Science.gov

Sample records for antimicrobial susceptibility testing

  1. Instrumentation in antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Felmingham, D; Brown, D F

    2001-07-01

    Studies in the 1960s demonstrated the problems of variability in susceptibility testing methods, especially those affecting the performance of disc diffusion procedures. These studies made apparent the need for standardization and resulted in more clearly defined performance limits for growth medium, incubation conditions, inoculum concentration, disc content for diffusion methods, the setting of interpretative MIC breakpoints and the establishment of quality control parameters. More recently, there has been a growing interest in the use of instrumentation for reading disc diffusion tests and the endpoints of agar or broth dilution MIC determinations. Instrumentation ranges in complexity from the simple optical reading of zones of inhibition or growth endpoints, requiring operator interpretation, to more sophisticated devices for reading, recording and 'expert system' analysis of results with interfacing of instruments to laboratory information management systems. Some of the more developed systems are fully automated and can also identify the organisms tested. The pressure to reduce labour costs and provide results earlier favours the use of more automated systems whilst the requirement for resistance surveillance provides impetus for the use of systems that provide quantitative results and electronic data handling.

  2. Antianaerobic Antimicrobials: Spectrum and Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, Hannah M.; Goldstein, Ellie J. C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria recovered from selected cases can influence the choice of antimicrobial therapy. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) has standardized many laboratory procedures, including anaerobic susceptibility testing (AST), and has published documents for AST. The standardization of testing methods by the CLSI allows comparisons of resistance trends among various laboratories. Susceptibility testing should be performed on organisms recovered from sterile body sites, those that are isolated in pure culture, or those that are clinically important and have variable or unique susceptibility patterns. Organisms that should be considered for individual isolate testing include highly virulent pathogens for which susceptibility cannot be predicted, such as Bacteroides, Prevotella, Fusobacterium, and Clostridium spp.; Bilophila wadsworthia; and Sutterella wadsworthensis. This review describes the current methods for AST in research and reference laboratories. These methods include the use of agar dilution, broth microdilution, Etest, and the spiral gradient endpoint system. The antimicrobials potentially effective against anaerobic bacteria include beta-lactams, combinations of beta-lactams and beta-lactamase inhibitors, metronidazole, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, macrolides, tetracyclines, and fluoroquinolones. The spectrum of efficacy, antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, and resistance patterns against these agents are described. PMID:23824372

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility and susceptibility testing of Mycoplasma hominis: a review.

    PubMed

    Bygdeman, S M; Mårdh, P A

    1983-01-01

    The determination of the minimal growth-inhibiting concentration (MIC), the minimal metabolism-inhibiting concentration (MMC), and the minimal mycoplasmacidal concentration (MCC) of various antimicrobial compounds for Mycoplasma hominis is influenced by the pH of the test media, the inoculum size, and the incubation time, although each of these factors generally do not affect the minimal concentration more than fourfold. M. hominis is resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics, vancomycin, sulfonamides, trimethoprim, and polymyxin B. There are great differences in the susceptibility of M. hominis to various macrolide antibiotics. Thus the organism is resistant to erythromycin and oleandomycin, moderately resistant to tylosin and spiramycin, susceptible to josamycin as well as to another macrolide drug, labelled M-4365G. M. hominis is also highly susceptible to the macrolide-like compound rosaramicin and to the tetracyclines (although resistant strains occur). It is susceptible to lincomycin and clindamycin, and moderately susceptible to chloramphenicol and rifampicin. The aminoglycosides have limited activity against M. hominis.

  4. 21 CFR 866.1640 - Antimicrobial susceptibility test powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antimicrobial susceptibility test powder. 866.1640 Section 866.1640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... agents. Test results are used to determine the antimicrobial agent of choice in the treatment...

  5. 21 CFR 866.1620 - Antimicrobial susceptibility test disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antimicrobial susceptibility test disc. 866.1620 Section 866.1620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... to determine the antimicrobial agent of choice in the treatment of bacterial diseases....

  6. Antimicrobial resistance in campylobacter: susceptibility testing methods and resistance trends.

    PubMed

    Ge, Beilei; Wang, Fei; Sjölund-Karlsson, Maria; McDermott, Patrick F

    2013-10-01

    Most Campylobacter infections are self-limiting but antimicrobial treatment (e.g., macrolides, fluoroquinolones) is necessary in severe or prolonged cases. Susceptibility testing continues to play a critical role in guiding therapy and epidemiological monitoring of resistance. The methods of choice for Campylobacter recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) are agar dilution and broth microdilution, while a disk diffusion method was recently standardized by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Macrolides, quinolones, and tetracyclines are among the common antimicrobials recommended for testing. Molecular determination of Campylobacter resistance via DNA sequencing or PCR-based methods has been performed. High levels of resistance to tetracycline and ciprofloxacin are frequently reported by many national surveillance programs, but resistance to erythromycin and gentamicin in Campylobacter jejuni remains low. Nonetheless, variations in susceptibility observed over time underscore the need for continued public health monitoring of Campylobacter resistance from humans, animals, and food.

  7. High-Throughput Intracellular Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, Lucius

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic human pathogen that causes a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Notably, in the human host, the organism is believed to replicate solely within an intracellular compartment, predominantly within pulmonary macrophages. Consequently, successful therapy is predicated on antimicrobials penetrating into this intracellular growth niche. However, standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods test solely for extracellular growth inhibition. Here, we make use of a high-throughput assay to characterize intracellular growth inhibition activity of known antimicrobials. For select antimicrobials, high-resolution dose-response analysis was then performed to characterize and compare activity levels in both macrophage infection and axenic growth assays. Results support the superiority of several classes of nonpolar antimicrobials in abrogating intracellular growth. Importantly, our assay results show excellent correlations with prior clinical observations of antimicrobial efficacy. Furthermore, we also show the applicability of high-throughput automation to two- and three-dimensional synergy testing. High-resolution isocontour isobolograms provide in vitro support for specific combination antimicrobial therapy. Taken together, findings suggest that high-throughput screening technology may be successfully applied to identify and characterize antimicrobials that target bacterial pathogens that make use of an intracellular growth niche. PMID:26392509

  8. 21 CFR 866.1620 - Antimicrobial susceptibility test disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antimicrobial susceptibility test disc. 866.1620 Section 866.1620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 866.1620...

  9. 21 CFR 866.1640 - Antimicrobial susceptibility test powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antimicrobial susceptibility test powder. 866.1640 Section 866.1640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 866.1640...

  10. 21 CFR 866.1640 - Antimicrobial susceptibility test powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antimicrobial susceptibility test powder. 866.1640 Section 866.1640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 866.1640...

  11. 21 CFR 866.1620 - Antimicrobial susceptibility test disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antimicrobial susceptibility test disc. 866.1620 Section 866.1620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 866.1620...

  12. 21 CFR 866.1620 - Antimicrobial susceptibility test disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antimicrobial susceptibility test disc. 866.1620 Section 866.1620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 866.1620...

  13. 21 CFR 866.1620 - Antimicrobial susceptibility test disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antimicrobial susceptibility test disc. 866.1620 Section 866.1620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 866.1620...

  14. 21 CFR 866.1640 - Antimicrobial susceptibility test powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antimicrobial susceptibility test powder. 866.1640 Section 866.1640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 866.1640...

  15. 21 CFR 866.1640 - Antimicrobial susceptibility test powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antimicrobial susceptibility test powder. 866.1640 Section 866.1640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 866.1640...

  16. [Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria].

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, José E; García-Sánchez, Enrique; García-García, María Inmaculada

    2014-02-01

    The anaerobic bacteria resistance to antibiotics is increasing, and even has appeared against the most active of those, like metronidazol and carbapenems. This fact forces to make and periodical sensibility tests -at least in the most aggressive and virulent species, in cases that they are isolated from life locations and in the absence of therapeutic response- to check the local sensibility and to establish suitable empiric therapies, all based on multicentric studies carried out in order to this or well to check the activity of new antibiotics. For the laboratory routine, the easiest sensibility method is the E-test/MIC evaluator. Another alternative is microdilution, that's only normalized for Bacteroides. There are preliminary facts that allow the use of disc diffusion method in some species of Bacteroides and Clostridium. For the temporal and multicentric studies, the procedure is dilution in agar plate, the reference method.

  17. Susceptibility Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also known as: Sensitivity Testing; Drug Resistance Testing; Culture and Sensitivity; C & S; Antimicrobial Susceptibility Formal name: Bacterial and Fungal Susceptibility Testing Related tests: Urine Culture ; Blood Culture ; Bacterial Wound Culture ; AFB Testing ; MRSA ; ...

  18. Improved medium for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, J H; Redding, J S; Maher, L A; Howell, A W

    1987-01-01

    The need for complex growth media has complicated routine susceptibility testing of Haemophilus influenzae because of antagonism of certain antimicrobial agents by the medium or because of difficulties in interpretation of growth endpoints. Haemophilus test medium (HTM) is a simple, transparent medium for broth- or agar-based tests with H. influenzae. HTM incorporates Mueller-Hinton medium with additions of 15 micrograms of hematin per ml, 15 micrograms of NAD per ml, and 5 mg of yeast extract per ml as growth-promoting additives. Agar or broth microdilution MICs of 10 antimicrobial agents for a collection of 179 H. influenzae isolates determined by using HTM compared favorably with MICs determined by the conventional agar or broth dilution methods recommended by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. Disk diffusion tests performed with HTM allowed accurate categorization of susceptible and resistant strains and were easier to interpret than tests performed with Mueller-Hinton chocolate agar. A particular advantage of HTM was the reliability of broth- or agar-based test results with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The results of the study suggest modification of current National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards MIC-interpretive criteria for H. influenzae with amoxicillin-clavulanate, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Error rate-bounded analysis of MICs and disk diffusion zone sizes also suggest modified zone-interpretive criteria for ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline with HTM or conventional media. Interpretive zone sizes are newly proposed for cefaclor and rifampin disk diffusion tests. PMID:3500965

  19. Innovative antimicrobial susceptibility testing method using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ya-Ling; Lin, Chi-Hung; Yen, Muh-Yong; Su, Yuan-Deng; Chen, Shean-Jen; Chen, How-Foo

    2009-03-15

    Utilizing the ultra sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor to examine drug resistance of bacteria was studied in this research. Susceptible and resistant strains of Escherichia coli JM109 to ampicillin and those of Staphylococcus epidermidis to tetracycline, served as a blind test, were examined. The bacteria adhered on the Au thin film was treated by the injection of antibiotic flow. The optical property change of the bacteria responded to antibiotics were recorded through SPR mechanism. As a result, the susceptible strain of E. coli generally revealed more than three times of SPR angle shift when compared to the resistant one; the susceptible strain of S. epidermidis revealed irregular SPR angle shift while the resistant strain kept the SPR angle almost unchanged. The new SPR method took less than 2h of antibiotic treatment time to complete the antimicrobial susceptibility test. Different from conventional applications of SPR, specific antibodies is not required in this method. As compared to the conventional assays, Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion and variations of broth microdilution usually take 1 day to weeks to issue the report. Using this SPR assay can greatly reduce the waiting period for laboratory tests, and can therefore benefit patients who need proper antibiotic treatments to control bacterial infections. The sensitivity of the SPR biosensor built for the application is around 1.4 x 10(-4) on the refractive index.

  20. Chemically defined antimicrobial susceptibility test medium for Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, J H; Lee, J C; Jones, P M

    1977-03-01

    A chemically defined growth medium containing physiological concentrations of magnesium and calcium ions was utilized in a microdilution procedure for antimicrobial drug susceptibility testing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Determinations of growth end points were simplified by use of sodium citrate as a sole carbon source and bromothymol blue as a pH indicator. Growth of the test organisms was detectable by a change in the indicator color from green to blue after alkalinization of the medium due to citrate utilization. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of amikacin, carbenicillin, gentamicin, and tobramycin were determined on 100 recent clinical isolates of Pseudomonas. Parallel determinations using the microdilution procedure and a conventional tube-broth dilution technique incorporating Mueller-Hinton broth with identical magnesium and calcium content generally agreed within one twofold dilution. Modal minimal inhibitory concentrations for susceptible strains using the microdilution method were: amikacin, 6 mug/ml; carbenicillin, 50 mug/ml; gentamicin, 1.5 mug/ml; tobramycin, 1.5 mug/ml. This modified microdilution technique allowed rapid, definitive minimal inhibitory concentration determinations, using growth end points defined by a color indicator change.

  1. 21 CFR 866.1700 - Culture medium for antimicrobial susceptibility tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Culture medium for antimicrobial susceptibility tests. 866.1700 Section 866.1700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....1700 Culture medium for antimicrobial susceptibility tests. (a) Identification. A culture medium...

  2. 21 CFR 866.1700 - Culture medium for antimicrobial susceptibility tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Culture medium for antimicrobial susceptibility tests. 866.1700 Section 866.1700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....1700 Culture medium for antimicrobial susceptibility tests. (a) Identification. A culture medium...

  3. 21 CFR 866.1700 - Culture medium for antimicrobial susceptibility tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Culture medium for antimicrobial susceptibility tests. 866.1700 Section 866.1700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....1700 Culture medium for antimicrobial susceptibility tests. (a) Identification. A culture medium...

  4. 21 CFR 866.1700 - Culture medium for antimicrobial susceptibility tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Culture medium for antimicrobial susceptibility tests. 866.1700 Section 866.1700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....1700 Culture medium for antimicrobial susceptibility tests. (a) Identification. A culture medium...

  5. 21 CFR 866.1700 - Culture medium for antimicrobial susceptibility tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Culture medium for antimicrobial susceptibility tests. 866.1700 Section 866.1700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....1700 Culture medium for antimicrobial susceptibility tests. (a) Identification. A culture medium...

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Spanish field isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A; Carvajal, A; García-Feliz, C; Osorio, J; Rubio, P

    2009-08-01

    This study is the first conducted in Spain to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility of field isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. One hundred and eight isolates of the bacterium, recovered from different Spanish swine farms between 2000 and 2007, were investigated. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of erythromycin, tylosin, tiamulin, valnemulin, clindamycin and lincomycin were determined using a broth microdilution technique. Most of the isolates showed poor susceptibility to erythromycin (MIC(90)>256 microg/ml), tylosin (MIC(90)>256 microg/ml), clindamycin (MIC(90)>4 microg/ml) and lincomycin (MIC(90)=128 microg/ml). Reduced susceptibility to tiamulin and valnemulin was observed with a MIC>2 microg/ml in 17.6% and 7.41% of the B. hyodysenteriae isolates, respectively. Moreover, a survival analysis permitted the detection of an increasing trend in the MIC values for almost all the antimicrobials used in the treatment of swine dysentery when comparing recent isolates (from 2006 to 2007) with those recovered in earlier years (between 2000 and 2004).

  7. Antimicrobials, susceptibility testing, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) in veterinary infection treatment.

    PubMed

    Papich, Mark G

    2013-09-01

    Veterinarians are quick to attribute an unsuccessful antimicrobial treatment to a failure of the culture and susceptibility test. There are many reasons why antimicrobial treatment fails. When evaluating a patient that has failed to respond to therapy, one must consider any of the many factors that contribute to antibiotic failure.

  8. [Consensus for antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Enterobacteriaceae. Subcommittee on Antimicrobials, SADEBAC (Argentinian Society of Clinical Bacteriology), Argentinian Association of Microbiology].

    PubMed

    Famiglietti, A; Quinteros, M; Vázquez, M; Marín, M; Nicola, F; Radice, M; Galas, M; Pasterán, F; Bantar, C; Casellas, J M; Kovensky Pupko, J; Couto, E; Goldberg, M; Lopardo, H; Gutkind, G; Soloaga, R

    2005-01-01

    Taking into account previous recommendations from the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS), the Antimicrobial Committee, Sociedad Argentina de Bacteriología Clínica (SADEBAC), Asociación Argentina de Microbiología (AAM), and the experience from its members and some invited microbiologists, a consensus was obtained for antimicrobial susceptibility testing and interpretation in most frequent enterobacterial species isolated from clinical samples in our region. This document describes the natural antimicrobial resistance of some Enterobacteriaceae family members, including the resistance profiles due to their own chromosomal encoded beta-lactamases. A list of the antimicrobial agents that should be tested, their position on the agar plates, in order to detect the most frequent antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, and considerations on which antimicrobial agents should be reported regarding to the infection site and patient characteristics are included. Also, a description on appropriate phenotypic screening and confirmatory test for detection of prevalent extended spectrum beta-lactamases in our region are presented. Finally, a summary on frequent antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and their probably associated resistance mechanisms, and some infrequent antimicrobial resistance profiles that deserve confirmation are outlined.

  9. EUCAST recommendations for antimicrobial susceptibility testing applied to the three main Campylobacter species isolated in humans.

    PubMed

    Sifré, Elodie; Salha, Ben Amor; Ducournau, Astrid; Floch, Pauline; Chardon, Hubert; Mégraud, Francis; Lehours, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Campylobacter isolates is of great importance for treatment options especially in systemic diseases. The European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) recently proposed epidemiological cut-offs (ECOFFs) for a limited number of antimicrobial compounds and for Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli only. In the present study, the EUCAST method was used after minor modifications to define antimicrobial susceptibility patterns for, 1997 C. jejuni, 419 C. coli and 100 Campylobacter fetus strains received at the French National Reference Center for Campylobacters and Helicobacters. Our results show that the ECOFFs defined by EUCAST for tetracycline and ciprofloxacin can be used for C. jejuni and C. coli. The same ECOFF can be used for erythromycin for the three species. The C. jejuni and C. coli ECOFFs for ciprofloxacin however cannot be applied to C. fetus. We also provide data to categorise two 2 β-lactams of interest for systemic diseases, ampicillin and amoxicillin+clavulanate, for the three species.

  10. [Antimicrobial susceptibility cumulative reports].

    PubMed

    Canut-Blasco, Andrés; Calvo, Jorge; Rodríguez-Díaz, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2016-10-01

    Cumulative reports on antimicrobial susceptibility tests data are important for selecting empirical treatments, as an educational tool in programs on antimicrobial use, and for establishing breakpoints defining clinical categories. These reports should be based on data validated by clinical microbiologists using diagnostic samples (not surveillance samples). In order to avoid a bias derived from including several isolates obtained from the same patient, it is recommended that, for a defined period, only the first isolate is counted. A minimal number of isolates per species should be presented: a figure of >=30 isolates is statistically acceptable. The report is usually presented in a table format where, for each cell, information on clinically relevant microorganisms-antimicrobial agents is presented. Depending on particular needs, multiple tables showing data related to patients, samples, services or special pathogens can be prepared.

  11. A review of the current state of antimicrobial susceptibility test methods for Brachyspira.

    PubMed

    Kulathunga, Dharmasiri G R S; Rubin, Joseph E

    2017-03-21

    The re-emergence of swine dysentery (Brachyspira-associated muco-haemorrhagic colitis) since the late 2000's has illuminated diagnostic challenges associated with this genus. The methods used to detect, identify and characterize Brachyspira from clinical samples have not been standardized and laboratories frequently rely heavily on in-house techniques. Particularly concerning is the lack of standardized methods for determining and interpreting the antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira spp. The integration of laboratory data into a treatment plan is a critical component of prudent antimicrobial usage, the lack of standardized methods is therefore an important limitation to the evidence based use of antimicrobials. This review will focus on describing the methodological limitations and inconsistencies between current susceptibility testing schemes employed for Brachyspira, provide an overview of what we do know about the susceptibility of these organisms and suggest future directions to improve and standardize diagnostic strategies.

  12. Use of a proposed antimicrobial susceptibility testing method for Haemophilus parasuis.

    PubMed

    Dayao, Denise Ann E; Kienzle, Marco; Gibson, Justine S; Blackall, Patrick J; Turni, Conny

    2014-08-27

    The aim of this study was to examine the antimicrobial susceptibility of 97 Haemophilus parasuis cultured from Australian pigs. As there is no existing standard antimicrobial susceptibility technique available for H. parasuis, methods utilising the supplemented media, BA/SN for disc diffusion and test medium broth (TMB) for a microdilution technique, were initially evaluated with the reference strains recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The results of the media evaluation suggested that BA/SN and TMB can be used as suitable media for susceptibility testing of H. parasuis. The proposed microdilution technique was then used with 97 H. parasuis isolates and nine antimicrobial agents. The study found that Australian isolates showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for ampicillin (1%), penicillin (2%), erythromycin (7%), tulathromycin (9%), tilmicosin (22%), tetracycline (31%) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (40%). This study has described potential antimicrobial susceptibility methods for H. parasuis and has detected a low percentage of Australian H. parasuis isolates with elevated antimicrobial MICs.

  13. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing, Drug Resistance Mechanisms, and Therapy of Infections with Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Kevin A.; Wallace, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Within the past 10 years, treatment and diagnostic guidelines for nontuberculous mycobacteria have been recommended by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Moreover, the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) has published and recently (in 2011) updated recommendations including suggested antimicrobial and susceptibility breakpoints. The CLSI has also recommended the broth microdilution method as the gold standard for laboratories performing antimicrobial susceptibility testing of nontuberculous mycobacteria. This article reviews the laboratory, diagnostic, and treatment guidelines together with established and probable drug resistance mechanisms of the nontuberculous mycobacteria. PMID:22763637

  14. Canadian multicenter laboratory study for standardized second-line antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meenu; Thibert, Louise; Chedore, Pamela; Shandro, Cary; Jamieson, Frances; Tyrrell, Gregory; Christianson, Sara; Soualhine, Hafid; Wolfe, Joyce

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a standardized protocol for second-line antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using the Bactec MGIT 960 system in Canadian laboratories. Four Canadian public health laboratories compared the susceptibility testing results of 9 second-line antimicrobials between the Bactec 460 and Bactec MGIT 960 systems. Based on the data generated, we have established that the Bactec MGIT 960 system provides results comparable to those obtained with the previous Bactec 460 method. The critical concentrations established for the testing of the antimicrobials used are as follows: amikacin, 1 μg/ml; capreomycin, 2.5 μg/ml; ethionamide, 5 μg/ml; kanamycin, 2.5 μg/ml; linezolid, 1 μg/ml; moxifloxacin, 0.25 μg/ml; ofloxacin, 2 μg/ml; p-aminosalicylic acid, 4 μg/ml; rifabutin, 0.5 μg/ml.

  15. Rapid Bead-Based Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing by Optical Diffusometry

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chih-Yao; Wang, Jhih-Cheng; Chuang, Han-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    This study combined optical diffusometry and bead-based immunoassays to develop a novel technique for quantifying the growth of specific microorganisms and achieving rapid AST. Diffusivity rises when live bacteria attach to particles, resulting in additional energy from motile microorganisms. However, when UV-sterilized (dead) bacteria attach to particles, diffusivity declines. The experimental data are consistent with the theoretical model predicted according to the equivalent volume diameter. Using this diffusometric platform, the susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the antibiotic gentamicin was tested. The result suggests that the proliferation of bacteria is effectively controlled by gentamicin. This study demonstrated a sensitive (one bacterium on single particles) and time-saving (within 2 h) platform with a small sample volume (~0.5 μL) and a low initial bacteria count (50 CFU per droplet ~ 105 CFU/mL) for quantifying the growth of microorganisms depending on Brownian motion. The technique can be applied further to other bacterial strains and increase the success of treatments against infectious diseases in the near future. PMID:26863001

  16. Bacterial Cytological Profiling (BCP) as a Rapid and Accurate Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Method for Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Quach, D.T.; Sakoulas, G.; Nizet, V.; Pogliano, J.; Pogliano, K.

    2016-01-01

    Successful treatment of bacterial infections requires the timely administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The failure to initiate the correct therapy in a timely fashion results in poor clinical outcomes, longer hospital stays, and higher medical costs. Current approaches to antibiotic susceptibility testing of cultured pathogens have key limitations ranging from long run times to dependence on prior knowledge of genetic mechanisms of resistance. We have developed a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility assay for Staphylococcus aureus based on bacterial cytological profiling (BCP), which uses quantitative fluorescence microscopy to measure antibiotic induced changes in cellular architecture. BCP discriminated between methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and -resistant (MRSA) clinical isolates of S. aureus (n = 71) within 1–2 h with 100% accuracy. Similarly, BCP correctly distinguished daptomycin susceptible (DS) from daptomycin non-susceptible (DNS) S. aureus strains (n = 20) within 30 min. Among MRSA isolates, BCP further identified two classes of strains that differ in their susceptibility to specific combinations of beta-lactam antibiotics. BCP provides a rapid and flexible alternative to gene-based susceptibility testing methods for S. aureus, and should be readily adaptable to different antibiotics and bacterial species as new mechanisms of resistance or multidrug-resistant pathogens evolve and appear in mainstream clinical practice. PMID:26981574

  17. A microfluidic device for antimicrobial susceptibility testing based on a broth dilution method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Bin; Fu, Chien-Yu; Chang, Wen-Hsin; You, Huey-Ling; Wang, Chih-Hung; Lee, Mel S; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2017-01-15

    Bacterial resistance to antimicrobial compounds is increasing at a faster rate than the development of new antibiotics; this represents a critical challenge for clinicians worldwide. Normally, the minimum inhibitory concentration of an antibiotic, the dosage at which bacterial growth is thwarted, provides an effective quantitative measure for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and determination of minimum inhibitory concentration is conventionally performed by either a serial broth dilution method or with the commercially available Etest(®) (Biomerieux, France) kit. However, these techniques are relatively labor-intensive and require a significant amount of training. In order to reduce human error and increase operation simplicity, a simple microfluidic device that can perform antimicrobial susceptibility testing automatically via a broth dilution method to accurately determine the minimum inhibitory concentration was developed herein. As a proof of concept, wild-type (ATCC 29212) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus cells were incubated at five different vancomycin concentrations on-chip, and the sample injection, transport, and mixing processes occurred within five reaction chambers and three reagent chambers via the chip's automatic dispensation and dilution functions within nine minutes. The minimum inhibitory concentration values measured after 24h of antibiotic incubation were similar to those calculated using Etest(®). With its high flexibility, reliability, and portability, the developed microfluidic device provides a simple method for antimicrobial susceptibility testing in an automated format that could be implemented for clinical and point-of-care applications.

  18. [Comparison of microdilution method and Phoenix automated system for testing antimicrobial susceptibilities of Enterococcus strains].

    PubMed

    Gülmez, Dolunay; Hasçelik, Gülşen

    2011-01-01

    Enterococcus spp. are important pathogens which are intrinsically resistant to most of the commonly used antimicrobial agents such as aminoglycosides and cephalosporins. Accurate determination of resistance is important to ensure appropriate antimicrobial therapy. This study was undertaken to compare the susceptibility results obtained by Phoenix system (Becton Dickinson, USA) with reference microdilution method. We included 1248 Enterococcus spp. (903 Enterococcus faecalis, 345 Enterococcus faecium) strains isolated from clinical samples between 2005-2007 in routine microbiology laboratory of Hacettepe University Hospital. The strains were identified and the antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined by the Phoenix system. Antimicrobial susceptibilities to ampicillin, teicoplanin, vancomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin were also studied by microdilution method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Evaluation revealed excellent agreement for all of the antibiotics with category agreement rates of > 97%. Among 1248 strains, 76 revealed discordant results. Very major error rates were 1.5% for ampicillin, 1.3% for gentamicin, and 0.9% for streptomycin. Major error rates were 1.4% for streptomycin, 0.6% for ampicillin and vancomycin and 0.3% for gentamicin. Minor error rates were found as 0.2% for vancomycin, and 0.1% for teicoplanin. Resistance rates obtained by microdilution were as follows; high level streptomycin 44%, high level gentamicin 29.7%, ampicillin 25.6%, vancomycin 2.2% and teicoplanin 2.2%. Resistance rates were higher in E.faecium than E.faecalis and 96.4% of the vancomycin resistant enterococcus isolates were identified as E.faecium. In conclusion, based on the data obtained, Phoenix system is reliable for testing susceptibilities of Enterococcus spp. to these antimicrobials. Since isolation of vancomycin resistant enterococci has an important impact in terms of hospital infection control, vancomycin

  19. CLSI performance standards for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacteria isoloated from aquatic animals; second information supplement. CLSI document VET03/VET04-S2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The supplemental information presented in this document is intended for use with the antimicrobial susceptibility testing procedures published in the following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) approved documents VET03-A Methods for Antimicrobial Disk Susceptibility Testing of Bacte...

  20. Combination antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Burkholderia cepacia complex: significance of species.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Felicity K; Milne, Kathleen E N; Stead, David A; Gould, Ian M

    2016-11-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is notorious for the life-threatening pulmonary infections it causes in patients with cystic fibrosis. The multidrug-resistant nature of Bcc and differing infective Bcc species make the design of appropriate treatment regimens challenging. Previous synergy studies have failed to take account of the species of Bcc isolates. Etest methodology was used to facilitate minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and antimicrobial combination testing on 258 isolates of Bcc, identified to species level by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). The most active antimicrobials were trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole, doxycycline and minocycline (52.5%, 46.4% and 45.9% of isolates susceptible, respectively). Synergy was observed in 9.2% of the 1799 combinations tested; the most common synergistic combinations were tobramycin + ceftazidime, meropenem + tobramycin and levofloxacin + piperacillin/tazobactam (35.4%, 32.3% and 22.2% synergy, respectively). Antimicrobial susceptibility analysis revealed differences between Burkholderia cenocepacia and Burkholderia multivorans. Disparity in clinical outcome during infection with these two micro-organisms necessitates further investigation into the clinical outcomes of treatment regimens in light of species identification and in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility studies.

  1. What's in a Name? The Impact of Accurate Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Identification on Appropriate Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria in the Staphylococcus intermedius group, including Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, often encode mecA-mediated methicillin resistance. Reliable detection of this phenotype for proper treatment and infection control decisions requires that these coagulase-positive staphylococci are accurately identified and specifically that they are not misidentified as S. aureus. As correct species level bacterial identification becomes more commonplace in clinical laboratories, one can expect to see changes in guidance for antimicrobial susceptibility testing and interpretation. The study by Wu et al. in this issue (M. T. Wu, C.-A. D. Burnham, L. F. Westblade, J. Dien Bard, S. D. Lawhon, M. A. Wallace, T. Stanley, E. Burd, J. Hindler, R. M. Humphries, J Clin Microbiol 54:535–542, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.02864-15) highlights the impact of robust identification of S. intermedius group organisms on the selection of appropriate antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods and interpretation. PMID:26763965

  2. Serogenotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Salmonella spp. isolated from retail meat samples in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stella; Braun, Sascha; Akintimehin, Faith; Fesobi, Toun; Bamidele, Moses; Coker, Akitoye; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    Microarray-based serogenotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility tests and the detection of relevant resistance genes were performed on isolates of Salmonella spp. from retail meat samples obtained in Lagos, Nigeria. Out of 151 meat samples, 33 Salmonella isolates were obtained. Nine different Salmonella serovars (S. Amoutive, S. Bargny, S. Drac, S. Ealing, S. Urbana, S. Hadar, S. Nyborg, S. Anatum and S. Havana) were identified by microarray-based serogenotyping and confirmed afterwards using classical serotyping. Antibiotic susceptibility tests with 17 antibiotics showed that almost all isolates were fully susceptible to this panel. The results of this study indicated a high prevalence of Salmonella in retail meat, the presence of some previously rather rarely described Serovars in retail meat samples from Lagos, and a need to monitor for Salmonella and their antibiotic resistance determinants. The microarray-based system used herein proved to be perfectly suited as epidemiological tool to replace classical serotyping.

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bovine digital dermatitis treponemes identifies macrolides for in vivo efficacy testing.

    PubMed

    Evans, N J; Brown, J M; Hartley, C; Smith, R F; Carter, S D

    2012-12-07

    Digital dermatitis (DD) is a major infectious lameness of dairy cattle and sheep considered to be caused by treponemes. The aim of this study was to identify antibiotics effective against DD treponemes that might be useful in the treatment of ruminant DD in the future or to identify antibiotics useful in isolation studies. Here, a microdilution method was used to identify in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of treponemes cultured from DD lesions to eight relevant antibiotics. DD treponemes exhibited highest susceptibility to amoxicillin, azithromycin and gamithromycin. Unfortunately, amoxicillin whilst having potential for DD treatment in other animals (e.g. sheep) would require milk withhold periods in dairy cattle. DD treponemes were not particularly susceptible to two cephalosporins: cefalexin and ceftiofur, which do not require milk withhold. The bacteria demonstrated low susceptibility to trimethoprim and especially colistin suggesting these antimicrobials may be particularly useful in isolation of DD treponemes. The most promising high susceptibility results for macrolides indicate a rationale to consider veterinary licensed macrolides as DD treatments. Furthermore, given the DD treponeme antibiotic susceptibility similarities to established treatments for human treponematoses, identification of treponemacidal, long acting β-lactam analogues not requiring milk withhold may allow for development of a successful treatment for dairy cattle DD.

  4. Rapid, modified Kirby-Bauer susceptibility test with single, high-concentration antimicrobial disks.

    PubMed

    Boyle, V J; Fancher, M E; Ross, R W

    1973-03-01

    A rapid (6-7 hr), modified Kirby-Bauer disk-susceptibility method, by which derivatives of tetrazolium dyes are used to enhance delineation between areas of growth and zones of inhibition, has been developed. Inoculated petri plates, prepared by the Kirby-Bauer method, were sprayed, after 6 to 7 hr of incubation (37 C), with aqueous solutions of MTT-tetrazolium or INT-tetrazolium resulting in readily detectable zones of inhibition. Excellent correlation was obtained between the modified test and the standard Kirby-Bauer test when challenged with a variety of gram-negative bacteria and Staphylococcus aureus strains. Additionally, the modified test has demonstrated reproducibility comparable to the standard Kirby-Bauer test. It is demonstrated that the modified test is applicable to susceptibility determinations with representative, commercially available antimicrobial disks. This applicability indicates that the modified method could provide rapid in vitro guidelines for in vivo therapy.

  5. Evaluation of a New System, VITEK 2, for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garrote, Fernando; Cercenado, Emilia; Bouza, Emilio

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the new automated VITEK 2 system (bioMérieux) for the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci. The results obtained with the VITEK 2 system were compared to those obtained by reference methods: standard identification by the scheme of Facklam and Sahm [R. R. Facklam and D. F. Sahm, p. 308–314, in P. R. Murray et al., ed., Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 6th ed., 1995] and with the API 20 STREP system and, for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, broth microdilution and agar dilution methods by the procedures of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The presence of vanA and vanB genes was determined by PCR. A total of 150 clinical isolates were studied, corresponding to 60 Enterococcus faecalis, 55 Enterococcus faecium, 26 Enterococcus gallinarum, 5 Enterococcus avium, 2 Enterococcus durans, and 2 Enterococcus raffinosus isolates. Among those isolates, 131 (87%) were correctly identified to the species level with the VITEK 2 system. Approximately half of the misidentifications were for E. faecium with low-level resistance to vancomycin, identified as E. gallinarum or E. casseliflavus; however, a motility test solved the discrepancies and increased the agreement to 94%. Among the strains studied, 66% were vancomycin resistant (57 VanA, 16 VanB, and 26 VanC strains), 23% were ampicillin resistant (MICs, ≥16 μg/ml), 31% were high-level gentamicin resistant, and 45% were high-level streptomycin resistant. Percentages of agreement for susceptibility and resistance to ampicillin, vancomycin, and teicoplanin and for high-level gentamicin resistance and high-level streptomycin resistance were 93, 95, 97, 97, and 96%, respectively. The accuracy of identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci with the VITEK 2 system, together with the significant reduction in handling time, will have a positive impact on the work flow of the clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:10834961

  6. Evaluation of a new system, VITEK 2, for identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garrote, F; Cercenado, E; Bouza, E

    2000-06-01

    We evaluated the new automated VITEK 2 system (bioMérieux) for the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci. The results obtained with the VITEK 2 system were compared to those obtained by reference methods: standard identification by the scheme of Facklam and Sahm [R. R. Facklam and D. F. Sahm, p. 308-314, in P. R. Murray et al., ed., Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 6th ed., 1995] and with the API 20 STREP system and, for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, broth microdilution and agar dilution methods by the procedures of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The presence of vanA and vanB genes was determined by PCR. A total of 150 clinical isolates were studied, corresponding to 60 Enterococcus faecalis, 55 Enterococcus faecium, 26 Enterococcus gallinarum, 5 Enterococcus avium, 2 Enterococcus durans, and 2 Enterococcus raffinosus isolates. Among those isolates, 131 (87%) were correctly identified to the species level with the VITEK 2 system. Approximately half of the misidentifications were for E. faecium with low-level resistance to vancomycin, identified as E. gallinarum or E. casseliflavus; however, a motility test solved the discrepancies and increased the agreement to 94%. Among the strains studied, 66% were vancomycin resistant (57 VanA, 16 VanB, and 26 VanC strains), 23% were ampicillin resistant (MICs, >/=16 microgram/ml), 31% were high-level gentamicin resistant, and 45% were high-level streptomycin resistant. Percentages of agreement for susceptibility and resistance to ampicillin, vancomycin, and teicoplanin and for high-level gentamicin resistance and high-level streptomycin resistance were 93, 95, 97, 97, and 96%, respectively. The accuracy of identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci with the VITEK 2 system, together with the significant reduction in handling time, will have a positive impact on the work flow of the clinical microbiology laboratory.

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori in times of increasing antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sinéad M; O'Morain, Colm; McNamara, Deirdre

    2014-08-07

    The gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) causes chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Treatment is recommended in all symptomatic patients. The current treatment options for H. pylori infection are outlined in this review in light of the recent challenges in eradication success, largely due to the rapid emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of H. pylori. Antibiotic resistance is a constantly evolving process and numerous studies have shown that the prevalence of H. pylori antibiotic resistance varies significantly from country to country, and even between regions within the same country. In addition, recent data has shown that previous antibiotic use is associated with harbouring antibiotic resistant H. pylori. Local surveillance of antibiotic resistance is warranted to guide clinicians in their choice of therapy. Antimicrobial resistance is assessed by H. pylori culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Recently developed molecular tests offer an attractive alternative to culture and allow for the rapid molecular genetic identification of H. pylori and resistance-associated mutations directly from biopsy samples or bacterial culture material. Accumulating evidence indicates that surveillance of antimicrobial resistance by susceptibility testing is feasible and necessary to inform clinicians in their choice of therapy for management of H. pylori infection.

  8. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus vitulinus by the BD phoenix automated microbiology system.

    PubMed

    Cirković, Ivana; Hauschild, Tomasz; Jezek, Petr; Dimitrijević, Vladimir; Vuković, Dragana; Stepanović, Srdjan

    2008-08-01

    This study evaluated the performance of the BD Phoenix system for the identification (ID) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of Staphylococcus vitulinus. Of the 10 S. vitulinus isolates included in the study, 2 were obtained from the Czech Collection of Microorganisms, 5 from the environment, 2 from human clinical samples, and 1 from an animal source. The results of conventional biochemical and molecular tests were used for the reference method for ID, while antimicrobial susceptibility testing performed in accordance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations and PCR for the mecA gene were the reference for AST. Three isolates were incorrectly identified by the BD Phoenix system; one of these was incorrectly identified to the genus level, and two to the species level. The results of AST by the BD Phoenix system were in agreement with those by the reference method used. While the results of susceptibility testing compared favorably, the 70% accuracy of the Phoenix system for identification of this unusual staphylococcal species was not fully satisfactory.

  9. Self-assembled magnetic bead biosensor for measuring bacterial growth and antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Paivo; McNaughton, Brandon H; Albertson, Theodore; Sinn, Irene; Mofakham, Sima; Elbez, Remy; Newton, Duane W; Hunt, Alan; Kopelman, Raoul

    2012-08-20

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance is one of the major concerns of modern healthcare worldwide, and the development of rapid, growth-based, antimicrobial susceptibility tests is key for addressing it. The cover image shows a self-assembled asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) biosensor developed for rapid detection of bacterial growth. Using the biosensors, the minimum inhibitory concentration of a clinical E. coli isolate can be measured within two hours, where currently tests take 6-24 hours. A 16-well prototype is also constructed for simple and robust observation of the self-assembled AMBR biosensors.

  10. Performance of Vitek 2 for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus spp. and Enterococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Bobenchik, April M; Hindler, Janet A; Giltner, Carmen L; Saeki, Sandra; Humphries, Romney M

    2014-02-01

    Vitek 2 (bioMérieux, Inc., Durham, NC) is a widely used commercial antimicrobial susceptibility testing system. We compared MIC results obtained by Vitek 2 to those obtained by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution (BMD) reference method for 134 staphylococcal and 84 enterococcal clinical isolates. Nineteen agents were evaluated, including all those available on Vitek 2 for testing staphylococci and enterococci. The resistance phenotypes tested included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (n = 58), S. aureus with inducible clindamycin resistance (ICR) (n = 30), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant MRSA (n = 10), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (n = 37), high-level gentamicin-resistant Enterococcus (n = 15), linezolid-resistant Enterococcus (n = 5), and daptomycin-nonsusceptible Enterococcus faecalis (n = 6). For the staphylococci, there was 98.9% categorical agreement (CA). There was one very major error (VME) for gentamicin in a Staphylococcus hominis isolate, six VMEs for inducible clindamycin in S. aureus isolates, and two major errors (ME) for daptomycin in an S. aureus and a Staphylococcus epidermidis isolate. For enterococci, there was 97.3% CA. Two VMEs were observed for daptomycin in isolates of E. faecalis and 2 ME, 1 for high-level gentamicin resistance and 1 for nitrofurantoin, in E. faecium isolates. Overall, there was 98.3% CA and 99% essential agreement for the testing of staphylococci and enterococci by the Vitek 2. With the exception of detecting ICR in S. aureus, Vitek 2 performed reliably for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of staphylococci and enterococci.

  11. Multilaboratory evaluation of disk diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Neisseria meningitidis isolates.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, James H; Crawford, Sharon A; Fulcher, Letitia C; Glennen, Anita; Harrington, Susan M; Swenson, Jana; Lynfield, Ruth; Murray, Patrick R; Tenover, Fred C

    2006-05-01

    In 2005, the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute published MIC interpretive criteria for 13 antimicrobial agents used for either therapy or prophylaxis of Neisseria meningitidis infections. The MIC method includes the use of lysed horse blood-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth with incubation in 5% CO2 for 20 to 24 h. Since some clinical laboratories might prefer the option of disk diffusion testing for infrequently encountered isolates a multicenter collaborative study was conducted to evaluate the reproducibility of a disk diffusion method for testing isolates of N. meningitidis. Interpretive criteria were developed for 12 antimicrobial agents. Four laboratories tested a common collection of 50 meningococcal strains and then tested 25 unique isolates per laboratory. Isolates were tested using Mueller-Hinton sheep blood agar plates incubated for 20 to 24 h in 5% CO2; they were also tested by the reference broth microdilution method in parallel. Pooling of the MIC and disk diffusion data from the common and unique isolates provided a sufficient sample size to develop susceptible, intermediate, and resistant zone diameter interpretive criteria using the error rate-bounded method for the following agents: chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, and rifampin. Due to the lack of resistant strains at the present time, "susceptible only" interpretive criteria were proposed for cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, meropenem, azithromycin, and minocycline. The numbers of minor interpretive errors with penicillin and ampicillin disk tests were unacceptably high and precluded recommended testing of those agents by the disk method. However, amdinocillin, an agent that preferentially binds to the altered penicillin binding protein responsible for diminished penicillin susceptibility, has potential utility as a surrogate screening reagent for ampicillin resistance. A disk diffusion breakpoint was derived for nalidixic acid to serve as a surrogate marker for

  12. Rapid inoculum standardization system: a novel device for standardization of inocula in antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

    PubMed Central

    Wicks, J H; Nelson, R L; Krejcarek, G E

    1983-01-01

    A rapid inoculum standardization system for antimicrobial susceptibility testing without incubation or the conventional turbidity adjustment has been developed. The rapid inoculum standardization system consists of a plastic rod with cross-hatched grooves on one end and a specific nutrient medium in a vial. The crosshatched grooves are designed to pick up and release a known number of viable microorganisms. In use, the end of the rod is touched to five colonies 1 to 2 mm in diameter from a primary agar plate, thus filling the grooves with bacteria. The rod is placed into the vial, and the bacteria are suspended in the medium by agitation with a Vortex Genie Mixer. The resulting suspension contains 5 X 10(7) to 5 X 10(8) CFU/ml for most gram-negative bacilli and gram-positive cocci. Microorganisms such as streptococci that have colonies less than 1 mm in diameter require as many as 10 colonies for an adequate inoculum suspension. Ninety-five commonly encountered bacterial isolates were tested in triplicate by agar plate counts. The resulting overall geometric mean of the agar plate counts was 1.52 X 10(8) CFU/ml for the species tested. We have found that the rapid inoculum standardization system provides a consistent and reproducible method for the standardization of inoculum for antimicrobial susceptibility testing without the incubation period and turbidity adjustment. Images PMID:6874902

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Brachyspira intermedia and Brachyspira pilosicoli isolates from Australian chickens.

    PubMed

    Hampson, D J; Stephens, C P; Oxberry, S L

    2006-02-01

    Susceptibilities of predominantly Australian isolates of the pathogenic intestinal spirochaetes Brachyspira intermedia (n = 25) and Brachyspira pilosicoli (n = 17) from chickens were tested in agar dilution against four concentrations each of the antimicrobials tiamulin, lincomycin, tylosin, metronidazole, tetracycline and ampicillin. Based on available minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoint values for Brachyspira hyodysenteriae or other Gram-negative enteric veterinary pathogens, isolates of both species generally were susceptible to tiamulin, lincomycin, metronidazole and tetracycline. Although not classed as resistant, four isolates of B. intermedia had an elevated MIC range for tiamulin (1 to 4 mg/l), 11 isolates of B. intermedia and five of B. pilosicoli had an elevated MIC range for lincomycin (10 to 50 mg/l), one isolate of B. pilosicoli had an elevated MIC range for tetracycline (10 to 20 mg/l), and one isolate of B. intermedia and five of B. pilosicoli had an elevated MIC range for ampicillin (10 to 50 mg/l). A clear lack of susceptibility to tylosin (MIC > 4 mg/l) was seen in 11 isolates each of B. intermedia and B. pilosicoli, and to ampicillin (MIC > 32 mg/l) in two isolates of B. pilosicoli. These data suggest that some resistance to common antimicrobials exists among intestinal spirochetes obtained from laying hens and supports the need of MIC data for clinical isolates before any treatment is considered.

  14. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing with electrokinetics enhanced biosensors for diagnosis of acute bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Lu, Yi; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-11-01

    Rapid pathogen detection and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) are required in diagnosis of acute bacterial infections to determine the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Molecular approaches for AST are often based on the detection of known antibiotic resistance genes. Phenotypic culture analysis requires several days from sample collection to result reporting. Toward rapid diagnosis of bacterial infection in non-traditional healthcare settings, we have developed a rapid AST approach that combines phenotypic culture of bacterial pathogens in physiological samples and electrochemical sensing of bacterial 16S rRNA. The assay determines the susceptibility of pathogens by detecting bacterial growth under various antibiotic conditions. AC electrokinetic fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature elevation are optimized to enhance the sensor signal and minimize the matrix effect, which improve the overall sensitivity of the assay. The electrokinetics enhanced biosensor directly detects the bacterial pathogens in blood culture without prior purification. Rapid determination of the antibiotic resistance profile of Escherichia coli clinical isolates is demonstrated.

  15. Multicenter evaluation of the BD Phoenix Automated Microbiology System for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Streptococcus species.

    PubMed

    Richter, Sandra S; Howard, Wanita J; Weinstein, Melvin P; Bruckner, David A; Hindler, Janet F; Saubolle, Michael; Doern, Gary V

    2007-09-01

    This multicenter study evaluated the BD Phoenix Automated Microbiology System STREP panel (BD Diagnostic Systems). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) with 13 agents was performed on 2,013 streptococci (938 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates; 396 group B streptococci [GBS]; 369 viridans group streptococci [VGS]; 290 beta-hemolytic streptococcus groups A, C, and G; and 20 other streptococci) with the Phoenix system and a broth microdilution reference method. Clinical and challenge isolates were tested against cefepime, cefotaxime (CTX), ceftriaxone (CTR), clindamycin (CLI), erythromycin (ERY), gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, linezolid, meropenem, penicillin (PEN), tetracycline (TET), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and vancomycin. Clinical isolates with major errors or very major errors (VMEs) were retested in duplicate by both methods. The final results for clinical isolates showed the following trends. For all of the organism-antimicrobial agent combinations tested, categorical agreement (CA) was 92 to 100%, with one exception-VGS-PEN (87% CA; all errors were minor). For S. pneumoniae, there was one major error with CLI (0.1%) and one or two VMEs with CTX (4%), CTR (4.5%), ERY (0.9%), and TET (0.7%). For groups A, C, and G, the CA was 97 to 100% and the only VMEs were resolved by additional reference laboratory testing. For GBS, there was only one VME (TET, 0.3%) and D-zone testing of 23 isolates with CLI major errors (one isolate unavailable) revealed inducible CLI resistance. For VGS, the major error rates were 0 to 3% and VMEs occurred with seven agents (3.5 to 7.1%). The mean times required for organism groups to generate results ranged from 8.4 to 9.4 h. The Phoenix system provided reliable and rapid AST results for most of the organism-antimicrobial agent combinations tested.

  16. An in situ antimicrobial susceptibility testing method based on in vivo measurements of chlorophyll α fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Heliopoulos, Nikolaos S; Galeou, Angeliki; Papageorgiou, Sergios K; Favvas, Evangelos P; Katsaros, Fotios K; Stamatakis, Kostas

    2015-05-01

    Up to now antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) methods are indirect and generally involve the manual counting of bacterial colonies following the extraction of microorganisms from the surface under study and their inoculation in a separate procedure. In this work, an in situ, direct and instrumental method for the evaluation and assessment of antibacterial properties of materials and surfaces is proposed. Instead of indirectly determining antibacterial activity using the typical gram(-) test organisms with the subsequent manual colony count or inhibition zone measurement, the proposed procedure, employs photosynthetic gram(-) cyanobacteria deposited directly onto the surface under study and assesses cell proliferation and viability by a quick, accurate and reproducible instrumental chlorophyll fluorescence spectrophotometric technique. In contrast with existing methods of determination of antibacterial properties, it produces high resolution and quantitative results and is so versatile that it could be used to evaluate the antibacterial properties of any compound (organic, inorganic, natural or man-made) under any experimental conditions, depending on the targeted application.

  17. Development of a national EUCAST challenge panel for antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Desmet, S; Verhaegen, J; Glupzcynski, Y; Van Eldere, J; Melin, P; Goossens, H; Piérard, D; Declercq, P; Lagrou, K; Boel, A; Cartuyvels, R; Denis, O; Vandewal, W; Saegeman, V

    2016-08-01

    A challenge panel of bacterial strains useful for clinical laboratories to validate their European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) system was established. A total of 117 strains, obtained from Belgian Reference Centres (n = 57) and from routine clinical samples (n = 60) was selected based on resistance pattern. These strains were analysed in seven different laboratories by three different automated AST systems (Vitek (n = 2), Phoenix (n = 2) and Microscan (n = 2)) and by disc diffusion from five different manufacturers (Rosco (n = 2), Becton-Dickinson (n = 2), Biomérieux (n = 1), Bio-rad (n = 1) and i2a (n = 1)). To select the challenge panel, selection criteria were set for categorical agreement between the different systems and the number of very major errors, major errors and minor errors. Very major and major errors for at least two antibiotics were observed in 43% of all strains, leading to the exclusion of these strains from the selected panel. In only 10% of all tested strains was there 100% categorical agreement for all antibiotics. Finally, 28 strains (14 Gram-positive and 14 Gram-negative) covering a wide spectrum of resistance mechanisms were selected. Pilot-testing of this challenge panel in 20 laboratories mainly confirmed the results of the validation study. Only six strains withheld for the pilot study could not be used as challenge strain due to an overall (very) major error rate of >5% for a particular antibiotic (n = 5) or for two antibiotics (n = 1). To conclude, this challenge panel should facilitate the implementation and use of EUCAST breakpoints in laboratories.

  18. Disk diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility testing of members of the family Legionellaceae including erythromycin-resistant variants of Legionella micdadei.

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, J N; McDevitt, D A; Pasculle, A W

    1984-01-01

    Disk diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility testing of members of the family Legionellaceae was accomplished on buffered charcoal yeast extract agar by allowing the bacteria to grow for 6 h before placement of the disks, followed by an additional 42-h incubation period before the inhibitory zones were measured. This system was standardized by comparing the zone sizes with the MICs for 20 antimicrobial agents of nine bacterial strains in five Legionella species and of 19 laboratory-derived, erythromycin-resistant variants of Legionella micdadei. A high, linear correlation between zone size and MIC was found for erythromycin, trimethoprim, penicillin, ampicillin, carbenicillin, cephalothin, cefamandole, cefoxitin, moxalactam, chloramphenicol, vancomycin, and clindamycin. Disk susceptibility testing could be employed to screen Legionella isolates for resistance to any of these antimicrobial agents, of which only erythromycin is known to be efficacious in the treatment of legionellosis. With selected antibiotics, disk susceptibility patterns also appeared to accurately identify to the species level the legionellae. The range of the MICs of the legionellae for rifampin and the aminoglycosides was too small to determine whether the correlation of zone size with MIC was linear. However, laboratory-derived, high-level rifampin-resistant variants of L. micdadei demonstrated no inhibition zone around the rifampin disk, indicating that disk susceptibility testing would likely identify a rifampin-resistant clinical isolate. Of the antimicrobial agents tested, the only agents for which disk susceptibility testing was definitely not possible on buffered charcoal yeast extract agar were oxacillin, the tetracyclines, and the sulfonamides. PMID:6565706

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Gram-positive and -negative bacterial isolates directly from spiked blood culture media with Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dekter, H E; Orelio, C C; Morsink, M C; Tektas, S; Vis, B; Te Witt, R; van Leeuwen, W B

    2017-01-01

    Patients suffering from bacterial bloodstream infections have an increased risk of developing systematic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which can result in rapid deterioration of the patients' health. Diagnostic methods for bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility tests are time-consuming. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Raman spectroscopy would be able to rapidly provide an antimicrobial susceptibility profile from bacteria isolated directly from positive blood cultures. First, bacterial strains (n = 133) were inoculated in tryptic soy broth and incubated in the presence or absence of antibiotics for 5 h. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Subsequently, a selection of strains was isolated from blood cultures and analyzed similarly. VITEK®2 technology and broth dilution were used as the reference methods. Raman spectra from 67 antibiotic-susceptible strains showed discriminatory spectra in the absence or at low concentrations of antibiotics as compared to high antibiotic concentrations. For 66 antibiotic-resistant strains, no antimicrobial effect was observed on the bacterial Raman spectra. Full concordance with VITEK®2 data and broth dilution was obtained for the antibiotic-susceptible strains, 68 % and 98 %, respectively, for the resistant strains. Discriminative antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) profiles were obtained for all bacterial strains isolated from blood cultures, resulting in full concordance with the VITEK®2 data. It can be concluded that Raman spectroscopy is able to detect the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial species isolated from a positive blood culture bottle within 5 h. Although Raman spectroscopy is cheap and rapid, further optimization is required, to fulfill a great promise for future AST profiling technology development.

  20. Modified in situ antimicrobial susceptibility testing method based on cyanobacteria chlorophyll a fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Heliopoulos, Nikolaos S; Galeou, Angeliki; Papageorgiou, Sergios K; Favvas, Evangelos P; Katsaros, Fotios K; Stamatakis, Kostas

    2016-02-01

    The chlorophyll a fluorescence based antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) method presented in a previous work was based on the measurement of Chl a fluorescence of the gram(-) cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942. Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 as a gram(-) bacterium is affected by antibacterial agents via mechanisms affecting all gram(-) bacteria, however, as an exclusively phototrophic organism it would also be affected by photosynthesis inhibitory action of an agent that otherwise has no antibacterial properties. In this report, the method is modified by replacing the exclusively phototrophic Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 with the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6714, capable of both phototrophic and heterotrophic growth in order to add versatility and better reflect the antibacterial effects of surfaces under study towards nonphotosynthetic bacteria.

  1. Rapid Real-Time Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing with Electrical Sensing on Plastic Microchips with Printed Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Safavieh, Mohammadali; Pandya, Hardik J; Venkataraman, Maanasa; Thirumalaraju, Prudhvi; Kanakasabapathy, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Anupriya; Prabhakar, Devbalaji; Chug, Manjyot Kaur; Shafiee, Hadi

    2017-03-30

    Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing is important for efficient and timely therapeutic decision making. Due to globally spread bacterial resistance, the efficacy of antibiotics is increasingly being impeded. Conventional antibiotic tests rely on bacterial culture, which is time-consuming and can lead to potentially inappropriate antibiotic prescription and up-front broad range of antibiotic use. There is an urgent need to develop point-of-care platform technologies to rapidly detect pathogens, identify the right antibiotics, and monitor mutations to help adjust therapy. Here, we report a biosensor for rapid (<90 min), real time, and label-free bacteria isolation from whole blood and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Target bacteria are captured on flexible plastic-based microchips with printed electrodes using antibodies (30 min), and its electrical response is monitored in the presence and absence of antibiotics over an hour of incubation time. We evaluated the microchip with Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as clinical models with ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, daptomycin, gentamicin, and methicillin antibiotics. The results are compared with the current standard methods, i.e. bacteria viability and conventional antibiogram assays. The technology presented here has the potential to provide precise and rapid bacteria screening and guidance in clinical therapies by identifying the correct antibiotics for pathogens.

  2. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Helicobacter felis, H. bizzozeronii, and H. salomonis.

    PubMed

    Van den Bulck, K; Decostere, A; Gruntar, I; Baele, M; Krt, B; Ducatelle, R; Haesebrouck, F

    2005-07-01

    The susceptibilities of Helicobacter felis (15 strains), H. bizzozeronii (7 strains), and H. salomonis (3 strains) to 10 antimicrobial agents were investigated by determination of the MIC using the agar dilution method. No consistent differences were noticed between the different Helicobacter species, which were all highly susceptible to ampicillin, clarithromycin, tetracycline, tylosin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, and neomycin, as demonstrated by low MICs. Higher MICs were obtained for lincomycin (up to 8 microg/ml) and spectinomycin (up to 4 microg/ml). Two H. felis strains showed a MIC of 16 microg/ml for metronidazole, suggesting acquired resistance to this antimicrobial agent.

  3. Development of an antimicrobial susceptibility testing method suitable for performance during space flight.

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, J H; Skweres, J A; Mishra, S K; McElmeel, M L; Maher, L A; Mulder, R; Lancaster, M V; Pierson, D L

    1997-01-01

    Very little is known regarding the effects of the microgravity environment of space flight upon the action of antimicrobial agents on bacterial pathogens. This study was undertaken to develop a simple method for conducting antibacterial susceptibility tests during a space shuttle mission. Specially prepared susceptibility test research cards (bioMérieux Vitek, Hazelwood, Mo.) were designed to include 6 to 11 serial twofold dilutions of 14 antimicrobial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, a beta-lactamase inhibitor, vancomycin, erythromycin, tetracycline, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. MICs of the drugs were determined by visual reading of color end points in the Vitek research cards made possible by incorporation of a colorimetric growth indicator (alamarBlue; Accumed International, Westlake, Ohio). This study has demonstrated reproducible susceptibility results in the testing of isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, group A Streptococcus species, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli (beta-lactamase-positive and -negative strains), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In some instances, the MICs were comparable to those determined by a standard broth microdilution method, while in some cases the unique test media and format yielded slightly different values that were themselves reproducible. The proposed in-flight experiment will include inoculation of the Vitek cards on the ground prior to launch of the space shuttle, storage of inoculated cards at refrigeration temperature aboard the space shuttle until experiment initiation, and then incubation of the cards for 18 to 48 h prior to visual interpretation of MICs by the mission's astronauts. Ground-based studies have shown reproducible MICs following storage of inoculated cards for 7 days at 4 to 8 degrees C to accommodate the mission's time schedule and the astronaut's activities. For comparison, ground-based control (normal gravity

  4. Development of an Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Method Suitable for Performing During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, James H.; Skweres, Joyce A.; Mishra S. K.; McElmeel, M. Letticia; Maher, Louise A.; Mulder, Ross; Lancaster, Michael V.; Pierson, Duane L.

    1997-01-01

    Very little is known regarding the affects of the microgravity environment of space flight upon the action of antimicrobial agents on bacterial pathogens. This study was undertaken to develop a simple method for conducting antibacterial susceptibility tests during a Space Shuttle mission. Specially prepared susceptibility test research cards (bioMerieux Vitek, Hazelwood, MO) were designed to include 6-11 serial two-fold dilutions of 14 antimicrobial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, a Beta-lactamase inhibitor, vancomycin, erythromycin, tetracycline, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICS) of the drugs were determined by visual reading of color endpoints in the Vitek research cards made possible by incorporation of a colorimetric growth indicator (alamarBlue(Trademark), Accumed International, Westlake, OH). This study has demonstrated reproducible susceptibility results when testing isolates of Staphylococcus aurezis, Group A Streptococcus, Enterococcusfaecalis, Escherichia coli (beta-lactamase positive and negative strains), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Pseudomoiias aeruginosa. In some instances, the MICs were comparable to those determined using a standard broth microdilution method, while in some cases the unique test media and format yielded slightly different values, that were themselves reproducible. The proposed in-flight experiment will include inoculation of the Vitek cards on the ground prior to launch of the Space Shuttle, storage of inoculated cards at refrigeration temperature aboard the Space Shuttle until experiment initiation, then incubation of the cards for 18-48 h prior to visual interpretation of MICs by the mission's astronauts. Ground-based studies have shown reproducible MICs following storage of inoculated cards for 7 days at 4-8 C to accommodate the mission's time schedule and the astronauts' activities. For comparison, ground-based control

  5. Comparison of methods for in vitro testing of susceptibility of porcine Mycoplasma species to antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Ter Laak, E A; Pijpers, A; Noordergraaf, J H; Schoevers, E C; Verheijden, J H

    1991-02-01

    The MICs of 18 antimicrobial agents used against strains of three porcine Mycoplasma species were determined by a serial broth dilution method. Twenty field strains of M. hyorhinis, ten field strains of M. hyopneumoniae, six field strains of M. flocculare, and the type strains of these species were tested. Twelve field strains and the type strain of M. hyorhinis were also tested by an agar dilution method. Tests were read at various time points. When the broth dilution method was used, the final MIC had to be read 2 days after color changes had stopped. MICs of tetracycline, oxytetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline were low for the three Mycoplasma species tested. MICs of chlortetracycline were 8 to 16 times higher than MICs of the other tetracyclines. Spiramycin, tylosin, kitasamycin, spectinomycin, tiamulin, lincomycin, and clindamycin were effective against all strains of M. hyorhinis and M. hyopneumoniae. The quinolones were highly effective against M. hyopneumoniae but less effective against M. hyorhinis. The susceptibility patterns for M. hyopneumoniae and M. flocculare were similar.

  6. Comparison of methods for in vitro testing of susceptibility of porcine Mycoplasma species to antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Ter Laak, E A; Pijpers, A; Noordergraaf, J H; Schoevers, E C; Verheijden, J H

    1991-01-01

    The MICs of 18 antimicrobial agents used against strains of three porcine Mycoplasma species were determined by a serial broth dilution method. Twenty field strains of M. hyorhinis, ten field strains of M. hyopneumoniae, six field strains of M. flocculare, and the type strains of these species were tested. Twelve field strains and the type strain of M. hyorhinis were also tested by an agar dilution method. Tests were read at various time points. When the broth dilution method was used, the final MIC had to be read 2 days after color changes had stopped. MICs of tetracycline, oxytetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline were low for the three Mycoplasma species tested. MICs of chlortetracycline were 8 to 16 times higher than MICs of the other tetracyclines. Spiramycin, tylosin, kitasamycin, spectinomycin, tiamulin, lincomycin, and clindamycin were effective against all strains of M. hyorhinis and M. hyopneumoniae. The quinolones were highly effective against M. hyopneumoniae but less effective against M. hyorhinis. The susceptibility patterns for M. hyopneumoniae and M. flocculare were similar. PMID:2024954

  7. Miniaturized Antimicrobial Susceptibility Test by Combining Concentration Gradient Generation and Rapid Cell Culturing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Samuel C.; Cestellos-Blanco, Stefano; Inoue, Keisuke; Zare, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Effective treatment of bacterial infection relies on timely diagnosis and proper prescription of antibiotic drugs. The antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) is one of the most crucial experimental procedures, providing the baseline information for choosing effective antibiotic agents and their dosages. Conventional methods, however, require long incubation times or significant instrumentation costs to obtain test results. We propose a lab-on-a-chip approach to perform AST in a simple, economic, and rapid manner. Our assay platform miniaturizes the standard broth microdilution method on a microfluidic device (20 × 20 mm) that generates an antibiotic concentration gradient and delivers antibiotic-containing culture media to eight 30-nL chambers for cell culture. When tested with 20 μL samples of a model bacterial strain (E. coli ATCC 25922) treated with ampicillin or streptomycin, our method allows for the determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations consistent with the microdilution test in three hours, which is almost a factor of ten more rapid than the standard method. PMID:27025635

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of pneumococci: determination of Kirby-Bauer breakpoints for penicillin G, erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and rifampin.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, M R; Mithal, Y; Robins-Browne, R M; Gaspar, M N; Koornhof, H J

    1979-08-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of pneumococci is now essential to monitor for the presence of resistance to agents such as the penicillins, macrolides, lincomycins, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline. In this study, clinical isolates of a selection of resistant South African strains were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination and by a modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion technique, using Mueller-Hinton medium supplemented with 5% horse blood. Disk diffusion breakpoints were determined for penicillin G, erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and rifampin. Reliable results were obtained on disk diffusion for all these agents except for penicillin G. With 6-mug penicillin G disks, zones of strains with intermediate penicillin susceptibility overlapped those of sensitive and resistant strains. With 5-mug methicillin disks, clearer separation of strains based on susceptibility to penicillin G occurred. Strains with zones of <35 mm around penicillin G disks and <25 mm around methicillin disks should have penicillin G MICs determined to confirm their resistance to penicillin G. In view of the potential for pneumococci to be resistant to the agents used in this study, antimicrobial susceptibility of all clinically significant isolates should be determined.

  9. [Antimicrobial susceptibility in Chile 2012].

    PubMed

    Cifuentes-D, Marcela; Silva, Francisco; García, Patricia; Bello, Helia; Briceño, Isabel; Calvo-A, Mario; Labarca, Jaime

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria antimicrobial resistance is an uncontrolled public health problem that progressively increases its magnitude and complexity. The Grupo Colaborativo de Resistencia, formed by a join of experts that represent 39 Chilean health institutions has been concerned with bacteria antimicrobial susceptibility in our country since 2008. In this document we present in vitro bacterial susceptibility accumulated during year 2012 belonging to 28 national health institutions that represent about 36% of hospital discharges in Chile. We consider of major importance to report periodically bacteria susceptibility so to keep the medical community updated to achieve target the empirical antimicrobial therapies and the control measures and prevention of the dissemination of multiresistant strains.

  10. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and genotypic characterization of Staphylococcus aureus from food and food animals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Meng, Jianghong; Zhou, Ting; Zhang, Yanming; Yang, Baowei; Xi, Meili; Sheng, Jinling; Zhi, Shuai; Xia, Xiaodong

    2012-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is commonly present in humans and animals. The aim of this study was to investigate antimicrobial resistance and genetic characteristics of S. aureus from food and food animals in Shaanxi Province in China. A total of 332 nasal swabs, breast skin swabs, raw milk, and pork samples were collected from local pig, dairy farms, or local grocery stores and screened for the presence of S. aureus. S. aureus isolates were characterized using antimicrobial susceptibility, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, and polymerase chain reaction for detecting pvl and mecA genes. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains were additionally tested for SCCmec type and exfoliative toxin genes. The prevalence of S. aureus was 30.6% in pig nasal swabs, 32.5% in pork, 25.7% in cow nasal swabs, 30.8% in cow breast skin swabs, and 29.3% in milk samples. Resistances were common among isolates tested against erythromycin (65.7%), tetracycline (65.7%), ciprofloxacin (52.7%), followed by gentamicin (36.7%), chloramphenicol (23.1%), cefoxitin (8.3%), and oxacillin (7.7%), but no isolate was resistant to vancomycin, amikacin, or cefoperazone. pvl gene was found in the isolates from all types of samples except from cow nasal swabs. Fourteen isolates from pig nasal swabs contained mecA gene and were considered as MRSA. PFGE analysis showed that nasal isolates differed from food isolates, but isolates from the same animal source appeared to cluster closely. The PFGE patterns of MRSA isolates were different from other S. aureus isolates from pig nasal cavity even though they were from the same source. All the MRSA isolates belonged to SCCmec type IV(b). No isolates contained exfoliative toxin genes. These findings indicated that S. aureus, including multidrug-resistant S. aureus, are widely spread in food animals and animal-derived foods in Shaanxi Province, China. MRSA isolates from pigs may pose potential health risks for workers in swine farms and the

  11. Genetic antimicrobial susceptibility testing in Gram-negative sepsis - impact on time to results in a routine laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kommedal, Øyvind; Aasen, Johanne Lind; Lindemann, Paul Christoffer

    2016-07-01

    Diagnostic testing of positive blood cultures is among the most critical tasks performed by clinical microbiology laboratories, and the total analysis time from sampling to results should be kept as short as possible. By providing identification of pelleted bacteria directly from positive blood-cultures, MALDI-TOF MS opens for relatively low-complex species-adjusted genetic susceptibility testing from the same bacterial pellet. In our lab routine, we prospectively evaluated a rapid in-house real-time PCR targeting the most common aminoglycoside and cephalosporin resistance genes in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and measured time to preliminary susceptibility reporting for 138 samples. The results were compared to direct phenotypic susceptibility testing with interpretation after 6 h and overnight incubation respectively. Results from the genetic susceptibility testing were available for 69.5% (96/138) of the positive blood cultures within 24 h after sample collection. No phenotypic susceptibility results were available at this time. Compared to overnight direct susceptibility testing, the average time from sample collection to preliminary susceptibility reporting was reduced with 43%, from 45 h and 5 min to 25 h and 44 min, providing an earlier adjustment of antimicrobial therapy for 12 patients. Minor logistic adjustments have the potential to save yet another 4 h.

