Science.gov

Sample records for antimalarial resistance network

  1. Antimalarial Drug Resistance: Literature Review and Activities and Findings of the ICEMR Network

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liwang; Mharakurwa, Sungano; Ndiaye, Daouda; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Rosenthal, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs are key tools for the control and elimination of malaria. Recent decreases in the global malaria burden are likely due, in part, to the deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapies. Therefore, the emergence and potential spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites in southeast Asia and changes in sensitivities to artemisinin partner drugs have raised concerns. In recognition of this urgent threat, the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMRs) are closely monitoring antimalarial drug efficacy and studying the mechanisms underlying drug resistance. At multiple sentinel sites of the global ICEMR network, research activities include clinical studies to track the efficacies of antimalarial drugs, ex vivo/in vitro assays to measure drug susceptibilities of parasite isolates, and characterization of resistance-mediating parasite polymorphisms. Taken together, these efforts offer an increasingly comprehensive assessment of the efficacies of antimalarial therapies, and enable us to predict the emergence of drug resistance and to guide local antimalarial drug policies. Here we briefly review worldwide antimalarial drug resistance concerns, summarize research activities of the ICEMRs related to drug resistance, and assess the global impacts of the ICEMR programs. PMID:26259943

  2. Mind the gaps - the epidemiology of poor-quality anti-malarials in the malarious world - analysis of the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network database

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor quality medicines threaten the lives of millions of patients and are alarmingly common in many parts of the world. Nevertheless, the global extent of the problem remains unknown. Accurate estimates of the epidemiology of poor quality medicines are sparse and are influenced by sampling methodology and diverse chemical analysis techniques. In order to understand the existing data, the Antimalarial Quality Scientific Group at WWARN built a comprehensive, open-access, global database and linked Antimalarial Quality Surveyor, an online visualization tool. Analysis of the database is described here, the limitations of the studies and data reported, and their public health implications discussed. Methods The database collates customized summaries of 251 published anti-malarial quality reports in English, French and Spanish by time and location since 1946. It also includes information on assays to determine quality, sampling and medicine regulation. Results No publicly available reports for 60.6% (63) of the 104 malaria-endemic countries were found. Out of 9,348 anti-malarials sampled, 30.1% (2,813) failed chemical/packaging quality tests with 39.3% classified as falsified, 2.3% as substandard and 58.3% as poor quality without evidence available to categorize them as either substandard or falsified. Only 32.3% of the reports explicitly described their definitions of medicine quality and just 9.1% (855) of the samples collected in 4.6% (six) surveys were conducted using random sampling techniques. Packaging analysis was only described in 21.5% of publications and up to twenty wrong active ingredients were found in falsified anti-malarials. Conclusions There are severe neglected problems with anti-malarial quality but there are important caveats to accurately estimate the prevalence and distribution of poor quality anti-malarials. The lack of reports in many malaria-endemic areas, inadequate sampling techniques and inadequate chemical analytical methods and

  3. Assessment of the Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network Standardized Procedure for In Vitro Malaria Drug Sensitivity Testing Using SYBR Green Assay for Field Samples with Various Initial Parasitemia Levels.

    PubMed

    Cheruiyot, Agnes C; Auschwitz, Jennifer M; Lee, Patricia J; Yeda, Redemptah A; Okello, Charles O; Leed, Susan E; Talwar, Mayank; Murthy, Tushar; Gaona, Heather W; Hickman, Mark R; Akala, Hoseah M; Kamau, Edwin; Johnson, Jacob D

    2016-04-01

    The malaria SYBR green assay, which is used to profilein vitrodrug susceptibility ofPlasmodium falciparum, is a reliable drug screening and surveillance tool. Malaria field surveillance efforts provide isolates with various low levels of parasitemia. To be advantageous, malaria drug sensitivity assays should perform reproducibly among various starting parasitemia levels rather than at one fixed initial value. We examined the SYBR green assay standardized procedure developed by the Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) for its sensitivity and ability to accurately determine the drug concentration that inhibits parasite growth by 50% (IC50) in samples with a range of initial parasitemia levels. The initial sensitivity determination of the WWARN procedure yielded a detection limit of 0.019% parasitemia.P. falciparumlaboratory strains and field isolates with various levels of initial parasitemia were then subjected to a range of doses of common antimalarials. The IC50s were comparable for laboratory strains with between 0.0375% and 0.6% parasitemia and for field isolates with between 0.075% and 0.6% parasitemia for all drugs tested. Furthermore, assay quality (Z') analysis indicated that the WWARN procedure displays high robustness, allowing for drug testing of malaria field samples within the derived range of initial parasitemia. The use of the WWARN procedure should allow for the inclusion of more malaria field samples in malaria drug sensitivity screens that would have otherwise been excluded due to low initial parasitemia levels.

  4. Assessment of the Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network Standardized Procedure for In Vitro Malaria Drug Sensitivity Testing Using SYBR Green Assay for Field Samples with Various Initial Parasitemia Levels

    PubMed Central

    Cheruiyot, Agnes C.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Lee, Patricia J.; Yeda, Redemptah A.; Okello, Charles O.; Leed, Susan E.; Talwar, Mayank; Murthy, Tushar; Gaona, Heather W.; Hickman, Mark R.; Akala, Hoseah M.; Kamau, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    The malaria SYBR green assay, which is used to profile in vitro drug susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum, is a reliable drug screening and surveillance tool. Malaria field surveillance efforts provide isolates with various low levels of parasitemia. To be advantageous, malaria drug sensitivity assays should perform reproducibly among various starting parasitemia levels rather than at one fixed initial value. We examined the SYBR green assay standardized procedure developed by the Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) for its sensitivity and ability to accurately determine the drug concentration that inhibits parasite growth by 50% (IC50) in samples with a range of initial parasitemia levels. The initial sensitivity determination of the WWARN procedure yielded a detection limit of 0.019% parasitemia. P. falciparum laboratory strains and field isolates with various levels of initial parasitemia were then subjected to a range of doses of common antimalarials. The IC50s were comparable for laboratory strains with between 0.0375% and 0.6% parasitemia and for field isolates with between 0.075% and 0.6% parasitemia for all drugs tested. Furthermore, assay quality (Z′) analysis indicated that the WWARN procedure displays high robustness, allowing for drug testing of malaria field samples within the derived range of initial parasitemia. The use of the WWARN procedure should allow for the inclusion of more malaria field samples in malaria drug sensitivity screens that would have otherwise been excluded due to low initial parasitemia levels. PMID:26856829

  5. Esterase mutation is a mechanism of resistance to antimalarial compounds

    PubMed Central

    Istvan, Eva S.; Mallari, Jeremy P.; Corey, Victoria C.; Dharia, Neekesh V.; Marshall, Garland R.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Goldberg, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Pepstatin is a potent peptidyl inhibitor of various malarial aspartic proteases, and also has parasiticidal activity. Activity of pepstatin against cultured Plasmodium falciparum is highly variable depending on the commercial source. Here we identify a minor contaminant (pepstatin butyl ester) as the active anti-parasitic principle. We synthesize a series of derivatives and characterize an analogue (pepstatin hexyl ester) with low nanomolar activity. By selecting resistant parasite mutants, we find that a parasite esterase, PfPARE (P. falciparum Prodrug Activation and Resistance Esterase) is required for activation of esterified pepstatin. Parasites with esterase mutations are resistant to pepstatin esters and to an open source antimalarial compound, MMV011438. Recombinant PfPARE hydrolyses pepstatin esters and de-esterifies MMV011438. We conclude that (1) pepstatin is a potent but poorly bioavailable antimalarial; (2) PfPARE is a functional esterase that is capable of activating prodrugs; (3) Mutations in PfPARE constitute a mechanism of antimalarial resistance. PMID:28106035

  6. PfCRT and its role in antimalarial drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Andrea; Lehane, Adele M.; Clain, Jérôme; Fidock, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to chloroquine, the former gold standard antimalarial drug, is mediated primarily by mutant forms of the ‘Chloroquine Resistance Transporter’ (PfCRT). These mutations impart upon PfCRT the ability to efflux chloroquine from the intracellular digestive vacuole, the site of drug action. Recent studies reveal that PfCRT variants can also affect parasite fitness, protect immature gametocytes against chloroquine action, and alter P. falciparum susceptibility to current first-line therapies. These results highlight the need to be vigilant in screening for the appearance of novel pfcrt alleles that could contribute to new multi-drug resistance phenotypes. PMID:23020971

  7. Quality of antimalarials at the epicenter of antimalarial drug resistance: results from an overt and mystery client survey in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Shunmay; Lawford, Harriet L S; Tabernero, Patricia; Nguon, Chea; van Wyk, Albert; Malik, Naiela; DeSousa, Mikhael; Rada, Ouk; Boravann, Mam; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hostetler, Dana M; Swamidoss, Isabel; Green, Michael D; Fernandez, Facundo M; Kaur, Harparkash

    2015-06-01

    Widespread availability of monotherapies and falsified antimalarials is thought to have contributed to the historical development of multidrug-resistant malaria in Cambodia. This study aimed to document the quality of artemisinin-containing antimalarials (ACAs) and to compare two methods of collecting antimalarials from drug outlets: through open surveyors and mystery clients (MCs). Few oral artemisinin-based monotherapies and no suspected falsified medicines were found. All 291 samples contained the stated active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of which 69% were considered good quality by chemical analysis. Overall, medicine quality did not differ by collection method, although open surveyors were less likely to obtain oral artemisinin-based monotherapies than MCs. The results are an encouraging indication of the positive impact of the country's efforts to tackle falsified antimalarials and artemisinin-based monotherapies. However, poor-quality medicines remain an ongoing challenge that demands sustained political will and investment of human and financial resources.

  8. Quality of Antimalarials at the Epicenter of Antimalarial Drug Resistance: Results from an Overt and Mystery Client Survey in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Shunmay; Lawford, Harriet L. S.; Tabernero, Patricia; Nguon, Chea; van Wyk, Albert; Malik, Naiela; DeSousa, Mikhael; Rada, Ouk; Boravann, Mam; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hostetler, Dana M.; Swamidoss, Isabel; Green, Michael D.; Fernandez, Facundo M.; Kaur, Harparkash

    2015-01-01

    Widespread availability of monotherapies and falsified antimalarials is thought to have contributed to the historical development of multidrug-resistant malaria in Cambodia. This study aimed to document the quality of artemisinin-containing antimalarials (ACAs) and to compare two methods of collecting antimalarials from drug outlets: through open surveyors and mystery clients (MCs). Few oral artemisinin-based monotherapies and no suspected falsified medicines were found. All 291 samples contained the stated active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of which 69% were considered good quality by chemical analysis. Overall, medicine quality did not differ by collection method, although open surveyors were less likely to obtain oral artemisinin-based monotherapies than MCs. The results are an encouraging indication of the positive impact of the country's efforts to tackle falsified antimalarials and artemisinin-based monotherapies. However, poor-quality medicines remain an ongoing challenge that demands sustained political will and investment of human and financial resources. PMID:25897063

  9. [Plasmodium falciparum susceptibility to antimalarial drugs: global data issued from the Pasteur Institutes international network].

    PubMed

    Ménard, Didier; Ariey, Frédéric; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2013-01-01

    Malaria research units within the Institut Pasteur international network (RIIP-Palu) located in Africa, in South-East Asia and in South America, work for many years in close collaboration with the National malaria control programmes. Relying on technical platforms with well-equipped laboratories and scientific expertise, they are at the forefront of research on the antimalarial drug resistance by working together for training young scientists and developping similar protocols allowing comprehensive comparisons. Including fundamental and operational researches, they conduct regional and international projects which aim (1) to detect the emergence of antimalarial drugs resistant parasites and to evaluate their spatio-temporal distribution, (2) to develop in vitro and molecular tools, (3) to identify epidemiological factors involved in the emergence and the spread of antimalarial drugs resistant parasites and (4) to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms implicated in resistance. In this review, will be presented methodological approaches and data obtained since 2000.

  10. Sentinel network for monitoring in vitro susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to antimalarial drugs in Colombia: a proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Aponte, Samanda L; Díaz, Gustavo; Pava, Zuleima; Echeverry, Diego F; Ibarguen, Darío; Rios, Melissa; Murcia, Luz M; Quelal, Claudia; Murillo, Claribel; Gil, Pedro; Björkman, Anders; Osorio, Lyda

    2011-08-01

    Drug resistance is one of the principal obstacles blocking worldwide malaria control. In Colombia, malaria remains a major public health concern and drug-resistant parasites have been reported. In vitro drug susceptibility assays are a useful tool for monitoring the emergence and spread of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. The present study was conducted as a proof of concept for an antimalarial drug resistance surveillance network based on in vitro susceptibility testing in Colombia. Sentinel laboratories were set up in three malaria endemic areas. The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay-histidine rich protein 2 and schizont maturation methods were used to assess the susceptibility of fresh P. falciparum isolates to six antimalarial drugs. This study demonstrates that an antimalarial drug resistance surveillance network based on in vitro methods is feasible in the field with the participation of a research institute, local health institutions and universities. It could also serve as a model for a regional surveillance network. Preliminary susceptibility results showed widespread chloroquine resistance, which was consistent with previous reports for the Pacific region. However, high susceptibility to dihydroartemisinin and lumefantrine compounds, currently used for treatment in the country, was also reported. The implementation process identified critical points and opportunities for the improvement of network sustainability strategies.

  11. Lack of doxycycline antimalarial prophylaxis impact on Staphylococcus aureus tetracycline resistance.

    PubMed

    Mende, Katrin; Beckius, Miriam L; Zera, Wendy C; Yu, Xin; Li, Ping; Tribble, David R; Murray, Clinton K

    2016-10-01

    There is concern that susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus to tetracyclines may decrease due to use of antimalarial prophylaxis (doxycycline). We examined characteristics related to tetracycline resistance, including doxycycline exposure, in S. aureus isolates collected via admission surveillance swabs and inpatient clinical cultures from United States military personnel injured during deployment (June 2009-January 2012). Tetracycline class resistance was determined using antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The first S. aureus isolate from 168 patients were analyzed, of which 38 (23%) isolates were resistant to tetracyclines (class). Tetracycline-resistant isolates had a higher proportion of resistance to clindamycin (P=0.019) compared to susceptible isolates. There was no significant difference in tetracycline resistance between isolates collected from patients with and without antimalarial prophylaxis; however, significantly more isolates had tet(M) resistance genes in the doxycycline exposure group (P=0.031). Despite 55% of the patients receiving doxycycline as antimalarial prophylaxis, there was no association with resistance to tetracyclines.

  12. Resistance to antimalarial drugs: An endless world war against Plasmodium that we risk losing.

    PubMed

    Severini, Carlo; Menegon, Michela

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this review was to describe the 'state of the art' of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to the main antimalarial drugs. A brief note on Plasmodium vivax is also included. Resistance of P. falciparum to the various antimalarials has a long history of hits and misses. During the last 60 years, the pace at which this parasite has developed resistance to antimalarial drugs has exceeded the pace at which new drugs have been developed. In the last decade, the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) as a first-line drug treatment for non-complicated P. falciparum malaria had led to extraordinary results in disease control, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. However, the emergence and spread of resistance to artemisinin in Southeast Asia jeopardise these results. In conclusion, the possible spread of artemisinin resistance in Africa should be considered as an epochal disaster.

  13. Potentiation of antimalarial drug action by chlorpheniramine against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nakornchai, Sunan; Konthiang, Phattanapong

    2006-09-01

    Chlorpheniramine, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, was assayed for in vitro antimalarial activity against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum K1 strain and chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum T9/94 clone, by measuring the 3H-hypoxanthine incorporation. Chlorphenirame inhibited P. falciparum K1 and T9/94 growth with IC50 values of 136.0+/-40.2 microM and 102.0+/-22.6 microM respectively. A combination of antimalarial drug and chlorpheniramine was tested against resistant P. falciparum in vitro. Isobologram analysis showed that chlorpheniramine exerts marked synergistic action on chloroquine against P. falciparum K1 and T9/94. Chlorpheniramine also potentiated antimalarial action of mefloquine, quinine or pyronaridine against both of the resistant strains of P. falciparum. However, chlorpheniramine antagonism with artesunate was obtained in both P. falciparum K1 and T9/94. The results in this study indicate that antihistaminic drugs may be promising candidates for potentiating antimalarial drug action against drug resistant malarial parasites.

  14. Resistive Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman

    This programed text on resistive networks was developed under contract with the United States Office of Education as part of a series of materials for use in an electrical engineering sequence. It is to be used in conjunction with other materials and with other short texts in the series, this one being Number 3. (DH)

  15. Antimalarial drug resistance: a review of the biology and strategies to delay emergence and spread

    PubMed Central

    Klein, E.Y.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to former first-line antimalarial drugs has been an unmitigated disaster. In recent years, artemisinin class drugs have become standard and they are considered an essential tool for helping to eradicate the disease. However, their ability to reduce morbidity and mortality and to slow transmission requires the maintenance of effectiveness. Recently, an artemisinin delayed-clearance phenotype was described. This is believed to be the precursor to resistance and threatens local elimination and global eradication plans. Understanding how resistance emerges and spreads is important for developing strategies to contain its spread. Resistance is the result of two processes: (i) drug selection of resistant parasites; and (ii) the spread of resistance. In this review, we examine the factors that lead to both drug selection and the spread of resistance. We then examine strategies for controlling the spread of resistance, pointing out the complexities and deficiencies in predicting how resistance will spread. PMID:23394809

  16. Parasites resistant to the antimalarial atovaquone fail to transmit by mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Christopher D.; Siregar, Josephine E.; Mollard, Vanessa; Vega-Rodríguez, Joel; Syafruddin, Din; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Matsuzaki, Motomichi; Toyama, Tomoko; Sturm, Angelika; Cozijnsen, Anton; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo; Kita, Kiyoshi; Marzuki, Sangkot; McFadden, Geoffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance compromises control of malaria. Here, we show that resistance to a commonly used antimalarial medication, atovaquone, is apparently unable to spread. Atovaquone pressure selects parasites with mutations in cytochrome b, a respiratory protein with low but essential activity in the mammalian blood phase of the parasite life cycle. Resistance mutations rescue parasites from the drug but later prove lethal in the mosquito phase, where parasites require full respiration. Unable to respire efficiently, resistant parasites fail to complete mosquito development, arresting their life cycle. Because cytochrome b is encoded by the maternally inherited parasite mitochondrion, even outcrossing with wild-type strains cannot facilitate spread of resistance. Lack of transmission suggests that resistance will be unable to spread in the field, greatly enhancing the utility of atovaquone in malaria control. PMID:27081071

  17. Clinical status and implications of antimalarial drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Winstanley, Peter A; Ward, Steven A; Snow, Robert W

    2002-02-01

    Africa carries the greatest burden of disease caused by Plasmodium falciparum, and we can expect this burden to rise in the near future, mainly because of drug resistance. Although effective drugs are available (such as artemether-lumefantrine, mefloquine, atovaquone-proguanil and halofantrine) they are uniformly too expensive for routine use. Affordable options include chloroquine plus sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), amodiaquine (alone or in combination with SP) and chlorproguanil-dapsone. Artemisinin combination therapy may offer considerable advantages over alternative therapies, but its introduction faces considerable logistic difficulty.

  18. [Resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to 3 antimalarials in Turbo (Antioquia, Colombia), 1998].

    PubMed

    Blair, S; Lacharme, L L; Fonseca, J C; Tobón, A

    2001-01-01

    In 1998 we determined in vivo and in vitro the frequency and the degree of resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to the three antimalarials (chloroquine, amodiaquine, and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine) most utilized in the municipality of Turbo (in the area of Urabá, Antioquia, Colombia), in a sample representative of the population with malaria. We carried out clinical and parasitological analyses over a 14-day period using the standard test recommended by the World Health Organization. In vivo, P. falciparum showed resistance to chloroquine, amodiaquine, and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, with a frequency of 97%, 7%, and 13%, respectively. In vitro, the corresponding figures were 21%, 23%, and 9%, respectively. For chloroquine the level of agreement between the in vivo and in vitro results was 23%.

  19. Evidence for a Central Role for PfCRT in Conferring Plasmodium falciparum Resistance to Diverse Antimalarial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David J.; Fidock, David A.; Mungthin, Mathirut; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Sidhu, Amar Bir Singh; Bray, Patrick G.; Ward, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum is primarily conferred by mutations in pfcrt. Parasites resistant to chloroquine can display hypersensitivity to other antimalarials; however, the patterns of cross-resistance are complex, and the genetic basis has remained elusive. We show that stepwise selection for resistance to amantadine or halofantrine produced previously unknown pfcrt mutations (including S163R), which were associated with a loss of verapamil-reversible chloroquine resistance. This was accompanied by restoration of efficient chloroquine binding to hematin in these selected lines. This S163R mutation provides insight into a mechanism by which PfCRT could gate the transport of protonated chloroquine through the digestive vacuole membrane. Evidence for the presence of this mutation in a Southeast Asian isolate supports the argument for a broad role for PfCRT in determining levels of susceptibility to structurally diverse antimalarials. PMID:15383277

  20. Evaluation of antimalarial resistance marker polymorphism in returned migrant workers in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Li, Jun; Yan, He; Feng, Xinyu; Xia, Zhigui

    2015-01-01

    Imported malaria has been a great challenge for public health in China due to decreased locally transmitted cases and frequent exchange worldwide. Plasmodium falciparum has been mainly responsible for the increasing impact. Currently, artesunate plus amodiaquine, one of the artemisinin combination therapies recommended by the World Health Organization, has been mainly used against uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in China. However, drug resistance marker polymorphism in returning migrant workers has not been demonstrated. Here, we have evaluated the prevalence of pfmdr1 and pfcrt polymorphisms, as well as the K13 propeller gene, a molecular marker of artemisinin resistance, in migrant workers returned from Ghana to Shanglin County, Guangxi Province, China, in 2013. A total of 118 blood samples were randomly selected and used for the assay. Mutations of the pfmdr1 gene that covered codons 86, 184, 1034, and 1246 were found in 11 isolates. Mutations at codon N86Y (9.7%) were more frequent than at others, and Y(86)Y(184)S(1034)D(1246) was the most prevalent (63.6%) of the four haplotypes. Mutations of the pfcrt gene that covered codons 74, 75, and 76 were observed in 17 isolates, and M(74)N(75)T(76) was common (70.6%) in three haplotypes. Eight different genotypes of the K13 propeller were first observed in 10 samples in China, 2 synonymous mutations (V487V and A627A) and 6 nonsynonymous mutations. C580Y was the most prevalent (2.7%) in all the samples. The data presented might be helpful for enrichment of molecular surveillance of antimalarial resistance and will be useful for developing and updating antimalarial guidance in China.

  1. Analyzing Thiol-Dependent Redox Networks in the Presence of Methylene Blue and Other Antimalarial Agents with RT-PCR-Supported in silico Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Zirkel, J.; Cecil, A.; Schäfer, F.; Rahlfs, S.; Ouedraogo, A.; Xiao, K.; Sawadogo, S.; Coulibaly, B.; Becker, K.; Dandekar, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background In the face of growing resistance in malaria parasites to drugs, pharmacological combination therapies are important. There is accumulating evidence that methylene blue (MB) is an effective drug against malaria. Here we explore the biological effects of both MB alone and in combination therapy using modeling and experimental data. Results We built a model of the central metabolic pathways in P. falciparum. Metabolic flux modes and their changes under MB were calculated by integrating experimental data (RT-PCR data on mRNAs for redox enzymes) as constraints and results from the YANA software package for metabolic pathway calculations. Several different lines of MB attack on Plasmodium redox defense were identified by analysis of the network effects. Next, chloroquine resistance based on pfmdr/and pfcrt transporters, as well as pyrimethamine/sulfadoxine resistance (by mutations in DHF/DHPS), were modeled in silico. Further modeling shows that MB has a favorable synergism on antimalarial network effects with these commonly used antimalarial drugs. Conclusions Theoretical and experimental results support that methylene blue should, because of its resistance-breaking potential, be further tested as a key component in drug combination therapy efforts in holoendemic areas. PMID:23236254

  2. Resistance of Plamodium falciparum to antimalarial drugs in Zaragoza (Antioquia, Colombia), 1998.

    PubMed

    Blair-Trujillo, Silvia; Lacharme-Lora, Leidy; Carmona-Fonseca, Jaime

    2002-04-01

    Plasmodium falciparum sensitivity to chloroquine (CHL), amodiaquine (AMO) and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SDX/PYR) was assessed in vivo and in vitro in a representative sample from the population of Zaragoza in El Bajo Cauca region (Antioquia-Colombia). There were 94 patients with P. falciparum evaluated. For the in vivo test the patients were followed by clinical examination and microscopy, during 7 days. The in vitro test was performed following the recommendations of the World Health Organization. The in vivo prevalence of resistance to CHL was 67%, to AMO 3% and to SDX/PYR 9%. The in vitro test showed sensitivity to all antimalarials evaluated. Concordance for CHL between the in vivo and in vitro tests was 33%. For AMO and SDX/PYR, the concordance was 100%. We conclude that a high percentage of patients are resistant to CHL (in vivo). A high rate of intestinal parasitism might explain in part, the differences observed between the in vivo and the in vitro results. Therefore, new policies and treatment regimens should be proposed for the treatment of the infection in the region. Nationwide studies assessing the degree of resistance are needed.

  3. Co-treatment with the anti-malarial drugs mefloquine and primaquine highly sensitizes drug-resistant cancer cells by increasing P-gp inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Hwa; Choi, Ae-Ran; Kim, Yong Kee; Yoon, Sungpil

    2013-11-22

    The purpose of this study was to identify conditions that will increase the sensitivity of resistant cancer cells to anti-mitotic drugs. Currently, atovaquine (ATO), chloroquine (CHL), primaquine (PRI), mefloquine (MEF), artesunate (ART), and doxycycline (DOY) are the most commonly used anti-malarial drugs. Herein, we tested whether anti-malarial drugs can sensitize drug-resistant KBV20C cancer cells. None of the six tested anti-malarial drugs was found to better sensitize the drug-resistant cells compared to the sensitive KB cells. With an exception of DOY, all other anti-malarial drugs tested could sensitize both KB and KBV20C cells to a similar extent, suggesting that anti-malarial drugs could be used for sensitive as well as resistant cancer cells. Furthermore, we examined the effects of anti-malarial drugs in combination with an antimitotic drug, vinblastine (VIN) on the sensitisation of resistant KBV20C cells. Using viability assay, microscopic observation, assessment of cleaved PARP, and Hoechst staining, we identified that two anti-malarial drugs, PRI and MEF, highly sensitized KBV20C-resistant cells to VIN treatment. Moreover, PRI- or MEF-induced sensitisation was not observed in VIN-treated sensitive KB parent cells, suggesting that the observed effect is specific to resistant cancer cells. We demonstrated that the PRI and MEF sensitisation mechanism mainly depends on the inhibition of p-glycoprotein (P-gp). Our findings may contribute to the development of anti-malarial drug-based combination therapies for patients resistant to anti-mitotic drugs.

  4. Antimalarial Activity and Mechanisms of Action of Two Novel 4-Aminoquinolines against Chloroquine-Resistant Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Anna Caroline Campos; Santos, Raquel de Meneses; Figueiredo, Flávio Júnior Barbosa; Cortopassi, Wilian Augusto; Pimentel, André Silva; França, Tanos Celmar Costa; Meneghetti, Mario Roberto; Krettli, Antoniana Ursine

    2012-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is a cost effective antimalarial drug with a relatively good safety profile (or therapeutic index). However, CQ is no longer used alone to treat patients with Plasmodium falciparum due to the emergence and spread of CQ-resistant strains, also reported for P. vivax. Despite CQ resistance, novel drug candidates based on the structure of CQ continue to be considered, as in the present work. One CQ analog was synthesized as monoquinoline (MAQ) and compared with a previously synthesized bisquinoline (BAQ), both tested against P. falciparum in vitro and against P. berghei in mice, then evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxicity and ability to inhibit hemozoin formation. Their interactions with residues present in the NADH binding site of P falciparum lactate dehydrogenase were evaluated using docking analysis software. Both compounds were active in the nanomolar range evaluated through the HRPII and hypoxanthine tests. MAQ and BAQ derivatives were not toxic, and both compounds significantly inhibited hemozoin formation, in a dose-dependent manner. MAQ had a higher selectivity index than BAQ and both compounds were weak PfLDH inhibitors, a result previously reported also for CQ. Taken together, the two CQ analogues represent promising molecules which seem to act in a crucial point for the parasite, inhibiting hemozoin formation. PMID:22649514

  5. Discovery of a selective, safe and novel anti-malarial compound with activity against chloroquine resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ankita; Paliwal, Sarvesh; Mishra, Ruchi; Sharma, Swapnil; Kumar Dwivedi, Anil; Tripathi, Renu; Gunjan, Sarika

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the DNA minor groove has attracted much attention for the development of anti-malarial agents. In view of this we have attempted to discover novel DNA minor groove binders through in-silico and in-vitro workflow. A rigorously validated pharmacophore model comprising of two positive ionizable (PI), one hydrophobic (HY) and one ring aromatic (RA) features was used to mine NCI chemical compound database. This led to retrieval of many hits which were screened on the basis of estimated activity, fit value and Lipinski’s violation. Finally two compounds NSC639017 and NSC371488 were evaluated for their in-vitro anti-malarial activities against Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 (CQ sensitive) and K1 (CQ resistant) strains by SYBR green-I based fluorescence assay. The results revealed that out of two, NSC639017 posses excellent anti-malarial activity particularly against chloroquine resistant strain and moreover NSC639017 also appeared to be safe (CC50 126.04 μg/ml) and selective during cytotoxicity evaluation. PMID:26346444

  6. DETECTION OF PUTATIVE ANTIMALARIAL-RESISTANT PLASMODIUM VIVAX IN ANOPHELES VECTORS AT THAILAND-CAMBODIA AND THAILAND-MYANMAR BORDERS.

    PubMed

    Rattaprasert, Pongruj; Chaksangchaichot, Panee; Wihokhoen, Benchawan; Suparach, Nutjaree; Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp, Prapa

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring of multidrug-resistant (MDR)falciparum and vivax malaria has recently been included in the Global Plan for Artemisinin Resistance Containment (GPARC) of the Greater Mekong Sub-region, particularly at the Thailand-Cambodia and Thailand-Myanmar borders. In parallel to GPARC, monitoring MDR malaria parasites in anopheline vectors is an ideal augment to entomological surveillance. Employing Plasmodium- and species-specific nested PCR techniques, only P. vivax was detected in 3/109 salivary gland DNA extracts of anopheline vectors collected during a rainy season between 24-26 August 2009 and 22-24 September 2009 and a dry season between 29-31 December 2009 and 16-18 January 2010. Indoor and out- door resting mosquitoes were collected in Thong Pha Phum District, Kanchanaburi Province (border of Thailand-Myanmar) and Bo Rai District, Trat Province (border of Thailand-Cambodia): one sample from Anopheles dirus at the Thailand-Cambodia border and two samples from An. aconitus from Thailand-Myanmar border isolate. Nucleotide sequencing of dihydrofolate reductase gene revealed the presence in all three samples of four mutations known to cause high resistance to antifolate pyrimethamine, but no mutations were found in multidrug resistance transporter 1 gene that are associated with (falciparum) resistance to quinoline antimalarials. Such findings indicate the potential usefulness of this approach in monitoring the prevalence of drug-resistant malaria parasites in geographically regions prone to the development of drug resistance and where screening of human population at risk poses logistical and ethical problems. Keywords: Anopheles spp, Plasmodium vivax, antimalarial resistance, Greater Mekong Sub-region, nested PCR, vector surveillance

  7. Prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum Molecular Markers of Antimalarial Drug Resistance in a Residual Malaria Focus Area in Sabah, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Abd Razak, Mohd Ridzuan; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Sastu, Umi Rubiah; Imwong, Mallika; Muniandy, Prem Kumar; Saat, Muhammad Nor Farhan; Muhammad, Amirrudin; Jelip, Jenarun; Tikuson, Moizin; Yusof, Norsalleh; Rundi, Christina; Mudin, Rose Nani; Syed Mohamed, Ami Fazlin

    2016-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) and fansidar (sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, SP) were widely used for treatment of Plasmodium falciparum for several decades in Malaysia prior to the introduction of Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy (ACT) in 2008. Our previous study in Kalabakan, located in south-east coast of Sabah showed a high prevalence of resistance to CQ and SP, suggesting the use of the treatment may no longer be effective in the area. This study aimed to provide a baseline data of antimalarial drug resistant markers on P. falciparum isolates in Kota Marudu located in the north-east coast of Sabah. Mutations on genes associated with CQ (pfcrt and pfmdr1) and SP (pfdhps and pfdhfr) were assessed by PCR amplification and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Mutations on the kelch13 marker (K13) associated with artemisinin resistance were determined by DNA sequencing technique. The assessment of pfmdr1 copy number variation associated with mefloquine resistant was done by real-time PCR technique. A low prevalence (6.9%) was indicated for both pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y mutations. All P. falciparum isolates harboured the pfdhps A437G mutation. Prevalence of pfdhfr gene mutations, S108N and I164L, were 100% and 10.3%, respectively. Combining the different resistant markers, only two isolates were conferred to have CQ and SP treatment failure markers as they contained mutant alleles of pfcrt and pfmdr1 together with quintuple pfdhps/pfdhfr mutation (combination of pfdhps A437G+A581G and pfdhfr C59R+S108N+I164L). All P. falciparum isolates carried single copy number of pfmdr1 and wild type K13 marker. This study has demonstrated a low prevalence of CQ and SP resistance alleles in the study area. Continuous monitoring of antimalarial drug efficacy is warranted and the findings provide information for policy makers in ensuring a proper malaria control. PMID:27788228

  8. How can we identify parasite genes that underlie antimalarial drug resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Tim; Nkhoma, Standwell; Ecker, Andrea; Fidock, David

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines genome-scale approaches that can be used to identify mutations in malaria (Plasmodium) parasites that underlie drug resistance and contribute to treatment failure. These approaches include genetic mapping by linkage or genome-wide association studies, drug selection and characterization of resistant mutants, and the identification of genome regions under strong recent selection. While these genomic approaches can identify candidate resistance loci, genetic manipulation is needed to demonstrate causality. We therefore also describe the growing arsenal of available transfection approaches for direct incrimination of mutations suspected to play a role in resistance. Our intention is both to review past progress and highlight promising approaches for future investigations. PMID:21174623

  9. Trimaran Resistance Artificial Neural Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    11th International Conference on Fast Sea Transportation FAST 2011, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, September 2011 Trimaran Resistance Artificial Neural Network Richard...Trimaran Resistance Artificial Neural Network 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e... Artificial Neural Network and is restricted to the center and side-hull configurations tested. The value in the parametric model is that it is able to

  10. Research in Experimental Antimalarial Chemotherapy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    and reversal of chloroquine resistance with promethazine (WRBL 50601), chlorpheniramine , diphenhydramine and pyrilamine were identified and published...in 1991 and 1992. The findings on reversal of chloroquine resistance with promethazine and chlorpheniramine represent the first demonstration of the...pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of potential combinations of chlorpheniramine with antimalarial drugs in human volunteers and animal models

  11. Mechanism of artemisinin resistance for malaria PfATP6 L263 mutations and discovering potential antimalarials: An integrated computational approach.

    PubMed

    N, Nagasundaram; C, George Priya Doss; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; V, Karthick; D, Thirumal Kumar; V, Balaji; R, Siva; Lu, Aiping; Ge, Zhang; Zhu, Hailong

    2016-07-29

    Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum threatens global efforts in the elimination or eradication of malaria. Several studies have associated mutations in the PfATP6 gene in conjunction with artemisinin resistance, but the underlying molecular mechanism of the resistance remains unexplored. Associated mutations act as a biomarker to measure the artemisinin efficacy. In the proposed work, we have analyzed the binding affinity and efficacy between PfATP6 and artemisinin in the presence of L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. Furthermore, we performed virtual screening to identify potential compounds to inhibit the PfATP6 mutant proteins. In this study, we observed that artemisinin binding affinity with PfATP6 gets affected by L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. This in silico elucidation of artemisinin resistance enhanced the identification of novel compounds (CID: 10595058 and 10625452) which showed good binding affinity and efficacy with L263D, L263E and L263K mutant proteins in molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations studies. Owing to the high propensity of the parasite to drug resistance the need for new antimalarial drugs will persist until the malarial parasites are eventually eradicated. The two compounds identified in this study can be tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments as possible candidates for the designing of new potential antimalarial drugs.

  12. Mechanism of artemisinin resistance for malaria PfATP6 L263 mutations and discovering potential antimalarials: An integrated computational approach

    PubMed Central

    N., Nagasundaram; C., George Priya Doss; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; V., Karthick; D., Thirumal Kumar; V., Balaji; R., Siva; Lu, Aiping; Ge, Zhang; Zhu, Hailong

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum threatens global efforts in the elimination or eradication of malaria. Several studies have associated mutations in the PfATP6 gene in conjunction with artemisinin resistance, but the underlying molecular mechanism of the resistance remains unexplored. Associated mutations act as a biomarker to measure the artemisinin efficacy. In the proposed work, we have analyzed the binding affinity and efficacy between PfATP6 and artemisinin in the presence of L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. Furthermore, we performed virtual screening to identify potential compounds to inhibit the PfATP6 mutant proteins. In this study, we observed that artemisinin binding affinity with PfATP6 gets affected by L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. This in silico elucidation of artemisinin resistance enhanced the identification of novel compounds (CID: 10595058 and 10625452) which showed good binding affinity and efficacy with L263D, L263E and L263K mutant proteins in molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations studies. Owing to the high propensity of the parasite to drug resistance the need for new antimalarial drugs will persist until the malarial parasites are eventually eradicated. The two compounds identified in this study can be tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments as possible candidates for the designing of new potential antimalarial drugs. PMID:27471101

  13. Mechanism of artemisinin resistance for malaria PfATP6 L263 mutations and discovering potential antimalarials: An integrated computational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasundaram, N.; George Priya Doss, C.; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Karthick, V.; Thirumal Kumar, D.; Balaji, V.; Siva, R.; Lu, Aiping; Ge, Zhang; Zhu, Hailong

    2016-07-01

    Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum threatens global efforts in the elimination or eradication of malaria. Several studies have associated mutations in the PfATP6 gene in conjunction with artemisinin resistance, but the underlying molecular mechanism of the resistance remains unexplored. Associated mutations act as a biomarker to measure the artemisinin efficacy. In the proposed work, we have analyzed the binding affinity and efficacy between PfATP6 and artemisinin in the presence of L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. Furthermore, we performed virtual screening to identify potential compounds to inhibit the PfATP6 mutant proteins. In this study, we observed that artemisinin binding affinity with PfATP6 gets affected by L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. This in silico elucidation of artemisinin resistance enhanced the identification of novel compounds (CID: 10595058 and 10625452) which showed good binding affinity and efficacy with L263D, L263E and L263K mutant proteins in molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations studies. Owing to the high propensity of the parasite to drug resistance the need for new antimalarial drugs will persist until the malarial parasites are eventually eradicated. The two compounds identified in this study can be tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments as possible candidates for the designing of new potential antimalarial drugs.

  14. Anti-malarial prescriptions in three health care facilities after the emergence of chloroquine resistance in Niakhar, Senegal (1992–2004)

    PubMed Central

    Munier, Aline; Diallo, Aldiouma; Cot, Michel; Ndiaye, Ousmane; Arduin, Pascal; Chippaux, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Background In the rural zone of Niakhar in Senegal, the first therapeutic failures for chloroquine (CQ) were observed in 1992. In 2003, the national policy regarding first-line treatment of uncomplicated malaria was modified, replacing CQ by a transitory bi-therapy amodiaquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AQ/SP), before the implementation of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in 2006. The aims of the study were to assess the evolution of anti-malarial prescriptions in three health care facilities between 1992 and 2004, in parallel with increasing CQ resistance in the region. Methods The study was conducted in the area of Niakhar, a demographic surveillance site located in a sahelo-sudanese region of Senegal, with mesoendemic and seasonal malaria transmission. Health records of two public health centres and a private catholic dispensary were collected retrospectively to cover the period 1992–2004. Results Records included 110,093 consultations and 292,965 prescribed treatments. Twenty-five percent of treatments were anti-malarials, prescribed to 49% of patients. They were delivered all year long, but especially during the rainy season, and 20% of patients with no clinical malaria diagnosis received anti-malarials. Chloroquine and quinine represented respectively 55.7% and 34.6% of prescribed anti-malarials. Overall, chloroquine prescriptions rose from 1992 to 2000, in parallel with clinical malaria; then the CQ prescription rate decreased from 2000 and was concomitant with the rise of SP and the persistence of quinine use. AQ and SP were mainly used as bi-therapy after 2003, at the time of national treatment policy change. Conclusion The results show the overall level of anti-malarial prescription in the study area for a considerable number of patients over a large period of time. Even though resistance to CQ rapidly increased from 1992 to 2001, no change in CQ prescription was observed until the early 2000s, possibly due to the absence of an obvious

  15. Molecular diagnosis of resistance to antimalarial drugs during epidemics and in war zones.

    PubMed

    Djimdé, Abdoulaye A; Dolo, Amagana; Ouattara, Amed; Diakité, Sira; Plowe, Christopher V; Doumbo, Ogobara K

    2004-08-15

    Plasmodium falciparum mutations pfcrt K76T and the dhfr/dhps "quintuple mutant" are molecular markers of resistance to chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, respectively. During an epidemic of P. falciparum malaria in an area of political unrest in northern Mali, where standard efficacy studies have been impossible, we measured the prevalence of these markers in a cross-sectional survey. In 80% of cases of infection, pfcrt K76T was detected, but none of the cases carried the dhfr/dhps quintuple mutant. On the basis of these results, chloroquine was replaced by sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in control efforts. This example illustrates how molecular markers for drug resistance can provide timely data that inform malaria-control policy during epidemics and other emergency situations.

  16. Artemisinin-based antimalarial research: application of biotechnology to the production of artemisinin, its mode of action, and the mechanism of resistance of Plasmodium parasites.

    PubMed

    Muangphrom, Paskorn; Seki, Hikaru; Fukushima, Ery Odette; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2016-07-01

    Malaria is a worldwide disease caused by Plasmodium parasites. A sesquiterpene endoperoxide artemisinin isolated from Artemisia annua was discovered and has been accepted for its use in artemisinin-based combinatorial therapies, as the most effective current antimalarial treatment. However, the quantity of this compound produced from the A. annua plant is very low, and the availability of artemisinin is insufficient to treat all infected patients. In addition, the emergence of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium has been reported recently. Several techniques have been applied to enhance artemisinin availability, and studies related to its mode of action and the mechanism of resistance of malaria-causing parasites are ongoing. In this review, we summarize the application of modern technologies to improve the production of artemisinin, including our ongoing research on artemisinin biosynthetic genes in other Artemisia species. The current understanding of the mode of action of artemisinin as well as the mechanism of resistance against this compound in Plasmodium parasites is also presented. Finally, the current situation of malaria infection and the future direction of antimalarial drug development are discussed.

  17. [Synthetic antimalarials].

    PubMed

    Fardet, L; Revuz, J

    2005-01-01

    The antimalarials, mainly chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, derive from the quinoleine core of quinine. Their initial therapeutic indication was the treatment of malaria attacks but, because of anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulatory activities, they have been since used to treat many other pathologies, in particular dermatological ones. For some of these pathologies, lupus or porphyria cutanea tarda for example, the use of these molecules is based on obvious scientific evidence. For other pathologies (cutaneous sarcoidosis, polymyositis, polymorphous light eruption...), the data on the medical literature corroborating the daily clinical practice are extremely poor. Their toxicity is limited. Their most common toxic effects are gastrointestinal (mild nausea or diarrhea) or mucocutaneous (reversible skin or mucosal pigmentation). Their most serious and dreaded side effect, retinopathy, can be largely prevented by using amounts of APS adapted to the weight of the patients. The recommended "safe" daily dose for hydroxychloroquine is 6.5 mg per kilogramme of body weight and for chloroquine 4 mg per kilogramme of body weight. However, at 6- to 12 months intervals, follow-up eye examinations should be performed.

  18. The antimalarial activity of Ru-chloroquine complexes against resistant Plasmodium falciparum is related to lipophilicity, basicity, and heme aggregation inhibition ability near water/n-octanol interfaces.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Alberto; Rajapakse, Chandima S K; Jalloh, Dalanda; Dautriche, Cula; Sánchez-Delgado, Roberto A

    2009-08-01

    We have measured water/n-octanol partition coefficients, pK(a) values, heme binding constants, and heme aggregation inhibition activity of a series of ruthenium-pi-arene-chloroquine (CQ) complexes recently reported to be active against CQ-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Measurements of heme aggregation inhibition activity of the metal complexes near water/n-octanol interfaces qualitatively predict their superior antiplasmodial action against resistant parasites, in relation to CQ; we conclude that this modified method may be a better predictor of antimalarial potency than standard tests in aqueous acidic buffer. Some interesting tendencies emerge from our data, indicating that the antiplasmodial activity is related to a balance of effects associated with the lipophilicity, basicity, and structural details of the compounds studied.

  19. Expanding the Antimalarial Drug Arsenal—Now, But How?

    PubMed Central

    Grimberg, Brian T.; Mehlotra, Rajeev K.

    2011-01-01

    The number of available and effective antimalarial drugs is quickly dwindling. This is mainly because a number of drug resistance-associated mutations in malaria parasite genes, such as crt, mdr1, dhfr/dhps, and others, have led to widespread resistance to all known classes of antimalarial compounds. Unfortunately, malaria parasites have started to exhibit some level of resistance in Southeast Asia even to the most recently introduced class of drugs, artemisinins. While there is much need, the antimalarial drug development pipeline remains woefully thin, with little chemical diversity, and there is currently no alternative to the precious artemisinins. It is difficult to predict where the next generation of antimalarial drugs will come from; however, there are six major approaches: (i) re-optimizing the use of existing antimalarials by either replacement/rotation or combination approach; (ii) repurposing drugs that are currently used to treat other infections or diseases; (iii) chemically modifying existing antimalarial compounds; (iv) exploring natural sources; (v) large-scale screening of diverse chemical libraries; and (vi) through parasite genome-based (“targeted”) discoveries. When any newly discovered effective antimalarial treatment is used by the populus, we must maintain constant vigilance for both parasite-specific and human-related factors that are likely to hamper its success. This article is neither comprehensive nor conclusive. Our purpose is to provide an overview of antimalarial drug resistance, associated parasite genetic factors (1. Introduction; 2. Emergence of artemisinin resistance in P. falciparum), and the antimalarial drug development pipeline (3. Overview of the global pipeline of antimalarial drugs), and highlight some examples of the aforementioned approaches to future antimalarial treatment. These approaches can be categorized into “short term” (4. Feasible options for now) and “long term” (5. Next generation of antimalarial

  20. A population genetic model for the initial spread of partially resistant malaria parasites under anti-malarial combination therapy and weak intrahost competition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuseob; Escalante, Ananias A; Schneider, Kristan A

    2014-01-01

    To develop public-health policies that extend the lifespan of affordable anti-malarial drugs as effective treatment options, it is necessary to understand the evolutionary processes leading to the origin and spread of mutations conferring drug resistance in malarial parasites. We built a population-genetic model for the emergence of resistance under combination drug therapy. Reproductive cycles of parasites are specified by their absolute fitness determined by clinical parameters, thus coupling the evolutionary-genetic with population-dynamic processes. Initial mutations confer only partial drug-resistance. Therefore, mutant parasites rarely survive combination therapy and within-host competition is very weak among parasites. The model focuses on the early phase of such unsuccessful recurrent mutations. This ends in the rare event of mutants enriching in an infected individual from which the successful spread of resistance over the entire population is initiated. By computer simulations, the waiting time until the establishment of resistant parasites is analysed. Resistance spreads quickly following the first appearance of a host infected predominantly by mutant parasites. This occurs either through a rare transmission of a resistant parasite to an uninfected host or through a rare failure of drugs in removing "transient" mutant alleles. The emergence of resistance is delayed with lower mutation rate, earlier treatment, higher metabolic cost of resistance, longer duration of high drug dose, and higher drug efficacy causing a stronger reduction in the sensitive and resistant parasites' fitnesses. Overall, contrary to other studies' proposition, the current model based on absolute fitness suggests that aggressive drug treatment delays the emergence of drug resistance.

  1. Genome-wide association analysis identifies genetic loci associated with resistance to multiple antimalarials in Plasmodium falciparum from China-Myanmar border

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zenglei; Cabrera, Mynthia; Yang, Jingyun; Yuan, Lili; Gupta, Bhavna; Liang, Xiaoying; Kemirembe, Karen; Shrestha, Sony; Brashear, Awtum; Li, Xiaolian; Porcella, Stephen F.; Miao, Jun; Yang, Zhaoqing; Su, Xin-zhuan; Cui, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance has emerged as one of the greatest challenges facing malaria control. The recent emergence of resistance to artemisinin (ART) and its partner drugs in ART-based combination therapies (ACT) is threatening the efficacy of this front-line regimen for treating Plasmodium falciparum parasites. Thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the resistance to ART and the partner drugs has become a high priority for resistance containment and malaria management. Using genome-wide association studies, we investigated the associations of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms with in vitro sensitivities to 10 commonly used antimalarial drugs in 94 P. falciparum isolates from the China-Myanmar border area, a region with the longest history of ART usage. We identified several loci associated with various drugs, including those containing pfcrt and pfdhfr. Of particular interest is a locus on chromosome 10 containing the autophagy-related protein 18 (ATG18) associated with decreased sensitivities to dihydroartemisinin, artemether and piperaquine – an ACT partner drug in this area. ATG18 is a phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate binding protein essential for autophagy and recently identified as a potential ART target. Further investigations on the ATG18 and genes at the chromosome 10 locus may provide an important lead for a connection between ART resistance and autophagy. PMID:27694982

  2. Synthesis and Antimalarial Activities of Cyclen 4-Aminoquinoline Analogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an attempt to augment the efficacy of 7-chloro 4-aminoquinoline analogs and also to overcome resistance to anti-malarial agents we synthesized three cyclen analogs of chloroquine (4,6,7). Compound 4 displays the most potent in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activities. It displays an IC50 of 7.5 ...

  3. Crystal structures of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease in complex with two potent anti-malarial compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Woster, Patrick M.; Kovari, Ladislau C.; Gupta, Deepak

    2012-06-19

    Two potent inhibitors (compounds 1 and 2) of malarial aspartyl protease, plasmepsin-II, were evaluated against wild type (NL4-3) and multidrug-resistant clinical isolate 769 (MDR) variants of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) aspartyl protease. Enzyme inhibition assays showed that both 1 and 2 have better potency against NL4-3 than against MDR protease. Crystal structures of MDR protease in complex with 1 and 2 were solved and analyzed. Crystallographic analysis revealed that the MDR protease exhibits a typical wide-open conformation of the flaps (Gly48 to Gly52) causing an overall expansion in the active site cavity, which, in turn caused unstable binding of the inhibitors. Due to the expansion of the active site cavity, both compounds showed loss of direct contacts with the MDR protease compared to the docking models of NL4-3. Multiple water molecules showed a rich network of hydrogen bonds contributing to the stability of the ligand binding in the distorted binding pockets of the MDR protease in both crystal structures. Docking analysis of 1 and 2 showed a decrease in the binding affinity for both compounds against MDR supporting our structure-function studies. Thus, compounds 1 and 2 show promising inhibitory activity against HIV-1 protease variants and hence are good candidates for further development to enhance their potency against NL4-3 as well as MDR HIV-1 protease variants.

  4. Optimization of propafenone analogues as antimalarial leads.

    PubMed

    Lowes, David J; Guiguemde, W Armand; Connelly, Michele C; Zhu, Fangyi; Sigal, Martina S; Clark, Julie A; Lemoff, Andrew S; Derisi, Joseph L; Wilson, Emily B; Guy, R Kiplin

    2011-11-10

    Propafenone, a class Ic antiarrythmic drug, inhibits growth of cultured Plasmodium falciparum. While the drug's potency is significant, further development of propafenone as an antimalarial would require divorcing the antimalarial and cardiac activities as well as improving the pharmacokinetic profile of the drug. A small array of propafenone analogues was designed and synthesized to address the cardiac ion channel and PK liabilities. Testing of this array revealed potent inhibitors of the 3D7 (drug sensitive) and K1 (drug resistant) strains of P. falciparum that possessed significantly reduced ion channel effects and improved metabolic stability. Propafenone analogues are unusual among antimalarial leads in that they are more potent against the multidrug resistant K1 strain of P. falciparum compared to the 3D7 strain.

  5. A combined within-host and between-hosts modelling framework for the evolution of resistance to antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Legros, Mathieu; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The spread of drug resistance represents a significant challenge to many disease control efforts. The evolution of resistance is a complex process influenced by transmission dynamics between hosts as well as infection dynamics within these hosts. This study aims to investigate how these two processes combine to impact the evolution of resistance in malaria parasites. We introduce a stochastic modelling framework combining an epidemiological model of Plasmodium transmission and an explicit within-human infection model for two competing strains. Immunity, treatment and resistance costs are included in the within-host model. We show that the spread of resistance is generally less likely in areas of intense transmission, and therefore of increased competition between strains, an effect exacerbated when costs of resistance are higher. We also illustrate how treatment influences the spread of resistance, with a trade-off between slowing resistance and curbing disease incidence. We show that treatment coverage has a stronger impact on disease prevalence, whereas treatment efficacy primarily affects resistance spread, suggesting that coverage should constitute the primary focus of control efforts. Finally, we illustrate the importance of feedbacks between modelling scales. Overall, our results underline the importance of concomitantly modelling the evolution of resistance within and between hosts.

  6. A search for sources of drug resistance by the 4D-QSAR analysis of a set of antimalarial dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Filho, Osvaldo Andrade; Hopfinger, Anton J.

    2001-01-01

    A set of 18 structurally diverse antifolates including pyrimethamine, cycloguanil, methotrexate, aminopterin and trimethoprim, and 13 pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidines were studied using four-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (4D-QSAR) analysis. The corresponding biological activities of these compounds include IC50 inhibition constants for both the wild type, and a specific mutant type of Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). Two thousand conformations of each analog were sampled to generate a conformational ensemble profile (CEP) from a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) of 100,000 conformer trajectory states. Each sampled conformation was placed in a 1 Å cubic grid cell lattice for each of five trial alignments. The frequency of occupation of each grid cell was computed for each of six types of pharmacophore groups of atoms of each compound. These grid cell occupancy descriptors (GCODs) were then used as a descriptor pool to construct 4D-QSAR models. Models for inhibition of both the `wild' type and the mutant enzyme were generated which provide detailed spatial pharmacophore requirements for inhibition in terms of atom types and their corresponding relative locations in space. The 4D-QSAR models indicate some structural features perhaps relevant to the mechanism of resistance of the Plasmodium falciparum DHFR to current antimalarials. One feature identified is a slightly different binding alignment of the ligands to the mutant form of the enzyme as compared to the wild type.

  7. Ex Vivo Activity of Endoperoxide Antimalarials, Including Artemisone and Arterolane, against Multidrug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Cambodia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    are urgently needed to address the ma-jor global public health problem of malaria . Despite contain- ment and control measures, malaria caused by...test wells (basal growth control ) to the OD for the well containing the maximum tested drug concentration. Molecular markers of malaria drug resistance...Extensive in vitro evidence suggests a role for pfmdr1 amplification in artemisinin resistance, such as indicated by a genetically modified P

  8. The Tragedy Caused by Fake Antimalarial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ambroise-Thomas, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Counterfeit antimalarials (mainly artemisinin derivatives) is a crucial health problem in developing countries, particularly in Africa. The illegal production, sale and distribution of fake drugs is a huge market evaluated to several billion of dollars and represents more than 50% of the pharmaceutical market in several African countries. Fake drugs have led to a very great number of deaths from untreated malaria or fatality provoked by toxic ingredients. These fake medicines increase the risk of artemisinin resistance developed by the use of sub therapeutic dosages of antimalarials. Tackling this criminal traffic is the objective of an international program created by WHO and involves the international police and custom organizations like INTERPOL. Several very important and encouraging results have been obtained, but the problem will be completely solved if genuine antimalarials, free-of-charge, are handed-over to populations in sub Sahara African countries. PMID:22708042

  9. Recent progress in the development of anti-malarial quinolones.

    PubMed

    Beteck, Richard M; Smit, Frans J; Haynes, Richard K; N'Da, David D

    2014-08-30

    Available anti-malarial tools have over the ten-year period prior to 2012 dramatically reduced the number of fatalities due to malaria from one million to less than six-hundred and thirty thousand. Although fewer people now die from malaria, emerging resistance to the first-line anti-malarial drugs, namely artemisinins in combination with quinolines and arylmethanols, necessitates the urgent development of new anti-malarial drugs to curb the disease. The quinolones are a promising class of compounds, with some demonstrating potent in vitro activity against the malaria parasite. This review summarizes the progress made in the development of potential anti-malarial quinolones since 2008. The efficacy of these compounds against both asexual blood stages and other stages of the malaria parasite, the nature of putative targets, and a comparison of these properties with anti-malarial drugs currently in clinical use, are discussed.

  10. Trends in antimalarial drug use in Africa.

    PubMed

    Flegg, Jennifer A; Metcalf, Charlotte J E; Gharbi, Myriam; Venkatesan, Meera; Shewchuk, Tanya; Hopkins Sibley, Carol; Guerin, Philippe J

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to chloroquine (CQ) and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) led the World Health Organization (WHO) to recommend changes in national drug policies. The time between policy changes and their implementation profoundly affects program impact. We developed a model based on data on antimalarial treatments, extracted from household surveys and national antimalarial policy information from the literature. Drug use in each country during the time period 1999-2011 and the trend in reduction of CQ use after policy change were estimated. The SP use estimates were correlated with the prevalence of a molecular marker associated with SP resistance. There was no spatial pattern in the country-level rate of reduction of CQ use, after policy change. In East Africa SP drug use was strongly correlated to resistance. If artemisinin resistance spreads to, or emerges in, Africa this methodology will be a valuable tool to estimate actual drug use and its impact on changes in drug efficacy.

  11. Inductors and Inductance-Resistance Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirwin, Gerald J.

    This programed booklet presents ideas related to inductors and inductance--resistance networks. It is designed for the engineering student who is familiar with differential equations and electrical networks. A variety of cases are considered with the idea of developing in the student a broad acquaintance with the inductor response. The booklet is…

  12. Induction of multiple pleiotropic drug resistance genes in yeast engineered to produce an increased level of anti-malarial drug precursor, artemisinic acid

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Dae-Kyun; Ouellet, Mario; Paradise, Eric M; Burd, Helcio; Eng, Diana; Paddon, Chris J; Newman, Jack D; Keasling, Jay D

    2008-01-01

    Background Due to the global occurrence of multi-drug-resistant malarial parasites (Plasmodium falciparum), the anti-malarial drug most effective against malaria is artemisinin, a natural product (sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide) extracted from sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua). However, artemisinin is in short supply and unaffordable to most malaria patients. Artemisinin can be semi-synthesized from its precursor artemisinic acid, which can be synthesized from simple sugars using microorganisms genetically engineered with genes from A. annua. In order to develop an industrially competent yeast strain, detailed analyses of microbial physiology and development of gene expression strategies are required. Results Three plant genes coding for amorphadiene synthase, amorphadiene oxidase (AMO or CYP71AV1), and cytochrome P450 reductase, which in concert divert carbon flux from farnesyl diphosphate to artemisinic acid, were expressed from a single plasmid. The artemisinic acid production in the engineered yeast reached 250 μg mL-1 in shake-flask cultures and 1 g L-1 in bio-reactors with the use of Leu2d selection marker and appropriate medium formulation. When plasmid stability was measured, the yeast strain synthesizing amorphadiene alone maintained the plasmid in 84% of the cells, whereas the yeast strain synthesizing artemisinic acid showed poor plasmid stability. Inactivation of AMO by a point-mutation restored the high plasmid stability, indicating that the low plasmid stability is not caused by production of the AMO protein but by artemisinic acid synthesis or accumulation. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and quantitative real time-PCR consistently showed that pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) genes, belonging to the family of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter, were massively induced in the yeast strain producing artemisinic acid, relative to the yeast strain producing the hydrocarbon amorphadiene alone. Global transcriptional analysis by

  13. Design, Synthesis and Testing of Novel Antimalarial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-05

    malaria can be caused by four species of protozoan parasites: Plasmodium (P.) falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale, and P. malariae. The most serious...conditions arise from infection by P. falciparum and may include heart, lung, kidney and brain problems or death. Resistance to many currently used anti...more active than quinine in mice, even against Plasmodium strains resistant to pyrimethamine and other antimalarial drugs. In monkeys, the results

  14. In Silico Mining for Antimalarial Structure-Activity Knowledge and Discovery of Novel Antimalarial Curcuminoids.

    PubMed

    Viira, Birgit; Gendron, Thibault; Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Cojean, Sandrine; Horvath, Dragos; Marcou, Gilles; Varnek, Alexandre; Maes, Louis; Maran, Uko; Loiseau, Philippe M; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth

    2016-06-29

    Malaria is a parasitic tropical disease that kills around 600,000 patients every year. The emergence of resistant Plasmodium falciparum parasites to artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) represents a significant public health threat, indicating the urgent need for new effective compounds to reverse ACT resistance and cure the disease. For this, extensive curation and homogenization of experimental anti-Plasmodium screening data from both in-house and ChEMBL sources were conducted. As a result, a coherent strategy was established that allowed compiling coherent training sets that associate compound structures to the respective antimalarial activity measurements. Seventeen of these training sets led to the successful generation of classification models discriminating whether a compound has a significant probability to be active under the specific conditions of the antimalarial test associated with each set. These models were used in consensus prediction of the most likely active from a series of curcuminoids available in-house. Positive predictions together with a few predicted as inactive were then submitted to experimental in vitro antimalarial testing. A large majority from predicted compounds showed antimalarial activity, but not those predicted as inactive, thus experimentally validating the in silico screening approach. The herein proposed consensus machine learning approach showed its potential to reduce the cost and duration of antimalarial drug discovery.

  15. [The evolution over time of the in-vitro resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to antimalarial drugs in 2 areas of the Brazilian Amazonia with distinct socioeconomic and geographic characteristics].

    PubMed

    Couto, A A; Calvosa, V S; Santos, M A; de Souza, J M

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the temporal progression of in vitro P. falciparum resistance to chloroquine, amodiaquine, quinine and mefloquine in two areas with distinct socioeconomical and geographical characteristics: Lourenço, in Amapá state and Paragominas, in Pará state. The former region is essentially an "open" gold mining camp, whereas the latter is one currently undergoing a colonization settlement process, in addition to expanding economical activities which mainly include cattle raising and wood exploitation. Our results show high resistance rates to chloroquine in the two study areas: 79.8% and 68.4% in Lourenço and Paragominas, respectively. Variations in the response of P. falciparum to both amodiaquine and quinine were recorded throughout the study period. On the other hand, no mefloquine P. falciparum resistant strains could be identified, despite the tact we had noted a decrease in sensitivity to this antimalarial drug throughout the study period.

  16. Capacitors and Resistance-Capacitance Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman; Root, Augustin A.

    This programed textbook was developed under a contract with the United States Office of Education as Number 5 in a series of materials for use in an electrical engineering sequence. It is divided into three parts--(1) capacitors, (2) voltage-current relationships, and (3) simple resistance-capacitance networks. (DH)

  17. Antimalarial activity of WR 243251, a Dihydroacridinedione.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, J; Brown, L; Miller, R; Andersen, S L; McGreevy, P; Schuster, B G; Ellis, W; Ager, A; Rossan, R

    1994-01-01

    WR 243251 is a dihydroacridinedione that was evaluated for antimalarial blood schizonticidal activity in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro doses calculated to kill 50% of organisms were 11 nM for a chloroquine-susceptible, mefloquine-resistant standard strain and 25 nM for a chloroquine- and pyrimethamine-resistant standard strain. The total dose needed to cure 100% of mice infected with a drug-susceptible strain of Plasmodium berghei was 12 to 20 mg/kg of body weight for both oral and subcutaneous administration. The regimen needed to cure 100% of Aotus monkeys infected with Plasmodium falciparum was 8 mg/kg/day for 3 days (chloroquine-susceptible strain) and 16 mg/kg/day for 3 days (chloroquine-resistant strain). The 100% curative doses for Aotus monkeys did not increase for parasites previously exposed to subcurative doses. The absolute value of the curative doses of WR 243251 was comparable to or lower than the values for clinical antimalarial agents. The high absolute activity, comparability of activities against susceptible and resistant parasites, and inability to induce resistance by exposure to subcurative doses suggest that WR 243251 has strong potential as a blood schizonticidal agent. PMID:7986005

  18. Pricing, distribution, and use of antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Foster, S D

    1991-01-01

    Prices of new antimalarial drugs are targeted at the "travellers' market" in developed countries, which makes them unaffordable in malaria-endemic countries where the per capita annual drug expenditures are US$ 5 or less. Antimalarials are distributed through a variety of channels in both public and private sectors, the official malaria control programmes accounting for 25-30% of chloroquine distribution. The unofficial drug sellers in markets, streets, and village shops account for as much as half of antimalarials distributed in many developing countries. Use of antimalarials through the health services is often poor; drug shortages are common and overprescription and overuse of injections are significant problems. Anxiety over drug costs may prevent patients from getting the necessary treatment for malaria, especially because of the seasonal appearance of this disease when people's cash reserves are very low. The high costs may lead them to unofficial sources, which will sell a single tablet instead of a complete course of treatment, and subsequently to increased, often irrational demand for more drugs and more injections. Increasingly people are resorting to self-medication for malaria, which may cause delays in seeking proper treatment in cases of failure, especially in areas where chloroquine resistance has increased rapidly. Self-medication is now widespread, and measures to restrict the illicit sale of drugs have been unsuccessful. The "unofficial" channels thus represent an unacknowledged extension of the health services in many countries; suggestions are advanced to encourage better self-medication by increasing the knowledge base among the population at large (mothers, schoolchildren, market sellers, and shopkeepers), with an emphasis on correct dosing and on the importance of seeking further treatment without delay, if necessary.

  19. Herbicidal properties of antimalarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Maxime G.; Leroux, Julie; Stubbs, Keith A.; Mylne, Joshua S.

    2017-01-01

    The evolutionary relationship between plants and the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum is well established and underscored by the P. falciparum apicoplast, an essential chloroplast-like organelle. As a result of this relationship, studies have demonstrated that herbicides active against plants are also active against P. falciparum and thus could act as antimalarial drug leads. Here we show the converse is also true; many antimalarial compounds developed for human use are highly herbicidal. We found that human antimalarial drugs (e.g. sulfadiazine, sulfadoxine, pyrimethamine, cycloguanil) were lethal to the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana at similar concentrations to market herbicides glufosinate and glyphosate. Furthermore, the physicochemical properties of these herbicidal antimalarial compounds were similar to commercially used herbicides. The implications of this finding that many antimalarial compounds are herbicidal proffers two novel applications: (i) using the genetically tractable A. thaliana to reveal mode-of-action for understudied antimalarial drugs, and (ii) co-opting antimalarial compounds as a new source for much needed herbicide lead molecules. PMID:28361906

  20. Antimalarial drug policy in India: Past, present & future

    PubMed Central

    Anvikar, Anupkumar R.; Arora, Usha; Sonal, G.S.; Mishra, Neelima; Shahi, Bharatendu; Savargaonkar, Deepali; Kumar, Navin; Shah, Naman K.; Valecha, Neena

    2014-01-01

    The use of antimalarial drugs in India has evolved since the introduction of quinine in the 17th century. Since the formal establishment of a malaria control programme in 1953, shortly after independence, treatments provided by the public sector ranged from chloroquine, the mainstay drug for many decades, to the newer, recently introduced artemisinin based combination therapy. The complexity of considerations in antimalarial treatment led to the formulation of a National Antimalarial Drug Policy to guide procurement as well as communicate best practices to both public and private healthcare providers. Challenges addressed in the policy include the use of presumptive treatment, the introduction of alternate treatments for drug-resistant malaria, the duration of primaquine therapy to prevent relapses of vivax malaria, the treatment of malaria in pregnancy, and the choice of drugs for chemoprophylaxis. While data on antimalarial drug resistance and both public and private sector treatment practices have been recently reviewed, the policy process of setting national standards has not. In this perspective on antimalarial drug policy, this review highlights its relevant history, analyzes the current policy, and examines future directions. PMID:24718394

  1. New tissue schizontocidal antimalarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, David E.; Ager, Arba L.; Brown, John L.; Chapple, Frank E.; Whitmire, Richard E.; Rossan, Richard N.

    1981-01-01

    Over 700 causal prophylactic and radical curative antimalarial drugs have been discovered during the screening of approximately 4000 chemical compounds in rodent and simian malaria models. Causal prophylactic activity in the Plasmodium berghei—rodent model was demonstrated by 10 distinct groups of chemicals: 1) tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase inhibitors, 2) naphthoquinones, 3) dihydroacridinediones, 4) tetrahydrofurans, 5) guanylhydrazones, 6) analogues of clopidol, 7) quinoline esters, 8) dibenzyltetrahydro-pyrimidines, 9) 6-aminoquinolines, 10) 8-aminoquinolines. Of the causal prophylactic compounds, only the 6- and 8-aminoquinolines were capable of curing persistent exoerythrocytic infections of P. cynomolgi in rhesus monkeys. The 6-aminoquinolines were substantially less active than primaquine. This report describes a series of 4-methyl-5-phenoxy-6-methoxy-8-aminoquinolines, which are potent blood schizontocides and radical curative drugs. The most active member of this series, 4-methyl-5-(3-trifluoromethylphenoxy)-6-methoxy-8-[(4-amino-1-methylbutyl)| amino]quinoline succinate (WR 225448), was 5 times more active than primaquine in curing persistent exoerythrocytic infections of P. cynomolgi in rhesus monkeys. As a blood schizontocide, WR 225448 was effective in animal models against P. berghei, P. cynomolgi, P. vivax, and both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of P. falciparum. WR 225448 was also more toxic than primaquine in rats on subacute (28-day) administration. PMID:6976854

  2. Resistance maximization principle for defending networks against virus attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Angsheng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Pan, Yicheng

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the defending of networks against virus attack. We define the resistance of a network to be the maximum number of bits required to determine the code of the module that is accessible from random walk, from which random walk cannot escape. We show that for any network G, R(G) =H1(G) -H2(G) , where R(G) is the resistance of G, H1(G) and H2(G) are the one- and two-dimensional structural information of G, respectively, and that resistance maximization is the principle for defending networks against virus attack. By using the theory, we investigate the defending of real world networks and of the networks generated by the preferential attachment and the security models. We show that there exist networks that are defensible by a small number of controllers from cascading failure of any virus attack. Our theory demonstrates that resistance maximization is the principle for defending networks against virus attacks.

  3. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Avinaba; Sadhukhan, Gobinda Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug resistance. PMID

  4. Artemisinin Antimalarials: Preserving the “Magic Bullet”

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Richard J; Woodrow, Charles J; White, Lisa J

    2010-01-01

    The artemisinins are the most effective antimalarial drugs known. They possess a remarkably wide therapeutic index. These agents have been used in traditional Chinese herbal medicine for more than 2,000 years but were not subjected to scientific scrutiny until the 1970s. The first formal clinical trials of the artemisinins, and the development of methods for their industrial scale production, followed rapidly. A decade later, Chinese scientists shared their findings with the rest of the world; since then, a significant body of international trial evidence has confirmed these drugs to be far superior to any available alternatives. In particular, they have the ability to rapidly kill a broad range of asexual parasite stages at safe concentrations that are consistently achievable via standard dosing regimens. As their half-life is very short, there was also thought to be a low risk of resistance. These discoveries coincided with the appearance and spread of resistance to all the other major classes of antimalarials. As a result, the artemisinins now form an essential element of recommended first-line antimalarial treatment regimens worldwide. To minimize the risk of artemisinin resistance, they are recommended to be used to treat uncomplicated malaria in combination with other antimalarials as artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs). Their rollout has resulted in documented reductions in malaria prevalence in a number of African and Asian countries. Unfortunately, there are already worrisome early signs of artemisinin resistance appearing in western Cambodia. If this resistance were to spread, it would be disastrous for malaria control efforts worldwide. The enormous challenge for the international community is how to avert this catastrophe and preserve the effectiveness of this antimalarial “magic bullet”. Drug Dev Res 71: 12–19, 2010. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21399699

  5. In Vitro Antimalarial Activity of Novel Semisynthetic Nocathiacin I Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Margery; McCutchan, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Presently, the arsenal of antimalarial drugs is limited and needs to be replenished. We evaluated the potential antimalarial activity of two water-soluble derivatives of nocathiacin (BMS461996 and BMS411886) against the asexual blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Nocathiacins are a thiazolyl peptide group of antibiotics, are structurally related to thiostrepton, have potent activity against a wide spectrum of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria, and inhibit protein synthesis. The in vitro growth inhibition assay was done using three laboratory strains of P. falciparum displaying various levels of chloroquine (CQ) susceptibility. Our results indicate that BMS461996 has potent antimalarial activity and inhibits parasite growth with mean 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of 51.55 nM for P. falciparum 3D7 (CQ susceptible), 85.67 nM for P. falciparum Dd2 (accelerated resistance to multiple drugs [ARMD]), and 99.44 nM for P. falciparum K1 (resistant to CQ, pyrimethamine, and sulfadoxine). Similar results at approximately 7-fold higher IC50s were obtained with BMS411886 than with BMS461996. We also tested the effect of BMS491996 on gametocytes; our results show that at a 20-fold excess of the mean IC50, gametocytes were deformed with a pyknotic nucleus and growth of stage I to IV gametocytes was arrested. This preliminary study shows a significant potential for nocathiacin analogues to be developed as antimalarial drug candidates and to warrant further investigation. PMID:25779576

  6. Antimalarial Activity of Cupredoxins

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Donaire, Antonio; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Curd, Rachel D.; Rangachari, Kaveri; Birdsall, Berry; Ramos, Andres; Holder, Anthony A.; De la Rosa, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of effective new antimalarial agents is urgently needed. One of the most frequently studied molecules anchored to the parasite surface is the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP1). At red blood cell invasion MSP1 is proteolytically processed, and the 19-kDa C-terminal fragment (MSP119) remains on the surface and is taken into the red blood cell, where it is transferred to the food vacuole and persists until the end of the intracellular cycle. Because a number of specific antibodies inhibit erythrocyte invasion and parasite growth, MSP119 is therefore a promising target against malaria. Given the structural homology of cupredoxins with the Fab domain of monoclonal antibodies, an approach combining NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements with docking calculations based on BiGGER is employed on MSP119-cupredoxin complexes. Among the cupredoxins tested, rusticyanin forms a well defined complex with MSP119 at a site that overlaps with the surface recognized by the inhibitory antibodies. The addition of holo-rusticyanin to infected cells results in parasitemia inhibition, but negligible effects on parasite growth can be observed for apo-rusticyanin and other proteins of the cupredoxin family. These findings point to rusticyanin as an excellent therapeutic tool for malaria treatment and provide valuable information for drug design. PMID:23749994

  7. Specialization for resistance in wild host-pathogen interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Luke G; Encinas-Viso, Francisco; Burdon, Jeremy J; Thrall, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Properties encompassed by host-pathogen interaction networks have potential to give valuable insight into the evolution of specialization and coevolutionary dynamics in host-pathogen interactions. However, network approaches have been rarely utilized in previous studies of host and pathogen phenotypic variation. Here we applied quantitative analyses to eight networks derived from spatially and temporally segregated host (Linum marginale) and pathogen (Melampsora lini) populations. First, we found that resistance strategies are highly variable within and among networks, corresponding to a spectrum of specialist and generalist resistance types being maintained within all networks. At the individual level, specialization was strongly linked to partial resistance, such that partial resistance was effective against a greater number of pathogens compared to full resistance. Second, we found that all networks were significantly nested. There was little support for the hypothesis that temporal evolutionary dynamics may lead to the development of nestedness in host-pathogen infection networks. Rather, the common patterns observed in terms of nestedness suggests a universal driver (or multiple drivers) that may be independent of spatial and temporal structure. Third, we found that resistance networks were significantly modular in two spatial networks, clearly reflecting spatial and ecological structure within one of the networks. We conclude that (1) overall patterns of specialization in the networks we studied mirror evolutionary trade-offs with the strength of resistance; (2) that specific network architecture can emerge under different evolutionary scenarios; and (3) network approaches offer great utility as a tool for probing the evolutionary and ecological genetics of host-pathogen interactions.

