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Sample records for antimony tellurides

  1. Thermoelectric Micro-Refrigerator Based on Bismuth/Antimony Telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Linh Tuan; Dang, Tung Huu; Nguyen, Thao Thi Thu; Nguyen, Thuat Tran; Nguyen, Hue Minh; Nguyen, Tuyen Viet; Nguyen, Hung Quoc

    2017-03-01

    Thermoelectric micro-coolers based on bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) and antimony telluride (Sb2Te3) are important in many practical applications thanks to their compactness and fluid-free circulation. In this paper, we studied thermoelectric properties of bismuth/antimony telluride (Bi/SbTe) thin films prepared by the thermal co-evaporation method, which yielded among the best thermoelectric quality. Different co-evaporation conditions such as deposition flux ratio of materials and substrate temperature during deposition were investigated to optimize the thermoelectric figure␣of merit of these materials. Micron-size refrigerators were designed and fabricated using standard lithography and etching technique. A three-layer structure was introduced, including a p-type layer, an n-type layer and an aluminum layer. Next to the main cooler, a pair of smaller Bi/SbTe junctions was used as a thermocouple to directly measure electron temperature of the main device. Etching properties of the thermoelectric materials were investigated and optimized to support the fabrication process of the micro-refrigerator. We discuss our results and address possible applications.

  2. The heat capacity of solid antimony telluride Sb2Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashinkin, A. S.; Malkova, A. S.; Mikhailova, M. S.

    2008-05-01

    The literature data on the heat capacity of solid antimony telluride over the range 53 895 K were analyzed. The heat capacity of Sb2Te3 was measured over the range 350 700 K on a DSM-2M calorimeter. The equation for the temperature dependence was suggested. The thermodynamic functions of Sb2Te3 were calculated over the range 298.15 700 K.

  3. An additive approach to low temperature zero pressure sintering of bismuth antimony telluride thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catlin, Glenn C.; Tripathi, Rajesh; Nunes, Geoffrey; Lynch, Philip B.; Jones, Howard D.; Schmitt, Devin C.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents an additive-based approach to the formulation of thermoelectric materials suitable for screen printing. Such printing processes are a likely route to such thermoelectric applications as micro-generators for wireless sensor networks and medical devices, but require the development of materials that can be sintered at ambient pressure and low temperatures. Using a rapid screening process, we identify the eutectic combination of antimony and tellurium as an additive for bismuth-antimony-telluride that enables good thermoelectric performance without a high pressure step. An optimized composite of 15 weight percent Sb7.5Te92.5 in Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 is scaled up and formulated into a screen-printable paste. Samples fabricated from this paste achieve a thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of 0.74 using a maximum processing temperature of 748 K and a total thermal processing budget of 12 K-hours.

  4. Suppression of Grain Growth by Additive in Nanostructured P-type Bismuth Antimony Tellurides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Qinyong; Chen, S.; Liu, W S; Lukas, K; Yan, X; Wang, H; Wang, D.; Opeil, C; Chen, Gang; Ren, Z. F.

    2011-01-01

    Grain growth is a major issue in the preparation of nanostructured bismuth-antimony-tellurides during hot pressing the nanopowders into dense bulk samples. To prevent grain agglomeration during ball milling and growth during hot pressing, organic agent (Oleic Acid, OA) as additive was added into the materials at the beginning of the ball milling process. With different concentrations of OA (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 wt%), grains with different sizes are obtained. Structural analysis clearly shows that it is the particle size of the nanopowders that determines the final grain size in the densely compacted bulk samples. A combination of small grains ~200–500 nm and nanopores leads to effective phonon scattering, which results in the decrease of lattice thermal conductivity, and ZT of ~1.3 at 373 K for the sample with 2.0 wt% OA.

  5. A density-functional study on the electronic and vibrational properties of layered antimony telluride.

    PubMed

    Stoffel, Ralf P; Deringer, Volker L; Simon, Ronnie E; Hermann, Raphaël P; Dronskowski, Richard

    2015-03-04

    We present a comprehensive survey of electronic and lattice-dynamical properties of crystalline antimony telluride (Sb2Te3). In a first step, the electronic structure and chemical bonding have been investigated, followed by calculations of the atomic force constants, phonon dispersion relationships and densities of states. Then, (macroscopic) physical properties of Sb2Te3 have been computed, namely, the atomic thermal displacement parameters, the Grüneisen parameter γ, the volume expansion of the lattice, and finally the bulk modulus B. We compare theoretical results from three popular and economic density-functional theory (DFT) approaches: the local density approximation (LDA), the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), and a posteriori dispersion corrections to the latter. Despite its simplicity, the LDA shows excellent performance for all properties investigated-including the Grüneisen parameter, which only the LDA is able to recover with confidence. In the absence of computationally more demanding hybrid DFT methods, the LDA seems to be a good choice for further lattice dynamical studies of Sb2Te3 and related layered telluride materials.

  6. Facile Control of Interfacial Energy-Barrier Scattering in Antimony Telluride Electrodeposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jiwon; Jung, Hyunsung; Lim, Jae-Hong; Myung, Nosang V.

    2017-04-01

    The augmented thermoelectric performance of nanocrystalline antimony telluride (Sb2Te3) films is investigated by introducing interfacial energy-barrier scattering (i.e., barrier heights), which occurs at both the grain boundaries and the interfaces with embedded second phases. It is postulated that the barriers created at both the interfaces and boundaries filter the low-energy carriers, thus favoring a high Seebeck coefficient. A facile, but high-precision composition-controlled electrodeposition technique is employed to synthesize single-phase nanocrystalline Sb2Te3 and nanocomposite Te/Sb2Te3. Both the initial composition of the Sb-Te solid solution and the post-annealing profiles are varied to control the grain size, as well as the formation of second-phase Te. The electrical and thermoelectric properties are measured and correlated with the physical properties, where an enhanced Seebeck coefficient at a fixed carrier concentration is interpreted as indicating that the energy-dependent carrier filtering effect is in force. On a promising note, modification of the Sb2Te3 film physical properties and formation of the second phase affect the interfacial energy-barrier scattering and yields an enhanced power factor. Thus, Sb2Te3 film is a promising p-type thermoelectric material for a room-temperature-operational micro-thermoelectric power generator.

  7. Semiconductor nanocrystals functionalized with antimony telluride zintl ions for nanostructured thermoelectrics.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Maksym V; Spokoyny, Boris; Lee, Jong-Soo; Scheele, Marcus; Weber, Andrew; Perera, Susanthri; Landry, Daniel; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2010-05-19

    The energy efficiency of heat engines could be improved by the partial recovery of waste heat using thermoelectric (TE) generators. We show the possibility of designing nanostructured TE materials using colloidal inorganic nanocrystals functionalized with molecular antimony telluride complexes belonging to the family of Zintl ions. The unique advantage of using Zintl ions as the nanocrystal surface ligands is the possibility to convert them into crystalline metal chalcogenides, thus linking individual nanobuilding blocks into a macroscopic assembly of electronically coupled functional modules. This approach allows preserving the benefits of nanostructuring and quantum confinement while enabling facile charge transport through the interparticle boundaries. A developed methodology was applied for solution-based fabrication of nanostructured n- and p-type Bi(2-x)Sb(x)Te(3) alloys with tunable composition and PbTe-Sb(2)Te(3) nanocomposites with controlled grain size. Characterization of the TE properties of these materials showed that their Seebeck coefficients, electrical and thermal conductivities, and ZT values compared favorably with those of previously reported solution-processed TE materials.

  8. Evaluation of Specific Heat, Sound Velocity and Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Strained Nanocrystalline Bismuth Antimony Telluride Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, D.; Tanaka, S.; Miyazaki, K.; Takashiri, M.

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effect of strain on specific heat, sound velocity and lattice thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline bismuth antimony telluride thin films, we performed both experimental study and modeling. The nanocrystalline thin films had mostly preferred crystal orientation along c-axis, and strains in the both directions of c-axis and a- b-axis. It was found that the thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline thin films decreased greatly as compared with that of bulk alloys. To gain insight into the thermal transport in the strained nanocrystalline thin films, we estimated the lattice thermal conductivity based on the phonon transport model of full distribution of mean free paths accounting for the effects of grain size and strain which was influenced to both the sound velocity and the specific heat. As a result, the lattice thermal conductivity was increased when the strain was shifted from compressive to tensile direction. We also confirmed that the strain was influenced by the lattice thermal conductivity but the reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity of thin films can be mainly attributed to the nano-size effect rather than the strain effect. Finally, it was found that the measured lattice thermal conductivities were in good agreement with modeling.

  9. Antimony

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Antimony ; CASRN 7440 - 36 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  10. Nanoscale arrays of antimony telluride single crystals by selective chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruomeng; Benjamin, Sophie L.; Gurnani, Chitra; Wang, Yudong; Hector, Andrew L.; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; De Groot, C. H. (Kees)

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of individual single nanocrystals of Sb2Te3 have been formed using selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from a single source precursor. Crystals are self-assembled reproducibly in confined spaces of 100 nm diameter with pitch down to 500 nm. The distribution of crystallite sizes across the arrays is very narrow (standard deviation of 15%) and is affected by both the hole diameter and the array pitch. The preferred growth of the crystals in the <1 1 0> orientation along the diagonal of the square holes strongly indicates that the diffusion of adatoms results in a near thermodynamic equilibrium growth mechanism of the nuclei. A clear relationship between electrical resistivity and selectivity is established across a range of metal selenides and tellurides, showing that conductive materials result in more selective growth and suggesting that electron donation is of critical importance for selective deposition. PMID:27283116

  11. Effects of chemical intermixing on electrical and thermal contact conductances at metallized bismuth and antimony telluride interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Devender,; Mehta, Rutvik J.; Ramanath, Ganpati; Lofgreen, Kelly; Mahajan, Ravi; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian

    2015-03-15

    Tailoring electrical and thermal contact conductivities (Σ{sub c} and Γ{sub c}) across metallized pnictogen chalcogenide interfaces is key for realizing efficient thermoelectric devices. The authors report that Cu, Ni, Ti, and Ta diffusion and interfacial telluride formation with n-Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and p-Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} influence both Σ{sub c} and Γ{sub c}. Cu metallization yields the highest Γ{sub c} and the lowest Σ{sub c}, correlating with maximal metal diffusion and copper telluride formation. Ni diffuses less and yields the highest Σ{sub c} with Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} due to p-type nickel telluride formation, which diminishes Σ{sub c} improvement with n-Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} interfaces. Ta and Ti contacts yield the lowest properties similar to that in Ni-metallized structures. These correlations between interfacial diffusion and phase formation on electronic and thermal transport properties will be important for devising suitable metallization for thermoelectric devices.

  12. Microstructure and Electrical Properties of Antimony Telluride Thin Films Deposited by RF Magnetron Sputtering on Flexible Substrate Using Different Sputtering Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khumtong, T.; Sukwisute, P.; Sakulkalavek, A.; Sakdanuphab, R.

    2017-02-01

    The microstructural, electrical, and thermoelectric properties of antimony telluride (Sb2Te3) thin films have been investigated for thermoelectric applications. Sb2Te3 thin films were deposited on flexible substrate (polyimide) by radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering from a Sb2Te3 target using different sputtering pressures in the range from 4 × 10-3 mbar to 1.2 × 10-2 mbar. The crystal structure, [Sb]:[Te] ratio, and electrical and thermoelectric properties of the films were analyzed by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and Hall effect and Seebeck measurements, respectively. The XRD spectra of the films demonstrated polycrystalline structure with preferred orientation of (015), (110), and (1010). A high-intensity spectrum was found for the film deposited at lower sputtering pressure. EDS analysis of the films revealed the effects of the sputtering pressure on the [Sb]:[Te] atomic ratio, with nearly stoichiometric films being obtained at higher sputtering pressure. The stoichiometric Sb2Te3 films showed p-type characteristics with electrical conductivity, carrier concentration, and mobility of 35.7 S cm-1, 6.38 × 1019 cm-3, and 3.67 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively. The maximum power factor of 1.07 × 10-4 W m-1 K-2 was achieved for the film deposited at sputtering pressure of 1.0 × 10-2 mbar.

  13. Antimony Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2010-01-01

    Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The major toxic side-effects of antimonials as a result of therapy are cardiotoxicity (~9% of patients) and pancreatitis, which is seen commonly in HIV and visceral leishmaniasis co-infections. Quality control of each batch of drugs produced and regular monitoring for toxicity is required when antimonials are used therapeutically. PMID:21318007

  14. Antimony trioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Antimony trioxide ; CASRN 1309 - 64 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  15. Antimony: a flame fighter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wintzer, Niki E.; Guberman, David E.

    2015-01-01

    In the 11th century, the word antimonium was used by medieval scholar Constantinus Africanus, but antimony metal was not isolated until the 16th century by Vannoccio Biringuccio, an Italian metallurgist. In the early 18th century, chemist Jons Jakob Berzelius chose the periodic symbol for antimony (Sb) based on stibium, which is the Latin name for stibnite.

  16. Epitaxial Silicon Doped With Antimony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, James E.; Halleck, Bradley L.

    1996-01-01

    High-purity epitaxial silicon doped with antimony made by chemical vapor deposition, using antimony pentachloride (SbCI5) as source of dopant and SiH4, SiCI2H2, or another conventional source of silicon. High purity achieved in layers of arbitrary thickness. Epitaxial silicon doped with antimony needed to fabricate impurity-band-conduction photodetectors operating at wavelengths from 2.5 to 40 micrometers.

  17. Oligosilanylated Antimony Compounds

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    By reactions of magnesium oligosilanides with SbCl3, a number of oligosilanylated antimony compounds were obtained. When oligosilanyl dianions were used, either the expected cyclic disilylated halostibine was obtained or alternatively the formation of a distibine was observed. Deliberate formation of the distibine from the disilylated halostibine was achieved by reductive coupling with C8K. Computational studies of Sb–Sb bond energies, barriers of pyramidal inversion at Sb, and the conformational behavior of distibines provided insight for the understanding of the spectroscopic properties. PMID:25937691

  18. Cadmium telluride photovoltaic radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, Dimitrios C.; Fox, Richard J.

    1981-01-01

    A dosimetry-type radiation detector is provided which employs a polycrystalline, chlorine-compensated cadmium telluride wafer fabricated to operate as a photovoltaic current generator used as the basic detecting element. A photovoltaic junction is formed in the wafer by painting one face of the cadmium telluride wafer with an n-type semiconductive material. The opposite face of the wafer is painted with an electrically conductive material to serve as a current collector. The detector is mounted in a hermetically sealed vacuum containment. The detector is operated in a photovoltaic mode (zero bias) while DC coupled to a symmetrical differential current amplifier having a very low input impedance. The amplifier converts the current signal generated by radiation impinging upon the barrier surface face of the wafer to a voltage which is supplied to a voltmeter calibrated to read quantitatively the level of radiation incident upon the detecting wafer.

  19. Cadmium telluride photovoltaic radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, D.C.; Fox, R.J.

    A dosimetry-type radiation detector is provided which employs a polycrystalline, chlorine-compensated cadmium telluride wafer fabricated to operate as a photovoltaic current generator used as the basic detecting element. A photovoltaic junction is formed in the wafer by painting one face of the cadmium telluride wafer with an n-type semi-conductive material. The opposite face of the wafer is painted with an electrically conductive material to serve as a current collector. The detector is mounted in a hermetically sealed vacuum containment. The detector is operated in a photovoltaic mode (zero bias) while DC coupled to a symmetrical differential current amplifier having a very low input impedance. The amplifier converts the current signal generated by radiation impinging upon the barrier surface face of the wafer to a voltage which is supplied to a voltmeter calibrated to read quantitatively the level of radiation incident upon the detecting wafer.

  20. Antimony activities in copper mattes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, M.; Toguri, J. M.

    1987-03-01

    A mass spectrometric technique combined with a double Knudsen cell was used to determine the antimony and copper activities in the Cu-Sb binary system at 1373 K and in the two-melt composition range of the Cu-S-Sb ternary system at 1423 K. The antimony and copper activities were calculated based on the intensity ration of the gaseous Sb and Cu species, over the unknown and known activity samples, respectively. γ{Sb/o} were found to be 1.1×10-2 in molten copper at 1373 K, and 1.8×10-2 and 0.44 in a copper-rich phase and in a matter phase, of the Cu-S-Sb ternary system at 1423 K, respectively. These values indicate, that antimony can be removed during the matte smelting and slagging stage of the copper smelting process. Interaction parameters of antimony in molten copper slagging stage of the copper smelting process. Interaction parameters of antimony in molten copper at 1423 K were calculated and found to be 10.7, -5.4, and 6.3 for ɛ{Sb/Sb} · ρSb Sb, and ɛ{Sb/S}, respectively.