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae --internal quality control as a quality tool on a national level.

    PubMed

    Kärpänoja, Pauliina; Nissinen, Antti; Huovinen, Pentti; Sarkkinen, Hannu

    2013-06-01

    Knowledge of the quality and conformity of antimicrobial resistance data is important for comparing resistance rates regionally and over time. In this study, we have evaluated these features of the Finnish national susceptibility surveillance data for two respiratory tract pathogens, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. For this purpose internal quality control results for two isolates (S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619 and H. influenzae ATCC 49247) were analyzed from 21 clinical microbiology laboratories over a 3-year period. The results show that standardization of the susceptibility testing methods has proceeded well. The number of protocols used for susceptibility testing has declined (from seventeen methods to two with S. pneumoniae and from eleven to three with H. influenzae) and the reproducibility is good. Nevertheless, we noticed that a few laboratories test and report susceptibility results without defined break-points and even include antimicrobials with questionable therapeutic effect. Another non-compliance with the standard was a lack of a regular control system to verify the attainment of the intended quality of results in some laboratories. Interlaboratory analysis of quality control results is a good way to evaluate the quality and conformity of national resistance data. Finnish laboratories have produced very reproducible and accurate susceptibility results in the pre-EUCAST period, which ended in 2011.

  13. [Antimicrobial susceptibility of probiotics].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Liu, Xiumei; Yang, Baolan; Li, Zhigang

    2008-05-01

    The aim of our study was to analyse the antibiotic susceptibility of 31 probiotics strains, including 9 Bifidobacterium and 22 Lactobacillus used for the manufacture of various fermented foods in China. Probiotics are tested for minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 24 kinds of antibiotics by broth dilution method on cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth with lysed horse blood. 31 strains of probiotics were sensitive to ampicillin, penicillin, imipenem, gentamicine, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, gatifloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin, and resistant to nalidixic acid, vancomycine, fosfomycin.

  14. Rapid Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Burkholderia pseudomallei by Use of Laser Light Scattering Technology

    PubMed Central

    Lascols, Christine; Sue, David; Weigel, Linda M.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid methods to determine antimicrobial susceptibility would assist in the timely distribution of effective treatment or postexposure prophylaxis in the aftermath of the release of bacterial biothreat agents such as Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, or Burkholderia pseudomallei. Conventional susceptibility tests require 16 to 48 h of incubation, depending on the bacterial species. We evaluated a method that is based on laser light scattering technology that measures cell density in real time. We determined that it has the ability to rapidly differentiate between growth (resistant) and no growth (susceptible) of several bacterial threat agents in the presence of clinically relevant antimicrobials. Results were available in <4 h for B. anthracis and <6 h for Y. pestis and B. pseudomallei. One exception was B. pseudomallei in the presence of ceftazidime, which required >10 h of incubation. Use of laser scattering technology decreased the time required to determine antimicrobial susceptibility by 50% to 75% for B. anthracis, Y. pestis, and B. pseudomallei compared to conventional methods. PMID:26984973

  15. An Antimicrobial Susceptibility Management System

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, James J.; O'Donnell, Edward D.

    1981-01-01

    A computerized system is described which is used to store, manipulate and retrieve antimicrobial susceptibility data in the clinical microbiology lab. Features include facilitated input of susceptibility data, rapid generation of reports, realtime access to data, and enhanced retrieval of information for Infection Control.

  16. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test for identification of new therapeutics and drug combinations against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Weingarten, Rebecca A; Xu, Miao; Southall, Noel; Dai, Sheng; Shinn, Paul; Sanderson, Philip E; Williamson, Peter R; Frank, Karen M; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Current antimicrobial susceptibility testing has limited screening capability for identifying empirical antibiotic combinations to treat severe bacterial infections with multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms. We developed a new antimicrobial susceptibility assay using automated ultra-high-throughput screen technology in combination with a simple bacterial growth assay. A rapid screening of 5170 approved drugs and other compounds identified 25 compounds with activities against MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae. To further improve the efficacy and reduce the effective drug concentrations, we applied a targeted drug combination approach that integrates drugs' clinical antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints, achievable plasma concentrations, clinical toxicities and mechanisms of action to identify optimal drug combinations. Three sets of three-drug combinations were identified with broad-spectrum activities against 10 MDR clinical isolates including K. pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli. Colistin–auranofin–ceftazidime and colistin–auranofin–rifabutin suppressed >80% growth of all 10 MDR strains; while rifabutin–colistin–imipenem inhibited >75% of these strains except two Acinetobacter baumannii isolates. The results demonstrate this new assay has potential as a real-time method to identify new drugs and effective drug combinations to combat severe clinical infections with MDR organisms. PMID:27826141

  17. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test for identification of new therapeutics and drug combinations against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Weingarten, Rebecca A; Xu, Miao; Southall, Noel; Dai, Sheng; Shinn, Paul; Sanderson, Philip E; Williamson, Peter R; Frank, Karen M; Zheng, Wei

    2016-11-09

    Current antimicrobial susceptibility testing has limited screening capability for identifying empirical antibiotic combinations to treat severe bacterial infections with multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms. We developed a new antimicrobial susceptibility assay using automated ultra-high-throughput screen technology in combination with a simple bacterial growth assay. A rapid screening of 5170 approved drugs and other compounds identified 25 compounds with activities against MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae. To further improve the efficacy and reduce the effective drug concentrations, we applied a targeted drug combination approach that integrates drugs' clinical antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints, achievable plasma concentrations, clinical toxicities and mechanisms of action to identify optimal drug combinations. Three sets of three-drug combinations were identified with broad-spectrum activities against 10 MDR clinical isolates including K. pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli. Colistin-auranofin-ceftazidime and colistin-auranofin-rifabutin suppressed >80% growth of all 10 MDR strains; while rifabutin-colistin-imipenem inhibited >75% of these strains except two Acinetobacter baumannii isolates. The results demonstrate this new assay has potential as a real-time method to identify new drugs and effective drug combinations to combat severe clinical infections with MDR organisms.

  18. Verification of an Automated, Digital Dispensing Platform for At-Will Broth Microdilution-Based Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kenneth P.

    2016-01-01

    With rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria, there is often a need to perform susceptibility testing for less commonly used or newer antimicrobial agents. Such testing can often be performed only by using labor-intensive, manual dilution methods and lies outside the capacity of most clinical labs, necessitating reference laboratory testing and thereby delaying the availability of susceptibility data. To address the compelling clinical need for microbiology laboratories to perform such testing in-house, we explored a novel, automated, at-will broth microdilution-based susceptibility testing platform. Specifically, we used the modified inkjet printer technology in the HP D300 digital dispensing system to dispense, directly from stock solutions into a 384-well plate, the 2-fold serial dilution series required for broth microdilution testing. This technology was combined with automated absorbance readings and data analysis to determine MICs. Performance was verified by testing members of the Enterobacteriaceae for susceptibility to ampicillin, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, colistin, gentamicin, meropenem, and tetracycline in comparison to the results obtained with a broth microdilution reference standard. In precision studies, essential and categorical agreement levels were 96.8% and 98.3%, respectively. Furthermore, significantly fewer D300-based measurements were outside ±1 dilution from the modal MIC, suggesting enhanced reproducibility. In accuracy studies performed using a panel of 80 curated clinical isolates, rates of essential and categorical agreement and very major, major, and minor errors were 94%, 96.6%, 0%, 0%, and 3.4%, respectively. Based on these promising initial results, it is anticipated that the D300-based methodology will enable hospital-based clinical microbiology laboratories to perform at-will broth microdilution testing of antimicrobials and to address a critical testing gap. PMID:27335151

  19. Verification of an Automated, Digital Dispensing Platform for At-Will Broth Microdilution-Based Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth P; Kirby, James E

    2016-09-01

    With rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria, there is often a need to perform susceptibility testing for less commonly used or newer antimicrobial agents. Such testing can often be performed only by using labor-intensive, manual dilution methods and lies outside the capacity of most clinical labs, necessitating reference laboratory testing and thereby delaying the availability of susceptibility data. To address the compelling clinical need for microbiology laboratories to perform such testing in-house, we explored a novel, automated, at-will broth microdilution-based susceptibility testing platform. Specifically, we used the modified inkjet printer technology in the HP D300 digital dispensing system to dispense, directly from stock solutions into a 384-well plate, the 2-fold serial dilution series required for broth microdilution testing. This technology was combined with automated absorbance readings and data analysis to determine MICs. Performance was verified by testing members of the Enterobacteriaceae for susceptibility to ampicillin, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, colistin, gentamicin, meropenem, and tetracycline in comparison to the results obtained with a broth microdilution reference standard. In precision studies, essential and categorical agreement levels were 96.8% and 98.3%, respectively. Furthermore, significantly fewer D300-based measurements were outside ±1 dilution from the modal MIC, suggesting enhanced reproducibility. In accuracy studies performed using a panel of 80 curated clinical isolates, rates of essential and categorical agreement and very major, major, and minor errors were 94%, 96.6%, 0%, 0%, and 3.4%, respectively. Based on these promising initial results, it is anticipated that the D300-based methodology will enable hospital-based clinical microbiology laboratories to perform at-will broth microdilution testing of antimicrobials and to address a critical testing gap.

  20. Multicenter laboratory evaluation of the bioMérieux Vitek antimicrobial susceptibility testing system with 11 antimicrobial agents versus members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Doern, G V; Brueggemann, A B; Perla, R; Daly, J; Halkias, D; Jones, R N; Saubolle, M A

    1997-01-01

    A four-center study in which a total of 1,082 recent clinical isolates of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were examined versus 11 antimicrobial agents with the bioMérieux Vitek susceptibility test system (Hazelwood, Mo.) and the GNS-F6 card was conducted. In addition, a challenge set consisting of the same 200 organisms was examined in each of the four participating laboratories. Results obtained with the Vitek system were compared to MICs determined by a standardized broth microdilution method. For purposes of comparison, susceptibility categories (susceptible, intermediate, or resistant) were assigned on the basis of the results of both methods. The result of the broth microdilution test was considered definitive. The total category error rate with the Vitek system and the recent clinical isolates (11,902 organism-antimicrobial comparisons) was 4.5%, i.e., 1.7% very major errors, 0.9% major errors, and 1.9% minor errors. The total category error rate calculated from tests performed with the challenge set (i.e., 8,800 organism-antimicrobial comparisons) was 5.9%, i.e., 2.2% very major errors, 1.1% major errors, and 2.6% minor errors. Very major error rates higher than the totals were noted with Enterobacter cloacae versus ampicillin-sulbactam, aztreonam, ticarcillin, and ticarcillin-clavulanate and with P. aeruginosa versus mezlocillin, ticarcillin, and ticarcillin-clavulanate. Major error rates higher than the averages were observed with Proteus mirabilis versus imipenem and with Klebsiella pneumoniae versus ofloxacin. Excellent overall interlaboratory reproducibility was observed with the Vitek system. The importance of inoculum size as a primary determinant in the accuracy of susceptibility test results with the Vitek system was clearly demonstrated in this study. Specifically, when an inoculum density fourfold higher than that recommended by the manufacturer was used, high rates of false resistance results were obtained

  1. [Recommendations from MENSURA for selection of antimicrobial agents for susceptibility testing and criteria for the interpretation of antibiograms].

    PubMed

    2000-03-01

    This document includes the recommendations from the Spanish antibiogram committee (The MENSURA group, Mesa Española de Normalización de la Sensibilidad y Resistencia a los Antimicrobianos, under the auspices of the Sociedad Española de Quimioterapia and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica) for the selection of antimicrobials for susceptibility testing. Separate tables for each group of organism with proposed susceptibility and resistance breakpoints are updated and comparatively presented with those of other groups, such us NCCLS, CA-SFM and BSAC. The susceptibility breakpoint tends to identify the fully susceptible population, which probably lacks any specific resistance mechanism. The analysis of MIC distributions for different homogeneous populations (same species) is used to define breakpoints for susceptibility. The resistance breakpoint is based on pharmacological and clinical data obtained when the corresponding antibiotic is administered with a conventional schedule. The primary objective of the Spanish MENSURA group is to contribute to the international consensus on the establishment of breakpoints.

  2. Direct antimicrobial drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the radiometric method

    SciTech Connect

    Libonati, J.P.; Stager, C.E.; Davis, J.R.; Siddiqi, S.H.

    1988-05-01

    Direct-drug-susceptibility tests were performed on clinical specimens positive for acid-fast bacilli by either Ziehl-Neelsen or fluorochrome staining. The results of conventional agar dilution and a modified radiometric (BACTEC) method were compared. A total of 580 smear-positive specimens were tested by the BACTEC method at three separate sites. Three hundred and seventy-seven of these were culture positive for M. tuberculosis, and 343 (91%) yielded acceptable direct-susceptibility-test results. We used the conventional method to determine that 343 of 519 smear-positive specimens were culture positive for M. tuberculosis, and 212 (62%) produced acceptable results within 3 wks. Conventional results were reported in 3-4 wks, while the time required to obtain results with the BACTEC method ranged from 5 to 21 days (average 11.5 days). Results indicate that the radiometric method provides reportable results more frequently with time savings as compared to the conventional method.

  3. Automated reading of a microtitre plate: preliminary evaluation in antimicrobial susceptibility tests and Enterobacteriaceae identification.

    PubMed Central

    Courcol, R J; Deleersnyder, H; Roussel-Delvallez, M; Martin, G R

    1983-01-01

    An automated microELISA Reader was evaluated for its ability to read and interpret microtitre plates. A total of 309 microtitre plates were investigated by automated and visual methods. There was disagreement between the methods in one hundred and twelve (0.6%) wells. However agreements between the two methods for susceptibility tests and Enterobacteriaceae identification were respectively 98.8% and 89.3%. PMID:6338058

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori isolates from Brazilian children and adolescents: comparing agar dilution, E-test, and disk diffusion.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Silvio Kazuo; Gales, Ana Cristina; Kawakami, Elisabete

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori is increasingly important due to resistance to the most used antimicrobials agents. Only agar dilution method is approved by CLSI, but it is difficult to perform routinely. We evaluated the reliability of E-test and disk diffusion comparing to agar dilution method on Helicobacter pylori antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Susceptibility testing was performed for amoxicillin, clarithromycin, furazolidone, metronidazole and tetracycline using E-test, disk-diffusion and agar dilution method in 77 consecutive Helicobacter pylori strains from dyspeptic children and adolescents. Resistance rates were: amoxicillin - 10.4%, 9% and 68.8%; clarithromycin - 19.5%, 20.8%, 36.3%; metronidazole - 40.2%33.7%, 38.9%, respectively by agar dilution, E-test and disk diffusion method. Furazolidone and tetracycline showed no resistance rates. Metronidazole presented strong correlation to E-test (r = 0.7992, p < 0.0001) and disk diffusion method (r=-0.6962, p < 0.0001). Clarithromycin presented moderate correlation to E-test (r = 0.6369, p < 0.0001) and disk diffusion method (r=-0.5656, p < 0.0001). Amoxicillin presented weak correlation to E-test (r = 0.3565, p = 0.0015) and disk diffusion (r=-0.3565, p = 0.0015). Tetracycline presented weak correlation with E-test (r = 0.2346, p = 0.04) and furazolidone to disk diffusion (r=-0.0288, p = 0.8038). E-test presented better agreement with gold standard. It is an easy and reliable method for Helicobacter pylori susceptibility testing. Disk diffusion method presented high disagreement and high rates of major errors.

  5. Comparison of methods for antimicrobial susceptibility testing and MIC values for pleuromutilin drugs for Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolated in Germany.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Judith; Kessler, Martina; Baums, Christoph G; Amtsberg, Gunter

    2004-08-19

    In Germany treatment of swine dysentery is hampered by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae strains showing elevated MIC values to the few antibiotics licensed. Therefore, susceptibility testing of clinical isolates is an important service to the swine practitioner. This study compares the established agar dilution procedure for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of this fastidious anaerobe to the broth microdilution test newly developed [Anim. Health Res. 2 (2001) 59; Vet. Microbiol. 84 (2002) 123; J. Clin. Microbiol. 41 (2003) 2596]. A total of 221 isolates were examined twice with either test procedure using tiamulin and valnemulin as antibiotics. Both methods gave reproducible results, and the MIC values for the reference strains B. hyodysenteriae B204 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 corresponded to previously published data. However, the results for individual strains differed significantly for both tests (P < 0.001) with MIC values being on average one dilution step lower in the broth dilution method. The 221 strains used for comparing test procedures were isolated between 1989 and 2001. An additional 102 strains isolated in 2002 were tested only with the broth dilution procedure. A significant rise in the average MIC value for both pleuromutilins could be demonstrated when comparing earlier isolates to those from 2000 to 2001 (P < 0.05), while in 2002 the average MIC significantly decreased when compared to the value in 2000 (P < 0.05). However, strains with MIC values for tiamulin as high as 8 microg/ml (broth dilution) could still be isolated.

  6. Comparative assessment of CDS, CLSI disc diffusion and Etest techniques for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: a 6-year study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vikram; Kakran, Monika; Ramesh, V

    2012-01-01

    Background A variety of techniques are available for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Objective The aim of this study was to find a cost-effective, reliable and easily applicable microbiological method to detect antimicrobial susceptibilities of N. gonorrhoeae in resource-poor countries. Design Prospective study. Setting Male and female STD clinic of Regional STD Teaching, Training and Research Centre, New Delhi, India. Participants N. gonorrhoeae isolates from all male and female patients presenting with acute gonococcal urethritis and cervical discharge. Material and methods A total of 295 consecutive N. gonorrhoeae isolates during 2005–2010 was used to compare the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and CDS disc diffusion technique with Etest by performing antimicrobial susceptibility testing in parallel for penicillin, tetracycline, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin and spectinomycin. WHO reference strains were used as controls. Results CDS disc diffusion zones of inhibition showed that complete percentage agreement for penicillin, ciprofloxacin and tetracycline was high with their analogous Etest minimal inhibitory concentrations in comparison to CLSI disc diffusion technique, that is, 91.5%, 92.9% and 99.3% versus 87.5%, 88.5% and 74.9%, respectively. CDS results had less number of major and minor category discrepancies in comparison to CLSI and CDS method showed excellent correlation coefficient (r=1) with Etest for all five antimicrobial agents tested in comparison to CLSI (r=0.92). It was very poor (r=0.61) by CLSI method for tetracycline. The correlation coefficients between the two methods and the Etest were identical if tetracycline was removed from the CLSI analysis. Conclusions The CDS technique is an attractive alternative for N. gonorrhoeae susceptibility testing and is recommended for monitoring the antimicrobial susceptibility in less developed and resource-poor settings to facilitate enhanced antimicrobial

  7. Performance of Vitek 2 for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Enterobacteriaceae with Vitek 2 (2009 FDA) and 2014 CLSI Breakpoints

    PubMed Central

    Bobenchik, April M.; Deak, Eszter; Hindler, Janet A.; Charlton, Carmen L.

    2014-01-01

    Vitek 2 (bioMérieux Inc., Durham, NC) is a widely used commercial antimicrobial susceptibility test system. We compared the MIC results obtained using the Vitek 2 AST-GN69 and AST-XN06 cards to those obtained by CLSI broth microdilution (BMD) for 255 isolates of Enterobacteriaceae, including 25 isolates of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. In total, 25 antimicrobial agents were examined. For 10 agents, the MIC data were evaluated using two sets of breakpoints: (i) the Vitek 2 breakpoints, which utilized the 2009 FDA breakpoints at the time of the study and are equivalent to the 2009 CLSI M100-S19 breakpoints, and (ii) the 2014 CLSI M100-S24 breakpoints. There was an overall 98.7% essential agreement (EA). The categorical agreement was 95.5% (CA) using the Vitek 2 breakpoints and 95.7% using the CLSI breakpoints. There was 1 very major error (VME) (0.05%) observed using the Vitek 2 breakpoints (cefazolin) and 8 VMEs (0.5%) using the CLSI breakpoints (2 each for aztreonam, cefepime, and ceftriaxone, and 1 for cefazolin and ceftazidime). Fifteen major errors (MEs) (0.4%) were noted using the Vitek 2 breakpoints and 8 (0.5%) using the CLSI breakpoints. Overall, the Vitek 2 performance was comparable to that of BMD for testing a limited number of Enterobacteriaceae commonly isolated by clinical laboratories. Ongoing studies are warranted to assess performance in isolates with emerging resistance. PMID:25540403

  8. Evaluation of an Automated System for Reading and Interpreting Disk Diffusion Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Fastidious Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Idelevich, Evgeny A.; Becker, Karsten; Schmitz, Janne; Knaack, Dennis; Peters, Georg; Köck, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Results of disk diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility testing depend on individual visual reading of inhibition zone diameters. Therefore, automated reading using camera systems might represent a useful tool for standardization. In this study, the ADAGIO automated system (Bio-Rad) was evaluated for reading disk diffusion tests of fastidious bacteria. 144 clinical isolates (68 β-haemolytic streptococci, 28 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 18 viridans group streptococci, 13 Haemophilus influenzae, 7 Moraxella catarrhalis, and 10 Campylobacter jejuni) were tested on Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 5% defibrinated horse blood and 20 mg/L β-NAD (MH-F, Oxoid) according to EUCAST. Plates were read manually with a ruler and automatically using the ADAGIO system. Inhibition zone diameters, indicated by the automated system, were visually controlled and adjusted, if necessary. Among 1548 isolate-antibiotic combinations, comparison of automated vs. manual reading yielded categorical agreement (CA) without visual adjustment of the automatically determined zone diameters in 81.4%. In 20% (309 of 1548) of tests it was deemed necessary to adjust the automatically determined zone diameter after visual control. After adjustment, CA was 94.8%; very major errors (false susceptible interpretation), major errors (false resistant interpretation) and minor errors (false categorization involving intermediate result), calculated according to the ISO 20776–2 guideline, accounted to 13.7% (13 of 95 resistant results), 3.3% (47 of 1424 susceptible results) and 1.4% (21 of 1548 total results), respectively, compared to manual reading. The ADAGIO system allowed for automated reading of disk diffusion testing in fastidious bacteria and, after visual validation of the automated results, yielded good categorical agreement with manual reading. PMID:27391898

  9. Knowledge and practices of laboratory workers on standardized antimicrobial susceptibility testing and biosafety practices to prevent the spread of superbugs in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ghanchi, Najia K; Khan, Erum; Farooqi, Joveria Q; Fasih, Naima; Dojki, Maqboola; Hughes, Molly A

    2014-09-01

    A cross-sectional survey using structured questionnaire was conducted to assess practices of microbiological laboratories working with pathogens. Forty-eight laboratory workers (50%) agreed that laboratory methods to detect antimicrobial resistance are not standardized in Pakistan, and 6% of the laboratory workers were not aware of the standardization of antimicrobial susceptibility testing in Pakistan. Reported rates of awareness regarding the role of waste disposal, disinfection, and handwashing in limiting the spread of antimicrobial resistance were 75%, 42%, and 81%, respectively. Our results provide baseline data for planning programs to train, supervise, and improve the operational quality of microbiological laboratories nationwide to prevent the spread of superbugs.

  10. Acceleration of antimicrobial susceptibility testing of positive blood cultures by inoculation of Vitek 2 cards with briefly incubated solid medium cultures.

    PubMed

    Idelevich, Evgeny A; Schüle, Isabel; Grünastel, Barbara; Wüllenweber, Jörg; Peters, Georg; Becker, Karsten

    2014-11-01

    Briefly incubated agar cultures from positive blood cultures were used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) by Vitek 2. The cultivation time until inoculation was 3.8 h for Gram-positive cocci and 2.4 h for Gram-negative rods. The error rates were low, providing early and reliable AST without additional time or cost expenditure.

  11. In vitro antimicrobial activity of benzoyl peroxide against Propionibacterium acnes assessed by a novel susceptibility testing method.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kazuaki; Ikeda, Fumiaki; Kanayama, Shoji; Nakajima, Akiko; Matsumoto, Tatsumi; Ishii, Ritsuko; Umehara, Masatoshi; Gotoh, Naomasa; Hayashi, Naoki; Iyoda, Takako; Matsuzaki, Kaoru; Matsumoto, Satoru; Kawashima, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Benzoyl peroxide (BPO), a therapeutic agent for acne vulgaris, was assessed for in vitro antimicrobial activity against Propionibacterium acnes using a novel broth microdilution testing that improved BPO solubility. We searched for a suitable culture medium to measure the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of BPO against P. acnes and finally found the Gifu anaerobic medium (GAM) broth supplemented with 0.1(v/v)% glycerol and 2(v/v)% Tween 80, in which BPO dissolved up to 1250 μg/mL and P. acnes grew well. The MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of BPO against 44 clinical isolates of P. acnes collected from Japanese patients with acne vulgaris were determined by our testing method using the supplemented GAM broth. The MICs of BPO were 128 or 256 μg/mL against all isolates of P. acnes regardless of susceptibility to nadifloxacin or clindamycin. The MBCs of BPO were also 128 or 256 μg/mL against the same isolates. Moreover, BPO at the MIC showed a rapid bactericidal activity against P. acnes ATCC11827 in time-kill assay. In conclusion, we could develop a novel assay for the MIC and MBC determinations of BPO against P. acnes, which is reliable and reproducible as a broth microdilution testing and the present results suggest that BPO has a potent bactericidal activity against P. acnes.

  12. Optical Screening for Rapid Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing and for Observation of Phenotypic Diversity among Strains of the Genetically Clonal Species Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Heather P; Gargis, Amy S; Michel, Pierre; Sue, David; Weigel, Linda M

    2017-03-01

    During high-impact events involving Bacillus anthracis, such as the Amerithrax incident of 2001 or the anthrax outbreaks in Russia and Sweden in 2016, critical decisions to reduce morbidity and mortality include rapid selection and distribution of effective antimicrobial agents for treatment and postexposure prophylaxis. Detection of antimicrobial resistance currently relies on a conventional broth microdilution method that requires a 16- to 20-h incubation time for B. anthracis Advances in high-resolution optical screening offer a new technology to more rapidly evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility and to simultaneously assess the growth characteristics of an isolate. Herein, we describe a new method developed and evaluated as a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test for B. anthracis This method is based on automated digital time-lapse microscopy to observe the growth and morphological effects of relevant antibiotics with an optical screening instrument, the oCelloScope. B. anthracis strains were monitored over time in the presence or absence of penicillin, ciprofloxacin, or doxycycline. Susceptibility to each antibiotic was determined in ≤4 h, 75 to 80% less than the time required for conventional methods. Time-lapse video imaging compiled from the optical screening images revealed unexpected differences in growth characteristics among strains of B. anthracis, which is considered to be a clonal organism. This technology provides a new approach for rapidly detecting phenotypic antimicrobial resistance and for documenting growth attributes that may be beneficial in the further characterization of individual strains.

  13. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Slots, J; Evans, R T; Lobbins, P M; Genco, R J

    1980-01-01

    The agar dilution technique was used for determination of the antibiotic susceptibilities of 57 oral isolates and 2 nonoral isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Tetracycline, minocycline, and chloramphenicol inhibited more than 96% of the strains tested at a concentration of less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml; 89% of the strains were inhibited by 2 micrograms of carbenicillin per ml. The other antimicrobial agents tested were less active. Approximately 10% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were resistant to ampicillin, erythromycin, and penicillin G at concentrations of 32 to 64 micrograms/ml. These data suggest that tetracycline and minocycline may be valuable drugs in the treatment of A. actinomycetemcomitans infections. PMID:6903116

  14. Same day identification and full panel antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacteria from positive blood culture bottles made possible by a combined lysis-filtration method with MALDI-TOF VITEK mass spectrometry and the VITEK2 system.

    PubMed

    Machen, Alexandra; Drake, Tim; Wang, Yun F Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of microorganisms causing bloodstream infections or sepsis have the potential to improve patient care. This proof-of-principle study evaluates the Lysis-Filtration Method for identification as well as antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacteria directly from positive blood culture bottles in a clinical setting. A total of 100 non-duplicated positive blood cultures were tested and 1012 microorganism-antimicrobial combinations were assessed. An aliquot of non-charcoal blood culture broth was incubated with lysis buffer briefly before being filtered and washed. Microorganisms recovered from the filter membrane were first identified by using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight VITEK® Mass Spectrometry (VITEK MS). After quick identification from VITEK MS, filtered microorganisms were inoculated to VITEK®2 system for full panel antimicrobial susceptibility testing analysis. Of 100 bottles tested, the VITEK MS resulted in 94.0% correct organism identification to the species level. Compared to the conventional antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods, direct antimicrobial susceptibility testing from VITEK®2 resulted in 93.5% (946/1012) category agreement of antimicrobials tested, with 3.6% (36/1012) minor error, 1.7% (7/1012) major error, and 1.3% (13/1012) very major error of antimicrobials. The average time to identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was 11.4 hours by using the Lysis-Filtration method for both VITEK MS and VITEK®2 compared to 56.3 hours by using conventional methods (p<0.00001). Thus, the same-day results of microorganism identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing directly from positive blood culture can be achieved and can be used for appropriate antibiotic therapy and antibiotic stewardship.

  15. Comparison of BD phoenix to vitek 2, microscan MICroSTREP, and Etest for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Mittman, Scott A; Huard, Richard C; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Whittier, Susan

    2009-11-01

    The performance of the BD Phoenix Automated Microbiology System (BD Diagnostic Systems) was compared to those of the Vitek 2 (bioMérieux), the MicroScan MICroSTREP plus (Siemens), and Etest (bioMérieux) for antibiotic susceptibility tests (AST) of 311 clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The overall essential agreement (EA) between each test system and the reference microdilution broth reference method for S. pneumoniae AST results was >95%. For Phoenix, the EAs of individual antimicrobial agents ranged from 90.4% (clindamycin) to 100% (vancomycin and gatifloxacin). The categorical agreements (CA) of Phoenix, Vitek 2, MicroScan, and Etest for penicillin were 95.5%, 94.2%, 98.7%, and 97.7%, respectively. The overall CA for Phoenix was 99.3% (1 very major error [VME] and 29 minor errors [mEs]), that for Vitek 2 was 98.8% (7 VMEs and 28 mEs), and those for MicroScan and Etest were 99.5% each (19 and 13 mEs, respectively). The average times to results for Phoenix, Vitek 2, and the manual methods were 12.1 h, 9.8 h, and 24 h, respectively. From these data, the Phoenix AST results demonstrated a high degree of agreement with all systems evaluated, although fewer VMEs were observed with the Phoenix than with the Vitek 2. Overall, both automated systems provided reliable AST results for the S. pneumoniae-antibiotic combinations in half the time required for the manual methods, rendering them more suitable for the demands of expedited reporting in the clinical setting.

  16. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Two Lawsonia intracellularis Isolates Associated with Proliferative Hemorrhagic Enteropathy and Porcine Intestinal Adenomatosis in South Korea▿

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jung-Yong; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Aeran; Lee, Ji Youn; Hwang, Jeong-Min; Kang, Bo-Kyu; Kim, Jong-Man; Choi, In-Soo; Lee, Joong-Bok

    2011-01-01

    This study represents the first published data on antimicrobial susceptibility of Asian isolates of Lawsonia intracellularis. We assessed MICs of 16 antimicrobials for two isolates of L. intracellularis recovered from diseased pigs in South Korea, one from a finisher pig with acute proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy in 2002 and the other from a grower pig with porcine intestinal adenomatosis in 2010. Tylosin and tilmicosin were found to be the most active against L. intracellularis both intracellularly (MICs, 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml and 0.125 μg/ml, respectively) and extracellularly (MICs, 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml and 1 μg/ml, respectively). PMID:21690283

  17. Measuring antimicrobial susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using Poloxamer 407 gel.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Koike, Naohito; Ehara, Tomoko; Matsumoto, Tetsuya

    2011-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes various opportunistic infections. Chronic and intractable infections with P. aeruginosa are closely related to the high levels of resistance displayed by this organism to antimicrobial agents and its ability to form biofilms. Although the standard method for examining antimicrobial resistance involves susceptibility testing using Mueller-Hinton agar or broth, this method does not take into account the influence of biofilm formation on antimicrobial susceptibility. Poloxamer 407 is a hydrophilic, nonionic surfactant of the more general class of copolymers that can be used to culture bacteria with similar properties as cells in a biofilm environment. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria cultured in Poloxamer 407 gel to those grown on Mueller-Hinton agar using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method with 24 strains of P. aeruginosa. Antimicrobial sensibility differed between the two mediums, with >60% of the strains displaying increased resistance to β-lactams when cultured on Poloxamer 407 gel. In addition, scanning electron microscopy revealed that typical biofilm formation and extracellular polymeric substance production was only observed with bacteria grown on Poloxamer 407 gel. Therefore, antimicrobial susceptibility test using Poloxamer 407 gel may provide more accurate information and allow the selection of suitable antimicrobial agents for treating patients infected with biofilm-forming pathogens.

  18. Clinical Impact of MALDI-TOF MS Identification and Rapid Susceptibility Testing on Adequate Antimicrobial Treatment in Sepsis with Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Verroken, Alexia; Defourny, Lydwine; le Polain de Waroux, Olivier; Belkhir, Leïla; Laterre, Pierre-François; Delmée, Michel; Glupczynski, Youri

    2016-01-01

    Shortening the turn-around time (TAT) of positive blood culture (BC) identification (ID) and susceptibility results is essential to optimize antimicrobial treatment in patients with sepsis. We aimed to evaluate the impact on antimicrobial prescription of a modified workflow of positive BCs providing ID and partial susceptibility results for Enterobacteriaceae (EB), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus on the day of BC positivity detection. This study was divided into a pre-intervention period (P0) with a standard BC workflow followed by 2 intervention periods (P1, P2) with an identical modified workflow. ID was performed with MALDI-TOF MS from blood, on early or on overnight subcultures. According to ID results, rapid phenotypic assays were realized to detect third generation cephalosporin resistant EB/P. aeruginosa or methicillin resistant S. aureus. Results were transmitted to the antimicrobial stewardship team for patient’s treatment revision. Times to ID, to susceptibility results and to optimal antimicrobial treatment (OAT) were compared across the three study periods. Overall, 134, 112 and 154 positive BC episodes in P0, P1 and P2 respectively were included in the analysis. Mean time to ID (28.3 hours in P0) was reduced by 65.3% in P1 (10.2 hours) and 61.8% in P2 (10.8 hours). Mean time to complete susceptibility results was reduced by 27.5% in P1 and 27% in P2, with results obtained after 32.4 and 32.6 hours compared to 44.7 hours in P0. Rapid tests allowed partial susceptibility results to be obtained after a mean time of 11.8 hours in P1 and 11.7 hours in P2. Mean time to OAT was decreased to 21.6 hours in P1 and to 17.9 hours in P2 compared to 36.1 hours in P0. Reducing TAT of positive BC with MALDI-TOF MS ID and rapid susceptibility testing accelerated prescription of targeted antimicrobial treatment thereby potentially improving the patients’ clinical outcome. PMID:27228001

  19. Clinical Impact of MALDI-TOF MS Identification and Rapid Susceptibility Testing on Adequate Antimicrobial Treatment in Sepsis with Positive Blood Cultures.

    PubMed

    Verroken, Alexia; Defourny, Lydwine; le Polain de Waroux, Olivier; Belkhir, Leïla; Laterre, Pierre-François; Delmée, Michel; Glupczynski, Youri

    2016-01-01

    Shortening the turn-around time (TAT) of positive blood culture (BC) identification (ID) and susceptibility results is essential to optimize antimicrobial treatment in patients with sepsis. We aimed to evaluate the impact on antimicrobial prescription of a modified workflow of positive BCs providing ID and partial susceptibility results for Enterobacteriaceae (EB), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus on the day of BC positivity detection. This study was divided into a pre-intervention period (P0) with a standard BC workflow followed by 2 intervention periods (P1, P2) with an identical modified workflow. ID was performed with MALDI-TOF MS from blood, on early or on overnight subcultures. According to ID results, rapid phenotypic assays were realized to detect third generation cephalosporin resistant EB/P. aeruginosa or methicillin resistant S. aureus. Results were transmitted to the antimicrobial stewardship team for patient's treatment revision. Times to ID, to susceptibility results and to optimal antimicrobial treatment (OAT) were compared across the three study periods. Overall, 134, 112 and 154 positive BC episodes in P0, P1 and P2 respectively were included in the analysis. Mean time to ID (28.3 hours in P0) was reduced by 65.3% in P1 (10.2 hours) and 61.8% in P2 (10.8 hours). Mean time to complete susceptibility results was reduced by 27.5% in P1 and 27% in P2, with results obtained after 32.4 and 32.6 hours compared to 44.7 hours in P0. Rapid tests allowed partial susceptibility results to be obtained after a mean time of 11.8 hours in P1 and 11.7 hours in P2. Mean time to OAT was decreased to 21.6 hours in P1 and to 17.9 hours in P2 compared to 36.1 hours in P0. Reducing TAT of positive BC with MALDI-TOF MS ID and rapid susceptibility testing accelerated prescription of targeted antimicrobial treatment thereby potentially improving the patients' clinical outcome.

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolated from 21 Polish farms.

    PubMed

    Zmudzki, J; Szczotka, A; Nowak, A; Strzelecka, H; Grzesiak, A; Pejsak, Z

    2012-01-01

    Swine dysentery (SD) is a common disease among pigs worldwide, which contributes to major production losses. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of B. hyodysenteriae, the etiological agent of SD, is mainly performed by the agar dilution method. This method has certain limitations due to difficulties in interpretation of results. The aim of this study was the analysis of antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae (B. hyodysenteriae) Polish field isolates by broth microdilution procedure. The study was performed on 21 isolates of B. hyodysenteriae, collected between January 2006 to December 2010 from cases of swine dysentery. VetMIC Brachyspira panels with antimicrobial agents (tiamulin, valnemulin, doxycycline, lincomycin, tylosin and ampicillin) were used for susceptibility testing of B. hyodysenteriae. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by the broth dilution procedure. The lowest antimicrobial activity was demonstrated for tylosin and lincomycin, with inhibition of bacterial growth using concentrations > 128 microg/ml and 32 microg/ml, respectively. In the case of doxycycline, the MIC values were < or = 2.0 microg/ml. No decreased susceptibility to tiamulin was found among the Polish isolates and MIC values for this antibiotic did not exceed 1.0 microg/ml. The results of the present study confirmed that Polish B. hyodysenteriae isolates were susceptible to the main antibiotics (tiamulin and valnemulin) used in treatment of swine dysentery. Further studies are necessary to evaluate a possible slow decrease in susceptibility to tiamulin and valnemulin of B. hyodysenteriae strains in Poland.

  1. ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY OF Streptococcus agalactiae ISOLATED FROM PREGNANT WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    de MELO, Simone Cristina Castanho Sabaini; SANTOS, Nathally Claudiane de Souza; de OLIVEIRA, Marcia; SCODRO, Regiane Bertin de Lima; CARDOSO, Rosilene Fressatti; PÁDUA, Rúbia Andreia Falleiros; SILVA, Flavia Teixeira Ribeiro; COSTA, Aline Balandis; CARVALHO, Maria Dalva de Barros; PELLOSO, Sandra Marisa

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Introduction: Group B streptococcus (GBS) or Streptococcus agalactiae can colonize the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts and has been considered one of the most important risk factors for the development of neonatal disease. The present study evaluated the antimicrobial susceptibility of GBS isolates from pregnant women who were attended at a public health service in Northern Paraná, Brazil. Methods: A descriptive analytical cross-sectional study was performed with 544 pregnant women, at ≥ 35 weeks of gestation. One hundred and thirty-six GBS isolates from pregnant women were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Results: All of the GBS isolates showed susceptibility to the drug that is most frequently used for intrapartum prophylaxis: penicillin. Resistance to clindamycin and erythromycin was detected, thus decreasing the options of prophylaxis in women who are allergic to penicillin. Conclusions: Additional studies should be conducted to increase the knowledge of GBS sensitivity profile to antimicrobials in other health centers. PMID:27828624

  2. [First Argentine consensus guidelines for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinically relevant anaerobic bacteria in humans/ Anaerobic Subcommittee of the Asociación Argentina de Microbiología].

    PubMed

    Legaria, María C; Bianchini, Hebe M; Castello, Liliana; Carloni, Graciela; Di Martino, Ana; Fernández Canigia, Liliana; Litterio, Mirta; Rollet, Raquel; Rossetti, Adelaida; Predari, Silvia C

    2011-01-01

    Through time, anaerobic bacteria have shown good susceptibility to clinically useful antianaerobic agents. Nevertheless, the antimicrobial resistance profile of most of the anaerobic species related to severe infections in humans has been modified in the last years and different kinds of resistance to the most active agents have emerged, making their effectiveness less predictable. With the aim of finding an answer and for the purpose of facilitating the detection of anaerobic antimicrobial resistance, the Anaerobic Subcommittee of the Asociación Argentina de Microbiología developed the First Argentine consensus guidelines for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinically relevant anaerobic bacteria in humans. This document resulted from the compatibilization of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations, the international literature and the work and experience of the Subcommittee. The Consensus document provides a brief taxonomy review, and exposes why and when anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility tests should be conducted, and which antimicrobial agents can be used according to the species involved. The recommendations on how to perform, read and interpret in vitro anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility tests with each method are exposed. Finally, the antibiotic susceptibility profile, the classification of antibiotics according to their in vitro activities, the natural and acquired mechanisms of resistance, the emerging resistance and the regional antibiotic resistance profile of clinically relevant anaerobic species are shown.

  3. In vitro susceptibilities of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to 10 antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, S K; Crawford, C E; Geddes, G L; Black, W A

    1988-01-01

    After preliminary in vitro screening of 10 antimicrobial agents against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the MICs of the 6 most promising agents against 27 clinical isolates were determined by agar dilution. The two quinolone compounds tested (difloxacin and A-56620) were the most active, each inhibiting 50% of the strains at concentrations of 4 micrograms/ml. M. tuberculosis strains previously shown to be resistant to isoniazid, streptomycin, rifampin, or ethambutol were as susceptible to these quinolone compounds as susceptible strains. PMID:3143305

  4. Dermatophyte susceptibility varies towards antimicrobial textiles.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Timo R; Mucha, Helmut; Hoefer, Dirk

    2012-07-01

    Dermatophytoses are a widespread problem worldwide. Textiles in contact with infected skin can serve as a carrier for fungus propagation. Hitherto, it is unknown, whether antifungal textiles could contribute in controlling dermatophytes e.g. by disrupting the chain of infection. Testing of antimicrobial fabrics for their antifungal activities therefore is a fundamental prerequisite to assess the putative clinical relevance of textiles for dermatophyte prevention. Fabrics finished with either didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC), poly-hexamethylenbiguanide, copper and two silver chloride concentrations were tested for their antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Candida albicans. To prove dermatophyte susceptibility towards the textiles, swatches were subjected to DIN EN 14199 (Trichophyton sp.) or DIN EN ISO 20743 (C. albicans) respectively. In addition, samples were embedded, and semi-thin sections were analysed microscopically. While all samples showed a clear inhibition of C. albicans, activity against Trichophyton sp. varied significantly: For example, DDAC completely inhibited T. rubrum growth, whereas T. mentagrophytes growth remained unaffected even in direct contact to the fibres. The results favour to add T. mentagrophytes as a test organism in textile dermatophyte efficacy tests. Microscopic analysis of swatches allowed detailed evaluation of additional parameters like mycelium thickness, density and hyphae penetration depth into the fabric.

  5. Antibiotic susceptibility of Stenotrophomonas (Xanthomonas) maltophilia: comparative (NCCLS criteria) evaluation of antimicrobial drugs with the agar dilution and the agar disk diffusion (Bauer-Kirby) tests.

    PubMed

    Traub, W H; Leonhard, B; Bauer, D

    1998-01-01

    Ninety-six clinical isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia were examined with the agar dilution method for susceptibility to 19 antimicrobial drugs. Doxycycline, cotrimoxazole, timentin, ofloxacin, fosfomycin, and piperacillin + tazobactam, in that order, inhibited the majority of strains. All isolates were resistant to nitrofurantoin. Concurrent disk susceptibility (Bauer-Kirby method) testing, using currently valid NCCLS interpretative criteria for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, uncovered a significant incidence of very major (category I), major (category II), and minor (categories III and IV) discrepancies for aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, chloramphenicol, and piperacillin + tazobactam and ticarcillin + clavulanic acid. Therefore, new interpretative criteria indicative of intermediate (I) susceptibility of S. maltophilia to these various antibiotics were proposed. In addition, new intermediate susceptibility criteria were proposed for the two beta-lactam-beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations. It was recommended to exclude ciprofloxacin from test batteries against this microorganism due to the wide scatter of minimal inhibitory concentration values and diameters of inhibition zones; the same was true for polymyxin B. It is hoped that the proposed modified, species-specific criteria will improve the clinical utility of laboratory-generated disk antibiograms with respect to the inherently multiple antibiotic-resistant, opportunistic pathogen S. maltophilia.

  6. Susceptibilities of Yersinia pestis strains to 12 antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Wong, J D; Barash, J R; Sandfort, R F; Janda, J M

    2000-07-01

    Ninety-two strains of Yersinia pestis recovered over a 21-year period were evaluated for susceptibility to traditional and newer antimicrobial agents. In vitro resistance was noted only against rifampin and imipenem (approximately 20% of strains). The most active compounds (MIC at which 90% of the isolates tested are inhibited) against Y. pestis were cefixime, ceftriaxone, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and trovafloxacin.

  7. A comparison of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns for Staphylococcus aureus in organic and conventional dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Tikofsky, Linda L; Barlow, John W; Santisteban, Carlos; Schukken, Ynte H

    2003-01-01

    Selective pressure from antimicrobial use, mutations, or acquisition of foreign resistance determinants mediate antimicrobial resistance. If antimicrobial use is the major selective pressure encouraging the development of resistance, then reduced use should result in decreased resistance. We compared antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Staphylococcus aureus isolates obtained from milk samples from 22 organic (nonantibiotic using) dairy herds to isolates from 16 conventional dairy herds. Susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion, and zone diameters were recorded in millimeters for 144 isolates from organic farms and 117 isolates from conventional farms and were also classified as susceptible or not-susceptible (intermediate and resistant categories combined). Strength of association between high or low use and proportion susceptible was evaluated by Chi-square analysis and differences in mean zone diameter for isolates from organic farms versus isolates from conventional farms were compared by analysis of variance. Analysis was done for each antimicrobial and deemed significant at p < or = 0.05. Differences in antimicrobial susceptibility were observed between S. aureus isolates from organic and conventional herds for seven of the nine antibiotics studied. Herds that were certified organic had S. aureus isolates that were more susceptible to antimicrobials. Overall, S. aureus isolates from both organic and conventional herds showed good susceptibility to most commonly used bovine mastitis antimicrobials; however, isolates from organic herds were significantly more susceptible. Longitudinal studies of herds undergoing the transition to organic farming would help elucidate the dynamics of antimicrobial resistance and the potential return of antimicrobial susceptibility.

  8. Frequent major errors in antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacterial strains distributed under the Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Quality Assurance Program.

    PubMed

    Boot, R

    2012-07-01

    The Quality Assurance Program (QAP) of the Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) was a proficiency testing system developed to service the laboratory animal discipline. The QAP comprised the distribution of bacterial strains from various species of animals for identification to species level and antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST). Identification capabilities were below acceptable standards. This study evaluated AST results using the DKFZ compilations of test results for all bacterial strains showing the number of participants reporting the strain as resistant (R), sensitive (S) or intermediate susceptible (I) to each antibiotic substance used. Due to lack of information about methods used, it was assumed that what the majority of the participants reported (R or S) was the correct test result and that an opposite result was a major error (ME). MEs occurred in 1375 of 14,258 (9.7%) of test results and ME% ranged from 0% to 23.2% per bacterial group-agent group combination. Considerable variation in MEs was found within groups of bacteria and within groups of agents. In addition to poor performance in proper species classification, the quality of AST in laboratory animal diagnostic laboratories seems far below standards considered acceptable in human diagnostic microbiology.

  9. Molecular Characterization and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Escherichia coli Isolates from Patients with Urinary Tract Infections in 20 Chinese Hospitals▿

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaoli; Cavaco, Lina M.; Lv, Yuan; Li, Yun; Zheng, Bo; Wang, Pengyuan; Hasman, Henrik; Liu, Yucun; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 222 urinary Escherichia coli isolates from 20 tertiary hospitals in 15 different provinces and 4 municipalities in mainland China were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility, phylogrouping, and the presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes. A subset of 138 suspected extended-spectrum cephalosporinase (ESC) producers were examined for genes encoding cephalosporin resistance. Forty-three isolates harboring blaCTX-M-14 or blaCTX-M-15 were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and plasmids containing these genes were typed using PCR-based replicon typing (PBRT). Thirteen phylogroup B2 blaCTX-M-14- and blaCTX-M-15-positive isolates were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A frequent occurrence of resistance (>46%) was observed toward cephalosporins, gentamicin, and fluoroquinolones. Among the 222 isolates, 4 qnrS1, 4 qepA, and 16 aac(6′)-Ib-cr genes were confirmed. Four major phylogroups (A, B1, B2, and D) and nontypeable isolates (NTs) were found among the isolates, with phylogroup D (54%) being the most common phylogroup. A total of 110 (80%) of the 138 screened isolates harbored blaCTX-M genes, with blaCTX-M-14 (71%) and blaCTX-M-15 (24%) being the most prevalent of these genes. Nine of the 13 CTX-M-15- or CTX-M-14-containing B2 isolates belonged to ST131. PFGE typing showed a high level of diversity, and plasmid analysis indicated a very large pool of different resistance plasmids mediating the spread of blaCTX-M genes in mainland China. An equally very high frequency of resistance and equally high levels of diversity in phylogroups, PFGE types, and plasmids were observed among community- and hospital-acquired E. coli isolates, indicating the presence of a large reservoir in the community and a long-term spread of cephalosporin resistance in China. PMID:21525216

  10. Usefulness of antimicrobial susceptibility in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Cosme, A; Montes, M; Martos, M; Gil, I; Mendarte, U; Salicio, Y; Piñeiro, L; Recasens, M T; Ibarra, B; Sarasqueta, C; Bujanda, L

    2013-04-01

    The rate of eradication of Helicobacter pylori with standard triple therapy using omeprazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin (OAC) is unacceptable in populations with high rates of clarithromycin resistance (15-20%). The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of 10-day OAC therapy as the first-line treatment in patients diagnosed by culture with antimicrobial susceptibility or diagnosed by a (13) C-labelled urea breath test (UBT) without antimicrobial susceptibility in an area where the clarithromycin resistance rate was 15-20%. This was a retrospective cohort study of 266 patients, recruited consecutively throughout 2008. A total of 247 H. pylori-infected patients received antibiotic therapy (221 received the 10-day OAC therapy and 26 received other regimens) of which 134 patients were diagnosed by culture of gastric samples followed by antimicrobial susceptibility testing and 113 were diagnosed by UBT. In all patients, the eradication of H. pylori was checked by UBT. The cost of eradication by 10-day OAC treatment was assessed in each patient. The success rate of 10-day OAC therapy in patients diagnosed by culture and by UBT was 88% (103/117) and 49% (51/104), respectively (p <0.0005). The treatment was also more cost-effective in the former of these two groups (€571 versus €666). To perform culture and antimicrobial susceptibility of the H. pylori isolates was a more successful and cost effective strategy than empirical 10-day OAC treatment in populations with high rates of resistance to clarithromycin.

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella from organic and conventional dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Ray, K A; Warnick, L D; Mitchell, R M; Kaneene, J B; Ruegg, P L; Wells, S J; Fossler, C P; Halbert, L W; May, K

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella isolated from conventional and organic dairy farms in the Midwest and Northeast United States. Environmental and fecal samples were collected from organic (n = 26) and conventional (n = 69) farms in Michigan, Minnesota, New York, and Wisconsin every 2 mo from August 2000 to October 2001. Salmonella isolates (n = 1,243) were tested using a broth microdilution method for susceptibility to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, ceftiofur, ceftriaxone, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Herd-level logistic regression and logistic proportional hazards multivariable models were used to examine the association between farm management type and susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. For most antimicrobial agents tested, susceptibility of Salmonella isolates was similar on organic and conventional herds when controlling for herd size and state. Conventional farms were more likely to have at least one Salmonella isolate resistant to streptomycin using logistic regression (odds ratio = 7.5; 95% confidence interval = 1.7-5.4). Conventional farms were more likely to have Salmonella isolates with greater resistance to streptomycin (odds ratio = 5.4; 95% confidence interval = 1.5-19.0) and sulfamethoxazole (odds ratio = 4.2; 95% confidence interval = 1.2-14.1) using logistic proportional hazards models. Although not statistically significant, conventional farms tended to be more likely to have at least one Salmonella isolate resistant to 5 or more antimicrobial agents when compared with organic farms.

  12. Educational antimicrobial susceptibility testing as a critical component of microbiology laboratory proficiency programs: American Proficiency Institute results for 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Glick, Teri; Sader, Helio S; Flamm, Robert K; Ross, James E; Rhomberg, Paul R; Edson, Daniel C

    2013-04-01

    External laboratory proficiency programs are an important requirement for test quality assurance (EQA) and compliance to regulatory guidelines (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments and inspections). The American Proficiency Institute (API) regularly distributes EQA sample challenges (test events) including an Educational Sample (ES) for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Beginning in 2007, API has sent 3 ES samples annually, each a well-characterized (molecular/phenotypic methods) strain having an interesting/emerging mechanism of resistance. Hundreds of USA laboratories, usually serving small- to medium-size hospitals and clinics, participate in the API ungraded ES test event. Analysis of responses is made and reported electronically as ES critiques addressing contemporary susceptibility testing issues that affect patient therapy. Seven Gram-positive (+) and 8 Gram-negative (-) ES strains were tested over the 5 years (2007-2011) with organism identification (graded) accuracy of 95.3% (range, 91.0-99.2%) for Gram (-) and 97.0% (range, 94.2-100.0%) for Gram (+) challenges. Susceptibility testing categorical accuracy was generally greatest for the disk diffusion test (91.0/97.0%) compared to the MIC methods (commercial automated or manual) combined (89.9/96.1%, for Gram [-]/Gram [+], respectively). The most worrisome observations of these ES samples were as follows: 1) poor recognition of ESBL- and serine carbapenemase-producing strains (various types including Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapanemase) due to delayed application of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute [CLSI] guidelines; 2) overcalling of ESBL in organisms having wild-type non-ESBL enzymes (OXA series; OXA, 1/30) due to commercial system or participant interpretive error; and 3) occasional drug-bug discords noted in nonfermentative Gram (-) bacilli. In conclusion, the API ES series of ungraded susceptibility testing challenges (accuracy was >90%) has been well received by subscribers and

  13. The impact of performing bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on bronchoalveolar fluid cultures 24 h a day in a microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Pailhoriès, Hélène; Lemarié, Carole; Kouatchet, Achille; Lasocki, Sigismond; Sargentini, Cyril; Kempf, Marie; Coron, Noémie; Mahaza, Chetaou; Joly-Guillou, Marie-laure; Eveillard, Matthieu

    2014-11-01

    We previously demonstrated the positive impact of performing bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) after day hours (night service [NS]) for certain clinical samples on the treatment of infected patients. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of including positive bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cultures in our NS. Two major positive consequences were recorded: initiation of earlier appropriate treatment and earlier change to a reduced-spectrum but still effective regimen. Reductions in delay were defined as the differences between the hours actually spent and hours estimated as though laboratory tests had been performed in the absence of NS. Fifty BALs were included. The NS led to the implementation of earlier appropriate therapy in 10 cases (20%), to earlier de-escalation in 15 cases (30%), and to earlier appropriate therapy and de-escalation in 4 cases (8%). In conclusion, performing bacterial identification and AST for positive BAL after laboratory opening hours could be relevant.

  14. In vitro susceptibilities of caprine Mycoplasma agalactiae field isolates to six antimicrobial agents using the E test methodology.

    PubMed

    Filioussis, George; Petridou, Evanthia; Giadinis, Nektarios D; Kritas, Spyridon K

    2014-12-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, spectinomycin, tetracycline, spiramycin and erythromycin against 30 caprine Greek isolates of Mycoplasma agalactiae were determined using E test methodology. The E test strips were placed on Eaton's agar medium without antimicrobials and phenol red. MICs were then read by determining where the growth inhibition zone intersected with the MIC scale on the strip. An MIC value of 8 µg/mL was considered as a guide to mycoplasma resistance. All isolates were sensitive to fluoroquinolones (MIC50, 0.19 g/mL; MIC90, 0.38 µg/mL; highest MIC, 0.5 µg/mL), spectinomycin (MIC50, 0.5 µg/mL; MIC90, 1 µg/mL; highest MIC, 1 µg/mL), and spiramycin (MIC50, 1 µg/mL; MIC90, 1.5 µg/mL; highest MIC, 2 µg/mL). Two strains exhibited resistance to tetracycline (MIC 32 µg/mL) but these were not found to carry any of the tet(M), tet(O), and tet(S) resistance genes. Finally all isolates expressed resistance to erythromycin (MIC50, 128 µg/mL; MIC90, >256 µg/mL).

  15. Relationship between antimicrobial drug usage and antimicrobial susceptibility of gram-positive mastitis pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pol, M; Ruegg, P L

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze relationships between usage of antimicrobial drugs on dairy farms and results of antimicrobial susceptibility testing of mastitis pathogens. Exposure to selected antimicrobial drugs (n = 10) was standardized by calculation of the number of defined daily doses used per cow. Farms (n = 40) were categorized based on amount of antimicrobial exposure: organic (no usage); conventional-low usage (conventional farms not using or using less than or equal to the first quartile of use of each compound); and conventional-high usage (conventional farms using more than the first quartile of a particular compound). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of selected antimicrobial drugs was determined using a commercial microbroth dilution system for isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (n = 137), coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS, n = 294), and Streptococcus spp. (n = 95) obtained from subclinical mastitis infections. Most isolates were inhibited at the lowest dilution tested of most antimicrobial drugs. Survival curves for Staph. aureus and CNS demonstrated heterogeneity in MIC based on the amount of exposure to penicillin and pirlimycin. For CNS, farm type was associated with the MIC of ampicillin and tetracycline. For Streptococcus spp., farm type was associated with MIC of pirlimycin and tetracycline. For all mastitis pathogens studied, the MIC of pirlimycin increased with increasing exposure to defined daily doses of pirlimycin. The level of exposure to most other antimicrobial drugs was not associated with MIC of mastitis pathogens. A dose-response effect between antimicrobial exposure and susceptibility was observed for some pathogen-antimicrobial combinations, but exposure to other antimicrobial drugs commonly used for prevention and treatment of mastitis was not associated with resistance.

  16. A Novel 7-Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Clonotyping Test Allows Rapid Prediction of Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Extraintestinal Escherichia coli Directly From Urine Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Tchesnokova, Veronika; Avagyan, Hovhannes; Billig, Mariya; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Aprikian, Pavel; Chan, Diana; Pseunova, Julietta; Rechkina, Elena; Riddell, Kim; Scholes, Delia; Fang, Ferric C.; Johnson, James R.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Escherichia coli is a highly clonal pathogen. Extraintestinal isolates belong to a limited number of genetically related groups, which often exhibit characteristic antimicrobial resistance profiles. Methods. We developed a rapid clonotyping method for extraintestinal E coli based on detection of the presence or absence of 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 2 genes (fumC and fimH). A reference set of 2559 E coli isolates, primarily of urinary origin, was used to predict the resolving power of the 7-SNP-based typing method, and 582 representative strains from this set were used to evaluate test robustness. Results. Fifty-four unique SNP combinations (“septatypes”) were identified in the reference strains. These septatypes yielded a clonal group resolution power on par with that of traditional multilocus sequence typing. In 72% of isolates, septatype identity predicted sequence type identity with at least 90% (mean, 97%) accuracy. Most septatypes exhibited highly distinctive antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. The 7-SNP-based test could be performed with high specificity and sensitivity using single or multiplex conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantitative PCR. In the latter format, E coli presence and septatype identity were determined directly in urine specimens within 45 minutes with bacterial loads as low as 102 colony-forming units/mL and, at clinically significant bacterial loads, with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions. 7-SNP-based typing of E coli can be used for both epidemiological studies and clinical diagnostics, which could greatly improve the empirical selection of antimicrobial therapy. PMID:26925427

  17. Antimicrobial susceptibility of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria collected from countries in Eastern Europe: results from the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T.) 2004-2010.

    PubMed

    Balode, Arta; Punda-Polić, Volga; Dowzicky, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    The Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T.) commenced in 2004 to longitudinally monitor global changes in bacterial susceptibility to a suite of antimicrobial agents. The current study examined the activity of tigecycline and comparators against isolates collected across Eastern Europe between 2004 and 2010. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution methodologies. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using CLSI interpretive criteria, and tigecycline susceptibility was established using European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) breakpoints. This study included 10 295 Gram-negative and 4611 Gram-positive isolates from 42 centres. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) were reported among 15.3% of Escherichia coli and 39.3% of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates; the highest rates were observed in Turkey (30.9%) and Bulgaria (53.8%), respectively. Imipenem-non-susceptible K. pneumoniae were identified only in Turkey. ESBL-positive E. coli were highly susceptible to imipenem (95.1%), meropenem (98.0%) and tigecycline (98.5%). Most antimicrobials showed poor activity against Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Vancomycin resistance was noted among 0.9% of Enterococcus faecalis and 11.7% of Enterococcus faecium isolates. High rates of susceptibility were reported for linezolid (99.7%) and tigecycline (100%) against E. faecium. One-quarter of Staphylococcus aureus isolates were meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), with the highest rate in Romania (51.5%); all MRSA were susceptible to linezolid, tigecycline and vancomycin. Antimicrobial resistance is high in much of Eastern Europe, with considerable variation seen among countries. Tigecycline and the carbapenems retain excellent activity against many pathogens from Eastern Europe; linezolid and vancomycin are active against most Gram-positive pathogens.

  18. Antifungal susceptibility testing.

    PubMed Central

    Rex, J H; Pfaller, M A; Rinaldi, M G; Polak, A; Galgiani, J N

    1993-01-01

    Unlike antibacterial susceptibility testing, reliable antifungal susceptibility testing is still largely in its infancy. Many methods have been described, but they produce widely discrepant results unless such factors as pH, inoculum size, medium formulation, incubation time, and incubation temperature are carefully controlled. Even when laboratories agree upon a common method, interlaboratory agreement may be poor. As a result of numerous collaborative projects carried out both independently and under the aegis of the Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, the effects of varying these factors have been extensively studied and a standard method which minimizes interlaboratory variability during the testing of Candida spp. and Cryptococcus neoformans has been proposed. This review summarizes this work, reviews the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed susceptibility testing standard, and identifies directions for future work. PMID:8269392

  19. [Recommendations for the analysis of cumulated data in antimicrobial susceptibility in health institutions].

    PubMed

    2010-04-01

    Due to the great variability in antimicrobial resistance patterns, local reports of cumulative antimicrobial susceptibility data are necessary in every health center. The purpose is to guide clinical decisions and the early detection of patterns that allow preventive measures to avoid dissemination of resistant strains. The main objective of this guide is to provide recommendations for the analysis of antimicrobial susceptibility data and elaboration of a local report. Recommendations provided in this guide are based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) document "Analysis and Presentation of Cumulative Antimicrobial Susceptibility Test Data" (3). Key aspects related to information gathering and data processing, analysis and presentation are described.

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of aquatic bacteria: quality control disk diffusion ranges for Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC 33658 at 22 and 28 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Miller, R A; Walker, R D; Baya, A; Clemens, K; Coles, M; Hawke, J P; Henricson, B E; Hsu, H M; Mathers, J J; Oaks, J L; Papapetropoulou, M; Reimschuessel, R

    2003-09-01

    Quality control (QC) ranges for disk diffusion susceptibility testing of aquatic bacterial isolates were proposed as a result of a multilaboratory study conducted according to procedures established by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). Ranges were proposed for Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC 33658 at 22 and 28 degrees C for nine different antimicrobial agents (ampicillin, enrofloxacin, erythromycin, florfenicol, gentamicin, oxolinic acid, oxytetracycline, ormetoprim-sulfadimethoxine, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). All tests were conducted on standard Mueller-Hinton agar. With >/=95% of all data points fitting within the proposed QC ranges, the results from this study comply with NCCLS guidelines and have been accepted by the NCCLS Subcommittee for Veterinary Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing. These QC guidelines will permit greater accuracy in interpreting results and, for the first time, the ability to reliably compare susceptibility test data between aquatic animal disease diagnostic laboratories.

  1. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Aquatic Bacteria: Quality Control Disk Diffusion Ranges for Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC 33658 at 22 and 28°C

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R. A.; Walker, R. D.; Baya, A.; Clemens, K.; Coles, M.; Hawke, J. P.; Henricson, B. E.; Hsu, H. M.; Mathers, J. J.; Oaks, J. L.; Papapetropoulou, M.; Reimschuessel, R.

    2003-01-01

    Quality control (QC) ranges for disk diffusion susceptibility testing of aquatic bacterial isolates were proposed as a result of a multilaboratory study conducted according to procedures established by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). Ranges were proposed for Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC 33658 at 22 and 28°C for nine different antimicrobial agents (ampicillin, enrofloxacin, erythromycin, florfenicol, gentamicin, oxolinic acid, oxytetracycline, ormetoprim-sulfadimethoxine, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). All tests were conducted on standard Mueller-Hinton agar. With ≥95% of all data points fitting within the proposed QC ranges, the results from this study comply with NCCLS guidelines and have been accepted by the NCCLS Subcommittee for Veterinary Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing. These QC guidelines will permit greater accuracy in interpreting results and, for the first time, the ability to reliably compare susceptibility test data between aquatic animal disease diagnostic laboratories. PMID:12958263

  2. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enteric Gram Negative Facultative Anaerobe Bacilli in Aerobic versus Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, Raghavendra G.; Renter, David G.; Volkova, Victoriya V.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatments result in the host’s enteric bacteria being exposed to the antimicrobials. Pharmacodynamic models can describe how this exposure affects the enteric bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance. The models utilize measurements of bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility traditionally obtained in vitro in aerobic conditions. However, in vivo enteric bacteria are exposed to antimicrobials in anaerobic conditions of the lower intestine. Some of enteric bacteria of food animals are potential foodborne pathogens, e.g., Gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. These are facultative anaerobes; their physiology and growth rates change in anaerobic conditions. We hypothesized that their antimicrobial susceptibility also changes, and evaluated differences in the susceptibility in aerobic vs. anaerobic conditions of generic E. coli and Salmonella enterica of diverse serovars isolated from cattle feces. Susceptibility of an isolate was evaluated as its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measured by E-Test® following 24 hours of adaptation to the conditions on Mueller-Hinton agar, and on a more complex tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood (BAP) media. We considered all major antimicrobial drug classes used in the U.S. to treat cattle: β-lactams (specifically, ampicillin and ceftriaxone E-Test®), aminoglycosides (gentamicin and kanamycin), fluoroquinolones (enrofloxacin), classical macrolides (erythromycin), azalides (azithromycin), sulfanomides (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim), and tetracyclines (tetracycline). Statistical analyses were conducted for the isolates (n≥30) interpreted as susceptible to the antimicrobials based on the clinical breakpoint interpretation for human infection. Bacterial susceptibility to every antimicrobial tested was statistically significantly different in anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions on both media, except for no difference in susceptibility to ceftriaxone on BAP agar. A satellite experiment

  3. Two-Center Collaborative Evaluation of the Performance of the BD Phoenix Automated Microbiology System for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Enterococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Fahr, Anne-Marie; Eigner, Ulrich; Armbrust, Martina; Caganic, Alexandra; Dettori, Giuseppe; Chezzi, Carlo; Bertoncini, Luca; Benecchi, Magda; Menozzi, Maria Grazia

    2003-01-01

    The performance of the BD Phoenix Automated Microbiology System (BD Diagnostic Systems, Sparks, Md.) was assessed for identification (ID) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) for the majority of clinically encountered bacterial isolates in a European collaborative two-center trial. A total of 469 bacterial isolates of the genera Staphylococcus (275 isolates), Enterococcus (179 isolates), and Streptococcus (15 isolates, for ID only) were investigated; of these, 367 were single patient isolates, and 102 were challenge strains tested at one center. Sixty-four antimicrobial drugs were tested, including the following drug classes: aminoglycosides, beta-lactam antibiotics, beta-lactam-beta-lactamase inhibitors, carbapenems, cephems, folate antagonists, quinolones, glycopeptides, macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B (MLS), and others. Phoenix ID results were compared to those of the laboratories' routine ID systems (API 32 Staph, API 32 Strep, and VITEK 2 [bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France]); Phoenix AST results were compared to those of frozen standard broth microdilution (SBM) panels according to NCCLS guidelines (NCCLS document M 100-S 9, approved standard M 7-A 4). Discrepant results were repeated in duplicate. Concordant IDs of 97.1, 98.9, and 100% were observed for staphylococci, enterococci, and streptococci, respectively. For AST results the overall essential agreement was 93.3%; the category agreement was 97.3%; and the very major error rate, major error rate, and minor error rate were 1.2, 1.9, and 1.3%, respectively. In conclusion, the Phoenix ID results showed high agreement with results of the systems to which they were being compared; the AST performance was highly equivalent to that of the SBM reference method. PMID:12624042

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility of equine and environmental isolates of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Båverud, V; Gunnarsson, A; Karlsson, M; Franklin, A

    2004-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility of 50 Clostridium difficile isolates, 36 of them from horse feces and 14 from environmental sites, was determined by broth microdilution. The antimicrobial agents tested were avilamycin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, erythromycin, gentamicin, neomycin, oxacillin, oxytetracycline, penicillin, spiramycin, streptomycin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, vancomycin, and virginiamycin. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin (MIC 16 microg/ml), oxytetracycline (MIC >/=32 microg/ml), spiramycin (MIC > 16 microg/ml), and virginiamycin (MIC 8-16 microg/ml) were higher for 18 isolates. Those were mainly isolated from horses at animal hospitals and further from environmental sites at a stud farm. In contrast, all isolates, except one, from healthy foals had low MICs of erythromycin, spiramycin, virginiamycin, and oxytetracycline. The isolates from soil in public parks had also low MICs of these antimicrobial agents. Broth microdilution appeared both reliable and reproducible for susceptibility testing of C. difficile. The method was also readily performed and the MIC endpoints were easily read.