  8. Antimalarial activity of plumbagin in vitro and in animal models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plumbagin is the major active constituent in several plants including Plumbago indica Linn. (root). This compound has been shown to exhibit a wide spectrum of biological and pharmacological activities. The present study aimed to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activity of plumbagin including its acute and subacute toxicity in mice. Methods In vitro antimalarial activity of plumbagin against K1 and 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum clones were assessed using SYBR Green I based assay. In vivo antimalarial activity was investigated in Plasmodium berghei-infected mouse model (a 4-day suppressive test). Results Plumbagin exhibited promising antimalarial activity with in vitro IC50 (concentration that inhibits parasite growth to 50%) against 3D7 chloroquine-sensitive P. falciparum and K1 chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum clones of 580 (270–640) and 370 (270–490) nM, respectively. Toxicity testing indicated relatively low toxicity at the dose levels up to 100 (single oral dose) and 25 (daily doses for 14 days) mg/kg body weight for acute and subacute toxicity, respectively. Chloroquine exhibited the most potent antimalarial activity in mice infected with P. berghei ANKA strain with respect to its activity on the reduction of parasitaemia on day 4 and the prolongation of survival time. Conclusions Plumbagin at the dose of 25 mg/kg body weight given for 4 days was safe and produced weak antimalarial activity. Chemical derivatization of the parent compound or preparation of modified formulation is required to improve its systemic bioavailability. PMID:24410949

  9. Antimalarial hybrid molecules: a close reality or a distant dream?

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Drishti; Gupta, Rinkoo D; Awasthi, Satish K

    2017-03-13

    Emergence of drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains has led to a situation of haste in the scientific and pharmaceutical communities. Hence, all their efforts are redirected towards finding alternate chemotherapeutic agents that are capable of combating multi-drug resistant parasite strains. In the above light, scientists have come up with the concept of hybridisation of two or more active pharmacophores into a single chemical entity, resulting in 'antimalarial hybrids.' The approach has been applied widely for lead generation against deadly diseases such as cancer and AIDS, with proven potential to be used as novel drugs, but is comparatively new in the sphere of antimalarial drug discovery. A sudden surge has been evidenced in the number of studies on design and synthesis of hybrids for treating malaria, and may be regarded as proof of their potential advantages over Artemisinin based Combination Therapy (ACT). However, it is evident from recent studies that most of the potential advantages of antimalarial hybrids, such as lower toxicity, better pharmacokinetics and easier formulation, have yet to be realised. A number of questions left unaddressed at present need to be answered before this approach can progress in to the late stages of clinical development and prove their worth in the clinic. To the best of our knowledge, this compilation is the first attempt to shed light over the shortcomings that are surfacing as more and more studies on molecular hybridization of the active pharmacophores of known antimalarials are being published.

  10. Screening of Thai medicinal plant extracts and their active constituents for in vitro antimalarial activity.

    PubMed

    Ichino, C; Soonthornchareonnon, N; Chuakul, W; Kiyohara, H; Ishiyama, A; Sekiguchi, H; Namatame, M; Otoguro, K; Omura, S; Yamada, H

    2006-04-01

    To discover antimalarial substances from plants cultivated in Thailand 80%-EtOH extracts from selected plants were screened for in vitro antimalarial activity against the drug resistant K1 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. In total, 86 Thai medicinal plant samples representing 48 species from 35 genera in 16 families were screened and two species (Polyalthia viridis and Goniothalamus marcanii) were found to show notable antimalarial activity (IC50: 10.0 and 6.3 microg/mL). Marcanine A and 16-hydroxycleroda-3,13(14)Z-dien-15,16-olide were identified as the respective major active constituents in P. viridis and G. marcanii, respectively.

  11. Crystal and molecular structure of the antimalarial agent enpiroline.

    PubMed Central

    Karle, J M; Karle, I L

    1989-01-01

    To identify common spatial and structural features of amino alcohol antimalarial agents with the eventual goal of designing more effective drugs and a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this class of antimalarial agents, the three-dimensional crystal and molecular structure of enpiroline, a new antimalarial agent active against chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum, was determined by X-ray crystallography and compared with the crystal structures of the cinchona alkaloids and of the new antimalarial agent WR 194,965. The aromatic rings of the phenyl-pyridine ring system of enpiroline are twisted from each other by approximately 18 degrees. The intramolecular aliphatic N-O distance in enpiroline was 2.80 A (1 A = 0.1 nm), which is close to the N-O distance found in the antimalarial cinchona alkaloids. Enpiroline contains both an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the aliphatic nitrogen and oxygen atoms and an intermolecular hydrogen bond between the aliphatic nitrogen and oxygen atoms of two neighboring molecules. One enantiomer of enpiroline superimposed best with quinine, and the other enantiomer of enpiroline superimposed best with quinidine, suggesting that both enantiomers of enpiroline possess antimalarial activity. Since a common feature of the crystal structures of the amino alcohol antimalarial agents is the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, the common spatial direction of hydrogen bond formation indicates the potential ability of these antimalarial agents to bind to a common receptor site. The crystallographic parameters were as follows: C19H18F6N5O; Mr = 404.3; symmetry of unit cell, monoclinic; space group, P2(1)/a; parameters of unit cell---a = 9.454 +/- 0.004 A, b = 18.908 +/- 0.008 A, c = 10.300 +/- 0.004 A, and beta = 96.55 +/- 0.03 degrees: V (volume of unit cell) = 1829.2 A3; Z (number of molecules per unit cell) = 4; Dchi (calculated density) = 1.46 g cm-3; source of radiation, CuK alpha (lambda = 1.54178 A); mu

  12. In silico and in vivo anti-malarial studies of 18β glycyrrhetinic acid from Glycyrrhiza glabra.

    PubMed

    Kalani, Komal; Agarwal, Jyoti; Alam, Sarfaraz; Khan, Feroz; Pal, Anirban; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most prevailing fatal diseases causing between 1.2 and 2.7 million deaths all over the world each year. Further, development of resistance against the frontline anti-malarial drugs has created an alarming situation, which requires intensive drug discovery to develop new, more effective, affordable and accessible anti-malarial agents possessing novel modes of action. Over the past few years triterpenoids from higher plants have shown a wide range of anti-malarial activities. As a part of our drug discovery program for anti-malarial agents from Indian medicinal plants, roots of Glycyrrhizaglabra were chemically investigated, which resulted in the isolation and characterization of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) as a major constituent. The in vitro studies against P. falciparum showed significant (IC50 1.69 µg/ml) anti-malarial potential for GA. Similarly, the molecular docking studies showed adequate docking (LibDock) score of 71.18 for GA and 131.15 for standard anti-malarial drug chloroquine. Further, in silico pharmacokinetic and drug-likeness studies showed that GA possesses drug-like properties. Finally, in vivo evaluation showed a dose dependent anti-malarial activity ranging from 68-100% at doses of 62.5-250 mg/kg on day 8. To the best of our knowledge this is the first ever report on the anti-malarial potential of GA. Further work on optimization of the anti-malarial lead is under progress.

  13. Optimization of 2-Anilino 4-Amino Substituted Quinazolines into Potent Antimalarial Agents with Oral in Vivo Activity.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Paul R; Tan, Cyrus; Jarman, Kate E; Lowes, Kym N; Curtis, Joan M; Nguyen, William; Di Rago, Adrian E; Bullen, Hayley E; Prinz, Boris; Duffy, Sandra; Baell, Jonathan B; Hutton, Craig A; Jousset Subroux, Helene; Crabb, Brendan S; Avery, Vicky M; Cowman, Alan F; Sleebs, Brad E

    2017-02-09

    Novel antimalarial therapeutics that target multiple stages of the parasite lifecycle are urgently required to tackle the emerging problem of resistance with current drugs. Here, we describe the optimization of the 2-anilino quinazoline class as antimalarial agents. The class, identified from publicly available antimalarial screening data, was optimized to generate lead compounds that possess potent antimalarial activity against P. falciparum parasites comparable to the known antimalarials, chloroquine and mefloquine. During the optimization process, we defined the functionality necessary for activity and improved in vitro metabolism and solubility. The resultant lead compounds possess potent activity against a multidrug resistant strain of P. falciparum and arrest parasites at the ring phase of the asexual stage and also gametocytogensis. Finally, we show that the lead compounds are orally efficacious in a 4 day murine model of malaria disease burden.

  14. Microbial transformation of antimalarial terpenoids.

    PubMed

    Parshikov, Igor A; Netrusov, Alexander I; Sutherland, John B

    2012-01-01

    The fungal and bacterial transformation of terpenoids derived from plant essential oils, especially the sesquiterpenoid artemisinin from Artemisia annua, has produced several new candidate drugs for the treatment of malaria. Obtaining new derivatives of terpenoids, including artemisinin derivatives with increased antimalarial activity, is an important goal of research in microbial biotechnology and medicinal chemistry.

  15. Endoperoxide antimalarials: development, structural diversity and pharmacodynamic aspects with reference to 1,2,4-trioxane-based structural scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Rudrapal, Mithun; Chetia, Dipak

    2016-01-01

    Malaria disease continues to be a major health problem worldwide due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. In recent days, artemisinin (ART)-based drugs and combination therapies remain the drugs of choice for resistant P. falciparum malaria. However, resistance to ART-based drugs has begun to appear in some parts of the world. Endoperoxide compounds (natural/semisynthetic/synthetic) representing a huge number of antimalarial agents possess a wide structural diversity with a desired antimalarial effectiveness against resistant P. falciparum malaria. The 1,2,4-trioxane ring system lacking the lactone ring that constitutes the most important endoperoxide structural scaffold is believed to be the key pharmacophoric moiety and is primarily responsible for the pharmacodynamic potential of endoperoxide-based antimalarials. Due to this reason, research into endoperoxide, particularly 1,2,4-trioxane-, 1,2,4-trioxolane- and 1,2,4,5-teraoxane-based scaffolds, has gained significant interest in recent years for developing antimalarial drugs against resistant malaria. In this paper, a comprehensive effort has been made to review the development of endoperoxide antimalarials from traditional antimalarial leads (natural/semisynthetic) and structural diversity of endoperoxide molecules derived from 1,2,4-trioxane-, 1,2,4-trioxolane- and 1,2,4,5-teraoxane-based structural scaffolds, including their chimeric (hybrid) molecules, which are newer and potent antimalarial agents. PMID:27843298

  16. Antimalarial activity of methanolic leaf extract of Piper betle L.

    PubMed

    Al-Adhroey, Abdulelah H; Nor, Zurainee M; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Amran, Adel A; Mahmud, Rohela

    2010-12-28

    The need for new compounds active against malaria parasites is made more urgent by the rapid spread of drug-resistance to available antimalarial drugs. The crude methanol extract of Piper betle leaves (50-400 mg/kg) was investigated for its antimalarial activity against Plasmodium berghei (NK65) during early and established infections. The phytochemical and antioxidant potentials of the crude extract were evaluated to elucidate the possibilities of its antimalarial effects. The safety of the extract was also investigated in ICR mice of both sexes by the acute oral toxicity limit test. The leaf extract demonstrated significant (P < 0.05) schizonticidal activity in all three antimalarial evaluation models. Phytochemical screening showed that the leaf extract contains some vital antiplasmodial chemical constituents. The extract also exhibited a potent ability to scavenge the free radicals. The results of acute toxicity showed that the methanol extract of Piper betle leaves is toxicologically safe by oral administration. The results suggest that the Malaysian folklorical medicinal application of the extract of Piper betle leaf has a pharmacological basis.

  17. Miniaturized Cultivation of Microbiota for Antimalarial Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Carrie; Calcul, Laurent; Beau, Jeremy; Ma, Wai Sheung; Lebar, Matthew D; von Salm, Jacqueline L; Harter, Charles; Mutka, Tina; Morton, Lindsay C; Maignan, Patrick; Barisic, Betty; van Olphen, Alberto; Kyle, Dennis E; Vrijmoed, Lilian; Pang, Ka-Lai; Pearce, Cedric J; Baker, Bill J

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing search for effective antiplasmodial agents remains essential in the fight against malaria worldwide. Emerging parasitic drug resistance places an urgent need to explore chemotherapies with novel structures and mechanisms of action. Natural products have historically provided effective antimalarial drug scaffolds. In an effort to search nature's chemical potential for antiplasmodial agents, unconventionally sourced organisms coupled with innovative cultivation techniques were utilized. Approximately 60,000 niche microbes from various habitats (slow-growing terrestrial fungi, Antarctic microbes, and mangrove endophytes) were cultivated on a small-scale, extracted, and used in high-throughput screening to determine antimalarial activity. About 1% of crude extracts were considered active and 6% partially active (≥ 67% inhibition at 5 and 50 μg/mL, respectively). Active extracts (685) were cultivated on a large-scale, fractionated, and screened for both antimalarial activity and cytotoxicity. High interest fractions (397) with an IC50 < 1.11 μg/mL were identified and subjected to chromatographic separation for compound characterization and dereplication. Identifying active compounds with nanomolar antimalarial activity coupled with a selectivity index tenfold higher was accomplished with two of the 52 compounds isolated. This microscale, high-throughput screening project for antiplasmodial agents is discussed in the context of current natural product drug discovery efforts.

  18. Potent Antimalarial Activity of Acriflavine In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Malaria continues to be a major health problem globally. There is an urgent need to find new antimalarials. Acriflavine (ACF) is known as an antibacterial agent and more recently as an anticancer agent. Here, we report that ACF inhibits the growth of asexual stages of both chloroquine (CQ) sensitive and resistant strains of human malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum in vitro at nanomolar concentration. ACF clears the malaria infection in vivo from the bloodstreams of mice infected with Plasmodium berghei. Interestingly, ACF is accumulated only in the parasitized red blood cells (RBCs) and parasite specific transporters may have role in this specific drug accumulation. We further show that ACF impairs DNA replication foci formation in the parasites and affects the enzymatic activities of apicoplast specific Gyrase protein. We thus establish ACF as a potential antimalarial amidst the widespread incidences of drug resistant Plasmodium strains. PMID:25089658

  19. Review of pyronaridine anti-malarial properties and product characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Pyronaridine was synthesized in 1970 at the Institute of Chinese Parasitic Disease and has been used in China for over 30 years for the treatment of malaria. Pyronaridine has high potency against Plasmodium falciparum, including chloroquine-resistant strains. Studies in various animal models have shown pyronaridine to be effective against strains resistant to other anti-malarials, including chloroquine. Resistance to pyronaridine appears to emerge slowly and is further retarded when pyronaridine is used in combination with other anti-malarials, in particular, artesunate. Pyronaridine toxicity is generally less than that of chloroquine, though evidence of embryotoxicity in rodents suggests use with caution in pregnancy. Clinical pharmacokinetic data for pyronaridine indicates an elimination T1/2 of 13.2 and 9.6 days, respectively, in adults and children with acute uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria in artemisinin-combination therapy. Clinical data for mono or combined pyronaridine therapy show excellent anti-malarial effects against P. falciparum and studies of combination therapy also show promise against Plasmodium vivax. Pyronaridine has been developed as a fixed dose combination therapy, in a 3:1 ratio, with artesunate for the treatment of acute uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria and blood stage P. vivax malaria with the name of Pyramax® and has received Positive Opinion by European Medicines Agency under the Article 58 procedure. PMID:22877082

  20. The in vitro antimalarial interaction of 9-hydroxycalabaxanthone and α-mangostin with mefloquine/artesunate.

    PubMed

    Chaijaroenkul, Wanna; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2014-03-01

    Multidrug resistance Plasmodium falciparum is the major health problem in Thailand. Discovery and development of new antimalarial drugs with novel modes of action is urgently required. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antimalarial interaction of 9-hydroxycalabaxanthone and α-mangostin with the standard antimalarial drugs mefloquine and artesunate in chloroquine sensitive (3D7) and chloroquine resistant (K1) P. falciparum clones in vitro. Median (range) IC50 (drug concentration which produces 50% parasite growth inhibition) values of the 9-hydroxycalabaxanthone, α-mangostin, artesunate and mefloquine for 3D7 vs K1 clones were 1.5 (0.9-2.1) vs 1.2 (1.1-1.6) μM, 17.9 (15.7.0-20.0) vs 9.7 (6.0-14.0) μM, 1.0 (0.4-3.0) vs 1.7 (1.0-2.5) nM, and 13.3 (11.1-13.3) vs 7.1 (6.7-12.2) nM, respectively. Analysis of isobologram and combination index (CI) of 9-hydroxycalabaxanthone with artesunate or mefloquine showed synergistic and indifference antimalarial interaction, respectively. α-mangostin-artesunate combination exhibited a slight antagonistic effect of antimalarial interaction, whereas α-mangostin and mefloquine combination showed indifference interaction in both clones. The combination of 9-hydroxycalabaxanthone with α-mangostin showed the synergistic antimalarial interaction in both clones.

  1. Synthesis and antimalarial activity of metal complexes of cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hubin, Timothy J.; Amoyaw, Prince N. -A.; Roewe, Kimberly D.; Simpson, Natalie C.; Maples, Randall D.; Carder Freeman, TaRynn N.; Cain, Amy N.; Le, Justin G.; Archibald, Stephen J.; Khan, Shabana I.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Khan, M. O. Faruk

    2014-01-01

    Using transition metals such as manganese(II), iron(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), and zinc(II), several new metal complexes of cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic chelators namely, cyclen- and cyclam-analogs with benzyl groups, were synthesized and screened for in vitro antimalarial activity against chloroquine-resistant (W2) and chloroquine-sensitive (D6) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The metal-free chelators tested showed little or no antimalarial activity. All the metal complexes of the dibenzyl cross-bridged cyclam ligand exhibited potent antimalarial activity. The Mn2+ complex of this ligand was the most potent with IC50s of 0.127 and 0.157 µM against the chloroquine-sensitive (D6) and chloroquine-resistant (W2) P. falciparum strains, respectively. In general, the dibenzyl hydrophobic ligands showed better antimalarial activity compared to the activity of monobenzyl ligands, potentially because of their higher lipophilicity and thus better cell penetration ability. The higher antimalarial activity displayed by the manganese complex for the cyclam ligand in comparison to that of the cyclen, correlates with the larger pocket of cyclam compared to that of cyclen which produces a more stable complex with the Mn2+. Few of the Cu2+ and Fe2+ complexes also showed improvement in activity but Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ complexes did not show any improvement in activity upon the metal-free ligands for anti-malarial development. PMID:24857776

  2. Development of mefloquine as an antimalarial drug*

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The spread of multiresistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum in south-east Asia and South America and the appearance of chloroquine resistance in Africa indicates the urgent need for alternative drugs against these parasites. Mefloquine, a 4-quinoline methanol, is the only new drug that is currently at an advanced stage of development. Studies in animal models and in the clinic have shown that it is highly active as a blood schizontocide against strains that are resistant to many established antimalarials, e.g., chloroquine and pyrimethamine. It is not, however, effective as a causal prophylactic agent. Preclinical toxicological, teratological, and carcinogenicity studies do not indicate any major contraindications to its use. Intensive clinical studies have been carried out in Africa, North and South America, south-east Asia, and Europe. These studies have indicated that the compound is generally well tolerated, safe, and effective in the treatment of malaria, particularly infections with chloroquine-resistant parasites. In order to protect this new and promising drug against the development of resistance to it in endemic areas, it is important that its introduction should be accomplished in a rational and deliberate manner. Appropriate precautionary measures include the development of mefloquine combinations (a combination of mefloquine with pyrimethamine—sulfadoxine is presently under investigation), its use with primaquine as a gametocytocidal drug to prevent transmission, and its deployment primarily for treatment, being used for prophylaxis only in special risk groups. PMID:6407767

  3. Resistance and Security Index of Networks: Structural Information Perspective of Network Security

    PubMed Central

    Li, Angsheng; Hu, Qifu; Liu, Jun; Pan, Yicheng

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Li and Pan defined the metric of the K-dimensional structure entropy of a structured noisy dataset G to be the information that controls the formation of the K-dimensional structure of G that is evolved by the rules, order and laws of G, excluding the random variations that occur in G. Here, we propose the notion of resistance of networks based on the one- and two-dimensional structural information of graphs. Given a graph G, we define the resistance of G, written , as the greatest overall number of bits required to determine the code of the module that is accessible via random walks with stationary distribution in G, from which the random walks cannot escape. We show that the resistance of networks follows the resistance law of networks, that is, for a network G, the resistance of G is , where and are the one- and two-dimensional structure entropies of G, respectively. Based on the resistance law, we define the security index of a network G to be the normalised resistance of G, that is, . We show that the resistance and security index are both well-defined measures for the security of the networks. PMID:27255783

  4. Resistance and Security Index of Networks: Structural Information Perspective of Network Security.

    PubMed

    Li, Angsheng; Hu, Qifu; Liu, Jun; Pan, Yicheng

    2016-06-03

    Recently, Li and Pan defined the metric of the K-dimensional structure entropy of a structured noisy dataset G to be the information that controls the formation of the K-dimensional structure of G that is evolved by the rules, order and laws of G, excluding the random variations that occur in G. Here, we propose the notion of resistance of networks based on the one- and two-dimensional structural information of graphs. Given a graph G, we define the resistance of G, written , as the greatest overall number of bits required to determine the code of the module that is accessible via random walks with stationary distribution in G, from which the random walks cannot escape. We show that the resistance of networks follows the resistance law of networks, that is, for a network G, the resistance of G is , where and are the one- and two-dimensional structure entropies of G, respectively. Based on the resistance law, we define the security index of a network G to be the normalised resistance of G, that is, . We show that the resistance and security index are both well-defined measures for the security of the networks.

  5. From crystal to compound: structure-based antimalarial drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Drinkwater, Nyssa; McGowan, Sheena

    2014-08-01

    Despite a century of control and eradication campaigns, malaria remains one of the world's most devastating diseases. Our once-powerful therapeutic weapons are losing the war against the Plasmodium parasite, whose ability to rapidly develop and spread drug resistance hamper past and present malaria-control efforts. Finding new and effective treatments for malaria is now a top global health priority, fuelling an increase in funding and promoting open-source collaborations between researchers and pharmaceutical consortia around the world. The result of this is rapid advances in drug discovery approaches and technologies, with three major methods for antimalarial drug development emerging: (i) chemistry-based, (ii) target-based, and (iii) cell-based. Common to all three of these approaches is the unique ability of structural biology to inform and accelerate drug development. Where possible, SBDD (structure-based drug discovery) is a foundation for antimalarial drug development programmes, and has been invaluable to the development of a number of current pre-clinical and clinical candidates. However, as we expand our understanding of the malarial life cycle and mechanisms of resistance development, SBDD as a field must continue to evolve in order to develop compounds that adhere to the ideal characteristics for novel antimalarial therapeutics and to avoid high attrition rates pre- and post-clinic. In the present review, we aim to examine the contribution that SBDD has made to current antimalarial drug development efforts, covering hit discovery to lead optimization and prevention of parasite resistance. Finally, the potential for structural biology, particularly high-throughput structural genomics programmes, to identify future targets for drug discovery are discussed.

  6. Nanoscale glucan polymer network causes pathogen resistance.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Dennis; Naumann, Marcel; Reimer, Rudolph; Voigt, Christian A

    2014-02-24

    Successful defence of plants against colonisation by fungal pathogens depends on the ability to prevent initial penetration of the plant cell wall. Here we report that the pathogen-induced (1,3)-β-glucan cell wall polymer callose, which is deposited at sites of attempted penetration, directly interacts with the most prominent cell wall polymer, the (1,4)-β-glucan cellulose, to form a three-dimensional network at sites of attempted fungal penetration. Localisation microscopy, a super-resolution microscopy technique based on the precise localisation of single fluorescent molecules, facilitated discrimination between single polymer fibrils in this network. Overexpression of the pathogen-induced callose synthase PMR4 in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana not only enlarged focal callose deposition and polymer network formation but also resulted in the exposition of a callose layer on the surface of the pre-existing cellulosic cell wall facing the invading pathogen. The importance of this previously unknown polymeric defence network is to prevent cell wall hydrolysis and penetration by the fungus. We anticipate our study to promote nanoscale analysis of plant-microbe interactions with a special focus on polymer rearrangements in and at the cell wall. Moreover, the general applicability of localisation microscopy in visualising polymers beyond plant research will help elucidate their biological function in complex networks.

  7. Nanoscale glucan polymer network causes pathogen resistance

    PubMed Central

    Eggert, Dennis; Naumann, Marcel; Reimer, Rudolph; Voigt, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    Successful defence of plants against colonisation by fungal pathogens depends on the ability to prevent initial penetration of the plant cell wall. Here we report that the pathogen-induced (1,3)-β-glucan cell wall polymer callose, which is deposited at sites of attempted penetration, directly interacts with the most prominent cell wall polymer, the (1,4)-β-glucan cellulose, to form a three-dimensional network at sites of attempted fungal penetration. Localisation microscopy, a super-resolution microscopy technique based on the precise localisation of single fluorescent molecules, facilitated discrimination between single polymer fibrils in this network. Overexpression of the pathogen-induced callose synthase PMR4 in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana not only enlarged focal callose deposition and polymer network formation but also resulted in the exposition of a callose layer on the surface of the pre-existing cellulosic cell wall facing the invading pathogen. The importance of this previously unknown polymeric defence network is to prevent cell wall hydrolysis and penetration by the fungus. We anticipate our study to promote nanoscale analysis of plant-microbe interactions with a special focus on polymer rearrangements in and at the cell wall. Moreover, the general applicability of localisation microscopy in visualising polymers beyond plant research will help elucidate their biological function in complex networks. PMID:24561766

  8. Novel molecular targets for antimalarial chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jana, Snehasis; Paliwal, Jyoti

    2007-07-01

    The emergence and spread of drug-resistant malaria parasites is a serious public health problem in the tropical world. Malaria control has relied upon the traditional quinoline, antifolate and artemisinin compounds. Very few new antimalarials were developed in the last quarter of the 20th century. An alarming increase in drug-resistant strains of the malaria parasite poses a significant problem for effective control. Recent advances in our knowledge of parasite biology as well as the availability of the genome sequence provide a wide range of novel targets for drug design. Gene products involved in controlling vital aspects of parasite metabolism and organelle function could be attractive targets. It is expected that the application of functional genomic tools in combination with modern approaches such as structure-based drug design and combinatorial chemistry will lead to the development of effective new drugs against drug-resistant malaria strains. This review discusses novel molecular targets of the malaria parasite available to the drug discovery scientist.

  9. Solution structures of antimalarial drug-heme complexes.

    PubMed

    Leed, Alison; DuBay, Kateri; Ursos, Lyann M B; Sears, Devin; De Dios, Angel C; Roepe, Paul D

    2002-08-13

    Paramagnetic metal centers [such as Fe(III) found within ferriprotoporphyrin IX heme (FPIX)] exert through space effects on the relaxation rate of nearby proton spins that depend critically on the metal-proton distance. We have measured these effects for all protons of several antimalarial drugs that bind to FPIX by systematically varying the drug:heme molar ratio in high field NMR experiments. These measurements allow us to determine precise FPIX Fe-drug H distances for the solution structures of noncovalent complexes formed between FPIX mu-oxo dimers and the antimalarial drugs chloroquine (CQ), quinine (QN), and quinidine (QD). Using these distances, we then performed distance restraint calculations to determine the lowest-energy solution structures of these complexes. Structures were solved for neutral, monoprotic (+1), and diprotic (+2) forms of the drugs. Analysis of these structures allows us to visualize for the first time the stereospecific differences between QN and QD binding to FPIX and the differences in populations of QN and QD solution structures upon changes in digestive vacuolar pH for drug resistant malarial parasites [Dzekunov, S. M., et al. (2000) Mol. Biochem. Parasitol. 110, 107-124]. The data indicate a previously unrecognized key role for the CQ aliphatic chain in stabilizing FPIX-CQ complexes, and suggest how lengthening or shortening the chain might perturb stability. We also define FPIX:drug stoichiometries of 2:1 for the complexes formed at physiological FPIX concentrations, in contrast to the 4:1 and 5:1 stoichiometries previously determined at higher FPIX concentrations [Dorn, A., et al. (1998) Biochem. Pharmacol. 55, 727-736]. These atomic resolution antimalarial drug-heme structures should help elucidate how these drugs inhibit formation of hemozoin during metabolism of heme within the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum and assist ongoing development of strategies for circumventing antimalarial drug resistance.

  10. Antimalarial Activity of Small-Molecule Benzothiazole Hydrazones

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Souvik; Siddiqui, Asim A.; Saha, Shubhra J.; De, Rudranil; Mazumder, Somnath; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Iqbal, Mohd S.; Nag, Shiladitya; Adhikari, Susanta

    2016-01-01

    We synthesized a new series of conjugated hydrazones that were found to be active against malaria parasite in vitro, as well as in vivo in a murine model. These hydrazones concentration-dependently chelated free iron and offered antimalarial activity. Upon screening of the synthesized hydrazones, compound 5f was found to be the most active iron chelator, as well as antiplasmodial. Compound 5f also interacted with free heme (KD [equilibrium dissociation constant] = 1.17 ± 0.8 μM), an iron-containing tetrapyrrole released after hemoglobin digestion by the parasite, and inhibited heme polymerization by parasite lysate. Structure-activity relationship studies indicated that a nitrogen- and sulfur-substituted five-membered aromatic ring present within the benzothiazole hydrazones might be responsible for their antimalarial activity. The dose-dependent antimalarial and heme polymerization inhibitory activities of the lead compound 5f were further validated by following [3H]hypoxanthine incorporation and hemozoin formation in parasite, respectively. It is worth mentioning that compound 5f exhibited antiplasmodial activity in vitro against a chloroquine/pyrimethamine-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum (K1). We also evaluated in vivo antimalarial activity of compound 5f in a murine model where a lethal multiple-drug-resistant strain of Plasmodium yoelii was used to infect Swiss albino mice. Compound 5f significantly suppressed the growth of parasite, and the infected mice experienced longer life spans upon treatment with this compound. During in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays, compound 5f showed minimal alteration in biochemical and hematological parameters compared to control. In conclusion, we identified a new class of hydrazone with therapeutic potential against malaria. PMID:27139466

  11. Antimalarial Benzoxaboroles Target Plasmodium falciparum Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Sonoiki, Ebere; Palencia, Andres; Guo, Denghui; Ahyong, Vida; Dong, Chen; Li, Xianfeng; Hernandez, Vincent S.; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Choi, Wai; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jennifer; Cooper, Roland; Alley, M. R. K.; Freund, Yvonne R.; DeRisi, Joseph; Cusack, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for new antimalarials, ideally with novel mechanisms of action. Benzoxaboroles have been shown to be active against bacteria, fungi, and trypanosomes. Therefore, we investigated the antimalarial activity and mechanism of action of 3-aminomethyl benzoxaboroles against Plasmodium falciparum. Two 3-aminomethyl compounds, AN6426 and AN8432, demonstrated good potency against cultured multidrug-resistant (W2 strain) P. falciparum (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 310 nM and 490 nM, respectively) and efficacy against murine Plasmodium berghei infection when administered orally once daily for 4 days (90% effective dose [ED90], 7.4 and 16.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively). To characterize mechanisms of action, we selected parasites with decreased drug sensitivity by culturing with stepwise increases in concentration of AN6426. Resistant clones were characterized by whole-genome sequencing. Three generations of resistant parasites had polymorphisms in the predicted editing domain of the gene encoding a P. falciparum leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS; PF3D7_0622800) and in another gene (PF3D7_1218100), which encodes a protein of unknown function. Solution of the structure of the P. falciparum LeuRS editing domain suggested key roles for mutated residues in LeuRS editing. Short incubations with AN6426 and AN8432, unlike artemisinin, caused dose-dependent inhibition of [14C]leucine incorporation by cultured wild-type, but not resistant, parasites. The growth of resistant, but not wild-type, parasites was impaired in the presence of the unnatural amino acid norvaline, consistent with a loss of LeuRS editing activity in resistant parasites. In summary, the benzoxaboroles AN6426 and AN8432 offer effective antimalarial activity and act, at least in part, against a novel target, the editing domain of P. falciparum LeuRS. PMID:27270277

  12. Antimalarials for children: indications, toxicities, and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Ziering, C L; Rabinowitz, L G; Esterly, N B

    1993-05-01

    The use of antimalarial drugs in children has been discussed extensively in the rheumatology literature, but there is scant information in the dermatology literature. We discuss indications, dosing, administration, and side effects of antimalarial drugs in children as well as skin diseases in children who have been treated with chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine.

  13. Inclusion of gametocyte parameters in anti-malarial drug efficacy studies: filling a neglected gap needed for malaria elimination.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Basco, Leonardo K; Beier, John C; Mahdy, Mohammed A K

    2015-10-19

    Standard anti-malarial drug efficacy and drug resistance assessments neglect the gametocyte parameters in their protocols. With the spread of drug resistance and the absence of clinically proven vaccines, the use of gametocytocidal drugs or drug combinations with transmission-blocking activity is a high priority for malaria control and elimination. However, the limited repertoire of gametocytocidal drugs and induction of gametocytogenesis after treatment with certain anti-malarial drugs necessitate both regular monitoring of gametocytocidal activities of anti-malarial drugs in clinical use and the effectiveness of candidate gametocytocidal agents. Therefore, updating current protocols of anti-malarial drug efficacy is needed to reflect the effects of anti-malarial drugs or drug combinations on gametocyte carriage and gametocyte density along with asexual parasite density. Developing protocols of anti-malarial drug efficacy that include gametocyte parameters related to both microscopic and submicroscopic gametocytaemias is important if drugs or drug combinations are to be strategically used in transmission-blocking interventions in the context of malaria elimination. The present piece of opinion highlights the challenges in gametocyte detection and follow-up and discuss the need for including the gametocyte parameter in anti-malarial efficacy studies.

  14. Resistive Network Optimal Power Flow: Uniqueness and Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, CW; Cai, DWH; Lou, X

    2015-01-01

    The optimal power flow (OPF) problem minimizes the power loss in an electrical network by optimizing the voltage and power delivered at the network buses, and is a nonconvex problem that is generally hard to solve. By leveraging a recent development on the zero duality gap of OPF, we propose a second-order cone programming convex relaxation of the resistive network OPF, and study the uniqueness of the optimal solution using differential topology, especially the Poincare-Hopf Index Theorem. We characterize the global uniqueness for different network topologies, e.g., line, radial, and mesh networks. This serves as a starting point to design distributed local algorithms with global behaviors that have low complexity, are computationally fast, and can run under synchronous and asynchronous settings in practical power grids.

  15. Muddled mechanisms: recent progress towards antimalarial target identification

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Rachel L.; Odom John, Audrey R.

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, malaria rates have plummeted as a result of aggressive infection control measures and the adoption of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). However, a potential crisis looms ahead. Treatment failures to standard antimalarial regimens have been reported in Southeast Asia, and devastating consequences are expected if resistance spreads to the African continent. To prevent a potential public health emergency, the antimalarial arsenal must contain therapeutics with novel mechanisms of action (MOA). An impressive number of high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns have since been launched, identifying thousands of compounds with activity against one of the causative agents of malaria, Plasmodium falciparum. Now begins the difficult task of target identification, for which studies are often tedious, labor intensive, and difficult to interpret. In this review, we highlight approaches that have been instrumental in tackling the challenges of target assignment and elucidation of the MOA for hit compounds. Studies that apply these innovative techniques to antimalarial target identification are described, as well as the impact of the data in the field. PMID:27803804

  16. Use of antimalarials in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ochsendorf, Falk R

    2010-10-01

    The antimalarials chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine have been used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases for more than 60 years. Even today new indications evolve due to the complex mode of action of these compounds. Due to the fear of side effects, especially irreversible retinopathy, their use is often limited. These side-effects, however, are a consequence of excessive daily dosages. An effective, safe therapy needs correct dosing, i. e. adherence to maximal daily dosages of 3.5(-4) mg chloroquine or 6(-6.5) mg hydroxychloroquine per kilogram ideal body weight. If the actual body weight is lower than the ideal body weight, this actual weight is used for the calculation of the dosage. Observing these limits allows a rather safe therapy of the diseases like lupus erythematosus, REM syndrome, porphyria cutanea tarda (2 × 125 mg chloroquine/week), cutaneous sarcoidosis and dermatomyositis. If standard therapies fail, then antimalarials can be tried to treat Sjögren syndrome, granuloma annulare or erosive lichen planus. If therapy fails, either can be combined with quinacrine to increase their effectiveness. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine are indispensable and well-tolerated essential drugs in dermatology and especially suited as part of a combination scheme, for example with corticosteroids, as they act synergistically and reduce side-effects.

  17. Discovery, Synthesis, and Optimization of Antimalarial 4(1H)-Quinolone-3-Diarylethers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The historical antimalarial compound endochin served as a structural lead for optimization. Endochin-like quinolones (ELQ) were prepared by a novel chemical route and assessed for in vitro activity against multidrug resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum and against malaria infections in mice. Here we describe the pathway to discovery of a potent class of orally active antimalarial 4(1H)-quinolone-3-diarylethers. The initial prototype, ELQ-233, exhibited low nanomolar IC50 values against all tested strains including clinical isolates harboring resistance to atovaquone. ELQ-271 represented the next critical step in the iterative optimization process, as it was stable to metabolism and highly effective in vivo. Continued analoging revealed that the substitution pattern on the benzenoid ring of the quinolone core significantly influenced reactivity with the host enzyme. This finding led to the rational design of highly selective ELQs with outstanding oral efficacy against murine malaria that is superior to established antimalarials chloroquine and atovaquone. PMID:24720377

  18. Potential antimalarials from African natural products: A reviw

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Bashir; Shittu, Oluwatosin Kudirat; Kabiru, Adamu Yusuf; Jigam, Ali Audu; Umar, Maimuna Bello; Berinyuy, Eustace Bonghan; Alozieuwa, Blessing Uchenna

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains an overwhelming infectious disease with significant health challenges in African and other endemic countries globally. Resistance to antimalarial drugs has become one of the most momentous challenges to human health, and thus has necessitated the hunt for new and effective drugs. Consequently, few decades have witnessed a surfeit of research geared to validate the effectiveness of commonly used traditionally medicines against malaria fever. The present review work focuses on documenting natural products from African whose activity has been reported in vivo or in vitro against malaria parasite. Literature was collected using electronic search of published articles (Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline, Sciencedirect, and Science domain) that report on antiplasmodial activity of natural products from differernts Africa region. A total of 652 plant taxa from 146 families, 134 isolated antimalarial compounds from 39 plants species, 2 herbal formulations and 4 insect/products were found to be reported in literature from 1996 to 2015. Plants species from family Asteraceae (11.04%), Fababceae (8.128%), Euphorbiaceae (5.52%), Rubiaceas (5.52%), and Apocyanaceae (5.214%), have received more scientific validation than others. African natural products possess remarkable healing properties as revealed in the various citations as promising antimalarial agents. Some of these natural products from Africa demonstrate high, promising or low activities against Plasmodium parasite. This study also shows that natural products from Africa have a huge amount of novel antimalarial compounds that could serve as a leads for the development of new and effective antiplasmodial drugs. However, in a view of bridging the gap in knowledge, clinical validation of these natural products are of paramount importance. PMID:26649238

  19. Resistant Microbial Cooccurrence Patterns Inferred by Network Topology

    PubMed Central

    Peura, Sari; Bertilsson, Stefan; Jones, Roger I.

    2015-01-01

    Although complex cooccurrence patterns have been described for microbes in natural communities, these patterns have scarcely been interpreted in the context of ecosystem functioning and stability. Here we constructed networks from species cooccurrences between pairs of microorganisms which were extracted from five individual aquatic time series, including a dystrophic and a eutrophic lake as well as an open ocean site. The resulting networks exhibited higher clustering coefficients, shorter path lengths, and higher average node degrees and levels of betweenness than those of random networks. Moreover, simulations demonstrated that taxa with a large number of cooccurrences and placement at convergence positions in the network, so-called “hubs” and “bottlenecks,” confer resistance against random removal of “taxa.” Accordingly, we refer to cooccurrences at convergence positions as system-relevant interdependencies, as they, like hubs and bottlenecks, determine network topology. These topology features of the cooccurrence networks point toward microbial community dynamics being resistant over time and thus could provide indicators for the state of ecosystem stability. PMID:25576616

  20. Natural products as starting points for future anti-malarial therapies: going back to our roots?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The discovery and development of new anti-malarials are at a crossroads. Fixed dose artemisinin combination therapy is now being used to treat a hundred million children each year, with a cost as low as 30 cents per child, with cure rates of over 95%. However, as with all anti-infective strategies, this triumph brings with it the seeds of its own downfall, the emergence of resistance. It takes ten years to develop a new medicine. New classes of medicines to combat malaria, as a result of infection by Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are urgently needed. Results Natural product scaffolds have been the basis of the majority of current anti-malarial medicines. Molecules such as quinine, lapachol and artemisinin were originally isolated from herbal medicinal products. After improvement with medicinal chemistry and formulation technologies, and combination with other active ingredients, they now make up the current armamentarium of medicines. In recent years advances in screening technologies have allowed testing of millions of compounds from pharmaceutical diversity for anti-malarial activity in cellular assays. These initiatives have resulted in thousands of new sub-micromolar active compounds – starting points for new drug discovery programmes. Against this backdrop, the paucity of potent natural products identified has been disappointing. Now is a good time to reflect on the current approach to screening herbal medicinal products and suggest revisions. Nearly sixty years ago, the Chinese doctor Chen Guofu, suggested natural products should be approached by dao-xing-ni-shi or ‘acting in the reversed order’, starting with observational clinical studies. Natural products based on herbal remedies are in use in the community, and have the potential unique advantage that clinical observational data exist, or can be generated. The first step should be the confirmation and definition of the clinical activity of herbal medicinal products already

  1. Quantifying the pharmacology of antimalarial drug combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Ian M.; Hodel, Eva Maria; Kay, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Most current antimalarial drugs are combinations of an artemisinin plus a ‘partner’ drug from another class, and are known as artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). They are the frontline drugs in treating human malaria infections. They also have a public-health role as an essential component of recent, comprehensive scale-ups of malaria interventions and containment efforts conceived as part of longer term malaria elimination efforts. Recent reports that resistance has arisen to artemisinins has caused considerable concern. We investigate the likely impact of artemisinin resistance by quantifying the contribution artemisinins make to the overall therapeutic capacity of ACTs. We achieve this using a simple, easily understood, algebraic approach and by more sophisticated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses of drug action; the two approaches gave consistent results. Surprisingly, the artemisinin component typically makes a negligible contribution (≪0.0001%) to the therapeutic capacity of the most widely used ACTs and only starts to make a significant contribution to therapeutic outcome once resistance has started to evolve to the partner drugs. The main threat to antimalarial drug effectiveness and control comes from resistance evolving to the partner drugs. We therefore argue that public health policies be re-focussed to maximise the likely long-term effectiveness of the partner drugs. PMID:27604175

  2. Compound antimalarial ethosomal cataplasm: preparation, evaluation, and mechanism of penetration enhancement.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shuo; Liu, Shu-Zhi; Zhang, Yu-Shi; Du, Mao-Bo; Liang, Ai-Hua; Song, Li-Hua; Ye, Zu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is still a serious public health problem in some parts of the world. The problems of recurrence and drug resistance are increasingly more serious. Thus, it is necessary to develop a novel antimalarial agent. The objectives of this study were to construct a novel compound antimalarial transdermal nanosystem-ethosomal cataplasm, to investigate its characteristics and efficiency, and to systematically explore the penetration-enhancing mechanisms of ethosomal cataplasm. Artesunate-loaded ethosomes and febrifugine-loaded ethosomes were prepared, and their characteristics were evaluated. Drug-loaded ethosomes were incorporated in the matrix of cataplasm to form the compound antimalarial ethosomal cataplasm. With the help of ethosomal technology, the accumulated permeation quantity of artesunate significantly increased at 8 hours after administration, which was 1.57 times as much as that of conventional cataplasm. Soon after administration, the ethosomal cataplasm could make a large quantity of antimalarial drug quickly penetrate through skin, then the remaining drug in the ethosomal cataplasm could be steadily released. These characteristics of ethosomal cataplasm are favorable for antimalarial drugs to kill Plasmodium spp. quickly and prevent the resurgence of Plasmodium spp. As expected, the ethosomal cataplasm showed good antimalarial efficiency in this experiment. The negative conversion rates were 100% and the recurrence rates were 0% at all dosages. The mechanism of penetration enhancement of the ethosomal cataplasm was systematically explored using an optics microscope, polarization microscope, and transmission electron microscopy. The microstructure, ultrastructure, and birefringent structure in skin were observed. Data obtained in this study showed that the application of ethosomal technology to antimalarial cataplasm could improve the transdermal delivery of drug, enhance the efficacy, and facilitate practical application in clinic.

  3. Investigating antimalarial drug interactions of emetine dihydrochloride hydrate using CalcuSyn-based interactivity calculations

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Holly; Deakin, Jon; Rajab, May; Idris-Usman, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    The widespread introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy has contributed to recent reductions in malaria mortality. Combination therapies have a range of advantages, including synergism, toxicity reduction, and delaying the onset of resistance acquisition. Unfortunately, antimalarial combination therapy is limited by the depleting repertoire of effective drugs with distinct target pathways. To fast-track antimalarial drug discovery, we have previously employed drug-repositioning to identify the anti-amoebic drug, emetine dihydrochloride hydrate, as a potential candidate for repositioned use against malaria. Despite its 1000-fold increase in in vitro antimalarial potency (ED50 47 nM) compared with its anti-amoebic potency (ED50 26–32 uM), practical use of the compound has been limited by dose-dependent toxicity (emesis and cardiotoxicity). Identification of a synergistic partner drug would present an opportunity for dose-reduction, thus increasing the therapeutic window. The lack of reliable and standardised methodology to enable the in vitro definition of synergistic potential for antimalarials is a major drawback. Here we use isobologram and combination-index data generated by CalcuSyn software analyses (Biosoft v2.1) to define drug interactivity in an objective, automated manner. The method, based on the median effect principle proposed by Chou and Talalay, was initially validated for antimalarial application using the known synergistic combination (atovaquone-proguanil). The combination was used to further understand the relationship between SYBR Green viability and cytocidal versus cytostatic effects of drugs at higher levels of inhibition. We report here the use of the optimised Chou Talalay method to define synergistic antimalarial drug interactivity between emetine dihydrochloride hydrate and atovaquone. The novel findings present a potential route to harness the nanomolar antimalarial efficacy of this affordable natural product. PMID:28257497

  4. Compound antimalarial ethosomal cataplasm: preparation, evaluation, and mechanism of penetration enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shuo; Liu, Shu-Zhi; Zhang, Yu-Shi; Du, Mao-Bo; Liang, Ai-Hua; Song, Li-Hua; Ye, Zu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is still a serious public health problem in some parts of the world. The problems of recurrence and drug resistance are increasingly more serious. Thus, it is necessary to develop a novel antimalarial agent. The objectives of this study were to construct a novel compound antimalarial transdermal nanosystem–ethosomal cataplasm, to investigate its characteristics and efficiency, and to systematically explore the penetration-enhancing mechanisms of ethosomal cataplasm. Artesunate-loaded ethosomes and febrifugine-loaded ethosomes were prepared, and their characteristics were evaluated. Drug-loaded ethosomes were incorporated in the matrix of cataplasm to form the compound antimalarial ethosomal cataplasm. With the help of ethosomal technology, the accumulated permeation quantity of artesunate significantly increased at 8 hours after administration, which was 1.57 times as much as that of conventional cataplasm. Soon after administration, the ethosomal cataplasm could make a large quantity of antimalarial drug quickly penetrate through skin, then the remaining drug in the ethosomal cataplasm could be steadily released. These characteristics of ethosomal cataplasm are favorable for antimalarial drugs to kill Plasmodium spp. quickly and prevent the resurgence of Plasmodium spp. As expected, the ethosomal cataplasm showed good antimalarial efficiency in this experiment. The negative conversion rates were 100% and the recurrence rates were 0% at all dosages. The mechanism of penetration enhancement of the ethosomal cataplasm was systematically explored using an optics microscope, polarization microscope, and transmission electron microscopy. The microstructure, ultrastructure, and birefringent structure in skin were observed. Data obtained in this study showed that the application of ethosomal technology to antimalarial cataplasm could improve the transdermal delivery of drug, enhance the efficacy, and facilitate practical application in clinic. PMID:26170661

  5. Temporal and spatial stability in translation invariant linear resistive networks.

    PubMed

    Solak, M K

    1997-01-01

    Simple algebraic methods are proposed to evaluate the temporal and spatial stability of translation invariant linear resistive networks. Temporal stability is discussed for a finite number of nodes n. The proposed method evaluates stability of a Toeplitz pencil A(n)(a)+muB(n)(b) in terms of parameters a(i ) and b(i). In many cases a simple method allows one to verify positive definition of B(n)(b) in terms of b(i) only.

  6. Introducing New Antimalarial Analogues of Chloroquine and Amodiaquine: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Parhizgar, Arezoo Rafiee; Tahghighi, Azar

    2017-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs with the 4-aminoquinoline scaffold such as the important drugs, chloroquine (CQ) and amodiaquine (AQ), have been used to prevent and treat malaria for many years. The importance of these drugs is related to their simple usage, high efficacy, affordability, and cost-effectiveness of their synthesis. In recent years, with the spread of parasite resistance to CQ and cross-resistance to its other analogues have decreased their consumption in many geographical areas. On the other hand, AQ is an effective antimalarial drug which its usage has been restricted due to hepatic and hematological toxicities. The significance of the quinoline ring at quinoline-based antimalarial drugs has prompted research centers and pharmaceutical companies to focus on the design and synthesis of new analogues of these drugs, especially CQ and AQ analogues. Accordingly, various derivatives have been synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo against the resistant strains of the malaria parasite to solve the problem of drug resistance. Also, the pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds have been evaluated to augment their efficacy and diminish their toxicity. Some of these analogues are currently in clinical and preclinical development. Consequently, the recent researches showed yet 4-aminoquinoline scaffold is active moiety in new compounds with antiplasmodial activity. Hence, the aim of this review article is to introduce of the novel synthetic analogues of CQ and AQ, which may constitute the next generation of antimalarial drugs with the 4-aminoquinoline scaffold. PMID:28360437

  7. Potentiation of antimalarial activity of arteether in combination with Vetiver root extract.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Sangeeta; Gunjan, Sarika; Pal, Anirban; Tripathi, Renu

    2016-05-01

    In malaria, development of resistance towards artemisinin derivatives has urged the need for new drugs or new drug combinations to tackle the drug resistant malaria. We studied the fresh root extract of Vetiver zizanioides (Linn.) Nash (VET) with a CDRI-CIMAP antimalarial α/β arteether (ART) together for their antimalarial potential. Our results showed additive to synergistic antimalarial activity of VET and ART with sum fractional inhibitory concentrations Σ FICs 1.02 ± 0.24 and 1.12 ± 0.32 for chloroquine sensitive (CQS) and chloroquine resistant (CQR) strain of Plasmodium falciparum (William H. Welch), respectively. Further, these combinations were explored against multidrug resistant rodent malaria parasite i.e. P. yoelii nigeriensis. Analysis of in vivo interaction of ART and VET showed that 10 mg/kg x 5 days of ART with 1000 mg/kg of VET x 5 days cured 100% mice infected with MDR parasite, while the same dose of ART could produce only up to 30% cure and VET fraction was not curative at all. Synergism/additiveness, found between VET and ART is reported for the first time. The curative dose of ART in the combination was reduced to its one fourth, and thus limits the side effects, if any. Although antimalarial potential of ART was enhanced by VET, action mechanism of later needs to be elucidated in detail.

  8. Synthesis, antimalarial activity and molecular docking of hybrid 4-aminoquinoline-1,3,5-triazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Hans Raj; Singh, Udaya Pratap; Thakur, Anjali; Kumar Ghosh, Surajit; Gogoi, Kabita; Prakash, Anil; Singh, Ramendra K

    2015-10-01

    A series of novel hybrid 4-aminoquinoline 1,3,5-triazine derivatives was synthesized in a five-steps reaction and evaluated for their in vitro antimalarial activity against chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) and chloroquine-resistant (RKL-2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Entire synthetic derivatives showed higher antimalarial activity on the sensitive strain while two compounds, viz., 9a and 9c displayed good activity against both the strains of P. falciparum. The observed activity was further substantiated by docking study on both wild and qradruple mutant type P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (pf-DHFR-TS).

  9. From a cytotoxic agent to the discovery of a novel antimalarial agent.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravi S P; Das, Umashankar; Auschwitz, Jennifer M; Leed, Susan E; Hickman, Mark R; Dimmock, Jonathan R; Alcorn, Jane

    2013-01-15

    A novel cytotoxin 3,5-bis(4-chlorobenzylidene)-1-[4-{2-(4-morpholinyl)ethoxy}phenyl-carbonyl]-4-piperidone hydrochloride 2 demonstrated potent antimalarial properties with IC(50) values of 0.60 and 1.97 μM against the drug sensitive D6 strain and the C235 drug-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum. This compound concentrates in red blood cells, lowers glutathione concentrations in erythrocytes and permeates across CACO-2 cells. These data reveal 2 to be a promising lead compound in the quest for novel antimalarial agents.

  10. Nickel-cadmium Battery Cell Reversal from Resistive Network Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    During the individual cell short-down procedures often used for storing or reconditioning nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) batteries, it is possible for significant reversal of the lowest capacity cells to occur. The reversal is caused by the finite resistance of the common current-carrying leads in the resistive network that is generally used during short-down. A model is developed to evaluate the extent of such a reversal in any specific battery, and the model is verified by means of data from the short-down of a f-cell, 3.5-Ah battery. Computer simulations of short-down on a variety of battery configurations indicate the desirability of controlling capacity imbalances arising from cell configuration and battery management, limiting variability in the short-down resistors, minimizing lead resistances, and optimizing lead configurations.

  11. Antimalarial activity of fractions of aqueous extract of Acacia nilotica root

    PubMed Central

    Alli, Lukman Adewale; Adesokan, Abdulfatai Ayoade; Salawu, Adeola Oluwakanyinsola

    2016-01-01

    Background: The problem of resistance of malarial parasites to available antimalarial drugs makes the development of new drugs imperative, with natural plant products providing an alternative source for discovering new drugs. Aim: To evaluate the antimalarial activity of eluted fractions of Acacia nilotica root extract and determine the phytochemicals responsible for its antimalarial activity. Materials and Methods: The extract was eluted successively in gradients of solvent mixture (hexane, ethyl acetate, and methanol) in multiples of 100 ml, and each fraction was collected separately. Eluates that showed similar thin layer chromatographic profiles and Rf values were combined to produce 4 main fractions (F-1, F-2, F-3, and F-4), which were tested separately for antimalarial activity using the curative test. Changes in body weight, temperature, and packed cell volume (PCV) were also recorded. Results: Fraction F-1 of A. nilotica at 50 and 100 mg/kg b/w produced significant and dose-dependent reduction in parasite count in Plasmodium berghei infected mice compared to the control, and also significantly increased the survival time of the mice compared to the control group. This fraction also ameliorated the malaria-induced anemia by improving PCV in treated mice. Conclusion: Antimalarial activity of extract of A. nilotica root is probably localized in the F-1 fraction of the extract, which was found to be rich in alkaloids and phenolics. Further study will provide information on the chemical properties of the active metabolites in this fraction. PMID:27104040

  12. Assessment of the efficacy of antimalarial drugs recommended by the National Malaria Control Programme in Madagascar: Up-dated baseline data from randomized and multi-site clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Didier; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Rabarijaona, Léon-Paul; Raharimalala, Lucie; Domarle, Olivier; Randrianasolo, Laurence; Randriamanantena, Arthur; Jahevitra, Martial; Andriantsoanirina, Valérie; Rason, Marie-Ange; Raherinjafy, Rogelin; Rakotomalala, Emma; Tuseo, Luciano; Raveloson, Andrianirina

    2008-01-01

    Background In order to improve the monitoring of the antimalarial drug resistance in Madagascar, a new national network based on eight sentinel sites was set up. In 2006/2007, a multi-site randomized clinical trial was designed to assess the therapeutic efficacy of chloroquine (CQ), sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), amodiaquine (AQ) and artesunate plus amodiaquine combination (ASAQ), the antimalarial therapies recommended by the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP). Methods Children between six months and 15 years of age, with uncomplicated falciparum malaria, were enrolled. Primary endpoints were the day-14 and day-28 risks of parasitological failure, either unadjusted or adjusted by genotyping. Risks of clinical and parasitological treatment failure after adjustment by genotyping were estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Secondary outcomes included fever clearance, parasite clearance, change in haemoglobin levels between Day 0 and the last day of follow-up, and the incidence of adverse events. Results A total of 1,347 of 1,434 patients (93.9%) completed treatment and follow-up to day 28. All treatment regimens, except for the chloroquine (CQ) treatment group, resulted in clinical cure rates above 97.6% by day-14 and 96.7% by day-28 (adjusted by genotyping). Parasite and fever clearance was more rapid with artesunate plus amodiaquine, but the extent of haematological recovery on day-28 did not differ significantly between the four groups. No severe side-effects were observed during the follow-up period. Conclusion These findings (i) constitute an up-dated baseline data on the efficacy of antimalarial drugs recommended by the NMCP, (ii) show that antimalarial drug resistance remains low in Madagascar, except for CQ, compared to the bordering countries in the Indian Ocean region such as the Comoros Archipelago and (iii) support the current policy of ASAQ as the first-line treatment in uncomplicated falciparum malaria. PMID:18394169

  13. Antimalarial activity of anthothecol derived from Khaya anthotheca (Meliaceae).

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Eun; Kim, Mi-Ran; Kim, Jeong-Han; Takeoka, Gary R; Kim, Tae-Wan; Park, Byeoung-Soo

    2008-06-01

    Antimalarial activity of anthothecol, a limonoid of Khaya anthotheca (Meliaceae) against Plasmodium falciparum was tested using a [(3)H]-hypoxanthine and 48h culture assay in vitro. Anthotechol showed potent antimalarial activity against malaria parasites with IC(50) values of 1.4 and 0.17microM using two different assays. Also, gedunin had antimalarial activity with IC(50) values of 3.1 and 0.14microM. However, the citrus limonoids, limonin and obacunone did not show any antimalarial activity. The antimalarial activities were compared with the three currently used antimalarial medicines quinine, chloroquinine and artemisinin.

  14. Heme Aggregation inhibitors: antimalarial drugs targeting an essential biomineralization process.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, J; Linck, R; Wright, D W

    2001-02-01

    Malaria, resulting from the parasites of the genus Plasmodium, places an untold burden on the global population. As recently as 40 years ago, only 10% of the world's population was at risk from malaria. Today, over 40% of the world's population is at risk. Due to increased parasite resistance to traditional drugs and vector resistance to insecticides, malaria is once again resurgent. An emergent theme from current strategies for the development of new antimalarials is that metal homeostasis within the parasite represents an important drug target. During the intra-erythrocytic phase of its life cycle, the malaria parasite can degrade up to 75% of an infected cell's hemoglobin. While hemoglobin proteolysis yields requisite amino acids, it also releases toxic free heme (Fe(III)PPIX). To balance the metabolic requirements for amino acids against the toxic effects of heme, malaria parasites have evolved a detoxification mechanism which involves the formation of a crystalline heme aggregate known as hemozoin. An overview of the biochemistry of the critical detoxification process will place it in the appropriate context with regards to drug targeting and design. Quinoline-ring antimalarial drugs are effective against the intraerythrocytic stages of pigment-producing parasites. Recent work on the mechanism of these compounds suggests that they prevent the formation of hemozoin. Evidence for such a mechanism is reviewed, especially in the context of the newly reported crystal structure of hemozoin. Additionally, novel drugs, such as the hydroxyxanthones, which have many of the characteristics of the quinolines are currently being investigated. Recent work has also highlighted two classes of inorganic complexes that have interesting antimalarial activity: (1) metal-N(4)O(2) Schiff base complexes and (2) porphyrins. The mechanism of action for these complexes is discussed. The use of these complexes as probes for the elucidation of structure-activity relationships in heme

  15. Antimalarials during pregnancy: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, L. J.; Steketee, R. W.; Chitsulo, L.; Wirima, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    Antenatal clinics (ANC) provide an avenue for interventions that promote maternal and infant health. In areas hyperendemic for Plasmodium falciparum, malaria infection during pregnancy contributes to low birth weight (LBW), which is the greatest risk factor for neonatal mortality. Using current data and costs from studies in Malawi, a decision-analysis model was constructed to predict the number of LBW cases prevented by three antimalarial regimens, in an area with a high prevalence of chloroquine (CQ)-resistant malaria. Factors considered included local costs of antimalarials, number of ANC visits, compliance with dispensed antimalarials, prevalence of placental malaria, and LBW incidence. For a hypothetical cohort of 10,000 women in their first or second pregnancy, a regimen consisting of one dose of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) in the second trimester followed by a second dose at the beginning of the third trimester would prevent 205 cases of LBW at a cost of US$ 9.66 per case of LBW prevented. A regimen using a treatment dose of SP followed by CQ 300 mg (base) weekly would prevent 59 cases of LBW at a cost of $62 per case prevented, compared with only 30 cases of LBW prevented at a cost of $113 per case when the regimen involves initial treatment with CQ (25 mg/kg) followed by CQ 300 mg (base) weekly. In areas hyperendemic for CQ-resistant P. falciparum, a two-dose SP regimen is a cost-effective intervention to reduce LBW incidence and it should be included as part of the antenatal care package. PMID:7743592

  16. N-cinnamoylation of antimalarial classics: quinacrine analogues with decreased toxicity and dual-stage activity.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana; Pérez, Bianca; Albuquerque, Inês; Machado, Marta; Prudêncio, Miguel; Nogueira, Fátima; Teixeira, Cátia; Gomes, Paula

    2014-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most lethal form of malaria, is becoming increasingly resistant to most available drugs. A convenient approach to combat parasite resistance is the development of analogues of classical antimalarial agents, appropriately modified in order to restore their relevance in antimalarial chemotherapy. Following this line of thought, the design, synthesis and in vitro evaluation of N-cinnamoylated quinacrine surrogates, 9-(N-cinnamoylaminobutyl)-amino-6-chloro-2-methoxyacridines, is reported. The compounds were found to be highly potent against both blood-stage P.falciparum, chloroquine-sensitive 3D7 (IC50 =17.0-39.0 nM) and chloroquine-resistant W2 and Dd2 strains (IC50 =3.2-41.2 and 27.1-131.0 nM, respectively), and liver-stage P.berghei (IC50 =1.6-4.9 μM) parasites. These findings bring new hope for the possible future "rise of a fallen angel" in antimalarial chemotherapy, with a potential resurgence of quinacrine-related compounds as dual-stage antimalarial leads.

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of acridine derivatives as antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Min; Ramiandrasoa, Florence; Guetzoyan, Lucie; Pradines, Bruno; Quintino, Edgar; Gadelle, Daniele; Forterre, Patrick; Cresteil, Thierry; Mahy, Jean-Pierre; Pethe, Stéphanie

    2012-04-01

    New N-alkylaminoacridine derivatives attached to nitrogen heterocycles were synthesized, and their antimalarial potency was examined. They were tested in vitro against the growth of Plasmodium falciparum, including chloroquine (CQ)-susceptible and CQ-resistant strains. This biological evaluation has shown that the presence of a heterocyclic ring significantly increases the activity against P. falciparum. The best compound shows a nanomolar IC(50) value toward parasite proliferation on both CQ-susceptible and CQ-resistant strains. The antimalarial activity of these new acridine derivatives can be explained by the two mechanisms studied in this work. First, we showed the capacity of these compounds to inhibit heme biocrystallization, a detoxification process specific to the parasite and essential for its survival. Second, in our search for alternative targets, we evaluated the in vitro inhibitory activity of these compounds toward Sulfolobus shibatae topoisomerase VI-mediated DNA relaxation. The preliminary results obtained reveal that all tested compounds are potent DNA intercalators, and significantly inhibit the activity of S. shibatae topoisomerase VI at concentrations ranging between 2.0 and 2.5 μM.

  18. Modelling the time course of antimalarial parasite killing: a tour of animal and human models, translation and challenges.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kashyap; Simpson, Julie A; Batty, Kevin T; Zaloumis, Sophie; Kirkpatrick, Carl M

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a global public health concern and current treatment options are suboptimal in some clinical settings. For effective chemotherapy, antimalarial drug concentrations must be sufficient to remove completely all of the parasites in the infected host. Optimized dosing therefore requires a detailed understanding of the time course of antimalarial response, whilst simultaneously considering the parasite life cycle and host immune elimination. Recently, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended the development of mathematical models for understanding better antimalarial drug resistance and management. Other international groups have also suggested that mechanistic pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) models can support the rationalization of antimalarial dosing strategies. At present, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is recommended as first line treatment of falciparum malaria for all patient groups. This review summarizes the PK-PD characterization of artemisinin derivatives and other partner drugs from both preclinical studies and human clinical trials. We outline the continuous and discrete time models that have been proposed to describe antimalarial activity on specific stages of the parasite life cycle. The translation of PK-PD predictions from animals to humans is considered, because preclinical studies can provide rich data for detailed mechanism-based modelling. While similar sampling techniques are limited in clinical studies, PK-PD models can be used to optimize the design of experiments to improve estimation of the parameters of interest. Ultimately, we propose that fully developed mechanistic models can simulate and rationalize ACT or other treatment strategies in antimalarial chemotherapy.

  19. Antimalarial activity of Malaysian Plectranthus amboinicus against Plasmodium berghei

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, Norazsida; Ahamed, Pakeer Oothuman Syed; Elhady, Hassan Mohamed; Taher, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Context: Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by parasitic protozoa from the genus of Plasmodium. The protozoans have developed resistance against many of current drugs. It is urgent to find an alternative source of new antimalarial agent. In the effort to discover new antimalarial agents, this research has been conducted on Plectranthus amboinicus. Aims: This study was conducted to evaluate the toxicity and antiplasmodial properties of P. amboinicus. Materials and Methods: Acute oral toxicity dose at 5000 mg/kg was conducted to evaluate the safety of this extract. Twenty mice were divided into control and experimental group. All the mice were observed for signs of toxicity, mortality, weight changes and histopathological changes. Antimalarial activity of different extract doses of 50, 200, 400 and 1000 mg/kg were tested in vivo against Plasmodium berghei infections in mice (five mice for each group) during early, established and residual infections. Results: The acute oral toxicity test revealed that no mortality or evidence of adverse effects was seen in the treated mice. The extract significantly reduced the parasitemia by the 50 (P = 0.000), 200 (P = 0.000) and 400 mg/kg doses (P = 0.000) in the in vivo prophylactic assay. The percentage chemo-suppression was calculated as 83.33% for 50 mg/kg dose, 75.62% for 200 mg/kg dose and 90.74% for 400 mg/kg dose. Body weight of all treated groups; T1, T2, T3 and T4 also showed enhancement after 7 days posttreatment. Statistically no reduction of parasitemia calculated for curative and suppressive test. Conclusion: Thus, this extract may give a promising agent to be used as a prophylactic agent of P. berghei infection. PMID:25276063

  20. Landscape resistance: using drainage networks as deformation markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelltort, Sebastien; Champagnac, Jean-Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Fluvial networks determine to a large extent the structure and geometry of erosive landscapes in mountain ranges. As a consequence it is fundamental to understand how they develop and evolve in order to reconstruct and predict landscape evolution in orogens. A particularly important problem is the degree to which fluvial networks and basin boundaries evolve and change through their existence. Two end members may be invoked. On one hand, river networks are rather dynamic, changing and reorganizing frequently during orogen evolution. In this view, landscapes mostly reflect the present stage of the tectonic forcing, with a minor component of "memory". On the other hand, river networks may also be largely static in the landscape, resistant to deformation, thus acting as potentially useful passive markers of the crustal strain. In this view, networks develop in the foreland, and are then passively advected into the relief by outward growth of the orogen [1]. The "dynamic" view has long found support in a variety of observations evoking river captures and drainage network changes (wind gaps, some hanging valleys, sinuous shape of water divides, inferred changes of detrital sources), and is reproduced in some analogue and numerical models [2]. However, there are also a large number of observations which support a contrary view according which drainage network are resistant to deformation. Some notorious examples are antecedent rivers and drainage systems cutting through lithological and geological structures (folds and faults), drainage systems extending behind the main drainage divide in large mountain ranges, and preservation of superficial cover rocks adjacent to valleys deeply incised into the basement. Some spectacular plane deformation of large river basins also points to the large resistance of river networks to plane deformation and their difficulty to reorganize [3]. We present a novel conceptual framework that allows distinguishing the different cases of

  1. The Redox Cycler Plasmodione Is a Fast-Acting Antimalarial Lead Compound with Pronounced Activity against Sexual and Early Asexual Blood-Stage Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, Katharina; Deregnaucourt, Christiane; Goetz, Alice-Anne; Tzanova, Tzvetomira; Gallo, Valentina; Arese, Paolo; Pradines, Bruno; Adjalley, Sophie H.; Bagrel, Denyse; Blandin, Stephanie; Lanzer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we presented the chemical design of a promising series of antimalarial agents, 3-[substituted-benzyl]-menadiones, with potent in vitro and in vivo activities. Ongoing studies on the mode of action of antimalarial 3-[substituted-benzyl]-menadiones revealed that these agents disturb the redox balance of the parasitized erythrocyte by acting as redox cyclers—a strategy that is broadly recognized for the development of new antimalarial agents. Here we report a detailed parasitological characterization of the in vitro activity profile of the lead compound 3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-menadione 1c (henceforth called plasmodione) against intraerythrocytic stages of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We show that plasmodione acts rapidly against asexual blood stages, thereby disrupting the clinically relevant intraerythrocytic life cycle of the parasite, and furthermore has potent activity against early gametocytes. The lead's antiplasmodial activity was unaffected by the most common mechanisms of resistance to clinically used antimalarials. Moreover, plasmodione has a low potential to induce drug resistance and a high killing speed, as observed by culturing parasites under continuous drug pressure. Drug interactions with licensed antimalarial drugs were also established using the fixed-ratio isobologram method. Initial toxicological profiling suggests that plasmodione is a safe agent for possible human use. Our studies identify plasmodione as a promising antimalarial lead compound and strongly support the future development of redox-active benzylmenadiones as antimalarial agents. PMID:27297478

  2. A New In Vivo Screening Paradigm to Accelerate Antimalarial Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Viera, Sara; Ibáñez, Javier; Mulet, Teresa; Magán-Marchal, Noemí; Garuti, Helen; Gómez, Vanessa; Cortés-Gil, Lorena; Martínez, Antonio; Ferrer, Santiago; Fraile, María Teresa; Calderón, Félix; Fernández, Esther; Shultz, Leonard D.; Leroy, Didier; Wilson, David M.; García-Bustos, José Francisco; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to available antimalarials requires the urgent development of new medicines. The recent disclosure of several thousand compounds active in vitro against the erythrocyte stage of Plasmodium falciparum has been a major breakthrough, though converting these hits into new medicines challenges current strategies. A new in vivo screening concept was evaluated as a strategy to increase the speed and efficiency of drug discovery projects in malaria. The new in vivo screening concept was developed based on human disease parameters, i.e. parasitemia in the peripheral blood of patients on hospital admission and parasite reduction ratio (PRR), which were allometrically down-scaled into P. berghei-infected mice. Mice with an initial parasitemia (P0) of 1.5% were treated orally for two consecutive days and parasitemia measured 24 h after the second dose. The assay was optimized for detection of compounds able to stop parasite replication (PRR = 1) or induce parasite clearance (PRR >1) with statistical power >99% using only two mice per experimental group. In the P. berghei in vivo screening assay, the PRR of a set of eleven antimalarials with different mechanisms of action correlated with human-equivalent data. Subsequently, 590 compounds from the Tres Cantos Antimalarial Set with activity in vitro against P. falciparum were tested at 50 mg/kg (orally) in an assay format that allowed the evaluation of hundreds of compounds per month. The rate of compounds with detectable efficacy was 11.2% and about one third of active compounds showed in vivo efficacy comparable with the most potent antimalarials used clinically. High-throughput, high-content in vivo screening could rapidly select new compounds, dramatically speeding up the discovery of new antimalarial medicines. A global multilateral collaborative project aimed at screening the significant chemical diversity within the antimalarial in vitro hits described in the literature is a feasible task

  3. In vivo Antimalarial Activities of Russelia Equisetiformis in Plasmodium Berghei Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ojurongbe, O.; Ojo, J. A.; Adefokun, D. I.; Abiodun, O. O.; Odewale, G.; Awe, E. O.

    2015-01-01

    The rising problem of resistance to most commonly used antimalarials remains a major challenge in the control of malaria suggesting the need for new antimalarial agents. This work explores the antiplasmodial potential of ethanol extract of Russelia equisetiformis in chloroquine Plasmodium berghei infected mice. Swiss albino mice were intraperitoneally infected with chloroquine-resistant P. berghei (ANKA). Experimental mice were treated for four days consecutively with graded doses of plant extracts and standard antimalarial drugs (artesunate and chloroquine) at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight used as control. The extract showed a dose-dependent activity in the chemosuppression of P. berghei parasites by 31.6, 44.7, 48.4 and 86.5% at doses of 100, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg, while chloroquine (10 mg/kg) and artesunate produced 59.4 and 68.4%, respectively. The extract showed a significant decrease in parasitaemia (P<0.05). The level of parasitemia and decrease in weight in all the treated groups was significantly lower (P<0.05) compared with the infected but untreated mice. The plant extract was devoid of toxicity at the highest dose tested (5000 mg/kg). The study concluded that the ethanol extract of R. equisetiformis possesses antimalarial effect, which supports the folk medicine claim of its use in the treatment of malaria. PMID:26664070

  4. Haem polymerase as a novel target of antimalarial action of cyproheptadine.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rashmi; Tripathi, Renu; Tekwani, Babu L; Jain, S K; Dutta, Guru P; Shukla, Onkar P

    2002-11-01

    An antihistaminic drug, cyproheptadine (20-25mg/kg x 4 days), showed significant schizontocidal activity in the blood against a lethal multidrug-resistant (MDR) strain of Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis (highly resistant to chloroquine, mefloquine, and quinine); the protection of mice ranged between 75 and 100%. A combination of cyproheptadine (15 mg/kg) and chloroquine improved antimalarial activity compared to treatment with either drug alone, whereas a combination of cyproheptadine with quinine or mefloquine did not improve its antimalarial activity. Chloroquine and cyproheptadine inhibited haem polymerization activity in cell-free extracts and in in vivo experiments with MDR P. yoelii, but the combination did not cause a more significant inhibition than found with either drug alone. Cyproheptadine has been shown to produce dose-dependent inhibition of haem polymerization activity both in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism of the antimalarial action of cyproheptadine and its enhanced antimalarial activity with chloroquine could be due, in part, to their inhibitory effect on haem polymerization.