  1. Phonon dynamics of americium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, B. S.; Aynyas, Mahendra; Ahirwar, Ashok K.; Sanyal, S. P.

    2013-06-01

    We report for the first time the complete phonon dispersion curves for Americium telluride (AmTe) using a breathing shell models (BSM) to establish their predominant ionic nature. The results obtained in the present study show the general features of the phonon spectrum. We could not compare our results with the experimental measurements as they are not available so far. We emphasize the need of neutron scattering measurements to compare our results. We also report, for the first time specific heat for this compound.

  2. Mineral Resource of the Month: Antimony

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guberman, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Antimony is a lustrous silvery-white semimetal or metalloid. Archaeological and historical studies indicate that antimony and its mineral sulfides have been used by humans for at least six millennia. The alchemist Basil Valentine is sometimes credited with “discovering” the element; he described the extraction of metallic antimony from stibnite in his treatise “The Triumphal Chariot of Antimony,” published sometime between 1350 and 1600. In the early 18th century, Jöns Jakob Berzelius chose the periodic symbol for antimony (Sb) based on stibium, which is the Latin name for stibnite.

  3. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L. )

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

  4. Process for producing large grain cadmium telluride

    DOEpatents

    Hasoon, F.S.; Nelson, A.J.

    1996-01-16

    A process is described for producing a cadmium telluride polycrystalline film having grain sizes greater than about 20 {micro}m. The process comprises providing a substrate upon which cadmium telluride can be deposited and placing that substrate within a vacuum chamber containing a cadmium telluride effusion cell. A polycrystalline film is then deposited on the substrate through the steps of evacuating the vacuum chamber to a pressure of at least 10{sup {minus}6} torr.; heating the effusion cell to a temperature whereat the cell releases stoichiometric amounts of cadmium telluride usable as a molecular beam source for growth of grains on the substrate; heating the substrate to a temperature whereat a stoichiometric film of cadmium telluride can be deposited; and releasing cadmium telluride from the effusion cell for deposition as a film on the substrate. The substrate then is placed in a furnace having an inert gas atmosphere and heated for a sufficient period of time at an annealing temperature whereat cadmium telluride grains on the substrate grow to sizes greater than about 20 {micro}m.

  5. Research support for cadmium telluride crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Banish, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Work performed during the period 11 Feb. 1992 to 10 Aug. 1993 on research support for cadmium telluride crystal growth is reported. Work on chemical impurity characterization and mass spectroscopy is described.

  6. FIRST REPORT ON OTOTOXICITY OF MEGLUMINE ANTIMONIATE

    PubMed Central

    Valete-Rosalino, Cláudia Maria; Araujo-Melo, Maria Helena; Bezerra, Débora Cristina de Oliveira; de Barcelos, Renata Oliveira; de Melo-Ferreira, Vanessa; Torraca, Tânia Salgado de Sousa; Martins, Ana Cristina da Costa; Moreira, João Soares; Vargas, Mirian Catherine Melgares; Braga, Frederico Pereira Bom; Salgueiro, Mariza de Matos; Saheki, Maurício Naoto; Schubach, Armando Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pentavalent antimonials are the first drug of choice in the treatment of tegumentary leishmaniasis. Data on ototoxicity related with such drugs is scarcely available in literature, leading us to develop a study on cochleovestibular functions. Case Report: A case of a tegumentary leishmaniasis patient, a 78-year-old man who presented a substantial increase in auditory threshold with tinnitus and severe rotatory dizziness during the treatment with meglumine antimoniate, is reported. These symptoms worsened in two weeks after treatment was interrupted. Conclusion: Dizziness and tinnitus had already been related to meglumine antimoniate. However, this is the first well documented case of cochlear-vestibular toxicity related to meglumine antimoniate. PMID:25229226

  7. Mineral resource of the month: antimony

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The article describes the characteristics and industrial uses of antimony. Antimony, which is produced as a byproduct of mining other metals such as gold, lead or silver, is used in everything from flame retardants, batteries, ceramics and glass. It is also used in glass for television picture tubes, computer monitors, pigments and catalysts.

  8. Thermoelectric Transport in Surface- and Antimony-Doped Bismuth Telluride Nanoplates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-25

    atmosphere, scale bar is 500 nm. (a) High-angle annular dark -field image, contrast is from carbon thickness; (b) Bi L-edge; (c) Sb K-edge; (d) Te K...Lundstrom, and L. Shi, Nano Lett. 13, 5316 (2013). 13 B. M. Fregoso and S. Coh, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 27, 422001 (2015). 14 D. Hsieh, Y. Xia, D

  9. Temperature-dependent ordering phenomena in single crystals of germanium antimony tellurides

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Philipp; Schneider, Matthias N.; Oeckler, Oliver

    2015-07-15

    The temperature-dependent behavior of quenched single-crystalline (GeTe){sub n}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} (n~2.8, n~5 and n~11) was investigated by semiquantitative modeling of diffuse X-ray scattering. The structure at room temperature exhibits trigonal twin domains, each comprising a stacking-disordered sequence of distorted rocksalt-type slabs with variable thicknesses. Ge and Sb share the cation position and vacancies are partially ordered in defect layers (van der Waals gaps) between the slabs. The average structure determined with resonant diffraction data corresponds to a rocksalt-type structure whose cation position is split along the stacking direction. Upon heating, cation ordering leads to a metastable superstructure of the rocksalt type at ~400 °C, which transforms to a rocksalt-type high-temperature phase with randomly distributed cations and vacancies at ~500 °C; this structure was also refined using resonant diffraction. Cooling at high or intermediate rates does not yield the long-range ordered phase, but directly leads to the twinned disordered phase. - Graphical abstract: Development of the diffraction patterns of (GeTe){sub ~11}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} upon heating; the insets symbolically sketch the real structure at the corresponding temperatures. - Highlights: • The structure of disordered (GeTe){sub n}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} is described as a function of temperature. • Structural changes are tracked by modeling diffuse X-ray scattering. • Quenched crystals exhibit distorted NaCl-type slabs with different thicknesses. • Vacancy ordering upon heating leads to a metastable superstructure of the NaCl type. • Further heating leads to an undistorted disordered NaCl-type high-temperature phase.

  10. Novel superstructure of the rocksalt type and element distribution in germanium tin antimony tellurides

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Tobias; Welzmiller, Simon; Neudert, Lukas; Urban, Philipp; Fitch, Andy; Oeckler, Oliver

    2014-11-15

    A superstructure of the rocksalt-type observed in quenched CVT-grown single crystals of Ge{sub 3.25(7)}Sn{sub 1.10(3)}Sb{sub 1.10(3)}Te{sub 6} was elucidated by X-ray diffraction using fourfold twinned crystals (space group P3{sup ¯}m1, a=4.280(1) Å, c=20.966(3) Å). The structure is built up of distorted rocksalt-type building blocks typical for long-range ordered GST materials and substitution variants thereof. In contrast to those phases, an exclusive ABC-type cubic stacking sequence of the Te-atom layers is present. High-resolution electron microscopy reveals spheroidal domains with this structure (average diameter 25 nm) whose stacking direction is perpendicular to the 〈1 1 1〉 directions of the basic rocksalt-type structure. Additional slab-like domains with a lateral extension up to 1 µm occasionally result in a hierarchical structure motif. Due to the similar electron counts of the elements involved, resonant diffraction was used in order to elucidate the element distribution in rocksalt-type building blocks of the stable layered compound 39R-Ge{sub 3}SnSb{sub 2}Te{sub 7} (R3{sup ¯}m, a=4.24990(4) Å, c=73.4677(9) Å). Sb tends to occupy the atom site close to the van der Waals gaps while Ge concentrates in the center of the building blocks. - Graphical abstract: High-resolution transmission electron micrograph, SAED pattern and reciprocal lattice section of X-ray single crystal data of Ge{sub 3.25}Sn{sub 1.1}Sb{sub 1.1}Te{sub 6} with an 11P-type superstructure of the rocksalt type. - Highlights: • A novel superstructure of the rocksalt-type in the system Ge–Sn–Sb–Te is elucidated. • It combines the cubic stacking of the HT phase with building blocks of the RT phase. • It indicates the ordering mechanism during the phase transition of GST materials. • A hierarchical structure motif is promising with respect to the reduction of κ{sub L}. • Resonant diffraction reveals the element distribution in 39R-Ge{sub 3}SnSb{sub 2}Te{sub 7}.

  11. Graphene Substrate for van der Waals Epitaxy of Layer-Structured Bismuth Antimony Telluride Thermoelectric Film.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Sung; Hwang, Jae-Yeol; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Ohta, Hiromichi; Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Sung Wng

    2017-02-01

    Graphene as a substrate for the van der Waals epitaxy of 2D layered materials is utilized for the epitaxial growth of a layer-structured thermoelectric film. Van der Waals epitaxial Bi0.5 Sb1.5 Te3 film on graphene synthesized via a simple and scalable fabrication method exhibits good crystallinity and high thermoelectric transport properties comparable to single crystals.

  12. Thickness Effects for Thermoelectric Property of Antimony Telluride Nanoplatelets via Solvothermal Method.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xinxin; Zheng, Wenwen; Liu, Fengming; Yang, Shuhua; Wang, Ziyu

    2016-11-29

    Nanostructures have the potential to exhibit good thermoelectric properties by tuning and controlling their size and thickness, and the competing electrical and thermal properties can be decoupled by engineering the interface and grain boundary. In the present study, Sb2Te3 nanoplatelets with different sizes were fabricated using a practical solvothermal method. The thickness of the platelets were regulated between sizes of 10 nm and 100 nm, and the opposite edge length was varied between 1 and 10 μm by altering chemical conditions. Consequently, manipulating the grain size made it suitable to benefit the carrier transport and also block phonons for the thin platelets, resulting in a significant decrease in thermal conductivity and simultaneous increase in electrical conductivity. The results showed that the optimized figure of merit ZT, increased from 0.2 to 1.0 for thin samples, providing a comprehensive understanding of size-dependent thermoelectric performance.

  13. Thickness Effects for Thermoelectric Property of Antimony Telluride Nanoplatelets via Solvothermal Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xinxin; Zheng, Wenwen; Liu, Fengming; Yang, Shuhua; Wang, Ziyu

    2016-11-01

    Nanostructures have the potential to exhibit good thermoelectric properties by tuning and controlling their size and thickness, and the competing electrical and thermal properties can be decoupled by engineering the interface and grain boundary. In the present study, Sb2Te3 nanoplatelets with different sizes were fabricated using a practical solvothermal method. The thickness of the platelets were regulated between sizes of 10 nm and 100 nm, and the opposite edge length was varied between 1 and 10 μm by altering chemical conditions. Consequently, manipulating the grain size made it suitable to benefit the carrier transport and also block phonons for the thin platelets, resulting in a significant decrease in thermal conductivity and simultaneous increase in electrical conductivity. The results showed that the optimized figure of merit ZT, increased from 0.2 to 1.0 for thin samples, providing a comprehensive understanding of size-dependent thermoelectric performance.

  14. Thickness Effects for Thermoelectric Property of Antimony Telluride Nanoplatelets via Solvothermal Method

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinxin; Zheng, Wenwen; Liu, Fengming; Yang, Shuhua; Wang, Ziyu

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructures have the potential to exhibit good thermoelectric properties by tuning and controlling their size and thickness, and the competing electrical and thermal properties can be decoupled by engineering the interface and grain boundary. In the present study, Sb2Te3 nanoplatelets with different sizes were fabricated using a practical solvothermal method. The thickness of the platelets were regulated between sizes of 10 nm and 100 nm, and the opposite edge length was varied between 1 and 10 μm by altering chemical conditions. Consequently, manipulating the grain size made it suitable to benefit the carrier transport and also block phonons for the thin platelets, resulting in a significant decrease in thermal conductivity and simultaneous increase in electrical conductivity. The results showed that the optimized figure of merit ZT, increased from 0.2 to 1.0 for thin samples, providing a comprehensive understanding of size-dependent thermoelectric performance. PMID:27898107

  15. Floating zone melting of cadmium telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Wen-Ming; Regel, L. L.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    To produce superior crystals of cadmium telluride, floating zone melting in space has been proposed. Techniques required for floating zone melting of cadmium telluride are being developed. We have successfully float-zoned cadmium telluride on earth using square rods. A resistance heater was constructed for forming the molten zone. Evaporation of the molten zone was controlled by adding excess cadmium to the growth ampoule combined with heating of the entire ampoule. An effective method to hold the feed rod was developed. Slow rotation of the growth ampoule was proven experimentally to be necessary to achieve a complete symmetric molten zone. Most of the resultant cylindrical rods were single crystals with twins. Still needed is a suitable automatic method to control the zone length. We tried a fiber optical technique to control the zone length, but experiments showed that application of this technique to automate zone length control is unlikely to be successful.

  16. Heteronuclear compounds of arsenic and antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauser, James E.

    1982-09-01

    Volatilization of secondary metals such as arsenic, antimony, and bismuth, during the smelting of copper ores, is important because of environmental and resource considerations. The Bureau of Mines, United States Department of the Interior, has been studying copper concentrate roasting in conjunction with the volatility of these minor constituents. Some unusual vaporization behavior initiated this supplemental paper which shows that when the mixed sulfides of arsenic and antimony are heated, the volatilization of arsenic is retarded and the volatilization of antimony increased. Mixed oxides of arsenic and antimony also exhibit exceptional volatilization behavior. These anomalous vaporization behaviors are attributed to the formation of heteronuclear compounds of arsenic and antimony, but the colligative properties of solutions may also be a factor.

  17. Thermal pulse damage thresholds in cadmium telluride.

    PubMed

    Slattery, J E; Thompson, J S; Schroeder, J B

    1975-09-01

    A model is presented for predicting the temperature rise in an opaque material during the absorption of a moderately short pulse of energy. Experimental verification of the model employing a pulsed ruby laser and a cadmium telluride plate is described. Two distinct damage thresholds were noted: (1) at modest energy levels plastic deformation occurred, and (2) the higher energies resulted in surface melting.

  18. Antimony and silicon environments in antimony silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Mee, M.; Davies, B.C.; Orman, R.G.; Thomas, M.F.; Holland, D.

    2010-09-15

    Antimony silicate glasses, of general formula xSb{sub 2}O{sub 3}.(1-x)SiO{sub 2} (0.1{<=}x{<=}0.78), have been prepared by melt-quenching and their structures studied using {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, {sup 121}Sb Moessbauer spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Oxidation during melting gives rise to Sb{sup 5+} in concentrations, which increase linearly with x to give a value of {approx}10% when x=0.78. {sup 121}Sb Moessbauer spectra show Moessbauer shifts and quadrupole splittings consistent with Sb{sup 3+} in a [:SbO{sub 3}] trigonal pyramid, similar to that in crystalline Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A broad band in the Raman spectrum at {approx}410 cm{sup -1} is due to the vibrations of such a unit. The dependence of the silicon Q{sup n} speciation on x can be interpreted by the formation of Sb-O-Sb links possibly to form rings of 4 [:SbO{sub 3}] units such as are found in valentinite. - Graphical abstract: Antimony silicate glasses have been shown to contain Sb{sup 3+} in [:SbO{sub 3}] trigonal pyramid units using {sup 121}Sb Moessbauer spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. {sup 29}Si magic-angle-spinning NMR has shown silicon Q{sup n} speciation which can be interpreted as formation of rings of 4 [:SbO{sub 3}] units such as are found in valentinite.

  19. Antimony-doped graphene nanoplatelets

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, In-Yup; Choi, Min; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Sun-Min; Kim, Min-Jung; Seo, Jeong-Min; Bae, Seo-Yoon; Yoo, Seonyoung; Kim, Guntae; Jeong, Hu Young; Park, Noejung; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2015-01-01

    Heteroatom doping into the graphitic frameworks have been intensively studied for the development of metal-free electrocatalysts. However, the choice of heteroatoms is limited to non-metallic elements and heteroatom-doped graphitic materials do not satisfy commercial demands in terms of cost and stability. Here we realize doping semimetal antimony (Sb) at the edges of graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs) via a simple mechanochemical reaction between pristine graphite and solid Sb. The covalent bonding of the metalloid Sb with the graphitic carbon is visualized using atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The Sb-doped GnPs display zero loss of electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction even after 100,000 cycles. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the multiple oxidation states (Sb3+ and Sb5+) of Sb are responsible for the unusual electrochemical stability. Sb-doped GnPs may provide new insights and practical methods for designing stable carbon-based electrocatalysts. PMID:25997811

  20. Antimony-doped graphene nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, In-Yup; Choi, Min; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Sun-Min; Kim, Min-Jung; Seo, Jeong-Min; Bae, Seo-Yoon; Yoo, Seonyoung; Kim, Guntae; Jeong, Hu Young; Park, Noejung; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2015-05-01

    Heteroatom doping into the graphitic frameworks have been intensively studied for the development of metal-free electrocatalysts. However, the choice of heteroatoms is limited to non-metallic elements and heteroatom-doped graphitic materials do not satisfy commercial demands in terms of cost and stability. Here we realize doping semimetal antimony (Sb) at the edges of graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs) via a simple mechanochemical reaction between pristine graphite and solid Sb. The covalent bonding of the metalloid Sb with the graphitic carbon is visualized using atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The Sb-doped GnPs display zero loss of electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction even after 100,000 cycles. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the multiple oxidation states (Sb3+ and Sb5+) of Sb are responsible for the unusual electrochemical stability. Sb-doped GnPs may provide new insights and practical methods for designing stable carbon-based electrocatalysts.