  5. Utility of antimicrobial susceptibility testing of multiple Haemophilus influenzae isolates from throat swabs of children with adenoid hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Antos-Bielska, Małgorzata; Lau-Dworak, Magdalena; Olszewska-Sosińska, Olga; Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata; Trafny, Elżbieta A

    2014-07-01

    Eleven out of 40 children with adenoiditis were colonized with multiple genotypes of Haemophilus influenzae. Heterogeneous antibiotic susceptibility to ampicillin and cotrimoxazole was observed in 6 children. A multiple-colony methodology may potentially help to find the resistant strains of H. influenzae in patients who do not respond to the antibiotic treatment.

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility of staphylococci isolated from otitis externa in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lilenbaum, W; Veras, M; Blum, E; Souza, G N

    2000-07-01

    Samples were obtained from 65 unmedicated adult dogs, processed for isolation of Staphylococcus species and tested for susceptibility to penicillin G, gentamicin, oxacillin, tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, streptomycin, ampicillin and rifampin. Forty-four isolates were obtained, which represents 67.7% of samples. Coagulase-negative species were most commonly found, and the most frequently isolated staphylococcus species were Staph. epidermidis and Staph. aureus. Other species, such as Staph. simulans, Staph. haemolyticus, Staph. saprophyticus and Staph. intermedius were also isolated. Resistance to antibiotics was frequently observed, with 90.9% of the isolates showing resistance to at least one drug. The most active antimicrobial agents against staphylococci isolated from otitis externa of dogs were rifampin and oxacillin. Multidrug resistance was a common finding, and one strain of Staph. haemolyticus species, was resistant to all tested antimicrobial agents. Resistance to three or more different drugs was a common finding, observed in 16 strains (36.4%) of both coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative staphylococci. This study highlights the emergence of cases of otitis externa determined by coagulase-negative staphylococcus strains and once more emphasizes the need for bacterial culture with species identification and susceptibility testing of swab specimens from the ear canal in order to choose appropriate antimicrobial agents.

  7. Regional differences and trends in antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Lob, Sibylle H; Hoban, Daryl J; Sahm, Daniel F; Badal, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, although representing a small percentage of Gram-negative bacilli isolates in intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) and urinary tract infections (UTIs), is frequently multidrug-resistant (MDR) and can pose difficult therapeutic challenges. From 2011 to 2014, 2337 A. baumannii were collected from IAIs and UTIs at 453 hospital sites in 48 countries as part of the SMART ongoing surveillance initiative. Current susceptibility and multidrug resistance, defined as resistance to at least three of the tested drug classes, were determined in a subset of 1011 isolates from 2013 to 2014. A. baumannii comprised 0.7-4.6% of all aerobic and facultative Gram-negative bacilli isolated in six global regions. MDR rates were lowest in North America (47%) and highest in Europe and the Middle East (>93%), with higher rates in ICUs than in non-ICU wards in almost all regions. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles varied by region but resistance was high everywhere, with no drug inhibiting >70% of A. baumannii isolates in any region. Susceptibility to imipenem was highest in North America (64%) and lowest in Europe and the Middle East (≤11%). Amikacin overall was the most active of the studied agents, including against MDR isolates (of which 11-38% were susceptible). Trend analysis of only those countries that contributed isolates in each study year (2011-2014) demonstrated an increasing trend in MDR rates in the Middle East as well as decreasing susceptibility to several single antimicrobial agents in Africa, Europe and the Middle East. These patterns and trends can help direct antimicrobial therapy and infection control efforts.

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus from retail ground meats.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Alina; Soong, Yee-Ann; Dupuy, Nicole; Shafer, Daniel; Richbourg, William; Johnson, Kourtney; Brown, Twain; Kestler, Edward; Li, Yi; Zheng, Jie; McDermott, Patrick; Meng, Jianghong

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), recovered from raw retail meat products purchased in the Washington, D.C., area. From March to August 2008, 694 samples of ground beef (n = 198), ground pork (n = 300), and ground turkey (n = 196) were collected by random sampling from stores of three grocery chains. In total, 200 S. aureus isolates (29%) were recovered by direct plating. When tested for susceptibility to 22 antimicrobials, 69% of the S. aureus isolates were resistant to tetracycline, 26% to penicillin, 17% to ampicillin, 13% to methicillin, 8% to erythromycin, 4.5% to clindamycin, 1.5% to gentamicin, and 0.5% to chloramphenicol, oxacillin, cefoxitin, or quinupristin-dalfopristin. However, 27% of the isolates were susceptible to all tested antimicrobials. More turkey and pork isolates were resistant to ampicillin, penicillin, and tetracycline than were beef isolates (P < 0.05). Additionally, 17% of the turkey and 17% of the pork isolates were resistant to methicillin (MIC ≥ 16 μg/ml), whereas no beef isolates were resistant to the antimicrobial agent. A single MRSA (methicillin MIC > 32 μg/ml) isolate containing the mecA gene with additional resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin, oxacillin plus 2% NaCl, cefoxitin, ampicillin, penicillin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, tetracycline, and gentamicin was recovered from one pork sample. The presence of antimicrobial-resistant S. aureus, coupled with the relative lack of such studies in the United States, suggests that further investigations on MRSA in the food supply are needed despite the low rate of MRSA found in this particular study.

  9. Two-center collaborative evaluation of performance of the BD phoenix automated microbiology system for identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Menozzi, Maria Grazia; Eigner, Ulrich; Covan, Silvia; Rossi, Sabina; Somenzi, Pietro; Dettori, Giuseppe; Chezzi, Carlo; Fahr, Anne-Marie

    2006-11-01

    The performance of the BD Phoenix Automated Microbiology System (BD Diagnostic Systems, Sparks, MD) was assessed for identification (ID) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of the majority of clinically encountered bacterial isolates in a European collaborative two-center trial. A total of 494 bacterial isolates including various species of the Enterobacteriaceae and 110 nonfermentative gram-negative bacteria were investigated: of these, 385 were single patient isolates, and 109 were challenge strains tested at one center. The performance of the Phoenix extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) test was also evaluated for 203 strains of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Klebsiella oxytoca included in the study. Forty-two antimicrobial drugs were tested, including members of the following drug classes: aminoglycosides, beta-lactam antibiotics, beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitors, carbapenems, cephems, monobactams, folate antagonists, quinolones, and others. Phoenix system ID results were compared to those of the laboratories' routine ID systems (API 20E and API CHE, ATB ID32E, ID32GN, and VITEK 2 [bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France]); Phoenix AST results were compared to those of frozen standard broth microdilution (SBM) panels according to NCCLS (now CLSI) guidelines (NCCLS document M100-S9, approved standard M7-A4). Discrepant results were repeated in duplicate. Concordant IDs of 98.4 and 99.1% were observed for the Enterobacteriaceae and the nonfermentative group, respectively. For AST results, the overall essential agreement was 94.2%; the category agreement was 97.3%; and the very major error rate, major error rate, and minor error rate were 1.6, 0.6, and 1.9%, respectively. In terms of ESBL detection, Phoenix results were 98.5% concordant with those of the reference system, with 98.0% sensitivity and 98.7% specificity. In conclusion, the Phoenix ID results showed high agreement with results of the systems to which they were being

  10. Quality control ranges for testing broth microdilution susceptibility of Flavobacterium columnare and F. psychrophilium to nine antimicrobials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-laboratory broth microdilution method trial was performed to standardize the specialized test conditions required for fish pathogens Flavobacterium columnare and F. pyschrophilum. Nine laboratories tested the quality control (QC) strains Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Aeromonas salmonicid...

  11. Phenotypic and Molecular Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Chen, Derrick; Cunningham, Scott A; Cole, Nicolynn C; Kohner, Peggy C; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Patel, Robin

    2017-04-01

    Failure to eradicate Helicobacter pylori infection is often a result of antimicrobial resistance, which for clarithromycin is typically mediated by specific point mutations in the 23S rRNA gene. The purpose of this study was to define current patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility in H. pylori isolates derived primarily from the United States and to survey them for the presence of point mutations in the 23S rRNA gene and assess the ability of these mutations to predict phenotypic clarithromycin susceptibility. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using agar dilution on 413 H. pylori isolates submitted to Mayo Medical Laboratories for susceptibility testing. For a subset of these isolates, a 150-bp segment of the 23S rRNA gene was sequenced. A total of 1,970 MICs were reported over the 4-year study period. The rate of clarithromycin resistance was high (70.4%), and elevated MICs were frequently observed for metronidazole (82.4% of isolates had an MIC of >8 μg/ml) and ciprofloxacin (53.5% of isolates had an MIC of >1 μg/ml). A total of 111 archived H. pylori isolates underwent 23S rRNA gene sequencing; we found 95% concordance between genotypes and phenotypes (P = 0.9802). Resistance to clarithromycin was most commonly due to an A2143G mutation (82%), followed by A2142G (14%) and A2142C (4%) mutations. Clinical H. pylori isolates derived primarily from the United States demonstrated a high rate of clarithromycin resistance and elevated metronidazole and ciprofloxacin MICs. The relative distribution of point mutations at positions 2143 and 2142 in the 23S rRNA gene in clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori was similar to that reported from other parts of the world; these mutations predict phenotypic resistance to clarithromycin.

  12. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Autochthonous Aquatic Vibrio cholerae in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Sandrine; Lesne, Jean; Jouy, Eric; Larvor, Emeline; Kempf, Isabelle; Boncy, Jacques; Rebaudet, Stanilas; Piarroux, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial susceptibility of 50 environmental isolates of Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 collected in surface waters in Haiti in July 2012, during an active cholera outbreak. A panel of 16 antibiotics was tested on the isolates using the disk diffusion method and PCR detection of seven resistance-associated genes (strA/B, sul1/2, ermA/B, and mefA). All isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefotaxime, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, amikacin, and gentamicin. Nearly a quarter (22.0%) of the isolates were susceptible to all 16 antimicrobials tested and only 8.0% of the isolates (n = 4) were multidrug-resistant. The highest proportions of resistant isolates were observed for sulfonamide (70.0%), amoxicillin (12.0%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (10.0%). One strain was resistant to erythromycin and one to doxycycline, two antibiotics used to treat cholera in Haiti. Among the 50 isolates, 78% possessed at least two resistance-associated genes, and the genes sul1, ermA, and strB were detected in all four multidrug-resistant isolates. Our results clearly indicate that the autochthonous population of V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 found in surface waters in Haiti shows antimicrobial patterns different from that of the outbreak strain. The presence in the Haitian aquatic environment of V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 with reduced susceptibility or resistance to antibiotics used in human medicine may constitute a mild public health threat. PMID:27818656

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility among gram-negative isolates collected in the USA between 2005 and 2011 as part of the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T.) was designed to monitor in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility to tigecycline and comparator agents. We present susceptibility data on Gram-negative organisms collected between 2005 and 2011 from nine United States census regions. Methods T.E.S.T. was conducted using standardized CLSI methodologies or FDA-approved breakpoints. Results Tigecycline was highly active (MIC90 ≤ 2 mg/L) against Enterobacteriaceae irrespective of species or region of collection (N = 25011). The isolates were also highly susceptible to the carbapenems when all regional data are combined, except for ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (MIC90 16 mg/L) and Acinetobacter baumannii (MIC90 ≥ 32 mg/L). In addition, 883 (30%) of 2900 A. baumannii isolates were classified as multidrug-resistant (MDR): these MDR organisms were most susceptible to tigecycline (MIC90 2 mg/L) and minocycline (MIC90 8 mg/L) when all regional data are considered together. Susceptibility patterns also varied widely among the regions Conclusions The findings highlight the importance of monitoring antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and implementing effective methods to curb increased resistance and also confirm that additional studies to determine the efficacy of tigecycline in vivo, especially for treating infections with MDR organisms, are warranted. PMID:24006892

  14. [Proposals of the working group "Antibiotic resistance" for the configuration of microtitre plates to be used in routine antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacterial pathogens from infections of large food-producing animals and mastitis cases].

    PubMed

    Luhofer, Gabriele; Böttner, Alexander; Hafez, H Mohamed; Kaske, Martin; Kehrenberg, Corinna; Kietzmann, Manfred; Klarmann, Dieter; Klein, Günter; Krabisch, Peter; Kühn, Tilman; Richter, Angelika; Sigge, Claudia; Traeder, Wolfgang; Waldmann, Karl-Heinz; Wallmann, Jürgen; Werckenthin, Christiane; Schwarz, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Two layouts for microtitre plates, which should serve for in-vitro susceptibility testing in routine diagnostics, have been set up by the working group "Antibiotic resistance" of the German Society for Veterinary Medicine. One of these layouts was designed for the testing of bacteria from cases of mastitis and the other for bacteria from infections in large food-producing animals. The choice of the antimicrobial agents and their concentrations to be included in these layouts were based on (1) the bacteria frequently associated with the respective diseases/animals, (2) the antimicrobial agents licensed for therapeutic use in these diseases/animals, (3) the currently available breakpoints, and (4) cross-resistances between the antimicrobial agerts so far known to occur in the respective bacteria.

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 51 strains of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbride, K A; Rosendal, S

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-one strains of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae were tested for susceptibility to 27 antimicrobial agents using agar disc diffusion, broth-tube dilution and microdilution methods. There was generally good agreement between the interpretation of the disc diffusion inhibition zones and the actual minimal inhibitory concentrations obtained with the dilution methods. The agreement between the results obtained with the broth-tube dilution method and the microdilution method was very good. Three strains were resistant to penicillin, ampicillin, carbenicillin, methicillin and tetracycline. One of those was also resistant to chloramphenicol. Forty strains were resistant to streptomycin, 23 strains were resistant to novobiocin and seven were resistant to triple sulfa. It is thus necessary to consider resistance development against antimicrobial agents chosen for the treatment of pleuro-pneumonia in pigs caused by Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae. PMID:6713256

  16. [Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the Proteeae in Japan, 1989].

    PubMed

    Igari, J; Hayashi, Y; Shitara, S; Shitara, M; Yoshimoto, K; Ohmizu, Y; Umetsu, M; Sasaki, J; Kawana, R; Yoshida, T

    1993-04-01

    We discussed the antimicrobial susceptibilities of Proteeae isolated in Japan, 1989. Eight hundred six clinical isolates were collected from 47 hospitals. These were comprised of 431 strains of Proteus mirabilis, 155 Proteus vulgaris, 154 Morganella morganii, 44 Providencia rettgeri and 22 Providencia stuartii. Antibiotics tested in this study were 2 penicillins, 5 cephems, 1 carbapenem and 2 aminoglycosides. The MIC's were determined using the standard method of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy. Susceptibilities of the above strains to these antibiotics are described below; 1. Latamoxef, ceftizoxime and imipenem had excellent activities with no evident differences among the species of Proteeae. 2. Ampicillin and cefazolin were less active against Indol-positive Proteeae. 3. Piperacillin and cefmetazole were also strongly active drugs against P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris and P. stuartii, and cefotiam against P. mirabilis and P. stuartii. 4. Gentamicin and netilmicin showed excellent activities against M. morganii.

  17. In Vitro Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Aerococcus urinae

    PubMed Central

    Hindler, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    Aerococcus urinae may cause urinary tract infections, bacteremia, and endocarditis. No standardized susceptibility test methods or interpretive criteria have been proposed for this organism. This study reports the MIC results for 128 A. urinae isolates tested by broth microdilution. The isolates had low MICs to amoxicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, doxycycline, linezolid, meropenem, penicillin, rifampin, tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and vancomycin. However, 55% of the isolates had MICs to clindamycin of >0.25 μg/ml, 44% had MICs to erythromycin of >0.25 μg/ml, and 16% had MICs to levofloxacin of >2 μg/ml. PMID:24671781

  18. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Aerococcus urinae.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Romney M; Hindler, Janet A

    2014-06-01

    Aerococcus urinae may cause urinary tract infections, bacteremia, and endocarditis. No standardized susceptibility test methods or interpretive criteria have been proposed for this organism. This study reports the MIC results for 128 A. urinae isolates tested by broth microdilution. The isolates had low MICs to amoxicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, doxycycline, linezolid, meropenem, penicillin, rifampin, tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and vancomycin. However, 55% of the isolates had MICs to clindamycin of >0.25 μg/ml, 44% had MICs to erythromycin of >0.25 μg/ml, and 16% had MICs to levofloxacin of >2 μg/ml.

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Haemophilus parasuis from pigs in the United Kingdom and Spain.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, A J Martín; Tucker, A W; Navas, J; Blanco, M; Morris, S J; Gutiérrez-Martín, C B

    2007-02-25

    A total of 30 British and 30 Spanish Haemophilus parasuis isolates were tested for their susceptibility to 19 of the antimicrobials currently used in swine practice with a broth microdilution method in order to know the emergence of resistance against these compounds in this porcine pathogen. All the British isolates were susceptible to penicillin, ceftiofur, erythromycin, tilmicosin, enrofloxacin, and florfenicol, and most of them were susceptible to the remaining antimicrobials (the highest resistance rate found was of 20% to neomycin). In contrast, all the Spanish isolates were susceptible exclusively to florfenicol, and high proportions of resistance were encountered for penicillin, ampicillin, oxytetracycline, erythromycin, tilmicosin, tiamulin and trimethoprim+sulphamethoxazole; in addition, a bimodal or multimodal distribution, or tailing of Spanish isolates over the MIC range was observed for clindamycin, sulphonamides and tylosine tartrate, suggesting the development of acquired resistance. In addition, several multiresistance patterns were found among the Spanish isolates, 23.3% of them being resistant to at least eight antimicrobials, the same rate as that encountered for those being susceptible to all antimicrobials tested. This study showed that in general British H. parasuis isolates are susceptible to antimicrobial agents routinely used for treatment of porcine respiratory diseases; however, the Spanish isolates need a more continuous surveillance of their susceptibility patterns.

  20. Factors affecting antimicrobial susceptibility of Fusobacterium species.

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, M D; Del Bene, V E; Lewis, J W

    1987-01-01

    Fifteen clinical isolates of Fusobacterium species were studied to determine their quality of growth on five agar media, their susceptibility to penicillin, cephalothin, cefoxitin, and cefotaxime, the inoculum effect, and the presence of L forms and beta-lactamase. Wilkins-Chalgren agar supported confluent growth best, but Fusobacterium nucleatum exhibited poor growth on all agar media. Most isolates exhibited poor reproducibility of MIC results with repeated agar dilution testing. However, most isolates were susceptible to all antibiotics at the breakpoint concentrations. No inoculum effect was observed, but preparation of an inoculum at a 0.5 McFarland nephelometric standard produced a lower than expected number of CFU (10(6) CFU) in some isolates. L forms were frequently seen. No beta-lactamase was found. The variability in MICs seen with beta-lactam antibiotics was not found when clindamycin was tested. MIC studies with Fusobacterium spp. may be complicated by poor growth on agar media, poor reproducibility, and small inoculum size. PMID:3494743

  1. Prevalence, capsular type and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus suis isolated from slaughter pigs in Korea.

    PubMed Central

    Han, D U; Choi, C; Ham, H J; Jung, J H; Cho, W S; Kim, J; Higgins, R; Chae, C

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence, capsular serotype, and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus suis isolated from slaughter pigs. Capsular serotype and antimicrobial susceptibility were determined by coagglutination test and agar dilution minimum inhibitory concentration, respectively. Streptococcus suis was isolated from 55 of the 406 palatine tonsillar samples tested (13.8%) and 14 of the 29 sampled herds (48.3%). Of the 55 isolates recovered from slaughter pigs, 26 (47.3%) were untypeable. Of the remaining 29 isolates, capsular serotypes 9 (9 isolates) and 16 (4 isolates) were the most common, followed by capsular serotypes 4 (3 isolates) and 7 (3 isolates). Every capsulated isolate was typeable and no palatine tonsillar sample yielded more than one serotype. Most of isolates were susceptible to low concentrations (MIC90) of amoxicillin (2 microg/mL), ceftiofur (1 microg/mL), and penicillin (1 microg/mL). No correlation was found between antimicrobial susceptibility and capsular serotype. PMID:11480519

  2. [Antimicrobial susceptibility testing in clinically relevant non-fermenting gram-negative bacilli: recommendations from the Antimicrobial Agents Subcommittee of the Sociedad Argentina de Bacteriología, Micología y Parasitología Clínicas, Asociación Argentina de Microbiología].

    PubMed

    Radice, Marcela; Marín, Marcelo; Giovanakis, Marta; Vay, Carlos; Almuzara, Marisa; Limansky, Adriana; Casellas, José M; Famiglietti, Angela; Quinteros, Mirta; Bantar, Carlos; Galas, Marcelo; Kovensky Pupko, Jaime; Nicola, Federico; Pasterán, Fernando; Soloaga, Rolando; Gutkind, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    This document contains the recommendations for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the clinically relevant non-fermenting gram-negative bacilli (NFGNB), adopted after conforming those from international committees to the experience of the Antimicrobial Agents Subcommittee members and invited experts. This document includes an update on NFGNB classification and description, as well as some specific descriptions regarding natural or frequent antimicrobial resistance and a brief account of associated resistance mechanisms. These recommendations not only suggest the antimicrobial drugs to be evaluated in each case, but also provide an optimization of the disk diffusion layout and a selection of results to be reported. Finally, this document also includes a summary of the different methodological approaches that may be used for detection and confirmation of emerging b-lactamases, such as class A and B carbapenemases.

  3. [Antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from stool cultures in Santiago, Chile].

    PubMed

    García, Patricia C; Valenzuela, Natalia S; Rodríguez, M Victoria L; León, Eugenia C; Fernández, Heríberto J

    2009-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a common agent of enterocolitis in humans. Campylobacteriosis has been recognized as a zoonotic disease whose reservoir is the intestinal flora of poultry. The reposition of fluid and electrolytes is the recommended treatment, and antimicrobials are required only in severe and/or in prolonged disease. Given the emergence of resistance to drugs commonly used in the treatment of acute diarrhea, we studied the antimicrobial susceptibility of 73 strains of Campylobacter jejuni isolated from stool culture. The antimicrobials tested were: erythromycin, azithromycin, ampicillin and ciprofloxacin. Of the 73 strains tested by E-test, 32.4% were resistant to ciprofloxacin and 6.4% were resistant to ampicillin. Resistance to erythromycin and azithromycin was not detected. The surveillance of antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter jejuni is important in the evaluation of empirically used antimicrobials in the treatment of bacterial enterocolitis.

  4. Fenticonazole activity measured by the methods of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing and CLSI against 260 Candida vulvovaginitis isolates from two European regions and annotations on the prevalent genotypes.

    PubMed

    Antonopoulou, Stavroula; Aoun, Michel; Alexopoulos, Evangelos C; Baka, Stavroula; Logothetis, Emanuel; Kalambokas, Theodoros; Zannos, Andreas; Papadias, Konstantine; Grigoriou, Odysseas; Kouskouni, Evangelia; Velegraki, Aristea

    2009-05-01

    The activity of fenticonazole was studied against 260 West and Southeast European vulvovaginal candidiasis isolates, and low MICs were displayed. Fenticonazole was assessed by European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing and CLSI microdilution methods for the first time, and the results showed excellent agreement (97%) and significant interclass correlation coefficient (P < 0.0001). Also, the levels of agreement for the results for itraconazole, fluconazole, and ketoconazole were 84%, 90%, and 98% (P < 0.0001), respectively. Multilocus typing by PCR fingerprinting and subsequent cluster analysis delineated geographically associated alignments for Candida albicans and fluconazole resistance-related clusters for Candida glabrata.

  5. Fenticonazole Activity Measured by the Methods of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing and CLSI against 260 Candida Vulvovaginitis Isolates from Two European Regions and Annotations on the Prevalent Genotypes▿

    PubMed Central

    Antonopoulou, Stavroula; Aoun, Michel; Alexopoulos, Evangelos C.; Baka, Stavroula; Logothetis, Emanuel; Kalambokas, Theodoros; Zannos, Andreas; Papadias, Konstantine; Grigoriou, Odysseas; Kouskouni, Evangelia; Velegraki, Aristea

    2009-01-01

    The activity of fenticonazole was studied against 260 West and Southeast European vulvovaginal candidiasis isolates, and low MICs were displayed. Fenticonazole was assessed by European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing and CLSI microdilution methods for the first time, and the results showed excellent agreement (97%) and significant interclass correlation coefficient (P < 0.0001). Also, the levels of agreement for the results for itraconazole, fluconazole, and ketoconazole were 84%, 90%, and 98% (P < 0.0001), respectively. Multilocus typing by PCR fingerprinting and subsequent cluster analysis delineated geographically associated alignments for Candida albicans and fluconazole resistance-related clusters for Candida glabrata. PMID:19223627

  6. Disk diffusion susceptibility testing of two macrolide antimicrobial agents: revised interpretive criteria for erythromycin and preliminary guidelines for roxithromycin (RU 965).

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R N; Barry, A L; Fuchs, P C; Thornsberry, C

    1986-01-01

    The 15-micrograms erythromycin disk was twice evaluated for interpretive accuracy against 417 and then 266 strains of gram-positive cocci, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae by using the criteria suggested by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. These studies suggest a revision of streptococcal and Staphylococcus sp. interpretive guidelines to criteria (greater than or equal to 23 mm = susceptible, less than or equal to 13 mm = resistant) that are more compatible with in vivo erythromycin concentrations. It is also recommended that zone diameters be modified for H. influenzae (greater than or equal to 23 mm = susceptible, less than 22 mm = resistant) and that meningococci not be tested. A wide moderately susceptible category (1.0 to 4.0 micrograms/ml) would primarily include enterococcus strains and those organisms that would then respond only to parenteral administration of erythromycin. Roxithromycin (RU 965 or RU 28965), a new oxime ether erythromycin derivative, was also evaluated by investigator-prepared 15-micrograms disks and later with 30- and 60-micrograms commercial disks. Although roxithromycin was comparable to erythromycin in activity and regression line statistics, changes in the susceptible disk criteria were necessary because of superior roxithromycin serum concentrations and a longer serum half-life. Preliminary susceptible breakpoint criteria were greater than 21 mm = susceptible, 10 to 20 mm = indeterminate, and less than or equal to 9 mm = resistant. By using the recommended interpretive criteria for both macrolides, less than 98% absolute agreement was obtained, therefore suggesting the application of a spectrum class concept. PMID:3091634

  7. Influence of clinical breakpoint changes from CLSI 2009 to EUCAST 2011 antimicrobial susceptibility testing guidelines on multidrug resistance rates of Gram-negative rods.

    PubMed

    Hombach, Michael; Wolfensberger, Aline; Kuster, Stefan P; Böttger, Erik C

    2013-07-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) rates of Gram-negative rods were analyzed comparing CLSI 2009 and EUCAST 2011 antibiotic susceptibility testing guidelines. After EUCAST 2011 was applied, the MDR rates increased for Klebsiella pneumoniae (2.2%), Enterobacter cloacae (1.1%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (0.7%), and Escherichia coli (0.4%). A total of 24% of Enterobacteriaceae MDR isolates and 12% of P. aeruginosa MDR isolates were categorized as MDR due to breakpoint changes.

  8. Campylobacter MLST Subtypes and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Broiler Cecal Isolates: A Two Year Study from 142 Commercial Flocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Campylobacter spp. are recognized as important agents of human foodborne gastroenteritis. To monitor trends in food safety and public health, antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Campylobacter derived from poultry products and infected patients has become common practice in both r...

  9. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of staphylococci isolated from canine pyoderma in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Penna, B.; Varges, R.; Martins, G.M.; Martins, R.R.; Lilenbaum, W.

    2009-01-01

    The study aimed to determine the etiology and antimicrobial resistance of staphylococci isolated from canine pyoderma. Samples were obtained from dogs with pyoderma and isolates were identified by biochemical reactions and tested for susceptibility to 15 antimicrobials. Thirty nine staphylococci isolates were obtained, and S. pseudintermedius was the most frequent (47.4%). All isolates showed resistance to at least one drug and 77.1% were multiresistant. The most effective drug was oxacillin. The study reports the alarming antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus isolated from canine pyoderma samples. PMID:24031392

  10. Antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial isolates from sea otters (Enhydra lutris).

    PubMed

    Brownstein, Deborah; Miller, Melissa A; Oates, Stori C; Byrne, Barbara A; Jang, Spencer; Murray, Michael J; Gill, Verena A; Jessup, David A

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial infections are an important cause of sea otter (Enhydra lutris) mortality, and some of these infections may originate from terrestrial and anthropogenic sources. Antimicrobials are an important therapeutic tool for management of bacterial infections in stranded sea otters and for prevention of infection following invasive procedures in free-ranging otters. In this study, susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobials was determined for 126 isolates of 15 bacterial species or groups from necropsied, live-stranded injured or sick, and apparently healthy wild sea otters examined between 1998 and 2005. These isolates included both gram-positive and gram-negative strains of primary pathogens, opportunistic pathogens, and environmental flora, including bacterial species with proven zoonotic potential. Minimal evidence of antimicrobial resistance and no strains with unusual or clinically significant multiple-drug resistance patterns were identified. Collectively, these findings will help optimize selection of appropriate antimicrobials for treatment of bacterial diseases in sea otters and other marine species.

  11. Biochemical characteristics and antimicrobials susceptibility of Salmonella gallinarum isolated in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-ju; Kim, Ki-seuk; Kwon, Yong-kuk; Tak, Ryun-bin

    2003-08-01

    Fowl typhoid (FT) reported since 1992 in Korea is a septicemic disease of domestic birds caused by Salmonella gallinarum (S. gallinarum). The purpose of this study was to investigate the biochemical characteristics and antimicrobials susceptibility of field isolates of S. gallinarum isolated by year in Korea. A total of 258 isolates of S. gallinarum from 1995 to 2001 showed the same pattern in the majority of biochemical test such as IMViC (indole, methyl red, Voges-Proskauer and citrate utilization), carbohydrate fermentation and amino acid decarboxylation, and these results were almost in accordance with the traditional biochemical characteristics of S. gallinarum strain. When the antimicrobial susceptibility test against 258 isolates of S. gallinarum was performed by the disk diffusion method using 12 antimicrobial agents, all isolates from 1995 appeared to be susceptible to all of the antimicrobial agents tested except for tetracycline and oxytetracycline, whereas the vast majority of isolates from 2001 showed the reduced susceptibility to ampicillin (13.0%), gentamicin (43.4%), kanamycin (69.6%), enrofloxacin (6.5%), ciprofloxacin (10.9%), norfloxacin (52.5%) and ofloxacin (82. 6%). The prevalence of the prevalence of completely resistant isolates resistant isolates to one or more drugs rapidly increased from 0% in 1995 to 93.5% in 2001. The minimal concentrations range of the majority of antimicrobial agents to inhibit 50% (MIC50s) against S. gallinarum isolates increased from 0.06 approximately 8 microg/ml in 1997 to 2 approximately 256 microg/ml in 2001. Especially, MIC50s for gentamicin and fluoroquinolones of isolates from 2001 increased over 10-fold than those of isolates from 1997. Therefore, our results indicate that sorbitol fermentation and arginine decarboxylation showed the diversity by isolates and the vast majority of isolates from 2001 showed the reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials tested.

  12. [Evolution of antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates].

    PubMed

    López-Hernández, S; Alarcón, T; López-Brea, M

    2000-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a microorganism frequently implicated in colonization and infection in hospitalized patients. An increase of resistance has been observed in recent years making these infections difficult to treat. The in vitro activity of 24 antibiotics, 15 betalactam agents and nine nonbetalactams, was studied in 156 A. baumannii clinical isolates. The strains were collected from different clinical samples obtained from inpatients (92%) and 8% were from outpatients. Evolution of susceptibility from January 1995 to December 1997 was studied. MIC of the following antibiotics was determined by the agar dilution method: ampicillin, ticarcillin, piperacillin, ampicillin-sulbactam, amoxicillin- clavulanic acid, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid, piperacillin-tazobactam, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefepime, imipenem, meropenem, clavulanic acid, sulbactam, tazobactam, amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, ofloxacin, doxycycline, fosfomycin, rifampin, azithromycin and colistin. Low antimicrobial susceptibility was observed in most A. baumannii strains. Colistin, imipenem, meropenem and ampicillin-sulbactam showed the greatest susceptibility (100, 88.4, 88.4 and 84.6%, respectively). A. baumannii strains from inpatients showed a lower antimicrobial susceptibility than strains from outpatients, who showed a high percentage of susceptibility to most antibiotics. Rifampin and azithromycin showed certain in vitro activity against the most susceptible A. baumannii strains. A progressive decrease in susceptibility to most antibiotics was observed during the period studied. Carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii emerged in 1996 and increased in 1997.

  13. [Recommendations for selecting antimicrobial agents for in vitro susceptibility studies using automatic and semiautomatic systems].

    PubMed

    Cantón, Rafael; Alós, Juan Ignacio; Baquero, Fernando; Calvo, Jorge; Campos, José; Castillo, Javier; Cercenado, Emilia; Domínguez, M Angeles; Liñares, Josefina; López-Cerezo, Lorena; Marco, Francesc; Mirelis, Beatriz; Morosini, María-Isabel; Navarro, Ferran; Oliver, Antonio; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio; Torres, Carmen; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2007-01-01

    The number of clinical microbiology laboratories that have incorporated automatic susceptibility testing devices has increased in recent years. The majority of these systems determine MIC values using microdilution panels or specific cards, with grouping into clinical categories (susceptible, intermediate or resistant) and incorporate expert systems to infer resistance mechanisms. This document presents the recommendations of a group of experts designated by Grupo de Estudio de los Mecanismos de Acción y Resistencia a los Antimicrobianos (GEMARA, Study group on mechanisms of action and resistance to antimicrobial agents) and Mesa Española de Normalización de la Sensibilidad y Resistencia a los Antimicrobianos (MENSURA, Spanish Group for Normalizing Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Antimicrobial Resistance), with the aim of including antimicrobial agents and selecting concentrations for the susceptibility testing panels of automatic systems. The following have been defined: various antimicrobial categories (A: must be included in the study panel; B: inclusion is recommended; and C: inclusion is secondary, but may facilitate interpretative reading of the antibiogram) and groups (0: not used in therapeutics but may facilitate the detection of resistance mechanisms; 1: must be studied and always reported; 2: must be studied and selectively reported; 3: must be studied and reported at a second level; and 4: should be studied in urinary tract pathogens isolated in urine and other specimens). Recommended antimicrobial concentrations are adapted from the breakpoints established by EUCAST, CLSI and MENSURA. This approach will lead to more accurate susceptibility testing results with better detection of resistance mechanisms, and allowing to reach the clinical goal of the antibiogram.

  14. Comparability of antimicrobial susceptibility test results from 22 European countries and Israel: an external quality assurance exercise of the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS) in collaboration with the United Kingdom National External Quality Assurance Scheme (UK NEQAS).

    PubMed

    Bronzwaer, S; Buchholz, U; Courvalin, P; Snell, J; Cornaglia, G; de Neeling, A; Aubry-Damon, H; Degener, J

    2002-12-01

    The goal of this exercise was to organize external quality assurance (QA) of antibiotic susceptibility testing for laboratories participating in EARSS and to assess the comparability of susceptibility test results across countries, and guidelines. In September 2000, UK NEQAS distributed a set of three Streptococcus pneumoniae strains, two Staphylococcus aureus strains and one Streptococcus haemolyticus strain. Laboratories reported the guideline followed, the interpretation of the susceptibility test result and the MIC, if tested. In this study we considered results 'concordant' if the reported interpretation of the participating laboratory agreed with the designated interpretation of reference laboratories. Overall, 433 (92%) of 471 laboratories from 23 countries reported back. Of the 8685 tests that were assessed, 8322 (96%) were interpreted correctly by the participants. Concordance for detection of penicillin non-susceptibility in the three S. pneumoniae strains was 96%, 90% and 87%, respectively. Laboratories performed extremely well in detecting oxacillin resistance in the homogeneously methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain, but the concordance rate dropped from 100% to 77% in the heterogeneously resistant MRSA strain. Concordance for detection of teicoplanin resistance in the S. haemolyticus strain was 82%. We stratified concordance rates first for country and then for guideline used, but observed only minor differences among countries and guidelines. Quantitative methods yielding an MIC were more concordant than non-MIC methods for penicillin resistance in the S. pneumoniae strains (94% versus 79%). The NCCLS guideline was the most frequently followed, by 61% of laboratories from 19 countries. This exercise shows that, overall, countries participating in EARSS are capable of delivering susceptibility data of good quality. The comparability of susceptibility data for penicillin resistance in S. pneumoniae and for homogeneous methicillin resistance in

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Staphylococcus intermedius isolates from clinical cases of canine pyoderma in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Blunt, Catherine A; van Vuuren, Moritz; Picard, Jacqueline

    2013-05-16

    Successful treatment of canine pyoderma has become compromised owing to the development of antimicrobial resistance with accompanying recurrence of infection. Canine skin samples submitted to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory for microbiological culture and sensitivity between January 2007 and June 2010, from which Staphylococcus intermedius was isolated, were selected for this investigation. Antimicrobial resistance of S. intermedius was most prevalent with reference to ampicillin followed by resistance to tetracycline and then potentiated sulphonamides. In general, antimicrobial resistance was low and very few methicillin-resistant isolates were detected. Temporal trends were not noted, except for ampicillin, with isolates becoming more susceptible, and potentiated sulphonamides (co-trimoxazole), with isolates becoming more resistant. In general, both the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion and broth dilution minimum inhibitory concentration tests yielded similar results for the antimicrobial agents tested. The main difference was evident in the over-estimation of resistance by the Kirby-Bauer test for ampicillin, co-trimoxazole, penicillin and doxycycline. Knowledge of trends in bacterial resistance is important for veterinarians when presented with canine pyoderma. Analysis of antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of S. intermedius isolated from canine pyodermas will guide veterinarians' use of the most appropriate agent and encourage prudent use of antimicrobials in companion animals.

  16. In vitro susceptibility of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale to several antimicrobial drugs.

    PubMed

    Soriano, V E; Vera, N A; Salado, C R; Fernández, R P; Blackall, P J

    2003-01-01

    As part of the basic characterization of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale, the minimal inhibitory concentrations of 10 antimicrobial drugs were determined for reference strains and Mexican isolates by a broth microdilution method. For optimal growth of the organisms, a supplemented brain-heart infusion broth was used. The susceptibility of O. rhinotracheale to amoxicillin, enrofloxacin, and oxytetracycline was variable. However, consistent higher minimal inhibitory concentrations values were obtained for gentamicin, fosfomycin, trimethoprim, sulfamethazine, sulfamerazine, sulfaquinoxaline, and sulfachloropyridazine. Obtained results among Mexican isolates indicate a marked antimicrobial drug resistance trend.

  17. Campylobacter spp. - prevalence on pig livers and antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    von Altrock, Alexandra; Hamedy, Ahmad; Merle, Roswitha; Waldmann, Karl-Heinz

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. on surfaces of slaughtered pig livers. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was performed to determine the sequence types (STs) of selected Campylobacter coli isolates. Additionally, C. coli and Campylobacter jejuni isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by the broth dilution method. The minimal inhibitory concentrations were determined for erythromycin, gentamicin, ampicillin, ampicillin/sulbactam, nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline and trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole. Samples were taken during the slaughtering process in a slaughterhouse in Lower Saxony, Germany. Altogether, 10% of 1500 surfaces of pig livers from 50 fattening herds was found to be Campylobacter positive, with C. coli as the predominant species (76%) followed by C. jejuni (21%). Resistance to erythromycin and tetracycline was higher in C. jejuni compared to C. coli, whereas C. coli were more resistant to quinolone compared to C. jejuni. Fluoroquinolone resistance is usually associated with cross-resistance to quinolone, but in the presented investigation C. coli as well as C. jejuni showed a higher resistance to ciprofloxacin (28.6% and 20.0%, respectively) than to nalidixic acid (9.5% and 0%, respectively). A high genetic diversity of the C. coli isolates was demonstrated by MLST. Differences in STs and antimicrobial resistance pattern indicate that the Campylobacter strains originated from the pig itself and not from the slaughterhouse. A comparison of the STs with those reported in the C. jejuni/coli PubMLST database showed an overlap of porcine and human isolates, indicating that C. coli isolates from pigs should be considered as potential sources of human infection.

  18. Multicenter Study of Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Anaerobic Bacteria in Korea in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yangsoon; Park, Yeon-Joon; Kim, Mi-Na; Uh, Young; Kim, Myung Sook

    2015-01-01

    Background Periodic monitoring of regional or institutional resistance trends of clinically important anaerobic bacteria is recommended, because the resistance of anaerobic pathogens to antimicrobial drugs and inappropriate therapy are associated with poor clinical outcomes. There has been no multicenter study of clinical anaerobic isolates in Korea. We aimed to determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns of clinically important anaerobes at multiple centers in Korea. Methods A total of 268 non-duplicated clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria were collected from four large medical centers in Korea in 2012. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by the agar dilution method according to the CLSI guidelines. The following antimicrobials were tested: piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, cefoxitin, cefotetan, imipenem, meropenem, clindamycin, moxifloxacin, chloramphenicol, metronidazole, and tigecycline. Results Organisms of the Bacteroides fragilis group were highly susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, and meropenem, as their resistance rates to these three antimicrobials were lower than 6%. For B. fragilis group isolates and anaerobic gram-positive cocci, the resistance rates to moxifloxacin were 12-25% and 11-13%, respectively. Among B. fragilis group organisms, the resistance rates to tigecycline were 16-17%. Two isolates of Finegoldia magna were non-susceptible to chloramphenicol (minimum inhibitory concentrations of 16-32 mg/L). Resistance patterns were different among the different hospitals. Conclusions Piperacillin-tazobactam, cefoxitin, and carbapemems are highly active β-lactam agents against most of the anaerobes. The resistance rates to moxifloxacin and tigecycline are slightly higher than those in the previous study. PMID:26206683

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility of porcine Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and Brachyspira pilosicoli isolated in Sweden between 1990 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The anaerobic spirochetes Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and Brachyspira pilosicoli cause diarrheal diseases in pigs. Their fastidious nature has hampered standardization of methods for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. For monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility wild type cutoff values are needed to define where the wild type distribution of MICs ends and no approved cutoffs are available for Brachyspira spp. In this study antimicrobial susceptibility data for both species (in total 906 isolates) were compiled and analyzed and wild type cut off values for B. hyodysenteriae proposed. Methods The MICs of tiamulin, valnemulin, tylosin, tylvalosin, doxycycline and lincomycin were determined by broth dilution in brain heart infusion broth supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum. Results The compiled MICs from the broth dilution tests of the B. hyodysenteriae type strain, B78T (ATCC® 27164T), showed that the method yields reproducible results. In an international perspective the frequencies of isolates with decreased antimicrobial susceptibility were low among both B. hyodysenteriae and B. pilosicoli. However, in B. pilosicoli a constant level of 10-15% isolates with tiamulin MICs >4 μg/ml was detected between 2002 and 2010 and in B. hyodysenteriae a gradual increase in tiamulin MICs was seen between 1990 and 2003 although this increase has ceased during the last years. The wild type cutoff values proposed for B. hyodysenteriae are: tiamulin >0.25 μg/ml, valnemulin >0.125 μg/ml, tylosin >16 μg/ml, tylvalosin >1 μg/ml, lincomycin >1 μg/ml and doxycycline >0.5 μg/ml. Conclusions The broth dilution method used in this study has over the years generated tightly grouped MIC populations for the field isolates and reproducible results for the control strain B78T and is therefore a suitable antimicrobial susceptibility test method for monitoring of Brachyspira spp. Here we propose wild type cutoff values for six antimicrobial agents for B. hyodysenteriae

  20. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Brucella melitensis Isolates in Peru

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    and Prevmtive Medicine Unit Two. Norfolk, Virginia’ Hospital Naciorwl Daniel Alcides Carrion , Callao, Pent~; Hospital Arzobi5po Loayza, Lima, Peru5...Alcides Carrion (Callao, Peru). All cultures, species identification, and antimicrobial suscep- tibility tests were performed in the Bacteriology

  1. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Environmental Streptococci Recovered from Bovine Milk Samples in the Maritime Provinces of Canada

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Marguerite; Saab, Matthew; Heider, Luke; McClure, J Trenton; Rodriguez-Lecompte, Juan Carlos; Sanchez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Determination of antimicrobial susceptibility of bovine mastitis pathogens is important for guiding antimicrobial treatment decisions and for the detection of emerging resistance. Environmental streptococci are ubiquitous in the farm environment and are a frequent cause of mastitis in dairy cows. The aim of the study was to determine patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility among species of environmental streptococci isolated from dairy cows in the Maritime Provinces of Canada. The collection consisted of 192 isolates identified in milk samples collected from 177 cows originating from 18 dairy herds. Results were aggregated into: (1) Streptococcus uberis (n = 70), (2) Streptococcus dysgalactiae (n = 28), (3) other Streptococci spp. (n = 35), (4), Lactococcus spp. (n = 32), and (5) Enterococcus spp. (n = 27). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined using the Sensititre microdilution system and mastitis plate format. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to analyze the data, with antimicrobial susceptibility as the outcome. The proportion of susceptible S. uberis ranged from 23% (for penicillin) to 99% (for penicillin/novobiocin), with a median of 82%. All S. dysgalactiae were susceptible to all antimicrobials except for penicillin (93% susceptible) and tetracycline (18% susceptible). The range of susceptibility for other Streptococcus spp. was 43% (for tetracycline) to 100%, with a median percent susceptibility of 92%. Lactococcus spp. isolates displayed percent susceptibilities ranging from 0% (for penicillin) to 97% (for erythromycin), median 75%. For the antimicrobials tested, the minimum inhibitory concentrations were higher for Enterococcus spp. than for the other species. According to the multilevel models, there was a significant interaction between antimicrobial and bacterial species, indicating that susceptibility against a particular antimicrobial varied among the species of environmental streptococci and vice

  2. Change in antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma gallisepticum field isolates.

    PubMed

    Gharaibeh, Saad; Al-Rashdan, Mohammad

    2011-06-02

    This study compares the antimicrobial susceptibility over time between two groups of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) isolates from the same geographical area. Minimum inhibitory concentration of 13 antimicrobials was determined against two groups of MG isolates from chickens. Group 1 strains (n=22) were isolated in 2004-2005 while group 2 strains (n=7) were isolated in 2007-2008. Minimum inhibitory concentration 50 for group 1 versus group 2 was 4/4, 0.5/0.5, ≤ 0.031/≥ 64, ≤ 0.031/2, ≤ 0.031/0.125, 1/0.5, 1/1, ≤ 0.031/≤ 0.031, ≤ 0.031/2, ≤ 0.031/2, 1/4, ≤ 0.031/0.062, and 0.062/2 μg/ml against gentamicin, spectinomycin, erythromycin, tilmicosin, tylosin, florfenicol, thiamphenicol, tiamulin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, chlortetracycline, doxycycline, and oxytetracycline, respectively. There was a statistically significant increase in resistance of group 2 to erythromycin, tilmicosin, tylosin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, chlortetracycline, doxycycline, and oxytetracycline. This dramatic increase in resistance against 8 antimicrobials belonging to three different families of antimicrobials in a relatively short period of time appears to be rare and of concern. The cause of this increased resistance observed in group 2 of MG isolates was not determined and should be further investigated. Monitoring of MG field strain susceptibility is highly recommended to implement successful treatment and prophylaxis programs in endemic areas.

  3. Susceptibilities of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum strains to antimicrobial agents in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    ter Laak, E A; Noordergraaf, J H; Verschure, M H

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the susceptibility of various strains of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum, which are prevalent causes of pneumonia in calves, to 16 antimicrobial agents in vitro. The MICs of the antimicrobial agents were determined by a serial broth dilution method for 16 field strains and the type strain of M. bovis, for 19 field strains and the type strain of M. dispar, and for 17 field strains of U. diversum. Final MICs for M. bovis and M. dispar were read after 7 days and final MICs for U. diversum after 1 to 2 days. All strains tested were susceptible to tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin but were resistant to nifuroquine and streptomycin. Most strains of U. diversum were intermediately susceptible to oxytetracycline but fully susceptible to chlortetracycline; most strains of M. bovis and M. dispar, however, were resistant to both agents. Strains of M. dispar and U. diversum were susceptible to doxycycline and minocycline, but strains of M. bovis were only intermediately susceptible. Susceptibility or resistance to chloramphenicol, spiramycin, spectinomycin, lincomycin, or enrofloxacin depended on the species but was not equal for the three species. The type strains of M. bovis and M. dispar were more susceptible to various antimicrobial agents, including tetracyclines, than the field strains. This finding might indicate that M. bovis and M. dispar strains are becoming resistant to these agents. Antimicrobial agents that are effective in vitro against all three mycoplasma species can be considered for treating mycoplasma infections in pneumonic calves. Therefore, tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin may be preferred over oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline. PMID:8452363

  4. Susceptibilities of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum strains to antimicrobial agents in vitro.

    PubMed

    ter Laak, E A; Noordergraaf, J H; Verschure, M H

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the susceptibility of various strains of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum, which are prevalent causes of pneumonia in calves, to 16 antimicrobial agents in vitro. The MICs of the antimicrobial agents were determined by a serial broth dilution method for 16 field strains and the type strain of M. bovis, for 19 field strains and the type strain of M. dispar, and for 17 field strains of U. diversum. Final MICs for M. bovis and M. dispar were read after 7 days and final MICs for U. diversum after 1 to 2 days. All strains tested were susceptible to tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin but were resistant to nifuroquine and streptomycin. Most strains of U. diversum were intermediately susceptible to oxytetracycline but fully susceptible to chlortetracycline; most strains of M. bovis and M. dispar, however, were resistant to both agents. Strains of M. dispar and U. diversum were susceptible to doxycycline and minocycline, but strains of M. bovis were only intermediately susceptible. Susceptibility or resistance to chloramphenicol, spiramycin, spectinomycin, lincomycin, or enrofloxacin depended on the species but was not equal for the three species. The type strains of M. bovis and M. dispar were more susceptible to various antimicrobial agents, including tetracyclines, than the field strains. This finding might indicate that M. bovis and M. dispar strains are becoming resistant to these agents. Antimicrobial agents that are effective in vitro against all three mycoplasma species can be considered for treating mycoplasma infections in pneumonic calves. Therefore, tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin may be preferred over oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline.

  5. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility determination of uropathogens in clinical urine specimens by use of ATP bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Ivancic, Vesna; Mastali, Mitra; Percy, Neil; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Babbitt, Jane T; Li, Yang; Landaw, Elliot M; Bruckner, David A; Churchill, Bernard M; Haake, David A

    2008-04-01

    We describe the first direct testing of the antimicrobial susceptibilities of bacterial pathogens in human clinical fluid samples by the use of ATP bioluminescence. We developed an ATP bioluminescence assay that eliminates somatic sources of ATP to selectively quantify the bacterial load in clinical urine specimens with a sensitivity of <1,000 CFU per milliliter. There was a log-log relationship between light emission and the numbers of CFU in clinical urine specimens. A clinical study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of the ATP bioluminescence assay for determination of the antimicrobial susceptibilities of uropathogens in clinical urine specimens tested in a blinded manner. ATP bioluminescent bacterial density quantitation was used to determine the inoculation volume in growth medium with and without antibiotics. After incubation at 37 degrees C for 120 min, the ATP bioluminescence assay was repeated to evaluate the uropathogen response to antibiotics. The ability of the ATP bioluminescence assay to discriminate between antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance was determined by comparison of the results obtained by the ATP bioluminescence assay with the results obtained by standard clinical microbiology methods. Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to determine the optimal threshold for discriminating between susceptibility and resistance. Susceptibility and resistance were correctly predicted in 87% and 95% of cases, respectively, for an overall unweighted accuracy of 91%, when the results were stratified by antibiotic. For samples in which the pathogen was susceptible, the accuracy improved to 95% when the results for samples with less than a 25-fold increase in the amount of bacterial ATP in the medium without antibiotics were excluded. These data indicate that a rapid bioluminescent antimicrobial susceptibility assay may be useful for the management of urinary tract infections.

  6. Susceptibility of Escherichia coli from growing piglets receiving antimicrobial feed additives.

    PubMed

    Kim, L M; Gray, Jeffery T; Harmon, Barry G; Jones, Richard D; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J

    2005-01-01

    Concerns regarding an apparent association between the use of antimicrobial feed additives (AFAs) in food animal production and a concomitant increase in antimicrobial drug resistance among zoonotic enteropathogens have provided the impetus to propose cessation of their use. While AFAs have been used in food animal production for nearly 50 years, the future use of AFAs will require an understanding of the effects of different classes of antimicrobials on the antimicrobial resistance of commensal flora. The present study examines the effect of three AFAs (apramycin, carbadox, and chlortetracycline) on the antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli in growing piglets and on animal performance. Three replicate trials were conducted using growing piglets fed standard diets with and without antimicrobial feed additives (AFAs). Fecal samples were cultured selectively for E. coli at regular intervals from all piglets from birth to market and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of E. coli isolates was performed using a replica-plate screening method and a broth microdilution method. While resistance to tetracycline in E. coli varied widely by sample, group, and trial, a significant increase in the percentage of resistant isolates was observed in piglets receiving AFAs when compared to controls (p < 0.0001). Resistance to apramycin increased in E. coli from piglets fed apramycin when compared to controls (p < 0.0001). However, upon removal of apramycin, resistance in E. coli declined to baseline levels by day 75. Piglets receiving AFAs demonstrated improved feed efficiency during phase 4 (p < 0.001), and higher average daily gains in phases 3 and 4 (p < 0.0001). This study suggests that antimicrobial resistance to AFAs in E. coli is drug-dependent and that some antimicrobials may be suitable for continued use in feeds during specified growth periods without concern for persistence of resistant E. coli populations.

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility and body site distribution of community isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Jorunn Pauline; Wolden, Runa; Heise, Philipp; Esaiassen, Eirin; Klingenberg, Claus; Aarag Fredheim, Elizabeth G

    2016-11-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial resistance in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) from healthy adults in the community. Healthy adults (n = 114) were swabbed on six body sites; both armpits, both knee pits and both sides of the groin. Species determination was performed using Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization - Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF) and susceptibility testing for 11 relevant antimicrobials was performed by the disc diffusion method and minimal inhibitory concentration gradient test. In total, 693 CoNS isolates were identified. Susceptibility testing was done on 386 isolates; one CoNS from each species found on each participant from the different body sites. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in the CoNS isolates were; erythromycin (24.6%), fusidic acid (19.9%), tetracycline (11.4%), clindamycin (7.8%), gentamicin (6.2%) and cefoxitin (4.1%). Multidrug resistance was observed in 5.2% of the isolates. Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. hominis were the first and second most prevalent species on all three body sites. We conclude that CoNS isolates from healthy adults in the community have a much lower prevalence of antimicrobial resistance than reported in nosocomial CoNS isolates. Still, we believe that levels of resistance in community CoNS should be monitored as the consumption of antimicrobials in primary care in Norway is increasing.

  8. Evaluation of antimicrobial susceptibility and integron carriage in Helicobacter pylori isolates from patients

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Heidary, Mohsen; Azad, Mehdi; Fazeli, Maryam; Goudarzi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility pattern and distribution of integron in H. pylori isolates collected from patients referred to private health care centers in Tehran, Iran. Background: Antibiotic resistance is the main reason for failure of Helicobacter pylori therapy. Integrons as genetic reservoirs play main roles in the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance gene. Methods: During a 12-month cross-sectional study period, 65 H. pylori isolates were recovered from 124 biopsy specimens. Isolates were subjected to susceptibility testing using by Epsilometer test according to the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) guideline. PCR was used to detect different types of integrons. Results: Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed that 73.8% of isolates were resistant to metronidazole, 43.1% to clarithromycin, 29.2% to tetracycline, 27.7% to amoxicillin, 23.1% to rifampicin and 13.4% to levofloxacin. Frequency of multidrug resistance among H. pylori isolates was 26.1%. The most predominant resistance profiles among our isolates were included resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole (20%). Class 1 and 2 integrons were detected in 8 (12.3%) and 15 (23.1%) of the isolates, respectively. Conclusions: The high prevalence of multidrug resistance and frequency of class 2 integron in this survey can be a warning for clinicians. Continuous surveillance is necessary for the development of new treatment protocols to prevent the treatment failures and also further spread of resistant isolates. PMID:28224028

  9. Characterization of the antimicrobial susceptibility of fungi responsible for onychomycosis in Spain.

    PubMed

    Zalacain, A; Obrador, C; Martinez, J P; Viñas, M; Vinuesa, T

    2011-07-01

    Due to the increase of choices relative to antifungals, there is a need to improve the standardization of in vitro methods used to determine the antifungal susceptibility of fungal pathogens. Our study evaluated the in vitro susceptibility of filamentous fungi isolated from patients with toenail onychomycosis against itraconazole, ciclopirox, eberconazole, fluconazole and terbinafine. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of these antifungal agents was determined with 100 isolates, including dermatophytes (70 strains) and non-dermatophyte molds (30 strains). The susceptibility of fungal isolates was measured by using a technique modified for dermatophytes (0.5 × 10(3)-0.5 × 10(4) conidia/ml as inocula) which followed the procedures described by the Antifungal Susceptibility Testing Subcommittee of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (AFST-EUCAST) and the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI M38-A). MIC ranges were 0.016-8.0 μg/ml for itraconazole, ciclopirox and eberconazole, 0.063-32.0 μg/ml for fluonazole, and 0.004-2.0 μg/ml for terbinafine. In vitro susceptibility tests indicated that eberconazole has a broad antimicrobial profile, including dermatophytes, as well as other filamentous fungi. Terbinafine was active (0.016-0.250 μg/ml) against dermatophytes.

  10. Biotypes and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Brucella isolates.

    PubMed

    Bodur, Hürrem; Balaban, Neriman; Aksaray, Sebahat; Yetener, Vedat; Akinci, Esragül; Colpan, Aylin; Erbay, Ayse

    2003-01-01

    41 Brucella strains isolated from blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures were identified to species level and biotypes detected. All of the isolates were Brucella melitensis: 2 strains of B. melitensis biotype-1 and 39 strains of B. melitensis biotype-3. In vitro activities of these strains were detected by the E test method. According to the 90% minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC90) values, the most active agent was doxycycline (MIC90 0.064 microg/ml), followed by ciprofloxacin (MIC90 0.25 microg/ml), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ceftriaxone (MIC90 0.38 microg/ml). Rifampin exhibited the highest MIC90 value (0.75 microg/ml).

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Brazilian Clostridium difficile strains determined by agar dilution and disk diffusion.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Edmir Geraldo; Nicodemo, Antonio Carlos; Sampaio, Jorge Luiz Mello

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of diarrhea in hospitalized patients worldwide. While metronidazole and vancomycin are the most prescribed antibiotics for the treatment of this infection, teicoplanin, tigecycline and nitazoxanide are alternatives drugs. Knowledge on the antibiotic susceptibility profiles is a basic step to differentiate recurrence from treatment failure due to antimicrobial resistance. Because C. difficile antimicrobial susceptibility is largely unknown in Brazil, we aimed to determine the profile of C. difficile strains cultivated from stool samples of inpatients with diarrhea and a positive toxin A/B test using both agar dilution and disk diffusion methods. All 50 strains tested were sensitive to metronidazole according to CLSI and EUCAST breakpoints with an MIC90 value of 2μg/mL. Nitazoxanide and tigecycline were highly active in vitro against these strains with an MIC90 value of 0.125μg/mL for both antimicrobials. The MIC90 were 4μg/mL and 2μg/mL for vancomycin and teicoplanin, respectively. A resistance rate of 8% was observed for moxifloxacin. Disk diffusion can be used as an alternative to screen for moxifloxacin resistance, nitazoxanide, tigecycline and metronidazole susceptibility, but it cannot be used for testing glycopeptides. Our results suggest that C. difficile strains from São Paulo city, Brazil, are susceptible to metronidazole and have low MIC90 values for most of the current therapeutic options available in Brazil.

  12. Patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility in Michigan wildlife and bovine isolates of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Daly, Meighan; Diegel, Kelly L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Schooley, Angie; Berry, Dale E; Kaneene, John B

    2006-07-01

    The state of Michigan has recognized the presence of Mycobacterium bovis in its free-ranging white-tailed deer population since 1994. This endemic infection is primarily located in a 12-county area in the northeastern lower peninsula of Michigan. A statewide surveillance and eradication program of the disease has been in effect since 1994. Worldwide, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms have a known predilection toward development of antimicrobial resistance. The objective of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility of M. bovis isolates from white-tailed deer in Michigan and detect any changes in susceptibility over time. M. bovis isolates from 2 fall hunting seasons (1999 and 2004) were used in this study. The fall season of 2004 marked the first documented case of direct transmission of M. bovis from a wild deer to a human in Michigan. Since M. bovis is a zoonotic disease, knowledge of susceptibility can expedite treatment options in humans. M. bovis isolates were obtained from 58 deer, 4 coyotes, 3 cattle, 2 raccoons, and 1 human case from the 2 years combined. Methods of susceptibility testing included 1% proportion agar plates and Bactec radiometric broth testing. M. bovis was found to be uniformly resistant to the antibiotic pyrazinamide; this resistance is common to all M. bovis isolates. No other antimicrobial resistance was found in any of the tested M. bovis isolates, which may be, in part, attributed to the lack of any significant treatment pressure in wildlife.

  13. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma bovis clinical isolates recovered from bison (Bison bison).

    PubMed

    Suleman, Muhammad; Prysliak, Tracy; Windeyer, Claire; Perez-Casal, Jose

    2016-03-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is a pathogen globally affecting cattle and bison herds, causing pneumonia, arthritis, mastitis, abortions, and other symptoms, leading to huge economic losses. Many studies have been done regarding the antimicrobial susceptibility of M. bovis isolated from cattle, but no such study is available for isolates recovered from bison. For the first time, in vitro susceptibilities of 40 M. bovis clinical isolates collected from bison herds in Canada are reported here. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined using Sensititre® plates. The most effective MIC50 and MIC90 were for spectinomycin (1 and >64 μg/mL), tiamulin (1 and >32 μg/mL), and tulathromycin (16 and 64 μg/mL), whereas tetracyclines, fluoroquinolones, and florfenicol failed to inhibit growth of M. bovis bison isolates. Isolates were nonsusceptible to tetracyclines (100%), fluoroquinolones (97.5%), and tilmicosin (100%), whereas the highest susceptibility of bison clinical isolates was seen with spectinomycin (95%) and tulathromycin (67.5%). Two lung isolates (Mb283 and 348) were found resistant to both spectinomycin and tulathromycin. These results show a marked difference in antimicrobial susceptibility of bison isolates as compared with previously reported and laboratory reference cattle isolates, emphasizing the necessity of testing antimicrobial susceptibility of M. bovis bison isolates and to generate better therapeutic regime for improved recovery chances for infected bison herds across North America.

  14. Methods for broth dilution susceptibility testing of bacteria isolated from aquatic animals; approved guideline-second edition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing is recommended to determine which antimicrobial agents should be considered for treating a bacterial pathogen. Many bacteria that cause disease in aquatic animals require growth conditions that vary substantially from routine terrestrial pathogens. It has thus ...

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Bacillus anthracis strains from Hungary.

    PubMed

    Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Sulyok, Kinga Mária; Makrai, László; Rónai, Zsuzsanna; Fodor, László; Jánosi, Szilárd; Gyuranecz, Miklós

    2016-06-01

    The susceptibility of 29 Bacillus anthracis strains, collected in Hungary between 1933 and 2014, was tested to 10 antibiotics with commercially available minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test strips. All strains were susceptible to amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, doxycycline, gentamicin, penicillin, rifampicin, and vancomycin. Intermediate susceptibility to erythromycin and cefotaxime was detected in 17.2% (5/29) and 58.6% (17/29) of the strains, respectively. Correlations were not observed between the isolation date, location, host species, genotype, and antibiotic susceptibility profile of strains.

  16. Current Concepts in Laboratory Testing to Guide Antimicrobial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Stephen G.; Schuetz, Audrey N.

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is indicated for pathogens contributing to an infectious process that warrants antimicrobial therapy if susceptibility to antimicrobials cannot be predicted reliably based on knowledge of their identity. Such tests are most frequently used when the etiologic agents are members of species capable of demonstrating resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics. Some organisms have predictable susceptibility to antimicrobial agents (ie, Streptococcus pyogenes to penicillin), and empirical therapy for these organisms is typically used. Therefore, AST for such pathogens is seldom required or performed. In addition, AST is valuable in evaluating the activity of new and experimental compounds and investigating the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistant pathogens. Several laboratory methods are available to characterize the in vitro susceptibility of bacteria to antimicrobial agents. When the nature of the infection is unclear and the culture yields mixed growth or usual microbiota (wherein the isolates usually bear little relationship to the actual infectious process), AST is usually unnecessary and results may, in fact, be dangerously misleading. Phenotypic methods for detection of specific antimicrobial resistance mechanisms are increasingly being used to complement AST (ie, inducible clindamycin resistance among several gram-positive bacteria) and to provide clinicians with preliminary direction for antibiotic selection pending results generated from standardized AST (ie, β-lactamase tests). In addition, molecular methods are being developed and incorporated by microbiology laboratories into resistance detection algorithms for rapid, sensitive assessment of carriage states of epidemiologically and clinically important pathogens, often directly from clinical specimens (ie, presence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in fecal specimens). PMID:22386185

  17. Isolation method (direct plating or enrichment) does not affect antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter from chicken carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine if Campylobacter isolation method influenced antimicrobial susceptibility results, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of nine antimicrobials were compared for 291 pairs of Campylobacter isolates recovered from chicken carcass rinse samples using direct plating and an enrichment...

  18. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma bovis isolated in Israel from local and imported cattle.

    PubMed

    Gerchman, Irena; Levisohn, Sharon; Mikula, Inna; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2009-06-12

    Monitoring of susceptibility to antibiotics in field isolates of pathogenic bovine mycoplasmas is important for appropriate choice of treatment. Our study compared in vitro susceptibility profiles of Mycoplasma bovis clinical strains, isolated during 2005-2007 from Israeli and imported calves. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined for macrolides by the microbroth dilution test, for aminoglycosides by commercial Etest, and for fluoroquinolones and tetracyclines by both methods. Notably, although correlation between the methods was generally good, it was not possible to determine the MIC endpoint for enrofloxacin-resistant strains (MIC > or =2.5 microg/ml in the microtest) by Etest. Comparison of antibiotic susceptibility profiles between local and imported M. bovis strains revealed that local strains were significantly more resistant to macrolides than most isolates from imported animals, with MIC(50) of 128 microg/ml vs. 2 microg/ml for tilmicosin and 8 microg/ml vs. 1 microg/ml for tylosin, respectively. However, local strains were more susceptible than most imported strains to fluoroquinolones and spectinomycin. Difference in susceptibility to tetracycline, doxycycline and oxytetracycline between local and imported strains was expressed in MIC(90) values for imported strains in the susceptible range compared to intermediate susceptibility for local strains. The marked difference in susceptibility profiles of M. bovis strains isolated from different geographical regions seen in this study emphasizes the necessity for performing of the antimicrobial susceptibility testing periodically and on a regional basis.

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of Mycoplasma isolated from bovine mastitis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kazuhiro; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Iwano, Hidetomo; Iwakuma, Akihiro; Onda, Ken; Sato, Reiichiro; Hayashi, Tomohito; Nagahata, Hajime; Oshida, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma spp. are highly contagious pathogens and intramammary Mycoplasma infection is a serious issue for the dairy industry. As there is no effective vaccine for Mycoplasma infection, control depends on good husbandry and chemo-antibiotic therapy. In this study, antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma strains recently isolated from cases of bovine mastitis in Japan was evaluated by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). All Mycoplasma bovis strains were sensitive to pirlimycin, danofloxacin and enrofloxacin, but not kanamycin, oxytetracycline, tilmicosin or tylosin. M. californicum and M. bovigenitalium strains were sensitive to pirlimycin, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, oxytetracycline, tilmicosin and tylosin, but not to kanamycin. This is the first report to describe the MIC of major antimicrobial agents for Mycoplasma species isolated from bovine mastitis in Japan.

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Brachyspira intermedia isolates from European layers.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, Marc; Boyen, Filip; Pasmans, Frank; Garmyn, An; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Martel, An

    2011-09-01

    A broth microdilution method was used to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of 20 Brachyspira intermedia isolates obtained from different layer flocks in Belgium and The Netherlands between 2008 and 2010. The antimicrobial agents used were tylosin, tilmicosin, tiamulin, valnemulin, doxycycline, and lincomycin. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) distribution patterns of tylosin, tilmicosin, lincomycin, and doxycycline were bimodal, demonstrating acquired resistance against doxycycline in three strains, against the macrolides in two strains, and against lincomycin in one strain. The MICs of tiamulin and valnemulin showed a monomodal distribution, but with tailing toward the higher MIC values, possibly suggesting low-level acquired resistance in six isolates. Sequencing revealed a G1058C mutation in the 16S rRNA gene in all doxycycline-resistant strains. The strain resistant to tylosin, tilmicosin, and lincomycin had an A2058T mutation in the 23S rRNA gene.