  5. Road towards new antimalarials - overview of the strategies and their chemical progress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Nagle, Advait S; Chatterjee, Arnab K

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is a major health and economic threat to about 40% of the world's population. The absence of effective vaccines and widespread resistance to many of the current antimalarials make this disease an urgent target for the scientific community. As a developing world disease, most of the efforts towards new drugs have been from academic and government supported projects. This has recently changed with the emergence of new funding mechanisms and public-private partnerships (PPP). The purpose of this review is to highlight the different approaches used to discover new antimalarial agents, including target-based approaches, derivatization of known antimalarial pharmacophores, drug repositioning from non-malaria indication and cell-based screening. Specific examples are provided to illustrate the pros and cons in the context of how to best address the ever-increasing drug resistance and how to cost-effectively identify new antimalarials. More attention is given to relatively mature programs that have gone through extensive SAR study, pharmacology and/or toxicity studies in the last ten years.

  6. Fixed Dose Combination of Arterolane and Piperaquine: A Newer Prospect in Antimalarial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Patil, CY; Katare, SS; Baig, MS; Doifode, SM

    2014-01-01

    Malaria has been very prevalent vector-borne disease in India and until date bears enormous implications on health care services of the country. Over the period of time, the development of resistance to traditional antimalarials like chloroquine has been posed as major deterrent in efforts of malaria control. As the drug resistance is today universally prevalent, especially in Plasmodium falciparum species, major burden of malarial control resides with the new artemisinin drug class. However, arterolane is one of the first fully synthetic non-artemisinin antimalarial compound with rapid schizontocidal activity, hence offering an alternative to artemisinin drugs in malaria control. Piperaquine is a synthetic bisquinoline (4-amioquinoline Antimalarial) with slow and longer schizontocidal activity. Therefore their combination has been shown to provide rapid parasitemic clearance and quick relief of most malaria-related symptoms along with prevention of recrudescences. This combination was approved by Drugs Controller General of India in 2011 for treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. The article is aimed at to review this newer prospect in antimalarial therapy for which comprehensive database search was done in Google, Google Scholar, PubMed using the terms “Malaria,” “Arterolane,” “OZ277,” “Piperaquine,” and “Artemisinin combination therapy.” A total of 323 articles were screened and 28 articles were considered for this review along with the World Health Organization and National malarial program guidelines. PMID:25221689

  7. Antimalarial Properties of Aqueous Crude Extracts of Gynostemma pentaphyllum and Moringa oleifera Leaves in Combination with Artesunate in Plasmodium berghei-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Borkaew, Preeyanuch; Klubsri, Chokdee; Dondee, Kittiyaporn; Bootprom, Panatda; Saiphet, Butsarat

    2016-01-01

    Due to the emergence and spread of malaria parasite with resistance to antimalarial drugs, discovery and development of new, safe, and affordable antimalarial are urgently needed. In this respect, medicinal plant extracts are targets to optimize antimalarial actions and restore efficacy of standard antimalarial drugs. The present study was aimed at determining the antimalarial activities of Gynostemma pentaphyllum and Moringa oleifera leaf extracts in combination with artesunate against Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. P. berghei ANKA maintained by serial passage in ICR mice were used based on intraperitoneal injection of 1 × 107 parasitized erythrocytes and subsequent development of parasitemia. These infected mice were used to investigate the antimalarial activity of artesunate (6 mg/kg) in combination with 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg/kg of G. pentaphyllum and M. oleifera leaf extracts using 4-day suppressive test. It was found that these extracts showed significant (P < 0.05) antimalarial activity in dose-dependent manner with percentage of suppression of 45, 50, and 55% for G. pentaphyllum leaf extract and 35, 40, and 50% for M. oleifera leaf extract. Additionally, artesunate combined with these extracts presented higher antimalarial activity, compared to extract treated alone with percentage of suppression of 78, 91, and 96% for G. pentaphyllum leaf extract and 73, 82, and 91% for M. oleifera leaf extract. The results indicated that combination treatment of G. pentaphyllum or M. oleifera leaf extracts with artesunate was able to increase the antimalarial activity by using low dose of artesunate. Hence, these results justified the combination of these extracts and artesunate in antimalarial herbal remedies. PMID:27872647

  8. Optimization of endochin-like quinolones for antimalarial activity

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Rolf; Kelly, Jane X.; Smilkstein, Martin J.; Hinrichs, David; Koop, Dennis R.; Riscoe, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    Structural analogs of the antimalarial Endochin were synthesized and screened for antiplasmodial activity against drug sensitive and multidrug resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Structural features have been identified that are associated with improved potency while other features are associated with equipotency against an atovaquone-resistant clinical isolate. Relative to endochin the most active compound ELQ-121 shows ≈ 100-fold improvement in IC50 for inhibition of P. falciparum in vitro and it also exhibits enhanced metabolic stability. A polyethylene glycol carbonate ester prodrug of ELQ-121 demonstrated in vivo efficacy against P. yoelii in mice. This is the first report of an endochin-like quinolone that is efficacious in treating malaria in a mammalian host. PMID:21040724

  9. An electronic network for the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in bacterial nosocomial isolates in Greece. The Greek Network for the Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Vatopoulos, A. C.; Kalapothaki, V.; Legakis, N. J.

    1999-01-01

    The present article reports an evaluation of the national electronic network for the continuous monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in Greece. The network employs a common electronic code and data format and uses WHONET software. Our four years' experience with the network confirms its practicality. A total of 22 hospitals in Greece are currently using the software, of which 19 participate in the network. Analysis of the information obtained has greatly helped in identifying the main factors responsible for the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in the participating hospitals. The data collected have also helped to identify priorities for further investigation of the genetic and molecular mechanisms responsible for the emergence of resistance and facilitated development of hospital-based empirical therapy of infections. In conclusion, the implementation of national networks for the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance should be regarded as a priority. PMID:10444883

  10. Unusual Antimalarial Meroditerpenes from Tropical Red Macroalgae

    PubMed Central

    Stout, E. Paige; Prudhomme, Jacques; Le Roch, Karine; Fairchild, Craig R.; Franzblau, Scott G.; Aalbersberg, William; Hay, Mark E.; Kubanek, Julia

    2010-01-01

    Three antimalarial meroditerpenes have been isolated from two Fijian red macroalgae. The absolute stereochemistry of callophycolide A (1), a unique macrolide from Callophycus serratus, was determined using a combination of Mosher’s ester analysis, circular dichroism analysis with a dimolybdenum tetraacetate complex, and conformational analysis using NOEs. In addition, two known tocopherols, β-tocopherylhydroquinone (4) and δ-tocopherylhydroquinone (5), were isolated from Amphiroa crassa. By oxidizing 5 to the corresponding δ-tocopherylquinone (6), antimalarial activity against the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum was increased by more than 20-fold. PMID:20801038

  11. Susceptibility of human Plasmodium knowlesi infections to anti-malarials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that Plasmodium knowlesi malaria in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo remains zoonotic, meaning anti-malarial drug resistance is unlikely to have developed in the absence of drug selection pressure. Therefore, adequate response to available anti-malarial treatments is assumed. Methods Here the ex vivo sensitivity of human P. knowlesi isolates in Malaysian Borneo were studied, using a WHO schizont maturation assay modified to accommodate the quotidian life cycle of this parasite. The in vitro sensitivities of P. knowlesi H strain adapted from a primate infection to in vitro culture (by measuring the production of Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase) were also examined together with some assays using Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Results Plasmodium knowlesi is uniformly highly sensitive to artemisinins, variably and moderately sensitive to chloroquine, and less sensitive to mefloquine. Conclusions Taken together with reports of clinical failures when P. knowlesi is treated with mefloquine, the data suggest that caution is required if using mefloquine in prevention or treatment of P. knowlesi infections, until further studies are undertaken. PMID:24245918

  12. Cytotoxic and antimalarial constituents from the roots of Eurycoma longifolia.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ping-Chung; Damu, Amooru G; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2004-02-01

    Sixty-five compounds were isolated from the roots of Eurycoma longifolia and characterized by comprehensive analyses of their 1D and 2D NMR, and mass spectral data. Among these isolates, four quassinoid diterpenoids were reported from natural sources for the first time, namely eurycomalide A (1), eurycomalide B (2), 13beta, 21-dihydroxyeurycomanol (3), and 5alpha, 14beta, 15beta-trihydroxyklaineanone (4). Screening of cytotoxicity, anti-HIV and antimalarial activity of these isolated compounds was also furnished by in vitro assays. Compounds 12, 13, 17, 18, 36, 38, 59, and 62 demonstrated strong cytotoxicity toward human lung cancer (A-549) cell lines, however, 12, 13, 17, 38, 57, 58, and 59 exhibited strong cytoxicity toward human breast cancer (MCF-7) cell lines. Compounds 57 and 58 displayed potent antimalarial activity against the resistant Plasmodium falciparum. The thorough studies on the stereochemistry of the different quassinoid diterpenoids provide a clear reference to the scientists who are interested on this field.

  13. Antimalarial activity of Bergenia ciliata (Haw.) Sternb. against Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Walter, Neha Sylvia; Bagai, Upma; Kalia, Shagun

    2013-09-01

    The emergence of resistance against most of the drugs in current use against malaria has aggravated the disease burden in endemic regions. Several plants species have been used for treatment of malaria in traditional/cultural health systems. Bergenia ciliata, used traditionally for treatment of fever by local communities in the Himalayan Region, was evaluated for its plausible role as an antimalarial. Phytochemical screening of the ethanolic leaf extract of B. ciliata (ELEBC) revealed the presence of phenols, flavonoids, steroids and diterpenes. The extract showed good in vitro antiplasmodial activity, with an IC50 <10 μg/ml. Acute toxicity of the extract was observed to be >5 g/kg, which is considered toxicologically safe for oral administration. When tested in vivo, different concentrations of the extract (250 to 1,000 mg/kg) exhibited considerable chemosuppression on day 7, in a dose-dependent manner. Maximum chemosuppression was observed to be 87.50% at 1,000 mg/kg. Administration of ELEBC (750 and 1,000 mg/kg) significantly (p < 0.0005) enhanced the mean survival time of mice in comparison to infected control, which exhibited a mean survival time of 8.6 ± 1.5 days. Study reports presence of considerable in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activity in ethanolic leaf extract of B. ciliata for first time. Hence, the ethnopharmacological usage of the plant for treating fever is confirmed with experimental evidence.

  14. Poor quality vital anti-malarials in Africa - an urgent neglected public health priority

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a major public health problem. A vital component of malaria control rests on the availability of good quality artemisinin-derivative based combination therapy (ACT) at the correct dose. However, there are increasing reports of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Methods Seven collections of artemisinin derivative monotherapies, ACT and halofantrine anti-malarials of suspicious quality were collected in 2002/10 in eleven African countries and in Asia en route to Africa. Packaging, chemical composition (high performance liquid chromatography, direct ionization mass spectrometry, X-ray diffractometry, stable isotope analysis) and botanical investigations were performed. Results Counterfeit artesunate containing chloroquine, counterfeit dihydroartemisinin (DHA) containing paracetamol (acetaminophen), counterfeit DHA-piperaquine containing sildenafil, counterfeit artemether-lumefantrine containing pyrimethamine, counterfeit halofantrine containing artemisinin, and substandard/counterfeit or degraded artesunate and artesunate+amodiaquine in eight countries are described. Pollen analysis was consistent with manufacture of counterfeits in eastern Asia. These data do not allow estimation of the frequency of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Conclusions Criminals are producing diverse harmful anti-malarial counterfeits with important public health consequences. The presence of artesunate monotherapy, substandard and/or degraded and counterfeit medicines containing sub-therapeutic amounts of unexpected anti-malarials will engender drug resistance. With the threatening spread of artemisinin resistance to Africa, much greater investment is required to ensure the quality of ACTs and removal of artemisinin monotherapies. The International Health Regulations may need to be invoked to counter these serious public health problems. PMID:22152094

  15. A chemical proteomics approach for the search of pharmacological targets of the antimalarial clinical candidate albitiazolium in Plasmodium falciparum using photocrosslinking and click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Penarete-Vargas, Diana Marcela; Boisson, Anaïs; Urbach, Serge; Chantelauze, Hervé; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Fraisse, Laurent; Vial, Henri J

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for severe malaria which is one of the most prevalent and deadly infectious diseases in the world. The antimalarial therapeutic arsenal is hampered by the onset of resistance to all known pharmacological classes of compounds, so new drugs with novel mechanisms of action are critically needed. Albitiazolium is a clinical antimalarial candidate from a series of choline analogs designed to inhibit plasmodial phospholipid metabolism. Here we developed an original chemical proteomic approach to identify parasite proteins targeted by albitiazolium during their native interaction in living parasites. We designed a bifunctional albitiazolium-derived compound (photoactivable and clickable) to covalently crosslink drug-interacting parasite proteins in situ followed by their isolation via click chemistry reactions. Mass spectrometry analysis of drug-interacting proteins and subsequent clustering on gene ontology terms revealed parasite proteins involved in lipid metabolic activities and, interestingly, also in lipid binding, transport, and vesicular transport functions. In accordance with this, the albitiazolium-derivative was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and trans-Golgi network of P. falciparum. Importantly, during competitive assays with albitiazolium, the binding of choline/ethanolamine phosphotransferase (the enzyme involved in the last step of phosphatidylcholine synthesis) was substantially displaced, thus confirming the efficiency of this strategy for searching albitiazolium targets.

  16. Exploring the 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indole scaffold as a novel antimalarial chemotype.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sofia A; Lukens, Amanda K; Coelho, Lis; Nogueira, Fátima; Wirth, Dyann F; Mazitschek, Ralph; Moreira, Rui; Paulo, Alexandra

    2015-09-18

    A series of 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indoles with building block diversity was synthesized based on a hit derived from an HTS whole-cell screen against Plasmodium falciparum. Thirty-eight compounds were obtained following a three-step synthetic approach and evaluated for anti-parasitic activity. The SAR shows that 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indole is intolerant to most N-piperidinyl modifications. Nevertheless, we were able to identify a new compound (10d) with lead-like properties (MW = 305; cLogP = 2.42), showing antimalarial activity against drug-resistant and sensitive strains (EC50 values ∼ 3 μM), selectivity for malaria parasite and no cross-resistance with chloroquine, thus representing a potential new chemotype for further optimization towards novel and affordable antimalarial drugs.

  17. 7-chloroquinoline-isatin conjugates: antimalarial, antitubercular, and cytotoxic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Raj, Raghu; Biot, Christophe; Carrère-Kremer, Séverine; Kremer, Laurent; Guérardel, Yann; Gut, Jiri; Rosenthal, Philip J; Forge, Delphine; Kumar, Vipan

    2014-05-01

    A series of twenty piperazine-tethered 7-chloroquinoline-isatin hybrids have been synthesized via either direct nucleophilic substitution or Cu(Ι)Cl-mediated Mannich reaction. These new conjugates were evaluated for their antimalarial and antitubercular efficacy against a chloroquine-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, respectively, while the cytotoxic profiles were evaluated against 3T6 cell line, a permanent mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line. The most potent of the test compound with IC50 of 0.22 μm against W2 strain of P. falciparum and 31.62 μm against the embryonic fibroblast cell line (cytotoxicity) displayed a high selective index of 143.73.

  18. Syntheses and antimalarial activities of N-substituted 11-azaartemisinins.

    PubMed

    Torok, D S; Ziffer, H; Meshnick, S R; Pan, X Q; Ager, A

    1995-12-22

    A two-step reaction sequence between artemisinin and methanolic ammonia followed by treatment with Amberlyst 15 yielded 11-azaartemisinin in 65% yield. Substituting a variety of primary alkyl- and heteroaromatic amines for ammonia in the reaction sequence yields N-substituted 11-azaartemisinins in similar or greater yield. When Amberlyst 15 is replaced by a mixture of sulfuric acid/silica gel, both 11-azaartemisinin and the expected metabolite, 10-azadesoxyartemisinin, are formed in 45% and 15% yields, respectively. In vitro and in vivo test data for a number of novel N-substituted 11-azaartemisinins, against drug-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum, show they possess antimalarial activities equal to or greater than that of artemisinin. The most active derivative, N-(2'-acetaldehydo)-11-azaartemisinin, 17, was 26 times more active in vitro and 4 times more active in vivo than artemisinin.

  19. Identification and Optimization of an Aminoalcohol-Carbazole Series with Antimalarial Properties

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations on the emergence of artemisinin resistant parasites have highlighted the need for new antimalarial treatments. An HTS campaign led to the identification of the 1-(1-aminopropan-2-ol)carbazole analogues as potent hits against Plasmodium falciparum K1 strain. The SAR study and optimization of early ADME and physicochemical properties direct us to the selection of a late lead compound that shows good efficacy when orally administrated in the in vivo P. berghei mouse model. PMID:24900603

  20. Role of US military research programs in the development of US Food and Drug Administration--approved antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Lynn W; Vaughn, David W; Skillman, Donald R

    2006-07-01

    US military physicians and researchers helped identify the optimum treatment dose of the naturally occurring compound quinine and collaborated with the pharmaceutical industry in the development and eventual US Food and Drug Administration approval of the synthetic antimalarial drugs chloroquine, primaquine, chloroquine-primaquine, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, mefloquine, doxycycline, halofantrine, and atovaquone-proguanil. Because malaria parasites develop drug resistance, the US military must continue to support the creation and testing of new drugs to prevent and treat malaria until an effective malaria vaccine is developed. New antimalarial drugs also benefit civilians residing in and traveling to malarious areas.

  1. In vitro antimalarial activity of extracts of some plants from a biological reserve in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Chinchilla, Misael; Valerio, Idalia; Sánchez, Ronald; Mora, Víctor; Bagnarello, Vanessa; Martínez, Laura; Gonzalez, Antonieta; Vanegas, Juan Carlos; Apestegui, Alvaro

    2012-06-01

    Treatment with the usual antimalarial drugs, have induced parasite resistance, reinforcing the need to finding natural antimalarial components that would be found on plants from the forest. Therefore, we decided to look for these components in Costa Rican plants from a protected forest area. Fresh and dry extracts of roots, bark, leaves, flowers and fruits of 25 plants from a biological reserve in Costa Rica, Reserva Biol6gica Alberto Manuel Brenes (REBAMB), were studied in vitro for the presence of substances with antimalarial activity. By studying the inhibition of P berghei schizogony, we assessed the antimalarial activity of several plant extracts: Aphelandra aurantiaca, A. tridentata (Acanthaceae); Xanthosoma undipes (Araceae); Iriartea deltoidea (Arecaceae); Neurolaena lobata (Asteraceae); Senna papillosa, Pterocarpus hayessi, Lonchocarpus pentaphyllus (Fabaceae); Nectandra membranacea, Persea povedae, Cinamomum chavarrianum (Lauraceae); Hampea appendiculata (Malvaceae); Ruagea glabra, Guarea glabra (Meliaceae); Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae); Bocconia frutescens (Papaveraceae); Piper friedrichsthalii (Piperaceae); Clematis dioica (Ranunculaceae); Prunus annularis (Rosaceae); Siparuna thecaphora (Siparunaceae); Solanum arboreum, Witheringia solanacea (Solanaceae); Ticodendrum incognitum (Ticodendraceae); Heliocarpus appendiculatus (Tiliaceae) and Myriocarpa longipes (Urticaceae). We used different parts of the plants as well as fresh and dried extracts for testing IC50. The solid content of the extracts ranged from 1-71.9 microg/mL. The fresh extracts showed stronger activity than the dry ones. Since the plants showing the strongest antimalarial activity are very common in Central America, and some similar genera of these plants have shown positives results in South America, we considered important to present these findings for discussion. On the other hand, this is the first systematic study of this kind ever realized in a circumscribed and protected area of

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of 7-substituted 4-aminoquinoline analogs for antimalarial activity

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jong Yeon; Kawasuji, Takashi; Lowes, David J.; Clark, Julie A.; Connelly, Michele C.; Zhu, Fangyi; Guiguemde, W. Armand; Sigal, Martina S.; Wilson, Emily B.; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Guy, R. Kiplin

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that substituted 4-aminoquinolines with a phenylether substituent at the 7-position of the quinoline ring and the capability of intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the protonated amine on the side chain and a hydrogen bond acceptor on the amine’s alkyl substituents exhibited potent antimalarial activity against the multi-drug resistant strain P. falciparum W2. We employed a parallel synthetic method to generate diaryl ether, biaryl, and alkylaryl 4-aminoquinoline analogs, in the background of a limited number of side chain variations that had previously afforded potent 4-aminoquinolines. All subsets were evaluated for their antimalarial activity against the chloroquine-sensitive strain 3D7 and the chloroquine-resistant K1 and cytotoxicity mammalian cell lines. While all three arrays showed good antimalarial activity, only the biaryl-containing subset showed consistently good potency against the drug-resistant K1strain good selectivity with regard to mammalian cytotoxicity. Overall, our data indicate that the biaryl-containing series contains promising candidates for further study. PMID:21910466

  3. Antimalarial pharmacology and therapeutics of atovaquone.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Gemma L; Moss, Darren M; Shone, Alison E; Lalloo, David G; Fisher, Nicholas; O'Neill, Paul M; Ward, Stephen A; Biagini, Giancarlo A

    2013-05-01

    Atovaquone is used as a fixed-dose combination with proguanil (Malarone) for treating children and adults with uncomplicated malaria or as chemoprophylaxis for preventing malaria in travellers. Indeed, in the USA, between 2009 and 2011, Malarone prescriptions accounted for 70% of all antimalarial pre-travel prescriptions. In 2013 the patent for Malarone will expire, potentially resulting in a wave of low-cost generics. Furthermore, the malaria scientific community has a number of antimalarial quinolones with a related pharmacophore to atovaquone at various stages of pre-clinical development. With this in mind, it is timely here to review the current knowledge of atovaquone, with the purpose of aiding the decision making of clinicians and drug developers involved in the future use of atovaquone generics or atovaquone derivatives.

  4. Synthesis and antimalarial activity of prodigiosenes.

    PubMed

    Marchal, Estelle; Smithen, Deborah A; Uddin, Md Imam; Robertson, Andrew W; Jakeman, David L; Mollard, Vanessa; Goodman, Christopher D; MacDougall, Kristopher S; McFarland, Sherri A; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Thompson, Alison

    2014-06-28

    Several analogues of the natural compound prodigiosin with modified A- and C-rings were synthesised as were some of their tin, cobalt, boron and zinc complexes. The antimalarial activity of these prodigiosenes was evaluated in vitro using the 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum strain. The presence of a nitrogen atom in the A-ring is needed for antimalarial activity but the presence of an alkyl group at the β'-position of the C-ring seems detrimental. Dibutyl tin complexes exhibit IC50 values mostly in the nanomolar range with equal or improved activity compared to the free-base prodigiosene ligand, despite the fact that the general toxicity of such tin complexes is demonstrably lower than that of the free-bases.

  5. Antimalarial compounds from Kniphofia foliosa roots.

    PubMed

    Wube, Abraham Abebe; Bucar, Franz; Asres, Kaleab; Gibbons, Simon; Rattray, Lauren; Croft, Simon L

    2005-06-01

    During the course of screening Ethiopian medicinal plants for their antimalarial properties, it was found that the dichloromethane extract of the roots of Kniphofia foliosa Hochst. (Asphodelaceae), which have long been used in the traditional medicine of Ethiopia for the treatment of abdominal cramps and wound healing, displayed strong in vitro antiplasmodial activity against the chloroquine-sensitive 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum with an ED50 value of 3.8 microg/mL and weak cytotoxic activity against KB cells with an ED50 value of 35.2 microg/mL. Five compounds were isolated from the roots and evaluated for their in vitro antimalarial activity. Among the compounds tested, 10-(chrysophanol-7'-yl)-10-(xi)-hydroxychrysopanol-9-anthrone and chryslandicin, showed a high inhibition of the growth of the malaria parasite, P. falciparum with ED50 values of 0.260 and 0.537 microg/mL, respectively, while the naphthalene derivative, 2-acetyl-1-hydroxy-8-methoxy-3-methylnaphthalene, exhibited a less significant antimalarial activity with an ED50 value of 15.4 microg/mL. To compare the effect on the parasite with toxicity to mammalian cells, the cytotoxic activities of the isolated compounds against the KB cell line were evaluated and 10-(chrysophanol-7'-yl)-10-(xi)-hydroxychrysopanol-9-anthrone and chryslandicin displayed very low toxicity with ED50 values of 104 and 90 microg/mL, respectively. This is the first report of the inhibition of the growth of P. falciparum by anthraquinone-anthrone dimers and establishes them as a new class of potential antimalarial compounds with very little host cell toxicity.

  6. In vitro antimalarial activity of medicinal plant extracts against Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Bagavan, Asokan; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul; Kaushik, Naveen Kumar; Sahal, Dinkar

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is a major global public health problem, and the alarming spread of drug resistance and limited number of effective drugs now available underline how important it is to discover new antimalarial compounds. In the present study, ten plants were extracted with ethyl acetate and methanol and tested for their antimalarial activity against chloroquine (CQ)-sensitive (3D7) and CQ-resistant (Dd2 and INDO) strains of Plasmodium falciparum in culture using the fluorescence-based SYBR Green assay. Plant extracts showed moderate to good antiparasitic effects. Promising antiplasmodial activity was found in the extracts from two plants, Phyllanthus emblica leaf 50% inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) 3D7: 7.25 μg/mL (ethyl acetate extract), 3.125 μg/mL (methanol extract), and Syzygium aromaticum flower bud, IC₅₀ 3D7:13 μg/mL, (ethyl acetate extract) and 6.25 μg/mL (methanol extract). Moderate activity (30-75 μg/mL) was found in the ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Abrus precatorius (seed) and Gloriosa superba (leaf); leaf ethyl acetate extracts of Annona squamosa and flower of Musa paradisiaca. The above mentioned plant extracts were also found to be active against CQ-resistant strains (Dd2 and INDO). Cytotoxicity study with P. emblica leaf and S. aromaticum flower bud, extracts showed good therapeutic indices. These results demonstrate that leaf ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of P. emblica and flower bud extract of S. aromaticum may serve as antimalarial agents even in their crude form. The isolation of compounds from P. emblica and S. aromaticum seems to be of special interest for further antimalarial studies.

  7. Substrate-analogous inhibitors exert antimalarial action by targeting the Plasmodium lactate transporter PfFNT at nanomolar scale

    PubMed Central

    Golldack, André; Henke, Björn; Wiechert, Marie; Blancke Soares, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Resistance against all available antimalarial drugs calls for novel compounds that hit unexploited targets in the parasite. Here, we show that the recently discovered Plasmodium falciparum lactate/proton symporter, PfFNT, is a valid druggable target, and describe a new class of fluoroalkyl vinylogous acids that potently block PfFNT and kill cultured parasites. The original compound, MMV007839, is derived from the malaria box collection of potent antimalarials with unknown targets and contains a unique internal prodrug principle that reversibly switches between a lipophilic transport form and a polar, substrate-analogous active form. Resistance selection of cultured P. falciparum parasites with sub-lethal concentrations of MMV007839 produced a single nucleotide exchange in the PfFNT gene; this, and functional characterization of the resulting PfFNT G107S validated PfFNT as a novel antimalarial target. From quantitative structure function relations we established the compound binding mode and the pharmacophore. The pharmacophore largely circumvents the resistance mutation and provides the basis for a medicinal chemistry program that targets lactate and proton transport as a new mode of antimalarial action. PMID:28178358

  8. The counterfeit anti-malarial is a crime against humanity: a systematic review of the scientific evidence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The counterfeiting of anti-malarials represents a form of attack on global public health in which fake and substandard anti-malarials serve as de facto weapons of mass destruction, particularly in resource-constrained endemic settings, where malaria causes nearly 660,000 preventable deaths and threatens millions of lives annually. It has been estimated that fake anti-malarials contribute to nearly 450,000 preventable deaths every year. This crime against humanity is often underestimated or ignored. This study attempts to describe and characterize the direct and indirect effects of counterfeit anti-malarials on public health, clinical care and socio-economic conditions. Methods A search was performed using key databases, WHO documents, and English language search engines. Of 262 potential articles that were identified using a fixed set of criteria, a convenience sample of 105 appropriate articles was selected for this review. Results Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is an important tool in the fight against malaria, but a sizable number of patients are unable to afford to this first-line treatment. Consequently, patients tend to procure cheaper anti-malarials, which may be fake or substandard. Forensic palynology reveals that counterfeits originate in Asia. Fragile drug regulations, ineffective law-enforcement agencies and corruption further burden ailing healthcare facilities. Substandard/fake anti-malarials can cause (a) economic sabotage; (b) therapeutic failure; (c) increased risk of the emergence and spread of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax; (d) an undermining of trust/confidence in healthcare stakeholders/systems; and, (e) serious side effects or death. Conclusion Combating counterfeit anti-malarials is a complex task due to limited resources and poor techniques for the detection and identification of fake anti-malarials. This situation calls for sustainable, global, scientific research and policy change

  9. Antimalarial activities of medicinal plants and herbal formulations used in Thai traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Thiengsusuk, Artitaya; Chaijaroenkul, Wanna; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2013-04-01

    Malaria is one of the world's leading killer infectious diseases with high incidence and morbidity. The problem of multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum has been aggravating particularly in Southeast Asia. Therefore, development of new potential antimalarial drugs is urgently required. The present study aimed to investigate antimalarial activities of a total of 27 medicinal plants and 5 herbal formulations used in Thai traditional medicine against chloroquine-resistant (K1) and chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) P. falciparum clones. Antimalarial activity of the ethanolic extracts of all plants/herbal formulations against K1 and 3D7 P. falciparum clones was assessed using SYBR Green I-based assay. All plants were initially screened at the concentration of 50 μg/ml to select the candidate plants that inhibited malaria growth by ≥50%. Each candidate plant was further assessed for the IC50 value (concentration that inhibits malaria growth by 50%) to select the potential plants. Selectivity index (SI) of each extract was determined from the IC50 ratio obtained from human renal epithelial cell and K1 or 3D7 P. falciparum clone. The ethanolic extracts from 19 medicinal plants/herbal formulation exhibited promising activity against both K1 and 3D7 clones of P. falciparum with survival of less than 50% at the concentration of 50 μg/ml. Among these, the extracts from the eight medicinal plants (Plumbago indica Linn., Garcinia mangostana Linn., Dracaena loureiri Gagnep., Dioscorea membranacea Pierre., Artemisia annua Linn., Piper chaba Hunt., Myristica fragrans Houtt., Kaempferia galanga Linn.) and two herbal formulations (Benjakul Formulation 1 and Pra-Sa-Prao-Yhai Formulation) showed potent antimalarial activity with median range IC50 values of less than 10 μg/ml against K1 or 3D7 P. falciparum clone or both. All except G. mangostana Linn. and A. annua Linn. showed high selective antimalarial activity against both clones with SI>10. Further studies on antimalarial

  10. Antimalarial activity of new water-soluble dihydroartemisinin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lin, A J; Klayman, D L; Milhous, W K

    1987-11-01

    The usefulness of sodium artesunate (3), a water-soluble derivative of artemisinin (1), is impaired by its poor stability in aqueous solution. To overcome the ease of hydrolysis of the ester group in 3, a new series of derivatives of dihydroartemisinin (2) was prepared in which the solubilizing moiety, which contains a carboxylate group, is joined to dihydroartemisinin by an ether rather than an ester linkage. The new derivatives were prepared in good yield by treatment of dihydroartemisinin with an appropriate alcohol under boron trifluoride etherate catalysis at room temperature. All major condensation products are the beta isomer. Hydrolysis of the esters with 2.5% KOH/MeOH gave the corresponding potassium salts, which were converted to free acids (8b-d) by acidification. The derivatives were tested in vitro against two clones of human malaria, Plasmodium falciparum D-6 (Sierra Leone clone) and W-2 (Indochina clone). No cross-resistance to the antimalarial agents mefloquine, chloroquine, pyrimethamine, sulfadoxine, and quinine was observed. In general, the new compounds are more effective against the W-2 than the D-6 strain. Esters (5a-d) possess activity comparable to that of the parent compounds 1 and 2; however, conversion of the esters to their corresponding carboxylates (7a-d) or acids (8b-d), with the exception of artelinic acid (8d), drastically decreases the antimalarial activities in both cell lines. Artelinic acid, which is both soluble and stable in 2.5% K2CO3 solution, possesses superior in vivo activity against Plasmodium berghei than artemisinin or artesunic acid.

  11. Synthetic peroxides as potent antimalarials. News and views.

    PubMed

    Jefford, Charles W

    2012-01-01

    The present review describes the development of synthetic cyclic peroxides, which are designed to surpass the antimalarial activity of the lead molecule, the natural product (+)-artemisinin and some of its C10 derivatives. To begin with, tricyclic and bicyclic 1,2,4-trioxanes are taken to show how the pharmacophore was identified and chirality proved to be irrelevant. The action of ferrous salts on trioxanes illustrates the structural elements that are needed so that reductive breaking of the peroxide bond leads to C-centered radicals, the alleged parasiticidal agents. Views are expressed on how heme, Plasmodium SERCA, and plain ferrous ions, either as targets or activators, could be implicated in the mode of action. Thereafter, news about 1,2,4-trioxolanes, 1,2,4-trioxanes, 1,2,4,5-tetraoxanes, 1,2-dioxolanes, and 1,2-dioxanes is recounted, emphasizing aspects of design, mechanism, and the importance of the adamantane entity for buttressing activity. News about compounds made up of a trioxane covalently bound to aminoquinoline, so-called hybrid molecules, is reported together with a view that they might be better than mechanical mixtures. No new antimalarial can be considered without a word about the risk posed by the parasite developing resistance. The review is not intended to be exhaustive. Some gaps prior to 2009 are filled in, while the later literature up to the end of July 2011 has been covered. Artemisinin and its derivatives fall outside the scope of the review. Nevertheless, some mechanistic insights garnered from artemisinin, which are relevant to synthetic peroxides, are included.

  12. Antimalarial activity of nepodin isolated from Rumex crispus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keyong Ho; Rhee, Ki-Hyeong

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to define the antimalarial activity of Rumex crispus. To identify an active compound that is isolated from R. crispus, bioassay-based chromatographic fractionation and purification is carried out from 70 % ethanol extract of R. crispus; then, an active compound, nepodin, is identified by spectroscopic analysis. Anitmalarial activity is measured by PfNDH2 assay, cytotoxicity, and animal test. From NADH:quinone oxidoreductase enzyme (PfNDAH2) assay, nepodin exhibited significant IC50 values that were 0.74 ± 0.07 and 0.79 ± 0.06 μg/ml against P. falciparum chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) and P. falciparum chloroquine-resistant (S20), respectively. Nepodin showed a potential selective inhibition (SI index: ratio of 50 % cytotoxic concentration to 50 % effective anti-plasmodial concentration) of 161.6 and 151.4 against P. falciparum 3D7 and P. falciparum S20. In the animal test, all groups of nepodin treatment of 10, 50, and 250 mg/kg were active with a parasitemia suppression of 97.1 ± 3.3, 99.1 ± 3.7, and 99.1 ± 2.6 %, respectively. The survival time with nepodin treatment was increased by 14.6 ± 2.5, 16.2 ± 1.5, and 19.8 ± 1.7 days at each dose, respectively. This study newly identified the plant R. crispus containing nepodin, which is a potential antimalarial compound. It exhibited the inhibitory activity of PfNDH2 and prolonged the survival time on the group of nepodin treatment; moreover, it inhibited the parasitemia in the animal test.

  13. Glycosides as possible lead antimalarial in new drug discovery: future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Marya; Khan, Haroon; Ahmad, Izhar

    2017-01-15

    Malaria remains one of the major public health problems worldwide and is responsible for a large number of morbidity and mortality. Especially, in the third world countries, it is still alarming. The development of drug-resistant to Plasmodium falciparum strains has further degraded the overall situation. However, a limited number of effective drugs available emphasizes how essential it is to establish new anti-malarial compounds. New antimalarial agents with distinctive structures and mechanism of action from the natural origin are thus immediately required to treat sensitive and drug-resistant strains of malaria. over the years, phytopharmaceuticals have provided numerous lead compounds. Similarly, the success rate of botanicals in terms of clinical significance is also very high. Of them, glycosides is one of the most widely distributed and emerging class of plant secondary metabolites. This review provides an outlook to recently isolated glycosides from plants with marked antimalarial effects in an in-vitro and in-vivo protocols and thus ideal candidates for clinical trials to ascertain their clinical utility and or led compounds.

  14. Development of a New Generation of 4-Aminoquinoline Antimalarial Compounds Using Predictive Pharmacokinetic and Toxicology Models

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sunetra; Madrid, Peter B.; Catz, Paul; LeValley, Susanna E.; Furniss, Michael J.; Rausch, Linda L.; Guy, R. Kiplin; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Iyer, Lalitha V.; Green, Carol E.; Mirsalis, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    Among the known antimalarial drugs, chloroquine (CQ) and other 4-aminoquinolines have shown high potency and good bioavailability, yet complications associated with drug resistance necessitate the discovery of effective new antimalarial agents. ADMETa prediction studies were employed to evaluate a library of new molecules based on the 4-aminoquinolone-related structure of CQ. Extensive in vitro screening and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in mice helped to identify two lead molecules, 18 and 4, with promising in vitro therapeutic efficacy, improved ADMET properties, low risk for drug-drug interactions, and desirable pharmacokinetic profiles. Both 18 and 4 are highly potent antimalarial compounds, with IC50 values = 5.6 nM and 17.3 nM, respectively, against the W2 (CQ-resistant) strain of Plasmodium falciparum (IC50 for CQ = 382 nM). When tested in mice, these compounds were found to have biological half-lives and plasma exposure values similar to or higher than those of CQ; they are therefore desirable candidates to pursue in future clinical trials. PMID:20361799

  15. Impact of prepackaging antimalarial drugs on cost to patients and compliance with treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Yeboah-Antwi, K.; Gyapong, J. O.; Asare, I. K.; Barnish, G.; Evans, D. B.; Adjei, S.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the extent to which district health teams could reduce the burden of malaria, a continuing major cause of mortality and morbidity, in a situation where severe resource constraints existed and integrated care was provided. METHODS: Antimalarial drugs were prepackaged into unit doses in an attempt to improve compliance with full courses of chemotherapy. FINDINGS: Compliance improved by approximately 20% in both adults and children. There were 50% reductions in cost to patients, waiting time at dispensaries and drug wastage at facilities. The intervention, which tended to improve both case and drug management at facilities, was well accepted by health staff and did not involve them in additional working time. CONCLUSION: The prepackaging of antimalarials at the district level offers the prospect of improved compliance and a reduction in the spread of resistance. PMID:11417034

  16. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as an antimalarial drug target using an integrated chemical biology approach

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Megan H.; Clough, Barbara; Rackham, Mark D.; Rangachari, Kaveri; Brannigan, James A.; Grainger, Munira; Moss, David K.; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Heal, William P.; Broncel, Malgorzata; Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Brady, Declan; Mann, David J.; Leatherbarrow, Robin J.; Tewari, Rita; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Holder, Anthony A.; Tate, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium that inflicts approximately one million deaths per annum worldwide. Chemical validation of new antimalarial targets is urgently required in view of rising resistance to current drugs. One such putative target is the enzyme N-myristoyltransferase (NMT), which catalyzes N-myristoylation of protein substrates. Here we report an integrated chemical biology approach to explore protein myristoylation in the major human parasite P. falciparum, combining chemical proteomic tools for identification of the myristoylated and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteome with selective small molecule NMT inhibitors. We demonstrate that NMT is an essential and chemically tractable target in malaria parasites both in vitro and in vivo, and show that selective inhibition of N-myristoylation leads to catastrophic and irreversible failure to assemble the inner membrane complex, a critical subcellular organelle in the parasite life cycle. Our studies provide the basis for development of new antimalarials targeting NMT. PMID:24451586

  17. A novel multiple-stage antimalarial agent that inhibits protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Baragaña, Beatriz; Hallyburton, Irene; Lee, Marcus C. S.; Norcross, Neil R.; Grimaldi, Raffaella; Otto, Thomas D.; Proto, William R.; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Meister, Stephan; Wirjanata, Grennady; Ruecker, Andrea; Upton, Leanna M.; Abraham, Tara S.; Almeida, Mariana J.; Pradhan, Anupam; Porzelle, Achim; Martínez, María Santos; Bolscher, Judith M.; Woodland, Andrew; Norval, Suzanne; Zuccotto, Fabio; Thomas, John; Simeons, Frederick; Stojanovski, Laste; Osuna-Cabello, Maria; Brock, Paddy M.; Churcher, Tom S.; Sala, Katarzyna A.; Zakutansky, Sara E.; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Sanz, Laura Maria; Riley, Jennifer; Basak, Rajshekhar; Campbell, Michael; Avery, Vicky M.; Sauerwein, Robert W; Dechering, Koen J.; Noviyanti, Rintis; Campo, Brice; Frearson, Julie A.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer-Bazaga, Santiago; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Wyatt, Paul G.; Leroy, Didier; Siegl, Peter; Delves, Michael J.; Kyle, Dennis E.; Wittlin, Sergio; Marfurt, Jutta; Price, Ric N.; Sinden, Robert E.; Winzeler, Elizabeth; Charman, Susan A.; Bebrevska, Lidiya; Gray, David W.; Campbell, Simon; Fairlamb, Alan H.; Willis, Paul; Rayner, Julian C.; Fidock, David A.; Read, Kevin D.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary There is an urgent need for new drugs to treat malaria, with broad therapeutic potential and novel modes of action, to widen the scope of treatment and to overcome emerging drug resistance. We describe the discovery of DDD107498, a compound with a potent and novel spectrum of antimalarial activity against multiple life-cycle stages of the parasite, with good pharmacokinetic properties, and an acceptable safety profile. DDD107498 demonstrates potential to address a variety of clinical needs, including single dose treatment, transmission blocking and chemoprotection. DDD107498 was developed from a screening programme against blood stage malaria parasites; its molecular target has been identified as translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2), which is responsible for the GTP-dependent translocation of the ribosome along mRNA, and is essential for protein synthesis. This discovery of eEF2 as a viable antimalarial drug target opens up new possibilities for drug discovery. PMID:26085270

  18. A novel multiple-stage antimalarial agent that inhibits protein synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baragaña, Beatriz; Hallyburton, Irene; Lee, Marcus C. S.; Norcross, Neil R.; Grimaldi, Raffaella; Otto, Thomas D.; Proto, William R.; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Meister, Stephan; Wirjanata, Grennady; Ruecker, Andrea; Upton, Leanna M.; Abraham, Tara S.; Almeida, Mariana J.; Pradhan, Anupam; Porzelle, Achim; Martínez, María Santos; Bolscher, Judith M.; Woodland, Andrew; Norval, Suzanne; Zuccotto, Fabio; Thomas, John; Simeons, Frederick; Stojanovski, Laste; Osuna-Cabello, Maria; Brock, Paddy M.; Churcher, Tom S.; Sala, Katarzyna A.; Zakutansky, Sara E.; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Sanz, Laura Maria; Riley, Jennifer; Basak, Rajshekhar; Campbell, Michael; Avery, Vicky M.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Dechering, Koen J.; Noviyanti, Rintis; Campo, Brice; Frearson, Julie A.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer-Bazaga, Santiago; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Wyatt, Paul G.; Leroy, Didier; Siegl, Peter; Delves, Michael J.; Kyle, Dennis E.; Wittlin, Sergio; Marfurt, Jutta; Price, Ric N.; Sinden, Robert E.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Charman, Susan A.; Bebrevska, Lidiya; Gray, David W.; Campbell, Simon; Fairlamb, Alan H.; Willis, Paul A.; Rayner, Julian C.; Fidock, David A.; Read, Kevin D.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2015-06-01

    There is an urgent need for new drugs to treat malaria, with broad therapeutic potential and novel modes of action, to widen the scope of treatment and to overcome emerging drug resistance. Here we describe the discovery of DDD107498, a compound with a potent and novel spectrum of antimalarial activity against multiple life-cycle stages of the Plasmodium parasite, with good pharmacokinetic properties and an acceptable safety profile. DDD107498 demonstrates potential to address a variety of clinical needs, including single-dose treatment, transmission blocking and chemoprotection. DDD107498 was developed from a screening programme against blood-stage malaria parasites; its molecular target has been identified as translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2), which is responsible for the GTP-dependent translocation of the ribosome along messenger RNA, and is essential for protein synthesis. This discovery of eEF2 as a viable antimalarial drug target opens up new possibilities for drug discovery.

  19. In vitro inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum by substances isolated from Amazonian antimalarial plants.

    PubMed

    de Andrade-Neto, Valter F; Pohlit, Adrian M; Pinto, Ana Cristina S; Silva, Ellen Cristina C; Nogueira, Karla L; Melo, Márcia R S; Henrique, Marycleuma C; Amorim, Rodrigo C N; Silva, Luis Francisco R; Costa, Mônica R F; Nunomura, Rita C S; Nunomura, Sergio M; Alecrim, Wilson D; Alecrim, M das Graças C; Chaves, F Célio M; Vieira, Pedro Paulo R

    2007-06-01

    In the present study, a quassinoid, neosergeolide, isolated from the roots and stems of Picrolemma sprucei (Simaroubaceae), the indole alkaloids ellipticine and aspidocarpine, isolated from the bark of Aspidosperma vargasii and A. desmanthum (Apocynaceae), respectively, and 4-nerolidylcatechol, isolated from the roots of Pothomorphe peltata (Piperaceae), all presented significant in vitro inhibition (more active than quinine and chloroquine) of the multi-drug resistant K1 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. Neosergeolide presented activity in the nanomolar range. This is the first report on the antimalarial activity of these known, natural compounds. This is also the first report on the isolation of aspidocarpine from A. desmanthum. These compounds are good candidates for pre-clinical tests as novel lead structures with the aim of finding new antimalarial prototypes and lend support to the traditional use of the plants from which these compounds are derived.

  20. Chemical and genetic validation of thiamine utilization as an antimalarial drug target.

    PubMed

    Chan, Xie Wah Audrey; Wrenger, Carsten; Stahl, Katharina; Bergmann, Bärbel; Winterberg, Markus; Müller, Ingrid B; Saliba, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    Thiamine is metabolized into an essential cofactor for several enzymes. Here we show that oxythiamine, a thiamine analog, inhibits proliferation of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in vitro via a thiamine-related pathway and significantly reduces parasite growth in a mouse malaria model. Overexpression of thiamine pyrophosphokinase (the enzyme that converts thiamine into its active form, thiamine pyrophosphate) hypersensitizes parasites to oxythiamine by up to 1,700-fold, consistent with oxythiamine being a substrate for thiamine pyrophosphokinase and its conversion into an antimetabolite. We show that parasites overexpressing the thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes oxoglutarate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase are up to 15-fold more resistant to oxythiamine, consistent with the antimetabolite inactivating thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes. Our studies therefore validate thiamine utilization as an antimalarial drug target and demonstrate that a single antimalarial can simultaneously target several enzymes located within distinct organelles.

  1. Regulatory network analysis of microRNAs and genes in imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Ismael; Gharbi, Hanen; Hassine, Islem Ben; Bouguerra, Ghada; Douzi, Kais; Teber, Mouheb; Abbes, Salem; Menif, Samia

    2016-09-16

    Targeted therapy in the form of selective breakpoint cluster region-abelson (BCR/ABL) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (imatinib mesylate) has successfully been introduced in the treatment of the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, acquired resistance against imatinib mesylate (IM) has been reported in nearly half of patients and has been recognized as major issue in clinical practice. Multiple resistance genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) are thought to be involved in the IM resistance process. These resistance genes and miRNAs tend to interact with each other through a regulatory network. Therefore, it is crucial to study the impact of these interactions in the IM resistance process. The present study focused on miRNA and gene network analysis in order to elucidate the role of interacting elements and to understand their functional contribution in therapeutic failure. Unlike previous studies which were centered only on genes or miRNAs, the prime focus of the present study was on relationships. To this end, three regulatory networks including differentially expressed, related, and global networks were constructed and analyzed in search of similarities and differences. Regulatory associations between miRNAs and their target genes, transcription factors and miRNAs, as well as miRNAs and their host genes were also macroscopically investigated. Certain key pathways in the three networks, especially in the differentially expressed network, were featured. The differentially expressed network emerged as a fault map of IM-resistant CML. Theoretically, the IM resistance process could be prevented by correcting the included errors. The present network-based approach to study resistance miRNAs and genes might help in understanding the molecular mechanisms of IM resistance in CML as well as in the improvement of CML therapy.

  2. Using artificial neural networks to invert 2D DC resistivity imaging data for high resistivity contrast regions: A MATLAB application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyamadpour, Ahmad; Taib, Samsudin; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2009-11-01

    MATLAB is a high-level matrix/array language with control flow statements and functions. MATLAB has several useful toolboxes to solve complex problems in various fields of science, such as geophysics. In geophysics, the inversion of 2D DC resistivity imaging data is complex due to its non-linearity, especially for high resistivity contrast regions. In this paper, we investigate the applicability of MATLAB to design, train and test a newly developed artificial neural network in inverting 2D DC resistivity imaging data. We used resilient propagation to train the network. The model used to produce synthetic data is a homogeneous medium of 100 Ω m resistivity with an embedded anomalous body of 1000 Ω m. The location of the anomalous body was moved to different positions within the homogeneous model mesh elements. The synthetic data were generated using a finite element forward modeling code by means of the RES2DMOD. The network was trained using 21 datasets and tested on another 16 synthetic datasets, as well as on real field data. In field data acquisition, the cable covers 120 m between the first and the last take-out, with a 3 m x-spacing. Three different electrode spacings were measured, which gave a dataset of 330 data points. The interpreted result shows that the trained network was able to invert 2D electrical resistivity imaging data obtained by a Wenner-Schlumberger configuration rapidly and accurately.

  3. Computational gene network study on antibiotic resistance genes of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Anitha, P; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2014-05-01

    Multi Drug Resistance (MDR) in Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the major threats for emerging nosocomial infections in hospital environment. Multidrug-resistance in A. baumannii may be due to the implementation of multi-combination resistance mechanisms such as β-lactamase synthesis, Penicillin-Binding Proteins (PBPs) changes, alteration in porin proteins and in efflux pumps against various existing classes of antibiotics. Multiple antibiotic resistance genes are involved in MDR. These resistance genes are transferred through plasmids, which are responsible for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. In addition, these resistance genes may also have a tendency to interact with each other or with their gene products. Therefore, it becomes necessary to understand the impact of these interactions in antibiotic resistance mechanism. Hence, our study focuses on protein and gene network analysis on various resistance genes, to elucidate the role of the interacting proteins and to study their functional contribution towards antibiotic resistance. From the search tool for the retrieval of interacting gene/protein (STRING), a total of 168 functional partners for 15 resistance genes were extracted based on the confidence scoring system. The network study was then followed up with functional clustering of associated partners using molecular complex detection (MCODE). Later, we selected eight efficient clusters based on score. Interestingly, the associated protein we identified from the network possessed greater functional similarity with known resistance genes. This network-based approach on resistance genes of A. baumannii could help in identifying new genes/proteins and provide clues on their association in antibiotic resistance.

  4. New quinoline di-Mannich base compounds with greater antimalarial activity than chloroquine, amodiaquine, or pyronaridine.

    PubMed Central

    Kotecka, B M; Barlin, G B; Edstein, M D; Rieckmann, K H

    1997-01-01

    We have compared the ex vivo antimalarial activity of 12 new quinoline di-Mannich base compounds containing the 7-dichloroquinoline or 7-trifluoromethylquinoline nucleus with amodiaquine, chloroquine, and pyronaridine using the Saimiri-bioassay model. Each compound was administered orally (30 mg/kg of body weight) to three or more noninfected Saimiri sciureus monkeys, and serum samples were collected at various times after drug administration and serially diluted with drug-free (control) serum. In vitro activity against the multidrug-resistant K1 isolate of Plasmodium falciparum was determined in serum samples by measuring the maximum inhibitory dilution at which the treated monkey serum inhibited schizont maturation in vitro. Of the 12 Mannich bases tested, 8 were associated with levels of ex vivo antimalarial activity in serum greater than those of amodiaquine, chloroquine, or pyronaridine 1 to 7 days after drug administration. Further studies were carried out with four of these compounds, and the results showed that the areas under the serum drug concentration-time curves for the four compounds were between 7- and 26-fold greater than that obtained for pyronaridine. Activity against four multidrug-resistant strains of P. falciparum was also much greater in serum samples collected from monkeys after administration of these four compounds than in serum samples collected after administration of pyronaridine or chloroquine. These findings suggest that these four quinoline Mannich base compounds possess a very marked and prolonged antimalarial activity and that further studies should be performed to determine their value as antimalarial drugs. PMID:9174201

  5. Structural requirements of 3-carboxyl-4(1H)-quinolones as potential antimalarials from 2D and 3D QSAR analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiazhong; Li, Shuyan; Bai, Chongliang; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2013-07-01

    Malaria is a fatal tropical and subtropical disease caused by the protozoal species Plasmodium. Many commonly available antimalarial drugs and therapies are becoming ineffective because of the emergence of multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum, which drives the need for the development of new antimalarial drugs. Recently, a series of 3-carboxyl-4(1H)-quinolone analogs, derived from the famous compound endochin, were reported as promising candidates for orally efficacious antimalarials. In this study, to analyze the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of these quinolones and investigate the structural requirements for antimalarial activity, the 2D multiple linear regressions (MLR) method and 3D comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) methods are employed to evolve different QSAR models. All these models give satisfactory results with highly accurate fitting and strong external predictive abilities for chemicals not used in model development. Furthermore, the contour maps from 3D models can provide an intuitive understanding of the key structure features responsible for the antimalarial activities. In conclusion, we summarize the detailed position-specific structural requirements of these derivatives accordingly. All these results are helpful for the rational design of new compounds with higher antimalarial bioactivities.

  6. Markov Networks of Collateral Resistance: National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System Surveillance Results from Escherichia coli Isolates, 2004-2012

    PubMed Central

    Love, William J.; Zawack, Kelson A.; Booth, James G.; Grӧhn, Yrjo T.

    2016-01-01

    Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an important component of public health. Antimicrobial drug use generates selective pressure that may lead to resistance against to the administered drug, and may also select for collateral resistances to other drugs. Analysis of AMR surveillance data has focused on resistance to individual drugs but joint distributions of resistance in bacterial populations are infrequently analyzed and reported. New methods are needed to characterize and communicate joint resistance distributions. Markov networks are a class of graphical models that define connections, or edges, between pairs of variables with non-zero partial correlations and are used here to describe AMR resistance relationships. The graphical least absolute shrinkage and selection operator is used to estimate sparse Markov networks from AMR surveillance data. The method is demonstrated using a subset of Escherichia coli isolates collected by the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System between 2004 and 2012 which included AMR results for 16 drugs from 14418 isolates. Of the 119 possible unique edges, 33 unique edges were identified at least once during the study period and graphical density ranged from 16.2% to 24.8%. Two frequent dense subgraphs were noted, one containing the five β-lactam drugs and the other containing both sulfonamides, three aminoglycosides, and tetracycline. Density did not appear to change over time (p = 0.71). Unweighted modularity did not appear to change over time (p = 0.18), but a significant decreasing trend was noted in the modularity of the weighted networks (p < 0.005) indicating relationships between drugs of different classes tended to increase in strength and frequency over time compared to relationships between drugs of the same class. The current method provides a novel method to study the joint resistance distribution, but additional work is required to unite the underlying biological and genetic characteristics

  7. Augmentation of the Differentiation Response to Antitumor Antimalarials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    histone deacetylase, quinoline antimalarials, chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine , differentiation, hyperacetylation 16. SECURITY CLASSIFIATION OF: 17.’LMTTO...shown that the quinoline antimalarials chloroquine (CQ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation in breast cancer... hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation in breast cancer cell lines without toxicity to normal MCF-IOA breast cells. Hence, the

  8. Augmentation of the Differentiation Response to Antitumor Antimalarials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) We have shown that the quinoline antimalarials chloroquine (CQ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ...Introduction: Preliminary studies showed that two of the quinoline antimalarials, chloroquine (CQ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), displayed selective... hydroxychloroquine upon pretreatment with ATRA or Aza on tumor cell survival (Figures 1 and 2, respectively). Clonogenic survival of MDA-MB-231 cells exposed to

  9. Antimalarial Activity of Anthothecol Derived from Khaya anthotheca (Meliaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimalarial activity of anthothecol, a limonoid of Khaya anthotheca (Meliaceae) against Plasmodium falciparum was tested using a [3H]-hypoxanthine and 48 h culture assay in vitro. Anthothecol showed potent antimalarial activity against malarial parasites with IC50 values of 1.4 and 0.17 uM using t...

  10. Recent progress in the identification and development of anti-malarial agents using virtual screening based approaches.

    PubMed

    Shah, Priyanka; Tiwari, Sunita; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    Malaria has continued to be one of the most perplexing diseases for biological science community around the world due to its prevalent devastating nature and quick developing resistance against the frontline drugs. Artimisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) has been so far found to be among the best therapies against Plasmodium pathogens but alarming emergence of resistance in parasites against every known chemotherapy has prompted the scientific community to step up all the efforts towards development of new and affordable anti-malarial drugs. Computer-aided approaches have received enormous attention in recent years in the field of identification and design of novel drugs. In this review, we summarize recently published research concerning the identification and development of anti-malarial compounds using virtual screening approaches. It would be admirable to discern the successful application of in silico studies for anti-malarial drug discovery hitherto and would certainly help in generating new avenues for pursuing integrated studies between the experimentalists and computational chemists in a systematic manner as a time and cost efficient alternative for future antimalarial drug discovery projects.

  11. QSAR modeling and chemical space analysis of antimalarial compounds.

    PubMed

    Sidorov, Pavel; Viira, Birgit; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth; Maran, Uko; Marcou, Gilles; Horvath, Dragos; Varnek, Alexandre

    2017-04-03

    Generative topographic mapping (GTM) has been used to visualize and analyze the chemical space of antimalarial compounds as well as to build predictive models linking structure of molecules with their antimalarial activity. For this, a database, including ~3000 molecules tested in one or several of 17 anti-Plasmodium activity assessment protocols, has been compiled by assembling experimental data from in-house and ChEMBL databases. GTM classification models built on subsets corresponding to individual bioassays perform similarly to the earlier reported SVM models. Zones preferentially populated by active and inactive molecules, respectively, clearly emerge in the class landscapes supported by the GTM model. Their analysis resulted in identification of privileged structural motifs of potential antimalarial compounds. Projection of marketed antimalarial drugs on this map allowed us to delineate several areas in the chemical space corresponding to different mechanisms of antimalarial activity. This helped us to make a suggestion about the mode of action of the molecules populating these zones.

  12. Antimalarial properties of imipramine and amitriptyline

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.; Siegel, L.; Pinto, J.; Meshnick, S.

    1986-03-01

    This laboratory has previously demonstrated that imipramine (IM) and amitriptyline (AM), inhibit the conversion of riboflavin to its coenzymic derivatives. Several other laboratories have shown that dietary riboflavin deficiency is protective against malarial infection. In the present investigation, the authors determined whether IM and AM exert antimalarial effects similar to that of riboflavin deficiency, as they have hypothesized. In addition, they evaluated whether these drugs, like other antimalarial agents, increase the hemolytic response to ferriprotoporphyrin IX (FP). The growth of P. falciparum (FCR3) in the absence or presence of these drugs (80 ..mu..M) was measured by incubating parasitized erythrocytes for 48 h in RPMI 1640 medium. Parasitemia was determined by counting erythrocyte smears and monitoring (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine uptake. With no drug, parasitemia was 20.3 +/- 5.3%, whereas in the presence of IM and AM, parasitemia was reduced to 7.3 +/- 0.8% and 13.6 +/- 2.8%, respectively. The uptake of (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine was reduced to 47 +/- 3.6% and 54 +/- 2.9% of control by IM and AM, respectively. Assays of hemolysis were conducted by incubating 0.5% RBC suspension in NaCl-Tris buffer for 3 h at 37/sup 0/C with variable concentrations of drugs and/or FP (1-7 ..mu..M). Both drugs at 10 to 100 ..mu..M significantly enhanced hemolysis induced by FP. No hemolysis by these drugs was detected in the absence of FP. It is concluded that the tricyclic antidepressants, IM and AM, possess substantial antimalarial properties, thereby supporting the hypothesis that drugs which interfere with riboflavin metabolism should also provide protection against malaria.

  13. Molecular markers associated with resistance to commonly used antimalarial drugs among Plasmodium falciparum isolates from a malaria-endemic area in Taiz governorate-Yemen during the transmission season.

    PubMed

    Alareqi, Lina M Q; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Lau, Yee-Ling; Fong, Mun-Yik; Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Mahmud, Rohela

    2016-10-01

    Since 2005, artesunate (AS) plus sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) combination has been adopted as the first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in Yemen in response to the high level of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to chloroquine (CQ). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the frequency distribution of molecular markers associated with resistance to CQ and AS plus SP combination among P. falciparum isolates from a malaria-endemic area in Taiz governorate, Yemen. Fifty P. falciparum isolates were collected during a cross-sectional study in Mawza district, Taiz, in the period from October 2013 to April 2014. The isolates were investigated for drug resistance-associated molecular markers in five genes, including P. falciparum CQ resistance transporter (pfcrt) 76T and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) 86Y as markers of resistance to CQ, mutations in the Kelch 13 (K13) propeller domain for resistance to AS, and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr) and P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps) genes for resistance to SP. Nested polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify target genes in DNA extracts of the isolates followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism for detecting 76T and 86Y mutations in pfcrt and pfmdr1, respectively, and by DNA sequencing for detecting mutations in K13, pfdhfr and pfdhps. All the investigated isolates from Mawza district were harboring the pfcrt 76T mutant and the pfmdr1 N86 wild-type alleles. The pfdhfr 51I/108N double mutant allele was found in 2.2% (1/45) of the isolates; however, no mutations were detected at codons 436, 437, 540, 581 and 613 of pfdhps. All P. falciparum isolates that were successfully sequenced (n=47) showed the K13 Y493, R539, I543 and C580 wild-type alleles. In conclusion, the pfcrt 76T mutant allele is fixed in the study area about six years after the official withdrawal of CQ, possibly indicating its over-the-counter availability and continued use as a

  14. Youth, Social Networking, and Resistance: A Case Study on a Multidimensional Approach to Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scozzaro, David

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory case study focused on youth and resistance that was aided by the use of technology. The combination of resistance and technology expanded a multidimensional framework and leads to new insight into transformative resistance. This study examined the framework of transformative resistance based on Solorzano and Delgado Bernal's…

  15. Targeting Plasmodium Metabolism to Improve Antimalarial Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Avitia-Domínguez, Claudia; Sierra-Campos, Erick; Betancourt-Conde, Irene; Aguirre-Raudry, Miriam; Vázquez-Raygoza, Alejandra; Luevano-De la Cruz, Artemisa; Favela-Candia, Alejandro; Sarabia-Sanchez, Marie; Ríos-Soto, Lluvia; Méndez-Hernández, Edna; Cisneros-Martínez, Jorge; Palacio-Gastélum, Marcelo Gómez; Valdez-Solana, Mónica; Hernández-Rivera, Jessica; De Lira-Sánchez, Jaime; Campos-Almazán, Mara; Téllez-Valencia, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the main infectious diseases in tropical developing countries and represents high morbidity and mortality rates nowadays. The principal etiological agent P. falciparum is transmitted through the bite of the female Anopheles mosquito. The issue has escalated due to the emergence of resistant strains to most of the antimalarials used for the treatment including Chloroquine, Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, and recently Artemisinin derivatives, which has led to diminished effectiveness and by consequence increased the severity of epidemic outbreaks. Due to the lack of effective compounds to treat these drug-resistant strains, the discovery or development of novel anti-malaria drugs is important. In this context, one strategy has been to find inhibitors of enzymes, which play an important role for parasite survival. Today, promising results have been obtained in this regard, involving the entire P. falciparum metabolism. These inhibitors could serve as leads in the search of a new chemotherapy against malaria. This review focuses on the achievements in recent years with regard to inhibition of enzymes used as targets for drug design against malaria.

  16. [The proper use of antimalarial drugs currently available].

    PubMed

    Bourgeade, A; Delmont, J

    1998-01-01

    French medical practitioners have at their disposal several antimalarial drugs for giving chemoprophylaxis to people travelling to a malaria endemic country or treating an imported malaria case in a patient. The choice depends on the contre-indications and indications of each drug, essentially subordinated to the presence and level of Plasmodium falciparum chemosensitivity in the visited area. For prevention, chloroquine alone can be taken in the areas where P. falciparum is absent or not chloroquine resistant; elsewhere, the choice between chloroquine/proguanil or mefloquine depends on knowing the prevalence and level of falciparum chloroquine resistance in these areas. For treatment, the only indications of chloroquine are imported malaria cases either due to P. vivax, P. ovale or P. malariae, or caused by P. falciparum contracted in one of the rare countries where the species is still sensitive to chloroquine. For uncomplicated falciparum malaria cases acquired in a chemoresistance area, mefloquine, halofantrine, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine or oral quinine is selected, depending on the observed chemoprophylaxis, the contra-indications and the suspicion of chemoresistance type. Whatever the provenance area, P. falciparum in a patient with one or several serious symptoms or possibly profuse vomiting is treated by intravenous quinine, associated with tetracycline if the patient comes from an area known for a low quinine sensitivity of this species. The spectrum of falciparum malaria treatment has recently broadened to include new drugs such as artemisinin, artemether or atovaquone/proguanil, the latter being as yet unauthorized in France.

  17. Access to Artemisinin-Combination Therapy (ACT) and other Anti-Malarials: National Policy and Markets in Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Amuasi, John H.; Diap, Graciela; Nguah, Samuel Blay; Karikari, Patrick; Boakye, Isaac; Jambai, Amara; Lahai, Wani Kumba; Louie, Karly S.; Kiechel, Jean-Rene

    2012-01-01

    Malaria remains the leading burden of disease in post-conflict Sierra Leone. To overcome the challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve effective treatment, Sierra Leone adopted artemisinin-combination therapy artesunate-amodiaquine (AS+AQ) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. Other national policy anti-malarials include artemether-lumefantrine (AL) as an alternative to AS+AQ, quinine and artemether for treatment of complicated malaria; and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp). This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. A cross-sectional survey of 127 medicine outlets (public, private and NGO) was conducted in urban and rural areas. The availability on the day of the survey, median prices, and affordability policy and available non-policy anti-malarials were calculated. Anti-malarials were stocked in 79% of all outlets surveyed. AS+AQ was widely available in public medicine outlets; AL was only available in the private and NGO sectors. Quinine was available in nearly two-thirds of public and NGO outlets and over one-third of private outlets. SP was widely available in all outlets. Non-policy anti-malarials were predominantly available in the private outlets. AS+AQ in the public sector was widely offered for free. Among the anti-malarials sold at a cost, the same median price of a course of AS+AQ (US$1.56), quinine tablets (US$0.63), were found in both the public and private sectors. Quinine injection had a median cost of US$0.31 in the public sector and US$0.47 in the private sector, while SP had a median cost of US$0.31 in the public sector compared to US$ 0.63 in the private sector. Non-policy anti-malarials were more affordable than first-line AS+AQ in all sectors. A course of AS+AQ was affordable at nearly two days’ worth of wages in both the public and private sectors. PMID:23133522

  18. Antimalarial action of artesunate involves DNA damage mediated by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Anusha M; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is the recommended first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. It has been suggested that the cytotoxic effect of artemisinin is mediated by free radicals followed by the alkylation of P. falciparum proteins. The endoperoxide bridge, the active moiety of artemisinin derivatives, is cleaved in the presence of ferrous iron, generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other free radicals. However, the emergence of resistance to artemisinin in P. falciparum underscores the need for new insights into the molecular mechanisms of antimalarial activity of artemisinin. Here we show that artesunate (ART) induces DNA double-strand breaks in P. falciparum in a physiologically relevant dose- and time-dependent manner. DNA damage induced by ART was accompanied by an increase in the intracellular ROS level in the parasites. Mannitol, a ROS scavenger, reversed the cytotoxic effect of ART and reduced DNA damage, and modulation of glutathione (GSH) levels was found to impact ROS and DNA damage induced by ART. Accumulation of ROS, increased DNA damage, and the resulting antiparasite effect suggest a causal relationship between ROS, DNA damage, and parasite death. Finally, we also show that ART-induced ROS production involves a potential role for NADPH oxidase, an enzyme involved in the production of superoxide anions. Our results with P. falciparum provide novel insights into previously unknown molecular mechanisms underlying the antimalarial activity of artemisinin derivatives and may help in the design of next-generation antimalarial drugs against the most virulent Plasmodium species.

  19. New developments in anti-malarial target candidate and product profiles.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Jeremy N; Duparc, Stephan; Gutteridge, Winston E; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob; Kaszubska, Wiweka; Macintyre, Fiona; Mazzuri, Sébastien; Möhrle, Jörg J; Wells, Timothy N C

    2017-01-13

    A decade of discovery and development of new anti-malarial medicines has led to a renewed focus on malaria elimination and eradication. Changes in the way new anti-malarial drugs are discovered and developed have led to a dramatic increase in the number and diversity of new molecules presently in pre-clinical and early clinical development. The twin challenges faced can be summarized by multi-drug resistant malaria from the Greater Mekong Sub-region, and the need to provide simplified medicines. This review lists changes in anti-malarial target candidate and target product profiles over the last 4 years. As well as new medicines to treat disease and prevent transmission, there has been increased focus on the longer term goal of finding new medicines for chemoprotection, potentially with long-acting molecules, or parenteral formulations. Other gaps in the malaria armamentarium, such as drugs to treat severe malaria and endectocides (that kill mosquitoes which feed on people who have taken the drug), are defined here. Ultimately the elimination of malaria requires medicines that are safe and well-tolerated to be used in vulnerable populations: in pregnancy, especially the first trimester, and in those suffering from malnutrition or co-infection with other pathogens. These updates reflect the maturing of an understanding of the key challenges in producing the next generation of medicines to control, eliminate and ultimately eradicate malaria.

  20. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa.

  1. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27194047

  2. In vitro antimalarial activity of different extracts of Eremostachys macrophylla Montbr. & Auch.

    PubMed Central

    Asnaashari, Solmaz; Heshmati Afshar, Fariba; Ebrahimi, Atefeh; Bamdad Moghadam, Sedigheh; Delazar, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:The risk of drug resistance and the use of medicinal plants in malaria prevention and treatment have led to the search for new antimalarial compounds with natural origin. Methods:In the current study, six extracts with different polarity from aerial parts and rhizomes of Eremostachys macrophylla Montbr. & Auch., were screened for their antimalarial properties by cell-free β-hematin formation assay. Results: Dichloromethane (DCM) extracts of both parts of plant showed significant antimalarial activities with IC50 values of 0.797 ± 0.016 mg/mL in aerial parts and 0.324 ± 0.039 mg/mL in rhizomes compared to positive control (Chloroquine, IC50 = 0.014 ± 0.003 mg/mL, IC90 = 0.163 ± 0.004 mg/mL). Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the most potent part (DCM extract of rhizomes) by vacuum liquid chromatography (VLC) afforded seven fractions. Sixty percent ethyl acetate/n-hexane fraction showed considerable antimalarial activity with IC50 value of 0.047 ± 0.0003 mg/mL. Conclusion: From 6 extracts with different polarity of E. macrophylla,s aerial parts and rhizomes, the DCM extract of both parts were the most active extract in this assay. The preliminary phytochemical study on the VLC fractions of the most potent part persuades us to focus on purifying the active components of these extracts and to conduct further investigation towards in vivo evaluation. PMID:26457251

  3. Reliability of antimalarial sensitivity tests depends on drug mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Wein, Sharon; Maynadier, Marjorie; Tran Van Ba, Christophe; Cerdan, Rachel; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Fraisse, Laurent; Vial, Henri

    2010-05-01

    In vitro antimalarial activity tests play a pivotal role in malaria drug research or for monitoring drug resistance in field isolates. We applied two isotopic tests, two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and the SYBR green I fluorescence-based assay, to test artesunate and chloroquine, the metabolic inhibitors atovaquone and pyrimethamine, our fast-acting choline analog T3/SAR97276, and doxycycline, which has a delayed death profile. Isotopic tests based on hypoxanthine and ethanolamine incorporation are the most reliable tests provided when they are applied after one full 48-h parasite cycle. The SYBR green assay, which measures the DNA content, usually requires 72 h of incubation to obtain reliable results. When delayed death is suspected, specific protocols are required with increasing incubation times up to 96 h. In contrast, both ELISA tests used (pLDH and HRP2) appear to be problematic, leading to disappointing and even erroneous results for molecules that do not share an artesunatelike profile. The reliability of these tests is linked to the mode of action of the drug, and the conditions required to get informative results are hard to predict. Our results suggest some minimal conditions to apply these tests that should give rise to a standard 50% inhibitory concentration, regardless of the mechanism of action of the compounds, and highlight that the most commonly used in vitro antimalarial activity tests do not have the same potential. Some of them might not detect the antimalarial potential of new classes of compounds with innovative modes of action, which subsequently could become promising new antimalarial drugs.

  4. Flow network QSAR for the prediction of physicochemical properties by mapping an electrical resistance network onto a chemical reaction poset.