  1. Surface complexation of antimony on kaolinite.

    PubMed

    Rakshit, Sudipta; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Datta, Rupali

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical fate of antimony (Sb) - a similar oxyanion as arsenic (As) - in a variety of environment is largely unexplored. Kaolinite is an important, naturally occurring clay mineral in soils and aquifers and is known to control the fate of several contaminants via a multitude of geochemical processes, primarily adsorption. Here we report adsorption of antimony on kaolinite as a function of solution chemistry: initial antimony concentration, pH, ionic strength, and a competing anion. A surface complexation modeling (SCM) approach was undertaken to understand the potential mechanistic implications of sorption envelope data. In the SCM, a multicomponent additive approach, in which kaolinite is assumed to be a (1:1) mixture of quartz (≡SiOH) and gibbsite (≡AlOH), was tested. Results indicated that ionic strength has a minimal effect on antimony adsorption. For the lower initial antimony concentration (4.11 μM), the additive model with binuclear surface complexes on quartz and gibbsite showed a better fit at pH<6, but somewhat under predicted the experimental data above pH 6. At the higher initial antimony concentration (41.1 μM), the sorption envelope was of different shape than the lower load. The additive model, which considered binuclear surface complexes for quartz and gibbsite, resulted in over prediction of the adsorption data at pH>3.5. However, the additive model with binuclear surface complex on quartz and mononuclear surface complex on gibbsite showed an excellent fit of the data. Phosphate greatly influenced antimony adsorption on kaolinite at both low and high antimony loadings, indicating competition for available surface sites.

  2. Process for producing cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface

    DOEpatents

    Levi, D.H.; Nelson, A.J.; Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1996-07-30

    A process is described for producing a layer of cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface to be employed in a photovoltaic device. The process comprises providing a cadmium telluride surface which is exposed to a hydrogen sulfide plasma at an exposure flow rate, an exposure time and an exposure temperature sufficient to permit reaction between the hydrogen sulfide and cadmium telluride to thereby form a cadmium sulfide layer on the cadmium telluride surface and accomplish passivation. In addition to passivation, a heterojunction at the interface of the cadmium sulfide and the cadmium telluride can be formed when the layer of cadmium sulfide formed on the cadmium telluride is of sufficient thickness. 12 figs.

  3. Diffusion and Defect Characterization Studies of Mercury Cadmium Telluride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    Mercury Cadmium Telluride" Principal Investigator: D. A. Stevenson Department of Materials Science and Engineering Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305...Include Security Classificatton, Difuson Defect Characterization Studies of Mercury Cadmium Telluride 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) ProfessJL Ddvid A. Stevenson 13a...diffusion and defect chemistry of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT; Hg Cd Te). In this study, we have measured tracer self- diffusion and interdiffusion

  4. Growth of lead tin telluride crystals in gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, Patrick G.

    1986-01-01

    Improved gels and several geometries were investigated for use in growing crystals. The use of lead sulfide test crystals proved workable, but it was impossible to obtain and maintain a sufficiently concentrated telluride ion solution to successfully grow lead telluride crystals. It appears that oxygen in the solution is capable of oxidizing the telluride ion up to tellurium metal. The method may still be successful, but only if precautions are taken to eliminate dissolved oxygen from the gels and aqueous solutions and to maintain a suitable concentration of telluride, Te(2)-(aq.).

  5. Cadmium zinc telluride charged particle nuclear detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Toney, J.E. |; James, R.B.; Antolak, A.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the improvements in understanding of transport phenomena in cadmium zinc telluride radiation sensors achieved through studies of alpha particle response and spatially resolved photoconductivity mapping. Alpha particle response waveforms and photocurrent profiles both indicate non-uniformities in the electric field which may have detrimental effects on detector performance. Identifying and eliminating the sources of these nonuniformities will ultimately lead to improved detector performance.

  6. Electron mobility in mercury cadmium telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James D.

    1988-01-01

    A previously developed program, which includes all electronic interactions thought to be important, does not correctly predict the value of electron mobility in mercury cadmium telluride particularly near room temperature. Part of the reason for this discrepancy is thought to be the way screening is handled. It seems likely that there are a number of contributors to errors in the calculation. The objective is to survey the calculation, locate reasons for differences between experiment and calculation, and suggest improvements.

  7. Molecular modelling of some para-substituted aryl methyl telluride and diaryl telluride antioxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisell, H.; Engman, L.

    2000-08-01

    Quantum mechanical calculations using the 3-21G(d) basis-set were performed on some p-substituted diaryl tellurides and aryl methyl tellurides, and the corresponding cationic radicals of these compounds. Calculated relative radical stabilization energies (RSE:s) were shown to correlate with experimentally determined peak oxidation potentials ( R=0.93) and 125Te-NMR chemical shifts ( R=0.91). A good correlation was also observed between the RSE:s and the Mulliken charge at the tellurium atoms ( R=0.97). The results showed that Hartree-Fock calculations using the 3-21G(d) basis set was sufficiently accurate for estimating the impact of p-substituents in aryl tellurides on experimentally determined properties such as peak oxidation potentials and 125Te-NMR chemical shifts.

  8. 40 CFR 721.1930 - Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt. 721... Substances § 721.1930 Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt (PMN...

  9. 40 CFR 721.1930 - Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt. 721... Substances § 721.1930 Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt (PMN...

  10. 40 CFR 721.1930 - Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt. 721... Substances § 721.1930 Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt (PMN...

  11. Reaction of divinyl telluride with thiourea

    SciTech Connect

    Amosova, S.V.; Gavrilova, G.M.; Tatarinova, A.A.; Gostevskaya, V.I.; Sinegovskaya, L.M.; Gusarova, N.K.; Trofimov, B.A.

    1986-07-20

    Earlier it was shown that with thiourea in the presence of equimolar amounts of acids divinyl sulfide forms 2H,6H-2,6-dimethyl-4-amino-1,3,5-dithiazines in the salt form with yields of 70-90%. In the case of other divinyl chalcogenides the formation of similar reaction products could be expected. However, cycloaddition of the isothiuronium salts (in this example with hydrochloric acid) is not observed in the case of divinyl telluride, but the Te-C bond is cleaved with the formation of an aldehyde and of complexes of tellurium with thiourea.

  12. Thermal conductivity of bulk nanostructured lead telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Takuma; Chen, Gang; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2014-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of lead telluride with embedded nanoinclusions was studied using Monte Carlo simulations with intrinsic phonon transport properties obtained from first-principles-based lattice dynamics. The nanoinclusion/matrix interfaces were set to completely reflect phonons to model the maximum interface-phonon-scattering scenario. The simulations with the geometrical cross section and volume fraction of the nanoinclusions matched to those of the experiment show that the experiment has already reached the theoretical limit of thermal conductivity. The frequency-dependent analysis further identifies that the thermal conductivity reduction is dominantly attributed to scattering of low frequency phonons and demonstrates mutual adaptability of nanostructuring and local disordering.

  13. The Membrane Electrowinning Separation of Antimony from a Stibnite Concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian-Guang; Yang, Sheng-Hai; Tang, Chao-Bo

    2010-06-01

    The main purpose of this study was to characterize and to extract antimony from a stibnite concentrate through electrowinning. This article reports an account of a study conducted on the optimization of the process parameters for antimony pentachloride circular leaching, purification, and electrowinning of antimony from antimony trichloride solution. The effect of electrowinning parameters, such as antimony and sodium chloride concentration in the catholyte, temperature, current density, polar distance, etc., on the voltage requirement and the current efficiency (CE) of antimony electrodeposition was explored. A maximum CE of more than 97 pct was attained with a catholyte composition of 70-g/L antimony, 25-g/L NaCl, 4.5-mol/L hydrogen ion concentration, with an anolyte composition of 40-g/L antimony trichloride at a temperature of 328 K (55 °C), a 4-cm polar distance, and a cathode current density of 200 A/m2. Under the optimized conditions, the CE was more than 97 pct, and a 99.98 pct antimony plate was obtained on the cathode. The chemical content analysis of the resulting anolyte was indicated to be 97 pct antimony pentachloride and 3 pct antimony trichloride, which could be recycled to leaching tank as the leaching agent.

  14. Microbial antimony biogeochemistry: Enzymes, regulation, and related metabolic pathways

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Jingxin; Qian Wang,; Oremland, Ronald S.; Kulp, Thomas R.; Rensing, Christopher; Wang, Gejiao

    2016-01-01

    Antimony (Sb) is a toxic metalloid that occurs widely at trace concentrations in soil, aquatic systems, and the atmosphere. Nowadays, with the development of its new industrial applications and the corresponding expansion of antimony mining activities, the phenomenon of antimony pollution has become an increasingly serious concern. In recent years, research interest in Sb has been growing and reflects a fundamental scientific concern regarding Sb in the environment. In this review, we summarize the recent research on bacterial antimony transformations, especially those regarding antimony uptake, efflux, antimonite oxidation, and antimonate reduction. We conclude that our current understanding of antimony biochemistry and biogeochemistry is roughly equivalent to where that of arsenic was some 20 years ago. This portends the possibility of future discoveries with regard to the ability of microorganisms to conserve energy for their growth from antimony redox reactions and the isolation of new species of “antimonotrophs.”

  15. Microbial Antimony Biogeochemistry: Enzymes, Regulation, and Related Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingxin; Wang, Qian; Oremland, Ronald S.; Kulp, Thomas R.; Rensing, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Antimony (Sb) is a toxic metalloid that occurs widely at trace concentrations in soil, aquatic systems, and the atmosphere. Nowadays, with the development of its new industrial applications and the corresponding expansion of antimony mining activities, the phenomenon of antimony pollution has become an increasingly serious concern. In recent years, research interest in Sb has been growing and reflects a fundamental scientific concern regarding Sb in the environment. In this review, we summarize the recent research on bacterial antimony transformations, especially those regarding antimony uptake, efflux, antimonite oxidation, and antimonate reduction. We conclude that our current understanding of antimony biochemistry and biogeochemistry is roughly equivalent to where that of arsenic was some 20 years ago. This portends the possibility of future discoveries with regard to the ability of microorganisms to conserve energy for their growth from antimony redox reactions and the isolation of new species of “antimonotrophs.” PMID:27342551

  16. The Diffusion of Antimony of Alpha Iron.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Diffusion coefficients of antimony in alpha iron were determined in the temperature range 700 to 900C using the residual activity method. Specimens...negligible effect on the diffusion of antomony in alpha iron . These results are discussed in relation to the phenomenon of temper brittleness in steels

  17. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-06-01

    This National Center for Photovoltaics sheet describes the capabilities of its polycrystalline thin-film research in the area of cadmium telluride. The scope and core competencies and capabilities are discussed.

  18. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  19. A new occurrence of telluride minerals in South Carolina.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, H.; Larson, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of drill cores from the Haile gold mine, Lancaster County, South Carolina, has revealed grains containing large amounts of Te with various combinations of Pb, Ag and Au in pyrite. These telluride minerals have so far not been identified. The nearby Brewer mine, on the basis of chemical evidence, also contains tellurides. The probable telluride localities in South Carolina are now expanded to three, significantly increasing the few reports of Te minerals from the Au deposits of the southeastern Piedmont, many of which are now considered to be volcanogenic. The occurrence of telluride minerals in gold ore from the Haile-Brewer area may help to explain the divergence in Au/Ag ratios reported in chemical analyses of drill core, ore samples and production records. Te, in addition, may be useful in geochemical exploration programmes in the SE Piedmont, including programmes using heavy mineral concentrates derived from stream alluvium. -R.S.M.

  20. Resistance mechanisms to arsenicals and antimonials.

    PubMed

    Rosen, B P

    1995-01-01

    Salts and organic derivatives of arsenic and antimony are quite toxic. Living organisms have adapted to this toxicity by the evolution of resistance mechanisms. Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells develop resistance when exposed to arsenicals or antimonials. In the case of bacteria resistance is conferred by plasmid-encoded arsenical resistance (ars) operons. The genes and gene products of the ars operon of the clinically-isolated conjugative R-factor R773 have been identified and their mechanism of action elucidated. The operon encodes an ATP-driven pump that extrudes arsenite and antimonite from the cells. The lowering of their intracellular concentration results in resistance. Arsenate resistance results from the action of the plasmid-encoded arsenate reductase that reduces arsenate to arsenite, which is then pumped out of the cell.

  1. The heat capacity of solid antimony selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashinkin, A. S.; Malkova, A. S.; Mikhailova, M. S.

    2008-06-01

    The literature data on the heat capacity of solid antimony selenide over the temperature range 53 K- T m were analyzed. The heat capacity of Sb2Se3 was measured from 350 to 600 K on a DSM-2M calorimeter. The experimental data were used to calculate the dependence C p = a + bT + cT -2 and the thermodynamic functions of solid Sb2Se3 over the temperature range 298.15 700 K.

  2. Cobalt and antimony: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Marlies; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Lison, Dominique

    2003-12-10

    The purpose of this review is to summarise the data concerning genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of Co and Sb. Both metals have multiple industrial and/or therapeutical applications, depending on the considered species. Cobalt is used for the production of alloys and hard metal (cemented carbide), diamond polishing, drying agents, pigments and catalysts. Occupational exposure to cobalt may result in adverse health effects in different organs or tissues. Antimony trioxide is primarily used as a flame retardant in rubber, plastics, pigments, adhesives, textiles, and paper. Antimony potassium tartrate has been used worldwide as an anti-shistosomal drug. Pentavalent antimony compounds have been used for the treatment of leishmaniasis. Co(II) ions are genotoxic in vitro and in vivo, and carcinogenic in rodents. Co metal is genotoxic in vitro. Hard metal dust, of which occupational exposure is linked to an increased lung cancer risk, is proven to be genotoxic in vitro and in vivo. Possibly, production of active oxygen species and/or DNA repair inhibition are mechanisms involved. Given the recently provided proof for in vitro and in vivo genotoxic potential of hard metal dust, the mechanistic evidence of elevated production of active oxygen species and the epidemiological data on increased cancer risk, it may be advisable to consider the possibility of a new evaluation by IARC. Both trivalent and pentavalent antimony compounds are generally negative in non-mammalian genotoxicity tests, while mammalian test systems usually give positive results for Sb(III) and negative results for Sb(V) compounds. Assessment of the in vivo potential of Sb2O3 to induce chromosome aberrations (CA) gave conflicting results. Animal carcinogenicity data were concluded sufficient for Sb2O3 by IARC. Human carcinogenicity data is difficult to evaluate given the frequent co-exposure to arsenic. Possible mechanisms of action, including potential to produce active oxygen species and to interfere with

  3. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF ANTIMONY (III) SULFOBROMIDE, SBSBR,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ANTIMONY COMPOUNDS, *SULFUR COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , BROMIDES, SYMMETRY(CRYSTALLOGRAPHY), FOURIER ANALYSIS, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, CRYSTAL LATTICES, CHEMICAL BONDS, X RAY DIFFRACTION.

  4. [Removal of Antimony in Wastewater by Electrochemical Hydride Generation and the Recovery of Antimony].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-jing; Zhang, Guo-ping; Li, Hai-xia; Fu, Zhi-ping; Ouyang, Xiao-xue; Wu, Qiong

    2015-04-01

    An electrochemical hydride generation method was developed for the removal of antimony in wastewater. Hydrogen was generated in the electrolysis of water. Hydrogen reacted with Sb and formed stibine, which volatilized from the solution. Then, stibine was heated and decomposed to elemental Sb. Based on these, Sb in wastewater could be removed and recovered. The highest removal of Sb (76.1%) was achieved in acidic solution (pH = 4). The formation of stibine was proven to contribute most significantly (66.2%) to the removal of antimony in the solution, while the electro-deposition and adsorption also made a small contribution. In the treatment, Sb(V) must be pre-reduced to Sb(III) prior to the formation of stibine. Lead, graphite and tungsten were employed as the materials for cathode, and lead electrode was found most suitable for the removal of antimony.