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility of gram-positive udder pathogens from bovine mastitis milk in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Overesch, G; Stephan, R; Perreten, V

    2013-06-01

    We evaluated the susceptibility of the gram-positive mastitis pathogens S. aureus, Str. uberis, Str. dysgalactiae, E. faecalis and L. garviae to antibiotics that are of epidemiological interest or are critically important for mastitis therapy and human medicine. Penicillin resistance was found to be most frequent in S. aureus, and nearly 5 % of the Str. uberis strains displayed a decreased susceptibility to this antibiotic. Resistance to aminoglycosides and macrolides was also detected in the strains tested. The detection of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and of a ciprofloxacin-resistant Str. dysgalactiae isolate corroborated the emergence of mastitis pathogens resistant to critically important antibiotics and underscores the importance of susceptibility testing prior to antibiotic therapy. The monitoring of antibiotic susceptibility patterns and antibiogram analyses are strongly recommended for targeted antimicrobial treatment and to avoid the unnecessary use of the latest generation of antibiotics.

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella isolates recovered from calves with diarrhoea in Australia.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Mm; Mohler, Vl; House, Jk

    2011-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify the common serotypes and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Salmonella spp. associated with diarrhoea in Australian dairy calves under the age of 6 weeks. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. METHODS Faecal samples were collected from outbreaks of diarrhoea in dairy and dairy beef calves less than 6 weeks old. Samples were screened for Salmonella using standard enrichment culture techniques. The antimicrobial susceptibility to 12 commonly used veterinary and human antimicrobials was assessed using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and the susceptibility profiles of dairy and dairy beef properties were compared using Fisher's exact test. RESULTS Salmonella ser. Dublin, S. ser. Typhimurium and S. ser. Bovismorbificans were the three most common salmonella serotypes isolated. The majority of properties had one serotype. Most of the Salmonella isolates were not resistant to any of the antimicrobials tested. No resistance was seen to amikacin and nalidixic acid, and only one isolate was resistant to ceftiofur or amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. The most common antimicrobial resistance was to streptomycin, ampicillin or combination sulfonamides. Multi-drug resistance was detected in S. ser. Anatum, S. ser. Bovismorbificans, S. ser. Muenster, S. ser. Newport and S. ser. Typhimurium. Isolates from dairy beef properties were more likely to be resistant to ampicillin, kanamycin, neomycin, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim and tetracycline (P < 0.05) and were more likely to exhibit multi-drug resistance. CONCLUSION The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella isolates from dairy calves in Australia is low compared with that reported overseas. From a human health perspective, resistance to antimicrobials used in the treatment of human salmonellosis was infrequent.

  3. A survey of the antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolated from Sable Island horses.

    PubMed

    Timonin, M E; Poissant, J; McLoughlin, P D; Hedlin, C E; Rubin, J E

    2017-03-01

    The feral horses of Sable Island are a geographically isolated population located ∼160 km off the east coast of Nova Scotia, Canada. Because these horses have no contact with domestic animals, have minimal contact with people, and have never received antimicrobials, they offer a unique opportunity to study the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance in unmanaged populations. As part of an ongoing multidisciplinary and individual-based monitoring program, we collected feces from 508 geolocalized horses (92% of the total population) between July and September 2014. We selectively cultured Escherichia coli on MacConkey and CHROMagar ESBL media. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined, and organisms resistant to β-lactam antimicrobials were screened for β-lactamase genes by PCR. Escherichia coli was recovered from 146 (28.7%) individuals, and the majority of isolates (97%) were susceptible to all drugs tested. Resistance to tetracycline was most common, including organisms isolated from 4 (2.7%) of the colonized horses. A single isolate resistant to ampicillin, ceftriaxone, and ceftiofur was identified, which possessed the CTX-M-1 gene. Our findings demonstrate that although antimicrobial resistance is not common in this remote population, clinically relevant resistance genes are present.

  4. Application of luciferase assay for ATP to antimicrobial drug susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Vellend, H.; Tuttle, S. A.; Barza, M. J.; Weinstein, L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The susceptibility of bacteria, particularly those derived from body fluids, to antimicrobial agents is determined in terms of an ATP index measured by culturing a bacterium in a growth medium. The amount of ATP is assayed in a sample of the cultured bacterium by measuring the amount of luminescent light emitted when the bacterial ATP is reacted with a luciferase-luciferin mixture. The sample of the cultured bacterium is subjected to an antibiotic agent. The amount of bacterial adenosine triphosphate is assayed after treatment with the antibiotic by measuring the luminescent light resulting from the reaction. The ATP index is determined from the values obtained from the assay procedures.

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria in Ontario, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Marchand-Austin, Alex; Rawte, Prasad; Toye, Baldwin; Jamieson, Frances B; Farrell, David J; Patel, Samir N

    2014-08-01

    The local epidemiology of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in anaerobic bacteria is important in guiding the empiric treatment of infections. However, susceptibility data are very limited on anaerobic organisms, particularly among non-Bacteroides organisms. To determine susceptibility profiles of clinically-significant anaerobic bacteria in Ontario Canada, anaerobic isolates from sterile sites submitted to Public Health Ontario Laboratory (PHOL) for identification and susceptibility testing were included in this study. Using the E-test method, isolates were tested for various antimicrobials including, penicillin, cefoxitin, clindamycin, meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam and metronidazole. The MIC results were interpreted based on guidelines published by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Of 2527 anaerobic isolates submitted to PHOL, 1412 were either from sterile sites or bronchial lavage, and underwent susceptibility testing. Among Bacteroides fragilis, 98.2%, 24.7%, 1.6%, and 1.2% were resistant to penicillin, clindamycin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and metronidazole, respectively. Clostridium perfringens was universally susceptible to penicillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and meropenem, whereas 14.2% of other Clostridium spp. were resistant to penicillin. Among Gram-positive anaerobes, Actinomyces spp., Parvimonas micra and Propionibacterium spp. were universally susceptible to β-lactams. Eggerthella spp., Collinsella spp., and Eubacterium spp. showed variable resistance to penicillin. Among Gram-negative anaerobes, Fusobacterium spp., Prevotella spp., and Veillonella spp. showed high resistance to penicillin but were universally susceptible to meropenem and piperacillin-tazobactam. The detection of metronidazole resistant B. fragilis is concerning as occurrence of these isolates is extremely rare. These data highlight the importance of ongoing surveillance to provide clinically relevant information to clinicians for empiric management of

  6. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Bordetella bronchiseptica Isolates from Swine and Companion Animals and Detection of Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Prüller, Sandra; Rensch, Ulrike; Meemken, Diana; Kaspar, Heike; Kopp, Peter A.; Klein, Günter; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica causes infections of the respiratory tract in swine and other mammals and is a precursor for secondary infections with Pasteurella multocida. Treatment of B. bronchiseptica infections is conducted primarily with antimicrobial agents. Therefore it is essential to get an overview of the susceptibility status of these bacteria. The aim of this study was to comparatively analyse broth microdilution susceptibility testing according to CLSI recommendations with an incubation time of 16 to 20 hours and a longer incubation time of 24 hours, as recently proposed to obtain more homogenous MICs. Susceptibility testing against a panel of 22 antimicrobial agents and two fixed combinations was performed with 107 porcine isolates from different farms and regions in Germany and 43 isolates obtained from companion animals in Germany and other European countries. Isolates with increased MICs were investigated by PCR assays for the presence of resistance genes. For ampicillin, all 107 porcine isolates were classified as resistant, whereas only a single isolate was resistant to florfenicol. All isolates obtained from companion animals showed elevated MICs for β-lactam antibiotics and demonstrated an overall low susceptibility to cephalosporines. Extension of the incubation time resulted in 1–2 dilution steps higher MIC50 values of porcine isolates for seven antimicrobial agents tested, while isolates from companion animals exhibited twofold higher MIC50/90 values only for tetracycline and cefotaxime. For three antimicrobial agents, lower MIC50 and MIC90 values were detected for both, porcine and companion animal isolates. Among the 150 isolates tested, the resistance genes blaBOR-1 (n = 147), blaOXA-2, (n = 4), strA and strB (n = 17), sul1 (n = 10), sul2 (n = 73), dfrA7 (n = 3) and tet(A) (n = 8) were detected and a plasmid localisation was identified for several of the resistance genes. PMID:26275219

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. from humans, pigs, cattle, and broilers in Denmark.

    PubMed Central

    Aarestrup, F M; Nielsen, E M; Madsen, M; Engberg, J

    1997-01-01

    The MICs of 16 antimicrobial agents were determined for 202 Campylobacter jejuni isolates, 123 Campylobacter coli isolates, and 6 Campylobacter lari isolates from humans and food animals in Denmark. The C. jejuni isolates originated from humans (75), broilers (95), cattle (29), and pigs (3); the C. coli isolates originated from humans (7), broilers (17), and pigs (99); and the C. lari isolates originated from broilers (5) and cattle (1). All isolates were susceptible to apramycin, neomycin, and gentamicin. Only a few C. jejuni isolates were resistant to one or more antimicrobial agents. Resistance to tetracycline was more common among C. jejuni isolates from humans (11%) than among C. jejuni isolates from animals (0 to 2%). More resistance to streptomycin was found among C. jejuni isolates from cattle (10%) than among those from humans (4%) or broilers (1%). A greater proportion of C. coli than of C. jejuni isolates were resistant to the other antimicrobial agents tested. Isolates were in most cases either coresistant to tylosin, spiramycin, and erythromycin or susceptible to all three antibiotics. More macrolide-resistant isolates were observed among C. coli isolates from swine (79%) than among C. coli isolates from broilers (18%) and humans (14%). Twenty-four percent of C. coli isolates from pigs were resistant to enrofloxacin, whereas 29% of C. coli isolates from humans and none from broilers were resistant. More resistance to streptomycin was observed among C. coli isolates from swine (48%) than among C. coli isolates from broilers (6%) or humans (0%). The six C. lari isolates were susceptible to all antimicrobial agents except ampicillin and nalidixic acid. This study showed that antimicrobial resistance was found only at relatively low frequencies among C. jejuni and C. lari isolates. Among C. coli isolates, especially from swine, there was a high level of resistance to macrolides and streptomycin. Furthermore, this study showed differences in the resistance

  8. Comparison of the Vitek 2 antifungal susceptibility system with the clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) Broth Microdilution Reference Methods and with the Sensititre YeastOne and Etest techniques for in vitro detection of antifungal resistance in yeast isolates.

    PubMed

    Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Bernal-Martinez, Leticia; Cuesta, Isabel; Buitrago, Maria J; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L

    2010-05-01

    The commercial technique Vitek 2 system for antifungal susceptibility testing of yeast species was evaluated. A collection of 154 clinical yeast isolates, including amphotericin B- and azole-resistant organisms, was tested. Results were compared with those obtained by the reference procedures of both the CLSI and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Two other commercial techniques approved for clinical use, the Etest and the Sensititre YeastOne, were included in the comparative exercise as well. The average essential agreement (EA) between the Vitek 2 system and the reference procedures was >95%, comparable with the average EAs observed between the reference procedures and the Sensititre YeastOne and Etest. The EA values were >97% for Candida spp. and stood at 92% for Cryptococcus neoformans. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) between the commercial techniques and the reference procedures were statistically significant (P<0.01). Percentages of very major errors were 2.6% between Vitek 2 and the EUCAST technique and 1.6% between Vitek 2 and the CLSI technique. The Vitek 2 MIC results were available after 14 to 18 h of incubation for all Candida spp. (average time to reading, 15.5 h). The Vitek 2 system was shown to be a reliable technique to determine antifungal susceptibility testing of yeast species and a more rapid and easier alternative for clinical laboratories than the procedures developed by either the CLSI or EUCAST.

  9. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter in broiler flocks in Japan.

    PubMed

    Haruna, M; Sasaki, Y; Murakami, M; Ikeda, A; Kusukawa, M; Tsujiyama, Y; Ito, K; Asai, T; Yamada, Y

    2012-06-01

    Campylobacter was isolated from 67 (47.2%) of 142 broiler flocks between September 2009 and February 2010. The prevalence of Campylobacter in broiler flocks was significantly lower during January and February than it was from September to December. Campylobacter colonization was more common in flocks that were not provided with a disinfected water supply, which was consistent with the findings of a previous study. The prevalence of antimicrobial drug-resistant Campylobacter spp. was investigated, and the minimum inhibitory concentrations of eight antimicrobial agents were determined for 122 Campylobacter jejuni isolates and 46 Campylobacter coli isolates from broiler flocks between 2007 and 2010. In this study, 29.5% (36/122) of C. jejuni isolates and 41.3% (19/46) of C. coli isolates were resistant to enrofloxacin (ERFX), whereas all isolates were susceptible to erythromycin. Furthermore, the ERFX-resistant isolates were tested for susceptibility to other classes of antimicrobial agents, and 55.6% (20/36) of ERFX-resistant C. jejuni isolates and 47.4% (9/19) of ERFX-resistant C. coli isolates were resistant to at least one of aminobenzyl penicillin, dihydrostreptomycin and oxytetracycline. To avoid an impact of antimicrobial drug-resistant Campylobacter spp. on the efficacy of antimicrobial treatment for human campylobacteriosis, prudent use of antimicrobial agents is a requisite. The use of antimicrobial agents should be accompanied by various approaches such as prevention of Campylobacter colonization in broiler flocks with the aim of lowering the occurrence of Campylobacter infection in humans.

  10. Survey of in vitro susceptibilities of Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 to antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T; Nair, G B; Albert, M J; Parodi, C C; Takeda, Y

    1995-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O139 (173 strains) and O1 (221 strains) were tested for their in vitro susceptibilities to 39 antimicrobial agents. Both O139 and O1 strains were highly susceptible to azithromycin, cephems, minocycline, penems, and newer fluoroquinolones. O139 strains (94.8%), O1 Indian El Tor strains (97%), and Bangladeshi El Tor strains (50%) were highly resistant to streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim and moderately resistant to chloramphenicol and furazolidone, in sharp contrast to O1 Peruvian El Tor and O1 classical strains. Some Bangladeshi El Tor strains (43.3%) showed tetracycline resistance as well. PMID:7695314

  11. Short communication: In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma agalactiae strains isolated from dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Paterna, A; Sánchez, A; Gómez-Martín, A; Corrales, J C; De la Fe, C; Contreras, A; Amores, J

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the susceptibility to several antimicrobials of 28 isolates of Mycoplasma agalactiae obtained from goats in a region (southeastern Spain) where contagious agalactia is endemic. For each isolate, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against 12 antimicrobials of the quinolone, macrolide, aminoglycoside, and tetracycline families was determined. The antimicrobials with the lowest MIC were enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, tylosin, and doxycycline, all with MIC90 (concentration at which growth of 90% of the isolates is inhibited) <1 µg/mL. Norfloxacin (a quinolone) showed a wide MIC range (0.1-12.8 µg/mL), suggesting a resistance mechanism toward this antimicrobial that was not elicited by enrofloxacin or ciprofloxacin (the other quinolones tested). Erythromycin showed the highest MIC90 such that its use against Mycoplasma agalactiae is not recommended. Finally, Mycoplasma agalactiae isolates obtained from goat herds with clinical symptoms of contagious agalactia featured higher MIC90 and MIC50 (concentration at which growth of 50% of the isolates is inhibited) values for many of the antimicrobials compared with isolates from asymptomatic animals. The relationship between the extensive use of antimicrobials in herds with clinical contagious agalactia and variations in MIC requires further study.

  12. Susceptibility testing of Entamoeba histolytica

    SciTech Connect

    Cedeno, J.R.; Krogstad, D.J.

    1983-12-01

    The growth of Entamoeba histolytica in microtiter plates in vitro in a variety of environments with reduced oxygen tensions is reported. With 3% O/sub 2/, 3% CO/sub 2/, and 94% N/sub 2/, the parasite growth in microtiter plates was identical to that in screw-capped culture tubes, as measured by (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation and by quantitative parasite counts. There were no significant differences between the drug concentrations necessary to inhibit parasite growth by 50% based on (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation vs those defined by quantitative parasite counts for the 15 antimicrobial agents tested (including seven drugs used for the treatment of amebiasis). This technique provides a reproducible method to quantitate the activity of potential antiamebic agents in vitro. The isotopic method should be of particular value in defining the metabolism of the parasite and effects of antimicrobial agents on it, whereas the morphologic method may be more valuable for workers with limited resources available to them.

  13. A survey of Clostridium spiroforme antimicrobial susceptibility in rabbit breeding.

    PubMed

    Agnoletti, Fabrizio; Ferro, Tiziana; Guolo, Angela; Marcon, Barbara; Cocchi, Monia; Drigo, Ilenia; Mazzolini, Elena; Bano, Luca

    2009-04-14

    Rabbit meat breeding may be heavily affected by enterotoxaemia due to Clostridium spiroforme. Data on its antimicrobial susceptibility are insufficient, presumably because of difficulties in cultivating and identifying the pathogen. Our aim is therefore to provide this information to veterinary practitioners by focusing on a panel of therapeutics used in intensive rabbit units. Lincomycin was also checked in order to investigate the origin of resistance to macrolides. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined with the agar dilution method according to the CLSI M11-A7 protocol (2007). MIC(50) and MIC(90) were, respectively, 64 and 64microg/ml for tiamulin, 32 and 32microg/ml for norfloxacin, 0.063 and 0.125microg/ml for amoxicillin, and 8 and 16microg/ml for doxycycline. MIC(50) and MIC(90) were 256microg/ml for sulphadimethoxine, spiramycin and lincomycin. Our results have shown that intrinsic or acquired antimicrobial resistances are diffuse in the C. spiroforme population and suggest focusing on prevention rather than on treatment of clostridial overgrowth, by reducing risk factors and using antimicrobials prudently.

  14. NCCLS perspectives in changing susceptibility breakpoints for antimicrobial drugs.

    PubMed

    Gums, John G

    2003-10-01

    The spread of resistance to many antimicrobial agents in various microbial species has been highlighted by the World Health Organisation and many government agencies around the world. The reasons for this increase and spread are complex and are discussed. A number of surveillance studies has monitored the increase in resistance among isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae to various important classes of antimicrobials. These results are discussed with particular reference to penicillins, macrolides and fluoroquinolones. Although there is evidence that in vitro resistance to macrolides and more recently to fluoroquinolones may be associated with a reduced clinical efficacy, there is no such clear association with resistance to beta-lactams and lack of clinical efficacy in non-meningeal infections. Resistance or susceptibility to an antimicrobial agent is based on breakpoints and these are set in the US by the National Committee of Clinical and Laboratory Standards. In response to these recent clinical studies showing that non-meningeal pneumococcal infections with strains classified as resistant in vitro still responded well to treatment with various beta-lactams, new breakpoints have been set. Results are presented showing that using these breakpoints, the levels of resistance to the third generation cephalosporins, ceftriaxone and cefotaxime against a range of non-meningeal pneumococcal isolates were lower than those obtained using the previous breakpoints. The excellent pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of these agents are believed to contribute to their good activity in the clinic.

  15. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium Isolated from Poultry Flocks in Germany.

    PubMed

    Maasjost, J; Mühldorfer, K; Cortez de Jäckel S; Hafez, H M

    2015-03-01

    Between 2010 and 2011, 145 Enterococcus isolates (Enterococcus faecalis, n = 127; Enterococcus faecium, n = 18) were collected during routine bacteriologic diagnostics from broilers, layers, and fattening turkeys in Germany showing various clinical signs. The susceptibility to 24 antimicrobial agents was investigated by broth microdilution test to determine minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). All E. faecalis isolates (n = 127) were susceptible to the beta-lactam antibiotics ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, and penicillin. Corresponding MIC with 50% inhibition (MIC50) and MIC with 90% inhibition (MIC90) values of these antimicrobial agents were at the lower end of the test range (≤ 4 μg/ml). In addition, no vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) were found. High resistance rates were identified in both Enterococcus species for lincomycin (72%-99%) and tetracycline (67%-82%). Half or more than half of Enterococcus isolates were resistant to gentamicin (54%-72%) and the macrolide antibiotics erythromycin (44%-61%) and tylosin-tartate (44%-56%). Enterococcus faecalis isolated from fattening turkeys showed the highest prevalence of antimicrobial resistance compared to other poultry production systems. Eighty-nine out of 145 Enterococcus isolates were resistant to three or more antimicrobial classes. Again, turkeys stood out with 42 (8 1%) multiresistant isolates. The most-frequent resistance patterns of E. faecalis were gentamicin, lincomycin, and tetracycline in all poultry production systems.

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility and distribution of inhibition zone diameters of bovine mastitis pathogens in Flanders, Belgium.

    PubMed

    Supré, K; Lommelen, K; De Meulemeester, L

    2014-07-16

    In dairy farms, antimicrobial drugs are frequently used for treatment of (sub)clinical mastitis. Determining the antimicrobial susceptibility of mastitis pathogens is needed to come to a correct use of antimicrobials. Strains of Staphylococcus aureus (n=768), Streptococcus uberis (n=939), Streptococcus dysgalactiae (n=444), Escherichia coli (n=563), and Klebsiella species (n=59) originating from routine milk samples from (sub)clinical mastitis were subjected to the disk diffusion method. Disks contained representatives of frequently used antibiotics in dairy. A limited number of clinical breakpoints were available through CLSI, and showed that susceptibility of Staph. aureus, E. coli, and Klebsiella was moderate to high. For streptococcal species however, a large variation between the tested species and the different antimicrobials was observed. In a next step, wild type populations were described based on epidemiological cut off values (EUCAST). Because of the limited number of official cut off values, the data were observed as a mastitis subpopulation and self-generated cut off values were created and a putative wild type population was suggested. The need for accurate clinical breakpoints for veterinary pathogens is high. Despite the lack of these breakpoints, however, a population study can be performed based on the distribution of inhibition zone diameters on the condition that a large number of strains is tested.

  17. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter spp. in live and dressed chicken in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Osaili, Tareq M; Alaboudi, Akram R; Al-Akhras, Rani R

    2012-01-01

    A total of 140 broiler flocks presented for slaughtering at Amman slaughterhouse were tested for Campylobacter spp. via collection of cloacal swabs from live birds, feathered skin samples at prescalding, and skin samples at postscalding (62°C or 57°C scalding temperature), postevisceration, and postchilling. The results indicated that 40% of the flocks tested by cloacal swabs, 34% at prescalding, 32% at post 57°C scalding, and 32% postevisceration were harboring Campylobacter jejuni. None of the skin samples collected from dressed birds at postscalding (62°C) or postwashing-chilling steps (regardless of scalding temperature) revealed the presence of C. jejuni. Thirty eight isolates were tested for susceptibility to ten antimicrobials by using the microbroth dilution method. Almost 50% of the isolates were multidrug resistant to 9 or 10 out of the ten tested antimicrobials. The other half of tested isolates were sensitive to erythromycin, tetracycline, doxycyclin, chlortetracycline, ciprofloxacin, enorfloxacin, gentamycin, tilmicosin, amoxicillin, and trimethoprim.

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic characterization of Escherichia coli recovered from frozen game meat.

    PubMed

    Mateus-Vargas, Rafael H; Atanassova, Viktoria; Reich, Felix; Klein, Günter

    2017-05-01

    The increasing number of antimicrobial resistant Enterobacteriaceae both in veterinary and human medicine, the dissemination of these bacteria in several environments and their possible repercussions on human health is causing concern. Game meat is usually seen as free of antimicrobial resistant bacteria. The objective of this study was to evaluate the current antimicrobial susceptibility status in generic Escherichia coli isolated from packed frozen game meat from a game handling establishment in Germany. A total of 229 E. coli isolates were obtained from cuts of red deer, roe deer and wild boar. The susceptibility to 12 antimicrobial agents was evaluated by a broth microdilution method according to ISO 20776-1:2006. Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values were compared to breakpoints and cut-off values published by the EUCAST. Isolates showing MICs above the reference values were further studied for associated resistance determinants and phylogrouping by PCR. Overall, 16 E. coli isolates (7.0%) showed resistance (microbiological or clinical) to at least one antimicrobial agent tested. Clinical resistance was recorded to ampicillin (5/229) and chloramphenicol (4/229), whereas the MIC of 9 isolates exceeded the epidemiological cut-off value for doxycycline. One of the ampicillin-resistant isolates showed resistance to the β-lactam antibiotic derivatives tested, cephalosporines and aztreonam. Three of 9 non-wild-type isolates for doxycycline were positive for tet (B) genes. The ß-lactam-resistant isolate was found to harbour blaCTX-M-1 gene. These data show a low prevalence of resistant E. coli in packed game meat compared to studies on conventional meat. Although isolates obtained in this study may also be originating from the processing environment and not necessarily from animals, based on our results, it is important to monitor the development of antimicrobial resistance in game animals and products in order to identify future threats for the

  19. TESTING ANTIMICROBIAL EFFICACY ON POROUS MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The efficacy of antimicrobial treatments to eliminate or control biological growth in the indoor environment can easily be tested on nonporous surfaces. However, the testing of antimicrobial efficacy on porous surfaces, such as those found in the indoor environment [i.e., gypsum ...

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria in a University Hospital Centre Split, Croatia in 2013.

    PubMed

    Novak, Anita; Rubic, Zana; Dogas, Varja; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Radic, Marina; Tonkic, Marija

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic bacteria play a significant role in many endogenous polymicrobial infections. Since antimicrobial resistance among anaerobes has increased worldwide, it is useful to provide local susceptibility data to guide empirical therapy. The present study reports recent data on the susceptibility of clinically relevant anaerobes in a University Hospital Centre (UHC) Split, Croatia. A total of 63 Gram-negative and 59 Gram-positive anaerobic clinical isolates from various body sites were consecutively collected from January to December 2013. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using standardized methods and interpreted using EUCAST criteria. Patient's clinical and demographic data were recorded by clinical microbiologist. Among 35 isolates of Bacteroides spp., 97.1% were resistant to penicillin (PCN), 5.7% to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), 8.6% to piperacillin/tazobactam (TZP), 29.0% to clindamycin (CLI) and 2.9% to metronidazole (MZ). Percentages of susceptible strains to imipenem (IPM), meropenem (MEM) and ertapenem (ETP) were 94.3. Resistance of other Gram-negative bacilli was 76.0% to PCN, 8.0% to AMC, 12.0% to TZP, 28.0% to CLI and 8% to MZ. All other Gram-negative strains were fully susceptible to MEM and ETP, while 96.0% were susceptible to IPM. Clostridium spp. isolates were 100% susceptible to all tested antibiotics except to CLI (two of four tested isolates were resistant). Propionibacterium spp. showed resistance to CLI in 4.3%, while 100% were resistant to MZ. Among other Gram-positive bacilli, 18.2% were resistant to PCN, 9.1% to CLI and 54.5% to MZ, while 81.8% of isolates were susceptible to carbapenems. Gram-positive cocci were 100% susceptible to all tested antimicrobials except to MZ, where 28.6% of resistant strains were recorded. Abdomen was the most common source of isolates (82.5%). The most prevalent types of infection were abscess (22.1%), sepsis (14.8%), appendicitis (13.9%) and peritonitis (6.6%). Twenty four patients (19

  1. In vitro susceptibility of Helicobacter pullorum strains to different antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Ceelen, Liesbeth; Decostere, Annemie; Devriese, Luc A; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2005-01-01

    The in vitro activity of 13 antimicrobial agents against 23 Helicobacter pullorum strains from poultry (21) and human (two) origin, and one human H. canadensis strain was tested by the agar dilution method. With the H. pullorum strains, monomodal distributions of Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) were seen with lincomycin, doxycycline, gentamicin, tobramycin, erythromycin, tylosin, metronidazole, and enrofloxacin in concentration ranges considered as indicating susceptibility in other bacteria. The normal susceptibility level for nalidixic acid was situated at or slightly above the MIC breakpoints proposed for Campylobacteriaceae. Ampicillin, ceftriaxone, and sulphamethoxazole-trimethoprim showed poor activity against H. pullorum. For the H. canadensis strain, a similar susceptibility pattern was seen, except for nalidixic acid and enrofloxacin, whose MIC of >512 and 8 microg/ml, respectively, indicated resistance of this agent. With spectinomycin, a bimodal distribution of the MICs was noted for the tested strains; eight H. pullorum isolates originating from one flock showed acquired resistance (MIC>512 microg/ml).

  2. Salmonella Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility from the National Animal Health Monitoring System Sheep 2011 Study.

    PubMed

    Dargatz, David A; Marshall, Katherine L; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Erdman, Matthew M; Kopral, Christine A

    2015-12-01

    Salmonella is a major cause of foodborne illness and can cause clinical disease in animals. Understanding the on-farm ecology of Salmonella will be helpful in decreasing the risk of foodborne transmission. An objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of Salmonella among fecal samples collected on sheep operations in the United States. Another objective was to compare the use of composite fecal samples with fecal samples collected from individual sheep as a tool for screening sheep flocks for Salmonella. Sheep fecal samples (individual and composite) were collected on operations in 22 states. Salmonella isolates were characterized with regard to species, serotype, and antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Most operations (72.1%) had at least one positive sample and overall 26.9% of samples were positive. The percentage of positive samples varied by animal age class. Composite and individual samples gave similar results. The majority of the isolates (94%) were Salmonella enterica subspecies diarizonae serotype 61:-:1,5,7. Nearly all of the isolates (91.2%) tested for antimicrobial susceptibility were susceptible to all antimicrobials in the panel. The findings suggest that salmonellae typically associated with foodborne disease transmission are infrequently found on sheep operations in the United States.

  3. Changes in antimicrobial susceptibility of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae isolated from pigs in Spain during the last decade.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Martín, César B; del Blanco, Noemí García; Blanco, Mónica; Navas, Jesús; Rodríguez-Ferri, Elías F

    2006-06-15

    A total of 229 Spanish Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae isolates recovered from diseased pigs with pleuropneumonia from 1997 to 2004 was tested for their susceptibility to 11 antimicrobials in a broth microdilution method. All the isolates were susceptible to florfenicol and most of them to cephalothin; however, a high rate of resistance was observed to tetracycline. A bimodal or multimodal distribution of isolates over the MIC range were observed for penicillins, tetracycline, trimethoprim, sulfisoxazole and nalidixic acid, suggesting the development of acquired resistance. Eight resistance patterns were established, and 21.1% of the isolates were resistant to at least two antimicrobials. In addition, a considerable increase in the resistance to tetracyclines was observed during the last decade in Spain, when compared with other A. pleuropneumoniae strains isolated during 1987-1988 (Gutiérrez, C.B., Píriz, S., Vadillo, S., Rodríguez Ferri, E.F., 1993. In vitro susceptibility of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae strains to 42 antimicrobial agents. Am. J. Vet. Res. 54, 546-550); this finding was also observed for gentamicin in minor percentage.

  4. Susceptibility of Pediococcus isolates to antimicrobial compounds in relation to hop-resistance and beer-spoilage

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Though important in the context of food microbiology and as potential pathogens in immuno-compromised humans, bacterial isolates belonging to the genus Pediococcus are best known for their association with contamination of ethanol fermentation processes (beer, wine, or fuel ethanol). Use of antimicrobial compounds (e.g., hop-compounds, Penicillin) by some industries to combat Pediococcus contaminants is long-standing, yet knowledge about the resistance of pediococci to antimicrobial agents is minimal. Here we examined Pediococcus isolates to determine whether antibiotic resistance is associated with resistance to hops, presence of genes known to correlate with beer spoilage, or with ability to grow in beer. Results Lactic acid bacteria susceptibility test broth medium (LSM) used in combination with commercially available GPN3F antimicrobial susceptibility plates was an effective method for assessing antimicrobial susceptibility of Pediococcus isolates. We report the finding of Vancomycin-susceptible Pediococcus isolates from four species. Interestingly, we found that hop-resistant, beer-spoilage, and beer-spoilage gene-harbouring isolates had a tendency to be more susceptible, rather than more resistant, to antimicrobial compounds. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the mechanisms involved in conferring hop-resistance or ability to spoil beer by Pediococcus isolates are not associated with resistance to antibiotics commonly used for treatment of human infections. Also, Vancomycin-resistance was found to be isolate-specific and not intrinsic to the genus as previously believed. PMID:19735560

  5. Microbiological profile and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of infected root canals associated with periapical abscesses.

    PubMed

    Sousa, E L R; Gomes, B P F A; Jacinto, R C; Zaia, A A; Ferraz, C C R

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this investigation was to identify microorganisms from root canals with periapical abscesses and assess the susceptibility of specific anaerobic bacteria to selected antimicrobials and their β-lactamase production. Sixty root canals were microbiologically investigated. The susceptibility of Anaerococcus prevotii, Fusobacterium necrophorum, F. nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, and Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens to antimicrobials was evaluated with the Etest, whereas β-lactamase production was assessed with nitrocefin. A total of 287 different bacterial strains were recovered, including 201 strict anaerobes. The most frequently strict isolated anaerobes were A. prevotii, P. micra, and F. necrophorum. The selected bacteria were susceptible to all the tested antibiotics, except A. prevotii and Fusobacterium species to azithromycin and erythromycin, as well as A. prevotii and F. necrophorum to metronidazole. None of the microorganisms produced β-lactamase. Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria predominated in the root canals with periapical abscesses. All microorganisms tested were susceptible to benzylpenicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin + clavulanate, cefaclor, and clindamycin, producing no β-lactamase.

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility of uropathogens isolated from Cambodian children

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Catrin E.; Sona, Soeng; Poda, Sar; Putchhat, Hor; Kumar, Varun; Sopheary, Sun; Stoesser, Nicole; Bousfield, Rachel; Day, Nicholas; Parry, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bacterial resistance to commonly used antimicrobials is an increasing problem in Asia but information concerning the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria causing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children is limited. Methods: This was a 5-year retrospective study of children with suspected UTI attending a paediatric hospital in north-west Cambodia. Urines with a positive culture containing a single organism with a count of >105 colony-forming units (CFU)/ml were considered diagnostic of infection. The organism was identified and the resistance pattern (using CLSI guidelines) and presence of an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype was determined. Results: In total, there were 217 episodes of infection, 210 (97%) with Gram-negative bacteria. Escherichia coli was the most common infecting isolate with high levels of resistance to most oral antibiotics, except nitrofurantoin. Nearly half of the E. coli (44%) were extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC)-resistant with the proportion increasing significantly over the 5-year period. ESC-resistant E. coli were more likely to be multi-drug-resistant and 91% demonstrated an ESBL phenotype. Conclusion: The data highlight the importance of microbiological surveillance of UTIs in children, particularly in areas where there are known to be multiply resistant organisms. PMID:25704569

  7. Antimicrobial resistance in methicillin susceptible and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius of canine origin: literature review from 1980 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Arshnee; Damborg, Peter; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2014-07-16

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a commensal and a common opportunistic pathogen causing mainly infections of the integumentary system in dogs. The recent emergence of multidrug-resistant S. pseudintermedius isolates, in particular methicillin-resistant strains (MRSP) is a threat to small animal health and highlights the need for antimicrobial resistance surveillance to detect trends and potentially perform timeous interventions. We systematically reviewed 202 published articles to investigate temporal changes in antimicrobial resistance in clinical and commensal S. pseudintermedius isolated from dogs in 27 countries between 1980 and 2013. Resistance to the most common antimicrobials tested for in published studies and important for the treatment of staphylococcal infections in dogs were assessed separately for methicillin resistant (MRSP) and methicillin susceptible (MSSP) isolates. Stratified by MSSP and MRSP, no significant increases in antimicrobial resistance were observed over time, except for the penicillinase-labile penicillins (penicillin and ampicillin) among MSSP. However, in recent years, a few studies have reported higher-level of resistance to amikacin, gentamicin and enrofloxacin amongst MSSP. The review highlights inconsistencies between studies as a result of several factors, for example the use of different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods and interpretation criteria. We recommend that data on susceptibility in important companion animal pathogens are collected and presented in a more harmonized way to allow more precise comparison of susceptibility patterns between studies. One way to accomplish this would be through systematic surveillance either at the country-level or at a larger scale across countries e.g. EU level.

  8. Aeromonas Diversity and Antimicrobial Susceptibility in Freshwater—An Attempt to Set Generic Epidemiological Cut-Off Values

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Sandrine; Granier, Sophie A.; Larvor, Emeline; Jouy, Eric; Cineux, Maelan; Wilhelm, Amandine; Gassilloud, Benoit; Le Bouquin, Sophie; Kempf, Isabelle; Chauvin, Claire

    2017-01-01

    The importance of the role of environment in the dissemination of antimicrobial resistant bacteria is now well recognized. Thus, bacterial indicators to monitor the phenomena are required. The Aeromonas genus is autochthonous in the aquatic environment and easy to detect in any water type, such as freshwater, or wastewater. These microorganisms are also causing infections in humans and animals (including fish). Furthermore, as Aeromonas spp. is able to acquire antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, it is candidate for indicator bacteria to follow antimicrobial resistance dissemination in aquatic environments. Unfortunately, to date, interpretation criteria for Aeromonas spp. for antimicrobial susceptibility tests are scarce in the literature. No epidemiological cut-off values for Aeromonas are currently available at EUCAST to interpret Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC). The only interpretation criteria available are clinical breakpoints from CLSI that are adapted from Enterobacteriaceae. Based on the results of MIC distributions obtained for a collection of environmental isolates of Aeromonas, this study aimed at proposing tentative epidemiological cut-off values (COWT) for Aeromonas spp. assessing whether the genus is an acceptable level of definition. Thus, 233 isolates collected from 16 rivers were identified at species level using Maldi-Tof (Bruker). Eleven different species were identified, the most abundant were A. bestiarum (n = 54), A. salmonicida (n = 45), A. sobria (n = 41), and A. eucrenophila (n = 37). 96-well micro-plates containing different concentrations of 15 antimicrobials, namely cefotaxime, ceftazidime, chloramphenicol, colistin, enrofloxacin, erythromycin, florfenicol, flumequine, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, oxolinic acid, streptomycin, temocillin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, were prepared. The broth micro-dilution method was used to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of each isolate. The estimation of COWT

  9. In Vitro Susceptibility of Mycobacterium ulcerans Isolates to Selected Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Mercy J.; Addo, Kwesi K.; Addo, Phyllis

    2017-01-01

    Background. The current definitive treatment of Buruli ulcer with antibiotics makes the issue of antimicrobial drug resistance an unavoidable one. This is as a result of drug misuse by health personnel and patients' noncompliance to treatment regimen. Monitoring of these factors and screening for new effective antimicrobials are crucial to effective management of Buruli ulcer disease. This study therefore investigated the inhibitory activity of some antibiotics against isolates of Mycobacterium ulcerans. Methods. Activity of eight antibiotics was tested against twelve M. ulcerans isolates (2 reference strains and 10 clinical isolates). The anti-M. ulcerans activities were determined by the agar dilution method and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by the agar proportion method. Results. All antimicrobials investigated had activity against M. ulcerans isolates tested. The MICs ranged from 0.16 μg/mL to 2.5 μg/mL. Azithromycin recorded the highest inhibitory activity at a mean MIC of 0.39 μg/mL, whilst clofazimine a second-line antileprosy drug, recorded the lowest at a mean MIC of 2.19 μg/mL. Among the four antituberculosis drugs, rifampicin had the highest activity with a mean MIC of 0.81 μg/mL. Conclusion. Azithromycin could be considered as a lucrative alternative to existing treatment methods for inhibiting M. ulcerans in Ghana. PMID:28392809

  10. Isolation and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Campylobacter Species among Diarrheic Children at Jimma, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tassew, Haimanot; Asrat, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Campylobacter is one of the leading bacterial causes of food-borne disease. The prevalence of Campylobacter species resistant to antimicrobial agents is increasing. This study is intended to determine prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Campylobacter species among under-five children with diarrhea. Methodology. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 227 under-five children with diarrhea from July to October 2012 at Jimma town. Isolation and identification of Campylobacter species were performed using standard bacteriological techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed following standard protocol. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used for analysis. Results. From 227 under-five children, 16.7% were positive for Campylobacter spp.; isolates, C. jejuni, C. coli, and C. lari, accounted for 71.1%, 21.1%, and 7.9%, respectively. Higher rate of resistance was observed to ampicillin 76.3%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (68.4%), tetracycline (39.5%), chloramphenicol (31.6%), clindamycin (26.3%), and doxycycline (23.7%). Erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, norfloxacin, and nalidixic acid were effective for more than 80% of the isolates. Multiple drug resistance was observed among 78.9% of all the three spp. Conclusions. Isolation rate of Campylobacter spp. was high. C. lari was reported for the first time at this study area. Higher rate of resistance was observed to the commonly used drugs. PMID:26904735

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli recovered from organic turkey farms in Germany.

    PubMed

    El-Adawy, Hosny; Ahmed, Marwa F E; Hotzel, Helmut; Tomaso, Herbert; Tenhagen, Bernd-Alois; Hartung, Joerg; Neubauer, Heinrich; Hafez, Hafez M

    2015-11-01

    The popularity of food produced from animals kept under an organic regimen has increased in recent years. In Germany, turkey meat consumption has increased. Despite several studies assessing the susceptibility of campylobacters to various antibiotics in poultry, no sufficient data exists regarding the antimicrobial resistance of campylobacters in organic-reared turkeys. This study provides information about antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter isolated from turkeys reared on organic farms in Germany. Ninety-six Campylobacter strains (41 C. jejuni and 55 C. coli) were isolated from different free-range turkey flocks. In vitro antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done using a broth microdilution test, and the presence of resistance genes to antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, tetracycline) was investigated. All Campylobacter isolates from organic turkeys (n = 96) were phenotypically sensitive to gentamicin, erythromycin, streptomycin, and chloramphenicol. In this study, the antibiotic susceptibilities of C. jejuni to ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, and naladixic acid were 56.0%, 51.3%, and 56.0%, respectively. In contrast, 44.0%, 73.0%, and 74.6% of C. coli isolates were resistant to tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, and nalidixic acid, respectively. Replacement of the Thr-86→Ile in the gyrA gene, and the presence of the tet(O) gene were the mainly identified resistance mechanisms against fluoroquinolones and tetracycline, respectively.These results also reinforce the need to develop strategies and implement specific control procedures to reduce the development of antimicrobial resistance.

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira spp. isolated from commercial laying hens and free-living wild mallards (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Jansson, Désirée S; Pringle, Märit

    2011-08-01

    In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility to tylosin, valnemulin, tiamulin, doxycycline, lincomycin and ampicillin was investigated by broth dilution in 48 Brachyspira spp. isolates from commercial laying hens (n=30) and free-living wild mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) (n=18). Presumed pathogens (Brachyspira alvinipulli, Brachyspira intermedia, Brachyspira pilosicoli), commensals (Brachyspira murdochii, Brachyspira innocens, "Brachyspira pulli"), and isolates of undetermined species affiliation were included. The laying hens had not been exposed to therapeutic levels of antimicrobials for at least 50 weeks before sampling, and low levels of environmental antimicrobial exposure were presumed in mallards. No isolates with decreased susceptibility to tylosin, valnemulin, tiamulin or doxycycline were found. Decreased susceptibility to lincomycin (minimum inhibitory concentration 16 µg/ml) was detected in two isolates (Brachyspira sp.) from laying hens. Five isolates showed decreased susceptibility to ampicillin (minimum inhibitory concentration 16 to >32 µg/ml), including two "B. pulli" and one B. alvinipulli from laying hens, and isolates of B. pilosicoli and "B. pulli" from mallards. Decreased susceptibility to ampicillin was associated with β-lactamase activity in four isolates. A new variant of a class D β-lactamase gene designated bla (oxa-192) was identified in a B. pilosicoli isolate of mallard origin. This is the first time the genetic basis for antimicrobial resistance is described in Brachyspira spp. from a free-living wild bird. Isolates displaying decreased susceptibility to ampicillin were accompanied by fully susceptible isolates of the same species or other genotypes within three laying hen flocks. This underlines the need for performing antimicrobial susceptibility tests on single clones/genotypes, and to analyse multiple isolates from the same flock.

  13. Evaluation of a Semiquantitative Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Method for Rapid Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Positive Blood Cultures.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jette S; Hamacher, Christina; Gross, Birgit; Sparbier, Katrin; Lange, Christoph; Kostrzewa, Markus; Schubert, Sören

    2016-11-01

    With the increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, rapid identification of the pathogen and its individual antibiotic resistance is crucial to ensure adequate antiinfective treatment at the earliest time point. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry for the identification of bacteria directly from the blood culture bottle has been widely established; however, there is still an urgent need for new methods that permit rapid resistance testing. Recently, a semiquantitative MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry-based method for the prediction of antibiotic resistance was described. We evaluated this method for detecting nonsusceptibility against two β-lactam and two non-β-lactam antibiotics. A collection of 30 spiked blood cultures was tested for nonsusceptibility against gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, 99 patient-derived blood cultures were tested for nonsusceptibility against cefotaxime, piperacillin-tazobactam, and ciprofloxacin in parallel with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identification from the blood culture fluid. The assay correctly classified all isolates tested for nonsusceptibility against gentamicin and cefotaxime. One misclassification for ciprofloxacin nonsusceptibility and five misclassifications for piperacillin-tazobactam nonsusceptibility occurred. Identification of the bacterium and prediction of nonsusceptibility was possible within approximately 4 h.

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus suis isolated from clinically healthy swine in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Taíssa Cook Siqueira; Paes, Antonio Carlos; Megid, Jane; Ribolla, Paulo Eduardo Martins; Paduan, Karina dos Santos; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important pathogen in the swine industry. This study is the first to report on the antimicrobial susceptibility of S. suis isolated from clinically healthy pigs in Brazil; the fourth major pork producer in the world. The antimicrobial susceptibility of 260 strains was determined by disc diffusion method. Strains were commonly susceptible to ceftiofur, cephalexin, chloramphenicol, and florfenicol, with more than 80% of the strains being susceptible to these antimicrobials. A high frequency of resistance to some of the antimicrobial agents was demonstrated, with resistance being most common to sulfa-trimethoprim (100%), tetracycline (97.69%), clindamycin (84.61%), norfloxacin (76.92%), and ciprofloxacin (61.15%). A high percentage of multidrug resistant strains (99.61%) were also found. The results of this study indicate that ceftiofur, cephalexin, and florfenicol are the antimicrobials of choice for empirical control of the infections caused by S. suis. PMID:24688177

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility assays in paper-based portable culture devices.

    PubMed

    Deiss, Frédérique; Funes-Huacca, Maribel E; Bal, Jasmin; Tjhung, Katrina F; Derda, Ratmir

    2014-01-07

    To detect antibiotic-resistant bacteria in areas remote from microbiology laboratories, we designed portable culture devices performing an analogue of the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion test inside patterned papers embedded in tape. We quantified the antibiotic susceptibility of several strains of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium by measuring blue-colored zones of inhibited growth.

  16. Monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus suis in the Netherlands, 2013-2015.

    PubMed

    van Hout, Jobke; Heuvelink, Annet; Gonggrijp, Maaike

    2016-10-15

    The objective of the present study was to analyse the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus suis isolates from post-mortem samples from pigs in the Netherlands. S. suis isolates originated from diagnostic submissions of pigs sent to the Pathology Department of GD Animal Health, from April 2013 till June 2015. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of in total 15 antimicrobials were assessed by broth microdilution following CLSI recommendations. MIC50 and MIC90 values were determined and MICs were interpreted as susceptible, intermediate and resistant using CLSI veterinary breakpoints (when available). Emergence of resistance among S. suis (n=1163) derived from clinical submissions of pigs appeared to be limited. Resistance to ampicillin, ceftiofur, clindamycin, enrofloxacin, florfenicol, penicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline was 0.3%, 0.5%, 48.1%, 0.6%, 0.1%, 0.5%, 3.0%, and 78.4%, respectively. Cross-resistance between penicillin and ampicillin appeared to be incomplete. MIC values of erythromycin, clindamycin, neomycin, penicillin and tilmicosin for isolates originating from grower/finisher pigs were significantly more often lower than the MIC values of isolates from suckling/weaned piglets. It has to be kept in mind that these results represent only part of the Dutch pig population and it can be discussed whether this is a representative sample. Interpretation of the MIC results of (clinically relevant) antimicrobials tested for treatment of S. suis infection is strongly hampered by the lack of CLSI-defined veterinary clinical breakpoints that are animal species- and body site-specific. Therefore, and to conduct a clinically reliable monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility of veterinary pathogens, more species- and organ-specific veterinary breakpoints are urgently needed.

  17. Determination of antimicrobial susceptibilities on infected urines without isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Deming, J. W.; Shrock, C. G.; Vellend, H.; Barza, M. J.; Weinstein, L. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for the quick determination of the susceptibilities of various unidentified bacteria contained in an aqueous physiological fluid sample, particularly urine, to one or more antibiotics. A bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay is carried out after the elimination of non-bacterial ATP to determine whether an infection exists. If an infection does exist, a portion of the sample is further processed, including subjecting parts of the portion to one or more antibiotics. Growth of the bacteria in the parts are determined, again by an ATP assay, to determine whether the unidentified bacteria in the sample are susceptible to the antibiotic or antibiotics under test.

  18. Susceptibility of different bacterial species isolated from food animals to copper sulphate, zinc chloride and antimicrobial substances used for disinfection.

    PubMed

    Aarestrup, Frank M; Hasman, Henrik

    2004-05-20

    A total of 569 different bacterial isolates (156 Salmonella, 202 E. coli, 43 S. aureus, 38 S. hyicus, 52 E. faecalis, 78 E. faecium) were tested for susceptibility to copper sulphate, benzalkonium chloride, hydrogen peroxide and chlorhexidine using MIC determinations. A total of 442 isolates were also tested for susceptibility to formaldehyde and 177 isolates for susceptibility to zinc chloride. Enterococcal isolates formed a bimodal distribution of MICs to copper sulphate, whereas the other bacterial species formed one large population. Otherwise the isolates formed one large population of susceptibilities to the different antimicrobial agents. Large variations were observed in the susceptibility of the different bacterial species to the different compounds. Staphylococci were in general very susceptible to all antimicrobial compounds tested. The Salmonella isolates were in general less susceptible to copper sulphate, benzalkonium chloride and chlorhexidine followed by E. coli and the Gram-positive species. The opposite was the case for zinc chloride. All isolates were very susceptible to H(2)O(2) with MICs ranging from 0.002 to 0.016%, and to formaldehyde with MICs at 0.003 and 0.006%. This study showed that Danish bacterial isolates from livestock so far have not or have only to a limited degree developed resistance to antimicrobial compounds commonly used for disinfection. Acquired copper resistance was only found in enterococci. There were large differences in the intrinsic susceptibility of the different bacterial species to these compounds, and Salmonella especially seems intrinsically less susceptible than the other bacterial species, which might have human health implications.

  19. Frequency and antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus species isolated from canine pyodermas.

    PubMed

    Medleau, L; Long, R E; Brown, J; Miller, W H

    1986-02-01

    Specimens obtained from pyogenic skin lesions of 210 dogs were culturally examined for staphylococci. A total of 215 isolates of staphylococci were biotyped, using the biochemical tests contained in a commercial staphylococcal identification system. Of 201 coagulase-positive isolates, 197 were identified as Staphylococcus intermedius, 3 as S aureus, and 1 as S hyicus. Of 14 coagulase-negative isolates, 5 were identified as S epidermidis, 5 as S xylosus, 3 as S simulans, and 1 as S hominis. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were done on all staphylococcal isolates, using the standard disk-diffusion method. Staphylococcus intermedius isolates were susceptible to cephalothin, methicillin, and gentamicin. Resistance to ampicillin, penicillin G, and tetracycline was frequent. Antibiotic resistance was not associated with the depth of skin infection. Resistance to ampicillin, penicillin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was not associated with previous antibiotic use. Increased resistance to chloramphenicol, clindamycin, and erythromycin was associated with previous antibiotic therapy. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of the other Staphylococcus species isolated are reported, but the small numbers of these species precluded making meaningful comparison with S intermedius.

  20. Pathogens and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles in critically ill patients with bloodstream infections: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Rachel D.; Fowler, Robert A.; Rishu, Asgar H.; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Cook, Deborah; Dodek, Peter; Hall, Richard; Kumar, Anand; Lamontagne, François; Lauzier, François; Marshall, John; Martin, Claudio M.; McIntyre, Lauralyn; Muscedere, John; Reynolds, Steven; Stelfox, Henry T.; Daneman, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance is vital to guiding empirical treatment of infections. Collating and reporting routine data on clinical isolate testing may offer more timely information about resistance patterns than traditional surveillance network methods. Methods: Using routine microbiology testing data collected from the Bacteremia Antibiotic Length Actually Needed for Clinical Effectiveness retrospective cohort study, we conducted a descriptive secondary analysis among critically ill patients in whom bloodstream infections had been diagnosed in 14 intensive care units (ICUs) in Canada. The participating sites were located within tertiary care teaching hospitals and represented 6 provinces and 10 cities. More than 80% of the study population was accrued from 2011-2013. We assessed the epidemiologic features of the infections and corresponding antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. Susceptibility testing was done according to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines at accredited laboratories. Results: A total of 1416 pathogens were isolated from 1202 patients. The most common organisms were Escherichia coli (217 isolates [15.3%]), Staphylococcus aureus (175 [12.4%]), coagulase-negative staphylococci (117 [8.3%]), Klebsiella pneumoniae (86 [6.1%]) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (85 [6.0%]). The contribution of individual pathogens varied by site. For 13 ICUs, gram-negative susceptibility rates were high for carbapenems (95.4%), tobramycin (91.2%) and piperacillin-tazobactam (90.0%); however, the proportion of specimens susceptible to these agents ranged from 75.0%-100%, 66.7%-100% and 75.0%-100%, respectively, across sites. Fewer gram-negative bacteria were susceptible to fluoroquinolones (84.5% [range 64.1%-97.2%]). A total of 145 patients (12.1%) had infections caused by highly resistant microorganisms, with significant intersite variation (range 2.6%-24.0%, χ2 = 57.50, p < 0.001). Interpretation: We assessed the epidemiologic

  1. Occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility of enteric rods and pseudomonads isolated from the dental prostheses biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Sanrrangers Sales; Ribeiro, Maximilo de Oliveira; Gomes, Francisco Isaac Fernandes; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos; Silva, Antonio Alfredo Rodrigues e; Zanin, Iriana Carla Junqueira; Barbosa, Francisco Cesar Barroso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aspiration of oral bacteria leads to cardiac and respiratory infectious diseases and dentures can act as a reservoir for pathogenic microorganisms. Objective: To determine the occurrence and the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of enteric rods and pseudomonads from the denture biofilm of 52 subjects at the Center for Dental Specialties of Sobral/ Ceara, Brazil. Material and Methods: Denture biofilm was collected and samples plated on MacConkey agar. The isolated bacterial colonies were identified using the BBL Crystal enteric/non-fermenter system. Antibiotic bacterial susceptibility was assessed by the disc diffusion method of amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, doxycycline, tetracycline, tobramycin, imipenem, cefotaxime, and ciprofloxacin. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of cefotaxime, tobramycin, doxycycline, imipenem, and ciprofloxacin was determined for 40 species by E-test. Results: 34 subjects (65.4%) harbored enteric rods in their prostheses. Klebsiella pneumoniae (26.5%), Escherichia coli (23.5%), and Enterobacter aerogenes (23.5%) were the most prevalent species. All organisms were susceptible to ciprofloxacin and most species were resistant to amoxicillin or amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, demonstrating variable sensitivity patterns to other antimicrobials. However, the MIC showed the emergence of strains with reduced sensitivity to ciprofloxacin (MIC90≥3 μg/ mL) and cefotaxime (MIC90≥2 μg/mL). Conclusion: The findings show high prevalence of nosocomial diseases-related bacterial species and low susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs. Therefore, these results imply caution against the indiscriminate use of broad spectrum antibiotics in dental practice. PMID:27812616

  2. Isolation of Helicobacter pylori in gastric mucosa and susceptibility to five antimicrobial drugs in Southern chile

    PubMed Central

    Otth, Laura; Wilson, Myra; Fernández, Heriberto; Otth, Carola; Toledo, Claudio; Cárcamo, Victoria; Rivera, Paula; Ruiz, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes more than 50% of the world population thus, it is considered an important cause of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the isolation frequency of H. pylori in Southern Chile from patients with symptomatology compatible with gastritis or gastric ulcer and to correlate these findings with demographic parameters of infected patients and the susceptibility profiles of the isolated strains to the antimicrobial drugs used in the eradication treatments. A total of 240 patients were enrolled in the study. Each gastric biopsy was homogenized and seeded onto blood agar plates containing a selective antibiotics mixture (DENT supplement). Plates were incubated at 37° C in a microaerophilic environment for five days. The susceptibility profiles to amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, tetracycline and metronidazole were determined using the E-test method. H. pylori was isolated from 99 patients (41.3%) with slightly higher frequency in female (42% positive cultures) than male (40.2% positive cultures). With regard to age and educational level, the highest isolation frequencies were obtained in patients between 21–30 (55%) and 41–50 (52.6%) years old, and patients with secondary (43.9%) and university (46.2%) educational levels. Nineteen (21.6%) strains showed resistance to at least one antimicrobial drug. Tetracycline was the most active antimicrobial in vitro, whereas metronidazole was the less active. One strain (5.3%) showed resistance to amoxicillin, clarithomycin and metronidazole, simultaneously. PMID:24031652

  3. Biocide and antimicrobial susceptibility of methicillin-resistant staphylococcal isolates from horses.

    PubMed

    Couto, Natacha; Belas, Adriana; Tilley, Paula; Couto, Isabel; Gama, Luís T; Kadlec, Kristina; Schwarz, Stefan; Pomba, Constança

    2013-09-27

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biocide and antimicrobial susceptibility of methicillin-resistant staphylococcal isolates from horses. Fourteen methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) were subjected to an extensive genotype characterization, including SCCmec, dru, spa, PFGE and MLST typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed and resistance genes were detected by PCR. Minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of four biocides [chlorhexidine acetate (CHA), benzalkonium chloride (BAC), triclosan (TCL) and glutaraldehyde (GLA)] were determined following the recommendations of document NF EN 1040. The presence of qac and sh-fabI genes was investigated by PCR. Several antimicrobial resistance patterns and genes were detected. When MRS strains were exposed for a longer period of time, a lower concentration of the biocide was needed to achieve lethality. TCL had the lowest MBC values. All MBC values were lower than the recommended in-use concentrations for veterinary medicine. S. haemolyticus and S. cohnii subsp. cohnii carried plasmid-borne qacA and sh-fabI or qacB and a qacH-like genes, respectively. Biocides appear to be a reliable antiseptic option against MRS, since even in the presence of bacterial efflux mechanisms, the recommended concentration is much higher than the in vitro MBC.

  4. Salmonella Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Among Dairy Farm Environmental Samples Collected in Texas.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Rivera, Lorraine D; Cummings, Kevin J; Loneragan, Guy H; Rankin, Shelley C; Hanson, Devin L; Leone, William M; Edrington, Thomas S

    2016-04-01

    Dairy cattle are a reservoir of several Salmonella serovars that are leading causes of human salmonellosis. The objectives of this study were to estimate the environmental prevalence of Salmonella on dairy farms in Texas and to characterize the antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates. Eleven dairy farms throughout Texas were sampled from August through October 2013, using a cross-sectional approach. Samples were collected from four locations within each farm (hospital pen, maternity pen, cow housing area, and calf housing area), and feces were collected from cull cows as available. Environmental and fecal samples were processed for Salmonella, and isolates were tested for susceptibility to 15 antimicrobial agents. Serovar characterization was performed on a subset of these isolates. Salmonella was isolated from 67.0% (236/352) of the environmental samples and 64.2% (43/67) of the cull cow fecal samples. Environmental samples from the maternity pen were significantly more likely to be Salmonella positive than samples from the cow and calf housing areas. Multidrug resistance was evident in 11.9% (27/226) of environmental isolates and 19.5% (8/41) of fecal isolates. Salmonella isolates from the calf housing area and maternity pen were significantly more likely to be multidrug resistant (MDR) than isolates from the cow housing area. The most common serovars found among the MDR isolates were Newport, Muenchen, and Typhimurium. These results help provide a focus for efforts to mitigate the burden of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella at the preharvest level.

  5. Isolation of Helicobacter pylori in gastric mucosa and susceptibility to five antimicrobial drugs in Southern chile.

    PubMed

    Otth, Laura; Wilson, Myra; Fernández, Heriberto; Otth, Carola; Toledo, Claudio; Cárcamo, Victoria; Rivera, Paula; Ruiz, Luis

    2011-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes more than 50% of the world population thus, it is considered an important cause of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the isolation frequency of H. pylori in Southern Chile from patients with symptomatology compatible with gastritis or gastric ulcer and to correlate these findings with demographic parameters of infected patients and the susceptibility profiles of the isolated strains to the antimicrobial drugs used in the eradication treatments. A total of 240 patients were enrolled in the study. Each gastric biopsy was homogenized and seeded onto blood agar plates containing a selective antibiotics mixture (DENT supplement). Plates were incubated at 37° C in a microaerophilic environment for five days. The susceptibility profiles to amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, tetracycline and metronidazole were determined using the E-test method. H. pylori was isolated from 99 patients (41.3%) with slightly higher frequency in female (42% positive cultures) than male (40.2% positive cultures). With regard to age and educational level, the highest isolation frequencies were obtained in patients between 21-30 (55%) and 41-50 (52.6%) years old, and patients with secondary (43.9%) and university (46.2%) educational levels. Nineteen (21.6%) strains showed resistance to at least one antimicrobial drug. Tetracycline was the most active antimicrobial in vitro, whereas metronidazole was the less active. One strain (5.3%) showed resistance to amoxicillin, clarithomycin and metronidazole, simultaneously.

  6. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Brachyspira Species Isolated from Swine Herds in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mirajkar, Nandita S; Davies, Peter R; Gebhart, Connie J

    2016-08-01

    Outbreaks of swine dysentery, caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and the recently discovered "Brachyspira hampsonii," have reoccurred in North American swine herds since the late 2000s. Additionally, multiple Brachyspira species have been increasingly isolated by North American diagnostic laboratories. In Europe, the reliance on antimicrobial therapy for control of swine dysentery has been followed by reports of antimicrobial resistance over time. The objectives of our study were to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility trends of four Brachyspira species originating from U.S. swine herds and to investigate their associations with the bacterial species, genotypes, and epidemiological origins of the isolates. We evaluated the susceptibility of B. hyodysenteriae, B. hampsonii, Brachyspira pilosicoli, and Brachyspira murdochii to tiamulin, valnemulin, doxycycline, lincomycin, and tylosin by broth microdilution and that to carbadox by agar dilution. In general, Brachyspira species showed high susceptibility to tiamulin, valnemulin, and carbadox, heterogeneous susceptibility to doxycycline, and low susceptibility to lincomycin and tylosin. A trend of decreasing antimicrobial susceptibility by species was observed (B. hampsonii > B. hyodysenteriae > B. murdochii > B. pilosicoli). In general, Brachyspira isolates from the United States were more susceptible to these antimicrobials than were isolates from other countries. Decreased antimicrobial susceptibility was associated with the genotype, stage of production, and production system from which the isolate originated, which highlights the roles of biosecurity and husbandry in disease prevention and control. Finally, this study also highlights the urgent need for Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute-approved clinical breakpoints for Brachyspira species, to facilitate informed therapeutic and control strategies.

  7. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Clostridium difficile Isolates from Family Dairy Farms.

    PubMed

    Bandelj, Petra; Golob, Majda; Ocepek, Matjaz; Zdovc, Irena; Vengust, Modest

    2016-08-03

    A significant risk factor for developing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in humans and animals is associated with the antimicrobial use. It has often been hypothesized that farm animals could be the source for human infection with Clostridium difficile (CD). In the European Union, family-run dairy farms are the predominant farming model, which are more interlinked within the community compared to large-scale intensive dairy or beef farms. Therefore, it is important to investigate antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of CD in such environment. A total of 159 CD isolates from 20 family dairy farms were tested with a customized broth microdilution plate for their antimicrobial resistance. Seventeen antimicrobials were selected (amoxicillin, ceftriaxone, clindamycin, daptomycin, erythromycin, fusidic acid, imipenem, levofloxacin, linezolid, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, oxacillin, rifampicin, tetracycline, tigecycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and vancomycin), which are commonly used for treatment of CDI in veterinary and human medicine, or were previously applied in CD epidemiological studies. Antimicrobials, which are used for treatment of CDI in humans (metronidazole, vancomycin, fusidic acid, tigecycline, linezolid) inhibited CD growth in vitro. Most CD isolates were resistant to erythromycin (93.1%), daptomycin (69.2%) and clindamycin (46.5%). High multiple-resistance was found in CD ribotype 012 (n = 5, 100%), some CD SLO 060 (n = 4, 25%) and one CD 033 (n = 1, 1.1%). High multiple-resistance in this study was linked with CD ribotypes and not with the origin of CD. The low prevalence of these ribotypes (6.3%; 10/159) indicates that family-run dairy farms are an unlikely source of CD with multiple-resistance to antimicrobials.

  8. Susceptibilities of anaerobic bacteria isolated from animals with ovine foot rot to 28 antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Piriz, S; Cuenca, R; Valle, J; Vadillo, S

    1992-01-01

    The agar dilution method was used to determine the inhibitory activities of 28 antimicrobial agents against 35 strains of the genus Peptostreptococcus, 4 strains of the species Peptococcus niger, 20 strains of the species Megasphaera elsdenii, 7 strains from the species Acidaminococcus fermentans, 8 strains of the genus Clostridium, 11 strains of the genus Eubacterium, and 1 strain of the species Propionibacterium acidipropionici, all of which were isolated from 125 clinical cases of ovine foot rot between January 1987 and December 1988. The three unreidopenicillins studied proved to be the most active antimicrobial agents, with a high percentage of strains being susceptible at a concentration of 64 micrograms/ml. Penicillin G, ampicillin, and the three cephalosporins studied also had good activity. Fosfomycin showed a high degree of activity among the 116 anaerobic bacteria tested. PMID:1590689

  9. In vitro assessment of the antimicrobial susceptibility of caprine isolates of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri.

    PubMed

    Paterna, A; Tatay-Dualde, J; Amores, J; Prats-van der Ham, M; Sánchez, A; de la Fe, C; Contreras, A; Corrales, J C; Gómez-Martín, Á

    2016-08-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum mycoplasmacidal concentration (MMC) of 17 antimicrobials against 41 Spanish caprine isolates of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri (Mmc) obtained from different specimens (milk, external auricular canal and semen) were determined using a liquid microdilution method. For half of the isolates, the MIC was also estimated for seven of the antimicrobials using an epsilometric test (ET), in order to compare both methods and assess the validity of ET. Mutations in genes gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE conferring fluoroquinolone resistance, which have been recently described in Mmc, were investigated using PCR. The anatomical origin of the isolate had no effect on its antimicrobial susceptibility. Moxifloxacin and doxycycline had the lowest MIC values. The rest of the fluoroquinolones studied (except norfloxacin), together with tylosin and clindamycin, also had low MIC values, although the MMC obtained for clindamycin was higher than for the other antimicrobials. For all the aminoglycosides, spiramycin and erythromycin, a notable level of resistance was observed. The ET was in close agreement with broth microdilution at low MICs, but not at intermediate or high MICs. The analysis of the genomic sequences revealed the presence of an amino acid substitution in codon 83 of the gene gyrA, which has not been described previously in Mmc.

  10. Development of Similar Broth Microdilution Methods to Determine the Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Flavobacterium columnare and F. psychrophilum.

    PubMed

    Gieseker, Charles M; Crosby, Tina C; Mayer, Tamara D; Bodeis, Sonya M; Stine, Cynthia B

    2016-03-01

    Flavobacterium columnare and F. psychrophilum are major fish pathogens that cause diseases that may require antimicrobial therapy. Choice of appropriate treatment is dependent upon determining the antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates. Therefore we optimized methods for broth microdilution testing of F. columnare and F. psychrophilum to facilitate standardizing an antimicrobial susceptibility test. We developed adaptations to make reproducible broth inoculums and confirmed the proper incubation time and media composition. We tested the stability of potential quality-control bacteria and compared test results between different operators. Log phase occurred at 48 h for F. columnare and 72-96 h for F. psychrophilum, confirming the test should be incubated at 28°C for approximately 48 h and at 18°C for approximately 96 h, respectively. The most consistent susceptibility results were achieved with plain, 4-g/L, dilute Mueller-Hinton broth supplemented with dilute calcium and magnesium. Supplementing the broth with horse serum did not improve growth. The quality-control strains, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC 33658, yielded stable minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) against all seven antimicrobials tested after 30 passes at 28°C and 15 passes at 18°C. In comparison tests, most MICs of the isolates agreed 100% within one drug dilution for ampicillin, florfenicol, and oxytetracycline. The agreement was lower with the ormetoprim-sulfdimethoxine combination, but there was at least 75% agreement for all but one isolate. These experiments have provided methods to help standardize antimicrobial susceptibility testing of these nutritionally fastidious aquatic bacteria. Received June 24, 2015; accepted October 2, 2015.

  11. Comparison of antimicrobial susceptibility among Clostridium difficile isolated from an integrated human and swine population in Texas.

    PubMed

    Norman, Keri N; Scott, Harvey M; Harvey, Roger B; Norby, Bo; Hume, Michael E

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium difficile can be a major problem in hospitals because the bacterium primarily affects individuals with an altered intestinal flora; this largely occurs through prolonged antibiotic use. Proposed sources of increased community-acquired infections are food animals and retail meats. The objective of this study was to compare the antimicrobial resistance patterns of C. difficile isolated from a closed, integrated population of humans and swine to increase understanding of the bacterium in these populations. Swine fecal samples were collected from a vertically flowing swine population consisting of farrowing, nursery, breeding, and grower/finisher production groups. Human wastewater samples were collected from swine worker and nonworker occupational group cohorts. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on 523 C. difficile strains from the population using the commercially available agar diffusion Epsilometer test (Etest(®)) for 11 different antimicrobials. All of the swine and human strains were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, piperacillin/tazobactam, and vancomycin. In addition, all of the human strains were susceptible to chloramphenicol. The majority of the human and swine strains were resistant to cefoxitin and ciprofloxacin. Statistically significant differences in antimicrobial susceptibility were found among the swine production groups for ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and clindamycin. No significant differences in antimicrobial susceptibility were found across human occupational group cohorts. We found that 8.3% of the swine strains and 13.3% of the human strains exhibited resistance to metronidazole. The finding of differences in susceptibility patterns between human and swine strains of C. difficile provides evidence that transmission between host species in this integrated population is unlikely.