    PubMed

    Ivanciuc, Ovidiu; Ivanciuc, Teodora; Klein, Douglas J

    2013-06-01

    Usual quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models are computed from unstructured input data, by using a vector of molecular descriptors for each chemical in the dataset. Another alternative is to consider the structural relationships between the chemical structures, such as molecular similarity, presence of certain substructures, or chemical transformations between compounds. We defined a class of network-QSAR models based on molecular networks induced by a sequence of substitution reactions on a chemical structure that generates a partially ordered set (or poset) oriented graph that may be used to predict various molecular properties with quantitative superstructure-activity relationships (QSSAR). The network-QSAR interpolation models defined on poset graphs, namely average poset, cluster expansion, and spline poset, were tested with success for the prediction of several physicochemical properties for diverse chemicals. We introduce the flow network QSAR, a new poset regression model in which the dataset of chemicals, represented as a reaction poset, is transformed into an oriented network of electrical resistances in which the current flow results in a potential at each node. The molecular property considered in the QSSAR model is represented as the electrical potential, and the value of this potential at a particular node is determined by the electrical resistances assigned to each edge and by a system of batteries. Each node with a known value for the molecular property is attached to a battery that sets the potential on that node to the value of the respective molecular property, and no external battery is attached to nodes from the prediction set, representing chemicals for which the values of the molecular property are not known or are intended to be predicted. The flow network QSAR algorithm determines the values of the molecular property for the prediction set of molecules by applying Ohm's law and Kirchhoff's current law to the poset

  5. Hemozoin Formation as a Target for Antimalarial Drug Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0030 TITLE: Hemozoin Formation as a Target for Antimalarial Drug Design PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael K. Riscoe, Ph.D...Formation as a Target for Antimalarial Drug Design DAMD17-03-1-0030 6. A UTHOR(S) Michael K. Riscoe, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZA TION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...Report: by Principal Investigator - Michael K. Riscoe, Ph.D. DAMD1 7-03-1-0030: "Hemozoin Formation as a Target for Antimalarial Drug Design " INTRODUCTION

  6. Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance in the AFHSC-GEIS Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    U.S. Marine officer candidates. Additionally, they performed resistance and virulence factor gene analysis for Klebsiella pneumonia and developed and...isolates of Streptococcus pyo- genes from U.S. military basic trainees [24]. Group A S. pyogenes (GAS) infections are common in young adults and may present...ease and glomerulonephritis. Acute GAS infections remain susceptible to penicillin but resistance to macro- lide antibiotics has been noted in recent

  7. Comparative chemical genomics reveal that the spiroindolone antimalarial KAE609 (Cipargamin) is a P-type ATPase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Goldgof, Gregory M.; Durrant, Jacob D.; Ottilie, Sabine; Vigil, Edgar; Allen, Kenneth E.; Gunawan, Felicia; Kostylev, Maxim; Henderson, Kiersten A.; Yang, Jennifer; Schenken, Jake; LaMonte, Gregory M.; Manary, Micah J.; Murao, Ayako; Nachon, Marie; Stanhope, Rebecca; Prescott, Maximo; McNamara, Case W.; Slayman, Carolyn W.; Amaro, Rommie E.; Suzuki, Yo; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    The spiroindolones, a new class of antimalarial medicines discovered in a cellular screen, are rendered less active by mutations in a parasite P-type ATPase, PfATP4. We show here that S. cerevisiae also acquires mutations in a gene encoding a P-type ATPase (ScPMA1) after exposure to spiroindolones and that these mutations are sufficient for resistance. KAE609 resistance mutations in ScPMA1 do not confer resistance to unrelated antimicrobials, but do confer cross sensitivity to the alkyl-lysophospholipid edelfosine, which is known to displace ScPma1p from the plasma membrane. Using an in vitro cell-free assay, we demonstrate that KAE609 directly inhibits ScPma1p ATPase activity. KAE609 also increases cytoplasmic hydrogen ion concentrations in yeast cells. Computer docking into a ScPma1p homology model identifies a binding mode that supports genetic resistance determinants and in vitro experimental structure-activity relationships in both P. falciparum and S. cerevisiae. This model also suggests a shared binding site with the dihydroisoquinolones antimalarials. Our data support a model in which KAE609 exerts its antimalarial activity by directly interfering with P-type ATPase activity. PMID:27291296

  8. Recursion-transform method for computing resistance of the complex resistor network with three arbitrary boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zhi-Zhong

    2015-05-01

    We develop a general recursion-transform (R-T) method for a two-dimensional resistor network with a zero resistor boundary. As applications of the R-T method, we consider a significant example to illuminate the usefulness for calculating resistance of a rectangular m ×n resistor network with a null resistor and three arbitrary boundaries, a problem never solved before, since Green's function techniques and Laplacian matrix approaches are invalid in this case. Looking for the exact calculation of the resistance of a binary resistor network is important but difficult in the case of an arbitrary boundary since the boundary is like a wall or trap which affects the behavior of finite network. In this paper we obtain several general formulas of resistance between any two nodes in a nonregular m ×n resistor network in both finite and infinite cases. In particular, 12 special cases are given by reducing one of the general formulas to understand its applications and meanings, and an integral identity is found when we compare the equivalent resistance of two different structures of the same problem in a resistor network.

  9. Antimalarial action of nitrobenzylthioinosine in combination with purine nucleoside antimetabolites.

    PubMed

    Gero, A M; Scott, H V; O'Sullivan, W J; Christopherson, R I

    1989-04-01

    The infection of human erythrocytes by two strains of the human malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum (FCQ-27 or the multi-drug-resistant strain K-1), markedly changed the transport characteristics of the nucleosides, adenosine and tubercidin, compared to uninfected erythrocytes. A component of the transport of these nucleosides was insensitive to the classical mammalian nucleoside transport inhibitor nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR). In vitro studies with tubercidin demonstrated ID50 values of 0.43 and 0.51 microM for FCQ-27 and K-1, respectively. In addition, the nucleoside transport inhibitors NBMPR, nitrobenzylthioguanosine (NBTGR), dilazep and dipyridamole also independently exhibited antimalarial activity in vitro. The combination of tubercidin and NBMPR or NBTGR in vitro demonstrated synergistic activity, whilst tubercidin together with dilazep or dipyridamole showed subadditive activity. Analysis by HPLC indicated that NBMPR could permeate the infected cell membrane and provided evidence for the catabolism of NBMPR in vitro, with subsequent alteration of the purine pool in the infected erythrocyte. These observations further indicated the possibility of the utilization of cytotoxic nucleosides against P. falciparum infection in conjunction with a nucleoside transport inhibitor to protect the host tissue.

  10. Using evidence to change antimalarial drug policy in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Shretta, R; Omumbo, J; Rapuoda, B; Snow, R W

    2000-11-01

    Chloroquine resistance was first detected in Kenya in 1978 and escalated during the 1980s. Chloroquine remained the treatment of choice for uncomplicated malaria infections until revised guidelines were launched in 1998 despite a plethora of scientific evidence on failure. This review analyses the range and quality of the evidence base that was used to change the drug policy in Kenya from chloroquine to SP and examines the process of consensus building and decision making. Our review illustrates the difficulties in translating sensitivity data with gross geographical, temporal and methodological variations into national treatment policy. The process was complicated by limited options, unknown adverse effects of replacement therapies, cost, as well as limited guidance on factors pertinent to changing the drug policy for malaria. Although > 50% of the studies showed parasitological failures by 1995, there was a general lack of consensus on the principles for assessing drug failures, the inclusion criteria for the study subjects and the relative benefits of parasitological and clinical assessments. A change in international recommendations for assessment of drug efficacy in 1996 from parasitological to clinical response further perplexed the decisions. There is an urgent need for international standards and evidence-based guidelines to provide a framework to assist the process by which decision-makers in malaria-endemic countries can make rational choices for antimalarial drug policy change.

  11. Small molecule screen for candidate antimalarials targeting Plasmodium Kinesin-5.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liqiong; Richard, Jessica; Kim, Sunyoung; Wojcik, Edward J

    2014-06-06

    Plasmodium falciparum and vivax are responsible for the majority of malaria infections worldwide, resulting in over a million deaths annually. Malaria parasites now show measured resistance to all currently utilized drugs. Novel antimalarial drugs are urgently needed. The Plasmodium Kinesin-5 mechanoenzyme is a suitable "next generation" target. Discovered via small molecule screen experiments, the human Kinesin-5 has multiple allosteric sites that are "druggable." One site in particular, unique in its sequence divergence across all homologs in the superfamily and even within the same family, exhibits exquisite drug specificity. We propose that Plasmodium Kinesin-5 shares this allosteric site and likewise can be targeted to uncover inhibitors with high specificity. To test this idea, we performed a screen for inhibitors selective for Plasmodium Kinesin-5 ATPase activity in parallel with human Kinesin-5. Our screen of nearly 2000 compounds successfully identified compounds that selectively inhibit both P. vivax and falciparum Kinesin-5 motor domains but, as anticipated, do not impact human Kinesin-5 activity. Of note is a candidate drug that did not biochemically compete with the ATP substrate for the conserved active site or disrupt the microtubule-binding site. Together, our experiments identified MMV666693 as a selective allosteric inhibitor of Plasmodium Kinesin-5; this is the first identified protein target for the Medicines of Malaria Venture validated collection of parasite proliferation inhibitors. This work demonstrates that chemical screens against human kinesins are adaptable to homologs in disease organisms and, as such, extendable to strategies to combat infectious disease.

  12. Urea/oxalamide tethered β-lactam-7-chloroquinoline conjugates: synthesis and in vitro antimalarial evaluation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pardeep; Raj, Raghu; Singh, Parvesh; Gut, Jiri; Rosenthal, Philip J; Kumar, Vipan

    2014-01-01

    The manuscript pertains to the synthesis of urea/oxalamide tethered β-lactam-7-chloroquinoline conjugates with well modulated chain lengths and their antimalarial evaluation. The results reveal the dependence of activity profiles on the N-1 substituent of the β-lactam ring, the nature of the linker as well as the length of the alkyl chain. The most potent of the tested compounds showed an IC50 of 34.97 nM against chloroquine resistant W2 strain of Plasmodium falciparum.

  13. Preliminary LC-MS Based Screening for Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Thioredoxin Reductase (PfTrxR) among a Set of Antimalarials from the Malaria Box.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Neil K; Reynolds, Priscilla J; Calderón, Angela I

    2016-03-28

    Plasmodium falciparum thioredoxin reductase (PfTrxR) has been identified as a potential drug target to combat growing antimalarial drug resistance. Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) has pre-screened and identified a set of 400 antimalarial compounds called the Malaria Box. From those, we have evaluated their mechanisms of action through inhibition of PfTrxR and found new active chemical scaffolds. Five compounds with significant PfTrxR inhibitory activity, with IC50 values ranging from 0.9-7.5 µM against the target enzyme, were found out of the Malaria Box.

  14. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-19

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks' robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  15. Basigin is a druggable target for host-oriented antimalarial interventions

    PubMed Central

    Zenonos, Zenon A.; Dummler, Sara K.; Müller-Sienerth, Nicole; Chen, Jianzhu; Preiser, Peter R.; Rayner, Julian C.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the parasite responsible for the most lethal form of malaria, an infectious disease that causes a large proportion of childhood deaths and poses a significant barrier to socioeconomic development in many countries. Although antimalarial drugs exist, the repeated emergence and spread of drug-resistant parasites limit their useful lifespan. An alternative strategy that could limit the evolution of drug-resistant parasites is to target host factors that are essential and universally required for parasite growth. Host-targeted therapeutics have been successfully applied in other infectious diseases but have never been attempted for malaria. Here, we report the development of a recombinant chimeric antibody (Ab-1) against basigin, an erythrocyte receptor necessary for parasite invasion as a putative antimalarial therapeutic. Ab-1 inhibited the PfRH5-basigin interaction and potently blocked erythrocyte invasion by all parasite strains tested. Importantly, Ab-1 rapidly cleared an established P. falciparum blood-stage infection with no overt toxicity in an in vivo infection model. Collectively, our data demonstrate that antibodies or other therapeutics targeting host basigin could be an effective treatment for patients infected with multi-drug resistant P. falciparum. PMID:26195724

  16. Plasmodium falciparum endoplasmic reticulum-resident calcium binding protein is a possible target of synthetic antimalarial endoperoxides, N-89 and N-251.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masayuki; Sanai, Hitomi; Hiramoto, Akiko; Sato, Akira; Hiraoka, Osamu; Sakura, Takaya; Kaneko, Osamu; Masuyama, Araki; Nojima, Masatomo; Wataya, Yusuke; Kim, Hye-Sook

    2012-12-07

    The endoperoxide artemisinin is a current first-line antimalarial and a critical component of the artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT) recommended by WHO for treatment of Plasmodium falciparum, the deadliest of malaria parasites. However, recent emergence of the artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum urged us to develop new antimalarial drugs. We have shown that synthetic endoperoxides N-89 and its hydroxyl derivative N-251 had high antimalarial activities both in vivo and in vitro. However, the mechanisms including the cellular targets of the endoperoxide antimalarials are not well understood. Thus, in this study, we employed chemical proteomics to survey potential molecular targets of endoperoxides by evaluating P. falciparum proteins capable to associate with endoperoxide structure (N-346, a carboxyamino derivative of N-89). We also analyzed the protein expression profiles of malaria parasites treated with N-89 or N-251 to explore possible changes associated with the drug action. From these experiments, we found that P. falciparum endoplasmic reticulum-resident calcium binding protein (PfERC) had high affinity to the endoperoxide structure (N-346) and was decreased by treatment with N-89 or N-251. PfERC is a member of CREC protein family, a potential disease marker and also a potential target for therapeutic intervention. We propose that the PfERC is a strong candidate of the endoperoxide antimalarial's target.

  17. Identification of β-Amino alcohol grafted 1,4,5 trisubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles as potent antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Devender, Nalmala; Gunjan, Sarika; Chhabra, Stuti; Singh, Kartikey; Pasam, Venkata Reddy; Shukla, Sanjeev K; Sharma, Abhisheak; Jaiswal, Swati; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Yogesh; Lal, Jawahar; Trivedi, Arun Kumar; Tripathi, Renu; Tripathi, Rama Pati

    2016-02-15

    In a quest to discover new drugs, we have synthesized a series of novel β-amino alcohol grafted 1,2,3-triazoles and screened them for their in vitro antiplasmodial and in vivo antimalarial activity. Among them, compounds 16 and 25 showed potent activity against chloroquine-sensitive (Pf3D7) strain with IC50 of 0.87 and 0.3 μM respectively, while compounds 7 and 13 exhibited better activity in vitro than the reference drug against chloroquine-resistance strain (PfK1) with IC50 of 0.5 μM each. Compound 25 showed 86.8% in vivo antimalarial efficacy with favorable pharmacokinetic parameters. Mechanistic studies divulged that potent compounds significantly boosted p53 protein levels to exhibit the antimalarial activity.

  18. Antimalarial activity of betulinic acid and derivatives in vitro against Plasmodium falciparum and in vivo in P. berghei-infected mice.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Matheus Santos; Costa, José Fernando Oliveira; Krettli, Antoniana Ursine; Zalis, Mariano Gustavo; Maia, Gabriela Lemos de Azevedo; Sette, Ivana Maria Fechine; Câmara, Celso de Amorim; Filho, José Maria Barbosa; Giulietti-Harley, Ana Maria; Ribeiro Dos Santos, Ricardo; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira

    2009-07-01

    Malaria is one of the most important tropical diseases and mainly affects populations living in developing countries. Reduced sensitivity of Plasmodium sp. to formerly recommended antimalarial drugs places an increasing burden on malaria control programs as well as on national health systems in endemic countries. The present study aims to evaluate the antimalarial activity of betulinic acid and its derivative compounds, betulonic acid, betulinic acid acetate, betulinic acid methyl ester, and betulinic acid methyl ester acetate. These substances showed antiplasmodial activity against chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum parasites in vitro, with IC(50) values of 9.89, 10.01, 5.99, 51.58, and 45.79 microM, respectively. Mice infected with Plasmodium berghei and treated with betulinic acid acetate had a dose-dependent reduction of parasitemia. Our results indicate that betulinic acid and its derivative compounds are candidates for the development of new antimalarial drugs.

  19. The Effect of Dosing Regimens on the Antimalarial Efficacy of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine: A Pooled Analysis of Individual Patient Data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) is increasingly recommended for antimalarial treatment in many endemic countries; however, concerns have been raised over its potential under dosing in young children. We investigated the influence of different dosing schedules on DP's clinical efficacy. Methods and Findings A systematic search of the literature was conducted to identify all studies published between 1960 and February 2013, in which patients were enrolled and treated with DP. Principal investigators were approached and invited to share individual patient data with the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN). Data were pooled using a standardised methodology. Univariable and multivariable risk factors for parasite recrudescence were identified using a Cox's regression model with shared frailty across the study sites. Twenty-four published and two unpublished studies (n = 7,072 patients) were included in the analysis. After correcting for reinfection by parasite genotyping, Kaplan–Meier survival estimates were 97.7% (95% CI 97.3%–98.1%) at day 42 and 97.2% (95% CI 96.7%–97.7%) at day 63. Overall 28.6% (979/3,429) of children aged 1 to 5 years received a total dose of piperaquine below 48 mg/kg (the lower limit recommended by WHO); this risk was 2.3–2.9-fold greater compared to that in the other age groups and was associated with reduced efficacy at day 63 (94.4% [95% CI 92.6%–96.2%], p<0.001). After adjusting for confounding factors, the mg/kg dose of piperaquine was found to be a significant predictor for recrudescence, the risk increasing by 13% (95% CI 5.0%–21%) for every 5 mg/kg decrease in dose; p = 0.002. In a multivariable model increasing the target minimum total dose of piperaquine in children aged 1 to 5 years old from 48 mg/kg to 59 mg/kg would halve the risk of treatment failure and cure at least 95% of patients; such an increment was not associated with gastrointestinal toxicity in the ten studies in which this

  20. Neural network estimate of seismic velocities and resistivity of rocks from electromagnetic and seismic sounding data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spichak, V. V.; Goidina, A. G.

    2016-05-01

    The neural network estimates of seismic P- and S-wave velocities from electrical resistivity of the rocks and, vice versa, resistivity estimates from seismic velocities are presented. It is shown that, depending on the ratio between the volumes of the known data and the data to be reconstructed, the accuracy of the estimates of the P- and S-wave velocities ranges within 1-4 and 4-6%, respectively. The logarithmic resistivity is estimated from seismic P- and S-velocities as accurately as up to 15-17%. In all cases, the biggest errors are obtained when the estimates are based on correlated data.

  1. Relationship between Pulmonary Airflow and Resistance in Patients with Airway Narrowing Using An 1-D Network Resistance and Compliance Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sanghun; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric; Lin, Ching-Long

    2016-11-01

    To predict the proper relationship between airway resistance and regional airflow, we proposed a novel 1-D network model for airway resistance and acinar compliance. First, we extracted 1-D skeletons at inspiration images, and generated 1-D trees of CT unresolved airways with a volume filling method. We used Horsfield order with random heterogeneity to create diameters of the generated 1-D trees. We employed a resistance model that accounts for kinetic energy and viscous dissipation (Model A). The resistance model is further coupled with a regional compliance model estimated from two static images (Model B). For validation, we applied both models to a healthy subject. The results showed that Model A failed to provide airflows consistent with air volume change, whereas Model B provided airflows consistent with air volume change. Since airflows shall be regionally consistent with air volume change in patients with normal airways, Model B was validated. Then, we applied Model B to severe asthmatic subjects. The results showed that regional airflows were significantly deviated from air volume change due to airway narrowing. This implies that airway resistance plays a major role in determining regional airflows of patients with airway narrowing. Support for this study was provided, in part, by NIH Grants U01 HL114494, R01 HL094315, R01 HL112986, and S10 RR022421.

  2. The analysis of HIV/AIDS drug-resistant on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maoxing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present an Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) drug-resistant model using an ordinary differential equation (ODE) model on scale-free networks. We derive the threshold for the epidemic to be zero in infinite scale-free network. We also prove the stability of disease-free equilibrium (DFE) and persistence of HIV/AIDS infection. The effects of two immunization schemes, including proportional scheme and targeted vaccination, are studied and compared. We find that targeted strategy compare favorably to a proportional condom using has prominent effect to control HIV/AIDS spread on scale-free networks.

  3. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks’ robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  4. Enhancement of the antimalarial efficacy of amodiaquine by chlorpheniramine in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sowunmi, Akintunde; Gbotosho, Grace O; Happi, Christian T; Adedeji, Ahmed A; Bolaji, Olayinka M; Fehintola, Fatai A; Fateye, Babasola A; Oduola, Ayoade M J

    2007-06-01

    Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum to amodiaquine (AQ) can be reversed in vitro with with antihistaminic and tricyclic antidepressant compounds, but its significance in vivo is unclear. The present report presents the enhancement of the antimalarial efficacy of AQ by chlorpheniramine, an H1 receptor antagonist that reverses chloroquine (CQ) resistance in vitro and enhances its efficacy in vivo, in five children who failed CQ and/or AQ treatment, and who were subsequently retreated and cured with a combination of AQ plus CP, despite the fact that parasites infecting the children harboured mutant pfcrtT76 and pfmdr1Y86 alleles associated with AQ resistance. This suggests a potential clinical application of the reversal phenomenon.

  5. Metabolism of 8-aminoquinoline antimalarial agents*

    PubMed Central

    Strother, A.; Fraser, I. M.; Allahyari, Reza; Tilton, B. E.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the most effective antimalarial agents are derivatives of 8-aminoquinoline. The metabolic products of many of these compounds appear to be toxic to the erythrocytes of certain human subjects, especially those deficient in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Although a number of studies have been conducted over many years, the metabolism of most of these compounds has not been determined. These studies are reviewed. Adult dogs dosed with tritium-labelled primaquine were observed to excrete approximately 16% of the injected radioactivity in the urine within 8 hours. Organic extracts of the urine were fractionated by thin-layer chromatography and the metabolic pattern obtained. Some primaquine was excreted along with at least five metabolites including 5-hydroxy-6-methoxy-8-(4-amino-1-methylbutylamino)quinoline (5HPQ) and a small amount of 6-hydroxy-8-(4-amino-1-methylbutylamino)quinoline (6HPQ). The 5HPQ could form a quinoneimine-type compound which may be a methaemoglobin-forming compound. This and other metabolites isolated from urine were found to be active methaemoglobin formers in in vitro studies. In vitro metabolism of primaquine by mouse liver enzymes also produced compounds capable of methaemoglobin formation. One of these had a blue colour when exposed to alkaline conditions, air, and light, and mass spectral data and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated a structure similar to a 5,6-dihydroxy derivative of primaquine. However, the chemical structure of the metabolite was not identified in these studies. PMID:6976849

  6. Interventions to improve the use of antimalarials in south-east Asia: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, M.; Wayling, S.; Pang, L.

    1998-01-01

    There are few drugs for malaria, and those which are available for use are subject to rapid development of resistance. Curiously, little effort has been made to improve drug use in malaria-endemic countries and to assess the benefits of such improvements. Advances can be made in public understanding of the value of ingesting a full regimen of antimalarials, in order to achieve complete cure, and in improving simple technologies (blister packaging) to achieve the same result. Better efforts can be made to reduce the availability of fake or substandard drugs in the marketplace. In this article, we describe the outcome of a concerted effort to improve drug compliance and drug quality in an area of multidrug resistance for malaria. These research efforts, guided by the Task Force for Improved Use of Antimalarials, characterized the problems in drug compliance in South-East Asia, and developed interventions to improve drug use in the various countries. Interventions involved drug packaging, public information campaigns, and assessments of drug quality. Results show that blister packaging worked best to improve drug compliance and that the increased cost of packaged medication did not limit its use. Drug quality was a major problem in unregulated countries and should be improved. PMID:9763718

  7. In vitro and in vivo anti-malarial activity of Boerhavia elegans and Solanum surattense

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need to identify new anti-malarial drug targets for both prophylaxis and chemotherapy, due to the increasing problem of drug resistance to malaria parasites. In the present study, the aim was to discover novel, effective plant-based extracts for the activity against malaria. Methods Ten plants found in Iran were selected by ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants. The crude ethanolic extracts were tested for in vitro anti-plasmodial activity against two strains of Plasmodium falciparum: K1 (chloroquine-resistant strain) and CY27 (chloroquine-sensitive strain), using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) assay. The anti-plasmodial activity of the extracts was also assessed in the 4-day suppressive anti-malarial assay in mice inoculated with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA strain). Crude ethanolic extracts showed good anti-plasmodial activity were further fractionated by partitioning in water and dichloromethane. Results Of 10 plant species assayed, three species: Boerhavia elegans (Choisy), Solanum surattense (Burm.f.) and Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) showed promising anti-plasmodial activity in vitro (IC50 ≤ 50 μg/ml) and in vivo with no toxicity. The dichloromethane fraction of three extracts revealed stronger anti-plasmodial activity than the total extracts. Conclusion Anti-plasmodial activities of extracts of B. elegans and S. surattense are reported for the first time. PMID:20462416

  8. Biological activities of nitidine, a potential anti-malarial lead compound

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nitidine is thought to be the main active ingredient in several traditional anti-malarial remedies used in different parts of the world. The widespread use of these therapies stresses the importance of studying this molecule in the context of malaria control. However, little is known about its potential as an anti-plasmodial drug, as well as its mechanism of action. Methods In this study, the anti-malarial potential of nitidine was evaluated in vitro on CQ-sensitive and -resistant strains. The nitidine's selectivity index compared with cancerous and non-cancerous cell lines was then determined. In vivo assays were then performed, using the four-day Peter's test methodology. To gain information about nitidine's possible mode of action, its moment of action on the parasite cell cycle was studied, and its localization inside the parasite was determined using confocal microscopy. The in vitro abilities of nitidine to bind haem and to inhibit β-haematin formation were also demonstrated. Results Nitidine showed similar in vitro activity in CQ-sensitive and resistant strains, and also a satisfying selectivity index (> 10) when compared with a non-cancerous cells line. Its in vivo activity was moderate; however, no sign of acute toxicity was observed during treatment. Nitidine's moment of action on the parasite cycle showed that it could not interfere with DNA replication; this was consistent with the observation that nitidine did not localize in the nucleus, but rather in the cytoplasm of the parasite. Nitidine was able to form a 1-1 complex with haem in vitro and also inhibited β-haematin formation with the same potency as chloroquine. Conclusion Nitidine can be considered a potential anti-malarial lead compound. Its ability to complex haem and inhibit β-haematin formation suggests a mechanism of action similar to that of chloroquine. The anti-malarial activity of nitidine could therefore be improved by structural modification of this molecule to increase

  9. Identification and Characterization of a Bacitracin Resistance Network in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chong; Shaaly, Aishath; Leslie, David J.; Weimar, Marion R.; Kalamorz, Falk; Carne, Alan; Cook, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance of Enterococcus faecalis against antimicrobial peptides, both of host origin and produced by other bacteria of the gut microflora, is likely to be an important factor in the bacterium's success as an intestinal commensal. The aim of this study was to identify proteins with a role in resistance against the model antimicrobial peptide bacitracin. Proteome analysis of bacitracin-treated and untreated cells showed that bacitracin stress induced the expression of cell wall-biosynthetic proteins and caused metabolic rearrangements. Among the proteins with increased production, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter with similarity to known peptide antibiotic resistance systems was identified and shown to mediate resistance against bacitracin. Expression of the transporter was dependent on a two-component regulatory system and a second ABC transporter, which were identified by genome analysis. Both resistance and the regulatory pathway could be functionally transferred to Bacillus subtilis, proving the function and sufficiency of these components for bacitracin resistance. Our data therefore show that the two ABC transporters and the two-component system form a resistance network against antimicrobial peptides in E. faecalis, where one transporter acts as the sensor that activates the TCS to induce production of the second transporter, which mediates the actual resistance. PMID:24342648

  10. Identification and characterization of a bacitracin resistance network in Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, Susanne; Fang, Chong; Shaaly, Aishath; Leslie, David J; Weimar, Marion R; Kalamorz, Falk; Carne, Alan; Cook, Gregory M

    2014-01-01

    Resistance of Enterococcus faecalis against antimicrobial peptides, both of host origin and produced by other bacteria of the gut microflora, is likely to be an important factor in the bacterium's success as an intestinal commensal. The aim of this study was to identify proteins with a role in resistance against the model antimicrobial peptide bacitracin. Proteome analysis of bacitracin-treated and untreated cells showed that bacitracin stress induced the expression of cell wall-biosynthetic proteins and caused metabolic rearrangements. Among the proteins with increased production, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter with similarity to known peptide antibiotic resistance systems was identified and shown to mediate resistance against bacitracin. Expression of the transporter was dependent on a two-component regulatory system and a second ABC transporter, which were identified by genome analysis. Both resistance and the regulatory pathway could be functionally transferred to Bacillus subtilis, proving the function and sufficiency of these components for bacitracin resistance. Our data therefore show that the two ABC transporters and the two-component system form a resistance network against antimicrobial peptides in E. faecalis, where one transporter acts as the sensor that activates the TCS to induce production of the second transporter, which mediates the actual resistance.

  11. Numerical design and optimization of hydraulic resistance and wall shear stress inside pressure-driven microfluidic networks.

    PubMed

    Damiri, Hazem Salim; Bardaweel, Hamzeh Khalid

    2015-11-07

    Microfluidic networks represent the milestone of microfluidic devices. Recent advancements in microfluidic technologies mandate complex designs where both hydraulic resistance and pressure drop across the microfluidic network are minimized, while wall shear stress is precisely mapped throughout the network. In this work, a combination of theoretical and modeling techniques is used to construct a microfluidic network that operates under minimum hydraulic resistance and minimum pressure drop while constraining wall shear stress throughout the network. The results show that in order to minimize the hydraulic resistance and pressure drop throughout the network while maintaining constant wall shear stress throughout the network, geometric and shape conditions related to the compactness and aspect ratio of the parent and daughter branches must be followed. Also, results suggest that while a "local" minimum hydraulic resistance can be achieved for a geometry with an arbitrary aspect ratio, a "global" minimum hydraulic resistance occurs only when the aspect ratio of that geometry is set to unity. Thus, it is concluded that square and equilateral triangular cross-sectional area microfluidic networks have the least resistance compared to all rectangular and isosceles triangular cross-sectional microfluidic networks, respectively. Precise control over wall shear stress through the bifurcations of the microfluidic network is demonstrated in this work. Three multi-generation microfluidic network designs are considered. In these three designs, wall shear stress in the microfluidic network is successfully kept constant, increased in the daughter-branch direction, or decreased in the daughter-branch direction, respectively. For the multi-generation microfluidic network with constant wall shear stress, the design guidelines presented in this work result in identical profiles of wall shear stresses not only within a single generation but also through all the generations of the

  12. Comparison of methods to determine point-to-point resistance in nearly rectangular networks with application to a ‘hammock’ network

    PubMed Central

    Essam, John W.; Izmailyan, Nikolay Sh.; Kenna, Ralph; Tan, Zhi-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Considerable progress has recently been made in the development of techniques to exactly determine two-point resistances in networks of various topologies. In particular, two types of method have emerged. One is based on potentials and the evaluation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Laplacian matrix associated with the network or its minors. The second method is based on a recurrence relation associated with the distribution of currents in the network. Here, these methods are compared and used to determine the resistance distances between any two nodes of a network with topology of a hammock. PMID:26064635

  13. High content live cell imaging for the discovery of new antimalarial marine natural products

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The human malaria parasite remains a burden in developing nations. It is responsible for up to one million deaths a year, a number that could rise due to increasing multi-drug resistance to all antimalarial drugs currently available. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the discovery of new drug therapies. Recently, our laboratory developed a simple one-step fluorescence-based live cell-imaging assay to integrate the complex biology of the human malaria parasite into drug discovery. Here we used our newly developed live cell-imaging platform to discover novel marine natural products and their cellular phenotypic effects against the most lethal malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Methods A high content live cell imaging platform was used to screen marine extracts effects on malaria. Parasites were grown in vitro in the presence of extracts, stained with RNA sensitive dye, and imaged at timed intervals with the BD Pathway HT automated confocal microscope. Results Image analysis validated our new methodology at a larger scale level and revealed potential antimalarial activity of selected extracts with a minimal cytotoxic effect on host red blood cells. To further validate our assay, we investigated parasite's phenotypes when incubated with the purified bioactive natural product bromophycolide A. We show that bromophycolide A has a strong and specific morphological effect on parasites, similar to the ones observed from the initial extracts. Conclusion Collectively, our results show that high-content live cell-imaging (HCLCI) can be used to screen chemical libraries and identify parasite specific inhibitors with limited host cytotoxic effects. All together we provide new leads for the discovery of novel antimalarials. PMID:22214291

  14. Antimalarial activity of phenylthiazolyl-bearing hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dow, Geoffrey S; Chen, Yufeng; Andrews, Katherine T; Caridha, Diana; Gerena, Lucia; Gettayacamin, Montip; Johnson, Jacob; Li, Qigui; Melendez, Victor; Obaldia, Nicanor; Tran, Thanh N; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2008-10-01

    The antimalarial activity and pharmacology of a series of phenylthiazolyl-bearing hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) was evaluated. In in vitro growth inhibition assays approximately 50 analogs were evaluated against four drug resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The range of 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) was 0.0005 to >1 microM. Five analogs exhibited IC(50)s of <3 nM, and three of these exhibited selectivity indices of >600. The most potent compound, WR301801 (YC-2-88) was shown to cause hyperacetylation of P. falciparum histones, which is a marker for HDAC inhibition in eukaryotic cells. The compound also inhibited malarial and mammalian HDAC activity in functional assays at low nanomolar concentrations. WR301801 did not exhibit cures in P. berghei-infected mice at oral doses as high as 640 mg/kg/day for 3 days or in P. falciparum-infected Aotus lemurinus lemurinus monkeys at oral doses of 32 mg/kg/day for 3 days, despite high relative bioavailability. The failure of monotherapy in mice may be due to a short half-life, since the compound was rapidly hydrolyzed to an inactive acid metabolite by loss of its hydroxamate group in vitro (half-life of 11 min in mouse microsomes) and in vivo (half-life in mice of 3.5 h after a single oral dose of 50 mg/kg). However, WR301801 exhibited cures in P. berghei-infected mice when combined at doses of 52 mg/kg/day orally with subcurative doses of chloroquine. Next-generation HDACIs with greater metabolic stability than WR301801 may be useful as antimalarials if combined appropriately with conventional antimalarial drugs.

  15. Antimalarial efficacy of Albizia lebbeck (Leguminosae) against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro & P. berghei in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Shagun; Walter, Neha Sylvia; Bagai, Upma

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Albizia lebbeck Benth. (Leguminosae) has long been used in Indian traditional medicine. The current study was designed to test antimalarial activity of ethanolic bark extract of A. lebbeck (EBEAL). Methods: EBEAL was prepared by soxhlet extraction and subjected to phytochemical analysis. The extract was evaluated for its in vitro antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine (CQ) sensitive (MRC2) and CQ resistant (RKL9) strains. Cytotoxicity (CC50) of extract against HeLa cells was evaluated. Median lethal dose (LD50) was determined to assess safety of EBEAL in BALB/c mice. Schizonticidal (100-1000 mg/kg) and preventive (100-750 mg/kg) activities of EBEAL were evaluated against P. berghei. Curative activity (100-750 mg/kg) of extract was also evaluated. Results: Phytochemical screening revealed presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, phenols, saponins, terpenes and phytosterols. The extract exhibited IC50 of 8.2 μg/ml (MRC2) and 5.1 μg/ml (RKL9). CC50 of extract on HeLa cell line was calculated to be >1000 μg/ml. EBEAL showed selectivity indices (SI) of >121.9 and >196.07 against MRC2 and RKL9 strains of P. falciparum, respectively. LD50 of EBEAL was observed to be >5 g/kg. Dose-dependent chemosuppression was observed with significant (P<0.001) schizonticidal activity at 1000 mg/kg with ED50 >100 mg/kg. Significant (P<0.001) curative and repository activities were exhibited by 750 mg/kg concentration of extract on D7. Interpretation & conclusions: The present investigation reports antiplasmodial efficacy of EBEAL in vitro against P. falciparum as evident by high SI values. ED50 of <100 mg/kg against P. berghei categorizes EBEAL as active antimalarial. Further studies need to be done to exploit its antiplasmodial activity further. PMID:26905234

  16. Diversity-oriented synthesis yields novel multistage antimalarial inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kato, Nobutaka; Comer, Eamon; Sakata-Kato, Tomoyo; Sharma, Arvind; Sharma, Manmohan; Maetani, Micah; Bastien, Jessica; Brancucci, Nicolas M; Bittker, Joshua A; Corey, Victoria; Clarke, David; Derbyshire, Emily R; Dornan, Gillian L; Duffy, Sandra; Eckley, Sean; Itoe, Maurice A; Koolen, Karin M J; Lewis, Timothy A; Lui, Ping S; Lukens, Amanda K; Lund, Emily; March, Sandra; Meibalan, Elamaran; Meier, Bennett C; McPhail, Jacob A; Mitasev, Branko; Moss, Eli L; Sayes, Morgane; Van Gessel, Yvonne; Wawer, Mathias J; Yoshinaga, Takashi; Zeeman, Anne-Marie; Avery, Vicky M; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Burke, John E; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Clardy, Jon C; Clemons, Paul A; Dechering, Koen J; Duvall, Jeremy R; Foley, Michael A; Gusovsky, Fabian; Kocken, Clemens H M; Marti, Matthias; Morningstar, Marshall L; Munoz, Benito; Neafsey, Daniel E; Sharma, Amit; Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Wirth, Dyann F; Scherer, Christina A; Schreiber, Stuart L

    2016-10-20

    Antimalarial drugs have thus far been chiefly derived from two sources-natural products and synthetic drug-like compounds. Here we investigate whether antimalarial agents with novel mechanisms of action could be discovered using a diverse collection of synthetic compounds that have three-dimensional features reminiscent of natural products and are underrepresented in typical screening collections. We report the identification of such compounds with both previously reported and undescribed mechanisms of action, including a series of bicyclic azetidines that inhibit a new antimalarial target, phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase. These molecules are curative in mice at a single, low dose and show activity against all parasite life stages in multiple in vivo efficacy models. Our findings identify bicyclic azetidines with the potential to both cure and prevent transmission of the disease as well as protect at-risk populations with a single oral dose, highlighting the strength of diversity-oriented synthesis in revealing promising therapeutic targets.

  17. Synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and mode-of-action studies of antimalarial reversed chloroquine compounds.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Steven J; Kelly, Jane X; Shomloo, Shawheen; Wittlin, Sergio; Brun, Reto; Liebmann, Katherine; Peyton, David H

    2010-09-09

    We have previously shown that a "reversed chloroquine (RCQ)" molecule, composed of a chloroquine-like moiety and a resistance reversal-like moiety, can overcome chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum ( Burgess , S. J. ; Selzer , A. ; Kelly , J. X. ; Smilkstein , M. J. ; Riscoe , M. K. ; Peyton , D. H. J. Med. Chem. 2006 , 49 , 5623 . Andrews , S. ; Burgess , S. J. ; Skaalrud , D. ; Kelly , J. X. ; Peyton , D. H. J. Med. Chem. 2010 , 53 , 916 ). Here, we present an investigation into the structure-activity relationship of the RCQ structures, resulting in an orally active molecule with good in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activity. We also present evidence of the mode of action, indicating that the RCQ molecules inhibit hemozoin formation in the parasite's digestive vacuole in a manner similar to that of chloroquine.

  18. Medical need, scientific opportunity and the drive for antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Ridley, Robert G

    2002-02-07

    Continued and sustainable improvements in antimalarial medicines through focused research and development are essential for the world's future ability to treat and control malaria. Unfortunately, malaria is a disease of poverty, and despite a wealth of scientific knowledge there is insufficient market incentive to generate the competitive, business-driven industrial antimalarial drug research and development that is normally needed to deliver new products. Mechanisms of partnering with industry have been established to overcome this obstacle and to open up and build on scientific opportunities for improved chemotherapy in the future.

  19. Antimalarial activity of physalins B, D, F, and G.

    PubMed

    Sá, Matheus S; de Menezes, Maria N; Krettli, Antoniana U; Ribeiro, Ivone M; Tomassini, Therezinha C B; Ribeiro dos Santos, Ricardo; de Azevedo, Walter F; Soares, Milena B P

    2011-10-28

    The antimalarial activities of physalins B, D, F, and G (1-4), isolated from Physalis angulata, were investigated. In silico analysis using the similarity ensemble approach (SEA) database predicted the antimalarial activity of each of these compounds, which were shown using an in vitro assay against Plasmodium falciparum. However, treatment of P. berghei-infected mice with 3 increased parasitemia levels and mortality, whereas treatment with 2 was protective, causing a parasitemia reduction and a delay in mortality in P. berghei-infected mice. The exacerbation of in vivo infection by treatment with 3 is probably due to its potent immunosuppressive activity, which is not evident for 2.

  20. Synthesis of a potent new antimalarial through natural products conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Michela; Trucchi, Beatrice; Monti, Diego; Romeo, Sergio; Kaiser, Marcel; Verotta, Luisella

    2013-01-01

    Three natural products have been assembled to obtain a new antimalarial hit. (+)-Usnic acid was used as scaffold to design and synthesize new products, that were tested on asexual development for P. falciparum and P. berghei. Among them, the ester of (+)-usnic acid-4-aminobutyric acid 14 with dihydroartemisinin shows considerable in vivo antimalarial activity against P. berghei in mice, similar to the synthetic drug artesunate. Compound 14 behaves as a delivery system for dihydroartemisinin and combine the effects of the endoperoxide with the redox properties of the phenolic portions of (+)-usnic acid. PMID:23307699

  1. Targeting the Plasmodium vivax equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (PvENT1) for antimalarial drug development

    PubMed Central

    Deniskin, Roman; Frame, I.J.; Sosa, Yvett; Akabas, Myles H.

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Plasmodium falciparum and vivax cause most cases of malaria. Emerging resistance to current antimalarial medications makes new drug development imperative. Ideally a new antimalarial drug should treat both falciparum and vivax malaria. Because malaria parasites are purine auxotrophic, they rely on purines imported from the host erythrocyte via Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters (ENTs). Thus, the purine import transporters represent a potential target for antimalarial drug development. For falciparum parasites the primary purine transporter is the P. falciparum Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter Type 1 (PfENT1). Recently we identified potent PfENT1 inhibitors with nanomolar IC50 values using a robust, yeast-based high throughput screening assay. In the current work we characterized the Plasmodium vivax ENT1 (PvENT1) homologue and its sensitivity to the PfENT1 inhibitors. We expressed a yeast codon-optimized PvENT1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PvENT1-expressing yeast imported both purines ([3H]adenosine) and pyrimidines ([3H]uridine), whereas wild type (fui1Δ) yeast did not. Based on radiolabel substrate uptake inhibition experiments, inosine had the lowest IC50 (3.8 μM), compared to guanosine (14.9 μM) and adenosine (142 μM). For pyrimidines, thymidine had an IC50 of 183 μM (vs. cytidine and uridine; mM range). IC50 values were higher for nucleobases compared to the corresponding nucleosides; hypoxanthine had a 25-fold higher IC50 than inosine. The archetypal human ENT1 inhibitor 4-nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR) had no effect on PvENT1, whereas dipyridamole inhibited PvENT1, albeit with a 40 μM IC50, a 1000-fold less sensitive than human ENT1 (hENT1). The PfENT1 inhibitors blocked transport activity of PvENT1 and the five known naturally occurring non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with similar IC50 values. Thus, the PfENT1 inhibitors also target PvENT1. This implies that development of novel antimalarial drugs

  2. Resistance between two nodes in general position on an m ×n fan network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essam, J. W.; Tan, Zhi-Zhong; Wu, F. Y.

    2014-09-01

    The resistance between two nodes in general position on a fan network with n radial lines and m transverse lines is determined. Also a similar result of Izmailian, Kenna, and Wu [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 47, 035003 (2014), 10.1088/1751-8113/47/3/035003] for an m ×n cobweb network is reproduced, but the method used here is significantly different. It avoids the use of the Kirchhoff matrix, requires the solution of just one instead of two eigenvalue problems, and results directly in only a single summation. Further, the current distribution is given explicitly as a byproduct of the method. The method is the same as that used by Tan, Zhou, and Yang [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 46, 195202 (2013), 10.1088/1751-8113/46/19/195202] to find the cobweb resistance between center and perimeter for 1≤m≤3 and general n. Proof of their conjecture for general m is discussed.

  3. Reprint of: Four-terminal resistances in mesoscopic networks of metallic wires: Weak localisation and correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Texier, Christophe; Montambaux, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    We consider the electronic transport in multi-terminal mesoscopic networks of weakly disordered metallic wires. After a brief description of the classical transport, we analyse the weak localisation (WL) correction to the four-terminal resistances, which involves an integration of the Cooperon over the wires with proper weights. We provide an interpretation of these weights in terms of classical transport properties. We illustrate the formalism on examples and show that weak localisation to four-terminal conductances may become large in some situations. In a second part, we study the correlations of four-terminal resistances and show that integration of Diffuson and Cooperon inside the network involves the same weights as the WL. The formulae are applied to multiconnected wire geometries.

  4. Four-terminal resistances in mesoscopic networks of metallic wires: Weak localisation and correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Texier, Christophe; Montambaux, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    We consider the electronic transport in multi-terminal mesoscopic networks of weakly disordered metallic wires. After a brief description of the classical transport, we analyse the weak localisation (WL) correction to the four-terminal resistances, which involves an integration of the Cooperon over the wires with proper weights. We provide an interpretation of these weights in terms of classical transport properties. We illustrate the formalism on examples and show that weak localisation to four-terminal conductances may become large in some situations. In a second part, we study the correlations of four-terminal resistances and show that integration of Diffuson and Cooperon inside the network involves the same weights as the WL. The formulae are applied to multiconnected wire geometries.

  5. Semi-interpenetrating polymer network for tougher and more microcracking resistant high temperature polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This invention is a semi-interpenetrating polymer network which includes a high performance thermosetting polyimide having a nadic end group acting as a crosslinking site and a high performance linear thermoplastic polyimide. An improved high temperature matrix resin is provided which is capable of performing at 316 C in air for several hundreds of hours. This resin has significantly improved toughness and microcracking resistance, excellent processability and mechanical performance, and cost effectiveness.

  6. Characterization of noncovalent complexes of antimalarial agents of the artemisinin-type and FE(III)-heme by electrospray mass spectrometry and collisional activation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pashynska, Vlada A; Van den Heuvel, Hilde; Claeys, Magda; Kosevich, Marina V

    2004-08-01

    In this study, we demonstrate, using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/CID/MS), that stable noncovalent complexes can be formed between Fe(III)-heme and antimalarial agents, i.e., quinine, artemisinin, and the artemisinin derivatives, dihydroartemisinin, alpha- and beta-artemether, and beta-arteether. Differences in the binding behavior of the examined drugs with Fe(III)-heme and the stability of the drug-heme complexes are demonstrated. The results show that all tested antimalarial agents form a drug-heme complex with a 1:1 stoichiometry but that quinine also results in a second complex with the heme dimer. ESI-MS performed on mixtures of pairs of various antimalarial agents with heme indicate that quinine binds preferentially to Fe(III)-heme, while ESI-MS/CID/MS shows that the quinine-heme complex is nearly two times more stable than the complexes formed between heme and artemisinin or its derivatives. Moreover, it is found that dihydroartemisinin, the active metabolite of the artemisinin-type drugs in vivo, results in a Na(+)-containing heme-drug complex, which is as stable as the heme-quinine complex. The efficiency of drug-heme binding of artemisinin derivatives is generally lower and the decomposition under CID higher compared with quinine, but these parameters are within the same order of magnitude. These results suggest that the efficiency of antimalarial agents of the artemisinin-type to form noncovalent complexes with Fe(III)-heme is comparable with that of the traditional antimalarial agent, quinine. Our study illustrates that electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry are suitable tools to probe noncovalent interactions between heme and antimalarial agents. The results obtained provide insights into the underlying molecular modes of action of the traditional antimalarial agent quinine and of the antimalarials of

  7. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as an antimalarial drug target using an integrated chemical biology approach.

    PubMed

    Wright, Megan H; Clough, Barbara; Rackham, Mark D; Rangachari, Kaveri; Brannigan, James A; Grainger, Munira; Moss, David K; Bottrill, Andrew R; Heal, William P; Broncel, Malgorzata; Serwa, Remigiusz A; Brady, Declan; Mann, David J; Leatherbarrow, Robin J; Tewari, Rita; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Holder, Anthony A; Tate, Edward W

    2014-02-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium, which leads to approximately one million deaths per annum worldwide. Chemical validation of new antimalarial targets is urgently required in view of rising resistance to current drugs. One such putative target is the enzyme N-myristoyltransferase, which catalyses the attachment of the fatty acid myristate to protein substrates (N-myristoylation). Here, we report an integrated chemical biology approach to explore protein myristoylation in the major human parasite P. falciparum, combining chemical proteomic tools for identification of the myristoylated and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteome with selective small-molecule N-myristoyltransferase inhibitors. We demonstrate that N-myristoyltransferase is an essential and chemically tractable target in malaria parasites both in vitro and in vivo, and show that selective inhibition of N-myristoylation leads to catastrophic and irreversible failure to assemble the inner membrane complex, a critical subcellular organelle in the parasite life cycle. Our studies provide the basis for the development of new antimalarials targeting N-myristoyltransferase.

  8. In vitro metabolism of phenoxypropoxybiguanide analogues in human liver microsomes to potent antimalarial dihydrotriazines.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Todd W; Kozar, Michael P; O'Neil, Michael T; Smith, Philip L; Schiehser, Guy A; Jacobus, David P; Diaz, Damaris S; Yang, Young-Sun; Milhous, Wilbur K; Skillman, Donald R

    2005-04-21

    Phenoxypropoxybiguanides, such as 1 (PS-15), are prodrugs analogous to the relationship of proguanil and its active metabolite cycloguanil. Unlike cycloguanil, however, 1a (WR99210), the active metabolite of 1, has retained in vitro potency against newly emerging antifolate-resistant malaria parasites. Unfortunately, manufacturing processes and gastrointestinal intolerance have prevented the clinical development of 1. In vitro antimalarial activity and in vitro metabolism studies have been performed on newly synthesized phenoxypropoxybiguanide analogues. All of the active dihydrotriazine metabolites exhibited potent antimalarial activity with in vitro IC(50) values less than 0.04 ng/mL. In vitro metabolism studies in human liver microsomes identified the production of not only the active dihydrotriazine metabolite, but also a desalkylation on the carbonyl chain, and multiple hydroxylated metabolites. The V(max) for production of the active metabolites ranged from 10.8 to 27.7 pmol/min/mg protein with the K(m) ranging from 44.8 to 221 microM. The results of these studies will be used to guide the selection of a lead candidate.

  9. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as an antimalarial drug target using an integrated chemical biology approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Megan H.; Clough, Barbara; Rackham, Mark D.; Rangachari, Kaveri; Brannigan, James A.; Grainger, Munira; Moss, David K.; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Heal, William P.; Broncel, Malgorzata; Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Brady, Declan; Mann, David J.; Leatherbarrow, Robin J.; Tewari, Rita; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Holder, Anthony A.; Tate, Edward W.

    2014-02-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium, which leads to approximately one million deaths per annum worldwide. Chemical validation of new antimalarial targets is urgently required in view of rising resistance to current drugs. One such putative target is the enzyme N-myristoyltransferase, which catalyses the attachment of the fatty acid myristate to protein substrates (N-myristoylation). Here, we report an integrated chemical biology approach to explore protein myristoylation in the major human parasite P. falciparum, combining chemical proteomic tools for identification of the myristoylated and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteome with selective small-molecule N-myristoyltransferase inhibitors. We demonstrate that N-myristoyltransferase is an essential and chemically tractable target in malaria parasites both in vitro and in vivo, and show that selective inhibition of N-myristoylation leads to catastrophic and irreversible failure to assemble the inner membrane complex, a critical subcellular organelle in the parasite life cycle. Our studies provide the basis for the development of new antimalarials targeting N-myristoyltransferase.

  10. An Alternative Paradigm for the Role of Antimalarial Plants in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Maranz, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Most investigations into the antimalarial activity of African plants are centered on finding an indigenous equivalent to artemisinin, the compound from which current frontline antimalarial drugs are synthesized. As a consequence, the standard practice in ethnopharmacological research is to use in vitro assays to identify compounds that inhibit parasites at nanomolar concentrations. This approach fails to take into consideration the high probability of acquisition of resistance to parasiticidal compounds since parasite populations are placed under direct selection for genetic that confers a survival advantage. Bearing in mind Africa's long exposure to malaria and extensive ethnobotanical experimentation with both therapies and diet, it is more likely that compounds not readily overcome by Plasmodium parasites would have been retained in the pharmacopeia and cuisine. Such compounds are characterized by acting primarily on the host rather than directly targeting the parasite and thus cannot be adequately explored in vitro. If Africa's long history with malaria has in fact produced effective plant therapies, their scientific elucidation will require a major emphasis on in vivo investigation. PMID:22593717

  11. Toxicity and side-effects of antimalarials in Africa: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Salako, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    Notwithstanding the presence of resistance to chloroquine in some parts of Africa, this drug is still the most widely used antimalarial in the continent. One adverse reaction of chloroquine that has an important bearing on its use is pruritus. The risk of increasing the incidence of ocular toxicity through prolonged use of chloroquine for prophylaxis must be borne in mind by physicians. Another antimalarial that is likely to be used in increasing amounts in Africa is pyrimethamine—sulfadoxine. With prolonged use of this combination for prophylaxis, the adverse reactions usually associated with the long-acting sulfonamides are possible. Genetic abnormalities may also play a part in the incidence and severity of adverse reactions to certain drugs, e.g., primaquine and quinine. Most of the common adverse reactions are mild and have little or no influence on the acceptability and utilization of the drugs, with the exception of chloroquine-induced pruritus. Studies to define the precise epidemiology and pathophysiology of this reaction are urgently needed. PMID:6335683

  12. A Pharmacokinetic Study of Antimalarial 3,5-Diaryl-2-aminopyridine Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Dambuza, Ntokozo; Smith, Peter; Evans, Alicia; Taylor, Dale; Chibale, Kelly; Wiesner, Lubbe

    2015-01-01

    Malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for approximately 80% of the incidence and 90% of deaths which occur in the World Health Organization (WHO) African region, with children and pregnant women having the highest incidence. P. falciparum has developed resistance, and therefore new effective candidate antimalarial drugs need to be developed. Previous studies identified 3,5-diaryl-2-aminopyridines as potential antimalarial drug candidates; therefore, derivatives of these compounds were synthesized in order to improve their desired properties and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of the derivatives were investigated in a mouse model which was dosed orally and intravenously. Collected blood samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS). The mean peak plasma level of 1.9 μM was obtained at 1 hour for compound 1 and 3.3 μM at 0.5 hours for compound 2. A decline in concentration was observed with a half-life of 2.53 and 0.87 hours for compound 1 in mice dosed orally and intravenously, respectively. For compound 2 a half-life of 2.96 and 0.68 hours was recorded. The bioavailability was 69% and 59.7% for compound 1 and compound 2, respectively. PMID:25893131

  13. Discovery and Characterization of ACT-451840: an Antimalarial Drug with a Novel Mechanism of Action.

    PubMed

    Boss, Christoph; Aissaoui, Hamed; Amaral, Nathalie; Bauer, Aude; Bazire, Stephanie; Binkert, Christoph; Brun, Reto; Bürki, Cédric; Ciana, Claire-Lise; Corminboeuf, Olivier; Delahaye, Stephane; Dollinger, Claire; Fischli, Christoph; Fischli, Walter; Flock, Alexandre; Frantz, Marie-Céline; Girault, Malory; Grisostomi, Corinna; Friedli, Astrid; Heidmann, Bibia; Hinder, Claire; Jacob, Gael; Le Bihan, Amelie; Malrieu, Sophie; Mamzed, Saskia; Merot, Aurelien; Meyer, Solange; Peixoto, Sabrina; Petit, Nolwenn; Siegrist, Romain; Trollux, Julien; Weller, Thomas; Wittlin, Sergio

    2016-09-20

    More than 40 % of the world's population is at risk of being infected with malaria. Most malaria cases occur in the countries of sub-Saharan Africa, Central and South America, and Asia. Resistance to standard therapy, including artemisinin combinations, is increasing. There is an urgent need for novel antimalarials with new mechanisms of action. In a phenotypic screen, we identified a series of phenylalanine-based compounds that exhibit antimalarial activity via a new and yet unknown mechanism of action. Our optimization efforts culminated in the selection of ACT-451840 [(S,E)-N-(4-(4-acetylpiperazin-1-yl)benzyl)-3-(4-(tert-butyl)phenyl)-N-(1-(4-(4-cyanobenzyl)piperazin-1-yl)-1-oxo-3-phenylpropan-2-yl)acrylamide] for clinical development. Herein we describe our optimization efforts from the screening hit to the potential drug candidate with respect to antiparasitic activity, drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) properties, and in vivo pharmacological efficacy.

  14. Natural polyhydroxyalkanoate-gold nanocomposite based biosensor for detection of antimalarial drug artemisinin.

    PubMed

    Phukon, Pinkee; Radhapyari, Keisham; Konwar, Bolin Kumar; Khan, Raju

    2014-04-01

    The worrisome trend of antimalarial resistance has already highlighted the importance of artemisinin as a potent antimalarial agent. The current investigation aimed at fabricating a biosensor based on natural polymer polyhydroxyalkanoate-gold nanoparticle composite mounting on an indium-tin oxide glass plate for the analysis of artemisinin. The biosensor was fabricated using an adsorbing horse-radish peroxidase enzyme on the electrode surface for which cyclic voltammetry was used to monitor the electro-catalytic reduction of artemisinin under diffusion controlled conditions. Electrochemical interfacial properties and immobilization of enzyme onto a polyhydroxyalkanoate-gold nanoparticle film were evaluated, and confirmed by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The differential pulse voltammetric peak current for artemisinin was increased linearly (concentration range of 0.01-0.08μg mL(-1)) with sensitivity of 0.26μAμg mL(-1). The greater sensitivity of the fabricated biosensor to artemisinin (optimum limits of detection were 0.0035μg mL(-1) and 0.0036μg mL(-1) in bulk and spiked human serum, respectively) could be of much aid in medical diagnosis.

  15. Genotoxic evaluation of the antimalarial drug, fansidar, in cultured human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Abou-Eisha, A; Afifi, M

    2004-09-01

    Fansidar (pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine) has been used extensively worldwide for the treatment of chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria, toxoplasmosis and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Because of the wide usage of pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine in developing countries and the lake of information from open literature and reports from manufacturers about the genotoxicity of such antimalarial drug, the present work was suggested. The possible genetic toxicity of fansidar has been evaluated in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. The frequencies of sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE) and micronuclei (MN) were scored as genetic endpoints. Both tests covering a wide range of induced genetic damage as primary DNA damage, clastogenicity and aneugenicity. Cultures were set up by using blood samples from two healthy donors and the treatment was done using different fansidar concentrations ranging from 1:20 to 10:200 microg/ml. From our results, it appears that this drug is able to induce moderate genotoxic effects, as revealed by the increases found in SCE and MN frequencies in cultures from the two donors at the two highest concentrations tested (5:100 and 10:200 microg/ml). In addition, cyotoxic/cytostatic effects of fansidar were revealed by a decrease in the proliferative rate index (PRI) and in the cytokinesis block proliferation index (CBPI). Our findings suggest that the use of this drug should be restricted to situations where other antimalarial drugs cannot be used. The drug should never be given to pregnant women.

  16. Investigation of Indolglyoxamide and Indolacetamide Analogues of Polyamines as Antimalarial and Antitrypanosomal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiayi; Kaiser, Marcel; Copp, Brent R.

    2014-01-01

    Pure compound screening has previously identified the indolglyoxylamidospermidine ascidian metabolites didemnidine A and B (2 and 3) to be weak growth inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (IC50 59 and 44 μM, respectively) and Plasmodium falciparum (K1 dual drug resistant strain) (IC50 41 and 15 μM, respectively), but lacking in selectivity (L6 rat myoblast, IC50 24 μM and 25 μM, respectively). To expand the structure–activity relationship of this compound class towards both parasites, we have prepared and biologically tested a library of analogues that includes indoleglyoxyl and indoleacetic “capping acids”, and polyamines including spermine (PA3-4-3) and extended analogues PA3-8-3 and PA3-12-3. 7-Methoxy substituted indoleglyoxylamides were typically found to exhibit the most potent antimalarial activity (IC50 10–92 nM) but with varying degrees of selectivity versus the L6 rat myoblast cell line. A 6-methoxyindolglyoxylamide analogue was the most potent growth inhibitor of T. brucei (IC50 0.18 μM) identified in the study: it, however, also exhibited poor selectivity (L6 IC50 6.0 μM). There was no apparent correlation between antimalarial and anti-T. brucei activity in the series. In vivo evaluation of one analogue against Plasmodium berghei was undertaken, demonstrating a modest 20.9% reduction in parasitaemia. PMID:24879541

  17. Influence of amodiaquine on the antimalarial activity of ellagic acid: crystallographic and biological studies.

    PubMed

    Żesławska, Ewa; Oleksyn, Barbara; Fabre, Aude; Benoit-Vical, Françoise

    2014-12-01

    In the search for new antimalarial drugs, design of hybrid molecules is recommended to improve biological activity and to decrease the risk of parasite resistance development. Ellagic acid, as an inhibitor of Plasmodium glutathione, presents an original mode of action and thus appears as a promising antiplasmodial compound. A new complex (AQ-EA) consisting of the well-known antimalarial drug, amodiaquine, and ellagic acid was obtained. The studied crystal structure of AQ-EA showed that the triclinic centrosymmetrical unit cell of the crystal contains two molecules of amodiaquine (AQ) and two symmetrically independent molecules of ellagic acid (EA). The packing of the molecules in the crystal is dominated by hydrogen bonds between AQ and EA. The antiplasmodial activity of the hybrid complex AQ-EA was also determined and compared with the values of IC50 for AQ and EA separately. Potentiation assays between both molecules were conducted to understand the pharmacological interactions between AQ and EA against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro. The hybrid complex AQ-EA (IC50 of 47 nm) showed improved antiplasmodial activity in comparison with EA alone.

  18. Mimicking the intramolecular hydrogen bond: synthesis, biological evaluation, and molecular modeling of benzoxazines and quinazolines as potential antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Gemma, Sandra; Camodeca, Caterina; Brindisi, Margherita; Brogi, Simone; Kukreja, Gagan; Kunjir, Sanil; Gabellieri, Emanuele; Lucantoni, Leonardo; Habluetzel, Annette; Taramelli, Donatella; Basilico, Nicoletta; Gualdani, Roberta; Tadini-Buoninsegni, Francesco; Bartolommei, Gianluca; Moncelli, Maria Rosa; Martin, Rowena E; Summers, Robert L; Lamponi, Stefania; Savini, Luisa; Fiorini, Isabella; Valoti, Massimo; Novellino, Ettore; Campiani, Giuseppe; Butini, Stefania

    2012-12-13

    The intramolecular hydrogen bond formed between a protonated amine and a neighboring H-bond acceptor group in the side chain of amodiaquine and isoquine is thought to play an important role in their antimalarial activities. Here we describe isoquine-based compounds in which the intramolecular H-bond is mimicked by a methylene linker. The antimalarial activities of the resulting benzoxazines, their isosteric tetrahydroquinazoline derivatives, and febrifugine-based 1,3-quinazolin-4-ones were examined in vitro (against Plasmodium falciparum ) and in vivo (against Plasmodium berghei ). Compounds 6b,c caused modest inhibition of chloroquine transport via the parasite's "chloroquine resistance transporter" (PfCRT) in a Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system. In silico predictions and experimental evaluation of selected drug-like properties were also performed on compounds 6b,c. Compound 6c emerged from this work as the most promising analogue of the series; it possessed low toxicity and good antimalarial activity when administered orally to P. berghei -infected mice.

  19. New heterocyclic hybrids of pyrazole and its bioisosteres: design, synthesis and biological evaluation as dual acting antimalarial-antileishmanial agents.

    PubMed

    Bekhit, Adnan A; Hassan, Ahmed M M; Abd El Razik, Heba A; El-Miligy, Mostafa M M; El-Agroudy, Eman J; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A

    2015-04-13

    A new series of pyrazole derivatives were synthesized by hybridization with five-membered heterocyclic moieties such as thiazoles, thiazolidinones, 1,3,4-thiadiazoles and pyrazolines. The compounds were evaluated for their in vivo antimalarial activity against Plasmodium berghei infected mice and the most active derivatives were further examined for their in vitro antimalarial activity against chloroquine resistant (RKL9) strain of Plasmodium falciparum. Compounds 2c, 2d, 4b, 4c, 4d, 5a, 6c, 8c and 9b had more than 90% parasite suppression activity of that found with the antimalarial reference standard drug, chloroquine phosphate and had lower IC50 values than chloroquine. Compounds 4b and 9b were the most active derivatives, and their activities were 5-fold higher than chloroquine. All the newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antileishmanial activity against Leishmania aethiopica promastigotes and amastigote. The results showed that compounds 2c, 2d, 3d, 4b, 4c, 4d and 5a had lower or similar IC50 values than the reference standard drugs, amphotericin B and miltefosine. Compound 3d had the highest antileishmanial activity. Collectively, compounds 2c, 2d, 4b, 4c, 4d and 5a exhibited dual activity against malaria and leishmaniasis and were safe and well tolerated by the experimental animals orally up to 300 mg/kg and parenterally up to 100 mg/kg.

  20. Antibiotic treatment expands the resistance reservoir and ecological network of the phage metagenome.

    PubMed

    Modi, Sheetal R; Lee, Henry H; Spina, Catherine S; Collins, James J

    2013-07-11

    The mammalian gut ecosystem has considerable influence on host physiology, but the mechanisms that sustain this complex environment in the face of different stresses remain obscure. Perturbations to the gut ecosystem, such as through antibiotic treatment or diet, are at present interpreted at the level of bacterial phylogeny. Less is known about the contributions of the abundant population of phages to this ecological network. Here we explore the phageome as a potential genetic reservoir for bacterial adaptation by sequencing murine faecal phage populations following antibiotic perturbation. We show that antibiotic treatment leads to the enrichment of phage-encoded genes that confer resistance via disparate mechanisms to the administered drug, as well as genes that confer resistance to antibiotics unrelated to the administered drug, and we demonstrate experimentally that phages from treated mice provide aerobically cultured naive microbiota with increased resistance. Systems-wide analyses uncovered post-treatment phage-encoded processes related to host colonization and growth adaptation, indicating that the phageome becomes broadly enriched for functionally beneficial genes under stress-related conditions. We also show that antibiotic treatment expands the interactions between phage and bacterial species, leading to a more highly connected phage-bacterial network for gene exchange. Our work implicates the phageome in the emergence of multidrug resistance, and indicates that the adaptive capacity of the phageome may represent a community-based mechanism for protecting the gut microflora, preserving its functional robustness during antibiotic stress.

  1. Antimalarial properties of SAABMAL®: an ethnomedicinal polyherbal formulation for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria infection in the tropics

    PubMed Central

    Obidike, I.C.; Amodu, B.; Emeje, M.O.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Malaria is a serious problem in the countries of the developing world. As the malaria parasite has become resistant to most of the antimalaria drugs available currently, there is a need to search for newer drugs. This study reports the pharmaceutical quality and in vivo antimalarial activities of a polyherbal formulation (SAABMAL®) used as malarial remedy in Nigeria. Methods: The antiplasmodial activity of SAABMAL® was determined by using the 4-day suppressive test in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. The formulation was tried on three different experimental animal models for in vivo antimalarial activities, which are prophylactic, suppressive and curative in mice. Chloroquine and pyrimethamine were used as standard drugs for comparison. Results: The suppressive study showed that, SAABMAL® (200 and 400 mg/kg/bw) significantly (P<0.01) produced a suppression (29.39 - 100%) of parasitaemia in a dose-dependent manner, while the curative study showed that SAABMAL® at 400 mg significantly (P<0.01) reduced (95.80%) parasitaemia compared with controls. The mean survival time of SAABMAL®-treated groups (100 and 200 mg/kg) was higher than that of the chloroquine-treated group. Histopathologically, no changes were found in the spleen of both untreated and treated groups. SAABMAL® capsules were of good mechanical properties with low weight variation and high degree of content mass uniformity. Interpretation & conclusions: The results obtained in this study showed the efficacy of SAABMAL®, a herbal antimalarial formulation against chloroquine sensitive malaria and its potential use in the treatment of uncomplicated malaria infection. Further studies need to be done in humans to test its efficacy and safety for its potential use as an antimalarial drug. PMID:25900958

  2. In vitro evaluation of aliphatic fatty alcohol metabolites of Perseaamericana seed as potential antimalarial and antimicrobial agents

    PubMed Central

    Falodun, A.; Erharuyi, O.; Imieje, V.; Ahomafor, J.; Akunyuli, C.; Jacobs, M.; Khan, S.; Hamann, M. T.; Langer, P.

    2016-01-01

    Perseaamericana Mill (Lauraceae) is a local medicinal plant used in Nigerian ethnomedicine as antimalarial. The aqueous decoction of the root part is a potent remedy against bacterial infections. Hence, the need to investigate the phytochemical and biological activities (antimicrobial and antiplasmodial) of the root back of Perseaamericana. Chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques were used in the identification and purification of metabolites, which were assayed for antimalarial and antimicrobial activities using Plasmodium falciparum and a panel of microorganisms. From the seeds of P. americana, five known 1, 2, 4-dihydroxy derivatives aliphatic alcohols, called avocadenols were isolated and identified by spectroscopic methods including 1D- and 2D NMR, and comparison with reported data in literature. Antifungal activity for 1, 2, 4-Trihydroxyheptadec-6-en-16-yne (5) (IC50< 8 μg/mL) against all the fungal strains and S. areus, and antimalarial activity for compounds 1, 2, 4-Trihydroxyheptadec-16-ene (1) and 1, 2, 4-tetrahydroxyheptadecane-6, 16-diene(2) (IC50 = 1.6 and 1.4 μg/mL for the D6 clone, respectively, and 2.1 and 1.4 μg/mL for the W2 clone, respectively) was observed. The fatty alcohols 1, 2, 4-tetrahydroxyheptadecane-6, 16-diene(2); 1, 2, 4-Trihydroxyheptadec-16-yne(3) and 1, 2, 4-Trihydroxyheptadecane(4) also exhibited promising in vitro antibacterial activity against a panel of pathogenic bacteria S. areus, methicillin resistant S. areus and E. coli at IC50 values of 21.1, 8, 200 μg/mL), (3.259, 86.32 μg/mL) and (17.18, 8.26 and 200 μg/mL), respectively. The results of this study provide evidence that the fatty alcohols are a promising class of antimalarial and antimicrobial agents. PMID:28042193

  3. Identifying associations in Escherichia coli antimicrobial resistance patterns using additive Bayesian networks.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Antoinette; Berthiaume, Philippe; Boerlin, Patrick; Gow, Sheryl; Léger, David; Lewis, Fraser I

    2013-05-15

    While the genesis of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in animal production is a high profile topic in the media and the scientific community, it is still not well understood. The epidemiology of AMR is complex. This complexity is demonstrated by extensive biological and evolutionary mechanisms which are potentially impacted by farm management and husbandry practices - the risk factors. Many parts of this system have yet to be fully described. Notably, the occurrence of multiple resistance patterns is the rule rather than exception - the multivariate problem. A first essential step in the development of any comprehensive risk factor analysis - whose goal is the prevention or reduction of AMR - is to describe those associations between different patterns of resistance which are systematic. That is, have sufficient statistical support for these patterns to be considered robust features of the underlying epidemiological system, and whose presence must therefore be incorporated into any risk factor analysis of AMR for it to be meaningful with respect to the farm environment. Presented here is a case study that seeks to identify systematic associations between patterns of resistance to 13 different antimicrobials in Escherichia coli isolates obtained from composite finisher (>80 kg) pig faecal samples obtained from Canada's five major pork producing provinces. The use of a Bayesian network analysis approach allowed us to identify many systematic associations between individual antimicrobial resistances. Sixteen of these resistances are corroborated with existing literature. These associations are distributed between several important classes of antimicrobials including the β-lactams, folate biosynthesis inhibitors, tetracyclines, aminoglycosides and quinolones. This study presents an exciting first step towards the larger and far more ambitious goal of developing generic and holistic risk factor analyses for on-farm occurrence of AMR. Analyses of this nature would combine

  4. Detecting Counterfeit Antimalarial Tablets by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Counterfeit antimalarial drugs are found in many developing countries, but it is challenging to differentiate between genuine and fakes due to their increasing sophistication. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a powerful tool in pharmaceutical forensics, and we tested this technique for discrim...

  5. Preparation and antimalarial activity of semisynthetic lycorenine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Cedrón, Juan C; Gutiérrez, David; Flores, Ninoska; Ravelo, Ángel G; Estévez-Braun, Ana

    2013-05-01

    A set of twenty one lycorenine derivatives has been prepared from the alkaloid hippeastrine (1). The modifications performed on hippeastrine included some functional group transformations, structural simplification and preparation of dimers. All alkaloids were tested as potential antimalarial agents, being the hippeastrine dimers the most active compounds.

  6. Antimalarial activity and safety assessment of Flueggea virosa leaves and its major constituent with special emphasis on their mode of action.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shiv Vardan; Manhas, Ashan; Kumar, Yogesh; Mishra, Sonali; Shanker, Karuna; Khan, Feroz; Srivastava, Kumkum; Pal, Anirban

    2017-03-05

    A clinical emergency stands due to the appearance of drug resistant Plasmodium strains necessitate novel and effective antimalarial chemotypes, where plants seem as the prime option, especially after the discovery of quinine and artemisinin. The present study was aimed towards bioprospecting leaves of Flueggea virosa for its antimalarial efficacy and active principles. Crude hydro-ethanolic extract along with solvent derived fractions were tested in vitro against Plasmodium falciparum CQ sensitive (3D7) and resistant (K1) strains, where all the fractions exhibited potential activity (IC50 values <10μg/mL) against both the strains. Interestingly, under in vivo conditions against P. berghei in Swiss mice, preferential chemo-suppression was recorded for crude hydro-ethanolic extract (77.38%) and ethyl acetate fraction (86.09%) at the dose of 500mg/kg body weight. Additionally, ethyl acetate fraction was found to be capable of normalizing the host altered pharmacological parameters and enhanced oxidative stress augmented during the infection. The bioactivity guided fractionation lead to the isolation of bergenin as a major and active constituent (IC50, 8.07±2.05μM) of ethyl acetate fraction with the inhibition of heme polymerization pathway of malaria parasite being one of the possible chemotherapeutic target. Furthermore, bergenin exhibited a moderate antimalarial activity against P. berghei and also ameliorated parasite induced systemic inflammation in host (mice). Safe toxicity profile elucidated through in vitro cytotoxicity and in silico ADME/T predications evidently suggest that bergenin possess drug like properties. Hence, the present study validates the traditional usage of F. indica as an antimalarial remedy and also insists for further chemical modifications of bergenin to obtain more effective antimalarial chemotypes.

  7. The malaria parasite cation ATPase PfATP4 and its role in the mechanism of action of a new arsenal of antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Spillman, Natalie Jane; Kirk, Kiaran

    2015-12-01

    The intraerythrocytic malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, maintains a low cytosolic Na(+) concentration and the plasma membrane P-type cation translocating ATPase 'PfATP4' has been implicated as playing a key role in this process. PfATP4 has been the subject of significant attention in recent years as mutations in this protein confer resistance to a growing number of new antimalarial compounds, including the spiroindolones, the pyrazoles, the dihydroisoquinolones, and a number of the antimalarial agents in the Medicines for Malaria Venture's 'Malaria Box'. On exposure of parasites to these compounds there is a rapid disruption of cytosolic Na(+). Whether, and if so how, such chemically distinct compounds interact with PfATP4, and how such interactions lead to parasite death, is not yet clear. The fact that multiple different chemical classes have converged upon PfATP4 highlights its significance as a potential target for new generation antimalarial agents. A spiroindolone (KAE609, now known as cipargamin) has progressed through Phase I and IIa clinical trials with favourable results. In this review we consider the physiological role of PfATP4, summarise the current repertoire of antimalarial compounds for which PfATP4 is implicated in their mechanism of action, and provide an outlook on translation from target identification in the laboratory to patient treatment in the field.

  8. Tracking down antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in a wastewater network.

    PubMed

    Slekovec, Céline; Plantin, Julie; Cholley, Pascal; Thouverez, Michelle; Talon, Daniel; Bertrand, Xavier; Hocquet, Didier

    2012-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa-containing wastewater released by hospitals is treated by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), generating sludge, which is used as a fertilizer, and effluent, which is discharged into rivers. We evaluated the risk of dissemination of antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa (AR-PA) from the hospital to the environment via the wastewater network. Over a 10-week period, we sampled weekly 11 points (hospital and urban wastewater, untreated and treated water, sludge) of the wastewater network and the river upstream and downstream of the WWTP of a city in eastern France. We quantified the P. aeruginosa load by colony counting. We determined the susceptibility to 16 antibiotics of 225 isolates, which we sorted into three categories (wild-type, antibiotic-resistant and multidrug-resistant). Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) were identified by gene sequencing. All non-wild-type isolates (n = 56) and a similar number of wild-type isolates (n = 54) were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Almost all the samples (105/110, 95.5%) contained P. aeruginosa, with high loads in hospital wastewater and sludge (≥3×10(6) CFU/l or/kg). Most of the multidrug-resistant isolates belonged to ST235, CC111 and ST395. They were found in hospital wastewater and some produced ESBLs such as PER-1 and MBLs such as IMP-29. The WWTP greatly reduced P. aeruginosa counts in effluent, but the P. aeruginosa load in the river was nonetheless higher downstream than upstream from the WWTP. We conclude that the antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa released by hospitals is found in the water downstream from the WWTP and in sludge, constituting a potential risk of environmental contamination.