  5. High Temperature Interactions of Antimony with Nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.

    2012-07-01

    In this chapter, the surface and bulk interactions of antimony with the Ni-based anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) will be discussed. High fuel flexibility is a significant advantage of SOFCs, allowing the direct use of fossil and bio fuels without a hydrogen separation unit. Synthesis gas derived from coal and biomass consists of a mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and steam, but finite amounts of tars and trace impurities such as S, Se, P, As, Sb, Cd, Pb, Cl, etc, are also always present. While synthesis gas is commonly treated with a series of chemical processes and scrubbers to remove the impurities, complete purification is not economical. Antimony is widely distributed in coals. During coal gasification antimony is volatilized, such that contact with the SOFC anodes and other SOFC parts, e.g., interconnect, current collecting wires, fuel gas supplying tubing, is most likely. This chapter addresses the following topics: high temperature Ni - Sb interactions; alteration phase, Ni3Sb, Ni5Sb2, NiSb, formation; thermochemical modeling; impact of Sb on the electrocatalytic activity of Ni toward the fuel oxidation and the presence of other impurities (sulfur, in particular); converted anode structural instability during long-term SOFC operation; comparison with nickel heterogeneous catalysts.

  6. Comparing polyaluminum chloride and ferric chloride for antimony removal.

    PubMed

    Kang, Meea; Kamei, Tasuku; Magara, Yasumoto

    2003-10-01

    Antimony has been one of the contaminants required to be regulated, however, only limited information has been collected to date regarding antimony removal by polyaluminium chloride (PACl) and ferric chloride (FC). Accordingly, the possible use of coagulation by PACl or FC for antimony removal was investigated. Jar tests were used to determine the effects of solution pH, coagulant dosage, and pre-chlorination on the removal of various antimony species. Although high-efficiency antimony removal by aluminum coagulation has been expected because antimony is similar to arsenic in that both antimony and arsenic are a kind of metalloid in group V of the periodic chart, this study indicated: (1) removal density (arsenic or antimony removed per mg coagulant) for antimony by PACl was about one forty-fifth as low as observed for As(V); (2) although the removal of both Sb(III) and Sb(V) by coagulation with FC was much higher than that of PACl, a high coagulant dose of 10.5mg of FeL(-1) at optimal pH of 5.0 was still not sufficient to meet the standard antimony level of 2 microg as SbL(-1) for drinking water when around 6 microg as SbL(-1) were initially present. Consequently, investigation of a more appropriate treatment process is necessary to develop economical Sb reduction; (3) although previous studies concluded that As(V) is more effectively removed than As(III), this study showed that the removal of Sb(III) by coagulation with FC was much more pronounced than that of Sb(V); (4) oxidation of Sb(III) with chlorine decreased the ability of FC to remove antimony. Accordingly, natural water containing Sb(III) under anoxic condition should be coagulated without pre-oxidation.

  7. 21 CFR 862.3110 - Antimony test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... antimony, a heavy metal, in urine, blood, vomitus, and stomach contents. Measurements obtained by this... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antimony test system. 862.3110 Section 862.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  8. 21 CFR 862.3110 - Antimony test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... antimony, a heavy metal, in urine, blood, vomitus, and stomach contents. Measurements obtained by this... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antimony test system. 862.3110 Section 862.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  9. 21 CFR 862.3110 - Antimony test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... antimony, a heavy metal, in urine, blood, vomitus, and stomach contents. Measurements obtained by this... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antimony test system. 862.3110 Section 862.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  10. 21 CFR 862.3110 - Antimony test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... antimony, a heavy metal, in urine, blood, vomitus, and stomach contents. Measurements obtained by this... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antimony test system. 862.3110 Section 862.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  11. 21 CFR 862.3110 - Antimony test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... antimony, a heavy metal, in urine, blood, vomitus, and stomach contents. Measurements obtained by this... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antimony test system. 862.3110 Section 862.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  12. The exposure to and health effects of antimony

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ross G.; Harrison, Adrian P.

    2009-01-01

    Context: This minireview describes the health effects of antimony exposure in the workplace and the environment. Aim: To collate information on the consequences of occupational and environmental exposure to antimony on physiological function and well-being. Methods: The criteria used in the current minireview for selecting articles were adopted from proposed criteria in The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Articles were classified from an acute and chronic exposure and toxicity thrust. Results: The proportion of utilised and non-utilised articles was tabulated. Antimony toxicity is dependent on the exposure dose, duration, route (breathing, eating, drinking, or skin contact), other chemical exposures, age, sex, nutritional status, family traits, life style, and state of health. Chronic exposure to antimony in the air at levels of 9 mg/m3 may exacerbate irritation of the eyes, skin, and lungs. Long-term inhalation of antimony can potentiate pneumoconiosis, altered electrocardiograms, stomach pain, diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach ulcers, results which were confirmed in laboratory animals. Although there were investigations of the effect of antimony in sudden infant death syndrome, current findings suggest no link. Antimony trioxide exposure is predominant in smelters. Mining and exposure via glass working, soldering, and brazing are also important. Conclusion: Antimony has some useful but undoubtedly harmful effects on health and well-being and measures need to be taken to prevent hazardous exposure of the like. Its biological monitoring in the workplace is essential. PMID:20165605

  13. Charge carrier effective mass and concentration derived from combination of Seebeck coefficient and Te125 NMR measurements in complex tellurides

    DOE PAGES

    Levin, E. M.

    2016-06-27

    Thermoelectric materials utilize the Seebeck effect to convert heat to electrical energy. The Seebeck coefficient (thermopower), S, depends on the free (mobile) carrier concentration, n, and effective mass, m*, as S ~ m*/n2/3. The carrier concentration in tellurides can be derived from 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-lattice relaxation measurements. The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, depends on both n and m* as 1/T1~(m*)3/2n (within classical Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics) or as 1/T1~(m*)2n2/3 (within quantum Fermi-Dirac statistics), which challenges the correct determination of the carrier concentration in some materials by NMR. Here it is shown that the combination of the Seebeck coefficientmore » and 125Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements in complex tellurides provides a unique opportunity to derive the carrier effective mass and then to calculate the carrier concentration. This approach was used to study AgxSbxGe50–2xTe50, well-known GeTe-based high-efficiency tellurium-antimony-germanium-silver thermoelectric materials, where the replacement of Ge by [Ag+Sb] results in significant enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. Thus, values of both m* and n derived using this combination show that the enhancement of thermopower can be attributed primarily to an increase of the carrier effective mass and partially to a decrease of the carrier concentration when the [Ag+Sb] content increases.« less

  14. General solvothermal approach to synthesize telluride nanotubes for thermoelectric applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai; Peng, Nan; Bai, Yu; Xu, Huiyan; Ma, D Y; Ma, Fei; Xu, Kewei

    2017-03-27

    One-dimensional tellurides are good candidates for thermoelectric applications, but the fabrication of telluride nanotubes is still challenging. To this end, the solvothermal approach is proposed to synthesize Bi2Te3, PbTe, CuxTe and Ag2Te nanotubes. In this scheme, single-crystal Te nanotubes are produced first and then used as the sacrificed template for epitaxial growth of metal telluride. It was demonstrated that polycrystalline telluride nanotubes are produced. Considering Bi2Te3 nanotubes as an example, the pellets are prepared by spark plasma sintering, and the thermoelectric properties are measured. Compared to the nanowire counterpart, the higher-energy barrier to electrons at the grain boundaries (GBs) leads to an optimized power factor of 1.04 mW m(-1) K(-2) at 373 K in the nanotube samples. Furthermore, the thermal conductivity of nanotubes is in the range of 0.503-0.617 W m(-1) K(-1), which is much smaller than that of the nanowires. The ultralow thermal conductivity could be attributed to both the higher potential barrier of GBs and the additional scattering of phonons at the side walls of the nanotubes. In all, a ZT value of 0.74 was obtained at 373 K, which is much higher than that of nanowires. This synthesis route is ready to be extended to other telluride nanotubes.

  15. Ion beam sputter deposited zinc telluride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Zinc telluride is of interest as a potential electronic device material, particularly as one component in an amorphous superlattice, which is a new class of interesting and potentially useful materials. Some structural and electronic properties of ZnTe films deposited by argon ion beam sputter depoairion are described. Films (up to 3000 angstroms thick) were deposited from a ZnTe target. A beam energy of 1000 eV and a current density of 4 mA/sq. cm. resulted in deposition rates of approximately 70 angstroms/min. The optical band gap was found to be approximately 1.1 eV, indicating an amorphous structure, as compared to a literature value of 2.26 eV for crystalline material. Intrinsic stress measurements showed a thickness dependence, varying from tensile for thicknesses below 850 angstroms to compressive for larger thicknesses. Room temperature conductivity measurement also showed a thickness dependence, with values ranging from 1.86 x to to the -6/ohm. cm. for 300 angstrom film to 2.56 x 10 to the -1/ohm. cm. for a 2600 angstrom film. Measurement of the temperature dependence of the conductivity for these films showed complicated behavior which was thickness dependent. Thinner films showed at least two distinct temperature dependent conductivity mechanisms, as described by a Mott-type model. Thicker films showed only one principal conductivity mechanism, similar to what might be expected for a material with more crystalline character.

  16. Ion beam sputter deposited zinc telluride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Zinc telluride is of interest as a potential electronic device material, particularly as one component in an amorphous superlattice, which is a new class of interesting and potentially useful materials. Some structural and electronic properties of ZnTe films deposited by argon ion beam sputter deposition are described. Films (up to 3000 angstroms thick) were deposited from a ZnTe target. A beam energy of 1000 eV and a current density of 4 mA/sq cm resulted in deposition rates of approximately 70 angstroms/min. The optical band gap was found to be approximately 1.1 eV, indicating an amorphous structure, as compared to a literature value of 2.26 eV for crystalline material. Intrinsic stress measurements showed a thickness dependence, varying from tensile for thicknesses below 850 angstroms to compressive for larger thicknesses. Room temperature conductivity measurement also showed a thickness dependence, with values ranging from 1.86 x 10 to the -6th/ohm cm for 300 angstrom film to 2.56 x 10 to the -1/ohm cm for a 2600 angstrom film. Measurement of the temperature dependence of the conductivity for these films showed complicated behavior which was thickness dependent. Thinner films showed at least two distinct temperature dependent conductivity mechanisms, as described by a Mott-type model. Thicker films showed only one principal conductivity mechanism, similar to what might be expected for a material with more crystalline character.

  17. Study of the Electrochemical System of Antimony-Tellurium in Dimethyl Sulfoxide for Growth of Nanowire Arrays, and an Innovative Method for Single Nanowire Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisman, Philip Taubman

    There is a strong interest in thermoelectric materials for energy production and savings. The properties which are integral to thermoelectric performance are typically linked, typically changing one of these properties for the better will change another for the worse. The intertwined nature of these properties has limited bulk thermoelectrics to low efficiencies, which has curbed their use to only niche applications. There has been theoretical and experimental work which has shown that limiting these materials in one or more dimensions will result in deconvolution of properties. Nanowires of well established thermoelectrics should show impressively high performance. Tellurium is attractive in many fields, including thermoelectrics. Nanowires of tellurium have been grown, but with limited success and with out the ability to dope the tellurium. Working on previous work with other systems, tellurium was studied in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The electrochemical system of tellurium was found to be quite dierent from its aqueous analog, but through comprehensive cyclic voltammetric study, all events were identified and explained. The binary antimony-tellurium system was also studied, as doping of tellurium is integral for many applications. Cyclic voltammograms of this system were studied, and the insight from these studies was used to grow nanowire arrays. Arrays of tellurium were grown and analysis showed that by using DMSO, antimony doped tellurium nanowire arrays could be grown. Furthermore, analysis showed that the antimony doped tellurium interstitially, resulting in a n-type material. Measurements were also performed on arrays and individual wires. Arrays of 1.15% antimony showed ZT of 0.092, with the low ZT attributed to poor contact methods. Although contacting was an obstacle towards measuring whole arrays, single wire measurements were also performed. Single wire measurements were done by a novel method which allows for easy, reproducible measurements of wire

  18. Off-stoichiometric silver antimony telluride: An experimental study of transport properties with intrinsic and extrinsic doping

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Michele D.; Jaworski, Christopher M.; Heremans, Joseph P.

    2015-05-15

    AgSbTe{sub 2} is a thermoelectric semiconductor with an intrinsically low thermal conductivity and a valence band structure that is favorable to obtaining a high thermoelectric figure of merit zT. It also has a very small energy gap Eg ∼ 7.6 ± 3 meV. As this gap is less than the thermal excitation energy at room temperature, near-intrinsic AgSbTe{sub 2} is a two carrier system having both holes (concentration p) and electrons (n). Good thermoelectric performance requires heavy p-type doping (p > > n). This can be achieved with native defects or with extrinsic doping, e.g. with transition metal element. The use of defect doping is complicated by the fact that many of the ternary Ag-Sb-Te and pseudo-binary Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}-Ag{sub 2}Te phase diagrams are contradictory. This paper determines the compositional region most favorable to creating a single phase material. Through a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic doping, values of zT > 1 are achieved, though not on single-phased material. Additionally, we show that thermal conductivity is not affected by defects, further demonstrating that the low lattice thermal conductivity of I-V-VI{sub 2} materials is due to an intrinsic mechanism, insensitive to changes in defect structure.

  19. Determination of the Origin of Crystal Orientation for Nanocrystalline Bismuth Telluride-Based Thin Films Prepared by Use of the Flash Evaporation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashiri, M.; Tanaka, S.; Miyazaki, K.

    2014-06-01

    We have investigated the origin of crystal orientation for nanocrystalline bismuth telluride-based thin films. Thin films of p-type bismuth telluride antimony (Bi-Te-Sb) and n-type bismuth telluride selenide (Bi-Te-Se) were fabricated by a flash evaporation method, with exactly the same deposition conditions except for the elemental composition of the starting powders. For p-type Bi-Te-Sb thin films the main x-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks were from the c-axis (Σ{00l}/Σ{ hkl} = 0.88) whereas n-type Bi-Te-Se thin films were randomly oriented (Σ{00l}/Σ{ hkl} = 0.40). Crystal orientation, crystallinity, and crystallite size were improved for both types of thin film by sintering. For p-type Bi-Te-Sb thin films, especially, high-quality structures were obtained compared with those of n-type Bi-Te-Se thin films. We also estimated the thermoelectric properties of the as-grown and sintered thin films. The power factor was enhanced by sintering; maximum values were 34.9 μW/cm K2 for p-type Bi-Te-Sb thin films at a sintering temperature of 300°C and 23.9 μW/cm K2 for n-type Bi-Te-Se thin films at a sintering temperature of 350°C. The exact mechanisms of film growth are not yet clear but we deduce the crystal orientation originates from the size of nano-clusters generated on the tungsten boat during flash evaporation.

  20. Electrical Characterization of Thin Film Cadmium Telluride Electrodeposited from Tri-N Telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Windheim, Jesko A.

    The electrical transport properties of CdTe electrodeposited from tri-n-butylphosphine telluride have been studied by resistivity and Hall effect measurements. Methods have been developed to reproducibly remove large area samples from their conducting substrates, and these samples were prepared for temperature dependent Hall measurements and resistivity measurements. Apparatus was designed and built to routinely measure Hall voltages as low as 250 muV for source impedances up to 10 ^{12} Omega. The central aspect of the measurement system was a low cost, differential electrometer amplifier designed around the AD549L monolithic electrometer operational amplifier. Temperature control was achieved via a Eurotherm 808 temperature controller, and a cooled stream of nitrogen gas. With this system, temperature could be maintained within +/- 0.5^circC at set points between -40^circC and +40^circC. Data collection, temperature ramping, and power to the magnet were all computer controlled, and resistivity measurements were fully automated. As-annealed electrodeposited CdTe was found to be consistently p-type, with resistivity values typically 10^6- 10^{7 } Omega-cm. Various donor and acceptor dopants have been incorporated into polycrystalline CdTe films by three methods: electrochemical codeposition, electromigration and vapour techniques. The dopants were Cd, Te, Cu, Ag, In, and O_2. The activity of the dopant was dependent on the method that was used for incorporation. Oxygen was found to only have a significant effect when it was incorporated in situ, during deposition. For Cd and Te, on the other hand, little effect was seen when their concentration was varied in situ. However, hole concentration increased substantially when Te was incorporated by diffusion, and a p to n conversion was observed when Cd was incorporated by diffusion. The carrier concentration of p-type CdTe could be systematically increased by increasing the current density for the electromigration of

  1. Antimony ore in the Fairbanks district, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Killeen, Pemberton Lewis; Mertie, John B.