  12. Diffusion Disk Susceptibility Testing with Cefaclor

    PubMed Central

    Shadomy, Smith; Carver, Melinda

    1978-01-01

    The reliability of the standardized 30-μg cephalothin disk and that of an experimental 30-μg cefaclor disk in predicting probable clinical susceptibility to cefaclor were compared. Quantitative determinations of cefaclor susceptibility were measured by the World Health Organization International Collaborative Study agar dilution procedure; diffusion disk tests were performed by the standardized U.S. Food and Drug Administration disk test. The cephalothin disk erred in predicting probable susceptibility in 52% of isolates of Enterococcus spp. resistant to 16 μg or less of cefaclor per ml; the cefaclor disk did not. The cephalothin disk erred in correctly predicting susceptibility in only 20% of cefaclor-susceptible isolates of Enterobacter spp.; the cefaclor disk correctly predicted susceptibility for 70%. These results indicate the need for further evaluation of a separate cefaclor disk for use in susceptibility testing with this new cephalosporin. PMID:646345

  13. Molecular characterization and antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolated from rabbits raised for meat production.

    PubMed

    Drigo, Ilenia; Mazzolini, Elena; Bacchin, Cosetta; Tonon, Elena; Puiatti, Cinzia; Bano, Luca; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Agnoletti, Fabrizio

    2015-12-31

    Clostridium difficile is an important cause of enteric disease in humans and animals. Recent studies demonstrated a genetic overlap between C. difficile isolated from animals and humans suggesting animals as possible reservoir for human pathogenic strains. This study was a preliminary investigation on the occurrence of C. difficile in rabbits raised in industrial holdings for food production and aimed to characterise isolates and estimate their antimicrobial susceptibility. C. difficile isolates were characterized by toxin profiles, toxinotyping and PCR-ribotyping. The MICs of six antibiotics were determined using E-test. Between 2007 and 2013, 285 industrial holdings (representing 40% of the national census) submitted rabbits to our laboratory for diagnostic purposes, among these holdings, groups of three to five post-weaned rabbits were sampled once by convenience. 1279 samples of caecal content were collected. The overall isolation rate of C. difficile from the enteric specimen was 3% (38/1279), with no difference among animals affected or not by enteric disorders. Among isolates 66% (25/38) were toxigenic. Sixteen different PCR-ribotypes (RTs) were identified. Among the toxigenic strains RT-014/020, RT-078 and RT-012 were found in at least three rabbit holdings. According to the ECOFF threshold, 82% (31/38) C. difficile isolates displayed a reduced susceptibility to at least one and 18% (7/38) to three tested antimicrobials. Rabbits are colonized by heterogeneous C. difficile ribotypes many of which are commonly isolated in humans. One third of isolates displayed a reduced susceptibility to MTZ, the first choice antimicrobial for human CDI treatment. According to our findings rabbits are a potential source of C. difficile for humans.

  14. Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Wound Isolates of Obligate Anaerobes from Combat Casualties

    PubMed Central

    White, Brian K.; Mende, Katrin; Weintrob, Amy C.; Beckius, Miriam L.; Zera, Wendy C.; Lu, Dan; Bradley, William; Tribble, David R.; Schnaubelt, Elizabeth R.; Murray, Clinton K.

    2015-01-01

    Data from recent conflicts related to war wounds and obligate anaerobes are limited. We define the epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of obligate anaerobes from Iraq and Afghanistan casualties (6/2009–12/2013), as well as their association with clinical outcomes. Susceptibility against eleven antibiotics (7 classes) was tested. Overall, 59 patients had 119 obligate anaerobes identified (83 were first isolates). Obligate anaerobes were isolated 7–13 days post-injury, primarily from lower extremity wounds (43%), and were largely Bacteroides spp. (42%) and Clostridium spp. (19%). Patients with pelvic wounds were more likely to have Bacteroides spp. and concomitant resistant gram-negative aerobes. Seventy-three percent of isolates were resistant to ≥1 antimicrobials. Bacteroides spp. demonstrated the most resistance (16% of first isolates). Patients with resistant isolates had similar outcomes to those with susceptible strains. Serial recovery of isolates occurred in 15% of patients and was significantly associated with isolation of Bacteroides spp., along with resistant gram-negative aerobes. PMID:26607420

  15. Serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella spp. isolated from farm animals in China.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Xiuhua; Hao, Haihong; Dai, Menghong; Wang, Yulian; Ahmad, Ijaz; Liu, Zhenli; Zonghui, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella spp. can indirectly infect humans via transfer from animals and animal-derived food products, and thereby cause potentially fatal diseases. Therefore, gaining an understanding of Salmonella infection in farm animals is increasingly important. The aim of this study was to identify the distribution of serotypes in Salmonella samples isolated from chickens (n = 837), pigs (n = 930), and dairy cows (n = 418) in central China (Henan, Hubei, and Hunan provinces) in 2010-2011, and investigate the susceptibility of strains to antimicrobial agents. Salmonella isolates were identified by PCR amplification of the invA gene, serotypes were determined by using a slide agglutination test for O and H antigens, and susceptibility to 24 antimicrobials was tested using the agar dilution method. In total, 248 Salmonella strains were identified: 105, 105, and 38 from chickens, dairy cows, and pigs, respectively. Additionally, 209 strains were identified in diseased pigs from the Huazhong Agricultural University veterinary hospital. Among these 457 strains, the dominant serotypes were Typhimurium in serogroup B, IIIb in serogroup C, and Enteritidis in serogroup D. In antimicrobial susceptibility tests, 41.14% of Salmonella spp. were susceptible to all antimicrobial agents, 48.14% were resistant to at least one, and 34.72% were resistant to more than three classes. Strains were highly resistant to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (39.61%), nalidixic acid (39.17%), doxycycline (28.22%), and tetracycline (27.58%). Resistance to cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones ranged from 5.25 to 7.44% and 19.04 to 24.51%, respectively. Among penicillin-resistant and cephalosporin-resistant strains, 25 isolates produced extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). The multidrug-resistant and ESBL-producing Salmonella strains identified in healthy animals here will present a challenge for veterinary medicine and farm animal husbandry, and could also pose a threat to public health. The level of

  16. Helicobacter pylori Detection and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    Mégraud, Francis; Lehours, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of Helicobacter pylori in 1982 was the starting point of a revolution concerning the concepts and management of gastroduodenal diseases. It is now well accepted that the most common stomach disease, peptic ulcer disease, is an infectious disease, and all consensus conferences agree that the causative agent, H. pylori, must be treated with antibiotics. Furthermore, the concept emerged that this bacterium could be the trigger of various malignant diseases of the stomach, and it is now a model for chronic bacterial infections causing cancer. Most of the many different techniques involved in diagnosis of H. pylori infection are performed in clinical microbiology laboratories. The aim of this article is to review the current status of these methods and their application, highlighting the important progress which has been made in the past decade. Both invasive and noninvasive techniques will be reviewed. PMID:17428887

  17. Antimycobacterial susceptibility testing methods for natural products research

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Juan Gabriel Bueno; Kouznetsov, Vladimir V.

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis underscores the need of continuous developments on new and efficient methods to determine the susceptibility of isolates of M. tuberculosis in the search for novel antimicrobial agents. Natural products constitute an important source of new drugs, but design and implementation of antimycobacterial susceptibility testing methods are necessary for evaluate the different extracts and compounds. A number of biological assay methodologies are in current use, ranging from the classical disk diffusion and broth dilution assay format, to radiorespirometric (BACTEC), dye-based, and fluorescent/luminescence reporter assays. This review presents an analysis on the in vitro susceptibility testing methods developed for determinate antitubercular activity in natural products and related compounds (semi-synthetic natural products and natural products-derived compounds) and the criteria to select the adequate method for determination of biological activity of new natural products. PMID:24031490

  18. Susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria: myth, magic, or method?

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, H M

    1991-01-01

    The demand for susceptibility testing of anaerobes has increased, yet consensus as to procedure and interpretation in this area has not been achieved. While routine testing of anaerobic isolates is not needed, certain isolates in specific clinical settings should be tested. Also, laboratories may monitor their local antibiograms by doing periodic surveillance batch testing. The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards has published a protocol of methods approved for susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria. Both agar and broth microdilution are included; however, the broth disk elution method is no longer approved by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards because of method-related interpretive errors. A number of newer methods are undergoing evaluation and seem promising. Clinicians and microbiologists reviewing susceptibility reports should be aware of sources of variability in the test results. Variables in susceptibility testing of anaerobes include the media and methods used, organisms chosen for testing, breakpoints chosen for interpretation, antibiotic, and determination of endpoint. Clustering of MICs around the breakpoint may lead to significant variability in test results. Adherence of testing laboratories to approved methods and careful descriptions of the method and the breakpoints used for interpretation would facilitate interlaboratory comparisons and allow problems of emerging resistance to be noted. A variety of resistance mechanisms occurs in anaerobic bacteria, including the production of beta-lactamase and other drug-inactivating enzymes, alteration of target proteins, and inability of the drug to penetrate the bacterial wall. Antimicrobial resistance patterns in the United States and abroad are described. PMID:1747863

  19. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of obligate anaerobic bacteria from clinical samples of animal origin.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, Melissa; Rodríguez-Cavallini, Evelyn; López-Ureña, Diana; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Quesada-Gómez, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of veterinary infectious diseases has been the focus of considerable research, yet relatively little is known about the causative agents of anaerobic infections. Susceptibility studies have documented the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and indicate distinct differences in resistance patterns related to veterinary hospitals, geographic regions, and antibiotic-prescribing regimens. The aim of the present study was to identify the obligate anaerobic bacteria from veterinary clinical samples and to determinate the in vitro susceptibility to eight antimicrobials and their resistance-associated genes. 81 clinical specimens obtained from food-producing animals, pets and wild animals were examined to determine the relative prevalence of obligate anaerobic bacteria, and the species represented. Bacteroides spp, Prevotella spp and Clostridium spp represented approximately 80% of all anaerobic isolates. Resistance to metronidazole, clindamycin, tetracycline and fluoroquinolones was found in strains isolated from food-producing animals. Ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and cephalotin showed the highest resistance in all isolates. In 17%, 4% and 14% of tetracycline-resistant isolates, the resistance genes tetL, tetM and tetW were respectively amplified by PCR whereas in 4% of clindamycin-resistant strains the ermG gene was detected. 26% of the isolates were positive for cepA, while only 6% harbored the cfxA (resistance-conferring genes to beta-lactams). In this study, the obligate anaerobic bacteria from Costa Rica showed a high degree of resistance to most antimicrobials tested. Nevertheless, in the majority of cases this resistance was not related to the resistance acquired genes usually described in anaerobes. It is important to address and regulate the use of antimicrobials in the agricultural industry and the empirical therapy in anaerobic bacterial infections in veterinary medicine, especially since antibiotics and resistant bacteria can persist in the

  20. Posttreatment Changes in Escherichia coli Antimicrobial Susceptibility Rates Among Diarrheic Patients Treated with Ciprofloxacin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND CHEMOTHERAPY, June 2005, p. 2571–2572 Vol. 49, No. 6 0066-4804/05/$08.000 doi:10.1128/AAC.49.6.2571–2572.2005 Copyright...2005, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Posttreatment Changes in Escherichia coli Antimicrobial Susceptibility Rates among... antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli among deployed U.S. military personnel being treated for diarrhea were evaluated. Stool samples were collected

  1. Actinomyces pyogenes: susceptibility of 103 clinical animal isolates to 22 antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Guérin-Faublée, V; Flandrois, J P; Broye, E; Tupin, F; Richard, Y

    1993-01-01

    Actinomyces pyogenes induces suppurative diseases in ruminants and many other animal species. Most of the earlier antimicrobial susceptibility data has been obtained by disk diffusion techniques. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 22 antibiotics for 103 strains of A pyogenes of animal origin were determined by agar dilution test (Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 5% sheep blood). All the strains were susceptible to penicillin G, amoxicillin, methicillin, cephalothin, cefoperazone, pristinamycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, spectinomycin, chloramphenicol, vancomycin, novobiocin and rifampin. Fifty-nine percent were resistant to streptomycin, 67% to tetracycline, doxycycline and minocycline, 12% to erythromycin, spiramycin and lincomycin. Most of the strains resistant to macrolides and lincosamides exhibited a constitutive MLS(B)-like phenotype. In the cultural conditions used, it was not possible to determine accurate MIC of fucidic acid and pefloxacin.

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from various animals.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Joseph E; Ball, Katherine R; Chirino-Trejo, Manuel

    2011-02-01

    This study characterized the antimicrobial susceptibility of 221 Staphylococcus aureus isolated from various species, and 60 canine Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from 1986 through 2000 at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM). Resistance of S. aureus was most common to penicillin (31%) and tetracycline (14%); resistance of S. pseudintermedius to penicillin was present in 8% and to tetracycline in 34% of isolates. Resistance to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole was only seen among S. pseudintermedius, and there was no resistance to amoxicillin/clavulanate, ampicillin/sulbactam, cephalothin, amikacin, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, chloramphenicol, or rifampin among any isolate. Inducible clindamycin resistance was found in both S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius, highlighting the need for careful interpretation of culture and susceptibility test results. There were significant differences in the minimum inhibitory concentrations of penicillin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, clindamycin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline between avian, bovine, equine, and porcine isolates.

  3. Serological characterisation and antimicrobial susceptibility of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae strains isolated from pigs in Spain.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, C B; Rodríguez Barbosa, J I; Tascón, R I; Costa, L; Riera, P; Rodríguez Ferri, E F

    1995-07-15

    Seventy-one isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae isolated from the lungs of pigs in outbreaks of pleuropneumonia in Spain were serotyped by indirect haemagglutination. Serotype 4 (42.2 per cent), serotype 7 (22.5 per cent) and serotype 2 (12.8 per cent) were predominant, whereas serotypes 1, 3, 6, 8, 9, 12 and untypable isolates were present only in small numbers. Serotypes 1, 2, 4 and 7 originated mainly from cases of acute pleuropneumonia, whereas serotypes 3, 6, 8, 9 and 12 were associated with chronically infected herds. The susceptibility of the isolates to 20 antimicrobial agents was determined by agar disc diffusion. Most were susceptible to cefuroxime, cefaclor, cefazolin, kanamycin, tobramycin, gentamicin, oxolinic acid, ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, thiamphenicol, colistin and trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole. Marked resistance was found with amoxicillin, ticarcillin, oxytetracycline, doxycycline and metronidazole. Rifampicin, fosfomycin and tiamulin were the agents most effective against the isolates tested.

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility of foodborne pathogens in organic or natural production systems: an overview.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Megan E; Fox, James Trent; Reinstein, Shelby L; Nagaraja, T G

    2008-12-01

    Organic and natural food production systems are increasing in popularity, at least partially because consumers perceive that these niche markets provide healthier and safer food products. One major difference between these niche markets and conventional production systems is the use of antimicrobials. Because antimicrobial agents exert selective pressures for antimicrobial resistance, relating antimicrobial susceptibility of foodborne bacteria to niche market production systems is of interest. Other differences between production systems might also influence the susceptibility of foodborne pathogens. The objective of this review is to compare the impact of food animal production systems on the antimicrobial susceptibility of common foodborne bacterial pathogens. Studies comparing the susceptibility of such pathogens were diverse in terms of geographic location, procedures, species of bacteria, and antimicrobials evaluated; thus, it was difficult to draw conclusions. The literature is highly variable in terms of production type and practices and susceptibility associations, although few studies have compared truly organic and conventional practices. When statistical associations were found between production type and minimum inhibitory concentrations or percentage of isolates resistant for a particular pathogen, the isolates from conventionally reared animals/products were more commonly resistant than the comparison group (organic, antibiotic free, etc.). Therefore, further studies are needed to better assess public health consequences of antimicrobial resistance and food animal production systems, specifically organic or natural versus conventional.

  5. [Methods for determining the antimicrobial susceptibility of mycobacteria].

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Fernando; Esteban, Jaime; González-Martin, Julià; Palacios, Juan-José

    2016-05-25

    Mycobacteria are a large group of microorganisms, multiple species of which are major causes of morbidity and mortality, such as tuberculosis and leprosy. At present, the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex are one of the most serious health problems worldwide. Furthermore, in contrast to M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are more frequently isolated and, in many cases, treatment is based on drug susceptibility testing. This article is a review of the different methods to determine the in vitro drug susceptibility of M. tuberculosis complex and the most relevant NTM isolates. The molecular techniques currently used for rapid detection of resistance of clinical specimens are also analysed.

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular typing of salmonella agona isolated from humans and other sources.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Dai; Zhang, Jianmin; Meng, Jianghong; Yang, Xiaowei; Jin, Huiming; Shi, Weimin; Luo, Kaijian; Tao, Yan; Pan, Haijian; Xu, Xuebin; Ren, Tao

    2014-11-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Agona (Salmonella Agona) has been among the top 10 serotypes that cause human diarrheal diseases in China. A total of 95 Salmonella Agona (67 from humans, and 28 from animals, food of animal origins, and environmental sources) recovered in Shanghai, China from 2005 to 2011 were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing and molecular subtyping using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Approximately 68.4% of the Salmonella Agona isolates were pansusceptible to 15 antimicrobial agents tested, and 4 isolates (4.21%) were resistant to at least 3 antimicrobials. PFGE analysis resulted in 41 unique patterns, of which 4 major PFGE patterns (X3, X4, X5, and X6) were grouped together at 96.1% similarity. Isolates of the four patterns included those from food (pork, beef, and chicken) and humans. Our findings showed that the same clones of Salmonella Agona were recovered from human patients and food, and that food of animal origin was potentially a major vehicle of Salmonella Agona in human salmonellosis in Shanghai.

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility of non-enterococcal intrinsic glycopeptide-resistant Gram-positive organisms.

    PubMed

    Vay, Carlos; Cittadini, Roxana; Barberis, Claudia; Hernán Rodríguez, Carlos; Perez Martínez, Herminia; Genero, Fabiana; Famiglietti, Angela

    2007-02-01

    Non-enterococcal Gram-positive bacteria that are intrinsically vancomycin-resistant have been infrequently isolated in association with serious infections. However, well-documented infections have lately been reported with increasing frequency. Because these organisms may be pathogens, we tested the MICs of 19 antimicrobial agents by the agar dilution method for predicting susceptibility. The activity of these antimicrobial agents was assessed against 28 strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus, 6; Lactobacillus acidophilus, 1; Lactobacillus casei, 1; Lactobacillus fermentum, 2; Lactobacillus brevis, 1; Lactobacillus plantarum, 1; Weissella confusa, 2; Leuconostoc mesenteroides, 7; Leuconostoc lactis, 4; Pediococcus acidilactici, 2; Pediococcus pentosaceus, 1), isolated from clinical specimens in an Argentinian university hospital from 1997 to 2003. The MICs of penicillin for 67% of the Lactobacillus strains and 100% of the Leuconostoc spp. and Pediococcus spp. strains tested were in the 0.25-2 microg/mL range. Erythromycin was the most active antimicrobial overall. Multiresistance was observed in 2 strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus, 1; Lactobacillus plantarum, 1).

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility and pathogenic genes of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the oral cavity of patients with periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to characterize the patterns of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in samples of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) isolated from periodontitis patients. Methods From July 2015 to August 2015, oral saliva was collected from a total of 112 patients diagnosed with periodontitis, including 80 outpatients in dental hospitals and 32 patients in dental clinics located in Seoul and Cheonan. The samples were subjected to a susceptibility test to evaluate the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, and the pathogenic factors and antimicrobial resistance factors in the DNA of S. aureus were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction. Results A susceptibility test against 15 antimicrobial agents showed that 88% of cultures were resistant to ampicillin, 88% to penicillin, and 2% to oxacillin. Resistance to at least two drugs was observed in 90% of cultures, and the most common pattern of multidrug resistance was to ampicillin and penicillin. Enterotoxins were detected in 65.9% of samples. The cell hemolysin gene hld was detected in 100% of cultures and hla was detected in 97.6% of samples. All strains resistant to penicillin and ampicillin had the blaZ gene. The aph(3′)IIIa gene, which encodes an aminoglycoside modifying enzyme, was detected in 46.3% of samples. Conclusions In the treatment of oral S. aureus infections, it is important to identify the pathogenic genes and the extent of antimicrobial resistance. Furthermore, it is necessary to study patterns of antimicrobial resistance and cross-infection in the context of periodontological specialties in which antimicrobials are frequently used, such as maxillofacial surgery, where the frequency of antimicrobial use for minor procedures such as implant placement is increasing. PMID:26734493

  9. Two Proposed Test Methods and Guidance for Antimicrobial Efficacy Testing

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is announcing the availability for public comment of two proposed test methods and associated testing guidance for evaluating antimicrobial pesticides against two biofilm bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus.

  10. Cumulative Antimicrobial Susceptibility Data from Intensive Care Units at One Institution: Should Data Be Combined?

    PubMed

    Campigotto, Aaron; Muller, Matthew P; Taggart, Linda R; Haj, Reem; Leung, Elizabeth; Nadarajah, Jeya; Matukas, Larissa M

    2016-04-01

    Cumulative susceptibility test data (CSTD) are used to guide empirical antimicrobial therapy and to track trends in antibiotic resistance. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommends reporting CSTD at least annually and sets the minimum number of isolates per reported organism at 30. To comply, many hospitals combine data from multiple intensive care units (ICUs); however, this may not be appropriate to guide empirical therapy because of variations in patient populations. In this study, susceptibility data for two different ICUs at a tertiary care hospital in Toronto, Canada, were used to create a traditional CSTD report, which combined data from different ICUs, and a rolling-average CSTD report, which pooled 2 years of data for each ICU separately. For simplicity, data for only the most common Gram-negative organisms (Escherichia coli,Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and the most relevant antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam) were examined. With the rolling-average method, significant differences in susceptibility were seen between the ICUs in 50% of the organism-antimicrobial combinations. Furthermore, the 3% median year-over-year difference in susceptibilities seen for the 16 organism-antibiotic combinations by using the traditional method was lower than the 14% median difference seen for the 20 between-ICU within-year comparisons obtained using the rolling-average method. Changes in our selection of empirical antibiotics resulted from this revised approach, and our results suggest that pooling data from ICUs with different patient populations may not be appropriate. A rolling-average method may be an appropriate strategy for the creation of individual-unit CSTD reports.

  11. Cumulative Antimicrobial Susceptibility Data from Intensive Care Units at One Institution: Should Data Be Combined?

    PubMed Central

    Campigotto, Aaron; Muller, Matthew P.; Taggart, Linda R.; Haj, Reem; Leung, Elizabeth; Nadarajah, Jeya

    2016-01-01

    Cumulative susceptibility test data (CSTD) are used to guide empirical antimicrobial therapy and to track trends in antibiotic resistance. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommends reporting CSTD at least annually and sets the minimum number of isolates per reported organism at 30. To comply, many hospitals combine data from multiple intensive care units (ICUs); however, this may not be appropriate to guide empirical therapy because of variations in patient populations. In this study, susceptibility data for two different ICUs at a tertiary care hospital in Toronto, Canada, were used to create a traditional CSTD report, which combined data from different ICUs, and a rolling-average CSTD report, which pooled 2 years of data for each ICU separately. For simplicity, data for only the most common Gram-negative organisms (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and the most relevant antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam) were examined. With the rolling-average method, significant differences in susceptibility were seen between the ICUs in 50% of the organism-antimicrobial combinations. Furthermore, the 3% median year-over-year difference in susceptibilities seen for the 16 organism-antibiotic combinations by using the traditional method was lower than the 14% median difference seen for the 20 between-ICU within-year comparisons obtained using the rolling-average method. Changes in our selection of empirical antibiotics resulted from this revised approach, and our results suggest that pooling data from ICUs with different patient populations may not be appropriate. A rolling-average method may be an appropriate strategy for the creation of individual-unit CSTD reports. PMID:26791365

  12. Effect of antimicrobial peptides on colistin-susceptible and colistin-resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter asburiae.

    PubMed

    Kádár, Béla; Kocsis, Béla; Kristof, Katalin; Tóth, Ákos; Szabó, Dóra

    2015-12-01

    In this study susceptibility to different antimicrobial peptides was investigated on colistin-susceptible and colistin-resistant identical pulsotype strains of KPC-2 producing Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 as well as colistin-susceptible and colistin-resistant Enterobacter asburiae strains isolated from clinical samples. In our test, bacteria were exposed to 50 mg/ml lactoferrin, lysozyme and protamine - cationic antimicrobial peptides belonging to innate immune system and having structural similarity to polymyxins - in separate reactions. After 18 hours incubation of colonies were counted. 40% of colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae strains and 97% of colistin-susceptible counterpart strains were lysed by protamine whereas 87% and 100% colony forming unit decrease by lysozyme was seen, respectively. In the case of colistin-resistant E. asburiae strains 1 log10 cell count increase were observed after treatment with lysozyme and 1.56 log10 after lactoferrin exposure compared to the initial number whereas the colistin-susceptible showed no relevant cell count increase. Our findings suggest that acquired colistin-resistance in Enterobacteriaceae is associated with tolerance against antimicrobial peptides.

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus suis isolated from swine in France and from humans in different countries between 1996 and 2000.

    PubMed

    Marie, J; Morvan, H; Berthelot-Hérault, F; Sanders, P; Kempf, I; Gautier-Bouchardon, A V; Jouy, E; Kobisch, M

    2002-08-01

    The susceptibility of 135 Streptococcus suis strains isolated from pigs (n = 110) and from humans (n = 25) to 13 antimicrobial agents was studied by microdilution and disc diffusion methods using Mueller-Hinton Agar II (MH) supplemented with either defibrinated sheep blood (MHSB) or horse serum (MHHS). Results were similar for both methods used except for penicillin G whose zone diameters were reduced with MHSB compared with MHHS. When MH was supplemented with sheep blood, 39% of S. suis strains classified as penicillin susceptible by MHHS microdilution showed intermediate susceptibility. Nearly all strains were susceptible to penicillin G (except by disc diffusion in MHSB), amoxicillin, ceftiofur, florfenicol, gentamicin and bacitracin. The least active antimicrobial agents were doxycycline and macrolides/lincosamides. High-level resistance (MIC > 500 mg/L or zone diameters < 10 mm) to streptomycin and kanamycin was detected in only a few strains. The virulence of strains did not seem to be related to antimicrobial resistance because no statistical difference was reported between the proportion of resistant strains of S. suis isolated from pigs with meningitis, septicaemia and arthritis, and those from tonsils and nasal cavities. However, significant differences were found in the proportions of macrolide- or doxycycline-resistant strains between S. suis serotype 2 and other serotypes. The results of antibiotic susceptibility testing presented in this study indicate that beta-lactams can be used in empirical treatment of human and pig S. suis infections in France.

  14. Comparison of spiral gradient and conventional agar dilution for susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, H M; Molitoris, E; Jashnian, F; Finegold, S M

    1991-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed on brucella laked blood agar with 340 isolates and 14 antimicrobial agents by the standard agar dilution technique and the spiral gradient technique in which antibiotic concentrations were established by diffusion from the agar surface. For comparison, spiral gradient MICs were determined by calculating antimicrobial concentrations at growth endpoints and rounding up to the next twofold incremental concentration. The cumulative percentage of strains susceptible at the breakpoint determined from spiral gradient data was within 10%, generally, of the percentage of strains susceptible at the breakpoint determined from agar dilution data. The overall agreement between the two techniques (within one doubling dilution) was 90.6%. The spiral gradient agar dilution technique is a reasonable alternative to the conventional agar dilution technique for susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria. Images PMID:1929262

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility of vancomycin-resistant Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, and Lactobacillus species.

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, J M; Facklam, R R; Thornsberry, C

    1990-01-01

    Eighty-five strains of vancomycin-resistant gram-positive bacteria from three genera, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, and Lactobacillus, were tested to determine susceptibility to 24 antimicrobial agents by broth microdilution and to 10 agents by disk diffusion. The MICs of vancomycin and teicoplanin ranged from 64 to greater than 512 micrograms/ml; however, the MICs of daptomycin, a new lipopeptide, were all less than or equal to 0.25 micrograms/ml. None of the organisms were resistant to imipenem, minocycline, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, or daptomycin. The MICs of penicillin were in the moderately susceptible range for all but three strains. Susceptibility to the other agents varied by genus and, in some cases, by species. When disk diffusion results were compared with MICs for drugs recommended for streptococci by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, Villanova, Pa., few very major or major errors were obtained, but the number of minor errors was 19.3%. Therefore, we recommended that MIC testing be used instead of disk diffusion testing for these organisms. PMID:2344161

  16. Virulence factors and antimicrobial susceptibility profile of extraintestinal Escherichia coli isolated from an avian colisepticemia outbreak.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Jonas Fernandes; Matter, Letícia Beatriz; Trindade, Michele Martins; Camillo, Giovana; Lovato, Maristela; de Ávila Botton, Sônia; Castagna de Vargas, Agueda

    2017-02-01

    In this study an avian colisepticemia outbreak was investigated. Two isolates from a chicken with colisepticemia were characterized for antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence factors profile. For this purpose 7 antimicrobial and 29 genes (fimH, hrlA/hek, iha, papC, sfa/focCD, tsh, mat, tia, gimB, ibeA, chuA, fyuA, ireA, iroN, irp2, iucD, sitD. chr., sitD. ep., iss, neuC, ompA, traT, astA, hlyA, sat, vat, pic, malX, cvi/cva) were tested. The outbreak happened in a hick chicken breeding located in the northwestern region of Rio Grande do Sul state in South of Brazil and caused 28.3% (102 deads of a total of 360 chickens) of mortality rate. Escherichia coli isolates obtained from the avian spleen and liver belong to the same phylogenetic group A and present resistance to all antimicrobials tested (ampicillin, tetracycline, gentamicin, neomycin, sulfa + trimethoprim, enrofloxacin, and norfloxacin). Both isolates harbor virulence factors related to adhesion (fimH, papC, mat), invasion (tia), iron acquisition system (iroN) and serum resistance (iss, ompA, traT), showing that these groups are important for Avian Pathogenic E. coli (APEC). However, they present different virulence profiles for some genes, whereas liver-isolate carries more hrlA/hek (adhesin), gimB (invasin), sitD ep. (iron acquisition system), sat (toxin) and hylA (toxin) genes, the spleen-isolate harbors fyuA (iron acquisition system) gene. Here, we highlight a coinfection by different strains of APEC in the same animal with colisepticemia, the great antimicrobial resistance of these bacterial isolates and the genetic traits that modulate the virulence for high mortality rate of chickens for human consumption.

  17. Identification, molecular characterisation and antimicrobial susceptibility of genomovars of the Burkholderia cepacia complex in Spain.

    PubMed

    Medina-Pascual, M J; Valdezate, S; Villalón, P; Garrido, N; Rubio, V; Saéz-Nieto, J A

    2012-12-01

    Burkholderia spp. strains collected in Spain over a 13-year period from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) (n = 148), non-CF patients (n = 103) and from environmental sources (n = 64) were characterised. One hundred and forty-one of the examined strains were involved in seven suspected nosocomial disease outbreaks. Strains were identified by their 16s rRNA and recA genes. Their genetic relatedness, the possession of cable pili and the B. cepacia epidemic strain marker (BCESM), and their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents were studied using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), cblA and esmR genes analysis, and by the E-test, respectively. The genomovar distribution for the 315 strains was as follows: B. stabilis 29.5 %, B. cepacia 14.9 %, B. multivorans 11.1 %, B. cenocepacia IIIA 9.5 %, B. vietnamiensis 3.8 %, B. cenocepacia IIIB 3.5 %, and B. ambifaria and B. pyrrocinia 0.3 % each. The genetic diversity of the B. cepacia complex (Bcc) was ample, with 57 different SpeI types, showing a genetic similarity of 36.4-96.6 %. No strain carried cblA, whereas 25 B. cenocepacia genotypes harboured BCESM (23 from patients with CF). Antimicrobial resistance rates to tobramycin (TOB; 86 %) and imipenem (IPM; 67 %) were high. The strains from patients with CF showed significantly greater resistance to piperacillin (PIP), levofloxacin (LVX) and co-trimoxazole (SXT) than those isolated from non-CF patients (p < 0.05). In conclusion, B. cenocepacia was the most prevalent genomovar found in patients with CF (19.1 %), whereas B. cepacia was the most common among non-CF patients (20.7 %). B. stabilis (47.6 %) was the most common environmental genomovar. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents depended on genomovar status and strain origin.

  18. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Brachyspira Species Isolated from Swine Herds in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Mirajkar, Nandita S.; Davies, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of swine dysentery, caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and the recently discovered “Brachyspira hampsonii,” have reoccurred in North American swine herds since the late 2000s. Additionally, multiple Brachyspira species have been increasingly isolated by North American diagnostic laboratories. In Europe, the reliance on antimicrobial therapy for control of swine dysentery has been followed by reports of antimicrobial resistance over time. The objectives of our study were to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility trends of four Brachyspira species originating from U.S. swine herds and to investigate their associations with the bacterial species, genotypes, and epidemiological origins of the isolates. We evaluated the susceptibility of B. hyodysenteriae, B. hampsonii, Brachyspira pilosicoli, and Brachyspira murdochii to tiamulin, valnemulin, doxycycline, lincomycin, and tylosin by broth microdilution and that to carbadox by agar dilution. In general, Brachyspira species showed high susceptibility to tiamulin, valnemulin, and carbadox, heterogeneous susceptibility to doxycycline, and low susceptibility to lincomycin and tylosin. A trend of decreasing antimicrobial susceptibility by species was observed (B. hampsonii > B. hyodysenteriae > B. murdochii > B. pilosicoli). In general, Brachyspira isolates from the United States were more susceptible to these antimicrobials than were isolates from other countries. Decreased antimicrobial susceptibility was associated with the genotype, stage of production, and production system from which the isolate originated, which highlights the roles of biosecurity and husbandry in disease prevention and control. Finally, this study also highlights the urgent need for Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute-approved clinical breakpoints for Brachyspira species, to facilitate informed therapeutic and control strategies. PMID:27252458

  19. Comparison of Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Campylobacter spp. Isolates from Organic and Conventional Dairy Herds in Wisconsin

    PubMed Central

    Sato, K.; Bartlett, P. C.; Kaneene, J. B.; Downes, F. P.

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Campylobacter spp. isolates from bovine feces were compared between organic and conventional dairy herds. Thirty organic dairy herds, where antimicrobials are rarely used for calves and never used for cows, were compared with 30 neighboring conventional dairy farms, where antimicrobials were routinely used for animals for all ages. Fecal specimens from 10 cows and 10 calves on 120 farm visits yielded 332 Campylobacter isolates. The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in organic and conventional farms was 26.7 and 29.1%, and the prevalence was not statistically different between the two types of farms. Campylobacter prevalence was significantly higher in March than in September, higher in calves than in cows, and higher in smaller farms than in large farms. The rates of retained placenta, pneumonia, mastitis, and abortion were associated with the proportion of Campylobacter isolation from fecal samples. The gradient disk diffusion MIC method (Etest) was used for testing susceptibility to four antimicrobial agents: ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, erythromycin, and tetracycline. Two isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, and none of isolates was resistant to gentamicin or erythromycin. Resistance to tetracycline was 45% (148 of 332 isolates). Tetracycline resistance was found more frequently in calves than in cows (P = 0.042), but no difference was observed between organic and conventional farms. When we used Campylobacter spp. as indicator bacteria, we saw no evidence that restriction of antimicrobial use on dairy farms was associated with prevalence of resistance to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, erythromycin, and tetracycline. PMID:15006764

  20. Comparison of prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Campylobacter spp. isolates from organic and conventional dairy herds in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Bartlett, P C; Kaneene, J B; Downes, F P

    2004-03-01

    The prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Campylobacter spp. isolates from bovine feces were compared between organic and conventional dairy herds. Thirty organic dairy herds, where antimicrobials are rarely used for calves and never used for cows, were compared with 30 neighboring conventional dairy farms, where antimicrobials were routinely used for animals for all ages. Fecal specimens from 10 cows and 10 calves on 120 farm visits yielded 332 Campylobacter isolates. The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in organic and conventional farms was 26.7 and 29.1%, and the prevalence was not statistically different between the two types of farms. Campylobacter prevalence was significantly higher in March than in September, higher in calves than in cows, and higher in smaller farms than in large farms. The rates of retained placenta, pneumonia, mastitis, and abortion were associated with the proportion of Campylobacter isolation from fecal samples. The gradient disk diffusion MIC method (Etest) was used for testing susceptibility to four antimicrobial agents: ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, erythromycin, and tetracycline. Two isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, and none of isolates was resistant to gentamicin or erythromycin. Resistance to tetracycline was 45% (148 of 332 isolates). Tetracycline resistance was found more frequently in calves than in cows (P = 0.042), but no difference was observed between organic and conventional farms. When we used Campylobacter spp. as indicator bacteria, we saw no evidence that restriction of antimicrobial use on dairy farms was associated with prevalence of resistance to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, erythromycin, and tetracycline.

  1. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter spp. isolated from meat.

    PubMed

    Carvalheira, Ana; Casquete, Rocio; Silva, Joana; Teixeira, Paula

    2017-02-21

    The prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Acinetobacter spp. from fifty samples of meat (chicken, turkey, beef and pork) were evaluated. Acinetobacter spp. was recovered from all samples and the clonal relatedness of 223 isolates identified to belong to the genus Acinetobacter was established by PFGE. A high genetic diversity was observed and 166 isolates from different samples, 141 representing different PFGE profiles, were further identified to the species level by rpoB gene sequencing. Thirteen distinct Acinetobacter species were identified among 156 isolates. The remaining ten isolates may represent three putatively novel species since rpoB sequence homologies with type strains of all available described Acinetobacter species, were <95%. The most common species was Acinetobacter guillouiae with a prevalence of 34.9%. However 18.7% of the strains belong to the Acinetobacter baumannii group (n=31) which include the species Acinetobacter baumannii (n=7), Acinetobacter pittii (n=12), Acinetobacter seifertii (n=8) and Acinetobacter nosocomialis (n=4) that are the species most frequently associated with nosocomial infections worldwide. In general, strains were resistant to some of the antimicrobials most frequently used to treat Acinetobacter infections such as piperacillin-tazobactam (64.9% of strains resistant), ceftazidime (43.5%), ciprofloxacin (42.9%), as well as to colistin (41.7%) and polymyxin B (35.1%), the last-resort drugs to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter. The percentage of resistant strains to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, aminoglycosides (amikacin and tobramycin) and ampicillin-sulbactam was >10% (23.2%, 23.2%, 14.3%, 12.5%, 12.5%, respectively). However, resistances to meropenem, imipenem and minocycline were only sporadically observed (8.3%, 1.2% and 1.2%, respectively). Overall, 51.2% of the strains were considered as multidrug-resistant (MDR) and 9.6% as extensively drug-resistant (XDR). The prevalence

  2. Bacterial Nanoscale Cultures for Phenotypic Multiplexed Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    Weibull, Emilie; Antypas, Haris; Kjäll, Peter; Brauner, Annelie; Andersson-Svahn, Helene

    2014-01-01

    An optimal antimicrobial drug regimen is the key to successful clinical outcomes of bacterial infections. To direct the choice of antibiotic, access to fast and precise antibiotic susceptibility profiling of the infecting bacteria is critical. We have developed a high-throughput nanowell antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) device for direct, multiplexed analysis. By processing in real time the optical recordings of nanoscale cultures of reference and clinical uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains with a mathematical algorithm, the time point when growth shifts from lag phase to early logarithmic phase (Tlag) was identified for each of the several hundreds of cultures tested. Based on Tlag, the MIC could be defined within 4 h. Heatmap presentation of data from this high-throughput analysis allowed multiple resistance patterns to be differentiated at a glance. With a possibility to enhance multiplexing capacity, this device serves as a high-throughput diagnostic tool that rapidly aids clinicians in prescribing the optimal antibiotic therapy. PMID:24989602

  3. Direct comparison of the BD phoenix system with the MicroScan WalkAway system for identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermentative gram-negative organisms.

    PubMed

    Snyder, J W; Munier, G K; Johnson, C L

    2008-07-01

    The Phoenix automated microbiology system (BD Diagnostics, Sparks, MD) is designed for the rapid identification (ID) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of clinically significant human bacterial pathogens. We evaluated the performance of the Phoenix instrument in comparison with that of the MicroScan WalkAway system (Dade Behring, West Sacramento, CA) in the ID and AST of gram-negative clinical strains and challenge isolates of Enterobacteriaceae (n = 150) and nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli (NFGNB; 45 clinical isolates and 8 challenge isolates). ID discrepancies were resolved with the API 20E and API 20NE conventional biochemical ID systems (bioMerieux, Durham, NC). The standard disk diffusion method was used to resolve discordant AST results. The overall percentages of agreement between the Phoenix ID results and the MicroScan results at the genus and species levels for clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae were 98.7 and 97.7%, respectively; following resolution with conventional biochemical testing, the accuracy of the Phoenix system was determined to be 100%. For NFGNB, the levels of agreement were 100 and 97.7%, respectively. Both systems incorrectly identified the majority of the uncommon nonfermentative nonpseudomonal challenge isolates recovered from cystic fibrosis patients; these isolates are not included in the databases of the respective systems. For AST of Enterobacteriaceae, the rate of complete agreement between the Phoenix results and the MicroScan results was 97%; the rates of very major, major, and minor errors were 0.3, 0.2, and 2.7%, respectively. For NFGNB, the rate of complete agreement between the Phoenix results and the MicroScan results was 89.1%; the rates of very major, major, and minor errors were 0, 0.5, and 7.7%, respectively. Following the confirmatory testing of nine clinical isolates initially screened by the MicroScan system as possible extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing organisms (seven Klebsiella

  4. BSAC standardized disc susceptibility testing method (version 10).

    PubMed

    Andrews, J M; Howe, R A

    2011-12-01

    The BSAC standardized disc susceptibility testing method remains unchanged, but there are considerable changes to the interpretative criteria due to continuing harmonization with the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) MIC breakpoints. There are a number of agents for which interpretative criteria have been removed. These MIC and/or zone diameter breakpoints will be published on the BSAC web site as a 'Legacy' table; they may be used for research or comparative purposes, but are not recommended for clinical management. Notably, testing of staphylococci for susceptibility to glycopeptides by disc diffusion has been removed because this method has been found to be unreliable, particularly for the detection of low-level resistance; low-level vancomycin resistance in staphylococci is increasingly deemed to be of clinical relevance. The tables for anaerobes have been expanded to include MIC breakpoints that have been determined by EUCAST. There are currently no zone diameter breakpoints for these organisms and an MIC method is recommended if susceptibility testing is required.

  5. Mycoplasma bovis: Mechanisms of Resistance and Trends in Antimicrobial Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Lysnyansky, Inna; Ayling, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is a cell-wall-less bacterium and belongs to the class Mollicutes. It is the most important etiological agent of bovine mycoplasmoses in North America and Europe, causing respiratory disease, mastitis, otitis media, arthritis, and reproductive disease. Clinical disease associated with M. bovis is often chronic, debilitating, and poorly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, resulting in significant economic loss, the full extent of which is difficult to estimate. Until M. bovis vaccines are universally available, sanitary control measures and antimicrobial treatment are the only approaches that can be used in attempts to control M. bovis infections. However, in vitro studies show that many of the current M. bovis isolates circulating in Europe have high minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for many of the commercially available antimicrobials. In this review we summarize the current MIC trends indicating the development of antimicrobial resistance in M. bovis as well as the known molecular mechanisms by which resistance is acquired. PMID:27199926

  6. Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling of Gram-positive cocci in blood cultures with the Vitek 2 system.

    PubMed

    Lupetti, A; Barnini, S; Castagna, B; Capria, A-L; Nibbering, P H

    2010-01-01

    Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling of the bacteria in blood cultures can result in clinical and financial benefits. Addition of saponin to the fluid from blood culture bottles promotes the recovery of the bacteria and thus may shorten the turnaround time of the microbiological analyses. In this study we compared the identification and susceptibility profiles of saponin-treated and untreated (standard method) blood cultures monomicrobial for Gram-positive cocci using Vitek 2. We concordantly identified 49 (89%) of 55 monobacterial cultures using the results with the standard method as reference. Complete categorical agreement between the susceptibility profiles with the new and the standard method was found for 26 (53%) of 49 isolates, while discrepancies were seen for 23 (47%) cultures. E-tests indicated that the new method resulted in a correct susceptibility profile for 8 (35%) of these 23 blood cultures. Therefore, 34 (69%) of 49 cultures showed a concordant/correct susceptibility profile for all antimicrobials with an overall error rate of 2.3%. Thus, addition of saponin to the fluid from blood culture bottles of the Bactec 9240 leads to the rapid (results available >or=12 hours earlier) and reliable identification and susceptibility profiling of Gram-positive cocci in blood cultures with Vitek 2.

  7. Homogeneity of antimicrobial policy, yet heterogeneity of antimicrobial resistance: antimicrobial non-susceptibility among 108 717 clinical isolates from primary, secondary and tertiary care patients in London

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Luke S. P.; Freeman, Rachel; Gilchrist, Mark J.; Gharbi, Myriam; Brannigan, Eimear T.; Donaldson, Hugo; Livermore, David M.; Holmes, Alison H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We examined the 4 year trend in antimicrobial susceptibilities and prescribing across levels of care at two London teaching hospitals and their multisite renal unit, and for the surrounding community. Methods Laboratory and pharmacy information management systems were interrogated, with antimicrobial use and susceptibilities analysed between hospitals, within hospitals and over time. Results A total of 108 717 isolates from 71 687 patients were identified, with significant differences (at P < 0.05) in antimicrobial susceptibility between and within hospitals. Across the 4 years, rates of ESBL-/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae ranged from 6.4% to 10.7% among community isolates, 17.8% to 26.9% at ward level and 25.2% to 52.5% in critical care. Significant variations were also demonstrated in glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (ward level 6.2%–17.4%; critical care 21.9%–56.3%), MRSA (ward level 18.5%–38.2%; critical care 12.5%–47.9%) and carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas spp. (ward level 8.3%–16.9%; critical care 19.9%–53.7%). Few instances of persistently higher resistance were seen between the hospitals in equivalent cohorts, despite persistently higher antimicrobial use in Hospital 1 than Hospital 2. We found significant fluctuations in non-susceptibility year on year across the cohorts, but with few persistent trends. Conclusions The marked heterogeneity of antimicrobial susceptibilities between hospitals, within hospitals and over time demands detailed, standardized surveillance and appropriate benchmarking to identify possible drivers and effective interventions. Homogeneous antimicrobial policies are unlikely to continue to be suitable as individual hospitals join hospital networks, and policies should be tailored to local resistance rates, at least at the hospital level, and possibly with finer resolution, particularly for critical care. PMID:25118270

  8. Antimicrobial Testing Methods & Procedures Developed by EPA's Microbiology Laboratory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    We develop antimicrobial testing methods and standard operating procedures to measure the effectiveness of hard surface disinfectants against a variety of microorganisms. Find methods and procedures for antimicrobial testing.

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of blood isolates from a teaching hospital in north India.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Manjula; Dutta, Priya; Gupta, Varsha

    2005-06-01

    Bloodstream infections are associated with significant patient morbidity and mortality worldwide. In this study, we examined antimicrobial susceptibility patterns by reviewing the data on 5,704 blood samples that were collected from patients with fever/sepsis admitted to Government Medical College and Hospital, Chandigarh, India, over a period of 1 year from August 2003 to July 2004. Among the 567 qualifying samples, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19.75%), Escherichia coli (15.17%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.99%), and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (12.87%) were the most frequently isolated Gram-negative bacteria other than Citrobacter, Acinetobacter, Proteus, and Enterobacter spp. collectively accounting for 80.96% of the isolates. Staphylococus aureus (13.86%) and Enterococcus feacalis (2.35%) were most frequently isolated Gram-positive bacteria other than other Streptococcus and Staphylococcus spp. collectively accounting for 18% of the isolates. Among the antibiotics used for susceptibility testing of Gram-negative isolates, amikacin showed higher activity (76.61%) against Enterobacteriaceae and ciprofloxacin (65.17%) against non-fermenters. However, cefoperazone + sulbactum showed the highest activity (82.66%) among all Gram-negative isolates. For Gram-positive isolates, vancomycin (100%), ciprofloxacin (89.74%) showed the highest activity against Staphylococcus spp. Combinations of antibiotics are often prescribed as emperic therapy for bacteremia, especially for Gram-negative pathogens. Hence the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of blood isolates reported here may be a useful guide for physicians initiating emperic therapy with antibiotics.

  10. Genetic characterization and antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter spp. isolated from domestic and imported chicken meats and humans in Korea.

    PubMed

    Ku, Bok Kyung; Kim, Hae Ji; Lee, Young Ju; Kim, Young Ihl; Choi, Jung Su; Park, Mi Young; Kwon, Jin Wook; Nam, Hyang-Mi; Kim, Yong Hwan; Jung, Suk-Chan; Lee, Sun Jin; Kim, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jong Hyun

    2011-03-01

    This study was conducted to examine the in vitro activity of antimicrobials against Campylobacter spp. isolates from chicken and human sources and the genetic interrelation among them. During 2004-2008, a total of 173 Campylobacter spp. isolated from chicken meats (60 domestic and 62 imported chicken meats) and humans (n = 51) were tested for susceptibility to nine antimicrobials. Of 173 isolates, 140 (80.9%) showed multidrug resistance (MDR) against three to eight antimicrobials. The most frequent pattern type was MDR to four antimicrobials: ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, and tetracycline. Over 52.6% (91/173) of the isolates tested were resistant to these four antibiotics simultaneously. Especially, two and five isolates originated from Korea and Brazil showed resistance against all antibiotics tested, except for florfenicol. Further, 95% (57/60) of the isolates originated from domestic chicken showed resistance to ciprofloxacin, the antimicrobial agent of choice for treatment of human campylobacteriosis. Genotypic characterization of all Campylobacter isolates performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis yielded 74 types among the 173 isolates. Isolates sharing the same or similar genetic clusters were detected in different countries at different times. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns of chicken-related isolates were closely related to those of isolates from humans with gastroenteritidis. The results of this study suggest that MDR Campylobacter spp. are widespread and that Campylobacter with similar genotypes are circulating both in humans and in chicken meat in Korea.

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolated from pigs in Southern Japan with a modified agar dilution method.

    PubMed

    Chuma, Takehisa; Kawamoto, Toshio; Shahada, Francis; Fujimoto, Hideki; Okamoto, Karoku

    2010-05-01

    The determination of antimicrobial minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) in Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae by using the agar dilution method has not been covered by the Clinical and Laboratory Institute (CLSI). Only the broth microdilution method has been outlined. This report describes a modification of the agar dilution procedure for E. rhusiopathiae using Trypto-soy agar supplemented with 0.1% Tween 80 and incubation in ambient air at 37 degrees C for 24 hr. The MICs of the assay were in agreement with those of the broth microdilution method recommended by the CLSI. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed using this method for 149 E. rhusiopathiae isolates from 2 meat processing plants in Kagoshima Prefecture during the period of April 2004 to March 2005. The number of strains resistant to oxytetracycline, erythromycin, lincomycin, ofloxacin and enrofloxacin were 56 (37.6%), 4 (2.7%), 18 (12.1%), 21 (14.1%) and 19 (12.8%), respectively. All strains were susceptible to ampicillin.

  12. In vitro susceptibilities of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to a number of antimicrobial combinations.

    PubMed Central

    Pavicić, M J; van Winkelhoff, A J; de Graaff, J

    1992-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to 14 antimicrobial combinations were studied by using the checkerboard titration technique. The results, expressed as the range of the fractional inhibitory concentration indices, were as follows: for metronidazole or its hydroxymetabolite combined with cefixime, 0.2 to 0.6; for moxalactam, 0.2 to 0.6; for penicillin G, 0.3 to 0.6; for tobramycin, 0.8 to 2.0; for erythromycin, 0.8 to 1.7; for ciprofloxacin, 0.2 to 0.6; for tetracycline, 0.8 to 1.2. Our observations indicated that the beta-lactam antibiotics as well as ciprofloxacin act synergistically with both metronidazole and its hydroxymetabolite against A. actinomycetemcomitans. Synergistic interactions were independent of the individual MICs of the antibiotics tested. Erythromycin, tobramycin, and tetracycline combined with either metronidazole or its hydroxymetabolite showed additive to indifferent effects against the five strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, with the fractional inhibitory concentration indices ranging from 0.8 to 2.0. A. actinomycetemcomitans was found to be highly susceptible to ciprofloxacin (MIC of ciprofloxacin for 90% of strains tested, 0.010 micrograms/ml) and cefixime (MIC of cefixime for 90% of strains tested, 0.8 micrograms/ml). The results indicate that in patients who are allergic to penicillin, cefixime and ciprofloxacin may be useful alternative antibiotics in combination with metronidazole for the treatment of A. actinomycetemcomitans-associated periodontitis. PMID:1482130

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of thermotolerant Campylobacter strains isolated from food animals in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kassa, Tesfaye; Gebre-Selassie, Solomon; Asrat, Daniel

    2007-01-17

    Thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. are frequent causes of diarrhoea in humans worldwide mostly originating from poultry. It has been suggested that extensive veterinary use of antibiotics is largely responsible for resistance in human isolates. During a 4-month period from January to April 2004, 192 Campylobacter spp. were isolated from fecal samples of 485 healthy food animals. The in vitro susceptibility to 12 antibiotics was determined by the agar disk diffusion method. Among the 192 Campylobacter spp. isolated, 135 (70.3%) were identified to be C. jejuni, 51 (26.6%) were C. coli and 6 (3.1%) were C. lari. C. jejuni was the most prevalent species in chickens (80.8%) versus 16.2% C. coli and 3.0% C. lari. All isolates found in pigs were C. coli. All strains were sensitive to chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin and all were resistant to cephalothin. More than 90% of the strains were sensitive to clindamycin, erythromycin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, streptomycin and tetracycline. Resistance was found against ampicillin in 20% and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole in 37.5%. Resistance was not statistically different among C. jejuni, C. coli and C. lari (p>0.05). Multidrug resistance to two or more drugs was detected in 14.5% of strains. In conclusion, the study showed that antimicrobial resistance is found only at relatively low frequencies for most antimicrobial agents tested except for ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole. The low percentages of resistance to most antimicrobial agents tested in this study may be the result of low/no usage of these agents as a growth promoters or treatment in the Ethiopian animal farm setting. The detection of multidrug resistant isolates may pose a threat to humans and further limits therapeutic options.

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility and distribution of antimicrobial-resistance genes among Enterococcus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus isolates recovered from poultry litter.

    PubMed

    Simjee, Shabbir; McDermott, Patrick F; White, David G; Hofacre, Charles; Berghaus, Roy D; Carter, Peggy J; Stewart, Leigh; Liu, Tongrui; Maier, Marie; Maurer, John J

    2007-12-01

    Data on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistant enterococci and staphylococci from the poultry production environment are sparse in the United States. This information is needed for science-based risk assessments of antimicrobial use in animal husbandry and potential public-health consequences. In this study, we assessed the susceptibility of staphylococci and enterococci isolated from poultry litter, recovered from 24 farms across Georgia, to several antimicrobials of veterinary and human health importance. Among the 90 Enterococcus isolates recovered, E. hirae (46%) was the most frequently encountered species, followed by E. faecium (27%), E. gallinarum (12%), and E. faecalis (10%). Antimicrobial resistance was most often observed to tetracycline (96%), followed by clindamycin (90%), quinupristin-dalfopristin (62%), penicillin (53%), erythromycin (50%), nitrofurantoin (49%), and clarithromycin (48%). Among the 110 staphylococci isolates recovered, only coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were identified with the predominant Staphylococcus species being S. sciuri (38%), S. lentus (21%), S. xylosus (14%) and S. simulans (12%). Resistance was less-frequently observed among the Staphylococcus isolates for the majority of antimicrobials tested, as compared with Enterococcus isolates, and was primarily limited to clarithromycin (71%), erythromycin (71%), clindamycin (48%), and tetracycline (38%). Multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotypes were prevalent in both Enterococcus and Staphylococcus; however, Enterococcus exhibited a statistically significant difference in the median number of antimicrobials to which resistance was observed (median = 5.0) compared with Staphylococcus species (median = 3.0). Because resistance to several of these antimicrobials in gram-positive bacteria may be attributed to the shuttling of common drug-resistance genes, we also determined which common antimicrobial-resistance genes were present in both enterococci and staphylococci. The

  15. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Leading Bacterial Pathogens Isolated from Laboratory Confirmed Blood Stream Infections in a Multi-Specialty Sanatorium

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nishat H; Hussain, Tabish

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Dealing with severe blood stream infections (BSI) is one of the intractable conditions in hospitals. The empirical treatment given remains pertinent in determining patient outcome, which becomes evidence based when substantiated by knowledge of susceptibility patterns of prevalent pathogenic organisms in the set up. This study was undertaken to determine the occurrence, species prevalence, and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of laboratory confirmed BSI (LCBSI) in patients admitted to our multi-specialty sanatorium. Materials and Methods: Eight hundred and forty-six blood samples from 829 patients suspected of having BSI were cultured as per standard microbiological procedures. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done for bacterial isolates from positive blood cultures. Results: Sixty (7.2%) cases were established as LCBSI. A total of eight pathogenic bacterial genera were identified and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern was noted. Staphylococcus spp. were most prevalent (33%), followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (20%), Escherichia coli (13%), Acinetobacter spp. (13%), Enterococcus spp. (12%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3%), Proteus spp. (2%), and Citrobacter spp. (2%). Conclusions: The study shows the prevalence of common bacterial pathogens causing BSI and their susceptibility patterns. Such studies provide benefit of instantaneous choice of antibiotic therapy aiming at improved patient management and reduced drug resistance. PMID:25538451

  16. Antimicrobic susceptibility testing. A personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Sherris, J C

    1989-06-01

    The development of antimicrobic susceptibility testing is outlined with particular reference to standardization of procedures and organizational developments that have led to substantially improved performance. Special problems continue to be posed by increased proportions of opportunistic pathogens and newly recognized mechanisms of resistance, and these require updating. The role of automated procedures and technical problems in MBC and serum bactericidal testing are considered.

  17. In vitro susceptibility of equine-obtained isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis to gallium maltolate and 20 other antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Norman, T E; Batista, M; Lawhon, S D; Zhang, S; Kuskie, K R; Swinford, A K; Bernstein, L R; Cohen, N D

    2014-07-01

    This study's objective was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of gallium maltolate (GaM) and 20 other antimicrobial agents against clinical equine isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. The growth of cultured isolates was not inhibited by any concentration of GaM. MIC data revealed susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobials.

  18. In Vitro Susceptibility of Equine-Obtained Isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis to Gallium Maltolate and 20 Other Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Batista, M.; Lawhon, S. D.; Zhang, S.; Kuskie, K. R.; Swinford, A. K.; Bernstein, L. R.; Cohen, N. D.

    2014-01-01

    This study's objective was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of gallium maltolate (GaM) and 20 other antimicrobial agents against clinical equine isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. The growth of cultured isolates was not inhibited by any concentration of GaM. MIC data revealed susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobials. PMID:24829243

  19. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Saiman, L; Chen, Y; Tabibi, S; San Gabriel, P; Zhou, J; Liu, Z; Lai, L; Whittier, S

    2001-11-01

    In the past decade, potential pathogens, including Alcaligenes species, have been increasingly recovered from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Accurate identification of multiply antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacilli is critical to understanding the epidemiology and clinical implications of emerging pathogens in CF. We examined the frequency of correct identification of Alcaligenes spp. by microbiology laboratories affiliated with American CF patient care centers. Selective media, an exotoxin A probe for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a commercial identification assay, API 20 NE, were used for identification. The activity of antimicrobial agents against these clinical isolates was determined. A total of 106 strains from 78 patients from 49 CF centers in 22 states were studied. Most (89%) were correctly identified by the referring laboratories as Alcaligenes xylosoxidans. However, 12 (11%) strains were misidentified; these were found to be P. aeruginosa (n = 10), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (n = 1), and Burkholderia cepacia (n = 1). Minocycline, imipenem, meropenem, piperacillin, and piperacillin-tazobactam were the most active since 51, 59, 51, 50, and 55% of strains, respectively, were inhibited. High concentrations of colistin (100 and 200 microg/ml) inhibited 92% of strains. Chloramphenicol paired with minocycline and ciprofloxacin paired with either imipenem or meropenem were the most active combinations and inhibited 40 and 32%, respectively, of strains. Selective media and biochemical identification proved to be useful strategies for distinguishing A. xylosoxidans from other CF pathogens. Standards for processing CF specimens should be developed, and the optimal method for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of A. xylosoxidans should be determined.

  20. Exposure of Sink Drain Microcosms to Triclosan: Population Dynamics and Antimicrobial Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    McBain, Andrew J.; Bartolo, Robert G.; Catrenich, Carl E.; Charbonneau, Duane; Ledder, Ruth G.; Price, Bradford B.; Gilbert, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Recent concern that the increased use of triclosan (TCS) in consumer products may contribute to the emergence of antibiotic resistance has led us to examine the effects of TCS dosing on domestic-drain biofilm microcosms. TCS-containing domestic detergent (TCSD) markedly lowered biofouling at 50% (wt/vol) but was poorly effective at use levels. Long-term microcosms were established and stabilized for 6 months before one was subjected to successive 3-month exposures to TCSD at sublethal concentrations (0.2 and 0.4% [wt/vol]). Culturable bacteria were identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis, and their susceptibilities to four biocides and six antibiotics were determined. Microcosms harbored ca. 10 log10 CFU/g of biofilm, representing at least 27 species, mainly gamma proteobacteria, and maintained dynamic stability. Viable cell counts were largely unaffected by TCSD exposure, but species diversity was decreased, as corroborated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. TCS susceptibilities ranged widely within bacterial groups, and TCS-tolerant strains (including aeromonads, pseudomonads, stenotrophomonads, and Alcaligenes spp.) were isolated before and after TCSD exposure. Several TCS-tolerant bacteria related to Achromobacter xylosoxidans became clonally expanded during dosing. TCSD addition did not significantly affect the community profiles of susceptibility to the test biocides or antibiotics. Several microcosm isolates, as well as reference bacteria, caused clearing of particulate TCS in solid media. Incubations of consortia and isolates with particulate TCS in liquid led to putative TCS degradation by the consortia and TCS solubilization by the reference strains. Our results support the view that low-level exposure of environmental microcosms to TCS does not affect antimicrobial susceptibility and that TCS is degradable by common domestic biofilms. PMID:12957932

  1. Effects of systemic administration of sitafloxacin on subgingival microflora and antimicrobial susceptibility profile in acute periodontal lesions.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Sachiyo; Kasai, Shunsuke; Ihara, Yuichiro; Imamura, Kentaro; Kita, Daichi; Ota, Koki; Kinumatsu, Takashi; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Saito, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect(s) of systemic administration of sitafloxacin on subgingival microbial profiles of acute periodontal lesions. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates was also investigated. Patients with acute phases of chronic periodontitis were subjected to clinical examination and microbiological assessment of their subgingival plaque samples by culture technique. Sitafloxacin was then administered (100 mg/day for 5 days) systemically. The clinical and microbiological examinations were repeated 6-8 days after administration. Susceptibilities of clinical isolates to various antimicrobials were determined using the broth and agar dilution methods. From the sampled sites in 30 participants, a total of 355 clinical isolates (34 different bacterial species) were isolated and identified. Parvimonas micra, Prevotella intermedia and Streptococcus mitis were the most prevalent cultivable bacteria in acute sites. Systemic administration of sitafloxacin yielded a significant improvement in clinical and microbiological parameters. Among the antimicrobials tested, sitafloxacin was the most potent against the clinical isolates with an MIC90 of 0.12 μg/ml at baseline. After administration, most clinical isolates were still highly susceptible to sitafloxacin although some increase in MICs was observed. The results suggest that systemic administration of sitafloxacin is effective against subgingival bacteria isolated from acute periodontal lesions.

  2. In vitro susceptibility of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae and M. hyorhinis to antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Sonmez, N; Morozumi, T; Mitani, K; Ito, N; Shiono, H; Yamamoto, K

    1996-11-01

    Fifty-four Japanese strains of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae isolated from porkers during 1980 to 1995, and 107 Japanese strains of M. hyorhinis isolated from piglets with respiratory disease during 1991 to 1994 were investigated for the in vitro activities of 13 antimicrobial agents [josamycin, tylosin, spiramycin, kitasamycin, erythromycin, lincomycin (LCM), kanamycin (KM), chloramphenicol (CP), thiamphenicol (TP), tiamulin (TML), oxytetracycline (OTC), chlortetracycline (CTC), and enrofloxacin (ERFX)] by the agar dilution method. Of the drugs tested TML showed the highest activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.013 to 0.1 microgram/ m/ (MIC90; 0.05 microgram/ml) against strains of M. hyosynoviae, and 0.2 to 0.78 microgram/ml (MIC90; 0.39 microgram/ml) against strains of M. hyorhinis. ERFX, LCM, most of the 16-membered macrolide antibiotics and tetracyclines also showed low MICs against both mycoplasma species. The susceptibility of KM, CP and TP to the mycoplasmas was considered to be of a secondary grade. Two of 54 strains of M. hyosynoviae, and 11 of 107 strains of M. hyorhinis showed resistance to all 14- and 16-membered macrolide antibiotics tested. Tetracyclines (OTC and CTC) showed a relatively broad MIC distribution from 0.1 to 6.25 micrograms/ml against the M. hyosynoviae strains tested. All of the strains isolated during 1980 to 1984 were susceptible at the concentration of 0.78 microgram/ml or less (MIC90; 0.78 microgram/ml) to OTC and 1.56 micrograms/ml or less (MIC90; 1.56 micrograms/ml) to CTC, while the susceptibility of strains isolated recently, during 1994 to 1995, was more than 0.78 microgram/ml (MIC90; 3.13 micrograms/ml) to OTC, and more than 1.56 micrograms/ml (MIC90; 6.25 micrograms/ml) to CTC.

  3. [Rapid antibiotic susceptibility test in Clinical Microbiology].

    PubMed

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; Bratos Pérez, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The most widely used antibiotic susceptibility testing methods in Clinical Microbiology are based on the phenotypic detection of antibiotic resistance by measuring bacterial growth in the presence of the antibiotic being tested. These conventional methods take typically 24hours to obtain results. A review is presented here of recently developed techniques for the rapid determination of antibiotic susceptibility. Data obtained with different methods such as molecular techniques, flow cytometry, chemiluminescence, mass spectrometry, commercial methods used in routine work, colorimetric methods, nephelometry, microarrays, microfluids, and methods based on cell disruption and sequencing, are analyzed and discussed in detail.

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolated from organic dairy farms, conventional dairy farms, and county fairs in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seongbeom; Fossler, Charles P; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco; Wells, Scott J; Hedberg, Craig W; Kaneene, John B; Ruegg, Pamela L; Warnick, Lorin D; Bender, Jeffrey B

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the antimicrobial susceptibility of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) isolates from organic dairy farms, conventional dairy farms, and Minnesota county fairs. A total of 83 STEC isolates (43 O157 and 40 non-O157 STEC) were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility as determined by the automated broth microdilution method. Resistance to tetracycline was identified in 19 (23%) isolates and to sulphadimethoxine in 40 (48%) isolates. Half of the STEC isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent. Resistance to at least one antimicrobial agent was observed in 18 (62%) isolates from conventional farms and in 11 (48%) isolates from organic farms. Resistance to at least one antimicrobial agent was more frequent in isolates from calves (77%) than from cows (39%). Multidrug resistant patterns were more common in non-O157 STEC than O157 STEC. This study provides data to document the degree of STEC antimicrobial resistance from dairy cattle sources in Minnesota. The use of antimicrobial agents on farms, and other environmental influences, may affect resistance patterns in isolates from cattle sources. Systematic surveillance of STEC from cattle could potentially detect emergence of antimicrobial resistance that may be spread to humans through the food chain.

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli F4, Pasteurella multocida, and Streptococcus suis isolates from a diagnostic veterinary laboratory and recommendations for a surveillance system.

    PubMed

    Glass-Kaastra, Shiona K; Pearl, David L; Reid-Smith, Richard J; McEwen, Beverly; Slavic, Durda; McEwen, Scott A; Fairles, Jim

    2014-04-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility data on Escherichia coli F4, Pasteurella multocida, and Streptococcus suis isolates from Ontario swine (January 1998 to October 2010) were acquired from a comprehensive diagnostic veterinary laboratory in Ontario, Canada. In relation to the possible development of a surveillance system for antimicrobial resistance, data were assessed for ease of management, completeness, consistency, and applicability for temporal and spatial statistical analyses. Limited farm location data precluded spatial analyses and missing demographic data limited their use as predictors within multivariable statistical models. Changes in the standard panel of antimicrobials used for susceptibility testing reduced the number of antimicrobials available for temporal analyses. Data consistency and quality could improve over time in this and similar diagnostic laboratory settings by encouraging complete reporting with sample submission and by modifying database systems to limit free-text data entry. These changes could make more statistical methods available for disease surveillance and cluster detection.

  6. Susceptibility testing for bovine respiratory and enteric disease.

    PubMed

    Apley, Michael D

    2003-11-01

    The interpretation of susceptibility results for antimicrobials with NCCLS-approved veterinary-specific breakpoints and where the methods also were NCCLS-approved are well established. When these same breakpoints are applied to other applications, however, the interpretation is not so clear. In these cases, a finding of S based on serial-dilution breakpoints puts the isolate in a defined population of bacteria with an MIC equal to or below the S breakpoint. An R result, in these cases, indicates that the organism may have an MIC equal to or greater (with no limits) than the R breakpoint. Extended-dilution testing yields more specific information about the isolate MIC. The relationship of disk-diffusion zone diameters to serial-dilution MICs is correlated on the basis of specific bacterial populations. When disk-diffusion results are interpreted for isolates other than those used for interpretive criteria development, the clinician is left wondering if the zone-diameter results now have a different relationship to serial-dilution results. Furthermore, the question of predictive value of the serial-dilution break-points still remains. The veterinary clinician should be aware of the differences in susceptibility testing predictive value for different applications. When approved veterinary-specific interpretive criteria are not available, then it is appropriate to keep records of clinical response related to susceptibility testing results for common therapies. Advice should be sought on the relationship of pathogen MICs to pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic parameters in these situations.