  9. Functional network alterations and their structural substrate in drug-resistant epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Caciagli, Lorenzo; Bernhardt, Boris C.; Hong, Seok-Jun; Bernasconi, Andrea; Bernasconi, Neda

    2014-01-01

    The advent of MRI has revolutionized the evaluation and management of drug-resistant epilepsy by allowing the detection of the lesion associated with the region that gives rise to seizures. Recent evidence indicates marked chronic alterations in the functional organization of lesional tissue and large-scale cortico-subcortical networks. In this review, we focus on recent methodological developments in functional MRI (fMRI) analysis techniques and their application to the two most common drug-resistant focal epilepsies, i.e., temporal lobe epilepsy related to mesial temporal sclerosis and extra-temporal lobe epilepsy related to focal cortical dysplasia. We put particular emphasis on methodological developments in the analysis of task-free or “resting-state” fMRI to probe the integrity of intrinsic networks on a regional, inter-regional, and connectome-wide level. In temporal lobe epilepsy, these techniques have revealed disrupted connectivity of the ipsilateral mesiotemporal lobe, together with contralateral compensatory reorganization and striking reconfigurations of large-scale networks. In cortical dysplasia, initial observations indicate functional alterations in lesional, peri-lesional, and remote neocortical regions. While future research is needed to critically evaluate the reliability, sensitivity, and specificity, fMRI mapping promises to lend distinct biomarkers for diagnosis, presurgical planning, and outcome prediction. PMID:25565942

  10. Synthesis, Docking, In Vitro and In Vivo Antimalarial Activity of Hybrid 4-aminoquinoline-1,3,5-triazine Derivatives Against Wild and Mutant Malaria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Hans Raj; Singh, Udaya Pratap; Gahtori, Prashant; Ghosh, Surajit Kumar; Gogoi, Kabita; Prakash, Anil; Singh, Ramendra K

    2015-09-01

    A new series of hybrid 4-aminoquinoline-1,3,5-triazine derivatives was synthesized by a four-step reaction. Target compounds were screened for in vitro antimalarial activity against chloroquine-sensitive (3D-7) and chloroquine-resistant (RKL-2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Compounds exhibited, by and large, good antimalarial activity against the resistant strain, while two of them, that is 8g and 8a, displayed higher activity against both the strains of P. falciparum. Additionally, docking study was performed on both wild (1J3I.pdb) and quadruple mutant (N51I, C59R, S108 N, I164L, 3QG2.pdb) type pf-DHFR-TS to highlight the structural features of hybrid molecules.

  11. Antimalarial drug quality in the most severely malarious parts of Africa - a six country study.

    PubMed

    Bate, Roger; Coticelli, Philip; Tren, Richard; Attaran, Amir

    2008-05-07

    A range of antimalarial drugs were procured from private pharmacies in urban and peri-urban areas in the major cities of six African countries, situated in the part of that continent and the world that is most highly endemic for malaria. Semi-quantitative thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and dissolution testing were used to measure active pharmaceutical ingredient content against internationally acceptable standards. 35% of all samples tested failed either or both tests, and were substandard. Further, 33% of treatments collected were artemisinin monotherapies, most of which (78%) were manufactured in disobservance of an appeal by the World Health Organisation (WHO) to withdraw these clinically inappropriate medicines from the market. The high persistence of substandard drugs and clinically inappropriate artemisinin monotherapies in the private sector risks patient safety and, through drug resistance, places the future of malaria treatment at risk globally.

  12. The anti-malarial atovaquone increases radiosensitivity by alleviating tumour hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Thomas M.; Fokas, Emmanouil; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A.; Folkes, Lisa K.; Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Huether, Melanie; Kelly, Catherine J.; Pirovano, Giacomo; Buffa, Francesca M.; Hammond, Ester M.; Stratford, Michael; Muschel, Ruth J.; Higgins, Geoff S.; McKenna, William Gillies

    2016-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia renders cancer cells resistant to cancer therapy, resulting in markedly worse clinical outcomes. To find clinical candidate compounds that reduce hypoxia in tumours, we conduct a high-throughput screen for oxygen consumption rate (OCR) reduction and identify a number of drugs with this property. For this study we focus on the anti-malarial, atovaquone. Atovaquone rapidly decreases the OCR by more than 80% in a wide range of cancer cell lines at pharmacological concentrations. In addition, atovaquone eradicates hypoxia in FaDu, HCT116 and H1299 spheroids. Similarly, it reduces hypoxia in FaDu and HCT116 xenografts in nude mice, and causes a significant tumour growth delay when combined with radiation. Atovaquone is a ubiquinone analogue, and decreases the OCR by inhibiting mitochondrial complex III. We are now undertaking clinical studies to assess whether atovaquone reduces tumour hypoxia in patients, thereby increasing the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:27453292

  13. Structural Basis for Binding and Selectivity of Antimalarial and Anticancer Ethylenediamine Inhibitors to Protein Farnesyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Michael A.; Fletcher, Steven; Cummings, Christopher G.; Pusateri, Erin E.; Blaskovich, Michelle A.; Rivas, Kasey; Gelb, Michael H.; Voorhis, Wesley C.Van; Sebti, Said M.; Hamilton, Andrew D.; Beese, Lorena S. ); ); ); )

    2009-03-20

    Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes an essential posttranslational lipid modification of more than 60 proteins involved in intracellular signal transduction networks. FTase inhibitors have emerged as a significant target for development of anticancer therapeutics and, more recently, for the treatment of parasitic diseases caused by protozoan pathogens, including malaria (Plasmodium falciparum). We present the X-ray crystallographic structures of complexes of mammalian FTase with five inhibitors based on an ethylenediamine scaffold, two of which exhibit over 1000-fold selective inhibition of P. falciparum FTase. These structures reveal the dominant determinants in both the inhibitor and enzyme that control binding and selectivity. Comparison to a homology model constructed for the P. falciparum FTase suggests opportunities for further improving selectivity of a new generation of antimalarial inhibitors.

  14. In vitro and in vivo antimalarial activity of amphiphilic naphthothiazolium salts with amine-bearing side chains.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Peter; Gipson, Gregory R; Clark, Martha A; Tripathi, Abhai; Sullivan, David J; Cerami, Carla

    2014-10-01

    Because of emerging resistance to existing drugs, new chemical classes of antimalarial drugs are urgently needed. We have rationally designed a library of compounds that were predicted to accumulate in the digestive vacuole and then decrystallize hemozoin by breaking the iron carboxylate bond in hemozoin. We report the synthesis of 16 naphthothiazolium salts with amine-bearing side chains and their activities against the erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro. KSWI-855, the compound with the highest efficacy against the asexual stages of P. falciparum in vitro, also had in vitro activity against P. falciparum gametocytes and in vivo activity against P. berghei in a murine malaria model.

  15. Flavones as isosteres of 4(1H)-quinolones: discovery of ligand efficient and dual stage antimalarial lead compounds.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Ressurreição, Ana S; da Cruz, Filipa P; Albuquerque, Inês S; Gut, Jiri; Carrasco, Marta P; Gonçalves, Daniel; Guedes, Rita C; dos Santos, Daniel J V A; Mota, Maria M; Rosenthal, Philip J; Moreira, Rui; Prudêncio, Miguel; Lopes, Francisca

    2013-11-01

    Malaria is responsible for nearly one million deaths annually, and the increasing prevalence of multi-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum poses a great challenge to controlling the disease. A diverse set of flavones, isosteric to 4(1H)-quinolones, were prepared and profiled for their antiplasmodial activity against the blood stage of P. falciparum W2 strain, and the liver stage of the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei. Ligand efficient leads were identified as dual stage antimalarials, suggesting that scaffold optimization may afford potent antiplasmodial compounds.

  16. 1H-1,2,3-Triazole-tethered isatin-7-chloroquinoline and 3-hydroxy-indole-7-chloroquinoline conjugates: synthesis and antimalarial evaluation.

    PubMed

    Raj, Raghu; Gut, Jiri; Rosenthal, Philip J; Kumar, Vipan

    2014-02-01

    A series of 1H-1,2,3-triazole-tethered isatin-7-chloroquinoline and 3-hydroxy-indole-7-chloroquinoline conjugates have been synthesized and evaluated for their antimalarial activity against chloroquine-resistant W2 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. The most potent of the test compound with an optimum combination of 3-hydroxy-indole ring and a n-butyl linker displayed an IC50 value of 69 nM.

  17. Discrimination between methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus using pyrolysis mass spectrometry and artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Goodacre, R; Rooney, P J; Kell, D B

    1998-01-01

    Curie-point pyrolysis mass spectra were obtained from 15 methicillin-resistant and 22 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus strains. Cluster analysis showed that the major source of variation between the pyrolysis mass spectra resulted from the phage group of the bacteria, not their resistance or susceptibility to methicillin. By contrast, artificial neural networks could be trained to recognize those aspects of the pyrolysis mass spectra that differentiated methicillin-resistant from methicillin-sensitive strains. The trained neural network could then use pyrolysis mass spectral data to assess whether an unknown strain was resistant to methicillin. These results give the first demonstration that the combination of pyrolysis mass spectrometry with neural networks can provide a very rapid and accurate antibiotic susceptibility testing technique.

  18. Multifunctional membranes for solvent resistant nanofiltration and pervaporation applications based on segmented polymer networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianfeng; Basko, Malgorzata; Du Prez, S Filip; Vankelecom, Ivo F J

    2008-12-25

    Hydrophilic bis(acrylate)-terminated poly(ethylene oxide) was used as macromolecular cross-linker of different hydrophobic polyacrylates for the synthesis of amphiphilic segmented polymer networks (SPNs). Multifunctional composite membranes with thin SPN toplayers were prepared by in situ polymerization. As the support consisted of hydrolyzed polyacrylonitrile, the high chemical resistance of the composite membrane allowed applications of the SPN-based membranes in solvent-resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) and pervaporation (PV). The membranes show very high retention on Rose Bengal (RB) in different solvents, especially in strong swelling solvents such as tetrahydrofuran (THF) and dimethylformamide (DMF). The membranes were also tested in pervaporation for dehydration of ethanol and isopropanol (IPA). The selectivity of the membranes greatly depends on the composition or the ratio of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic phases of the SPN.

  19. The Stapled AKAP Disruptor Peptide STAD-2 Displays Antimalarial Activity through a PKA-Independent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Briana R; Wang, Yuxiao; Trope, Edward C; Ho, Tienhuei G; Muralidharan, Vasant; Kennedy, Eileen J; Peterson, David S

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance poses a significant threat to ongoing malaria control efforts. Coupled with lack of a malaria vaccine, there is an urgent need for the development of new antimalarials with novel mechanisms of action and low susceptibility to parasite drug resistance. Protein Kinase A (PKA) has been implicated as a critical regulator of pathogenesis in malaria. Therefore, we sought to investigate the effects of disrupted PKA signaling as a possible strategy for inhibition of parasite replication. Host PKA activity is partly regulated by a class of proteins called A Kinase Anchoring Proteins (AKAPs), and interaction between HsPKA and AKAP can be inhibited by the stapled peptide Stapled AKAP Disruptor 2 (STAD-2). STAD-2 was tested for permeability to and activity against Plasmodium falciparum blood stage parasites in vitro. The compound was selectively permeable only to infected red blood cells (iRBC) and demonstrated rapid antiplasmodial activity, possibly via iRBC lysis (IC50 ≈ 1 μM). STAD-2 localized within the parasite almost immediately post-treatment but showed no evidence of direct association with PKA, indicating that STAD-2 acts via a PKA-independent mechanism. Furosemide-insensitive parasite permeability pathways in the iRBC were largely responsible for uptake of STAD-2. Further, peptide import was highly specific to STAD-2 as evidenced by low permeability of control stapled peptides. Selective uptake and antiplasmodial activity of STAD-2 provides important groundwork for the development of stapled peptides as potential antimalarials. Such peptides may also offer an alternative strategy for studying protein-protein interactions critical to parasite development and pathogenesis.

  20. Fractions of an antimalarial neem-leaf extract have activities superior to chloroquine, and are gametocytocidal.

    PubMed

    Udeinya, I J; Brown, N; Shu, E N; Udeinya, F I; Quakeyie, I

    2006-01-01

    The antimalarial activities of two fractions (IRDN-A and IRDN-B) of an extract from the leaves of the neem tree (Azadirachta indica) were compared with those of chloroquine, in in-vitro assays against Plasmodium falciparum. The asexual stages of a chloroquine-sensitive clone (ITG2F6) and a chloroquine-resistant isolate (W2) and the gametocytes of the NF 54 (BD-7) isolate of P. falciparum were used as the drug targets. Activity against the asexual stages was generally evaluated as the concentrations inhibiting the parasitaemias recorded in the control cultures, after an incubation of 48-72 h, by 50% (IC50) or 100% (IC100). For the ITG2F6 strain, the IC50 and IC100 (in microg/ml) were, respectively, 10(-5) and 10(-4) for IRDN-A, 10(-3) and 10(-2) for IRDN-B, and 10(-2) and 1.0 for chloroquine. The corresponding values for the W2 strain were 10(-5) and 1.0 for IRDN-A, and 10.0 and >100 for chloroquine (even at 100 microg/ml, chloroquine only inhibited the parasitaemia by 85%). Each of the two neem-leaf fractions lysed 50% and 100% of developing gametocytes, at 10(-3) and 1.0 microg/ml, respectively; and 50% and 100% of mature gametocytes at 10(-3) and 10(2) microg/ml, respectively. If they are found safe and effective in vivo, the neem-leaf fractions may form the basis of new antimalarial drugs that not only cure chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant malaria but also markedly reduce transmission.

  1. A non-radioactive DAPI-based high-throughput in vitro assay to assess Plasmodium falciparum responsiveness to antimalarials--increased sensitivity of P. falciparum to chloroquine in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Daouda; Patel, Vishal; Demas, Allison; LeRoux, Michele; Ndir, Omar; Mboup, Souleymane; Clardy, Jon; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Daily, Johanna P; Wirth, Dyann F

    2010-02-01

    The spread of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance is outpacing new antimalarial development and compromising effective malaria treatment. Combination therapy is widely implemented to prolong the effectiveness of currently approved antimalarials. To maximize utility of available drugs, periodic monitoring of drug efficacy and gathering of accurate information regarding parasite-sensitivity changes are essential. We describe a high-throughput, non-radioactive, field-based assay to evaluate in vitro antimalarial drug sensitivity of P. falciparum isolates from 40 Senegalese patients. Compared with earlier years, we found a significant decrease in chloroquine in vitro and in genotypic resistances (> 50% and > 65%, respectively, in previous studies) with only 23% of isolates showing resistance. This is possibly caused by a withdrawal of chloroquine from Senegal in 2002. We also found a range of artemisinin responses. Prevalence of drug resistance is dynamic and varies by region. Therefore, the implementation of non-radioactive, robust, high-throughput antimalarial sensitivity assays is critical for defining region-specific prophylaxis and treatment guidelines.

  2. Network reconstruction of platelet metabolism identifies metabolic signature for aspirin resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Alex; Rahmanian, Sorena; Bordbar, Aarash; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.; Jamshidi, Neema

    2014-01-01

    Recently there has not been a systematic, objective assessment of the metabolic capabilities of the human platelet. A manually curated, functionally tested, and validated biochemical reaction network of platelet metabolism, iAT-PLT-636, was reconstructed using 33 proteomic datasets and 354 literature references. The network contains enzymes mapping to 403 diseases and 231 FDA approved drugs, alluding to an expansive scope of biochemical transformations that may affect or be affected by disease processes in multiple organ systems. The effect of aspirin (ASA) resistance on platelet metabolism was evaluated using constraint-based modeling, which revealed a redirection of glycolytic, fatty acid, and nucleotide metabolism reaction fluxes in order to accommodate eicosanoid synthesis and reactive oxygen species stress. These results were confirmed with independent proteomic data. The construction and availability of iAT-PLT-636 should stimulate further data-driven, systems analysis of platelet metabolism towards the understanding of pathophysiological conditions including, but not strictly limited to, coagulopathies.

  3. Anti-malarial activity and HS-SPME-GC-MS chemical profiling of Plinia cerrocampanensis leaf essential oil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plinia cerrocampanensis is an endemic plant of Panama. The leaf essential oil of this plant has shown antibacterial activity. However, anti-malarial activity and chemical profiling by HS-SPME-GC-MS of this essential oil have not been reported before. Methods Anti-malarial activity of the essential oil (EO) was evaluated in vitro against chloroquine-sensitive HB3 and chloroquine-resistant W2 strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Synergistic effect of chloroquine and the EO on parasite growth was evaluated by calculating the combination index. A methodology involving headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) was developed to investigate the composition of Plinia cerrocampanensis EO. Results Plinia cerrocampanensis EO showed a high anti-malarial activity and a synergistic interaction with chloroquine. The Plinia cerrocampanensis EO inhibited P. falciparum growth in vitro at an IC50 of 7.3 μg/mL. Chloroquine together with the EO decreased the IC50 of chloroquine from 0.1 μg/mL to 0.05 μg/mL, and of the EO from 7.3 μg/mL to 1.1 μg/mL. The measured combination index was 0.58, which clearly indicates that the EO acts synergistically with chloroquine. Since the EO maintained its inhibitory activity on the chloroquine-sensitive strain of the parasite, it could be acting by a different mechanism of action than chloroquine. The best HS-SPME-GC-MS analytical conditions were obtained when the temperature of extraction was 49°C, incubation time 14 min, and the time of extraction 10 min. This method allowed for the identification of 53 volatile constituents in the EO, including new compounds not reported earlier. Conclusions The anti-malarial activity exhibited by the Plinia cerrocampanensis EO may lend support for its possible use as an alternative for anti-malarial therapy. PMID:24410874

  4. Deciphering the hormonal signalling network behind the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Medina, Ainhoa; Fernández, Iván; Sánchez-Guzmán, María J.; Jung, Sabine C.; Pascual, Jose A.; Pozo, María J.

    2013-01-01

    Root colonization by selected Trichoderma isolates can activate in the plant a systemic defense response that is effective against a broad-spectrum of plant pathogens. Diverse plant hormones play pivotal roles in the regulation of the defense signaling network that leads to the induction of systemic resistance triggered by beneficial organisms [induced systemic resistance (ISR)]. Among them, jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) signaling pathways are generally essential for ISR. However, Trichoderma ISR (TISR) is believed to involve a wider variety of signaling routes, interconnected in a complex network of cross-communicating hormone pathways. Using tomato as a model, an integrative analysis of the main mechanisms involved in the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum against the necrotrophic leaf pathogen Botrytis cinerea was performed. Root colonization by T. harzianum rendered the leaves more resistant to B. cinerea independently of major effects on plant nutrition. The analysis of disease development in shoots of tomato mutant lines impaired in the synthesis of the key defense-related hormones JA, ET, salicylic acid (SA), and abscisic acid (ABA), and the peptide prosystemin (PS) evidenced the requirement of intact JA, SA, and ABA signaling pathways for a functional TISR. Expression analysis of several hormone-related marker genes point to the role of priming for enhanced JA-dependent defense responses upon pathogen infection. Together, our results indicate that although TISR induced in tomato against necrotrophs is mainly based on boosted JA-dependent responses, the pathways regulated by the plant hormones SA- and ABA are also required for successful TISR development. PMID:23805146

  5. Deciphering the hormonal signalling network behind the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum in tomato.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Medina, Ainhoa; Fernández, Iván; Sánchez-Guzmán, María J; Jung, Sabine C; Pascual, Jose A; Pozo, María J

    2013-01-01

    Root colonization by selected Trichoderma isolates can activate in the plant a systemic defense response that is effective against a broad-spectrum of plant pathogens. Diverse plant hormones play pivotal roles in the regulation of the defense signaling network that leads to the induction of systemic resistance triggered by beneficial organisms [induced systemic resistance (ISR)]. Among them, jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) signaling pathways are generally essential for ISR. However, Trichoderma ISR (TISR) is believed to involve a wider variety of signaling routes, interconnected in a complex network of cross-communicating hormone pathways. Using tomato as a model, an integrative analysis of the main mechanisms involved in the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum against the necrotrophic leaf pathogen Botrytis cinerea was performed. Root colonization by T. harzianum rendered the leaves more resistant to B. cinerea independently of major effects on plant nutrition. The analysis of disease development in shoots of tomato mutant lines impaired in the synthesis of the key defense-related hormones JA, ET, salicylic acid (SA), and abscisic acid (ABA), and the peptide prosystemin (PS) evidenced the requirement of intact JA, SA, and ABA signaling pathways for a functional TISR. Expression analysis of several hormone-related marker genes point to the role of priming for enhanced JA-dependent defense responses upon pathogen infection. Together, our results indicate that although TISR induced in tomato against necrotrophs is mainly based on boosted JA-dependent responses, the pathways regulated by the plant hormones SA- and ABA are also required for successful TISR development.

  6. Detecting counterfeit antimalarial tablets by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dowell, Floyd E; Maghirang, Elizabeth B; Fernandez, Facundo M; Newton, Paul N; Green, Michael D

    2008-11-04

    Counterfeit antimalarial drugs are found in many developing countries, but it is challenging to differentiate between genuine and fakes due to their increasing sophistication. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a powerful tool in pharmaceutical forensics, and we tested this technique for discriminating between counterfeit and genuine artesunate antimalarial tablets. Using NIRS, we found that artesunate tablets could be identified as genuine or counterfeit with high accuracy. Multivariate classification models indicated that this discriminatory ability was based, at least partly, on the presence or absence of spectral signatures related to artesunate. This technique can be field-portable and requires little training after calibrations are developed, thus showing great promise for rapid and accurate fake detection.

  7. Antimalarial Drugs as Immune Modulators: New Mechanisms for Old Drugs.

    PubMed

    An, Jie; Minie, Mark; Sasaki, Tomikazu; Woodward, Joshua J; Elkon, Keith B

    2017-01-14

    The best known of the naturally occurring antimalarial compounds are quinine, extracted from cinchona bark, and artemisinin (qinghao), extracted from Artemisia annua in China. These and other derivatives are now chemically synthesized and remain the mainstay of therapy to treat malaria. The beneficial effects of several of the antimalarial drugs (AMDs) on clinical features of autoimmune disorders were discovered by chance during World War II. In this review, we discuss the chemistry of AMDs and their mechanisms of action, emphasizing how they may impact multiple pathways of innate immunity. These pathways include Toll-like receptors and the recently described cGAS-STING pathway. Finally, we discuss the current and future impact of AMDs on systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and devastating monogenic disorders (interferonopathies) characterized by expression of type I interferon in the brain.

  8. Optimizing the programmatic deployment of the anti-malarials artemether-lumefantrine and dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine using pharmacological modelling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Successful programmatic use of anti-malarials faces challenges that are not covered by standard drug development processes. The development of appropriate pragmatic dosing regimens for low-resource settings or community-based use is not formally regulated, even though these may alter factors which can substantially affect individual patient and population level outcome, such as drug exposure, patient adherence and the spread of drug resistance and can affect a drug’s reputation and its eventual therapeutic lifespan. Methods An in silico pharmacological model of anti-malarial drug treatment with the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiles of artemether-lumefantrine (AM-LF, Coartem®) and dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ, Eurartesim®) was constructed to assess the potential impact of programmatic factors, including regionally optimized, age-based dosing regimens, poor patient adherence, food effects and drug resistance on treatment outcome at population level, and compared both drugs’ susceptibility to these factors. Results Compared with DHA-PPQ, therapeutic effectiveness of AM-LF seems more robust to factors affecting drug exposure, such as age- instead of weight-based dosing or poor adherence. The model highlights the sub-optimally low ratio of DHA:PPQ which, in combination with the narrow therapeutic dose range of PPQ compared to DHA that drives the weight or age cut-offs, leaves DHA at a high risk of under-dosing. Conclusion Pharmacological modelling of real-life scenarios can provide valuable supportive data and highlight modifiable determinants of therapeutic effectiveness that can help optimize the deployment of anti-malarials in control programmes. PMID:24708571

  9. Antimicrobial peptides: a new class of antimalarial drugs?

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Nuno; Aguiar, Luísa; Gomes, Paula

    2014-01-01

    A range of antimicrobial peptides (AMP) exhibit activity on malaria parasites, Plasmodium spp., in their blood or mosquito stages, or both. These peptides include a diverse array of both natural and synthetic molecules varying greatly in size, charge, hydrophobicity, and secondary structure features. Along with an overview of relevant literature reports regarding AMP that display antiplasmodial activity, this review makes a few considerations about those molecules as a potential new class of antimalarial drugs. PMID:25566072

  10. Neural network modeling and prediction of resistivity structures using VES Schlumberger data over a geothermal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra K.; Tiwari, R. K.; Singh, S. B.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents the effects of several parameters on the artificial neural networks (ANN) inversion of vertical electrical sounding (VES) data. Sensitivity of ANN parameters was examined on the performance of adaptive backpropagation (ABP) and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithms (LMA) to test the robustness to noisy synthetic as well as field geophysical data and resolving capability of these methods for predicting the subsurface resistivity layers. We trained, tested and validated ANN using the synthetic VES data as input to the networks and layer parameters of the models as network output. ANN learning parameters are varied and corresponding observations are recorded. The sensitivity analysis of synthetic data and real model demonstrate that ANN algorithms applied in VES data inversion should be considered well not only in terms of accuracy but also in terms of high computational efforts. Also the analysis suggests that ANN model with its various controlling parameters are largely data dependent and hence no unique architecture can be designed for VES data analysis. ANN based methods are also applied to the actual VES field data obtained from the tectonically vital geothermal areas of Jammu and Kashmir, India. Analysis suggests that both the ABP and LMA are suitable methods for 1-D VES modeling. But the LMA method provides greater degree of robustness than the ABP in case of 2-D VES modeling. Comparison of the inversion results with known lithology correlates well and also reveals the additional significant feature of reconsolidated breccia of about 7.0 m thickness beneath the overburden in some cases like at sounding point RDC-5. We may therefore conclude that ANN based methods are significantly faster and efficient for detection of complex layered resistivity structures with a relatively greater degree of precision and resolution.

  11. Stability analysis of a model gene network links aging, stress resistance, and negligible senescence

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Valeria; Molodtsov, Ivan; Menshikov, Leonid I.; Reis, Robert J. Shmookler; Fedichev, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Several animal species are considered to exhibit what is called negligible senescence, i.e. they do not show signs of functional decline or any increase of mortality with age. Recent studies in naked mole rat and long-lived sea urchins showed that these species do not alter their gene-expression profiles with age as much as other organisms do. This is consistent with exceptional endurance of naked mole rat tissues to various genotoxic stresses. We conjectured, therefore, that the lifelong transcriptional stability of an organism may be a key determinant of longevity. We analyzed the stability of a simple genetic-network model and found that under most common circumstances, such a gene network is inherently unstable. Over a time it undergoes an exponential accumulation of gene-regulation deviations leading to death. However, should the repair systems be sufficiently effective, the gene network can stabilize so that gene damage remains constrained along with mortality of the organism. We investigate the relationship between stress-resistance and aging and suggest that the unstable regime may provide a mathematical basis for the Gompertz “law” of aging in many species. At the same time, this model accounts for the apparently age-independent mortality observed in some exceptionally long-lived animals. PMID:26316217

  12. A comparison of two types of neural network for weld quality prediction in small scale resistance spot welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaodong; Wang, Yuanxun; Zhao, Dawei; Huang, YongAn

    2017-09-01

    Our study aims at developing an effective quality monitoring system in small scale resistance spot welding of titanium alloy. The measured electrical signals were interpreted in combination with the nugget development. Features were extracted from the dynamic resistance and electrode voltage curve. A higher welding current generally indicated a lower overall dynamic resistance level. A larger electrode voltage peak and higher change rate of electrode voltage could be detected under a smaller electrode force or higher welding current condition. Variation of the extracted features and weld quality was found more sensitive to the change of welding current than electrode force. Different neural network model were proposed for weld quality prediction. The back propagation neural network was more proper in failure load estimation. The probabilistic neural network model was more appropriate to be applied in quality level classification. A real-time and on-line weld quality monitoring system may be developed by taking advantages of both methods.

  13. Splice variants and regulatory networks associated with host resistance to the intestinal worm Cooperia oncophora in cattle.

    PubMed

    Li, Robert W; Wu, Sitao; Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Weizhong; Schroeder, Steven G

    2015-07-30

    To elucidate the molecular mechanism of host resistance, we characterized the jejunal transcriptome of Angus cattle selected for parasite resistance for over 20 years in response to infection caused by the intestinal worm Cooperia oncophora. The transcript abundance of 56 genes, such as that of mucin 12 (MUC12) and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALPI), was significantly higher in resistant cattle. Novel splicing variants, exon skipping events, and gene fusion events, were also detected. An algorithm for the reconstruction of accurate cellular networks (ARACNE) was used to infer de novo regulatory molecular networks in the interactome between the parasite and host. Under a combined cutoff of an error tolerance (ϵ = 0.10) and a stringent P-value threshold of mutual information (1.0 × 10(-5)), a total of 229,100 direct interactions controlled by 20,288 hub genes were identified. Among these hub genes, 7651 genes had ≥ 100 direct neighbors while the top 9778 hub genes controlled more than 50% of total direct interactions. Three lysozyme genes (LYZ1, LYZ2, and LYZ3), which are co-located in bovine chromosome 5 in tandem and are strongly upregulated in resistant cattle, shared a common regulatory network of 55 genes. These ancient antimicrobials were likely involved in regulating host-parasite interactions by affecting host gut microbiome. Notably, ALPI, known as a gut mucosal defense factor, controlled a molecular network consisting 410 genes, including 14 transcription factors (TF) and 10 genes that were significantly regulated in resistant cattle. Several large regulatory networks were controlled by TF, such as STAT6, SREBF1, and ELF4. Gene ontology (GO) processes significantly enriched in the regulatory network controlled by STAT6 included lipid metabolism. Our findings provide insights into the immune regulation of host-parasite interactions and the molecular mechanisms of host resistance in cattle.

  14. [Ophthalmological monitoring protocol for patients treated with long-term antimalarials or vigabatrin].

    PubMed

    Ingster-Moati, I; Orssaud, C

    2009-01-01

    Treatment with the antimalarials chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine rarely causes retinopathy. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine toxicity are untreatable and can progress to legal blindness. Since 1957, there has been a consensus on the need to monitor patients on long-term chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine therapy. Currently, the procedure for follow-up includes collection of patient information, complete ophthalmological exam with automated central perimetry, and retinal electrophysiology. Screening should take place before treatment or no more than 6 months after initiation of antimalarial therapy. During treatment, monitoring relative to the baseline should be at a frequency determined by whether there are risk factors for development of toxicity, such as a cumulative dose greater than 1.8 kg, a daily dose greater than 6.5mg of hydroxychloroquine/kg/day, concurrent or past ophthalmological diseases, hepatic or renal insufficiency, age older than 65 years, and chloroquine intake. Retinopathy can occur in the absence of risk factors. The risk/benefit ratio favors therapy despite the time and expense of screening. Vigabatrin (VGB) is an effective drug for treatment of epilepsy and has been used in the treatment of West syndrome and epilepsy resistant to other drugs. VGB treatment improves quality of life, but it can induce characteristic bilateral nasal visual field defects and changes in retinal electrophysiology. Currently, the recommended procedure is to screen these patients before treatment, if possible, with a complete ophthalmological exam including perimetry and retinal electrophysiology every 6 months. It may be necessary to rely on retinal electrophysiology since some patients may not be able to undergo perimetry. The risk/benefit ratio sill clearly favors VGB treatment. Patients whose seizure incidence is reduced and have only minimal visual changes could continue VGB with strict monitoring. The others must discontinue VGB.

  15. Effects of an antimalarial quinazoline derivative on human erythrocytes and on cell membrane molecular models.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Aguirre, Yareli; Hernández-Luis, Francisco; Mendoza-Martínez, César; Sotomayor, Carlos Patricio; Aguilar, Luis Felipe; Villena, Fernando; Castillo, Ivan; Hernández, David J; Suwalsky, Mario

    2012-03-01

    Plasmodium, the parasite which causes malaria in humans multiplies in the liver and then infects circulating erythrocytes. Thus, the role of the erythrocyte cell membrane in antimalarial drug activity and resistance has key importance. The effects of the antiplasmodial N(6)-(4-methoxybenzyl)quinazoline-2,4,6-triamine (M4), and its inclusion complex (M4/HPβCD) with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) on human erythrocytes and on cell membrane molecular models are herein reported. This work evidences that M4/HPβCD interacts with red cells as follows: a) in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies on human erythrocytes induced shape changes at a 10μM concentration; b) in isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM) a concentration as low as 1μM induced sharp DPH fluorescence anisotropy decrease whereas increasing concentrations produced a monotonically decrease of DPH fluorescence lifetime at 37°C; c) X-ray diffraction studies showed that 200μM induced a complete structural perturbation of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers whereas no significant effects were detected in dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) bilayers, classes of lipids present in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively; d) fluorescence spectroscopy data showed that increasing concentrations of the complex interacted with the deep hydrophobic core of DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) at 18°C. All these experiments are consistent with the insertion of M4/HPβCD in the outer monolayer of the human erythrocyte membrane; thus, it can be considered a promising and novel antimalarial agent.

  16. Pharmacological Properties of a New Antimalarial Bisthiazolium Salt, T3, and a Corresponding Prodrug, TE3

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Olivier; Margout, Delphine; Taudon, Nicolas; Wein, Sharon; Calas, Michèle; Vial, Henri J.; Bressolle, Françoise M. M.

    2005-01-01

    A new approach to malarial chemotherapy based on quaternary ammonium that targets membrane biogenesis during intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum development has recently been developed. To increase the bioavailability, nonionic chemically modified prodrugs were synthesized. In this paper, the pharmacological properties of a bisthiazolium salt (T3) and its bioprecursor (TE3) were studied. Their antimalarial activities were determined in vitro against the growth of P. falciparum and in vivo against the growth of P. vinckei in mice. Pharmacokinetic evaluations were performed after T3 (1.3 and 3 mg/kg of body weight administered intravenously; 6.4 mg/kg administered intraperitoneally) and TE3 (1.5 and 3 mg/kg administered intravenously; 12 mg/kg administered orally) administrations to rats. After intraperitoneal administration, very low doses offer protection in a murine model of malaria (50% efficient dose [ED50] of 0.2 to 0.25 mg/kg). After oral administration, the ED50 values were 13 and 5 mg/kg for T3 and TE3, respectively. Both compounds exerted antimalarial activity in the low nanomolar range. After TE3 administration, rapid prodrug-drug conversion occurred; the mean values of the pharmacokinetic parameters for T3 were as follows: total clearance, 1 liter/h/kg; steady-state volume of distribution, 14.8 liters/kg; and elimination half-life, 12 h. After intravenous administration, T3 plasma concentrations increased in proportion to the dose. The absolute bioavailability was 72% after intraperitoneal administration (T3); it was 15% after oral administration (TE3). T3 plasma concentrations (8 nM) 24 h following oral administration of TE3 were higher than the 50% inhibitory concentrations for the most chloroquine-resistant strains of P. falciparum (6.3 nM). PMID:16127032

  17. In Vivo Antimalarial Activity of Annona muricata Leaf Extract in Mice Infected with Plasmodium berghei

    PubMed Central

    Somsak, Voravuth; Polwiang, Natsuda; Chachiyo, Sukanya

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most important infectious diseases in the world. The choice for the treatment is highly limited due to drug resistance. Hence, finding the new compounds to treat malaria is urgently needed. The present study was attempted to evaluate the antimalarial activity of the Annona muricata aqueous leaf extract in Plasmodium berghei infected mice. Aqueous leaf extract of A. muricata was prepared and tested for acute toxicity in mice. For efficacy test in vivo, standard 4-day suppressive test was carried out. ICR mice were inoculated with 107 parasitized erythrocytes of P. berghei ANKA by intraperitoneal injection. The extracts (100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg) were then given orally by gavage once a day for 4 consecutive days. Parasitemia, percentage of inhibition, and packed cell volume were subsequently calculated. Chloroquine (10 mg/kg) was given to infected mice as positive control while untreated control was given only distilled water. It was found that A. muricata aqueous leaf extract at doses of 100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg resulted in dose dependent parasitemia inhibition of 38.03%, 75.25%, and 85.61%, respectively. Survival time was prolonged in infected mice treated with the extract. Moreover, no mortality to mice was observed with this extract up to a dose of 4000 mg/kg. In conclusion, the A. muricata aqueous leaf extract exerted significant antimalarial activity with no toxicity and prolonged survival time. Therefore, this extract might contain potential lead molecule for the development of a new drug for malaria treatment. PMID:27092277

  18. Plasmodium IspD (2-C-Methyl-D-erythritol 4-Phosphate Cytidyltransferase), an Essential and Druggable Antimalarial Target

    PubMed Central

    Imlay, Leah S.; Armstrong, Christopher M.; Masters, Mary Clare; Li, Ting; Price, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Rachel L.; Mann, Katherine M.; Li, Lucy X.; Stallings, Christina L.; Berry, Neil G.; O’Neill, Paul M.; Odom, Audrey R.

    2015-01-01

    As resistance to current therapies spreads, novel antimalarials are urgently needed. In this work, we examine the potential for therapeutic intervention via the targeting of Plasmodium IspD (2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate cytidyltransferase), the second dedicated enzyme of the essential methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis. Enzymes of this pathway represent promising therapeutic targets because the pathway is not present in humans. The Malaria Box compound, MMV008138, inhibits Plasmodium falciparum growth, and PfIspD has been proposed as a candidate intracellular target. We find that PfIspD is the sole intracellular target of MMV008138 and characterize the mode of inhibition and target-based resistance, providing chemical validation of this target. Additionally, we find that the Pf ISPD genetic locus is refractory to disruption in malaria parasites, providing independent genetic validation for efforts targeting this enzyme. This work provides compelling support for IspD as a druggable target for the development of additional, much-needed antimalarial agents. PMID:26783558

  19. Insights into cytochrome bc 1 complex binding mode of antimalarial 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinones through molecular modelling

    PubMed Central

    Sodero, Ana Carolina Rennó; Abrahim-Vieira, Bárbara; Torres, Pedro Henrique Monteiro; Pascutti, Pedro Geraldo; Garcia, Célia RS; Ferreira, Vitor Francisco; da Rocha, David Rodrigues; Ferreira, Sabrina Baptista; Silva, Floriano Paes

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Malaria persists as a major public health problem. Atovaquone is a drug that inhibits the respiratory chain of Plasmodium falciparum, but with serious limitations like known resistance, low bioavailability and high plasma protein binding. OBJECTIVES The aim of this work was to perform molecular modelling studies of 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinones analogues of atovaquone on the Qo site of P. falciparum cytochrome bc 1 complex (Pfbc1) to suggest structural modifications that could improve their antimalarial activity. METHODS We have built the homology model of the cytochrome b (CYB) and Rieske iron-sulfur protein (ISP) subunits from Pfbc1 and performed the molecular docking of 41 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinones with known in vitro antimalarial activity and predicted to act on this target. FINDINGS Results suggest that large hydrophobic R2 substituents may be important for filling the deep hydrophobic Qo site pocket. Moreover, our analysis indicates that the H-donor 2-hydroxyl group may not be crucial for efficient binding and inhibition of Pfbc1 by these atovaquone analogues. The C1 carbonyl group (H-acceptor) is more frequently involved in the important hydrogen bonding interaction with His152 of the Rieske ISP subunit. MAIN CONCLUSIONS Additional interactions involving residues such as Ile258 and residues required for efficient catalysis (e.g., Glu261) could be explored in drug design to avoid development of drug resistance by the parasite. PMID:28327793

  20. Phytochemical screening and in vivo antimalarial activity of extracts from three medicinal plants used in malaria treatment in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Bankole, A E; Adekunle, A A; Sowemimo, A A; Umebese, C E; Abiodun, O; Gbotosho, G O

    2016-01-01

    The use of plant to meet health-care needs has greatly increased worldwide in the recent times. The search for new plant-derived bioactive agents that can be explored for the treatment of drug-resistant malaria infection is urgently needed. Thus, we evaluated the antimalarial activity of three medicinal plants used in Nigerian folklore for the treatment of malaria infection. A modified Peter's 4-day suppressive test was used to evaluate the antimalarial activity of the plant extracts in a mouse model of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium berghei ANKA strain. Animals were treated with 250, 500, or 800 mg/kg of aqueous extract. It was observed that of all the three plants studied, Markhamia tomentosa showed the highest chemosuppression of parasites of 73 % followed by Polyalthia longifolia (53 %) at day 4. All the doses tested were well tolerated. Percentage suppression of parasite growth on day 4 post-infection ranged from 1 to 73 % in mice infected with P. berghei and treated with extracts when compared with chloroquine diphosphate, the standard reference drug which had a chemosuppression of 90 %. The percentage survival of mice that received extract ranged from 0 to 60 % (increased as the dose increases to 800 mg/kg). Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of tannins, saponins, and phenolic compounds in all the three plants tested.

  1. Triaminopyrimidine is a fast-killing and long-acting antimalarial clinical candidate

    PubMed Central

    Hameed P., Shahul; Solapure, Suresh; Patil, Vikas; Henrich, Philipp P.; Magistrado, Pamela A.; Bharath, Sowmya; Murugan, Kannan; Viswanath, Pavithra; Puttur, Jayashree; Srivastava, Abhishek; Bellale, Eknath; Panduga, Vijender; Shanbag, Gajanan; Awasthy, Disha; Landge, Sudhir; Morayya, Sapna; Koushik, Krishna; Saralaya, Ramanatha; Raichurkar, Anandkumar; Rautela, Nikhil; Roy Choudhury, Nilanjana; Ambady, Anisha; Nandishaiah, Radha; Reddy, Jitendar; Prabhakar, K. R.; Menasinakai, Sreenivasaiah; Rudrapatna, Suresh; Chatterji, Monalisa; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Martínez, María Santos; Sanz, Laura María; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Fidock, David A.; Lukens, Amanda K.; Wirth, Dyann F.; Bandodkar, Balachandra; Mukherjee, Kakoli; McLaughlin, Robert E.; Waterson, David; Rosenbrier-Ribeiro, Lyn; Hickling, Kevin; Balasubramanian, V.; Warner, Peter; Hosagrahara, Vinayak; Dudley, Adam; Iyer, Pravin S.; Narayanan, Shridhar; Kavanagh, Stefan; Sambandamurthy, Vasan K.

    2015-01-01

    The widespread emergence of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) strains resistant to frontline agents has fuelled the search for fast-acting agents with novel mechanism of action. Here, we report the discovery and optimization of novel antimalarial compounds, the triaminopyrimidines (TAPs), which emerged from a phenotypic screen against the blood stages of Pf. The clinical candidate (compound 12) is efficacious in a mouse model of Pf malaria with an ED99 <30 mg kg−1 and displays good in vivo safety margins in guinea pigs and rats. With a predicted half-life of 36 h in humans, a single dose of 260 mg might be sufficient to maintain therapeutic blood concentration for 4–5 days. Whole-genome sequencing of resistant mutants implicates the vacuolar ATP synthase as a genetic determinant of resistance to TAPs. Our studies highlight the potential of TAPs for single-dose treatment of Pf malaria in combination with other agents in clinical development. PMID:25823686

  2. Antimalarial 4(1H)-pyridones bind to the Qi site of cytochrome bc1

    PubMed Central

    Capper, Michael J.; O’Neill, Paul M.; Fisher, Nicholas; Strange, Richard W.; Moss, Darren; Ward, Stephen A.; Berry, Neil G.; Lawrenson, Alexandre S.; Hasnain, S. Samar; Biagini, Giancarlo A.; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome bc1 is a proven drug target in the prevention and treatment of malaria. The rise in drug-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum, the organism responsible for malaria, has generated a global effort in designing new classes of drugs. Much of the design/redesign work on overcoming this resistance has been focused on compounds that are presumed to bind the Qo site (one of two potential binding sites within cytochrome bc1) using the known crystal structure of this large membrane-bound macromolecular complex via in silico modeling. Cocrystallization of the cytochrome bc1 complex with the 4(1H)-pyridone class of inhibitors, GSK932121 and GW844520, that have been shown to be potent antimalarial agents in vivo, revealed that these inhibitors do not bind at the Qo site but bind at the Qi site. The discovery that these compounds bind at the Qi site may provide a molecular explanation for the cardiotoxicity and eventual failure of GSK932121 in phase-1 clinical trial and highlight the need for direct experimental observation of a compound bound to a target site before chemical optimization and development for clinical trials. The binding of the 4(1H)-pyridone class of inhibitors to Qi also explains the ability of this class to overcome parasite Qo-based atovaquone resistance and provides critical structural information for future design of new selective compounds with improved safety profiles. PMID:25564664

  3. Synthesis, antimalarial activity in vitro and docking studies of novel neolignan derivatives.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Glaécia A N; Souza, Gisele C; Santos, Lourivaldo S; Barata, Lauro E S; Meneses, Carla C F; Krettli, Antoniana U; Daniel-Ribeiro, Cláudio Tadeu; Alves, Cláudio Nahum

    2017-02-28

    The absence of effective vaccines against malaria and the difficulties associated with controlling mosquito vectors has left chemotherapy as the primary control measure against malaria. However, the emergence and spread of parasite resistance to conventional antimalarial drugs result in a worrisome scenario making the search for new drugs a priority. In the present study, the activities of nine neolignan derivatives were evaluated as follows: (i) against blood forms of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum (clone W2), using the tritiated hypoxanthine incorporation and Anti-HRPII assays; (ii) for cytotoxic activity against cultured human hepatoma cells (HepG2); and, (iii) for intermolecular interaction with the P. falciparum cysteine protease of falcipain-2 (F2) by molecular docking. The neolignan derivatives 9 and 10 showed activity against the blood form of the chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum clone W2 and were not cytotoxic against cultured human hepatoma cells. A molecular docking study of these two neolignans with FP2 revealed several intermolecular interactions that should guide the design of future analogs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. A potent antimalarial benzoxaborole targets a Plasmodium falciparum cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor homologue.

    PubMed

    Sonoiki, Ebere; Ng, Caroline L; Lee, Marcus C S; Guo, Denghui; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Zhou, Yasheen; Alley, M R K; Ahyong, Vida; Sanz, Laura M; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria Jose; Dong, Chen; Schupp, Patrick G; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jenny; Cooper, Roland A; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; DeRisi, Joseph; Freund, Yvonne R; Fidock, David A; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2017-03-06

    Benzoxaboroles are effective against bacterial, fungal and protozoan pathogens. We report potent activity of the benzoxaborole AN3661 against Plasmodium falciparum laboratory-adapted strains (mean IC50 32 nM), Ugandan field isolates (mean ex vivo IC50 64 nM), and murine P. berghei and P. falciparum infections (day 4 ED90 0.34 and 0.57 mg kg(-1), respectively). Multiple P. falciparum lines selected in vitro for resistance to AN3661 harboured point mutations in pfcpsf3, which encodes a homologue of mammalian cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 3 (CPSF-73 or CPSF3). CRISPR-Cas9-mediated introduction of pfcpsf3 mutations into parental lines recapitulated AN3661 resistance. PfCPSF3 homology models placed these mutations in the active site, where AN3661 is predicted to bind. Transcripts for three trophozoite-expressed genes were lost in AN3661-treated trophozoites, which was not observed in parasites selected or engineered for AN3661 resistance. Our results identify the pre-mRNA processing factor PfCPSF3 as a promising antimalarial drug target.

  5. A potent antimalarial benzoxaborole targets a Plasmodium falciparum cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor homologue

    PubMed Central

    Sonoiki, Ebere; Ng, Caroline L.; Lee, Marcus C. S.; Guo, Denghui; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Zhou, Yasheen; Alley, M. R. K.; Ahyong, Vida; Sanz, Laura M.; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria Jose; Dong, Chen; Schupp, Patrick G.; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jenny; Cooper, Roland A.; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; DeRisi, Joseph; Freund, Yvonne R.; Fidock, David A.; Rosenthal, Philip J.

    2017-01-01

    Benzoxaboroles are effective against bacterial, fungal and protozoan pathogens. We report potent activity of the benzoxaborole AN3661 against Plasmodium falciparum laboratory-adapted strains (mean IC50 32 nM), Ugandan field isolates (mean ex vivo IC50 64 nM), and murine P. berghei and P. falciparum infections (day 4 ED90 0.34 and 0.57 mg kg−1, respectively). Multiple P. falciparum lines selected in vitro for resistance to AN3661 harboured point mutations in pfcpsf3, which encodes a homologue of mammalian cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 3 (CPSF-73 or CPSF3). CRISPR-Cas9-mediated introduction of pfcpsf3 mutations into parental lines recapitulated AN3661 resistance. PfCPSF3 homology models placed these mutations in the active site, where AN3661 is predicted to bind. Transcripts for three trophozoite-expressed genes were lost in AN3661-treated trophozoites, which was not observed in parasites selected or engineered for AN3661 resistance. Our results identify the pre-mRNA processing factor PfCPSF3 as a promising antimalarial drug target. PMID:28262680

  6. SICR rumor spreading model in complex networks: Counterattack and self-resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zan, Yongli; Wu, Jianliang; Li, Ping; Yu, Qinglin

    2014-07-01

    Rumor is an important form of social interaction. However, spreading of harmful rumors could have a significant negative impact on the well-being of the society. In this paper, considering the counterattack mechanism of the rumor spreading, we introduce two new models: Susceptible-Infective-Counterattack-Refractory (SICR) model and adjusted-SICR model. We then derive mean-field equations to describe their dynamics in homogeneous networks and conduct the steady-state analysis. We also introduce the self-resistance parameter τ, and study the influence of this parameter on rumor spreading. Numerical simulations are performed to compare the SICR model with the SIR model and the adjusted-SICR model, respectively, and we investigate the spreading peak of the rumor and the final size of the rumor with various parameters. Simulation results are congruent exactly with the theoretical analysis. The experiment reveals some interesting patterns of rumor spreading involved with counterattack force.

  7. Inhibition of the peroxidative degradation of haem as the basis of action of chloroquine and other quinoline antimalarials.

    PubMed Central

    Loria, P; Miller, S; Foley, M; Tilley, L

    1999-01-01

    The malaria parasite feeds by degrading haemoglobin in an acidic food vacuole, producing free haem moieties as a by-product. The haem in oxyhaemoglobin is oxidized from the Fe(II) state to the Fe(III) state with the consequent production of an equimolar concentration of H2O2. We have analysed the fate of haem molecules in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes and have found that only about one third of the haem is polymerized to form haemozoin. The remainder appears to be degraded by a non-enzymic process which leads to an accumulation of iron in the parasite. A possible route for degradation of the haem is by reacting with H2O2, and we show that, under conditions designed to resemble those found in the food vacuole, i.e., at pH5.2 in the presence of protein, free haem undergoes rapid peroxidative decomposition. Chloroquine and quinacrine are shown to be efficient inhibitors of the peroxidative destruction of haem, while epiquinine, a quinoline compound with very low antimalarial activity, has little inhibitory effect. We also show that chloroquine enhances the association of haem with membranes, while epiquinine inhibits this association, and that treatment of parasitized erythrocytes with chloroquine leads to a build-up of membrane-associated haem in the parasite. We suggest that chloroquine exerts its antimalarial activity by causing a build-up of toxic membrane-associated haem molecules that eventually destroy the integrity of the malaria parasite. We have further shown that resistance-modulating compounds, such as chlorpromazine, interact with haem and efficiently inhibit its degradation. This may explain the weak antimalarial activities of these compounds. PMID:10191268

  8. Interacting networks of resistance, virulence and core machinery genes identified by genome-wide epistasis analysis.

    PubMed

    Skwark, Marcin J; Croucher, Nicholas J; Puranen, Santeri; Chewapreecha, Claire; Pesonen, Maiju; Xu, Ying Ying; Turner, Paul; Harris, Simon R; Beres, Stephen B; Musser, James M; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D; Aurell, Erik; Corander, Jukka

    2017-02-01

    Recent advances in the scale and diversity of population genomic datasets for bacteria now provide the potential for genome-wide patterns of co-evolution to be studied at the resolution of individual bases. Here we describe a new statistical method, genomeDCA, which uses recent advances in computational structural biology to identify the polymorphic loci under the strongest co-evolutionary pressures. We apply genomeDCA to two large population data sets representing the major human pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) and Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus). For pneumococcus we identified 5,199 putative epistatic interactions between 1,936 sites. Over three-quarters of the links were between sites within the pbp2x, pbp1a and pbp2b genes, the sequences of which are critical in determining non-susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics. A network-based analysis found these genes were also coupled to that encoding dihydrofolate reductase, changes to which underlie trimethoprim resistance. Distinct from these antibiotic resistance genes, a large network component of 384 protein coding sequences encompassed many genes critical in basic cellular functions, while another distinct component included genes associated with virulence. The group A Streptococcus (GAS) data set population represents a clonal population with relatively little genetic variation and a high level of linkage disequilibrium across the genome. Despite this, we were able to pinpoint two RNA pseudouridine synthases, which were each strongly linked to a separate set of loci across the chromosome, representing biologically plausible targets of co-selection. The population genomic analysis method applied here identifies statistically significantly co-evolving locus pairs, potentially arising from fitness selection interdependence reflecting underlying protein-protein interactions, or genes whose product activities contribute to the same phenotype. This discovery approach greatly

  9. Interacting networks of resistance, virulence and core machinery genes identified by genome-wide epistasis analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pesonen, Maiju; Musser, James M.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Aurell, Erik; Corander, Jukka

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in the scale and diversity of population genomic datasets for bacteria now provide the potential for genome-wide patterns of co-evolution to be studied at the resolution of individual bases. Here we describe a new statistical method, genomeDCA, which uses recent advances in computational structural biology to identify the polymorphic loci under the strongest co-evolutionary pressures. We apply genomeDCA to two large population data sets representing the major human pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) and Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus). For pneumococcus we identified 5,199 putative epistatic interactions between 1,936 sites. Over three-quarters of the links were between sites within the pbp2x, pbp1a and pbp2b genes, the sequences of which are critical in determining non-susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics. A network-based analysis found these genes were also coupled to that encoding dihydrofolate reductase, changes to which underlie trimethoprim resistance. Distinct from these antibiotic resistance genes, a large network component of 384 protein coding sequences encompassed many genes critical in basic cellular functions, while another distinct component included genes associated with virulence. The group A Streptococcus (GAS) data set population represents a clonal population with relatively little genetic variation and a high level of linkage disequilibrium across the genome. Despite this, we were able to pinpoint two RNA pseudouridine synthases, which were each strongly linked to a separate set of loci across the chromosome, representing biologically plausible targets of co-selection. The population genomic analysis method applied here identifies statistically significantly co-evolving locus pairs, potentially arising from fitness selection interdependence reflecting underlying protein-protein interactions, or genes whose product activities contribute to the same phenotype. This discovery approach greatly

  10. In vivo antimalarial activity of extracts of Tanzanian medicinal plants used for the treatment of malaria

    PubMed Central

    Nondo, Ramadhani S.O.; Erasto, Paul; Moshi, Mainen J.; Zacharia, Abdallah; Masimba, Pax J.; Kidukuli, Abdul W.

    2016-01-01

    Plants used in traditional medicine have been the source of a number of currently used antimalarial medicines and continue to be a promising resource for the discovery of new classes of antimalarial compounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo antimalarial activity of four plants; Erythrina schliebenii Harms, Holarrhena pubescens Buch-Ham, Phyllanthus nummulariifolius Poir, and Caesalpinia bonducella (L.) Flem used for treatment of malaria in Tanzania. In vivo antimalarial activity was assessed using the 4-day suppressive antimalarial assay. Mice were infected by injection via tail vein with 2 × 107 erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Extracts were administered orally, once daily, for a total of four daily doses from the day of infection. Chloroquine (10 mg/kg/day) and solvent (5 mL/kg/day) were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. The extracts of C. bonducella, E. schliebenii, H. pubescens, and P. nummulariifolius exhibited dose-dependent suppression of parasite growth in vivo in mice, with the highest suppression being by C. bonducella extract. While each of the plant extracts has potential to yield useful antimalarial compounds, the dichloromethane root extract of C. bonducella seems to be the most promising for isolation of active antimalarial compound(s). In vivo antimalarial activity presented in this study supports traditional uses of C. bonducella roots, E. schliebenii stem barks, H. pubescens roots, and P. nummulariifolius for treatment of malaria. PMID:27144154

  11. Characterization of Novel Antimalarial Compound ACT-451840: Preclinical Assessment of Activity and Dose–Efficacy Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Le Bihan, Amélie; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Binkert, Christoph; Boss, Christoph; Brun, Reto; Brunner, Ralf; Buchmann, Stephan; Dechering, Koen J.; Delves, Michael; Ewerling, Sonja; Ferrer, Santiago; Fischli, Christoph; Gamo–Benito, Francisco Javier; Heidmann, Bibia; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Leroy, Didier; Martínez, Maria Santos; Meyer, Solange; Moehrle, Joerg J.; Noviyanti, Rintis; Sanz, Laura María; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Scheurer, Christian; Schleiferboeck, Sarah; Sinden, Robert; Snyder, Christopher; Straimer, Judith; Wirjanata, Grennady; Marfurt, Jutta; Weller, Thomas; Clozel, Martine; Wittlin, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Background Artemisinin resistance observed in Southeast Asia threatens the continued use of artemisinin-based combination therapy in endemic countries. Additionally, the diversity of chemical mode of action in the global portfolio of marketed antimalarials is extremely limited. Addressing the urgent need for the development of new antimalarials, a chemical class of potent antimalarial compounds with a novel mode of action was recently identified. Herein, the preclinical characterization of one of these compounds, ACT-451840, conducted in partnership with academic and industrial groups is presented. Method and Findings The properties of ACT-451840 are described, including its spectrum of activities against multiple life cycle stages of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (asexual and sexual) and Plasmodium vivax (asexual) as well as oral in vivo efficacies in two murine malaria models that permit infection with the human and the rodent parasites P. falciparum and Plasmodium berghei, respectively. In vitro, ACT-451840 showed a 50% inhibition concentration of 0.4 nM (standard deviation [SD]: ± 0.0 nM) against the drug-sensitive P. falciparum NF54 strain. The 90% effective doses in the in vivo efficacy models were 3.7 mg/kg against P. falciparum (95% confidence interval: 3.3–4.9 mg/kg) and 13 mg/kg against P. berghei (95% confidence interval: 11–16 mg/kg). ACT-451840 potently prevented male gamete formation from the gametocyte stage with a 50% inhibition concentration of 5.89 nM (SD: ± 1.80 nM) and dose-dependently blocked oocyst development in the mosquito with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 30 nM (range: 23–39). The compound’s preclinical safety profile is presented and is in line with the published results of the first-in-man study in healthy male participants, in whom ACT-451840 was well tolerated. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling was applied using efficacy in the murine models (defined either as antimalarial activity or as

  12. Coexpression network analysis of the genes regulated by two types of resistance responses to powdery mildew in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juncheng; Zheng, Hongyuan; Li, Yiwen; Li, Hongjie; Liu, Xin; Qin, Huanju; Dong, Lingli; Wang, Daowen

    2016-01-01

    Powdery mildew disease caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt) inflicts severe economic losses in wheat crops. A systematic understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in wheat resistance to Bgt is essential for effectively controlling the disease. Here, using the diploid wheat Triticum urartu as a host, the genes regulated by immune (IM) and hypersensitive reaction (HR) resistance responses to Bgt were investigated through transcriptome sequencing. Four gene coexpression networks (GCNs) were developed using transcriptomic data generated for 20 T. urartu accessions showing IM, HR or susceptible responses. The powdery mildew resistance regulated (PMRR) genes whose expression was significantly correlated with Bgt resistance were identified, and they tended to be hubs and enriched in six major modules. A wide occurrence of negative regulation of PMRR genes was observed. Three new candidate immune receptor genes (TRIUR3_13045, TRIUR3_01037 and TRIUR3_06195) positively associated with Bgt resistance were discovered. Finally, the involvement of TRIUR3_01037 in Bgt resistance was tentatively verified through cosegregation analysis in a F2 population and functional expression assay in Bgt susceptible leaf cells. This research provides insights into the global network properties of PMRR genes. Potential molecular differences between IM and HR resistance responses to Bgt are discussed. PMID:27033636

  13. An associative capacitive network based on nanoscale complementary resistive switches for memory-intensive computing.

    PubMed

    Kavehei, Omid; Linn, Eike; Nielen, Lutz; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Skafidas, Efstratios; Valov, Ilia; Waser, Rainer

    2013-06-07

    We report on the implementation of an Associative Capacitive Network (ACN) based on the nondestructive capacitive readout of two Complementary Resistive Switches (2-CRSs). ACNs are capable of performing a fully parallel search for Hamming distances (i.e. similarity) between input and stored templates. Unlike conventional associative memories where charge retention is a key function and hence, they require frequent refresh cycles, in ACNs, information is retained in a nonvolatile resistive state and normal tasks are carried out through capacitive coupling between input and output nodes. Each device consists of two CRS cells and no selective element is needed, therefore, CMOS circuitry is only required in the periphery, for addressing and read-out. Highly parallel processing, nonvolatility, wide interconnectivity and low-energy consumption are significant advantages of ACNs over conventional and emerging associative memories. These characteristics make ACNs one of the promising candidates for applications in memory-intensive and cognitive computing, switches and routers as binary and ternary Content Addressable Memories (CAMs) and intelligent data processing.

  14. An associative capacitive network based on nanoscale complementary resistive switches for memory-intensive computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavehei, Omid; Linn, Eike; Nielen, Lutz; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Skafidas, Efstratios; Valov, Ilia; Waser, Rainer

    2013-05-01

    We report on the implementation of an Associative Capacitive Network (ACN) based on the nondestructive capacitive readout of two Complementary Resistive Switches (2-CRSs). ACNs are capable of performing a fully parallel search for Hamming distances (i.e. similarity) between input and stored templates. Unlike conventional associative memories where charge retention is a key function and hence, they require frequent refresh cycles, in ACNs, information is retained in a nonvolatile resistive state and normal tasks are carried out through capacitive coupling between input and output nodes. Each device consists of two CRS cells and no selective element is needed, therefore, CMOS circuitry is only required in the periphery, for addressing and read-out. Highly parallel processing, nonvolatility, wide interconnectivity and low-energy consumption are significant advantages of ACNs over conventional and emerging associative memories. These characteristics make ACNs one of the promising candidates for applications in memory-intensive and cognitive computing, switches and routers as binary and ternary Content Addressable Memories (CAMs) and intelligent data processing.

  15. The Network of Epithelial-mesenchymal transition: potential new targets for tumor resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nantajit, Danupon; Lin, Dong; Li, Jian Jian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In multiple cell metazoans, the ability of polarized epithelial cells to convert to motile mesenchymal cells in order to relocate to another location is governed by a unique process termed epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). While being an essential process of cellular plasticity for normal tissue and organ developments, EMT is found to be involved in an array of malignant phenotypes of tumor cells including proliferation and invasion, angiogenesis, stemness of cancer cells and resistance to chemo-radiotherapy. Although EMT is being extensively studied and demonstrated to play a key role in tumor metastasis and in sustaining tumor hallmarks, there is a lack of clear picture of the overall EMT signaling network, wavering the potential clinical trials targeting EMT. Methods In this review, we highlight the potential key therapeutic targets of EMT linked with tumor aggressiveness, hypoxia, angiogenesis and cancer stem cells, emphasizing on an emerging EMT-associated NF-κB/HER2/STAT3 pathway in radioresistance of breast cancer stem cells. Results Further definition of cancer stem cell repopulation due to EMT-controlled tumor microenvironment will help to understand how tumors exploit the EMT mechanisms for their survival and expansion advantages. Conclusions The knowledge of EMT will offer more effective targets in clinical trials to treat therapy-resistant metastatic lesions. PMID:25270087

  16. Biodiversity of amoebae and amoeba-resisting bacteria in a hospital water network.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Vincent; Herrera-Rimann, Katia; Blanc, Dominique S; Greub, Gilbert

    2006-04-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) are ubiquitous organisms that have been isolated from various domestic water systems, such as cooling towers and hospital water networks. In addition to their own pathogenicity, FLA can also act as Trojan horses and be naturally infected with amoeba-resisting bacteria (ARB) that may be involved in human infections, such as pneumonia. We investigated the biodiversity of bacteria and their amoebal hosts in a hospital water network. Using amoebal enrichment on nonnutrient agar, we isolated 15 protist strains from 200 (7.5%) samples. One thermotolerant Hartmannella vermiformis isolate harbored both Legionella pneumophila and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. By using amoebal coculture with axenic Acanthamoeba castellanii as the cellular background, we recovered at least one ARB from 45.5% of the samples. Four new ARB isolates were recovered by culture, and one of these isolates was widely present in the water network. Alphaproteobacteria (such as Rhodoplanes, Methylobacterium, Bradyrhizobium, Afipia, and Bosea) were recovered from 30.5% of the samples, mycobacteria (Mycobacterium gordonae, Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium xenopi) were recovered from 20.5% of the samples, and Gammaproteobacteria (Legionella) were recovered from 5.5% of the samples. No Chlamydia or Chlamydia-like organisms were recovered by amoebal coculture or detected by PCR. The observed strong association between the presence of amoebae and the presence of Legionella (P < 0.001) and mycobacteria (P = 0.009) further suggests that FLA are a reservoir for these ARB and underlines the importance of considering amoebae when water control measures are designed.

  17. Long term effectiveness of antimalarial drugs in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Avina-Zubieta, J; Galindo-Rodriguez, G.; Newman, S.; Suarez-Almazor, M.; Russell, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study was to compare the long term effectiveness between chloroquine (CQ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ).
METHODS—Medical charts of all patients seen by eight rheumatologists practising in two tertiary care centres and starting antimalarial treatment between January 1985 and December 1993 were reviewed. Patient characteristics, disease, and treatment information were collected. The main outcome measures were the cause of and the time to the discontinuation of antimalarial drugs resulting from all causes, principally toxicity or inefficacy, or both. Bivariate analysis including t tests and χ2 tests were used to assess differences between means and proportions respectively. Survival curves were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis (Cox regression) was used to adjust for potential confounders.
RESULTS—After all medical records were reviewed, 1042 eligible cases were identified. From these, 940 (90%) had usable information and they represent the cohort. Five hundred and fifty eight had rheumatoid arthritis, 178 had systemic lupus erythematosus, 127 had palindromic arthritis, and 77 had other diagnoses. Fifty seven per cent of the patients received CQ and 43% HCQ. The proportion of patients with side effects taking HCQ and CQ was 15% and 28% respectively (p=0.001). Using Cox regression model to adjust for age at the onset of antimalarial treatment, physician differences, sex, disease type, disease duration before treatment, and rank selection, there were no differences in the hazard ratio (HR) for overall discontinuations between CQ and HCQ. While the HR for discontinuations because of toxicity was lower for HCQ (HR= 0.6, 95% CI 0.4, 0.9), the HR for discontinuations because of inefficacy was significantly higher for HCQ (HR= 1.4, 95% CI 1.1, 1.9).
CONCLUSIONS—After adjusting for time and several confounders HCQ was less toxic but less effective than CQ. Only one case of probable

  18. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of 3-phenylquinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxide derivatives as antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Esther; Lima, Lidia M; Bongard, Emily; Charnaud, Sarah; Villar, Raquel; Solano, Beatriz; Burguete, Asunción; Perez-Silanes, Silvia; Aldana, Ignacio; Vivas, Livia; Monge, Antonio

    2008-09-01

    As a continuation of our research and with the aim of obtaining new antimalarial agents, new series of 3-phenylquinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxide derivatives have been synthesized following the classical Beirut reaction. Antiplasmodial activity was evaluated in vitro against Plasmodium falciparum by the incorporation of [3H]-hypoxanthine. Cytotoxicity was tested in KB cells by AlamarBlue assay. Twenty-one of the 60 compounds that were assayed against 3D7 (CQ-sensitive) showed enough activity to be also evaluated against K1 (CQ-resistant) strain. Ten of them were shown to be more active than chloroquine in the resistant strain. The most interesting compounds are 7-(methyl or methoxy)-3-(4'-fluoro or chloro)phenylquinoxaline-2-carbonitrile 1,4-di-N-oxides because of their low IC50 and their high SI shown for the K1 strain, making them valid new leads.

  19. Two-Point Resistance of a Non-Regular Cylindrical Network with a Zero Resistor Axis and Two Arbitrary Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zhi-Zhong

    2017-03-01

    We study a problem of two-point resistance in a non-regular m × n cylindrical network with a zero resistor axis and two arbitrary boundaries by means of the Recursion-Transform method. This is a new problem never solved before, the Green’s function technique and the Laplacian matrix approach are invalid in this case. A disordered network with arbitrary boundaries is a basic model in many physical systems or real world systems, however looking for the exact calculation of the resistance of a binary resistor network is important but difficult in the case of the arbitrary boundaries, the boundary is like a wall or trap which affects the behavior of finite network. In this paper we obtain a general resistance formula of a non-regular m × n cylindrical network, which is composed of a single summation. Further, the current distribution is given explicitly as a byproduct of the method. As applications, several interesting results are derived by making special cases from the general formula. Supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province under Grant No. BK20161278

  20. Resistive Switching Memory of TiO2 Nanowire Networks Grown on Ti Foil by a Single Hydrothermal Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ming; Musselman, Kevin P.; Duley, Walter W.; Zhou, Norman Y.

    2017-04-01

    The resistive switching characteristics of TiO2 nanowire networks directly grown on Ti foil by a single-step hydrothermal technique are discussed in this paper. The Ti foil serves as the supply of Ti atoms for growth of the TiO2 nanowires, making the preparation straightforward. It also acts as a bottom electrode for the device. A top Al electrode was fabricated by e-beam evaporation process. The Al/TiO2 nanowire networks/Ti device fabricated in this way displayed a highly repeatable and electroforming-free bipolar resistive behavior with retention for more than 104 s and an OFF/ON ratio of approximately 70. The switching mechanism of this Al/TiO2 nanowire networks/Ti device is suggested to arise from the migration of oxygen vacancies under applied electric field. This provides a facile way to obtain metal oxide nanowire-based ReRAM device in the future.

  1. Single vessel air injection estimates of xylem resistance to cavitation are affected by vessel network characteristics and sample length.

    PubMed

    Venturas, Martin D; Rodriguez-Zaccaro, F Daniela; Percolla, Marta I; Crous, Casparus J; Jacobsen, Anna L; Pratt, R Brandon

    2016-10-01

    Xylem resistance to cavitation is an important trait that is related to the ecology and survival of plant species. Vessel network characteristics, such as vessel length and connectivity, could affect the spread of emboli from gas-filled vessels to functional ones, triggering their cavitation. We hypothesized that the cavitation resistance of xylem vessels is randomly distributed throughout the vessel network. We predicted that single vessel air injection (SVAI) vulnerability curves (VCs) would thus be affected by sample length. Longer stem samples were predicted to appear more resistant than shorter samples due to the sampled path including greater numbers of vessels. We evaluated the vessel network characteristics of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.), English oak (Quercus robur L.) and black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & A. Gray), and constructed SVAI VCs for 5- and 20-cm-long segments. We also constructed VCs with a standard centrifuge method and used computer modelling to estimate the curve shift expected for pathways composed of different numbers of vessels. For all three species, the SVAI VCs for 5 cm segments rose exponentially and were more vulnerable than the 20 cm segments. The 5 cm curve shapes were exponential and were consistent with centrifuge VCs. Modelling data supported the observed SVAI VC shifts, which were related to path length and vessel network characteristics. These results suggest that exponential VCs represent the most realistic curve shape for individual vessel resistance distributions for these species. At the network level, the presence of some vessels with a higher resistance to cavitation may help avoid emboli spread during tissue dehydration.

  2. Surveillance of Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae: Tracking Molecular Epidemiology and Outcomes through a Regional Network

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Federico; Rudin, Susan D.; Cober, Eric; Hanrahan, Jennifer; Ziegler, Julie; Webber, Raymond; Fox, Jacqueline; Mason, Pamela; Richter, Sandra S.; Cline, Marianne; Hall, Geraldine S.; Kaye, Keith S.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Kalayjian, Robert C.; Salata, Robert A.; Segre, Julia A.; Conlan, Sean; Evans, Scott; Fowler, Vance G.

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenem resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is on the rise in the United States. A regional network was established to study microbiological and genetic determinants of clinical outcomes in hospitalized patients with carbapenem-resistant (CR) Klebsiella pneumoniae in a prospective, multicenter, observational study. To this end, predefined clinical characteristics and outcomes were recorded and K. pneumoniae isolates were analyzed for strain typing and resistance mechanism determination. In a 14-month period, 251 patients were included. While most of the patients were admitted from long-term care settings, 28% of them were admitted from home. Hospitalizations were prolonged and complicated. Nonsusceptibility to colistin and tigecycline occurred in isolates from 7 and 45% of the patients, respectively. Most of the CR K. pneumoniae isolates belonged to repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) types A and B (both sequence type 258) and carried either blaKPC-2 (48%) or blaKPC-3 (51%). One isolate tested positive for blaNDM-1, a sentinel discovery in this region. Important differences between strain types were noted; rep-PCR type B strains were associated with blaKPC-3 (odds ratio [OR], 294; 95% confidence interval [CI], 58 to 2,552; P < 0.001), gentamicin nonsusceptibility (OR, 24; 95% CI, 8.39 to 79.38; P < 0.001), amikacin susceptibility (OR, 11.0; 95% CI, 3.21 to 42.42; P < 0.001), tigecycline nonsusceptibility (OR, 5.34; 95% CI, 1.30 to 36.41; P = 0.018), a shorter length of stay (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.00; P = 0.043), and admission from a skilled-nursing facility (OR, 3.09; 95% CI, 1.26 to 8.08; P = 0.013). Our analysis shows that (i) CR K. pneumoniae is seen primarily in the elderly long-term care population and that (ii) regional monitoring of CR K. pneumoniae reveals insights into molecular characteristics. This work highlights the crucial role of ongoing surveillance of carbapenem resistance determinants. PMID:24798270

  3. Surveillance of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae: tracking molecular epidemiology and outcomes through a regional network.

