-matching process with, in addition, the appearance of angular dispersion for the off-axis frequency components generated. The angular dispersion sustains the formation of the short X pulse in the second harmonic (SH) and is recognized as three-dimensional (3D) dynamics. On the contrary, the large-diameter fundamental beam reduces the number of the degrees of freedom, does not allow the generation of the angular dispersion, and maintains the so-called one-dimensional (1D) SHG dynamics, where the self-phase-matching appears just for axial components and is accompanied by the shrinking of the SH temporal bandwidth, and sustains a long SH pulse formation. The transition from long SH pulse generation typical of the 1D dynamics to the short 3D X pulse is illustrated numerically and experimentally by changing the conditions from the self-defocusing to the self-focusing regime by simply tuning the phase mismatch. The numerical and experimental verification of the analytical results are also presented.

  16. Generalized additive models reveal the intrinsic complexity of wood formation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Henri E; Rathgeber, Cyrille B K; Kiessé, Tristan Senga; Hartmann, Felix P; Barbeito, Ignacio; Fournier, Meriem

    2013-04-01

    The intra-annual dynamics of wood formation, which involves the passage of newly produced cells through three successive differentiation phases (division, enlargement, and wall thickening) to reach the final functional mature state, has traditionally been described in conifers as three delayed bell-shaped curves followed by an S-shaped curve. Here the classical view represented by the 'Gompertz function (GF) approach' was challenged using two novel approaches based on parametric generalized linear models (GLMs) and 'data-driven' generalized additive models (GAMs). These three approaches (GFs, GLMs, and GAMs) were used to describe seasonal changes in cell numbers in each of the xylem differentiation phases and to calculate the timing of cell development in three conifer species [Picea abies (L.), Pinus sylvestris L., and Abies alba Mill.]. GAMs outperformed GFs and GLMs in describing intra-annual wood formation dynamics, showing two left-skewed bell-shaped curves for division and enlargement, and a right-skewed bimodal curve for thickening. Cell residence times progressively decreased through the season for enlargement, whilst increasing late but rapidly for thickening. These patterns match changes in cell anatomical features within a tree ring, which allows the separation of earlywood and latewood into two distinct cell populations. A novel statistical approach is presented which renews our understanding of xylogenesis, a dynamic biological process in which the rate of cell production interplays with cell residence times in each developmental phase to create complex seasonal patterns.

  17. Dynamics of Hippocampal Protein Expression During Long-term Spatial Memory Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Borovok, Natalia; Nesher, Elimelech; Levin, Yishai; Reichenstein, Michal; Pinhasov, Albert

    2016-01-01

    trafficking, enhancement of metabolic activity, and Wnt signaling pathway during the steep phase of memory formation; and (3) cytoskeleton organization proteins. Taken together, this study clearly demonstrates dynamic assembly and disassembly of protein-protein interaction networks depending on the stage of memory formation engrams. PMID:26598641

  18. Characterization and Dynamics of Aggresome Formation by a Cytosolic Gfp-Chimera✪

    PubMed Central

    García-Mata, Rafael; Bebök, Zsuzsa; Sorscher, Eric J.; Sztul, Elizabeth S.

    1999-01-01

    Formation of a novel structure, the aggresome, has been proposed to represent a general cellular response to the presence of misfolded proteins (Johnston, J.A., C.L. Ward, and R.R. Kopito. 1998. J. Cell Biol. 143:1883–1898; Wigley, W.C., R.P. Fabunmi, M.G. Lee, C.R. Marino, S. Muallem, G.N. DeMartino, and P.J. Thomas. 1999. J. Cell Biol. 145:481–490). To test the generality of this finding and characterize aspects of aggresome composition and its formation, we investigated the effects of overexpressing a cytosolic protein chimera (GFP-250) in cells. Overexpression of GFP-250 caused formation of aggresomes and was paralleled by the redistribution of the intermediate filament protein vimentin as well as by the recruitment of the proteasome, and the Hsp70 and the chaperonin systems of chaperones. Interestingly, GFP-250 within the aggresome appeared not to be ubiquitinated. In vivo time-lapse analysis of aggresome dynamics showed that small aggregates form within the periphery of the cell and travel on microtubules to the MTOC region where they remain as distinct but closely apposed particulate structures. Overexpression of p50/dynamitin, which causes the dissociation of the dynactin complex, significantly inhibited the formation of aggresomes, suggesting that the minus-end–directed motor activities of cytoplasmic dynein are required for aggresome formation. Perinuclear aggresomes interfered with correct Golgi localization and disrupted the normal astral distribution of microtubules. However, ER-to-Golgi protein transport occurred normally in aggresome containing cells. Our results suggest that aggresomes can be formed by soluble, nonubiquitinated proteins as well as by integral transmembrane ubiquitinated ones, supporting the hypothesis that aggresome formation might be a general cellular response to the presence of misfolded proteins. PMID:10491388

  19. Microscopical study of the formation of adiabatic shear bands in 4340 steel during dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boakye-Yiadom, Solomon; Bassim, Nabil; Khaliq Khan, Abdul

    2013-12-01

    In this study, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron probe microanalyser were used to analyse the changes in microstructure of AISI 4340 steel specimens caused by impact at high strain rates and large strains. The structures of the steel prior to dynamic deformation and after dynamic deformation were examined to understand on a microscale level, the mechanism of formation of adiabatic shear bands (ASBs). The study also includes the structural changes that occur during post-deformation annealing processes which may relate to understanding of the mechanism of formation of ASBs. Prior to deformation, the tempered steel specimens consisted of lenticular laths of α-ferrite with precipitated platelet and spherical M3C carbides. After impact, the structure inside the shear band was characterized by refined and recrystallized grains immersed in dense dislocation structures. In addition, residual carbide particles were observed inside the shear bands due to deformation induced carbide dissolution. Regions away from the shear bands developed 'knitted' dislocation walls, evolving gradually into sub-boundaries and highly misoriented grain boundaries at increasing strains, leading to grain refinement of the ferrite. After impact, annealing the shear bands at 350 °C resulted in an increase in hardness regardless of the heat treatment before impact, amount of deformation and the time of annealing. This is because of the occurrence of extensive reprecipitation of dissolved carbides that existed in the steel structure prior to deformation. It is concluded that dynamic recovery/recrystallization, development of dislocation structures and carbide dissolution all contribute simultaneously to the formation of ASBs in quench-hardened steels.

  20. UAV formation control design with obstacle avoidance in dynamic three-dimensional environment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kai; Xia, Yuanqing; Huang, Kaoli

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the artificial potential field method combined with rotational vectors for a general problem of multi-unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) systems tracking a moving target in dynamic three-dimensional environment. An attractive potential field is generated between the leader and the target. It drives the leader to track the target based on the relative position of them. The other UAVs in the formation are controlled to follow the leader by the attractive control force. The repulsive force affects among the UAVs to avoid collisions and distribute the UAVs evenly on the spherical surface whose center is the leader-UAV. Specific orders or positions of the UAVs are not required. The trajectories of avoidance obstacle can be obtained through two kinds of potential field with rotation vectors. Every UAV can choose the optimal trajectory to avoid the obstacle and reconfigure the formation after passing the obstacle. Simulations study on UAV are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed method.

  1. Kinetics of formation of bile salt micelles from coarse-grained Langevin dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Vila Verde, Ana; Frenkel, Daan

    2016-06-21

    We examine the mechanism of formation of micelles of dihydroxy bile salts using a coarse-grained, implicit solvent model and Langevin dynamics simulations. We find that bile salt micelles primarily form via addition and removal of monomers, similarly to surfactants with typical head-tail molecular structures, and not via a two-stage mechanism - involving formation of oligomers and their subsequent aggregation to form larger micelles - originally proposed for bile salts. The free energy barrier to removal of single bile monomers from micelles is ≈2kBT, much less than what has been observed for head-tail surfactants. Such a low barrier may be biologically relevant: it allows for rapid release of bile monomers into the intestine, possibly enabling the coverage of fat droplets by bile salt monomers and subsequent release of micelles containing fats and bile salts - a mechanism that is not possible for ionic head-tail surfactants of similar critical micellar concentrations.

  2. Spacecraft Formation Control: Managing Line-of-Sight Drift Based on the Dynamics of Relative Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Sammer. Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    In a quest to improve space-based observational capability, an increasing number of investigators are proposing missions with precision formation flying architectures. Typical missions include the Micro- Arcsecond X-ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM), Stellar Imager (SI), and the New Worlds Observer (NWO). Missions designed to explore targets in deep-space generally require holding a formation configuration fixed in inertial space during science observation. Analysis in this paper is specifically aimed at the NWO architecture, characterizing the natural drift of the line-of-sight and the separation range for two spacecraft operating in the vicinity of the Earth/Moon-Sun L(sub 2) libration point. Analysis employs a linear form of the relative dynamics associated with an n-body gravity field. The study is designed to identify favorable observation directions, characterized by minimal line-of-sight drift, along the mission timeline.

  3. Discrete dynamic system oriented on the formation of prebiotic dipeptides from Rode's experiment.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Samaniego, José Lino; Buhse, Thomas; Castañón González, Jorge Alberto

    2014-01-01

    This work attempts to rationalize the possible prebiotic profile of the first dipeptides of about 4 billion years ago based on a computational discrete dynamic system that uses the final yields of the dipeptides obtained in Rode's experiments of salt-induced peptide formation (Rode et al., 1999, Peptides 20: 773-786). The system built a prebiotic scenario that allowed us to observe that (i) the primordial peptide generation was strongly affected by the abundances of the amino acid monomers, (ii) small variations in the concentration of the monomers have almost no effect on the final distribution pattern of the dipeptides and (iii) the most plausible chemical reaction of prebiotic peptide bond formation can be linked to Rode's hypothesis of a salt-induced scenario. The results of our computational simulations were related to former simulations of the Miller, and Fox & Harada experiments on amino acid monomer and oligomer generation, respectively, offering additional information to our approach.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of bubble formation and cavitation in liquid metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Insepov, Z.; Hassanein, A.; Bazhirov, T. T.; Norman, G. E.; Stegailov, V. V.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Inst. for High Energy Densities of Joint Inst. for High Temperatures of RAS

    2007-11-01

    Thermodynamics and kinetics of nano-scale bubble formation in liquid metals such as Li and Pb were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at pressures typical for magnetic and inertial fusion. Two different approaches to bubble formation were developed. In one method, radial densities, pressures, surface tensions, and work functions of the cavities in supercooled liquid lithium were calculated and compared with the surface tension experimental data. The critical radius of a stable cavity in liquid lithium was found for the first time. In the second method, the cavities were created in the highly stretched region of the liquid phase diagram; and then the stability boundary and the cavitation rates were calculated in liquid lead. The pressure dependences of cavitation frequencies were obtained over the temperature range 700-2700 K in liquid Pb. The results of MD calculations for cavitation rate were compared with estimates of classical nucleation theory (CNT).

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Solvation and Kink Site Formation at the {001} Barite-Water Interface.

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, Andrew G

    2009-09-01

    Solvation and kink site formation on step edges are known to be controlling parameters in crystal growth and dissolution. However, links from classical crystal growth models to specific reactions at the mineral-water interface have remained elusive. Molecular dynamics is used here to examine the water structure on barium surface sites and kink site formation enthalpies for material adsorbed to and removed from the step parallel to the [120] direction on the {001} barite-water interface. The bariums at the interface are shown to be coordinatively unsaturated with respect to water, and it is suggested that this is due to a steric hindrance from the nature of the interface. Kink site detachment energies that include hydration energies are endothermic for barium and exothermic for sulfate. The implications and problems of using these parameters in a crystal growth model are discussed.

  6. A numerical study on the dynamics of droplet formation in a microfluidic double T-junction

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Trung-Dung; Byon, Chan; Joo, Sang Woo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, droplet formations in microfluidic double T-junctions (MFDTD) are investigated based on a two-dimensional numerical model with volume of fluid method. Parametric ranges for generating alternating droplet formation (ADF) are identified. A physical background responsible for the ADF is suggested by analyzing the dynamical stability of flow system. Since the phase discrepancy between dispersed flows is mainly caused by non-symmetrical breaking of merging droplet, merging regime becomes the alternating regime at appropriate conditions. In addition, the effects of channel geometries on droplet formation are studied in terms of relative channel width. The predicted results show that the ADF region is shifted toward lower capillary numbers when channel width ratio is less than unity. The alternating droplet size increases with the increase of channel width ratio. When this ratio reaches unity, alternating droplets can be formed at very high water fraction (wf = 0.8). The droplet formation in MFDTD depends significantly on the viscosity ratio, and the droplet size in ADF decreases with the increase of the viscosity ratio. The understanding of underlying physics of the ADF phenomenon is useful for many applications, including nanoparticle synthesis with different concentrations, hydrogel bead generation, and cell transplantation in biomedical therapy. PMID:25825622

  7. A Simple Dynamical Model for Filament Formation in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Wheatland, M. S.

    2005-09-01

    Filament formation in the solar atmosphere is considered. In the limit of sub-Alfvénic but supersonic motion, plasma flow in the solar corona is driven via the induction equation by a slow evolution of force-free magnetic fields. Methods for solving the relevant magnetohydrodynamic equations are presented and applied to filament modeling in two and three dimensions. An illustrative two-dimensional example is given, which is based on a potential magnetic field with a dip. The example describes the formation of a normal filament between two bipolar regions on the Sun. Next a detailed three-dimensional calculation is presented, which uses linear force-free magnetic fields. The boundary conditions are chosen to resemble the qualitative ``head-to-tail'' linkage model for the formation of filaments, suggested by Martens & Zwaan. Consistent with this model, dense formations, reminiscent of filament pillars, are shown to appear in the corona above the region of converging and canceling magnetic bipoles. The numerical results are consistent with the principal role of magnetic field in the dynamical processes of dense plasma accumulation and support in filaments, advocated by Martens & Zwaan.

  8. Integration of Libration Point Orbit Dynamics into a Universal 3-D Autonomous Formation Flying Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The autonomous formation flying control algorithm developed by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for the New Millennium Program (NMP) Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) mission is investigated for applicability to libration point orbit formations. In the EO-1 formation-flying algorithm, control is accomplished via linearization about a reference transfer orbit with a state transition matrix (STM) computed from state inputs. The effect of libration point orbit dynamics on this algorithm architecture is explored via computation of STMs using the flight proven code, a monodromy matrix developed from a N-body model of a libration orbit, and a standard STM developed from the gravitational and coriolis effects as measured at the libration point. A comparison of formation flying Delta-Vs calculated from these methods is made to a standard linear quadratic regulator (LQR) method. The universal 3-D approach is optimal in the sense that it can be accommodated as an open-loop or closed-loop control using only state information.

  9. Grow with the Flow: A Dynamic Tale of Blood Clot Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiderman, Karin; Fogelson, Aaron

    2008-11-01

    The body heals injured blood vessels and prevents bleeding by clotting the blood. Clots are primarily made of blood-borne cells and a fibrous material that is assembled at the site of injury in flowing blood. Clot composition and structure change with local chemistry and fluid dynamics, which in turn alter the flow. To better understand this fluid-structure coupling, we have created a mathematical model to simulate the formation of a blood clot in a dynamic fluid environment. The growing clot is represented as a mixed porous medium whose permeability is dependent on the coagulation chemistry within it. The flow field resulting from a clot with specific calculated permeability and size can then be recovered by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with an added friction term. We report on how this complex fluid-structure interaction affects the limiting factor(s) of blood clot growth.

  10. Ion Dynamics at Shocks: Ion Reflection and Beam Formation at Quasi-perpendicular Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kucharek, Harald; Moebius, Eberhard

    2005-08-01

    The physics of collisionless shocks is controlled by the ion dynamics. The generation of gyrating ions by reflection as well as the formation of field-aligned ion beams are essential parts of this dynamic. On the one hand reflection is most likely the first interaction of ions with the shock before they undergo the downstream thermalization process. On the other hand field-aligned ion beams, predominately found at the quasi-perpendicular bow shock, propagate into the distant foreshock region and may create wave activity. We revisit ion reflection, the source and basic production mechanism of field-aligned ion beams, by using multi-spacecraft measurements and contrast these observations with existing theories. Finally, we propose an alternative production mechanism.

  11. Dynamics of Hollow Atom Formation in Intense X-Ray Pulses Probed by Partial Covariance Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasinski, L. J.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Mucke, M.; Squibb, R. J.; Siano, M.; Eland, J. H. D.; Linusson, P.; v. d. Meulen, P.; Salén, P.; Thomas, R. D.; Larsson, M.; Foucar, L.; Ullrich, J.; Motomura, K.; Mondal, S.; Ueda, K.; Osipov, T.; Fang, L.; Murphy, B. F.; Berrah, N.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J. D.; Schorb, S.; Messerschmidt, M.; Glownia, J. M.; Cryan, J. P.; Coffee, R. N.; Takahashi, O.; Wada, S.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Richter, R.; Prince, K. C.; Feifel, R.

    2013-08-01

    When exposed to ultraintense x-radiation sources such as free electron lasers (FELs) the innermost electronic shell can efficiently be emptied, creating a transient hollow atom or molecule. Understanding the femtosecond dynamics of such systems is fundamental to achieving atomic resolution in flash diffraction imaging of noncrystallized complex biological samples. We demonstrate the capacity of a correlation method called “partial covariance mapping” to probe the electron dynamics of neon atoms exposed to intense 8 fs pulses of 1062 eV photons. A complete picture of ionization processes competing in hollow atom formation and decay is visualized with unprecedented ease and the map reveals hitherto unobserved nonlinear sequences of photoionization and Auger events. The technique is particularly well suited to the high counting rate inherent in FEL experiments.

  12. Formation and dynamics of partially non-wetting droplets in square microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Bibin M.; Cubaud, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    We experimentally study the formation and evolution of partially non-wetting droplets in microchannels made of glass and silicon. Droplets are generated by focusing pure water in an external phase of silicone oil using square microchannels. To probe the influence of the capillary number on droplet behavior in confined geometries, the oil viscosity is varied over four decades. For each fluid pair, the critical speed associated with the dynamic wetting transition is experimentally determined using a contact angle goniometer equipped with a high-speed camera. We discuss a variety of wetting phenomena in microchannels. In particular, we focus on the droplet lubrication transition from low to large capillary numbers and we examine droplet velocity as a function of droplet length, flow rates, and dynamic wetting properties. This work is supported by NSF (CBET- 1150389).

  13. Dynamical picture for the formation and decay of the exotic XYZ mesons.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Stanley J; Hwang, Dae Sung; Lebed, Richard F

    2014-09-12

    We present a new dynamical picture that identifies the formation of the exotic c[over ¯]c-containing states XYZ with the confinement-induced hadronization of a rapidly separating pair of a compact diquark and antidiquark. This picture combines the advantages of diquark-based models, which can accommodate much of the known XYZ spectrum, with the experimental fact that such states are both relatively narrow and are produced promptly. It also naturally explains the preference of some of the exotic states to decay to ψ(2S), rather than J/ψ, in terms of a simple wave-function overlap effect.

  14. Dynamic-energy-budget-driven fruiting-body formation in myxobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrata, M.; Birnir, B.

    2010-06-01

    We develop an interacting particle model to simulate the life cycle of myxobacteria, which consists of two main stages—the swarming stage and the development (fruiting body formation) stage. As experiments have shown that the phase transition from swarming to development stage is triggered by starvation, we incorporate into the simulation a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) called the dynamic energy budget, which controls the uptake and use of energy by individuals. This inclusion successfully automates the phase transition in our simulation. Only one parameter, namely, the food density, controls the entire simulation of the life cycle.

  15. Formation of bound states in expanded metal studied via path integral molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deymier, P. A.; Oh, Ki-Dong

    2004-03-01

    The usefulness of the restricted path integral molecular dynamics method for the study of strongly correlated electrons is demonstrated by studying the formation of bound electronic states in a half-filled expanded three-dimensional hydrogenoid body-centred cubic lattice at finite temperature. Starting from a metallic state with one-component plasma character, we find that bound electrons form upon expansion of the lattice. The bound electrons are spatially localized with their centre for the motion of gyration located at ionic positions. The number of bound electrons increases monotonically with decreasing density.

  16. The structure, dynamics, and star formation rate of the Orion nebula cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C.; Jaehnig, Karl

    2014-11-01

    The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues to the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, which is consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances, the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the interstellar medium density, which is estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content of the ONC is insufficient by a factor ∼1.8 to reproduce the observed velocity dispersion from virialized motions, in agreement with previous assessments that the ONC is moderately supervirial. This may indicate recent gas dispersal. Based on the latest estimates for the age spread in the system and our density profiles, we find that at the half-mass radius, 90% of the stellar population formed within ∼5-8 free-fall times (t {sub ff}). This implies a star formation efficiency per t {sub ff} of ε{sub ff} ∼ 0.04-0.07 (i.e., relatively slow and inefficient star formation rates during star cluster formation).

  17. CHARACTERIZING THE BROWN DWARF FORMATION CHANNELS FROM THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION AND BINARY-STAR DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Thies, Ingo; Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel; Marks, Michael

    2015-02-10

    The stellar initial mass function (IMF) is a key property of stellar populations. There is growing evidence that the classical star-formation mechanism by the direct cloud fragmentation process has difficulties reproducing the observed abundance and binary properties of brown dwarfs and very-low-mass stars. In particular, recent analytical derivations of the stellar IMF exhibit a deficit of brown dwarfs compared to observational data. Here we derive the residual mass function of brown dwarfs as an empirical measure of the brown dwarf deficiency in recent star-formation models with respect to observations and show that it is compatible with the substellar part of the Thies-Kroupa IMF and the mass function obtained by numerical simulations. We conclude that the existing models may be further improved by including a substellar correction term that accounts for additional formation channels like disk or filament fragmentation. The term ''peripheral fragmentation'' is introduced here for such additional formation channels. In addition, we present an updated analytical model of stellar and substellar binarity. The resulting binary fraction and the dynamically evolved companion mass-ratio distribution are in good agreement with observational data on stellar and very-low-mass binaries in the Galactic field, in clusters, and in dynamically unprocessed groups of stars if all stars form as binaries with stellar companions. Cautionary notes are given on the proper analysis of mass functions and the companion mass-ratio distribution and the interpretation of the results. The existence of accretion disks around young brown dwarfs does not imply that these form just like stars in direct fragmentation.

  18. Do dynamic effects play a significant role in enzymatic catalysis? A theoretical analysis of formate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Roca, Maite; Oliva, Mónica; Castillo, Raquel; Moliner, Vicente; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2010-10-04

    A theoretical study of the protein dynamic effects on the hydride transfer between the formate anion and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase (FDH), is presented in this paper. The analysis of free downhill molecular dynamic trajectories, performed in the enzyme and compared with the reaction in aqueous solution, has allowed the study of the dynamic coupling between the reacting fragments and the protein or the solvent water molecules, as well as an estimation of the dynamic effect contribution to the catalytic effect from calculation of the transmission coefficient in the enzyme and in solution. The obtained transmission coefficients for the enzyme and in solution were 0.46±0.04 and 0.20±0.03, respectively. These values represent a contribution to catalysis of 0.5 kcal mol(-1), which, although small, is not negligible keeping in mind the low efficiency of FDH. The analysis of the reactive trajectories also reveals how the relative movements of some amino acids, mainly His332 and Arg284, precede and promote the chemical reaction. In spite of these movements, the time-dependent evolution of the electric field created by the enzyme on the key atoms of the reaction reveals a permanent field, which reduces the work required to reach the transition state, with a concomitant polarization of the cofactor. Finally, application of Grote-Hynes theory has allowed the identification of the modes responsible for the substrate-environment coupling, showing how some protein motions take place simultaneously with the reaction. Thus, the equilibrium approach would provide, in this case, an overestimation of the catalyzed rate constant.

  19. Dynamic aspects of the ozone anomalies formation in the Antarctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapo, Palina; Svetashev, Alexander; Krasouski, Alexander; Barodka, Siarhei

    2013-04-01

    The ozone layer is a unique shield protecting all living creatures on our planet. However, it has become subject of active research only after the first ozone hole was discovered over Antarctica. Ozone layer depletion over Antarctica is an even more acute problem, since Antarctica is the only continent having a very endemic, rich nature with least human impact. It has been shown that extreme temperature conditions in polar stratosphere and polar stratospheric clouds formation in addition to photochemical reactions involving ozone and ozone-depleting substances act as a primary cause of ozone-layer depletion. In the present study we review the dynamic aspects of ozone anomalies formation in the Antarctic region by numerical simulation. For that purpose we consider the ozone hole which formed over Antarctica in the period of September-October 2011. Using the WRF modelling system and its PolarWRF modification, we simulate meteorological situation over Antarctica in the time periods of ozone hole formation and destruction, and also in the time period when the ozone hole is absent. Based on the modelling results, we argue that a cold air mass (anticyclone) formed over the territory of Antarctica during the formation of the ozone hole. Absence of solar irradiation and strong cooling of the atmosphere contribute to formation of such meteorological conditions during the Antarctic winter. In the stratosphere there is a region of low atmospheric pressure, which is clearly visible on a pressure topography map. Under the effect of the tropospheric and the stratospheric vortices, air patches movement leads to ozone concentration decrease and formation of the ozone anomalies. From the WRF system modelling results we calculate several basic meteorological characteristics and analyze surface maps and aerological (skew-T) diagrams for atmospheric variables with the NCL scripting language. We conclude that atmospheric dynamics has an impact on ozone depression. Also, we evaluate the

  20. Aperiodic dynamics in a deterministic adaptive network model of attitude formation in social groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Jonathan A.; Grindrod, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Adaptive network models, in which node states and network topology coevolve, arise naturally in models of social dynamics that incorporate homophily and social influence. Homophily relates the similarity between pairs of nodes' states to their network coupling strength, whilst social influence causes coupled nodes' states to convergence. In this paper we propose a deterministic adaptive network model of attitude formation in social groups that includes these effects, and in which the attitudinal dynamics are represented by an activato-inhibitor process. We illustrate that consensus, corresponding to all nodes adopting the same attitudinal state and being fully connected, may destabilise via Turing instability, giving rise to aperiodic dynamics with sensitive dependence on initial conditions. These aperiodic dynamics correspond to the formation and dissolution of sub-groups that adopt contrasting attitudes. We discuss our findings in the context of cultural polarisation phenomena. Social influence. This reflects the fact that people tend to modify their behaviour and attitudes in response to the opinions of others [22-26]. We model social influence via diffusion: agents adjust their state according to a weighted sum (dictated by the evolving network) of the differences between their state and the states of their neighbours. Homophily. This relates the similarity of individuals' states to their frequency and strength of interaction [27]. Thus in our model, homophily drives the evolution of the weighted ‘social' network. A precise formulation of our model is given in Section 2. Social influence and homophily underpin models of social dynamics [21], which cover a wide range of sociological phenomena, including the diffusion of innovations [28-32], complex contagions [33-36], collective action [37-39], opinion dynamics [19,20,40,10,11,13,15,41,16], the emergence of social norms [42-44], group stability [45], social differentiation [46] and, of particular relevance

  1. Sediment infilling and wetland formation dynamics in an active crevasse splay of the Mississippi River delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahoon, Donald R.; White, David A.; Lynch, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Crevasse splay environments provide a mesocosm for evaluating wetland formation and maintenance processes on a decadal time scale. Site elevation, water levels, vertical accretion, elevation change, shallow subsidence, and plant biomass were measured at five habitats along an elevation gradient to evaluate wetland formation and development in Brant Pass Splay; an active crevasse splay of the Balize delta of the Mississippi River. The processes of vertical development (vertical accretion, elevation change, and shallow subsidence) were measured with the surface elevation table–marker horizon method. There were three distinct stages to the accrual of elevation capital and wetland formation in the splay: sediment infilling, vegetative colonization, and development of a mature wetland community. Accretion, elevation gain, and shallow subsidence all decreased by an order of magnitude from the open water (lowest elevation) to the forest (highest elevation) habitats. Vegetative colonization occurred within the first growing season following emergence of the mud surface. An explosively high rate of below-ground production quickly stabilized the loosely consolidated sub-aerial sediments. After emergent vegetation colonization, vertical development slowed and maintenance of marsh elevation was driven both by sediment trapping by the vegetation and accumulation of plant organic matter in the soil. Continued vertical development and survival of the marsh then depended on the health and productivity of the plant community. The process of delta wetland formation is both complex and nonlinear. Determining the dynamics of wetland formation will help in understanding the processes driving the past building of the delta and in developing models for restoring degraded wetlands in the Mississippi River delta and other deltas around the world.

  2. Controlled and uncontrolled motion in the circular, restricted three-body problem: Dynamically natural spacecraft formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilio, Ralph Ramos

    Spacecraft formation flying involves operating multiple spacecraft in a pre-determined geometrical shape such that the configuration yields both individual and system benefits. One example is an over-flight of the same spatial position by spacecraft in geocentric orbit with the intent to create a complementary data set of remotely sensed observables. Another example is controlling to a high degree of accuracy the distance between spacecraft in heliocentric orbit to create a virtual, large-diameter interferometer telescope. Although Keplerian orbits provide the basic framework for general and precision spacecraft formation flying they also present limitations. Spacecraft are generally constrained to operate only in circular and elliptical orbits, parabolic paths, or hyperbolic trajectories around celestial bodies. Applying continuation methods and bifurcation theory techniques to the circular, restricted three-body problem - where stable and unstable periodic orbits exist around equilibrium points - creates an environment that is more orbit rich. After surmounting a similar challenge with test particles in the circular, restricted three-vortex problem in fluid mechanics as a proof-of-concept, it was shown that spacecraft traveling in uncontrolled motion along separate and distinct planar or three-dimensional periodic orbits could be placed in controlled motion, i.e. a controller is enabled and later disabled at precisely the proper positions, to have them phase-locked on a single periodic orbit. Although it was possible to use this controller in a resonant frequency/orbit approach to establish a formation, it was clearly shown that a separate controller could be used in conjunction with the first to expedite the formation establishment process. Creation of these dynamically natural spacecraft formations or multi-spacecraft platforms will enable the 'loiter, synchronize/coordinate, and observe' approach for future engineering and scientific missions where flexibility

  3. Formation of the widest binary stars from dynamical unfolding of triple systems.

    PubMed

    Reipurth, Bo; Mikkola, Seppo

    2012-12-13

    The formation of very wide binary systems, such as the α Centauri system with Proxima (also known as α Centauri C) separated from α Centauri (which itself is a close binary A/B) by 15,000 astronomical units (1 AU is the distance from Earth to the Sun), challenges current theories of star formation, because their separation can exceed the typical size of a collapsing cloud core. Various hypotheses have been proposed to overcome this problem, including the suggestion that ultrawide binaries result from the dissolution of a star cluster--when a cluster star gravitationally captures another, distant, cluster star. Recent observations have shown that very wide binaries are frequently members of triple systems and that close binaries often have a distant third companion. Here we report N-body simulations of the dynamical evolution of newborn triple systems still embedded in their nascent cloud cores that match observations of very wide systems. We find that although the triple systems are born very compact--and therefore initially are more protected against disruption by passing stars--they can develop extreme hierarchical architectures on timescales of millions of years as one component is dynamically scattered into a very distant orbit. The energy of ejection comes from shrinking the orbits of the other two stars, often making them look from a distance like a single star. Such loosely bound triple systems will therefore appear to be very wide binaries.

  4. Ultrafast electronic and vibrational dynamics in brominated aluminum corroles: Energy relaxation and triplet formation

    PubMed Central

    Stensitzki, T.; Yang, Y.; Berg, A.; Mahammed, A.; Gross, Z.; Heyne, K.

    2016-01-01

    We combined femtosecond (fs) VIS pump–IR probe spectroscopy with fs VIS pump–supercontinuum probe spectroscopy to characterize the photoreaction of the hexacoordinated Al(tpfc-Br8)(py)2 in a comprehensive way. Upon fs excitation at ∼400 nm in the Soret band, the excitation energy relaxes with a time constant of (250 ± 80) fs to the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. This is evident from the rise time of the stimulated emission signal in the visible spectral range. On the same time scale, narrowing of broad infrared signals in the C=C stretching region around 1500 cm−1 is observed. Energy redistribution processes are visible in the vibrational and electronic dynamics with time constants between ∼2 ps and ∼20 ps. Triplet formation is detected with a time constant of (95 ± 3) ps. This is tracked by the complete loss of stimulated emission. Electronic transition of the emerging triplet absorption band overlaps considerably with the singlet excited state absorption. In contrast, two well separated vibrational marker bands for triplet formation were identified at 1477 cm−1 and at 1508 cm−1. These marker bands allow a precise identification of triplet dynamics in corrole systems. PMID:27226980

  5. Dynamics of identity in the academic field and implications to science students' identity formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, Flavia

    2011-03-01

    Aydeniz and Hodge investigated how college professors negotiate their responsibilities as teachers and as researchers and the rationales behind their pedagogical approaches. Their findings illustrate how difficult it can be to keep the balance between these two responsibilities in a university that does not support professor's enactment of teaching goals. Thinking identity as a dynamics in self and institutional boundary, Albrecht and Fortney in their forum contribution, expand the analysis of Professor G's professional identity and conclude that in his case, institutional boundary is impermeable as it values research scientist more than teacher identity. In this forum contribution I emphasize the role of institutional culture in the identitarian process, interpreting the identity and identity formation of a science college teacher within the dynamics of the academic field. I expand the discussion to the other side of the problem, bringing excerpts of an interview with a Physics student from a Brazilian university as an illustration of how the academic habitus can impact the formation of a student's identity.

  6. Formation and Development of the Dynamic Stall Vortex on a Wing with Leading Edge Tubercles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrynuk, John; Bohl, Douglas

    2015-11-01

    Humpback whales are unique in that their flippers have leading edge ``bumps'' or tubercles. Past work on airfoils inspired by whale flippers has centered on the static aerodynamic characteristics of these airfoils. The current study uses Molecular Tagging Velocimetry (MTV) to investigate the effects of tubercles on dynamically pitching NACA 0012 airfoils. A baseline (i.e. straight leading edge) wing and one modified with leading edge tubercles are investigated. Tracking of the Dynamic Stall Vortex (DSV) is performed to quantitatively compare the DSV formation location, path, and convective velocity for tubercled and baseline wings. The results show that there is a spanwise variation in the initial formation location and motion of the DSV on the modified wing. Once formed, the DSV aligns into a more uniform spanwise structure. As the pitching motion progresses, the DSV on the modified wing convects away from the airfoil surface later and slower than is observed for the baseline airfoil. The results indicate that the tubercles may delay stall when compared to the baseline airfoil. This work was supported by NSF Grant # 0845882.

  7. Magnetic multipole induced zero-rotation frequency bounce-resonant loss in a Penning-Malmberg trap used for antihydrogen trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Kerrigan, S. J.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Keller, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Kurchaninov, L.

    2009-10-15

    In many antihydrogen trapping schemes, antiprotons held in a short-well Penning-Malmberg trap are released into a longer well. This process necessarily causes the bounce-averaged rotation frequency {omega}{sub r} of the antiprotons around the trap axis to pass through zero. In the presence of a transverse magnetic multipole, experiments and simulations show that many antiprotons (over 30% in some cases) can be lost to a hitherto unidentified bounce-resonant process when {omega}{sub r} is close to zero.

  8. Dynamic auxin transport patterns preceding vein formation revealed by live-imaging of Arabidopsis leaf primordia

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, Danielle; Berleth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Self-regulatory patterning mechanisms capable of generating biologically meaningful, yet unpredictable cellular patterns offer unique opportunities for obtaining mathematical descriptions of underlying patterning systems properties. The networks of higher-order veins in leaf primordia constitute such a self-regulatory system. During the formation of higher-order veins, vascular precursors are selected from a homogenous field of subepidermal cells in unpredictable positions to eventually connect in complex cellular networks. Auxin transport routes have been implicated in this selection process, but understanding of their role in vascular patterning has been limited by our inability to monitor early auxin transport dynamics in vivo. Here we describe a live-imaging system in emerging Arabidopsis thaliana leaves that uses a PIN1:GFP reporter to visualize auxin transport routes and an Athb8:YFP reporter as a marker for vascular commitment. Live-imaging revealed common features initiating the formation of all higher-order veins. The formation of broad PIN1 expression domains is followed by their restriction, leading to sustained, elevated PIN1 expression in incipient procambial cells files, which then express Athb8. Higher-order PIN1 expression domains (hPEDs) are initiated as freely ending domains that extend toward each other and sometimes fuse with them, creating connected domains. During the restriction and specification phase, cells in wider hPEDs are partitioned into vascular and non-vascular fates: Central cells acquire a coordinated cell axis and express elevated PIN1 levels as well as the pre-procambial marker Athb8, while edge cells downregulate PIN1 and remain isodiametric. The dynamic nature of the early selection process is underscored by the instability of early hPEDs, which can result in dramatic changes in vascular network architecture prior to Athb8 expression, which is correlated with the promotion onto vascular cell fate. PMID:24966861

  9. New Worlds Observer Formation Control Design Based on the Dynamics of Relative Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    The New Worlds Observer (NWO) mission is designed for the direct detection and characterization of extrasolar planets. The NWO mission concept employs a two spacecraft leader-follower formation on a trajectory around the Earth/Moon-Sun L(sub 2) Libration Point. The leader spacecraft is baselined as a 4 meter optical telescope. The follower, Starshade spacecraft, is designed to suppress light from a central body star permitting direct detection of a surrounding exoplanetary system. The current design requires a nominal leader-follower separation range of 72 Megameters. NWO poses many challenges including formation control. NWO cycles between three principal control modes during the nominal mission timeline: science (fine pointing), realignment and transition. This paper examines formation control strategies in the context of dynamics of relative motion for two spacecraft operating in the vicinity of the Earth/Moon-Sun L(sub 2)libration point. The paper presents an overview of the equations of relative motion followed by a discussion of each of the control modes. Discussion and analysis characterize control strategies for each of the mission control modes, including requirements, implementation challenges and project fuel budgets.

  10. Droplet formation and growth inside a polymer network: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jiyun; Jang, Eunseon; Shoaib, Mahbubul Alam; Jo, Kyubong; Kim, Jun Soo

    2016-04-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation study that focuses on the formation and growth of nanoscale droplets inside polymer networks. Droplet formation and growth are investigated by the liquid-vapor phase separation of a dilute Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid inside regularly crosslinked, polymer networks with varying mesh sizes. In a polymer network with small mesh sizes, droplet formation can be suppressed, the extent of which is dependent on the attraction strength between the LJ particles. When droplets form in a polymer network with intermediate mesh sizes, subsequent growth is significantly slower when compared with that in bulk without a polymer network. Interestingly, droplet growth beyond the initial nucleation stage occurs by different mechanisms depending on the mesh size: droplets grow mainly by diffusion and coalescence inside polymer networks with large mesh sizes (as observed in bulk), whereas Ostwald ripening becomes a more dominant mechanism for droplet growth for small mesh sizes. The analysis of droplet trajectories clearly reveals the obstruction effect of the polymer network on the movement of growing droplets, which leads to Ostwald ripening of droplets. This study suggests how polymer networks can be used to control the growth of nanoscale droplets.

  11. Droplet formation and growth inside a polymer network: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jiyun; Jang, Eunseon; Shoaib, Mahbubul Alam; Jo, Kyubong; Kim, Jun Soo

    2016-04-07

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation study that focuses on the formation and growth of nanoscale droplets inside polymer networks. Droplet formation and growth are investigated by the liquid-vapor phase separation of a dilute Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid inside regularly crosslinked, polymer networks with varying mesh sizes. In a polymer network with small mesh sizes, droplet formation can be suppressed, the extent of which is dependent on the attraction strength between the LJ particles. When droplets form in a polymer network with intermediate mesh sizes, subsequent growth is significantly slower when compared with that in bulk without a polymer network. Interestingly, droplet growth beyond the initial nucleation stage occurs by different mechanisms depending on the mesh size: droplets grow mainly by diffusion and coalescence inside polymer networks with large mesh sizes (as observed in bulk), whereas Ostwald ripening becomes a more dominant mechanism for droplet growth for small mesh sizes. The analysis of droplet trajectories clearly reveals the obstruction effect of the polymer network on the movement of growing droplets, which leads to Ostwald ripening of droplets. This study suggests how polymer networks can be used to control the growth of nanoscale droplets.

  12. A genetic algorithm for a bi-objective mathematical model for dynamic virtual cell formation problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradgholi, Mostafa; Paydar, Mohammad Mahdi; Mahdavi, Iraj; Jouzdani, Javid

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays, with the increasing pressure of the competitive business environment and demand for diverse products, manufacturers are force to seek for solutions that reduce production costs and rise product quality. Cellular manufacturing system (CMS), as a means to this end, has been a point of attraction to both researchers and practitioners. Limitations of cell formation problem (CFP), as one of important topics in CMS, have led to the introduction of virtual CMS (VCMS). This research addresses a bi-objective dynamic virtual cell formation problem (DVCFP) with the objective of finding the optimal formation of cells, considering the material handling costs, fixed machine installation costs and variable production costs of machines and workforce. Furthermore, we consider different skills on different machines in workforce assignment in a multi-period planning horizon. The bi-objective model is transformed to a single-objective fuzzy goal programming model and to show its performance; numerical examples are solved using the LINGO software. In addition, genetic algorithm (GA) is customized to tackle large-scale instances of the problems to show the performance of the solution method.

  13. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process.

  14. The dynamical masses, densities, and star formation scaling relations of Lyα galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Richardson, Mark L. A.; McLinden, Emily M.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Tilvi, Vithal S.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first dynamical mass measurements for Lyα galaxies at high redshift, based on velocity dispersion measurements from rest-frame optical emission lines and size measurements from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, for nine galaxies drawn from four surveys. We use these measurements to study Lyα galaxies in the context of galaxy scaling relations. The resulting dynamical masses range from 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}. We also fit stellar population models to our sample and use them to place the Lyα sample on a stellar mass versus line width relation. The Lyα galaxies generally follow the same scaling relation as star-forming galaxies at lower redshift, although, lower stellar mass fits are also acceptable in ∼1/3 of the Lyα galaxies. Using the dynamical masses as an upper limit on gas mass, we show that Lyα galaxies have unusually active star formation for their gas mass surface density. This behavior is consistent with what is observed in starburst galaxies, despite the typically smaller masses and sizes of the Lyα galaxy population. Finally, we examine the mass densities of these galaxies and show that their future evolution likely requires dissipational ('wet') merging. In short, we find that Lyα galaxies are low-mass cousins of larger starbursts.