    1951-01-01

    Antimony-bearing ores in the Fairbanks district, Alaska, are found principally in two areas, the extremities of which are at points 10 miles west and 23 miles northeast of Fairbanks; and one of two minor areas lies along this same trend 30 miles farther to the northeast. These areas are probably only local manifestations of mineralization that affected a much broader area and formed antimony-bearing deposits in neighboring districts, the closest of which is 50 miles away. The ores were exposed largely as a result of lode gold mining, but at two periods in the past, high prices for antimony ore warranted an independent production and about 2500 tons of stibnite ore was shipped. The sulfide deposits occupy the same fractures along which a gold-quartz mineralization of greater economic importance occurred; and both are probably genetically related to igneous rocks which intrude the schistose country rock. The sulfide is in part contemporaneous with some late-stage quartz in which it occurs as disseminated crystals; and in part the latest filling in the mineralized zones where it forms kidney-shaped masses of essentially solid sulfide. One extremely long mass must have contained nearly 100 tons of ore, but the average of the larger kidneys is closer to several tons. Much of the ore is stibnite, with quartz as a minor impurity, and assays show the tenor to vary from 40 to 65 percent antimony. Sulphantimonites are less abundant but likewise occur as disseminated crystals and as kidney-shaped bodies. Antimony oxides appear on the weathered surface and along fractures within the sulfide ore. Deposits containing either stibnite or sulphantimonite are known at more than 50 localities, but only eighteen have produced ore and the bulk of this came from the mines. The geology of the deposit, and the nature, extent, and period of the workings are covered in the detailed descriptions of individual occurrences. Several geologic and economic factors, which greatly affect

  2. Antimony quantification in Leishmania by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, W L; Rainey, P M

    1993-05-15

    Tri- and pentavalent antimony were quantified in Leishmania mexicana pifanoi amastigotes and promastigotes by atomic absorption spectroscopy with electrothermal atomization. Leishmania grown in axenic culture were treated with either potassium antimony tartrate [Sb(III)] or sodium stibogluconate [Sb(V)]. The parasites were collected, digested with nitric acid, and subjected to atomic absorption spectroscopy. The method was linear from 0 to 7 ng of antimony. The interassay coefficients of variation were 9.6 and 5.7% (N = 5) for 0.52 and 3.7-ng samples of leishmanial antimony, respectively. The limit of detection was 95 pg of antimony. The assay was used to characterize Sb(III) and Sb(V) influx and efflux kinetics. Influx rates were determined at antimony concentrations that produced a 50% inhibition of growth (IC50). The influx rates of Sb(V) into amastigotes and promastigotes were 4.8 and 12 pg/million cells/h, respectively, at 200 micrograms antimony/ml. The influx rate of Sb(III) into amastigotes was 41 pg/million cells/h at 20 micrograms antimony/ml. Influx of Sb(III) into promastigotes at 1 microgram antimony/ml was rapid and reached a plateau of 175 pg/million cells in 2 h. Efflux of Sb(III) and Sb(V) from amastigotes and promastigotes exhibited biphasic kinetics. The initial (alpha) half-life of Sb(V) efflux was less than 4 min and that of Sb(III) was 1-2 h. The apparent terminal (beta) half-lives ranged from 7 to 14 h.

  3. Tissue distribution of residual antimony in rats treated with multiple doses of meglumine antimoniate

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Deise Riba; Miranda, Elaine Silva; Saint’Pierre, Tatiana Dillenburg; Paumgartten, Francisco José Roma

    2014-01-01

    Meglumine antimoniate (MA) and sodium stibogluconate are pentavalent antimony (SbV) drugs used since the mid-1940s. Notwithstanding the fact that they are first-choice drugs for the treatment of leishmaniases, there are gaps in our knowledge of their toxicological profile, mode of action and kinetics. Little is known about the distribution of antimony in tissues after SbV administration. In this study, we evaluated the Sb content of tissues from male rats 24 h and three weeks after a 21-day course of treatment with MA (300 mg SbV/kg body wt/d, subcutaneous). Sb concentrations in the blood and organs were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In rats, as with in humans, the Sb blood levels after MA dosing can be described by a two-compartment model with a fast (t1/2 = 0.6 h) and a slow (t1/2 >> 24 h) elimination phase. The spleen was the organ that accumulated the highest amount of Sb, while bone and thyroid ranked second in descending order of tissues according to Sb levels (spleen >> bone, thyroid, kidneys > liver, epididymis, lungs, adrenals > prostate > thymus, pancreas, heart, small intestines > skeletal muscle, testes, stomach > brain). The pathophysiological consequences of Sb accumulation in the thyroid and Sb speciation in the liver, thyroid, spleen and bone warrant further studies. PMID:25075781

  4. Ultrasonication of Bismuth Telluride Nanocrystals Fabricated by Solvothermal Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Sang-Hyon; Choi, Sang H.; Kim, Jae-Woo; King, Glen C.; Elliott, James R.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of ultrasonication on bismuth telluride nanocrystals prepared by solvothermal method. In this study, a low dimensional nanocrystal of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) was synthesized by a solvothermal process in an autoclave at 180 C and 200 psi. During the solvothermal reaction, organic surfactants effectively prevented unwanted aggregation of nanocrystals in a selected solvent while controlling the shape of the nanocrystal. The atomic ratio of bismuth and tellurium was determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The cavitational energy created by the ultrasonic probe was varied by the ultrasonication process time, while power amplitude remained constant. The nanocrystal size and its size distribution were measured by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and a dynamic light scattering system. When the ultrasonication time increased, the average size of bismuth telluride nanocrystal gradually increased due to the direct collision of nanocrystals. The polydispersity of the nanocrystals showed a minimum when the ultrasonication was applied for 5 min. Keywords: bismuth telluride, nanocrystal, low-dimensional, ultrasonication, solvothermal

  5. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS RETORT USED FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS RETORT USED FOR FLASHING MERCURY OFF OF GOLD TO CREATE SOFT INGOTS CALLED "SPONGES." AT RIGHT ARE SAFES FOR STORING 22-POUND SPONGES WORTH OVER $60,000 EACH, CA. 1985. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  6. Biogeochemistry of arsenic and antimony in the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutter, Gregory A.; Cutter, Lynda S.

    2006-05-01

    The biogeochemical cycles of the metalloid elements arsenic and antimony were examined along a 15,000 km surface water transect and at 9 vertical profile stations in the western North Pacific Ocean as part of the 2002 IOC Contaminant Baseline Survey. Results show that the speciation of dissolved arsenic (As III, As V, and methylated As) was subtly controlled by the arsenate (AsV)/phosphate ratio. An additional fraction of presumed organic arsenic previously reported in coastal waters was also present (˜15% of the total As) in oceanic surface waters. Dissolved inorganic antimony displayed mildly scavenged behavior that was confirmed by correlations with aluminum, but atmospheric inputs that may be anthropogenic in origin also affected its concentrations. Monomethyl antimony, the predominant organic form of the element, behaved almost conservatively throughout the water column, radically changing the known biogeochemical cycle of antimony.

  7. Comparative trials of antimonial drugs in urinary schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A.

    1968-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic trials in urinary schistosomiasis are described and discussed. Their design and conduct were based on recommended statistical techniques, now generally accepted as the most appropriate approach to the assessment of antischistosomal drugs. Randomization produced comparable host groups in whom multiple parasitic infection and radiological urinary tract damage were common. Treatment was with one of three antimonial compounds given at equivalent metallic dosage daily. Antimony sodium tartrate (AST) and antimony dimercaptosuccinate (TWSb) were equally efficient curatively but both produced many side-effects. Sodium antimonylgluconate (TSAG) was four-fifths as effective but tolerance was superior. Estimations of urinary antimony excretion showed that tissue retention of the metal was related to cure-rates and side-effects. It was concluded that none of the drugs were suitable for mass chemotherapy. More new non-toxic schistosomicides are urgently needed and for their assessment, the setting-up of multicentre trials, following international agreement on technical methods, is suggested. PMID:5302298

  8. The electronic structure of the antimony chalcogenide series: Prospects for optoelectronic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, John J.; Allen, Jeremy P.; Scanlon, David O.; Watson, Graeme W.

    2014-05-01

    In this study, density functional theory is used to evaluate the electronic structure of the antimony chalcogenide series. Analysis of the electronic density of states and charge density shows that asymmetric density, or ‘lone pairs’, forms on the Sb{sup III} cations in the distorted oxide, sulphide and selenide materials. The asymmetric density progressively weakens down the series, due to the increase in energy of valence p states from O to Te, and is absent for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The fundamental and optical band gaps were calculated and Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} have indirect band gaps, while Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} was calculated to have a direct band gap at Γ. The band gaps are also seen to reduce from Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The optical band gap for Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} makes it a candidate as a transparent conducting oxide, while Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} have suitable band gaps for thin film solar cell absorbers. - Graphical abstract: A schematic illustrating the interaction between the Sb{sup III} cations and the chalcogenide anions and the change in their respective energy levels down the series. - Highlights: • The electronic structure of the antimony chalcogenide series is modelled using DFT. • Asymmetric density is present on distorted systems and absent on the symmetric telluride system. • Asymmetric density is formed from the mixing of Sb 5s and anion p states, where the anti-bonding combination is stabilised by the Sb 5p states. • The asymmetric density weakens down the series due to the increase in energy of chalcogenide p states. • The increase in energy of the anion p states reduces the fundamental and optical band gaps.

  9. Characterization of the Antimonial Antileishmanial Agent Meglumine Antimonate (Glucantime)

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, William L.; McMurray, Walter J.; Rainey, Petrie M.

    1998-01-01

    Meglumine antimonate (Glucantime), a drug of choice for the treatment of leishmaniasis, is produced by the reaction of pentavalent antimony with N-methyl-d-glucamine, a carbohydrate derivative. We investigated the structure and composition of meglumine antimonate, which remain poorly understood, despite 50 years of use. Measurement of the antimony content of meglumine antimonate powder indicated a 1:1.37 molar ratio of antimony to N-methyl-d-glucamine. Osmolality measurements performed with meglumine antimonate solutions demonstrated an average of 1.43 antimony atoms per molecule of meglumine antimonate. The osmolality of a 1:10 dilution of stock meglumine antimonate increased by 45% over 8 days, suggesting hydrolysis to less complex species. A comparison of the proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of N-methyl-d-glucamine and meglumine antimonate revealed an increase in complexity in the latter but with all of the resonances of the former still being evident, consistent with the presence of coordination complexes between antimony and each of the N-methyl-d-glucamine hydroxyls. Fast atom bombardment and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry coupled with several derivatization procedures provided evidence that up to four N-methyl-d-glucamine hydroxyls are coordinated with each antimony. A series of oligomers were observed. The major moiety has a molecular mass of 507 atomic mass units and consists of NMG-Sb-NMG, where Sb represents antimony and NMG represents N-methyl-d-glucamine. Additional species containing up to four antimony atoms and five N-methyl-d-glucamine moieties and corresponding to the general form (NMG-Sb)n-NMG are also present. These results suggest that this agent is a complex mixture that exists in equilibrium in aqueous solution. PMID:9593130

  10. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1988--31 December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

  11. Transient Response of Cadmium Telluride Modules to Light Exposure: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C.; del Cueto, J.; Albin, D. S.; Petersen, C.; Tyler, L.; TamizhMani, G.

    2011-07-01

    Commercial cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic (PV) modules from three different manufacturers were monitored for performance changes during indoor and outdoor light-exposure. Short-term transients in Voc were recorded on some modules, with characteristic times of ~1.1 hours. Outdoor performance data shows a similar drop in Voc after early morning light exposure. Preliminary analysis of FF changes show light-induced changes on multiple time scales, including a long time scale.

  12. Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Lassen, J.; Ruczkowski, J.; Teigelhöfer, A.; Bricault, P.

    2017-02-01

    The resonant ionization laser ion source is an element selective, efficient and versatile ion source to generate radioactive ion beams at on-line mass separator facilities. For some elements with complex atomic structures and incomplete spectroscopic data, laser spectroscopic investigations are required for ionization scheme development. Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy using Ti:Sa lasers has been performed on antimony (Sb) at TRIUMF's off-line laser ion source test stand. Laser light of 230.217 nm (vacuum wavelength) as the first excitation step and light from a frequency-doubled Nd:YVO4 laser (532 nm) as the nonresonant ionization step allowed to search for suitable second excitation steps by continuous wavelength scans from 720 nm to 920 nm across the wavelength tuning range of a grating-tuned Ti:Sa laser. Upon the identification of efficient SES, the third excitation steps for resonance ionization were investigated by laser scans across Rydberg states, the ionization potential and autoionizing states. One Rydberg state and six AI states were found to be well suitable for efficient resonance ionization.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of bismuth telluride based nanostructured thermoelectric composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz Khorasgani, Mohsen

    Thermoelectric (TE) materials and devices are attractive in solid-state energy conversion applications such as waste heat recovery, air-conditioning, and refrigeration. Since the 1950's lots of unremitting efforts have been made to enhance the efficiency of energy conversion in TE materials (i. e. improving the figure of merit (ZT)), however, most of commercial bulk TE materials still suffer from low efficiency with ZTs around unity. To enhance the performance of bismuth telluride based TE alloys, we have developed composite TE materials, based on the idea that introducing more engineered interfaces in the bulk TE materials may lead to thermal conductivity reduction due to increased phonon scattering by these interfaces. In this approach it is expected that the electronic transport properties of the material are not effectively affected. Consequently, ZT enhancement can be achieved. In this dissertation we will discuss synthesis and characterization of two types of bismuth telluride based bulk composite TE materials. The first type is engineered to contain the presence of coherent interfaces between phases in the material resulting from different mixtures of totally miscible compounds with similar composition. The second type includes the nanocomposites with embedded foreign nano-particles in which the matrix and the particles are delimited by incoherent interfaces. The synthesis procedure, micro- and nano-structures as well as thermoelectric properties of these composites will be presented. In our study on the composites with coherent interfaces, we produced a series of different composites of p-type bismuth antimony telluride alloys and studied their microstructure and thermoelectric properties. Each composite consists of two phases that were obtained in powder form by mechanical alloying. Mixed powders in various proportions of the two different phases were consolidated by hot extrusion to obtain each bulk composite. The minimum grain size of bulk composites as

  14. [Antimony and other heavy metals in metallic kitchen ware].

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, H; Sugita, T; Yoshihira, K

    1989-01-01

    The antimony in metallic kitchen ware was determined. The content of this element in metals used for the production or repairing of utensils, containers and packaging which come in contact with foods is regulated and should be less than 5% in under the Japanese Food Sanitation Law. In eight metallic samples, antimony was detected in solder used for the production of a can for green tea and an eggbeater. The contents were 1.30% in the former and 1.90% in the latter. No antimony was detected in solder used for a cookie cutter. A sample of solder used for electric work, not for food utensils, contained 0.81% of antimony. In other metallic utensils which come in contact with food such as aluminum foil, a brass spoon, a stainless steel fork, a wire netting, and an iron rock for vegetable color stabilizing, antimony was not detected at a 0.05% detection limit. A qualitative test using rhodamine B also showed positive results in only three solder samples. Lead concentrations in solder used for the kitchen ware were from 39.3 to 51.3%. These concentrations were higher than the limit (20%) of lead content by the Law. No cadmium was detected in any samples.

  15. 40 CFR 440.90 - Applicability; description of the antimony ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... antimony ore subcategory. 440.90 Section 440.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Antimony Ore Subcategory § 440.90 Applicability; description of the antimony ore subcategory. The provisions of...

  16. Solvothermal synthesis and study of nonlinear optical properties of nanocrystalline thallium doped bismuth telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Molli, Muralikrishna; Parola, Sowmendran; Avinash Chunduri, L.A.; Aditha, Saikiran; Sai Muthukumar, V; Mimani Rattan, Tanu; Kamisetti, Venkataramaniah

    2012-05-15

    Nanocrystalline Bismuth telluride and thallium (4 mol %) doped Bismuth telluride were synthesized through hydrothermal method. The as-prepared products were characterized using Powder X-ray Diffraction, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Powder XRD results revealed the crystalline nature of the obtained phases. HRTEM showed the particle-like morphology of the products. The decrease in the absorption coefficient due to thallium doping was observed in FTIR spectra. The intensity dependent nonlinear optical properties of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride and thallium doped bismuth telluride were studied using the Z-scan technique in open-aperture configuration. Bismuth telluride doped with thallium showed enhanced nonlinear optical response compared to pristine bismuth telluride and hence could be used as a potential candidate for optical power limiting applications. - Graphical Abstract: Nonlinear transmission (Z-scan) curves of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride ({Delta}) and thallium doped bismuth telluride ({open_square}). Thallium doped bismuth telluride showed enhanced nonlinear absorption compared to bismuth telluride. Inset: TEM micrograph of bismuth telluride nanocrystallites. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Thallium doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} through solvothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduced absorption coefficient due to thallium doping found from IR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Open-aperture Z-scan technique for nonlinear optical studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two photon absorption based model for theoretical fitting of Z-scan data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced nonlinear absorption in Thallium doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} - potential candidate for optical power limiting applications.