    PubMed

    van Duin, David; Perez, Federico; Rudin, Susan D; Cober, Eric; Hanrahan, Jennifer; Ziegler, Julie; Webber, Raymond; Fox, Jacqueline; Mason, Pamela; Richter, Sandra S; Cline, Marianne; Hall, Geraldine S; Kaye, Keith S; Jacobs, Michael R; Kalayjian, Robert C; Salata, Robert A; Segre, Julia A; Conlan, Sean; Evans, Scott; Fowler, Vance G; Bonomo, Robert A

    2014-07-01

    Carbapenem resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is on the rise in the United States. A regional network was established to study microbiological and genetic determinants of clinical outcomes in hospitalized patients with carbapenem-resistant (CR) Klebsiella pneumoniae in a prospective, multicenter, observational study. To this end, predefined clinical characteristics and outcomes were recorded and K. pneumoniae isolates were analyzed for strain typing and resistance mechanism determination. In a 14-month period, 251 patients were included. While most of the patients were admitted from long-term care settings, 28% of them were admitted from home. Hospitalizations were prolonged and complicated. Nonsusceptibility to colistin and tigecycline occurred in isolates from 7 and 45% of the patients, respectively. Most of the CR K. pneumoniae isolates belonged to repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) types A and B (both sequence type 258) and carried either blaKPC-2 (48%) or blaKPC-3 (51%). One isolate tested positive for blaNDM-1, a sentinel discovery in this region. Important differences between strain types were noted; rep-PCR type B strains were associated with blaKPC-3 (odds ratio [OR], 294; 95% confidence interval [CI], 58 to 2,552; P < 0.001), gentamicin nonsusceptibility (OR, 24; 95% CI, 8.39 to 79.38; P < 0.001), amikacin susceptibility (OR, 11.0; 95% CI, 3.21 to 42.42; P < 0.001), tigecycline nonsusceptibility (OR, 5.34; 95% CI, 1.30 to 36.41; P = 0.018), a shorter length of stay (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.00; P = 0.043), and admission from a skilled-nursing facility (OR, 3.09; 95% CI, 1.26 to 8.08; P = 0.013). Our analysis shows that (i) CR K. pneumoniae is seen primarily in the elderly long-term care population and that (ii) regional monitoring of CR K. pneumoniae reveals insights into molecular characteristics. This work highlights the crucial role of ongoing surveillance of carbapenem resistance determinants.

  4. Development and Optimization of a Novel 384-Well Anti-Malarial Imaging Assay Validated for High-Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M.

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing occurrence of drug resistance in the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, there is a great need for new and novel anti-malarial drugs. We have developed a 384-well, high-throughput imaging assay for the detection of new anti-malarial compounds, which was initially validated by screening a marine natural product library, and subsequently used to screen more than 3 million data points from a variety of compound sources. Founded on another fluorescence-based P. falciparum growth inhibition assay, the DNA-intercalating dye 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, was used to monitor changes in parasite number. Fluorescent images were acquired on the PerkinElmer Opera High Throughput confocal imaging system and analyzed with a spot detection algorithm using the Acapella data processing software. Further optimization of this assay sought to increase throughput, assay stability, and compatibility with our high-throughput screening equipment platforms. The assay typically yielded Z'-factor values of 0.5–0.6, with signal-to-noise ratios of 12. PMID:22232455

  5. Identification of phosphinate dipeptide analog inhibitors directed against the Plasmodium falciparum M17 leucine aminopeptidase as lead antimalarial compounds.

    PubMed

    Skinner-Adams, Tina S; Lowther, Jonathan; Teuscher, Franka; Stack, Colin M; Grembecka, Jolanta; Mucha, Artur; Kafarski, Pawel; Trenholme, Katharine R; Dalton, John P; Gardiner, Donald L

    2007-11-29

    Previous studies have pinpointed the M17 leucyl aminopeptidase of Plasmodium falciparum (PfLAP) as a target for the development of new antimalarials. This metallo-exopeptidase functions in the terminal stages of hemoglobin digestion and is inhibited by bestatin, a natural analog of Phe-Leu. By screening novel phosphinate dipeptide analogues for inhibitory activity against recombinant PfLAP, we have discovered two compounds, 4 (hPheP[CH2]Phe) and 5 (hPheP[CH2]Tyr), with inhibitory constants better than bestatin. These compounds are fast, tight-binding inhibitors that make improved contacts within the active site of PfLAP. Both compounds inhibit the growth of P. falciparum in vitro, exhibiting IC50 values against the chloroquine-resistant clone Dd2 of 20-40 and 12-23 muM, respectively. While bestatin exhibited some in vivo activity against Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi, compound 4 reduced parasite burden by 92%. These studies establish the PfLAP as a prime target for the development of antimalarial drugs and provide important new lead compounds.

  6. Comparison of the Exposure Time Dependence of the Activities of Synthetic Ozonide Antimalarials and Dihydroartemisinin against K13 Wild-Type and Mutant Plasmodium falciparum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tuo; Xie, Stanley C.; Cao, Pengxing; Giannangelo, Carlo; McCaw, James; Creek, Darren J.; Charman, Susan A.; Klonis, Nectarios

    2016-01-01

    Fully synthetic endoperoxide antimalarials, namely, OZ277 (RBx11160; also known as arterolane) and OZ439 (artefenomel), have been approved for marketing or are currently in clinical development. We undertook an analysis of the kinetics of the in vitro responses of Plasmodium falciparum to the new ozonide antimalarials. For these studies we used a K13 mutant (artemisinin resistant) isolate from a region in Cambodia and a genetically matched (artemisinin sensitive) K13 revertant. We used a pulsed-exposure assay format to interrogate the time dependence of the response. Because the ozonides have physicochemical properties different from those of the artemisinins, assay optimization was required to ensure that the drugs were completely removed following the pulsed exposure. Like that of artemisinins, ozonide activity requires active hemoglobin degradation. Short pulses of the ozonides were less effective than short pulses of dihydroartemisinin; however, when early-ring-stage parasites were exposed to drugs for periods relevant to their in vivo exposure, the ozonide antimalarials were markedly more effective. PMID:27161632

  7. The potential of anti-malarial compounds derived from African medicinal plants, part I: a pharmacological evaluation of alkaloids and terpenoids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Traditional medicine caters for about 80% of the health care needs of many rural populations around the world, especially in developing countries. In addition, plant-derived compounds have played key roles in drug discovery. Malaria is currently a public health concern in many countries in the world due to factors such as chemotherapy faced by resistance, poor hygienic conditions, poorly managed vector control programmes and no approved vaccines. In this review, an attempt has been made to assess the value of African medicinal plants for drug discovery by discussing the anti-malarial virtue of the derived phytochemicals that have been tested by in vitro and in vivo assays. This survey was focused on pure compounds derived from African flora which have exhibited anti-malarial properties with activities ranging from “very active” to “weakly active”. However, only the compounds which showed anti-malarial activities from “very active” to “moderately active” are discussed in this review. The activity of 278 compounds, mainly alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, coumarines, phenolics, polyacetylenes, xanthones, quinones, steroids, and lignans have been discussed. The first part of this review series covers the activity of 171 compounds belonging to the alkaloid and terpenoid classes. Data available in the literature indicated that African flora hold an enormous potential for the development of phytomedicines for malaria. PMID:24330395

  8. The potential of anti-malarial compounds derived from African medicinal plants, part I: a pharmacological evaluation of alkaloids and terpenoids.

    PubMed

    Amoa Onguéné, Pascal; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Lifongo, Lydia Likowo; Ndom, Jean Claude; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva'a

    2013-12-13

    Traditional medicine caters for about 80% of the health care needs of many rural populations around the world, especially in developing countries. In addition, plant-derived compounds have played key roles in drug discovery. Malaria is currently a public health concern in many countries in the world due to factors such as chemotherapy faced by resistance, poor hygienic conditions, poorly managed vector control programmes and no approved vaccines. In this review, an attempt has been made to assess the value of African medicinal plants for drug discovery by discussing the anti-malarial virtue of the derived phytochemicals that have been tested by in vitro and in vivo assays. This survey was focused on pure compounds derived from African flora which have exhibited anti-malarial properties with activities ranging from "very active" to "weakly active". However, only the compounds which showed anti-malarial activities from "very active" to "moderately active" are discussed in this review. The activity of 278 compounds, mainly alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, coumarines, phenolics, polyacetylenes, xanthones, quinones, steroids, and lignans have been discussed. The first part of this review series covers the activity of 171 compounds belonging to the alkaloid and terpenoid classes. Data available in the literature indicated that African flora hold an enormous potential for the development of phytomedicines for malaria.

  9. Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harparkash; Clarke, Siȃn; Lalani, Mirza; Phanouvong, Souly; Guérin, Philippe; McLoughlin, Andrew; Wilson, Benjamin K; Deats, Michael; Plançon, Aline; Hopkins, Heidi; Miranda, Debora; Schellenberg, David

    2016-02-13

    This meeting report presents the key findings and discussion points of a 1-day meeting entitled 'Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts' held on 28th May 2015, in Geneva, Switzerland, to disseminate the findings of the artemisinin combination therapy consortium's drug quality programme. The teams purchased over 10,000 samples, using representative sampling approaches, from six malaria endemic countries: Equatorial Guinea (Bioko Island), Cambodia, Ghana, Nigeria, Rwanda and Tanzania. Laboratory analyses of these samples showed that falsified anti-malarials (<8 %) were found in just two of the countries, whilst substandard artemisinin-based combinations were present in all six countries and, artemisinin-based monotherapy tablets are still available in some places despite the fact that the WHO has urged regulatory authorities in malaria-endemic countries to take measures to halt the production and marketing of these oral monotherapies since 2007. This report summarizes the presentations that reviewed the public health impact of falsified and substandard drugs, sampling strategies, techniques for drug quality analysis, approaches to strengthen health systems capacity for the surveillance of drug quality, and the ensuing discussion points from the dissemination meeting.

  10. Antimalarial potential of leaves of Chenopodium ambrosioides L.

    PubMed

    Cysne, Dalila Nunes; Fortes, Thiare Silva; Reis, Aramys Silva; de Paulo Ribeiro, Bruno; Dos Santos Ferreira, Amália; do Amaral, Flavia Maria Mendonça; Guerra, Rosane Nassar Meireles; Marinho, Claudio Romero Farias; Nicolete, Roberto; Nascimento, Flávia Raquel Fernandes

    2016-11-01

    In an effort to identify novel therapeutic alternatives for the treatment of malaria, the present study evaluated the antimalarial effect of the crude hydroalcoholic extract (HCE) from the leaves of Chenopodium ambrosioides L. For this purpose, the molecular affinity between the total proteins from erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum and HCE or chloroquine was evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Subsequently, the plasmodicidal potential of HCE was assessed in a P. falciparum culture. Using BALB/c mice infected with Plasmodium berghei intraperitoneally (ip.), we evaluated the effects of ip. treatment, for three consecutive days (day 7, 8, and 9 after infection), with chloroquine (45 mg/kg) or HCE (5 mg/kg), considering the survival index and the parasitaemia. The groups were compared to an untreated control group that receives only PBS at the same periods. The results indicated that HCE could bind to the total proteins of infected erythrocytes and could inhibit the parasite growth in vitro (IC50 = 25.4 g/mL). The in vivo therapeutic treatment with HCE increased the survival and decreased the parasitaemia in the infected animals. Therefore, the HCE treatment exhibited a significant antiplasmodial effect and may be considered as a potential candidate for the development of new antimalarial drugs.

  11. A Novel Way to Grow Hemozoin-Like Crystals In Vitro and Its Use to Screen for Hemozoin Inhibiting Antimalarial Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ritts, Bruce; Burke, Peter; Hänscheid, Thomas; McDonnell, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemozoin crystals are normally formed in vivo by Plasmodium parasites to detoxify free heme released after hemoglobin digestion during its intraerythrocytic stage. Inhibition of hemozoin formation by various drugs results in free heme concentration toxic for the parasites. As a consequence, in vitro assays have been developed to screen and select candidate antimalarial drugs based on their capacity to inhibit hemozoin formation. In this report we describe new ways to form hemozoin-like crystals that were incidentally discovered during research in the field of prion inactivation. Methods We investigated the use of a new assay based on naturally occurring “self-replicating” particles and previously described as presenting resistance to decontamination comparable to prions. The nature of these particles was determined using electron microscopy, Maldi-Tof analysis and X-ray diffraction. They were compared to synthetic hemozoin and to hemozoin obtained from Plasmodium falciparum. We then used the assay to evaluate the capacity of various antimalarial and anti-prion compounds to inhibit “self-replication” (crystallisation) of these particles. Results We identified these particles as being similar to ferriprotoporphyrin IX crystal and confirmed the ability of these particles to serve as nuclei for growth of new hemozoin-like crystals (HLC). HLC are morphologically similar to natural and synthetic hemozoin. Growth of HLC in a simple assay format confirmed inhibition by quinolines antimalarials at potencies described in the literature. Interestingly, artemisinins and tetracyclines also seemed to inhibit HLC growth. Conclusions The described HLC assay is simple and easy to perform and may have the potential to be used as an additional tool to screen antimalarial drugs for their hemozoin inhibiting activity. As already described by others, drugs that inhibit hemozoin crystal formation have also the potential to inhibit misfolded proteins assemblies

  12. The Activities of Current Antimalarial Drugs on the Life Cycle Stages of Plasmodium: A Comparative Study with Human and Rodent Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Delves, Michael; Plouffe, David; Scheurer, Christian; Meister, Stephan; Wittlin, Sergio; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Sinden, Robert E.; Leroy, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Background Malaria remains a disease of devastating global impact, killing more than 800,000 people every year—the vast majority being children under the age of 5. While effective therapies are available, if malaria is to be eradicated a broader range of small molecule therapeutics that are able to target the liver and the transmissible sexual stages are required. These new medicines are needed both to meet the challenge of malaria eradication and to circumvent resistance. Methods and Findings Little is known about the wider stage-specific activities of current antimalarials that were primarily designed to alleviate symptoms of malaria in the blood stage. To overcome this critical gap, we developed assays to measure activity of antimalarials against all life stages of malaria parasites, using a diverse set of human and nonhuman parasite species, including male gamete production (exflagellation) in Plasmodium falciparum, ookinete development in P. berghei, oocyst development in P. berghei and P. falciparum, and the liver stage of P. yoelii. We then compared 50 current and experimental antimalarials in these assays. We show that endoperoxides such as OZ439, a stable synthetic molecule currently in clinical phase IIa trials, are strong inhibitors of gametocyte maturation/gamete formation and impact sporogony; lumefantrine impairs development in the vector; and NPC-1161B, a new 8-aminoquinoline, inhibits sporogony. Conclusions These data enable objective comparisons of the strengths and weaknesses of each chemical class at targeting each stage of the lifecycle. Noting that the activities of many compounds lie within achievable blood concentrations, these results offer an invaluable guide to decisions regarding which drugs to combine in the next-generation of antimalarial drugs. This study might reveal the potential of life-cycle–wide analyses of drugs for other pathogens with complex life cycles. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID

  13. Flexible transparent memory cell: bipolar resistive switching via indium-tin oxide nanowire networks on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Tian, Zhenhuan; Shang, Geng; Wang, Jiangteng; Li, Yufeng; Yun, Feng

    2016-11-01

    This report describes the fabrication and resistive switching (RS) characteristics of a novel flexible transparent (FT) resistive random access memory (ReRAM) device with a Ag/indium-tin oxide (ITO) nanowire network/ITO capacitor deposited on a PDMS substrate. The transmittance of the device is ˜70% in the visible region, and it exhibits a stable high-resistance state (HRS) to low-resistance state (LRS) ratio (HRS/LRS ratio) in different bending states. The RS characteristics are attributed to the congregate state of oxygen vacancies at different voltages, and the difference between positive and negative bending is mainly contributed by the effect of stress on the conductive layer. The FT-ReRAM can be used as nonvolatile memory element in future flexible transparent devices.

  14. Identifying microRNA-mRNA regulatory network in gemcitabine-resistant cells derived from human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yehua; Pan, Yan; Xu, Litao; Chen, Lianyu; Liu, Luming; Chen, Hao; Chen, Zhen; Meng, Zhiqiang

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is unresectable in over 80 % of patients owing to difficulty in early diagnosis. Chemotherapy is the most frequently adopted therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. The development of drug resistance to gemcitabine (GEM), which is always used in standard chemotherapy, often results in therapeutic failure. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the gemcitabine resistance remain unclear. Therefore, we sought to explore the microRNA-mRNA network that is associated with the development of gemcitabine resistance and to identify molecular targets for overcoming the gemcitabine resistance. By exposing SW1990 pancreatic cancer cells to long-term gemcitabine with increasing concentrations, we established a gemcitabine-resistant cell line (SW1990/GEM) with a high IC50 (the concentration needed for 50 % growth inhibition, 847.23 μM). The mRNA and microRNA expression profiles of SW1990 cells and SW1990/GEM cells were determined using RNA-seq analysis. By comparing the results in control SW1990 cells, 507 upregulated genes and 550 downregulated genes in SW1990/GEM cells were identified as differentially expressed genes correlated with gemcitabine sensitivity. Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes were related to diverse biological processes. The upregulated genes were mainly associated with drug response and apoptosis, and the downregulated genes were correlated with cell cycle progression and RNA splicing. Concurrently, the differentially expressed microRNAs, which are the important player in drug resistance development, were also examined in SW1990/GEM cells, and 56 differential microRNAs were identified. Additionally, the expression profiles of selected genes and microRNAs were confirmed by using Q-PCR assays. Furthermore, combining the differentially expressed microRNAs and mRNAs as well as the predicted targets for these microRNAs, a core microRNA-mRNA regulatory network was constructed, which included hub micro

  15. Design of Small Impact-Resistant RTGs for Global Network of Unmanned Mars Landers

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1991-06-26

    Ongoing studies by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for the robotic exploration of Mars contemplate a network of at least twenty small and relatively inexpensive landers distributed over both low and high latitudes of the Martian globe. They are intended to explore the structural, mineralogical, and chemical characteristics of the Martian soil, search for possible subsurface trapped ice, and collect long-term seismological and meteorological data over a period of ten years. They can also serve as precursors for later unmanned and manned Mars missions.; The collected data will be transmitted periodically, either directly to Earth or indirectly via an orbiting relay. The choice of transmission will determine the required power, which is currently expected to be between 2 and 12 watts(e) per lander. This could be supplied either by solar arrays or by Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Solar-powered landers could only be used for low Martian latitudes, but RTG-powered landers can be used for both low and high latitudes. Moreover, RTGs are less affected by Martian sandstorms and can be modified to resist high-G-load impacts. High impact resistance is a critical goal. It is desired by the mission designers, to minimize the mass and complexity of the system needed to decelerate the landers to a survivable impact velocity.; To support the NASA system studies, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Special Applications (DOE/OSA) asked Fairchild to perform RTG design studies for this mission. The key problem in designing these RTGs is how to enable the generators to tolerate substantially higher G-loads than those encountered on previous RTG missions.; The Fairchild studies resulted in designs of compact RTGs based on flight-proven and safety-qualified heat source components, with a number of novel features designed to provide the desired high impact tolerance. The present paper describes those designs and their rationale, and a

  16. Percolation network in resistive switching devices with the structure of silver/amorphous silicon/p-type silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanhong; Gao, Ping; Bi, Kaifeng; Peng, Wei; Jiang, Xuening; Xu, Hongxia

    2014-01-27

    Conducting pathway of percolation network was identified in resistive switching devices (RSDs) with the structure of silver/amorphous silicon/p-type silicon (Ag/a-Si/p-Si) based on its gradual RESET-process and the stochastic complex impedance spectroscopy characteristics (CIS). The formation of the percolation network is attributed to amounts of nanocrystalline Si particles as well as defect sites embedded in a-Si layer, in which the defect sites supply positions for Ag ions to nucleate and grow. The similar percolation network has been only observed in Ag-Ge-Se based RSD before. This report provides a better understanding for electric properties of RSD based on the percolation network.

  17. Network-assisted genetic dissection of pathogenicity and drug resistance in the opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hanhae; Jung, Kwang-Woo; Maeng, Shinae; Chen, Ying-Lien; Shin, Junha; Shim, Jung Eun; Hwang, Sohyun; Janbon, Guilhem; Kim, Taeyup; Heitman, Joseph; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2015-03-05

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic human pathogenic fungus that causes meningoencephalitis. Due to the increasing global risk of cryptococcosis and the emergence of drug-resistant strains, the development of predictive genetics platforms for the rapid identification of novel genes governing pathogenicity and drug resistance of C. neoformans is imperative. The analysis of functional genomics data and genome-scale mutant libraries may facilitate the genetic dissection of such complex phenotypes but with limited efficiency. Here, we present a genome-scale co-functional network for C. neoformans, CryptoNet, which covers ~81% of the coding genome and provides an efficient intermediary between functional genomics data and reverse-genetics resources for the genetic dissection of C. neoformans phenotypes. CryptoNet is the first genome-scale co-functional network for any fungal pathogen. CryptoNet effectively identified novel genes for pathogenicity and drug resistance using guilt-by-association and context-associated hub algorithms. CryptoNet is also the first genome-scale co-functional network for fungi in the basidiomycota phylum, as Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to the ascomycota phylum. CryptoNet may therefore provide insights into pathway evolution between two distinct phyla of the fungal kingdom. The CryptoNet web server (www.inetbio.org/cryptonet) is a public resource that provides an interactive environment of network-assisted predictive genetics for C. neoformans.

  18. Changing Trends in Antimicrobial Resistance and Serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates in Asian Countries: an Asian Network for Surveillance of Resistant Pathogens (ANSORP) Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Hyun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Yang, Yonghong; Wang, Hui; Lu, Min; So, Thomas Man-kit; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Yasin, Rohani M.; Carlos, Celia C.; Pham, Hung Van; Lalitha, M. K.; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Perera, Jennifer; Shibl, Atef M.; Baek, Jin Yang; Kang, Cheol-In; Ko, Kwan Soo; Peck, Kyong Ran

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae remains a serious concern worldwide, particularly in Asian countries, despite the introduction of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7). The Asian Network for Surveillance of Resistant Pathogens (ANSORP) performed a prospective surveillance study of 2,184 S. pneumoniae isolates collected from patients with pneumococcal infections from 60 hospitals in 11 Asian countries from 2008 to 2009. Among nonmeningeal isolates, the prevalence rate of penicillin-nonsusceptible pneumococci (MIC, ≥4 μg/ml) was 4.6% and penicillin resistance (MIC, ≥8 μg/ml) was extremely rare (0.7%). Resistance to erythromycin was very prevalent in the region (72.7%); the highest rates were in China (96.4%), Taiwan (84.9%), and Vietnam (80.7%). Multidrug resistance (MDR) was observed in 59.3% of isolates from Asian countries. Major serotypes were 19F (23.5%), 23F (10.0%), 19A (8.2%), 14 (7.3%), and 6B (7.3%). Overall, 52.5% of isolates showed PCV7 serotypes, ranging from 16.1% in Philippines to 75.1% in Vietnam. Serotypes 19A (8.2%), 3 (6.2%), and 6A (4.2%) were the most prominent non-PCV7 serotypes in the Asian region. Among isolates with serotype 19A, 86.0% and 79.8% showed erythromycin resistance and MDR, respectively. The most remarkable findings about the epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in Asian countries after the introduction of PCV7 were the high prevalence of macrolide resistance and MDR and distinctive increases in serotype 19A. PMID:22232285

  19. The application of artificial neural networks for phenotypic drug resistance prediction: evaluation and comparison with other interpretation systems.

    PubMed

    Pasomsub, Ekawat; Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Kijsirikul, Boonserm; Chantratita, Wasun

    2010-03-01

    Although phenotypic resistance testing provides more direct measurement of antiretroviral drug resistance than genotypic testing, it is costly and time-consuming. However, genotypic resistance testing has the advantages of being simpler and more accessible, and it might be possible to use the data obtained for predicting quantitative drug susceptibility to interpret complex mutation combinations. This study applied the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) system to predict the HIV-1 resistance phenotype from the genotype. A total of 7,598 pairs of HIV-1 sequences, with their corresponding phenotypic fold change values for 14 antiretroviral drugs, were trained, validated, and tested in ANN modeling. The results were compared with the HIV-SEQ and Geno2pheno interpretation systems. The prediction performance of the ANN models was measured by 10-fold cross-validation. The results indicated that by using the ANN, with an associated set of amino acid positions known to influence drug resistance for individual antiretroviral drugs, drug resistance was accurately predicted and generalized for individual HIV-1 subtypes. Therefore, high correlation with the experimental phenotype may help physicians choose optimal therapeutic regimens that might be an option, or supporting system, of FDA-approved genotypic resistance testing in heavily treatment-experienced patients.

  20. Assessment of urinary excretion of antimalarial drugs in large-scale chemotherapeutic eradication projects

    PubMed Central

    Bruce-Chwatt, L. J.

    1959-01-01

    Assessment of the urinary excretion of an antimalarial drug is a useful means of checking the amount of drug administered and the regularity of intake. The author describes the various methods available for the qualitative and quantitative estimation of antimalarial drugs in urine and discusses their relative merits, with special reference to their suitability for use in the field. He points out the difficulties involved in estimating the urinary excretion of antimalarials in large-scale chemotherapeutic eradication projects and stress the importance of simplifying testing techniques as far as possible. PMID:13805135

  1. A search for natural bioactive compounds in Bolivia through a multidisciplinary approach. Part IV. Is a new haem polymerisation inhibition test pertinent for the detection of antimalarial natural products?

    PubMed

    Baelmans, R; Deharo, E; Bourdy, G; Muñoz, V; Quenevo, C; Sauvain, M; Ginsburg, H

    2000-11-01

    The search for new antimalarial agents in plant crude extracts using traditional screening tests is time-consuming and expensive. New in vitro alternative techniques, based on specific metabolic or enzymatic process, have recently been developed to circumvent testing of antimalarial activity in parasite culture. The haem polymerisation inhibition test (HPIA) was proposed as a possible routine in vitro assay for the detection of antimalarial activity in natural products. A total of 178 plant extracts from the Pharmacopeia of the Bolivian ethnia Tacana, were screened for their ability to inhibit the polymerisation of haematin. Five extracts from Aloysia virgata (Ruíz & Pavón) A.L. Jussieu (Verbenaceae), Bixa orellana L. (Bixaceae), Caesalpinia pluviosa D.C. (Caesalpiniaceae), Mascagnia stannea (Griseb) Nied. (Malpighiaceae) and Trichilia pleenea (Adr. Jussieu) (Meliaceae) demonstrated more than 70% inhibition of haematin polymerisation at 2.5 mg/ml. The extracts were also tested for antimalarial activity in culture against F32 strain (chloroquine-sensitive) and D2 strain (chloroquine-resistant) of Plasmodium falciparum and in vivo against P. berghei. The extract from Caesalpinia pluviosa was the only one that showed activity in HPIA and in the classical test in culture. The accuracy and pertinence of HPIA, applied to natural products is discussed.

  2. Epidemiological networks and drug resistance of HIV type 1 in Krasnoyarsk region, Russia.

    PubMed

    Rumyantseva, Olga A; Olkhovskiy, Igor A; Malysheva, Marina A; Ruzaeva, Ludmila A; Vasiliev, Alexander V; Kazennova, Elena V; Bobkova, Marina R; Lukashov, Vladimir V

    2009-09-01

    To study the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 in Krasnoyarsk region, Russia, where HIV-1 has spread rapidly since 2000, we obtained pol sequences from individuals living in this region (n = 67) as well as in the geographically closely related Altay region (n = 13). In both regions, subtype A viruses specific for the former Soviet Union (IDU-A strains) were dominant (92.5%). Virus sequences clustered according to the geographic origin of the infected individuals rather than to their risk group, demonstrating the role of geographically defined epidemiological networks in the propagation of the HIV-1 epidemic in the region. Six viruses belonged to subtype B. Three of them were phylogenetically (and therefore epidemiologically) closely related to each other, demonstrating that even though IDU-A viruses dominate the epidemic, the spread of other virus strains does occur. Most viruses (75%) had an A62V mutation in reverse transcriptase, specific for HIV-1 strains in Russia. Remarkably, 26 of 47 (55%) patients under HAART with detectable virus loads did not have any known drug-resistant mutation, indicating the need to increase compliance to therapy.

  3. Antimalarial Activity of KAF156 in Falciparum and Vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    White, Nicholas J.; Duong, Tran T.; Uthaisin, Chirapong; Nosten, François; Phyo, Aung P.; Hanboonkunupakarn, Borimas; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Jittamala, Podjanee; Chuthasmit, Kittiphum; Cheung, Ming S.; Feng, Yiyan; Li, Ruobing; Magnusson, Baldur; Sultan, Marc; Wieser, Daniela; Xun, Xiaolei; Zhao, Rong; Diagana, Thierry T.; Pertel, Peter; Leong, F. Joel

    2016-01-01

    Background KAF156 belongs to a new class of antimalarial agents (imidazolopiperazines), with activity against asexual and sexual blood stages and the preerythrocytic liver stages of malarial parasites. Methods We conducted a phase 2, open-label, two-part study at five centers in Thailand and Vietnam to assess the antimalarial efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetic profile of KAF156 in adults with acute Plasmodium vivax or P. falciparum malaria. Assessment of parasite clearance rates in cohorts of patients with vivax or falciparum malaria who were treated with multiple doses (400 mg once daily for 3 days) was followed by assessment of the cure rate at 28 days in a separate cohort of patients with falciparum malaria who received a single dose (800 mg). Results Median parasite clearance times were 45 hours (interquartile range, 42 to 48) in 10 patients with falciparum malaria and 24 hours (interquartile range, 20 to 30) in 10 patients with vivax malaria after treatment with the multiple-dose regimen and 49 hours (interquartile range, 42 to 54) in 21 patients with falciparum malaria after treatment with the single dose. Among the 21 patients who received the single dose and were followed for 28 days, 1 had reinfection and 7 had recrudescent infections (cure rate, 67%; 95% credible interval, 46 to 84). The mean (±SD) KAF156 terminal elimination half-life was 44.1±8.9 hours. There were no serious adverse events in this small study. The most common adverse events included sinus bradycardia, thrombocytopenia, hypokalemia, anemia, and hyperbilirubinemia. Vomiting of grade 2 or higher occurred in 2 patients, 1 of whom discontinued treatment because of repeated vomiting after receiving the single 800-mg dose. More adverse events were reported in the single-dose cohort, which had longer follow-up, than in the multiple-dose cohorts. Conclusions KAF156 showed antimalarial activity without evident safety concerns in a small number of adults with uncomplicated P. vivax or P

  4. Antimalarial benzylisoquinoline alkaloid from the rainforest tree Doryphora sassafras.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Malcolm S; Davis, Rohan A; Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M; Quinn, Ronald J

    2009-08-01

    Mass-directed isolation of the CH(2)Cl(2)/MeOH extract of Doryphora sassafras resulted in the purification of a new benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, 1-(4-hydroxybenzyl)-6,7-methylenedioxy-2-methylisoquinolinium trifluoroacetate (1), and the known aporphine alkaloid (S)-isocorydine (2). The structures of 1 and 2 were determined by 1D and 2D NMR and MS data analyses. The compounds were isolated during a drug discovery program aimed at identifying new antimalarial leads from a prefractionated natural product library. When tested against two different strains of the parasite Plasmodium falciparum (3D7 and Dd2), 1 displayed IC(50) values of 3.0 and 4.4 microM, respectively. Compound 1 was tested for cytotoxicity toward a human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293) and displayed no activity at 120 microM.

  5. Phototoxic reaction associated with Malarone (atovaquone/proguanil) antimalarial prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Amelot, Aymeric; Dupouy-Camet, Jean; Jeanmougin, Michel

    2014-04-01

    Phototoxic reaction has not been reported previously as an adverse reaction to the combination of atovaquone and proguanil (AP) (Malarone) used for antimalarial prophylaxis and therapy. We report here a 32-year-old patient treated with AP who presented with clinical manifestations of photosensitivity. AP-induced phototoxicity in this patient was further supported by phototesting. Malarone is not known to photosensitize and render the skin more susceptible to severe sunburn-like reactions. That it may do so, as in this case, is of importance especially as this drug is used predominantly by those travelling to sunnier climes. A notification of potential phototoxic effects of AP should be published for the choice of prophylaxis made by tourists traveling in malarial areas.

  6. The Oral Antimalarial Drug Tafenoquine Shows Activity against Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Luis; Martínez-García, Marta; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Manzano, José Ignacio; Yardley, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease that requires new, safer, and more effective treatments. Repurposing oral drugs could reduce both the time and cost involved in sleeping sickness drug discovery. Tafenoquine (TFQ) is an oral antimalarial drug belonging to the 8-aminoquinoline family which is currently in clinical phase III. We show here that TFQ efficiently kills different T. brucei spp. in the submicromolar concentration range. Our results suggest that TFQ accumulates into acidic compartments and induces a necrotic process involving cell membrane disintegration and loss of cytoplasmic content, leading to parasite death. Cell lysis is preceded by a wide and multitarget drug action, affecting the lysosome, mitochondria, and acidocalcisomes and inducing a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation of intracellular Ca2+, and production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first report of an 8-aminoquinoline demonstrating significant in vitro activity against T. brucei. PMID:26195527

  7. Deciphering the late biosynthetic steps of antimalarial compound FR-900098.

    PubMed

    Johannes, Tyler W; DeSieno, Matthew A; Griffin, Benjamin M; Thomas, Paul M; Kelleher, Neil L; Metcalf, William W; Zhao, Huimin

    2010-01-29

    FR-900098 is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of malaria. Here we report the heterologous production of this compound in Escherichia coli by reconstructing the entire biosynthetic pathway using a three-plasmid system. Based on this system, whole-cell feeding assays in combination with in vitro enzymatic activity assays reveal an unusual functional role of nucleotide conjugation and lead to the complete elucidation of the previously unassigned late biosynthetic steps. These studies also suggest a biosynthetic route to a second phosphonate antibiotic, FR-33289. A thorough understanding of the FR-900098 biosynthetic pathway now opens possibilities for metabolic engineering in E. coli to increase production of the antimalarial antibiotic and combinatorial biosynthesis to generate novel derivatives of FR-900098.

  8. Trisubstituted Pyrimidines as Efficacious and Fast-Acting Antimalarials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we describe the optimization of a phenotypic hit against Plasmodium falciparum, based on a trisubstituted pyrimidine scaffold. This led to compounds with good pharmacokinetics and oral activity in a P. berghei mouse model of malaria. The most promising compound (13) showed a reduction in parasitemia of 96% when dosed at 30 mg/kg orally once a day for 4 days in the P. berghei mouse model of malaria. It also demonstrated a rapid rate of clearance of the erythrocytic stage of P. falciparum in the SCID mouse model with an ED90 of 11.7 mg/kg when dosed orally. Unfortunately, the compound is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450 enzymes, probably due to a 4-pyridyl substituent. Nevertheless, this is a lead molecule with a potentially useful antimalarial profile, which could either be further optimized or be used for target hunting. PMID:27314305

  9. Flexible, elastic and tear-resistant networks prepared by photo-crosslinking poly(trimethylene carbonate) macromers.

    PubMed

    Schüller-Ravoo, S; Feijen, J; Grijpma, D W

    2012-10-01

    Poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) macromers with molecular weights (M(n)) between 1000 and 41,000 g mol(-1) were prepared by ring opening polymerization and subsequent functionalization with methacrylate end groups. Flexible networks were obtained by radical photo-crosslinking reactions of these macromers. With increasing molecular weight of the macromer the networks obtained showed increasing swelling ratios in chloroform and decreasing glass transition temperatures, reaching a constant value of approximately -18°C, which is close to that of linear high molecular weight PTMC. For all prepared networks the creep resistance was high. However, the molecular weight of the macromer strongly influenced the tensile properties of the networks. With increasing molecular weight of the macromer the E-modulus of the networks decreased from 314 MPa (lowest M(n)) to 5 MPa (highest M(n)), while their elongation at break continuously increased, reaching a very high value of 1200%. The maximum tensile strength values of the networks were found to first decrease with increasing M(n), but to increase again at values above approximately 10,000gmol(-1), at which the networks started to show rubber-like behavior. The toughness (area under the stress-strain curves, W) determined in tensile testing experiments, in tear propagation experiments, and in suture retention strength measurements showed that PTMC networks prepared from the higher molecular weight macromers (M(n)>10,000 g mol(-1)) were tenacious materials. The mechanical properties of these networks compare favorably with those of linear high molecular weight PTMC and well-known elastomeric materials like silicone rubber (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) and natural latex rubber. Additionally they also compare well with those of native blood vessels, which may be of importance in the use of these materials for the tissue engineering of small diameter blood vessels.

  10. Discovery of Novel Liver-Stage Antimalarials through Quantum Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, David J.; Liu, Yi; Mott, Bryan T.; Kaludov, Nikola; Martinov, Martin N.

    2015-01-01

    Without quantum theory any understanding of molecular interactions is incomplete. In principal, chemistry, and even biology, can be fully derived from non-relativistic quantum mechanics. In practice, conventional quantum chemical calculations are computationally too intensive and time consuming to be useful for drug discovery on more than a limited basis. A previously described, original, quantum-based computational process for drug discovery and design bridges this gap between theory and practice, and allows the application of quantum methods to large-scale in silico identification of active compounds. Here, we show the results of this quantum-similarity approach applied to the discovery of novel liver-stage antimalarials. Testing of only five of the model-predicted compounds in vitro and in vivo hepatic stage drug inhibition assays with P. berghei identified four novel chemical structures representing three separate quantum classes of liver-stage antimalarials. All four compounds inhibited liver-stage Plasmodium as a single oral dose in the quantitative PCR mouse liver-stage sporozoites-challenge model. One of the newly identified compounds, cethromycin [ABT-773], a macrolide-quinoline hybrid, is a drug with an extensive (over 5,000 people) safety profile warranting its exploitation as a new weapon for the current effort of malaria eradication. The results of our molecular modeling exceed current state-of-the-art computational methods. Drug discovery through quantum similarity is data-driven, agnostic to any particular target or disease process that can evaluate multiple phenotypic, target-specific, or co-crystal structural data. This allows the incorporation of additional pharmacological requirements, as well as rapid exploration of novel chemical spaces for therapeutic applications. PMID:25951139

  11. Altering Antimalarial Drug Regimens May Dramatically Enhance and Restore Drug Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable concern that malaria parasites are starting to evolve resistance to the current generation of antimalarial drugs, the artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). We use pharmacological modeling to investigate changes in ACT effectiveness likely to occur if current regimens are extended from 3 to 5 days or, alternatively, given twice daily over 3 days. We show that the pharmacology of artemisinins allows both regimen changes to substantially increase the artemisinin killing rate. Malaria patients rarely contain more than 1012 parasites, while the standard dosing regimens allow approximately 1 in 1010 parasites to survive artemisinin treatment. Parasite survival falls dramatically, to around 1 in 1017 parasites if the dose is extended or split; theoretically, this increase in drug killing appears to be more than sufficient to restore failing ACT efficacy. One of the most widely used dosing regimens, artemether-lumefantrine, already successfully employs a twice-daily dosing regimen, and we argue that twice-daily dosing should be incorporated into all ACT regimen design considerations as a simple and effective way of ensuring the continued long-term effectiveness of ACTs. PMID:26239993

  12. Antimalarial evaluation of the chemical constituents of hairy root culture of Bixa orellana L.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Bo; Clark, Julie; Ling, Taotao; Connelly, Michele; Medina-Bolivar, Fabricio; Rivas, Fatima

    2014-01-08

    Over 216 million malaria cases are reported annually worldwide and about a third of these cases, primarily children under the age of five years old, will not survive the infection. Despite this significant world health impact, only a limited number of therapeutic agents are currently available. The lack of scaffold diversity poses a threat in the event that multi-drug-resistant strains emerge. Terrestrial natural products have provided a major source of chemical diversity for starting materials in many FDA approved drugs over the past century. Bixa orellana L. is a popular plant used in South America for the treatment of malaria. In search of new potential therapeutic agents, the chemical constituents of a selected hairy root culture line of Bixa orellana L. were characterized utilizing NMR and mass spectrometry methods, followed by its biological evaluation against malaria strains 3D7 and K1. The crude extract and its isolated compounds demonstrated EC50 values in the micromolar range. Herein, we report our findings on the chemical constituents of Bixa orellana L. from hairy roots responsible for the observed antimalarial activity.

  13. Exploring the scope of new arylamino alcohol derivatives: Synthesis, antimalarial evaluation, toxicological studies, and target exploration.

    PubMed

    Quiliano, Miguel; Mendoza, Adela; Fong, Kim Y; Pabón, Adriana; Goldfarb, Nathan E; Fabing, Isabelle; Vettorazzi, Ariane; López de Cerain, Adela; Dunn, Ben M; Garavito, Giovanny; Wright, David W; Deharo, Eric; Pérez-Silanes, Silvia; Aldana, Ignacio; Galiano, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    Synthesis of new 1-aryl-3-substituted propanol derivatives followed by structure-activity relationship, in silico drug-likeness, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, in silico metabolism, in silico pharmacophore modeling, and in vivo studies led to the identification of compounds 22 and 23 with significant in vitro antiplasmodial activity against drug sensitive (D6 IC50 ≤ 0.19 μM) and multidrug resistant (FCR-3 IC50 ≤ 0.40 μM and C235 IC50 ≤ 0.28 μM) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Adequate selectivity index and absence of genotoxicity was also observed. Notably, compound 22 displays excellent parasitemia reduction (98 ± 1%), and complete cure with all treated mice surviving through the entire period with no signs of toxicity. One important factor is the agreement between in vitro potency and in vivo studies. Target exploration was performed; this chemotype series exhibits an alternative antimalarial mechanism.

  14. Anti-malarial activity of indole alkaloids isolated from Aspidosperma olivaceum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several species of Aspidosperma (Apocynaceae) are used as treatments for human diseases in the tropics. Aspidosperma olivaceum, which is used to treat fevers in some regions of Brazil, contains the monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) aspidoscarpine, uleine, apparicine, and N-methyl-tetrahydrolivacine. Using bio-guided fractionation and cytotoxicity testing in a human hepatoma cell line, several plant fractions and compounds purified from the bark and leaves of the plant were characterized for specific therapeutic activity (and selectivity index, SI) in vitro against the blood forms of Plasmodium falciparum. Methods The activity of A. olivaceum extracts, fractions, and isolated compounds was evaluated against chloroquine (CQ)-resistant P. falciparum blood parasites by in vitro testing with radiolabelled [3H]-hypoxanthine and a monoclonal anti-histidine-rich protein (HRPII) antibody. The cytotoxicity of these fractions and compounds was evaluated in a human hepatoma cell line using a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and the SI was calculated as the ratio between the toxicity and activity. Two leaf fractions were tested in mice with Plasmodium berghei. Results All six fractions from the bark and leaf extracts were active in vitro at low doses (IC50 < 5.0 μg/mL) using the anti-HRPII test, and only two (the neutral and basic bark fractions) were toxic to a human cell line (HepG2). The most promising fractions were the crude leaf extract and its basic residue, which had SIs above 50. Among the four pure compounds evaluated, aspidoscarpine in the bark and leaf extracts showed the highest SI at 56; this compound, therefore, represents a possible anti-malarial drug that requires further study. The acidic leaf fraction administered by gavage to mice with blood-induced malaria was also active. Conclusion Using a bio-monitoring approach, it was possible to attribute the anti-P. falciparum activity of A. olivaceum to

  15. Ketotifen is an antimalarial prodrug of norketotifen with blood schizonticidal and liver-stage efficacy.

    PubMed

    Milner, Erin; Sousa, Jason; Pybus, Brandon; Auschwitz, Jennifer; Caridha, Diana; Gardner, Sean; Grauer, Kristina; Harris, Erin; Hickman, Mark; Kozar, Michael P; Lee, Patricia; Leed, Susan; Li, Qigui; Melendez, Victor; Moon, Jay; Ngundam, Franklyn; O'Neil, Michael; Parriott, Sandi; Potter, Brittney; Sciotti, Rick; Tangteung, Anchalee; Dow, Geoffrey S

    2012-03-01

    Ketotifen is known to exhibit antimalarial activity in mouse and monkey malaria models. However, the low plasma levels and short half life of the drug do not adequately explain its in vivo efficacy. We synthesized most of the known metabolites of ketotifen and evaluated their antimalarial activity and pharmacokinetics in mice. Norketotifen, the de-methylated metabolite of ketotifen, was a more potent antimalarial in vitro as compared to ketotifen, and exhibited equivalent activity in vivo against asexual blood and developing liver-stage parasites. After ketotifen dosing, norketotifen levels were much higher than ketotifen relative to the IC50s of the compounds against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro. The data support the notion that the antimalarial activity of ketotifen in mice is mediated through norketotifen.

  16. Distillation time as tool for improved antimalarial activity and differential oil composition of cumin seed oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A steam distillation extraction kinetics experiment was conducted to estimate essential oil yield, composition, antimalarial, and antioxidant capacity of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) seed (fruits). Furthermore, regression models were developed to predict essential oil yield and composition for a given...

  17. Diastereoselective synthesis of potent antimalarial cis-β-lactam agents through a [2 + 2] cycloaddition of chiral imines with a chiral ketene.

    PubMed

    Jarrahpour, Aliasghar; Ebrahimi, Edris; Sinou, Véronique; Latour, Christine; Brunel, Jean Michel

    2014-11-24

    The effect of double asymmetric induction for the synthesis of new cis-β-lactams by [2 + 2] cycloaddition reactions of chiral imines with a chiral ketene was investigated. The cycloaddition reaction was found to be totally diastereoselective leading exclusively to the formation of the cis-β-lactam derivatives. The newly synthesized cycloadducts were evaluated for their antimalarial activities against Plasmodium falciparum K14 resistant strain with moderate to excellent IC50 values varying from 8 to 50 μM. Of the fifteen β-lactams tested, four showed IC50 ≤ 11 μM.

  18. Two-point resistance of an m × n resistor network with an arbitrary boundary and its application in RLC network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi-Zhong, Tan

    2016-05-01

    A rectangular m × n resistor network with an arbitrary boundary is investigated, and a general resistance formula between two nodes on an arbitrary axis is derived by the Recursion-Transform (RT) method, a problem that has never been resolved before, for the Green’s function technique and the Laplacian matrix approach are inapplicable to it. To have the exact solution of resistance is important but it is difficult to obtain under the condition of arbitrary boundary. Our result is directly expressed in a single summation and mainly composed of characteristic roots, which contain both finite and infinite cases. Further, the current distribution is given explicitly as a byproduct of the method. Our framework can be effectively applied to RLC networks. As an application to the LC network, we find that our formulation leads to the occurrence of resonances at h 1 = 1 - cos ϕ i - sin ϕ i cot n ϕ i . This somewhat curious result suggests the possibility of practical applications of our formulae to resonant circuits. Project supported by the Prophase Preparatory Project of Natural Science Foundation of Nantong University, China (Grant No. 15ZY16).

  19. Molecular networks associated with host resistance to gastrointestional nematodes in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parasitism by gastrointestinal nematodes is a disease severely affecting productivity in ruminants. To unravel mechanisms of host resistance to parasitic infection, we characterized the jejunal transcriptome of the cattle populations displaying resistance phenotypes in response to experimental Coope...

  20. New Insight into the Mechanism of Accumulation and Intraerythrocytic Compartmentation of Albitiazolium, a New Type of Antimalarial

    PubMed Central

    Tran Van Ba, Christophe; Maynadier, Marjorie; Bordat, Yann; Perez, Julie; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Fraisse, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Bis-thiazolium salts constitute a new class of antihematozoan drugs that inhibit parasite phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. They specifically accumulate in Plasmodium- and Babesia-infected red blood cells (IRBC). Here, we provide new insight into the choline analogue albitiazolium, which is currently being clinically tested against severe malaria. Concentration-dependent accumulation in P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes reached steady state after 90 to 120 min and was massive throughout the blood cycle, with cellular accumulation ratios of up to 1,000. This could not occur through a lysosomotropic effect, and the extent did not depend on the food vacuole pH, which was the case for the weak base chloroquine. Analysis of albitiazolium accumulation in P. falciparum IRBC revealed a high-affinity component that was restricted to mature stages and suppressed by pepstatin A treatment, and thus likely related to drug accumulation in the parasite food vacuole. Albitiazolium also accumulated in a second high-capacity component present throughout the blood cycle that was likely not related to the food vacuole and also observed with Babesia divergens-infected erythrocytes. Accumulation was strictly glucose dependent, drastically inhibited by H+/K+ and Na+ ionophores upon collapse of ionic gradients, and appeared to be energized by the proton-motive force across the erythrocyte plasma membrane, indicating the importance of transport steps for this permanently charged new type of antimalarial agent. This specific, massive, and irreversible accumulation allows albitiazolium to restrict its toxicity to hematozoa-infected erythrocytes. The intraparasitic compartmentation of albitiazolium corroborates a dual mechanism of action, which could make this new type of antimalarial agent resistant to parasite resistance. PMID:25001307

  1. Acceleration of Deep Neural Network Training with Resistive Cross-Point Devices: Design Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Gokmen, Tayfun; Vlasov, Yurii

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, deep neural networks (DNN) have demonstrated significant business impact in large scale analysis and classification tasks such as speech recognition, visual object detection, pattern extraction, etc. Training of large DNNs, however, is universally considered as time consuming and computationally intensive task that demands datacenter-scale computational resources recruited for many days. Here we propose a concept of resistive processing unit (RPU) devices that can potentially accelerate DNN training by orders of magnitude while using much less power. The proposed RPU device can store and update the weight values locally thus minimizing data movement during training and allowing to fully exploit the locality and the parallelism of the training algorithm. We evaluate the effect of various RPU device features/non-idealities and system parameters on performance in order to derive the device and system level specifications for implementation of an accelerator chip for DNN training in a realistic CMOS-compatible technology. For large DNNs with about 1 billion weights this massively parallel RPU architecture can achieve acceleration factors of 30, 000 × compared to state-of-the-art microprocessors while providing power efficiency of 84, 000 GigaOps∕s∕W. Problems that currently require days of training on a datacenter-size cluster with thousands of machines can be addressed within hours on a single RPU accelerator. A system consisting of a cluster of RPU accelerators will be able to tackle Big Data problems with trillions of parameters that is impossible to address today like, for example, natural speech recognition and translation between all world languages, real-time analytics on large streams of business and scientific data, integration, and analysis of multimodal sensory data flows from a massive number of IoT (Internet of Things) sensors. PMID:27493624

  2. Acceleration of Deep Neural Network Training with Resistive Cross-Point Devices: Design Considerations.

    PubMed

    Gokmen, Tayfun; Vlasov, Yurii

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, deep neural networks (DNN) have demonstrated significant business impact in large scale analysis and classification tasks such as speech recognition, visual object detection, pattern extraction, etc. Training of large DNNs, however, is universally considered as time consuming and computationally intensive task that demands datacenter-scale computational resources recruited for many days. Here we propose a concept of resistive processing unit (RPU) devices that can potentially accelerate DNN training by orders of magnitude while using much less power. The proposed RPU device can store and update the weight values locally thus minimizing data movement during training and allowing to fully exploit the locality and the parallelism of the training algorithm. We evaluate the effect of various RPU device features/non-idealities and system parameters on performance in order to derive the device and system level specifications for implementation of an accelerator chip for DNN training in a realistic CMOS-compatible technology. For large DNNs with about 1 billion weights this massively parallel RPU architecture can achieve acceleration factors of 30, 000 × compared to state-of-the-art microprocessors while providing power efficiency of 84, 000 GigaOps∕s∕W. Problems that currently require days of training on a datacenter-size cluster with thousands of machines can be addressed within hours on a single RPU accelerator. A system consisting of a cluster of RPU accelerators will be able to tackle Big Data problems with trillions of parameters that is impossible to address today like, for example, natural speech recognition and translation between all world languages, real-time analytics on large streams of business and scientific data, integration, and analysis of multimodal sensory data flows from a massive number of IoT (Internet of Things) sensors.

  3. Unraveling Fungal Radiation Resistance Regulatory Networks through the Genome-Wide Transcriptome and Genetic Analyses of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang-Woo; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong; Lim, Sangyong; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2016-11-29

    have been found to show high radiation resistance. Organisms harboring the ability of radiation resistance have unique regulatory networks to overcome this stress. Cryptococcus neoformans is one of the radiation-resistant fungi and is found in highly radioactive environments. However, it remains elusive how radiation-resistant eukaryotic microorganisms work differentially from radiation-sensitive ones. Here, we performed transcriptome analysis of C. neoformans to explore gene expression profiles after gamma radiation exposure and functionally characterized some of identified radiation resistance genes. Notably, we identified a novel regulator of radiation resistance, named Bdr1 (a bZIP TF for DNA damage response 1), which is a transcription factor (TF) that is not closely homologous to any known TF and is transcriptionally controlled by the Rad53 kinase. Therefore, our work could shed light on understanding not only the radiation response but also the radiation resistance mechanism of C. neoformans.

  4. Rational Design of Antimalarial Drugs Using Molecular Modeling and Statistical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cleydson Breno Rodrigues dos; Lobato, Cleison Carvalho; Braga, Francinaldo Sarges; Costa, Josivan da Silva; Favacho, Hugo Alexandre Silva; Carvalho, Jose Carlos Tavares; Macedo, Williams Jorge da Cruz; Brasil, Davi Do Socorro Barros; Silva, Carlos Henrique Tomich de Paula da; Silva Hage-Melim, Lorane Izabel da

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinin is an antimalarial compound isolated from Artemisia annua L. that is effective against Plasmodium falciparum. This paper proposes the development of new antimalarial derivatives of artemisinin from a SAR study and statistical analysis by multiple linear regression (MLR). The HF/6-31G** method was used to determine the molecular properties of artemisinin and 10 derivatives with antimalarial action. MEP maps and molecular docking were used to study the interface between ligand and receptor (heme). The Pearson correlation was used to choose the most important properties interrelated to the antimalarial activity: Hydration Energy (HE), Energy of the Complex (Ecplex), bond length (FeO1), and maximum index of R/Electronegativity of Sanderson (RTe+). After the Pearson correlation, 72 MLR models were built between antimalarial activity and molecular properties; the statistical quality of the models was evaluated by means of correlation coefficient (r), squared correlation coefficient (r(2)), explained variance (adjusted R(2)), standard error of estimate (SEE), and variance ratio (F), and only four models showed predictive ability. The selected models were used to predict the antimalarial activity of ten new artemisinin derivatives (test set) with unknown activity, and only eight of these compounds were predicted to be more potent than artemisinin, and were therefore subjected to theoretical studies of pharmacokinetic and toxicological properties. The test set showed satisfactory results for six new artemisinin compounds which is a promising factor for future synthesis and biological assays.

  5. Optimization of 4-aminoquinoline/clotrimazole-based hybrid antimalarials: further structure-activity relationships, in vivo studies, and preliminary toxicity profiling.

    PubMed

    Gemma, Sandra; Camodeca, Caterina; Sanna Coccone, Salvatore; Joshi, Bhupendra P; Bernetti, Matteo; Moretti, Vittoria; Brogi, Simone; Bonache de Marcos, Maria Cruz; Savini, Luisa; Taramelli, Donatella; Basilico, Nicoletta; Parapini, Silvia; Rottmann, Matthias; Brun, Reto; Lamponi, Stefania; Caccia, Silvio; Guiso, Giovanna; Summers, Robert L; Martin, Rowena E; Saponara, Simona; Gorelli, Beatrice; Novellino, Ettore; Campiani, Giuseppe; Butini, Stefania

    2012-08-09

    Despite recent progress in the fight against malaria, the emergence and spread of drug-resistant parasites remains a serious obstacle to the treatment of infections. We recently reported the development of a novel antimalarial drug that combines the 4-aminoquinoline pharmacophore of chloroquine with that of clotrimazole-based antimalarials. Here we describe the optimization of this class of hybrid drug through in-depth structure-activity relationship studies. Antiplasmodial properties and mode of action were characterized in vitro and in vivo, and interactions with the parasite's 'chloroquine resistance transporter' were investigated in a Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system. These tests indicated that piperazine derivatives 4b and 4d may be suitable for coadministration with chloroquine against chloroquine-resistant parasites. The potential for metabolism of the drugs by cytochrome P450 was determined in silico, and the lead compounds were tested for toxicity and mutagenicity. A preliminary pharmacokinetic analysis undertaken in mice indicated that compound 4b has an optimal half-life.

  6. Treatment of Plasmodium chabaudi Parasites with Curcumin in Combination with Antimalarial Drugs: Drug Interactions and Implications on the Ubiquitin/Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Zoraima; Machado, Marta; Lindeza, Ana; do Rosário, Virgílio; Gazarini, Marcos L.; Lopes, Dinora

    2013-01-01

    Antimalarial drug resistance remains a major obstacle in malaria control. Evidence from Southeast Asia shows that resistance to artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is inevitable. Ethnopharmacological studies have confirmed the efficacy of curcumin against Plasmodium spp. Drug interaction assays between curcumin/piperine/chloroquine and curcumin/piperine/artemisinin combinations and the potential of drug treatment to interfere with the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) were analyzed. In vivo efficacy of curcumin was studied in BALB/c mice infected with Plasmodium chabaudi clones resistant to chloroquine and artemisinin, and drug interactions were analyzed by isobolograms. Subtherapeutic doses of curcumin, chloroquine, and artemisinin were administered to mice, and mRNA was collected following treatment for RT-PCR analysis of genes encoding deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs). Curcumin was found be nontoxic in BALB/c mice. The combination of curcumin/chloroquine/piperine reduced parasitemia to 37% seven days after treatment versus the control group's 65%, and an additive interaction was revealed. Curcumin/piperine/artemisinin combination did not show a favorable drug interaction in this murine model of malaria. Treatment of mice with subtherapeutic doses of the drugs resulted in a transient increase in genes encoding DUBs indicating UPS interference. If curcumin is to join the arsenal of available antimalarial drugs, future studies exploring suitable drug partners would be of interest. PMID:23691276

  7. An LHX1-Regulated Transcriptional Network Controls Sleep/Wake Coupling and Thermal Resistance of the Central Circadian Clockworks.

    PubMed

    Bedont, Joseph L; LeGates, Tara A; Buhr, Ethan; Bathini, Abhijith; Ling, Jonathan P; Bell, Benjamin; Wu, Mark N; Wong, Philip C; Van Gelder, Russell N; Mongrain, Valerie; Hattar, Samer; Blackshaw, Seth

    2017-01-09

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the central circadian clock in mammals. It is entrained by light but resistant to temperature shifts that entrain peripheral clocks [1-5]. The SCN expresses many functionally important neuropeptides, including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), which drives light entrainment, synchrony, and amplitude of SCN cellular clocks and organizes circadian behavior [5-16]. The transcription factor LHX1 drives SCN Vip expression, and cellular desynchrony in Lhx1-deficient SCN largely results from Vip loss [17, 18]. LHX1 regulates many genes other than Vip, yet activity rhythms in Lhx1-deficient mice are similar to Vip(-/-) mice under light-dark cycles and only somewhat worse in constant conditions. We suspected that LHX1 targets other than Vip have circadian functions overlooked in previous studies. In this study, we compared circadian sleep and temperature rhythms of Lhx1- and Vip-deficient mice and found loss of acute light control of sleep in Lhx1 but not Vip mutants. We also found loss of circadian resistance to fever in Lhx1 but not Vip mice, which was partially recapitulated by heat application to cultured Lhx1-deficient SCN. Having identified VIP-independent functions of LHX1, we mapped the VIP-independent transcriptional network downstream of LHX1 and a largely separable VIP-dependent transcriptional network. The VIP-independent network does not affect core clock amplitude and synchrony, unlike the VIP-dependent network. These studies identify Lhx1 as the first gene required for temperature resistance of the SCN clockworks and demonstrate that acute light control of sleep is routed through the SCN and its immediate output regions.

  8. Effect of tetrahedral amorphous carbon coating on the resistivity and wear of single-walled carbon nanotube network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Ajai; Kaskela, Antti; Novikov, Serguei; Etula, Jarkko; Liu, Xuwen; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Koskinen, Jari

    2016-05-01

    Single walled carbon nanotube networks (SWCNTNs) were coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) to improve the mechanical wear properties of the composite film. The ta-C deposition was performed by using pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc method resulting in the generation of C+ ions in the energy range of 40-60 eV which coalesce to form a ta-C film. The primary disadvantage of this process is a significant increase in the electrical resistance of the SWCNTN post coating. The increase in the SWCNTN resistance is attributed primarily to the intrinsic stress of the ta-C coating which affects the inter-bundle junction resistance between the SWCNTN bundles. E-beam evaporated carbon was deposited on the SWCNTNs prior to the ta-C deposition in order to protect the SWCNTN from the intrinsic stress of the ta-C film. The causes of changes in electrical resistance and the effect of evaporated carbon thickness on the changes in electrical resistance and mechanical wear properties have been studied.

  9. Selection of Parasites with Diminished Drug Sensitivity by Amodiaquine-Containing Antimalarial Regimens in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Fatima; Nsobya, Samuel L.; Kiggundu, Moses; Joloba, Moses; Rosenthal, Philip J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Amodiaquine (AQ) is paired with artesunate (AS) or sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) in recommended antimalarial regimens. It is unclear how readily AQ resistance will be selected with combination chemotherapy. Methods We collected 61 Plasmodium falciparum samples from a cohort of Ugandan children randomized to treatment with AQ/SP, AS/AQ, or artemether-lumefantrine (AL) for uncomplicated malaria. In vitro sensitivity to monodesethylamodiaquine (MDAQ) was measured with a histidine rich protein-2-based ELISA, and potential resistance-mediating polymorphisms pfmdr-1were evaluated. Results Parasites from subjects previously treated with AQ/SP or AS/AQ within 12 weeks were less sensitive to MDAQ (n=18; mean IC50 62.9 nM; range 12.7–158.3 nM) than parasites from those not treated within 12 weeks (n=43; mean IC50 37.5 nM; range 6.3–184.7 nM; p=0.0085) or only those in the treatment arm that did not contain AQ (n=20; mean IC50 28.8 nM; range 6.3–121.8 nM; p=0.0042). The proportion of strains with polymorphisms expected to mediate diminished response to AQ (pfmdr-1 86Y and 1246Y) increased after prior AQ therapy, although differences were not significant. Conclusions Prior therapy selected for diminished response to MDAQ, suggesting that AQ-containing regimens may rapidly lose efficacy in Africa. The mechanism of diminished MDAQ response is not fully explained by known mutations in pfmdr-1. PMID:19905933

  10. Production of the antimalarial drug precursor artemisinic acid in engineered yeast.

    PubMed

    Ro, Dae-Kyun; Paradise, Eric M; Ouellet, Mario; Fisher, Karl J; Newman, Karyn L; Ndungu, John M; Ho, Kimberly A; Eachus, Rachel A; Ham, Timothy S; Kirby, James; Chang, Michelle C Y; Withers, Sydnor T; Shiba, Yoichiro; Sarpong, Richmond; Keasling, Jay D

    2006-04-13

    Malaria is a global health problem that threatens 300-500 million people and kills more than one million people annually. Disease control is hampered by the occurrence of multi-drug-resistant strains of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Synthetic antimalarial drugs and malarial vaccines are currently being developed, but their efficacy against malaria awaits rigorous clinical testing. Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide extracted from Artemisia annua L (family Asteraceae; commonly known as sweet wormwood), is highly effective against multi-drug-resistant Plasmodium spp., but is in short supply and unaffordable to most malaria sufferers. Although total synthesis of artemisinin is difficult and costly, the semi-synthesis of artemisinin or any derivative from microbially sourced artemisinic acid, its immediate precursor, could be a cost-effective, environmentally friendly, high-quality and reliable source of artemisinin. Here we report the engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high titres (up to 100 mg l(-1)) of artemisinic acid using an engineered mevalonate pathway, amorphadiene synthase, and a novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP71AV1) from A. annua that performs a three-step oxidation of amorpha-4,11-diene to artemisinic acid. The synthesized artemisinic acid is transported out and retained on the outside of the engineered yeast, meaning that a simple and inexpensive purification process can be used to obtain the desired product. Although the engineered yeast is already capable of producing artemisinic acid at a significantly higher specific productivity than A. annua, yield optimization and industrial scale-up will be required to raise artemisinic acid production to a level high enough to reduce artemisinin combination therapies to significantly below their current prices.

  11. Successful application of virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulations against antimalarial molecular targets

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Renata Rachide; Costa, Marina dos Santos; Santos, Bianca dos Reis; da Fonseca, Amanda Luisa; Ferreira, Lorena Sales; Chagas, Rafael Cesar Russo; da Silva, Alisson Marques; Varotti, Fernando de Pilla; Taranto, Alex Gutterres

    2016-01-01

    The main challenge in the control of malaria has been the emergence of drug-resistant parasites. The presence of drug-resistant Plasmodium sp. has raised the need for new antimalarial drugs. Molecular modelling techniques have been used as tools to develop new drugs. In this study, we employed virtual screening of a pyrazol derivative (Tx001) against four malaria targets: plasmepsin-IV, plasmepsin-II, falcipain-II, and PfATP6. The receiver operating characteristic curves and area under the curve (AUC) were established for each molecular target. The AUC values obtained for plasmepsin-IV, plasmepsin-II, and falcipain-II were 0.64, 0.92, and 0.94, respectively. All docking simulations were carried out using AutoDock Vina software. The ligand Tx001 exhibited a better interaction with PfATP6 than with the reference compound (-12.2 versus -6.8 Kcal/mol). The Tx001-PfATP6 complex was submitted to molecular dynamics simulations in vacuum implemented on an NAMD program. The ligand Tx001 docked at the same binding site as thapsigargin, which is a natural inhibitor of PfATP6. Compound TX001 was evaluated in vitro with a P. falciparum strain (W2) and a human cell line (WI-26VA4). Tx001 was discovered to be active against P. falciparum (IC50 = 8.2 µM) and inactive against WI-26VA4 (IC50 > 200 µM). Further ligand optimisation cycles generated new prospects for docking and biological assays. PMID:27982302

  12. Genome-wide analysis captures the determinants of the antibiotic cross-resistance interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Lázár, Viktória; Nagy, István; Spohn, Réka; Csörgő, Bálint; Györkei, Ádám; Nyerges, Ákos; Horváth, Balázs; Vörös, Andrea; Busa-Fekete, Róbert; Hrtyan, Mónika; Bogos, Balázs; Méhi, Orsolya; Fekete, Gergely; Szappanos, Balázs; Kégl, Balázs; Papp, Balázs; Pál, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how evolution of antimicrobial resistance increases resistance to other drugs is a challenge of profound importance. By combining experimental evolution and genome sequencing of 63 laboratory-evolved lines, we charted a map of cross-resistance interactions between antibiotics in Escherichia coli, and explored the driving evolutionary principles. Here, we show that (1) convergent molecular evolution is prevalent across antibiotic treatments, (2) resistance conferring mutations simultaneously enhance sensitivity to many other drugs and (3) 27% of the accumulated mutations generate proteins with compromised activities, suggesting that antibiotic adaptation can partly be achieved without gain of novel function. By using knowledge on antibiotic properties, we examined the determinants of cross-resistance and identified chemogenomic profile similarity between antibiotics as the strongest predictor. In contrast, cross-resistance between two antibiotics is independent of whether they show synergistic effects in combination. These results have important implications on the development of novel antimicrobial strategies. PMID:25000950

  13. Importance of network density of nanotube: Effect on nitrogen dioxide gas sensing by solid state resistive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Prabhash; Grachyova, D. V.; Moskalenko, A. S.; Shcherbak, M. A.; Pavelyev, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    Dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is an established fact, however, its effect on toxic gas sensing for the development of solid state resistive sensor was not well reported. In this report, the dispersion quality of SWCNTs has been investigated and improved, and this well-dispersed SWCNTs network was used for sensor fabrication to monitor nitrogen dioxide gas. Ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopic studies shows the strength of SWNTs dispersion and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging provides the morphological properties of the sensor device. In this gas sensor device, two sets of resistive type sensors were fabricated that consisting of a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) using dielectrophoresis technique with different SWCNTs network density. With low-density SWCNTs networks, this fabricated sensor exhibits a high response for nitrogen dioxide sensing. The sensing of nitrogen dioxide is mainly due to charge transfer from absorbed molecules to sidewalls of nanotube and tube-tube screening acting a major role for the transport properties of charge carriers.

  14. Effect of length of chopped pristine and intercalated graphite fibers on the resistivity of fiber networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Stahl, Mark

    1988-01-01

    Samples of Amoco P-100 fibers were chopped to lengths of 3.14, 2.53, 1.90, 1.27, 0.66 mm, or milled for 2 hours. The two-point resistivity of compacts of these fibers were measured as a function of pressure from 34 kPa to 143 MPa. Samples of each fiber length were intercalated with bromine at room temperature and similarly measured. The low pressure resistivity of the compacts decreased with increasing fiber length. Intercalation lowered the resistivity of each of the chopped length compacts, but raised the resistivity of the milled fiber compacts. Bulk resistivity of all samples decreased with increasing pressure at similar rates. Even though fiber volumes were as low as 5 percent, all measurements exhibited measurable resistivity. A greater change with pressure in the resistance was observed for shorter fibers than for longer, probably an indication of tighter fiber packing. Intercalation appeared to have no effect on the fiber to fiber contact resistance.

  15. A novel prediction approach for antimalarial activities of Trimethoprim, Pyrimethamine, and Cycloguanil analogues using extremely randomized trees.

    PubMed

    Nattee, Cholwich; Khamsemanan, Nirattaya; Lawtrakul, Luckhana; Toochinda, Pisanu; Hannongbua, Supa

    2017-01-01

    Malaria is still one of the most serious diseases in tropical regions. This is due in part to the high resistance against available drugs for the inhibition of parasites, Plasmodium, the cause of the disease. New potent compounds with high clinical utility are urgently needed. In this work, we created a novel model using a regression tree to study structure-activity relationships and predict the inhibition constant, Ki of three different antimalarial analogues (Trimethoprim, Pyrimethamine, and Cycloguanil) based on their molecular descriptors. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt to study the structure-activity relationships of all three analogues combined. The most relevant descriptors and appropriate parameters of the regression tree are harvested using extremely randomized trees. These descriptors are water accessible surface area, Log of the aqueous solubility, total hydrophobic van der Waals surface area, and molecular refractivity. Out of all possible combinations of these selected parameters and descriptors, the tree with the strongest coefficient of determination is selected to be our prediction model. Predicted Ki values from the proposed model show a strong coefficient of determination, R(2)=0.996, to experimental Ki values. From the structure of the regression tree, compounds with high accessible surface area of all hydrophobic atoms (ASA_H) and low aqueous solubility of inhibitors (Log S) generally possess low Ki values. Our prediction model can also be utilized as a screening test for new antimalarial drug compounds which may reduce the time and expenses for new drug development. New compounds with high predicted Ki should be excluded from further drug development. It is also our inference that a threshold of ASA_H greater than 575.80 and Log S less than or equal to -4.36 is a sufficient condition for a new compound to possess a low Ki.

  16. The Impact of Text Message Reminders on Adherence to Antimalarial Treatment in Northern Ghana: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Raifman, Julia R. G.; Lanthorn, Heather E.; Rokicki, Slawa; Fink, Günther

    2014-01-01

    Background Low rates of adherence to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) regimens increase the risk of treatment failure and may lead to drug resistance, threatening the sustainability of current anti-malarial efforts. We assessed the impact of text message reminders on adherence to ACT regimens. Methods Health workers at hospitals, clinics, pharmacies, and other stationary ACT distributors in Tamale, Ghana provided flyers advertising free mobile health information to individuals receiving malaria treatment. The messaging system automatically randomized self-enrolled individuals to the control group or the treatment group with equal probability; those in the treatment group were further randomly assigned to receive a simple text message reminder or the simple reminder plus an additional statement about adherence in 12-hour intervals. The main outcome was self-reported adherence based on follow-up interviews occurring three days after treatment initiation. We estimated the impact of the messages on treatment completion using logistic regression. Results 1140 individuals enrolled in both the study and the text reminder system. Among individuals in the control group, 61.5% took the full course of treatment. The simple text message reminders increased the odds of adherence (adjusted OR 1.45, 95% CI [1.03 to 2.04], p-value 0.028). Receiving an additional message did not result in a significant change in adherence (adjusted OR 0.77, 95% CI [0.50 to 1.20], p-value 0.252). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that a simple text message reminder can increase adherence to antimalarial treatment and that additional information included in messages does not have a significant impact on completion of ACT treatment. Further research is needed to develop the most effective text message content and frequency. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01722734 PMID:25350546

  17. Optimization of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridin-9(10H)-ones as antimalarials utilizing structure-activity and structure-property relationships.

    PubMed

    Cross, R Matthew; Maignan, Jordany R; Mutka, Tina S; Luong, Lisa; Sargent, Justin; Kyle, Dennis E; Manetsch, Roman

    2011-07-14

    Antimalarial activity of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridin-9(10H)-ones (THAs) has been known since the 1940s and has garnered more attention with the development of the acridinedione floxacrine (1) in the 1970s and analogues thereof such as WR 243251 (2a) in the 1990s. These compounds failed just prior to clinical development because of suboptimal activity, poor solubility, and rapid induction of parasite resistance. Moreover, detailed structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies of the THA core scaffold were lacking and SPR studies were nonexistent. To improve upon initial findings, several series of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridin-9(10H)-ones were synthesized and tested in a systematic fashion, examining each compound for antimalarial activity, solubility, and permeability. Furthermore, a select set of compounds was chosen for microsomal stability testing to identify physicochemical liabilities of the THA scaffold. Several potent compounds (EC(50) < 100 nM) were identified to be active against the clinically relevant isolates W2 and TM90-C2B while possessing good physicochemical properties and little to no cross-resistance.

  18. A Click Chemistry‐Based Proteomic Approach Reveals that 1,2,4‐Trioxolane and Artemisinin Antimalarials Share a Common Protein Alkylation Profile

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Hanafy M.; Barton, Victoria E.; Panchana, Matthew; Charoensutthivarakul, Sitthivut; Biagini, Giancarlo A.; Ward, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In spite of the recent increase in endoperoxide antimalarials under development, it remains unclear if all these chemotypes share a common mechanism of action. This is important since it will influence cross‐resistance risks between the different classes. Here we investigate this proposition using novel clickable 1,2,4‐trioxolane activity based protein‐profiling probes (ABPPs). ABPPs with potent antimalarial activity were able to alkylate protein target(s) within the asexual erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum (3D7). Importantly, comparison of the alkylation fingerprint with that generated from an artemisinin ABPP equivalent confirms a highly conserved alkylation profile, with both endoperoxide classes targeting proteins in the glycolytic, hemoglobin degradation, antioxidant defence, protein synthesis and protein stress pathways, essential biological processes for plasmodial survival. The alkylation signatures of the two chemotypes show significant overlap (ca. 90 %) both qualitatively and semi‐quantitatively, suggesting a common mechanism of action that raises concerns about potential cross‐resistance liabilities. PMID:27397940

  19. A Click Chemistry‐Based Proteomic Approach Reveals that 1,2,4‐Trioxolane and Artemisinin Antimalarials Share a Common Protein Alkylation Profile

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Hanafy M.; Barton, Victoria E.; Panchana, Matthew; Charoensutthivarakul, Sitthivut; Biagini, Giancarlo A.; Ward, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In spite of the recent increase in endoperoxide antimalarials under development, it remains unclear if all these chemotypes share a common mechanism of action. This is important since it will influence cross‐resistance risks between the different classes. Here we investigate this proposition using novel clickable 1,2,4‐trioxolane activity based protein‐profiling probes (ABPPs). ABPPs with potent antimalarial activity were able to alkylate protein target(s) within the asexual erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum (3D7). Importantly, comparison of the alkylation fingerprint with that generated from an artemisinin ABPP equivalent confirms a highly conserved alkylation profile, with both endoperoxide classes targeting proteins in the glycolytic, hemoglobin degradation, antioxidant defence, protein synthesis and protein stress pathways, essential biological processes for plasmodial survival. The alkylation signatures of the two chemotypes show significant overlap (ca. 90 %) both qualitatively and semi‐quantitatively, suggesting a common mechanism of action that raises concerns about potential cross‐resistance liabilities. PMID:27089538

  20. Applying the Network Simulation Method for testing chaos in a resistively and capacitively shunted Josephson junction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellver, Fernando Gimeno; Garratón, Manuel Caravaca; Soto Meca, Antonio; López, Juan Antonio Vera; Guirao, Juan L. G.; Fernández-Martínez, Manuel

    In this paper, we explore the chaotic behavior of resistively and capacitively shunted Josephson junctions via the so-called Network Simulation Method. Such a numerical approach establishes a formal equivalence among physical transport processes and electrical networks, and hence, it can be applied to efficiently deal with a wide range of differential systems. The generality underlying that electrical equivalence allows to apply the circuit theory to several scientific and technological problems. In this work, the Fast Fourier Transform has been applied for chaos detection purposes and the calculations have been carried out in PSpice, an electrical circuit software. Overall, it holds that such a numerical approach leads to quickly computationally solve Josephson differential models. An empirical application regarding the study of the Josephson model completes the paper.