  15. Mosaic-pattern vegetation formation and dynamics driven by the water-wind crisscross erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gao-Lin; Wang, Dong; Liu, Yu; Hao, Hong-Min; Fang, Nu-Fang; Shi, Zhi-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Theoretical explanations for vegetation pattern dynamic emphasized on banded pattern-forming systems on the dynamics of the spot pattern. In this context, we explore the patch pattern forming and development in the desertification land. We hypothesized that spatial heterogeneity of microtopography and soil properties with different patch sizes would determine vegetation pattern dynamics theory. The spatial heterogeneity of microtopography and soil properties with different patch sizes were studied. Differences between the inside and outside of the canopy of soil carbon content and soil total nitrogen content were significantly increasing with patches sizes. Sampling location across vegetation patch was the main factor controlling soil properties. Soil nutrient content and saturated hydraulic conductivity were the largest, while bulk density and the coarse sand content were the lowest at the sampling location of half-way between taproot and downslope edge of the canopy. The height of the mound relative to the adjacent soil interspace between shrubs increased as patches diameter increased at the upslope of the taproot. Hydrological and aeolian processes resulted in spatial distributions of soil moisture, nutrition properties, which lead to patch migrated to downslope rather than upslope. A conceptual model was integrated hydrological and nutrient facilitation and competition effects among the plant-soil in mosaic-pattern patch formation and succession process.

  16. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yanggang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; ...

    2015-03-04

    Ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations and static Density Functional Theory calculations have been performed to investigate the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst. It is found that under reaction condition CO adsorption significantly labializes the surface atoms of the Au cluster and leads to the formation of isolated Au+-CO species that resides on the support in the vicinity of the Au particle. In this context, we identified a dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism at the interfacial area for CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst, which is a lower energy pathway than that of CO oxidation at the interface with themore » metal particle. This results from the ability of the single atom site to strongly couple with the redox properties of the support in a synergistic manner thereby lowering the barrier for redox reactions. We find that the single Au+ ion, which only exists under reaction conditions, breaks away from the Au cluster to catalyze CO oxidation and returns to the Au cluster after the catalytic cycle is completed. Generally, our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in a catalytic process.« less

  17. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanggang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Li, Jun; Rousseau, Roger J.

    2015-03-04

    Ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations and static Density Functional Theory calculations have been performed to investigate the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst. It is found that under reaction condition CO adsorption significantly labializes the surface atoms of the Au cluster and leads to the formation of isolated Au+-CO species that resides on the support in the vicinity of the Au particle. In this context, we identified a dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism at the interfacial area for CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst, which is a lower energy pathway than that of CO oxidation at the interface with the metal particle. This results from the ability of the single atom site to strongly couple with the redox properties of the support in a synergistic manner thereby lowering the barrier for redox reactions. We find that the single Au+ ion, which only exists under reaction conditions, breaks away from the Au cluster to catalyze CO oxidation and returns to the Au cluster after the catalytic cycle is completed. Generally, our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in a catalytic process.

  18. DYNAMICS AND ECCENTRICITY FORMATION OF PLANETS IN OGLE-06-109L SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Su; Zhao Gang; Zhou Jilin

    2009-11-20

    Recent observation of the microlensing technique reveals two giant planets at 2.3 AU and 4.6 AU around the star OGLE-06-109L. The eccentricity of the outer planet (e{sub c} ) is estimated to be 0.11{sup +0.17}{sub -0.04}, comparable to that of Saturn (0.01-0.09). The similarities between the OGLE-06-109L system and the solar system indicate that they may have passed through similar histories during their formation stage. In this paper, we investigate the dynamics and formation of the orbital architecture in the OGLE-06-109L system. For the present two planets with their nominal locations, the secular motions are stable as long as their eccentricities (e{sub b} , e{sub c} ) fulfill e {sup 2} {sub b} + e {sup 2} {sub c} <= 0.3{sup 2}. Earth-size bodies might be formed and are stable in the habitable zone (0.25-0.36 AU) of the system. Three possible scenarios may be accounted for the formation of e{sub b} and e{sub c} : (1) convergent migration of two planets and the 3:1 mean motion resonance (MMR) trapping; (2) planetary scattering; and (3) divergent migration and the 3:1 MMR crossing. As we showed that the probability for the two giant planets in 3:1 MMR is low (approx3%), scenario (1) is less likely. According to models (2) and (3), the final eccentricity of inner planet (e{sub b} ) may oscillate between [0-0.06], comparable to that of Jupiter (0.03-0.06). An inspection of e{sub b} , e{sub c} 's secular motion may be helpful to understand which model is really responsible for the eccentricity formation.

  19. A dynamical model for gas flows, star formation and nuclear winds in galactic centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Crocker, Roland M.

    2017-04-01

    We present a dynamical model for gas transport, star formation and winds in the nuclear regions of galaxies, focusing on the Milky Way's Central Molecular Zone (CMZ). In our model angular momentum and mass are transported by a combination of gravitational and bar-driven acoustic instabilities. In gravitationally unstable regions the gas can form stars, and the resulting feedback drives both turbulence and a wind that ejects mass from the CMZ. We show that the CMZ is in a quasi-steady state where mass deposited at large radii by the bar is transported inwards to a star-forming, ring-shaped region at ∼100 pc from the Galactic Centre, where the shear reaches a minimum. This ring undergoes episodic starbursts, with bursts lasting ∼5-10 Myr occurring at ∼20-40 Myr intervals. During quiescence the gas in the ring is not fully cleared, but is driven out of a self-gravitating state by the momentum injected by expanding supernova remnants. Starbursts also drive a wind off the star-forming ring, with a time-averaged mass flux comparable to the star formation rate. We show that our model agrees well with the observed properties of the CMZ, and places it near a star formation minimum within the evolutionary cycle. We argue that such cycles of bursty star formation and winds should be ubiquitous in the nuclei of barred spiral galaxies, and show that the resulting distribution of galactic nuclei on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation is in good agreement with that observed in nearby galaxies.

  20. The formation of Uranus and Neptune in solid-rich feeding zones: Connecting chemistry and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Bodenheimer, Peter

    2010-05-01

    The core accretion theory of planet formation has at least two fundamental problems explaining the origins of Uranus and Neptune: (1) dynamical times in the trans-saturnian solar nebula are so long that core growth can take >15 Myr and (2) the onset of runaway gas accretion that begins when cores reach ˜10 M⊕ necessitates a sudden gas accretion cutoff just as Uranus and Neptune's cores reach critical mass. Both problems may be resolved by allowing the ice giants to migrate outward after their formation in solid-rich feeding zones with planetesimal surface densities well above the minimum-mass solar nebula. We present new simulations of the formation of Uranus and Neptune in the solid-rich disk of Dodson-Robinson et al. (Dodson-Robinson, S.E., Willacy, K., Bodenheimer, P., Turner, N.J., Beichman, C.A. [2009]. Icarus 200, 672-693) using the initial semimajor axis distribution of the Nice model (Gomes, R., Levison, H.F., Tsiganis, K., Morbidelli, A. [2005]. Nature 435, 466-469; Morbidelli, A., Levison, H.F., Tsiganis, K., Gomes, R. [2005]. Nature 435, 462-465; Tsiganis, K., Gomes, R., Morbidelli, A., Levison, H.F. [2005]. Nature 435, 459-461), with one ice giant forming at 12 AU and the other at 15 AU. The innermost ice giant reaches its present mass after 3.8-4.0 Myr and the outermost after 5.3-6 Myr, a considerable time decrease from previous one-dimensional simulations (e.g. Pollack, J.B., Hubickyj, O., Bodenheimer, P., Lissauer, J.J., Podolak, M., Greenzweig, Y. [1996]. Icarus 124, 62-85). The core masses stay subcritical, eliminating the need for a sudden gas accretion cutoff. Our calculated carbon mass fractions of 22% are in excellent agreement with the ice giant interior models of Podolak et al. (Podolak, M., Weizman, A., Marley, M. [1995]. Planet. Space Sci. 43, 1517-1522) and Marley et al. (Marley, M.S., Gómez, P., Podolak, M. [1995]. J. Geophys. Res. 100, 23349-23354). Based on the requirement that the ice giant-forming planetesimals contain >10% mass

  1. Dynamical Properties of z ~ 2 Star-forming Galaxies and a Universal Star Formation Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouché, N.; Cresci, G.; Davies, R.; Eisenhauer, F.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Gillessen, S.; Lehnert, M.; Lutz, D.; Nesvadba, N.; Shapiro, K. L.; Sternberg, A.; Tacconi, L. J.; Verma, A.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Renzini, A.; Erb, D. K.; Shapley, A.; Steidel, C. C.

    2007-12-01

    We present the first comparison of the dynamical properties of different samples of z~1.4-3.4 star-forming galaxies from spatially resolved imaging spectroscopy from SINFONI/VLT integral field spectroscopy and IRAM CO millimeter interferometry. Our samples include 16 rest-frame UV-selected, 16 rest-frame optically selected, and 13 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). We find that rest-frame UV and optically bright (K<20) z~2 star forming galaxies are dynamically similar, and follow the same velocity-size relation as disk galaxies at z~0. In the theoretical framework of rotating disks forming from dissipative collapse in dark matter halos, the two samples require a spin parameter <λ> ranging from 0.06 to 0.2. In contrast, bright SMGs (S850μm>=5 mJy) have larger velocity widths and are much more compact. Hence, SMGs have lower angular momenta and higher matter densities than either the UV or optically selected populations. This indicates that dissipative major mergers may dominate the SMGs population, resulting in early spheroids, and that a significant fraction of the UV/optically bright galaxies have evolved less violently, either in a series of minor mergers, or in rapid dissipative collapse from the halo, given that either process may leads to the formation of early disks. These early disks may later evolve into spheroids via disk instabilities or mergers. Because of their small sizes and large densities, SMGs lie at the high surface density end of a universal (out to z=2.5) ``Schmidt-Kennicutt'' relation between gas surface density and star formation rate surface density. The best-fit relation suggests that the star formation rate per unit area scales as the surface gas density to a power of ~1.7, and that the star formation efficiency increases by a factor of 4 between non-starbursts and strong starbursts. Based on observations at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), Paranal, Chile, under programs GTO 073.B-9018, 074.A-9011

  2. Stochastic formation of magnetic vortex structures in asymmetric disks triggered by chaotic dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Im, Mi-Young; Lee, Ki-Suk; Vogel, Andreas; ...

    2014-12-17

    The non-trivial spin configuration in a magnetic vortex is a prototype for fundamental studies of nanoscale spin behaviour with potential applications in magnetic information technologies. Arrays of magnetic vortices interfacing with perpendicular thin films have recently been proposed as enabler for skyrmionic structures at room temperature, which has opened exciting perspectives on practical applications of skyrmions. An important milestone for achieving not only such skyrmion materials but also general applications of magnetic vortices is a reliable control of vortex structures. However, controlling magnetic processes is hampered by stochastic behaviour, which is associated with thermal fluctuations in general. Here we showmore » that the dynamics in the initial stages of vortex formation on an ultrafast timescale plays a dominating role for the stochastic behaviour observed at steady state. Our results show that the intrinsic stochastic nature of vortex creation can be controlled by adjusting the interdisk distance in asymmetric disk arrays.« less

  3. Dynamic models of biological pattern formation have some surprising implications for understanding the epigenetics of development.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Peter C M; Lo, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear epigenetic processes are conceived of in terms of self-organizing dynamic models of biological pattern formation. Epigenetic processes thus conceived generate substantial subject-specific structural variation, for instance, in growing brain networks. It is shown that standard quantitative genetic modeling based on analyses of interindividual phenotypic variation misclassifies the variation generated by nonlinear epigenetic processes as being due to specific environmental influences. A new quantitative genetic model, iFACE, is introduced to correctly identify the structural variation generated by self-organizing epigenetic processes. iFACE is based on time series analysis of intraindividual variation of a single pair of genetically related subjects. The results of an application of iFACE to multilead EEG obtained with a single dizygotic twin pair is presented.

  4. Formation and dynamics of "waterproof" photoluminescent complexes of rare earth ions in crowded environment.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Tetyana; Blades, Michael; Duque, Juan G; Doorn, Stephen K; Biaggio, Ivan; Rotkin, Slava V

    2014-12-28

    Understanding behavior of rare-earth ions (REI) in crowded environments is crucial for several nano- and bio-technological applications. Evolution of REI photoluminescence (PL) in small compartments inside a silica hydrogel, mimic to a soft matter bio-environment, has been studied and explained within a solvation model. The model uncovered the origin of high PL efficiency to be the formation of REI complexes, surrounded by bile salt (DOC) molecules. Comparative study of these REI-DOC complexes in bulk water solution and those enclosed inside the hydrogel revealed a strong correlation between an up to 5×-longer lifetime of REIs and appearance of the DOC ordered phase, further confirmed by dynamics of REI solvation shells, REI diffusion experiments and morphological characterization of microstructure of the hydrogel.

  5. Stochastic formation of magnetic vortex structures in asymmetric disks triggered by chaotic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Mi-Young; Lee, Ki-Suk; Vogel, Andreas; Hong, Jung-Il; Meier, Guido; Fischer, Peter

    2014-12-17

    The non-trivial spin configuration in a magnetic vortex is a prototype for fundamental studies of nanoscale spin behaviour with potential applications in magnetic information technologies. Arrays of magnetic vortices interfacing with perpendicular thin films have recently been proposed as enabler for skyrmionic structures at room temperature, which has opened exciting perspectives on practical applications of skyrmions. An important milestone for achieving not only such skyrmion materials but also general applications of magnetic vortices is a reliable control of vortex structures. However, controlling magnetic processes is hampered by stochastic behaviour, which is associated with thermal fluctuations in general. Here we show that the dynamics in the initial stages of vortex formation on an ultrafast timescale plays a dominating role for the stochastic behaviour observed at steady state. Our results show that the intrinsic stochastic nature of vortex creation can be controlled by adjusting the interdisk distance in asymmetric disk arrays.

  6. Observation of bubble formation in water during microwave irradiation by dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakuma, Yusuke; Munenaga, Takuya; Nakata, Ryosuke

    2016-09-01

    A microwave reactor was designed for in situ observation of nano- and micro-bubbles, and size profiles during and after irradiation were measured with respect to irradiation power and time. Bubble formation in water during irradiation was observed even at temperatures below the boiling point of water. The maximum size strongly depended on radiation power and time, even at a given temperature. Nano-particles in the dispersion medium were found to play an important role in achieving more stable nucleation of bubbles around particles, and stable size distributions were obtained from clear autocorrelation by a dynamic light scattering system. Moreover, a combination of microwave induction heating and the addition of nano-particles to the dispersion medium can prevent heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles on the cell wall. Quantitative nano-bubble size profiles obtained by in situ observation provide useful information regarding microwave-based industrial processes for nano-particle production.

  7. Studies of the effects of electron cloud formation on beam dynamics at CesrTA

    SciTech Connect

    Crittenden, J. A.; Calvey, J. R.; Dugan, G.; Livezey, J. A.; Kreinick, D.L.; Palmer, M. A.; Rubin, D. L.; Harkay, K.; Holtzapple, R. L.; Ohmi, K.; Furman, M. A.; Penn, G.; Venturini, M.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L.

    2009-05-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) has commenced operation as a linear collider damping ring test bed following its conversion from an e{sup +}e{sup -}-collider in 2008. A core component of the research program is the measurement of effects of synchrotron-radiation-induced electron cloud formation on beam dynamics. We have studied the interaction of the beam with the cloud with measurements of coherent tune shifts and emittance growth in various bunch train configurations, bunch currents, beam energies, and bunch lengths, for both e{sup +} and e{sup -} beams. This paper compares a subset of these measurements to modeling results from the two-dimensional cloud simulation packages ECLOUD and POSINST. These codes each model most of the tune shift measurements with remarkable accuracy, while some comparisons merit further investigation.

  8. Sub-Doppler infrared spectroscopy and formation dynamics of triacetylene in a slit supersonic expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Agarwal, Jay; Allen, Wesley D.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2016-02-01

    Infrared spectroscopy and formation dynamics of triacetylene are investigated in a slit jet supersonic discharge and probed with sub-Doppler resolution (≈60 MHz) on the fundamental antisymmetric CH stretch mode (ν5). The triacetylene is generated in the throat of the discharge by sequential attack of ethynyl radical with acetyelene and diacetylene: (i) HCCH → HCC + H, (ii) HCC + HCCH → HCCCCH + H, (iii) HCC + HCCCCH → HCCCCCCH + H, cooled rapidly in the slit expansion to 15 K, and probed by near shot-noise-limited absorption sensitivity with a tunable difference-frequency infrared laser. The combination of jet cooled temperatures (Trot = 15 K) and low spectral congestion permits (i) analysis of rotationally avoided crossings in the ν5 band ascribed to Coriolis interactions, as well as (ii) first detection of ν5 Π-Π hot band progressions built on the ν12 sym CC bend and definitively assigned via state-of-the-art ab initio vibration-rotation interaction parameters (αi), which make for interesting comparison with recent spectroscopic studies of Doney et al. [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 316, 54 (2015)]. The combined data provide direct evidence for significantly non-equilibrium populations in the CC bending manifold, dynamically consistent with a strongly bent radical intermediate and transition states for forming triacetylene product. The presence of intense triacetylene signals under cold, low density slit jet conditions provides support for (i) barrierless addition of HCC with HCCCCH and (ii) a high quantum yield for HCCCCCCH formation. Complete basis set calculations for energetics [CCSD(T)-f12/VnZ-f12, n = 2,3] and frequencies [CCSD(T)-f12/VdZ-f12] are presented for both radical intermediate and transition state species, predicting collision stabilization in the slit jet expansion to be competitive with unimolecular decomposition with increasing polyyne chain length.

  9. Sub-Doppler infrared spectroscopy and formation dynamics of triacetylene in a slit supersonic expansion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Agarwal, Jay; Allen, Wesley D; Nesbitt, David J

    2016-02-21

    Infrared spectroscopy and formation dynamics of triacetylene are investigated in a slit jet supersonic discharge and probed with sub-Doppler resolution (≈60 MHz) on the fundamental antisymmetric CH stretch mode (ν5). The triacetylene is generated in the throat of the discharge by sequential attack of ethynyl radical with acetyelene and diacetylene: (i) HCCH → HCC + H, (ii) HCC + HCCH → HCCCCH + H, (iii) HCC + HCCCCH → HCCCCCCH + H, cooled rapidly in the slit expansion to 15 K, and probed by near shot-noise-limited absorption sensitivity with a tunable difference-frequency infrared laser. The combination of jet cooled temperatures (Trot = 15 K) and low spectral congestion permits (i) analysis of rotationally avoided crossings in the ν5 band ascribed to Coriolis interactions, as well as (ii) first detection of ν5 Π-Π hot band progressions built on the ν12 sym CC bend and definitively assigned via state-of-the-art ab initio vibration-rotation interaction parameters (αi), which make for interesting comparison with recent spectroscopic studies of Doney et al. [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 316, 54 (2015)]. The combined data provide direct evidence for significantly non-equilibrium populations in the CC bending manifold, dynamically consistent with a strongly bent radical intermediate and transition states for forming triacetylene product. The presence of intense triacetylene signals under cold, low density slit jet conditions provides support for (i) barrierless addition of HCC with HCCCCH and (ii) a high quantum yield for HCCCCCCH formation. Complete basis set calculations for energetics [CCSD(T)-f12/VnZ-f12, n = 2,3] and frequencies [CCSD(T)-f12/VdZ-f12] are presented for both radical intermediate and transition state species, predicting collision stabilization in the slit jet expansion to be competitive with unimolecular decomposition with increasing polyyne chain length.

  10. Metamorphic sole formation, emplacement and blueschist overprint: early obduction dynamics witnessed by W. Turkey ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunder, Alexis; Agard, Philippe; Chopin, Christian; Soret, Mathieu; Okay, Aral; Whitechurch, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Western Turkey, with a >200 km long-belt of unmetamorphosed ophiolite overlying continental lithosphere is one or even the largest obducted ophiolite on Earth and therefore a key example to study obduction and early subduction dynamics. All Western Turkish ophiolite fragments are considered as part of the same Neotethyan branch resulting of a long-lived continental subduction (or underthrusting). Synchronous (ca. ~ 93 Ma) metamorphic sole formation and preservation at the base of most of the Turkish ophiolite fragments support this single event and place a strong constraint on the age of subduction initiation. Metamorphic soles are indeed generally considered to have formed during the early and hot subduction zone at 25 ± 10 km depths and welded to the overriding oceanic lithosphere. In Western Turkey however (as for most places worldwide) a systematic study of the pressure-temperature conditions with modern thermobarometric tools is generally lacking, and fundamental mechanisms of formation or accretion to the upper plate are poorly (if at all) constrained. We herein reappraise Western Turkish metamorphic soles focusing on the following points and issues: (i) detailed structures of metamorphic sole and other subduction derived units, petrological evolution and refined pressure-temperature conditions; peak pressure-temperature conditions of metamorphic sole were estimated using garnet, clinopyroxene, amphibole and plagioclase as the peak paragenesis at 10.5 ± 2 kbar and 800 ± 50°C based on pseudosections using the Theriak/Domino package (ii) the rather unique (and enigmatic) blueschist facies overprint found in places was investigated in terms of structural position and pressure-temperature conditions. Conditions of overprint were estimated around 12 kbar and 425 °C from the presence of glaucophane, lawsonite, jadeite and garnet overgrowing the amphibolite-facies assemblage. This field-based study provides clues to mechanisms of metamorphic sole underplating

  11. Multicolor Photometry of the Merging Galaxy Cluster A2319: Dynamics and Star Formation Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622^{+91}_{-70} km s-1, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ~10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ~ 20 mag. A u-band (~3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h BATC = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time scales, older stellar ages, and

  12. Multicolor photometry of the merging galaxy cluster A2319: Dynamics and star formation properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu E-mail: yuanqirong@njnu.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622{sub −70}{sup +91} km s{sup –1}, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ∼10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ∼ 20 mag. A u-band (∼3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h {sub BATC} = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time

  13. Overflow dynamics and bottom water formation in the western Ross Sea: Influence of tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Danilov, S.; Hellmer, H. H.; SchröTer, J.

    2010-10-01

    The tidal impact on overflow dynamics and bottom water production in the western Ross Sea is studied with the Finite Element Ocean Model, which allows embedding a mesh with 0.5 km resolution in a coarse resolution (30 km) setup without nesting. The simulated overflow properties inside and downstream of the western Ross Sea are described. The overflow exhibits pronounced variability at both daily and spring-neap tidal time scales in the western Ross Sea. Tides increase mixing over both the outer shelf and upper slope there. Plume jets are shaped by tidal currents at a bathymetric bend west of the Drygalski Trough mouth, descending rapidly and supplying the bottom water. A fraction of shelf water remains over the shelf and propagates westward from the Ross Sea, but it does not contribute significantly to bottom water formation because of energetic mixing over the upper slope. Compared to a simulation without tidal forcing, tides (with the major K1 and O1 constituents) increase the outflow rate over the continental slope off Cape Adare by about 70%. A set of sensitivity experiments show that the rate of bottom water production is not a monotonic function of the tidal currents amplitude. Tidal forcing with intermediate strength leads to the most efficient bottom water formation.

  14. Chemical dynamics of triacetylene formation and implications to the synthesis of polyynes in Titan's atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Gu, X.; Kim, Y. S.; Kaiser, R. I.; Mebel, A. M.; Liang, M. C.; Yung, Y. L.

    2009-01-01

    For the last four decades, the role of polyynes such as diacetylene (HCCCCH) and triacetylene (HCCCCCCH) in the chemical evolution of the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan has been a subject of vigorous research. These polyacetylenes are thought to serve as an UV radiation shield in planetary environments; thus, acting as prebiotic ozone, and are considered as important constituents of the visible haze layers on Titan. However, the underlying chemical processes that initiate the formation and control the growth of polyynes have been the least understood to date. Here, we present a combined experimental, theoretical, and modeling study on the synthesis of the polyyne triacetylene (HCCCCCCH) via the bimolecular gas phase reaction of the ethynyl radical (CCH) with diacetylene (HCCCCH). This elementary reaction is rapid, has no entrance barrier, and yields the triacetylene molecule via indirect scattering dynamics through complex formation in a single collision event. Photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere imply that triacetylene may serve as a building block to synthesize even more complex polyynes such as tetraacetylene (HCCCCCCCCH). PMID:19805262

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Permeation of Bisphenol A and Pore Formation in a Lipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Chen, Junlang; Zhou, Guoquan; Wang, Yu; Xu, Can; Wang, Xiaogang

    2016-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is particularly considered as one of the most suspicious endocrine disruptors. Exposure to BPA may bring about possible human toxicities, such as cancerous tumors, birth defects and neoteny. One of the key issues to understand its toxicities is how BPA enters cells. In this paper, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions between BPA and a phospholipid membrane (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC bilayer). The simulation results show that BPA can easily enter the membrane from the aqueous phase. With the increasing concentrations of BPA in the membrane, BPA tends to aggregate and form into cluster. Meanwhile, several DPPC lipids are pulled out from each leaflet and adsorbed on the cluster surface, leading to pore formation. Detailed observations indicate that the lipid extraction results mainly from the dispersion interactions between BPA cluster and lipid tails, as well as weak electrostatic attractions between lipid headgroups and the two hydroxyl groups on BPA. The lipid extraction and pore formation may cause cell membrane damage and are of great importance to uncover BPA’s cytotoxicity.

  16. Coupled Attitude and Orbit Dynamics and Control in Formation Flying Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Yun-Jun; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Mason, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Formation flying systems can range from global constellations offering extended service coverage to clusters of highly coordinated vehicles that perform distributed sensing. Recently, the use of groups of micro-satellites in the areas of near Earth explorations, deep space explorations, and military applications has received considerable attention by researchers and practitioners. To date, most proposed control strategies are based on linear models (e.g., Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire equations) or nonlinear models that are restricted to circular reference orbits. Also, all models in the literature are uncoupled between relative position and relative attitude. In this paper, a generalized dynamic model is proposed. The reference orbit is not restricted to the circular case. In this formulation, the leader or follower satellite can be in either a circular or an elliptic orbit. In addition to maintaining a specified relative position, the satellites are also required to maintain specified relative attitudes. Thus the model presented couples vehicle attitude and orbit requirements. Orbit perturbations are also included. In particular, the J(sub 2) effects are accounted in the model. Finally, a sliding mode controller is developed and used to control the relative attitude of the formation and the simulation results are presented.

  17. The DYNAFLUX / DYNACOLD Network: Dynamics, Fluxes, Stability, Succession and Landscape Formation in Cold Climate Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beylich, Achim A.

    2016-04-01

    There is a wide range of high-latitude and high-altitude cold climate landscapes in Europe, covering a significant proportion of the total land surface area. This spectrum of defined cold climate landscapes represents a variety of stages of deglaciation history and landscape formation. We can find landscapes at different levels of postglacial stabilization which is providing the opportunity to study the interactions between geo-, bio-, social and socio-economic systems at the land surface. The DYNAFLUX / DYNACOLD Network (2004-) bridges across the geo-, bio-, social and socio-economic sciences in order to analyze the complex dynamics of stabilization, succession and landscape formation during and after ice retreat and under ongoing human influences. The network provides a multidisciplinary forum where researchers come together. In addition, it is linking a number of networks, working groups and programs and creates an umbrella network and a forum for sharing knowledge. The scientific focus of this network is also relevant for different end users, including risk and vulnerability assessment, sustainable land use, land management and conservation. In addition, key questions related to Global Change like, e.g., hazards, permafrost degradation and loss of biodiversity are discussed.

  18. Nonlinear dynamics of pattern formation and pattern recognition in the rabbit olfactory bulb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Bill

    1986-10-01

    A mathematical model of the process of pattern recognition in the first olfactory sensory cortex of the rabbit is presented. It explains the formation and alteration of spatial patterns in neural activity observed experimentally during classical Pavlovian conditioning. On each inspiration of the animal, a surge of receptor input enters the olfactory bulb. EEG activity recorded at the surface of the bulb undergoes a transition from a low amplitude background state of temporal disorder to coherent oscillation. There is a distinctive spatial pattern of rms amplitude in this oscillation which changes reliably to a second pattern during each successful recognition by the animal of a conditioned stimulus odor. When a new odor is paired as conditioned stimulus, these patterns are replaced by new patterns that stabilize as the animal adapts to the new environment. I will argue that a unification of the theories of pattern formation and associative memory is required to account for these observations. This is achieved in a model of the bulb as a discrete excitable medium with spatially inhomogeneous coupling expressed by a connection matrix. The theory of multiple Hopf bifurcations is employed to find coupled equations for the amplitudes of competing unstable oscillatory modes. These may be created in the system by proper coupling and selectively evoked by specific classes of inputs. This allows a view of limit cycle attractors as “stored” fixed points of a gradient vector field and thereby recovers the more familiar dynamical systems picture of associative memory.

  19. HCO3(-) formation from CO2 at high pH: ab initio molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Stirling, András

    2011-12-15

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the dissolution of CO2 in water at high pH. The CO2 + OH(-) --> HCO3(-) forward and the HCO3(-) --> CO2 + OH(-) reverse paths have been simulated by employing the metadynamics technics. We have found that the free energy barrier along the forward direction is predominantly hydration related and significantly entropic in origin, whereas the backward barrier is primarily enthalpic. The main motifs in the forward mechanism are the structural diffusion of the hydroxyl ion to the first hydration sphere of CO2, its desolvation, and the C-O bond formation in concert with the CO2 bending within the hydrate cavity. In the reverse reaction, the origin of the barrier is the rupture of the strong C-O(H) bond. The present findings support the notion that the free energy barrier of the bicarbonate formation is strongly solvation related but provide also additional mechanistic details at the molecular level.

  20. Laboratory studies of the dynamic of resonance cones formation in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, V. V.; Starodubtsev, M. V.; Kostrov, A. V.

    2013-03-15

    The paper is devoted to experimental studies of formation of resonance cones in magnetized plasmas by pulsed RF source in the lower-hybrid (whistler) and the upper-hybrid frequency ranges. It is shown that in both frequency ranges, resonance cones exhibit similar dynamics after switching-on the RF source: at first, wide maxima of radiation are formed in non-resonance directions, which then become narrower, with their direction approaching the resonance one. While the resonance cones are being formed, one observes a fine structure in the form of secondary radiation maxima. It is shown that the characteristic formation time of stationary resonance cones is determined by the minimal value of the group velocity of the quasi-electrostatic waves excited by the antenna. In the low-temperature plasma, this value is limited in the lower-hybrid frequency range by the spatial spectrum of the emitting antenna and in the upper-hybrid range, by the effects of spatial plasma dispersion.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Permeation of Bisphenol A and Pore Formation in a Lipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Chen, Junlang; Zhou, Guoquan; Wang, Yu; Xu, Can; Wang, Xiaogang

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is particularly considered as one of the most suspicious endocrine disruptors. Exposure to BPA may bring about possible human toxicities, such as cancerous tumors, birth defects and neoteny. One of the key issues to understand its toxicities is how BPA enters cells. In this paper, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions between BPA and a phospholipid membrane (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC bilayer). The simulation results show that BPA can easily enter the membrane from the aqueous phase. With the increasing concentrations of BPA in the membrane, BPA tends to aggregate and form into cluster. Meanwhile, several DPPC lipids are pulled out from each leaflet and adsorbed on the cluster surface, leading to pore formation. Detailed observations indicate that the lipid extraction results mainly from the dispersion interactions between BPA cluster and lipid tails, as well as weak electrostatic attractions between lipid headgroups and the two hydroxyl groups on BPA. The lipid extraction and pore formation may cause cell membrane damage and are of great importance to uncover BPA’s cytotoxicity. PMID:27629233

  2. Studying the Dynamics of Non-stationary Jet Streams Formation in the Northern Hemisphere Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emtsev, Sergey; Krasouski, Aliaksandr; Svetashev, Alexander; Turishev, Leonid; Barodka, Siarhei

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, we investigate dynamics of non-stationary jets formation in troposphere by means of mesoscale simulations in the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) modeling system, analyzing jet streams that affected the territory of Belarus over the time period of 2010-2012. For that purpose, we perform modeling on domains with 5 km, 3 km and 1 km grid steps and 35 vertical coordinate levels with an upper boundary of 10 hPa. We focus our attention to identification of basic regularities in formation, movements and transformations of jet streams, as well as to analysis of their characteristic features, geographical position and underlying atmospheric processes and their classification. On the basis of these regularities, we define basic meteorological parameters that can be used to directly or indirectly (as well as qualitatively and quantitatively) identify the presence of jet streams in the specific region of troposphere, and also to determine their localization, stage of development and other characteristics. Furthermore, we estimate energetic parameters of the identified jet streams and their impact on synoptic situation in the surrounding region. Analyzing meteorological fields obtained from satellite observations, we elaborate a methodology of operational detection and localization of non-stationary jet streams from satellite data. Validation of WRF modeling results with these data proves that mesoscale simulations with WRF are able to provide quite successful forecasts of non-stationary tropospheric jet streams occurrence and also determination of their localization and main characteristics up to 3 days in advance.

  3. Dynamic model based on voltage transfer curve for pattern formation in dielectric barrier glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ben; He, Feng; Ouyang, Jiting; Duan, Xiaoxi

    2015-12-15

    Simulation work is very important for understanding the formation of self-organized discharge patterns. Previous works have witnessed different models derived from other systems for simulation of discharge pattern, but most of these models are complicated and time-consuming. In this paper, we introduce a convenient phenomenological dynamic model based on the basic dynamic process of glow discharge and the voltage transfer curve (VTC) to study the dielectric barrier glow discharge (DBGD) pattern. VTC is an important characteristic of DBGD, which plots the change of wall voltage after a discharge as a function of the initial total gap voltage. In the modeling, the combined effect of the discharge conditions is included in VTC, and the activation-inhibition effect is expressed by a spatial interaction term. Besides, the model reduces the dimensionality of the system by just considering the integration effect of current flow. All these greatly facilitate the construction of this model. Numerical simulations turn out to be in good accordance with our previous fluid modeling and experimental result.

  4. Travelling lipid domains in a dynamic model for protein-induced pattern formation in biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Karin; Bär, Markus

    2005-06-01

    Cell membranes are composed of a mixture of lipids. Many biological processes require the formation of spatial domains in the lipid distribution of the plasma membrane. We have developed a mathematical model that describes the dynamic spatial distribution of acidic lipids in response to the presence of GMC proteins and regulating enzymes. The model encompasses diffusion of lipids and GMC proteins, electrostatic attraction between acidic lipids and GMC proteins as well as the kinetics of membrane attachment/detachment of GMC proteins. If the lipid-protein interaction is strong enough, phase separation occurs in the membrane as a result of free energy minimization and protein/lipid domains are formed. The picture is changed if a constant activity of enzymes is included into the model. We chose the myristoyl-electrostatic switch as a regulatory module. It consists of a protein kinase C that phosphorylates and removes the GMC proteins from the membrane and a phosphatase that dephosphorylates the proteins and enables them to rebind to the membrane. For sufficiently high enzymatic activity, the phase separation is replaced by travelling domains of acidic lipids and proteins. The latter active process is typical for nonequilibrium systems. It allows for a faster restructuring and polarization of the membrane since it acts on a larger length scale than the passive phase separation. The travelling domains can be pinned by spatial gradients in the activity; thus the membrane is able to detect spatial clues and can adapt its polarity dynamically to changes in the environment.

  5. Optimization of detectors positioning with respect to flying dynamics for future formation flight missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civitani, Marta; Djalal, Sophie; Chipaux, Remi

    2009-08-01

    In a X-ray telescope in formation flight configuration, the optics and the focal-plane detectors reside in two different spacecraft. The dynamics of the detector spacecraft (DSC) with respect to the mirror spacecraft (MSC, carrying the mirrors of the telescope) changes continuously the arrival positions of the photons on the detectors. In this paper we analyze this issue for the case of the SIMBOL-X hard X-ray mission, extensively studied by CNES and ASI until 2009 spring. Due to the existing gaps between pixels and between detector modules, the dynamics of the system may produce a relevant photometric effect. The aim of this work is to present the optimization study of the control-law algorithm with respect to the detector's geometry. As the photometric effect may vary depending upon position of the source image on the detector, the analysis-carried out using the simuLOS (INAF, CNES, CEA) simulation tool-is extended over the entire SIMBOL-X field of view.

  6. Infalling clouds on to supermassive black hole binaries - I. Formation of discs, accretion and gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicovic, F. G.; Cuadra, J.; Sesana, A.; Stasyszyn, F.; Amaro-Seoane, P.; Tanaka, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that most - if not all - galaxies harbour a supermassive black hole (SMBH) at their nucleus; hence binaries of these massive objects are an inevitable product of the hierarchical evolution of structures in the Universe, and represent an important but thus-far elusive phase of galaxy evolution. Gas accretion via a circumbinary disc is thought to be important for the dynamical evolution of SMBH binaries, as well as in producing luminous emission that can be used to infer their properties. One plausible source of the gaseous fuel is clumps of gas formed due to turbulence and gravitational instabilities in the interstellar medium, that later fall towards and interact with the binary. In this context, we model numerically the evolution of turbulent clouds in near-radial infall on to equal-mass SMBH binaries, using a modified version of the SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) code GADGET-3. We present a total of 12 simulations that explore different possible pericentre distances and relative inclinations, and show that the formation of circumbinary discs and discs around each SMBH (`mini-discs') depend on those parameters. We also study the dynamics of the formed discs, and the variability of the feeding rate on to the SMBHs in the different configurations.

  7. Plasma formation and dynamics in conical wire arrays in the Llampudken pulsed power generator

    SciTech Connect

    Muñoz, C. Gonzalo E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Valenzuela, Vicente E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Veloso, Felipe E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Favre, Mario E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Wyndham, Edmund E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl

    2014-12-15

    Plasma formation and dynamics from conical wire array is experimentally studied. Ablation from the wires is observed, forming plasma accumulation at the array axis and subsequently a jet outflow been expelled toward the top of the array. The arrays are composed by 16 equally spaced 25μ diameter tungsten wires. Their dimensions are 20mm height, with base diameters of 8mm and 16mm top diameter. The array loads are design to be overmassed, hence no complete ablation of the wires is observed during the current rise. The experiments have been carried out in the Llampudken. pulsed power generator (∼350kA in ∼350ns). Plasma dynamics is studied in both side-on and end-on directions. Laser probing (shadowgraphy) is achieved using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (532nm, 12ps FWHM) captured by CCD cameras. Pinhole XUV imaging is captured using gated microchannel plate cameras with time resolution ∼5ns. Results on the jet velocity and the degree of collimation indicating the plausibility on the use of these jets as comparable to the study astrophysically produced jets are presented and discussed.

  8. An Observational Study of the Recurring Formation and Dissipation of a Dynamic Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guiping; Wang, Jingxiu; Zhang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Based on observations at the Hα wavelength from the Hinode spacecraft, we report here the detailed process of a dynamical filament that showed repeated appearance and dissipation in a filament channel. First, Hα short fibrils spreading in the pre-formed filament channel joined into longer threads. The joining process was found to be accompanied by small-scale brightening activity, indicating the possible involvement of magnetic reconnection. The forming filament was thickened by merging the neighboring dark threads that were nearly parallel to the axis and also those adjacent to its main endpoints. The formed filament as a single coherent structure only existed for tens of minutes, immediately followed by the dissipation. The dissipation appeared to start with expansion of the filament body, ascending and stripping away of the filament threads, and mass drainage along the legs of the filament. The formation-dissipation process of the filament was repeated three times within the four-hour observational window of Hinode. These observations indicate that the filament structure is highly dynamic. This study provides the observational evidence to confirm the hypothesis of Martin et al. ( Ann. Geophys. 26, 3061, 2008) on the irreversible build-up of magnetic fields in the corona by discrete threads or groups of threads ascending bodily into the corona.

  9. Formation and dynamical evolution of the Neptune Trojans - the influence of the initial Solar system architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykawka, P. S.; Horner, J.; Jones, B. W.; Mukai, T.

    2010-05-01

    Current models of Solar system formation suggest that the four giant planets accreted as a significantly more compact system than we observe today. In this work, we investigate the dynamical stability of pre-formed Neptune Trojans under the gravitational influence of the four giant planets in compact planetary architectures, over 10 Myr. In our modelling, the initial orbital locations of Uranus and Neptune (aN) were varied to produce systems in which those planets moved on non-resonant orbits or in which they lay in their mutual 1:2, 2:3 and 3:4 mean-motion resonances (MMRs). In total, 420 simulations were carried out, examining 42 different architectures, with a total of 840000 particles across all runs. In the non-resonant cases, the Trojans suffered only moderate levels of dynamical erosion, with the most compact systems (those with aN <= 18 au) losing around 50 per cent of their Trojans by the end of the integrations. In the 2:3 and 3:4 MMR scenarios, however, dynamical erosion was much higher with depletion rates typically greater than 66 per cent and total depletion in the most compact systems. The 1:2 resonant scenarios featured disruption on levels intermediate between the non-resonant cases and other resonant scenarios, with depletion rates of the order of tens of per cent. Overall, the great majority of plausible pre-migration planetary architectures resulted in severe levels of depletion of the Neptunian Trojan clouds. In particular, if Uranus and Neptune formed near their mutual 2:3 or 3:4 MMR and at heliocentric distances within 18au (as favoured by recent studies), we found that the great majority of pre-formed Trojans would have been lost prior to Neptune's migration. This strengthens the case for the great bulk of the current Neptunian Trojan population having been captured during that migration.