  17. Possible Links between Sickle Cell Crisis and Pentavalent Antimony

    PubMed Central

    Garcerant, Daniel; Rubiano, Luisa; Blanco, Victor; Martinez, Javier; Baker, Nancy C.; Craft, Noah

    2012-01-01

    For over 60 years, pentavalent antimony (Sbv) has been the first-line treatment of leishmaniasis. Sickle cell anemia is a disease caused by a defect in red blood cells, which among other things can cause vasooclusive crisis. We report the case of a 6-year-old child with leishmaniasis who during treatment with meglumine antimoniate developed a sickle cell crisis (SCC). No previous reports describing the relationship between antimonial drugs and sickle cell disease were found. Reviews of both the pathophysiology of SCC and the mechanism of action of Sbv revealed that a common pathway (glutathione) may have resulted in the SCC. ChemoText, a novel database created to predict chemical-protein-disease interactions, was used to perform a more expansive and systematic review that was able to support the association between glutathione, Sbv, and SCC. Although suggestive evidence to support the hypothesis, additional research at the bench would be needed to prove Sbv caused the SCC. PMID:22665619

  18. Charge carrier effective mass and concentration derived from combination of Seebeck coefficient and 125Te NMR measurements in complex tellurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    Thermoelectric materials utilize the Seebeck effect to convert heat to electrical energy. The Seebeck coefficient (thermopower), S , depends on the free (mobile) carrier concentration, n , and effective mass, m*, as S ˜m*/n2 /3 . The carrier concentration in tellurides can be derived from 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-lattice relaxation measurements. The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1 /T1 , depends on both n and m* as 1 /T1˜(m*)3/2n (within classical Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics) or as 1 /T1˜(m*)2n2 /3 (within quantum Fermi-Dirac statistics), which challenges the correct determination of the carrier concentration in some materials by NMR. Here it is shown that the combination of the Seebeck coefficient and 125Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements in complex tellurides provides a unique opportunity to derive the carrier effective mass and then to calculate the carrier concentration. This approach was used to study A gxS bxG e50-2xT e50 , well-known GeTe-based high-efficiency tellurium-antimony-germanium-silver thermoelectric materials, where the replacement of Ge by [Ag+Sb] results in significant enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. Values of both m* and n derived using this combination show that the enhancement of thermopower can be attributed primarily to an increase of the carrier effective mass and partially to a decrease of the carrier concentration when the [Ag+Sb] content increases.

  19. Antimony Based III-V Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    CA Wang

    2004-06-09

    Antimony-based III-V thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells are attractive converters for systems with low radiator temperature around 1100 to 1700 K, since these cells potentially can be spectrally matched to the thermal source. Cells under development include GaSb and the lattice-matched GaInAsSb/GaSb and InPAsSb/InAs quaternary systems. GaSb cell technology is the most mature, owing in part to the relative ease in preparation of the binary alloy compared to quaternary GaInAsSb and InPAsSb alloys. Device performance of 0.7-eV GaSb cells exceeds 90% of the practical limit. GaInAsSb TPV cells have been the primary focus of recent research, and cells with energy gap E{sub g} ranging from {approx}0.6 to 0.49 eV have been demonstrated. Quantum efficiency and fill factor approach theoretical limits. Open-circuit voltage factor is as high as 87% of the practical limit for the higher-E{sub g} cells, but degrades to below 80% with decreasing E{sub g} of the alloy, which might be due to Auger recombination. InPAsSb cells are the least studied, and a cell with E{sub g} = 0.45-eV has extended spectral response out to 4.3 {micro}m. This paper briefly reviews the main contributions that have been made for antimonide-based TPV cells, and suggests additional studies for further performance enhancements.

  20. Antimony recycling in the United States in 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlin Jr., James F.

    2006-01-01

    The importance of recycling has become more obvious as concerns about the environment and import dependence have grown in recent years. When materials are recycled, fewer natural resources are consumed, and less waste products go to landfills or pollute the water and air. This study, one of a series of reports on metals recycling in 2000, discusses the flow of antimony from mining through its uses and disposal with emphasis on recycling. In 2000, the recycling efficiency for antimony was estimated to be 89 percent, and the recycling rate was about 20 percent.

  1. Reductive precipitation of metals photosensitized by tin and antimony porphyrins

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.; Gong, Weiliang; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Lutze, Werner

    2003-09-30

    A method for reducing metals using a tin or antimony porphyrin by forming an aqueous solution of a tin or antimony porphyrin, an electron donor, such as ethylenediaminetetraaceticacid, triethylamine, triethanolamine, and sodium nitrite, and at least one metal compound selected from a uranium-containing compound, a mercury-containing compound, a copper-containing compound, a lead-containing compound, a gold-containing compound, a silver-containing compound, and a platinum-containing compound through irradiating the aqueous solution with light.

  2. 78 FR 68052 - Town of Telluride, Colorado; Notice of Preliminary Determination of a Qualifying Conduit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Town of Telluride, Colorado; Notice of Preliminary Determination of a Qualifying Conduit Hydropower Facility and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On October 28, 2013, the Town of Telluride, Colorado, filed...

  3. Method of Creating Micro-scale Silver Telluride Grains Covered with Bismuth Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung (Inventor); Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Lee, Kunik (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided is a method of enhancing thermoelectric performance by surrounding crystalline semiconductors with nanoparticles by contacting a bismuth telluride material with a silver salt under a substantially inert atmosphere and a temperature approximately near the silver salt decomposition temperature; and recovering a metallic bismuth decorated material comprising silver telluride crystal grains.

  4. [The corrosion behavior of antimony in a Ag-Sn-Cu-Sb amalgam].

    PubMed

    Weiland, M; Borrmann, S; Nossek, H

    1989-01-01

    Specimen of amalgam containing antimony were stored in solutions with different pH and different content of rhodanide until 21 days. The most antimony were solved within 24 hours. After 7 days an increase of the antimony concentration were not observed in physiological pH. An inhibition of corrosion by rhodanide existed only after incubation from 21 days. The quantity of antimony (10-21 micrograms) were analysed by mean of atomic absorption spectroscopy. It represent not a risk for the health. The natural presence of this element in environment and in human body is discussed to the analysed quantity of solved antimony.

  5. On line automated system for the determination of Sb(V), Sb(III), thrimethyl antimony(v) and total antimony in soil employing multisyringe flow injection analysis coupled to HG-AFS.

    PubMed

    Silva Junior, Mario M; Portugal, Lindomar A; Serra, Antonio M; Ferrer, Laura; Cerdà, Victor; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2017-04-01

    This paper proposes the use of a multisyringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) system for inorganic antimony speciation analysis, trimethyl antimony(V) and determination of total antimony in soil samples using hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). Total antimony has been determined after reduction of antimony(V) to antimony(III) using potassium iodide and ascorbic acid. For determination of total inorganic antimony the sample is percolated in a mini-column containing the Dowex 50W-X8 resin for retention of the organic species of antimony. Antimony(III) is quantified in presence of 8-hydroxyquinoline as masking agent for antimony(V) after an extraction step of the organic antimony species using the also same mini-column. The trimethyl antimony(V) content is found by difference between total antimony and total inorganic antimony. By other hand, antimony(V) is quantified by difference between total inorganic antimony and antimony(III). The analytical determinations were performed using sodium tetrahydroborate as reducing agent. The optimization step was performed using two-level full factorial design and Doehlert matrix involving the factors: hydrochloric acid and sodium tetrahydroborate concentrations and sample flow rate. The optimized experimental conditions allow the antimony determination utilizing the external calibration technique with limits of detection and quantification of 0.9 and 3.1ngg(-1), respectively, and a precision expressed as relative standard deviation of 3.2% for an antimony solution of 5.0µgL(-1). The method accuracy was confirmed by analysis of the soil certified reference material furnished from Sigma-Aldrich RTC. Additionally, addition/recovery tests were performed employing synthetic solutions prepared using trimethyl antimony(V), antimony(III), antimony(V) and five soil samples. The antimony extraction step was performed in a closed system using hydrochloric acid, ultrasonic radiation and controlled temperature. The

  6. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in polycrystalline bismuth telluride nanofilm

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Lin; Ma, Weigang; Zhang, Xing

    2014-06-16

    In this study, the dynamics of energy carriers in polycrystalline bismuth telluride nanofilm are investigated by the ultrafast pump-probe method. The energy relaxation processes are quantitatively analyzed by using the numerical fitting models. The extracted hot carrier relaxation times of photon excitation, thermalization, and diffusion are around sub-picosecond. The initial reflectivity recovery is found to be dominantly determined by the carrier diffusion, electron-phonon coupling, and photo-generated carriers trapping processes. High-frequency and low-frequency oscillations are both observed and attributed to coherent optical phonons and coherent acoustic phonons, respectively.

  7. Photoreflectance Study of Boron Ion-Implanted (100) Cadmium Telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amirtharaj, P. M.; Odell, M. S.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Alt, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    Ion implanted (100) cadmium telluride was studied using the contactless technique of photoreflectance. The implantations were performed using 50- to 400-keV boron ions to a maximum dosage of 1.5 x 10(16)/sq cm, and the annealing was accomplished at 500 C under vacuum. The spectral measurements were made at 77 K near the E(0) and E(1) critical points; all the spectra were computer-fitted to Aspnes' theory. The spectral line shapes from the ion damaged, partially recovered and undamaged, or fully recovered regions could be identified, and the respective volume fraction of each phase was estimated.

  8. Handbook of Phase Transition Sulfides, Selenides and Tellurides,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    fCAa24 o c()0 an E -b.Sldln () ahdln - 2 M ; do-a.5ie .I OII A-32. CdSe Cadnim Monoselenlde Cadmium selenide is a metal-nonmetal phase transition...RD-R146 658 HANDBOOK OF PHASE TRANSITION SULFIDES SELENIDES AND 1/3 rELLURIDES(U) TACTICAL WEAPONS GUIDANCE AND CONTROL INFORMATION ANALYSIS CE. W J...CIAL- WE:a\\FONf* C7UIDAt-NCE: & =ONrR DL. INP1:XRMATK3N At-LASIS C:EN*T7R HANDBOOK OF PHASE TRANSITION SULFIDES, SELENIDES AND TELLURIDES WALTER J

  9. High pressure phase transition and elastic properties of americium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aynyas, Mahendra; Rukmangad, Aditi; Arya, B. S.; Sanyal, S. P.

    2013-06-01

    The structural and elastic properties of Americium Telluride (AmTe) have been investigated by using a modified inter-ionic potential theory (MIPT). This theory is capable of explaining first order phase transition with a crystallographic change NaCl to CsCl structure for this compound. The values of optimized lattice constant, phase transition pressure, zero pressure bulk modulus and second order elastic constants (C11, C44) agree well with their corresponding experimental data. Debye temperature (θD) is also calculated for this compound for the first time.

  10. Antimony to Cure Visceral Leishmaniasis Unresponsive to Liposomal Amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    Morizot, Gloria; Jouffroy, Romain; Faye, Albert; Chabert, Paul; Belhouari, Katia; Calin, Ruxandra; Charlier, Caroline; Miailhes, Patrick; Siriez, Jean-Yves; Mouri, Oussama; Yera, Hélène; Gilquin, Jacques; Tubiana, Roland; Lanternier, Fanny; Mamzer, Marie-France; Legendre, Christophe; Peyramond, Dominique; Caumes, Eric; Lortholary, Olivier; Buffet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We report on 4 patients (1 immunocompetent, 3 immunosuppressed) in whom visceral leishmaniasis had become unresponsive to (or had relapsed after) treatment with appropriate doses of liposomal amphotericin B. Under close follow-up, full courses of pentavalent antimony were administered without life-threatening adverse events and resulted in rapid and sustained clinical and parasitological cure.

  11. Acid-base properties of titanium-antimony oxides catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Zenkovets, G.A.; Paukshtis, E.A.; Tarasova, D.V.; Yurchenko, E.N.

    1982-06-01

    The acid-base properties of titanium-antimony oxide catalysts were studied by the methods of back titration and ir spectroscopy. The interrelationship between the acid-base and catalytic properties in the oxidative ammonolysis of propylene was discussed. 3 figures, 1 table.

  12. Antimony(V) Adsorption by Variable-Charge Minerals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Sb(OH)6, SO4, and PO4 adsorption by gibbsite , kaolinite , goethite, and birnessite...pKa triple layer surface complexation modeling of Sb(OH)6, SO4, and PO4 adsorption by gibbsite , kaolinite , goethite, and birnessite...Competition Surface Complexation Triple Layer Model Gibbsite Kaolinite Goethite Birnessite xviii Abstract Background. Antimony (Sb) is a

  13. Discovery of palladium, antimony, tellurium, iodine, and xenon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Kathawa, J.; Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M.

    2013-01-15

    Currently, thirty-eight palladium, thirty-eight antimony, thirty-nine tellurium, thirty-eight iodine, and forty xenon isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  14. Antimony tartrate corrosion inhibitive composition for coolant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Payerle, N.E.

    1987-08-11

    An automobile coolant concentrate is described comprising (a) a liquid polyhydric alcohol chosen from the group consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, diethylene glycol and mixtures thereof, and (b) corrosion inhibitors in a corrosion inhibitory amount with respect to corrosion of lead-containing solders, the corrosion inhibitors comprising (i) an alkali metal antimony tartrate, and (ii) an azole compound.

  15. Influence of Antimony-Halogen Additives on Flame Propagation.

    PubMed

    Babushok, Valeri I; Deglmann, Peter; Krämer, Roland; Linteris, Gregory T

    2017-01-01

    A kinetic model for flame inhibition by antimony-halogen compounds in hydrocarbon flames is developed. Thermodynamic data for the relevant species are assembled from the literature, and calculations are performed for a large set of additional species of Sb-Br-C-H-O system. The main Sb- and Br-containing species in the combustion products and reaction zone are determined using flame equilibrium calculations with a set of possible Sb-Br-C-H-O species, and these are used to develop the species and reactions in a detailed kinetic model for antimony flame inhibition. The complete thermodynamic data set and kinetic mechanism are presented. Laminar burning velocity simulations are used to validate the mechanism against available data in the literature, as well as to explore the relative performance of the antimony-halogen compounds. Further analysis of the premixed flame simulations has unraveled the catalytic radical recombination cycle of antimony. It includes (primarily) the species Sb, SbO, SbO2, and HOSbO, and the reactions: Sb+O+M=SbO+M; Sb+O2+M=SbO2+M; SbO+H=Sb+OH; SbO+O=Sb+O2; SbO+OH+M=HOSbO+M; SbO2+H2O=HOSbO+OH; HOSbO+H=SbO+H2O; SbO+O+M=SbO2+M. The inhibition cycles of antimony are shown to be more effective than those of bromine, and intermediate between the highly effective agents CF3Br and trimethylphosphate. Preliminary examination of a Sb/Br gas-phase system did not show synergism in the gas-phase catalytic cycles (i.e., they acted essentially independently).

  16. Antimony and arsenic biogeochemistry in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jing-Ling; Zhang, Xu-Zhou; Sun, You-Xu; Liu, Su-Mei; Huang, Daji; Zhang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    The biogeochemical cycles of the metalloid elements arsenic and antimony in the East China Sea (ECS), one of the most important marginal seas for western Pacific, were examined in May 2011. Dissolved inorganic arsenic (As(V) and As(III)) and antimony (Sb(V) and Sb(III)) species were determined by selective hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). Results show that total dissolved inorganic arsenic (TDIAs; [TDIAs]=[As(V)]+[As(III)]) were moderately depleted in the surface water and enriched in the deep water. Arsenite (As(III)) showed different vertical profiles with that of TDIAs, with significant surface enrichment in the middle shelf region where the concentrations of phosphate were extremely low. Speciation of dissolved arsenic was subtly controlled by the stoichiometric molar ratio of arsenate (As(V)) to phosphate. The average As(V)/P ratio for the ECS in spring 2011 was 10.8×10-3, which is higher than previous results and indicates the arsenate stress. The concentrations of total dissolved inorganic antimony (TDISb; [TDISb]=[Sb(V)]+[Sb(III)]) were high near the Changjiang Estuary and the coastal area of Hangzhou Bay and decreased moderately off the coast. TDISb displayed moderate conservative behavior in the ECS that confirms by the correlations with salinity and dissolved aluminum. Different with that of As(III), antimonite (Sb(III)) concentrations were extremely lower in the ECS, with relative higher concentration appeared at the bottom layer which indicates the contribution from sediment-water interface. A preliminary box model was established to estimate the water-mass balance and antimony budgets for the ECS. Compared with other areas in the world, the concentrations of dissolved inorganic arsenic and antimony in the ECS remain at natural levels.