  1. Utilizing Continuous Resistivity Profiling for Assessment and Characterization of Canal Seepage in El Paso's Lower Valley Irrigation Network System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. A.; Sheng, Z.

    2009-12-01

    Annually, billions of gallons of water are lost through seepage along sections of the irrigation network. To conserve water, El Paso County Water Improvement District has been assessing seepage losses and investigating measures for reducing such losses. Resistivity techniques were used to identify areas of high seepage and provide information on locations along canals that need to be structurally modified in an effort to curb water lost through seepage. Several half mile sections were selected along canals with varying seepage rates to conduct electric resistivity surveys in order generate soil profiles during the non-irrigation and irrigation seasons. Two different multiple channel resistivity meters (The“OhmMapper and the Super Sting R8”) were used, which both allow a vertical resistivity profile to be collected using a single current transmission. The results presented are preliminary and we believe that upon completion findings will serve multiple purposes. Firstly, a better understanding of seepage patterns, seepage rate and its spatial variation can be obtained. Secondly, our findings could be used to produce geological profiles associated with seepage areas which will enable the irrigation district to develop guidelines for improving delivery efficiency, especially during drought. And thirdly, our results will be transferable to other areas of the state and will have a positive impact on the environment and the overall quality of life.

  2. High-Strength, Tough, Fatigue Resistant, and Self-Healing Hydrogel Based on Dual Physically Cross-Linked Network.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhengyu; Zhang, Guoping; Zeng, Xiaoliang; Li, Jinhui; Li, Gang; Huang, Wangping; Sun, Rong; Wong, Chingping

    2016-09-14

    Hydrogels usually suffer from low mechanical strength, which largely limit their application in many fields. In this Research Article, we prepared a dual physically cross-linked hydrogel composed of poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (PAM-co-PAA) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) by simple two-steps methods of copolymerization and freezing/thawing. The hydrogen bond-associated entanglement of copolymer chains formed as cross-linking points to construct the first network. After being subjected to the freezing/thawing treatment, PVA crystalline domains were formed to serve as knots of the second network. The hydrogels were demonstrated to integrate strength and toughness (1230 ± 90 kPa and 1250 ± 50 kJ/m(3)) by the introduction of second physically cross-linked network. What̀s more, the hydrogels exhibited rapid recovery, excellent fatigue resistance, and self-healing property. The dynamic property of the dual physically cross-linked network contributes to the excellent energy dissipation and self-healing property. Therefore, this work provides a new route to understand the toughness mechanism of dual physically cross-linked hydrogels, hopefully promoting current hydrogel research and expanding their applications.

  3. A review of antimalarial plants used in traditional medicine in communities in Portuguese-speaking countries: Brazil, Mozambique, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, São Tomé and Príncipe and Angola.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jefferson Rocha de A; Ramos, Aline de S; Machado, Marta; de Moura, Dominique F; Neto, Zoraima; Canto-Cavalheiro, Marilene M; Figueiredo, Paula; do Rosário, Virgilio E; Amaral, Ana Claudia F; Lopes, Dinora

    2011-08-01

    The isolation of bioactive compounds from medicinal plants, based on traditional use or ethnomedical data, is a highly promising potential approach for identifying new and effective antimalarial drug candidates. The purpose of this review was to create a compilation of the phytochemical studies on medicinal plants used to treat malaria in traditional medicine from the Community of Portuguese-Speaking Countries (CPSC): Angola, Brazil, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique and São Tomé and Príncipe. In addition, this review aimed to show that there are several medicinal plants popularly used in these countries for which few scientific studies are available. The primary approach compared the antimalarial activity of native species used in each country with its extracts, fractions and isolated substances. In this context, data shown here could be a tool to help researchers from these regions establish a scientific and technical network on the subject for the CPSC where malaria is a public health problem.

  4. Potential P-glycoprotein-mediated drug-drug interactions of antimalarial agents in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Oga, Enoche F; Sekine, Shuichi; Shitara, Yoshihisa; Horie, Toshiharu

    2012-07-01

    Antimalarials are widely used in African and Southeast Asian countries, where they are combined with other drugs for the treatment of concurrent ailments. The potential for P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between antimalarials and P-gp substrates was examined using a Caco-2 cell-based model. Selected antimalarials were initially screened for their interaction with P-gp based on the inhibition of rhodamine-123 (Rho-123) transport in Caco-2 cells. Verapamil (100 μM) and quinidine (1 μM) were used as positive inhibition controls. Lumefantrine, amodiaquin, and artesunate all showed blockade of Rho-123 transport. Subsequently, the inhibitory effect of these antimalarials on the bi-directional passage of digoxin (DIG) was examined. All of the drugs decreased basal-to-apical (B-A) P-gp-mediated DIG transport at concentrations of 100 μM and 1 mM. These concentrations may reflect therapeutic doses for amodiaquin and artesunate. Therefore, clinically relevant DDIs may occur between certain antimalarials and P-gp substrates in general.

  5. P. falciparum in vitro killing rates allow to discriminate between different antimalarial mode-of-action.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Laura M; Crespo, Benigno; De-Cózar, Cristina; Ding, Xavier C; Llergo, Jose L; Burrows, Jeremy N; García-Bustos, Jose F; Gamo, Francisco-Javier

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy is still the cornerstone for malaria control. Developing drugs against Plasmodium parasites and monitoring their efficacy requires methods to accurately determine the parasite killing rate in response to treatment. Commonly used techniques essentially measure metabolic activity as a proxy for parasite viability. However, these approaches are susceptible to artefacts, as viability and metabolism are two parameters that are coupled during the parasite life cycle but can be differentially affected in response to drug actions. Moreover, traditional techniques do not allow to measure the speed-of-action of compounds on parasite viability, which is an essential efficacy determinant. We present here a comprehensive methodology to measure in vitro the direct effect of antimalarial compounds over the parasite viability, which is based on limiting serial dilution of treated parasites and re-growth monitoring. This methodology allows to precisely determine the killing rate of antimalarial compounds, which can be quantified by the parasite reduction ratio and parasite clearance time, which are key mode-of-action parameters. Importantly, we demonstrate that this technique readily permits to determine compound killing activities that might be otherwise missed by traditional, metabolism-based techniques. The analysis of a large set of antimalarial drugs reveals that this viability-based assay allows to discriminate compounds based on their antimalarial mode-of-action. This approach has been adapted to perform medium throughput screening, facilitating the identification of fast-acting antimalarial compounds, which are crucially needed for the control and possibly the eradication of malaria.

  6. Reference method for detection of Pgp mediated multidrug resistance in human hematological malignancies: a method validated by the laboratories of the French Drug Resistance Network.

    PubMed

    Huet, S; Marie, J P; Gualde, N; Robert, J

    1998-12-15

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) associated with overexpression of the MDR1 gene and of its product, P-glycoprotein (Pgp), plays an important role in limiting cancer treatment efficacy. Many studies have investigated Pgp expression in clinical samples of hematological malignancies but failed to give definitive conclusion on its usefulness. One convenient method for fluorescent detection of Pgp in malignant cells is flow cytometry which however gives variable results from a laboratory to another one, partly due to the lack of a reference method rigorously tested. The purpose of this technical note is to describe each step of a reference flow cytometric method. The guidelines for sample handling, staining and analysis have been established both for Pgp detection with monoclonal antibodies directed against extracellular epitopes (MRK16, UIC2 and 4E3), and for Pgp functional activity measurement with Rhodamine 123 as a fluorescent probe. Both methods have been validated on cultured cell lines and clinical samples by 12 laboratories of the French Drug Resistance Network. This cross-validated multicentric study points out crucial steps for the accuracy and reproducibility of the results, like cell viability, data analysis and expression.

  7. Low-cost, high-speed identification of counterfeit antimalarial drugs on paper.

    PubMed

    Koesdjojo, Myra T; Wu, Yuanyuan; Boonloed, Anukul; Dunfield, Elizabeth M; Remcho, Vincent T

    2014-12-01

    With the emergence of artesunate antimalarial counterfeiting in Southeast Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, we present the production of a rapid, inexpensive and simple colorimetric-based testing kit for the detection of counterfeit artesunate in order to preserve life and prevent the development of multi-drug resistant malaria. The kit works based on paper microfluidics which offer several advantages over conventional microfluidics, and has great potential to generate inexpensive, easy-to-use, rapid and disposable diagnostic devices. Here, we have developed a colorimetric assay that is specific to artesunate and turns yellow upon addition of the sample. The test can be done within minutes, and allows for a semi-quantitative analysis of the artesunate tablets by comparing the developed yellow color on the paper test to a color-coded key chart that comes with the kit. A more accurate and precise analysis is done by utilizing a color analyzer on an iPhone camera that measures the color intensity of the developed color on the paper chip. A digital image of the chip was taken and analyzed by measuring the average gray intensity of the color developed on the paper circle. A plot of the artesunate concentration versus the average gray scale intensity was generated. Results show that the intensity of the yellow color developed on the paper test was consistent and proportional to the amount of artesunate present in the sample. With artesunate concentrations ranging from 0.0 to 20mg/mL, a linear calibration plot was obtained with a detection limit of 0.98 mg/mL.

  8. In Vivo Antimalarial Activities of Mono- and Bis Quaternary Ammonium Salts Interfering with Plasmodium Phospholipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ancelin, Marie L.; Calas, Michèle; Bonhoure, Anne; Herbute, Serge; Vial, Henri J.

    2003-01-01

    We previously showed that quaternary ammonium salts have potent antimalarial activities against the blood stage of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. In the present study, 13 compounds of this series were comparatively assessed in murine in vivo malarial models. Mice infected with Plasmodium berghei were successfully treated with 11 quaternary ammonium salts in a 4-day suppressive test with a once-daily intraperitoneal administration. The dose required to decrease parasitemia by 50% (ED50) ranged from 0.04 to 4.5 mg/kg of body weight. For six mono- and three bis-quaternary ammonium salts, the therapeutic indices (i.e., 50% lethal dose and ED50) were higher than 5, and at best, around 20 to 30 for five of them (E6, E8, F4, G5, and G25), which is comparable to that of chloroquine under the same conditions. Plasmodium chabaudi was significantly more susceptible to G5, G15, and G25 compounds than P. berghei. Similar therapeutic indices were obtained, regardless of the administration mode or initial parasitemia (up to 11.2%). Parasitemia clearance was complete without recrudescence. Subcutaneously administered radioactive compounds had a short elimination half-life in mice (3.5 h) with low bioavailability (17.3%), which was likely due to the permanent cationic charge of the molecule. The high in vivo therapeutic index in the P. chabaudi-infected mouse model and the absence of recrudescence highlight the enormous potential of these quaternary ammonium salts for clinical malarial treatment. PMID:12878525

  9. Comparative transcriptomic analysis uncovers the complex genetic network for resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Zhao, Qing; Yang, Qingyong; Liu, Han; Li, Qingyuan; Yi, Xinqi; Cheng, Yan; Guo, Liang; Fan, Chuchuan; Zhou, Yongming

    2016-01-08

    Sclerotinia stem rot caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is one of the most devastating diseases in many important crops including Brassica napus worldwide. Quantitative resistance is the only source for genetic improvement of Sclerotinia-resistance in B. napus, but the molecular basis for such a resistance is largely unknown. Here, we performed dynamic transcriptomic analyses to understand the differential defense response to S. sclerotiorum in a resistant line (R-line) and a susceptible line (S-line) of B. napus at 24, 48 and 96 h post-inoculation. Both the numbers of and fold changes in differentially expressed genes in the R-line were larger than those in the S-line. We identified 9001 relative differentially expressed genes in the R-line compared with the S-line. The differences between susceptibility and resistance were associated with the magnitude of expression changes in a set of genes involved in pathogen recognition, MAPK signaling cascade, WRKY transcription regulation, jasmonic acid/ethylene signaling pathways, and biosynthesis of defense-related protein and indolic glucosinolate. The results were supported by quantitation of defense-related enzyme activity and glucosinolate contents. Our results provide insights into the complex molecular mechanism of the defense response to S. sclerotiorum in B. napus and for development of effective strategies in Sclerotinia-resistance breeding.

  10. A Redox-Active Fluorescent pH Indicator for Detecting Plasmodium falciparum Strains with Reduced Responsiveness to Quinoline Antimalarial Drugs.

    PubMed

    Jida, Mouhamad; Sanchez, Cecilia P; Urgin, Karène; Ehrhardt, Katharina; Mounien, Saravanan; Geyer, Aurelia; Elhabiri, Mourad; Lanzer, Michael; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth

    2017-02-10

    Mutational changes in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) have been associated with differential responses to a wide spectrum of biologically active compounds including current and former quinoline and quinoline-like antimalarial drugs. PfCRT confers altered drug responsiveness by acting as a transport system, expelling drugs from the parasite's digestive vacuole where these drugs exert, at least part of, their antiplasmodial activity. To preserve the efficacy of these invaluable drugs, novel functional tools are required for epidemiological surveys of parasite strains carrying mutant PfCRT variants and for drug development programs aimed at inhibiting or circumventing the action of PfCRT. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of a pH-sensitive fluorescent chloroquine analogue consisting of 7-chloro-N-{2-[(propan-2-yl)amino]ethyl}quinolin-4-amine functionalized with the fluorochrome 7-nitrobenzofurazan (NBD) (henceforth termed Fluo-CQ). In the parasite, Fluo-CQ accumulates in the digestive vacuole, giving rise to a strong fluorescence signal but only in parasites carrying the wild type PfCRT. In parasites carrying the mutant PfCRT, Fluo-CQ does not accumulate. The differential handling of the fluorescent probe, combined with live cell imaging, provides a diagnostic tool for quick detection of those P. falciparum strains that carry a PfCRT variant associated with altered responsiveness to quinoline and quinoline-like antimalarial drugs. In contrast to the accumulation studies, chloroquine (CQ)-resistant parasites were observed cross-resistant to Fluo-CQ when the chemical probe was tested in various CQ-sensitive and -resistant parasite strains. NBD derivatives were found to act as redox cyclers of two essential targets, using a coupled assay based on methemoglobin and the NADPH-dependent glutathione reductase (GRs) from P. falciparum. This redox activity is proposed to contribute to the dual action of Fluo-CQ on redox

  11. Asymptotic expansion for the resistance between two maximally separated nodes on an M by N resistor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailian, N. Sh.; Huang, Ming-Chang

    2010-07-01

    We analyze the exact formulas for the resistance between two arbitrary notes in a rectangular network of resistors under free, periodic and cylindrical boundary conditions obtained by Wu [J. Phys. A 37, 6653 (2004)]10.1088/0305-4470/37/26/004. Based on such expression, we then apply the algorithm of Ivashkevich, Izmailian, and Hu [J. Phys. A 35, 5543 (2002)]10.1088/0305-4470/35/27/302 to derive the exact asymptotic expansions of the resistance between two maximally separated nodes on an M×N rectangular network of resistors with resistors r and s in the two spatial directions. Our results is (1)/(s)RM×N(r,s)=c(ρ)lnS+c0(ρ,ξ)+∑p=1∞(c2p(ρ,ξ))/(Sp) with S=MN , ρ=r/s and ξ=M/N . The all coefficients in this expansion are expressed through analytical functions. We have introduced the effective aspect ratio ξeff=ρξ for free and periodic boundary conditions and ξeff=ρξ/2 for cylindrical boundary condition and show that all finite-size correction terms are invariant under transformation ξeff→1/ξeff .

  12. Effect of antimalarials treatment on rat liver lysosomal function-Anin vivo study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Samir P; Katewa, Subhash D; Katyare, Surendra S

    2005-01-01

    Effects of treatmentin vivo with the antimalarials:chloroquine (CQ), primaquine (PQ) and quinine(Q) on lysosomal enzymes and lysosomal membrane integrity were examined. Treatment with the three antimalarials showed an apparent increase in the membrane stability. CQ treatment resulted in increase in both the 'free' and 'total' activities of all the enzymes i.e. acid phosphatase, RNase II, DNase II and cathepsin D. PQ treatment lowered the 'free' and 'total' activities of acid phosphatase and cathepsin D, but the DNase II activities increased. Treatment with Q resulted in increased 'free' and 'total' activities of RNase II and DNase II. While 'free' activities of acid phosphatase and cathepsin D were low; the 'total' activities increased significantly. Our results suggest that a generalized increase in free nucleases activities following prolonged treatment with antimalarials may lead to cell damage and/or necrosis.

  13. Formulation of nanotized curcumin and demonstration of its antimalarial efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Aparajita; Banerjee, Tanushree; Bhandary, Suman; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2014-01-01

    Aim The present study was conducted to overcome the disadvantages associated with the poor water solubility and low bioavailability of curcumin by synthesizing nanotized curcumin and demonstrating its efficacy in treating malaria. Materials and methods Nanotized curcumin was prepared by a modified emulsion-diffusion-evaporation method and was characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering, Zetasizer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and differential thermal analysis. The novelty of the prepared nanoformulation lies in the fact that it was devoid of any polymeric matrices used in conventional carriers. The antimalarial efficacy of the prepared nanotized curcumin was then checked both in vitro and in vivo. Results The nanopreparation was found to be non-toxic and had a particle size distribution of 20–50 nm along with improved aqueous dispersibility and an entrapment efficiency of 45%. Nanotized curcumin (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50]: 0.5 μM) was also found to be ten-fold more effective for growth inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro as compared to its native counterpart (IC50: 5 μM). Oral bioavailability of nanotized curcumin was found to be superior to that of its native counterpart. Moreover, when Plasmodium berghei-infected mice were orally treated with nanotized curcumin, it prolonged their survival by more than 2 months with complete clearance of parasites in comparison to the untreated animals, which survived for 8 days only. Conclusion Nanotized curcumin holds a considerable promise in therapeutics as demonstrated here for treating malaria as a test system. PMID:25484584

  14. Acquired resistance of malarial parasites against artemisinin-based drugs: social and economic impacts.

    PubMed

    Porter-Kelley, Johanna M; Cofie, Joann; Jean, Sophonie; Brooks, Mark E; Lassiter, Mia; Mayer, Dc Ghislaine

    2010-01-01

    Malaria, a disease of poverty and high morbidity and mortality in the tropical world, has led to a worldwide search for control measures. To that end, good antimalarial chemotherapies have been difficult to find in the global market and those that seem to be most effective are rapidly becoming ineffective due to the emergence and spread of drug resistance. Artemisinin, a very effective yet expensive antimalarial, has quickly become the recommended drug of choice when all other possibilities fail. However, for all its promise as the next great antimalarial, the outlook is bleak. Resistance is developing to artemisinin while another effective antimalarial is not in sight. Malaria endemic areas which are mostly in developing countries must deal with the multifaceted process of changing and implementing new national malaria treatment guidelines. This requires complex interactions between several sectors of the affected society which in some cases take place within the context of political instability. Moreover, the cost associated with preventing and containing the spread of antimalarial resistance is detrimental to economic progress. This review addresses the impact of artemisinin resistance on the socioeconomic structure of malaria endemic countries.

  15. Microwave characterization of slotline on high resistivity silicon for antenna feed network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Taub, Susan R.; Lee, Richard Q.; Young, Paul G.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional silicon wafers have low resistivity and consequently unacceptably high value of dielectric attenuation constant. Microwave circuits for phased array antenna systems fabricated on these wafers therefore have low efficiency. By choosing a silicon substrate with sufficiently high resistivity it is possible to make the dielectric attenuation constant of the interconnecting microwave transmission lines approach those of GaAs or InP. In order for this to be possible, the transmission lines must be characterized. In this presentation, the effective dielectric constant (epsilon sub eff) and attenuation constant (alpha) of a slotline on high resistivity (5000 to 10 000 ohm-cm) silicon wafer will be discussed. The epsilon sub eff and alpha are determined from the measured resonant frequencies and the corresponding insertion loss of a slotline ring resonator. The results for slotline will be compared with microstrip line and coplanar waveguide.

  16. 4-Aminoquinoline-β-lactam conjugates: synthesis, antimalarial, and antitubercular evaluation.

    PubMed

    Raj, Raghu; Biot, Christophe; Carrère-Kremer, Séverine; Kremer, Laurent; Guérardel, Yann; Gut, Jiri; Rosenthal, Philip J; Kumar, Vipan

    2014-02-01

    A library of quinoline-β-lactam-based hybrids was synthesized and tested for their antimalarial and antitubercular activities. The present antimalarial data showed the dependence of activity on the nature of linker, N-1 substituent of the β-lactam ring as well as the length of alkyl chain. Most of the compounds are not as efficient as chloroquine in inhibiting the culture growth of Plasmodium falciparum W2 strain. Nevertheless, the synthesized hybrids showed better antitubercular activities (up to five times) compared with cephalexin (up to three times) and ethionamide.

  17. Retinal toxicity induced by antimalarial drugs: literature review and case report.

    PubMed

    Garza-Leon, Manuel; Flores-Alvarado, Diana Elsa; Muñoz-Bravo, Juan Manuel

    2016-06-17

    Antimalarial drugs are widely used in several countries for control of rheumatologic diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. They are still used in Mexico because of their low cost and few secondary effects, most of which are mild and reversible. Even so, at an ophthalmological level, they could produce irreversible visual damage, which is why it is important to have ophthalmological evaluation and proper follow up. We present a clinical case as an example of characteristic ophthalmological findings as well as risk factors for retinal toxicity. We then discuss guidelines for diagnosis and follow up of patients who use antimalarial drugs for the treatment of rheumatologic illnesses.

  18. Diversity-Oriented Synthesis-Facilitated Medicinal Chemistry: Toward the Development of Novel Antimalarial Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe medicinal chemistry that was accelerated by a diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) pathway, and in vivo studies of our previously reported macrocyclic antimalarial agent that derived from the synthetic pathway. Structure–activity relationships that focused on both appendage and skeletal features yielded a nanomolar inhibitor of P. falciparum asexual blood-stage growth with improved solubility and microsomal stability and reduced hERG binding. The build/couple/pair (B/C/P) synthetic strategy, used in the preparation of the original screening library, facilitated medicinal chemistry optimization of the antimalarial lead. PMID:25211597

  19. Diversity-oriented synthesis-facilitated medicinal chemistry: toward the development of novel antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Comer, Eamon; Beaudoin, Jennifer A; Kato, Nobutaka; Fitzgerald, Mark E; Heidebrecht, Richard W; Lee, Maurice duPont; Masi, Daniela; Mercier, Marion; Mulrooney, Carol; Muncipinto, Giovanni; Rowley, Ann; Crespo-Llado, Keila; Serrano, Adelfa E; Lukens, Amanda K; Wiegand, Roger C; Wirth, Dyann F; Palmer, Michelle A; Foley, Michael A; Munoz, Benito; Scherer, Christina A; Duvall, Jeremy R; Schreiber, Stuart L

    2014-10-23

    Here, we describe medicinal chemistry that was accelerated by a diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) pathway, and in vivo studies of our previously reported macrocyclic antimalarial agent that derived from the synthetic pathway. Structure-activity relationships that focused on both appendage and skeletal features yielded a nanomolar inhibitor of P. falciparum asexual blood-stage growth with improved solubility and microsomal stability and reduced hERG binding. The build/couple/pair (B/C/P) synthetic strategy, used in the preparation of the original screening library, facilitated medicinal chemistry optimization of the antimalarial lead.

  20. Fractal Analysis of Flow Resistance in Tree-Like Branching Networks with Roughened Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shanshan; Fu, Huahua; Yu, Boming

    In this work, the effective average height of the roughness elements, the relative increase of the pressure gradients, the relative decrease of the permeability are derived based on the fractal geometry theory and technique for laminar flow through tree-like branching networks with roughened channels. The relationships among the effective average height, the structural parameters and pressure drops as well as permeability are studied. It is found that the total pressure drop across a tree-like branching network with roughened channels is increased by a factor of 1/(1 ‑ ɛ)4, and the permeability for the network with roughened channels is decreased by a factor of (1 ‑ ɛ)2, where ɛ is the relative roughness of surfaces of channels, compared to those with smooth channels.

  1. Anti-malarial activity of Holarrhena antidysenterica and Viola canescens, plants traditionally used against malaria in the Garhwal region of north-west Himalaya

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The increasing number of multidrug-resistant Plasmodium strains warrants exploration of new anti-malarials. Medicinal plant research has become more important, particularly after the development of Chinese anti-malarial drug artemisnin from Artemisia annua. The present study shows evaluation of anti-malarial effects of two plants commonly used against malaria in the Garhwal region of north-west Himalaya, in order to discover the herbal-based medicine. Methods In vitro anti-plasmodial sensitivity of plant extracts was assessed using schizont maturation and parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) assay. Cytotoxic activities of the examined extracts were determined on L-6 cells of rat skeletal muscle myoblast. The 4-day test for anti-malarial activity against a chloroquine sensitive Plasmodium berghei NK65 strain in Swiss albino mice was used for monitoring in vivo activity of plant extracts. Results Chloroform extract of H. antidysenterica (HA-2) and petroleum ether extract of V. canescens (VC-1) plants significantly reduced parasitaemia in P. berghei infected mice. The extract HA-2 showed in vitro anti-plasmodial activity with its IC50 value 5.5 μg/ml using pLDH assay and ED50 value 18.29 mg/kg in P. berghei infected Swiss albino mice. Similarly petroleum ether extract of V. canescens (VC-1) showed in vitro anti-plasmodial activity with its IC50 value 2.76 μg/ml using pLDH assay and ED50 15.8 mg/kg in P. berghei infected mice. The extracts coded as HA-2 at 30 mg/kg and VC-1 at 20 mg/kg exhibited parasite inhibition in mice: 73.2% and 63.0% respectively. Of these two plant extracts, petroleum ether extract of V. canescens was found slightly cytotoxic. Conclusion The present investigation reflects the use of these traditional medicinal plants against malaria and these plants may work as potential source in the development of variety of herbal formulations for the treatment of malaria. PMID:21288335

  2. Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maughan, George R.; Petitto, Karen R.; McLaughlin, Don

    2001-01-01

    Describes the connectivity features and options of modern campus communication and information system networks, including signal transmission (wire-based and wireless), signal switching, convergence of networks, and network assessment variables, to enable campus leaders to make sound future-oriented decisions. (EV)

  3. Resistance to aerobic exercise training causes metabolic dysfunction and reveals novel exercise-regulated signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Sarah J; Rivas, Donato A; Alves-Wagner, Ana B; Hirshman, Michael F; Gallagher, Iain J; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Atkins, Ryan; Greenhaff, Paul L; Qi, Nathan R; Gustafsson, Thomas; Fielding, Roger A; Timmons, James A; Britton, Steven L; Koch, Lauren G; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2013-08-01

    Low aerobic exercise capacity is a risk factor for diabetes and a strong predictor of mortality, yet some individuals are "exercise-resistant" and unable to improve exercise capacity through exercise training. To test the hypothesis that resistance to aerobic exercise training underlies metabolic disease risk, we used selective breeding for 15 generations to develop rat models of low and high aerobic response to training. Before exercise training, rats selected as low and high responders had similar exercise capacities. However, after 8 weeks of treadmill training, low responders failed to improve their exercise capacity, whereas high responders improved by 54%. Remarkably, low responders to aerobic training exhibited pronounced metabolic dysfunction characterized by insulin resistance and increased adiposity, demonstrating that the exercise-resistant phenotype segregates with disease risk. Low responders had impaired exercise-induced angiogenesis in muscle; however, mitochondrial capacity was intact and increased normally with exercise training, demonstrating that mitochondria are not limiting for aerobic adaptation or responsible for metabolic dysfunction in low responders. Low responders had increased stress/inflammatory signaling and altered transforming growth factor-β signaling, characterized by hyperphosphorylation of a novel exercise-regulated phosphorylation site on SMAD2. Using this powerful biological model system, we have discovered key pathways for low exercise training response that may represent novel targets for the treatment of metabolic disease.

  4. Synthesis of oxidation-resistant cupronickel nanowires for transparent conducting nanowire networks.

    PubMed

    Rathmell, Aaron R; Nguyen, Minh; Chi, Miaofang; Wiley, Benjamin J

    2012-06-13

    Nanowires of copper can be coated from liquids to create flexible, transparent conducting films that can potentially replace the dominant transparent conductor, indium tin oxide, in displays, solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes, and electrochromic windows. One issue with these nanowire films is that copper is prone to oxidation. It was hypothesized that the resistance to oxidation could be improved by coating copper nanowires with nickel. This work demonstrates a method for synthesizing copper nanowires with nickel shells as well as the properties of cupronickel nanowires in transparent conducting films. Time- and temperature-dependent sheet resistance measurements indicate that the sheet resistance of copper and silver nanowire films will double after 3 and 36 months at room temperature, respectively. In contrast, the sheet resistance of cupronickel nanowires containing 20 mol % nickel will double in about 400 years. Coating copper nanowires to a ratio of 2:1 Cu:Ni gave them a neutral gray color, making them more suitable for use in displays and electrochromic windows. These properties, and the fact that copper and nickel are 1000 times more abundant than indium or silver, make cupronickel nanowires a promising alternative for the sustainable, efficient production of transparent conductors.

  5. Synthesis of Oxidation-Resistant Cupronickel Nanowires for Transparent Conducting Nanowire Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Rathmall, Aaron; Nguyen, Minh; Wiley, Benjamin J

    2012-01-01

    Nanowires of copper can be coated from liquids to create flexible, transparent conducting films that can potentially replace the dominant transparent conductor, indium tin oxide, in displays, solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes, and electrochromic windows. One issue with these nanowire films is that copper is prone to oxidation. It was hypothesized that the resistance to oxidation could be improved by coating copper nanowires with nickel. This work demonstrates a method for synthesizing copper nanowires with nickel shells as well as the properties of cupronickel nanowires in transparent conducting films. Time- and temperature-dependent sheet resistance measurements indicate that the sheet resistance of copper and silver nanowire films will double after 3 and 36 months at room temperature, respectively. In contrast, the sheet resistance of cupronickel nanowires containing 20 mol % nickel will double in about 400 years. Coating copper nanowires to a ratio of 2:1 Cu:Ni gave them a neutral gray color, making them more suitable for use in displays and electrochromic windows. These properties, and the fact that copper and nickel are 1000 times more abundant than indium or silver, make cupronickel nanowires a promising alternative for the sustainable, efficient production of transparent conductors.

  6. Correlation of HIV protease structure with Indinavir resistance: a data mining and neural networks approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draghici, Sorin; Cumberland, Lonnie T., Jr.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2000-04-01

    This paper presents some results of data mining HIV genotypic and structural data. Our aim is to try to relate structural features of HIV enzymes essential to its reproductive abilities to the drug resistance phenomenon. This paper concentrates on the HIV protease enzyme and Indinavir which is one of the FDA approved protease inhibitors. Our starting point was the current list of HIV mutations related to drug resistance. We used the fact that some molecular structures determined through high resolution X-ray crystallography were available for the protease-Indinavir complex. Starting with these structures and the known mutations, we modelled the mutant proteases and studied the pattern of atomic contacts between the protease and the drug. After suitable pre- processing, these patterns have been used as the input of our data mining process. We have used both supervised and unsupervised learning techniques with the aim of understanding the relationship between structural features at a molecular level and resistance to Indinavir. The supervised learning was aimed at predicting IC90 values for arbitrary mutants. The SOFM was aimed at identifying those structural features that are important for drug resistance and discovering a classifier based on such features. We have used validation and cross validation to test the generalization abilities of the learning paradigm we have designed. The straightforward supervised learning was able to learn very successfully but validation results are less than satisfactory. This is due to the insufficient number of patterns in the training set which in turn is due to the scarcity of the available data. The data mining using SOFM was very successful. We have managed to distinguish between resistant and non-resistant mutants using structural features. We have been able to divide all reported HIV mutants into several categories based on their 3- dimensional molecular structures and the pattern of contacts between the mutant protease and

  7. Network Analysis of Foramen Ovale Electrode Recordings in Drug-resistant Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-García, Ancor; Vega-Zelaya, Lorena; Pastor, Jesús; Torres, Cristina V.; Sola, Rafael G.; Ortega, Guillermo J.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 30% of epilepsy patients are refractory to antiepileptic drugs. In these cases, surgery is the only alternative to eliminate/control seizures. However, a significant minority of patients continues to exhibit post-operative seizures, even in those cases in which the suspected source of seizures has been correctly localized and resected. The protocol presented here combines a clinical procedure routinely employed during the pre-operative evaluation of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients with a novel technique for network analysis. The method allows for the evaluation of the temporal evolution of mesial network parameters. The bilateral insertion of foramen ovale electrodes (FOE) into the ambient cistern simultaneously records electrocortical activity at several mesial areas in the temporal lobe. Furthermore, network methodology applied to the recorded time series tracks the temporal evolution of the mesial networks both interictally and during the seizures. In this way, the presented protocol offers a unique way to visualize and quantify measures that considers the relationships between several mesial areas instead of a single area. PMID:28060326

  8. Significantly enhanced creep resistance of low volume fraction in-situ TiBw/Ti6Al4V composites by architectured network reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Huang, L. J.; Geng, L.; Scarpa, F.; Jiao, Y.; Peng, H. X.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new class of TiBw/Ti6Al4V composites with a network reinforcement architecture that exhibits a significant creep resistance compared to monolithic Ti6Al4V alloys. Creep tests performed at temperatures between 773 K and 923 K and stress range of 100 MPa-300 MPa indicate both a significant improvement of the composites creep resistance due to the network architecture made by the TiB whiskers (TiBw), and a decrease of the steady-state creep rates by augmenting the local volume fractions of TiBw in the network region. The deformation behavior is driven by a diffusion-controlled dislocation climb process. Moreover, the activation energies of these composites are significantly higher than that of Ti6Al4V alloys, indicating a higher creep resistance. The increase of the activation energy can be attributed to the TiBw architecture that severely impedes the movements of dislocation and grain boundary sliding and provides a tailoring of the stress transfer. These micromechanical mechanisms lead to a remarkable improvement of the creep resistance of these networked TiBw/Ti6Al4V composites featuring the special networked architecture.

  9. Significantly enhanced creep resistance of low volume fraction in-situ TiBw/Ti6Al4V composites by architectured network reinforcements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S.; Huang, L. J.; Geng, L.; Scarpa, F.; Jiao, Y.; Peng, H. X.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new class of TiBw/Ti6Al4V composites with a network reinforcement architecture that exhibits a significant creep resistance compared to monolithic Ti6Al4V alloys. Creep tests performed at temperatures between 773 K and 923 K and stress range of 100 MPa-300 MPa indicate both a significant improvement of the composites creep resistance due to the network architecture made by the TiB whiskers (TiBw), and a decrease of the steady-state creep rates by augmenting the local volume fractions of TiBw in the network region. The deformation behavior is driven by a diffusion-controlled dislocation climb process. Moreover, the activation energies of these composites are significantly higher than that of Ti6Al4V alloys, indicating a higher creep resistance. The increase of the activation energy can be attributed to the TiBw architecture that severely impedes the movements of dislocation and grain boundary sliding and provides a tailoring of the stress transfer. These micromechanical mechanisms lead to a remarkable improvement of the creep resistance of these networked TiBw/Ti6Al4V composites featuring the special networked architecture. PMID:28094350

  10. Evaluation and localization of an artificial drainage network by 3D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography.

    PubMed

    Jouen, T; Clément, R; Henine, H; Chaumont, C; Vincent, B; Tournebize, J

    2016-08-26

    In France, 10 % of total arable land is equipped with subsurface drainage systems, to control winter and spring waterlogging due to a temporary perched water table. Most of these systems were installed in the1980s and have aged since then and may now need maintenance. Sometimes, the location of the systems is known, but the standard situation in France is that the original as-built master sketches are no longer available. Performance assessment of drainage systems and curative actions are complicated since drain location is unknown. In this article, the authors test the application of a non-destructive drain detection method which consists in water injection at the outfall of the drainage network combined with time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring. To assess the performance of this methodology, which consists in measuring electrical resistivity from electrodes placed at the nodes of a 1.2-m regular mesh, the authors interpreted the signal using a two-step approach. The first step is based on 3D ERT numerical modelling during a scenario of surface infiltration processes (forward modelling followed by geophysical inversion); this step optimizes the ERT method for locating the infiltration at depths below 1 m. The second step is the validation of the results obtained by numerical modelling with an experimental data set, using water injection into the drainage network combined with time-lapse ERT monitoring on an experimental field site. The results showed the relevance of time-lapse ERT monitoring on a small agricultural plot for locating the drainage network. The numerical results also showed several limitations of the combined methodology: (i) it is necessary to use an electrode spacing unit less than 1.20 m, which does not facilitate investigation on large agriculture plots, (ii) measurements must be taken when resistivity contrast is the strongest between the infiltration area and the soil and (iii) the volume of water needed for

  11. Antimalarial activity of Mannich bases derived from 4-(7'-bromo-1',5'-naphthyridin-4'-ylamino)phenol and 4-(7'-trifluoromethylquinolin-4'-ylamino)phenol against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Scott, H V; Tan, W L; Barlin, G B

    1987-04-01

    Mono- and di-Mannich bases derived from 4-(7'-bromo-1',5'-naphthyridin-4'-ylamino)phenol and 4-(7'-trifluoromethylquinolin-4'-ylamino)phenol were assayed for antimalarial activity (using an in vitro radioisotopic technique) against two isolates of Plasmodium falciparum. Many from these two series of compounds had an IC50 value (concentration of compound causing 50% inhibition of 3H-hypoxanthine incorporation) comparable to or better than those of mefloquine and amodiaquine, for both a chloroquine-sensitive isolate (FCQ-27) and the chloroquine-resistant isolate (K1). At least one compound, 2,6-bis (piperidin-1''-ylmethyl)-4-(7'-trifluoromethylquinolin -4'-ylamino)phenol (TN112), showed significant superior activity to the three antimalarials chloroquine, mefloquine and amodiaquine against both isolates. (Statistically superior activity compared to these three antimalarials was found for TN112, except that against the K1 isolate its activity was just outside the range of significance relative to mefloquine.) Some of the 7-bromo-1,5-naphthyridine Mannich bases were appreciably less toxic in mice than amodiaquine.

  12. Embryotoxicity and toxicokinetics of the antimalarial artesunate in rats.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moon-Koo; Yu, Wook-Joon; Lee, Jin-Soo; Lee, Jong-Hwa

    2013-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the potential embryo-fetal toxicity and toxicokinetics of the antimalarial agent artesunate (ARTS) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Pregnant rats were administered ARTS daily from gestational day 6~15 via oral gavage, at test doses of 0, 2, 4, or 8 mg/kg (22 females per group). The fetuses were examined for external, visceral, and skeletal abnormalities on gestational day 20. With regard to the dams, there were no deaths, treatment-related clinical signs, changes in body weight, or food intake in any of the treatment groups. There were no treatment-related gross findings at necropsy in any treatment group. In the 8 mg/kg group, there was a decrease in gravid uterine weight and in the weight of female fetuses. There was also an increase in fetal deaths (primarily late resorptions) and an increase in post-implantation losses (37%) at 8 mg/kg. An increase in the incidence of visceral and skeletal variations at 4 and 8 mg/kg was observed. These defects included minor changes in the appearance of the kidney and thymus, as well as absent ribs or thoracic vertebrae. Toxicokinetics were assessed in a parallel study, using 4 mated females per group. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis, the concentration of ARTS and its metabolite dihydroartemisinin (DHA) were quantified in plasma from rats on gestational days 5, 6, 10, and 15. Amniotic fluid was assayed for ARTS and DHA on gestational day 15. There was evidence of rapid conversion of ARTS to the metabolite DHA in maternal plasma, since ARTS could not be consistently detected in plasma at the three doses tested. ARTS and DHA were not detected in amniotic fluid at gestational day 15, indicating limited placental transfer of the two agents. The embryofetal no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of the test item was considered to be 8 mg/kg/day for dams, and 2 mg/kg/day for embryo-fetal development.

  13. Quality of Antimalarial Drugs and Antibiotics in Papua New Guinea: A Survey of the Health Facility Supply Chain

    PubMed Central

    Hetzel, Manuel W.; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Bala, Nancy; Pulford, Justin; Betuela, Inoni; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Lavu, Evelyn K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor-quality life-saving medicines are a major public health threat, particularly in settings with a weak regulatory environment. Insufficient amounts of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) endanger patient safety and may contribute to the development of drug resistance. In the case of malaria, concerns relate to implications for the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT). In Papua New Guinea (PNG), Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax are both endemic and health facilities are the main source of treatment. ACT has been introduced as first-line treatment but other drugs, such as primaquine for the treatment of P. vivax hypnozoites, are widely available. This study investigated the quality of antimalarial drugs and selected antibiotics at all levels of the health facility supply chain in PNG. Methods and Findings Medicines were obtained from randomly sampled health facilities and selected warehouses and hospitals across PNG and analysed for API content using validated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Of 360 tablet/capsule samples from 60 providers, 9.7% (95% CI 6.9, 13.3) contained less, and 0.6% more, API than pharmacopoeial reference ranges, including 29/37 (78.4%) primaquine, 3/70 (4.3%) amodiaquine, and one sample each of quinine, artemether, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and amoxicillin. According to the package label, 86.5% of poor-quality samples originated from India. Poor-quality medicines were found in 48.3% of providers at all levels of the supply chain. Drug quality was unrelated to storage conditions. Conclusions This study documents the presence of poor-quality medicines, particularly primaquine, throughout PNG. Primaquine is the only available transmission-blocking antimalarial, likely to become important to prevent the spread of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum and eliminating P. vivax hypnozoites. The availability of poor-quality medicines reflects the lack of adequate quality control and regulatory

  14. New Approaches to Maximizing Thermo-oxidation Resistance of Polycyanurate Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-13

    Resveratrol -based CE Delivers Exceptional Thermal Stability and Fire Resistance Acknowledgements: Strategic Environmental Research and Development...CH2-CH2- (dihydro resveratrol ) OH OH HO R OCN OCN NCO R Char (65%) Cure at 250C N N N N N N O O O R N N N Resveratrol cyanate ester* Resveratrol ...triazine thermoset resin > 450C Fire ( resveratrol ) • Polyphenolic antioxidant used as a dietary supplement • Extracted from seaweed, red grapes, red wine

  15. Resistance switching in a SiC nanowire/Au nanoparticle network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Y.; Kohno, H.

    2009-07-01

    Resistance switching in a semiconductor nanowire/metal nanoparticle system is demonstrated. SiC nanowires grown on a Si substrate and decorated with Au nanoparticles are measured using W microprobes in a scanning electron microscope, where one probe is grounded and the other is biased. HIGH and LOW states can be toggled by applying a negative or positive pulse voltage. The switching mechanism is attributed to a charge transfer between the SiC nanowires and the Au nanoparticles.

  16. Strengthening of national capacity in implementation of antimalarial drug quality assurance in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Vijaykadga, Saowanit; Cholpol, Sawat; Sitthimongkol, Saipin; Pawaphutanan, Anusorn; Pinyoratanachot, Arunya; Rojanawatsirivet, Chaiporn; Kovithvattanapong, Rojana; Thimasarn, Krongthong

    2006-01-01

    Substandard and counterfeit pharmaceutical products, including antimalarial drugs, appear to be widespread internationally and affect both the developing and developed countries. The aim of the study was to investigate the quality of antimalarial drugs, ie, artesunate (ART), chloroquine (CHL), mefloquine (MEF), quinine (QUI), sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (S/P) and tetracycline (TT) obtained from the government sector and private pharmacies in 4 Thai provinces: Mae Hong Son, Kanchanaburi, Ranong, and Chanthaburi. Three hundred sixty-nine samples of 6 antimalarial drugs from 27 government hospitals, 27 malaria clinics, and 53 drugstores, were collected. Drug quality was assessed by simple disintegration test and semi-quantitative thin-layer chromatography in each province; 10% passed, 100% failed and doubtful samples were sent to be verified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) at the Thai National Drug Analysis Laboratory, (NL). Fifteen point four percent of ART, 11.1% of CHL and 29.4% of QUI were substandard. Based on the finding, drug regulatory authorities in the country took appropriate action against violators to ensure that antimalarial drugs consumed by malaria patients are of good quality.

  17. Detecting the antimalarial artemisinin in plant extracts using near-infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antimalarial artemisinin is produced by Artemisia annua L and can be used to kill the protozoan parasite Plasmodium, which is spread by mosquitoes. Artemisinin is extracted from these plants through tea preparation. The artemisinin content of the tea varies depending on how much artemisinin was ...

  18. Considerations about the structure—activity relationships of 8-aminoquinoline antimalarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    McChesney, James D.

    1981-01-01

    A discussion of the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of 8-aminoquinoline antimalarial drugs is presented. Consideration is given to the potential role of metabolic transformations in the in vivo activation of 8-aminoquinolines. It is emphasized that the mechanism of action of 8-aminoquinoline agents has not yet been established and thus any analysis of SAR must be speculative. PMID:6976853

  19. Influence of antimalarial treatment on acquisition of immunity in Plasmodium berghei NK65 malaria.

    PubMed

    Long, Ton That Ai; Nakazawa, Shusuke; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Kanbara, Hiroji

    2002-07-01

    Antimalarial treatments during primary Plasmodium berghei NK65 infection in BALB/c mice influenced the acquisition of protective immunity against reinfection. Among subcurative treatments, lower doses better enable mice to acquire protective immunity than do higher doses. Eradication of parasites from the start of infection did not promote protective immunity.

  20. Cross-Study Comparison Reveals Common Genomic, Network, and Functional Signatures of Desiccation Resistance in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Telonis-Scott, Marina; Sgrò, Carla M.; Hoffmann, Ary A.; Griffin, Philippa C.

    2016-01-01

    Repeated attempts to map the genomic basis of complex traits often yield different outcomes because of the influence of genetic background, gene-by-environment interactions, and/or statistical limitations. However, where repeatability is low at the level of individual genes, overlap often occurs in gene ontology categories, genetic pathways, and interaction networks. Here we report on the genomic overlap for natural desiccation resistance from a Pool-genome-wide association study experiment and a selection experiment in flies collected from the same region in southeastern Australia in different years. We identified over 600 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with desiccation resistance in flies derived from almost 1,000 wild-caught genotypes, a similar number of loci to that observed in our previous genomic study of selected lines, demonstrating the genetic complexity of this ecologically important trait. By harnessing the power of cross-study comparison, we narrowed the candidates from almost 400 genes in each study to a core set of 45 genes, enriched for stimulus, stress, and defense responses. In addition to gene-level overlap, there was higher order congruence at the network and functional levels, suggesting genetic redundancy in key stress sensing, stress response, immunity, signaling, and gene expression pathways. We also identified variants linked to different molecular aspects of desiccation physiology previously verified from functional experiments. Our approach provides insight into the genomic basis of a complex and ecologically important trait and predicts candidate genetic pathways to explore in multiple genetic backgrounds and related species within a functional framework. PMID:26733490

  1. What are the most efficacious treatment regimens for isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis? A systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stagg, H R; Harris, R J; Hatherell, H-A; Obach, D; Tsuchiya, N; Kranzer, K; Nikolayevskyy, V; Kim, J; Lipman, M C; Abubakar, I

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Consensus on the best treatment regimens for patients with isoniazid-resistant TB is limited; global treatment guidelines differ. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis using mixed-treatment comparisons methodology to provide an up-to-date summary of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and relative regimen efficacy. Methods Ovid MEDLINE, the Web of Science and EMBASE were mined using search terms for TB, drug therapy and RCTs. Extracted data were inputted into fixed-effects and random-effects models. ORs for all possible network comparisons and hierarchical rankings for different regimens were obtained. Results 12 604 records were retrieved and 118 remained postextraction, representing 59 studies—27 standalone and 32 with multiple papers. In comparison to a baseline category that included the WHO-recommended regimen for countries with high levels of isoniazid resistance (rifampicin-containing regimens using fewer than three effective drugs at 4 months, in which rifampicin was protected by another effective drug at 6 months, and rifampicin was taken for 6 months), extending the duration of rifampicin and increasing the number of effective drugs at 4 months lowered the odds of unfavourable outcomes (treatment failure or the lack of microbiological cure; relapse post-treatment; death due to TB) in a fixed-effects model (OR 0.31 (95% credible interval 0.12–0.81)). In a random-effects model all estimates crossed the null. Conclusions Our systematic review and network meta-analysis highlight a regimen category that may be more efficacious than the WHO population level recommendation, and identify knowledge gaps where data are sparse. Systematic review registration number PROSPERO CRD42014015025. PMID:27298314

  2. Fabrication of Oxidation-Resistant Metal Wire Network-Based Transparent Electrodes by a Spray-Roll Coating Process.

    PubMed

    Kiruthika, S; Gupta, Ritu; Anand, Aman; Kumar, Ankush; Kulkarni, G U

    2015-12-16

    Roll and spray coating methods have been employed for the fabrication of highly oxidation resistant transparent and conducting electrodes (TCEs) by a simple solution process using crackle lithography technique. We have spray-coated a crackle paint-based precursor to produce highly interconnected crackle network on PET roll mounted on a roll coater with web speed of 0.6 m/min. Ag TCE with a transmittance of 78% and sheet resistance of ∼20 Ω/□ was derived by spraying Ag precursor ink over the crackle template followed by lift-off and annealing under ambient conditions. The Ag wire mesh was stable toward bending and sonication tests but prone to oxidation in air. When electrolessly coated with Pd, its robustness toward harsh oxidation conditions was enhanced. A low-cost transparent electrode has also been realized by using only small amounts of Ag as seed layer and growing Cu wire mesh by electroless method. Thus, made Ag/Cu meshes are found to be highly stable for more than a year even under ambient atmosphere.

  3. Astragaloside IV improves lipid metabolism in obese mice by alleviation of leptin resistance and regulation of thermogenic network

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui; Gao, Yan; Shi, Hai-Lian; Qin, Li-Yue; Huang, Fei; Lan, Yun-Yi; Zhang, Bei-Bei; Hu, Zhi-Bi; Wu, Xiao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a worldwide threat to public health in modern society, which may result from leptin resistance and disorder of thermogenesis. The present study investigated whether astragaloside IV (ASI) could prevent obesity in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed and db/db mice. In HFD-fed mice, ASI prevented body weight gain, lowered serum triglyceride and total cholesterol levels, mitigated liver lipid accumulation, reduced fat tissues and decreased the enlargement of adipose cells. In metabolic chambers, ASI lessened appetite of the mice, decreased their respiratory exchange ratio and elevated VCO2 and VO2 without altering circadian motor activity. Moreover, ASI modulated thermogenesis associated gene expressions in liver and brawn fat tissues, as well as leptin resistance evidenced by altered expressions of leptin, leptin receptor (ObR) or appetite associated genes. In SH-SY5Y cells, ASI enhanced leptin signaling transduction. However, in db/db mice, ASI did not change body weight gain and appetite associated genes. But it decreased serum triglyceride and total cholesterol levels as well as liver triglyceride. Meanwhile, it significantly modulated gene expressions of PPARα, PGC1-α, UCP2, ACC, SCD1, LPL, AP2, CD36 and SREBP-1c. Collectively, our study suggested that ASI could efficiently improve lipid metabolism in obese mice probably through enhancing leptin sensitivity and modulating thermogenic network. PMID:27444146

  4. Recent results and performance of the multi-gap resistive plate chambers network for the EEE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Avanzini, C.; Baldini, L.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Batignani, G.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossini, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cicalò, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Coccia, E.; Corvaglia, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Pasquale, S.; Di Giovanni, A.; D`Incecco, M.; Dreucci, M.; Fabbri, F. L.; Fattibene, E.; Ferraro, A.; Frolov, V.; Galeotti, P.; Garbini, M.; Gemme, G.; Gnesi, I.; Grazzi, S.; Gustavino, C.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; La Rocca, P.; Licciulli, F.; Maggiora, A.; Maragoto Rodriguez, O.; Maron, G.; Martelli, B.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Miozzi, S.; Nania, R.; Noferini, F.; Nozzoli, F.; Panareo, M.; Panetta, M. P.; Paoletti, R.; Park, W.; Perasso, L.; Pilo, F.; Piragino, G.; Riggi, F.; Righini, G. C.; Sartorelli, G.; Scapparone, E.; Schioppa, M.; Scribano, A.; Selvi, M.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stori, L.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Visnyei, O. B.; Vistoli, M. C.; Votano, L.; Williams, M. C. S.; Zani, S.; Zichichi, A.; Zuyeusky, R.

    2016-11-01

    The Extreme Energy Events (EEE) Project is devoted to the study of Extensive Atmospheric Showers through a network of muon telescopes, installed in High Schools, with the further aim of introducing young students to particle and astroparticle physics. Each telescope is a tracking detector composed of three Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC) with an active area of 1.60 × 0.80 m2. Their characteristics are similar to the ones built for the Time Of Flight array of the ALICE Experimentat LHC . The EEE Project started with a few pilot towns, where the telescopes have been taking data since 2008, and it has been constantly extended, reaching at present more than 50 MRPCs telescopes. They are spread across Italy with two additional stations at CERN, covering an area of around 3 × 105 km2, with a total surface area for all the MRPCs of 190 m2. A comprehensive description of the MRPCs network is reported here: efficiency, time and spatial resolution measured using cosmic rays hitting the telescopes. The most recent results on the detector and physics performance from a series of coordinated data acquisition periods are also presented.

  5. Mechanosensitive Molecular Networks Involved in Transducing Resistance Exercise-Signals into Muscle Protein Accretion

    PubMed Central

    Rindom, Emil; Vissing, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Loss of skeletal muscle myofibrillar protein with disease and/or inactivity can severely deteriorate muscle strength and function. Strategies to counteract wasting of muscle myofibrillar protein are therefore desirable and invite for considerations on the potential superiority of specific modes of resistance exercise and/or the adequacy of low load resistance exercise regimens as well as underlying mechanisms. In this regard, delineation of the potentially mechanosensitive molecular mechanisms underlying muscle protein synthesis (MPS), may contribute to an understanding on how differentiated resistance exercise can transduce a mechanical signal into stimulation of muscle accretion. Recent findings suggest specific upstream exercise-induced mechano-sensitive myocellular signaling pathways to converge on mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), to influence MPS. This may e.g. implicate mechanical activation of signaling through a diacylglycerol kinase (DGKζ)-phosphatidic acid (PA) axis or implicate integrin deformation to signal through a Focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 (TSC2)-Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) axis. Moreover, since initiation of translation is reliant on mRNA, it is also relevant to consider potentially mechanosensitive signaling pathways involved in muscle myofibrillar gene transcription and whether some of these pathways converge with those affecting mTORC1 activation for MPS. In this regard, recent findings suggest how mechanical stress may implicate integrin deformation and/or actin dynamics to signal through a Ras homolog gene family member A protein (RhoA)-striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) axis or implicate deformation of Notch to affect Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling through a small mother of decapentaplegic (Smad) axis. PMID:27909410

  6. Mechanosensitive Molecular Networks Involved in Transducing Resistance Exercise-Signals into Muscle Protein Accretion.

    PubMed

    Rindom, Emil; Vissing, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Loss of skeletal muscle myofibrillar protein with disease and/or inactivity can severely deteriorate muscle strength and function. Strategies to counteract wasting of muscle myofibrillar protein are therefore desirable and invite for considerations on the potential superiority of specific modes of resistance exercise and/or the adequacy of low load resistance exercise regimens as well as underlying mechanisms. In this regard, delineation of the potentially mechanosensitive molecular mechanisms underlying muscle protein synthesis (MPS), may contribute to an understanding on how differentiated resistance exercise can transduce a mechanical signal into stimulation of muscle accretion. Recent findings suggest specific upstream exercise-induced mechano-sensitive myocellular signaling pathways to converge on mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), to influence MPS. This may e.g. implicate mechanical activation of signaling through a diacylglycerol kinase (DGKζ)-phosphatidic acid (PA) axis or implicate integrin deformation to signal through a Focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 (TSC2)-Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) axis. Moreover, since initiation of translation is reliant on mRNA, it is also relevant to consider potentially mechanosensitive signaling pathways involved in muscle myofibrillar gene transcription and whether some of these pathways converge with those affecting mTORC1 activation for MPS. In this regard, recent findings suggest how mechanical stress may implicate integrin deformation and/or actin dynamics to signal through a Ras homolog gene family member A protein (RhoA)-striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) axis or implicate deformation of Notch to affect Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling through a small mother of decapentaplegic (Smad) axis.

  7. Mechanisms of hematin crystallization and inhibition by the antimalarial drug chloroquine

    PubMed Central

    Olafson, Katy N.; Ketchum, Megan A.; Rimer, Jeffrey D.; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Hematin crystallization is the primary mechanism of heme detoxification in malaria parasites and the target of the quinoline class of antimalarials. Despite numerous studies of malaria pathophysiology, fundamental questions regarding hematin growth and inhibition remain. Among them are the identity of the crystallization medium in vivo, aqueous or organic; the mechanism of crystallization, classical or nonclassical; and whether quinoline antimalarials inhibit crystallization by sequestering hematin in the solution, or by blocking surface sites crucial for growth. Here we use time-resolved in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and show that the lipid subphase in the parasite may be a preferred growth medium. We provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence of the molecular mechanisms of hematin crystallization and inhibition by chloroquine, a common quinoline antimalarial drug. AFM observations demonstrate that crystallization strictly follows a classical mechanism wherein new crystal layers are generated by 2D nucleation and grow by the attachment of solute molecules. We identify four classes of surface sites available for binding of potential drugs and propose respective mechanisms of drug action. Further studies reveal that chloroquine inhibits hematin crystallization by binding to molecularly flat {100} surfaces. A 2-μM concentration of chloroquine fully arrests layer generation and step advancement, which is ∼104× less than hematin’s physiological concentration. Our results suggest that adsorption at specific growth sites may be a general mode of hemozoin growth inhibition for the quinoline antimalarials. Because the atomic structures of the identified sites are known, this insight could advance the future design and/or optimization of new antimalarials. PMID:25831526

  8. Linking Murine and Human Plasmodium falciparum Challenge Models in a Translational Path for Antimalarial Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, James S.; Marquart, Louise; Sekuloski, Silvana; Trenholme, Katharine; Elliott, Suzanne; Griffin, Paul; Rockett, Rebecca; O'Rourke, Peter; Sloots, Theo; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Martínez, María-Santos; Duparc, Stephan; Leroy, Didier; Wells, Timothy N. C.; Baker, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Effective progression of candidate antimalarials is dependent on optimal dosing in clinical studies, which is determined by a sound understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD). Recently, two important translational models for antimalarials have been developed: the NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ−/− (NSG) model, whereby mice are engrafted with noninfected and Plasmodium falciparum-infected human erythrocytes, and the induced blood-stage malaria (IBSM) model in human volunteers. The antimalarial mefloquine was used to directly measure the PK/PD in both models, which were compared to previously published trial data for malaria patients. The clinical part was a single-center, controlled study using a blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum challenge inoculum in volunteers to characterize the effectiveness of mefloquine against early malaria. The study was conducted in three cohorts (n = 8 each) using different doses of mefloquine. The characteristic delay in onset of action of about 24 h was seen in both NSG and IBSM systems. In vivo 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were estimated at 2.0 μg/ml and 1.8 μg/ml in the NSG and IBSM models, respectively, aligning with 1.8 μg/ml reported previously for patients. In the IBSM model, the parasite reduction ratios were 157 and 195 for the 10- and 15-mg/kg doses, within the range of previously reported clinical data for patients but significantly lower than observed in the mouse model. Linking mouse and human challenge models to clinical trial data can accelerate the accrual of critical data on antimalarial drug activity. Such data can guide large clinical trials required for development of urgently needed novel antimalarial combinations. (This trial was registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry [http://anzctr.org.au] under registration number ACTRN12612000323820.) PMID:27044554

  9. Gene Network Analysis of Metallo Beta Lactamase Family Proteins Indicates the Role of Gene Partners in Antibiotic Resistance and Reveals Important Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Parimelzaghan, Anitha; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2016-06-01

    Metallo Beta (β) Lactamases (MBL) are metal dependent bacterial enzymes that hydrolyze the β-lactam antibiotics. In recent years, MBL have received considerable attention because it inactivates most of the β-lactam antibiotics. Increase in dissemination of MBL encoding antibiotic resistance genes in pathogenic bacteria often results in unsuccessful treatments. Gene interaction network of MBL provides a complete understanding on the molecular basis of MBL mediated antibiotic resistance. In our present study, we have constructed the MBL network of 37 proteins with 751 functional partners from pathogenic bacterial spp. We found 12 highly interconnecting clusters. Among the 37 MBL proteins considered in the present study, 22 MBL proteins are from B3 subclass, 14 are from B1 subclass and only one is from B2 subclass. Global topological parameters are used to calculate and compare the probability of interactions in MBL proteins. Our results indicate that the proteins associated within the network have a strong influence in antibiotic resistance mechanism. Interestingly, several drug targets are identified from the constructed network. We believe that our results would be helpful for researchers exploring MBL-mediated antibiotic resistant mechanisms.

  10. Clarifying the molecular mechanism associated with carfilzomib resistance in human multiple myeloma using microarray gene expression profile and genetic interaction network.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhihong; Liu, Tingbo; Zheng, Jing; Hu, Jianda

    2017-01-01

    Carfilzomib is a Food and Drug Administration-approved selective proteasome inhibitor for patients with multiple myeloma (MM). However, recent studies indicate that MM cells still develop resistance to carfilzomib, and the molecular mechanisms associated with carfilzomib resistance have not been studied in detail. In this study, to better understand its potential resistant effect and its underlying mechanisms in MM, microarray gene expression profile associated with carfilzomib-resistant KMS-11 and its parental cell line was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. Raw fluorescent signals were normalized and differently expressed genes were identified using Significance Analysis of Microarrays method. Genetic interaction network was expanded using String, a biomolecular interaction network JAVA platform. Meanwhile, molecular function, biological process and signaling pathway enrichment analysis were performed based on Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Totally, 27 upregulated and 36 downregulated genes were identified and a genetic interaction network associated with the resistant effect was expanded basing on String, which consisted of 100 nodes and 249 edges. In addition, signaling pathway enrichment analysis indicated that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, autophagy, ErbB signaling pathway, microRNAs in cancer and fatty acid metabolism pathways were aberrant in carfilzomib-resistant KMS-11 cells. Thus, in this study, we demonstrated that carfilzomib potentially conferred drug resistance to KMS-11 cells by cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, autophagy, ErbB signaling pathway, microRNAs in cancer and fatty acid metabolism pathways, which may provide some potential molecular therapeutic targets for drug combination therapy against carfilzomib resistance.

  11. Clarifying the molecular mechanism associated with carfilzomib resistance in human multiple myeloma using microarray gene expression profile and genetic interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhihong; Liu, Tingbo; Zheng, Jing; Hu, Jianda

    2017-01-01

    Carfilzomib is a Food and Drug Administration-approved selective proteasome inhibitor for patients with multiple myeloma (MM). However, recent studies indicate that MM cells still develop resistance to carfilzomib, and the molecular mechanisms associated with carfilzomib resistance have not been studied in detail. In this study, to better understand its potential resistant effect and its underlying mechanisms in MM, microarray gene expression profile associated with carfilzomib-resistant KMS-11 and its parental cell line was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. Raw fluorescent signals were normalized and differently expressed genes were identified using Significance Analysis of Microarrays method. Genetic interaction network was expanded using String, a biomolecular interaction network JAVA platform. Meanwhile, molecular function, biological process and signaling pathway enrichment analysis were performed based on Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Totally, 27 upregulated and 36 downregulated genes were identified and a genetic interaction network associated with the resistant effect was expanded basing on String, which consisted of 100 nodes and 249 edges. In addition, signaling pathway enrichment analysis indicated that cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction, autophagy, ErbB signaling pathway, microRNAs in cancer and fatty acid metabolism pathways were aberrant in carfilzomib-resistant KMS-11 cells. Thus, in this study, we demonstrated that carfilzomib potentially conferred drug resistance to KMS-11 cells by cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction, autophagy, ErbB signaling pathway, microRNAs in cancer and fatty acid metabolism pathways, which may provide some potential molecular therapeutic targets for drug combination therapy against carfilzomib resistance. PMID:28280367

  12. Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, Betty

    Networking is an information giving and receiving system, a support system, and a means whereby women can get ahead in careers--either in new jobs or in current positions. Networking information can create many opportunities: women can talk about how other women handle situations and tasks, and previously established contacts can be used in…

  13. Nested autoinhibitory feedbacks alter the resistance of homeostatic adaptive biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Schaber, Jörg; Lapytsko, Anastasiya; Flockerzi, Dietrich

    2014-02-06

    Negative feedback control is a ubiquitous feature of biochemical systems, as is time delay between a signal and its response. Negative feedback in conjunction with time delay can lead to oscillations. In a cellular context, it might be beneficial to mitigate oscillatory behaviour to avoid recurring stress situations. This can be achieved by increasing the distance between the parameters of the system and certain thresholds, beyond which oscillations occur. This distance has been termed resistance. Here, we prove that in a generic three-dimensional negative feedback system the resistance of the system is modified by nested autoinhibitory feedbacks. Our system features negative feedbacks through both input-inhibition as well as output-activation, a signalling component with mass conservation and perfect adaptation. We show that these features render the system applicable to biological data, exemplified by the high osmolarity glycerol system in yeast and the mammalian p53 system. Output-activation is better supported by data than input-inhibition and also shows distinguished properties with respect to the system's stimulus. Our general approach might be useful in designing synthetic systems in which oscillations can be tuned by synthetic autoinhibitory feedbacks.

  14. Antibiotic resistance monitoring: the Spanish programme. The VAV Network. Red de Vigilancia de Resistencias Antibióticas en Bacterias de Origen Veterinario.

    PubMed

    Moreno, M A; Domínguez, L; Teshager, T; Herrero, I A; Porrero, M C

    2000-05-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a problem in modern public health and antimicrobial use and especially misuse, the most important selecting force for bacterial antibiotic resistance. As this resistance must be monitored we have designed the Spanish network 'Red de Vigilancia de Resistencias Antibióticas en Bacterias de Origen Veterinario'. This network covers the three critical points of veterinary responsibility, bacteria from sick animals, bacteria from healthy animals and bacteria from food animals. Key bacteria, antimicrobials and animal species have been defined for each of these groups along with laboratory methods for testing antimicrobial susceptibility and for data analysis and reporting. Surveillance of sick animals was first implemented using Escherichia coli as the sentinel bacterium. Surveillance of E. coli and Enterococcus faecium from healthy pigs was implemented in 1998. In July 1999, data collection on Salmonella spp. was initiated in poultry slaughterhouses. Additionally, the prevalence of vancomycin resistant E. faecium was also monitored. This network has specific topics of interest related to methods of determining resistance, analysis and reporting of data, methods of use for veterinary practitioners and collaboration with public health authorities.

  15. The mechanism of resistance to sulfa drugs in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Triglia, Tony; Cowman, Alan F.

    1999-02-01

    The sulfonamide and sulfone (sulfa) group of antimalarials has been used extensively throughout malaria endemic regions of the world to control this important infectious disease of humans. Sulfadoxine is the most extensively used drug of this group of drugs and is usually combined with pyrimethamine (Fansidar), particularly for the control of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most lethal form of malaria. Resistance to the sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine combination is widespread. Analysis using molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches has shown that the mechanism of resistance to sulfadoxine involves mutation of dihydropteroate synthase, the enzyme target of this group of drugs. Understanding the mechanism of resistance of P. falciparum to sulfa drugs has allowed detailed analysis of the epidemiology of the spread of drug resistance alleles in the field(1)and, in the future, opens the way to the development of novel antimalarials to this target enzyme. Copyright 1999 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  16. Generation of arbitrary monotonic concentration profiles by a serial dilution microfluidic network composed of microchannels with a high fluidic-resistance ratio.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Koji; Sugiura, Shinji; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2009-06-21

    This paper reports a serial dilution microfluidic network composed of microchannels with a high fluidic-resistance ratio for generating linear concentration profiles as well as logarithmic concentration profiles spanning 3 and 6 orders of magnitude. The microfluidic networks were composed of thin fluidic-resistance microchannels with 160 to 730 microm(2) cross-sectional areas and thick diffusion-mixing microchannels with 3,600 to 17,000 microm(2) cross-sectional areas, and were fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane by multilayer photolithography and replica molding. We proposed a design algorithm of the microfluidic network for an arbitrary monotonic concentration profile by means of a hydrodynamic calculation. Because of the high fluidic-resistance ratio of the fluidic-resistance microchannels to the diffusion-mixing microchannels, appropriate geometry and dimensions of the fluidic-resistance microchannels allowed us to obtain desired concentration profiles. The fabricated microfluidic network was compact, occupying a 8 x 18 to 21.0 x 13.5 mm(2) area on the microchip. Both the linear and the logarithmic concentration profiles were successfully generated with the error less than 15% for the linear concentration profile, 22% and 35% for the logarithmic concentration profiles of 3 and 6 orders of magnitude, respectively. The generated linear concentration profiles of the small molecule, calcein, were independent of the flow rate within the range of 0.009 to 0.23 microL/min. The concentration profiles of the large molecules, dextrans, depended on the flow rate and molecular weight. The required residence time of large molecules in the diffusion-mixing microchannel was correlated with dimensionless diffusion time, Fick number, and was discussed based on the scaling law. These compact, stable serial dilution microfluidic networks are expected to be applied to various integrated on-chip analyses.

  17. The "concerned other" call: using family links and networks to overcome resistance to addiction treatment.

    PubMed

    Garrett, J; Stanton, M D; Landau, J; Baciewicz, G; Brinkman-Sull, D; Shea, R

    1999-02-01

    Untreated chemical dependency costs the United States over $165 billion annually. Meanwhile, treatment offsets these costs by a ratio of $7 saved for every $1 spent. But the vast majority of chemically dependent people (CDPs) remain uninvolved in either treatment or self-help groups. It is therefore imperative that more effective ways be developed for therapeutically engaging them. One avenue is to maximize the opportunity presented when a "concerned other" (CO) person-such as a family member, friend, coworker, or clergy member-contacts a treatment agency to get help for a CDP. This paper provides a method for handling such calls. Specific guidelines are presented as to (a) the kind of information to b e gathered, (b) procedures to be followed, and (c) options to be offered toward mobilizing the CO and other family/social network members in successfully effecting CDP treatment engagement.

  18. In vitro and in vivo antimalarial evaluations of myrtle extract, a plant traditionally used for treatment of parasitic disorders.

    PubMed

    Naghibi, Farzaneh; Esmaeili, Somayeh; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Nateghpour, Mehdi; Taghvai, Mahdieh; Kamkar, Siamak; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Based on the collected ethnobotanical data from the Traditional Medicine and Materia Medica Research Center (TMRC), Iran, Myrtus communis L. (myrtle) was selected for the assessment of in vitro and in vivo antimalarial and cytotoxic activities. Methanolic extract of myrtle was prepared from the aerial parts and assessed for antiplasmodial activity, using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) assay against chloroquine-resistant (K1) and chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The 4-day suppressive test was employed to determine the parasitemia suppression of the myrtle extract against P. berghei in vivo. The IC50 values of myrtle extract were 35.44 µg/ml against K1 and 0.87 µg/ml against 3D7. Myrtle extract showed a significant suppression of parasitaemia (84.8 ± 1.1% at 10 mg/kg/day) in mice infected with P. berghei after 4 days of treatment. Cytotoxic activity was carried out against mammalian cell lines using methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay. No cytotoxic effect on mammalian cell lines up to 100 µg/mL was shown. The results support the traditional use of myrtle in malaria. Phytochemical investigation and understanding the mechanism of action would be in our upcoming project.

  19. In Vitro and In Vivo Antimalarial Evaluations of Myrtle Extract, a Plant Traditionally Used for Treatment of Parasitic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Naghibi, Farzaneh; Esmaeili, Somayeh; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Nateghpour, Mehdi; Taghvai, Mahdieh; Kamkar, Siamak; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Based on the collected ethnobotanical data from the Traditional Medicine and Materia Medica Research Center (TMRC), Iran, Myrtus communis L. (myrtle) was selected for the assessment of in vitro and in vivo antimalarial and cytotoxic activities. Methanolic extract of myrtle was prepared from the aerial parts and assessed for antiplasmodial activity, using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) assay against chloroquine-resistant (K1) and chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The 4-day suppressive test was employed to determine the parasitemia suppression of the myrtle extract against P. berghei  in vivo. The IC50 values of myrtle extract were 35.44 µg/ml against K1 and 0.87 µg/ml against 3D7. Myrtle extract showed a significant suppression of parasitaemia (84.8 ± 1.1% at 10 mg/kg/day) in mice infected with P. berghei after 4 days of treatment. Cytotoxic activity was carried out against mammalian cell lines using methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay. No cytotoxic effect on mammalian cell lines up to 100 µg/mL was shown. The results support the traditional use of myrtle in malaria. Phytochemical investigation and understanding the mechanism of action would be in our upcoming project. PMID:24455686

  20. Semisynthetic 15-O-acyl- and 1,15-di-O-acyleurycomanones from Eurycoma longifolia as potential antimalarials.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kit-Lam; Choo, Chee-Yan; Abdullah, Noor Rain

    2005-10-01

    Among the quassinoids isolated from Eurycoma longifolia Jack, eurycomanone was identified as the most potent and toxic inhibitor of the chloroquine-resistant Gombak A isolate of Plasmodium falciparum. Several diacylated derivatives of eurycomanone, 1,15-di-O-isovaleryleurycomanone, 1,15-di-O-(3,3-dimethylacryloyl)- eurycomanone and 1,15-di-O-benzoyleurycomanone were synthesized by direct acylation with the respective acid chlorides. The monoacylated 15-O-isovaleryleurycomanone was synthesized by selective protection of the other hydroxy groups of eurycomanone with trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulphonate to enable the exclusive acylation of its C-15 hydroxy group. This was followed by the removal of the protecting groups with citric acid. The diacylated eurycomanones exhibited lower antiplasmodial activity against the Gombak A isolates and lower toxicity in the brine shrimp assay when compared to eurycomanone. In contrast, the monoacylated derivative displayed comparable antiplasmodial potency to eurycomanone, but its toxicity was reduced. Thus, preliminary studies of the synthesized acylated eurycomanones have shown that acylation only at the C-15 hydroxy group may be worthy of further antimalarial investigation.