  10. Territorial Dynamics and Stable Home Range Formation for Central Place Foragers

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Jonathan R.; Harris, Stephen; Giuggioli, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Uncovering the mechanisms behind territory formation is a fundamental problem in behavioural ecology. The broad nature of the underlying conspecific avoidance processes are well documented across a wide range of taxa. Scent marking in particular is common to a large range of terrestrial mammals and is known to be fundamental for communication. However, despite its importance, exact quantification of the time-scales over which scent cues and messages persist remains elusive. Recent work by the present authors has begun to shed light on this problem by modelling animals as random walkers with scent-mediated interaction processes. Territories emerge as dynamic objects that continually change shape and slowly move without settling to a fixed location. As a consequence, the utilisation distribution of such an animal results in a slowly increasing home range, as shown for urban foxes (Vulpes vulpes). For certain other species, however, home ranges reach a stable state. The present work shows that stable home ranges arise when, in addition to scent-mediated conspecific avoidance, each animal moves as a central place forager. That is, the animal's movement has a random aspect but is also biased towards a fixed location, such as a den or nest site. Dynamic territories emerge but the probability distribution of the territory border locations reaches a steady state, causing stable home ranges to emerge from the territorial dynamics. Approximate analytic expressions for the animal's probability density function are derived. A programme is given for using these expressions to quantify both the strength of the animal's movement bias towards the central place and the time-scale over which scent messages persist. Comparisons are made with previous theoretical work modelling central place foragers with conspecific avoidance. Some insights into the mechanisms behind allometric scaling laws of animal space use are also given. PMID:22479510

  11. Dynamics and drivers for dense shelf water formation, migration and cascading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaldo, Davide; Benetazzo, Alvise; Barbariol, Francesco; Bergamasco, Andrea; Boldrin, Alfredo; Marcello Falcieri, Francesco; Langone, Leonardo; Sclavo, Mauro; Trincardi, Fabio; Carniel, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Dense Shelf Waters formation and their descent towards the deep ocean are generally accepted as one of the main factors driving large-scale thermohaline and biogeochemical fluxes from the continental shelf. With reference to a particularly intense event occurred in winter 2012 in the northern Adriatic Sea (namely Gulf of Venice), an epicontinental basin of the Mediterranean Sea, a set of high-resolution (1 km horizontal discretization) numerical experiments carried out by means of the COAWST (Coupled Ocean, Atmosphere Waves and Sediment Transport) modelling system allowed to explore the dynamics underlying such phenomena. The role of external factors (freshwater input, tides, and continental margin topography) was investigated as well as the mutual interactions involving atmosphere, waves and ocean circulation. The so-called North Adriatic Dense Water (NAdDW) forms in the Gulf of Venice as a consequence of the cooling and salinization of the sub-basin induced by cold air jets blowing from northeast across the Eastern Alps and Balkans. Partially recirculating in a double-gyre structure, newly formed water masses progressively leave the formation region flowing southeastwards leant on the Italian shelf. Along its path, significant fractions of NAdDW are intercepted by mid-Adriatic pits and by the continental shelf break off the Apulian coast. Whilst riverine freshwater input is crucial in preconditioning the NAdDW formation basin and controlling the intrusion of saltier waters from the south, atmosphere-wave-ocean dynamics drive the generation proper by governing air-sea heat and momentum exchanges and ocean circulation, with substantial effects on the modes of buoyancy extraction and on the extent of the water masses involved in this process. The trajectory of the dense stream leaving the northernmost basin tends to a geostrophic equilibrium determined by water mass momentum and density, which in turn reflect the interplay of the factors acting on the generation

  12. Investigation of regularities of formation and propagation of elastic vortices in surface layers of materials under dynamic contact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafurov, S. V.; Shilko, E. V.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2016-11-01

    On the base of computer-aided simulation by movable cellular automaton method regularities of formation of vortices in surface layers of materials under dynamic contact loading were investigated. It was shown that the dynamic contact loading leads to the formation of an elastic vortex in the area of contact interaction and its subsequent propagation in the volume of material. Direction of vortex movement essentially depends on the velocity of contact loading and value of the contact pressure, which are determined features of the interaction of the material surface and the counterbody (e.g. stress state of contact area).

  13. IUTAM Symposium on Vortex Dynamics: Formation, Structure and Function, 10-14 March 2013, Fukuoka, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2014-06-01

    This special issue of Fluid Dynamics Research contains the first of a two-part publication of the papers presented at the IUTAM Symposium on Vortex Dynamics: Formation, Structure and Function, held at the Centennial Hall, Kyushu University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan, during the week of 10-14 March 2013. Vortices are ubiquitous structures in fluid mechanics spanning the range of scales from nanofluidics and microfluidics to geophysical and astrophysical flows. Vortices are the key to understanding many different phenomena. As a result, the subject of vortex dynamics continues to evolve and to constantly find new applications in biology, biotechnology, industrial and environmental problems. Vortices can be created by the separation of a flow from the surface of a body or at a density interface, and evolve into coherent structures. Once formed, a vortex acquires a function, depending on its individual structure. In this way, for example, insects gain lift and fish gain thrust. Surprisingly, despite the long history of vortex dynamics, only recently has knowledge about formation, structure and function of vortices been combined to yield new perspectives in the subject, thereby helping to solve outstanding problems brought about by modern advances in computer technology and improved experimental techniques. This symposium is a continuation, five years on, of the IUTAM Symposium '50 Years of Vortex Dynamics', Lyngby, Denmark that took place between 12-16 October 2008, organized by the late Professor Hassan Aref. Originally, Professor Aref was a member of the International Scientific Committee of this symposium and offered his enthusiasm and great expertise, to support its organization. To our shock, he suddenly passed away on 9 September 2011. Furthermore, Professor Slava Meleshko, a leading scientist of fluid and solid mechanics and an intimate friend of Professor Aref, was expected to make an eminent contribution to the symposium. Soon after this sad loss

  14. Dynamics of polyploid formation and establishment in the allotetraploid rock fern Asplenium majoricum

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Harriet V.; Ansell, Stephen W.; Russell, Stephen J.; Schneider, Harald; Vogel, Johannes C.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Successful establishment of newly formed polyploid species depends on several interlinked genetic and ecological factors. These include genetic diversity within and among individuals, chromosome behaviour and fertility, novel phenotypes resulting from novel genomic make-up and expression, intercytotypic and interspecific competition, and adaptation to distinct habitats. The allotetraploid rock fern Asplenium majoricum is known from one small population in Valencia, Spain, and several larger populations on the Balearic island of Majorca. In Valencia, it occurs sympatrically with its diploid parents, A. fontanum subsp. fontanum and A. petrarchae subsp. bivalens, and their diploid hybrid A. × protomajoricum. This highly unusual situation allowed the study of polyploid genetic diversity and its relationship to the formation and establishment of nascent polyploid lineages. Methods Genetic variation for isozyme and chloroplast DNA markers was determined for A. majoricum and A. × protomajoricum sampled thoroughly from known sites in Majorca and Valencia. Results were compared with variation determined previously for the diploid parent taxa. Key Results A highly dynamic system with recurring diploid hybrid and allotetraploid formation was discovered. High diversity in the small Valencian A. majoricum population indicates multiple de novo origins from diverse parental genotypes, but most of these lineages become extinct without becoming established. The populations on Majorca most probably represent colonization(s) from Valencia rather than an in situ origin. Low genetic diversity suggests that this colonization may have occurred only once. Conclusions There is a striking contrast in success of establishment of the Majorcan and Valencian populations of A. majoricum. Chance founding of populations in a habitat where neither A. fontanum subsp. fontanum nor A. petrarchae subsp. bivalens occurs appears to have been a key factor enabling the establishment

  15. On the dynamic nature of the prolate solar chromosphere: jet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, B.; Koutchmy, S.; Vilinga, J.

    2007-03-01

    Context: In "cool" spectral lines, the smoothed upper edge of the solar chromosphere is prolate in the South-North direction at the epoch of minimum solar activity and nearly spherically symmetric at the maximum phase. We attribute the effect to the dynamical nature of the upper chromosphere, which consists of a large number of small jet-like structures ascending into the corona. We could not resolve the source region of an individual jetlet, although similar but larger structures are visible, especially in EUV coronal lines. Aims: We consider the problem of the formation of an individual jet above the limb, assuming that a large number of jet-like events is responsible for the prolate solar upper chromosphere. We then assume that spicules, being the cool part of the phenomenon, behave similarly, and we will mainly concentrate the analysis on the magnetic origin of the event. Methods: Image processing is used to reveal the displacement of magnetic field tubes filled with coronal plasma and jet formation due to field aligned motion above the null point created in the corona by the emerging magnetic bipole. Results: The growth of the bipole leads to a reconnection of the field lines and to a specific plasma motion in the vicinity of the null point that results in a plasma flow along the spine line of the 3D null. We assume that similar but smaller processes could happen very often at a smaller scale in the chromosphere, near emerging magnetic ephemeral regions, forming numerous jetlets in the upper chromosphere. As the field aligned motion is guided by the magnetic field, at the epoch of low activity the large-scale structure of the polar magnetic field and the one of the quiet equatorial region is sufficiently different to explain the prolateness of the chromosphere.

  16. Role of the temperature dynamics in formation of nanopatterns upon single femtosecond laser pulses on gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Evgeny L.; Levy, Yoann; Gurevich, Svetlana V.; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the role of two-temperature heating dynamics for formation of periodic structures on metal surfaces exposed to single ultrashort laser pulses.The results of two-temperature model (TTM) two-dimensional simulations are presented on the irradiation of gold by a single 800-nm femtosecond laser pulse the intensity of which is modulated in order to reproduce an initial electron temperature perturbation, which can arise from incoming and scattered surface wave interference. The growing (unstable) modes of the lattice temperature distribution along the surface may be significant in the laser induced periodic surface structures formation. After the end of the laser pulse and before the complete coupling between lattice and electrons occurs, the evolution of the amplitude of the subsequent modulation in the lattice temperature reveals different tendencies depending on the spatial period of the initial modulation. This instabilitylike behavior is shown to arise due to the perturbation of the electronic temperature which relaxes slower for bigger spatial periods and thus imparts more significant modulations to the lattice temperature. Small spatial periods of the order of 100 nm and smaller experience stabilization and fast decay from the more efficient lateral heat diffusion which facilitates the relaxation of the electronic temperature amplitude due to in-depth diffusion. An analytical instability analysis of a simplified version of the TTM set of equations supports the lattice temperature modulation behavior obtained in the simulations and reveals that in-depth diffusion length is a determining parameter in the dispersion relation of unstable modes. Finally, it is discussed how the change in optical properties can intensify the modulation-related effects.

  17. Molecular dynamics of wetting layer formation and forced water invasion in angular nanopores with mixed wettability.

    PubMed

    Sedghi, Mohammad; Piri, Mohammad; Goual, Lamia

    2014-11-21

    The depletion of conventional hydrocarbon reservoirs has prompted the oil and gas industry to search for unconventional resources such as shale gas/oil reservoirs. In shale rocks, considerable amounts of hydrocarbon reside in nanoscale pore spaces. As a result, understanding the multiphase flow of wetting and non-wetting phases in nanopores is important to improve oil and gas recovery from these formations. This study was designed to investigate the threshold capillary pressure of oil and water displacements in a capillary dominated regime inside nanoscale pores using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The pores have the same cross-sectional area and volume but different cross-sectional shapes. Oil and water particles were represented with a coarse grained model and the NEMD simulations were conducted by assigning external pressure on an impermeable piston. Threshold capillary pressures were determined for the drainage process (water replaced by oil) in different pores. The molecular dynamics results are in close agreements with calculations using the Mayer-Stowe-Princen (MS-P) method which has been developed on the premise of energy balance in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the drainage simulations, a change in wall particles' wettability from water-wet to oil-wet was implemented based on the final configuration of oil and water inside the pore. Waterflooding simulations were then carried out at the threshold capillary pressure. The results show that the oil layer formed between water in the corner and in the center of the pore is not stable and collapses as the simulation continues. This is in line with the predictions from the MS-P method.

  18. Initial conditions of formation of starburst clusters: constraints from stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-08-01

    Recent high resolution observations of dense regions of molecular clouds and massive gaseous clumps with instruments like Herschel and ALMA have revealed intricate and filamentary overdensity structures in them. Such progenitors of massive starburst clusters are in contrast with smooth, centrally-pronounced profiles of the latter. In this work, we intend to constrain massive, substructured stellar distributions that would evolve to cluster-like profiles at very young ages (~Myr), as seen in starburst clusters. Taking the well observed NGC3603 Young Cluster (NYC) as an example, we compute the infall and final merger of filament-like compact (0.1-0.3 pc) subclusters, totalling 10000 M_sun, from a range of spatial scales and modes of sub-clustering, using direct N-body calculations. These calculations infer an allowable span of approx. 2.5 pc from which the subclusters can fall in a gas potential and merge to form a single centrally-dense structure in near dynamical equilibrium, within the young age of NYC (1-2 Myr). However, these merged clusters are too compact and centrally overdense compared to typical young clusters. Our N-body calculations, beginning from such compact initial conditions, show that even stellar wind and supernova mass loss, dynamical heating from retaining black holes, external tidal field and heating due to tight O-star binaries together cannot expand these clusters to their observed sizes, even in 100 Myr. Hence an explosive gas dispersal phase seems essential for forming starburst and other young clusters observed in the Milky Way and in the Local Group which can expand the clusters to their observed sizes and concentrations; including that for NYC with approx. 30% clump star formation efficiency. However, some observed massive but highly extended (>10 pc) , >10 Myr old clusters better fit a slow (several Myr timescale) gas dispersal from parsec-scale initial profiles, which can be the future of embedded systems like W3 Main.

  19. Decreased Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on nanomodified endotracheal tubes: a dynamic lung model

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Mary C; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a serious complication of mechanical ventilation that has been shown to be associated with increased mortality rates and medical costs in the pediatric intensive care unit. Currently, there is no cost-effective solution to the problems posed by VAP. Endotracheal tubes (ETTs) that are resistant to bacterial colonization and that inhibit biofilm formation could provide a novel solution to the problems posed by VAP. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate differences in the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on unmodified polyvinyl chloride (PVC) ETTs and on ETTs etched with a fungal lipase, Rhizopus arrhizus, to create nanoscale surface features. These differences were evaluated using an in vitro model of the pediatric airway to simulate a ventilated patient in the pediatric intensive care unit. Each experiment was run for 24 hours and was supported by computational models of the ETT. Dynamic conditions within the ETT had an impact on the location of bacterial growth within the tube. These conditions also quantitatively affected bacterial growth especially within the areas of tube curvature. Most importantly, experiments in the in vitro model revealed a 2.7 log reduction in the number (colony forming units/mL) of P. aeruginosa on the nanoroughened ETTs compared to the untreated PVC ETTs after 24 hours. This reduction in total colony forming units/mL along the x-axis of the tube was similar to previous studies completed for Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, this dynamic study showed that lipase etching can create surface features of nanoscale roughness on PVC ETTs that decrease bacterial attachment of P. aeruginosa without the use of antibiotics and may provide clinicians with an effective and inexpensive tool to combat VAP. PMID:27563242

  20. Dynamics of protein aggregation and oligomer formation governed by secondary nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Lazell, Hamish W.; Arosio, Paolo; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2015-08-01

    The formation of aggregates in many protein systems can be significantly accelerated by secondary nucleation, a process where existing assemblies catalyse the nucleation of new species. In particular, secondary nucleation has emerged as a central process controlling the proliferation of many filamentous protein structures, including molecular species related to diseases such as sickle cell anemia and a range of neurodegenerative conditions. Increasing evidence suggests that the physical size of protein filaments plays a key role in determining their potential for deleterious interactions with living cells, with smaller aggregates of misfolded proteins, oligomers, being particularly toxic. It is thus crucial to progress towards an understanding of the factors that control the sizes of protein aggregates. However, the influence of secondary nucleation on the time evolution of aggregate size distributions has been challenging to quantify. This difficulty originates in large part from the fact that secondary nucleation couples the dynamics of species distant in size space. Here, we approach this problem by presenting an analytical treatment of the master equation describing the growth kinetics of linear protein structures proliferating through secondary nucleation and provide closed-form expressions for the temporal evolution of the resulting aggregate size distribution. We show how the availability of analytical solutions for the full filament distribution allows us to identify the key physical parameters that control the sizes of growing protein filaments. Furthermore, we use these results to probe the dynamics of the populations of small oligomeric species as they are formed through secondary nucleation and discuss the implications of our work for understanding the factors that promote or curtail the production of these species with a potentially high deleterious biological activity.

  1. Molecular dynamics of wetting layer formation and forced water invasion in angular nanopores with mixed wettability

    SciTech Connect

    Sedghi, Mohammad Piri, Mohammad; Goual, Lamia

    2014-11-21

    The depletion of conventional hydrocarbon reservoirs has prompted the oil and gas industry to search for unconventional resources such as shale gas/oil reservoirs. In shale rocks, considerable amounts of hydrocarbon reside in nanoscale pore spaces. As a result, understanding the multiphase flow of wetting and non-wetting phases in nanopores is important to improve oil and gas recovery from these formations. This study was designed to investigate the threshold capillary pressure of oil and water displacements in a capillary dominated regime inside nanoscale pores using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The pores have the same cross-sectional area and volume but different cross-sectional shapes. Oil and water particles were represented with a coarse grained model and the NEMD simulations were conducted by assigning external pressure on an impermeable piston. Threshold capillary pressures were determined for the drainage process (water replaced by oil) in different pores. The molecular dynamics results are in close agreements with calculations using the Mayer-Stowe-Princen (MS-P) method which has been developed on the premise of energy balance in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the drainage simulations, a change in wall particles’ wettability from water-wet to oil-wet was implemented based on the final configuration of oil and water inside the pore. Waterflooding simulations were then carried out at the threshold capillary pressure. The results show that the oil layer formed between water in the corner and in the center of the pore is not stable and collapses as the simulation continues. This is in line with the predictions from the MS-P method.

  2. Dynamics of protein aggregation and oligomer formation governed by secondary nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Michaels, Thomas C. T. Lazell, Hamish W.; Arosio, Paolo; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2015-08-07

    The formation of aggregates in many protein systems can be significantly accelerated by secondary nucleation, a process where existing assemblies catalyse the nucleation of new species. In particular, secondary nucleation has emerged as a central process controlling the proliferation of many filamentous protein structures, including molecular species related to diseases such as sickle cell anemia and a range of neurodegenerative conditions. Increasing evidence suggests that the physical size of protein filaments plays a key role in determining their potential for deleterious interactions with living cells, with smaller aggregates of misfolded proteins, oligomers, being particularly toxic. It is thus crucial to progress towards an understanding of the factors that control the sizes of protein aggregates. However, the influence of secondary nucleation on the time evolution of aggregate size distributions has been challenging to quantify. This difficulty originates in large part from the fact that secondary nucleation couples the dynamics of species distant in size space. Here, we approach this problem by presenting an analytical treatment of the master equation describing the growth kinetics of linear protein structures proliferating through secondary nucleation and provide closed-form expressions for the temporal evolution of the resulting aggregate size distribution. We show how the availability of analytical solutions for the full filament distribution allows us to identify the key physical parameters that control the sizes of growing protein filaments. Furthermore, we use these results to probe the dynamics of the populations of small oligomeric species as they are formed through secondary nucleation and discuss the implications of our work for understanding the factors that promote or curtail the production of these species with a potentially high deleterious biological activity.

  3. Vortex formation in coalescence of droplets with a reservoir using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Taherian, Fereshte; Marcon, Valentina; Bonaccurso, Elmar; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2016-10-01

    The flow patterns generated by the coalescence of aqueous ethanol droplets with a water reservoir are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The influence of surface tension gradient, which leads to the spreading of the droplet along the liquid-vapor interface of the reservoir, is studied by changing the ethanol concentration of the droplet. The internal circulation (vortex strength) of the droplet and the reservoir are analyzed separately. Simulation results reveal the formation of swirling flows within the droplet at early times when the radius of the coalescence neck due to the capillary forces increases rapidly with time. The vortex strength is found to be higher at lower concentrations of ethanol (higher liquid-vapor surface tension of the droplet), where the driving force for the contact line movement (capillary force) is stronger. The circulation diminishes by moving the center of mass of the droplet toward the reservoir. The lower surface tension of the droplet compared to the reservoir leads to surface tension gradient driven flow, which transports the droplet molecules along the liquid-vapor interface of the reservoir. Such a flow motion results in the generation of convective flows in the underlying water, which forms swirling flows within the reservoir. Therefore, the vortex strength of the reservoir is higher at higher ethanol concentrations of the droplet. The reservoir circulation decays to zero as soon as the ethanol concentration becomes homogeneous along the interface of the pool. The time evolution of circulation within the droplet and the reservoir are correlated with the center of mass motion of the droplet toward the surface, the time variation of the precursor film radius and the dynamic surface tension of the reservoir.

  4. THE DYNAMICAL STATE OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES AND THE FORMATION OF CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Coziol, R.; Andernach, H.; Caretta, C. A.; Alamo-MartInez, K. A.; Tago, E. E-mail: heinz@astro.ugto.mx E-mail: k.alamo@astrosmo.unam.mx

    2009-06-15

    A large sample of Abell clusters of galaxies, selected for the likely presence of a dominant galaxy, is used to study the dynamical properties of the brightest cluster members (BCMs). From visual inspection of Digitized Sky Survey images combined with redshift information we identify 1426 candidate BCMs located in 1221 different redshift components associated with 1169 different Abell clusters. This is the largest sample published so far of such galaxies. From our own morphological classification we find that {approx}92% of the BCMs in our sample are early-type galaxies and 48% are of cD type. We confirm what was previously observed based on much smaller samples, namely, that a large fraction of BCMs have significant peculiar velocities. From a subsample of 452 clusters having at least 10 measured radial velocities, we estimate a median BCM peculiar velocity of 32% of their host clusters' radial velocity dispersion. This suggests that most BCMs are not at rest in the potential well of their clusters. This phenomenon is common to galaxy clusters in our sample, and not a special trait of clusters hosting cD galaxies. We show that the peculiar velocity of the BCM is independent of cluster richness and only slightly dependent on the Bautz-Morgan type. We also find a weak trend for the peculiar velocity to rise with the cluster velocity dispersion. The strongest dependence is with the morphological type of the BCM: cD galaxies tend to have lower relative peculiar velocities than elliptical galaxies. This result points to a connection between the formation of the BCMs and that of their clusters. Our data are qualitatively consistent with the merging-groups scenario, where BCMs in clusters formed first in smaller subsystems comparable to compact groups of galaxies. In this scenario, clusters would have formed recently from the mergers of many such groups and would still be in a dynamically unrelaxed state.

  5. Site-specific dynamics of amyloid formation and fibrillar configuration of Aβ(1-23) using an unnatural amino acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyang; Lantz, Richard; Cosme, Patrick; Rivera, Nelson; Andino, Carlos; Gonzalez, Walter G; Terentis, Andrew C; Wojcikiewicz, Ewa P; Oyola, Rolando; Miksovska, Jaroslava; Du, Deguo

    2015-04-25

    We identify distinct site-specific dynamics over the time course of Aβ1-23 amyloid formation by using an unnatural amino acid, p-cyanophenylalanine, as a sensitive fluorescent and Raman probe. Our results also suggest the key role of an edge-to-face aromatic interaction in the conformational conversion to form and stabilize β-sheet structure.

  6. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Yee, L. D.; Schilling, K.; Loza, C. L.; Craven, J. S.; Zuend, A.; Ziemann, P. J.; Seinfeld, J.

    2013-12-01

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multi-generation gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a mid-experiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. The results of the current work have a number of implications for SOA models. While the dynamics of an aerosol size distribution reflects the mechanism of growth, we demonstrate here that it provides a key constraint in interpreting laboratory and ambient SOA formation. This work, although carried out specifically for the long chain alkane, dodecane, is expected to be widely applicable to other major classes of SOA precursors. SOA consists of a myriad of organic compounds containing various functional groups, which can generally undergo heterogeneous/multiphase reactions forming low-volatility products such as oligomers and other high molecular mass compounds. If particle-phase chemistry is indeed

  7. Understanding the dynamics of the inductive plasma formation and its application to create doublet shaped plasma in the TCV tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Joyeeta; Coda, Stefano; Duval, Basil Paul; Galperti, Cristian; Moret, Jean-Marc; Reimerdes, Holger

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of the plasma formation in TCV are revisited with the goal of improving reliability and developing new scenarios such as the creation of doublet configurations. A database for the plasma formation scenarios in TCV reveals that 15% of the attempts to form a plasma fail during the burn-through phase. Plasma formation dynamics are greatly affected by the difference between programmed and obtained plasma current ramp rates that can lead to oscillations in IP when the IP feedback control is activated. This mismatch in IP also propagates into the radial position control. Failed burn-throughs occur when the Ohmic heating power is insufficient either since IP rises too slow or due to a combined effect of the IP feedback oscillations and a regularly occurring MHD instability. Several strategies to improve the present plasma formation scenario have been implemented. Based on the improved understanding of the plasma formation dynamics, a strategy has been developed to create and control a doublet configuration by merging of two droplet-shaped plasma requiring simultaneous breakdown at two locations.

  8. Lane Formation Dynamics of Oppositely Self-Driven Binary Particles: Effects of Density and Finite System Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Kosuke; Kim, Kang

    2017-04-01

    We examined the lane formation dynamics of oppositely self-driven binary particles by molecular dynamics simulations of a two-dimensional system. Our study comprehensively revealed the effects of the density and system size on the lane formation. The phase diagram distinguishing the no-lane and lane states was systematically determined for various combinations of the anisotropic friction coefficient and the desired velocity. A peculiar clustered structure was observed when the lane was destroyed by considerably increasing the desired velocity. A strong system size effect was demonstrated by the relationship between the temporal and spatial scales of the lane structure. This system size effect can be attributed to an analogy with the driven lattice gas. The transport efficiency was characterized from the scaling relation in terms of the degree of lane formation and the interface thickness between different lanes.

  9. Dynamic changes in prefrontal cortex involvement during verbal episodic memory formation.

    PubMed

    Galli, Giulia; Feurra, Matteo; Pavone, Enea Francesco; Sirota, Miroslav; Rossi, Simone

    2017-02-24

    During encoding, the neural activity immediately before or during an event can predict whether that event will be later remembered. The contribution of brain activity immediately after an event to memory formation is however less known. Here, we used repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) to investigate the temporal dynamics of episodic memory encoding with a focus on post-stimulus time intervals. At encoding, rTMS was applied during the online processing of the word, at its offset, or 100, 200, 300 or 400ms thereafter. rTMS was delivered to the left ventrolateral (VLPFC) or dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). VLPFC rTMS during the first few hundreds of milliseconds after word offset disrupted subsequent recognition accuracy. We did not observe effects of DLPFC rTMS at any time point. These results suggest that encoding-related VLPFC engagement starts at a relatively late processing stage, and may reflect brain processes related to the offset of the stimulus.

  10. Formation of single-walled bimetallic coinage alloy nanotubes in confined carbon nanotubes: molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Han, Yang; Zhou, Jian; Dong, Jinming; Yoshiyuki, Kawazoe

    2013-10-28

    The growth of single-walled bimetallic Au-Ag, Au-Cu and Ag-Cu alloy nanotubes (NTs) and nanowires (NWs) in confined carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been investigated by using the classical molecular dynamics (MD) method. It is found that three kinds of single-walled gold-silver, gold-copper and silver-copper alloy NTs could indeed be formed in confined CNTs at any alloy concentration, whose geometric structures are less sensitive to the alloy concentration. And an extra nearly pure Au (Cu) chain will exist at the center of Au-Ag (Au-Cu and Ag-Cu) NTs when the diameters of the outside CNTs are big enough, thus producing a new type of tube-like alloy NWs. The bonding energy differences between the mono- and hetero-elements of the coinage metal atoms and the quasi-one-dimensional confinement from the CNT play important roles in suppressing effectively the "self-purification" effects, leading to formation of these coinage alloy NTs. In addition, the fluid-solid phase transition temperatures of the bimetallic alloy NTs are found to locate between those of the corresponding pure metal tubes. Finally, the dependences of the radial breathing mode (RBM) frequencies and the tube diameters of the alloy NTs on the alloying concentration were obtained, which will be very helpful for identifying both the alloying concentration and the alloy tube diameters in future experiments.

  11. Insights into pulverized rock formation from dynamic rupture models of earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, R. M.; Duan, B.

    2017-02-01

    Pulverized rocks (PR) are extremely incohesive and highly fractured rocks found within the damage zones of several large strike-slip faults around the world. They maintain their crystal structure, show little evidence of shearing or chemical alteration, and are believed to be produced by strong tensile forces. Several mechanisms for pulverization have been proposed based on simple qualitative analyses or laboratory experiments under simplified loading conditions. Numerical modelling, however, can offer new insights into what is needed to produce PR and likely conditions of formation. We perform dynamic rupture simulations of different earthquakes, varying the magnitude, the slip distribution, and the rupture speed (supershear and subshear), while measuring the stresses produced away from the fault. To contextualize our results, a basic threshold of 10 MPa is set as the tensile strength of the rock mass and recordings are made of where, when, and by how much this threshold is exceeded for each earthquake type. Guided by field observations, we discern that a large (>Mw 7.1) subshear earthquake along a bimaterial fault produces a pulverized rock distribution most consistent with observations. The damage is asymmetric with the majority on the stiffer side of the fault extending out for several hundred metres. Within this zone there is a large and sudden volumetric expansion in all directions as the rupture passes. We propose that such an extreme tensile stress state, repeated for every earthquake, eventually produces the PR seen in the field.

  12. In vivo dynamics of chromatin-associated complex formation in mammalian nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Moné, Martijn J.; Bernas, Tytus; Dinant, Christoffel; Goedvree, Feliks A.; Manders, Erik M. M.; Volker, Marcel; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Vermeulen, Wim; van Driel, Roel

    2004-01-01

    Chromatin is the substrate for many processes in the cell nucleus, including transcription, replication, and various DNA repair systems, all of which require the formation of multiprotein machineries on the chromatin fiber. We have analyzed the kinetics of in vivo assembly of the protein complex that is responsible for nucleotide excision repair (NER) in mammalian cells. Assembly is initiated by UV irradiation of a small area of the cell nucleus, after which the accumulation of GFP-tagged NER proteins in the DNA-damaged area is measured, reflecting the establishment of the dual-incision complex. The dynamic behavior of two NER proteins, ERCC1-XPF and TFIIH, was studied in detail. Results show that the repair complex is assembled with a rate of ≈30 complexes per second and is not diffusion limited. Furthermore, we provide in vivo evidence that not only binding of TFIIH, but also its helicase activity, is required for the recruitment of ERCC1-XPF. These studies give quantitative insight into the de novo assembly of a chromatin-associated protein complex in living cells. PMID:15520397

  13. Dynamical pattern formation in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid under two orthogonal sinusoidal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yépez, L. D.; Carrillo, J. L.; Donado, F.; Sausedo-Solorio, J. M.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamical pattern formation of clusters of magnetic particles in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid, under the influence of a superposition of two perpendicular sinusoidal fields, is studied experimentally. By varying the frequency and phase shift of the perpendicular fields, this configuration enables us to experimentally analyze a wide range of field configurations, including the case of a pure rotating field and the case of an oscillating unidirectional field. The fields are applied parallel to the horizontal plane where the fluid lies or in the vertical plane. For fields applied in the horizontal plane, we observed that, when the ratio of the frequencies increases, the average cluster size exhibits a kind of periodic resonances. When the phase shift between the fields is varied, the average chain length reaches maximal values for the cases of the rotating field and the unidirectional case. We analyze and discuss these results in terms of a weighted average of the time-dependent Mason number. In the case of a rotating field on the vertical plane, we also observe that the competition between the magnetic and the viscous forces determines the average cluster size. We show that this configuration generates a series of physically meaningful self-organization of clusters and transport phenomena.

  14. Dynamic formation of zeolite synthesized from fly ash by alkaline hydrothermal conversion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, ZhiJian; Li, Jiangli; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Hang; Zhu, Jun; He, Qiang

    2013-11-01

    This study was designed to characterize the dynamic formation of zeolite synthesized from fly ash (ZFA) and to identify the zeolitization mechanisms during a 160-h-long hydrothermal alkaline conversion at 95°C by using fly ash (FA) samples collected from four typical thermoelectric power plants in China, with the purpose of improving ZFA quality. The process of synthesizing ZFA can be fundamentally divided into five stages: induction stage (0-0.5 h), accelerating dissolution stage (0.5-12 h), nucleation and/or crystallization stage (12-24 h), crystal growth stage (24-72 h) and crystal transformation stage (72-160 h). The crystal growth stage determined the quality of zeolite crystallization, coupled with functions of re-assembling the silicon-aluminium tetrahedral network and developing submicro- and/or nanometer microstructure. A 48-h-long hydrothermal conversion generated ZFAs that had a greater specific surface area (26.0-89.4 times) and cation exchange capacity (29.6-71.0 times) than FA, which successfully sequestrated 41-95% of ammonium and 75-98% of phosphate from swine manure. However, over-reaction resulted in more stable hydroxysodalite and/or sodalite, surface agglomeration and cracking, and energy wasting. This work suggests that the reuse of recycled synthesis materials should occur during the fourth step (24-72 h).

  15. Formation and dynamics of large-scale magnetic structures in the ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloutier, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    The formation and dynamics of large-scale magnetic structures in the ionosphere of Venus are examined. It is shown that such structures must be the result of steady state convection of interplanetary field lines into the ionosphere by the small amount of solar wind plasma (less than or approximately equal to 1-5 percent) absorbed by the planetary atmosphere below the ionopause, rather than isolated remnants of large fields persisting for long periods without connection to the solar wind induced current and convection pattern. In particular, it is demonstrated that the magnetic diffusion of such structures would result in their dissipation with time scales of 1-10 min, if they were not steady state structures in convective and diffusive equilibriuim. It is shown that the equations governing the diffusion of these magnetic structures are similar to those governing diffusion of a gas out of an enclosed chamber with a porous wall, and a simple analog is illustrated. The application of these results to magnetic fields of astrophysical plasmas is discussed.

  16. Insights into Pulverized Rock Formation from Dynamic Rupture Models of Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, R. M.; Duan, B.

    2016-11-01

    Pulverized rocks (PR) are extremely incohesive and highly fractured rocks found within the damage zones of several large strike-slip faults around the world. They maintain their crystal structure, show little evidence of shearing or chemical alteration, and are believed to be produced by strong tensile forces. Several mechanisms for pulverization have been proposed based on simple qualitative analyses or laboratory experiments under simplified loading conditions. Numerical modeling, however, can offer new insights into what is needed to produce PR and likely conditions of formation. We perform dynamic rupture simulations of different earthquakes, varying the magnitude, the slip distribution, and the rupture speed (supershear and subshear), while measuring the stresses produced away from the fault. To contextualize our results, a basic threshold of 10 MPa is set as the tensile strength of the rock mass and recordings are made of where, when, and by how much this threshold is exceeded for each earthquake type. Guided by field observations, we discern that a large (> Mw 7.1) subshear earthquake along a bimaterial fault produces a pulverized rock distribution most consistent with observations. The damage is asymmetric with the majority on the stiffer side of the fault extending out for several hundred meters. Within this zone there is a large and sudden volumetric expansion in all directions as the rupture passes. We propose that such an extreme tensile stress state, repeated for every earthquake, eventually produces the PR seen in the field.

  17. Modelling formation and evolution dynamics of the loop prominences and substance motion in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, Alexander; Glushkov, Alexander; Khetselius, Olga

    We present a new model approach to modelling formation and evolution dynamics of the loop prominences and response of the solar atmosphere in a loop to bombardment of electrons and other particles. As it is well known the existed models of creation of the active prominences can be devided on two groups. In first group models explain appearance of relatively cold and substance in the corona due to the condensation of the coronal gas (Olsson-Likaudis, Lust- Zirin et al). In second group one can indicate mechanisms, when the prominence substance is transit up from low layers of the solar atmosphere (Jeferris-Orral, Goldsmith et al).We investigate the kinematics of the matter motion in a variable magnetic field in the magnetic hydrodynamical approximation of a strong field and cold plasma. The variation of magnetic moments of two dipoles system leads to development of such phenomena as loop prominences and coronal rain. Our model generelizes the Ivanov-Platov Troitzk model (c.f.[1]). References: 1. Ivanov J.N., Platov N., Preprint of Institute for Spectroscopy of RAS, N AS-2, Troitsk (1994); Ivanov L.N., Glushkov A.V., Preprint of Institute for Spectroscopy of RAS, N AS-9, Troitsk (1994); A.V.Glushkov,S.V.Malinovskaya, etal, Bound Vol. Paris-Meudon Observ.,1995; In: New projects and new lines of research in nuclear physics. Eds. G.Fazio and F.Hanappe, Singapore : World Scientific.-2003.

  18. Modelling formation and evolution dynamics of the loop prominences and substance motion in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, A.

    We present a new model approach to modelling formation and evolution dynamics of the loop prominences and response of the solar atmosphere in a loop to bombardment of electrons and other particles As it is well known the existed models of creation of the active prominences can be devided on two groups In first group models explain appearance of relatively cold and substance in the corona due to the condensation of the coronal gas Olsson-Likaudis Lust-Zirin et al In second group one can indicate mechanisms when the prominence substance is transit up from low layers of the solar atmosphere Jeferris-Orral Goldsmith et al We investigate the kinematics of the matter motion in a variable magnetic field in the magnetic hydrodynamical approximation of a strong field and cold plasma The variation of magnetic moments of two dipoles system leads to development of such phenomena as loop prominences and coronal rain Our model generelizes the Ivanov-Platov Troitzk model c f 1 References begin enumerate item Preprint of Institute for Specteroscopy of RAS N AS-2 Troitsk 1994 A V Glushkov S V Malinovskaya etal Bound Vol Paris-Meudon Observ 1995 In New projects and new lines of research in nuclear physics Eds G Fazio and F Hanappe Singapore World Scientific -2003 end enumerate

  19. Improved efficacy of ethyl formate against stored grain insects by combination with carbon dioxide in a 'dynamic' application.

    PubMed

    Haritos, Victoria S; Damcevski, Katherine A; Dojchinov, Greg

    2006-04-01

    Ethyl formate is being evaluated as a fumigant for stored grain as it is a potential alternative to the ozone-depleting fumigant methyl bromide and to phosphine, which is under pressure owing to the development of strong resistance in stored grain insects. However, use of ethyl formate faces significant challenges, such as poor penetration through grain, significant losses to grain sorption, high concentrations of fumigant required to control insects, and flammability risks, which have limited its further development. In this study it was found that the combination of carbon dioxide (5-20%) with ethyl formate significantly enhanced efficacy of the fumigant against external living stages of the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.), the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica F., and the flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst). Dynamic application of ethyl formate and carbon dioxide mixture (100 mg litre-1 ethyl formate, 20% CO2) pumped through a model silo containing wheat (50 kg) for one gas exchange was also investigated. A flow rate of 6 litres min-1 gave a relatively even distribution of fumigant throughout the grain column and similar mortality levels among cultures of S. oryzae and T. castaneum placed at three positions, the top, middle and bottom of the column. Mortality of 99.8% of mixed stage cultures of T. castaneum and 95.1% of S. oryzae was achieved in 3 h exposures to 111 and 185 mg ethyl formate h litre-1 respectively applied by the dynamic method. It is concluded that the combination of carbon dioxide with ethyl formate and dynamic application enhances distribution and efficacy of the fumigant against stored grain insects.

  20. Driving the formation of the RbCs dimer by a laser pulse: A nonlinear-dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandre, C.; Mahecha, Jorge; Salas, J. Pablo

    2017-03-01

    We study the formation of the RbCs molecule by an intense laser pulse using nonlinear dynamics. Under the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the system is modeled by a two-degree-of-freedom rovibrational Hamiltonian, which includes the ground electronic potential energy curve of the diatomic molecule and the interaction of the molecular polarizability with the electric field of the laser. As the laser intensity increases, we observe that the formation probability first increases and then decreases after reaching a maximum. We show that the analysis can be simplified to the investigation of the long-range interaction between the two atoms. We conclude that the formation is due to a very small change in the radial momentum of the dimer induced by the laser pulse. From this observation, we build a reduced one-dimensional model which allows us to derive an approximate expression of the formation probability as a function of the laser intensity.

  1. A test of star formation laws in disk galaxies. II. Dependence on dynamical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Suwannajak, Chutipong; Tan, Jonathan C.; Leroy, Adam K.

    2014-05-20

    We use the observed radial profiles of the mass surface densities of total, Σ {sub g}, and molecular, Σ{sub H2}, gas, rotation velocity, and star formation rate (SFR) surface density, Σ{sub sfr}, of the molecular-rich (Σ{sub H2} ≥ Σ{sub HI}/2) regions of 16 nearby disk galaxies to test several star formation (SF) laws: a 'Kennicutt-Schmidt (K-S)' law, Σ{sub sfr}=A{sub g}Σ{sub g,2}{sup 1.5}; a 'Constant Molecular' law, Σ{sub sfr} = A {sub H2}Σ{sub H2,2}; the turbulence-regulated laws of Krumholz and McKee (KM05) and Krumholz, McKee, and Tumlinson (KMT09); a 'Gas-Ω' law, Σ{sub sfr}=B{sub Ω}Σ{sub g}Ω; and a shear-driven 'giant molecular cloud (GMC) Collision' law, Σ{sub sfr} = B {sub CC}Σ {sub g}Ω(1-0.7β), where β ≡ d ln v {sub circ}/d ln r. If allowed one free normalization parameter for each galaxy, these laws predict the SFR with rms errors of factors of 1.4-1.8. If a single normalization parameter is used by each law for the entire galaxy sample, then rms errors range from factors of 1.5-2.1. Although the Constant Molecular law gives the smallest rms errors, the improvement over the KMT, K-S, and GMC Collision laws is not especially significant, particularly given the different observational inputs that the laws utilize and the scope of included physics, which ranges from empirical relations to detailed treatment of interstellar medium processes. We next search for systematic variation of SF law parameters with local and global galactic dynamical properties of disk shear rate (related to β), rotation speed, and presence of a bar. We demonstrate with high significance that higher shear rates enhance SF efficiency per local orbital time. Such a trend is expected if GMC collisions play an important role in SF, while an opposite trend would be expected if the development of disk gravitational instabilities is the controlling physics.