  17. Ore petrology and geochemistry of Tertiary gold telluride deposits of the Colorado mineral belt

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, J.A.; Romberger, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    Epithermal gold telluride deposits from the Colorado mineral belt share a number of similarities: relationship to alkalic stocks; high fluorine and CO/sub 2/ content; and similar paragenesis. Petrography of deposits in the Jamestown, Cripple Creek, and La Plata districts has resulted in a composite paragenesis: early Fe-Cu-Pb-Zn sulfides + hematite; tetrahedrite; high Te tellurides; low Te tellurides; late native gold. Fluid inclusion studies suggest telluride deposition occurred below 200/sup 0/C from low salinity. Gangue and alteration mineralogy indicates the ore fluids were near neutral pH during telluride deposition. The presence of hematite and locally barite suggest relatively oxidizing conditions. Evaluation of thermodynamic stabilities of tellurides and aqueous tellurium species indicates that progressive oxidation is consistent with the observed ore mineral paragenesis. Available data on gold bisulfide and chloride complexes suggest neither were important in the transport of gold in these systems. Thermodynamic data suggest the ditelluride ion (Te/sub 2//sup 2 -/) predominates in the range of inferred physiochemical conditions for the transport and deposition of gold in these systems. Inferred complexes such as AuTe/sub 2//sup -/ could account for the gold transport, and oxidation would be the most effective mechanism of precipitation of gold telluride or native gold. Published data suggest the associated alkalic stocks may be the ultimate source of the metals, since they are enriched in Au, Ag, Te, As, and Bi.

  18. TOP as ligand and solvent to synthesize silver telluride nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shutang; Lee, Soonil

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Silver telluride nanosheets were prepared through one-pot synthetic strategy. • TOP as both ligand and solvent favors silver telluride nanosheets growth. • The I–V curve of an Ag{sub 2}Te-nanosheet film indicates that as-prepared Ag{sub 2}Te nanosheets have good electric conductivity. - Abstract: Ag{sub 2}Te nanosheets are synthesized by a simple one-pot route using trioctylphosphine (TOP) as both solvent and stabilizer. Various controlling parameters were examined, such as molar ratios of AgNO{sub 3} to tellurium powder, reaction temperature and time, and precursor concentration. The morphology and composition of the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. On the basis of a series of synthesis and characterizations, the formation mechanism of the Ag{sub 2}Te nanosheets are discussed. The I–V curve of an Ag{sub 2}Te-nan osheet film indicates that as-prepared Ag{sub 2}Te nanosheets have good electric conductivity.

  19. Antimony and arsenic biogeochemistry in the western Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutter, Gregory A.; Cutter, Lynda S.; Featherstone, Alison M.; Lohrenz, Steven E.

    The subtropical to equatorial Atlantic Ocean provides a unique regime in which one can examine the biogeochemical cycles of antimony and arsenic. In particular, this region is strongly affected by inputs from the Amazon River and dust from North Africa at the surface, and horizontal transport at depth from high-latitude northern (e.g., North Atlantic Deep Water) and southern waters (e.g., Antarctic Bottom and Intermediate Waters). As a part of the 1996 Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission's Contaminant Baseline Survey, data for dissolved As(III+V), As(III), mono- and dimethyl arsenic, Sb(III+V), Sb(III), and monomethyl antimony were obtained at six vertical profile stations and 44 sites along the 11,000 km transect from Montevideo, Uruguay, to Bridgetown, Barbados. The arsenic results were similar to those in other oceans, with moderate surface depletion, deep-water enrichment, a predominance of arsenate (>85% As(V)), and methylated arsenic species and As(III) in surface waters that are likely a result of phytoplankton conversions to mitigate arsenate "stress" (toxicity). Perhaps the most significant discovery in the arsenic results was the extremely low concentrations in the Amazon Plume (as low as 9.8 nmol/l) that appear to extend for considerable distances offshore in the equatorial region. The very low concentration of inorganic arsenic in the Amazon River (2.8 nmol/l; about half those in most rivers) is probably the result of intense iron oxyhydroxide scavenging. Dissolved antimony was also primarily in the pentavalent state (>95% antimonate), but Sb(III) and monomethyl antimony were only detected in surface waters and displayed no correlations with biotic tracers such as nutrients and chlorophyll a. Unlike As(III+V)'s nutrient-type vertical profiles, Sb(III+V) displayed surface maxima and decreased into the deep waters, exhibiting the behavior of a scavenged element with a strong atmospheric input. While surface water Sb had a slight correlation with

  20. BioGeochemistry of antimony, Sources, Transfers, Impacts and Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Gael; Pinelli, Eric; Hedde, Mickael; Guiresse, Maritxu; De Vleeschouwer, François; Silvestre, Jérôme; Enrico, Maxime; Gandois, Laure; Monna, Fabrice; Gers, Charles; Probst, Anne

    2013-04-01

    BioGeoSTIB is a project funded by ADEME (French Environmental Protection Agency). Its aim is to provide a better understanding of biogeochemical cycle disturbances of antimony by man. Specifically, it is focused on the atmosphere-soil-organism interfaces. Based on a multi-scale approach, the impact of antimony on organisms and organism communities and the factors of Sb dispersion in the environment aim to better characterized. This report gives the main results of 2 and 1 -2 years of research. Using peat bogs as environmental archives, we show that Sb contamination in soils date back to the beginning of the metallurgy. Atmospheric deposition of Sb largely increased by 100 times during the Industrial Revolution compared to natural levels (~0,001-0,01 mg m-2 an-1) estimated in the deepest peat layers. This disturbance in the antimony geochemical cycle modified its concentrations in soils. One main source of present Sb contamination is automotive traffic due to Sb in braking lines. This emerging contamination was characterized close to a roundabout. This additional source of Sb does not seem to impact soil fauna but Sb concentrations in soil solutions exceed 1 μg L-1. Genotoxicity tests have been performed on the model plant Vicia faba and show that antimony is genotoxic at its lowest concentrations and that there is a synergistic effect lead, a trace metal frequently found in association with antimony in the environment. It is a main issue to determine Sb critical loads in the environment but main identified lacks are thermodynamic data, which are not available yet, to model the behavior of Sb in soil solutions and the fact the antimony is always associated with other anthropogenic trace metals like lead. Critical thresholds of Sb have been determined for the first time based on genotoxicity experiment. Simulations show that these thresholds can be exceeded in the future, whereas present limits for invertebrates (US-EPA) are and will not be reached. However

  1. Identification of antimony- and arsenic-oxidizing bacteria associated with antimony mine tailing.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, Natsuko; Fukushima, Koh; Itai, Takaaki

    2013-01-01

    Antimony (Sb) is a naturally occurring toxic element commonly associated with arsenic (As) in the environment and both elements have similar chemistry and toxicity. Increasing numbers of studies have focused on microbial As transformations, while microbial Sb interactions are still not well understood. To gain insight into microbial roles in the geochemical cycling of Sb and As, soils from Sb mine tailing were examined for the presence of Sb- and As-oxidizing bacteria. After aerobic enrichment culturing with As(III) (10 mM) or Sb(III) (100 μM), pure cultures of Pseudomonas- and Stenotrophomonas-related isolates with Sb(III) oxidation activities and a Sinorhizobium-related isolate capable of As(III) oxidation were obtained. The As(III)-oxidizing Sinorhizobium isolate possessed the aerobic arsenite oxidase gene (aioA), the expression of which was induced in the presence of As(III) or Sb(III). However, no Sb(III) oxidation activity was detected from the Sinorhizobium-related isolate, suggesting the involvement of different mechanisms for Sb and As oxidation. These results demonstrate that indigenous microorganisms associated with Sb mine soils are capable of Sb and As oxidation, and potentially contribute to the speciation and mobility of Sb and As in situ.

  2. Antimony-assisted carbonization of Si(111) with solid source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hackley, Justin; Richardson, Christopher J. K.; Sarney, Wendy L.

    2013-11-15

    The carbonization of an antimony-terminated Si (111) surface in a solid source molecular beam epitaxy system is presented. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy are used to characterize samples grown with and without antimony termination. It is shown that the antimony-terminated surface promotes the formation of thin, smooth and continuous SiC films at a relatively low temperature of 800 °C.

  3. Surface segregation of antimony in Fe-Si steel for grain oriented sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenko, M.; Vodopivec, F.; Praček, B.

    1993-06-01

    Surface segregation of antimony in a polycrystalline Fe-Si alloy with 0.049 wt% Sb was investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy in the temperature range from 450 to 800°C, and the segregation kinetics of antimony were described. From the surface segregation kinetics and its temperature dependence the bulk diffusion coefficient of antimony and the activation energy were determined in the temperature range from 500 to 600°C.

  4. Selective synthesis of ternary copper-antimony sulfide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongying; Shen, Shuling; Zhang, Yejun; Gu, Hongwei; Wang, Qiangbin

    2013-11-18

    Ternary copper-antimony sulfide nanocrystals (CAS NCs) have attracted increasing attention in photovoltaics and photoelectric nanodevices due to their tunable band gaps in the near-IR regime. Although much progress in the synthesis of CAS NCs has been achieved, the selective synthesis of CAS NCs with controllable morphologies and compositions is preliminary: in particular, a facile method is still in demand. In this work, we have successfully selectively synthesized high-quality CAS NCs with diverse morphologies, compositions, and band gaps, including rectangular CuSbS2 nanosheets (NSs), trigonal-pyramidal Cu12Sb4S13 NCs, and rhombic Cu3SbS3 NSs, by cothermodecomposition of copper diethyldithiocarbamate trihydrate (Cu(Ddtc)2) and antimony diethyldithiocarbamate trihydrate (Sb(Ddtc)3). The direct and indirect band gaps of the obtained CAS NCs were systematically studied by performing Kubelka-Munk transformations of their solid-state diffuse reflectance spectra.

  5. [Miltefosine versus meglumine antimoniate in the treatment of mucosal leishmaniasis].

    PubMed

    Garcia Bustos, Maria F; Barrio, Alejandra; Parodi, Cecilia; Beckar, Josefina; Moreno, Sonia; Basombrio, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The conventional treatment for tegumentary leishmaniasis is meglumine antimoniate, which needs parenteral administration, has increased therapeutic failure, and produces serious adverse effects, justifying the search for therapeutic alternatives. We report here the preliminary results of a phase II clinical trial in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, in which the efficacy of oral miltefosine versus the antimonial compound was assessed. The evaluation of response to the treatment was performed by monitoring with nasopharyngeal video-fibroscopy, using a score of mucosal injury severity for patients at each follow-up point. We found no significant differences so far between the number of patients cured with miltefosine or conventional chemotherapy. The favorable results of this study suggest that miltefosine could be an effective and safe oral therapeutic alternative in the region.

  6. A preliminary study on the use of cadmium telluride detectors in the scintigraphy of thyroid gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, A. M.; Quirini, A.; Vasanelli, L.; Bacci, C.; Bernabei, R.; Pani, R.; Rispoli, B.; Ballesio, P. L.; Furetta, C.

    1981-10-01

    A cadmium telluride gamma detector has been used for monitoring the activity of a radioactive tracer in a thyroid gland. Preliminary measurements are reported in comparison with those obtained with a standard NaI(Tl) scintillator.

  7. [Premature birth after the use of pentavalent antimonial: case report].

    PubMed

    Silveira, Bruna Pinheiro; Araújo Sobrinho, José; Leite, Lacínia Freire; Sales, Maria das Neves Andrade; Gouveia, Maria do Socorro Araújo; Mathias, Renato Leal; Guedes Filho, Ricardo Amorim; Barbosa, Sônia Maria

    2003-01-01

    A case is reported of a 19-year-old woman, at week 24 of gestation, with visceral leishmaniosis. She was treated with meglumine antimoniate at a dose of 850 mg/day for 20 days. There occurred premature birth on day five of treatment and the neonate died one day after birth. Considering the importance of protozoiasis in our population and the rarity of the association with pregnancy, we resolved to publish the case.

  8. Comparison of Meglumine Antimoniate and Pentamidine for Peruvian Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    2002. Patients. The patients lived in and around the city of Cusco, Peru and presented with a clinical diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis ...for investigation of chemotherapeutic agents in leishmaniasis . J Infect Dis 142: 83–86. 8. Davey RT, Masur H, 1990. Recent advances in the diagnosis ...COMPARISON OF MEGLUMINE ANTIMONIATE AND PENTAMIDINE FOR PERUVIAN CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS ELLEN M. ANDERSEN, MARIA CRUZ-SALDARRIAGA, ALEJANDRO LLANOS

  9. Correlation of CsK2Sb photocathode lifetime with antimony thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, M. A.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Poelker, M.; Elmustafa, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    CsK2Sb photocathodes with quantum efficiency on the order of 10% at 532 nm, and lifetime greater than 90 days at low voltage, were successfully manufactured via co-deposition of alkali species emanating from an effusion source. Photocathodes were characterized as a function of antimony layer thickness and alkali consumption, inside a vacuum chamber that was initially baked, but frequently vented without re-baking. Photocathode lifetime measured at low voltage is correlated with the antimony layer thickness. Photocathodes manufactured with comparatively thick antimony layers exhibited the best lifetime. We speculate that the antimony layer serves as a reservoir, or sponge, for the alkali.

  10. Correlation of CsK{sub 2}Sb photocathode lifetime with antimony thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, M. A. Elmustafa, A. A.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Poelker, M.

    2015-06-01

    CsK{sub 2}Sb photocathodes with quantum efficiency on the order of 10% at 532 nm, and lifetime greater than 90 days at low voltage, were successfully manufactured via co-deposition of alkali species emanating from an effusion source. Photocathodes were characterized as a function of antimony layer thickness and alkali consumption, inside a vacuum chamber that was initially baked, but frequently vented without re-baking. Photocathode lifetime measured at low voltage is correlated with the antimony layer thickness. Photocathodes manufactured with comparatively thick antimony layers exhibited the best lifetime. We speculate that the antimony layer serves as a reservoir, or sponge, for the alkali.

  11. Ion implantation of erbium into polycrystalline cadmium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Ushakov, V. V. Klevkov, Yu. V.; Dravin, V. A.

    2015-05-15

    The specific features of the ion implantation of polycrystalline cadmium telluride with grains 20–1000 μm in dimensions are studied. The choice of erbium is motivated by the possibility of using rare-earth elements as luminescent “probes” in studies of the defect and impurity composition of materials and modification of the composition by various technological treatments. From the microphotoluminescence data, it is found that, with decreasing crystal-grain dimensions, the degree of radiation stability of the material is increased. Microphotoluminescence topography of the samples shows the efficiency of the rare-earth probe in detecting regions with higher impurity and defect concentrations, including regions of intergrain boundaries.

  12. Thermochemistry of transition metal tellurides of interest in nuclear technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, C. K.

    The binary systems of tellurium with the alloying constituents of stainless steel, viz. Fe, Cr, Ni, Mo and Mn, were investigated by using high temperature mass spectrometry. The partial pressures of Te 2 and Te, which were the only species detected in the vapour phase in all the cases except MnTe, were obtained as a function of temperature and composition. All the telluride phases were found to be nonstoichiometric and their homogeneity ranges broader than hitherto recognised. Thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy of vaporisation, enthalpy of formation and Gibbs free energy of formation were deduced for various compositions. The threshold tellurium potential necessary for the corrosion of the clad was calculated for each alloying constituent, and this data was compared with the estimated tellurium potential in the fuel-clad gap of the fuel pins in fast breeder reactors. The role of fission product tellurium in the internal corrosion of the clad is discussed in the light of the above data.

  13. Comparison of Germanium Telluride (GeTe) Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of Germanium Telluride (GeTe) Crystals grown on Earth (left) and in space (right) during the Skylab SL-3 mission. These crystals were grown using a vapor transport crystal growth method in the Multipurpose Electric Furnace System (MEFS). Crystals grown on earth are needles and platelettes with distorted surfaces and hollow growth habits. The length of the ground-based needle is approximately 2 mm and the average lenth of the platelets is 1 mm. The dull appearance of the Skylab crystals resulted from condensation of the transport agent during the long cooling period dictated by the Skylab furnace. In a dedicated process, this would be prevented by removing the ampoule from the furnace and quenching the vapor source.