  7. [Serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Salmonella strains recovered from environmental samples between 2008-2014].

    PubMed

    Güleşen, Revasiye; Levent, Belkıs; Üvey, Mehmet; Bayrak, Hasan; Akgeyik, Mesut

    2016-07-01

    Despite the measures taken and control applications worldwide, Salmonella infections continue to threat the public health. Since these infections also cause significant economical loss, the salmonellas continue to be forefront globally. The determination of Salmonella serotypes and their sources is important for epidemiological point of view. In this study, serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of environmental isolates of Salmonella spp. recovered from the poultry farms, that were send for confirmation and serotyping between seven years period, 2008-2014, were evaluated. Strains isolated from environmental samples that were sent to Public Health Institute, Department of Microbiology Reference Laboratory, National Reference Laboratory for Enteric Pathogens, were inoculated onto Salmonella-Shigella and Xylose Lysine Desoxycholate agar and evaluated after 18-24 hours of incubation at 37°C. The identification of the strains was performed by using standard biochemical tests from the suspected colonies. Strains compatible with Salmonella spp. were serotyped using polyvalent and monovalent Salmonella O and H antisera by slide agglutination method. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed and evaluated according to CLSI recommendation using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. In our study, a total of 2011 Salmonella strains were evaluated and 15 different serogroups and 75 different serotypes were identified. The most common Salmonella serotypes were S.Infantis (30.6%), followed by S.Enteritidis (21.8%), S.Typhimurium (6.5%), S.Kottbus (5.2%), S.Tennessee (4.3%), S.Mbandaka (4.1%), S.Indiana (3.9%), S.Kentucky (3%), S.Corvallis (2.5%), S.Paratyphi B (1.9%) and S.Hadar (1.7%). Among the isolates, 50.1% (1008/2011) were found susceptible to all of the tested antimicrobials. The rate of isolates that were resistant to only one drug was found to be 15.6%, whereas 30.9% of the strains showed multi-drug resistance (resistant to ≥ 3 antimicrobial drugs

  8. 21 CFR 866.1645 - Fully automated short-term incubation cycle antimicrobial susceptibility system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fully automated short-term incubation cycle antimicrobial susceptibility system. 866.1645 Section 866.1645 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY...

  9. 21 CFR 866.1645 - Fully automated short-term incubation cycle antimicrobial susceptibility system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fully automated short-term incubation cycle antimicrobial susceptibility system. 866.1645 Section 866.1645 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY...

  10. 21 CFR 866.1645 - Fully automated short-term incubation cycle antimicrobial susceptibility system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fully automated short-term incubation cycle antimicrobial susceptibility system. 866.1645 Section 866.1645 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY...

  11. 21 CFR 866.1645 - Fully automated short-term incubation cycle antimicrobial susceptibility system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fully automated short-term incubation cycle antimicrobial susceptibility system. 866.1645 Section 866.1645 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY...

  12. Salmonella prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility among dairy farm environmental samples collected in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy cattle are a reservoir of several Salmonella serovars that are leading causes of human salmonellosis. The objectives of this study were to determine the environmental prevalence of Salmonella on dairy farms in Texas and to characterize the antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates. Eleven...

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibilities and serotypes of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae strains in Switzerland.

    PubMed Central

    Wüst, J; Huf, E; Kayser, F H

    1995-01-01

    In 1993 and 1994, 10 microbiological laboratories in Switzerland collected 351 strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae from invasive infections. Susceptibilities to the main representatives of the chemical classes were as follows: penicillin, 93%; chloramphenicol, 92%; erythromycin, 94%; sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, 86%; tetracycline, 92%; vancomycin, 100%. Forty-three strains showed resistance to one agent, and 35 strains showed resistance to two or more antimicrobial agents simultaneously; i.e., 22% of the strains were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent. Four strains (1%) were fully resistant to penicillin, whereas 21 strains (6%) showed reduced susceptibility. Of these 25 strains not fully susceptible to penicillin, 10 were resistant to one, 3 were resistant to two, and 8 were resistant to three additional antimicrobial agents. Of the quinolones, sparfloxacin was the most active substance, with an MIC at which 90% of the strains are inhibited of 0.5 mg/liter. The most common serotypes were types 6 (13.6% of isolates), 7 (10.5%), 19 (10.5%), 14 (9.1%), and 1 (8.5%) as well as 3 and 23 (8.0% each). Reduced susceptibility to penicillin was found mainly among serotypes 6, 14, 19, and 23. The currently available 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine covers 320 (91%) of the pneumococci isolated. Regional differences within Switzerland with regard to serotypes and antimicrobial resistance were not observed. PMID:8586693

  14. 21 CFR 866.1645 - Fully automated short-term incubation cycle antimicrobial susceptibility system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fully automated short-term incubation cycle antimicrobial susceptibility system. 866.1645 Section 866.1645 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... choice to treat bacterial diseases. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special...

  15. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Mechanisms of Resistance to Quinolones and β-Lactams in Acinetobacter Genospecies 3

    PubMed Central

    Ribera, A.; Fernández-Cuenca, F.; Beceiro, A.; Bou, G.; Martínez-Martínez, L.; Pascual, A.; Cisneros, J. M.; Rodríguez-Baño, J.; Pachón, J.; Vila, J.

    2004-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined in 15 epidemiologically unrelated clinical isolates of Acinetobacter genospecies 3. Moreover, the mechanisms of resistance to some β-lactam antibiotics may be associated with the presence of a chromosomal cephalosporinase, AmpC, and the resistance to quinolones related to mutations in the gyrA and parC genes. PMID:15047561

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility in thermophilic Campylobacter species isolated from pigs and chickens in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jonker, A; Picard, J A

    2010-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the leading causes of sporadic food-borne bacterial disease in humans. In intensive poultry and pig rearing systems the use of oral antibiotics is essential to maintain health. Consequently, there is a high risk for the thermophilic Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli resident in the intestinal tract of food animals to develop resistance to commonly used antibiotics. Contamination of meat or eggs with pathogenic strains of resistant Campylobacter could, therefore, result in a form of campylobacteriosis in humans that is difficult to treat. The aim of this investigation was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. isolated from pigs and poultry by the broth microdilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test. A total of 482 samples from the Western Cape and Gauteng provinces was collected and analysed. Thirty-eight Campylobacter isolates were obtained. Analysis of data revealed that C. jejuni strains mainly of poultry origin were more resistant to the fluoroquinolones, macrolides and tetracyclines and the C. coli strains were more resistant to the macrolides and lincosamides. Multi-resistance was also detected in 4 Campylobacter strains from the Western Cape. With the exception of tetracyclines, strains from high health Gauteng broiler farms were susceptible to antibiotics used to treat Campylobacter infections.

  17. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli from community-acquired urinary tract infections in Europe: the ECO·SENS study revisited.

    PubMed

    Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Poulsen, Hanna Odén

    2012-01-01

    This study determined the antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli causing community-acquired, acute, uncomplicated, non-recurrent urinary tract infection in unselected women aged 18-65 years and compared the results with those obtained 8 years earlier in the first ECO·SENS study (1999-2000). During 2007-2008, urine samples were taken from 1697 women in Austria, Greece, Portugal, Sweden and the UK. The countries were chosen to represent areas of Europe indicated to have more (Greece and Portugal) or less (UK, Austria and Sweden) problems with resistance. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 903 E. coli isolates (150-200 isolates per country) to 14 antimicrobials was performed by disk diffusion using European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) breakpoints. In E. coli, resistance to mecillinam, cefadroxil (representing oral cephalosporins), nitrofurantoin, fosfomycin trometamol, gentamicin and the third-generation cephalosporins cefotaxime and ceftazidime was <2%, with the following exceptions: gentamicin in Portugal (2.8%); fosfomycin in Greece (2.9%); and cephalosporins in Austria (2.7-4.1%). Resistance levels were higher for amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (2.0-8.9%) and ciprofloxacin (0.5-7.6%) and much higher to ampicillin (21.2-34.0%), sulfamethoxazole (21.2-31.3%), trimethoprim (14.9-19.1%) and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (14.4-18.2%). Resistance to quinolones and trimethoprim increased between the ECO·SENS I (1999-2000) and ECO·SENS II (2007-2008): nalidixic acid 4.3% to 10.2%; ciprofloxacin 1.1% to 3.9%; and trimethoprim 13.3% to 16.7%. In the previous study, no isolates with extended-spectrum β-lactamase were found; however, in the present study 11 isolates were identified as having either CTX-M or AmpC.

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibilities and biotypes of Arcanobacterium haemolyticum blood isolates.

    PubMed

    Carlson, P; Korpela, J; Walder, M; Nyman, M

    1999-12-01

    Isolates obtained from the blood of ten patients with Arcanobacterium haemolyticum septicaemia were biotyped as smooth or rough using morphological and biochemical criteria, and their susceptibilities to 18 antibacterial agents were determined. Nine of the clinical cases included here have not been reported previously and are discussed in brief. One of the strains was highly resistant to macrolides and clindamycin. With one exception, the strains belonged to the smooth biotype. The data presented here indicates that the treatment of systemic Arcanobacterium haemolyticum infections should be based on the antibacterial susceptibility profiles of individual strains and on the site of the infection.

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R. O. S.; Salvarani, F.M.; Assis, R.A.; Martins, N.R.S.; Pires, P.S.; Lobato, F.C.F.

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a normal inhabitant of the intestinal tract of chickens as well as a potential pathogen that causes necrotic enteritis and colangio hepatitis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of seven different compounds used for therapy, growth promotion or prevention of coccidiosis was determined by agar dilution method for 55 C. perfringens strains isolated from the intestines of broiler chickens. All strains showed high susceptibility to penicillin, avilamycin, monensin and narasin. Only 7.3% of the strains showed an intermediated sensitivity to lincomycin, and 49 (89.1%) were considered susceptible. For tetracycline and bacitracin, 41.8% and 47.3% of strains, respectively, were considered resistant. PMID:24031355

  20. Antimicrobials Products Tested or Pending Testing

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The agency has completed testing of the majority of registered hospital disinfectants and tuberculocide products. The list of products can assist users in making informed choices regarding infection control in their facilities.

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility among Gram-positive organisms collected from pediatric patients globally between 2004 and 2011: results from the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Michael; Dowzicky, Michael J

    2013-07-01

    The Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (TEST) was designed to monitor global longitudinal changes in bacterial susceptibility to a panel of antimicrobial agents, including tigecycline. In this study, we examine susceptibility among Gram-positive isolates collected from pediatric patients globally between 2004 and 2011. A total of 9,422 Gram-positive isolates were contributed by 1,255 centers, predominantly from Europe and North America. One-third of Staphylococcus aureus isolates were methicillin resistant, peaking in prevalence in 2007. All S. aureus isolates (n = 3,614) were susceptible to linezolid, tigecycline, and vancomycin; minocycline, imipenem, and meropenem were also highly active (>92% susceptibility). Ampicillin and penicillin susceptibility increased significantly during the study period (P < 0.0001 for both). Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates (n = 3,373) were highly susceptible to vancomycin (100%), linezolid (>99%), and levofloxacin and tigecycline (both >96%); imipenem susceptibility was low (32%) in Africa while minocycline susceptibility was low in Asia-Pacific Rim (38%). Penicillin resistance occurred in one-fifth of all S. pneumoniae isolates, with penicillin susceptibility ranging from 14% in Africa to 65% in Europe. Streptococcus agalactiae isolates (n = 1,056) were highly susceptible to most antimicrobials, although only 16% were susceptible to minocycline. Enterococcus faecalis isolates (n = 1,112) were highly susceptible (>97%) to ampicillin, linezolid, penicillin, tigecycline, and vancomycin globally, but only 34% were minocycline susceptible; minocycline susceptibility decreased significantly from 2004 to 2011 (P < 0.001). Tigecycline and linezolid were highly active against Enterococcus faecium (n = 267) globally (100% and 98% susceptible, respectively). Tigecycline and linezolid were highly active against Gram-positive pathogens from pediatric patients in TEST 2004 to 2011, with vancomycin and the carbapenems performing well

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Arcanobacterium pyogenes isolated from the lungs of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Tell, Lisa A; Brooks, Jason W; Lintner, Valerie; Matthews, Tammy; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie

    2011-09-01

    In vitro susceptibilities of 29 strains of Arcanobacterium pyogenes isolated from lung lesions of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) with pneumonia were determined using the broth microdilution method to ascertain efficacious treatment options for pneumonic white-tailed deer. All 29 A. pyogenes strains tested were susceptible to ceftiofur, spectinomycin, tiamulin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole but were resistant to both danofloxacin and sulfadimethoxine. Likewise, all 29 isolates were either fully susceptible or intermediately susceptible to gentamicin (25 susceptible; 4 intermediate) and tulathromycin (25 susceptible; 4 intermediate). At least one isolate of A. pyogenes tested was resistant to ampicillin, chlortetracycline, clindamycin, enrofloxacin, florfenicol, oxytetracycline, penicillin, and tilmicosin suggesting their ineffectiveness in treating A. pyogenes-associated lung infections in white-tailed deer. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) data for tylosin and neomycin could not be interpreted due to unavailability of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI)-approved breakpoints for these 2 agents. In summary, based on MIC values, ceftiofur, spectinomycin, tiamulin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are more efficacious than other antimicrobial agents for treating A. pyogenes-related pneumonia in white-tailed deer. However, ceftiofur may be preferred over the other 4 drugs as it is being widely used to treat respiratory disease in cattle and other animal species, as well as is available for single dose parenteral administration.

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of competitive exclusion bacteria applied to newly hatched chickens.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R Doug; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2005-07-25

    Competitive exclusion (CE) products are mixtures of obligate and facultative anaerobic bacteria applied to poultry hatchlings for prevention of Salmonella colonization. These mixtures have the potential to introduce bacteria with undesirable antimicrobial drug resistance traits into the human food supply. Antimicrobial drug susceptibilities of 27 obligate and facultative anaerobes isolated from a commercial CE product were evaluated with a microdilution minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay. Bacteroides distasonis and Bacteroides fragilis isolates were resistant to tetracycline and other antimicrobial drugs. An Escherichia coli isolate was resistant to four antimicrobial drugs: erythromycin, penicillin, vancomycin, and tylosin. Erythromycin-resistant enterococci and vancomycin-resistant Lactococcus lactis isolates in the CE product were detected. These findings suggest that more work needs to be done to assess the potential effects of CE product use in poultry on the food supply.

  4. [Methods for in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing].

    PubMed

    Dannaoui, Eric

    2006-01-01

    During the last years, a large amount of work has been completed to improve the methods used for in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing. Reference techniques are currently available both for yeasts and filamentous fungi, but in some instances, technical improvement are needed. Etest is another well standardized method that can be used as an alternative on a routine basis in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Studies of in vitro-in vivo correlations have led to the definition of susceptibility breakpoints for yeasts for fluconazole, itraconazole, and flucytosine.

  5. Correlation between bactericidal activity of fosfomycin trometamol in an in vitro model of the urinary bladder and susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Pinasi, C; Albini, E; Marca, G

    1987-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to define an interpretative guideline for disk diffusion susceptibility testing with fosfomycin trometamol, a new antimicrobial agent which has been developed for the treatment of urinary tract infections. Two potencies of fosfomycin disk were used: 50 and 200 micrograms, prepared in the presence and absence of glucose-6-phosphate. To verify the reliability of the results obtained in susceptibility testing, we have also evaluated the bactericidal activity of fosfomycin trometamol versus sensitive and resistant strains in an 'in vitro' model simulating the hydrokinetic aspects involved in the treatment of bacterial cystitis. The data obtained evidenced the role of glucose-6-phosphate in antimicrobial susceptibility tests as well as the importance of the urinary antibiotic concentrations to define sensitive and resistant bacteria. On the basis of our results, we recommend that a 200-microgram disk of fosfomycin containing 50 micrograms of glucose-6-phosphate should be used in antimicrobial susceptibility testing with fosfomycin trometamol.

  6. Altered Competitive Fitness, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Cellular Morphology in a Triclosan-Induced Small-Colony Variant of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Sarah; Latimer, Joe; Bazaid, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can produce small-colony variants (SCVs) that express various phenotypes. While their significance is unclear, SCV propagation may be influenced by relative fitness, antimicrobial susceptibility, and the underlying mechanism. We have investigated triclosan-induced generation of SCVs in six S. aureus strains, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Parent strains (P0) were repeatedly passaged on concentration gradients of triclosan using a solid-state exposure system to generate P10. P10 was subsequently passaged without triclosan to generate X10. Susceptibility to triclosan and 7 antibiotics was assessed at all stages. For S. aureus ATCC 6538, SCVs were further characterized by determining microbicide susceptibility and competitive fitness. Cellular morphology was examined using electron microscopy, and protein expression was evaluated through proteomics. Triclosan susceptibility in all SCVs (which could be generated from 4/6 strains) was markedly decreased, while antibiotic susceptibility was significantly increased in the majority of cases. An SCV of S. aureus ATCC 6538 exhibited significantly increased susceptibility to all tested microbicides. Cross-wall formation was impaired in this bacterium, while expression of FabI, a target of triclosan, and IsaA, a lytic transglycosylase involved in cell division, was increased. The P10 SCV was 49% less fit than P0. In summary, triclosan exposure of S. aureus produced SCVs in 4/6 test bacteria, with decreased triclosan susceptibility but with generally increased antibiotic susceptibility. An SCV derived from S. aureus ATCC 6538 showed reduced competitive fitness, potentially due to impaired cell division. In this SCV, increased FabI expression could account for reduced triclosan susceptibility, while IsaA may be upregulated in response to cell division defects. PMID:26033734

  7. Altered Competitive Fitness, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Cellular Morphology in a Triclosan-Induced Small-Colony Variant of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Sarah; Latimer, Joe; Bazaid, Abdulrahman; McBain, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can produce small-colony variants (SCVs) that express various phenotypes. While their significance is unclear, SCV propagation may be influenced by relative fitness, antimicrobial susceptibility, and the underlying mechanism. We have investigated triclosan-induced generation of SCVs in six S. aureus strains, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Parent strains (P0) were repeatedly passaged on concentration gradients of triclosan using a solid-state exposure system to generate P10. P10 was subsequently passaged without triclosan to generate X10. Susceptibility to triclosan and 7 antibiotics was assessed at all stages. For S. aureus ATCC 6538, SCVs were further characterized by determining microbicide susceptibility and competitive fitness. Cellular morphology was examined using electron microscopy, and protein expression was evaluated through proteomics. Triclosan susceptibility in all SCVs (which could be generated from 4/6 strains) was markedly decreased, while antibiotic susceptibility was significantly increased in the majority of cases. An SCV of S. aureus ATCC 6538 exhibited significantly increased susceptibility to all tested microbicides. Cross-wall formation was impaired in this bacterium, while expression of FabI, a target of triclosan, and IsaA, a lytic transglycosylase involved in cell division, was increased. The P10 SCV was 49% less fit than P0. In summary, triclosan exposure of S. aureus produced SCVs in 4/6 test bacteria, with decreased triclosan susceptibility but with generally increased antibiotic susceptibility. An SCV derived from S. aureus ATCC 6538 showed reduced competitive fitness, potentially due to impaired cell division. In this SCV, increased FabI expression could account for reduced triclosan susceptibility, while IsaA may be upregulated in response to cell division defects.

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Vibrio alginolyticus isolated from oyster in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-Ho; Shin, YuJin; Jang, SeokCheol; Jung, Yeojung; So, Jae-Seong

    2016-10-01

    Pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus, a cause of severe infection in shellfish, as well as in humans, has been found at high frequency around all coastal areas of Korea. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of V. alginolyticus, to identify the strains isolated from oysters in West Sea, and to investigate their antimicrobial resistance profiles. Biochemical analyses of the 90 initially recovered presumptive V. alginolyticus colonies indicated that 16 isolates were V. alginolyticus. PCR analysis to detect the presence of the gyrB gene confirmed that 15 (93.8 %) of the 16 isolates were V. alginolyticus. These 15 isolates had the following profiles of resistance against 16 antibiotics: all isolates were resistant to ampicillin and vancomycin, and 26.7 % of the isolates exhibited resistance to cephalothin. A large number of isolates showed intermediate resistance to erythromycin (100 %) and rifampin (73.3 %). Five (33.3 %) of the V. alginolyticus isolates demonstrated multiple resistance to at least three antimicrobials.

  9. Data Mining Validation of Fluconazole Breakpoints Established by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing▿

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Isabel; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Laguna, Fernando; Rodriguez-Pardo, Dolors; Almirante, Benito; Pahissa, Albert; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L.

    2009-01-01

    European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) breakpoints classify Candida strains with a fluconazole MIC ≤ 2 mg/liter as susceptible, those with a fluconazole MIC of 4 mg/liter as representing intermediate susceptibility, and those with a fluconazole MIC > 4 mg/liter as resistant. Machine learning models are supported by complex statistical analyses assessing whether the results have statistical relevance. The aim of this work was to use supervised classification algorithms to analyze the clinical data used to produce EUCAST fluconazole breakpoints. Five supervised classifiers (J48, Correlation and Regression Trees [CART], OneR, Naïve Bayes, and Simple Logistic) were used to analyze two cohorts of patients with oropharyngeal candidosis and candidemia. The target variable was the outcome of the infections, and the predictor variables consisted of values for the MIC or the proportion between the dose administered and the MIC of the isolate (dose/MIC). Statistical power was assessed by determining values for sensitivity and specificity, the false-positive rate, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and the Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC). CART obtained the best statistical power for a MIC > 4 mg/liter for detecting failures (sensitivity, 87%; false-positive rate, 8%; area under the ROC curve, 0.89; MCC index, 0.80). For dose/MIC determinations, the target was >75, with a sensitivity of 91%, a false-positive rate of 10%, an area under the ROC curve of 0.90, and an MCC index of 0.80. Other classifiers gave similar breakpoints with lower statistical power. EUCAST fluconazole breakpoints have been validated by means of machine learning methods. These computer tools must be incorporated in the process for developing breakpoints to avoid researcher bias, thus enhancing the statistical power of the model. PMID:19433568

  10. Global assessment of antimicrobial susceptibility among Gram-negative organisms collected from pediatric patients between 2004 and 2012: results from the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial.

    PubMed

    Kehl, Sue C; Dowzicky, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    The Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (TEST) was designed to monitor susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobial agents among important pathogens. We report here on susceptibility among Gram-negative pathogens collected globally from pediatric patients between 2004 and 2012. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using guidelines published by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Most Enterobacteriaceae showed high rates of susceptibility (>95%) to amikacin, tigecycline, and the carbapenems (imipenem and meropenem); 90.8% of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates were susceptible to minocycline, and susceptibility rates were highest in North America, Europe, and Asia/Pacific Rim. Amikacin was the most active agent against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (90.4% susceptibility), with susceptibility rates being highest in North America. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) were reported for 11.0% of Escherichia coli isolates and 24.2% of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates globally, with rates reaching as high as 25.7% in the Middle East and >43% in Africa and Latin America, respectively. Statistically significant (P<0.01) differences in susceptibility rates were noted between pediatric age groups (1 to 5 years, 6 to 12 years, or 13 to 17 years of age), globally and in some regions, for all pathogens except Haemophilus influenzae. Significant (P<0.01) differences were reported for all pathogens globally and in most regions, considerably more frequently, when pediatric and adult susceptibility results were compared. Amikacin, tigecycline, and the carbapenems were active in vitro against most Gram-negative pathogens collected from pediatric patients; A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa were susceptible to fewer antimicrobial agents. Susceptibility rates among isolates from pediatric patients were frequently different from those among isolates collected from adults.

  11. Salmonella prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility from the National Animal Health Monitoring System Swine 2000 and 2006 studies.

    PubMed

    Haley, C A; Dargatz, D A; Bush, E J; Erdman, M M; Fedorka-Cray, P J

    2012-03-01

    Concern about Salmonella contamination of food is compounded by fear that antimicrobials traditionally used to combat the infection will become useless due to rising antibiotic resistance. Livestock, in particular swine, often are blamed for illnesses caused by Salmonella and for increasing antibiotic resistance due to use of antibiotics in pigs. As part of the National Animal Health Monitoring System Swine 2000 and 2006 studies, swine fecal samples were cultured for Salmonella. These samples were collected from 123 operations in 17 states in 2000 and from 135 operations in 17 states in 2006. At each operation, 50 and 60 fecal samples were collected from late finisher pig pens in 2000 and 2006, respectively. Salmonella isolates were characterized to determine serogroup and serotype and were tested for susceptibility to a panel of 17 and 15 antimicrobial drugs in 2000 and 2006, respectively. A total of 5,470 and 7,788 samples were cultured for Salmonella in 2000 and 2006, respectively. Overall, 6.2% of the samples and 34.2% of the farms were positive for Salmonella in 2000. In 2006, 7.2% of the samples and 52.6% of the farms were positive. Salmonella Derby, Salmonella Typhimurium var. 5- (formerly Salmonella Typhimurium var. Copenhagen), and Salmonella Agona were the three serotypes most often recovered in both study years. The most common antimicrobial resistance pattern for Salmonella Derby in the two study years was resistance to streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and tetracycline. Most isolates were resistant to tetracycline, sulfisoxazole, and streptomycin in both study years. The proportion of Salmonella isolates that were susceptible to all antimicrobials (pansusceptible) was 38.1% in 2000 and 20.4% in 2006. The proportion of Salmonella isolates that were resistant to three or more antimicrobials (multidrug resistant) was similar in 2000 and in 2006 (52.8 and 57.7%, respectively).

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma bovis isolates from veal calves and dairy cattle in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Heuvelink, Annet; Reugebrink, Constance; Mars, Jet

    2016-06-30

    Control of Mycoplasma bovis infections depends on good husbandry practices and antibiotic treatment. To allow more prudent use of antimicrobial drugs, there is a need for information on the susceptibility profile of this pathogen. The objective of the present study was to analyse the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical M. bovis isolates in the Netherlands. The collection comprised 95 bovine isolates, originating from lungs (n=56), mastitis milk (n=27), and synovial fluid (n=12), collected between 2008 and 2014. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were assessed by broth microdilution, both by using in-house prepared MIC plates and by using commercially available MIC plates. For each antimicrobial agent, the range of MIC results, the MIC50, and MIC90 values were calculated. M. bovis strains recently isolated in the Netherlands appeared to be characterized by relatively high MIC values for antimicrobial agents that, until now, have been recommended by the Dutch Association of Veterinarians for treating pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma species. Fluoroquinolones appeared to be the most efficacious in inhibiting M. bovis growth, followed by tulathromycin and oxytetracycline. The highest MIC values were obtained for erythromycin, tilmicosin, and tylosin. Future studies should be done on determining M. bovis specific clinical breakpoints, standardization of methods to determine MIC values as well as molecular studies on detection of antimicrobial resistance mechanisms of M. bovis isolates to develop PCR assays for determining resistance.

  13. Meat industry wastewater: microbiological quality and antimicrobial susceptibility of E. coli and Salmonella sp. isolates, case study in Vojvodina, Serbia.

    PubMed

    Stošić, Milena; Čučak, Dragana; Kovačević, Srđan; Perović, Marija; Radonić, Jelena; Turk Sekulić, Maja; Vojinović Miloradov, Mirjana; Radnović, Dragan

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater from meat processing industries is a fusion of compounds with a high load of organic matter, and pathogen microorganisms like Escherichia coli, and Salmonella sp. The aim of this research was to determine microbiological characteristics of the wastewater discharged from the meat processing industry in order to get a more detailed insight into meat industry wastewater pollution, and to evaluate the resistance of bacterial strains E. coli and Salmonella sp. to antibiotics. The evaluation of the antimicrobial susceptibility was performed on 37 strains of E. coli and eight strains of Salmonella sp. to nine different antibiotics. The number of faecal pollution indicators was very high in all samples. From a total of 37 strains of E. coli, a moderate degree of resistance was shown to tetracycline (37.83%); a low degree of resistance to ampicillin (21.62%), streptomycin (24.32%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazol (18.92%) and nalidixic acid (16.22%); and very low to: chloramphenicol (13.51%), ciprofloxacin (2.7%), gentamicin and cefotaxime (0.0%). The results for eight strains of Salmonella sp. show that all eight isolates had some degree of susceptibility to nine tested antimicrobial agents and six strains were fully susceptible to all tested antibiotics.

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens isolated from piglets with or without diarrhea in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Salvarani, Felipe Masiero; Silveira Silva, Rodrigo Otávio; Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; da Costa Cruz Júnior, Eduardo Coulaud; Albefaro, Isabella Silva; de Carvalho Guedes, Roberto Maurício; Faria Lobato, Francisco Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for 13 antibiotics against Clostridium perfringens isolated from Brazilian piglets. The collection of isolates was performed in June to October 2010. All isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin and ceftiofur, whereas most were resistant to tetracycline and lincomycin. Avilamycin and narasin were more effective against isolates from non-diarrheic than from diarrheic piglets. The other antimicrobials were less active in need of high concentrations to inhibit the growth of the C. perfringens type A. These results suggest the need for further studies evaluating molecular factors related to the antimicrobial resistance of C. perfringens. PMID:24031924

  15. Urinary Escherichia coli antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and their relationship with community antibiotic use in Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Meumann, Ella M; Mitchell, Brett G; McGregor, Alistair; McBryde, Emma; Cooley, Louise

    2015-10-01

    This study assessed urinary Escherichia coli antibiotic susceptibility patterns in Tasmania, Australia, and examined their association with community antibiotic use. The susceptibility profiles of all urinary E. coli isolates collected in Tasmania between January 2010 and December 2012 were included. The amount of Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS)-subsidised use of amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), cefalexin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim was retrieved (at the Tasmanian population level) and the number of defined daily doses per 1000 population per day in Tasmania for these antibiotics was calculated for each month during the study period. Antimicrobial susceptibility data were assessed for changes over time in the 3-year study period. Antimicrobial use and susceptibility data were assessed for seasonal differences and lag in resistance following antibiotic use. Excluding duplicates, 28145 E. coli isolates were included. Resistance levels were low; 35% of isolates were non-susceptible to amoxicillin, 14% were non-susceptible to trimethoprim and <5% were non-susceptible to AMC, cefalexin, gentamicin and norfloxacin. Amoxicillin use increased by 35% during winter/spring compared with summer/autumn, and AMC use increased by 21%. No seasonal variation in quinolone use or resistance was detected. The low levels of antimicrobial resistance identified may relate to Tasmania's isolated geographical location. Significant seasonal variation in amoxicillin and AMC use is likely to be due to increased use of these antibiotics for treatment of respiratory tract infections in winter. Quinolone use is restricted by the PBS in Australia, which is the likely explanation for the low levels of quinolone use and resistance identified.

  16. Prevalence of Salmonella spp. in cane toads (Bufo marinus) from Grenada, West Indies, and their antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Drake, M; Amadi, V; Zieger, U; Johnson, R; Hariharan, H

    2013-09-01

    Cloacal swabs and caecal contents sampled from 58 cane toads (Bufo marinus) in St George's parish, Grenada, during a 7-month period in 2011 were examined by an enrichment and selective culture method for presence of Salmonella spp. Twenty-four (41%) toads were positive for Salmonella spp. of which eight were Salmonella enterica serovar Javiana, and eight were S. enterica serovar Rubislaw. The other serovars were as follows: Montevideo, 6; Arechavaleta, 1; and serovar: IV:43:-:-, 1. The high frequency of isolation of serovar Javiana, an emerging human pathogen associated with several outbreaks in the recent years in the eastern United States, suggests a possible role for cane toads in transmission of this serovar. Although S. Rubislaw has been isolated from lizards, bats and cases of some human infections, there is no report of its carriage by cane toads, and in such high frequency. The rate of carriage of S. Montevideo, a cause for human foodborne outbreaks around the world was also over 10% in the 58 toads sampled in this study. The antimicrobial drug susceptibility tests against amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, imipenem, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, tetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole showed that drug resistance is minimal and is of little concern. Antimicrobial resistance was limited to ampicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid in one isolate of S. Javiana and one isolate of S. Rubislaw. This is the first report of isolation and antimicrobial susceptibilities of various Salmonella serovars not identified previously in cane toads in Grenada, West Indies.

  17. Primary Antimicrobial Susceptibility Changes in Children with Helicobacter pylori Infection over 13 Years in Northern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Gismondi, Pierpacifico; Maffini, Valentina; Bizzarri, Barbara; Fornaroli, Fabiola; Madia, Carmen; Salerno, Antonino; Cangelosi, A. Marta; de'Angelis, Gian Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The eradication therapy of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is still a challenge for gastroenterologists. One of the main causes of failure in H. pylori eradication is the antibiotic resistance mainly to clarithromycin. Culture from biopsies is maybe the most used method among the antimicrobial susceptibility techniques. In this study, we compared the antimicrobial susceptibility changes in children with H. pylori infection over 13 years and we confirmed that clarithromycin resistance has been increased (16% versus 26%) though with no statistically signficant value. Therefore, clarithromycin should not be used in empiric treatment of H. pylori eradication therapy in children, but its use should be limited only to children with known antimicrobial susceptibility. On the other hand, metronidazole resistance has decreased over this time period in statistically significant manner (56% versus 33%, p = 0.014). Furthermore, ampicillin resistance has been confirmed to be very rare (3% versus 0%) in children with H. pylori infection. In conclusion, in H. pylori infection, if we do not know the antibiotic susceptibility of patients, we should recommend an eradication therapy based on the local distribution of antibiotic resistance rates trying to limit the therapeutic failures. PMID:26064096

  18. Susceptibility of equine bacterial isolates to antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P J; Wilson, W D; Hirsh, D C; Baggot, J D; Martin, L D

    1985-02-01

    In vitro antimicrobic susceptibility patterns of commonly isolated aerobic gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial pathogens of equine origin were determined, using the agar-plate dilution method. All organisms were recent clinical isolates and included Corynebacterium (Rhodococcus) equi, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, (coagulase positive) Staphylococcus sp, Streptococcus equi, Streptococcus zooepidemicus, Actinobacillus sp, Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella. In vitro susceptibility levels were outlined for 14 antimicrobics as follows: amikacin less than or equal to 4.0 micrograms/ml, ampicillin less than or equal to 1.0 microgram/ml, amoxicillin less than or equal to 1.0 microgram/ml, cefadroxil less than or equal to 8.0 micrograms/ml, chloramphenicol less than or equal to 8.0 micrograms/ml, erythromycin less than or equal to 1.0 microgram/ml, gentamicin less than or equal to 2.0 micrograms/ml, kanamycin less than or equal to 4.0 micrograms/ml, penicillin less than or equal to 1.0 microgram/ml, tetracycline less than or equal to 1.0 microgram/ml, sulfadimethoxine less than or equal to 10.0 micrograms/ml, ormetoprim/sulfadimethoxine less than or equal to 0.5/9.5 micrograms/ml, sulfadiazine less than or equal to 10.0 micrograms/ml, and trimethoprim/sulfadiazine less than or equal to 0.5/9.5 micrograms/ml.

  19. Microbiologic characterization and antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium tetani isolated from wounds of patients with clinically diagnosed tetanus.

    PubMed

    Campbell, James I; Lam, Thi Minh Yen; Huynh, Thi Loan; To, So Diep; Tran, Thi Thu Nga; Nguyen, Van Minh Hoang; Le, Thanh Son; Nguyen, van Vinh Chau; Parry, Christopher; Farrar, Jeremy J; Tran, Tinh Hien; Baker, Stephen

    2009-05-01

    Clostridium tetani is the etiologic agent of the muscle-spasming disease tetanus. Despite an effective vaccine, tetanus is an ongoing problem in some developing countries. Diagnosis by bacterial culture is not done because it is generally unnecessary and the entry of route of the bacteria can be inapparent. We attempted to isolate and evaluate C. tetani from the wounds of 84 patients with tetanus. We effectively isolated C. tetani from 45 patients. All strains tested positive by polymerase chain reaction for the gene encoding tetanus neurotoxin. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined by disc diffusion and E-test. All C. tetani isolates were susceptible to penicillin and metronidazole but resistant to co-trimoxazole. Despite treatment with high doses of penicillin, C. tetani was isolated after 16 days of intravenous penicillin in two cases. These data show that the intravenous route for penicillin may be inadequate for clearing the infection and emphasizes wound debridement in the treatment of tetanus.

  20. [Susceptibilities of Escherichia coli, Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus isolated from animals to ofloxacin and commonly used antimicrobial agents].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, I; Yoshida, T; Higashide, Y; Sakano, T

    1990-01-01

    Susceptibilities of Escherichia coli, Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus isolated from chickens, pigs and cattle to ofloxacin (OFLX) and commonly used antimicrobial agents were investigated. 1. E. coli (28 isolates) demonstrated the highest level of susceptibility of OFLX (MIC 0.10-0.39 micrograms/ml for all the isolates) among all the test drugs. Commonly used antimicrobial agents to which these isolates responded with relatively high susceptibilities (MIC50 0.78-6.25 micrograms/ml) included oxolinic acid (OXA), ampicillin (ABPC), kanamycin (KM) and chloramphenicol (CP) with their MIC50 values in the increasing order as above. Drugs to which these isolates responded with moderate to weak susceptibilities (MIC50 25 approximately greater than 800 micrograms/ml) were doxycycline (DOXY), streptomycin (SM), spectinomycin (SPCM) and sulfadimethoxine (SDMX) in the increasing order of MIC50. E. coli isolates with resistances to all the test drugs other than OFLX and OXA amounted to 7.1-57.1% of the isolates examined and 20 isolates (71.4%) in total. 2. Susceptibilities to OFLX and 4 existing pyridonecarboxylic acid derivatives of E. coli (48 samples) isolated recently from diarrheal pigs were compared. When evaluated in terms of MIC50, the values of OFLX and norfloxacin were both 0.10 micrograms/ml. The values increased by differences of 0.39-3.13 micrograms/ml in an order of OXA, pipemidic acid and nalidixic acid. 3. Salmonella (28 isolates) demonstrated the highest level of susceptibility to OFLX (MIC 0.20-0.39 micrograms/ml for all the isolates) among all the test drugs. The drugs to which these isolates responded with relatively high to moderate susceptibilities (MIC50 0.78-12.5 micrograms/ml) included ABPC, OXA, DOXY, KM, CP and SM with their MIC50 values increasing in this order. The drugs to which the isolates responded with low susceptibilities (MIC50 above 100 micrograms/ml) were SPCM and SDMX. Of all the 28 Salmonella isolates tested, 7.1-32.1% were resistant

  1. Susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to antimicrobial agents: effect of sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J; Murty, V L; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1995-03-01

    H. pylori is regarded as a primary etiologic factor in gastric disease and the therapies now include a combination of antimicrobial agents with antiulcer drugs. Here, the effect of a new gastroprotective agent, sulglycotide, on the in vitro anti-H. pylori activity of metronidazole, erythromycin, tetracycline, and amoxycillin was assessed. The assays in the absence of sulglycotide gave MIC value 0.10mg/L for erythromycin, 0.12mg/L for amoxycillin, 0.15mg/L for tetracycline and 14mg/L for metronidazole, while sulglycotide alone gave MIC value of 20mg/L. The sulglycotide at its optimal dose (5mg/L) evoked a 4-fold enhancement in the MIC of amoxycillin, 5-fold in tetracycline, and 8.3-fold in erythromycin, while the MIC of metronidazole improved 3.5-fold at 10mg/L sulglycotide. The results point towards the advantage of combination therapy of sulglycotide and antibiotics for H. pylori eradication.

  2. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from retail shrimps in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Yin, Wai-Fong; Lee, Learn-Han; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a marine and estuarine bacterium that has been the leading cause of foodborne outbreaks which leads to a significant threat to human health worldwide. Consumption of seafood contaminated with V. parahaemolyticus causes acute gastroenteritis in individuals. The bacterium poses two main virulence factor including the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) which is a pore-forming protein that contributes to the invasiveness of the bacterium in humans and TDH-related hemolysin (trh), which plays a similar role as tdh in the disease pathogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial resistance V. parahaemolyticus strains in shrimps purchased from wetmarkets and supermarkets. The toxR-based PCR assay indicated that a total of 57.8% (185/320) isolates were positive for V. parahaemolyticus. Only 10% (19/185) toxR-positive isolate exhibit the trh gene and none of the isolates were tested positive for tdh. The MAR index was measured for 14 common antimicrobial agents. The results indicated 98% of the isolates were highly susceptible to imipenem, ampicillin sulbactam (96%), chloramphenicol (95%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (93%), gentamicin (85%), levofloxacin (83%), and tetracycline (82%). The chloramphenicol (catA2) and kanamycin (aphA-3) resistance genes were detected in the resistant V. parahaemolyticus isolates. Our results demonstrate that shrimps are contaminated with V. parahaemolyticus, some of which carry the trh-gene thus being potential to cause food borne illness. The occurrence of multidrug resistance strains in the environment could be an indication of excessive usage of antibiotics in agriculture and aquaculture fields. PMID:25688239

  3. [Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of microorganisms causing bacteremia and fungemia in pediatric oncology patients].

    PubMed

    Cheguirián, M L; Carvajal, L R; Ledesma, E M; Enrico, M C; Reale, A L; Culasso, C; Bertoni, L

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of our research was to know the frequency of microorganisms causing bacteremia and/or fungemia in oncology patients from Hospital de Niños de Córdoba, as well as to describe the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of bacteria isolated from January 2006 to April 2007. A total of 59 bacteremia and fungemia cases in 44 patients were studied. From the total number of isolations, 45.8% were gram-negative bacilli, 35.6% were gram-positive cocci, and 18.6% were yeasts. The global distribution of the most prevalent microorganisms was the following: Klebsiella spp. 15.3%; Staphylococcus aureus and Candida parapsilosis 11.9%; coagulase-negative staphylococci 10.2%; Escherichia coli 8.5%, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 6.8%. More than 40% (41.2%) of enterobacteria showed an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase phenotype, and 20.0% of non-fermenting gram-negative bacilli were multi-resistant to tested antibiotics, while 38.5% of Staphylococcus spp. were methicillin-resistant. In conclusion, the most prevalent microorganisms were gram-negative bacilli, and within this group, enterobacteria evidenced a higher percentage of resistance to tested antibiotics.

  4. Occurrence of Salmonella spp. in broiler chicken carcasses and their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Dalila Angélica Moliterno; Ribeiro, Aldemir Reginato; Vasconcelos, Ana Mércia Mendes; Santos, Sylnei Barros; Silva, Juliana Vital Domingos; de Andrade, Patrícia Lúcia Arruda; de Arruda Falcão, Lúcia Sadae Pereira da Costa

    2009-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the occurrence of Salmonellae in broiler chicken carcasses and to determine the antimicrobial resistance profile of the isolated strains. Twenty-five out of the 260 broiler chicken carcasses samples (9.6%) were positive for Salmonella. S. Enteritidis was the most frequent serovar. Nineteen Salmonella isolates were tested for antimicrobial resistance, and the results indicated that 94.7% were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent. Resistance to streptomycin (73.7%), nitrofurantoin (52.3%), tetracycline (31.6%), and nalidixic acid (21%) were the prevalent amongst Salmonella strains tested. PMID:24031401

  5. Prevalence, serovars and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella spp. from wild and domestic green iguanas (Iguana iguana) in Grenada, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, W R B; Amadi, V; Pinckney, R; Macpherson, C N L; McKibben, J S; Bruhl-Day, R; Johnson, R; Hariharan, H

    2014-09-01

    Cloacal swabs from 62 green iguanas (Iguana iguana), including 47 wild and 15 domestic ones from five parishes of Grenada, were sampled during a 4-month period of January to April 2013 and examined by enrichment and selective culture for the presence of Salmonella spp. Fifty-five per cent of the animals were positive, and eight serovars of Salmonella were isolated. The most common serovar was Rubislaw (58.8%), a serovar found recently in many cane toads in Grenada, followed by Oranienburg (14.7%), a serovar that has been causing serious human disease outbreaks in Japan. Serovar IV:48:g,z51 :- (formerly, S. Marina) highly invasive and known for serious infections in children in the United States, constituted 11.8% of the isolates, all of them being from domestic green iguanas. Salmonella Newport, a serovar recently found in a blue land crab in Grenada, comprised 11.8% of the isolates from the green iguanas. The remaining four less frequent serovars included S. Javiana and S. Glostrup. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests conducted by a disc diffusion method against amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, tetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole showed that drug resistance is minimal, with intermediate susceptibility, mainly to streptomycin, tetracycline and cefotaxime. This is the first report of isolation and antimicrobial susceptibilities of various Salmonella serovars from wild and domestic green iguanas in Grenada, West Indies.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from pork and chicken carcasses in Taiwan: prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jyhshiun; Yeh, Kuang-Sheng; Liu, Hsueh-Tao; Lin, Jiunn-Horng

    2009-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a cause of many diseases in both humans and animals. This pathogen is also a major target in the screening of slaughterhouse carcasses to monitor hygienic conditions during slaughter. During 2004 to 2006, S. aureus was recovered from 8.8% (38 of 430), 11.3% (77 of 680), and 4.3% (13 of 300) of pork carcass samples, respectively, collected at 53 slaughterhouses in Taiwan. During 2003 to 2005, it was recovered from 0.3% (1 of 305), 0.4% (1 of 260), and 7.8% (31 of 395) of rinse fluids from chicken carcasses, respectively, collected at 17 meat processing plants. The minimum dilution method was used to determine antimicrobial susceptibility (MICs) of these strains (n = 103) as well as those collected from pork and chicken carcasses (n = 104) in a previous study beginning in 2000. All 207 strains were sensitive to nitrofurantoin and vancomycin. Over 50% were resistant to clindamycin (MIC that inhibited 90% of strains [MIC90] = 32 microg/ml) and tetracycline (MIC90 = 64 microg/ml). The percentages resistant to methicillin (oxacillin), chloramphenicol, erythromycin, and tylosin were 19.4% (40 of 207), 18.8% (39 of 207), 23.2% (48 of 207), and 20.8% (43 of 207) with MIC90s of 8, 64, > or = 64, and > or = 128 microg/ml, respectively. The methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains exhibited resistance to more antibiotics than did the methicillin-susceptible strains, and 87.5% (35 of 40) of the MRSA strains carried the mecA gene sequence. Since MRSA infections have become a public health concern in both communities and hospitals, testing for the presence of MRSA in animal carcasses during slaughtering operations is warranted.

  7. Microbial Etiology and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Bactria Implicated in Urinary Tract Infection in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nozarian, Zohreh; Abdollahi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Urinary tract infections (UTI) are one of the most common infectious diseases with different microbial agent and antimicrobial resistant pattern in hospitalized patients and outpatients. In order to assess the adequacy of therapy, knowledge of prevalence and resistance pattern of the bacteria is necessary. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and the antimicrobial resistance pattern of main bacterial responsible for UTI in order to establish an appropriate empirical therapy. Methods: All urine samples were referred to Imam Hospital Laboratory, Tehran, Iran during 2011-2012, urine culture isolated and bacteria were identified and the profile of antibiotic susceptibility was characterized. Result: From 1851 urine cultures, UTI was more frequent in woman (68%) E. coli was as usual the most common pathogen implicated in UTI. Most susceptibility was to imipenem (98.9%). nitroforantoin (96%) and amikacin (94.1%) and increased resistance to penicillin (66.6%), nalidixic acid (62.1%) ampicilin (60.1%) and cotrimoxazole 54.3%. Discussion: The most common isolated pathogen was E. coli . According to antibiogram susceptibility, the recommended antimicrobial drugs are nitroforantoin and imipenem. nalidixic acid and cotrimoxazole are not recommended because drug resistance is high. PMID:26516326

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility, virulence genes, and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of Staphylococcus aureus recovered from bovine mastitis in Ningxia, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Limei; Zhou, Xuezhang; He, Yulong; Yong, Changfu; Shen, Mingliang; Szenci, Otto; Han, Bo

    2016-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureusis the leading pathogen involved inbovine mastitis, but knowledgeabout antimicrobial resistance, virulence factors, and genotypes of Staphylococcus aureus resulting in bovine mastitis in Ningxia, China, is limited. Therefore, antimicrobial susceptibility, virulence gene, and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses of Staph. aureus were carried out. A total of 327 milk samples from cows with clinical and subclinical mastitis in 4 regions of Ningxia were used for the isolation and identification of pathogens according to phenotypic and molecular characteristics. Antimicrobial susceptibility against 22 antimicrobial agents was determined by disk diffusion. The presence of 8 virulence genes in Staph. aureus isolates was tested by PCR. Genotypes of isolates were investigated based on RAPD. Results showed that 35 isolates obtained from mastitis milk samples were identified as Staph. aureus. The isolates were resistant to sulfamethoxazole (100%), penicillin G (94.3%), ampicillin (94.3%), erythromycin (68.6%), azithromycin (68.6%), clindamycin (25.7%), amoxicillin (11.4%), and tetracycline (5.7%). All of the isolates contained one or more virulence genes with average (standard deviation) of 6.6±1.6. The most prevalent virulence genes were hlb (97.1%), followed by fnbpA, hla, coa (94.3% each), nuc (85.7%), fnbpB (80%), clfA (77.1%), and tsst-1 (40%). Nine different gene patterns were found and 3 of them were the dominant gene combinations (77.1%). Staphylococcus aureus isolates (n=35) were divided into 6 genotypes by RAPD tying, the genotypes III and VI were the most prevalent genotypes. There was greatvariation in genotypes of Staph. aureus isolates, not only among different farms, but also within the same herd in Ningxia province. The study showed a high incidence of Staph. aureus with genomic variation of resistance genes, which is matter of great concern in public and animal health in Ningxia province of China.

  9. Characterization of Toxin Genes and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in Fishery Products in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Arfatahery, Noushin; Davoodabadi, Abolfazl; Abedimohtasab, Taranehpeimaneh

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of seafood-borne diseases worldwide, which are attributable to the contamination of food by preformed enterotoxins. In this study, a total of 206 (34.3%) Staphylococcus aureus strains were obtained from 600 fish and shrimp samples and were tested for their antimicrobial susceptibility. We assessed the prevalence of the genes responsible for the staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEA, SEB) and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) genes. The results indicated that 34% of aqua food samples were contaminated with S. aureus, and 23.8% of these isolates were mec-A-positive. Sixty-four percent of the strains isolated from contaminated seafood was enterotoxigenic S. aureus, and 28.2% of SEs were MRSA-positive. The most prevalent genotype was characterized by the presence of the sea gene (45.2%), followed by the seb gene (18.5%), and the tst gene encoding TSST-1 was found in eight strains (3.9%). Of the 206 S. aureus isolates, 189 strains (84.9%) were resistant to at least one antibiotic. Given the frequent outbreaks of enterotoxigenic MRSA, it is necessary to make revisions to mandatory programmes to facilitate improved hygiene practices during fishing, aquaculture, processing, and sales to prevent the contamination of fishery products in Iran. PMID:27694813

  10. [Serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Salmonella strains isolated from food in Cuba].

    PubMed

    Puig Peña, Yamila; Espino Hernández, María; Leyva Castillo, Virginia; Aportela López, Neibys; Machín Díaz, Mayrin; Soto Rodríguez, Perla

    2011-12-01

    The serotypes of 178 isolates of Salmonella enterica taken from food in different regions of Cuba between January 2008 and December 2009 were identified, and the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of 100 selected isolates was determined by strata sampling. A total of 20 Salmonella serotypes were identified, with a predominance of S. Enteritidis (23%), S. Agona (13.5%), and S. London (11.2%). Of all the strains, 75% were resistant or presented intermediate resistance to at least one of the drugs tested, in the following order: tetracycline (70.7%), ampicillin (22.7%), and nalidixic acid (14.7%). Ten different resistance patterns were identified. The most frequent patterns corresponded to strains that were either drug-resistant or had intermediate resistance (89.3%). Three strains (identified as S. Infantis, S. Derby, and S. Enteritidis) were multiresistant, and one of them, S. Enteritidis, was not sensitive to either nalidixic acid or ciprofloxacin. To control salmonellosis, the importance of maximizing integrated health surveillance is emphasized.

  11. In vivo susceptibility of the Legionnaires disease bacterium to ten antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Lewis, V J; Thacker, W L; Shepard, C C; McDade, J E

    1978-03-01

    The susceptibility of the Legionnaires disease bacterium to various antimicrobial agents was determined by inoculation of embryonated eggs via the yolk sac. When administered prophylactically, the minimal dose of drug preventing all deaths due to the infection was as follows: rifampin, 0.02 mg; gentamicin, 0.25 mg; streptomycin, 0.39 mg; erythromycin, 0.62 mg; sulfadiazine, 1.56 mg; chloramphenicol, 2.50 mg; and cephalothin, 20.0 mg. Smaller amounts delayed deaths, and larger or equal amounts rendered the embryos free of infection. Oxytetracycline in the largest tested amount, 5.0 mg, protected 80% of the embryos from death, and as little as 0.31 mg delayed death. Chlortetracycline (0.50 mg) and ampicillin (10.0 mg) were ineffective. The six most effective drugs were studied in an experiment in which they were administered at various times after infection in doses that were twice the minimal prophylactic dose preventing all deaths. In this therapeutic experiment, rifampin, and erythromycin allowed 100% survival when given even 72 h after infection; gentamicin, streptomycin, sulfadiazine, and chloramphenicol did so when given 48 h after infection. All six drugs increased mean survival time when administered 72 h after infection.

  12. [Performance evaluation of VITEK 2 system in meropenem susceptibility testing of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates].

    PubMed

    Acuner, Ibrahim Cağatay; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Birinci, Asuman; Cekiç Cihan, Ciğdem; Bek, Yüksel; Durupınar, Belma

    2011-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen associated with various community-acquired or nosocomial infections. Multi-drug resistant P.aeruginosa strains increasingly cause epidemics and spread in various hospital wards and geographic regions. Carbapenems are among the most effective antimicrobials in the treatment of multi-drug resistant P.aeruginosa infections, and meropenem is the most successful among alternatives in initial therapy. Particularly in severe infections, inappropriate or inadequate initial antimicrobial therapy is independently associated with adverse clinical and economic outcomes. Availability of accurate and rapid susceptibility testing is a priority. Most of the automated microbiology systems can provide rapid results within 8 to 12 hours. In comparison to standard methods, problems in the antimicrobial susceptibility testing of particular microorganisms and antimicrobial agents have been reported for automated microbiology systems. Failures have been reported previously especially in the susceptibility testing of P.aeruginosa versus carbapenem. Most of these studies are designed according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA, USA) performance analysis scheme (Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Antimicrobial Susceptibility Test Systems) in a simplified form. However, there are many lacking issues in the design of most of these studies. Among these, insufficient sample size, use of inappropriate reference method, lack of reproducibility testing, and inadequate distribution of study isolates in interpretative categories are of notice. There are only few studies in the literature that evaluate the performance of automated systems in antimicrobial susceptibility testing of carbapenems in clinical P.aeruginosa isolates with a sufficient sample size (n ? 100). However, most of these studies still have one or more major deficiencies in the study design. Furthermore, none of these studies evaluate the performance of

  13. The occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility of salmonellae isolated from commercially available canine raw food diets in three Canadian cities.

    PubMed

    Finley, R; Reid-Smith, R; Ribble, C; Popa, M; Vandermeer, M; Aramini, J

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Salmonella isolated from commercially available canine raw food diets in Canada. A total of 166 commercial frozen raw food diet samples were purchased from randomly selected local pet stores in three Canadian cities for a period of 8 months. All samples were evaluated for the presence of Salmonella, serotyped and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. There was an overall Salmonella prevalence of 21%; chicken was an ingredient for 67% of the Salmonella-positive diets. Eighteen different Salmonella serotypes were recovered, and resistance was observed to 12 of the 16 antimicrobials tested, with the majority of Ontario isolates exhibiting resistance to ampicillin and Calgary isolates to tetracycline. This study demonstrates the potential risk of raw food diets, especially for immunocompromised individuals, and stresses the need for implementing regulatory guidelines for the production of these diets in order to help control and ideally eliminate the bacterial risks associated with their use and consumption.

  14. Rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Yersinia pestis using bioluminescent reporter phage

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, David A.; Molineux, Ian J.; Westwater, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    The rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Yersinia pestis is paramount for a positive prognosis. We previously engineered a Y. pestis-specific ‘bioluminescent’ reporter phage for the identification of Y. pestis. In this study, we generated an improved reporter phage and evaluated the ability of this phage to provide direct and rapid susceptibility testing. Compared to the first generation reporter, the second generation reporter exhibited a 100-fold increase in signal strength, leading to a 10-fold increase in assay sensitivity. Y. pestis antimicrobial testing in the presence of the reporter elicited bioluminescent signals that were drug concentration-dependent, and produced susceptibility profiles that mirrored the standard CLSI method. The phage-generated susceptibility profiles, however, were obtained within hours in contrast to days with the conventional method. PMID:22579583

  15. Rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Yersinia pestis using bioluminescent reporter phage.

    PubMed

    Schofield, David A; Molineux, Ian J; Westwater, Caroline

    2012-08-01

    The rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Yersinia pestis is paramount for a positive prognosis. We previously engineered a Y. pestis-specific 'bioluminescent' reporter phage for the identification of Y. pestis. In this study, we generated an improved reporter phage and evaluated the ability of this phage to provide direct and rapid susceptibility testing. Compared to the first generation reporter, the second generation reporter exhibited a 100-fold increase in signal strength, leading to a 10-fold increase in assay sensitivity. Y. pestis antimicrobial testing in the presence of the reporter elicited bioluminescent signals that were drug concentration-dependent, and produced susceptibility profiles that mirrored the standard CLSI method. The phage-generated susceptibility profiles, however, were obtained within hours in contrast to days with the conventional method.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Antimicrobial Susceptibility Results from Four Years (2012 to 2015) of the International Network for Optimal Resistance Monitoring Program in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sader, Helio S; Huband, Michael D; Castanheira, Mariana; Flamm, Robert K

    2017-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a major cause of health care-associated infections, and inappropriate initial antimicrobial therapy is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The International Network for Optimal Resistance Monitoring (INFORM) program monitors the in vitro activity of ceftazidime-avibactam and many comparator agents. We evaluated the antimicrobial susceptibility of 7,452 P. aeruginosa isolates collected from 79 U.S. medical centers in 2012 to 2015. The isolates were collected and tested consecutively for susceptibility by broth microdilution method. Infection types included mainly pneumonia (50.5%), skin and skin structure (24.0%), urinary tract (7.8%), and bloodstream (7.7%) infections. The only compounds with >90% susceptibility rates were colistin (MIC50/90, 1/2 mg/liter, respectively; 99.4% susceptible), ceftazidime-avibactam (MIC50/90, 2/4 mg/liter, respectively; 97.0% susceptible), and amikacin (MIC50/90, 2/8 mg/liter, respectively; 97.0/93.0% susceptible [CLSI/EUCAST, respectively]). The addition of avibactam to ceftazidime increased the percentage of susceptible P. aeruginosa isolates from 84.3% to 97.0%. Multidrug resistance (MDR) and extensive drug resistance (XDR) phenotypes were observed among 1,151 (15.4%) and 698 (9.4%) isolates, respectively, and ceftazidime-avibactam inhibited 82.1 and 75.8% of these isolates at ≤8 mg/liter, respectively. High rates of cross-resistance were observed with ceftazidime, meropenem, and piperacillin-tazobactam, whereas ceftazidime-avibactam retained activity against isolates nonsusceptible to ceftazidime (81.0% susceptible), meropenem (86.2% susceptible), and piperacillin-tazobactam (85.4% susceptible), as well as isolates nonsusceptible to these three β-lactams (71.2% susceptible). The only antimicrobial combinations that provided a better overall anti-Pseudomonas coverage than ceftazidime-avibactam (97.0% susceptibility rate) were those including amikacin (97.0 to 98.4% coverage

  17. Susceptibilities of Enterococcus faecalis biofilms to some antimicrobial medications.

    PubMed

    Lima, K C; Fava, L R; Siqueira, J F

    2001-10-01

    Enterococcus faecalis has been suggested to be an important etiological agent in endodontic failures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of chlorhexidine- or antibiotics-based medications in eliminating E. faecalis biofilms. One-day and three-day biofilms of E. faecalis were induced on cellulose nitrate membrane filters. Each biofilm-containing membrane was thoroughly covered with 1 ml of the test medications and incubated for 1 day at 37 degrees C. Treated biofilms were then aseptically transferred to vials containing a neutralizing agent in saline solution and vortexed. Suspensions were 10-fold diluted, seeded onto Mitis salivarius agar plates, and the colony-forming units counted after 48 h of incubation. There were significant differences between the formulations tested. The association of clindamycin with metronidazole significantly reduced the number of cells in 1-day biofilms. However of all medications tested, only 2% chlorhexidine-containing medications were able to thoroughly eliminate most of both 1-day and 3-day E. faecalis biofilms.

  18. Review of rapid diagnostic tests used by antimicrobial stewardship programs.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Karri A; Perez, Katherine K; Forrest, Graeme N; Goff, Debra A

    2014-10-15

    Rapid microbiologic tests provide opportunities for antimicrobial stewardship programs to improve antimicrobial use and clinical and economic outcomes. Standard techniques for identification of organisms require at least 48-72 hours for final results, compared with rapid diagnostic tests that provide final organism identification within hours of growth. Importantly, rapid microbiologic tests are considered "game changers" and represent a significant advancement in the management of infectious diseases. This review focuses on currently available rapid diagnostic tests and, importantly, the impact of rapid testing in combination with antimicrobial stewardship on patient outcomes.

  19. In vitro susceptibilities of rapidly growing mycobacteria to newer antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Khardori, N; Nguyen, H; Rosenbaum, B; Rolston, K; Bodey, G P

    1994-01-01

    The in vitro antimicrobial susceptibilities of 42 isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria (Mycobacterium fortuitum, M. chelonae, and Mycobacterium species [other than M. fortuitum and M. chelonae]) to nine quinolones, including newer agents, two new aminoglycosides, and an aminocyclitol (trospectomycin) were determined by a broth microdilution method. The new quinolones, PD 117596, PD 127391, and PD 117558, showed excellent in vitro activities against M. fortuitum (MICs for 90% of isolates [MIC90s], 0.06, 0.06, and 0.12 microgram/ml, respectively). The MIC90 of ciprofloxacin for M. fortuitum was 0.5 microgram/ml. Only 14 to 28% of isolates of M. chelonae were susceptible to various quinolones. Most isolates of all three species were susceptible to the new aminoglycosides SCH 21420 and SCH 22591. The MIC90s of trospectomycin were 8 micrograms/ml for M. chelonae, 32 micrograms/ml for Mycobacterium species, and > 64 micrograms/ml for M. fortuitum. PMID:8141567

  20. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents among bovine mastitis pathogens isolated from North American dairy cattle, 2002-2010.

    PubMed

    Lindeman, Cynthia J; Portis, Ellen; Johansen, Lacie; Mullins, Lisa M; Stoltman, Gillian A

    2013-09-01

    Approximately 8,000 isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli, isolated by 25 veterinary laboratories across North America between 2002 and 2010, were tested for in vitro susceptibility to beta-lactam, macrolide, and lincosamide drugs. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the beta-lactam drugs remained low against most of the Gram-positive strains tested, and no substantial changes in the MIC distributions were seen over time. Of the beta-lactam antimicrobial agents tested, only ceftiofur showed good in vitro activity against E. coli. The MICs of the macrolides and lincosamides also remained low against Gram-positive mastitis pathogens. While the MIC values given by 50% of isolates (MIC50) for erythromycin and pirlimycin and the streptococci were all low (≤0.5 µg/ml), the MIC values given by 90% of isolates (MIC90) were higher and more variable, but with no apparent increase over time. Staphylococcus aureus showed little change in erythromycin susceptibility over time, but there may be a small, numerical increase in pirlimycin MIC50 and MIC90 values. Overall, the results suggest that mastitis pathogens in the United States and Canada have not shown any substantial changes in the in vitro susceptibility to beta-lactam, macrolide, and lincosamide drugs tested over the 9 years of the study.

  1. Antimicrobial Testing Methods & Procedures: MB-31-03

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about ATMP - SOP Quantitative Disk Carrier Test Method (QCT-2) Modified for Testing Antimicrobial Products Against Spores of Clostridium difficile (ATCC 43598) on Inanimate, Hard, Non-porous Surfaces - MB-31-03

  2. Towards a Standardized Method for Broth Microdilution Susceptibility Testing of Haemophilus parasuis.

    PubMed

    Prüller, Sandra; Turni, Conny; Blackall, Patrick J; Beyerbach, Martin; Klein, Günter; Kreienbrock, Lothar; Strutzberg-Minder, Katrin; Kaspar, Heike; Meemken, Diana; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2017-01-01

    Currently, there is no agreed method available for broth microdilution susceptibility testing of Haemophilus parasuis, one of the most important bacterial pathogens in pig production. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a method that could be easily performed by diagnostic laboratories and that appears suitable for a harmonized susceptibility testing. Growth determinations using one type strain and three field isolates revealed no visible growth of H. parasuis in media which have proven to be suitable for susceptibility testing of fastidious organisms. Therefore, a new medium, cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth (CAMHB) plus NADH and sterile filtered heat-inactivated chicken serum, was developed. The reproducibility of MICs obtained in this medium was evaluated and statistically analyzed, considering a model with two different variables (precondition of five identical MICs and MIC mode accepting a deviation of ±1 dilution step, respectively). No significant differences for both variables were seen between two time points investigated and between results obtained with the recently proposed test medium broth (TMB). Nearly all MICs of quality control strains were in the acceptable range. Subsequently, 47 H. parasuis isolates representing 13 serovars were tested with the newly developed medium and TMB. Statistical analysis of all isolates and 15 antimicrobial agents and antimicrobial combinations showed no significant difference between MICs obtained in supplemented CAMHB and TMB. Because of a simplified implementation in routine diagnostic and a lower chance of interference between medium components and antimicrobial agents, supplemented CAMHB is recommended with an incubation time of 24 h.

  3. Population Genetics and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Canine Campylobacter Isolates Collected before and after a Raw Feeding Experiment.

    PubMed

    Olkkola, Satu; Kovanen, Sara; Roine, Johanna; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa; Hielm-Björkman, Anna; Kivistö, Rauni

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, increasing numbers of consumers have become interested in feeding raw food for their pet dogs as opposed to commercial dry food, in the belief of health advantages. However, raw meat and internal organs, possibly contaminated by pathogens such as Campylobacter spp., may pose a risk of transmission of zoonoses to the pet owners. Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans but C. upsaliensis has also been associated with human disease. In this study we investigated the effect of different feeding strategies on the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in Finnish dogs. We further characterized the isolates using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), whole-genome (wg) MLST and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Dogs were sampled before and after a feeding period consisting of commercial raw feed or dry pellet feed. Altogether 56% (20/36) of the dogs yielded at least one Campylobacter-positive fecal sample. C. upsaliensis was the major species detected from 39% of the dogs before and 30% after the feeding period. Two C. jejuni isolates were recovered, both from raw-fed dogs after the dietary regimen. The isolates represented the same genotype (ST-1326), suggesting a common infection source. However, no statistically significant correlation was found between the feeding strategies and Campylobacter spp. carriage. The global genealogy of MLST types of dog and human C. upsaliensis isolates revealed weakly clonal population structure as most STs were widely dispersed. Major antimicrobial resistance among C. upsaliensis isolates was against streptomycin (STR MIC > 4 mg/l). Apart from that, all isolates were highly susceptible against the antimicrobials tested. Mutations were found in the genes rpsL or rpsL and rsmG in streptomycin resistant isolates. In conclusion, increasing trend to feed dogs with raw meat warrants more studies to evaluate the risk associated with raw feeding of pets in transmission of zoonoses to humans.

  4. Population Genetics and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Canine Campylobacter Isolates Collected before and after a Raw Feeding Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Roine, Johanna; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa; Hielm-Björkman, Anna; Kivistö, Rauni

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, increasing numbers of consumers have become interested in feeding raw food for their pet dogs as opposed to commercial dry food, in the belief of health advantages. However, raw meat and internal organs, possibly contaminated by pathogens such as Campylobacter spp., may pose a risk of transmission of zoonoses to the pet owners. Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans but C. upsaliensis has also been associated with human disease. In this study we investigated the effect of different feeding strategies on the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in Finnish dogs. We further characterized the isolates using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), whole-genome (wg) MLST and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Dogs were sampled before and after a feeding period consisting of commercial raw feed or dry pellet feed. Altogether 56% (20/36) of the dogs yielded at least one Campylobacter-positive fecal sample. C. upsaliensis was the major species detected from 39% of the dogs before and 30% after the feeding period. Two C. jejuni isolates were recovered, both from raw-fed dogs after the dietary regimen. The isolates represented the same genotype (ST-1326), suggesting a common infection source. However, no statistically significant correlation was found between the feeding strategies and Campylobacter spp. carriage. The global genealogy of MLST types of dog and human C. upsaliensis isolates revealed weakly clonal population structure as most STs were widely dispersed. Major antimicrobial resistance among C. upsaliensis isolates was against streptomycin (STR MIC > 4mg/l). Apart from that, all isolates were highly susceptible against the antimicrobials tested. Mutations were found in the genes rpsL or rpsL and rsmG in streptomycin resistant isolates. In conclusion, increasing trend to feed dogs with raw meat warrants more studies to evaluate the risk associated with raw feeding of pets in transmission of zoonoses to humans

  5. Prevalence, Molecular Characterization, and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Milk and Dairy Products.