  2. A Test of Star Formation Laws in Disk Galaxies. II. Dependence on Dynamical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannajak, Chutipong; Tan, Jonathan C.; Leroy, Adam K.

    2014-05-01

    We use the observed radial profiles of the mass surface densities of total, Σ g , and molecular, ΣH2, gas, rotation velocity, and star formation rate (SFR) surface density, Σsfr, of the molecular-rich (ΣH2 >= ΣHI/2) regions of 16 nearby disk galaxies to test several star formation (SF) laws: a "Kennicutt-Schmidt (K-S)" law, \\Sigma _{sfr}=A_g\\Sigma _{g,2}^{1.5}; a "Constant Molecular" law, Σsfr = A H2ΣH2, 2; the turbulence-regulated laws of Krumholz & McKee (KM05) and Krumholz, McKee, & Tumlinson (KMT09); a "Gas-Ω" law, \\Sigma _{sfr}=B_\\Omega \\Sigma _g\\Omega; and a shear-driven "giant molecular cloud (GMC) Collision" law, Σsfr = B CCΣ g Ω(1-0.7β), where β ≡ d ln v circ/d ln r. If allowed one free normalization parameter for each galaxy, these laws predict the SFR with rms errors of factors of 1.4-1.8. If a single normalization parameter is used by each law for the entire galaxy sample, then rms errors range from factors of 1.5-2.1. Although the Constant Molecular law gives the smallest rms errors, the improvement over the KMT, K-S, and GMC Collision laws is not especially significant, particularly given the different observational inputs that the laws utilize and the scope of included physics, which ranges from empirical relations to detailed treatment of interstellar medium processes. We next search for systematic variation of SF law parameters with local and global galactic dynamical properties of disk shear rate (related to β), rotation speed, and presence of a bar. We demonstrate with high significance that higher shear rates enhance SF efficiency per local orbital time. Such a trend is expected if GMC collisions play an important role in SF, while an opposite trend would be expected if the development of disk gravitational instabilities is the controlling physics.

  3. The Last Stages of Terrestrial Planet Formation: Dynamical Friction and the Late Veneer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Hilke E.; Warren, Paul H.; Yin, Qing-Zhu

    2012-06-01

    The final stage of terrestrial planet formation consists of the clean-up of residual planetesimals after the giant impact phase. Dynamically, a residual planetesimal population is needed to damp the high eccentricities and inclinations of the terrestrial planets to circular and coplanar orbits after the giant impact stage. Geochemically, highly siderophile element (HSE) abundance patterns inferred for the terrestrial planets and the Moon suggest that a total of about 0.01 M⊕ of chondritic material was delivered as "late veneer" by planetesimals to the terrestrial planets after the end of giant impacts. Here, we combine these two independent lines of evidence for a leftover population of planetesimals and show that: (1) a residual population of small planetesimals containing 0.01 M⊕ is able to damp the high eccentricities and inclinations of the terrestrial planets after giant impacts to their observed values. (2) At the same time, this planetesimal population can account for the observed relative amounts of late veneer added to the Earth, Moon, and Mars provided that the majority of the accreted late veneer was delivered by small planetesimals with radii <~ 10 m. These small planetesimal sizes are required to ensure efficient damping of the planetesimal's velocity dispersion by mutual collisions, which in turn ensures sufficiently low relative velocities between the terrestrial planets and the planetesimals such that the planets' accretion cross sections are significantly enhanced by gravitational focusing above their geometric values. Specifically, we find that, in the limit that the relative velocity between the terrestrial planets and the planetesimals is significantly less than the terrestrial planets' escape velocities, gravitational focusing yields a mass accretion ratio of Earth/Mars ~(ρ⊕/ρmars)(R⊕/Rmars)4 ~ 17, which agrees well with the mass accretion ratio inferred from HSEs of 12-23. For the Earth-Moon system, we find a mass accretion ratio of

  4. THE LAST STAGES OF TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION: DYNAMICAL FRICTION AND THE LATE VENEER

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichting, Hilke E.; Warren, Paul H.; Yin Qingzhu

    2012-06-10

    The final stage of terrestrial planet formation consists of the clean-up of residual planetesimals after the giant impact phase. Dynamically, a residual planetesimal population is needed to damp the high eccentricities and inclinations of the terrestrial planets to circular and coplanar orbits after the giant impact stage. Geochemically, highly siderophile element (HSE) abundance patterns inferred for the terrestrial planets and the Moon suggest that a total of about 0.01 M{sub Circled-Plus} of chondritic material was delivered as 'late veneer' by planetesimals to the terrestrial planets after the end of giant impacts. Here, we combine these two independent lines of evidence for a leftover population of planetesimals and show that: (1) a residual population of small planetesimals containing 0.01 M{sub Circled-Plus} is able to damp the high eccentricities and inclinations of the terrestrial planets after giant impacts to their observed values. (2) At the same time, this planetesimal population can account for the observed relative amounts of late veneer added to the Earth, Moon, and Mars provided that the majority of the accreted late veneer was delivered by small planetesimals with radii {approx}< 10 m. These small planetesimal sizes are required to ensure efficient damping of the planetesimal's velocity dispersion by mutual collisions, which in turn ensures sufficiently low relative velocities between the terrestrial planets and the planetesimals such that the planets' accretion cross sections are significantly enhanced by gravitational focusing above their geometric values. Specifically, we find that, in the limit that the relative velocity between the terrestrial planets and the planetesimals is significantly less than the terrestrial planets' escape velocities, gravitational focusing yields a mass accretion ratio of Earth/Mars {approx}({rho}{sub Circled-Plus }/{rho}{sub mars})(R{sub Circled-Plus }/R{sub mars}){sup 4} {approx} 17, which agrees well with the mass

  5. Dark-ages Reionization and Galaxy formation simulation - I. The dynamical lives of high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Gregory B.; Angel, Paul W.; Mutch, Simon J.; Power, Chris; Duffy, Alan R.; Geil, Paul M.; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, Stuart B.

    2016-07-01

    We present the Dark-ages Reionization and Galaxy formation Observables from Numerical Simulations (DRAGONS) programme and Tiamat, the collisionless N-body simulation programme upon which DRAGONS is built. The primary trait distinguishing Tiamat from other large simulation programme is its density of outputs at high redshift (100 from z = 35 to z = 5; roughly one every 10 Myr) enabling the construction of very accurate merger trees at an epoch when galaxy formation is rapid and mergers extremely frequent. We find that the friends-of-friends halo mass function agrees well with the prediction of Watson et al. at high masses, but deviates at low masses, perhaps due to our use of a different halo finder or perhaps indicating a break from `universal' behaviour. We then analyse the dynamical evolution of galaxies during the Epoch of Reionization finding that only a small fraction (˜20 per cent) of galactic haloes are relaxed. We illustrate this using standard relaxation metrics to establish two dynamical recovery time-scales: (i) haloes need ˜1.5 dynamical times following formation, and (ii) ˜2 dynamical times following a major (3:1) or minor (10:1) merger to be relaxed. This is remarkably consistent across a wide mass range. Lastly, we use a phase-space halo finder to illustrate that major mergers drive long-lived massive phase-space structures which take many dynamical times to dissipate. This can yield significant differences in the inferred mass build-up of galactic haloes and we suggest that care must be taken to ensure a physically meaningful match between the galaxy formation physics of semi-analytic models and the halo finders supplying their input.

  6. Discrete Molecular Dynamics Study of Oligomer Formation by N-Terminally Truncated Amyloid β-Protein

    PubMed Central

    Meral, Derya; Urbanc, Brigita

    2013-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), amyloid β-protein (Aβ) self–assembles into toxic oligomers. Of the two predominant Aβ alloforms, Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42, the latter is particularly strongly linked to AD. N-terminally truncated and pyroglutamated Aβ peptides were recently shown to seed Aβ aggregation and contribute significantly to Aβ–mediated toxicity, yet their folding and assembly were not explored computationally. Discrete molecular dynamics (DMD) approach previously captured in vitro–derived distinct Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 oligomer size distributions and predicted that the more toxic Aβ1–42 oligomers had more flexible and solvent exposed N-termini than Aβ1–40 oligomers. Here, we examined oligomer formation of Aβ3–40, Aβ3–42, Aβ11–40, and Aβ11–42 by the DMD approach. The four N-terminally truncated peptides showed increased oligomerization propensity relative to the full–length peptides, consistent with in vitro findings. Conformations formed by Aβ3–40/42 had significantly more flexible and solvent–exposed N-termini than Aβ1–40/42 conformations. In contrast, in Aβ11–40/42 conformations the N-termini formed more contacts and were less accessible to the solvent. The compactness of the Aβ11–40/42 conformations was in part facilitated by Val12. Two single amino acid substitutions that reduced and abolished hydrophobicity at position 12, respectively, resulted in a proportionally increased structural variability. Our results suggest that Aβ11–40 and Aβ11–42 oligomers might be less toxic than Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 oligomers and offer a plausible explanation for the experimentally–observed increased toxicity of Aβ3–40 and Aβ3–42 and their pyroglutamated forms. PMID:23500806

  7. Development and validation of a dynamical atmosphere-vegetation-soil HTO transport and OBT formation model.

    PubMed

    Ota, Masakazu; Nagai, Haruyasu

    2011-09-01

    A numerical model simulating transport of tritiated water (HTO) in atmosphere-soil-vegetation system, and, accumulation of organically bound tritium (OBT) in vegetative leaves was developed. Characteristic of the model is, for calculating tritium transport, it incorporates a dynamical atmosphere-soil-vegetation model (SOLVEG-II) that calculates transport of heat and water, and, exchange of CO(2). The processes included for calculating tissue free water tritium (TFWT) in leaves are HTO exchange between canopy air and leaf cellular water, root uptake of aqueous HTO in soil, photosynthetic assimilation of TFWT into OBT, and, TFWT formation from OBT through respiration. Tritium fluxes at the last two processes are input to a carbohydrate compartment model in leaves that calculates OBT translocation from leaves and allocation in them, by using photosynthesis and respiration rate in leaves. The developed model was then validated through a simulation of an existing experiment of acute exposure of grape plants to atmospheric HTO. Calculated TFWT concentration in leaves increased soon after the start of HTO exposure, reaching to equilibrium with the atmospheric HTO within a few hours, and then rapidly decreased after the end of the exposure. Calculated non-exchangeable OBT amount in leaves linearly increased during the exposure, and after the exposure, rapidly decreased in daytime, and, moderately nighttime. These variations in the calculated TFWT concentrations and OBT amounts, each mainly controlled by HTO exchange between canopy air and leaf cellular water and by carbohydrates translocation from leaves, fairly agreed with the observations within average errors of a factor of two.

  8. Cold gas dynamic spraying of aluminum: The role of substrate characteristics in deposit formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Shipway, P. H.; McCartney, D. G.

    2005-03-01

    Aluminum powder of 99.7 wt.% purity and in the nominal particle size range of -75+15 µm has been sprayed onto a range of substrates by cold gas dynamic spraying (cold spraying) with helium, at room temperature, as the accelerating gas. The substrates examined include metals with a range of hardness, polymers, and ceramics. The substrate surfaces had low roughness (R a < 0.1 µm) before deposition of aluminum in an attempt to separate effects of mechanical bonding from other forms of bonding, such as chemical or metallurgical bonding. The cross-sectional area of a single track of aluminum sprayed onto the substrate was taken as a measure of the ease of initiation of deposition, assuming that once a coating had begun to deposit onto a substrate, its growth would occur at a constant rate regardless of substrate type. It has been shown that initiation of deposition depends critically upon substrate type. For metals where initiation was not easy, small aluminum particles were deposited preferentially to large ones (due to their higher impact velocities); these may have acted as an interlayer to promote further building of the coating. A number of phenomena have been observed following spraying onto various substrates, such as substrate melting, substrate and particle deformation, and evidence for the formation of a metal-jet (akin to that seen in explosive welding). Such phenomena have been related to the processes occurring during impact of the particles on the substrate. Generally, initiation of aluminum deposition was poor for nonmetallic materials (where no metallic bonding between the particle and substrate was possible) and for very soft metals (in the case of tin, melting of the substrate was observed). Metallic substrates harder than the aluminum particles generally promoted deposition, although deposition onto aluminum alloy was difficult due to the presence of a tenacious oxide layer. Initiation was seen to be rapid on hard metallic substrates, even when

  9. fSpatial and temporal dynamics of cellulose degradation and biofilm formation by Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis and Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Wu; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Elkins, James G; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L

    2011-10-07

    Cellulose degradation is one of the major bottlenecks of a consolidated bioprocess that employs cellulolytic bacterial cells as catalysts to produce biofuels from cellulosic biomass. In this study, we investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of cellulose degradation by Caldicellulosiruptfor obsidiansis, which does not produce cellulosomes, and Clostridium thermocellum, which does produce cellulosomes. Results showed that the degradation of either regenerated or natural cellulose was synchronized with biofilm formation, a process characterized by the formation and fusion of numerous crater-like depressions on the cellulose surface. In addition, the dynamics of biofilm formation were similar in both bacteria, regardless of cellulosome production. Only the areas of cellulose surface colonized by microbes were significantly degraded, highlighting the essential role of the cellulolytic biofilm in cellulose utilization. After initial attachment, the microbial biofilm structure remained thin, uniform and dense throughout the experiment. A cellular automaton model, constructed under the assumption that the attached cells divide and produce daughter cells that contribute to the hydrolysis of the adjacent cellulose, can largely simulate the observed process of biofilm formation and cellulose degradation. This study presents a model, based on direct observation, correlating cellulolytic biofilm formation with cellulose degradation.

  10. Spatial and temporal dynamics of cellulose degradation and biofilm formation by Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis and Clostridium thermocellum Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiwu; Lee, Sueng-Hwan; Elkins, James G; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose degradation is one of the major bottlenecks of a consolidated bioprocess that employs cellulolytic bacterial cells as catalysts to produce biofuels from cellulosic biomass. In this study, we investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of cellulose degradation by Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis, which does not produce cellulosomes, and Clostridium thermocellum, which does produce cellulosomes. Results showed that the degradation of either regenerated or natural cellulose was synchronized with biofilm formation, a process characterized by the formation and fusion of numerous crater-like depressions on the cellulose surface. In addition, the dynamics of biofilm formation were similar in both bacteria, regardless of cellulosome production. Only the areas of cellulose surface colonized by microbes were significantly degraded, highlighting the essential role of the cellulolytic biofilm in cellulose utilization. After initial attachment, the microbial biofilm structure remained thin, uniform and dense throughout the experiment. A cellular automaton model, constructed under the assumption that the attached cells divide and produce daughter cells that contribute to the hydrolysis of the adjacent cellulose, can largely simulate the observed process of biofilm formation and cellulose degradation. This study presents a model, based on direct observation, correlating cellulolytic biofilm formation with cellulose degradation.

  11. Structural insights into dynamics of RecU–HJ complex formation elucidates key role of NTR and stalk region toward formation of reactive state

    PubMed Central

    Khavnekar, Sagar; Dantu, Sarath Chandra; Sedelnikova, Svetlana; Ayora, Sylvia; Rafferty, John; Kale, Avinash

    2017-01-01

    Holliday junction (HJ) resolving enzyme RecU is involved in DNA repair and recombination. We have determined the crystal structure of inactive mutant (D88N) of RecU from Bacillus subtilis in complex with a 12 base palindromic DNA fragment at a resolution of 3.2 Å. This structure shows the stalk region and the essential N-terminal region (NTR) previously unseen in our DNA unbound structure. The flexible nature of the NTR in solution was confirmed using SAXS. Thermofluor studies performed to assess the stability of RecU in complex with the arms of an HJ indicate that it confers stability. Further, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of wild type and an NTR deletion variant of RecU, with and without HJ. The NTR is observed to be highly flexible in simulations of the unbound RecU, in agreement with SAXS observations. These simulations revealed domain dynamics of RecU and their role in the formation of complex with HJ. The MD simulations also elucidate key roles of the NTR, stalk region, and breathing motion of RecU in the formation of the reactive state. PMID:27903910

  12. Structural insights into dynamics of RecU-HJ complex formation elucidates key role of NTR and stalk region toward formation of reactive state.

    PubMed

    Khavnekar, Sagar; Dantu, Sarath Chandra; Sedelnikova, Svetlana; Ayora, Sylvia; Rafferty, John; Kale, Avinash

    2017-01-25

    Holliday junction (HJ) resolving enzyme RecU is involved in DNA repair and recombination. We have determined the crystal structure of inactive mutant (D88N) of RecU from Bacillus subtilis in complex with a 12 base palindromic DNA fragment at a resolution of 3.2 Å. This structure shows the stalk region and the essential N-terminal region (NTR) previously unseen in our DNA unbound structure. The flexible nature of the NTR in solution was confirmed using SAXS. Thermofluor studies performed to assess the stability of RecU in complex with the arms of an HJ indicate that it confers stability. Further, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of wild type and an NTR deletion variant of RecU, with and without HJ. The NTR is observed to be highly flexible in simulations of the unbound RecU, in agreement with SAXS observations. These simulations revealed domain dynamics of RecU and their role in the formation of complex with HJ. The MD simulations also elucidate key roles of the NTR, stalk region, and breathing motion of RecU in the formation of the reactive state.

  13. Evaluation of dynamic formation of cervical spine column based on functional radiological studies in patients after cervical spine injury.

    PubMed

    Martynkiewicz, Jacek; Dragan, Szymon Feliks; Płocieniak, Katarzyna; Krawczyk, Artur; Kulej, Mirosław; Dragan, Szymon Łukasz

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cervical spine function, based on our own functional method of roentgenometric analysis in patients who suffered from cervical spine sprain injury. Study involved 72 patients who suffered from cervical spine whiplash injury. Conventional plain radiographs in all patients included three lateral views: maximum flexion, neutral (resting) and maximum extension. All views allowed roentgenometric evaluation of ligament instability of the lower cervical spine C5-C7 according to the White and Panjabi criteria. Furthermore, based on literature analysis and their own clinical observations, the authors proposed new classification of dynamic formation of cervical spine column. The dynamic formation of cervical column is evaluated based on pathomechanical chain of being between normal and unstable. Authors' own evaluation system in flexion views can be useful in diagnosis and treatment of this type of injury.

  14. Dynamics and Control of Tethered Satellite Formations for the Purpose of Space-Based Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Full Springs, Programmed Reels – “Single Satellite Ellipse”, β=40◦, w/ Perturbations, 10K secs) 184 Obviously, this is a problem: formation integrity ... approach of this next control scheme is to spin the system at a high enough rate such that formation integrity is no longer an issue, and now use thrusters...Delay Times . 172 6.1.4 Adding Perturbations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 6.1.5 “ Optimized ” Formation Parameters Case . . . . 178 6.2 Control

  15. Star formation across cosmic time and its influence on galactic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freundlich, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Observations show that ten billion years ago, galaxies formed their stars at rates up to twenty times higher than now. As stars are formed from cold molecular gas, a high star formation rate means a significant gas supply, and galaxies near the peak epoch of star formation are indeed much more gas-rich than nearby galaxies. Is the decline of the star formation rate mostly driven by the diminishing cold gas reservoir, or are the star formation processes also qualitatively different earlier in the history of the Universe? Ten billion years ago, young galaxies were clumpy and prone to violent gravitational instabilities, which may have contributed to their high star formation rate. Stars indeed form within giant, gravitationally-bound molecular clouds. But the earliest phases of star formation are still poorly understood. Some scenarii suggest the importance of interstellar filamentary structures as a first step towards core and star formation. How would their filamentary geometry affect pre-stellar cores? Feedback mechanisms related to stellar evolution also play an important role in regulating star formation, for example through powerful stellar winds and supernovae explosions which expel some of the gas and can even disturb the dark matter distribution in which each galaxy is assumed to be embedded. This PhD work focuses on three perspectives: (i) star formation near the peak epoch of star formation as seen from observations at sub-galactic scales; (ii) the formation of pre-stellar cores within the filamentary structures of the interstellar medium; and (iii) the effect of feedback processes resulting from star formation and evolution on the dark matter distribution.

  16. Antiprotons and Cold Antihydrogen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    bibliographic citations for 10 publications and 36 lectures that were produced during 2004 under this contract. The author also was the recipient of the George Ledlie Prize at Harvard University in 2004.

  17. Formation and decay of the compound nucleus *220Th within the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemdeep, Chopra, Sahila; Kaur, Arshdeep; Gupta, Raj K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The radioactive *220Th compound nucleus (CN) is of interest since the evaporation residue (ER) cross sections are available for various entrance channels 16O+204Pb , 40Ar+180Hf , 48Ca+172Yb , and 82Se+138Ba at near barrier energies. Within the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM), the radioactive CNs *215Fr, *242Pu, *246Bk, and *254Fm are studied where the main decay mode is fission, with very small predicted ER cross section. *220Th provides a first case with experimentally observed ER cross section instead of fission. Purpose: To look for the optimum "hot-compact" target-projectile (t-p) combinations for the synthesis of "cold"*. For best fitting of the measured ER cross sections, with quasifission (qf) content, if any, the fusion-fission (ff) component is predicted. The magic-shell structure and entrance channel mass-asymmetry effects are analyzed, and the behavior of CN formation and survival probabilities PCN and Psurv is studied. Methods: The quantum-mechanical fragmentation theory (QMFT) is used to predict the possible cold t-p combinations for synthesizing *220Th, and the QMFT-based DCM is used to analyze its decay channels for the experimentally studied entrance channels. The only parameter of the model, the neck length Δ R , varies smoothly with the excitation energy E* of CN and is used to best fit the ER data and predict qf and ff cross sections. Results: The hot-compact and "cold-elongated" fragmentation paths show dissimilar results, whose comparisons with measured fission yields result in t-p combinations, the cold reaction valleys. For the decay process, the fixed Δ R fit the measured ER cross section nicely, but not the individual decay-channel cross sections, which require the presence of qf effects, less so for asymmetric t-p combinations, and large (predicted) ff cross section. Conclusions: The calculated yields for hot-compact fragmentation path compared favorably with the observed asymmetric fission-mass distribution, resulting in

  18. A Nonverbal Phoneme Deletion Task Administered in a Dynamic Assessment Format

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillam, Sandra Laing; Fargo, Jamison; Foley, Beth; Olszewski, Abbie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the project was to design a nonverbal dynamic assessment of phoneme deletion that may prove useful with individuals who demonstrate complex communication needs (CCN) and are unable to communicate using natural speech or who present with moderate-severe speech impairments. Method: A nonverbal dynamic assessment of phoneme…

  19. Formation mechanism of a basin of attraction for passive dynamic walking induced by intrinsic hyperbolicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obayashi, Ippei; Aoi, Shinya; Tsuchiya, Kazuo; Kokubu, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Passive dynamic walking is a useful model for investigating the mechanical functions of the body that produce energy-efficient walking. The basin of attraction is very small and thin, and it has a fractal-like shape; this explains the difficulty in producing stable passive dynamic walking. The underlying mechanism that produces these geometric characteristics was not known. In this paper, we consider this from the viewpoint of dynamical systems theory, and we use the simplest walking model to clarify the mechanism that forms the basin of attraction for passive dynamic walking. We show that the intrinsic saddle-type hyperbolicity of the upright equilibrium point in the governing dynamics plays an important role in the geometrical characteristics of the basin of attraction; this contributes to our understanding of the stability mechanism of bipedal walking.

  20. Pair dynamics in the formation of molecules in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Naidon, Pascal; Masnou-Seeuws, Francoise

    2003-09-01

    We revisit the mean-field treatment of photoassociation and Feshbach resonances in a Bose-Einstein condensate previously used by various authors. Generalizing the Cherny and Shanenko approach [Phys. Rev. E 62, 1646 (2000)] where the finite size of the potentials is explicitly introduced, we develop a two-channel model for a mixed atomic-molecular condensate. Besides the individual dynamics of the condensed and noncondensed atoms, the model also takes into account their pair dynamics by means of pair wave functions. We show that the resulting set of coupled equations can be reduced to the usual coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations when the time scale of the pair dynamics is short compared to that of the individual dynamics. Such time scales are discussed in the case of typical photoassociation experiments with cw lasers. We show that the individual dynamics plays a minor role, demonstrating the validity of the rates predicted by the usual models describing photoassociation in a nondegenerate gas.

  1. Prediction of Growth Factor-Dependent Cleft Formation During Branching Morphogenesis Using A Dynamic Graph-Based Growth Model.

    PubMed

    Dhulekar, Nimit; Ray, Shayoni; Yuan, Daniel; Baskaran, Abhirami; Oztan, Basak; Larsen, Melinda; Yener, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    This study considers the problem of describing and predicting cleft formation during the early stages of branching morphogenesis in mouse submandibular salivary glands (SMG) under the influence of varied concentrations of epidermal growth factors (EGF). Given a time-lapse video of a growing SMG, first we build a descriptive model that captures the underlying biological process and quantifies the ground truth. Tissue-scale (global) and morphological features related to regions of interest (local features) are used to characterize the biological ground truth. Second, we devise a predictive growth model that simulates EGF-modulated branching morphogenesis using a dynamic graph algorithm, which is driven by biological parameters such as EGF concentration, mitosis rate, and cleft progression rate. Given the initial configuration of the SMG, the evolution of the dynamic graph predicts the cleft formation, while maintaining the local structural characteristics of the SMG. We determined that higher EGF concentrations cause the formation of higher number of buds and comparatively shallow cleft depths. Third, we compared the prediction accuracy of our model to the Glazier-Graner-Hogeweg (GGH) model, an on-lattice Monte-Carlo simulation model, under a specific energy function parameter set that allows new rounds of de novo cleft formation. The results demonstrate that the dynamic graph model yields comparable simulations of gland growth to that of the GGH model with a significantly lower computational complexity. Fourth, we enhanced this model to predict the SMG morphology for an EGF concentration without the assistance of a ground truth time-lapse biological video data; this is a substantial benefit of our model over other similar models that are guided and terminated by information regarding the final SMG morphology. Hence, our model is suitable for testing the impact of different biological parameters involved with the process of branching morphogenesis in silico, while

  2. Prediction of Growth Factor Dependent Cleft Formation During Branching Morphogenesis Using A Dynamic Graph-Based Growth Model

    PubMed Central

    Dhulekar, Nimit; Ray, Shayoni; Yuan, Daniel; Baskaran, Abhirami; Oztan, Basak; Larsen, Melinda; Yener, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    This study considers the problem of describing and predicting cleft formation during the early stages of branching morphogenesis in mouse submandibular salivary glands (SMG) under the influence of varied concentrations of epidermal growth factors (EGF). Given a time-lapse video of a growing SMG, first we build a descriptive model that captures the underlying biological process and quantifies the ground truth. Tissue-scale (global) and morphological features related to regions of interest (local features) are used to characterize the biological ground truth. Second, we devise a predictive growth model that simulates EGF-modulated branching morphogenesis using a dynamic graph algorithm, which is driven by biological parameters such as EGF concentration, mitosis rate, and cleft progression rate. Given the initial configuration of the SMG, the evolution of the dynamic graph predicts the cleft formation, while maintaining the local structural characteristics of the SMG. We determined that higher EGF concentrations cause the formation of higher number of buds and comparatively shallow cleft depths. Third, we compared the prediction accuracy of our model to the Glazier-Graner-Hogeweg (GGH) model, an on-lattice Monte-Carlo simulation model, under a specific energy function parameter set that allows new rounds of de novo cleft formation. The results demonstrate that the dynamic graph model yields comparable simulations of gland growth to that of the GGH model with a significantly lower computational complexity. Fourth, we enhanced this model to predict the SMG morphology for an EGF concentration without the assistance of a ground truth time-lapse biological video data; this is a substantial benefit of our model over other similar models that are guided and terminated by information regarding the final SMG morphology. Hence, our model is suitable for testing the impact of different biological parameters involved with the process of branching morphogenesis in silico, while

  3. Dispersal and group formation dynamics in a rare and endangered temperate forest bat (Nyctalus lasiopterus, Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae).

    PubMed

    Santos, João D; Meyer, Christoph F J; Ibáñez, Carlos; Popa-Lisseanu, Ana G; Juste, Javier

    2016-11-01

    For elusive mammals like bats, colonization of new areas and colony formation are poorly understood, as is their relationship with the genetic structure of populations. Understanding dispersal and group formation behaviors is critical not only for a better comprehension of mammalian social dynamics, but also for guiding conservation efforts of rare and endangered species. Using nuclear and mitochondrial markers, we studied patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation among and within breeding colonies of giant noctule bats (Nyctalus lasiopterus), their relation to a new colony still in formation, and the impact of this ongoing process on the regionwide genetic makeup. Nuclear differentiation among colonies was relatively low and mostly nonsignificant. Mitochondrial variation followed this pattern, contrasting with findings for other temperate bat species. Our results suggest that this may indicate a recent population expansion. On average, female giant noctules were not more closely related to other colony members than to foreign individuals. This was also true for members of the newly forming colony and those of another, older group sampled shortly after its formation, suggesting that contrary to findings for other temperate bats, giant noctule colonies are not founded by relatives. However, mother-daughter pairs were found in the same populations more often than expected under random dispersal. Given this indication of philopatry, the lack of mitochondrial differentiation among most colonies in the region is probably due to the combination of a recent population expansion and group formation events.

  4. ON THE FORMATION LOCATION OF URANUS AND NEPTUNE AS CONSTRAINED BY DYNAMICAL AND CHEMICAL MODELS OF COMETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kavelaars, J. J.; Mousis, Olivier; Petit, Jean-Marc; Weaver, Harold A.

    2011-06-20

    The D/H enrichment observed in Saturn's satellite Enceladus is remarkably similar to the values observed in the nearly-isotropic comets. Given the predicted strong variation of D/H with heliocentric distance in the solar nebula, this observation links the primordial source region of the nearly-isotropic comets with the formation location of Enceladus. That is, comets from the nearly-isotropic class were most likely fed into their current reservoir, the Oort cloud, from a source region near the formation location of Enceladus. Dynamical simulations of the formation of the Oort cloud indicate that Uranus and Neptune are, primarily, responsible for the delivery of material into the Oort cloud. In addition, Enceladus formed from material that condensed from the solar nebula near the location at which Saturn captured its gas envelope, most likely at or near Saturn's current location in the solar system. The coupling of these lines of evidence appears to require that Uranus and Neptune were, during the epoch of the formation of the Oort cloud, much closer to the current location of Saturn than they are currently. Such a configuration is consistent with the Nice model of the evolution of the outer solar system. Further measurements of the D/H enrichment in comets, particularly in ecliptic comets, will provide an excellent discriminator among various models of the formation of the outer solar system.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of spontaneous fibril formation by random-coil peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Hall, Carol K.

    2004-11-01

    Assembly of normally soluble proteins into amyloid fibrils is a cause or associated symptom of numerous human disorders, including Alzheimer's and the prion diseases. We report molecular-level simulation of spontaneous fibril formation. Systems containing 12-96 model polyalanine peptides form fibrils at temperatures greater than a critical temperature that decreases with peptide concentration and exceeds the peptide's folding temperature, consistent with experimental findings. Formation of small amorphous aggregates precedes ordered nucleus formation and subsequent rapid fibril growth through addition of -sheets laterally and monomeric peptides at fibril ends. The fibril's structure is similar to that observed experimentally. amyloid | protein aggregation

  6. Development of a new molecular dynamics method for tribochemical reaction and its application to formation dynamics of MoS 2 tribofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Yusuke; Onodera, Tasuku; Suzuki, Ai; Sahnoun, Riadh; Koyama, Michihisa; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Endou, Akira; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Kubo, Momoji; Del Carpio, Carlos A.; Shin-yoshi, Takatoshi; Nishino, Noriaki; Suzuki, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Akira

    2008-09-01

    Recently we have developed a novel molecular dynamics program NEW-RYUDO-CR, which can deal with chemical reactions. The developed method has been applied to the study of tribochemical reaction dynamics of MoS 2 tribofilm on iron surface. The initially amorphous MoS 2 layer self-organized its structure as result of the tribochemical reactions and formed layered MoS 2 tribofilm. The friction coefficient significantly decreased as the MoS 2 tribofilm was formed. Besides, sliding was observed between sulfur layers of MoS 2 tribofilms which occurred due to repulsive Coulombic interaction forces between sulfur atoms. This indicates that the formation of the layered MoS 2 tribofilm is important to achieve better lubrication properties.

  7. Dynamics of iron-acceptor-pair formation in co-doped silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, T.; Gibaja, F.; Graf, O.; Gross, D.; Kaes, M.; Heuer, M.; Kirscht, F.; Möller, C.; Lauer, K.

    2013-11-11

    The pairing dynamics of interstitial iron and dopants in silicon co-doped with phosphorous and several acceptor types are presented. The classical picture of iron-acceptor pairing dynamics is expanded to include the thermalization of iron between different dopants. The thermalization is quantitatively described using Boltzmann statistics and different iron-acceptor binding energies. The proper understanding of the pairing dynamics of iron in co-doped silicon will provide additional information on the electronic properties of iron-acceptor pairs and may become an analytical method to quantify and differentiate acceptors in co-doped silicon.

  8. Dynamics of strong-field laser-induced microplasma formation in noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, D. A.; Compton, R.; Filin, A.; Levis, R. J.

    2010-03-15

    The ultrafast dynamics of microplasmas generated by femtosecond laser pulses in noble gases has been investigated using four-wave mixing (FWM). The time dependence of the FWM signal is observed to reach higher intensity levels faster for Xe, with progressively lower scattering intensity and longer time dynamics for the noble gas series Xe, Kr, Ar, Ne, and He. The temporal dynamics is interpreted in terms of a tunnel ionization and impact cooling mechanism. A formalism to interpret the observed phenomena is presented here with comparison to the measured laser intensity and gas pressure trends.

  9. Curvature perturbation and domain wall formation with pseudo scaling scalar dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, Yohei; Nakayama, Kazunori; Takimoto, Masahiro E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2016-02-01

    Cosmological dynamics of scalar field with a monomial potential φ{sup n} with a general background equation of state is revisited. It is known that if n is smaller than a critical value, the scalar field exhibits a coherent oscillation and if n is larger it obeys a scaling solution without oscillation. We study in detail the case where n is equal to the critical value, and find a peculiar scalar dynamics which is neither oscillating nor scaling solution, and we call it a pseudo scaling solution. We also discuss cosmological implications of a pseudo scaling scalar dynamics, such as the curvature perturbation and the domain wall problem.

  10. Dynamic monitoring of membrane nanotubes formation induced by vaccinia virus on a high throughput microfluidic chip

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Min; Xu, Na; Wang, Cheng; Pang, Dai-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Membrane nanotubes (MNTs) are physical connections for intercellular communication and induced by various viruses. However, the formation of vaccinia virus (VACV)-induced MNTs has never been studied. In this report, VACV-induced MNTs formation process was monitored on a microfluidic chip equipped with a series of side chambers, which protected MNTs from fluidic shear stress. MNTs were formed between susceptible cells and be facilitated by VACV infection through three patterns. The formed MNTs varied with cell migration and virus concentration. The length of MNTs was positively correlated with the distance of cell migration. With increasing virus titer, the peak value of the ratio of MNT-carried cell appeared earlier. The immunofluorescence assay indicated that the rearrangement of actin fibers induced by VACV infection may lead to the formation of MNTs. This study presents evidence for the formation of MNTs induced by virus and helps us to understand the relationship between pathogens and MNTs. PMID:28317863

  11. Mantle Dynamics, Early Reservoir Formation and Degassing of the Martian Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, D.; Plesa, A.-C.; Grott, M.; Morschhauser, A.

    2014-11-01

    Inefficient volcanic outgassing of the interior supports the hypothesis that rather than being warm-and-wet, the martian climate was probably cold-and-wet. The formation of a buoyant depleted mantle layer prevents efficient outgassing of water.

  12. Dynamic monitoring of membrane nanotubes formation induced by vaccinia virus on a high throughput microfluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Min; Xu, Na; Wang, Cheng; Pang, Dai-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Ling

    2017-03-01

    Membrane nanotubes (MNTs) are physical connections for intercellular communication and induced by various viruses. However, the formation of vaccinia virus (VACV)-induced MNTs has never been studied. In this report, VACV-induced MNTs formation process was monitored on a microfluidic chip equipped with a series of side chambers, which protected MNTs from fluidic shear stress. MNTs were formed between susceptible cells and be facilitated by VACV infection through three patterns. The formed MNTs varied with cell migration and virus concentration. The length of MNTs was positively correlated with the distance of cell migration. With increasing virus titer, the peak value of the ratio of MNT-carried cell appeared earlier. The immunofluorescence assay indicated that the rearrangement of actin fibers induced by VACV infection may lead to the formation of MNTs. This study presents evidence for the formation of MNTs induced by virus and helps us to understand the relationship between pathogens and MNTs.

  13. Dynamics of vegetative cytoplasm during generative cell formation and pollen maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, A.; Musgrave, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    Ultrastructural changes of pollen cytoplasm during generative cell formation and pollen maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. The pollen cytoplasm develops a complicated ultrastructure and changes dramatically during these stages. Lipid droplets increase after generative cell formation and their organization and distribution change with the developmental stage. Starch grains in amyloplasts increase in number and size during generative and sperm cell formation and decrease at pollen maturity. The shape and membrane system of mitochondria change only slightly. Dictyosomes become very prominent, and numerous associated vesicles are observed during and after sperm cell formation. Endoplasmic reticulum appears extensively as stacks during sperm cell formation. Free and polyribosomes are abundant in the cytoplasm at all developmental stages although they appear denser at certain stages and in some areas. In mature pollen, all organelles are randomly distributed throughout the vegetative cytoplasm and numerous small particles appear. Organization and distribution of storage substances and appearance of these small particles during generative and sperm cell formation and pollen maturation are discussed.

  14. Failure of film formation of viscoelastic fluid: dynamics of viscoelastic fluid in a partially filled horizontally rotating cylinder.

    PubMed

    Sumino, Yutaka; Shibayama, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Kajiya, Tadashi; Doi, Masao

    2012-04-01

    The dynamics of a viscoelastic Maxwell fluid is studied in a partially filled cylinder rotating around a horizontal axis. At low rotational velocity, the fluid behaves in the same manner as a viscous fluid. A thin fluid film is pulled up from the edge of a fluid bump at the bottom of the cylinder, and it covers the inner wall of the cylinder completely. As a result, a steady state is the coexistence of the film and the bump of the fluid. When the rotational velocity of the cylinder is increased, the film formation fails and the bump of fluid rolls steadily at the bottom of the cylinder. This failure of film formation has never been observed in the case of a viscous fluid. At higher rotational velocity, the bump of the fluid starts to oscillate at the bottom of the cylinder. Then, the fluid bump again rolls steadily with a further increase in the rotational velocity. The failure of film formation is explained in terms of the elastic behavior of the viscoelastic fluid near the boundary between the film and the bump regions. The theoretical prediction shows good agreement with the experimental results. We further estimate the condition for which a viscoelastic fluid displays dynamically nonwetting behavior; i.e., the absence of fluid film at any value of rotational velocity.

  15. Autophagosome formation from membrane compartments enriched in phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate and dynamically connected to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Axe, Elizabeth L; Walker, Simon A; Manifava, Maria; Chandra, Priya; Roderick, H Llewelyn; Habermann, Anja; Griffiths, Gareth; Ktistakis, Nicholas T

    2008-08-25

    Autophagy is the engulfment of cytosol and organelles by double-membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes. Autophagosome formation is known to require phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P) and occurs near the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but the exact mechanisms are unknown. We show that double FYVE domain-containing protein 1, a PI(3)P-binding protein with unusual localization on ER and Golgi membranes, translocates in response to amino acid starvation to a punctate compartment partially colocalized with autophagosomal proteins. Translocation is dependent on Vps34 and beclin function. Other PI(3)P-binding probes targeted to the ER show the same starvation-induced translocation that is dependent on PI(3)P formation and recognition. Live imaging experiments show that this punctate compartment forms near Vps34-containing vesicles, is in dynamic equilibrium with the ER, and provides a membrane platform for accumulation of autophagosomal proteins, expansion of autophagosomal membranes, and emergence of fully formed autophagosomes. This PI(3)P-enriched compartment may be involved in autophagosome biogenesis. Its dynamic relationship with the ER is consistent with the idea that the ER may provide important components for autophagosome formation.

  16. Dynamic Tunnel Usability Study: Format Recommendations for Synthetic Vision System Primary Flight Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Kramer, Lynda J.; Bailey, Randall E.

    2006-01-01

    A usability study evaluating dynamic tunnel concepts has been completed under the Aviation Safety and Security Program, Synthetic Vision Systems Project. The usability study was conducted in the Visual Imaging Simulator for Transport Aircraft Systems (VISTAS) III simulator in the form of questionnaires and pilot-in-the-loop simulation sessions. Twelve commercial pilots participated in the study to determine their preferences via paired comparisons and subjective rankings regarding the color, line thickness and sensitivity of the dynamic tunnel. The results of the study showed that color was not significant in pilot preference paired comparisons or in pilot rankings. Line thickness was significant for both pilot preference paired comparisons and in pilot rankings. The preferred line/halo thickness combination was a line width of 3 pixels and a halo of 4 pixels. Finally, pilots were asked their preference for the current dynamic tunnel compared to a less sensitive dynamic tunnel. The current dynamic tunnel constantly gives feedback to the pilot with regard to path error while the less sensitive tunnel only changes as the path error approaches the edges of the tunnel. The tunnel sensitivity comparison results were not statistically significant.