  1. Marine organism sulfated polysaccharides exhibiting significant antimalarial activity and inhibition of red blood cell invasion by Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Joana; Vilanova, Eduardo; Mourão, Paulo A. S.; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The antimalarial activity of heparin, against which there are no resistances known, has not been therapeutically exploited due to its potent anticoagulating activity. Here, we have explored the antiplasmodial capacity of heparin-like sulfated polysaccharides from the sea cucumbers Ludwigothurea grisea and Isostichopus badionotus, from the red alga Botryocladia occidentalis, and from the marine sponge Desmapsamma anchorata. In vitro experiments demonstrated for most compounds significant inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum growth at low-anticoagulant concentrations. This activity was found to operate through inhibition of erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium, likely mediated by a coating of the parasite similar to that observed for heparin. In vivo four-day suppressive tests showed that several of the sulfated polysaccharides improved the survival of Plasmodium yoelii-infected mice. In one animal treated with I. badionotus fucan parasitemia was reduced from 10.4% to undetectable levels, and Western blot analysis revealed the presence of antibodies against P. yoelii antigens in its plasma. The retarded invasion mediated by sulfated polysaccharides, and the ensuing prolonged exposure of Plasmodium to the immune system, can be explored for the design of new therapeutic approaches against malaria where heparin-related polysaccharides of low anticoagulating activity could play a dual role as drugs and as potentiators of immune responses. PMID:27071342

  2. Irrational use of antimalarial drugs in rural areas of eastern Pakistan: a random field study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prescription of antimalarial drugs in the absence of malarial disease is a common practice in countries where malaria is endemic. However, unwarranted use of such drugs can cause side effects in some people and is a financial drain on local economies. In this study, we surveyed the prevalence of malaria parasites in humans, and the prevalence of the malaria transmitting mosquito vectors in the study area. We also investigated the use of antimalarial drugs in the local people. We focused on randomly selected rural areas of eastern Pakistan where no malaria cases had been reported since May 2004. Methods Mass blood surveys, active case detection, passive case detection, and vector density surveys were carried out in selected areas of Sargodha district from September 2008 to August 2009. Data pertaining to the quantities and types of antimalarial drugs used in these areas were collected from health centers, pharmacies, and the district CDC program of the Health Department of the Government of the Punjab. Results Seven hundred and forty four blood samples were examined, resulting in a Blood Examination Rate (BER) of 3.18; microscopic analysis of blood smears showed that none of the samples were positive for malaria parasites. Investigation of the mosquito vector density in 43 living rooms (bedrooms or rooms used for sleeping), 23 stores, and 32 animal sheds, revealed no vectors capable of transmitting malaria in these locations. In contrast, the density of Culex mosquitoes was high. Substantial consumption of a variety of antimalarial tablets, syrups, capsules and injections costing around 1000 US$, was documented for the region. Conclusion Use of antimalarial drugs in the absence of malarial infection or the vectors that transmit the disease was common in the study area. Continuous use of such drugs, not only in Pakistan, but in other parts of the world, may lead to drug-induced side effects amongst users. Better training of health care professionals is

  3. New Antimalarial Hits from Dacryodes edulis (Burseraceae) - Part I: Isolation, In Vitro Activity, In Silico “drug-likeness” and Pharmacokinetic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zofou, Denis; Tematio, Esther Laure; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Tene, Mathieu; Ngemenya, Moses N.; Tane, Pierre; Titanji, Vincent P. K.

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to identify the compounds responsible for the anti-malarial activity of Dacryoedes edulis (Burseraceae) and to investigate their suitability as leads for the treatment of drug resistant malaria. Five compounds were isolated from ethyl acetate and hexane extracts of D. edulis stem bark and tested against 3D7 (chloroquine-susceptible) and Dd2 (multidrug-resistant) strains of Plasmodium falciparum, using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase method. Cytotoxicity studies were carried out on LLC-MK2 monkey kidney epithelial cell-line. In silico analysis was conducted by calculating molecular descriptors using the MOE software running on a Linux workstation. The “drug-likeness” of the isolated compounds was assessed using Lipinski criteria, from computed molecular properties of the geometry optimized structures. Computed descriptors often used to predict absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination and toxicity (ADMET) were used to assess the pharmacokinetic profiles of the isolated compounds. Antiplasmodial activity was demonstrated for the first time in five major natural products previously identified in D. edulis, but not tested against malaria parasites. The most active compound identified was termed DES4. It had IC50 values of 0.37 and 0.55 µg/mL, against 3D7 and Dd2 respectively. In addition, this compound was shown to act in synergy with quinine, satisfied all criteria of “Drug-likeness” and showed considerable probability of providing an antimalarial lead. The remaining four compounds also showed antiplasmodial activity, but were less effective than DES4. None of the tested compounds was cytotoxicity against LLC-MK2 cells, suggesting their selective activities on malaria parasites. Based on the high in vitro activity, low toxicity and predicted “Drug-likeness” DES4 merits further investigation as a possible drug lead for the treatment of malaria. PMID:24282507

  4. Design of Small Impact-Resistant RTGs for Global Network of Unmanned Mars Landers

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1991-10-01

    Presented at the 42nd Congress of the IAF, October 5-11, 1991 in Montreal, Canada. This paper presents the results of Fairchild's work in support of DOE to perform RTG design studies for this mission. The key problem in designing these RTGs is how to enable the generators to tolerate substantially higher g-loads than those encountered on previous RTG missions. The Fairchild studies resulted in designs of compact RTGs based on flight-proven and safety-qualified heat source components, with a number of novel features designed to provide the desired high impact tolerance. The present paper describes those designs and their rationale, and a preliminary, quasi-static impact analysis that yielded very encouraging results. They indicate that these RTGs have sufficient impact resistance to enable survival of landers without retrorockets. This would result in significant cost savings. There are four copies in the file. Two copies of a presentation with the same title by Al Schock dated June 26/27, 1991 is attached. There are two copies of a Fairchild document, undated included. There is also two copies dated 6/26/1991 with the report number FSC-ESD-217-91-495 and one copy of a ducument, dated 7/11/191 with the report number FSC-ESD-217-91-495A. There are four copies with the same title in the file, but undated. These copies have a different Abstract and are similar, but not the exact version as the other copies.

  5. Unravelling the networks dictating host resistance versus tolerance during pulmonary infections.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Isabelle; Kaufmann, Eva; Downey, Jeffrey; Divangahi, Maziar

    2017-03-01

    The appearance of single cell microorganisms on earth dates back to more than 3.5 billion years ago, ultimately leading to the development of multicellular organisms approximately 3 billion years later. The evolutionary burst of species diversity and the "struggle for existence", as proposed by Darwin, generated a complex host defense system. Host survival during infection in vital organs, such as the lung, requires a delicate balance between host defense, which is essential for the detection and elimination of pathogens and host tolerance, which is critical for minimizing collateral tissue damage. Whereas the cellular and molecular mechanisms of host defense against many invading pathogens have been extensively studied, our understanding of host tolerance as a key mechanism in maintaining host fitness is extremely limited. This may also explain why current therapeutic and preventive approaches targeting only host defense mechanisms have failed to provide full protection against severe infectious diseases, including pulmonary influenza virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections. In this review, we aim to outline various host strategies of resistance and tolerance for effective protection against acute or chronic pulmonary infections.

  6. Crosstalk suppression in networked resistive sensor arrays using virtual ground technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai Saxena, Raghvendra; Semwal, Sushil Kumar; Singh Rana, Pratap; Bhan, R. K.

    2013-11-01

    In 2D resistive sensor arrays, the interconnections are reduced considerably by sharing rows and columns among various sensor elements in such a way that one end of each sensor is connected to a row node and other end connected to a column node. This scheme results in total N + M interconnections for N × M array of sensors. Thus, it simplifies the interconnect complexity but suffers from the crosstalk problem among its elements. We experimentally demonstrate that this problem can be overcome by putting all the row nodes at virtually equal potential using virtual ground of high gain operational amplifiers in negative feedback. Although it requires large number of opamps, it solves the crosstalk problem to a large extent. Additionally, we get the response of all the sensors lying in a column simultaneously, resulting in a faster scanning capability. By performing lock-in-amplifier based measurements on a light dependent resistor at a randomly selected location in a 4 × 4 array of otherwise fixed valued resistors, we have shown that the technique can provide 86 dB crosstalk suppression even with a simple opamp. Finally, we demonstrate the circuit implementation of this technique for a 16 × 16 imaging array of light dependent resistors.

  7. Expanding the antimalarial toolkit: Targeting host–parasite interactions

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Patrick E.

    2016-01-01

    Recent successes in malaria control are threatened by drug-resistant Plasmodium parasites and insecticide-resistant Anopheles mosquitoes, and first generation vaccines offer only partial protection. New research approaches have highlighted host as well as parasite molecules or pathways that could be targeted for interventions. In this study, we discuss host–parasite interactions at the different stages of the Plasmodium life cycle within the mammalian host and the potential for therapeutics that prevent parasite migration, invasion, intracellular growth, or egress from host cells, as well as parasite-induced pathology. PMID:26834158

  8. Expanding the antimalarial toolkit: Targeting host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Langhorne, Jean; Duffy, Patrick E

    2016-02-08

    Recent successes in malaria control are threatened by drug-resistant Plasmodium parasites and insecticide-resistant Anopheles mosquitoes, and first generation vaccines offer only partial protection. New research approaches have highlighted host as well as parasite molecules or pathways that could be targeted for interventions. In this study, we discuss host-parasite interactions at the different stages of the Plasmodium life cycle within the mammalian host and the potential for therapeutics that prevent parasite migration, invasion, intracellular growth, or egress from host cells, as well as parasite-induced pathology.

  9. Gene Networks in the Wild: Identifying Transcriptional Modules that Mediate Coral Resistance to Experimental Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Rose, Noah H; Seneca, Francois O; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2015-12-28

    Organisms respond to environmental variation partly through changes in gene expression, which underlie both homeostatic and acclimatory responses to environmental stress. In some cases, so many genes change in expression in response to different influences that understanding expression patterns for all these individual genes becomes difficult. To reduce this problem, we use a systems genetics approach to show that variation in the expression of thousands of genes of reef-building corals can be explained as variation in the expression of a small number of coexpressed "modules." Modules were often enriched for specific cellular functions and varied predictably among individuals, experimental treatments, and physiological state. We describe two transcriptional modules for which expression levels immediately after heat stress predict bleaching a day later. One of these early "bleaching modules" is enriched for sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins, particularly E26 transformation-specific (ETS)-family transcription factors. The other module is enriched for extracellular matrix proteins. These classes of bleaching response genes are clear in the modular gene expression analysis we conduct but are much more difficult to discern in single gene analyses. Furthermore, the ETS-family module shows repeated differences in expression among coral colonies grown in the same common garden environment, suggesting a heritable genetic or epigenetic basis for these expression polymorphisms. This finding suggests that these corals harbor high levels of gene-network variation, which could facilitate rapid evolution in the face of environmental change.

  10. Gene Networks in the Wild: Identifying Transcriptional Modules that Mediate Coral Resistance to Experimental Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Noah H.; Seneca, Francois O.; Palumbi, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Organisms respond to environmental variation partly through changes in gene expression, which underlie both homeostatic and acclimatory responses to environmental stress. In some cases, so many genes change in expression in response to different influences that understanding expression patterns for all these individual genes becomes difficult. To reduce this problem, we use a systems genetics approach to show that variation in the expression of thousands of genes of reef-building corals can be explained as variation in the expression of a small number of coexpressed “modules.” Modules were often enriched for specific cellular functions and varied predictably among individuals, experimental treatments, and physiological state. We describe two transcriptional modules for which expression levels immediately after heat stress predict bleaching a day later. One of these early “bleaching modules” is enriched for sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins, particularly E26 transformation-specific (ETS)-family transcription factors. The other module is enriched for extracellular matrix proteins. These classes of bleaching response genes are clear in the modular gene expression analysis we conduct but are much more difficult to discern in single gene analyses. Furthermore, the ETS-family module shows repeated differences in expression among coral colonies grown in the same common garden environment, suggesting a heritable genetic or epigenetic basis for these expression polymorphisms. This finding suggests that these corals harbor high levels of gene-network variation, which could facilitate rapid evolution in the face of environmental change. PMID:26710855

  11. Protein Phosphatase 2A in the Regulatory Network Underlying Biotic Stress Resistance in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Durian, Guido; Rahikainen, Moona; Alegre, Sara; Brosché, Mikael; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2016-01-01

    Biotic stress factors pose a major threat to plant health and can significantly deteriorate plant productivity by impairing the physiological functions of the plant. To combat the wide range of pathogens and insect herbivores, plants deploy converging signaling pathways, where counteracting activities of protein kinases and phosphatases form a basic mechanism for determining appropriate defensive measures. Recent studies have identified Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a crucial component that controls pathogenesis responses in various plant species. Genetic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches have underscored the versatile nature of PP2A, which contributes to the regulation of receptor signaling, organellar signaling, gene expression, metabolic pathways, and cell death, all of which essentially impact plant immunity. Associated with this, various PP2A subunits mediate post-translational regulation of metabolic enzymes and signaling components. Here we provide an overview of protein kinase/phosphatase functions in plant immunity signaling, and position the multifaceted functions of PP2A in the tightly inter-connected regulatory network that controls the perception, signaling and responding to biotic stress agents in plants. PMID:27375664

  12. A functional biological network centered on XRCC3: a new possible marker of chemoradiotherapy resistance in rectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Marco; Zangrando, Andrea; Pastrello, Chiara; D'Angelo, Edoardo; Romano, Gabriele; Giovannoni, Roberto; Giordan, Marco; Maretto, Isacco; Bedin, Chiara; Zanon, Carlo; Digito, Maura; Esposito, Giovanni; Mescoli, Claudia; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; Rizzolio, Flavio; Jurisica, Igor; Giordano, Antonio; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Nitti, Donato

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is widely used to improve local control of disease, sphincter preservation and to improve survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients enrolled in the present study underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy, followed by surgical excision. Response to chemoradiotherapy was evaluated according to Mandard's Tumor Regression Grade (TRG). TRG 3, 4 and 5 were considered as partial or no response while TRG 1 and 2 as complete response. From pretherapeutic biopsies of 84 locally advanced rectal carcinomas available for the analysis, only 42 of them showed 70% cancer cellularity at least. By determining gene expression profiles, responders and non-responders showed significantly different expression levels for 19 genes (P < 0.001). We fitted a logistic model selected with a stepwise procedure optimizing the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and then validated by means of leave one out cross validation (LOOCV, accuracy = 95%). Four genes were retained in the achieved model: ZNF160, XRCC3, HFM1 and ASXL2. Real time PCR confirmed that XRCC3 is overexpressed in responders group and HFM1 and ASXL2 showed a positive trend. In vitro test on colon cancer resistant/susceptible to chemoradioterapy cells, finally prove that XRCC3 deregulation is extensively involved in the chemoresistance mechanisms. Protein-protein interactions (PPI) analysis involving the predictive classifier revealed a network of 45 interacting nodes (proteins) with TRAF6 gene playing a keystone role in the network. The present study confirmed the possibility that gene expression profiling combined with integrative computational biology is useful to predict complete responses to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with advanced rectal cancer. PMID:26023803

  13. A functional biological network centered on XRCC3: a new possible marker of chemoradiotherapy resistance in rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Marco; Zangrando, Andrea; Pastrello, Chiara; D'Angelo, Edoardo; Romano, Gabriele; Giovannoni, Roberto; Giordan, Marco; Maretto, Isacco; Bedin, Chiara; Zanon, Carlo; Digito, Maura; Esposito, Giovanni; Mescoli, Claudia; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; Rizzolio, Flavio; Jurisica, Igor; Giordano, Antonio; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Nitti, Donato

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is widely used to improve local control of disease, sphincter preservation and to improve survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients enrolled in the present study underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy, followed by surgical excision. Response to chemoradiotherapy was evaluated according to Mandard's Tumor Regression Grade (TRG). TRG 3, 4 and 5 were considered as partial or no response while TRG 1 and 2 as complete response. From pretherapeutic biopsies of 84 locally advanced rectal carcinomas available for the analysis, only 42 of them showed 70% cancer cellularity at least. By determining gene expression profiles, responders and non-responders showed significantly different expression levels for 19 genes (P < 0.001). We fitted a logistic model selected with a stepwise procedure optimizing the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and then validated by means of leave one out cross validation (LOOCV, accuracy = 95%). Four genes were retained in the achieved model: ZNF160, XRCC3, HFM1 and ASXL2. Real time PCR confirmed that XRCC3 is overexpressed in responders group and HFM1 and ASXL2 showed a positive trend. In vitro test on colon cancer resistant/susceptible to chemoradioterapy cells, finally prove that XRCC3 deregulation is extensively involved in the chemoresistance mechanisms. Protein-protein interactions (PPI) analysis involving the predictive classifier revealed a network of 45 interacting nodes (proteins) with TRAF6 gene playing a keystone role in the network. The present study confirmed the possibility that gene expression profiling combined with integrative computational biology is useful to predict complete responses to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with advanced rectal cancer.

  14. The effects of silane network structure on their resistance to water-assisted crack growth.

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Edward J.; Benkoski, Jason J.; Hall, Jessica S.; Kent, Michael Stuart; Yim, Hyun

    2003-07-01

    Silane adhesion promoters are commonly used to improve the adhesion, durability, and corrosion resistance of polymer-oxide interfaces. The current study investigates a model interface consisting of the natural oxide of 100 Si and an epoxy cured from diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and triethylenetetraamine (TETA). The thickness of (3-glycidoxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPS) films placed between the two materials provided the structural variable. Five surface treatments were investigated: a bare interface, a rough monolayer film, a smooth monolayer film, a 5 nm thick film, and a 10 nm thick film. Previous neutron reflection experiments revealed large extension ratios (>2) when the 5 and 10 nm thick GPS films were exposed to deuterated nitrobenzene vapor. Despite the larger extension ratio for the 5 nm thick film, the epoxy/Si fracture energy (G{sub c}) was equal to that of the 10 nm thick film under ambient conditions. Even the smooth monolayer exhibited the same G{sub c}. Only when the monolayer included a significant number of agglomerates did the G{sub c} drop to levels closer to that of the bare interface. When immersed in water at room temperature for 1 week, the threshold energy release rate (G{sub th}) was nearly equal to G{sub c} for the smooth monolayer, 5 nm thick film, and 10 nm thick film. While the G{sub th} for all three films decreased with increasing water temperature, the G{sub th} of the smooth monolayer decreased more rapidly. The bare interface was similarly sensitive to temperature; however, the G{sub th} of the rough monolayer did not change significantly as the temperature was raised. Despite the influence of pH on hydrolysis, the G{sub th} was insensitive to the pH of the water for all surface treatments.

  15. A broad analysis of resistance development in the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Corey, Victoria C; Lukens, Amanda K; Istvan, Eva S; Lee, Marcus C S; Franco, Virginia; Magistrado, Pamela; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sakata-Kato, Tomoyo; Fuchs, Olivia; Gnädig, Nina F; Goldgof, Greg; Linares, Maria; Gomez-Lorenzo, Maria G; De Cózar, Cristina; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria Jose; Prats, Sara; Meister, Stephan; Tanaseichuk, Olga; Wree, Melanie; Zhou, Yingyao; Willis, Paul A; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Goldberg, Daniel E; Fidock, David A; Wirth, Dyann F; Winzeler, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-15

    Microbial resistance to chemotherapy has caused countless deaths where malaria is endemic. Chemotherapy may fail either due to pre-existing resistance or evolution of drug-resistant parasites. Here we use a diverse set of antimalarial compounds to investigate the acquisition of drug resistance and the degree of cross-resistance against common resistance alleles. We assess cross-resistance using a set of 15 parasite lines carrying resistance-conferring alleles in pfatp4, cytochrome bc1, pfcarl, pfdhod, pfcrt, pfmdr, pfdhfr, cytoplasmic prolyl t-RNA synthetase or hsp90. Subsequently, we assess whether resistant parasites can be obtained after several rounds of drug selection. Twenty-three of the 48 in vitro selections result in resistant parasites, with time to resistance onset ranging from 15 to 300 days. Our data indicate that pre-existing resistance may not be a major hurdle for novel-target antimalarial candidates, and focusing our attention on fast-killing compounds may result in a slower onset of clinical resistance.

  16. A broad analysis of resistance development in the malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Victoria C.; Lukens, Amanda K.; Istvan, Eva S.; Lee, Marcus C. S.; Franco, Virginia; Magistrado, Pamela; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sakata-Kato, Tomoyo; Fuchs, Olivia; Gnädig, Nina F.; Goldgof, Greg; Linares, Maria; Gomez-Lorenzo, Maria G.; De Cózar, Cristina; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria Jose; Prats, Sara; Meister, Stephan; Tanaseichuk, Olga; Wree, Melanie; Zhou, Yingyao; Willis, Paul A.; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Goldberg, Daniel E.; Fidock, David A.; Wirth, Dyann F.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial resistance to chemotherapy has caused countless deaths where malaria is endemic. Chemotherapy may fail either due to pre-existing resistance or evolution of drug-resistant parasites. Here we use a diverse set of antimalarial compounds to investigate the acquisition of drug resistance and the degree of cross-resistance against common resistance alleles. We assess cross-resistance using a set of 15 parasite lines carrying resistance-conferring alleles in pfatp4, cytochrome bc1, pfcarl, pfdhod, pfcrt, pfmdr, pfdhfr, cytoplasmic prolyl t-RNA synthetase or hsp90. Subsequently, we assess whether resistant parasites can be obtained after several rounds of drug selection. Twenty-three of the 48 in vitro selections result in resistant parasites, with time to resistance onset ranging from 15 to 300 days. Our data indicate that pre-existing resistance may not be a major hurdle for novel-target antimalarial candidates, and focusing our attention on fast-killing compounds may result in a slower onset of clinical resistance. PMID:27301419

  17. Design, synthesis, and application of novel triclosan prodrugs as potential antimalarial and antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Satyendra; Karmodiya, Krishanpal; Parasuraman, Prasanna; Surolia, Avadhesha; Surolia, Namita

    2008-05-15

    A number of new triclosan-conjugated analogs bearing biodegradable ester linkage have been synthesized, characterized and evaluated for their antimalarial and antibacterial activities. Many of these compounds exhibit good inhibition against Plasmodium falciparum and Escherichia coli. Among them tertiary amine containing triclosan-conjugated prodrug (5) inhibited both P. falciparum (IC(50); 0.62microM) and E. coli (IC(50); 0.26microM) at lower concentrations as compared to triclosan. Owing to the presence of a cleavable ester moiety, these new prodrugs are hydrolyzed under physiological conditions and parent molecule, triclosan, is released. Further, introduction of tertiary/quaternary functionality increases their cellular uptake. These properties impart them with higher potency to their antimalarial as well as antibacterial activities. The best compound among them 5 shows close to four-fold enhanced activities against P. falciparum and E. coli cultures as compared to triclosan.

  18. Validation of use of a traditional antimalarial remedy from French Guiana, Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam.

    PubMed

    Jullian, V; Bourdy, G; Georges, S; Maurel, S; Sauvain, M

    2006-07-19

    Zanthoxylum rhoifolium bark (Rutaceae) is a medicinal plant, traditionally used in French Guiana to treat and prevent malaria. Bioassay-guided extractions of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium bark have shown that antiplasmodial activity is concentrated in the alkaloid fraction. Further fractionation of this extract has yielded seven benzophenanthridine alkaloids, dihydroavicine 1, dihydronitidine 2, oxyavicine 3, oxynitidine 4, fagaridine 5, avicine 6 and nitidine 7. Antimalarial activity of the last five compounds has been evaluated, and nitidine was the most potent, displaying an IC(50)<0.27microM against Plasmodium falciparum. Investigation of the traditional remedy, a trunk bark decoction in water, has shown that fagaridine 5, avicine 6 and nitidine 7 are also present in the decoction, therefore justifying the traditional use of Zanthoxylumrhoifolium bark as antimalarial.

  19. In vivo antimalarial efficacy of acetogenins, alkaloids and flavonoids enriched fractions from Annona crassiflora Mart.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Lúcia Pinheiro Santos; Garcia, Giani Martins; Gonçalves, Samuel Geraldo do Vale; Dionísio, Bárbara Lana; Braga, Erika Martins; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado

    2014-01-01

    Annona crassiflora and Annonaceae plants are known to be used to treat malaria by traditional healers. In this work, the antimalarial efficacy of different fractions of A. crassiflora, particularly acetogenin, alkaloids and flavonoid-rich fractions, was determined in vivo using Plasmodium berghei-infected mice model and toxicity was accessed by brine shrimp assay. The A. crassiflora fractions were administered at doses of 12.5 mg/kg/day in a 4-day test protocol. The results showed that some fractions from woods were rich in acetogenins, alkaloids and terpenes, and other fractions from leaves were rich in alkaloids and flavonoids. The parasitaemia was significantly (p < 0.05, p < 0.001) reduced (57-75%) with flavonoid and alkaloid-rich leaf fractions, which also increased mean survival time of mice after treatment. Our results confirm the usage of this plant in folk medicine as an antimalarial remedy.

  20. Expeditious Synthesis, Antimicrobial and Antimalarial Activities of Novel Heterocycles Bearing Imidazole-oxadiazole Based Hybrid Pharmacophores.

    PubMed

    Balaji, K; Bhatt, P; Jha, A

    2016-11-01

    A facile synthesis of 2-substituted-5-amino-oxadiazole derivatives has been achieved by refluxing/sonicating a mixture of semicarbazide with various aromatic acids in conc. sulphuric acid alone. The isolated products were further condensed with p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde/p-hydroxybenzaldehyde to obtain respective imino derivatives. Finally, some potentially biologically active imidazole analogues were obtained by reacting ammonium acetate and 5-bromoisatin with the synthesized imino products. All the newly synthesized compounds were thoroughly characterized by standard analytical techniques. These imidazole-oxadiazole hybrid compounds were also evaluated for their antimicrobial and antimalarial activities. The compounds all exhibited moderate to significant antimicrobial activity (6-10 mm, zone of inhibition) and promising antimalarial activity (IC50 0.037-0.100 µM). This report entails a detailed synthetic procedure, spectroscopic elucidation and activities of the synthesized compounds.

  1. Hollow Fiber Methodology for Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Studies of Antimalarial Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Caton, Emily; Nenortas, Elizabeth; Bakshi, Rahul P.; Shapiro, Theresa A.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationships can enhance the speed and economy of drug development by enabling informed and rational decisions at every step, from lead selection to clinical dosing. For anti-infective agents in particular, dynamic in vitro hollow fiber cartridge experiments permit exquisite control of kinetic parameters and the study of their consequent impact on pharmacodynamic efficacy. Such information is of great interest for the cost-restricted but much-needed development of new antimalarial drugs, especially since major human pathogen Plasmodium falciparum can be cultivated in vitro but is not readily available in animal models. This protocol describes the materials and procedures for determining the PK/PD relationships of antimalarial compounds. PMID:26995353

  2. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of the interactions of antimalarial drugs with porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Moreau, S; Perly, B; Chachaty, C; Deleuze, C

    1985-05-29

    Haematins (hydroxyferriprotoporphyrin IX) constitute a possible receptor for antimalarial drugs such as chloroquine or quinine. This paper reports the study of the interactions of these two molecules with two tetrapyrrole (haematin and uroporphyrin I) by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. This method provided us with the geometry of the interactions in aqueous medium. The interaction consists of a close stacking of the porphyrin ring and the quinoleine moiety of the drugs. Using a porphyrin ring current model it was possible to reach the spatial relationships of the interacting species. It was concluded that hydrophobic forces play a key role in the interaction. The porphyrin plane can accommodate wide structural variations of the interacting species, leading to a weak specificity. The consequences on the mode of action of antimalarial drugs are discussed.

  3. The Antimalarial Natural Product Symplostatin 4 Is a Nanomolar Inhibitor of the Food Vacuole Falcipains

    PubMed Central

    Stolze, Sara Christina; Deu, Edgar; Kaschani, Farnusch; Li, Nan; Florea, Bogdan I.; Richau, Kerstin H.; Colby, Tom; van der Hoorn, Renier A.L.; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; Bogyo, Matthew; Kaiser, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The marine natural product symplostatin 4 (Sym4) has been recognized as a potent antimalarial agent. However, its mode of action and, in particular, direct targets have to date remained elusive. We report a chemical synthesis of Sym4 and show that Sym4-treatment of P. falciparum-infected red blood cells (RBCs) results in the generation of a swollen food vacuole phenotype and a reduction of parasitemia at nanomolar concentrations. We furthermore demonstrate that Sym4 is a nanomolar inhibitor of the P. falciparum falcipains in infected RBCs, suggesting inhibition of the hemoglobin degradation pathway as Sym4’s mode of action. Finally, we reveal a critical influence of the unusual methylmethoxypyrrolinone (mmp) group of Sym4 for potent inhibition, indicating that Sym4 derivatives with such a mmp moiety might represent viable lead structures for the development of antimalarial falcipain inhibitors. PMID:23261598

  4. Cancer systems biology in the genome sequencing era: part 2, evolutionary dynamics of tumor clonal networks and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Edwin; Zou, Jinfeng; Zaman, Naif; Beitel, Lenore K; Trifiro, Mark; Paliouras, Miltiadis

    2013-08-01

    A tumor often consists of multiple cell subpopulations (clones). Current chemo-treatments often target one clone of a tumor. Although the drug kills that clone, other clones overtake it and the tumor recurs. Genome sequencing and computational analysis allows to computational dissection of clones from tumors, while singe-cell genome sequencing including RNA-Seq allows profiling of these clones. This opens a new window for treating a tumor as a system in which clones are evolving. Future cancer systems biology studies should consider a tumor as an evolving system with multiple clones. Therefore, topics discussed in Part 2 of this review include evolutionary dynamics of clonal networks, early-warning signals (e.g., genome duplication events) for formation of fast-growing clones, dissecting tumor heterogeneity, and modeling of clone-clone-stroma interactions for drug resistance. The ultimate goal of the future systems biology analysis is to obtain a 'whole-system' understanding of a tumor and therefore provides a more efficient and personalized management strategies for cancer patients.

  5. Myristicyclins A and B: antimalarial procyanidins from Horsfieldia spicata from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenyu; Van Wagoner, Ryan M; Pond, Cristopher D; Pole, Ann R; Jensen, James B; Blankenship, D'Arbra; Grimberg, Brian T; Kiapranis, Robert; Matainaho, Teatulohi K; Barrows, Louis R; Ireland, Chris M

    2014-01-17

    An antimalarial screen for plants collected from Papua New Guinea identified an extract of Horsfieldia spicata as having activity. Isolation of the active constituents led to the identification of two new compounds: myristicyclins A (1) and B (2). Both compounds are procyanidin-like congeners of myristinins lacking a pendant aromatic ring. Myristicyclin A was found to inhibit the ring, trophozoite, and schizont stages of Plasmodium falciparum at similar concentrations in the mid-μM range.

  6. Myristicyclins A and B: Antimalarial procyanidins from Horsfieldia spicata from Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhenyu; Van Wagoner, Ryan M.; Pond, Cristopher D.; Pole, Ann R.; Jensen, James B.; Blankenship, D’Arbra; Grimberg, Brian T.; Kiapranis, Robert; Matainaho, Teatulohi K.; Barrows, Louis R.

    2014-01-01

    An antimalarial screen for plants collected from Papua New Guinea identified an extract of Horsfieldia spicata as having activity. Isolation of the active constituents led to the identification of two new compounds: myristicyclins A (1) and B (2). Both compounds are procyanidin-like congeners of myristinins lacking a pendant aromatic ring. Myristicyclin A was found to inhibit the ring, trophozoite, and schizont stages of Plasmodium falciparum at similar concentrations in the mid-μM range. PMID:24350818

  7. Case Study of Small Molecules As Antimalarials: 2-Amino-1-phenylethanol (APE) Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Antiparasitic oral drugs have been associated to lipophilic molecules due to their intrinsic permeability. However, these kind of molecules are associated to numerous adverse effects, which have been extensively studied. Within the Tres Cantos Antimalarial Set (TCAMS) we have identified two small, soluble and simple hits that even presenting antiplasmodial activities in the range of 0.4–0.5 μM are able to show in vivo activity. PMID:24944739

  8. Antimalarial diterpenoid dimers of a new carbon skeleton from Aphanamixis grandifolia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Liu, Jia; Gan, Li-She; Dalal, Seema; Cassera, Maria B; Yue, Jian-Min

    2016-01-21

    Chemical investigation into the minor constituents of Aphanamixis grandifolia yielded three new diterpenoid dimers, aphadilactones E-G (1-3) featuring a new carbon skeleton. Their structures and absolute configurations were fully established by comprehensive spectroscopic data analysis and ECD calculation. Discovery of another two new dimers (4 and 5) suggested the structure of recently reported aphanamene A to be re-investigated. Compounds 1-5 showed moderate antimalarial activities with low micromolar IC50 values.

  9. In vivo antimalarial evaluation of MAMA decoction on Plasmodium berghei in mice.

    PubMed

    Adepiti, Awodayo O; Elujoba, Anthony A; Bolaji, Oluseye O

    2014-02-01

    The use of decoctions of different plant materials is common practice in antimalarial ethnomedicine in Africa. Scientific evaluation of such herbal combinations to verify the claims is important. The study has evaluated the antimalarial efficacy of MAMA decoction (MD), a multicomponent herbal preparation and its individual plant components, namely leaves of Morinda lucida Benth [Rubiaceae] (ML), Azadirachta indica A. Juss [Meliaceae] (AI), Alstonia boonei De Wild [Apocynaceae] (AB) and Mangifera indica L [Anacardiaceae] (MI) in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. Each decoction was prepared by boiling the powdered leaf in water, concentrated in vacuo and freeze-dried. The acute toxicity of MD (LD50=3.8 g/kg) was determined using Lorke's method. The antimalarial activities of MD and its plant components were evaluated by oral administration of the freeze-dried extracts (15-240 mg/kg) using the early malaria infection test model. The established malaria infection test was used to evaluate MD (60-240 mg/kg) while amodiaquine [10 mg/kg] (AQ) and distilled water were employed as the positive and negative controls, respectively. From the early malaria infection test, the effective doses at 50 % (ED50) and 90 % (ED90) for MD, AB, AI, ML, MI and AQ were 43, 79, 140, 134, 208 and 3.9 mg/kg and 202, 276, 291, 408, 480 and 9.2 mg/kg, respectively. For the established infection test, MD (240 mg/kg) and AQ gave parasite clearance of 55 and 95 % on day 5 of treatment. MD possesses antimalarial activity and is relatively safe.

  10. Antimalarial Activities in New Pyrrolo(3,2-f)Quinazoline-1,3-Diamine Derivatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    modification of the semiautomated mi- crodilution technique of Desjardins et al. (7) and Chulay et al. (4). Four P. falciparum malaria parasite clones...valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 12. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To...2005/Returned for modification 27 June 2005/Accepted 6 September 2005 WR227825 is an antimalarial pyrroloquinazolinediamine derivative with a high

  11. Antimalarial Chemotherapy: Natural Product Inspired Development of Preclinical and Clinical Candidates with Diverse Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Álvaro, Elena; Hong, W David; Nixon, Gemma L; O'Neill, Paul M; Calderón, Félix

    2016-06-23

    Natural products have played a pivotal role in malaria chemotherapy progressing from quinine and artemisinin to ozonide-based compounds. Many of these natural products have served as template for the design and development of antimalarial drugs currently in the clinic or in the development phase. In this review, we will detail those privileged scaffolds that have guided medicinal chemistry efforts yielding molecules that have reached the clinic.

  12. New antimalarial norterpene cyclic peroxides from Xisha Islands sponge Diacarnus megaspinorhabdosa.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Ru-Ping; Xu, Bin; Yu, Hao-Bing; Ma, Guo-Yi; Wang, Guang-Fei; Dai, Shu-Wen; Zhang, Wei; Jiao, Wei-Hua; Song, Shao-Jiang; Lin, Hou-Wen

    2016-04-15

    Four new norterpene cyclic peroxides (1-4), together with three known norterpene cyclic peroxides were isolated from the Xisha Islands Sponge Diacarnus megaspinorhabdosa. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analyses and comparison with the related model compounds. The compounds (1-7) were evaluated for the inhibitory activity against the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, all of them showed significant antimalarial activity with IC50 values in the range of 1.6-8.6 μM.

  13. The Antimalarial Effect of Curcumin Is Mediated by the Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amatul Hamizah; Sudi, Suhaini; Basir, Rusliza; Embi, Noor; Sidek, Hasidah Mohd

    2017-02-01

    Curcumin, a bioactive compound in Curcuma longa, exhibits various pharmacological activities, including antimalarial effects. In silico docking simulation studies suggest that curcumin possesses glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β)-inhibitory properties. The involvement of GSK3 in the antimalarial effects in vivo is yet to be demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether the antimalarial effects of curcumin involve phosphorylation of host GSK3β. Intraperitoneal administration of curcumin into Plasmodium berghei NK65-infected mice resulted in dose-dependent chemosuppression of parasitemia development. At the highest dose tested (30 mg/kg body weight), both therapeutic and prophylactic administrations of curcumin resulted in suppression exceeding 50% and improved median survival time of infected mice compared to control. Western analysis revealed a 5.5-fold (therapeutic group) and 1.8-fold (prophylactic group) increase in phosphorylation of Ser 9 GSK3β and 1.6-fold (therapeutic group) and 1.7-fold (prophylactic group) increase in Ser 473 Akt in liver of curcumin-treated infected animals. Following P. berghei infection, levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-4 were elevated by 7.5-, 35.0-, 33.0-, and 2.2-fold, respectively. Curcumin treatment (therapeutic) caused a significant decrease (by 6.0- and 2.0-fold, respectively) in serum TNF-α and IFN-γ level, while IL-10 and IL-4 were elevated (by 1.4- and 1.8-fold). Findings from the present study demonstrate for the first time that the antimalarial action of curcumin involved inhibition of GSK3β.

  14. Evaluation of In Vitro Antimalarial Activity of Different Extracts of Eremostachys azerbaijanica Rech.f.

    PubMed Central

    Asnaashari, Solmaz; Heshmati Afshar, Fariba; Bamdad Moghadam, Sedigheh; Delazar, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Six extracts with different polarity from aerial parts and rhizomes of Eremostachys azerbaijanica Rech.f., were screened for their antimalarial properties by cell free 𝛽-hematin formation assay. Dichloromethane (DCM) extracts of both parts of plant showed significant antimalarial activities with IC50 values of 0.949 ± 0.061 mg/mL in aerial parts and 0.382 ± 0.011 mg/mL in rhizomes. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the most potent part (DCM extract of rhizomes) by vacuum liquid chromatography (VLC) afforded seven fractions. Two fractions [100% Ethyl acetate (EtOAC) and 100% Methatol (MeOH)] showed considerable antimalarial activity with IC50 values of 0.335 ± 0.033 mg/mL and 0.403 ± 0.037 mg/mL, respectively. According to GC-MS analysis, the sesquiterpene, steroid and coumarin derivatives are the main constituents of the most potent fractions; therefore, it seems that the anti malarial activity of these fractions may be related to the presence of these types of compounds. PMID:27980588

  15. In vivo antimalarial activity of the endophytic actinobacteria, Streptomyces SUK 10.

    PubMed

    Baba, Mohd Shukri; Zin, Noraziah Mohamad; Hassan, Zainal Abidin Abu; Latip, Jalifah; Pethick, Florence; Hunter, Iain S; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; Herron, Paul R

    2015-12-01

    Endophytic bacteria, such as Streptomyces, have the potential to act as a source for novel bioactive molecules with medicinal properties. The present study was aimed at assessing the antimalarial activity of crude extract isolated from various strains of actinobacteria living endophytically in some Malaysian medicinal plants. Using the four day suppression test method on male ICR strain mice, compounds produced from three strains of Streptomyces (SUK8, SUK10, and SUK27) were tested in vivo against Plasmodium berghei PZZ1/100 in an antimalarial screen using crude extracts at four different concentrations. One of these extracts, isolated from Streptomyces SUK10 obtained from the bark of Shorea ovalis tree, showed inhibition of the test organism and was further tested against P. berghei-infected mice for antimalarial activity at different concentrations. There was a positive relationship between the survival of the infected mouse group treated with 50 µg/kg body weight (bw) of ethyl acetate-SUK10 crude extract and the ability to inhibit the parasites growth. The parasite inhibition percentage for this group showed that 50% of the mice survived for more than 90 days after infection with the parasite. The nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic tree suggested that Streptomyces SUK10 may constitute a new species within the Streptomyces genus. As part of the drug discovery process, these promising finding may contribute to the medicinal and pharmaceutical field for malarial treatment.

  16. Safety, Tolerability, and Compliance with Long-Term Antimalarial Chemoprophylaxis in American Soldiers in Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, David L.; Garges, Eric; Manning, Jessica E.; Bennett, Kent; Schaffer, Sarah; Kosmowski, Andrew J.; Magill, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term antimalarial chemoprophylaxis is currently used by deployed U.S. military personnel. Previous small, short-term efficacy studies have shown variable rates of side effects among patients taking various forms of chemoprophylaxis, though reliable safety and tolerability data on long-term use are limited. We conducted a survey of troops returning to Fort Drum, NY following a 12-month deployment to Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan from 2006 to 2007. Of the 2,351 respondents, 95% reported taking at least one form of prophylaxis during their deployment, and 90% were deployed for > 10 months. Compliance with daily doxycycline was poor (60%) compared with 80% with weekly mefloquine (MQ). Adverse events (AEs) were reported by approximately 30% with both MQ and doxycycline, with 10% discontinuing doxycycline compared with 4% of MQ users. Only 6% and 31% of soldiers reported use of bed nets and skin repellents, respectively. Compliance with long-term malaria prophylaxis was poor, and there were substantial tolerability issues based on these anonymous survey results, though fewer with MQ than doxycycline. Given few long-term antimalarial chemoprophylaxis options, there is an unmet medical need for new antimalarials safe for long-term use. PMID:26123954

  17. Collaborative health and enforcement operations on the quality of antimalarials and antibiotics in southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yuk Lin; Plançon, Aline; Lau, Yen Hui; Hostetler, Dana M; Fernández, Facundo M; Green, Michael D; Sounvoravong, Sourisak; Nara, Suon; Boravann, Mam; Dumrong, Thitikornkovit; Bangsawan, Nurjaya; Low, Min Yong; Lim, Chin-Chin; Ai, Ruth Lee Choo; Newton, Paul N

    2015-06-01

    Counterfeit (or falsified) and substandard medicines pose a major public health risk. We describe the findings of Operation Storm I and II conducted in 2008-2009 to combat counterfeit medicines through partnership between national customs, Drug Regulatory Agencies (DRAs), and police in Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. Samples were obtained from seizures and market surveillance by national DRAs. Laboratory analysis using spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques and examination of packaging were performed. Ninety-three suspect antibiotics and 95 antimalarial samples were collected. Of the 93 antibiotics, 29 (31%) had % active pharmaceutical ingredient content (%API) < 85% or > 115% (including one counterfeit). Of the 95 antimalarials, 30 (32%) had %API < 85 > 115% API (including one counterfeit). A significant minority of samples, antimalarials (13%) and antibiotics (15%), were collected in plastic bags with minimal or no labeling. Of 20 ampicillin samples, 13 (65%) contained < 85% API (with one counterfeit containing additional amoxicillin). Of 34 oral artesunate samples, 7 (21%) contained %API out of the 85-115% range. Coordinated and synergistic partnership adopted by the participating countries, International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL), World Health Organization (WHO), and laboratories facilitated a platform for discussions and intelligence sharing, helping to improve each participating country's capacity to combat poor-quality medicines.

  18. Safety, Tolerability, and Compliance with Long-Term Antimalarial Chemoprophylaxis in American Soldiers in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Saunders, David L; Garges, Eric; Manning, Jessica E; Bennett, Kent; Schaffer, Sarah; Kosmowski, Andrew J; Magill, Alan J

    2015-09-01

    Long-term antimalarial chemoprophylaxis is currently used by deployed U.S. military personnel. Previous small, short-term efficacy studies have shown variable rates of side effects among patients taking various forms of chemoprophylaxis, though reliable safety and tolerability data on long-term use are limited. We conducted a survey of troops returning to Fort Drum, NY following a 12-month deployment to Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan from 2006 to 2007. Of the 2,351 respondents, 95% reported taking at least one form of prophylaxis during their deployment, and 90% were deployed for > 10 months. Compliance with daily doxycycline was poor (60%) compared with 80% with weekly mefloquine (MQ). Adverse events (AEs) were reported by approximately 30% with both MQ and doxycycline, with 10% discontinuing doxycycline compared with 4% of MQ users. Only 6% and 31% of soldiers reported use of bed nets and skin repellents, respectively. Compliance with long-term malaria prophylaxis was poor, and there were substantial tolerability issues based on these anonymous survey results, though fewer with MQ than doxycycline. Given few long-term antimalarial chemoprophylaxis options, there is an unmet medical need for new antimalarials safe for long-term use.

  19. Concurrent Inflammation Augments Antimalarial Drugs-Induced Liver Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Niknahad, Hossein; Heidari, Reza; Firuzi, Roya; Abazari, Farzaneh; Ramezani, Maral; Azarpira, Negar; Hosseinzadeh, Massood; Najibi, Asma; Saeedi, Arastoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accumulating evidence suggests that drug exposure during a modest inflammation induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) might increase the risk of drug-induced liver injury. The current investigation was designed to test if antimalarial drugs hepatotoxicity is augmented in LPS‑treated animals. Methods: Rats were pre-treated with LPS (100 µg/kg, i.p). Afterward, non-hepatotoxic doses of amodiaquine (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, oral) and chloroquine (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, oral) were administered. Results: Interestingly, liver injury was evident only in animals treated with both drug and LPS as estimated by pathological changes in serum biochemistry (ALT, AST, LDH, and TNF-α), and liver tissue (severe hepatitis, endotheliitis, and sinusoidal congestion). An increase in liver myeloperoxidase enzyme activity, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonylation, along with tissue glutathione depletion were also detected in LPS and drug co-treated animals. Conclusion: Antimalarial drugs rendered hepatotoxic in animals undergoing a modest inflammation. These results indicate a synergistic liver injury from co-exposure to antimalarial drugs and inflammation. PMID:28101469

  20. Paper Test Cards for Presumptive Testing of Very Low Quality Antimalarial Medications

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Abigail A.; Lieberman, Marya

    2015-01-01

    Carrying out chemical analysis of antimalarials to detect low-quality medications before they reach a patient is a costly venture. Here, we show that a library of chemical color tests embedded on a paper card can presumptively identify formulations corresponding to very low quality antimalarial drugs. The presence or absence of chloroquine (CQ), doxycycline (DOX), quinine, sulfadoxine, pyrimethamine, and primaquine antimalarial medications, in addition to fillers used in low-quality pharmaceuticals, are indicated by patterns of colors that are generated on the test cards. Test card sensitivity for detection of these pure components ranges from 90% to 100% with no false positives in the absence of pharmaceutical. The color intensities from reactions characteristic of CQ or DOX allowed visual detection of formulations of these medications cut with 60% or 100% filler, although samples cut with 30% filler could not be reliably detected colorimetrically. However, the addition of unexpected fillers, even in 30% quantities, or substitute pharmaceuticals, could sometimes be detected by other color reactions on the test cards. Tests are simple and inexpensive enough to be carried out in clinics, pharmacies, and ports of entry and could provide a screening method to presumptively indicate very low quality medicines throughout the supply chain. PMID:25897064

  1. Testing of natural products and synthetic molecules aiming at new antimalarials.

    PubMed

    Krettli, Antoniana U; Adebayo, Joseph O; Krettli, Luisa G

    2009-03-01

    The search for new antimalarials, which in the past relied on animal models, is now usually performed with cultures of Plasmodium falciparum (PF) blood parasites by evaluation of parasite growth inhibition. Field isolates of PF human malaria parasite, parasite strains and clones, well characterized for their susceptibility to chloroquine and other standard antimalarials are available for the in vitro tests. The simplest method to evaluate parasite growth is the determination of parasitemias in Giemsa stained blood smears through light microscopy. Other methodologies have proven to be more precise and allow mass screening of new compounds against PF blood stages, such as: (i) measuring the incorporation of radioactive hypoxanthine by the parasites; (ii) indirect colorimetric assays in which specific parasite enzyme activities, and histidine-rich protein II (HRP2) production are measured with the help of monoclonal antibodies; (iii) the beta-haematin formation, and; (iv) assays using green fluorescent protein (GFP) in gene-expressing parasites. The advantages and disadvantages of the different in vitro screening methods, as well as the different in vivo models for antimalarial tests, are described in this review. Such tests can be used for the evaluation of medicinal plants, synthetic and hybrid molecules or drug combinations.

  2. Antimalarial action of hydroxamate-based iron chelators and potentiation of desferrioxamine action by reversed siderophores.

    PubMed Central

    Golenser, J; Tsafack, A; Amichai, Y; Libman, J; Shanzer, A; Cabantchik, Z I

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxamate-based chelators of iron are potent inhibitors of in vitro growth of Plasmodium falciparum. Two types of such chelators, the natural desferrioxamine and the synthetic reversed siderophore RSFileum2, are prototypes of antimalarial agents whose action spectra differ in the speed of action, stage dependence, and degree of reversibility of effects. This work explores the possibility of improving the antimalarial efficacy of these agents by using them in various combinations on in vitro cultures of P. falciparum. Growth assessment was based both on total nucleic acid synthesis and on parasitemia. The results indicate that the synthetic reversed siderophore more than complements the antimalarial action of desferrioxamine when applied during either ring, trophozoite, or mixed stages. The combined drug effects were significantly higher than the additive effect of the individual drugs. Qualitatively similar results were obtained for both reversible effects and irreversible (i.e., sustained) effects. Following an 8-h window of exposure the combined drug treatment caused parasite growth arrest and prevented its recovery, even 3 days after the treatment. The fact that such a combination of iron chelators displays a wider action spectrum than either drug alone has implications for the design of chemotherapy regimens. PMID:7695330

  3. Intervention to Promote Patients' Adherence to Antimalarial Medication: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Fuangchan, Anjana; Dhippayom, Teerapon; Kongkaew, Chuenjid

    2014-01-01

    Non-adherence as a major contributor to poor treatment outcomes. This study aimed to explore the effectiveness of existing interventions promoting adherence to antimalarial drugs by systematic review. The following databases were used to identify potential articles: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane CENTRAL, and CINAHL (through March 2013). From 1,813 potential papers identified, 16 studies met the selection criteria comprising 9,247 patients. Interventions were classified as packaging aids, visual media, combined visual media and verbal information, community education, medication supervision, and convenient regimen. These interventions were shown to increase adherence to antimalarial drugs (median relative risk = 1.4, interquartile range 1.2–2.0). Although a most effective intervention did not emerge, community education and visual media/verbal information combinations may well have most potential to improve adherence to antimalarial medication. These interventions should be implemented in combination to optimize their beneficial effects. The current understanding on improved adherence would facilitate to contain outbreaks of malaria cost effectively. PMID:24166045

  4. Enhanced antimalarial activity by a novel artemether-lumefantrine lipid emulsion for parenteral administration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yufan; Lu, Tingli; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Ying; Chen, Ting; Mei, Qibing; Chen, Tao

    2014-10-01

    Artemether and lumefantrine (also known as benflumetol) are difficult to formulate for parenteral administration because of their low aqueous solubility. Cremophor EL as an emulsion excipient has been shown to cause serious side effects. This study reports a method of preparation and the therapeutic efficacies of novel lipid emulsion (LE) delivery systems with artemether, lumefantrine, or artemether in combination with lumefantrine, for parenteral administration. Their physical and chemical stabilities were also evaluated. Furthermore, the in vivo antimalarial activities of the lipid emulsions developed were tested in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. Artemether, lumefantrine, or artemether in combination with lumefantrine was encapsulated in an oil phase, and the in vivo performance was assessed by comparison with artesunate for injection. It was found that the lumefantrine lipid emulsion (LUM-LE) and artemether-lumefantrine lipid emulsion (ARM-LUM-LE-3) (1:6) began to decrease the parasitemia levels after only 3 days, and the parasitemia inhibition was 90% at doses of 0.32 and 0.27 mg/kg, respectively, with immediate antimalarial effects greater than those of the positive-control group and constant antimalarial effects over 30 days. LUM-LE and ARM-LUM-LE-3 demonstrated the best performance in terms of chemical and physical stabilities and antiplasmodial efficacy, with a mean particle size of 150 nm, and they have many favorable properties for parenteral administration, such as biocompatibility, physical stability, and ease of preparation.

  5. Transition metal complexes of buparvaquone as potent new antimalarial agents. 1. Synthesis, X-ray crystal-structures, electrochemistry and antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Nikhil H; Padhye, Subhash B; Croft, Simon L; Kendrick, Howard D; Davies, Wendy; Anson, Christopher E; Powell, Annie K

    2003-07-01

    New Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Fe(II), and Mn(II) metal complexes of buparvaquone [3-trans(4-tert.-butylcyclohexyl)methyl-2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquione] (L1H) have been synthesized and characterized using IR, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, microanalytical methods and single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. The single crystal structures were determined for ligand L1H [space group P-1 with a=6.2072(14) A, b=10.379 (2) A, c=13.840 (3) A, V=878.7(3) A(3), Z=2, D(calcd.)=1.234 mg/m(3)] and copper complex [Cu(L1)(2)(C(2)H(5)OH)(2)] C1 [space group I2/a with a=17.149(14) A, b=9.4492(8) A, c=26.946(3) A, V=4335.3(7)A(3), Z=4, D(calcd.)=1.233 mg/m(3)]. All the metal complexes along with the parent ligand have been studied for their electrochemical properties using cyclic voltammetric techniques. The compounds were tested for their in vitro antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum strains. A correlation between the antimalarial activity and the redox property of these complexes is presented. The copper complex C1 exhibits significantly higher growth inhibitory activity both in vitro and in vivo than the parent ligand.

  6. Use of the atmospheric generators for capnophilic bacteria Genbag-CO2 for the evaluation of in vitro Plasmodium falciparum susceptibility to standard anti-malarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    generators for capnophilic bacteria Genbag CO2® is an appropriate technology that can be transferred to the field for epidemiological surveys of drug-resistant malaria. The present data suggest the importance of the gas mixture on in vitro microtest results for anti-malarial drugs and the importance of determining the microtest conditions before comparing and analysing the data from different laboratories and concluding on malaria resistance. PMID:21235757

  7. Bayesian models trained with HTS data for predicting β-haematin inhibition and in vitro antimalarial activity

    PubMed Central

    Wicht, Kathryn J.; Combrinck, Jill M.; Smith, Peter J.; Egan, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    A large quantity of high throughput screening (HTS) data for antimalarial activity has become available in recent years. This includes both phenotypic and target-based activity. Realising the maximum value of these data remains a challenge. In this respect, methods that allow such data to be used for virtual screening maximise efficiency and reduce costs. In this study both in vitro antimalarial activity and inhibitory data for β-haematin formation, largely obtained from publically available sources, has been used to develop Bayesian models for inhibitors of β-haematin formation and in vitro antimalarial activity. These models were used to screen two in silico compound libraries. In the first, the 1510 U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved drugs available on PubChem were ranked from highest to lowest Bayesian score based on a training set of β-haematin inhibiting compounds active against P. falciparum that did not include any of the clinical antimalarials or close analogues. The six known clinical antimalarials that inhibit β-haematin formation were ranked in the top 2.1% of compounds. Furthermore, the in vitro antimalarial hit-rate for this prioritised set of compounds was found to be 81% in the case of the subset where activity data are available in PubChem. In the second, a library of about 5,000 commercially available compounds (AldrichCPR) was virtually screened for ability to inhibit β-haematin formation and then for in vitro antimalarial activity. A selection of 34 compounds was purchased and tested, of which 24 were predicted to be β-haematin inhibitors. The hit rate for inhibition of β-haematin formation was found to be 25% and a third of these were active against P. falciparum, corresponding to enrichments estimated at about 25- and 140-fold relative to random screening, respectively. PMID:25573118

  8. Construction of local gene network for revealing different liver function of rats fed deep-fried oil with or without resistant starch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiwei; Liao, Tianqi; Zhou, Zhongkai; Wang, Yuyang; Diao, Yongjia; Strappe, Padraig; Prenzler, Paul; Ayton, Jamie; Blanchard, Chris

    2016-09-06

    To study the mechanism underlying the liver damage induced by deep-fried oil (DO) consumption and the beneficial effects from resistant starch (RS) supplement, differential gene expression and pathway network were analyzed based on RNA sequencing data from rats. The up/down regulated genes and corresponding signaling pathways were used to construct a novel local gene network (LGN). The topology of the network showed characteristics of small-world network, with some pathways demonstrating a high degree. Some changes in genes led to a larger probability occurrence of disease or infection with DO intake. More importantly, the main pathways were found to be almost the same between the two LGNs (30 pathways overlapped in total 48) with gene expression profile. This finding may indicate that RS supplement in DO-containing diet may mainly regulate the genes that related to DO damage, and RS in the diet may provide direct signals to the liver cells and modulate its effect through a network involving complex gene regulatory events. It is the first attempt to reveal the mechanism of the attenuation of liver dysfunction from RS supplement in the DO-containing diet using differential gene expression and pathway network.

  9. Brain state evolution during seizure and under anesthesia: a network-based analysis of stereotaxic eeg activity in drug-resistant epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Yaffe, Robert; Burns, Sam; Gale, John; Park, Hyun-Joo; Bulacio, Juan; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological condition with a prevalence of 1%, and 14-34% have medically refractory epilepsy (MRE). Seizures in focal MRE are generated by a single epileptogenic zone (or focus), thus there is potentially a curative procedure - surgical resection. This procedure depends significantly on correct identification of the focus, which is often uncertain in clinical practice. In this study, we analyzed intracranial stereotaxic EEG (sEEG) data recorded in two human patients with drug-resistant epilepsy prior to undergoing resection surgery. We view the sEEG data as samples from the brain network and hypothesize that seizure foci can be identified based on their network connectivity during seizure. Specifically, we computed a time sequence of connectivity matrices from EEG recordings that represent network structure over time. For each patient, connectivity between electrodes was measured using the coherence in a given frequency band. Matrix structure was analyzed using singular value decomposition and the leading singular vector was used to estimate each electrode's time dependent centrality (importance to the network's connectivity). Our preliminary study suggests that seizure foci may be the most weakly connected regions in the brain during the beginning of a seizure and the most strongly connected regions towards the end of a seizure. Additionally, in one of the patients analyzed, the network connectivity under anesthesia highlights seizure foci. Ultimately, network centrality computed from sEEG activity may be used to develop an automated, reliable, and computationally efficient algorithm for identifying seizure foci.

  10. Development of a transgenic Plasmodium berghei line (Pb pfpkg) expressing the P. falciparum cGMP-dependent protein kinase, a novel antimalarial drug target.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Rita; Patzewitz, Eva-Maria; Poulin, Benoit; Stewart, Lindsay; Baker, David A

    2014-01-01

    With the inevitable selection of resistance to antimalarial drugs in treated populations, there is a need for new medicines to enter the clinic and new targets to progress through the drug discovery pipeline. In this study we set out to develop a transgenic rodent model for testing inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum cyclic GMP-dependent kinase in vivo. A model was needed that would allow us to investigate whether differences in amino acid sequence of this enzyme between species influences in vivo efficacy. Here we report the successful development of a transgenic P. berghei line in which the cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) was replaced by the P. falciparum orthologue. We demonstrate that the P. falciparum orthologue was able to functionally complement the endogenous P. berghei pkg gene throughout blood stage development and early sexual development. However, subsequent development in the mosquito was severely compromised. We show that this is due to a defect in the female lineage of the transgenic by using genetic crosses with both male and female deficient P. berghei lines. This defect could be due to expression of a female-specific target in the mosquito stages of P. berghei that cannot be phosphorylated by the P. falciparum kinase. Using a previously reported anti-coccidial inhibitor of the cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase, we show no difference in in vivo efficacy between the transgenic and control P. berghei lines. This in vivo model will be useful for screening future generations of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitors and allowing us to overcome any species-specific differences in the enzyme primary sequence that would influence in vivo efficacy in the rodent model. The approach will also be applicable to in vivo testing of other antimalarial compounds where the target is known.

  11. Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl-rhodium and iridium complexes containing (N^N and N^O) bound chloroquine analogue ligands: synthesis, characterization and antimalarial properties.

    PubMed

    Ekengard, Erik; Kumar, Kamlesh; Fogeron, Thibault; de Kock, Carmen; Smith, Peter J; Haukka, Matti; Monari, Magda; Nordlander, Ebbe

    2016-03-07

    The synthesis and characterization of twenty new pentamethylcyclopentadienyl-rhodium and iridium complexes containing N^N and N^O-chelating chloroquine analogue ligands are described. The in vitro antimalarial activity of the new ligands as well as the complexes was evaluated against the chloroquine sensitive (CQS) NF54 and the chloroquine resistant (CQR) Dd2 strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The antimalarial activity was found to be good to moderate; although all complexes are less active than artesunate, some of the ligands and complexes showed better activity than chloroquine (CQ). In particular, rhodium complexes were found to be considerably more active than iridium complexes against the CQS NF54 strain. Salicylaldimine Schiff base ligands having electron-withdrawing groups (F, Cl, Br, I and NO2) in para position of the salicyl moiety and their rhodium complexes showed good antiplasmodial activity against both the CQS-NF54 and the CQR-Dd2 strains. The crystal structures of (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){N(1)-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)-N(2)-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine)} chlororhodium(III) chloride and (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){(4-chloro-2-(((2-((7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)amino)ethyl)imino)methyl)phenolate)}chlororhodium(III) chloride are reported. The crystallization of the amino-pyridyl complex (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){(N(1)-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)-N(2)-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine)}chloroiridium(III) chloride in acetone resulted in the formation of the imino-pyridyl derivative (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){(N1-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)-N2-(pyridin-2-ylmethylene)ethane-1,2-diamine)}chloroiridium(III) chloride, the crystal structure of which is also reported.

  12. Benefits of a new Metropolis-Hasting based algorithm, in non-linear regression for estimation of ex vivo antimalarial sensitivity in patients infected with two strains.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rebecca; Mentré, France; Kaddouri, Halima; Le Bras, Jacques; Le Nagard, Hervé

    2014-12-01

    Malaria is one of the world׳s most widespread parasitic diseases. The parasitic protozoans of the genus Plasmodium have developed resistance to several antimalarial drugs. Some patients are therefore infected by two or more strains with different levels of antimalarial drug sensitivity. We previously developed a model to estimate the drug concentration (IC50) that inhibits 50% of the growth of the parasite isolated from a patient infected with one strain. We propose here a new Two-Slopes model for patients infected by two strains. This model involves four parameters: the proportion of each strain and their IC50, and the sigmoidicity parameter. To estimate the parameters of this model, we have developed a new algorithm called PGBO (Population Genetics-Based Optimizer). It is based on the Metropolis-Hasting algorithm and is implemented in the statistical software R. We performed a simulation study and defined three evaluation criteria to evaluate its properties and compare it with three other algorithms (Gauss-Newton, Levenberg-Marquardt, and a simulated annealing). We also evaluated it using in vitro data and three ex vivo datasets from the French Malaria Reference Center. Our evaluation criteria in the simulation show that PGBO gives good estimates of the parameters even if the concentration design is poor. Moreover, our algorithm is less sensitive than Gauss-Newton algorithms to initial values. Although parameter estimation is good, interpretation of the results can be difficult if the proportion of the second strain is close to 0 or 1. For these reasons, this approach cannot yet be implemented routinely.

  13. Genetic Background Specific Hypoxia Resistance in Rat is Correlated with Balanced Activation of a Cross-Chromosomal Genetic Network Centering on Physiological Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Genetic background of an individual can drastically influence an organism's response upon environmental stress and pathological stimulus. Previous studies in inbred rats showed that compared to Brown Norway (BN), Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rat exerts strong hypoxia susceptibility. However, despite extensive narrow-down approaches via the chromosome substitution methodology, this genome-based physiological predisposition could not be traced back to distinct quantitative trait loci. Upon the completion and public data availability of PhysGen SS-BN consomic (CS) rat platform, I employed systems biology approach attempting to further our understanding of the molecular basis of genetic background effect in light of hypoxia response. I analyzed the physiological screening data of 22 CS rat strains under normoxia and 2-weeks of hypoxia, and cross-compared them to the parental strains. The analyses showed that SS-9(BN) and SS-18(BN) represent the most hypoxia-resistant CS strains with phenotype similar to BN, whereas SS-6(BN) and SS-Y(BN) segregated to the direction of SS. A meta-analysis on the transcriptomic profiles of these CS rat strains under hypoxia treatment showed that although polymorphisms on the substituted BN chromosomes could be directly involved in hypoxia resistance, this seems to be embedded in a more complex trans-chromosomal genetic regulatory network. Via information theory based modeling approach, this hypoxia relevant core genetic network was reverse engineered. Network analyses showed that the protective effects of BN chromosome 9 and 18 were reflected by a balanced activation of this core network centering on physiological homeostasis. Presumably, it is the system robustness constituted on such differential network activation that acts as hypoxia response modifier. Understanding of the intrinsic link between the individual genetic background and the network robustness will set a basis in the current scientific efforts toward personalized medicine.

  14. Competing endogenous RNA networks of CYP4Z1 and pseudogene CYP4Z2P confer tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lufeng; Li, Xiaoman; Meng, Xia; Chou, Jinjiang; Hu, Jinhang; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Zhiting; Xing, Yingying; Liu, Yu; Xi, Tao

    2016-05-15

    Patients with estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive breast cancer can be treated with endocrine therapy using anti-estrogens such as tamoxifen; nonetheless, patients often develop resistance limiting the success of breast cancer treatment. The potential mechanisms remain elusive. In detail, many miRNAs have been associated with breast cancer tamoxifen resistance, but no studies have addressed the role of miRNA-mediated competitive endogenous RNAs network (ceRNET) in tamoxifen resistance. The ceRNET between CYP4Z1 and pseudogene CYP4Z2P has been revealed to promote breast cancer angiogenesis. However, its function in tamoxifen resistance remains unclear. Here we report CYP4Z1 and CYP4Z2P were downregulated in MCF-7 cells compared with tamoxifen-resistant MCF-7-TamR cells. Enforced upregulation of CYP4Z1- or CYP4Z2P-3'UTR level renders MCF-7 Cells resistant to tamoxifen. We find that overexpression of CYP4Z1- or CYP4Z2P-3'UTR enhances the transcriptional activity of ERα through the activation of ERα phosphorylation. Furthermore, we find that CYP4Z1- and CYP4Z2P-3'UTRs increase ERα activity dependent on cyclin-dependent kinase 3 (CDK3). Reporter gene and western blot assays revealed that CYP4Z1- and CYP4Z2P-3'UTRs act as CDK3 ceRNAs. More importantly, the blocking of CYP4Z1- and CYP4Z2P-3'UTRs reversed tamoxifen resistance in MCF-7-TamR cells. Our data demonstrates that the ceRNET between CYP4Z1 and pseudogene CYP4Z2P acts as a sub-ceRNET to promote CDK3 expression in ER-positive breast cancer and is a potential therapeutic target for treatment of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer.

  15. Comparison of iron status 28 d after provision of antimalarial treatment with iron therapy compared with antimalarial treatment alone in Ugandan children with severe malaria12

    PubMed Central

    Opoka, Robert O; Ssemata, Andrew S; Georgieff, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Background: The provision of iron with antimalarial treatment is the standard of care for concurrent iron deficiency and malaria. However, iron that is given during a malaria episode may not be well absorbed or used, particularly in children with severe malaria and profound inflammation. Objectives: We aimed to 1) determine baseline values of iron and inflammatory markers in children with severe malarial anemia (SMA), children with cerebral malaria (CM), and community children (CC) and 2) compare markers in iron-deficient children in each group who received 28 d of iron supplementation during antimalarial treatment with those in children who did not receive iron during treatment.. Design: Seventy-nine children with CM, 77 children with SMA, and 83 CC who presented to Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda, were enrolled in a 28-d iron-therapy study. Children with malaria received antimalarial treatment. All children with CM or SMA, as well as 35 CC, had zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) concentrations ≥80 μmol/mol heme and were randomly assigned to receive a 28-d course of iron or no iron. We compared iron markers at day 0 among study groups (CM, SMA, and CC groups) and at day 28 between children in each group who were randomly assigned to receive iron or to not receive iron. Results: At day 0, children with CM and SMA had greater values of C-reactive protein, ferritin, and hepcidin than those of CC. At day 28, interactions between study and treatment group were NS. Children in the no-iron compared with iron groups had similar mean values for hemoglobin (115 compared with 113 g/L, respectively; P = 0.73) and ZPP (124 compared with 124 μmol/mol heme, respectively; P = 0.96) but had lower median ferritin [101.0 μg/L (95% CI: 84.2, 121.0 μg/L) compared with 152.9 μg/L (128.8, 181.6 μg/L), respectively; P ≤ 0.001] and hepcidin [45.8 ng/mL (36.8, 56.9 ng/mL) compared with 83.1 ng/mL (67.6, 102.2 ng/mL), respectively; P < 0.011]. Conclusions: Severe inflammation is a

  16. Imidazolopiperazines: hit to lead optimization of new antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Nagle, Advait; Kuhen, Kelli; Gagaring, Kerstin; Borboa, Rachel; Francek, Caroline; Chen, Zhong; Plouffe, David; Goh, Anne; Lakshminarayana, Suresh B; Wu, Jeanette; Ang, Hui Qing; Zeng, Peiting; Kang, Min Low; Tan, William; Tan, Maria; Ye, Nicole; Lin, Xuena; Caldwell, Christopher; Ek, Jared; Skolnik, Suzanne; Liu, Fenghua; Wang, Jianling; Chang, Jonathan; Li, Chun; Hollenbeck, Thomas; Tuntland, Tove; Isbell, John; Fischli, Christoph; Brun, Reto; Rottmann, Matthias; Dartois, Veronique; Keller, Thomas; Diagana, Thierry; Winzeler, Elizabeth; Glynne, Richard; Tully, David C; Chatterjee, Arnab K

    2011-07-28

    Starting from a hit series from a GNF compound library collection and based on a cell-based proliferation assay of Plasmodium falciparum, a novel imidazolopiperazine scaffold was optimized. SAR for this series of compounds is discussed, focusing on optimization of cellular potency against wild-type and drug resistant parasites and improvement of physiochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. The lead compounds in this series showed good potencies in vitro and decent oral exposure levels in vivo. In a Plasmodium berghei mouse infection model, one lead compound lowered the parasitemia level by 99.4% after administration of 100 mg/kg single oral dose and prolonged mice survival by an average of 17.0 days. The lead compounds were also well-tolerated in the preliminary in vitro toxicity studies and represents an interesting lead for drug development.

  17. Characterizing the binding interaction between antimalarial artemether (AMT) and bovine serum albumin (BSA): Spectroscopic and molecular docking methods.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jie-Hua; Pan, Dong-Qi; Wang, Xiou-Xiou; Liu, Ting-Ting; Jiang, Min; Wang, Qi

    2016-09-01

    Artemether (AMT), a peroxide sesquiterpenoides, has been widely used as an antimalarial for the treatment of multiple drug-resistant strains of plasmodium falciparum malaria. In this work, the binding interaction of AMT with bovine serum albumin (BSA) under the imitated physiological conditions (pH7.4) was investigated by UV spectroscopy, fluorescence emission spectroscopy, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), circular dichroism (CD), three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking methods. The experimental results indicated that there was a change in UV absorption of BSA along with a slight red shift of absorption wavelength, indicating that the interaction of AMT with BSA occurred. The intrinsic fluorescence of BSA was quenched by AMT due to the formation of AMT-BSA complex. The number of binding sites (n) and binding constant of AMT-BSA complex were about 1 and 2.63×10(3)M(-1) at 298K, respectively, suggesting that there was stronger binding interaction of AMT with BSA. Based on the analysis of the signs and magnitudes of the free energy change (ΔG(0)), enthalpic change (ΔH(0)) and entropic change (ΔS(0)) in the binding process, it can be concluded that the binding of AMT with BSA was enthalpy-driven process due to |ΔH°|>|TΔS°|. The results of experiment and molecular docking confirmed the main interaction forces between AMT and BSA were van der Waals force. And, there was a slight change in the BSA conformation after binding AMT but BSA still retains its secondary structure α-helicity. However, it had been confirmed that AMT binds on the interface between sub-domain IIA and IIB of BSA.

  18. Structural mapping of the ClpB ATPases of Plasmodium falciparum: Targeting protein folding and secretion for antimalarial drug design

    PubMed Central

    AhYoung, Andrew P; Koehl, Antoine; Cascio, Duilio; Egea, Pascal F

    2015-01-01

    Caseinolytic chaperones and proteases (Clp) belong to the AAA+ protein superfamily and are part of the protein quality control machinery in cells. The eukaryotic parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of malaria, has evolved an elaborate network of Clp proteins including two distinct ClpB ATPases. ClpB1 and ClpB2 are involved in different aspects of parasitic proteostasis. ClpB1 is present in the apicoplast, a parasite-specific and plastid-like organelle hosting various metabolic pathways necessary for parasite growth. ClpB2 localizes to the parasitophorous vacuole membrane where it drives protein export as core subunit of a parasite-derived protein secretion complex, the Plasmodium Translocon of Exported proteins (PTEX); this process is central to parasite virulence and survival in the human host. The functional associations of these two chaperones with parasite-specific metabolism and protein secretion make them prime drug targets. ClpB proteins function as unfoldases and disaggregases and share a common architecture consisting of four domains—a variable N-terminal domain that binds different protein substrates, followed by two highly conserved catalytic ATPase domains, and a C-terminal domain. Here, we report and compare the first crystal structures of the N terminal domains of ClpB1 and ClpB2 from Plasmodium and analyze their molecular surfaces. Solution scattering analysis of the N domain of ClpB2 shows that the average solution conformation is similar to the crystalline structure. These structures represent the first step towards the characterization of these two malarial chaperones and the reconstitution of the entire PTEX to aid structure-based design of novel anti-malarial drugs. PMID:26130467

  19. Application of artificial neural networks to describe the combined effect of pH and NaCl on the heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Esnoz, A; Periago, P M; Conesa, R; Palop, A

    2006-02-01

    A model for prediction of bacterial spore inactivation was developed. The influence of temperature, pH and NaCl on the heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores was described using low-complexity, black box models based on artificial neural networks. Literature data were used to build and train the neural network, and new experimental data were used to evaluate it. The neural network models gave better predictions than the classical quadratic response surface model in all the experiments tried. When the neural networks were evaluated using new experimental data, also good predictions were obtained, providing fail-safe predictions of D values in all cases. The weights and biases values of neurons of the neural network that gave the best results are presented, so the reader can use the model for their own purposes. The use of this non-linear modelling technique makes it possible to describe more accurately interacting effects of environmental factors when compared with classical predictive microbial models.

  20. CoMFA, CoMSIA, and docking studies on thiolactone-class of potent anti-malarials: identification of essential structural features modulating anti-malarial activity.

    PubMed

    Roy, Kuldeep K; Bhunia, Shome S; Saxena, Anil K

    2011-09-01

    The integrated ligand- and structure-based drug design techniques have been applied on a homogeneous dataset of thiolactone-class of potent anti-malarials, to explore the essential structural features for the inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum. Developed CoMFA (q(2) = 0.716) and CoMSIA (q(2) = 0.632) models well explained structure-activity variation in both the training (CoMFA R(2) = 0.948 & CoMSIA R(2) = 0.849) and test set (CoMFA R(2) (pred) = 0.789 & CoMSIA R(2) (pred) = 0.733) compounds. The docking and scoring of the most active compound 10 into the active site of high-resolution (2.35 Å) structure of FabB-TLM binary complex (PDB-ID: 1FJ4) indicated that thiolactone core of this compound forms bifurcated H-bonding with two catalytic residues His298 and His333, and its saturated de