    PubMed

    Al-Ashmawy, Maha Abdou; Sallam, Khalid Ibrahim; Abd-Elghany, Samir Mohammed; Elhadidy, Mohamed; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2016-03-01

    The present work was undertaken to study the prevalence, molecular characterization, virulence factors, and antimicrobial susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in raw milk and dairy products in Mansoura City, Egypt. MRSA was detected in 53% (106/200) among all milk and dairy products with prevalence rates of 75%, 65%, 40%, 50%, and 35% in raw milk, Damietta cheese, Kareish cheese, ice cream, and yogurt samples, respectively. The mean S. aureus counts were 3.49, 3.71, 2.93, 3.40, and 3.23 log10 colony-forming units (CFU)/g among tested raw milk, Damietta cheese, Kareish cheese, ice cream and yogurt, respectively, with an overall count of 3.41 log10 CFU/g. Interestingly, all recovered S. aureus isolates were genetically verified as MRSA strains by molecular detection of the mecA gene. Furthermore, genes encoding α-hemolysin (hla) and staphylococcal enterotoxins (sea, seb, sec) were detected in all isolates. The antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of recovered MRSA isolates against 13 tested antimicrobials revealed that the least effective drugs were penicillin G, cloxacillin, tetracycline, and amoxicillin with bacterial resistance percentages of 87.9%, 75.9%, 65.2%, and 55.6%, respectively. These findings suggested that milk and dairy products represent a potential infection risk threat of multidrug-resistant and toxigenic S. aureus in Egypt due to neglected hygienic practices during production, retail, or storage stages. These findings highlighted the crucial importance of applying more restrictive hygienic measures in dairy production in Egypt for food safety.

  6. Bacteriological Profile and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of Blood Culture Isolates among Septicemia Suspected Children in Selected Hospitals Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Negussie, Adugna; Mulugeta, Gebru; Bedru, Ahmed; Ali, Ibrahim; Shimeles, Damte; Lema, Tsehaynesh; Aseffa, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood stream infections are major cause of morbidity and mortality in children in developing countries. The emerging of causative agents and resistance to various antimicrobial agents are increased from time to time. The main aim of this study was to determine the bacterial agents and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns among children suspected of having septicemia. Methods A cross sectional study involved about 201 pediatric patients (≤ 12 years) was conducted from October 2011 to February 2012 at pediatric units of TikurAnbessa Specialized Hospital and Yekatit 12 Hospital. Standard procedure was followed for blood sample collection, isolate identifications and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Results Among 201 study subjects 110 (54.7%) were males. Majority 147 (73.1%) of them were neonates (≤ 28 days). The mean length of hospital stay before sampling was 4.29 days. Out of the 201 tested blood samples, blood cultures were positive in 56 (27.9%).Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria constituted 29(51.8%) and 26(46.4%), respectively. The most frequent pathogen found was Staphylococcus aureus 13 (23.2%), followed by Serratia marcescens 12(21.4%), CoNS 11(19.6%), klebsiella spp 9(16%) and Salmonella spp 3(5.4%). Majority of bacterial isolates showed high resistance to Ampicillin, Penicillin, Co-trimoxazole, Gentamicin and Tetracycline which commonly used in the study area. Conclusion Majority of the isolates were multidrug resistant. These higher percentages of multi-drug resistant emerged isolates urge us to take infection prevention measures and to conduct other large studies for appropriate empiric antibiotic choice. PMID:26997847

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius colonizing healthy dogs in Saskatoon, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Priyantha, Roshan; Gaunt, Mathew C.; Rubin, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius carried by healthy dogs in Saskatoon, and describes changes in antimicrobial resistance since a 2008 study. One hundred healthy dogs presenting to the wellness service at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine were screened for S. pseudintermedius by culturing rectal and pharyngeal swabs. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was identified biochemically and antimicrobial minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined by broth microdilution. Methicillin resistance was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of the mecA gene. Of 221 S. pseudintermedius isolates from 78 dogs, 7 were methicillin resistant. No resistance to the fluoroquinolones, nitrofurantoin, tigecycline, vancomycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, linezolid, or daptomycin was identified. Of the 78 positive dogs, isolates resistant to penicillin were found in 78%, to ampicillin in 61% and to tetracycline in 26%; resistance to oxacillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, trimethoprim + sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, and gentamicin was found in < 10% of dogs. Compared to the 2008 study, the frequency of resistance to all drugs increased, and the frequency of colonization with pan-susceptible isolates decreased from 46% to 30%. PMID:26740701

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius colonizing healthy dogs in Saskatoon, Canada.

    PubMed

    Priyantha, Roshan; Gaunt, Mathew C; Rubin, Joseph E

    2016-01-01

    This study reports antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius carried by healthy dogs in Saskatoon, and describes changes in antimicrobial resistance since a 2008 study. One hundred healthy dogs presenting to the wellness service at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine were screened for S. pseudintermedius by culturing rectal and pharyngeal swabs. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was identified biochemically and antimicrobial minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined by broth microdilution. Methicillin resistance was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of the mecA gene. Of 221 S. pseudintermedius isolates from 78 dogs, 7 were methicillin resistant. No resistance to the fluoroquinolones, nitrofurantoin, tigecycline, vancomycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, linezolid, or daptomycin was identified. Of the 78 positive dogs, isolates resistant to penicillin were found in 78%, to ampicillin in 61% and to tetracycline in 26%; resistance to oxacillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, trimethoprim + sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, and gentamicin was found in < 10% of dogs. Compared to the 2008 study, the frequency of resistance to all drugs increased, and the frequency of colonization with pan-susceptible isolates decreased from 46% to 30%.

  9. Susceptibility profiles of Nocardia spp. to antimicrobial and antituberculotic agents detected by a microplate Alamar Blue assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pan; Zhang, Xiujuan; Du, Pengcheng; Li, Guilian; Li, Luxi; Li, Zhenjun

    2017-01-01

    Nocardia species are ubiquitous in natural environments and can cause nocardiosis. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has long been the monotherapy treatment of choice, but resistance to this treatment has recently emerged. In this study, we used microplate Alamar Blue assays to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of 65 standard Nocardia isolates, including 28 type strains and 20 clinical Nocardia isolates, to 32 antimicrobial agents, including 13 little studied drugs. Susceptibility to the most commonly used drug, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, was observed in 98% of the isolates. Linezolid, meropenem, and amikacin were also highly effective, with 98%, 95%, and 90% susceptibility, respectively, among the isolates. The isolates showed a high percentage of resistance or nonsusceptibility to isoniazid, rifampicin, and ethambutol. For the remaining antimicrobials, resistance was species-specific among isolates and was observed in traditional drug pattern types. In addition, the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of a variety of rarely encountered standard Nocardia species are reported, as are the results for rarely reported clinical antibiotics. We also provide a timely update of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns that includes three new drug pattern types. The data from this study provide information on antimicrobial activity against specific Nocardia species and yield important clues for the optimization of species-specific Nocardia therapies. PMID:28252662

  10. Comparison of agar dilution and antibiotic gradient strip test with broth microdilution for susceptibility testing of swine Brachyspira species.

    PubMed

    Mirajkar, Nandita S; Gebhart, Connie J

    2016-03-01

    Production-limiting diseases in swine caused by Brachyspira are characterized by mucohemorrhagic diarrhea (B. hyodysenteriae and "B. hampsonii") or mild colitis (B. pilosicoli), while B. murdochii is often isolated from healthy pigs. Emergence of novel pathogenic Brachyspira species and strains with reduced susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobials has reinforced the need for standardized susceptibility testing. Two methods are currently used for Brachyspira susceptibility testing: agar dilution (AD) and broth microdilution (BMD). However, these tests have primarily been used for B. hyodysenteriae and rarely for B. pilosicoli. Information on the use of commercial susceptibility testing products such as antibiotic gradient strips is lacking. Our main objective was to validate and compare the susceptibility results, measured as the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), of 6 antimicrobials for 4 Brachyspira species (B. hyodysenteriae, "B. hampsonii", B. pilosicoli, and B. murdochii) by BMD and AD (tiamulin, valnemulin, lincomycin, tylosin, and carbadox) or antibiotic gradient strip (doxycycline) methods. In general, the results of a high percentage of all 4 Brachyspira species differed by ±1 log2 dilution or less by BMD and AD for tiamulin, valnemulin, lincomycin, and tylosin, and by BMD and antibiotic gradient strip for doxycycline. The carbadox MICs obtained by BMD were 1-5 doubling dilutions different than those obtained by AD. BMD for Brachyspira was quicker to perform with less ambiguous interpretation of results when compared with AD and antibiotic gradient strip methods, and the results confirm the utility of BMD in routine diagnostics.

  11. Electromagnetic Radiation System (EMRS) for Susceptibility Testing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY, *ELECTROMAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY, COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT, ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , ANTENNAS, ELECTROMAGNETIC INTERFERENCE, RADAR SIGNALS, RADIO SIGNALS, FIELD INTENSITY.

  12. NORMAL VAGINAL BACTERIAL FLORA OF GIANT PANDAS (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA) AND THE ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF THE ISOLATES.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Yang, Jiang; Wang, Hongning; Li, Caiwu; He, Yongguo; Jin, SenYan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Wang, Pengyan; Xu, Yuesong; Xu, Changwen; Fan, Chengyun; Xu, Lulai; Huang, Shan; Qu, Chunmao; Li, Guo

    2016-06-01

    To study the typical vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), we took vaginal swabs for the sake of bacterial isolation, from 24 healthy female giant pandas. A total of 203 isolates were identified, representing a total of 17 bacterial species. The most common bacteria isolated were Lactobacillus spp. (54.2%, 13/24), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (41.7%, 10/24) and Escherichia coli (33.3%, 8/24). Some opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, such as Peptostreptococcus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae , and Proteus mirabilis , were also isolated but showed no pathology. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of aerobic bacterial isolates was performed with the disk diffusion method. Of the 152 isolates, resistance was most frequently observed with chloramphenicol (17.8%), followed by tetracycline (14.5%), ciprofloxacin (12.5%), streptomycin (11.8%), and florfenicol (11.8%), whereas 7.2% were multidrug resistant. This is the first report of the normal culturable vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas and the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates.

  13. NORMAL VAGINAL BACTERIAL FLORA OF GIANT PANDAS (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA) AND THE ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF THE ISOLATES.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Yang, Jiang; Wang, Hongning; Li, Caiwu; He, Yongguo; Jin, SenYan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Wang, Pengyan; Xu, Yuesong; Xu, Changwen; Fan, Chengyun; Xu, Lulai; Huang, Shan; Qu, Chunmao; Li, Guo

    2016-03-01

    In order to study the typical vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), we took vaginal swabs for the sake of bacterial isolation, from 24 healthy female giant pandas. A total of 203 isolates were identified, representing a total of 17 bacterial species. The most common bacteria isolated were Lactobacillus spp. (54.2%, 13 of 24), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (41.7%, 10 of 24) and Escherichia coli (33.3%, 8 of 24). Some opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, such as Peptostreptococcus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis, were also isolated but showed no pathology. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of aerobic bacterial isolates was performed with disk diffusion method. Of the 152 isolates, resistance was most frequently observed with chloramphenicol (17.8%), followed by tetracycline (14.5%), ciprofloxacin (12.5%), streptomycin (11.8%), and florfenicol (11.8%), while 7.2% were multidrug resistant. This is the first report of the normal vaginal culturable bacterial flora of giant pandas, followed by the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates.

  14. Isolation and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus castoreus isolated from carcasses of European beavers (Castor fiber) in Germany.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Christoph; Kutzer, Peter; Winterhoff, Nora; Engelhardt, Andreas; Bilk, Sabine; Teubner, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) castoreus was isolated from seven beavers (Castor fiber), which were found dead in the federal state of Brandenburg, Germany, and submitted to the Berlin-Brandenburg State laboratory for post mortem diagnostics. The isolates originated from various inflammatory processes where they were associated with other Gram negative and Gram positive aerobic and/or anaerobic bacteria (i. e. Actinobacillus sp., species of the Actinomycetaceae family, coliform bacteria, Fusobacterium sp., Prevotella sp.), but also from cloacal swabs. Testing their antimicrobial susceptibility, all S. castoreus isolates and the type strain S. castoreus (DSM 17536) were classified as being susceptible to penicillin G, ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, 1st generation cephalosporins, erythromycin, tetracycline, and chloramphenicole but intermediate to gentamicin. Considering both the polymicrobial flora isolated from the inflamed tissues and the fact that antimicrobials of a narrow spectrum (namely penicillins, 1st generation cephalosporins, macrolids and lincosamids) can be toxic to rodents, chloramphenicol might be a suitable drug for treatment of beavers suffering from S. castoreus (mixed)-bacterial infections.

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility and multilocus sequence typing of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum.

    PubMed

    Tatay-Dualde, Juan; Prats-van der Ham, Miranda; de la Fe, Christian; Paterna, Ana; Sánchez, Antonio; Corrales, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Antonio; Tola, Sebastiana; Gómez-Martin, Ángel

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum is one of the causative agents of contagious agalactia (CA). Nevertheless, there is still a lack of information about its antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic characteristics. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study the antimicrobial and genetic variability of different Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum field isolates. For this purpose, the growth inhibition effect of 18 antimicrobials and a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme based on five housekeeping genes (fusA, glpQ, gyrB, lepA and rpoB) were performed on 32 selected field isolates from Italy and Spain.The results showed a wide range of growth inhibitory effects for almost all the antimicrobials studied. Macrolides presented lower efficacy inhibiting Mcc growth than in previous works performed on other CA-causative mycoplasmas. Erythromycin was not able to inhibit the growth of any of the studied strains, contrary to doxycycline, which inhibited the growth of all of them from low concentrations. On the other hand, the study of the concatenated genes revealed a high genetic variability among the different Mcc isolates. Hence, these genetic variations were greater than the ones reported in prior works on other mycoplasma species.

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility and multilocus sequence typing of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum

    PubMed Central

    Tatay-Dualde, Juan; Prats-van der Ham, Miranda; Paterna, Ana; Sánchez, Antonio; Corrales, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Antonio; Tola, Sebastiana; Gómez-Martin, Ángel

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum is one of the causative agents of contagious agalactia (CA). Nevertheless, there is still a lack of information about its antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic characteristics. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study the antimicrobial and genetic variability of different Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum field isolates. For this purpose, the growth inhibition effect of 18 antimicrobials and a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme based on five housekeeping genes (fusA, glpQ, gyrB, lepA and rpoB) were performed on 32 selected field isolates from Italy and Spain.The results showed a wide range of growth inhibitory effects for almost all the antimicrobials studied. Macrolides presented lower efficacy inhibiting Mcc growth than in previous works performed on other CA-causative mycoplasmas. Erythromycin was not able to inhibit the growth of any of the studied strains, contrary to doxycycline, which inhibited the growth of all of them from low concentrations. On the other hand, the study of the concatenated genes revealed a high genetic variability among the different Mcc isolates. Hence, these genetic variations were greater than the ones reported in prior works on other mycoplasma species. PMID:28346546

  17. Antimicrobial susceptibility and internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in vacuum-tumbled marinated beef products.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, S; Brooks, J C; Martin, J N; Brashears, M M

    2016-12-01

    As the incidence of multidrug resistance (MDR) Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is increasing, data regarding the antimicrobial interventions and pathogen internalization in marinated meat products are important. This study evaluated the antimicrobial intervention and internalization of Salm. Typhimurium in marinated beef sirloin steaks. Beef bottom sirloin flaps (IMPS #185A; USDA Select) inoculated (10(8)  log10  CFU ml(-1) ) with Salm. Typhimurium were sprayed (lactic acid (4%) and buffered vinegar (2%)) prior to vacuum-tumbled marination (0·35% sodium chloride and 0·45% sodium tripolyphosphate) for 30 min. Pathogen presence after antimicrobial spray, vacuum-tumbled marination, and translocation was determined by direct plating on Xylose Lysine Deoxycholate (XLD) agar with tryptic soy agar (TSA) overlay. The data imply varied internalization and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Salm. Typhimurium in marinated meat. Lactic acid (4%) spray (P < 0·0001) and buffered vinegar (2%; P < 0·0001) reduced surface populations of Salm. Typhimurium on inoculated beef sirloin flaps prior to vacuum marination. However, lactic acid treated sirloin flaps had greater reductions (~2 log10  CFU cm(-2) ) than buffered vinegar when compared with control prior to vacuum marination. However, the translocation of Salm. Typhimurium following vacuum marination was not influenced (P < 0·333) by the application of a surface organic acid spray prior to marination.

  18. Neuropsychological Test Performance and Hypnotic Susceptibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Query, William T.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Examined the relationship between brain-behavior and hypnotic susceptibility in 70 alcoholic patients, using the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale and its Fromm-Weingarten modification. Results showed the two scales were interchangeable insofar as they measured the same ability, and indicated that hypnotic susceptibility is related to…

  19. Species distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of enterococci isolated from broilers infected experimentally with Eimeria spp and fed with diets containing different supplements

    PubMed Central

    Cassenego, A.P.V.; d’Azevedo, P.A.; Ribeiro, A.M.L.; Frazzon, J.; Van Der Sand, S.T.; Frazzon, A. P. G.

    2011-01-01

    Resistant bacteria in animal can be spread to environment and to humans. Poultry feed and infections caused by Eimeria spp. are important factors in determining the intestinal microbial communities. The aim of this study was to verify the prevalence of species and antimicrobial susceptibility of Enterococcus isolated from broilers fed with different supplements and infected experimentally with Eimeria spp. Broilers were divided in eight groups, fed with diets supplemented with a combination of antimicrobial, ionophore-coccidiostatics, probiotic, essential oil. At 14 days old all birds, except the control, received a solution containing oocysts of Eimeria spp. Samples of cloacal swabs from broilers were collected. A total of 240 Enterococcus sp. strains were isolated, confirmed genus by PCR, classified as species, tested for antimicrobial susceptibility and screened by PCR for the presence of tet(L), tet(M) and erm(B) genes. The overall distribution of species isolated from fecal samples was E. faecalis (40%), followed by E. casseliflavus/E. gallinarum (10.8%), E. mundtii (10.8%), E. faecium (10.8%), E. columbae (5.8%) and E. gallinarum (4.2%). Changes in the composition or frequency of Enterococcus species were observed in all dietary supplementation. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests showed resistance phenotypes a range of antibiotics, especially used in humans such as, streptomycin, penicillin, rifampicin and vancomycin. There was no correlation between different supplementation for broilers and antimicrobial resistance and the presence of tet(M), tet(L) and erm(B) genes. Dietary supplementation had effect on the Enterococcus sp. colonization, but did not have significant effect on the phenotype and genotype of antimicrobial resistance in enterococci. PMID:24031659

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolated from pigs with swine erysipelas in Japan, 1988-1998.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Kijima, M; Yoshimura, H; Takahashi, T

    2001-03-01

    The susceptibility to 21 antimicrobial agents of 214 strains of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolated from pigs affected with swine erysipelas in Japan between 1988 and 1998 was determined. Ampicillin, cloxacillin, benzylpenicillin, ceftiofur, tylosin, enrofloxacin and danofloxacin were the most active agents [minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs); < or = 0.025-0.78 microgram/ml], followed by cefazolin, virginiamycin, tiamulin, chloramphenicol, florphenicol and oxolinic acid (MICs; 0.1-25 micrograms/ml). Activity was poor or absent with kanamycin and sulfadimethoxine. Strains resistant to dihydrostreptomycin, erythromycin, clindamycin, lincomycin, oxytetracycline and doxycycline were detected. The susceptibilities to dihydrostreptomycin and oxytetracycline tended to decrease. Investigation of the differences in antimicrobial susceptibility of the 214 strains according to their serotypes, sources, isolation years and regions, showed that the strains resistant to dihydrostreptomycin were most frequently found in the strains of serotype 1a and in strains from septicaemic cases. Strains resistant to oxytetracycline were detected in all serotypes and all sources, and most of the strains resistant to erythromycin were detected in the strains of serotype 2. The frequency of strains resistant to dihydrostreptomycin gradually increased from 1988 to 1996, but then decreased between 1997 and 1998. The frequency of strains resistant to oxytetracycline was remained more than 38% from 1988 to 1998. It was suggested that the strains resistant to dihydrostreptomycin and oxytetracycline were distributed over almost all districts of Japan.

  1. Bacterial entropathogens and antimicrobial susceptibility in children with acute diarrhea in Babol, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili Dooki, Mohammad Reza; Rajabnia, Ramazan; Barari Sawadkohi, Rahim; Mosaiebnia Gatabi, Zahra; Poornasrollah, Mohammad; Mirzapour, Mohaddeseh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infectious diarrhea is one of common cause of children diarrhea causing mortality and morbidity worldwide. This study was performed to identify the common bacteria and their antimicrobial susceptibility in children with diarrhea. Methods: Children under 14 years old with acute diarrhea who referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital, Mazandaran, North of Iran, were enrolled during the summer and fall of 2009. From each patient, two fecal specimens were collected. Samples were cultured and bacterial isolation was done by conventional methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility was identified by disk diffusion and micro dilution methods. Results: One hundred-seventy two patients with the mean age of 41.8±37.6 months were evaluated. The bacteria were isolated in 48 (27.9%) cases. The most common isolated bacteria was E.coli and then shigella in both bloody and nonbloody diarrheal patients. There was a significant difference between bacteria positive specimens and WBC in stool smear (p=0.003). All isolated shigella were susceptible to Ceftizoxime and ciprofloxacin and were resistant to Cefixime. Resistant to Nalidixic acid was seen in 14% of them. Conclusion: The results show that E.coli was the most frequently isolated pathogen in children with bloody and nonbloody diarrhea. Ceftizoxime is a good antibiotic for shigellosis in children in our area but Cefixime is not appropriate. PMID:24490011

  2. Molecular typing and antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens from broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Gharaibeh, Saad; Al Rifai, Rami; Al-Majali, Ahmad

    2010-12-01

    Clostridium perfringens (Cp) causes necrotic enteritis disease in commercial poultry. Antimicrobials are used to control and treat this disease and sometimes clinical outbreaks do not respond well to certain treatments. This study was designed to isolate Cp from clinical cases, type these isolates by multiplex PCR, and determine their antimicrobial susceptibility by micro-dilution method. A total of 67 Cp isolates were obtained from 155 broiler chicken flocks. All isolates were classified as type A and non-enterotoxin producers. Lincomycin, erythromycins, and tilmicosin showed very high minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) 50 of ≥256 μg/ml. However, tylosin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, penicillin, florfenicol, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, chlortetracycline, doxycycline, and oxytetracycline had variable MIC₅₀ of 64, 0.5, 1, 1, 8, 4, 8, 4, 8, 0.5 μg/ml, respectively. It is recommended that Cp infections in Jordan be treated with either penicillins or tetracyclines especially amoxicillin and oxytetracycline.

  3. Diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella enterica serovars isolated from pig farms in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Fashae, Kayode; Hendriksen, Rene S

    2014-01-01

    Animals including food animals play a significant role in the epidemiology of Salmonella enterica. The control requires identification of sources and institution of targeted interventions. This study investigates the diversity of S. enterica serovars, antimicrobial susceptibility, and occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes in pigs in Ibadan, Nigeria. Pooled fresh pen floor fecal samples of pigs collected from 31 pig farms were cultured; the Salmonella isolates were serotyped and their antimicrobial susceptibility was determined. PMQR genes were screened by polymerase chain reaction. The 229 Salmonella isolates were made of 50 serovars predominated by rare serovars Salmonella Give (n = 36; 15.7 %), Salmonella Brancaster (n = 17; 7.4 %), Salmonella Colindale (n = 15; 6.6 %), Salmonella Elisaberthville (n = 13; 5.7 %), Salmonella Hillingdon (n = 13; 5.7 %), and Salmonella Kingston (n = 13; 5.7 %). The most widely distributed serovars among the farms were Salmonella Give (six farms) and Salmonella Elisaberthville (six farms). Resistance to chloramphenicol, sulfonamides, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, and tetracycline ranged from 11.6 % (n = 26) to 22.8 % (n = 51). Resistance ciprofloxacin and gentamicin was low (n = 2; 0.9 %). Multiply resistant isolates included Salmonella Kentucky, the most resistant serovar. qnrB19 was found in two isolates of Salmonella Corvallis and one isolate of Salmonella Larochelle, respectively, while qnrS1 was found in two isolates of Salmonella Derby. Other PMQR genes were not detected. Pigs constitute an important source of diverse Salmonella serovars in Ibadan. The isolates were more resistant to old antimicrobials with some multiple resistant. Control measures and regulation of antimicrobials are warranted.

  4. An international survey of the antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens from uncomplicated urinary tract infections: the ECO.SENS Project.

    PubMed

    Kahlmeter, G

    2003-01-01

    The ECO.SENS study is the first international survey to investigate the prevalence and susceptibility of pathogens causing community-acquired acute uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Midstream urine samples were taken for culture and for testing for the presence of leucocytes from 4734 women not older than 65 years presenting with symptoms of acute UTI at 252 community health care centres in 17 countries. Recognized urinary tract pathogens were identified and the susceptibility to 12 antimicrobials determined. Pathogens were present in 3278 (69.2%) patients, Escherichia coli accounting for 77.0% of isolates. In E. coli, 42% of the isolates were resistant to one or more of the 12 antimicrobial drugs investigated. Resistance was most common to ampicillin (29.8%) and sulfamethoxazole (29.1%), followed by trimethoprim (14.8%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (14.1%) and nalidixic acid (5.4%). Resistance in E. coli to co-amoxiclav, mecillinam, cefadroxil, nitrofurantoin, fosfomycin, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin was <3%. However, co-amoxiclav resistance was apparent in Portugal (9.3%) as was resistance to the quinolones, nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin, in Portugal (11.6% and 5.8%, respectively) and Spain (26.7% and 14.7%, respectively). Overall, Proteus mirabilis were less resistant to ampicillin (16.1%) and more resistant to trimethoprim (25.5%) than E. coli, whereas Klebsiella spp. were more resistant to ampicillin (83.5%) and fosfomycin (56.7%). 'Other Enterobacteriaceae' were more resistant to the broad spectrum beta-lactams (ampicillin 45.9%, co-amoxiclav 21.3% and cefadroxil 24.6%), nitrofurantoin (40.2%) and fosfomycin (15.6%). In Staphylococcus saprophyticus resistance development was rare. Overall, antimicrobial resistance was lowest in the Nordic countries and Austria and highest in Portugal and Spain.

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility and mechanisms of high-level macrolide resistance in clinical isolates of Moraxella nonliquefaciens.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Shotaro; Matsuzaki, Kosuke; Kazama, Tomoya; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Ida, Yoko; Koyano, Saho; Sonobe, Kazunari; Okamura, Noboru; Saito, Ryoichi

    2014-02-01

    We investigated antimicrobial susceptibility and the molecular mechanism involved in conferring high-level macrolide resistance in 47 clinical isolates of Moraxella nonliquefaciens from Japan. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using Etest and agar dilution methods. Thirty-two erythromycin-non-susceptible strains were evaluated for the possibility of clonal spreading, using PFGE. To analyse the mechanism related to macrolide resistance, mutations in the 23S rRNA gene and the ribosomal proteins, and the presence of methylase genes were investigated by PCR and sequencing. The efflux system was examined using appropriate inhibitors. Penicillin, ampicillin, amoxicillin, cefixime, levofloxacin and antimicrobials containing β-lactamase inhibitors showed strong activity against 47 M. nonliquefaciens isolates. Thirty-two (68.1 %) of the 47 isolates showed high-level MICs to macrolides (MIC ≥128 mg l(-1)) and shared the A2058T mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. The geometric mean MIC to macrolides of A2058T-mutated strains was significantly higher than that of WT strains (P<0.0001). Thirty-two isolates with high-level macrolide MICs clustered into 30 patterns on the basis of the PFGE dendrogram, indicating that the macrolide-resistant strains were not clonal. In contrast, no common mutations of the ribosomal proteins or methylase genes, or overproduction of the efflux system were observed in A2058T-mutated strains. Moreover, of the 47 M. nonliquefaciens strains, 43 (91.5 %) were bro-1 and 4 (8.5 %) were bro-2 positive. Our results suggest that most M. nonliquefaciens clinical isolates show high-level macrolide resistance conferred by the A2058T mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. This study represents the first characterization of M. nonliquefaciens.

  6. Detection of Group B Streptococcus in Brazilian pregnant women and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns

    PubMed Central

    Castellano-Filho, Didier Silveira; da Silva, Vânia Lúcia; Nascimento, Thiago César; de Toledo Vieira, Marcel; Diniz, Cláudio Galuppo

    2010-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is still not routinely screened during pregnancy in Brazil, being prophylaxis and empirical treatment based on identification of risk groups. This study aimed to investigate GBS prevalence in Brazilian pregnant women by culture or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) associated to the enrichment culture, and to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of isolated bacteria, so as to support public health policies and empirical prophylaxis. After an epidemiological survey, vaginal and anorectal specimens were collected from 221 consenting laboring women. Each sample was submitted to enrichment culture and sheep blood agar was used to isolate suggestive GBS. Alternatively, specific PCR was performed from enrichment cultures. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined for isolated bacteria by agar diffusion method. No risk groups were identified. Considering the culture-based methodology, GBS was detected in 9.5% of the donors. Twenty five bacterial strains were isolated and identified. Through the culture-PCR methodology, GBS was detected in 32.6% specimens. Bacterial resistance was not detected against ampicillin, cephazolin, vancomycin and ciprofloxacin, whereas 22.7% were resistant to erythromycin and 50% were resistant to clindamycin. GBS detection may be improved by the association of PCR and enrichment culture. Considering that colony selection in agar plates may be laboring and technician-dependent, it may not reflect the real prevalence of streptococci. As in Brazil prevention strategies to reduce the GBS associated diseases have not been adopted, prospective studies are needed to anchor public health policies especially considering the regional GBS antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. PMID:24031585

  7. Awareness of Cancer Susceptibility Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Phuong L.; Vadaparampil, Susan Thomas; Breen, Nancy; McNeel, Timothy S.; Wideroff, Louise; Graubard, Barry I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic testing for several cancer susceptibility syndromes is clinically available; however, existing data suggest limited population awareness of such tests. Purpose To examine awareness regarding cancer genetic testing in the U.S. population aged ≥25 years in the 2000, 2005, and 2010 National Health Interview Surveys. Methods The weighted percentages of respondents aware of cancer genetic tests, and percent changes from 2000–2005 and 2005–2010, overall and by demographic, family history, and healthcare factors were calculated. Interactions were used to evaluate the patterns of change in awareness between 2005 and 2010 among subgroups within each factor. To evaluate associations with awareness in 2005 and 2010, percentages were adjusted for covariates using multiple logistic regression. The analysis was performed in 2012. Results Awareness decreased from 44.4% to 41.5% (p<0.001) between 2000 and 2005, and increased to 47.0% (p<0.001) in 2010. Awareness increased between 2005 and 2010 in most subgroups, particularly among individuals in the South (p-interaction=0.03) or with a usual place of care (p-interaction=0.01). In 2005 and 2010, awareness was positively associated with personal or family cancer history and high perceived cancer risk, and inversely associated with racial/ethnic minorities, age 25–39 or ≥60 years, male gender, lower education and income levels, public or no health insurance, and no provider contact in 12 months. Conclusions Despite improvement from 2005 to 2010, ≤50% of the U.S. adult population was aware of cancer genetic testing in 2010. Notably, disparities persist for racial/ethnic minorities and individuals with limited health care access or income. PMID:24745633

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiling and genomic diversity of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates: A study in western Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mohajeri, Parviz; Farahani, Abbas; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Ketabi, Hosnieh; Abiri, Ramin; Najafi, Farid

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Acinetobacter baumannii is an aerobic non-motile Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that is resistant to most antibiotics. Carbapenems are the most common antibiotics for the treatment of infections caused by this pathogen. Mechanisms of antibiotic-resistance in A. baumannii are mainly mediated by efflux pumps-lactamases. The aim of this study was to determine antibiotic susceptibility, the possibility of existence of OXAs genes and fingerprinting by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter collected from Kermanshah hospitals. Materials and Methods One hundred and four isolates were collected from patients attending Imam Reza, Taleghani and Imam Khomeini hospitals of Kermanshah (Iran). Isolates were identified by biochemical tests and API 20NE kit. The susceptibility to different antibiotics was assessed with Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. PCR was performed for detection of bla OXA-23, bla OXA-24, bla OXA-51 and bla OXA-58 beta-lactamase genes. Clonal relatedness was estimated by PFGE (with the restriction enzyme Apa I) and DNA patterns were analyzed by Gel compare II 6.5 software. Results All isolates showed high-level of resistance to imipenem, meropenem as well as to other antimicrobial agents, while no resistance to polymyxin B, colistin, tigecylcine and minocycline was observed. The bla OXA-23like and bla OXA-24 like were found among 77.9% and 19.2% of the isolates, respectively. All isolates were positive for bla OXA-51, but none produced any amplicon for bla OXA-58. PFGE genotype analysis suggested the existence of eight clones among the 104 strains [A (n = 35), B (n = 29), C (n = 19), D (n = 10), E (n = 4), F (n = 3), G (n = 3), H (n = 1)]. Clone A was the dominant clone in hospital settings particularly infection wards so that the isolates in this group, compared to the other clones, showed higher levels of resistance to antibiotics. Conclusion The bla OXA-51-like and bla OXA-23like were

  9. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Udder Pathogens Isolated from Dairy Herds in the West Littoral Region of Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    A total of 522 strains belonging to streptococci, enterococci and staphylococci isolated from sub-clinical and clinical cases of bovine mastitis from the west littoral region of Uruguay were analysed for their susceptibility to several antimicrobial agents. The susceptibility patterns were studied by agar disk diffusion methods (ADDM) and broth micro-dilution to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The concentration that inhibits 90% (MIC90) of the analysed strains reported in micrograms per millilitre, for Staphylococcus aureus were > 8, 8, ≤ 0.5, ≤ 4, ≤ 1, ≤ 0.5, > 64, ≤ 0.25, 0.5, ≤ 1 and ≤ 1 to penicillin, ampicillin, oxacillin, cephalotin, gentamicin, erythromycin, oxitetracycline, enrofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, neomycin, and clindamycin, respectively. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) had different values for penicillin (4) and ampicillin (2), while the other antimicrobial agents had the same MIC90 values as reported for S. aureus. The MIC90 values for streptococci were 0.12, 0.25, ≤ 4, 16, ≤ 0.25, 0.5, 0.25 for penicillin, ampicillin, cephalotin, gentamicin, erythromycin, oxytetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, whereas MIC90 for enterococci were 4, 4, 4, ≤ 0.5, 2, > 8 for penicillin, ampicillin, gentamicin, erythromycin, oxytetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, respectively. Of 336 strains of S. aureus, 160 (47.6%) were resistant to penicillin. For 41 CNS strains, 10 (27%) presented penicillin-resistance. All the streptococcal strains were susceptible to penicillin, while 3 (7%) of the 43 enteroccocal strains were resistant. Non significant statistical differences were found between the results obtained by ADDM and broth micro-dilution for classifying bacterial isolates as susceptible or resistant according to the National Committee of Clinical Laboratory Standards. PMID:12071114

  10. A two-hour antibiotic susceptibility test by ATP-bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; García-Loygorri Jordán de Urries, María Cristina; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, María Purificación; Simarro Grande, María; Orduña Domingo, Antonio; Bratos Pérez, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) in Clinical Microbiology laboratories is still time-consuming, and most procedures take 24h to yield results. In this study, a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test using ATP-bioluminescence has been developed. The design of method was performed using five ATCC collection strains of known susceptibility. This procedure was then validated against standard commercial methods on 10 strains of enterococci, 10 staphylococci, 10 non-fermenting gram negative bacilli, and 13 Enterobacteriaceae from patients. The agreement obtained in the sensitivity between the ATP-bioluminescence method and commercial methods (E-test, MicroScan and VITEK2) was 100%. In summary, the preliminary results obtained in this work show that the ATP-bioluminescence method could provide a fast and reliable AST in two hours.

  11. Ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae isolates in Geneva: serotype, antimicrobial susceptibility, and β-lactam resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cherkaoui, A; Diene, S M; Emonet, S; Renzi, G; Francois, P; Schrenzel, J

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the molecular mechanisms of ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae isolated in Geneva, Switzerland. We investigated the association between specific patterns of amino acid substitutions in penicillin-binding protein 3 (with or without β-lactamase production) and β-lactam susceptibility. Another main focus for this study was to compare the accuracy of disk diffusion and Etest methods to detect resistance to ampicillin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. The antibiotic susceptibility to β-lactam antibiotics of 124 H. influenzae isolates was determined by disk diffusion and Etest methods, and interpreted by European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoints. Alterations in PBP3 were investigated by sequencing the ftsI gene. Of the 124 clinical isolates analyzed, ampicillin resistance was found in 36% (45 out of 124). The rate of resistance to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was 9% and 0.8%, using EUCAST and CLSI breakpoints respectively. For the 78 β-lactamase negative ampicillin-susceptible (BLNAS) isolates for which the Etest method indicated a high degree of susceptibility (MIC ≤ 1 mg/L), the disk diffusion method revealed resistance to ampicillin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid in 33 cases (42%). Most common amino acid substitutions were Asn526Lys and Val547Ile, followed by Asp569Ser, Ala502Val, Asp350Asn, Met377Ile, Ile449Val, and Arg517His. The patterns observed were classified into six groups (IIa, IIb, IIc, IId, III-like, and miscellaneous). Continued characterization of both invasive and respiratory H. influenzae isolates is necessary in order to observe changes in the microbiology and epidemiology of this pathogen that could lead to clinical failure when treated by empirical antibiotic therapy.

  12. Antimicrobial activity and antibiotic susceptibility of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium spp. intended for use as starter and probiotic cultures

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, Ralitsa; Yocheva, Lyubomira; Tserovska, Lilia; Zhelezova, Galina; Stefanova, Nina; Atanasova, Akseniya; Danguleva, Antonia; Ivanova, Gergana; Karapetkov, Nikolay; Rumyan, Nevenka; Karaivanova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial activity and antibiotic susceptibility were tested for 23 Lactobacillus and three Bifidobacterium strains isolated from different ecological niches. Agar-well diffusion method was used to test the antagonistic effect (against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus and Candida albicans) of acid and neutralized (pH 5.5) lyophilized concentrated supernatants (cell-free supernatant; CFS) and whey (cell-free whey fractions; CFW) from de Man–Rogosa–Sharpe/trypticase-phytone-yeast broth and skim milk. Acid CFS and CFW showed high acidification rate-dependent bacterial inhibition; five strains were active against C. albicans. Neutralized CFS/CFW assays showed six strains active against S. aureus (L. acidophilus L-1, L. brevis 1, L. fermentum 1, B. animalis subsp. lactis L-3), E. coli (L. bulgaricus 6) or B. cereus (L. plantarum 24-4В). Inhibition of two pathogens with neutralized CFS (L. bulgaricus 6, L. helveticus 3, L. plantarum 24-2L, L. fermentum 1)/CFW (L. plantarum 24-5D, L. plantarum 24-4В) was detected. Some strains maintained activity after pH neutralization, indicating presence of active substances. The antibiotics minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by the Epsilometer test method. All strains were susceptible to ampicillin, gentamicin, erythromycin and tetracycline. Four lactobacilli were resistant to one antibiotic (L. rhamnosus Lio 1 to streptomycin) or two antibiotics (L. acidophilus L-1 and L. brevis 1 to kanamycin and clindamycin; L. casei L-4 to clindamycin and chloramphenicol). Vancomycin MICs > 256 μg/mL indicated intrinsic resistance for all heterofermentative lactobacilli. The antimicrobially active strains do not cause concerns about antibiotic resistance transfer and could be used as natural biopreservatives in food and therapeutic formulations. PMID:26019620

  13. Bacillus cereus from blood cultures: virulence genes, antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors for blood stream infection.

    PubMed

    Horii, Toshinobu; Notake, Shigeyuki; Tamai, Kiyoko; Yanagisawa, Hideji

    2011-11-01

    We characterized the profiles of virulence genes and antimicrobial susceptibility of Bacillus cereus isolates from blood cultures as well as the risk factors for blood stream infections (BSIs). The diversity of virulence gene patterns was found to be wide among 15 B. cereus isolates from BSIs and also among 11 isolates from contaminated blood cultures. The MicroScan broth microdilution method yielded results corresponding with those of the agar dilution (reference) method for levofloxacin, linezolid, and vancomycin, while the Etest results were consistent with the reference results for clindamycin, gentamicin, imipenem, levofloxacin, and linezolid. Compared with the reference values, however, some isolates showed marked differences of the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for ampicillin and clindamycin when determined using the MicroScan method, or the MICs for ampicillin, meropenem, and vancomycin when determined using the Etest method. Significantly more patients were treated with antimicrobials for more than 3 days during the 3-month period before isolation in the BSI group. Prior antimicrobial therapy may be a risk factor for BSIs due to B. cereus.

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of uropathogen Escherichia coli in renal transplant recipients: dramatic increase in ciprofloxacin resistance.

    PubMed

    Azap, Ö; Togan, T; Yesilkaya, A; Arslan, H; Haberal, M

    2013-04-01

    The urinary tract is the most common site of bacterial infections in renal transplant recipients. The management of urinary tract infections (UTI) in renal transplant recipients is becoming more difficult because of drug-resistant bacteria. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of uropathogen bacteria isolated from 398 patients who underwent renal transplantation between 2007 and 2011 were obtained from medical records. At least 1 UTI episode was diagnosed in 172 (43.2%) patients. Among the 703 bacteria isolated from these patients, Exherichia coli the most common pathogen, was isolated from 407/703 episodes (57.8%). Ciprofloxacin, co-trimoxazole, ceftriaxone, and gentamicin resistance rates were 59.4%, 85.7%, 40.7%, and 36.6%, respectively. Ninty six of 407 E. coli isolates (23.5%) were ESBL positive. Analysis of resistance rates in our center demonstrated ciprofloxacin resistance rate in uropathogenic E. coli to have increased gradually from 30.4% in 2003, 41.3% in 2007, and 59.4% in 2012. Instutional data regarding the etiologic agents and antimicrobial susceptibility results are important for proper management of patients with UTI.

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of health care-associated and community-associated strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from hospitalized patients in Canada, 1995 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Simor, Andrew E; Louie, Lisa; Watt, Christine; Gravel, Denise; Mulvey, Michael R; Campbell, Jennifer; McGeer, Allison; Bryce, Elizabeth; Loeb, Mark; Matlow, Anne

    2010-05-01

    We determined the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibilities of 7,942 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates obtained from patients hospitalized in 48 Canadian hospitals from 1995 to 2008. Regional variations in susceptibilities were identified. The dissemination of community-associated strains in Canada appears to have contributed to increased susceptibility of MRSA to several non-beta-lactam antimicrobial agents in the past decade. Reduced susceptibility to glycopeptides was not identified.

  16. In Vitro antimicrobial susceptibilities of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from two teaching hospitals in Taiwan, 1989-1995.

    PubMed

    Su, J Y; Chang, S C; Luh, K T; Hsieh, W C

    1995-08-01

    The susceptibility of 46 pneumococcal isolates collected during October 1989 to May 1995 from National Taiwan University Hospital and Taipei Municipal Yang Ming Hospital was studied. Among these isolates, the resistant rate of penicillin G was 21.7%; the penicillin G-resistant strains were more frequently resistant than the penicillin-sensitive strains to other beta-lactam antimicrobial drugs. The minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of penicillin G for all isolates were equal to, or one dilution higher than, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Three strains were false positive for penicillin resistance among isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae screened with oxacillin. On the other hand, resistance to penicillin G was often independent of resistance to erythromycin. Vancomycin was the most active agent tested.

  17. A Rapid Molecular Test for Determining Yersinia pestis Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin by the Quantification of Differentially Expressed Marker Genes

    PubMed Central

    Steinberger-Levy, Ida; Shifman, Ohad; Zvi, Anat; Ariel, Naomi; Beth-Din, Adi; Israeli, Ofir; Gur, David; Aftalion, Moshe; Maoz, Sharon; Ber, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Standard antimicrobial susceptibility tests used to determine bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics are growth dependent and time consuming. The long incubation time required for standard tests may render susceptibility results irrelevant, particularly for patients infected with lethal bacteria that are slow growing on agar but progress rapidly in vivo, such as Yersinia pestis. Here, we present an alternative approach for the rapid determination of antimicrobial susceptibility, based on the quantification of the changes in the expression levels of specific marker genes following exposure to growth-inhibiting concentrations of the antibiotic, using Y. pestis and ciprofloxacin as a model. The marker genes were identified by transcriptomic DNA microarray analysis of the virulent Y. pestis Kimberley53 strain after exposure to specific concentrations of ciprofloxacin for various time periods. We identified several marker genes that were induced following exposure to growth-inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin, and we confirmed the marker expression profiles at additional ciprofloxacin concentrations using quantitative RT-PCR. Eleven candidate marker transcripts were identified, of which four mRNA markers were selected for a rapid quantitative RT-PCR susceptibility test that correctly determined the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values and the categories of susceptibility of several Y. pestis strains and isolates harboring various ciprofloxacin MIC values. The novel molecular susceptibility test requires just 2 h of antibiotic exposure in a 7-h overall test time, in contrast to the 24 h of antibiotic exposure required for a standard microdilution test. PMID:27242774

  18. [Serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibilities of invasive group A streptococci identified in eastern Black Sea region of Turkey].

    PubMed

    Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Topkaya, Aynur E; Balıkcı, Ahmet; Aydın, Faruk

    2011-07-01

    Frequency of invasive group A streptococcus (GAS) infections is increasing worldwide in recent 20 years. Serotypes responsible for these clinical manifestations and their antibiotic susceptibilities should be known in order to establish preventive measures and initiate appropriate treatment. This study was aimed to determine the serotypes, antibiotic susceptibilities and inducible clindamycin resistance among invasive GAS isolated between 2006-2009 period. A total of 22 GAS strains isolated from clinical samples [sterile body fluids (peritoneal, pleural, pericardial, joint and cerebrospinal fluids), blood, tissue biopsy] of the patients (14 male, 8 female; age range: 3-82 years, median age: 59) who admitted to Karadeniz Technical University Faculty of Medicine, Farabi Hospital located in Trabzon province (Eastern Black Sea Region of Turkey), between March 2006 and March 2009 were included in the study. GAS serotypes were determined by the investigation of serum opacity factors (SOF), T proteins and M proteins. SOF production was investigated by microplate method using human serum and SOF types were determined by SOF-inhibition test using specific antisera. T protein types were detected by agglutination method using polyvalent anti-T sera, and M serotypes were detected by capillary precipitation method using M antisera. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed by disk-diffusion method according to CLSI recommendations. SOF were positive in 9 (41%) samples. Use of T antiserum yielded T (n= 8) and U (n= 7) types and M antiserum M1 (n= 4) and M2 (n= 3) types. The overall antibiotic susceptibility rate of the isolates was 68% (15/22) and overall resistance rate was 32% (7/22). All of the GAS strains were found susceptible to benzylpenicillin, ceftriaxone, vancomycin, levofloxacine and linezolid, however 9 (41%) were intermediate susceptible to tetracycline and 1 (4.5%) was intermediate susceptible to erythromycin. Four (18%) strains were found resistant to

  19. Genetic relatedness, antimicrobial and biocide susceptibility comparative analysis of methicillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from Portugal.

    PubMed

    Couto, Natacha; Belas, Adriana; Couto, Isabel; Perreten, Vincent; Pomba, Constança

    2014-08-01

    Forty methicillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP and MSSP, respectively) from colonization and infection in dogs and cats were characterized for clonality, antimicrobial, and biocide susceptibility. MSSP were genetically more diverse than MRSP by multi-locus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Three different spa types (t06, t02, t05) and two SCCmec types (II-III and V) were detected in the MRSP isolates. All MRSP and two MSSP strains were multidrug-resistant. Several antibiotic resistance genes (mecA, blaZ, tet(M), tet(K), aac(6')-Ie-aph(2')-Ia, aph(3')-III, ant(6)-Ia, sat4, erm(B), lnu(A), dfr(G), and catp(C221)) were identified by microarray and double mutations in the gyrA and grlA genes and a single mutation in the rpoB gene were detected by sequence analysis. No differences were detected between MSSP and MRSP in the chlorhexidine acetate (CHA) minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). However, two MSSP had elevated MIC to triclosan (TCL) and one to benzalkonium chloride and ethidium bromide. One MSSP isolate harboured a qacA gene, while in another a qacB gene was detected. None of the isolates harboured the sh-fabI gene. Three of the biocide products studied had high bactericidal activity (Otodine(®), Clorexyderm Spot Gel(®), Dermocanis Piocure-M(®)), while Skingel(®) failed to achieve a five log reduction in the bacterial counting. S. pseudintermedius have become a serious therapeutic challenge in particular if methicillin- resistance and/or multidrug-resistance are involved. Biocides, like CHA and TCL, seem to be clinically effective and safe topical therapeutic options.

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Japanese secondary care facility.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yumiko; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Akamatsu, Norihiko; Matsuda, Junichi; Yamaryo, Takeshi; Kawakami, Kenji; Matsuo, Hidenori; Kosai, Kosuke; Uno, Naoki; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Yanagihara, Katsunori

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is prevalent in Japan, and the Staphylococcus cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type II is common among hospital-acquired MRSA isolates. Information pertaining to MRSA characteristics is limited, including SCCmec types, in primary or secondary care facilities. A total of 128 MRSA isolates (90 skin and soft tissue isolates and 38 blood isolates) were collected at a secondary care facility, Kawatana Medical Center, from 2005 to 2011. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for anti-MRSA antibiotics and molecular testing for SCCmec and virulence genes (tst, sec, etb, lukS/F-PV) were performed. Strains positive for lukS/F-PV were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing and phage open-reading frame typing. SCCmec typing in skin and soft tissue isolates revealed that 65.6% had type IV, 22.2% had type II, 8.9% had type I, and 3.3% had type III. In blood isolates, 50.0% had type IV, 47.4% had type II, and 2.6% had type III. Minimum inhibitory concentrations, MIC(50)/MIC(90), against vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, and arbekacin increased slightly in SCCmec II isolates from skin and soft tissue. MICs against daptomycin were similar between sites of isolation. SCCmec type II isolates possess tst and sec genes at a greater frequently than SCCmec type IV isolates. Four lukS/F-PV-positive isolates were divided into two clonal patterns and USA300 was not included. In conclusion, SCCmec type IV was dominant in blood, skin, and soft tissue isolates in a secondary care facility in Japan. Because antimicrobial susceptibility varies with the SCCmec type, SCCmec typing of clinical isolates should be monitored in primary or secondary care facilities.

  1. Virulence Genes and the Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Escherichia coli, Isolated from Wild Waterbirds, in the Netherlands and Poland.

    PubMed

    Kuczkowski, Maciej; Krawiec, Marta; Voslamber, Berend; Książczyk, Marta; Płoskońska-Bugla, Gabriela; Wieliczko, Alina

    2016-08-01

    Affiliation to four phylogroups (A, B1, B2, and D) was examined, among 190 Escherichia coli strains, collected from five, wild waterbird species, including the following: the Greylag goose-Anser anser (61) and the Canada goose-Branta canadensis (33) obtained in the Netherlands, and the Mallard-Anas platyrhynchos (38), the Mute swan-Cygnus olor (37), and the Great cormorant-Phalacrocorax carbo (21) obtained in Poland. Moreover, the prevalence of 10 virulence factors: astA, iss, iucD, irp2, papC, tsh, vat, cva/cvi, stx2f, and bfp, as well as antimicrobial susceptibility to amoxicillin, enrofloxacin, and tetracycline (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] using E-tests) were investigated, in the examined E. coli strains. Results demonstrated that the greatest number of E. coli strains belonged to phylogenetic groups, B1 (86 strains-45.3%) and D (49 strains-25.8%), whereas 40 (21.0%) and only 15 (7.9%) isolates were classified as being of phylogenetic groups, A and B2, respectively. Among the 10 tested virulence-associated genes, 7 genes were detected in 61 examined strains (32.1%) with highly varying frequency. Virulence profiles showed that astA, iss, and irp2 genes were detected most frequently among all examined E. coli strains, isolated from every chosen bird species. Antimicrobial susceptibility, as detected by MIC for the examined antibiotics, is variable among strains isolated from different species of birds. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of E. coli strains, isolated from different species of wild waterbirds and determine their potential pathogenicity to the environment, other birds, and people.

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of urinary pathogens in Trinidad, 1996-1999.

    PubMed Central

    Orrett, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among urinary pathogens has been increasing worldwide. Laboratory diagnosed urinary tract infections were retrospectively evaluated for the years 1996 through 1999, to document the common pathogens and their changing antimicrobial profiles. From 14,853 hospital specimens, an isolation rate of 6.1% was found; and from 5330 community specimens, the isolation rate was 27.9%. E. coli was the predominant cause of urinary tract infections in both hospital and community practices. The rate of isolation of the other pathogens was relatively stable except for citrobacter species, which increased from 1.3% in 1996 to 20.1% in 1999 (p < 0.001) among community isolates. Significant changes in the susceptibility patterns of uropathogens also were observed. E. coli strains from hospitals were significantly more resistant to cefuroxime than community strains (p < 0.001), while resistance to ampicillin and nalidixic acid was high in both practices. No substantial changes in susceptibility to gentamicin and tetracycline were noticed during the four-year period compared to the 99% resistance to tetracycline in 1995. In relation to nitrofurantoin, no significant changes were noted in both practices where resistant rates remained low, but susceptibility to augmentin showed much improvement among all isolates, including E. coli. Urinary isolates were more commonly recovered from the paediatric age group (1-10 years) and those older than 50 years of age, and males were the predominant gender in both age groups. The study showed that the antibiotics useful in the treatment of UTI in decreasing order of effectiveness in community practice were gentamicin, norfloxacin, nitrofurantoin and cefuroxime. For nosocomial UTI, the drugs most effective include norfloxacin, nitrofurantoin, gentamicin, co-trimoxazole and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. PMID:12793792

  3. Recommendation for a Standardised Method of Broth Microdilution Susceptibility Testing for Porcine Bordetella bronchiseptica

    PubMed Central

    Prüller, Sandra; Frömke, Cornelia; Kaspar, Heike; Klein, Günter; Kreienbrock, Lothar; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to establish and standardise a broth microdilution susceptibility testing method for porcine Bordetella (B.) bronchiseptica. B. bronchiseptica isolates from different geographical regions and farms were genotyped by macrorestriction analysis and subsequent pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. One reference and one type strain plus two field isolates of B. bronchiseptica were chosen to analyse growth curves in four different media: cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth (CAMHB) with and without 2% lysed horse blood, Brain-Heart-Infusion (BHI), and Caso broth. The growth rate of each test strain in each medium was determined by culture enumeration and the suitability of CAMHB was confirmed by comparative statistical analysis. Thereafter, reference and type strain and eight epidemiologically unrelated field isolates of B. bronchiseptica were used to test the suitability of a broth microdilution susceptibility testing method following CLSI-approved performance standards given in document VET01-A4. Susceptibility tests, using 20 antimicrobial agents, were performed in five replicates, and data were collected after 20 and 24 hours incubation and statistically analysed. Due to the low growth rate of B. bronchiseptica, an incubation time of 24 hours resulted in significantly more homogeneous minimum inhibitory concentrations after five replications compared to a 20-hour incubation. An interlaboratory comparison trial including susceptibility testing of 24 antimicrobial agents revealed a high mean level of reproducibility (97.9%) of the modified method. Hence, in a harmonization for broth microdilution susceptibility testing of B. bronchiseptica, an incubation time of 24 hours in CAMHB medium with an incubation temperature of 35°C and an inoculum concentration of approximately 5 x 105 cfu/ml was proposed. PMID:25910232

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility and minimal inhibitory concentration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from septic ocular surface disease in different animal species

    PubMed Central

    Leigue, L.; Montiani-Ferreira, F.; Moore, B.A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from different animal species with septic ocular surface disease. Sixteen strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from different species of animals (dog, cat, horse, penguin and brown bear) with ocular surface diseases such as conjunctivitis, keratocojnuctivits sicca and ulcerative keratitis. These isolates were tested against 11 different antimicrobials agents using the Kirby-Bauer disk-diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined using E-tests for two antibiotics (tobramycin and ciprofloxacin) commonly used in veterinary ophthalmology practice. Imipenem was the most effective antibiotic, with 100% of the strains being susceptible, followed by amikacin (87.5%), gentamicin, norfloxacin, gatifloxacin and polymyxin (both with 81.5%of susceptibility). MIC90 of ciprofloxacin was 2 µg/ml and the values found ranged from 0.094 µg/ml to 32 µg/ml. For tobramycin, MIC90 was 32 µg/ml and ranged from 0.25 µg/ml to 256 µg/ml. The most effective in vitro antibiotic tested against P. aeruginosa in this study was imipenem, followed by amikacin. The 3 mg/ml eye drops commercially available ciprofloxacin presentations were in vitro effective against all strains tested in this study if applied up to 4 hours after instillation. Whereas for tobramycin the 3 mg/ml eye drops commercial presentations were not in vitro effective against some strains isolated in this study. Thus for ocular infections with P. aeruginosa when using tobramycin the ideal recommendation would be to either use eye drops with higher concentrations or decrease the frequency intervals from four to a minimum of every two hours. PMID:27928519

  5. BSAC standardized disc susceptibility testing method (version 11).

    PubMed

    Howe, R A; Andrews, J M

    2012-12-01

    This article highlights key amendments incorporated into version 11 of the BSAC standardized disc susceptibility testing method, available as Supplementary data at JAC Online (http://jac.oxfordjournals.org/) and on the BSAC web site (http://bsac.org.uk/susceptibility/guidelines-standardized-disc-susceptibility-testing-method/). The basic disc susceptibility testing method remains unchanged, but there have been a number of alterations to the interpretive criteria for certain organism/drug combinations due to continuing harmonization with the EUCAST MIC breakpoints and constant efforts to improve the reliability and clinical applicability of the guidance.

  6. A comparison of non-typhoidal Salmonella from humans and food animals using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns.

    PubMed

    Sandt, Carol H; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Tewari, Deepanker; Ostroff, Stephen; Joyce, Kevin; M'ikanatha, Nkuchia M

    2013-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most important foodborne diseases affecting humans. To characterize the relationship between Salmonella causing human infections and their food animal reservoirs, we compared pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from ill humans in Pennsylvania and from food animals before retail. Human clinical isolates were received from 2005 through 2011 during routine public health operations in Pennsylvania. Isolates from cattle, chickens, swine and turkeys were recovered during the same period from federally inspected slaughter and processing facilities in the northeastern United States. We found that subtyping Salmonella isolates by PFGE revealed differences in antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and, for human Salmonella, differences in sources and invasiveness that were not evident from serotyping alone. Sixteen of the 20 most common human Salmonella PFGE patterns were identified in Salmonella recovered from food animals. The most common human Salmonella PFGE pattern, Enteritidis pattern JEGX01.0004 (JEGX01.0003ARS), was associated with more cases of invasive salmonellosis than all other patterns. In food animals, this pattern was almost exclusively (99%) found in Salmonella recovered from chickens and was present in poultry meat in every year of the study. Enteritidis pattern JEGX01.0004 (JEGX01.0003ARS) was associated with susceptibility to all antimicrobial agents tested in 94.7% of human and 97.2% of food animal Salmonella isolates. In contrast, multidrug resistance (resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobial agents) was observed in five PFGE patterns. Typhimurium patterns JPXX01.0003 (JPXX01.0003 ARS) and JPXX01.0018 (JPXX01.0002 ARS), considered together, were associated with resistance to five or more classes of antimicrobial agents: ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides and tetracycline (ACSSuT), in 92% of human and 80% of food

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility, virulence determinant carriage and molecular characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with skin and soft tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fangyou; Liu, Yunling; Lv, Jinnan; Qi, Xiuqin; Lu, Chaohui; Ding, Yu; Li, Dan; Liu, Huanle; Wang, Liangxing

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of the antimicrobial susceptibility, carriage of virulence determinants and molecular characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) may provide further insights related to clinical outcomes with these infections. From January 2012 to September 2013, a total of 128 non-duplicate S. aureus isolates were recovered from patients with SSTIs. All 128 S. aureus SSTI isolates carried at least five virulence genes tested. Virulence genes detected among at least 70% of all tested isolates included hld (100%), hla (95.3%), icaA (96.9%), clf (99.2%), sdrC (79.7%), sdrD (70.3%), and sdrE (72.7%). The prevalence of MRSA isolates with 10 virulence genes tested (54.4%, 31/56) was significantly higher than that among MSSA isolates (35.2%, 25/71) (p<0.05). The positive rates of seb, sen, sem, sdrE and pvl among MRSA isolates were significantly higher than among MSSA isolates (p<0.05). ST7 and ST630 accounting for 10.9% were found to be the predominant STs. The most prevalent spa type was t091 (8.6%). MRSA-ST59-SCCmec IV was the most common clone (12.3%) among MRSA isolates whereas among MSSA isolates the dominant clone was MSSA-ST7 (15.5%). Six main clonal complexes (CCs) were found, including CC5 (52.3%), CC7 (11.7%), CC59 (8.6%), CC88 (6.3%), CC398 (4.7%), and CC121 (3.1%). A higher carriage of seb and sec was found among CC59 isolates. In comparison to CC5 and CC7 isolates, those with the highest carriage rates (>80.0%) of sdrC and sdrD, CC59 isolates had lower prevalence of these two virulence genes. All CC59 isolates were susceptible to gentamicin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, while CC5 and CC7 isolates had resistance rates to these two antimicrobials of 25.4% and 20.9%, and 40.0% and 40.0%, respectively. The resistance rates for tetracycline, clindamycin, and erythromycin among CC5 isolates were lower than among CC7 and CC59 isolates. In conclusion, the molecular typing of S. aureus SSTI

  8. Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia strains to different skin-derived antimicrobial proteins.

    PubMed

    Köten, Bente; Becker, Karsten; Podschun, Rainer; von Eiff, Christof; Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf; Harder, Jürgen; Gläser, Regine

    2012-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing cutaneous infections to life-threatening bacteremia. These infections are often caused by strains derived from the own microflora suggesting that a disturbed epidermal barrier may promote invasion of S. aureus. Antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMP) such as human beta-defensin-3 and RNase 7 contribute to control the colonization of S. aureus on the skin surface. This leads to the hypothesis that strains with a decreased susceptibility toward skin-derived AMP may better overcome the innate cutaneous defence barrier increasing the possibility of invading into the blood stream. To address this hypothesis we determined whether S. aureus strains from bacteremia patients are less susceptible to various skin-derived AMP than strains from healthy carriers. No differences in the AMP-killing activity against bacteremia-derived S. aureus and control strains were detected suggesting that the onset of S. aureus bacteremia is not based on the varying susceptibilities against skin-derived AMP.

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical specimens in Northern area of Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zoubi, Mazhar Salim; Al-Tayyar, Ibrahim Ali; Hussein, Emad; Jabali, Alla Al; Khudairat, Salih

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The global spread of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) constitutes one of the most serious contemporary challenges to the treatment of hospital-acquired infections. We aimed to screen and assess the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical specimens in local hospitals of Northern province in Jordan. Materials and Methods: Staphylococcus aureus was isolated and identified using standard methods from various clinical specimens of different infected body sites from 358 patients during the period from January 2008 to November 2012. Results: Our analysis showed that 31.6% of S. aureus infections were MRSA, while 31% were multidrug resistance (MDR) and 42.7% were Oxacillin-resistant (ORSA). Most of these strains were isolated from wound specimens. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin (100%). They were also susceptible to chloramphenicol, linezolid, nitrofurantoin, rifampicin and teicoplanin (>80%), but showed resistance to erythromycin and penicillin. Conclusion: Vancomycin was the most effective antimicrobial agent against S. aureus. We recommend regular surveillance of hospital associated infections and monitoring antibiotic sensitivity pattern and strict drug policy for antibiotics used within and outside the hospital environments. PMID:26719783

  10. The Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Klebsiella pneumoniae from Community Settings in Taiwan, a Trend Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wu-Pu; Wang, Jann-Tay; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Chang, Feng-Yee; Fung, Chang-Phone; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Chen, Yao-Shen; Shiau, Yih-Ru; Tan, Mei-Chen; Wang, Hui-Ying; Lai, Jui-Fen; Huang, I-Wen; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Drug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, especially extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)- and/or AmpC β-lactamase-producing strains, is an emerging problem worldwide. However, few data focusing on drug susceptibility of K. pneumoniae from community is available. In this study, we analyzed 1016 K. pneumoniae isolates from outpatients or those visiting emergency rooms collected during 2002–2012 from Taiwan Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance program. Significantly decreased susceptibilities to 3rd generation cephalosporins and ciprofloxacin were found during the study period. By 2012, susceptibility to cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin was 83.6% and 81.6%, respectively. The prevalence of ESBL-producers increased from 4.8% in 2002 to 11.9% in 2012 (P = 0.012), while that of AmpC β-lactamase-producers increased from 0% to 9.5% in the same period (P < 0.001). Phylogenic analysis of the ESBL and AmpC-β-lactamase-producers by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multi-locus sequence typing revealed wide genetic diversity even among the most common sequence type 11 isolates (33.0%). By multivariate analysis, later study year, elderly, and urine isolates were associated with carriage of ESBL genes, while only urine isolates were associated with carriage of AmpC β-lactamase genes. Further studies are needed to determine which antibiotics are reasonable empirical therapy options for patients presenting with severe sepsis that might be caused by K. pneumoniae. PMID:27824151

  11. Prevalence, serovars, and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella isolated from blue land crabs (Cardisoma guanhumi) in Grenada, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Ross; Hariharan, Harry; Matthew, Vanessa; Chappell, Sam; Davies, Rob; Parker, Regina; Sharma, Andravindra

    2013-07-01

    Samples of intestine and hepatopancreas from 65 blue land crabs (Cardisoma guanhumi), a crustacean commonly consumed as a food item in Grenada, were collected from six geographic sites in Grenada and tested for Salmonella by enrichment and selective culture. The individual animal prevalence of Salmonella based on isolation was 17% (11 of 65), and all infected crabs were from three of the six sampled locations. Isolates were identified by serotyping as Salmonella enterica serovars Saintpaul (n = 6), Montevideo (n = 4), and Newport (n = 1). The intestines of all 11 infected crabs were positive for Salmonella, but only 7 of 11 hepatopancreas samples were positive for Salmonella, and these isolates were the same serovar as isolated from the matching intestine. These three Salmonella serovars are known to cause human illness in many countries, and in the Caribbean Salmonella Saintpaul has been frequently isolated from humans. In a disc diffusion assay, all isolates were susceptible to all 11 drugs tested: amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, imipenem, neomycin, streptomycin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. To our knowledge, this report is the first concerning isolation and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Salmonella serotypes from the blue land crab.

  12. Trends towards lower antimicrobial susceptibility and characterization of acquired resistance among clinical isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae in Spain.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Álvaro; Carvajal, Ana; Vester, Birte; Pringle, Märit; Naharro, Germán; Rubio, Pedro

    2011-07-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae in Spain was monitored, and the underlying molecular mechanisms of resistance were investigated. MICs of tylosin, tiamulin, valnemulin, lincomycin, and tylvalosin were determined for 87 B. hyodysenteriae isolates recovered from 2008 to 2009 by broth dilution. Domain V of the 23S rRNA gene and the ribosomal protein L3 gene were sequenced in 20 isolates for which the tiamulin MIC was ≥ 4 μg/ml, presenting decreased susceptibility, and in 18 tiamulin-susceptible isolates (MIC ≤ 0.125 μg/ml), and all isolates were typed by multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeats analysis. A comparison with antimicrobial susceptibility data from 2000 to 2007 showed an increase in pleuromutilin resistance over time, doubling the number of isolates with decreased susceptibility to tiamulin. No alteration in susceptibility was detected for lincomycin, and the MIC of tylosin remained high (MIC(50) > 128 μg/ml). The decreased susceptibility to tylosin and lincomycin can be explained by mutations at position A2058 of the 23S rRNA gene (Escherichia coli numbering). A2058T was the predominant mutation, but A2058G also was found together with a change of the neighboring base pair at positions 2057 to 2611. The role of additional point mutations in the vicinity of the peptidyl transferase center and mutations in the L3 at amino acids 148 and 149 and their possible involvement in antimicrobial susceptibility are considered. An association between G2032A and high levels of tiamulin and lincomycin MICs was found, suggesting an increasing importance of this mutation in antimicrobial resistance of clinical isolates of B. hyodysenteriae.

  13. [Antimicrobial susceptibility of a selection of Salmonella enterica strains of various origins isolated in Spain].

    PubMed

    Cruchaga, S; Echeita, A; Usera, M A

    1999-09-01

    The widespread use of antimicrobials in human and veterinary practice is increasingly causing the emergence of different multidrug-resistant human pathogens. This situation makes treating infections caused by these microorganisms difficult. Salmonella enterica is an ubiquitous organism and may be a good indicator of the influence of the use and abuse of antimicrobials on the appearance of multiresistant strains. One hundred and ninety S. enterica strains of different origins isolated in Spain in 1996 were randomly selected. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was studied using the agar dilution method according to NCCLS criteria in the following antimicrobials: ampicillin, ticarcillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefazolin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, imipenem, gentamicin, apramycin, ciprofloxacin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole and co-trimoxazole. Sixty-three percent of the S. enterica tested were resistant and 24% were multiresistant. The percentage of resistant and multiresistant strains of S. enterica of human origin was slightly higher than those of nonhuman origin. Statistically, ampicillin, ticarcillin and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid were significantly more resistant in strains of human origin. Ninety-one percent of the strains of Typhimurium serotype and phagotype 104 were multiresistant. The Salmonella Typhimurium serotype and phagotype 104 ACSTSu-resistant clone, which is widespread in various Western countries, was also isolated in this study. The use of different antimicrobials in human and veterinary practice needs to be rationalized.