  17. Living on the Edge: Contrasted Wood-Formation Dynamics in Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris under Mediterranean Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Martinez del Castillo, Edurne; Longares, Luis A.; Gričar, Jožica; Prislan, Peter; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio; Čufar, Katarina; de Luis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Wood formation in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) was intra-annually monitored to examine plastic responses of the xylem phenology according to altitude in one of the southernmost areas of their distribution range, i.e., in the Moncayo Natural Park, Spain. The monitoring was done from 2011 to 2013 at 1180 and 1580 m a.s.l., corresponding to the lower and upper limits of European beech forest in this region. Microcores containing phloem, cambium and xylem were collected biweekly from twenty-four trees from the beginning of March to the end of November to assess the different phases of wood formation. The samples were prepared for light microscopy to observe the following phenological phases: onset and end of cell production, onset and end of secondary wall formation in xylem cells and onset of cell maturation. The temporal dynamics of wood formation widely differed among years, altitudes and tree species. For Fagus sylvatica, the onset of cambial activity varied between the first week of May and the third week of June. Cambial activity then slowed down and stopped in summer, resulting in a length of growing season of 48–75 days. In contrast, the growing season for P. sylvestris started earlier and cambium remained active in autumn, leading to a period of activity varying from 139-170 days. The intra-annual wood-formation pattern is site and species-specific. Comparison with other studies shows a clear latitudinal trend in the duration of wood formation, positive for Fagus sylvatica and negative for P. sylvestris. PMID:27047534

  18. 5D imaging via light sheet microscopy reveals cell dynamics during the eye-antenna disc primordium formation in Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu Shan; Ku, Hui Yu; Tsai, Yun Chi; Chang, Chin Hao; Pao, Sih Hua; Sun, Y. Henry; Chiou, Arthur

    2017-03-01

    5D images of engrailed (en) and eye gone (eyg) gene expressions during the course of the eye-antenna disc primordium (EADP) formation of Drosophila embryos from embryonic stages 13 through 16 were recorded via light sheet microscopy and analyzed to reveal the cell dynamics involved in the development of the EADP. Detailed analysis of the time-lapsed images revealed the process of EADP formation and its invagination trajectory, which involved an inversion of the EADP anterior-posterior axis relative to the body. Furthermore, analysis of the en-expression pattern in the EADP provided strong evidence that the EADP is derived from one of the en-expressing head segments.

  19. Mechanisms of pit formation at strained crystalline Si(111)/Si3N4(0001) interfaces: Molecular-dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Srivastava, Deepak; Owens, Eli T.; Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Anderson, Jonas T.; Burky, Melissa R.; Ducatman, Samuel C.; Gripper, Adam M.; Guffey, Eric J.; Ramos, Fernando Serrano

    2006-08-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of the crystalline silicon-silicon nitride interfaces are performed to investigate the mechanical failure mechanisms at the interfaces under external strain. At 8% applied tensile strain, parallel to the interface, regular crack initiation and propagation in silicon nitride and dislocation emission and propagation in silicon are observed. At larger 16% strain, however, the formation of a pit similar to that in experiments with lattice-mismatched systems is observed. The simulation results suggest the primary mechanism of pit formation is interaction of a local compressional pinch of the film at the interface with the close proximity to the arrival of a dislocation at the interface in the highly strained silicon.

  20. 5D imaging via light sheet microscopy reveals cell dynamics during the eye-antenna disc primordium formation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu Shan; Ku, Hui Yu; Tsai, Yun Chi; Chang, Chin Hao; Pao, Sih Hua; Sun, Y. Henry; Chiou, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    5D images of engrailed (en) and eye gone (eyg) gene expressions during the course of the eye-antenna disc primordium (EADP) formation of Drosophila embryos from embryonic stages 13 through 16 were recorded via light sheet microscopy and analyzed to reveal the cell dynamics involved in the development of the EADP. Detailed analysis of the time-lapsed images revealed the process of EADP formation and its invagination trajectory, which involved an inversion of the EADP anterior-posterior axis relative to the body. Furthermore, analysis of the en-expression pattern in the EADP provided strong evidence that the EADP is derived from one of the en-expressing head segments. PMID:28322328

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of the nucleation of water: Determining the sticking probability and formation energy of a cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Kawano, Akio; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2014-03-01

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations of the nucleation of water vapor in order to test nucleation theories. Simulations were performed for a wide range of supersaturation ratios (S = 3-25) and water temperatures (Tw = 300-390 K). We obtained the nucleation rates and the formation free energies of a subcritical cluster from the cluster size distribution. The classical nucleation theory and the modified classical nucleation theory (MCNT) overestimate the nucleation rates in all cases. The semi-phenomenological model, which corrects the MCNT prediction using the second virial coefficient of a vapor, reproduces the formation free energy of a cluster with the size ≲20 to within 10% and the nucleation rate and cluster size distributions to within one order of magnitude. The sticking probability of the vapor molecules to the clusters was also determined from the growth rates of the clusters. The sticking probability rapidly increases with the supersaturation ratio S, which is similar to the Lennard-Jones system.

  2. Dynamic Neural Network-Based Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) Fault Detection and Isolation for Formation Flying of Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes, A.; Khorasani, K.

    The main objective of this paper is to develop a dynamic neural network-based fault detection and isolation (FDI) scheme for the Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPTs) that are used in the Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) of satellites that are tasked to perform a formation flying mission. By using data collected from the relative attitudes of the formation flying satellites our proposed "High Level" FDI scheme can detect the pair of thrusters which is faulty, however fault isolation cannot be accomplished. Based on the "High Level" FDI scheme and the DNN-based "Low Level" FDI scheme developed earlier by the authors, an "Integrated" DNN-based FDI scheme is then proposed. To demonstrate the FDI capabilities of the proposed schemes various fault scenarios are simulated.

  3. A Nonlinear, Six-Degree of Freedom Precision Formation Control Algorithm, Based on Restricted Three Body Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor); Luquette, Richard J.; Sanner, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    Precision Formation Flying is an enabling technology for a variety of proposed space-based observatories, including the Micro-Arcsecond X-ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM), the associated MAXIM pathfinder mission, and the Stellar Imager. An essential element of the technology is the control algorithm. This paper discusses the development of a nonlinear, six-degree of freedom (6DOF) control algorithm for maintaining the relative position and attitude of a spacecraft within a formation. The translation dynamics are based on the equations of motion for the restricted three body problem. The control law guarantees the tracking error convergences to zero, based on a Lyapunov analysis. The simulation, modelled after the MAXIM Pathfinder mission, maintains the relative position and attitude of a Follower spacecraft with respect to a Leader spacecraft, stationed near the L2 libration point in the Sun-Earth system.

  4. Homogeneous hydride formation path in α-Zr: Molecular dynamics simulations with the charge-optimized many-body potential

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Bai, Xian-Ming; Yu, Jianguo; ...

    2016-06-01

    A formation path for homogeneous γ hydride formation in hcp α-Zr, from solid solution to the ζ and then the γ hydride, was demonstrated using molecular static calculations and molecular dynamic simulations with the charge-optimized many-body (COMB) potential. Hydrogen has limited solubility in α-Zr. Once the solubility limit is exceeded, the stability of solid solution gives way to that of coherent hydride phases such as the ζ hydride by planar precipitation of hydrogen. At finite temperatures, the ζ hydride goes through a partial hcp-fcc transformation via 1/3 <1¯100> slip on the basal plane, and transforms into a mixture of γmore » hydride and α-Zr. In the ζ hydride, slip on the basal plane is favored thermodynamically with negligible barrier, and is therefore feasible at finite temperatures without mechanical loading. The transformation process involves slips of three equivalent shear partials, in contrast to that proposed in the literature where only a single shear partial was involved. The adoption of multiple slip partials minimizes the macroscopic shape change of embedded hydride clusters and the shear strain accumulation in the matrix, and thus reduces the overall barrier needed for homogeneous γ hydride formation. In conclusion, this formation path requires finite temperatures for hydrogen diffusion without mechanical loading. Therefore, it should be effective at the cladding operating conditions.« less

  5. Homogeneous hydride formation path in α-Zr: Molecular dynamics simulations with the charge-optimized many-body potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Bai, Xian-Ming; Yu, Jianguo; Tonks, Michael R.; Noordhoek, Mark J.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2016-06-01

    A formation path for homogeneous γ hydride formation in hcp α-Zr, from solid solution to the ζ and then the γ hydride, was demonstrated using molecular static calculations and molecular dynamic simulations with the charge-optimized many-body (COMB) potential. Hydrogen has limited solubility in α-Zr. Once the solubility limit is exceeded, the stability of solid solution gives way to that of coherent hydride phases such as the ζ hydride by planar precipitation of hydrogen. At finite temperatures, the ζ hydride goes through a partial hcp-fcc transformation via 1/3 <1¯100> slip on the basal plane, and transforms into a mixture of γ hydride and α-Zr. In the ζ hydride, slip on the basal plane is favored thermodynamically with negligible barrier, and is therefore feasible at finite temperatures without mechanical loading. The transformation process involves slips of three equivalent shear partials, in contrast to that proposed in the literature where only a single shear partial was involved. The adoption of multiple slip partials minimizes the macroscopic shape change of embedded hydride clusters and the shear strain accumulation in the matrix, and thus reduces the overall barrier needed for homogeneous γ hydride formation. In conclusion, this formation path requires finite temperatures for hydrogen diffusion without mechanical loading. Therefore, it should be effective at the cladding operating conditions.

  6. Towards a programmable microfluidic valve: Formation dynamics of two-dimensional magnetic bead arrays in transient magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittbracht, F.; Eickenberg, B.; Weddemann, A.; Hütten, A.

    2011-06-01

    The induction of dipolar coupling has proven to allow for the initiation of self-assembled, reconfigurable particle clusters of superparamagnetic microbeads suspended in a carrier liquid. The adjustment of the interplay between magnetic and hydrodynamic forces opens various possibilities for guiding strategies of these superstructures within microfluidic devices. In this work, the formation dynamics of such particle clusters under the influence of a rotating magnetic field are studied. Different agglomeration regimes are characterized by the dimensionality of the confined objects. The growth dynamics of the obtained agglomerates are analyzed quantitatively in order to deduce the microscopic growth mechanisms. The growth of two-dimensional clusters is governed by the addition of bead chains to previously formed agglomerates. Time scales for the cluster growth are characterized by the chain dissociation rate. Based on the experimental findings, we may conclude to a linear dependence of the chain dissociation rate on the rotation frequency of the applied magnetic field.

  7. High Performance Simulations of Accretion Disk Dynamics and Jet Formations Around Kerr Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Mizuno, Yosuke; Watson, Michael

    2007-01-01

    We investigate jet formation in black-hole systems using 3-D General Relativistic Particle-In-Cell (GRPIC) and 3-D GRMHD simulations. GRPIC simulations, which allow charge separations in a collisionless plasma, do not need to invoke the frozen condition as in GRMHD simulations. 3-D GRPIC simulations show that jets are launched from Kerr black holes as in 3-D GRMHD simulations, but jet formation in the two cases may not be identical. Comparative study of black hole systems with GRPIC and GRMHD simulations with the inclusion of radiate transfer will further clarify the mechanisms that drive the evolution of disk-jet systems.

  8. Andreev Bound States Formation and Quasiparticle Trapping in Quench Dynamics Revealed by Time-Dependent Counting Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souto, R. Seoane; Martín-Rodero, A.; Yeyati, A. Levy

    2016-12-01

    We analyze the quantum quench dynamics in the formation of a phase-biased superconducting nanojunction. We find that in the absence of an external relaxation mechanism and for very general conditions the system gets trapped in a metastable state, corresponding to a nonequilibrium population of the Andreev bound states. The use of the time-dependent full counting statistics analysis allows us to extract information on the asymptotic population of even and odd many-body states, demonstrating that a universal behavior, dependent only on the Andreev state energy, is reached in the quantum point contact limit. These results shed light on recent experimental observations on quasiparticle trapping in superconducting atomic contacts.

  9. Dynamic modeling and scaling of nanostructure formation in the lithographically induced self-assembly and self-construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin; Chou, Stephen Y.

    2003-05-01

    We numerically studied the dynamical formation process and the scaling of the nanostructures in the lithographically induced self-assembly and self-construction of thin polymer films. Our studies show that the period of the self-assembled pillars depends on the ratio between the surface tension force and the electrostatic force. The viscosity of the polymer has no effect on the final pillar shape. When the feature width of the mold is comparable to or smaller than the most unstable disturbance wavelength of the system, the initially self-assembled pillars will merge to form a self-constructed mesa.

  10. The Dynamics of Professional Identity Formation: Graduates' Transitions from Higher Education to Working Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyström, Sofia

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the development of professional identity as a relationship between professional and personal aspects of life. The focus is on student and novice professional psychologists' and political scientists' processes of professional identity formation in their transition from higher education to working life. Drawing on Wenger's theory…

  11. Investigating the Dynamics of Formative Assessment: Relationships between Teacher Knowledge, Assessment Practice and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Joan; Osmundson, Ellen; Dai, Yunyun; Ringstaff, Cathy; Timms, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study of elementary school science examines questions central to policy, practice and research on formative assessment: What is the quality of teachers' content-pedagogical and assessment knowledge? What is the relationship between teacher knowledge and assessment practice? What is the relationship between teacher knowledge,…

  12. The Dynamics of Visual Experience, an EEG Study of Subjective Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Mark A.; Twomey, Deirdre; Glennon, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Background Since the origin of psychological science a number of studies have reported visual pattern formation in the absence of either physiological stimulation or direct visual-spatial references. Subjective patterns range from simple phosphenes to complex patterns but are highly specific and reported reliably across studies. Methodology/Principal Findings Using independent-component analysis (ICA) we report a reduction in amplitude variance consistent with subjective-pattern formation in ventral posterior areas of the electroencephalogram (EEG). The EEG exhibits significantly increased power at delta/theta and gamma-frequencies (point and circle patterns) or a series of high-frequency harmonics of a delta oscillation (spiral patterns). Conclusions/Significance Subjective-pattern formation may be described in a way entirely consistent with identical pattern formation in fluids or granular flows. In this manner, we propose subjective-pattern structure to be represented within a spatio-temporal lattice of harmonic oscillations which bind topographically organized visual-neuronal assemblies by virtue of low frequency modulation. PMID:22292053

  13. Dynamics of coalescence and spreading of liquid polymeric particles during coating formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedyaev, V. L.; Galimov, E. R.; Galimova, N. Ya; Gimranov, I. R.; Siraev, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    Processes of agglutination, coalescence and spreading of polymeric powder particles during coating formation are considered using methods of mathematical modeling. The relationships to evaluate time of particles agglutination, velocity of coalescence and spreading of material on the surface of a treated body are given. Recommendations on intensification of the given technological stages are presented.

  14. Kondo correlations formation and the local magnetic moment dynamics in the Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslova, N. S.; Arseyev, P. I.; Mantsevich, V. N.

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the typical time scales of the Kondo correlations formation for the single-state Anderson model, when coupling to the reservoir is switched on at the initial time moment. The influence of the Kondo effect appearance on the system non-stationary characteristics was analyzed and discussed.

  15. Hybrid methods in planetesimal dynamics: formation of protoplanetary systems and the mill condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Glaschke, Patrick; Spurzem, Rainer

    2014-12-01

    The formation and evolution of protoplanetary discs remains a challenge from both a theoretical and numerical standpoint. In this work, we first perform a series of tests of our new hybrid algorithm presented in Glaschke, Amaro-Seoane and Spurzem (henceforth Paper I) that combines the advantages of high accuracy of direct-summation N-body methods with a statistical description for the planetesimal disc based on Fokker-Planck techniques. We then address the formation of planets, with a focus on the formation of protoplanets out of planetesimals. We find that the evolution of the system is driven by encounters as well as direct collisions and requires a careful modelling of the evolution of the velocity dispersion and the size distribution over a large range of sizes. The simulations show no termination of the protoplanetary accretion due to gap formation, since the distribution of the planetesimals is only subjected to small fluctuations. We also show that these features are weakly correlated with the positions of the protoplanets. The exploration of different impact strengths indicates that fragmentation mainly controls the overall mass-loss, which is less pronounced during the early runaway growth. We prove that the fragmentation in combination with the effective removal of collisional fragments by gas drag sets an universal upper limit of the protoplanetary mass as a function of the distance to the host star, which we refer to as the mill condition.

  16. Dynamics of formation of the resonance rotations of natural celestial bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Khentov, A.A.

    1982-07-01

    The rule for formation of the observed commensurabilities of the 1:1 and 3:2 types between the rotational and orbitial motions of certain bodies of the Solar System in the course of evolution is validated. An interpretation of the rotation of Venus is proposed.

  17. Near soliton dynamics and singularity formation for L^2 critical problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Y.; Merle, F.; Raphaël, P.; Szeftel, J.

    2014-04-01

    This survey reviews the state of the art concerning singularity formation for two canonical dispersive problems: the L^2 critical non-linear Schrödinger equation and the L^2 critical generalized KdV equation. In particular, the currently very topical question of classifying flows with initial data near a soliton is addressed. Bibliography: 72 titles.

  18. Studying complex fluids and crystal formation using Dynamic Light Scattering and Optical Probe Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streletzky, Kiril A.

    2004-10-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) spectroscopy provides non-destructive analytic technique for probing structure and dynamics of polymer solutions, colloids, micellar systems, liquid crystals, and, in some cases, observation of nucleation and crystal growth. The method of optical probe diffusion uses DLS to measure transport of dilute mesoscopic probes in a complex fluid solution. If tracer particles are the dominant scatterers in solution, their diffusion provides important information for inferring physical properties of the complex fluid. In situ nature of DLS allows non-invasive studies of different chemical and physical processes such as polymer and colloidal diffusion, gelation, micellar aggregation and dynamics. DLS is also useful for studying critical behavior of liquid crystals and for observing crystallization from clear solutions. The highlights of our results obtained using DLS and optical probe diffusion are presented. These examples include: a) research on polymer dynamics in dilute and concentrated solutions of a neutral HPC polymer; b) project on aggregation and transport of spherical Tx-100 micelles; c) study of crystallization of molecular sieve zeolite NaA.

  19. Static and Dynamic Human Shape Modeling - Concept Formation and Technology Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    body measurements for product-independent size assignment [6] and were used by Seo et al [7] for human shape synthesizing. Using such a small...model is a base model that provides a complete, fundamental structure for human shape modeling. In order for a template model to be usable for dynamic

  20. Three-dimensional imaging system for analyses of dynamic droplet impaction and deposition formation on leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A system was developed to assess the dynamic processes of droplet impact, rebound and retention on leaf surfaces with three-dimensional (3-D) images. The system components consisted of a uniform-size droplet generator, two high speed digital video cameras, a constant speed track, a leaf holder, and ...

  1. PLANET FORMATION IN STELLAR BINARIES. I. PLANETESIMAL DYNAMICS IN MASSIVE PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Rafikov, Roman R.; Silsbee, Kedron

    2015-01-10

    About 20% of exoplanets discovered by radial velocity surveys reside in stellar binaries. To clarify their origin one has to understand the dynamics of planetesimals in protoplanetary disks within binaries. The standard description, accounting for only gas drag and gravity of the companion star, has been challenged recently, as the gravity of the protoplanetary disk was shown to play a crucial role in planetesimal dynamics. An added complication is the tendency of protoplanetary disks in binaries to become eccentric, giving rise to additional excitation of planetesimal eccentricity. Here, for the first time, we analytically explore the secular dynamics of planetesimals in binaries such as α Cen and γ Cep under the combined action of (1) gravity of the eccentric protoplanetary disk, (2) perturbations due to the (coplanar) eccentric companion, and (3) gas drag. We derive explicit solutions for the behavior of planetesimal eccentricity e {sub p} in non-precessing disks (and in precessing disks in certain limits). We obtain the analytical form of the distribution of the relative velocities of planetesimals, which is a key input for understanding their collisional evolution. Disk gravity strongly influences relative velocities and tends to push the sizes of planetesimals colliding with comparable objects at the highest speed to small values, ∼1 km. We also find that planetesimals in eccentric protoplanetary disks apsidally aligned with the binary orbit collide at lower relative velocities than in misaligned disks. Our results highlight the decisive role that disk gravity plays in planetesimal dynamics in binaries.

  2. Planet Formation in Stellar Binaries. I. Planetesimal Dynamics in Massive Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.; Silsbee, Kedron

    2015-01-01

    About 20% of exoplanets discovered by radial velocity surveys reside in stellar binaries. To clarify their origin one has to understand the dynamics of planetesimals in protoplanetary disks within binaries. The standard description, accounting for only gas drag and gravity of the companion star, has been challenged recently, as the gravity of the protoplanetary disk was shown to play a crucial role in planetesimal dynamics. An added complication is the tendency of protoplanetary disks in binaries to become eccentric, giving rise to additional excitation of planetesimal eccentricity. Here, for the first time, we analytically explore the secular dynamics of planetesimals in binaries such as α Cen and γ Cep under the combined action of (1) gravity of the eccentric protoplanetary disk, (2) perturbations due to the (coplanar) eccentric companion, and (3) gas drag. We derive explicit solutions for the behavior of planetesimal eccentricity e p in non-precessing disks (and in precessing disks in certain limits). We obtain the analytical form of the distribution of the relative velocities of planetesimals, which is a key input for understanding their collisional evolution. Disk gravity strongly influences relative velocities and tends to push the sizes of planetesimals colliding with comparable objects at the highest speed to small values, ~1 km. We also find that planetesimals in eccentric protoplanetary disks apsidally aligned with the binary orbit collide at lower relative velocities than in misaligned disks. Our results highlight the decisive role that disk gravity plays in planetesimal dynamics in binaries.

  3. Transient β-hairpin formation in α-synuclein monomer revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hang; Ma, Wen; Han, Wei; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-12-28

    Parkinson’s disease, originating from the intrinsically disordered peptide α-synuclein, is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects more than 5% of the population above age 85. It remains unclear how α-synuclein monomers undergo conformational changes leading to aggregation and formation of fibrils characteristic for the disease. In the present study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations (over 180 μs in aggregated time) using a hybrid-resolution model, Proteins with Atomic details in Coarse-grained Environment (PACE), to characterize in atomic detail structural ensembles of wild type and mutant monomeric α-synuclein in aqueous solution. The simulations reproduce structural properties of α-synuclein characterized in experiments, such as secondary structure content, long-range contacts, chemical shifts, and {sup 3}J(H{sub N}H{sub C{sub α}})-coupling constants. Most notably, the simulations reveal that a short fragment encompassing region 38-53, adjacent to the non-amyloid-β component region, exhibits a high probability of forming a β-hairpin; this fragment, when isolated from the remainder of α-synuclein, fluctuates frequently into its β-hairpin conformation. Two disease-prone mutations, namely, A30P and A53T, significantly accelerate the formation of a β-hairpin in the stated fragment. We conclude that the formation of a β-hairpin in region 38-53 is a key event during α-synuclein aggregation. We predict further that the G47V mutation impedes the formation of a turn in the β-hairpin and slows down β-hairpin formation, thereby retarding α-synuclein aggregation.

  4. A cyclic peptide inhibitor of apoC-II peptide fibril formation: mechanistic insight from NMR and molecular dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Michael D W; Yeung, Levi; Hung, Andrew; Todorova, Nevena; Mok, Yee-Foong; Karas, John A; Gooley, Paul R; Yarovsky, Irene; Howlett, Geoffrey J

    2012-03-09

    The misfolding and aggregation of proteins to form amyloid fibrils is a characteristic feature of several common age-related diseases. Agents that directly inhibit formation of amyloid fibrils represent one approach to combating these diseases. We have investigated the potential of a cyclic peptide to inhibit fibril formation by fibrillogenic peptides from human apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II). Cyc[60-70] was formed by disulfide cross-linking of cysteine residues added to the termini of the fibrillogenic peptide comprising apoC-II residues 60-70. This cyclic peptide did not self-associate into fibrils. However, substoichiometric concentrations of cyc[60-70] significantly delayed fibril formation by the fibrillogenic, linear peptides apoC-II[60-70] and apoC-II[56-76]. Reduction of the disulfide bond or scrambling the amino acid sequence within cyc[60-70] significantly impaired its inhibitory activity. The solution structure of cyc[60-70] was solved using NMR spectroscopy, revealing a well-defined structure comprising a hydrophilic face and a more hydrophobic face containing the Met60, Tyr63, Ile66 and Phe67 side chains. Molecular dynamics (MD) studies identified a flexible central region within cyc[60-70], while MD simulations of "scrambled" cyc[60-70] indicated an increased formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and a reduction in the overall flexibility of the peptide. Our structural studies suggest that the inhibitory activity of cyc[60-70] is mediated by an elongated structure with inherent flexibility and distinct hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces, enabling cyc[60-70] to interact transiently with fibrillogenic peptides and inhibit fibril assembly. These results suggest that cyclic peptides based on amyloidogenic core peptides could be useful as specific inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation.

  5. Transient β-hairpin formation in α-synuclein monomer revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hang; Han, Wei; Ma, Wen; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease, originating from the intrinsically disordered peptide α-synuclein, is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects more than 5% of the population above age 85. It remains unclear how α-synuclein monomers undergo conformational changes leading to aggregation and formation of fibrils characteristic for the disease. In the present study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations (over 180 μs in aggregated time) using a hybrid-resolution model, Proteins with Atomic details in Coarse-grained Environment (PACE), to characterize in atomic detail structural ensembles of wild type and mutant monomeric α-synuclein in aqueous solution. The simulations reproduce structural properties of α-synuclein characterized in experiments, such as secondary structure content, long-range contacts, chemical shifts, and 3J(HNHCα)-coupling constants. Most notably, the simulations reveal that a short fragment encompassing region 38-53, adjacent to the non-amyloid-β component region, exhibits a high probability of forming a β-hairpin; this fragment, when isolated from the remainder of α-synuclein, fluctuates frequently into its β-hairpin conformation. Two disease-prone mutations, namely, A30P and A53T, significantly accelerate the formation of a β-hairpin in the stated fragment. We conclude that the formation of a β-hairpin in region 38-53 is a key event during α-synuclein aggregation. We predict further that the G47V mutation impedes the formation of a turn in the β-hairpin and slows down β-hairpin formation, thereby retarding α-synuclein aggregation.

  6. Formation Dynamics of CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite Following Two-Step Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jay B; Milot, Rebecca L; Wright, Adam D; Herz, Laura M; Johnston, Michael B

    2016-01-07

    Hybrid metal-halide perovskites have emerged as a leading class of semiconductors for optoelectronic devices because of their desirable material properties and versatile fabrication methods. However, little is known about the chemical transformations that occur in the initial stages of perovskite crystal formation. Here we follow the real-time formation dynamics of MAPbI3 from a bilayer of lead iodide (PbI2) and methylammonium iodide (MAI) deposited through a two-step thermal evaporation process. By lowering the substrate temperature during deposition, we are able to initially inhibit intermixing of the two layers. We subsequently use infrared and visible light transmission, X-ray diffraction, and photoluminescence lifetime measurements to reveal the room-temperature transformations that occur in vacuum and ambient air, as MAI diffuses into the PbI2 lattice to form MAPbI3. In vacuum, the transformation to MAPbI3 is incomplete as unreacted MAI is retained in the film. However, exposure to moist air allows for conversion of the unreacted MAI to MAPbI3, demonstrating that moisture is essential in making MAI more mobile and thus aiding perovskite crystallization. These dynamic processes are reflected in the observed charge-carrier lifetimes, which strongly fluctuate during periods of large ion migration but steadily increase with improving crystallinity.

  7. Effect of Sr substitution on irreversibility line, lattice dynamics and formation of Hg,Pb-1223 superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sergey; Kiryakov, N. P.; Emelyanov, D. A.; Kuznetsov, M. S.; Tretyakov, Yu. D.; Petrykin, V. V.; Kakihana, M.; Yamauchi, H.; Zhuo, Yi; Kim, Mun-Seog; Lee, Sung-Ik

    1998-09-01

    Effect of Sr substitution on irreversible properties and lattice dynamics of Hg,Pb-1223 phases was studied. We found that flux pinning properties in high magnetic fields essentially improved by substitutions of Hg by Pb and Ba by Sr. Consideration of lattice dynamics figured out the role of lead and strontium on phase stability and hole doping of CuO 2 layers. Investigation of phase composition and microstructural features of the samples allowed us to suggest a possible mechanism of Hg,Pb-1223 phase formation. The substituted samples possessed an improved chemical stability and allowed their further utilization for materials preparation. As an example, nearly single phase thick film on MgO substrate with the Tc of 120 K was obtained by screen printing method. Despite of the very high intragrain critical current density ( jc=3×10 5 A/cm 2, H=0, 77 K), transport jc was restricted by formation of `weak links' on the grain boundaries.

  8. Sizable dynamics in small pores: CO2 location and motion in the α-Mg formate metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuanjun; Lucier, Bryan E G; Zhang, Yue; Ren, Pengju; Zheng, Anmin; Huang, Yining

    2017-02-22

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are promising materials for carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption and storage; however, many details regarding CO2 dynamics and specific adsorption site locations within MOFs remain unknown, restricting the practical uses of MOFs for CO2 capture. The intriguing α-magnesium formate (α-Mg3(HCOO)6) MOF can adsorb CO2 and features a small pore size. Using an intertwined approach of (13)C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy, (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization SSNMR, and computational molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, new physical insights and a rich variety of information have been uncovered regarding CO2 adsorption in this MOF, including the surprising suggestion that CO2 motion is restricted at elevated temperatures. Guest CO2 molecules undergo a combined localized rotational wobbling and non-localized twofold jumping between adsorption sites. MD simulations and SSNMR experiments accurately locate the CO2 adsorption sites; the mechanism behind CO2 adsorption is the distant interaction between the hydrogen atom of the MOF formate linker and a guest CO2 oxygen atom, which are ca. 3.2 Å apart.

  9. Hormone-Mediated Pattern Formation in Seedling of Plants: a Competitive Growth Dynamics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Mimura, Masayasu; Ohya, Tomoyuki; Oikawa, Noriko; Okabe, Hirotaka; Kai, Shoichi

    2001-10-01

    An ecologically relevant pattern formation process mediated by hormonal interactions among growing seedlings is modeled based on the experimental observations on the effects of indole acetic acid, which can act as an inhibitor and activator of root growth depending on its concentration. In the absence of any lateral root with constant hormone-sensitivity, the edge effect phenomenon is obtained depending on the secretion rate of hormone from the main root. Introduction of growth-stage-dependent hormone-sensitivity drastically amplifies the initial randomness, resulting in spatially irregular macroscopic patterns. When the lateral root growth is introduced, periodic patterns are obtained whose periodicity depends on the length of lateral roots. The growth-stage-dependent hormone-sensitivity and the lateral root growth are crucial for macroscopic periodic-pattern formation.

  10. Dealloying of Platinum-Aluminum Thin Films: Dynamics of Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinski, Henning; Ryll, Thomas; Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Rechberger, Felix; Ying, Sun; Gauckler, Ludwig J.; Mornaghini, Flavio C. F.; Ries, Yasmina; Spolenak, Ralph; Döbeli, Max

    2011-11-01

    The application of focused ion beam (FIB) nanotomography and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) to dealloyed platinum-aluminum thin films allows for an in-depth analysis of the dominating physical mechanisms of nanoporosity formation during the dealloying process. The porosity formation due to the dissolution of the less noble aluminum in the alloy is treated as result of a reaction-diffusion system. The RBS and FIB analysis yields that the porosity evolution has to be regarded as superposition of two independent processes, a linearly propagating diffusion front with a uniform speed and a slower dissolution process in regions which have already been passed by the diffusion front. The experimentally observed front evolution is captured by the Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskounov (FKPP). The slower dissolution is represented by a zero-order rate law which causes a gradual porosity in the thin film.

  11. Dynamics of ripple formation on silicon surfaces by ultrashort laser pulses in subablation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsibidis, G. D.; Barberoglou, M.; Loukakos, P. A.; Stratakis, E.; Fotakis, C.

    2012-09-01

    An investigation of ultrashort pulsed laser-induced surface modification due to conditions that result in a superheated melted liquid layer and material evaporation are considered. To describe the surface modification occurring after cooling and resolidification of the melted layer and understand the underlying physical fundamental mechanisms, a unified model is presented to account for crater and subwavelength ripple formation based on a synergy of electron excitation and capillary wave solidification. The proposed theoretical framework aims to address the laser-material interaction in subablation conditions and thus the minimal mass removal in combination with a hydrodynamics-based scenario of the crater creation and ripple formation following surface irradiation with single and multiple pulses, respectively. The development of the periodic structures is attributed to the interference of the incident wave with a surface plasmon wave. Details of the surface morphology attained are elaborated as a function of the imposed conditions, and results are tested against experimental data.

  12. Physics of biofilms: the initial stages of biofilm formation and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Guillaume; Bergman, Andrew; Zhang, Qiucen; Bortz, David; Austin, Robert

    2014-04-01

    One of the physiological responses of bacteria to external stress is to assemble into a biofilm. The formation of a biofilm greatly increases a bacterial population's resistance to a hostile environment by shielding cells, for example, from antibiotics. In this paper, we describe the conditions necessary for the emergence of biofilms in natural environments and relate them to the emergence of biofilm formation inside microfluidic devices. We show that competing species of Escherichia coli bacteria form biofilms to spatially segregate themselves in response to starvation stress, and use in situ methods to characterize the physical properties of the biofilms. Finally, we develop a microfluidic platform to study the inter-species interactions and show how biofilm-mediated genetic interactions can improve a species’ resistance to external stress.

  13. Dynamics of Faceted Nanoparticles Formation in a Crystalline Matrix During Ion Implantation Processing.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun-Dar

    2016-02-01

    The faceted nanoparticle synthesized by ion implantation, such as Zn, Cu or Ag nanoparticles, is one of the promising materials for the next generation of optical devices. To understand and better control the manufacturing processes of ion implantation, a theoretical model is applied to investigate the formation and evolution of faceted nanoparticles under various experimental conditions of implantation processing. In this study, the mechanisms of the anisotropic interfacial energy and kinetics with different ion distributions are taken into consideration to demonstrate the role of the crystallographic symmetry, ion energy and temperature on the faceted nanoparticles formation in a crystalline matrix. As presented in the numerical results, the morphological shape of the nanoparticles is mainly affected by the crystallographic symmetry, while the distribution of the precipitates is principally determined by the ion energy. For the condition of high-temperature implantation, a high mobility of ions causes the characteristic length of nanostructures to increase and creates a coarsening morphology of nanoparticles. It is attributed to a longer diffusion distance during the nucleation and growth processes. This model can be widely used for the predictions of the nanostructures formation with various ion implantation processes.

  14. Dynamical models for the formation of elephant trunks in HII regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Jonathan; Lim, Andrew J.

    2010-04-01

    The formation of pillars of dense gas at the boundaries of HII regions is investigated with hydrodynamical numerical simulations including ionizing radiation from a point source. We show that shadowing of ionizing radiation by an inhomogeneous density field is capable of forming so-called elephant trunks (pillars of dense gas as in e.g. M16) without the assistance of self-gravity or of ionization front and cooling instabilities. A large simulation of a density field containing randomly generated clumps of gas is shown to naturally generate elephant trunks with certain clump configurations. These configurations are simulated in isolation and analysed in detail to show the formation mechanism and determine possible observational signatures. Pillars formed by the shadowing mechanism are shown to have rather different velocity profiles depending on the initial gas configuration, but asymmetries mean that the profiles also vary significantly with perspective, limiting their ability to discriminate between formation scenarios. Neutral and molecular gas cooling are shown to have a strong effect on these results.

  15. Study of dynamical formation and shape of microlenses formed by the reflow method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audran, S.; Faure, B.; Mortini, B.; Aumont, C.; Tiron, R.; Zinck, C.; Sanchez, Y.; Fellous, C.; Regolini, J.; Reynard, J. P.; Schlatter, G.; Hadziioannou, G.

    2006-03-01

    Microlenses arrays are commonly used in CMOS images sensors to focus the incident light onto the photosensitive area of the pixel. These microlenses are fabricated using a thermal reflow method. Currently, due to the fast evolution of CMOS Imager technology, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in microlens formation becomes essential to better control what occurs during the process. We have seen in a previous study that the complexity of the reflow method comes from the competition between two phenomena occurring during the melt bake step: on one hand the surface tension tends to push the resist patterns into a spherical shape, on the other hand the resist crosslinking reaction drastically increases the resist viscosity hindering the microlens formation. In this paper the influence of resist crosslinking, resist volume and resist/substrate interface on the final shape of the microlens has been investigated. It appears that the contact angle between microlens and substrate varies depending on substrate wettability but is the same whatever the resist volume for a given substrate/resist combination. The microlens shape depends also significantly on bake temperature and crosslinking kinetics. In fact the right tuning of process conditions seems to be the key parameter in the control of the final microlens shape because it enables to adjust the kinetics of each mechanism and thus favour the microlens formation with regards to resist crosslinking.

  16. Formation and relaxation dynamics of iso-CH2Cl-I in cryogenic matrices.

    PubMed

    Preston, Thomas J; Dutta, Maitreya; Esselman, Brian J; Kalume, Aimable; George, Lisa; McMahon, Robert J; Reid, Scott A; Crim, F Fleming

    2011-09-21

    Photolysis of chloroiodomethane (CH(2)ClI) in cryogenic matrices followed by recombination of the nascent radical pair produces an isomer (CH(2)Cl-I) that features a halogen-halogen (Cl-I) bond. Using ultrafast laser pulses, it is possible to follow the formation of this isomer by transient electronic absorption in low-temperature matrices of N(2), CH(4), and Ar. Frequency-domain measurements provide vibrational and electronic spectra, and electronic structure calculations give the structures of the isomers and the minimum energy path that connects them. The ultrafast experiments cleave the C-I bond with a 267-nm photolysis pulse and probe the formation of the isomer at wavelengths between 435 nm and 510 nm. The longest wavelengths preferentially interrogate vibrationally excited molecules, and their transient absorption shows that the highly vibrationally excited isomer appears within 1 to 2 ps, depending on the matrix, likely reflecting the loss of 2000 cm(-1) or more of energy in a strong, inelastic collision of the fragments with the matrix. The subsequent relaxation of the vibrationally excited isomer occurs in 20 to 40 ps, a time that is comparable to those observed for halomethane molecules and their isomers in liquids and in supercritical CO(2). These observations suggest that the formation and initial relaxation of the isomer in dense media do not depend strongly on the identity of the surroundings.

  17. High-resolution biophysical analysis of the dynamics of nucleosome formation

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Akiko; Hartmann, Brigitte; Travers, Andrew; Nogues, Claude; Buckle, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    We describe a biophysical approach that enables changes in the structure of DNA to be followed during nucleosome formation in in vitro reconstitution with either the canonical “Widom” sequence or a judiciously mutated sequence. The rapid non-perturbing photochemical analysis presented here provides ‘snapshots’ of the DNA configuration at any given moment in time during nucleosome formation under a very broad range of reaction conditions. Changes in DNA photochemical reactivity upon protein binding are interpreted as being mainly induced by alterations in individual base pair roll angles. The results strengthen the importance of the role of an initial (H3/H4)2 histone tetramer-DNA interaction and highlight the modulation of this early event by the DNA sequence. (H3/H4)2 binding precedes and dictates subsequent H2A/H2B-DNA interactions, which are less affected by the DNA sequence, leading to the final octameric nucleosome. Overall, our results provide a novel, exciting way to investigate those biophysical properties of DNA that constitute a crucial component in nucleosome formation and stabilization. PMID:27263658

  18. Human group formation in online guilds and offline gangs driven by a common team dynamic.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Neil F; Xu, Chen; Zhao, Zhenyuan; Ducheneaut, Nicolas; Yee, Nicholas; Tita, George; Hui, Pak Ming

    2009-06-01

    Quantifying human group dynamics represents a unique challenge. Unlike animals and other biological systems, humans form groups in both real (offline) and virtual (online) spaces-from potentially dangerous street gangs populated mostly by disaffected male youths to the massive global guilds in online role-playing games for which membership currently exceeds tens of millions of people from all possible backgrounds, age groups, and genders. We have compiled and analyzed data for these two seemingly unrelated offline and online human activities and have uncovered an unexpected quantitative link between them. Although their overall dynamics differ visibly, we find that a common team-based model can accurately reproduce the quantitative features of each simply by adjusting the average tolerance level and attribute range for each population. By contrast, we find no evidence to support a version of the model based on like-seeking-like (i.e., kinship or "homophily").

  19. Structural dynamics associated with intermediate formation in an archetypal conformational disease.

    PubMed

    Nyon, Mun Peak; Segu, Lakshmi; Cabrita, Lisa D; Lévy, Géraldine R; Kirkpatrick, John; Roussel, Benoit D; Patschull, Anathe O M; Barrett, Tracey E; Ekeowa, Ugo I; Kerr, Richard; Waudby, Christopher A; Kalsheker, Noor; Hill, Marian; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Lomas, David A; Christodoulou, John; Gooptu, Bibek

    2012-03-07

    In conformational diseases, native protein conformers convert to pathological intermediates that polymerize. Structural characterization of these key intermediates is challenging. They are unstable and minimally populated in dynamic equilibria that may be perturbed by many analytical techniques. We have characterized a forme fruste deficiency variant of α(1)-antitrypsin (Lys154Asn) that forms polymers recapitulating the conformer-specific neo-epitope observed in polymers that form in vivo. Lys154Asn α(1)-antitrypsin populates an intermediate ensemble along the polymerization pathway at physiological temperatures. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to report the structural and dynamic changes associated with this. Our data highlight an interaction network likely to regulate conformational change and do not support the recent contention that the disease-relevant intermediate is substantially unfolded. Conformational disease intermediates may best be defined using powerful but minimally perturbing techniques, mild disease mutants, and physiological conditions.

  20. Pulsed laser ablation in liquids: Impact of the bubble dynamics on particle formation.

    PubMed

    Reich, Stefan; Schönfeld, Patrick; Wagener, Philipp; Letzel, Alexander; Ibrahimkutty, Shyjumon; Gökce, Bilal; Barcikowski, Stephan; Menzel, Andreas; Dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Plech, Anton

    2017-03-01

    Pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL) is a multiscale process, involving multiple mutually interacting phenomena. In order to synthesize nanoparticles with well-defined properties it is important to understand the dynamics of the underlying structure evolution. We use visible-light stroboscopic imaging and X-ray radiography to investigate the dynamics occurring during PLAL of silver and gold on a macroscopic scale, whilst X-ray small angle scattering is utilized to deepen the understanding on particle genesis. By comparing our results with earlier reports we can elucidate the role of the cavitation bubble. We find that symmetry breaking at the liquid-solid interface is a critical factor for bubble motion and that the bubble motion acts on the particle distribution as confinement and retraction force to create secondary agglomerates.

  1. Nanostructure Formation by Dynamic Densification and Recrystallization of Amorphous Ti-Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counihan, P. J.; Thadhani, N. N.

    1997-07-01

    Dynamic densification was used to consolidate mechanically amorphized Ti-Si alloy powders. A 3-capsule, plate-impact, gas-gun loading system was used to densify the powders at impact velocities of 300 and 500 m/s. The recovered compacts were observed to retain the amorphous structure as evidenced by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission microscopy (TEM) analysis. The densified material was subsequently annealed at various temperatures (above the crystallization temperature) to produce a nanocrystalline Ti_5Si3 microstructure. TEM and XRD analysis revealed retention of a nano-grain microstructure (< 100 nm) in the crystallized compacts. In this presentation the influence of dynamic densification on the crystallization of the amorphous compound and retention of the nano-scale grain size in the crystallized compacts will be discussed.

  2. Formation and dynamics of supported phospholipid membranes on a periodic nanotextured substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H; Montano, Gabriel M; Shreve, Andrew P

    2008-01-01

    We have studied and modeled the morphology and dynamics of planar lipid bilayer assemblies supported on a textured silicon substrate that contains nano-structured features perpendicular to the plane of observation. Using a combination of characterization methods, including atomic force microscopy and quantitative fluorescence microscopy, we have discovered the bilayer assemblies are conformal to the underlying nanostructured substrate. As far as the dynamics are concnerned, the lipids freely diffuse in and out of the plane of observation while supported by the nanotextured material. In a microscopic sense, diffusion is isotropic along the patterned substrate. Macroscopically, when observed over length scales exceeding the dimensions of the nano-structured features, the diffusion appears anisotropic. The observed macroscopic anisotropy is well simulated using models of diffusion on the nanostructured surface that assume the lipids diffuse homogeneously and isotropically on the supporting nanotextured substrate.

  3. Human group formation in online guilds and offline gangs driven by a common team dynamic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Neil F.; Xu, Chen; Zhao, Zhenyuan; Ducheneaut, Nicolas; Yee, Nicholas; Tita, George; Hui, Pak Ming

    2009-06-01

    Quantifying human group dynamics represents a unique challenge. Unlike animals and other biological systems, humans form groups in both real (offline) and virtual (online) spaces—from potentially dangerous street gangs populated mostly by disaffected male youths to the massive global guilds in online role-playing games for which membership currently exceeds tens of millions of people from all possible backgrounds, age groups, and genders. We have compiled and analyzed data for these two seemingly unrelated offline and online human activities and have uncovered an unexpected quantitative link between them. Although their overall dynamics differ visibly, we find that a common team-based model can accurately reproduce the quantitative features of each simply by adjusting the average tolerance level and attribute range for each population. By contrast, we find no evidence to support a version of the model based on like-seeking-like (i.e., kinship or “homophily”).

  4. Inhibitory synapse dynamics: coordinated presynaptic and postsynaptic mobility and the major contribution of recycled vesicles to new synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Dobie, Frederick A; Craig, Ann Marie

    2011-07-20

    Dynamics of GABAergic synaptic components have been studied previously over milliseconds to minutes, revealing mobility of postsynaptic scaffolds and receptors. Here we image inhibitory synapses containing fluorescently tagged postsynaptic scaffold Gephyrin, together with presynaptic vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) or postsynaptic GABA(A) receptor γ2 subunit (GABA(A)Rγ2), over seconds to days in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, revealing modes of inhibitory synapse formation and remodeling. Entire synapses were mobile, translocating rapidly within a confined region and exhibiting greater nonstochastic motion over multihour periods. Presynaptic and postsynaptic components moved in unison, maintaining close apposition while translocating distances of several micrometers. An observed flux in the density of synaptic puncta partially resulted from the apparent merging and splitting of preexisting clusters. De novo formation of inhibitory synapses was observed, marked by the appearance of stably apposed Gephyrin and VGAT clusters at sites previously lacking either component. Coclustering of GABA(A)Rγ2 supports the identification of such new clusters as synapses. Nascent synapse formation occurred by gradual accumulation of components over several hours, with VGAT clustering preceding that of Gephyrin and GABA(A)Rγ2. Comparing VGAT labeling by active uptake of a luminal domain antibody with post hoc immunocytochemistry indicated that recycling vesicles from preexisting boutons significantly contribute to vesicle pools at the majority of new inhibitory synapses. Although new synapses formed primarily on dendrite shafts, some also formed on dendritic protrusions, without apparent interconversion. Altogether, the long-term imaging of GABAergic presynaptic and postsynaptic components reveals complex dynamics and perpetual remodeling with implications for mechanisms of assembly and synaptic integration.

  5. Dynamic mineral clouds on HD 189733b. I. 3D RHD with kinetic, non-equilibrium cloud formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, G.; Dobbs-Dixon, I.; Helling, Ch.; Bognar, K.; Woitke, P.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Observations of exoplanet atmospheres have revealed the presence of cloud particles in their atmospheres. 3D modelling of cloud formation in atmospheres of extrasolar planets coupled to the atmospheric dynamics has long been a challenge. Aims: We investigate the thermo-hydrodynamic properties of cloud formation processes in the atmospheres of hot Jupiter exoplanets. Methods: We simulate the dynamic atmosphere of HD 189733b with a 3D model that couples 3D radiative-hydrodynamics with a kinetic, microphysical mineral cloud formation module designed for RHD/GCM exoplanet atmosphere simulations. Our simulation includes the feedback effects of cloud advection and settling, gas phase element advection and depletion/replenishment and the radiative effects of cloud opacity. We model the cloud particles as a mix of mineral materials which change in size and composition as they travel through atmospheric thermo-chemical environments. All local cloud properties such as number density, grain size and material composition are time-dependently calculated. Gas phase element depletion as a result of cloud formation is included in the model. In situ effective medium theory and Mie theory is applied to calculate the wavelength dependent opacity of the cloud component. Results: We present a 3D cloud structure of a chemically complex, gaseous atmosphere of the hot Jupiter HD 189733b. Mean cloud particle sizes are typically sub-micron (0.01-0.5 μm) at pressures less than 1 bar with hotter equatorial regions containing the smallest grains. Denser cloud structures occur near terminator regions and deeper (~1 bar) atmospheric layers. Silicate materials such as MgSiO3[s] are found to be abundant at mid-high latitudes, while TiO2[s] and SiO2[s] dominate the equatorial regions. Elements involved in the cloud formation can be depleted by several orders of magnitude. Conclusions: The interplay between radiative-hydrodynamics and cloud kinetics leads to an inhomogeneous, wavelength

  6. Multi-step formation of a hemifusion diaphragm for vesicle fusion revealed by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hui-Hsu Gavin; Chang, Che-Ming; Lee, Jian-Bin

    2014-06-01

    Membrane fusion is essential for intracellular trafficking and virus infection, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the fusion process remain poorly understood. In this study, we employed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the membrane fusion mechanism using vesicle models which were pre-bound by inter-vesicle Ca(2+)-lipid clusters to approximate Ca(2+)-catalyzed fusion. Our results show that the formation of the hemifusion diaphragm for vesicle fusion is a multi-step event. This result contrasts with the assumptions made in most continuum models. The neighboring hemifused states are separated by an energy barrier on the energy landscape. The hemifusion diaphragm is much thinner than the planar lipid bilayers. The thinning of the hemifusion diaphragm during its formation results in the opening of a fusion pore for vesicle fusion. This work provides new insights into the formation of the hemifusion diaphragm and thus increases understanding of the molecular mechanism of membrane fusion. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy.

  7. Dynamics of formation of low-angle tilt boundaries in metals and alloys at high loading rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutkin, M. Yu.; Rzhavtsev, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    A computer model has been developed in which the process of formation of low-angle tilt boundaries and fragmentation of initial subgrains during shock loading of metals and alloys is clearly demonstrated by the of two-dimensional discrete dislocation-disclination dynamics method. The formation and evolution of such grains proceeds under the action of an external stress and the stress field of grain boundary disclinations distributed on the subgrain boundaries. With the D16 aluminum alloy as an example, three cases of fragmented structures formed in accordance with the initial configuration of the disclination ensemble have been considered for a dipole, quadrupole, and arbitrary octupole of wedge disclinations. It has been shown that, in all these cases, the formation of a stable fragmented structure requires a stress of ~0.5 GPa and time of 10 ns. The main results of computer simulation (the finite form of a fragmented structure, typical level of applied stress, and small fragmentation time) agree well with known experimental results on shock compression of the D16 aluminum alloy.

  8. Water Ordering Controls the Dynamic Equilibrium of Micelle-Fiber Formation in Self-Assembly of Peptide Amphiphiles

    DOE PAGES

    Deshmukh, Sanket; Solomon, Lee A.; Kamath, Ganesh; ...

    2016-08-24

    Understanding the role of water in governing the kinetics of the self-assembly processes of amphiphilic peptides has still remained elusive. Here, using a multi-stage atomistic-coarse-grained approach, complemented by circular dichroism/infra-red spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering experiments, we highlight the dual nature of water in dictating the mechanism and dynamics of self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles (PAs). Our computational study shows that (i) Water cage formation and breakage near the hydrophobic groups controls the fusion dynamics and aggregation of PAs in the micellar stage, and (ii) Enhanced structural ordering of vicinal water near the hydrophilic amino acids shifts the equilibrium towards themore » fiber phase and stimulates structure and order in the PAs when they assemble into a hexagonal nanofiber architecture. Finally, spectroscopy and microscopy studies authenticate our computational observation that water ordering near the PAs increases with increase in time. The measured infra-red O-H bond stretch frequency reminiscent of ice-like suggests that the solvated water becomes increasingly solid-like with increased structural order in the assembled peptide network – thus shedding light on the role of water in a self-assembly process.« less

  9. Water Ordering Controls the Dynamic Equilibrium of Micelle-Fiber Formation in Self-Assembly of Peptide Amphiphiles

    SciTech Connect

    Deshmukh, Sanket; Solomon, Lee A.; Kamath, Ganesh; Fry, H. Christopher; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.

    2016-08-24

    Understanding the role of water in governing the kinetics of the self-assembly processes of amphiphilic peptides has still remained elusive. Here, using a multi-stage atomistic-coarse-grained approach, complemented by circular dichroism/infra-red spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering experiments, we highlight the dual nature of water in dictating the mechanism and dynamics of self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles (PAs). Our computational study shows that (i) Water cage formation and breakage near the hydrophobic groups controls the fusion dynamics and aggregation of PAs in the micellar stage, and (ii) Enhanced structural ordering of vicinal water near the hydrophilic amino acids shifts the equilibrium towards the fiber phase and stimulates structure and order in the PAs when they assemble into a hexagonal nanofiber architecture. Finally, spectroscopy and microscopy studies authenticate our computational observation that water ordering near the PAs increases with increase in time. The measured infra-red O-H bond stretch frequency reminiscent of ice-like suggests that the solvated water becomes increasingly solid-like with increased structural order in the assembled peptide network – thus shedding light on the role of water in a self-assembly process.

  10. Processes of annual moraine formation at a temperate alpine valley glacier: glacier dynamics and climatic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukas, S.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the first detailed sedimentological study of annual moraines formed by an alpine valley glacier. The moraines have been formed since at least AD 1980 by a subsidiary lobe of Gornergletscher, Switzerland, that advances up a reverse bedrock slope. They reach heights of 0.5-1.5 m, widths of up to 6 m and lengths of up to several hundreds of metres. Sediments in these moraines comprise proglacial outwash and debris flow units; subglacial traction till is absent entirely. Based on four representative sections, three genetic process combinations have been identified. (1) Inefficient bulldozing of a gently-sloping ice margin transfers proglacial sediments onto the ice, causing differential ablation and dead-ice incorporation upon retreat. (2) Terrestrial ice-contact fans are formed by the dumping of englacial and supraglacial material from point sources such as englacial conduit fills. Debris flows and associated fluvial sediments are stacked against a temporarily stationary margin at the start, and deformed during glacier advance in the remainder, of the accumulation season. (3) A steep ice margin without supraglacial input leads to efficient bulldozing and deformation of pre-existing foreland sediments by wholesale folding. Ice surface slope appears to be a key control on the type of process responsible for moraine formation in any given place and year. The second and third modes result in stable and higher moraines that have a higher preservation potential than those containing dead ice. Analysis of the spacing and climatic records at Gornergletscher reveal that winter temperature controls marginal retreat and hence moraine formation. However, any climatic signal is complicated by other factors, most notably the presence of a reverse bedrock slope, so that the extraction of a clear climatic signal is not straightforward. This study highlights the complexity of annual moraine formation in high-mountain environments and suggests avenues for further

  11. Are the Formation and Abundances of Metal-poor Stars the Result of Dust Dynamics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Conroy, Charlie

    2017-02-01

    Large dust grains can fluctuate dramatically in their local density, relative to the gas, in neutral turbulent disks. Small, high-redshift galaxies (before reionization) represent ideal environments for this process. We show via simple arguments and simulations that order-of-magnitude fluctuations are expected in local abundances of large grains (>100 Å) under these conditions. This can have important consequences for star formation and stellar metal abundances in extremely metal-poor stars. Low-mass stars can form in dust-enhanced regions almost immediately after some dust forms even if the galaxy-average metallicity is too low for fragmentation to occur. We argue that the metal abundances of these “promoted” stars may contain interesting signatures as the CNO abundances (concentrated in large carbonaceous grains and ices) and Mg and Si (in large silicate grains) can be enhanced and/or fluctuate almost independently. Remarkably, the otherwise puzzling abundance patterns of some metal-poor stars can be well fit by standard IMF-averaged core-collapse SNe yields if we allow for fluctuating local dust-to-gas ratios. We also show that the observed log-normal distribution of enhancements in these species agrees with our simulations. Moreover, we confirm that Mg and Si are correlated in these stars the abundance ratios are similar to those in local silicate grains. Meanwhile [Mg/Ca], predicted to be nearly invariant from pure SNe yields, shows very large enhancements and variations up to factors of ≳100 as expected in the dust-promoted model, preferentially in the [C/Fe]-enhanced metal-poor stars. Together, this suggests that (1) dust exists in second-generation star formation, (2) local dust-to-gas ratio fluctuations occur in protogalaxies and can be important for star formation, and (3) the light element abundances of these stars may be affected by the local chemistry of dust where they formed, rather than directly tracing nucleosynthesis from earlier

  12. Preliminary Planar Formation-Flight Dynamics Near Sun-Earth L2 Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segerman, Alan M.; Zedd, Michael F.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A few space agencies are planning missions to the vicinity of the Sun-Earth L(sub 2) point, some involving a distributed space system of telescope spacecraft, configured in a plane about a hub. An improved understanding is developed of the relative motion of such objects in formation flight. The telescope equations of motion are written relative to the hub, in terms of the hub s distance from L(sub 2), and an analytical solution is developed, useful for performing orbit control analysis. A halo telescope orbit is investigated, with initial conditions selected to avoid resonance excitation. An example case of the resulting solution is presented.

  13. Dynamics and control of spacecraft formation flying and constellation station keeping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaodong

    2005-11-01

    Formation flying and constellation station keeping, the innovative concept of distributing the functionality of monolithic satellites among less expensive, smaller, cooperative satellites, enables faster ground track repeats, provides higher degrees of system redundancy and, in the end, reduces the cost of the whole mission. However, the practical implementation of this concept is associated with the need to tightly design, measure, control and maintain the formation or relative distance, phasing and orientations among the participating satellites. Implementing, maintaining, and reconfiguring the cluster of satellites is so critical and complex, that it would be a big burden on the traditional ground-based orbital determination, navigation and command systems, and it also may impose stringent requirements on current control systems in terms of the energy consumption, precision, and the overall budget. The research work in this dissertation addresses the problems in two parts: the first part, which discusses mainly how to design the relative orbits for formation flying and constellation station keeping; and the second part, which is about the exploitation of possible control algorithms for maintaining the formation and constellation. Orbits are investigated for which there are no relative secular precessions or drifts due to the Earth's perturbations between the spacecraft. In this case the energy consumption could be largely decreased. A general method is introduced to establish the relationship between a given orbit relative to a reference orbit. By analyzing a set of differential equations, relationships between the orbit design and all possible relative secular drifts due to perturbations in the Earth's gravitational field, can be derived. Mathematical singularities encountered at specific orbital inclination angles, such as polar inclinations, are discussed. By using the general approach, a solution for polar inclinations is found. Two solution sets are found

  14. Origin and dynamical evolution of Neptune Trojans - I. Formation and planetary migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykawka, P. S.; Horner, J.; Jones, B. W.; Mukai, T.

    2009-10-01

    We present the results of detailed dynamical simulations of the effect of the migration of the four giant planets on both the transport of pre-formed Neptune Trojans and the capture of new Trojans from a trans-Neptunian disc. The cloud of pre-formed Trojans consisted of thousands of massless particles placed on dynamically cold orbits around Neptune's L4 and L5 Lagrange points, while the trans-Neptunian disc contained tens of thousands of such particles spread on dynamically cold orbits between the initial and final locations of Neptune. Through the comparison of the results with the previous work on the known Neptunian Trojans, we find that scenarios involving the slow migration of Neptune over a large distance (50 Myr to migrate from 18.1 au to its current location, using an exponential-folding time of τ = 10 Myr) provide the best match to the properties of the known Trojans. Scenarios with faster migration (5Myr, with τ = 1Myr), and those in which Neptune migrates from 23.1 au to its current location, fail to adequately reproduce the current-day Trojan population. Scenarios which avoid disruptive perturbation events between Uranus and Neptune fail to yield any significant excitation of pre-formed Trojans (transported with efficiencies between 30 and 98 per cent whilst maintaining the dynamically cold nature of these objects - e < 0.1, i < 5°). Conversely, scenarios with periods of strong Uranus-Neptune perturbation lead to the almost complete loss of such pre-formed objects. In these cases, a small fraction (~0.15 per cent) of these escaped objects are later recaptured as Trojans prior to the end of migration, with a wide range of eccentricities (<0.35) and inclinations (<40°). In all scenarios (including those with such disruptive interaction between Uranus and Neptune), the capture of objects from the trans-Neptunian disc (through which Neptune migrates) is achieved with efficiencies between ~0.1 and ~1 per cent. The captured Trojans display a wide range

  15. Computer simulation of the dynamic process of mark formation for magneto-optical memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Motoko; Moroga, Katsumi; Okada, Mitsuya; Okada, Osamu; Hidaka, Yasuharu

    1994-02-01

    A computer simulation method, based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation was developed in order to investigate the dynamics of magneto-optical recording and the mark writing process for the rare earth-transition metal amorphous magneto-optical layer was subsequently analyzed. It was found that the writing process depends sensitively on the spot radius of the irradiation laser. This result is discussed considering the reverse magnetized domain shrinking force, due to radial direction variation of wall energy density in a cylindrical domain model and the characteristics of the magnetic parameters. The writing process is especially affected by the temperature dependence of parameters in the region near the Curie temperature.

  16. Formation of H̅ in p̅-Ps collisions embedded in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnavelu, Kuru; Ghoshal, Arijit; Nayek, Sujay; Bhattacharya, Arka; Kamali, Mohd Zahurin Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Screening effects of plasmas on the formation of antihydrogen (H̅) in an arbitrary s-state from the ground state of the positronium atom (Ps) by antiproton (p̅) impact have been studied within the framework of charge-conjugation and time-reversal invariance. Two types of plasma environments have been considered, namely weakly coupled plasma and dense quantum plasma. For weakly coupled plasma, the interactions among the charged particles in plasma have been represented by Debye-Huckel screening model, whereas for dense quantum plasma, interactions among the charged particles in plasma have been represented by exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. Effects of plasma screening on the antihydrogen formation cross section have been studied in the energy range 15-400 keV of incident antiproton. For the free atomic case, our results agree well with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  17. TIDAL DISRUPTIONS IN CIRCUMBINARY DISKS. I. STAR FORMATION, DYNAMICS, AND BINARY EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Brem, Patrick; Cuadra, Jorge E-mail: Patrick.Brem@aei.mpg.de

    2013-02-10

    In our current interpretation of the hierarchical structure of the universe, it is well established that galaxies collide and merge with each other during their lifetimes. If massive black holes (MBHs) reside in galactic centers, we expect them to form binaries in galactic nuclei surrounded by a circumbinary disk. If cooling is efficient enough, the gas in the disk will clump and trigger stellar formation in situ. In this first paper we address the evolution of the binary under the influence of the newly formed stars, which form individually and also clustered. We use smoothed particle hydrodynamics techniques to evolve the gas in the circumbinary disk and to study the phase of star formation. When the amount of gas in the disk is negligible, we further evolve the system with a high-accurate direct-summation N-body code to follow the evolution of the stars, the innermost binary and tidal disruption events (TDEs). For this, we modify the direct N-body code to include (1) treatment of TDEs and (2) 'gas cloud particles' that mimic the gas, so that the stellar clusters do not dissolve when we follow their infall on to the MBHs. We find that the amount of stars disrupted by either infalling stellar clusters or individual stars is as large as 10{sup -4} yr{sup -1} per binary, higher than expected for typical galaxies.

  18. Regulating temporospatial dynamics of morphogen for structure formation of the lacrimal gland by chitosan biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ya-Chuan; Yang, Tsung-Lin

    2017-01-01

    The lacrimal gland is an important organ responsible for regulating tear synthesis and secretion. The major work of lacrimal gland (LG) is to lubricate the ocular surface and maintain the health of eyes. Functional deterioration of the lacrimal gland happens because of aging, diseases, or therapeutic complications, but without effective treatments till now. The LG originates from the epithelium of ocular surface and develops by branching morphogenesis. To regenerate functional LGs, it is required to explore the way of recapitulating and facilitating the organ to establish the intricate and ramified structure. In this study, we proposed an approach using chitosan biomaterials to create a biomimetic environment beneficial to the branching structure formation of developing LG. The morphogenetic effect of chitosan was specific and optimized to promote LG branching. With chitosan, increase in temporal expression and local concentration of endogenous HGF-related molecules creates an environment around the emerging tip of LG epithelia. By efficiently enhancing downstream signaling of HGF pathways, the cellular activities and behaviors were activated to contribute to LG branching morphogenesis. The morphogenetic effect of chitosan was abolished by either ligand or receptor deprivation, or inhibition of downstream signaling transduction. Our results elucidated the underlying mechanism accounting for chitosan morphogenetic effects on LG, and also proposed promising approaches with chitosan to assist tissue structure formation of the LG.

  19. Dynamics of carrier populations and localized spins during magnetic-polaron formation in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Biplob; Oszwaldowski, Rafal; Schweidenback, Lars; Russ, Andreas; Murphy, Joseph; Cartwright, Alexander; Zutic, Igor; McCombe, Bruce; Petrou, Athos; Chou, Wu-Ching; Chung Fan, Wen; Sellers, Ian; Petukhov, Andre

    2013-03-01

    We have extended our previous investigation of time evolution of PL from (Zn,Mn)Te/ZnSe quantum dots in a magnetic field B. PL studies at T = 5 K in these type-II dots reveal formation of magnetic polarons (MP). We find their formation time τMP to be 0.5 ns, which varies little with B. The circular polarization P of the emission shows a surprising behavior. For all fields, the characteristic time τP is longer than τMP. Furthermore, τP decreases from 10 ns to 1.9 ns as B increases from 1 to 4 tesla. We attribute this effect to a low- B bottleneck in the σ+ recombination channel, due to the almost equal populations of the spin +/- 1 / 2 electrons participating in the interband transitions. In contrast, the +/- 3 / 2 holes in the (Zn,Mn)Te QDs, are affected mostly by the effective field due to exchange interaction between hole and Mn spins around it. This effective field is much larger than B. Work supported by DOE-BES, ONR and NSF.

  20. Dynamics of particle chain formation in a liquid polymer under ac electric field: modeling and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belijar, G.; Valdez-Nava, Z.; Diaham, S.; Laudebat, L.; Jones, T. B.; Lebey, T.

    2017-01-01

    Polymer/ceramic composite materials are of great interest for their many potential applications because of their ability to combine at least two properties of the constitutive elements: particles and matrix. In most cases, such enhanced properties are required only in one direction. Orthotropic materials can be elaborated by applying an ac electric field to form particle chain structures in the direction of the electric field due to the dielectrophoretic interactions affecting the particles. However, there is still a lack in the understanding of the impact of the structures on the properties of the material. The aim of this study is to propose a predictive model for the evolution of the permittivity during the chain formation, by including micro- and macroscopic phenomena. The chaining model is based on dipole-dipole interactions and the dielectric permittivity is computed through a finite element method. In parallel, an experimental study is performed with online permittivity measurements of composites during chaining. The developed model is able to predict the experimental results from 1 vol% while taking into account parameters such as the resin viscosity and permittivity and the transient evolution of the applied electric field. The formation of particle chains inside a material has applications in many domains such as electrorheological fluids, anisotropic composites, self-recovery materials etc. Such a developed model is a valuable tool for the tailoring of materials.

  1. Dynamics of Magnesite Formation at Low Temperature and High pCO2 in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Qafoku, Odeta; Dixon, David A; Rosso, Kevin M; Schaef, Herbert T; Bowden, Mark E; Arey, Bruce W; Felmy, Andrew R

    2015-09-01

    Magnesite precipitation from aqueous solution, despite conditions of supersaturation, is kinetically hindered at low temperatures for reasons that remain poorly understood. The present study examines the products of Mg(OH)2 reaction in solutions saturated with supercritical CO2 at high pressures (90 and 110 atm) and low temperatures (35 and 50 °C). Solids characterization combined with in situ solution analysis reveal that the first reaction products are the hydrated carbonates hydromagnesite and nesquehonite, appearing simultaneously with brucite dissolution. Magnesite is not observed until it comprises a minor product at 7 days reaction at 50 °C. Complete transition to magnesite as the sole product at 35 °C (135 days) and at a faster rate at 50 °C (56 days) occurs as the hydrated carbonates slowly dissolve under the slightly acidic conditions generated at high pCO2. Such a reaction progression at high pCO2 suggests that over long term the hydrated Mg-carbonates functioned as intermediates in magnesite formation. These findings highlight the importance of developing a better understanding of the processes expected to occur during CO2 storage. They also support the importance of integrating magnesite as an equilibrium phase in reactive transport calculations of the effects of CO2 sequestration on geological formations at long time scale.

  2. Flow Field and Nutrient Dynamics Control Over Formation of Parallel Vegetation Patterns in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, V.; Cheng, Y.; Stieglitz, M.

    2009-12-01

    Pattern formation in vegetated communities reflects the underlying mechanisms governing resource utilization and distribution across the landscape. An example of a patterned ecosystem is the Florida Everglades, which is characterized by parallel and slightly elevated peat "ridges" separated by deeper water "slough" communities (R&S). Ridges are dominated by sawgrass (Cladium jamaiscence). These patterns are thought to be aligned with and develop in response to the historic surface water flow direction, though the precise mechanisms which lead to their formation are poorly understood. Over the years this R&S habitat has degraded in areas where the natural flow regime, hydroperiod, and water depths have been impacted by human development. Managing and restoring this habitat has been an objective of the U.S. Federal and Florida State governments since the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) was authorized in 2000. It is imperative, however, to develop a mechanistic understanding of ridge-slough formation before the potential benefits of hydrologic forecasts associated with CERP can be evaluated. Recently, Cheng et al (see Cheng et al, session NG14) employed a simple 2D advection-diffusion model developed by Rietkerk et al (2004) to describe for the first time, the formation of parallel stripes from hydrologic interactions. To simulate parallel stripes, Cheng et al retained the basic equations of the Rietkerk model but allowed for constant advection of water and nutrient in one direction to simulate slope conditions, with evapotranspiration driven advection of water and nutrient perpendicular to the downhill flow direction. We employ this modeling framework and parameterize the model with Everglades field data to simulate ridge-slough formation. In this model, the relatively higher rates of evapotranspiration on the ridges compared to the sloughs create hydraulic gradients which carry dissolved nutrients from the sloughs to the faster growing ridges. With

  3. Varicella-zoster virus induces the formation of dynamic nuclear capsid aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Marielle; Thelen, Nicolas; Thiry, Marc; Riva, Laura; Ote, Isabelle; Condé, Claude; Vandevenne, Patricia; Di Valentin, Emmanuel; Bontems, Sébastien; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine

    2014-04-15

    The first step of herpesviruses virion assembly occurs in the nucleus. However, the exact site where nucleocapsids are assembled, where the genome and the inner tegument are acquired, remains controversial. We created a recombinant VZV expressing ORF23 (homologous to HSV-1 VP26) fused to the eGFP and dually fluorescent viruses with a tegument protein additionally fused to a red tag (ORF9, ORF21 and ORF22 corresponding to HSV-1 UL49, UL37 and UL36). We identified nuclear dense structures containing the major capsid protein, the scaffold protein and maturing protease, as well as ORF21 and ORF22. Correlative microscopy demonstrated that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates and time-lapse video imaging showed that they appear prior to the accumulation of cytoplasmic capsids, presumably undergoing the secondary egress, and are highly dynamic. Our observations suggest that these structures might represent a nuclear area important for capsid assembly and/or maturation before the budding at the inner nuclear membrane. - Highlights: • We created a recombinant VZV expressing the small capsid protein fused to the eGFP. • We identified nuclear dense structures containing capsid and procapsid proteins. • Correlative microscopy showed that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates. • Procapsids and partial capsids are found within the aggregates of WT and eGFP-23 VZV. • FRAP and FLIP experiments demonstrated that they are dynamic structures.

  4. Self-assembly formation of palm-based esters nano-emulsion: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Rahman, Mohd. Basyaruddin; Huan, Qiu-Yi; Tejo, Bimo A.; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Abdul

    2009-10-01

    Palm-oil esters (POEs) are unsaturated and non-ionic esters that can be prepared by enzymatic synthesis from palm oil. Their nano-emulsion properties possess great potential to act as drug carrier for transdermal drug delivery system. A ratio of 75:5:20 (water/POEs/Span20) was chosen from homogenous region in the phase diagram of our previous experimental work to undergo molecular dynamics simulation. A 15 ns molecular dynamics simulation of nano-emulsion system (water/POEs/Span20) was carried out using OPLS-AA force field. The aggregations of the oil and surfactant molecules are observed throughout the simulation. After 8 ns of simulation, the molecules start to aggregate to form one spherical micelle where the POEs molecules are surrounded by the non-ionic surfactant (Span20) molecules with an average size of 4.2 ± 0.05 nm. The size of the micelle and the ability of palm-based nano-emulsion to self-assemble suggest that this nano-emulsion can potentially use in transdermal drug delivery system.

  5. Vortex formation and dynamics in two-dimensional driven-dissipative condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebenstreit, F.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the real-time evolution of lattice bosons in two spatial dimensions whose dynamics is governed by a Markovian quantum master equation. We employ the Wigner-Weyl phase space quantization and derive the functional integral for open quantum many-body systems that determines the time evolution of the Wigner function. Using the truncated Wigner approximation, in which quantum fluctuations are only taken into account in the initial state whereas the dynamics is governed by classical evolution equations, we study the buildup of long-range correlations due to the action of non-Hermitean quantum jump operators that constitute a mechanism for dissipative cooling. Starting from an initially disordered state corresponding to a vortex condensate, the dissipative process results in the annihilation of vortex-antivortex pairs and the establishment of quasi-long-range order at late times. We observe that a finite vortex density survives the cooling process, which disagrees with the analytically constructed vortex-free Bose-Einstein condensate at asymptotic times. This indicates that quantum fluctuations beyond the truncated Wigner approximation need to be included to fully capture the physics of dissipative Bose-Einstein condensation.

  6. Competition of thermodynamic and dynamic factors during formation of multicomponent particles via spray drying.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kohsaku; Hasegawa, Yusuke; Deguchi, Kenzo; Ohki, Shinobu; Shimizu, Tadashi; Yoshihashi, Yasuo; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Terada, Katsuhide

    2013-02-01

    As psicose cannot be spray dried because of its low glass transition temperature (T(g)), additives have been used to manufacture spray-dried particles. Its thermodynamic miscibility with each additive was evaluated by thermal analysis and C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. Aspartame was miscible with psicose at all ratios, and spray-dried particles were obtained when T(g) of the mixture was higher than the outlet temperature of the spray dryer, where 30 wt % of psicose was loaded. poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and cluster dextrin were partially miscible with psicose, with a maximum loading of 40 wt %. When polymeric excipients were used, their mixing behavior with psicose was affected by the dynamic factor during the spray drying, that is, enhanced phase separation due to the molecular-weight difference. The T(g) value of the polymer-rich phases, which were likely to form shell layers on the surfaces, played an important role in determining availability of the spray-dried particles. Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) offered a very effective loading capacity of 80 wt %, due to distinct phase separation to form shell phase with a very high T(g). Because molecular weight of HPMC was the smallest among the polymeric excipients, the thermodynamic miscibility seemed to affect the dynamic phase separation. These results provide useful information for preparing multicomponent spray-dried particles.

  7. Dynamic Modelling Reveals ‘Hotspots’ on the Pathway to Enzyme-Substrate Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Shane E.; Weber, Daniel K.; Downton, Matthew T.; Wagner, John; Perugini, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) catalyzes the first committed step in the diaminopimelate pathway of bacteria, yielding amino acids required for cell wall and protein biosyntheses. The essentiality of the enzyme to bacteria, coupled with its absence in humans, validates DHDPS as an antibacterial drug target. Conventional drug design efforts have thus far been unsuccessful in identifying potent DHDPS inhibitors. Here, we make use of contemporary molecular dynamics simulation and Markov state models to explore the interactions between DHDPS from the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and its cognate substrate, pyruvate. Our simulations recover the crystallographic DHDPS-pyruvate complex without a priori knowledge of the final bound structure. The highly conserved residue Arg140 was found to have a pivotal role in coordinating the entry of pyruvate into the active site from bulk solvent, consistent with previous kinetic reports, indicating an indirect role for the residue in DHDPS catalysis. A metastable binding intermediate characterized by multiple points of intermolecular interaction between pyruvate and key DHDPS residue Arg140 was found to be a highly conserved feature of the binding trajectory when comparing alternative binding pathways. By means of umbrella sampling we show that these binding intermediates are thermodynamically metastable, consistent with both the available experimental data and the substrate binding model presented in this study. Our results provide insight into an important enzyme-substrate interaction in atomistic detail that offers the potential to be exploited for the discovery of more effective DHDPS inhibitors and, in a broader sense, dynamic protein-drug interactions. PMID:26967332

  8. Decreased Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on nanomodified endotracheal tubes: a dynamic airway model.

    PubMed

    Machado, Mary C; Tarquinio, Keiko M; Webster, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a serious and costly clinical problem. Specifically, receiving mechanical ventilation for over 24 hours increases the risk of VAP and is associated with high morbidity, mortality, and medical costs. Cost-effective endotracheal tubes (ETTs) that are resistant to bacterial infections could help prevent this problem. The objective of this study was to determine differences in the growth of Staphylococcus aureus on nanomodified and unmodified polyvinyl chloride (PVC) ETTs under dynamic airway conditions simulating a ventilated patient. PVC ETTs were modified to have nanometer surface features by soaking them in Rhizopus arrhisus, a fungal lipase. Twenty-four-hour experiments (supported by computational models) showed that airflow conditions within the ETT influenced both the location and the concentration of bacterial growth on the ETTs, especially within areas of tube curvature. More importantly, experiments revealed a 1.5 log reduction in the total number of S. aureus on the novel nanomodified ETTs compared with the conventional ETTs after 24 hours of airflow. This dynamic study showed that lipase etching can create nanorough surface features on PVC ETTs that suppress S. aureus growth, and thus may provide clinicians with an effective and inexpensive tool to combat VAP.

  9. Decreased Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on nanomodified endotracheal tubes: a dynamic airway model

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Mary C; Tarquinio, Keiko M; Webster, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a serious and costly clinical problem. Specifically, receiving mechanical ventilation for over 24 hours increases the risk of VAP and is associated with high morbidity, mortality, and medical costs. Cost-effective endotracheal tubes (ETTs) that are resistant to bacterial infections could help prevent this problem. The objective of this study was to determine differences in the growth of Staphylococcus aureus on nanomodified and unmodified polyvinyl chloride (PVC) ETTs under dynamic airway conditions simulating a ventilated patient. PVC ETTs were modified to have nanometer surface features by soaking them in Rhizopus arrhisus, a fungal lipase. Twenty-four-hour experiments (supported by computational models) showed that airflow conditions within the ETT influenced both the location and the concentration of bacterial growth on the ETTs, especially within areas of tube curvature. More importantly, experiments revealed a 1.5 log reduction in the total number of S. aureus on the novel nanomodified ETTs compared with the conventional ETTs after 24 hours of airflow. This dynamic study showed that lipase etching can create nanorough surface features on PVC ETTs that suppress S. aureus growth, and thus may provide clinicians with an effective and inexpensive tool to combat VAP. PMID:22904622

  10. Dynamic Filament Formation by a Divergent Bacterial Actin-Like ParM Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brzoska, Anthony J.; Jensen, Slade O.; Barton, Deborah A.; Davies, Danielle S.; Overall, Robyn L.; Skurray, Ronald A.; Firth, Neville

    2016-01-01

    Actin-like proteins (Alps) are a diverse family of proteins whose genes are abundant in the chromosomes and mobile genetic elements of many bacteria. The low-copy-number staphylococcal multiresistance plasmid pSK41 encodes ParM, an Alp involved in efficient plasmid partitioning. pSK41 ParM has previously been shown to form filaments in vitro that are structurally dissimilar to those formed by other bacterial Alps. The mechanistic implications of these differences are not known. In order to gain insights into the properties and behavior of the pSK41 ParM Alp in vivo, we reconstituted the parMRC system in the ectopic rod-shaped host, E. coli, which is larger and more genetically amenable than the native host, Staphylococcus aureus. Fluorescence microscopy showed a functional fusion protein, ParM-YFP, formed straight filaments in vivo when expressed in isolation. Strikingly, however, in the presence of ParR and parC, ParM-YFP adopted a dramatically different structure, instead forming axial curved filaments. Time-lapse imaging and selective photobleaching experiments revealed that, in the presence of all components of the parMRC system, ParM-YFP filaments were dynamic in nature. Finally, molecular dissection of the parMRC operon revealed that all components of the system are essential for the generation of dynamic filaments. PMID:27310470

  11. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-15

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  12. Formation dynamics of subsurface hydrocarbon intrusions following the Deepwater Horizon blowout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Socolofsky, S.A.; Adams, E.E.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrocarbons released following the Deepwater Horizon (DH) blowout were found in deep, subsurface horizontal intrusions, yet there has been little discussion about how these intrusions formed. We have combined measured (or estimated) observations from the DH release with empirical relationships developed from previous lab experiments to identify the mechanisms responsible for intrusion formation and to characterize the DH plume. Results indicate that the intrusions originate from a stratification-dominated multiphase plume characterized by multiple subsurface intrusions containing dissolved gas and oil along with small droplets of liquid oil. Unlike earlier lab measurements, where the potential density in ambient water decreased linearly with elevation, at the DH site it varied quadratically. We have modified our method for estimating intrusion elevation under these conditions and the resulting estimates agree with observations that the majority of the hydrocarbons were found between 800 and 1200 m. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Formation dynamics of subsurface hydrocarbon intrusions following the Deepwater Horizon blowout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Socolofsky, Scott A.; Adams, E. Eric; Sherwood, Christopher R.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrocarbons released following the Deepwater Horizon (DH) blowout were found in deep, subsurface horizontal intrusions, yet there has been little discussion about how these intrusions formed. We have combined measured (or estimated) observations from the DH release with empirical relationships developed from previous lab experiments to identify the mechanisms responsible for intrusion formation and to characterize the DH plume. Results indicate that the intrusions originate from a stratification-dominated multiphase plume characterized by multiple subsurface intrusions containing dissolved gas and oil along with small droplets of liquid oil. Unlike earlier lab measurements, where the potential density in ambient water decreased linearly with elevation, at the DH site it varied quadratically. We have modified our method for estimating intrusion elevation under these conditions and the resulting estimates agree with observations that the majority of the hydrocarbons were found between 800 and 1200 m.

  14. Flow-field dynamics during droplet formation by dripping in hydrodynamic-focusing microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Funfschilling, D; Debas, H; Li, H-Z; Mason, T G

    2009-07-01

    Using microscopic particle image velocimetry, we examine the flow field around an oil droplet as it is formed by hydrodynamic focusing in an aqueous solution using a pressure-driven cross-channel microfluidic device. By detecting the temporal dependence of the instantaneous flow fields of the continuous phase in the dripping regime, we show that shear is not the primary mechanism that initiates droplet formation in our low flow rate and moderate capillary number experimental conditions. Instead, the advancing finger of oil partially and temporarily plugs the outlet channel, creating a pressure difference that builds up and is released when water from the side channels pushes the tip of the finger into the outlet channel, thereby facilitating the birth of the droplet by interfacial pinch-off that is primarily initiated by an extensional flow.

  15. Holocene monsoonal dynamics and fluvial terrace formation in the northwest Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, B.; Fleitmann, D.; Nishiizumi, K.; Strecker, M. R.; Thiede, R. C.

    2006-07-01

    Aluminum-26 and beryllium-10 surface exposure dating on cut-and-fill river-terrace surfaces from the lower Sutlej Valley (northwest Himalaya) documents the close link between Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) oscillations and intervals of enhanced fluvial incision. During the early Holocene ISM optimum, precipitation was enhanced and reached far into the internal parts of the orogen. The amplified sediment flux from these usually dry but glaciated areas caused alluviation of downstream valleys up to 120 m above present grade at ca. 9.9 k.y. B.P. Terrace formation (i.e., incision) in the coarse deposits occurred during century-long weak ISM phases that resulted in reduced moisture availability and most likely in lower sediment flux. Here, we suggest that the lower sediment flux during weak ISM phases allowed rivers to incise episodically into the alluvial fill.