  14. Contemporary tetracycline susceptibility testing: doxycycline MIC methods and interpretive criteria (CLSI and EUCAST) performance when testing Gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Stilwell, Matthew G; Wilson, Michael L; Mendes, Rodrigo E

    2013-05-01

    International susceptibility testing breakpoint organizations and regulatory agencies have markedly differing interpretive criteria for the tetracycline class. Here we examined the magnitude of these differences for doxycycline and tetracycline hydrochloride (HCL) when tested against a collection of 13,176 Gram-positive cocci from a worldwide surveillance network (SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program, 2010). Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoints are routinely higher, usually 4-fold, compared to those of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST); however, CLSI recently (2013) modified Streptococcus pneumoniae breakpoints (≤ 2 μg/mL in 2012) to ≤ 0.25 and ≤ 1 μg/mL for doxycycline and tetracycline HCL, respectively. We report that these changes are a promising step toward international breakpoint harmonization, but lack a comprehensive approach needed for testing tetracyclines against all Gram-positive cocci. Generally, EUCAST breakpoint criteria showed i) lower spectrums (reduced susceptibility rates) for the tetracyclines, but highest for doxycycline versus all species examined; ii) greater test accuracy (lower predictive categorical errors), especially for tetracycline to predict doxycycline susceptibility (99.91%); and iii) zone diameter correlate breakpoints which are generally available online. Molecular tests for tet resistance genes demonstrate that tet (K) and tet (M) containing strains can occur in the susceptible population of MIC results by both CLSI and EUCAST breakpoint criteria. In summary, doxycycline continues to show greater comparative potency versus tetracycline HCL against all monitored Gram-positive species and the international harmonization of tetracycline breakpoints should be a priority, as the most recent CLSI update only addressed 1 streptococcal species and 2 tetracycline agents.

  15. Long-term evaluation of the antimicrobial susceptibility and microbial profile of subgingival biofilms in individuals with aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Talita Gomes Baêta; Heller, Débora; do Souto, Renata Martins; Silva-Senem, Mayra Xavier e; Varela, Victor Macedo; Torres, Maria Cynesia Barros; Feres-Filho, Eduardo Jorge; Colombo, Ana Paula Vieira

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the antimicrobial susceptibility and composition of subgingival biofilms in generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP) patients treated using mechanical/antimicrobial therapies, including chlorhexidine (CHX), amoxicillin (AMX) and metronidazole (MET). GAP patients allocated to the placebo (C, n = 15) or test group (T, n = 16) received full-mouth disinfection with CHX, scaling and root planning, and systemic AMX (500 mg)/MET (250 mg) or placebos. Subgingival plaque samples were obtained at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months post-therapy from 3–4 periodontal pockets, and the samples were pooled and cultivated under anaerobic conditions. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of AMX, MET and CHX were assessed using the microdilution method. Bacterial species present in the cultivated biofilm were identified by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. At baseline, no differences in the MICs between groups were observed for the 3 antimicrobials. In the T group, significant increases in the MICs of CHX (p < 0.05) and AMX (p < 0.01) were detected during the first 3 months; however, the MIC of MET decreased at 12 months (p < 0.05). For several species, the MICs significantly changed over time in both groups, i.e., Streptococci MICs tended to increase, while for several periodontal pathogens, the MICs diminished. A transitory increase in the MIC of the subgingival biofilm to AMX and CHX was observed in GAP patients treated using enhanced mechanical therapy with topical CHX and systemic AMX/MET. Both protocols presented limited effects on the cultivable subgingival microbiota. PMID:26273264

  16. Streptococcus suis in employees and the environment of swine slaughterhouses in São Paulo, Brazil: Occurrence, risk factors, serotype distribution, and antimicrobial susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Taíssa Cook Siqueira; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Lacouture, Sonia; Megid, Jane; Ribolla, Paulo Eduardo Martins; de Figueiredo Pantoja, José Carlos; Paes, Antonio Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important pathogen in the swine industry. This article is the first to report the occurrence, risk factors, serotype distribution, and antimicrobial susceptibility of S. suis recovered from employees and environmental samples of swine slaughterhouses in Brazil. Tonsillar swabs from all 139 pig-slaughtering employees and 261 environmental swabs were collected for detection of S. suis and serotyping by monoplex and multiplex polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk-diffusion method. Although S. suis was not detected in any of the tested employees, it was isolated from 25% of the environmental samples. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in the occurrence of S. suis were observed between slaughterhouses and between areas of low, medium, and high risk. The most frequent serotypes were 4 and 29, each accounting for 12% of the isolates, followed by 5, 12, 21, and 31, each accounting for 6%. High rates of susceptibility to the antimicrobials doxycycline (100%), ceftiofur (94%), ampicillin (81%), and cephalexin (75%) were observed. However, multidrug resistance was observed in all the isolates. Because S. suis is present in the environment of swine slaughterhouses, on carcasses and knives, as well as on the hands of employees in all areas, all employees are at risk of infection. PMID:26424907

  17. Alterations in conjunctival bacteria and antimicrobial susceptibility during topical administration of ofloxacin after cataract surgery in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sandmeyer, Lynne S; Bauer, Bianca S; Mohaghegh Poor, Seyed Mohammad; Feng, Cindy Xin; Chirino-Trejo, Manuel

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate changes in conjunctival bacteria and antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria after cataract surgery in dogs. ANIMALS 16 client-owned dogs. PROCEDURES Samples for aerobic and anaerobic culture were obtained from the conjunctival fornices of both eyes of dogs 24 hours before (week 0) and 1, 3, and 6 weeks after cataract surgery. Topical administration of ofloxacin (every 6 hours) was initiated 12 hours before surgery and continued for 3 weeks. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion and a commercially available test for ofloxacin. RESULTS Frequency of positive culture results was significantly higher at week 6 than at weeks 0 and 1. Bacterial load was more likely to be moderate or high at weeks 3 and 6 than at weeks 0 and 1. The most frequently cultured organism was Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (21/78 [26.9%]), followed by coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp (19/78 [24.4%]). Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was the organism most frequently cultured at weeks 0 (5/12), 1 (4/12), and 6 (8/19), whereas frequency of this organism was lowest at week 3 (1/20). In contrast, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp were the most frequently cultured organisms at week 3 (10/20). There was a significant increase in the proportion of organisms resistant to ofloxacin at week 3, compared with the proportion at week 0. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The number of bacterial organisms increased and the population of conjunctival bacteria was altered and had a higher proportion resistant to ofloxacin during the 6 weeks after cataract surgery for dogs treated by use of this protocol.

  18. Changing trends in serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive diseases in Central Thailand, 2009-2012.

    PubMed

    Phongsamart, Wanatpreeya; Srifeungfung, Somporn; Chatsuwan, Tanittha; Nunthapisud, Pongpun; Treerauthaweeraphong, Vipa; Rungnobhakhun, Pimpha; Sricharoenchai, Sirintip; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2014-01-01

    To describe the trends in serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of S. pneumoniae causing invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) we tested 238 pneumococci isolates from normally sterile sites between 2009 and 2012 and compared these findings with previous data collected within our network. Serotyping was performed for 15 serotypes contained in the 7-,10-, 13-, and experimental 15-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV). The most common serotypes found were 6B (13.9%), 19A (12.6%), 14 (8.0%), 18C (5.9%), and 6A (3.8%); and 39.9% were non-PCV15 serotypes. One of 81 patients with available data had breakthrough infection with vaccine serotype (19F). There was a significant increase of serotype 19A among children ≤5 years (5.6% in 2000-2009 vs 18.3% in 2009-2012, P = 0.003). The all-age serotype coverage was 36.4%, 41.5%, 59.3%, and 59.7% for PCV7, PCV10, PCV13, and PCV 15, respectively. The corresponding coverage in children ≤5 years were 46.4%, 48.8%, 73.2%, and 73.2% respectively. High susceptibilities to penicillin (89.7%), cefotaxime (95.7%), cefditoren (90.2% by Spanish breakpoints), ofloxacin (97.9%), and levofloxacin (100%), but low to cefdinir (50.0%), cefditoren (45.1% by US-FDA breakpoints), macrolides (<50%), clindamycin (67.7%), tetracycline (41.4%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (32.4%) were observed. Serotype 19A was less susceptible to penicillin (80.0 vs 91.2%, P = 0.046), cefditoren (66.7 vs 95.5% by Spanish breakpoints, P = 0.004), and tetracycline (9.1 vs 45.5%, P = 0.024) than non-19A isolates. These data emphasize the need for continued surveillance to monitor changes in serotypes as well as antimicrobial susceptibilities in order to guide strategies for prevention and treatment.

  19. [Susceptibility of clinically-isolated bacteria strains to respiratory quinolones and evaluation of antimicrobial agent efficacy by Monte Carlo simulation].

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Tadashi; Yamada, Yukiji; Kimura, Takeshi; Kodama, Mai; Fujitomo, Yumiko; Masaki, Nakanishi; Toshiaki, Komori; Keisuke, Shikata; Fujita, Naohisa

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory quinolones (RQs) are broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents used for the treatment of a wide variety of community-acquired and nosocomial infections. However, bacterial resistance to quinolones has been on the increase. In this study, we investigated the predicted efficacy of RQs for various strains of 9 bacterial species clinically isolated at our university hospital using the Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) method based on pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics modeling. In addition, the influence of the patients' renal function on the efficacy of RQs was evaluated. We surveyed antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 9 bacterial species (n = number of strains) [Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 15), Streptococcus pyogenes (n = 14), Streptococcus agalactiae (n = 19), methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (n = 24), Escherichia coli (n = 35), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 17), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 14), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 31), and Moraxella catarrhalis (n = 11)] to 4 RQs [garenoxacin (GRNX), levofloxacin (LVFX), sitafloxacin (STFX), and moxifloxacin (MFLX)]. We found that compared with the other RQs, Gram-positive cocci was most resistant to LVFX, and that the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC₉₀) values for S. pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, and MSSA were high (2, 16, > 16, and 8 µg/mL, respectively). In regard to Gram-negative rods, the susceptibility of E. coli to RQs was found to be decreased, with the MIC₉₀ values of GRNX, LVFX, STFX, and MFLX being > 16, 16, 1, and 16 µg/mL, respectively. MCS revealed that the target attainment rate of the area under the unbound concentration-time curve divided by the MIC₉₀ (ƒ · AUC/MIC ratio), against S. pneumoniae was 86.9-100%, but against E. coli was low (52.1-66.2%). The ƒ · AUC/MIC target attainment rate of LVFX against S. pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, and S. agalactiae tended to decrease due to increased creatinine clearance, and that of LVFX and STFX against MSSA also

  20. Changing trends in serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive diseases in Central Thailand, 2009–2012

    PubMed Central

    Phongsamart, Wanatpreeya; Srifeungfung, Somporn; Chatsuwan, Tanittha; Nunthapisud, Pongpun; Treerauthaweeraphong, Vipa; Rungnobhakhun, Pimpha; Sricharoenchai, Sirintip; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2014-01-01

    To describe the trends in serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of S. pneumoniae causing invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) we tested 238 pneumococci isolates from normally sterile sites between 2009 and 2012 and compared these findings with previous data collected within our network. Serotyping was performed for 15 serotypes contained in the 7-,10-, 13-, and experimental 15-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV). The most common serotypes found were 6B (13.9%), 19A (12.6%), 14 (8.0%), 18C (5.9%), and 6A (3.8%); and 39.9% were non-PCV15 serotypes. One of 81 patients with available data had breakthrough infection with vaccine serotype (19F). There was a significant increase of serotype 19A among children ≤5 years (5.6% in 2000–2009 vs 18.3% in 2009–2012, P = 0.003). The all-age serotype coverage was 36.4%, 41.5%, 59.3%, and 59.7% for PCV7, PCV10, PCV13, and PCV 15, respectively. The corresponding coverage in children ≤5 years were 46.4%, 48.8%, 73.2%, and 73.2% respectively. High susceptibilities to penicillin (89.7%), cefotaxime (95.7%), cefditoren (90.2% by Spanish breakpoints), ofloxacin (97.9%), and levofloxacin (100%), but low to cefdinir (50.0%), cefditoren (45.1% by US-FDA breakpoints), macrolides (<50%), clindamycin (67.7%), tetracycline (41.4%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (32.4%) were observed. Serotype 19A was less susceptible to penicillin (80.0 vs 91.2%, P = 0.046), cefditoren (66.7 vs 95.5% by Spanish breakpoints, P = 0.004), and tetracycline (9.1 vs 45.5%, P = 0.024) than non-19A isolates. These data emphasize the need for continued surveillance to monitor changes in serotypes as well as antimicrobial susceptibilities in order to guide strategies for prevention and treatment. PMID:25424794

  1. Susceptibility of various purple and green sulfur bacteria to different antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Nogales, B; Guerrero, R; Esteve, I

    1994-10-15

    Several purple and green sulfur bacteria (genera Chromatium, Thiocapsa and Chlorobium) were tested for their sensitivity to different antimicrobial agents by a disc diffusion assay, using thioacetamide as a source of hydrogen sulfide for plate growth. Chlorobium limicola strains were more sensitive to amoxicillin, erythromycin and nalidixic acid, whereas gentamicin and netilmicin were more active against the purple bacteria tested. None of the organisms were sensitive to oxacillin and trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole. The critical concentrations at the edge of the inhibition zone were also calculated for three organisms and the antimicrobials colistin, mitomycin C, penicillin G, rifampicin, and streptomycin. The results obtained suggest that colistin, mitomycin C, penicillin G would provide selective conditions against the growth of Chlorobium limicola strains, while streptomycin and other aminoglycoside antibiotics would select against purple bacteria.

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility and MIC distribution of 41 drugs against clinical isolates from China and reference strains of nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Guilian; Pang, Hui; Guo, Qian; Huang, Mingxiang; Tan, Yanhong; Li, Chao; Wei, Jianhao; Xia, Yuanzhi; Jiang, Yi; Zhao, Xiuqin; Liu, Haican; Zhao, Li-Li; Liu, Zhiguang; Xu, Donglei; Wan, Kanglin

    2017-03-01

    To treat nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections more optimally, further research pertaining to mycobacterial susceptibility to antimicrobial agents is required. A total of 82 species of NTM reference strains and 23 species of NTM clinical isolates were included. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for 41 drugs were determined using the microdilution method in cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth. The results showed that most of the NTM were susceptible to aminoglycosides, quinolones, three macrolides (clarithromycin, azithromycin and roxithromycin), cefmetazole, linezolid and capreomycin. Rapidly growing mycobacterium strains were additionally susceptible to cefoxitin, clofazimine, rifapentine, doxycycline, minocycline, tigecycline, meropenem and sulfamethoxazole, whereas slowly growing mycobacterium strains were additionally susceptible to rifabutin. This study on the susceptibility of NTM includes the largest sample size of Chinese clinical isolates and reference strains. NTM species-specific drug susceptibility patterns suggested that it is urgent to identify the species of NTM, to normalise the treatment of NTM infectious disease and to clarify the resistance mechanisms of NTM.

  3. Antimicrobial Stewardship in the Microbiology Laboratory: Impact of Selective Susceptibility Reporting on Ciprofloxacin Utilization and Susceptibility of Gram-Negative Isolates to Ciprofloxacin in a Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Seah, J.; Chan, A.; Downing, M.; Johnstone, J.; Matukas, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of selective susceptibility reporting on ciprofloxacin utilization and Gram-negative susceptibility to ciprofloxacin in a hospital setting. Historically at our institution, the microbiology laboratory practice was to report ciprofloxacin susceptibility for all Enterobacteriaceae regardless of susceptibility to other agents. A selective reporting policy was implemented which involved the suppression of ciprofloxacin susceptibility to Enterobacteriaceae when there was lack of resistance to the antibiotics on the Gram-negative panel. Ciprofloxacin utilization (measured in defined daily doses [DDD] per 1,000 patient days) was collected before and after the intervention and compared to moxifloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, nitrofurantoin, and amoxicillin-clavulanate. Monthly susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli to ciprofloxacin was tabulated. An interrupted time series analysis using segmented regression was performed. The mean monthly ciprofloxacin utilization decreased from 87 (95% CI, 83.7 to 91.2) to 39 (95% CI, 35.0 to 44.0) DDD per 1,000 patient days before and after the implementation of selective reporting, respectively. There was an immediate and sustained reduction in ciprofloxacin usage at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postintervention (P < 0.001). A compensatory increase in amoxicillin-clavulanate use was noted starting at 6 months postintervention and persisted for the study period (P < 0.027). Susceptibility of E. coli, but not that of P. aeruginosa, to ciprofloxacin was higher than predicted starting 12 months after the intervention (P < 0.05). In conclusion, selective reporting of ciprofloxacin susceptibly may be a useful intervention to reduce targeted antimicrobial utilization and improve Gram-negative susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. This approach should be considered as part of a broader multimodal antimicrobial stewardship program. PMID:27385708

  4. A liaR deletion restores susceptibility to daptomycin and antimicrobial peptides in multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Jinnethe; Panesso, Diana; Tran, Truc T; Mishra, Nagendra N; Cruz, Melissa R; Munita, Jose M; Singh, Kavindra V; Yeaman, Michael R; Murray, Barbara E; Shamoo, Yousif; Garsin, Danielle; Bayer, Arnold S; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-04-15

    Daptomycin is a lipopeptide antibiotic that is used clinically against many gram-positive bacterial pathogens and is considered a key frontline bactericidal antibiotic to treat multidrug-resistant enterococci. Emergence of daptomycin resistance during therapy of serious enterococcal infections is a major clinical issue. In this work, we show that deletion of the gene encoding the response regulator, LiaR (a member of the LiaFSR system that controls cell envelope homeostasis), from daptomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis not only reversed resistance to 2 clinically available cell membrane-targeting antimicrobials (daptomycin and telavancin), but also resulted in hypersusceptibility to these antibiotics and to a variety of antimicrobial peptides of diverse origin and with different mechanisms of action. The changes in susceptibility to these antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides correlated with in vivo attenuation in a Caenorhabditis elegans model. Mechanistically, deletion of liaR altered the localization of cardiolipin microdomains in the cell membrane. Our findings suggest that LiaR is a master regulator of the enterococcal cell membrane response to diverse antimicrobial agents and peptides; as such, LiaR represents a novel target to restore the activity of clinically useful antimicrobials against these organisms and, potentially, increase susceptibility to endogenous antimicrobial peptides.

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of thermophilic Campylobacter from humans, swine, and chicken broilers

    PubMed Central

    Guévremont, Evelyne; Nadeau, Éric; Sirois, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and the distribution of antimicrobial resistance, and the presence of genetic determinants of resistance, in Campylobacter recovered from swine, poultry, and human populations in Quebec. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 10 antimicrobial agents were determined by the agar dilution technique. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect the tetO determinant, and mutations in gyrA were analyzed by sequencing and by mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA) PCR. Among C. coli isolates from pigs, the rates of resistance were high, at 59% for clindamycin, 61% for erythromycin, 67% for streptomycin, and 68% for tetracycline; isolates from chicken broilers were mainly resistant to streptomycin and tetracycline, with a rate of 50% for each; and 56% of the isolates from humans were resistant to tetracycline. The rates of resistance among C. jejuni isolates were low except for tetracycline (39% and 67% in humans and broilers, respectively). The tetO determinant was identified among both tetracycline-resistant and tetracycline-susceptible Campylobacter isolates from swine. Sequencing analysis showed that 64% and 100% of ciprofloxacin-resistant C. coli isolates from swine and humans, respectively, had the mutation Thr-86→Ile, which is associated with quinolone resistance. The MAMA PCR gave identical results. Further analyses need to be done in order to detect other genetic determinants of tetracycline resistance. PMID:16639939

  6. Virulence factors, antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Beigverdi, Reza; Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Mirsalehian, Akbar; Hantoushzadeh, Sedigheh; Boroumandi, Shahram; Taherikalani, Morovat; Emaneini, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    Forty-one Streptococcus agalactiae isolates collected from pregnant women at 35-37 weeks of gestation were analysed for their capsular types, antimicrobial resistance determinants, distribution of virulence factors and genetic relatedness using PCR and multiplex PCR. Capsular type III was predominant (65.8%), followed by capsular type II (14.6%), Ib (7.3%), and V(4.9%). All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, vancomycin, linezolid and quinupristin-dalfopristin. Resistance to tetracycline, erythromycin and clindamycin were found in 97.6%, 24.4%, and 14.6% of isolates, respectively. The most common antimicrobial resistance gene was tetM found in 97.6% of the isolates followed by ermTR and ermB found in 12% and 7.3% of isolates, respectively. The most common virulence gene was hly (100%), followed by scpB (97.6%), bca (97.6%), rib (53.65%) and bac (4.9%). The insertion sequence IS1548 was found in 63.4% of isolates. By multi locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) typing, 30 different allelic profiles or MLVA types (MTs) were identified. The most frequent was the MT1 (5/41, 12.2%) and followed by MT2 (4/41, 9.75%). Our data revealed that population structure of these isolates is highly diverse and indicates different MLVA types.

  7. Reliability of provocative tests of motion sickness susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calkins, D. S.; Reschke, M. F.; Kennedy, R. S.; Dunlop, W. P.

    1987-01-01

    Test-retest reliability values were derived from motion sickness susceptibility scores obtained from two successive exposures to each of three tests: (1) Coriolis sickness sensitivity test; (2) staircase velocity movement test; and (3) parabolic flight static chair test. The reliability of the three tests ranged from 0.70 to 0.88. Normalizing values from predictors with skewed distributions improved the reliability.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of zinc oxide particles on five micro-organisms of the Challenge Tests related to their physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Pasquet, Julia; Chevalier, Yves; Couval, Emmanuelle; Bouvier, Dominique; Noizet, Gaëlle; Morlière, Cécile; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine

    2014-01-02

    Zinc oxide is commonly used in pharmaceutical products to prevent or treat topical or systemic diseases owing to its antimicrobial properties, but it is scarcely used as preservative in topical formulations. The aim of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of zinc oxide (ZnO) powders on the five microbial strains used for Challenge Tests in order to evaluate this inorganic compound as a preservative in topical formulation and assess relationships between the structural parameters of ZnO particles and their antimicrobial activity. For this purpose, the physicochemical characteristics of three ZnO grades were measured and their antimicrobial efficacy against the following micro-organisms - Escherichia coli; Staphylococcus aureus; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Candida albicans; Aspergillus brasiliensis - was assessed using disc diffusion susceptibility tests and a broth dilution method. The comprehensive dataset of physicochemical characteristics and antimicrobial activities (MIC and MBC) is discussed regarding methodological issues related to the particulate nature of ZnO and structure-activity relationships. Every ZnO grade showed bactericidal and antifungal activity against the five tested micro-organisms in a concentration dependent manner. ZnO particles with smaller size, larger specific area and higher porosity exhibit higher antimicrobial activity. Such trends are related to their mechanisms of antimicrobial activity.

  9. Penicillin skin testing: potential implications for antimicrobial stewardship.

    PubMed

    Unger, Nathan R; Gauthier, Timothy P; Cheung, Linda W

    2013-08-01

    As the progression of multidrug-resistant organisms and lack of novel antibiotics move us closer toward a potential postantibiotic era, it is paramount to preserve the longevity of current therapeutic agents. Moreover, novel interventions for antimicrobial stewardship programs are integral to combating antimicrobial resistance worldwide. One unique method that may decrease the use of second-line antibiotics (e.g., fluoroquinolones, vancomycin) while facilitating access to a preferred β-lactam regimen in numerous health care settings is a penicillin skin test. Provided that up to 10% of patients have a reported penicillin allergy, of whom ~10% have true IgE-mediated hypersensitivity, significant potential exists to utilize a penicillin skin test to safely identify those who may receive penicillin or a β-lactam antibiotic. In this article, we provide information on the background, associated costs, currently available literature, pharmacists' role, antimicrobial stewardship implications, potential barriers, and misconceptions, as well as future directions associated with the penicillin skin test.

  10. Comparison between automated system and PCR-based method for identification and antimicrobial susceptibility profile of clinical Enterococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Furlaneto-Maia, Luciana; Rocha, Kátia Real; Siqueira, Vera Lúcia Dias; Furlaneto, Márcia Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Enterococci are increasingly responsible for nosocomial infections worldwide. This study was undertaken to compare the identification and susceptibility profile using an automated MicrosScan system, PCR-based assay and disk diffusion assay of Enterococcus spp. We evaluated 30 clinical isolates of Enterococcus spp. Isolates were identified by MicrosScan system and PCR-based assay. The detection of antibiotic resistance genes (vancomycin, gentamicin, tetracycline and erythromycin) was also determined by PCR. Antimicrobial susceptibilities to vancomycin (30 µg), gentamicin (120 µg), tetracycline (30 µg) and erythromycin (15 µg) were tested by the automated system and disk diffusion method, and were interpreted according to the criteria recommended in CLSI guidelines. Concerning Enterococcus identification the general agreement between data obtained by the PCR method and by the automatic system was 90.0% (27/30). For all isolates of E. faecium and E. faecalis we observed 100% agreement. Resistance frequencies were higher in E. faecium than E. faecalis. The resistance rates obtained were higher for erythromycin (86.7%), vancomycin (80.0%), tetracycline (43.35) and gentamicin (33.3%). The correlation between disk diffusion and automation revealed an agreement for the majority of the antibiotics with category agreement rates of > 80%. The PCR-based assay, the van(A) gene was detected in 100% of vancomycin resistant enterococci. This assay is simple to conduct and reliable in the identification of clinically relevant enterococci. The data obtained reinforced the need for an improvement of the automated system to identify some enterococci.

  11. [Invasive disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae: serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility in a Health Care Area in Galicia].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, F Pardo; Bernal, M L Pérez del Molino; Jung, P A Romero; Lamas, L Martínez; García, B Regueiro

    2007-12-01

    In the Health Care Area of Santiago de Compostela, during three years (2004-2006), we studied 218 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from invasive disease (10 CSF, 133 blood culture, 7 pleural fluid, 9 corneal ulcer and 59 lower respiratory tract), to determine the predominant serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility. 77.1% of the isolates were from adults and 22.9% from pediatric patients. There were 33 different serotypes, six of them occurring in more than 5% of cases, in decreasing order: 19 (16.97%), 3 (11.46%), 1 (10.55%), 14 (10.55%), 23 (6.88%) and 6 (6.88%). The predominant serogroup in CSF was 19 and in blood culture predominant serogroups were 19, 1, 14 and 3. 63.76% of the isolates were susceptible to all antibiotics tested. The most frequent resistance phenotypes were to erythromycin (24.31%), followed by penicillin (18.34%). Both phenotypes were associated with serotypes 19, 14 and 6. The resistance to levofloxacin was 0.9% and 0.5% to cefotaxime. We did not find any vancomycin resistance.

  12. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus Recovered from Recreational and Commercial Areas of Chesapeake Bay and Maryland Coastal Bays

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Kristi S.; Rosenberg Goldstein, Rachel E.; He, Xin; Jacobs, John M.; Crump, Byron C.; Sapkota, Amy R.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus in the estuarine-marine environment are of human health significance and may be increasing in pathogenicity and abundance. Vibrio illness originating from dermal contact with Vibrio laden waters or through ingestion of seafood originating from such waters can cause deleterious health effects, particularly if the strains involved are resistant to clinically important antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility among these pathogens. Surface-water samples were collected from three sites of recreational and commercial importance from July to September 2009. Samples were plated onto species-specific media and resulting V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus strains were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction assays and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility using the Sensititre® microbroth dilution system. Descriptive statistics, Friedman two-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Vibrio vulnificus (n = 120) and V. parahaemolyticus (n = 77) were isolated from all sampling sites. Most isolates were susceptible to antibiotics recommended for treating Vibrio infections, although the majority of isolates expressed intermediate resistance to chloramphenicol (78% of V. vulnificus, 96% of V. parahaemolyticus). Vibrio parahaemolyticus also demonstrated resistance to penicillin (68%). Sampling location or month did not significantly impact V. parahaemolyticus resistance patterns, but V. vulnificus isolates from St. Martin's River had lower overall intermediate resistance than that of the other two sampling sites during the month of July (p = 0.0166). Antibiotics recommended to treat adult Vibrio infections were effective in suppressing bacterial growth, while some antibiotics recommended for pediatric treatment were not effective against some of the recovered isolates. To our knowledge, these are the first antimicrobial

  13. The detection and antimicrobial susceptibility profile of Shigella isolates from meat and swab samples at butchers' shops in Gondar town, Northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Garedew, Legesse; Hagos, Zenabu; Zegeye, Bidir; Addis, Zelalem

    2016-01-01

    Food borne pathogens are major causes of deaths, illnesses and billions of dollars of expenses. The burden of food borne illness is worsened by the ever increasing rate of antimicrobial resistance microbes. Shigella, a bacterial pathogen associated with food, is reported to account for higher prevalence rates of food borne illness in different settings. A cross-sectional study was conducted from February 10 to June 30, 2013, at the butcher houses of Gondar town in the Northwest of Ethiopia to assess the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Shigella. Cattle raw meat and swab samples from selected critical control points, including knives, chopping boards, and the hands and noses of butchers, were collected and analyzed. The identification of Shigella was carried out using colony characteristics, the Gram reaction, and biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. The overall hygienic status of the butcher shops was also assessed using a checklist. An observational analysis revealed that the sanitary condition of the butcher shops and their premises was poor. Of 306 samples screened, 10.5% were positive for Shigella. Approximately 7.4% of meat samples and 10.2% of swab samples were contaminated with Shigella. Out of the total Shigella isolates, 90.6%, 46.9%, 18.8% and 9.4% were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, ceftriaxone and tetracycline, respectively. A multidrug resistance pattern was recorded in 27.8% of the isolates. In conclusion, the safety of meat sold at Gondar butchers houses was poor. The identified Shigella isolates showed high levels of drug resistance and multidrug resistance patterns for commonly used antimicrobials in veterinary and human medicine. Practicing wise use of antimicrobials and strict sanitary interventions at different critical control points is strongly recommended, in addition to further in-depth studies to prevent unprecedented consequences from

  14. Short communication: In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma bovis isolates identified in milk from dairy cattle in Belgium, Germany, and Italy.

    PubMed

    Barberio, A; Flaminio, B; De Vliegher, S; Supré, K; Kromker, V; Garbarino, C; Arrigoni, N; Zanardi, G; Bertocchi, L; Gobbo, F; Catania, S; Moroni, P

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of 73 isolates of Mycoplasma bovis isolated from milk of dairy cattle herds of Belgium, Germany, and Italy. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined by the microbroth dilution method for the following antimicrobials: erythromycin, spiramycin, tilmicosin, tylosin, lincomycin, enrofloxacin, doxycycline, oxytetracycline, florfenicol, and tiamulin. Macrolides, florfenicol, oxytetracycline, and enrofloxacin, were chosen because they represent antimicrobials families commonly used in several countries for treatment of M. bovis, and their MIC values in cattle population are reported in several studies, allowing a comparison with previous data. Doxycycline and tiamulin were selected to assess the susceptibility of M. bovis to new antimicrobials, because they are not registered in the European Union for the treatment of dairy cattle. Among the agents of the different antimicrobial classes, the macrolides showed the highest concentration to inhibit 90% of isolates (MIC90), all above the highest concentration tested: >8μg/mL for erythromycin, >16μg/mL for spiramycin, and >32μg/mL for tilmicosin and tylosin. Also the MIC90 of lincomycin was above the highest concentration tested (>32μg/mL), but the distribution of the MIC values was almost perfectly bimodal: 41 isolates had a MIC ≤0.5μg/mL and 30 isolates >32μg/mL. Oxytetracycline had a 2-fold higher concentration to inhibit 50% of isolates (2 vs. 0.5μg/mL) and 1-fold higher MIC90 (4 vs. 2μg/mL) than doxycycline. Enrofloxacin and florfenicol had both a MIC90 of 2μg/mL, whereas tiamulin had a MIC90 of 0.5μg/mL. Significant differences on the MIC values were found among the 3 countries for several antimicrobials: compared with Germany, Belgium and Italy showed significantly higher MIC for lincomycin, spiramycin, and tylosin, and lower for oxytetracycline and florfenicol. The Belgian isolates showed the lowest MIC

  15. [Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Resistance Mutations in Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli Isolates from Human and Meat Sources].

    PubMed

    Oishi, Akira; Murakami, Koichi; Etoh, Yoshiki; Sera, Nobuyuki; Horikawa, Kazumi

    2015-03-01

    Recently, there has been a marked increase in the number of reports of fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and its genetic determinants in Campylobacter species isolated from meat and human subjects in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan. Between 2011 and 2013, 55 and 64 isolates were collected from meat (chicken meat and beef liver) and humans, respectively, in this prefecture. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were conducted using the agar dilution method in accordance with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines, using the following 11 antimicrobial agents : cephalexin, cefoxitin, nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, minocycline, ampicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin and erythromycin. The susceptibility rates of the isolates to three quinolones (nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin) were 43.7%, 41.2%, 40.3%, respectively. All the isolates were multidrug resistant. Whereas 46.9%-51.6% of the human isolates were resistant to one or more of the quinolones, only 32.7%-34.5% of the meat isolates were resistant to one or more of the drugs. DNA sequencing showed that of the 50 quinolone resistant isolates 44 had position 86 isoleucine (Ile) substituted for threonine (Thr) in the GyrA protein (Thr86Ile). This amino acid substitution resulted from ACA to ATA and ACT to ATT mutations of codon 86 in C. jejuni and C. coli, respectively. Furthermore, two of the four C. jejuni isolates lacking the Thr86Ile mutation had combined Ser22Gly-Asn203Ser substitutions, while the remaining two isolates had combined Ser22Gly-Asn203Ser-Ala 206Val substitutions. These four isolates also had cmeABC sequences that differed from the quinolone sensitive C. jejuni ATCC33560(T) strain. In conclusion, C. jejuni and C. coli have relatively high quinolone resistance, and are resistant to other antibiotics. The new combination of amino acid

  16. Effect on quarter milk somatic cell count and antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus rostri causing intramammary infection in dairy water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, C; Piepers, S; De Vliegher, S; Barberio, A; Supré, K; Scaccabarozzi, L; Pisoni, G; Bronzo, V; Haesebrouck, F; Moroni, P

    2013-06-01

    In many parts of the world, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the predominant cause of intramammary infections (IMI) in dairy cows and in water buffaloes, as well. A longitudinal field study was carried out on one well-managed dairy water buffalo herd to determine the prevalence and distribution of CNS and a recently described CNS-species, Staphylococcus rostri, in milk samples to explore its relevance for buffaloes' udder health throughout lactation, and to gain insight into the susceptibility of the latter species toward commonly used antimicrobials. Twice weekly quarter milk samples from a cohort of 11 lactating water buffaloes were collected over an 8-mo period. The CNS (n=109; 76.2% of all culture-positive samples) were the predominant pathogens causing IMI, followed by Corynebacterium bovis (n=11; 7.6%) and Streptococcus spp. (n=9; 6.2%) other than Stretococcus uberis (n=2; 1.4%). Thirty-seven hemolytic staphylococci suspected to be Staphylococcus aureus were further differentiated using transfer DNA-intergenic spacer-PCR and rpoB-gene sequencing because they were coagulase-negative. Thirty-three of those isolates were identified as Staph. rostri, whereas 2 others were identified as Staphylococcus epidermidis. None of the Staph. rostri isolates displayed resistance to the antimicrobial agents tested. Mean quarter milk somatic cell count (qSCC) of all samples collected throughout lactation was 20,970 cells/mL. The qSCC at sampling of quarters infected with Staph. rostri (34,466 cells/mL) and CNS other than Staph. rostri (34,813 cells/mL) were significantly higher than the qSCC of noninfected quarters (20,287 cells/mL), yet not significantly different from each other. These findings provide novel insight into the prevalence and distribution, antimicrobial susceptibility, and relevance of Staph. rostri compared with other CNS species causing IMI in water buffaloes. Further studies are needed to pinpoint the relevance, niches, and transmission routes of

  17. Insect Gut Symbiont Susceptibility to Host Antimicrobial Peptides Caused by Alteration of the Bacterial Cell Envelope*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Son, Dae Woo; Kim, Chan-Hee; Cho, Jae Hyun; Marchetti, Roberta; Silipo, Alba; Sturiale, Luisa; Park, Ha Young; Huh, Ye Rang; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Fukatsu, Takema; Molinaro, Antonio; Lee, Bok Luel

    2015-01-01

    The molecular characterization of symbionts is pivotal for understanding the cross-talk between symbionts and hosts. In addition to valuable knowledge obtained from symbiont genomic studies, the biochemical characterization of symbionts is important to fully understand symbiotic interactions. The bean bug (Riptortus pedestris) has been recognized as a useful experimental insect gut symbiosis model system because of its cultivatable Burkholderia symbionts. This system is greatly advantageous because it allows the acquisition of a large quantity of homogeneous symbionts from the host midgut. Using these naïve gut symbionts, it is possible to directly compare in vivo symbiotic cells with in vitro cultured cells using biochemical approaches. With the goal of understanding molecular changes that occur in Burkholderia cells as they adapt to the Riptortus gut environment, we first elucidated that symbiotic Burkholderia cells are highly susceptible to purified Riptortus antimicrobial peptides. In search of the mechanisms of the increased immunosusceptibility of symbionts, we found striking differences in cell envelope structures between cultured and symbiotic Burkholderia cells. The bacterial lipopolysaccharide O antigen was absent from symbiotic cells examined by gel electrophoretic and mass spectrometric analyses, and their membranes were more sensitive to detergent lysis. These changes in the cell envelope were responsible for the increased susceptibility of the Burkholderia symbionts to host innate immunity. Our results suggest that the symbiotic interactions between the Riptortus host and Burkholderia gut symbionts induce bacterial cell envelope changes to achieve successful gut symbiosis. PMID:26116716

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility to azithromycin among Salmonella enterica Typhi and Paratyphi A isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Misra, Richa; Prasad, Kashi Nath

    2016-12-01

    Decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility (DCS) and multidrug resistance in typhoidal Salmonella isolates in areas of endemicity are significant therapeutic problems. Guidelines for azithromycin disc diffusion and MIC interpretive criteria for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi were published recently by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute in 2015. We investigated the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of azithromycin in 100 isolates of Salmonella Typhi (n=80), Paratyphi A (n=18) and B (n=2) recovered from bloodstream infections from January 2013 to December 2015. Zone sizes were extrapolated against MIC values, and a scatter plot was constructed. The azithromycin MICs by Etest ranged from 2 to 16 µg ml-1, while the disc diffusion diameters were from 13 to 22 mm. We observed that the margin of the zone of inhibition around the azithromycin disc may not be very clear and therefore difficult to interpret and that there was wide variation in the zone sizes for the same MIC value in both serovars. DCS was observed in 85 % of Salmonella Typhi recovered (68/80) and in 15/18 (83.3 %) Paratyphi A isolates. Judicious use of azithromycin is advocated as an alternative oral agent in endemic areas where DCS is common.

  19. Occurrence of enterotoxigenic and nonenterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in calves and evaluation of their antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Fernanda S; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos, Mario J

    2007-07-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is considered an important clinical pathogen and the most common anaerobe isolated from human and animal clinical specimens; enterotoxigenic strains produce diarrhea. The presence of enterotoxigenic (ETBF) and nonenterotoxigenic B. fragilis in stool samples from calves with or without acute diarrhea and the antimicrobial susceptibility of the strains were evaluated. The stool samples were plated onto a selective B. fragilis-bile-esculin agar, and incubated anaerobically (10% CO(2)/90% N(2)), at 37 degrees C, for 72 h. Species of the B. fragilis group were identified by using the API 32-A kit. Enterotoxigenic strains were detected by PCR and the cytotoxic assay. From 54 diarrhea and 54 nondiarrhea stools, 124 and 92 members of the B. fragilis group, respectively, were recovered. Only two ETBF strains were isolated from two different diarrhea samples and the bft gene was detected in both. Moreover, the bft gene was detected in DNA from four different diarrheal stools samples but no ETBF strain was recovered. All the bacteria were susceptible to chloramphenicol, imipenem, moxifloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, metronidazole and tigecycline. Most of the isolates from both calves with and without diarrhea were resistant to all metals. Our results are of concern, and suggest the need to increase the surveillance of antibiotic and metal resistance of this microbial group isolated from animal production such as calves.

  20. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma mycoides mycoides large colony and Arcanobacterium pyogenes isolated from clinical cases of ulcerative balanitis and vulvitis in Dorper sheep in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kidanemariam, A; Gouws, J; van Vuuren, M; Gummow, B

    2005-12-01

    The in vitro activities of enrofloxacin, florfenicol, oxytetracycline and spiramycin were determined against field isolates of Mycoplasma mycoides mycoides large colony (MmmLC) by means of the broth microdilution technique. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of these antimicrobial drugs were determined for a representative number of 10 isolates and 1 type strain. The susceptibility of Arcanobacterium pyogenes to enrofloxacin, oxytetracycline and tilmicosin was determined by means of an agar disk diffusion test. The MICs of enrofloxacin, florfenicol, oxytetracycline and spiramycin were within the ranges of 0.125-0.5, 1.0-2.0, 2.0-4.0 and 4.0-8.0 microg/ml, respectively. This study has shown that resistance of MmmLC against enrofloxacin, florfenicol, oxytetracycline and spiramycin was negligible. All the field strains of A. pyogenes that were tested were susceptible to enrofloxacin, oxytetracycline and tilmicosin with mean inhibition zones of 30.6, 42.3 and 35.8 mm, respectively. Although there is lack of data on in vivo efficacy and in vitro MIC or inhibition zone diameter breakpoints of these antimicrobial drugs for MmmLC, the MIC results indicate that these 4 classes of antimicrobial drugs should be effective in the treatment of ulcerative balanitis and vulvitis in sheep in South Africa.

  1. Automatic Radiated Susceptibility Test System for Payload Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Hoai T.; Sturman, John C.; Sargent, Noel B.

    1995-01-01

    An automatic radiated susceptibility test system (ARSTS) was developed for NASA Lewis Research Center's Electro-magnetic Interference laboratory. According to MSFC-SPEC 521B, any electrical or electronic equipment that will be transported by the spacelab and space shuttle must be tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic interference. This state-of-the-art automatic test system performs necessary calculations; analyzes, processes, and records a great quantity of measured data; and monitors the equipment being tested in real-time and with minimal user intervention. ARSTS reduces costly test time, increases test accuracy, and provides reliable test results.

  2. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of salmonellae isolates from reptiles in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Chen, Wan-Ching; Chin, Shih-Chien; Lai, Yen-Hsueh; Tung, Kwong-Chung; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Chang, Chao-Chin

    2010-01-01

    Pets, including reptiles, have been shown to be a source of Salmonella infection in humans. Due to increasing popularity and variety of exotic reptiles as pets in recent years, more human clinical cases of reptile-associated Salmonella infection have been identified. However, limited information is available with regard to serotypes in different reptiles (turtles, snakes, and lizards) and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella in pet reptiles. The current study was thus conducted to determine the prevalence of Salmonella colonization in pet reptiles. Salmonella organisms were isolated from 30.9% of 476 reptiles investigated. The isolation prevalences were 69.7% (23/33), 62.8% (27/43), and 24.3% (97/400) in snakes, lizards, and turtles, respectively. A total of 44 different Salmonella serovars were identified. Compared with S. Heron, Bredeney, Treforest, and 4,[5],12:i:-, S. Typhimurium isolates were resistant to many antimicrobials tested, and notably 61.1% of the isolates were resistant to cephalothin. The results indicated that raising reptiles as pets could be a possible source of Salmonella infection in humans, particularly zoonotic Salmonella serovars such as S. Typhimurium that may be resistant to antimicrobials.

  3. Phenotypic, antimicrobial susceptibility profile and virulence factors of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from buffalo and cow mastitic milk

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Kamelia M; Hassan, Hany M; Orabi, Ahmed; Abdelhafez, Ahmed S T

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the prevalence and virulence genes of Klebsiella mastitis pathogens in a buffalo population are undocumented. Also, the association of rmpA kfu, uge, magA, Aerobactin, K1 and K2 virulent factors with K. pneumoniae buffalo, and cow mastitis is unreported. The virulence of K. pneumoniae was evaluated through both phenotypic and molecular assays. In vivo virulence was assessed by the Vero cell cytotoxicity, suckling mouse assay and mice lethality test. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by disk diffusion method. The 45 K. pneumoniae isolates from buffalo (n = 10/232) and cow (n = 35/293) milk were isolated (45/525; 8.6%) and screened via PCR for seven virulence genes encoding uridine diphosphate galactose 4 epimerase encoding gene responsible for capsule and smooth lipopolysaccharide synthesis (uge), siderophores (kfu and aerobactin), protectines or invasins (rmpA and magA), and the capsule and hypermucoviscosity (K1 and K2). The most common virulence genes were rmpA, kfu, uge, and magA (77.8% each). Aerobactin and K1 genes were found at medium rates of 66.7% each and K2 (55.6%). The Vero cell cytotoxicity and LD (50) in mice were found in 100% of isolates. A multidrug resistance pattern was observed for 40% of the antimicrobials. The distribution of virulence profiles indicate a role of rmpA, kfu, uge, magA, Aerobactin, and K1 and K2 in pathogenicity of K. pneumoniae in udder infections and invasiveness, and constitutes a threat for vulnerable animals, even more if they are in combination with antibiotic resistance. PMID:24915048

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Edwardsiella ictaluri isolates from natural outbreaks of bacillary necrosis of Pangasianodon hypophthalmus in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tu, Thanh Dung; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Baele, Margo; Decostere, Annemie

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the in vitro susceptibility of 64 Vietnamese isolates of Edwardsiella ictaluri, the causal agent of the infectious disease Bacillus Necrosis Pangasius in Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, using the agar dilution technique. All isolates originated from different farms and were collected between 2002 and 2005. None of the isolates displayed acquired resistance to amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol, florfenicol, gentamicin, kanamycin, neomycin, and nitrofurantoin. Acquired resistance to streptomycin was detected in 83%, to oxytetracycline in 81%, and to trimethoprim in 71% of the isolates, as indicated by a bimodal distribution of the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of these antimicrobials. The MICs of enrofloxacin displayed a monomodal distribution with tailing toward the higher MIC values, possibly indicating reduced susceptibility of a minority of isolates (3 out of the 64). For the quinolone antimicrobial agents flumequin and oxolinic acid, acquired resistance was encountered in 8% and 6% of the strains, respectively. All strains were intrinsically resistant to the polypeptide antimicrobial agent colistin. Seventy-three percent of the isolates were shown to have acquired resistance to at least three antimicrobial agents. The results of this study emphasize the strict need to control both the prophylactic and curative use of antimicrobial agents in Vietnamese aquaculture.

  5. Comparison of the accuracy of disk diffusion zone diameters obtained by manual zone measurements to that by automated zone measurements to determine antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Lestari, Endang Sri; Severin, Juliëtte A; Filius, P Margreet G; Kuntaman, Kuntaman; Offra Duerink, D; Hadi, Usman; Wahjono, Hendro; Verbrugh, Henri A

    2008-10-01

    Although a variety of techniques are available for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, disk diffusion methods remain the most widely used. We compared the accuracy of disk diffusion zone diameters as obtained by manual zone measurements in a low resource country (Indonesia) to that by automated zone measurements (Oxoid aura image system) in a high resource setting (the Netherlands) to determine susceptibility categories (sensitive, intermediate susceptible or resistant). A total of 683 isolates were studied, including 294 Staphylococcus aureus, 195 Escherichia coli and 194 other Enterobacteriaceae. Antimicrobial agents included tetracycline, oxacillin, gentamicin, erythromycin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and chloramphenicol for S. aureus and ampicillin, gentamicin, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and chloramphenicol for E. coli and other Enterobacteriaceae. Of the 4098 drug-organism combinations, overall category agreement (CA), major discrepancy (MD) and minor discrepancy (mD) between the two methods were 82.4% (3379/4098), 6.0% (244/4098) and 11.6% (475/4098), respectively. One hundred and sixty three of 244 MDs were resolved using reference broth microdilution method. Overall very major error (VME), major error (ME) and minor error (mE) of manual zone measurement were 28.8%, 45.4% and 4.9%, respectively and for the aura image system 4.9%, 16.0% and 4.9%, respectively. The results of this study indicate that the disk diffusion method with manual zone measurement in Indonesia is reliable for susceptibility testing. The use of an automated zone reader, such as the aura image system, will reduce the number of errors, and thus improve the accuracy of susceptibility test results for medically relevant bacteria.

  6. Novel Antibiotic Susceptibility Tests by the ATP-Bioluminescence Method Using Filamentous Cell Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Noriaki; Nakajima, Moto-O; O’Hara, Koji; Sawai, Tetsuo

    1998-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing by the ATP-bioluminescence method has been noted for its speed; it provides susceptibility results within 2 to 5 h. However, several disagreements between the ATP method and standard methodology have been reported. The present paper describes a novel ATP method in a 3.5-h test which overcomes these deficiencies through the elimination of false-resistance discrepancies in tests on gram-negative bacteria with β-lactam agents. In our test model using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and piperacillin, it was shown that ATP in filamentous cells accounted for the false resistance. We found that 0.5% 2-amino-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (AMPD) extracted ATP from the filamentous cells without affecting normal cells and that 0.3 U of adenosine phosphate deaminase (APDase)/ml simultaneously digested the extracted ATP. We used the mixture of these reagents for the pretreatment of cells in a procedure we named filamentous cell treatment, prior to ATP measurements. This novel ATP method with the filamentous cell treatment eliminated false-resistance discrepancies in tests on P. aeruginosa with β-lactam agents, including piperacillin, cefoperazone, aztreonam, imipenem-cilastatin, ceftazidime, and cefsulodin. Furthermore, this novel methodology produced results which agreed with those of the standard microdilution method in other tests on gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis, for non-β-lactam agents, such as fosfomycin, ofloxacin, minocycline, and aminoglycosides. MICs obtained by the novel ATP method were also in agreement with those obtained by the agar dilution method of susceptibility testing. From these results, it was shown that the novel ATP method could be used successfully to test the activities of antimicrobial agents with the elimination of the previously reported discrepancies. PMID:9624485

  7. Are Creativity Tests Susceptible to Coaching?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairweather, Elizabeth C.; Cramond, Bonnie; Landis, Rebecca Nordin

    2015-01-01

    Critics of creativity tests, some of which are used widely in determining student eligibility for special educational opportunities such as gifted programs, claim that scores on these tests can be improved with specific training on the scoring components of the tests. However, we could find no empirical evidence supporting this claim. So, we…

  8. [Consensus on antimicrobial sensitivity tests in gram-positive cocci. Subcommittee on Antimicrobials, SADEBAC (Argentinian Society of Clinical Bacteriology), Argentinian Association of Microbiology].

    PubMed

    Famiglietti, A; Quinteros, M; Predari, S C; Corso, A; Lopardo, H; Casellas, J M; Bantar, C; Couto, E; Galas, M; Goldberg, M; Gutkind, G; Kovensky Pupko, J; Marín, M; Nicola, F; Pasterán, F; Radice, M; Soloaga, R

    2003-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing is mainly performed in Argentina by disk diffusion method, following National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) recommendations. We worked out new recommendations for the reporting and interpretation of this test when dealing with gram-positive cocci, in accordance to local trends and epidemiology. General considerations for performing the diffusion assay, quality control, and an update on susceptibility testing for gram-positive cocci are reported in this first document. The present update should be considered as a group of recommendations summarized by Argentinean experts and as the result of a consensus meeting coordinated by the Subcomisión de Antimicrobianos of the Sociedad Argentina de Bacteriología Clínica (Asociación Argentina de Microbiología). Experts in antimicrobial agents were convened in order to prepare this final document. These recommendations take into account local needs, affordability and availability to be used in current practice, tending to contribute to the correct antimicrobial treatment election, according to the particular microorganism and the infection sites.

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella isolates from healthy pigs and chickens (2008-2011).

    PubMed

    de Jong, Anno; Smet, Annemieke; Ludwig, Carolin; Stephan, Bernd; De Graef, Evelyne; Vanrobaeys, Mia; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2014-07-16

    Using the agar dilution method, antimicrobial susceptibility to human-use antibiotics was determined among Belgian faecal Salmonella isolates from healthy pigs and broiler chickens. Both epidemiological cut-off values and clinical breakpoints were applied for interpretation of the results. Cephalosporin-resistant isolates were examined for the presence of genes encoding CTX-M, SHV, TEM and CMY β-lactamases. All isolates with decreased quinolone susceptibility were screened for plasmid-borne genes qnr, qepA and aac(6')-Ib-cr. In all, 368 Salmonella isolates were recovered from pigs and 452 from chickens. Clinical resistance to ciprofloxacin was absent in isolates of both host species, and was 1.9 and 13.1% to cefotaxime in pig and poultry isolates, respectively. Decreased susceptibility to cefotaxime amounted to 2.2 and 0.7%, whereas for ciprofloxacin this was 3.0 and 23.0% in pig and poultry isolates, respectively. Ciprofloxacin decreased susceptibility was limited to few serovars, mainly Paratyphi B. Multidrug resistance was markedly higher for pig isolates (39.7%) than for chicken isolates (17.3%). Sixty-six cefotaxime-resistant isolates, 59 from chickens and 7 from pigs, were phenotypically determined as ESBL/AmpC producers; predominantly Paratyphi B and Typhimurium serovars. BlaCTX-M (mostly blaCTXM-1, but also blaCTXM-2 and blaCTXM-9) and blaTEM-52 were the predominant ESBL genes. Only few isolates expressed SHV-12 or an AmpC enzyme (CMY-2). Isolates of four serovars carried qnr genes: Brandenburg and Llandof from pigs, both qnrS; Indiana and Paratyphi B from chickens with qnrB and qnrA. The latter isolate carried blaCTX-M-9 and was the only strain with a plasmid-borne quinolone resistance gene among the ESBL/AmpC producers. This Salmonella survey confirms that the ESBL/AmpC producers are particularly prevalent in chickens (12.8%), and much less in pigs (1.9%). A link between plasmid-borne quinolone resistance genes and ESBLs/AmpC was uncommon.

  10. Use of Aeromonas spp. as General Indicators of Antimicrobial Susceptibility among Bacteria in Aquatic Environments in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Masaru; Tagaki, Chie; Fukuda, Akira; Okubo, Torahiko; Boonla, Chanchai; Suzuki, Satoru; Seki, Kanako; Takada, Hideshige; Tamura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobials are widely used, not only for treating human infections, but also for treatment of livestock and in fish farms. Human habitats in Southeastern Asian countries are located in close proximity to aquatic environments. As such, the human populations within these regions are at risk of exposure to antimicrobial resistant bacteria, and thereby disseminating antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). In this study, we collected water samples from 15 sites (5 sites in Chao Phraya River, 2 sites at the mouth of Chao Phraya River, 3 sites in Ta Chin River, and 5 sites at city canals) and 12 sites (6 sites at city canals; 2 sites at chicken farms; 2 sites at pig farms; and 2 samples from sites at pig farms, which were subsequently treated at a biogas plant) in Thailand in 2013 and 2014, respectively. In total, 117 Aeromonas spp. were isolated from the water samples, and these organisms exhibited various antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. Notably, there was a significant correlation between the environmental concentration of tetracyclines and the rates of tetracycline resistance in the isolated Aeromonas spp.; however, both the concentration and rates of tetracycline resistance in samples derived from pig farms were higher than those of samples harvested from other aquatic environments. These findings suggest that the high concentrations of antimicrobials observed in these aquatic environments likely select for ARGs. Furthermore, they indicate that Aeromonas spp. comprise an effective marker for monitoring antimicrobial resistance in aquatic environments. PMID:27433156

  11. Use of Aeromonas spp. as General Indicators of Antimicrobial Susceptibility among Bacteria in Aquatic Environments in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Usui, Masaru; Tagaki, Chie; Fukuda, Akira; Okubo, Torahiko; Boonla, Chanchai; Suzuki, Satoru; Seki, Kanako; Takada, Hideshige; Tamura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobials are widely used, not only for treating human infections, but also for treatment of livestock and in fish farms. Human habitats in Southeastern Asian countries are located in close proximity to aquatic environments. As such, the human populations within these regions are at risk of exposure to antimicrobial resistant bacteria, and thereby disseminating antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). In this study, we collected water samples from 15 sites (5 sites in Chao Phraya River, 2 sites at the mouth of Chao Phraya River, 3 sites in Ta Chin River, and 5 sites at city canals) and 12 sites (6 sites at city canals; 2 sites at chicken farms; 2 sites at pig farms; and 2 samples from sites at pig farms, which were subsequently treated at a biogas plant) in Thailand in 2013 and 2014, respectively. In total, 117 Aeromonas spp. were isolated from the water samples, and these organisms exhibited various antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. Notably, there was a significant correlation between the environmental concentration of tetracyclines and the rates of tetracycline resistance in the isolated Aeromonas spp.; however, both the concentration and rates of tetracycline resistance in samples derived from pig farms were higher than those of samples harvested from other aquatic environments. These findings suggest that the high concentrations of antimicrobials observed in these aquatic environments likely select for ARGs. Furthermore, they indicate that Aeromonas spp. comprise an effective marker for monitoring antimicrobial resistance in aquatic environments.

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility and phylotyping profile of pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica isolates from calves and pigs in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Souto, Monalisa S M; Coura, Fernanda M; Dorneles, Elaine M S; Stynen, Ana Paula R; Alves, Telma M; Santana, Jordana Almeida; Pauletti, Rebeca B; Guedes, Roberto M C; Viott, Aline M; Heinemann, Marcos B; Lage, Andrey P

    2017-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to determine (i) the profiles of phylogroup and (ii) the antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from calves, and of Salmonella spp. strains isolated from calves and pigs in Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Sixty-one pathogenic E. coli strains and Salmonella spp. (n = 24) strains isolated from fecal samples of calves and Salmonella spp. (n = 39) strains previously isolated from fecal samples of growing/finishing pigs were tested. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using the agar dilution method was determined for nalidixic acid, amikacin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, cefoxitin, norfloxacin, gentamicin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. All E. coli isolates were susceptible to amikacin. Tetracycline was the antimicrobial that presented the higher frequency of resistance among E. coli strains, followed by ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, amoxicillin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, gentamicin, and cefoxitin. E. coli (n = 61) strains isolated from calves belonged to different phylogroup namely, phylogroup A (n = 26), phylogroup B1 (n = 31), phylogroup E (n = 3), and phylogroup F (n = 1). Phylogroups B2, C, and D were not identified among the E. coli in the present study. All Salmonella spp. (n = 24) strains isolated from fecal samples of calves were susceptible to amikacin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, norfloxacin, gentamicin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Resistance to nalidixic acid and cefoxitin was detected in 16.66 and 8.33 % of the Salmonella spp. strains, respectively. Among the Salmonella spp. (n = 39) strains isolated from fecal samples of pigs, the higher frequency of resistance was observed to tetracycline, followed by amoxicillin, gentamicin, ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, nalidixic acid, cefoxitin, and norfloxacin. All strains were susceptible to amikacin. Forty-eight (78.68 %) of the E. coli strains

  13. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF VIRULENCE AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PROFILES OF UROPATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI FROM PATIENTS IN A TERTIARY HOSPITAL, SOUTHERN THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Themphachanal, Monchanok; Kongpheng, Suttiporn; Rattanachuay, Pattamarat; Khianngam, Saowapar; Singkhamanan, Kamonnut; Sukhumungoon, Pharanai

    2015-11-01

    Among uropathogens, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the most common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI) worldwide, but clinical aspects due to this bacterial species is not fully understood in southern Thailand. Two hundred fifty-four UPEC isolates from patients admitted to Maharaj Nakhon Si Thammarat Hospital, southern Thailand were examined for crucial virulence genes, showing that 33.5% contained at least one of the virulence, genes tested. Genes encoding P fimbria, cytotoxic necrotizing factor-1 and α-hemolysin constituted the majority (15.8%) carried by UPEC isolates. Phylogenetic group classification revealed that 57.5% of UPEC belonged to group D. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests showed that 70.5% and 65.1% of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin, respectively. Moreover, 50.0% of UPEC were capable of producing extended spectrum beta-lactamases. These findings should be of benefit for more appropriate treatment of UTI patients in this region of Thailand. Keywords: uropathogenic Escherichia coli, antibiotics resistance, cnfl, hlyA, pap, Thailand

  14. Wide variability in Pseudomonas aeruginosa aminoglycoside results among seven susceptibility testing procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Staneck, J L; Glenn, S; DiPersio, J R; Leist, P A

    1989-01-01

    Seven commonly used antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods were used to test the susceptibility of 150 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa against gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, carbenicillin, and piperacillin. Results were compared with respect to the susceptibility characteristics of the population of isolates as defined by each method. Conventional methods included agar disk diffusion and agar dilution, carried out in accordance with current recommendations of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, as well as broth microdilution testing with cation-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth (CSMHB). Methods in which instrumentation was used for result determination included the Autobac I, Avantage, Sensititre Autoreader (using a breakpoint panel at 18 h of incubation), and Vitek (AMS-240, using the GNS susceptibility card). When necessary for comparison, MIC data were converted to categorical interpretations (susceptible, intermediate, and resistant). With respect to gentamicin, no significant differences were noted among the results of disk diffusion, broth microdilution, Sensititre Auto breakpoint, or Vitek methods which characterized 60 to 67% of isolates as susceptible, 16 to 22% as intermediate, and 13 to 17% as resistant. In contrast, agar dilution, Autobac, and Avantage, although yielding gentamicin results similar to those of one another, were each significantly different in result reporting from the other four methods above for gentamicin results, and they characterized the Pseudomonas population largely as susceptible (88 to 97%), with 0 to 6% intermediate and only 3% to 6% resistant. More isolates were characterized as being resistant to gentamicin in the Avantage test if an assay broth supplemented with increased amounts of calcium was used. Cation impregnation of Autobac disks did not appreciably change Autobac results. The geometric mean MIC of gentamicin was 4 micrograms/ml lower in the agar dilution method than in the CSMHB

  15. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of E. coli O157:H7 Isolated from Traditionally Marketed Raw Cow Milk in and around Asosa Town, Western Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Disassa, Nigatu; Sibhat, Berhanu; Muktar, Yimer; Belina, Dinaol

    2017-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2014 to July 2015 to determine the prevalence and populations of E. coli as well as the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of E. coli O157:H7 isolated from raw milk. Biochemical and serological tests methods were used to confirm E. coli and E. coli O157:H7 and isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility test using the agar disc diffusion method. Out of 380 raw milk samples examined, 129 (33.9%) and 11 (2.9%) were contaminated with E. coli and E. coli O157:H7, respectively. The highest prevalence was recorded in samples obtained from vendors (39.1%, 4.978 ± 0.180 log10/ml) compared with samples from farmers (28.1%, 3.93 ± 0.01 log10/ml) with significant differences (P = 0.02). The frequency of contamination was higher in the samples collected from milk that was stored and transported in plastic containers (39.4%) than in the containers made of stainless steel (23.0%) (P = 0.002). The antimicrobial susceptibility profile showed that E. coli O157:H7 were resistant to tetracycline (81.8%), streptomycin (81.8%), and kanamycin (63.6%). Milk samples were produced and handled under poor hygienic conditions, stored, and transported in inappropriate containers and under temperature abuse conditions leading to high health risk to the consumers. Additional studies would be needed to establish association between the occurrences of E. coli O157:H7 in raw milk and all the risk factors involved in and around Asosa town. PMID:28316862

  16. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of E. coli O157:H7 Isolated from Traditionally Marketed Raw Cow Milk in and around Asosa Town, Western Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Disassa, Nigatu; Sibhat, Berhanu; Mengistu, Shimelis; Muktar, Yimer; Belina, Dinaol

    2017-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2014 to July 2015 to determine the prevalence and populations of E. coli as well as the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of E. coli O157:H7 isolated from raw milk. Biochemical and serological tests methods were used to confirm E. coli and E. coli O157:H7 and isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility test using the agar disc diffusion method. Out of 380 raw milk samples examined, 129 (33.9%) and 11 (2.9%) were contaminated with E. coli and E. coli O157:H7, respectively. The highest prevalence was recorded in samples obtained from vendors (39.1%, 4.978 ± 0.180 log10/ml) compared with samples from farmers (28.1%, 3.93 ± 0.01 log10/ml) with significant differences (P = 0.02). The frequency of contamination was higher in the samples collected from milk that was stored and transported in plastic containers (39.4%) than in the containers made of stainless steel (23.0%) (P = 0.002). The antimicrobial susceptibility profile showed that E. coli O157:H7 were resistant to tetracycline (81.8%), streptomycin (81.8%), and kanamycin (63.6%). Milk samples were produced and handled under poor hygienic conditions, stored, and transported in inappropriate containers and under temperature abuse conditions leading to high health risk to the consumers. Additional studies would be needed to establish association between the occurrences of E. coli O157:H7 in raw milk and all the risk factors involved in and around Asosa town.

  17. Differences in antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from blood cultures, set by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Shimizu, Chihiro; Kasahara, Mayumi; Nakata, Chiyo; Munakata, Machiko; Takahashi, Hakuo

    2007-02-01

    A study was made of the antimicrobial susceptibility to and efficacy of various kinds of antimicrobial agents against 179 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that were isolated from blood cultures at Kansai Medical University Hospital from 1990 through 2004. The annual detection rate was highest in 1994, at 22 strains (6.5%). There were 9 multidrug resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.0%). Among 14 antimicrobial agents tested for measurements, ciprofloxacin (CPFX) showed the best minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 50 value, of 0.25 microg/ml, followed by pazufloxacin (PZFX) and biapenem (BIPM), each at 0.5 microg/ml. When the period of 15 years was divided into three stages, the MIC50 value for each antimicrobial agent was highest in the middle stage (1995 to 1999). Assuming that the percentage of sensitive strains according to the breakpoints set by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) represents the antimicrobial susceptibility rate, amikacin (AMK) showed the best value, of 85.5%. According to the sepsis breakpoint set by the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), the efficacy of CPFX showed the highest rate (77.1%) of all the antimicrobial agents tested. Among beta-lactams, BIPM showed the highest efficacy rate, of 67.0%. When the efficacy rates were compared with each other, the difference in efficacy rate between the breakpoint set by the CLSI and the sepsis breakpoint set by the JSC was large for beta-lactams. Comparisons made based on the CLSI criteria showed no difference in cross-resistance rates between CPFX, meropenem (MEPM), and BIPM. However, when comparisons were made using the JSC sepsis breakpoint, MEPM showed a cross-resistance rate of 87.8%, while the rate for BIPM was lower, at 56.1%, with the chi2 test showing a significant difference, at P = 0.0014. In accordance with the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics theory that has been advocated, breakpoints which are more suitable for the clinical setting in Japan should

  18. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Resistance Patterns among Helicobacter pylori Strains from The Gambia, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Douglas E.; Antonio, Martin; Corrah, Tumani; Tapgun, Mary; Walton, Robert; Thomas, Vivat; Galano, Juan J.; Sancho, Javier; Adegbola, Richard A.; Thomas, Julian E.

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a globally important and genetically diverse gastric pathogen that infects most people in developing countries. Eradication efforts are complicated by antibiotic resistance, which varies in frequency geographically. There are very few data on resistance in African strains. Sixty-four Gambian H. pylori strains were tested for antibiotic susceptibility. The role of rdxA in metronidazole (Mtz) susceptibility was tested by DNA transformation and sequencing; RdxA protein variants were interpreted in terms of RdxA structure. Forty-four strains (69%) were resistant to at least 8 μg of Mtz/ml. All six strains from infants, but only 24% of strains from adults, were sensitive (P = 0.0031). Representative Mtz-resistant (Mtzr) strains were rendered Mtz susceptible (Mtzs) by transformation with a functional rdxA gene; conversely, Mtzs strains were rendered Mtzr by rdxA inactivation. Many mutations were found by Gambian H. pylori rdxA sequencing; mutations that probably inactivated rdxA in Mtzr strains were identified and explained using RdxA protein's structure. All of the strains were sensitive to clarithromycin and erythromycin. Amoxicillin and tetracycline resistance was rare. Sequence analysis indicated that most tetracycline resistance, when found, was not due to 16S rRNA gene mutations. These data suggest caution in the use of Mtz-based therapies in The Gambia. The increasing use of macrolides against respiratory infections in The Gambia calls for continued antibiotic susceptibility monitoring. The rich variety of rdxA mutations that we found will be useful in further structure-function studies of RdxA, the enzyme responsible for Mtz susceptibility in this important pathogen. PMID:23263004

  19. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Bacteria from Milkmen and Cows with Clinical Mastitis in and around Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kateete, David Patrick; Kabugo, Usuf; Baluku, Hannington; Nyakarahuka, Luke; Kyobe, Samuel; Okee, Moses; Najjuka, Christine Florence; Joloba, Moses Lutaakome

    2013-01-01

    Background Identification of pathogens associated with bovine mastitis is helpful in treatment and management decisions. However, such data from sub-Saharan Africa is scarce. Here we describe the distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of bacteria from cows with clinical mastitis in Kampala, Uganda. Due to high concern of zoonotic infections, isolates from milkmen are also described. Methodology/Principal Findings Ninety seven milk samples from cows with clinical mastitis and 31 nasal swabs from milkmen were collected (one sample per cow/human). Fifty eight (60%) Gram-positive isolates namely Staphylococci (21), Enterococci (16), Streptococci (13), Lactococci (5), Micrococci (2) and Arcanobacteria (1) were detected in cows; only one grew Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, 24 (25%) coliforms namely Escherichia coli (12), Klebsiella oxytoca (5), Proteus vulgaris (2), Serratia (2), Citrobacter (1), Cedecea (1) and Leclercia (1) were identified. From humans, 24 Gram-positive bacteria grew, of which 11 were Staphylococci (35%) including four Staphylococcus aureus. Upon susceptibility testing, methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were prevalent; 57%, 12/21 in cows and 64%, 7/11 in humans. However, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was not detected. Furthermore, methicillin and vancomycin resistant CoNS were detected in cows (Staphylococcus hominis, Staphylococcus lugdunensis) and humans (Staphylococcus scuiri). Also, vancomycin and daptomycin resistant Enterococci (Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, respectively) were detected in cows. Coliforms were less resistant with three pan-susceptible isolates. However, multidrug resistant Klebsiella, Proteus, Serratia, Cedecea, and Citrobacter were detected. Lastly, similar species grew from human and bovine samples but on