  16. Lipid Droplet Formation, Their Localization and Dynamics during Leishmania major Macrophage Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rabhi, Sameh; Rabhi, Imen; Trentin, Bernadette; Piquemal, David; Regnault, Béatrice; Goyard, Sophie; Lang, Thierry; Descoteaux, Albert; Enninga, Jost; Guizani-Tabbane, Lamia

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania, the causative agent of vector-borne diseases, known as leishmaniases, is an obligate intracellular parasite within mammalian hosts. The outcome of infection depends largely on the activation status of macrophages, the first line of mammalian defense and the major target cells for parasite replication. Understanding the strategies developed by the parasite to circumvent macrophage defense mechanisms and to survive within those cells help defining novel therapeutic approaches for leishmaniasis. We previously showed the formation of lipid droplets (LDs) in L. major infected macrophages. Here, we provide novel insights on the origin of the formed LDs by determining their cellular distribution and to what extent these high-energy sources are directed to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. We show that the ability of L. major to trigger macrophage LD accumulation is independent of parasite viability and uptake and can also be observed in non-infected cells through paracrine stimuli suggesting that LD formation is from cellular origin. The accumulation of LDs is demonstrated using confocal microscopy and live-cell imagin in parasite-free cytoplasmic region of the host cell, but also promptly recruited to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. Indeed LDs are observed inside parasitophorous vacuole and in parasite cytoplasm suggesting that Leishmania parasites besides producing their own LDs, may take advantage of these high energy sources. Otherwise, these LDs may help cells defending against parasitic infection. These metabolic changes, rising as common features during the last years, occur in host cells infected by a large number of pathogens and seem to play an important role in pathogenesis. Understanding how Leishmania parasites and different pathogens exploit this LD accumulation will help us define the common mechanism used by these different pathogens to manipulate and/or take advantage of this high-energy source. PMID:26871576

  17. From Dynamic Expression Patterns to Boundary Formation in the Presomitic Mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Tiedemann, Hendrik B.; Schneltzer, Elida; Zeiser, Stefan; Hoesel, Bastian; Beckers, Johannes; Przemeck, Gerhard K. H.; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě

    2012-01-01

    The segmentation of the vertebrate body is laid down during early embryogenesis. The formation of signaling gradients, the periodic expression of genes of the Notch-, Fgf- and Wnt-pathways and their interplay in the unsegmented presomitic mesoderm (PSM) precedes the rhythmic budding of nascent somites at its anterior end, which later develops into epithelialized structures, the somites. Although many in silico models describing partial aspects of somitogenesis already exist, simulations of a complete causal chain from gene expression in the growth zone via the interaction of multiple cells to segmentation are rare. Here, we present an enhanced gene regulatory network (GRN) for mice in a simulation program that models the growing PSM by many virtual cells and integrates WNT3A and FGF8 gradient formation, periodic gene expression and Delta/Notch signaling. Assuming Hes7 as core of the somitogenesis clock and LFNG as modulator, we postulate a negative feedback of HES7 on Dll1 leading to an oscillating Dll1 expression as seen in vivo. Furthermore, we are able to simulate the experimentally observed wave of activated NOTCH (NICD) as a result of the interactions in the GRN. We esteem our model as robust for a wide range of parameter values with the Hes7 mRNA and protein decays exerting a strong influence on the core oscillator. Moreover, our model predicts interference between Hes1 and HES7 oscillators when their intrinsic frequencies differ. In conclusion, we have built a comprehensive model of somitogenesis with HES7 as core oscillator that is able to reproduce many experimentally observed data in mice. PMID:22761566

  18. Product formation controlled by substrate dynamics in leukotriene A4 hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Stsiapanava, Alena; Tholander, Fredrik; Kumar, Ramakrishnan B; Qureshi, Abdul Aziz; Niegowski, Damian; Hasan, Mahmudul; Thunnissen, Marjolein; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes

    2014-02-01

    Leukotriene A4 hydrolase/aminopeptidase (LTA4H) (EC 3.3.2.6) is a bifunctional zinc metalloenzyme with both an epoxide hydrolase and an aminopeptidase activity. LTA4H from the African claw toad, Xenopus laevis (xlLTA4H) has been shown to, unlike the human enzyme, convert LTA4 to two enzymatic metabolites, LTB4 and another biologically active product Δ(6)-trans-Δ(8)-cis-LTB4 (5(S),12R-dihydroxy-6,10-trans-8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid). In order to study the molecular aspect of the formation of this product we have characterized the structure and function of xlLTA4H. We solved the structure of xlLTA4H to a resolution of 2.3Å. It is a dimeric structure where each monomer has three domains with the active site in between the domains, similar as to the human structure. An important difference between the human and amphibian enzyme is the phenylalanine to tyrosine exchange at position 375. Our studies show that mutating F375 in xlLTA4H to tyrosine abolishes the formation of the LTB4 isomeric product Δ(6)-trans-Δ(8)-cis-LTB4. In an attempt to understand how one amino acid exchange leads to a new product profile as seen in the xlLTA4H, we performed a conformer analysis of the triene part of the substrate LTA4. Our results show that the Boltzmann distribution of substrate conformers correlates with the observed distribution of products. We suggest that the observed difference in product profile between the human and the xlLTA4H arises from different level of discrimination between substrate LTA4 conformers.

  19. Stepwise dynamics of an anionic micellar film - Formation of crown lenses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongju; Nikolov, Alex; Wasan, Darsh

    2017-06-15

    We studied the stepwise thinning of a microscopic circular foam film formed from an anionic micellar solution of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The foam film formed from the SDS micellar solution thins in a stepwise manner by the formation and expansion of a dark spot(s) of one layer less than the film thickness. During the last stages of film thinning (e.g., a film with one micellar layer), the dark spot expansion occurs via two steps. Initially, a small dark circular spot inside a film of several microns in size is formed, which expands at a constant rate. Then, a ridge along the expanding spot is formed. As the ridge grows, it becomes unstable and breaks into regular crown lenses, which are seen as white spots in the reflected light at the border of the dark spot with the surrounding thicker film. The Rayleigh type of instability contributes to the formation of the lenses, which results in the increase of the dark spot expansion rate with time. We applied the two-dimensional micellar-vacancy diffusion model and took into consideration the effects of the micellar layering and film volume on the rate of the dark spot expansion [Lee et al., 2016] to predict the rate of the dark spot expansion for a 0.06M SDS film in the presence of lenses. We briefly discuss the Rayleigh type of instability in the case of a 0.06M SDS foam film. The goals of this study are to reveal why the crown lenses are formed during the foam film stratification and to elucidate their effect on the rate of spot expansion.

  20. Lipid Droplet Formation, Their Localization and Dynamics during Leishmania major Macrophage Infection.

    PubMed

    Rabhi, Sameh; Rabhi, Imen; Trentin, Bernadette; Piquemal, David; Regnault, Béatrice; Goyard, Sophie; Lang, Thierry; Descoteaux, Albert; Enninga, Jost; Guizani-Tabbane, Lamia

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania, the causative agent of vector-borne diseases, known as leishmaniases, is an obligate intracellular parasite within mammalian hosts. The outcome of infection depends largely on the activation status of macrophages, the first line of mammalian defense and the major target cells for parasite replication. Understanding the strategies developed by the parasite to circumvent macrophage defense mechanisms and to survive within those cells help defining novel therapeutic approaches for leishmaniasis. We previously showed the formation of lipid droplets (LDs) in L. major infected macrophages. Here, we provide novel insights on the origin of the formed LDs by determining their cellular distribution and to what extent these high-energy sources are directed to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. We show that the ability of L. major to trigger macrophage LD accumulation is independent of parasite viability and uptake and can also be observed in non-infected cells through paracrine stimuli suggesting that LD formation is from cellular origin. The accumulation of LDs is demonstrated using confocal microscopy and live-cell imagin in parasite-free cytoplasmic region of the host cell, but also promptly recruited to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. Indeed LDs are observed inside parasitophorous vacuole and in parasite cytoplasm suggesting that Leishmania parasites besides producing their own LDs, may take advantage of these high energy sources. Otherwise, these LDs may help cells defending against parasitic infection. These metabolic changes, rising as common features during the last years, occur in host cells infected by a large number of pathogens and seem to play an important role in pathogenesis. Understanding how Leishmania parasites and different pathogens exploit this LD accumulation will help us define the common mechanism used by these different pathogens to manipulate and/or take advantage of this high-energy source.

  1. Dynamics of Plug Formation in a Circular Cylinder Under Low Bond Number Conditions: Experiment and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallaby, Ghazi; Kizito, John P.

    2016-08-01

    The goal of the current study is to investigate the dynamics of two phase interface under a low Bond number condition. Silicone oil is injected into a cylinder under a Bond number of about 0.47 via a side tube forming a T-junction with the former. The time evolution of the interface of silicon oil in a cylinder is captured using a high speed camera. The volume at which the plug is formed is then determined using an image processing tool to analyze the captured images. A numerical simulation is carried out where fluid is injected into a cylinder, under a less than unity Bond number condition, via a side tube. Numerical and experimental results are then compared.

  2. Formation and decay of tetrazane derivatives--a Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Nonnenberg, Christel; Frank, Irmgard

    2008-08-14

    The complications during flight 510 of the Ariane Project were ascribed to problems in the upper stage engine that employs the bipropellant monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO). This has led to the question what conditions or reactions possibly cause an uncontrolled behaviour in the combustion process of MMH/NTO. We use first-principles molecular dynamics to investigate the reactions of the hypergolic mixture in different chemical situations. It was possible to observe the ultrafast redox reaction between the reactants on the timescale of an unconstrained simulation. We show that electrostatic attraction is crucial for the understanding of this reaction. Besides a cold reaction preceding the ignition, a reaction path leading to the highly reactive compound dimethyltetrazane could be identified.

  3. Bulge formation and necking in a polymer tube under dynamic expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgreen, Britta; Tvergaard, Viggo; Needleman, Alan

    2008-12-01

    Bulging and necking in long thin polymer tubes subjected to increasing internal pressure are analysed numerically. The polymer is characterized by a finite strain elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation and the calculations are carried out using a dynamic finite element program. Two types of imposed loading are prescribed: (i) a pressure that increases linearly with time and (ii) a change in enclosed volume that increases linearly with time. For both loading conditions, an axisymmetric bulge develops on the tube followed by necking in the bulge. The necks propagate in both the circumferential and the axial directions. Multiple necks form at locations given by the thin points associated with the wave number of the prescribed initial thickness imperfection. When a change in enclosed volume is prescribed, the pressure reaches a maximum, decreases and then stays approximately constant. One neck eventually becomes dominant in that it propagates further along the tube axis than any of the other necks.

  4. Instability dynamics and breather formation in a horizontally shaken pendulum chain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Alexander, T J; Sidhu, H; Kevrekidis, P G

    2014-10-01

    Inspired by the experimental results of Cuevas et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 224101 (2009)], we consider theoretically the behavior of a chain of planar rigid pendulums suspended in a uniform gravitational field and subjected to a horizontal periodic driving force applied to the pendulum pivots. We characterize the motion of a single pendulum, finding bistability near the fundamental resonance and near the period-3 subharmonic resonance. We examine the development of modulational instability in a driven pendulum chain and find both a critical chain length and a critical frequency for the appearance of the instability. We study the breather solutions and show their connection to the single-pendulum dynamics and extend our analysis to consider multifrequency breathers connected to the period-3 periodic solution, showing also the possibility of stability in these breather states. Finally we examine the problem of breather generation and demonstrate a robust scheme for generation of on-site and off-site breathers.

  5. Spinor dynamics-driven formation of a dual-beam atom laser.

    PubMed

    Lundblad, N; Thompson, R J; Aveline, D C; Maleki, L

    2006-10-30

    We demonstrate a novel dual-beam atom laser formed by outcoupling oppositely polarized components of an all-optical F = 1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensate whose Zeeman sublevel populations have been coherently evolved through spin dynamics. The condensate is formed through all-optical means using a single-beam running-wave dipole trap. We create a condensate in the magnetic field-insensitive m(F) = 0 state, and drive coherent spin-mixing evolution through adiabatic compression of the initially weak trap. Such dual beams, number-correlated through the angular momentum-conserving reaction 2m(0) ?m(+1) +m(-1), have been proposed as tools to explore entanglement and squeezing in Bose-Einstein condensates, and have potential use in precision phase measurements.

  6. Ignition and formation dynamics of a polariton condensate on a semiconductor microcavity pillar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, C.; Solnyshkov, D.; Tosi, G.; Martín, M. D.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Deligeorgis, G.; Savvidis, P. G.; Malpuech, G.; Viña, L.

    2014-10-01

    We present an experimental study on the ignition and decay of a polariton optical parametric oscillator (OPO) in a semiconductor microcavity pillar. The combination of a continuous-wave laser pump, under quasi-phase-matching conditions, and a nonresonant, 2-ps-long pulse probe allows us to obtain the full dynamics of the system. The arrival of the probe induces a blueshift in the polariton emission, bringing the OPO process into resonance with the pump, which triggers the OPO process. We time-resolve the polariton OPO signal emission for more than 1 ns in both real space and momentum space. We fully characterize the emission of the OPO signal with spectral tomography techniques. Our interpretations are backed up by theoretical simulations based on the two-dimensional coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equation for excitons and photons.

  7. Proposed formation and dynamical signature of a chiral Bose liquid in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaopeng; Paramekanti, Arun; Hemmerich, Andreas; Liu, W Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Recent experiments on p-orbital atomic bosons have suggested the emergence of a spectacular ultracold superfluid with staggered orbital currents in optical lattices. This raises fundamental questions concerning the effects of thermal fluctuations as well as possible ways of directly observing such chiral order. Here we show via Monte Carlo simulations that thermal fluctuations destroy this superfluid in an unexpected two-step process, unveiling an intermediate normal phase with spontaneously broken time-reversal symmetry, dubbed a 'chiral Bose liquid'. For integer fillings (n≥2) in the chiral Mott regime, thermal fluctuations are captured by an effective orbital Ising model, and Onsager's powerful exact solution is adopted to determine the transition from this intermediate liquid to the para-orbital normal phase at high temperature. A lattice quench is designed to convert the staggered angular momentum, previously thought by experts difficult to directly probe, into coherent orbital oscillations, providing a time-resolved dynamical signature of chiral order.

  8. Formation of segmental clusters during relaxation of a fully extended polyethylene chain at 300 K: A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Qi; Jin, Xigao

    1999-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on the relaxation of fully extended polyethylene chains, varying in length from 600 to 4000 CH2 units. When a chain has more than 1200 CH2 units, the relaxation proceeds in three stages, subglobule formation, subglobule growth, and subglobule coalescence into one globule. In the stage of subglobule growth, the number of subglobules is almost a constant because of kinetic barrier, which is different from the results based on Monte Carlo simulations of polymer collapse in dilute solution. The difference of lamella thickness between MD simulations and experiments is discussed. The degree of adjacent reentry is calculated, and amounts between 0.4 and 0.5 for the formed lamellae.

  9. Molecular-dynamics-based model for the formation of arsenic interstitials during low-temperature growth of GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Kunsagi-Mate, Sandor; Vegh, Eszter; Schuer, Carsten; Marek, Tamas; Strunk, Horst P.

    2005-08-15

    The formation of interstitial arsenic defects in low-temperature grown (LT) GaAs layers is examined by temperature dependent, direct trajectory molecular dynamics calculations at semiempirical level. In agreement with earlier ab initio calculations, a metastable interstitial position of an As{sub 2} molecule just below the As-rich c(4x4){beta} reconstructed GaAs(001) surface (characterized by As-As dimers) is obtained. We model this conformation as a precursor state for excess interstitial As in the LT-GaAs layers. Furthermore, a migration layer was found above the surface, where As{sub 2} molecules can move practically freely. We identify the hopping of As{sub 2} molecules from the interstitial position into this migration layer as the process that controls the experimentally observed dependencies of the excess arsenic content on substrate temperature and arsenic overpressure during growth of LT-GaAs layers.

  10. Formation of giant molecular clouds in global spiral structures: The role of orbital dynamics and cloud-cloud collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. W., Jr.; Stewart, G. R.

    1987-01-01

    The different roles played by orbital dynamics and dissipative cloud-cloud collisions in the formation of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in a global spiral structure are investigated. The interstellar medium (ISM) is simulated by a system of particles, representing clouds, which orbit in a spiral-perturbed, galactic gravitational field. The overall magnitude and width of the global cloud density distribution in spiral arms is very similar in the collisional and collisionless simulations. The results suggest that the assumed number density and size distribution of clouds and the details of individual cloud-cloud collisions have relatively little effect on these features. Dissipative cloud-cloud collisions play an important steadying role for the cloud system's global spiral structure. Dissipative cloud-cloud collisions also damp the relative velocity dispersion of clouds in massive associations and thereby aid in the effective assembling of GMC-like complexes.

  11. Formation of a compound flux rope by the merging of two filament channels, the associated dynamics, and its stability

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Inoue, Satoshi; Magara, Tetsuya E-mail: njoshi98@gmail.com

    2014-11-01

    We present observations of compound flux rope formation, which occurred on 2014 January 1, via merging of two nearby filament channels, the associated dynamics, and its stability using multiwavelength data. We also discuss the dynamics of cool and hot plasma moving along the newly formed compound flux rope. The merging started after the interaction between the southern leg of the northward filament and the northern leg of the southward filament at ≈01:21 UT and continued until a compound flux rope formed at ≈01:33 UT. During the merging, the cool filament plasma heated up and started to move along both sides of the compound flux rope, i.e., toward the north (≈265 km s{sup –1}) and south (≈118 km s{sup –1}) from the point of merging. After traveling a distance of ≈150 Mm toward the north, the plasma cooled down and started to return back to the south (≈14 km s{sup –1}) after ≈02:00 UT. The observations provide a clear example of compound flux rope formation via merging of two different flux ropes and the occurrence of a flare through tether cutting reconnection. However, the compound flux rope remained stable in the corona and had a confined eruption. The coronal magnetic field decay index measurements revealed that both the filaments and the compound flux rope axis lie within the stability domain (decay index <1.5), which may be the possible cause for their stability. The present study also deals with the relationship between the filament's chirality (sinistral) and the helicity (positive) of the surrounding flux rope.

  12. Compound nucleus formation probability PCN determined within the dynamical cluster-decay model for various "hot" fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Arshdeep; Chopra, Sahila; Gupta, Raj K.

    2014-08-01

    The compound nucleus (CN) fusion/formation probability PCN is defined and its detailed variations with the CN excitation energy E*, center-of-mass energy Ec .m., fissility parameter χ, CN mass number ACN, and Coulomb interaction parameter Z1Z2 are studied for the first time within the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM). The model is a nonstatistical description of the decay of a CN to all possible processes. The (total) fusion cross section σfusion is the sum of the CN and noncompound nucleus (nCN) decay cross sections, each calculated as the dynamical fragmentation process. The CN cross section σCN is constituted of evaporation residues and fusion-fission, including intermediate-mass fragments, each calculated for all contributing decay fragments (A1, A2) in terms of their formation and barrier penetration probabilities P0 and P. The nCN cross section σnCN is determined as the quasi-fission (qf) process, where P0=1 and P is calculated for the entrance-channel nuclei. The DCM, with effects of deformations and orientations of nuclei included in it, is used to study the PCN for about a dozen "hot" fusion reactions forming a CN of mass number A ˜100 to superheavy nuclei and for various different nuclear interaction potentials. Interesting results are that PCN=1 for complete fusion, but PCN<1 or PCN≪1 due to the nCN contribution, depending strongly on different parameters of the entrance-channel reaction but found to be independent of the nuclear interaction potentials used.

  13. Dynamics of peat accumulation and marl flat formation in a calcareous fen, midwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miner, J.J.; Ketterling, D.B.

    2003-01-01

    The age and sequence of peat accumulation were investigated at a calcareous fen in northeastern Illinois, USA. The purpose of this study was to identify the processes that form and sustain marl flats, which are areas of marl or tufa substrate within the fen that contain numerous rare plant species. Geomorphic, stratigraphic, and radiocarbon evidence was used to establish the processes and chronology of peat accumulation and erosion adjacent to each marl flat. The age of the base of the peat deposit varies greatly throughout the fen, ranging from 14,679 calibrated years before present (cal. years BP) to nearly modern, indicating that colonization of the sand and gravel substrate by peat occurred throughout the period from the Late Pleistocene to present. Adjacent to one marl flat, trends in basal peat age and thickness show that peat accumulation has progressed laterally inward from both sides, suggesting that the marl flat has been infilling with peat progressively by accumulation at the margins since at least 5,370 cal. years BP or longer. A second marl flat in the fen is surrounded by older, thick peat of differing ages on either edge and is bounded by fresh scarps, indicating that the marl flat currently is expanding laterally by erosion into the preexisting peat blanket. These two examples suggest a continuously repeating process, where erosion of the accumulated peat blanket forms a marl flat, which is later covered by peat accumulation. Trends in basal peat age elsewhere in the fen suggest that other marl flats may have existed in the past that have been completely infilled with peat. This study suggests that marl flat formation is a natural process that has been occurring for millennia, continuously creating habitat for the rare plant species that occupy marl flats. There is no evidence that the marl flats at this site are indicative of anthropogenic disturbance, so that management options for these areas are limited to maintaining the quality and quantity

  14. Modular and dynamic approaches to the formation of single-chain polymer nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuten, Bryan Tyler

    The methodology towards the creation of nanoscale polymeric objects by way of the folding of single polymer chains has been enjoying success in the field of polymer chemistry and materials science. By synthesizing polymer chains with built in functionality either through functional side groups, or direct incorporation into the polymer backbone, polymer chemists are able to fold single polymer chains onto themselves through a broad range of covalent and non-covalent interactions in dilute solution. These compact, nano-sized objects can now be used in a wide arrange of functions and applications. The aim of this dissertation is to provide first, a comprehensive overview of the recent advances and success enjoyed by this field and second, to showcase some of the various routes towards the dynamic and modular creation of these single-chain polymer nanoparticles (SCNPs). Chapter 2 of this work discusses the use of dynamic covalent cross-linking chemistry via reversible disulfide bridges in the folding and unfolding of SCNPs. Through the use of triple detection size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) it was shown through changes in retention time, a phenomena indicative of hydrodynamic volume, a polymer was being folded into compact SCNPs and then unfolded and refolded via redox chemistry. Chapter 3 explores the design of polymers that had various different cross-linkable moieties incorporated into the monomer side units. By having cross-linkable moieties that can undergo different chemical cross-linking reactions (i.e thiol-yne click reactions, epoxide ring-opening reactions, activated esters), a modular approach towards the folding and subsequent functionalization of SCNPs is created. Looking to design a system with a greater degree of control over the modular functionality, chapter 4 investigates the use of norbornene imide monomers containing pentafluorophenyl activated esters with varying methylene spacer unites between the polymerizable olefin and the activated ester

  15. Starting mechanisms and dynamics of bubble formation induced by a Ho:Yttrium aluminum garnet laser in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenz, Martin; Könz, Flurin; Pratisto, Hans; Weber, Heinz P.; Silenok, Alexander S.; Konov, Vitaly I.

    1998-12-01

    The starting mechanisms and dynamics of laser-induced bubble formation at a submerged fiber tip in distilled water were experimentally investigated using pressure measurements and fast flash videography. A fiber guided Ho:YAG laser operating in the free running (τ=200 μs) and Q-switched (τ=45 ns) mode at a wavelength of λ=2.12 μm was used as a light source. It is shown that the beam profile at the distal fiber tip (multimode fiber d=300 μm) exhibits hot spots that result in an inhomogeneous temperature distribution in the heated water volume. Depending on the laser irradiance, three different bubble formation processes are distinguished: bubble formation by heating, by rarefraction (cavitation), and by a combination of these two processes. For laser irradiances of less than 0.5 MW/ cm2 bubble formation takes place at temperatures near the critical point of water (T=280 °C). A rapid decrease in the threshold temperature for bubble formation was found for laser irradiances between 0.5 and 1 MW/cm 2. At laser irradiances higher than 3 MW/cm2, microbubbles with radii of up to 20 μm were formed at the front of the laser pulse even though the average water temperature was far below 100 °C. The water temperature distribution during the laser pulse was determined by numerical simulation. Simultaneous pressure measurements revealed that each subablative laser spike induces a bipolar pressure transient. The onset of the bubble expansion was found to be correlated with a characteristic pressure increase that can be used for on-line monitoring of the ablation process. The distortion of the temporal profile of the pressure wave is shown to be an effect of diffraction. The reduction of pressure by the negative part of the bipolar pressure transients leads to a lowering of the evaporation pressure and therefore to the initiation of bubbles by cavitation. With increasing irradiance this mechanism becomes more efficient.

  16. Impact of dynamically induced ozone mini-hole events on PSC formation and chemical ozone destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenke, A.; Grewe, V.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of ozone mini-holes over the extra-tropics of the northern hemisphere on the heterogeneous ozone chemistry is investigated, based on simulations with the coupled climate-chemistry model ECHAM4.L39(DLR)/CHEM. Ozone mini-holes are synoptic-scale regions of strongly reduced total ozone, directly associated with upper troposphere high pressure systems. The simulated mini-hole events are validated with a mini-hole climatology based on daily ozone measurements with the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) instrument on the satellite Nimbus-7 between 1979 and 1993. Furthermore, the impact of mini-holes on the stratospheric heterogeneous ozone chemistry is investigated indirectly. For this purpose, polar stratospheric cloud formation inside mini-holes is suppressed during the model simulation. Heterogeneous processes inside mini-holes amount to one third of the heterogeneous ozone destruction in general over northern mid- and high-latitudes during winter (January-April). This ozone perturbation subsides and recovers during summer with an e-folding time of two months.

  17. Dynamic Sumoylation of a Conserved Transcription Corepressor Prevents Persistent Inclusion Formation during Hyperosmotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Oeser, Michelle L; Amen, Triana; Nadel, Cory M; Bradley, Amanda I; Reed, Benjamin J; Jones, Ramon D; Gopalan, Janani; Kaganovich, Daniel; Gardner, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    Cells are often exposed to physical or chemical stresses that can damage the structures of essential biomolecules. Stress-induced cellular damage can become deleterious if not managed appropriately. Rapid and adaptive responses to stresses are therefore crucial for cell survival. In eukaryotic cells, different stresses trigger post-translational modification of proteins with the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO. However, the specific regulatory roles of sumoylation in each stress response are not well understood. Here, we examined the sumoylation events that occur in budding yeast after exposure to hyperosmotic stress. We discovered by proteomic and biochemical analyses that hyperosmotic stress incurs the rapid and transient sumoylation of Cyc8 and Tup1, which together form a conserved transcription corepressor complex that regulates hundreds of genes. Gene expression and cell biological analyses revealed that sumoylation of each protein directs distinct outcomes. In particular, we discovered that Cyc8 sumoylation prevents the persistence of hyperosmotic stress-induced Cyc8-Tup1 inclusions, which involves a glutamine-rich prion domain in Cyc8. We propose that sumoylation protects against persistent inclusion formation during hyperosmotic stress, allowing optimal transcriptional function of the Cyc8-Tup1 complex.

  18. Caustic-based approach to understanding bunching dynamics and current spike formation in particle bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, T. K.; Paganin, D. M.; Dowd, R. T.

    2016-10-01

    Current modulations, current spikes, and current horns, are observed in a range of accelerator physics applications including strong bunch compression in Free Electron Lasers and linear colliders, trains of microbunching for terahertz radiation, microbunching instability and many others. This paper considers the fundamental mechanism that drives intense current modulations in dispersive regions, beyond the common explanation of nonlinear and higher-order effects. Under certain conditions, neighboring electron trajectories merge to form caustics, and often result in characteristic current spikes. Caustic lines and surfaces are regions of maximum electron density, and are witnessed in accelerator physics as folds in phase space of accelerated bunches. We identify the caustic phenomenon resulting in cusplike current profiles and derive an expression which describes the conditions needed for particle-bunch caustic formation in dispersive regions. The caustic expression not only reveals the conditions necessary for caustics to form but also where in longitudinal space the caustics will form. Particle-tracking simulations are used to verify these findings. We discuss the broader implications of this work including how to utilize the caustic expression for manipulation of the longitudinal phase space to achieve a desired current profile shape.

  19. Dynamic Sumoylation of a Conserved Transcription Corepressor Prevents Persistent Inclusion Formation during Hyperosmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Oeser, Michelle L.; Amen, Triana; Nadel, Cory M.; Bradley, Amanda I.; Reed, Benjamin J.; Jones, Ramon D.; Gopalan, Janani; Kaganovich, Daniel; Gardner, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Cells are often exposed to physical or chemical stresses that can damage the structures of essential biomolecules. Stress-induced cellular damage can become deleterious if not managed appropriately. Rapid and adaptive responses to stresses are therefore crucial for cell survival. In eukaryotic cells, different stresses trigger post-translational modification of proteins with the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO. However, the specific regulatory roles of sumoylation in each stress response are not well understood. Here, we examined the sumoylation events that occur in budding yeast after exposure to hyperosmotic stress. We discovered by proteomic and biochemical analyses that hyperosmotic stress incurs the rapid and transient sumoylation of Cyc8 and Tup1, which together form a conserved transcription corepressor complex that regulates hundreds of genes. Gene expression and cell biological analyses revealed that sumoylation of each protein directs distinct outcomes. In particular, we discovered that Cyc8 sumoylation prevents the persistence of hyperosmotic stress-induced Cyc8-Tup1 inclusions, which involves a glutamine-rich prion domain in Cyc8. We propose that sumoylation protects against persistent inclusion formation during hyperosmotic stress, allowing optimal transcriptional function of the Cyc8-Tup1 complex. PMID:26800527

  20. Silver cluster formation, dynamics, and chemistry in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Houk, Ronald J T; Jacobs, Benjamin W; El Gabaly, Farid; Chang, Noel N; Talin, A Alec; Graham, Dennis D; House, Stephen D; Robertson, Ian M; Allendorf, Mark D

    2009-10-01

    Synthetic methods used to produce metal nanoparticles typically lead to a distribution of particle sizes. In addition, creation of the smallest clusters, with sizes of a few to tens of atoms, remains very challenging. Nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a promising solution to these problems, since their long-range crystalline order creates completely uniform pore sizes with the potential for both steric and chemical stabilization. We report a systematic investigation of silver nanocluster formation within MOFs using three representative MOF templates. The as-synthesized clusters are spectroscopically consistent with dimensions < or =1 nm, with a significant fraction existing as Ag(3) clusters, as shown by electron paramagnetic resonance. Importantly, we show conclusively that very rapid TEM-induced MOF degradation leads to agglomeration and stable, easily imaged particles, explaining prior reports of particles larger than MOF pores. These results solve an important riddle concerning MOF-based templates and suggest that heterostructures composed of highly uniform arrays of nanoparticles within MOFs are feasible.

  1. Dynamic receptor team formation can explain the high signal transduction gain in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Albert, Réka; Chiu, Yu-Wen; Othmer, Hans G

    2004-05-01

    Evolution has provided many organisms with sophisticated sensory systems that enable them to respond to signals in their environment. The response frequently involves alteration in the pattern of movement, either by directed movement, a process called taxis, or by altering the speed or frequency of turning, which is called kinesis. Chemokinesis has been most thoroughly studied in the peritrichous bacterium Escherichia coli, which has four helical flagella distributed over the cell surface, and swims by rotating them. When rotated counterclockwise the flagella coalesce into a propulsive bundle, producing a relatively straight "run," and when rotated clockwise they fly apart, resulting in a "tumble" which reorients the cell with little translocation. A stochastic process generates the runs and tumbles, and in a chemoeffector gradient, runs that carry the cell in a favorable direction are extended. The cell senses spatial gradients as temporal changes in receptor occupancy and changes the probability of counterclockwise rotation (the bias) on a fast timescale, but adaptation returns the bias to baseline on a slow timescale, enabling the cell to detect and respond to further concentration changes. The overall structure of the signal transduction pathways is well characterized in E. coli, but important details are still not understood. Only recently has a source of gain in the signal transduction network been identified experimentally, and here we present a mathematical model based on dynamic assembly of receptor teams that can explain this observation.

  2. Formation of Kuiper-belt binaries by dynamical friction and three-body encounters.

    PubMed

    Goldreich, Peter; Lithwick, Yoram; Sari, Re'em

    2002-12-12

    The Kuiper belt is a disk of icy bodies that orbit the Sun beyond Neptune; the largest known members are Pluto and its companion Charon. A few per cent of Kuiper-belt bodies have recently been found to be binaries with wide separations and mass ratios of the order of unity. Collisions were too infrequent to account for the observed number of binaries, implying that these binaries formed through collisionless interactions mediated by gravity. These interactions are likely to have been most effective during the period of runaway accretion, early in the Solar System's history. Here we show that a transient binary forms when two large bodies penetrate one another's Hill sphere (the region where their mutual forces are larger than the tidal force of the Sun). The loss of energy needed to stabilize the binary orbit can then occur either through dynamical friction from surrounding small bodies, or through the gravitational scattering of a third large body. Our estimates slightly favour the former mechanism. We predict that five per cent of Kuiper-belt objects are binaries with apparent separations greater than 0.2 arcsec, and that most are in tighter binaries or systems of higher multiplicity.

  3. Dynamic Receptor Team Formation Can Explain the High Signal Transduction Gain in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Réka; Chiu, Yu-wen; Othmer, Hans G.

    2004-01-01

    Evolution has provided many organisms with sophisticated sensory systems that enable them to respond to signals in their environment. The response frequently involves alteration in the pattern of movement, either by directed movement, a process called taxis, or by altering the speed or frequency of turning, which is called kinesis. Chemokinesis has been most thoroughly studied in the peritrichous bacterium Escherichia coli, which has four helical flagella distributed over the cell surface, and swims by rotating them. When rotated counterclockwise the flagella coalesce into a propulsive bundle, producing a relatively straight “run,” and when rotated clockwise they fly apart, resulting in a “tumble” which reorients the cell with little translocation. A stochastic process generates the runs and tumbles, and in a chemoeffector gradient, runs that carry the cell in a favorable direction are extended. The cell senses spatial gradients as temporal changes in receptor occupancy and changes the probability of counterclockwise rotation (the bias) on a fast timescale, but adaptation returns the bias to baseline on a slow timescale, enabling the cell to detect and respond to further concentration changes. The overall structure of the signal transduction pathways is well characterized in E. coli, but important details are still not understood. Only recently has a source of gain in the signal transduction network been identified experimentally, and here we present a mathematical model based on dynamic assembly of receptor teams that can explain this observation. PMID:15111386

  4. Dynamic formation of ER–PM junctions presents a lipid phosphatase to regulate phosphoinositides

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jill B.; Vivas, Oscar; Kruse, Martin; Traynor-Kaplan, Alexis E.; Hille, Bertil

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum–plasma membrane (ER–PM) contact sites play an integral role in cellular processes such as excitation–contraction coupling and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). Another ER–PM assembly is one tethered by the extended synaptotagmins (E-Syt). We have discovered that at steady state, E-Syt2 positions the ER and Sac1, an integral ER membrane lipid phosphatase, in discrete ER–PM junctions. Here, Sac1 participates in phosphoinositide homeostasis by limiting PM phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P), the precursor of PI(4,5)P2. Activation of G protein–coupled receptors that deplete PM PI(4,5)P2 disrupts E-Syt2–mediated ER–PM junctions, reducing Sac1’s access to the PM and permitting PM PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2 to recover. Conversely, depletion of ER luminal calcium and subsequent activation of SOCE increases the amount of Sac1 in contact with the PM, depleting PM PI(4)P. Thus, the dynamic presence of Sac1 at ER–PM contact sites allows it to act as a cellular sensor and controller of PM phosphoinositides, thereby influencing many PM processes. PMID:27044890

  5. The dynamics of droplet formation and detachment in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.; Clark, D.E.; Carlson, N.M.; Watkins, A.D.; Lethcoe, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental measurements of gas metal arc welding are required for the development and confirmation of models of the process. This paper reports on two experiments that provide information for models of the arc physics and of the weld pool dynamics. The heat transfer efficiency of the spray transfer mode in gas metal arc welding was measured using a calorimetry technique. The efficiency varied from 75 to 85%. A special fixture was used to measure the droplet contribution, which is determined to be between 35 and 45% of the total input energy. A series of experiments was performed at a variety of conditions ranging from globular to spray to streaming transfer. The transfer was observed by taking high-speed movies at 500 to 5000 frames per second of the backlighted droplets. An automatic image analysis system was used to obtain information about the droplets including time between detachments, droplet size, and droplet acceleration. At the boundary between the globular and spray modes, the droplet size varies between small droplets that melt off faster than average, resulting in a smaller electrode extension, and large droplets that melt off slower than average, resulting in an increase in the electrode extension. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Dynamics of the formation of a hydrogel by a pathogenic amyloid peptide: islet amyloid polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Létitia; Lee, Chiu Fan; Hodder, Peter; Hawkins, Nick; Vaux, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Many chronic degenerative diseases result from aggregation of misfolded polypeptides to form amyloids. Many amyloidogenic polypeptides are surfactants and their assembly can be catalysed by hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces (an air-water interface in-vitro or membranes in-vivo). We recently demonstrated the specificity of surface-induced amyloidogenesis but the mechanisms of amyloidogenesis and more specifically of adsorption at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces remain poorly understood. Thus, it is critical to determine how amyloidogenic polypeptides behave at interfaces. Here we used surface tensiometry, rheology and electron microscopy to demonstrate the complex dynamics of gelation by full-length human islet amyloid polypeptide (involved in type II diabetes) both in the bulk solution and at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces (air-water interface and phospholipids). We show that the hydrogel consists of a 3D supramolecular network of fibrils. We also assessed the role of solvation and dissected the evolution over time of the assembly processes. Amyloid gelation could have important pathological consequences for membrane integrity and cellular functions. PMID:27535008

  7. Modeling epigenome folding: formation and dynamics of topologically associated chromatin domains.

    PubMed

    Jost, Daniel; Carrivain, Pascal; Cavalli, Giacomo; Vaillant, Cédric

    2014-09-01

    Genomes of eukaryotes are partitioned into domains of functionally distinct chromatin states. These domains are stably inherited across many cell generations and can be remodeled in response to developmental and external cues, hence contributing to the robustness and plasticity of expression patterns and cell phenotypes. Remarkably, recent studies indicate that these 1D epigenomic domains tend to fold into 3D topologically associated domains forming specialized nuclear chromatin compartments. However, the general mechanisms behind such compartmentalization including the contribution of epigenetic regulation remain unclear. Here, we address the question of the coupling between chromatin folding and epigenome. Using polymer physics, we analyze the properties of a block copolymer model that accounts for local epigenomic information. Considering copolymers build from the epigenomic landscape of Drosophila, we observe a very good agreement with the folding patterns observed in chromosome conformation capture experiments. Moreover, this model provides a physical basis for the existence of multistability in epigenome folding at sub-chromosomal scale. We show how experiments are fully consistent with multistable conformations where topologically associated domains of the same epigenomic state interact dynamically with each other. Our approach provides a general framework to improve our understanding of chromatin folding during cell cycle and differentiation and its relation to epigenetics.

  8. Dynamical charge and pseudospin currents in graphene and possible Cooper pair formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawetz, K.

    2016-10-01

    Based on the quantum kinetic equations for systems with SU(2) structure, regularization-free density and pseudospin currents are calculated in graphene realized as the infinite-mass limit of electrons with quadratic dispersion and a proper spin-orbit coupling. Correspondingly the currents possess no quasiparticle part but only anomalous parts. The intraband and interband conductivities are discussed with respect to magnetic fields and magnetic domain puddles. It is found that the magnetic field and mean field of domains can be represented by an effective Zeeman field. For large Zeeman fields the dynamical conductivities become independent of the density and are universal in this sense. The different limits of vanishing density, relaxation, frequency, and Zeeman field are not interchangeable. The optical conductivity agrees well with the experimental values using screened impurity scattering and an effective Zeeman field. The universal value of Hall conductivity is shown to be modified due to the Zeeman field. The pseudospin current reveals an anomaly since a quasiparticle part appears though it vanishes for particle currents. The density and pseudospin response functions to an external electric field are calculated and the dielectric function is discussed with respect to collective excitations. A frequency and wave-vector range is identified where the dielectric function changes sign and the repulsive Coulomb potential becomes effectively attractive allowing Cooper pairing.

  9. Relative dynamics and control of spacecraft formations subject to lorentz force perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aziz, Yehia; Shoaib, Muhammad

    A spacecraft that generates an electrostatic charge on its surface in the Earth magnetic field will be subject to a perturbative Lorentz force. The Lorentz force acting on an electrostatically charged spacecraft may provide a useful thrust for controlling a spacecraft’s orbit. We develop Lorentz force as a function of the orbital elements. The orbital perturbations of a charged spacecraft by Lorentz force in the Earth’s magnetic field are investigated using the Gauss variation of the Lagrange planetary Equations. The Earth’s magnetic field is modeled as a tilted dipole. The perturbations in the orbital elements depend on the value of the charge to mass ratio (q/m). The dynamical model of relative motion developed leads to approximate analytical solutions for the motion of a charged spacecraft subject to Lorentz force. The chief spacecraft’s reference orbit is taken to be either circular or elliptical. The deputy spacecraft is capable of accumulating electrostatic charge. The numerical results show that Lorentz force can be used to change the in-track position and plane orbit of the spacecraft. The numerical analysis shows that the target trajectory of the Lorentz spacecraft can be reached by varying the ratio (q/m) in different Low Earth Orbits.

  10. Secular dynamics of multiplanet systems: implications for the formation of hot and warm Jupiters via high-eccentricity migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamers, Adrian S.; Antonini, Fabio; Lithwick, Yoram; Perets, Hagai B.; Portegies Zwart, Simon F.

    2017-01-01

    Hot Jupiters (HJs) are Jupiter-like planets that reside very closely to their host star, within ˜0.1 au. Their formation is not well understood. It is generally believed that they cannot have formed in situ, implying that some form of migration must have occurred after their initial formation. We study the production of HJs through secular evolution in multiplanet systems with three to five planets. In this variant of high-e migration, the eccentricity of the orbit of the innermost planet is excited on secular time-scales, triggering orbital migration due to tidal dissipation. We use a secular dynamics code and carry out a population synthesis study. We find that HJs are only produced if the viscous time-scale is short (≈0.014 yr). In contrast, in up to ≈0.3 of systems, the innermost planet is tidally disrupted. The orbital period distribution is peaked around 5 d, consistent with observations. The median HJ mass is 1 MJ with a maximum of ≈2 MJ, similar to observed HJs. Approximately 0.1 of the HJs have retrograde orbits with respect to the stellar spin. We do not find a significant population of warm Jupiters in our simulations, i.e. planets with semimajor axes between 0.1 and 1 au.

  11. Data supporting regulating temporospatial dynamics of morphogen for structure formation of the lacrimal gland by chitosan biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ya-Chuan; Yang, Tsung-Lin

    2017-02-01

    The lacrimal gland is responsible for tear synthesis and secretion, and is derived from the epithelia of ocular surface and generated by branching morphogenesis. The dataset presented in this article is to support the research results of the effect of chitosan biomaterials on facilitating the structure formation of the lacrimal gland by regulating temporospatial dynamics of morphogen. The embryonic lacrimal gland explants were used as the standard experimental model for investigating lacrimal gland branching morphogenesis. Chitosan biomaterials promoted lacrimal gland branching with a dose-dependent effect. It helped in vivo binding of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) related molecules in the epithelial-mesenchymal boundary of emerging epithelial branches. When mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) inhibitors applied, the chitosan effects reduced. Nonetheless, the ratios of MAPK and Akt/PKB phosphorylation were still greater in the chitosan group than the control. The data demonstrated here confirm the essential role of HGF-signaling in chitosan-promoted structure formation of the lacrimal gland.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of the Influence of Cluster Geometry on Formation of C60 Fullerene Clusters in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hojin; Bedrov, Dmitry; Smith, Grant D

    2008-02-01

    We have performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of linear (1-dimensional), planar (2-dimensional), and icosahedral (3-dimensional) clusters of C60 fullerenes in aqueous solution in order to investigate the influence of cluster geometry on their free energy of formation. As was found in our previous study of the potential of mean force (PMF) as a function of separation for a single pair of fullerenes in aqueous solution, the interaction between fullerenes for all cluster geometries was dominated by direct fullerene-fullerene interactions and not by water-induced hydrophobic interactions. A coarse-grained implicit solvent (CGIS) potential, given by the PMF for the fullerene pair in water obtained from atomistic simulations, was found to describe well the free energy of formation of the linear cluster, indicating that many-body effects, i.e., the influence of neighboring fullerenes on the water-induced interaction between a fullerene pair, are negligible for the 1-dimensional geometry. For the 2-dimensional and particularly the 3-dimensional geometry, however, many-body effects were found to strongly influence hydration, leading to complete dehydration of the central fullerene at close fullerene-fullerene separations for the icosahedral cluster. This strong influence of geometry on hydration translates into water-induced interactions that, while remaining repulsive, as is found for the fullerene pair, are not well described by the two-body CGIS potential obtained from the isolated fullerene pair, particularly for the 3-dimensional geometry.

  13. Code interoperability and standard data formats in quantum chemistry and quantum dynamics: The Q5/D5Cost data model.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Elda; Evangelisti, Stefano; Laganà, Antonio; Monari, Antonio; Rampino, Sergio; Verdicchio, Marco; Baldridge, Kim K; Bendazzoli, Gian Luigi; Borini, Stefano; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Angeli, Celestino; Kallay, Peter; Lüthi, Hans P; Ruud, Kenneth; Sanchez-Marin, José; Scemama, Anthony; Szalay, Peter G; Tajti, Attila

    2014-03-30

    Code interoperability and the search for domain-specific standard data formats represent critical issues in many areas of computational science. The advent of novel computing infrastructures such as computational grids and clouds make these issues even more urgent. The design and implementation of a common data format for quantum chemistry (QC) and quantum dynamics (QD) computer programs is discussed with reference to the research performed in the course of two Collaboration in Science and Technology Actions. The specific data models adopted, Q5Cost and D5Cost, are shown to work for a number of interoperating codes, regardless of the type and amount of information (small or large datasets) to be exchanged. The codes are either interfaced directly, or transfer data by means of wrappers; both types of data exchange are supported by the Q5/D5Cost library. Further, the exchange of data between QC and QD codes is addressed. As a proof of concept, the H + H2 reaction is discussed. The proposed scheme is shown to provide an excellent basis for cooperative code development, even across domain boundaries. Moreover, the scheme presented is found to be useful also as a production tool in the grid distributed computing environment.

  14. Possible mechanism of BN fullerene formation from a boron cluster: Density-functional tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Y

    2016-04-15

    We simulate the formation of a BN fullerene from an amorphous B cluster at 2000 K by quantum mechanical molecular dynamics based on the density-functional tight-binding method. We run 30 trajectories 200 ps in length, where N atoms are supplied around the target cluster, which is initially an amorphous B36 cluster. Most of the incident N atoms are promptly incorporated into the target cluster to form B-N-B bridges or NB3 pyramidal local substructures. BN fullerene formation is initiated by alternating BN ring condensation. Spontaneous atomic rearrangement and N2 dissociation lead to the construction of an sp(2) single-shelled structure, during which the BN cluster undergoes a transition from a liquid-like to a solid-like state. Continual atomic rearrangement and sporadic N2 dissociation decrease the number of defective rings in the BN cluster and increase the number of six-membered rings, forming a more regular shell structure. The number of four-membered rings tends to remain constant, and contributes to more ordered isolated-tetragon-rule ring placement.

  15. The dynamics of complex formation between amylose brushes on gold and fatty acids by QCM-D.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zheng; Tsoufis, Theodoros; Svaldo-Lanero, Tiziana; Duwez, Anne-Sophie; Rudolf, Petra; Loos, Katja

    2013-10-14

    Amylose brushes were synthesized by enzymatic polymerization with glucose-1-phosphate as monomer and rabbit muscle phosphorylase b as catalyst on gold-covered surfaces of a quartz crystal microbalance. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra confirmed the presence of the characteristic absorption peaks of amylose between 3100 cm(-1) and 3500 cm(-1). The thickness of the amylose brushes-measured by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry--can be tailored from 4 to 20 nm, depending on the reaction time. The contour length of the stretched amylose chains on gold surfaces has been evaluated by single molecule force spectroscopy, and a total chain length of about 20 nm for 16.2 nm thick amylose brushes was estimated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to characterize the amylose brushes before and after the adsorption of fatty acids. The dynamics of inclusion complex formation between amylose brushes and two fatty acids (octanoic acid and myristic acid) with different chain length was investigated as a function of time using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) immersed in the liquid phase. QCM-D signals including the frequency and dissipation shifts elucidated the effects of the fatty acid concentration, the solvent types, the chain length of the fatty acids and the thickness of the amylose brushes on the dynamics of fatty acid molecule adsorption on the amylose brush-modified sensor surfaces.

  16. Dynamics of electrical double layer formation in room-temperature ionic liquids under constant-current charging conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xikai; Huang, Jingsong; Zhao, Hui; Sumpter, Bobby G; Qiao, Rui

    2014-07-16

    We report detailed simulation results on the formation dynamics of an electrical double layer (EDL) inside an electrochemical cell featuring room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) enclosed between two planar electrodes. Under relatively small charging currents, the evolution of cell potential from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations during charging can be suitably predicted by the Landau-Ginzburg-type continuum model proposed recently (Bazant et al 2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 046102). Under very large charging currents, the cell potential from MD simulations shows pronounced oscillation during the initial stage of charging, a feature not captured by the continuum model. Such oscillation originates from the sequential growth of the ionic space charge layers near the electrode surface. This allows the evolution of EDLs in RTILs with time, an atomistic process difficult to visualize experimentally, to be studied by analyzing the cell potential under constant-current charging conditions. While the continuum model cannot predict the potential oscillation under such far-from-equilibrium charging conditions, it can nevertheless qualitatively capture the growth of cell potential during the later stage of charging. Improving the continuum model by introducing frequency-dependent dielectric constant and density-dependent ion diffusion coefficients may help to further extend the applicability of the model. The evolution of ion density profiles is also compared between the MD and the continuum model, showing good agreement.

  17. Water ordering controls the dynamic equilibrium of micelle-fibre formation in self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Sanket A.; Solomon, Lee A.; Kamath, Ganesh; Fry, H. Christopher; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the role of water in governing the kinetics of the self-assembly processes of amphiphilic peptides remains elusive. Here, we use a multistage atomistic-coarse-grained approach, complemented by circular dichroism/infrared spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering experiments to highlight the dual nature of water in driving the self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles (PAs). We show computationally that water cage formation and breakage near the hydrophobic groups control the fusion dynamics and aggregation of PAs in the micellar stage. Simulations also suggest that enhanced structural ordering of vicinal water near the hydrophilic amino acids shifts the equilibrium towards the fibre phase and stimulates structure and order during the PA assembly into nanofibres. Experiments validate our simulation findings; the measured infrared O-H bond stretching frequency is reminiscent of an ice-like bond which suggests that the solvated water becomes increasingly ordered with time in the assembled peptide network, thus shedding light on the role of water in a self-assembly process.

  18. Water ordering controls the dynamic equilibrium of micelle–fibre formation in self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Sanket A.; Solomon, Lee A.; Kamath, Ganesh; Fry, H. Christopher; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the role of water in governing the kinetics of the self-assembly processes of amphiphilic peptides remains elusive. Here, we use a multistage atomistic-coarse-grained approach, complemented by circular dichroism/infrared spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering experiments to highlight the dual nature of water in driving the self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles (PAs). We show computationally that water cage formation and breakage near the hydrophobic groups control the fusion dynamics and aggregation of PAs in the micellar stage. Simulations also suggest that enhanced structural ordering of vicinal water near the hydrophilic amino acids shifts the equilibrium towards the fibre phase and stimulates structure and order during the PA assembly into nanofibres. Experiments validate our simulation findings; the measured infrared O–H bond stretching frequency is reminiscent of an ice-like bond which suggests that the solvated water becomes increasingly ordered with time in the assembled peptide network, thus shedding light on the role of water in a self-assembly process. PMID:27554944

  19. Peptide Aggregation and Pore Formation in a Lipid Bilayer: A Combined Coarse-Grained and All Atom Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Thøgersen, Lea; Schiøtt, Birgit; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2008-01-01

    We present a simulation study where different resolutions, namely coarse-grained (CG) and all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics simulations, are used sequentially to combine the long timescale reachable by CG simulations with the high resolution of AA simulations, to describe the complete processes of peptide aggregation and pore formation by alamethicin peptides in a hydrated lipid bilayer. In the 1-μs CG simulations the peptides spontaneously aggregate in the lipid bilayer and exhibit occasional transitions between the membrane-spanning and the surface-bound configurations. One of the CG systems at t = 1 μs is reverted to an AA representation and subjected to AA simulation for 50 ns, during which water molecules penetrate the lipid bilayer through interactions with the peptide aggregates, and the membrane starts leaking water. During the AA simulation significant deviations from the α-helical structure of the peptides are observed, however, the size and arrangement of the clusters are not affected within the studied time frame. Solid-state NMR experiments designed to match closely the setup used in the molecular dynamics simulations provide strong support for our finding that alamethicin peptides adopt a diverse set of configurations in a lipid bilayer, which is in sharp contrast to the prevailing view of alamethicin oligomers formed by perfectly aligned helical alamethicin peptides in a lipid bilayer. PMID:18676652

  20. EFFECTS OF DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF GIANT PLANETS ON THE DELIVERY OF ATMOPHILE ELEMENTS DURING TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Soko; Brasser, Ramon; Ida, Shigeru

    2016-02-10

    Recent observations started revealing the compositions of protostellar disks and planets beyond the solar system. In this paper, we explore how the compositions of terrestrial planets are affected by the dynamical evolution of giant planets. We estimate the initial compositions of the building blocks of these rocky planets by using a simple condensation model, and numerically study the compositions of planets formed in a few different formation models of the solar system. We find that the abundances of refractory and moderately volatile elements are nearly independent of formation models, and that all the models could reproduce the abundances of these elements of the Earth. The abundances of atmophile elements, on the other hand, depend on the scattering rate of icy planetesimals into the inner disk, as well as the mixing rate of the inner planetesimal disk. For the classical formation model, neither of these mechanisms are efficient and the accretion of atmophile elements during the final assembly of terrestrial planets appears to be difficult. For the Grand Tack model, both of these mechanisms are efficient, which leads to a relatively uniform accretion of atmophile elements in the inner disk. It is also possible to have a “hybrid” scenario where the mixing is not very efficient but the scattering is efficient. The abundances of atmophile elements in this case increase with orbital radii. Such a scenario may occur in some of the extrasolar planetary systems, which are not accompanied by giant planets or those without strong perturbations from giants. We also confirm that the Grand Tack scenario leads to the distribution of asteroid analogues where rocky planetesimals tend to exist interior to icy ones, and show that their overall compositions are consistent with S-type and C-type chondrites, respectively.

  1. Population dynamics, antibiotics resistance and biofilm formation of Aeromonas and Vibrio species isolated from aquatic sources in Northern Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Odeyemi, Olumide A; Ahmad, Asmat

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to compare population dynamics, antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation of Aeromonas and Vibrio species from seawater and sediment collected from Northern Malaysia. Isolates with different colony morphology were characterized using both biochemical and molecular methods before testing for antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation. Results obtained from this study showed that in Kedah, the population of Aeromonas isolated from sediment was highest in Pantai Merdeka (8.22 log CFU/ml), Pulau Bunting recorded the highest population of Aeromonas from sediment (8.43 log CFU/g). It was observed that Vibrio species isolated from seawater and sediment were highest in Kuala Sanglang (9.21 log CFU/ml). In Kuala Perlis, the population of Aeromonas isolated from seawater was highest in Jeti (7.94 log CFU/ml). Highest population of Aeromonas from sediment was recorded in Kampong Tanah Baru (7.99 log CFU/g). It was observed that Vibrio species isolated from seawater was highest in Padang Benta (8.42 log CFU/g) while Jeti Kuala Perlis had highest population of Vibrio isolated from sediment. It was observed that location does not influence population of Aeromonas. The results of the independent t - test revealed that there was no significant relationship between location and population of Vibrio (df = 10, t = 1.144, p > 0.05). The occurrence of biofilm formation and prevalence of antibiotic resistant Aeromonas and Vibrio species in seawater and sediment pose danger to human and aquatic animals' health.

  2. Specific heat of hydrated lysozyme, water's contribution to its dynamics, and criteria for glass formation of biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Tombari, Elpidio; Johari, G P

    2013-09-14

    Previous studies of the dynamics of hydrated proteins had shown a feature resembling an exceptionally broad glass-softening endotherm. Its onset temperature, denoted as T(g), was indefinable in one calorimetric study of hydrated lysozyme and was in the 148-218 K range in another study, depending upon hydration. Other methods reported this T(g) as ~170 K. We argue that glass-formation of biomaterials should be studied by measuring a property on both the cooling and heating paths and it should be ascertained (i) that there is thermal hysteresis of the measured property, (ii) that the real and imaginary components of a dynamic property obey the Kramers-Kronig relations, and (iii) that there is an effect of annealing that is consistent with the glass phenomenology. We report the real and imaginary components of the dynamic specific heat, C(p)' and C(p)", of dry and two hydrated lysozyme samples on the cooling and the heating paths as well as the effects of annealing and changing the frequency. For the most hydrated (34.6 g water per 100 g lysozyme) sample, C(p,app) does not show thermal hysteresis in the 160-230 K range, C(p)' varies in a sigmoid-shape manner with T while C(p)" remains close to zero, and there is no effect of annealing. We interpret these findings in terms of continuous development of ice-like aggregates of immobile H2O as more H-bonds form on cooling, and continuous deterioration of the aggregates on heating. As the equilibrium constant between the aggregates and mobile H2O increases on cooling, configurational degrees of freedom of H2O molecules and lysozyme segments decrease. Consequently, the net change in enthalpy is small but the change in C(p) is large. Mobility of the lysozyme segments still depends upon the mobility of H2O molecules.

  3. Specific heat of hydrated lysozyme, water's contribution to its dynamics, and criteria for glass formation of biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombari, Elpidio; Johari, G. P.

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies of the dynamics of hydrated proteins had shown a feature resembling an exceptionally broad glass-softening endotherm. Its onset temperature, denoted as Tg, was indefinable in one calorimetric study of hydrated lysozyme and was in the 148-218 K range in another study, depending upon hydration. Other methods reported this Tg as ˜170 K. We argue that glass-formation of biomaterials should be studied by measuring a property on both the cooling and heating paths and it should be ascertained (i) that there is thermal hysteresis of the measured property, (ii) that the real and imaginary components of a dynamic property obey the Kramers-Kronig relations, and (iii) that there is an effect of annealing that is consistent with the glass phenomenology. We report the real and imaginary components of the dynamic specific heat, Cp' and Cp″, of dry and two hydrated lysozyme samples on the cooling and the heating paths as well as the effects of annealing and changing the frequency. For the most hydrated (34.6 g water per 100 g lysozyme) sample, Cp,app does not show thermal hysteresis in the 160-230 K range, Cp' varies in a sigmoid-shape manner with T while Cp″ remains close to zero, and there is no effect of annealing. We interpret these findings in terms of continuous development of ice-like aggregates of immobile H2O as more H-bonds form on cooling, and continuous deterioration of the aggregates on heating. As the equilibrium constant between the aggregates and mobile H2O increases on cooling, configurational degrees of freedom of H2O molecules and lysozyme segments decrease. Consequently, the net change in enthalpy is small but the change in Cp is large. Mobility of the lysozyme segments still depends upon the mobility of H2O molecules.

  4. Dynamic processes in the lithosphere leading to extension, rifting and basin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The similarity of ages of extensional core complexes, co-genetic basin formation, and kinematically compatible movements along large strike-slip faults in western North America to ages of comparable events within the Himalayas-Alps orogenic belt leads to the speculation that strain related to changes in Pacific (PAC)-North America(NA) plate motions may be recorded on a global scale affecting the coupled plates and extending eastward across Eurasia. The contemporaneous global deformation reflects abrupt changes in PAC-NA plate motions in response to coupling following convergence of buoyant oceanic lithosphere, commonly part of a spreading center, which impedes subduction and leads to collision followed by coupling when the buoyant lithosphere binds against the base of the overriding continental plate. Critical coupling of a sufficiently long ridge segment leads to "capture", after which the former movements of the newly coupled plates are integrated abruptly and changed from previous directions. In western North America, episodes of capture of the NA plate by the (PAC) plate are recorded by break-up unconformities (ca. 55, 35, and 17 Ma) and basins commonly within extensional domains distinguished by age and direction of tectonic transport (Eocene [~55-42 Ma], ca. 285o, Oligocene [~35-20 Ma], 240o, Miocene [17-0 Ma], ca. 280o). The transport directions record the integration of the southwesterly motion of NA , related to mantle convection, and the northwesterly motion of PAC, driven by slab pull. Following each coupling event, PAC moves westward dragging: 1) the formerly subducting Farallon slab, 2) the coupled, formerly overriding, NA plate, and 3) Eurasia (EA), with it. In response to the strong extension that is imposed upon rocks within domains encompassed by the PAC-NA coupled region, and along the southern margin of Eurasia, brittle deformation, accommodated by normal and strike-slip faults, and formation of contemporaneous basins, takes place. Core

  5. Formation, dynamic behavior, and chemical transformation of Pt complexes with a rotaxane-like structure.

    PubMed

    Suzaki, Yuji; Osakada, Kohtaro

    2006-09-18

    The reaction of [Pt(CH2COMe)(Ph)(cod)] (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) with (ArCH2NH2CH2-C6H4COOH)+ (PF6)- (Ar = 4-tBuC6H4 or 9-anthryl) in the presence of cyclic oligoethers such as dibenzo[24]crown-8 (DB24C8) and dicyclohexano[24]crown-8 (DC24C8) produces {(ce)[ArCH2NH2CH2C6H4COOPt(Ph)(cod)]}+ (PF6)- (ce = DB24C8 or DC24C8, Ar = 4-tBuC6H4 or 9-anthryl) with interlocked structures. FABMS and NMR spectra of a solution of these compounds indicate that the Pt complexes with a secondary ammonium group and DB24C8 (or DC24C8) make up the axis and cyclic components, respectively. Temperature-dependent 1H NMR spectra of a solution of {(DB24C8)[4-tBuC6H4CH2NH2CH2-C6H4COOPt(Ph)(cod)]}+ (PF6)- ({(DB24C8)[4-H]}+ (PF6)-) show equilibration with free DB24C8 and the axis component. The addition of DB24C8 to a solution of {(DC24C8)[4-H]}+ (PF6)- causes partial exchange of the macrocyclic component of the interlocked molecules, giving a mixture of {(DC24C8)[4-H]}+ (PF6)-, {(DB24C8)[4-H]}+ (PF6)-, and free macrocyclic compounds. The reaction of 3,5-Me2C6H3COCl with {(DB24C8)[4-H]}+ (PF6)- affords the organic rotaxane {(DB24C8)(4-tBuC6H4CH2NH2CH2-C6H4COOCOC6H3Me2-3,5)}+ (PF6)- through C-O bond formation between the aroyl group and the carboxylate ligand of the axis component. The addition of 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) to a solution of {(DB24C8)[4-H]}+ (PF6)- induces the degradation of the interlocked structure to form a complex with trigonal bipyramidal coordination, [Pt(Ph)(bpy)(cod)]+ (PF6)-, whereas the reaction of bpy with [Pt(OCOC6H4Me-4)(Ph)(cod)] produces the square-planar complex [Pt(OCOC6H4Me-4)(Ph)(bpy)].

  6. Dynamics of air gap formation around roots with changing soil water content.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetterlein, D.; Carminati, A.; Weller, U.; Oswald, S.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2009-04-01

    Most models regarding uptake of water and nutrients from soil assume intimate contact between roots and soil. However, it is known for a long time that roots may shrink under drought conditions. Due to the opaque nature of soil this process could not be observed in situ until recently. Combining tomography of the entire sample (field of view of 16 x 16 cm, pixel side 0.32 mm) with local tomography of the soil region around roots (field of view of 5 x 5 cm, pixel side 0.09 mm), the high spatial resolution required to image root shrinkage and formation of air-filled gaps around roots could be achieved. Applying this technique and combining it with microtensiometer measurements, measurements of plant gas exchange and microscopic assessment of root anatomy, a more detailed study was conducted to elucidate at which soil matric potential roots start to shrink in a sandy soil and which are the consequences for plant water relations. For Lupinus albus grown in a sandy soil tomography of the entire root system and of the interface between taproot and soil was conducted from day 11 to day 31 covering two drying cycles. Soil matric potential decreased from -36 hPa at day 11 after planting to -72, -251, -429 hPa, on day 17, 19, 20 after planting. On day 20 an air gap started to occur around the tap root and extended further on day 21 with matric potential below -429 hPa (equivalent to 5 v/v % soil moisture). From day 11 to day 21 stomatal conductivity decreased from 467 to 84 mmol m-2 s-1, likewise transpiration rate decreased and plants showed strong wilting symptoms on day 21. Plants were watered by capillary rise on day 21 and recovered completely within a day with stomatal conductivity increasing to 647 mmol m-2 s-1. During a second drying cycle, which was shorter as plants continuously increased in size, air gap formed again at the same matric potential. Plant stomatal conductance and transpiration decreased in a similar fashion with decreasing matric potential and

  7. Modeling wood dynamics, jam formation, and sediment storage in a gravel-bed stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, B. C.; Hassan, M. A.; Davidson, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    In small and intermediate sized streams, the interaction between wood and bed material transport often determines the nature of the physical habitat, which in turn influences the health of the stream's ecosystem. We present a stochastic model that can be used to simulate the effects on physical habitat of forest fires, climate change, and other environmental disturbances that alter wood recruitment. The model predicts large wood (LW) loads in a stream as well as the volume of sediment stored by the wood; while it is parameterized to describe gravel bed streams similar to a well-studied field prototype, Fishtrap Creek, British Columbia, it can be calibrated to other systems as well. In the model, LW pieces are produced and modified over time as a result of random tree-fall, LW breakage, LW movement, and piece interaction to form LW jams. Each LW piece traps a portion of the annual bed material transport entering the reach and releases the stored sediment when the LW piece is entrained and moved. The equations governing sediment storage are based on a set of flume experiments also scaled to the field prototype. The model predicts wood loads ranging from 70 m3/ha to more than 300 m3/ha, with a mean value of 178 m3/ha: both the range and the mean value are consistent with field data from streams with similar riparian forest types and climate. The model also predicts an LW jam spacing that is consistent with field data. Furthermore, our modeling results demonstrate that the high spatial and temporal variability in sediment storage, sediment transport, and channel morphology associated with LW-dominated streams occurs only when LW pieces interact and form jams. Model runs that do not include jam formation are much less variable. These results suggest that river restoration efforts using engineered LW pieces that are fixed in place and not permitted to interact will be less successful at restoring the geomorphic processes responsible for producing diverse, productive

  8. The dynamics of autophagy visualized in live cells: from autophagosome formation to fusion with endo/lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Bampton, Edward T W; Goemans, Christoph G; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Mizushima, Noboru; Tolkovsky, Aviva M

    2005-04-01

    Autophagy has been implicated in a range of disorders and hence is of major interest. However, imaging autophagy in real time has been hampered by lack of suitable markers. We have compared the potential of monodansylcadaverine, widely used as an autophagosomal marker, and the Atg8 homologue LC3, to follow autophagy by fluorescence microscopy whilst labelling late endosomes and lysosomes simultaneously using EGFP-CD63. Monodansylcadaverine labelled only acidic CD63-positive compartments in response to a range of autophagic inducers in various live or post-fixed cells, staining being identical in atg5(+/+) and atg5(-/-) MEFs in which autophagosome formation is disabled. Monodansylcadaverine staining was essentially indistinguishable from that of LysoTracker Red, LAMP-1 or LAMP-2. In contrast, 60-90% of EGFP-LC3-positive punctate organelles did not colocalise with LAMP-1/LAMP-2/CD63 and were monodansylcadaverine-negative while EGFP-LC3 puncta that did colocalise with LAMP-1/LAMP-2/CD63 were also monodansylcadaverine-positive. Hence monodansylcadaverine is no different from other markers of acidic compartments and it cannot be used to follow autophagosome formation. In contrast, fusion of mRFP-LC3-labelled autophagosomes with EGFP-CD63-positive endosomes and lysosomes and sequestration of dsRed-labelled mitochondria by EGFP-LC3- and EGFP-CD63-positive compartments could be visualized in real time. Moreover, transition of EGFP-LC3-I (45 kDa) to EGFP-LC3-II (43 kDa)-traced by immunoblotting and verified by [(3)H]ethanolamine labelling-revealed novel insights into the dynamics of autophagosome homeostasis, including the rapid activation of autophagy by the apoptotic inducer staurosporine prior to apoptosis proper. Use of fluorescent LC3 and a counter-fluorescent endosomal/lysosomal protein clearly allows the entire autophagic process to be followed by live cell imaging with high fidelity.

  9. Formation of orthopoxvirus cytoplasmic A-type inclusion bodies and embedding of virions are dynamic processes requiring microtubules.

    PubMed

    Howard, Amanda R; Moss, Bernard

    2012-05-01

    In cells infected with some orthopoxviruses, numerous mature virions (MVs) become embedded within large, cytoplasmic A-type inclusions (ATIs) that can protect infectivity after cell lysis. ATIs are composed of an abundant viral protein called ATIp, which is truncated in orthopoxviruses such as vaccinia virus (VACV) that do not form ATIs. To study ATI formation and occlusion of MVs within ATIs, we used recombinant VACVs that express the cowpox full-length ATIp or we transfected plasmids encoding ATIp into cells infected with VACV, enabling ATI formation. ATI enlargement and MV embedment required continued protein synthesis and an intact microtubular network. For live imaging of ATIs and MVs, plasmids expressing mCherry fluorescent protein fused to ATIp were transfected into cells infected with VACV expressing the viral core protein A4 fused to yellow fluorescent protein. ATIs appeared as dynamic, mobile bodies that enlarged by multiple coalescence events, which could be prevented by disrupting microtubules. Coalescence of ATIs was confirmed in cells infected with cowpox virus. MVs were predominantly at the periphery of ATIs early in infection. We determined that coalescence contributed to the distribution of MVs within ATIs and that microtubule-disrupting drugs abrogated coalescence-mediated MV embedment. In addition, MVs were shown to move from viral factories at speeds consistent with microtubular transport to the peripheries of ATIs, whereas disruption of microtubules prevented such trafficking. The data indicate an important role for microtubules in the coalescence of ATIs into larger structures, transport of MVs to ATIs, and embedment of MVs within the ATI matrix.

  10. Computer simulations of channel meandering and the formation of point bars: Linking channel dynamics to the preserved stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T.; Covault, J. A.; Pyrcz, M.; Sullivan, M.

    2012-12-01

    a,b) is used to investigate the formation and preservation of point bars with meandering rivers. Rather than consisting of a single set of concentric scroll bar like feature as one would expect from the pattern of meandering channels, observations of point bar deposits in map view reveal the previously mentioned complexity in their internal organization. A preserved point bar deposit is often found to be composed of multiple sets of remnant scroll bar like features, each with different orientations. Each set is bounded by the unconformity resulting from one set of the scroll bar like feature truncated by the other set. This study links the channel dynamics to the preserved point bar architectures, and delineates the key controls that affect the point bar internal organization.

  11. Interlinked nonlinear subnetworks underlie the formation of robust cellular patterns in Arabidopsis epidermis: a dynamic spatial model

    PubMed Central

    Benítez, Mariana; Espinosa-Soto, Carlos; Padilla-Longoria, Pablo; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2008-01-01

    Background Dynamical models are instrumental for exploring the way information required to generate robust developmental patterns arises from complex interactions among genetic and non-genetic factors. We address this fundamental issue of developmental biology studying the leaf and root epidermis of Arabidopsis. We propose an experimentally-grounded model of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) that are coupled by protein diffusion and comprise a meta-GRN implemented on cellularised domains. Results Steady states of the meta-GRN model correspond to gene expression profiles typical of hair and non-hair epidermal cells. The simulations also render spatial patterns that match the cellular arrangements observed in root and leaf epidermis. As in actual plants, such patterns are robust in the face of diverse perturbations. We validated the model by checking that it also reproduced the patterns of reported mutants. The meta-GRN model shows that interlinked sub-networks contribute redundantly to the formation of robust hair patterns and permits to advance novel and testable predictions regarding the effect of cell shape, signalling pathways and additional gene interactions affecting spatial cell-patterning. Conclusion The spatial meta-GRN model integrates available experimental data and contributes to further understanding of the Arabidopsis epidermal system. It also provides a systems biology framework to explore the interplay among sub-networks of a GRN, cell-to-cell communication, cell shape and domain traits, which could help understanding of general aspects of patterning processes. For instance, our model suggests that the information needed for cell fate determination emerges from dynamic processes that depend upon molecular components inside and outside differentiating cells, suggesting that the classical distinction of lineage versus positional cell differentiation may be instrumental but rather artificial. It also suggests that interlinkage of nonlinear and redundant

  12. Dynamics and topochemistry of the thermal formation of cadmium telluride from the constituent elements: A differential scanning calorimetry study

    SciTech Connect

    Wenyuan Lin; Mishra, K.K.; Segal, R.; Rajeshwar, K. )

    1991-05-16

    The kinetics and topochemical details of the condensed-phase Cd + Te = CdTe reaction system were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Measurable rates in this reaction system were sustained only after fusion of the Cd reactant particles. The exothermic reaction heat-release profiles were analyzed by DSC as a function of the scan rate. A new kinetics measurement protocol was developed that combines isothermal DSC operation with dynamic heat-cool probe' cycles for the Cd content of the reaction mixture. When the starting reaction components were in fine powder form, the reaction rate initially was very rapid, leading to the formation of a passivating CdTe outer skin. The activation energy of 7.2 {plus minus} 0.8 kJ/mol measured from these data was consistent with a model involving physical diffusion of the reactants through the CdTe layer as the rate-determining step. Accordingly, the use of larger size Te reactant particles in the 575-875-{mu}m range enabled a quantitative fit of the kinetics data to a contracting sphere model. Finally, the use of SEM and EDX permitted unambiguous verification of the proposed model for the reaction topochemistry.

  13. Presynaptically released Cbln1 induces dynamic axonal structural changes by interacting with GluD2 during cerebellar synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Ito-Ishida, Aya; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Miura, Eriko; Matsuda, Keiko; Watanabe, Masahiko; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Okabe, Shigeo

    2012-11-08

    Differentiation of pre- and postsynaptic sites is coordinated by reciprocal interaction across synaptic clefts. At parallel fiber (PF)-Purkinje cell (PC) synapses, dendritic spines are autonomously formed without PF influence. However, little is known about how presynaptic structural changes are induced and how they lead to differentiation of mature synapses. Here, we show that Cbln1 released from PFs induces dynamic structural changes in PFs by a mechanism that depends on postsynaptic glutamate receptor delta2 (GluD2) and presynaptic neurexin (Nrx). Time-lapse imaging in organotypic culture and ultrastructural analyses in vivo revealed that Nrx-Cbln1-GluD2 signaling induces PF protrusions that often formed circular structures and encapsulated PC spines. Such structural changes in PFs were associated with the accumulation of synaptic vesicles and GluD2, leading to formation of mature synapses. Thus, PF protrusions triggered by Nrx-Cbln1-GluD2 signaling may promote bidirectional maturation of PF-PC synapses by a positive feedback mechanism.

  14. Exploration of fluid dynamic indicators/causative factors in the formation of tower structures in staphylococci bacteria bio-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Erica; Derek, Moormeier; Bayles, Kenneth; Wei, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteria form biofilms with distinct structures that facilitate their ability to tolerate treatment and to spread within the body. As such, staph infections represent one of the greatest threats to post-surgery patients. It has been found that flow conditions play a significant role in the developmental and dispersal activity of a biofilm. The coupling between the growing biofilm and surrounding flow, however, is not well understood. Indeed, little is know why bacteria form tower structures under certain conditions but not in a predictable way. μ-PTV measurements were made in a microchannel to try to identify fluid dynamic indicators for the formation of towers in biofilm growth. Preliminary experiments indicated changes in the near wall flow up to five hours before a tower formed. The reason for that is the target of this investigation. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria were cultured in the Bioflux Fluxion channel and subjected to a steady shear rate of 0.5 dynes. In addition to μ-PTV measurement, nuclease production and cell number density counts were observed prior to and during tower development. These were compared against measurements made under the same nominal flow conditions where a tower did not form.

  15. The growth of discs and bulges during hierarchical galaxy formation - II. Metallicity, stellar populations and dynamical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonini, C.; Mutch, S. J.; Wyithe, J. S. B.; Croton, D. J.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the properties of the stellar populations of model galaxies as a function of galaxy evolutionary history and angular momentum content. We use the new semi-analytic model presented in Tonini et al. This new model follows the angular momentum evolution of gas and stars, providing the base for a new star formation recipe, and treatment of the effects of mergers that depends on the central galaxy dynamical structure. We find that the new recipes have the effect of boosting the efficiency of the baryonic cycle in producing and recycling metals, as well as preventing minor mergers from diluting the metallicity of bulges and ellipticals. The model reproduces the stellar mass-stellar metallicity relation for galaxies above 1010 solar masses, including Brightest Cluster Galaxies. Model discs, galaxies dominated by instability-driven components, and merger-driven objects each stem from different evolutionary channels. These model galaxies therefore occupy different loci in the galaxy mass-size relation, which we find to be in accord with the ATLAS 3D classification of disc galaxies, fast rotators and slow rotators. We find that the stellar populations' properties depend on the galaxy evolutionary type, with more evolved stellar populations being part of systems that have lost or dissipated more angular momentum during their assembly history.

  16. Atomic Scale Dynamics of Contact Formation in the Cross-Section of InGaAs Nanowire Channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renjie; Jungjohann, Katherine L; Mook, William M; Nogan, John; Dayeh, Shadi A

    2017-04-12

    Alloyed and compound contacts between metal and semiconductor transistor channels enable self-aligned gate processes which play a significant role in transistor scaling. At nanoscale dimensions and for nanowire channels, prior experiments focused on reactions along the channel length, but the early stage of reaction in their cross sections remains unknown. Here, we report on the dynamics of the solid-state reaction between metal (Ni) and semiconductor (In0.53Ga0.47As), along the cross-section of nanowires that are 15 nm in width. Unlike planar structures where crystalline nickelide readily forms at conventional, low alloying temperatures, nanowires exhibit a solid-state amorphization step that can undergo a crystal regrowth step at elevated temperatures. In this study, we capture the layer-by-layer reaction mechanism and growth rate anisotropy using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our kinetic model depicts this new, in-plane contact formation which could pave the way for engineered nanoscale transistors.

  17. Dynamics of electrical double layer formation in room-temperature ionic liquids under constant-current charging conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xikai; Huang, Jingsong; Zhao, Hui; Sumpter, Bobby G; Qiao, Rui

    2014-01-01

    We report detailed simulation results on the formation dynamics of an electrical double layer (EDL) inside an electrochemical cell featuring room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) enclosed between two planar electrodes. Under relatively small charging currents, the evolution of cell potential during charging can be suitably predicted by the Landau-Ginzburg-type continuum model proposed recently (M. Z. Bazant, B. D. Storey, and A. A. Kornyshev, Phys. Rev. Lett., 106, 046102, 2011). Under very large charging currents, the cell potential shows pronounced oscillation during the initial stage of charging, a feature not captured by the continuum model. Such oscillation originates from the sequential growth of the ionic space charge layers near the electrode surface, allowing the evolution of EDLs in RTILs with time, an atomistic process difficult to visualize experimentally, to be studied by analyzing the cell potential under constant current charging conditions. While the continuum model cannot predict the potential oscillation under such far-from-equilibrium charging conditions, it can nevertheless qualitatively capture the growth of cell potential during the later stage of charging. Improving the continuum model by introducing frequency-dependent dielectric constant and density-dependent ion diffusion coefficients may help to further extend the applicability of the model. Keywords: ionic

  18. μCT-based, in vivo dynamic bone histomorphometry allows 3D evaluation of the early responses of bone resorption and formation to PTH and alendronate combination therapy.

    PubMed

    de Bakker, Chantal M J; Altman, Allison R; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Tribble, Mary Beth; Li, Connie; Chandra, Abhishek; Qin, Ling; Liu, X Sherry

    2015-04-01

    Current osteoporosis treatments improve bone mass by increasing net bone formation: anti-resorptive drugs such as bisphosphonates block osteoclast activity, while anabolic agents such as parathyroid hormone (PTH) increase bone remodeling, with a greater effect on formation. Although these drugs are widely used, their role in modulating formation and resorption is not fully understood, due in part to technical limitations in the ability to longitudinally assess bone remodeling. Importantly, it is not known whether or not PTH-induced bone formation is independent of resorption, resulting in controversy over the effectiveness of combination therapies that use both PTH and an anti-resorptive. In this study, we developed a μCT-based, in vivo dynamic bone histomorphometry technique for rat tibiae, and applied this method to longitudinally track changes in bone resorption and formation as a result of treatment with alendronate (ALN), PTH, or combination therapy of both PTH and ALN (PTH+ALN). Correlations between our μCT-based measures of bone formation and measures of bone formation based on calcein-labeled histology (r=0.72-0.83) confirm the accuracy of this method. Bone remodeling parameters measured through μCT-based in vivo dynamic bone histomorphometry indicate an increased rate of bone formation in rats treated with PTH and PTH+ALN, together with a decrease in bone resorption measures in rats treated with ALN and PTH+ALN. These results were further supported by traditional histology-based measurements, suggesting that PTH was able to induce bone formation while bone resorption was suppressed.

  19. How primordial is the structure of comet 67P?. Combined collisional and dynamical models suggest a late formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutzi, M.; Benz, W.; Toliou, A.; Morbidelli, A.; Brasser, R.

    2017-01-01

    Context. There is an active debate about whether the properties of comets as observed today are primordial or, alternatively, if they are a result of collisional evolution or other processes. Aims: We investigate the effects of collisions on a comet with a structure like 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P). We develop scaling laws for the critical specific impact energies Qreshape required for a significant shape alteration. These are then used in simulations of the combined dynamical and collisional evolution of comets in order to study the survival probability of a primordially formed object with a shape like 67P. Although the focus of this work is on a structure of this kind, the analysis is also performed for more generic bi-lobe shapes, for which we define the critical specific energy Qbil. The simulation outcomes are also analyzed in terms of impact heating and the evolution of the porosity. Methods: The effects of impacts on comet 67P are studied using a state-of-the-art smooth particle hydrodynamics shock physics code. In the 3D simulations, a publicly available shape model of 67P is applied and a range of impact conditions and material properties are investigated. The resulting critical specific impact energy Qreshape (as well as Qbil for generic bi-lobe shapes) defines a minimal projectile size which is used to compute the number of shape-changing collisions in a set of dynamical simulations. These simulations follow the dispersion of the trans-Neptunian disk during the giant planet instability, the formation of a scattered disk, and produce 87 objects that penetrate into the inner solar system with orbits consistent with the observed JFC population. The collisional evolution before the giant planet instability is not considered here. Hence, our study is conservative in its estimation of the number of collisions. Results: We find that in any scenario considered here, comet 67P would have experienced a significant number of shape-changing collisions, if it

  20. Formation, characterization, and flow dynamics of nanostructure modified sensitive and selective gas sensors based on porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Serdar

    Nanopore covered microporous silicon interfaces have been formed via an electrochemical etch for gas sensor applications. Rapid reversible and sensitive gas sensors have been fabricated. Both top-down and bottom-up approaches are utilized in the process. A nano-pore coated micro-porous silicon surface is modified selectively for sub-ppm detection of NH3, PH3 , NO, H2S, SO2. The selective depositions include electrolessly generated SnO2, CuxO, Au xO, NiO, and nanoparticles such as TiO2, MgO doped