  14. Process dependent thermoelectric properties of EDTA assisted bismuth telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulsi, Chiranjit; Kargupta, Kajari; Banerjee, Dipali

    2016-04-01

    Comparison between the structure and thermoelectric properties of EDTA (Ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid) assisted bismuth telluride prepared by electrochemical deposition and hydrothermal route is reported in the present work. The prepared samples have been structurally characterized by high resolution X-ray diffraction spectra (HRXRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopic images (HRTEM). Crystallite size and strain have been determined from Williamson-Hall plot of XRD which is in conformity with TEM images. Measurement of transport properties show sample in the pellet form (S1) prepared via hydrothermal route has higher value of thermoelectric power (S) than the electrodeposited film (S2). But due to a substantial increase in the electrical conductivity (σ) of the film (S2) over the pellet (S1), the power factor and the figure of merit is higher for sample S2 than the sample S1 at room temperature.

  15. Growth of lead-tin telluride crystals under high gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regel, L. L.; Turchaninov, A. M.; Shumaev, O. V.; Bandeira, I. N.; An, C. Y.; Rappl, P. H. O.

    1992-04-01

    The influence of high gravity environment on several growth habits of lead-tin telluride crystals began to be investigated. Preliminary experiments with Pb 0.8Sn 0.2te grown by the Bridgman technique had been made at the centrifuge facilities of the Y.A. Gagarin Cosmonauts Center in the USSR, using accelerations of 5 g, 5.2 g and 8 g. The Sn distribution for these crystals was compared with that obtained for growth at normal gravity and the results show the existence of significant compositional inhomogeneities along the axial direction. Convection currents at high gravity seem to help multiple nucleation and subsequent random orientation of growth. Analyses of carrier concentrations as well as morphological characteristics were also made.

  16. Shock-Wave Consolidation of Nanostructured Bismuth Telluride Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jan; Alvarado, Manuel; Nemir, David; Nowell, Mathew; Murr, Lawrence; Prasad, Narasimha

    2012-06-01

    Nanostructured thermoelectric powders can be produced using a variety of techniques. However, it is very challenging to build a bulk material from these nanopowders without losing the nanostructure. In the present work, nanostructured powders of the bismuth telluride alloy system are obtained in kilogram quantities via a gas atomization process. These powders are characterized using a variety of methods including scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction analysis. Then the powders are consolidated into a dense bulk material using a shock-wave consolidation technique whereby a nanopowder-containing tube is surrounded by explosives and then detonated. The resulting shock wave causes rapid fusing of the powders without the melt and subsequent grain growth of other techniques. We describe the test setup and consolidation results.

  17. Local Stoichiometry and Atomic Interdiffusion during Reactive Metal/Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride Junction Formation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-23

    CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS- 1963-A IfP LOCAL STOICHIOMETRY AND ATOMIC INTERDIFFUSION DURING REACTIVE METAL/ MERCURY- CADMIUM -TELLURIDE...TITLE rand Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT PERIOED LOCAL STOICHIOMETRY AND ATOMIC INTERDIFFUSION Interim, 1/8 DURING REACTIVE METAL/MERCURY- CADMIUM ...identliy by block nuembw) Ag, Ge and Sm overlayers on Mercury- Cadmium -Telluride surfaces exhibit widely different interface reactivity and yield a

  18. Kinetics and mechanism of photopromoted oxidative dissolution of antimony trioxide.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xingyun; Kong, Linghao; He, Mengchang

    2014-12-16

    Light (sunlight, ultraviolet, simulated sunlight) irradiation was used to initiate the dissolution of antimony trioxide (Sb2O3). Dissolution rate of Sb2O3 was accelerated and dissolved trivalent antimony (Sb(III)) was oxidized in the irradiation of light. The photopromoted oxidative dissolution mechanism of Sb2O3 was studied through experiments investigating the effects of pH, free radicals scavengers, dissolved oxygen removal and Sb2O3 dosage on the release rate of antimony from Sb2O3 under simulated sunlight irradiation. The key oxidative components were hydroxyl free radicals, photogenerated holes and superoxide free radicals; their contribution ratios were roughly estimated. In addition, a conceptual model of the photocatalytic oxidation dissolution of Sb2O3 was proposed. The overall pH-dependent dissolution rate of Sb2O3 and the oxidation of Sb(III) under light irradiation were expressed by r = 0.08 ·[OH(-)](0.63) and rox = 0.10 ·[OH(-)](0.79). The present study on the mechanism of the photo-oxidation dissolution of Sb2O3 could help clarify the geochemical cycle and fate of Sb in the environment.

  19. Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells with PEDOT:PSS Back Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, Michael; Duarte, Fernanda; Paudel, Naba; Yan, Yanfa; Wang, Weining

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) solar cell is one of the most promising thin film solar cells and its highest efficiency has reached 21%. To keep improving the efficiency of CdTe solar cells, a few issues need to be addressed, one of which is the back contact. The back contact of CdTe solar cells are mostly Cu-base, and the problem with Cu-based back contact is that Cu diffuses into the grain boundary and into the CdS/CdTe junction, causing degradation problem at high temperature and under illumination. To continue improving the efficiency of CdTe/CdS solar cells, a good ohmic back contact with high work function and long term stability is needed. In this work, we report our studies on the potential of conducting polymer being used as the back contact of CdTe/CdS solar cells. Conducting polymers are good candidates because they have high work functions and high conductivities, are easy to process, and cost less, meeting all the requirements of a good ohmic back contact for CdTe. In our studies, we used poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) with different conductivities and compared them with traditional Cu-based back contact. It was observed that the CdTe solar cell performance improves as the conductivity of the PEDOT:PSS increase, and the efficiency (9.1%) is approaching those with traditional Cu/Au back contact (12.5%). Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells with PEDOT:PSS Back Contact.

  20. Polycrystalline thin film cadmium telluride solar cells fabricated by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefny, J. U.; Furtak, T. E.; Williamson, D. L.; Kim, D.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the principal results of work performed during the second year of a 3-year program at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM). The work on transparent conducting oxides was carried out primarily by CSM students at NREL and is described in three publications listed in Appendix C. The high-quality ZnO produced from the work was incorporated into a copper indium diselenide cell that exhibited a world-record efficiency of 16.4%. Much of the time was devoted to the improvement of cadmium sulfide films deposited by chemical bath deposition methods and annealed with or without a cadmium chloride treatment. Progress was also made in the electrochemical deposition of cadmium telluride. High-quality films yielding CdS/CdTe/Au cells of greater than 10% efficiency are now being produced on a regular basis. We explored the use of zinc telluride back contacts to form an n-i-p cell structure as previously used by Ametek. We began small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies to characterize crystal structures, residual stresses, and microstructures of both CdTe and CdS. Large SAXS signals were observed in CdS, most likely because of scattering from gain boundaries. The signals observed to date from CdTe are much weaker, indicating a more homogeneous microstructure. We began to use the ADEPT modeling program, developed at Purdue University, to guide our understanding of the CdS/CdTe cell physics and the improvements that will most likely lead to significantly enhanced efficiencies.

  1. Antimony leaching from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic used for bottled drinking water.

    PubMed

    Westerhoff, Paul; Prapaipong, Panjai; Shock, Everett; Hillaireau, Alice

    2008-02-01

    Antimony is a regulated contaminant that poses both acute and chronic health effects in drinking water. Previous reports suggest that polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastics used for water bottles in Europe and Canada leach antimony, but no studies on bottled water in the United States have previously been conducted. Nine commercially available bottled waters in the southwestern US (Arizona) were purchased and tested for antimony concentrations as well as for potential antimony release by the plastics that compose the bottles. The southwestern US was chosen for the study because of its high consumption of bottled water and elevated temperatures, which could increase antimony leaching from PET plastics. Antimony concentrations in the bottled waters ranged from 0.095 to 0.521 ppb, well below the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 6 ppb. The average concentration was 0.195+/-0.116 ppb at the beginning of the study and 0.226+/-0.160 ppb 3 months later, with no statistical differences; samples were stored at 22 degrees C. However, storage at higher temperatures had a significant effect on the time-dependent release of antimony. The rate of antimony (Sb) release could be fit by a power function model (Sb(t)=Sb 0 x[Time, h]k; k=8.7 x 10(-6)x[Temperature ( degrees C)](2.55); Sb 0 is the initial antimony concentration). For exposure temperatures of 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, and 85 degrees C, the exposure durations necessary to exceed the 6 ppb MCL are 176, 38, 12, 4.7, 2.3, and 1.3 days, respectively. Summertime temperatures inside of cars, garages, and enclosed storage areas can exceed 65 degrees C in Arizona, and thus could promote antimony leaching from PET bottled waters. Microwave digestion revealed that the PET plastic used by one brand contained 213+/-35 mgSb/kg plastic; leaching of all the antimony from this plastic into 0.5L of water in a bottle could result in an antimony concentration of 376 ppb. Clearly, only a small

  2. Heavy weight vehicle traffic and its relationship with antimony content in human blood.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Waldo; De Gregori, Ida; Basilio, Paola; Bravo, Manuel; Pinto, Marcela; Lobos, Maria Gabriela

    2009-05-01

    Brake pads systems are nowadays considered as one of the most important sources of antimony in airborne particulate matter. One way that antimony can enter the body is through the lungs and specially by the interaction of antimony with -SH groups present in erythrocyte membrane cells. In spite of that, there are no studies about antimony enrichment in blood of workers exposed to high vehicle traffic. Port workers are generally exposed to heavy weight vehicle traffic. In Chile the biggest marine port is found in Valparaíso City. In this study antimony in whole blood and its fractions (erythrocytes-plasma and erythrocytes membranes-cytoplasm) of 45 volunteers were determined. The volunteers were port workers from Valparaíso city, and two control groups, one from Valparaíso and another from Quebrada Alvarado, the latter being a rural area located about 100 Km away from Valparaíso. The results demonstrate that port workers are highly impacted by antimony emissions from heavy weight vehicle traffic showing an average concentration of 27 +/- 9 ng Sb kg(-1), 5-10 times higher than the concentration of antimony in the blood of control groups. These are the highest antimony levels in blood ever reported in the literature. The highest antimony percentages (>60%) were always found in the erythrocyte fractions. However, the exposure degree to vehicle traffic is significant over antimony distribution in plasma, erythrocytes and cytoplasm. This results shows that the antimony mass in the erythrocyte membranes, was approximately constant at 1.0 +/- 0.1 ng Sb g(-1) of whole blood in all blood samples analyzed.

  3. Effect of antimony on the microbial growth and the activities of soil enzymes.

    PubMed

    An, Youn-Joo; Kim, Minjin

    2009-02-01

    The effects of antimony (Sb) on microbial growth inhibition and activities of soil enzymes were investigated in the present study. Test bacterial species were Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus aureus. Among the microorganisms tested, S. aureus was the most sensitive. The 50% effects on the inhibition of specific growth rate of E. coli, B. subtilis, and, S. aureus were 555, 18.4, and 15.8 mg Sb L(-1), respectively. A silt loam soil was amended with antimony and incubated in a controlled condition. Microbial activities of dehydrogenase, acid phosphatase (P cycle), arylsulfatase (S cycle), beta-glucosidase (C cycle), urease (N cycle), and fluorescein diacetate hydrolase in soil were measured. Activities of urease and dehydrogenase were related with antimony and can be an early indication of antimony contamination. The maximum increase in soil urease activity by antimony was up to 168% after 3d compared with the control. The activities of other four enzymes (acid phosphatase, fluorescein diacetate hydrolase, arylsulfatase and ss-glucosidase) were less affected by antimony. This study suggested that antimony affects nitrogen cycle in soil by changing urease activity under the neutral pH, however, soil enzyme activities may not be a good protocol due to their complex response patterns to antimony pollution.

  4. The Hydrothermal Chemistry of Gold, Arsenic, Antimony, Mercury and Silver

    SciTech Connect

    Bessinger, Brad; Apps, John A.

    2003-03-23

    A comprehensive thermodynamic database based on the Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equation of state was developed for metal complexes in hydrothermal systems. Because this equation of state has been shown to accurately predict standard partial molal thermodynamic properties of aqueous species at elevated temperatures and pressures, this study provides the necessary foundation for future exploration into transport and depositional processes in polymetallic ore deposits. The HKF equation of state parameters for gold, arsenic, antimony, mercury, and silver sulfide and hydroxide complexes were derived from experimental equilibrium constants using nonlinear regression calculations. In order to ensure that the resulting parameters were internally consistent, those experiments utilizing incompatible thermodynamic data were re-speciated prior to regression. Because new experimental studies were used to revise the HKF parameters for H2S0 and HS-1, those metal complexes for which HKF parameters had been previously derived were also updated. It was found that predicted thermodynamic properties of metal complexes are consistent with linear correlations between standard partial molal thermodynamic properties. This result allowed assessment of several complexes for which experimental data necessary to perform regression calculations was limited. Oxygen fugacity-temperature diagrams were calculated to illustrate how thermodynamic data improves our understanding of depositional processes. Predicted thermodynamic properties were used to investigate metal transport in Carlin-type gold deposits. Assuming a linear relationship between temperature and pressure, metals are predicted to predominantly be transported as sulfide complexes at a total aqueous sulfur concentration of 0.05 m. Also, the presence of arsenic and antimony mineral phases in the deposits are shown to restrict mineralization within a limited range of chemical conditions. Finally, at a lesser aqueous sulfur

  5. Inhibition of ABC Transporters Abolishes Antimony Resistance in Leishmania Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Mookerjee Basu, Jayati; Mookerjee, Ananda; Banerjee, Rajdeep; Saha, Manik; Singh, Subhankar; Naskar, Ksudiram; Tripathy, Gayetri; Sinha, Prabhat K.; Pandey, Krishna; Sundar, Shyam; Bimal, Sanjeev; Das, Pradip K.; Choudhuri, Soumitra K.; Roy, Syamal

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of antimony (Sb) resistance has jeopardized the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in various countries. Previous studies have considered the part played by leishmanial parasites in antimony resistance, but the involvement of host factors in the clinical scenario remained to be investigated. Here we show that unlike infection with Sb-sensitive (Sbs) Leishmania donovani, infection with Sb-resistant (Sbr) L. donovani induces the upregulation of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) in host cells, resulting in a nonaccumulation of intracellular Sb following treatment with sodium antimony gluconate (SAG) favoring parasite replication. The inhibition of MRP1 and P-gp with resistance-modifying agents such as lovastatin allows Sb accumulation and parasite killing within macrophages and offers protection in an animal model in which infection with Sbr L. donovani is otherwise lethal. The occurrence of a similar scenario in clinical cases is supported by the findings that unlike monocytes from SAG-sensitive kala-azar (KA) patients, monocytes from SAG-unresponsive KA patients overexpress P-gp and MRP1 and fail to accumulate Sb following in vitro SAG treatment unless pretreated with inhibitors of ABC transporters. Thus, the expression status of MRP1 and P-gp in blood monocytes may be used as a diagnostic marker for Sb resistance and the treatment strategy can be designed accordingly. Our results also indicate that lovastatin, which can inhibit both P-gp and MRP1, might be beneficial for reverting Sb resistance in leishmaniasis as well as drug resistance in other clinical situations, including cancer. PMID:18056276

  6. Electrostatically defined silicon quantum dots with counted antimony donor implants

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M. Luhman, D. R.; Lilly, M. P.; Pacheco, J. L.; Perry, D.; Garratt, E.; Ten Eyck, G.; Bishop, N. C.; Wendt, J. R.; Manginell, R. P.; Dominguez, J.; Pluym, T.; Bielejec, E.; Carroll, M. S.

    2016-02-08

    Deterministic control over the location and number of donors is crucial to donor spin quantum bits (qubits) in semiconductor based quantum computing. In this work, a focused ion beam is used to implant antimony donors in 100 nm × 150 nm windows straddling quantum dots. Ion detectors are integrated next to the quantum dots to sense the implants. The numbers of donors implanted can be counted to a precision of a single ion. In low-temperature transport measurements, regular Coulomb blockade is observed from the quantum dots. Charge offsets indicative of donor ionization are also observed in devices with counted donor implants.

  7. Charge carrier effective mass and concentration derived from combination of Seebeck coefficient and Te125 NMR measurements in complex tellurides

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, E. M.

    2016-06-27

    Thermoelectric materials utilize the Seebeck effect to convert heat to electrical energy. The Seebeck coefficient (thermopower), S, depends on the free (mobile) carrier concentration, n, and effective mass, m*, as S ~ m*/n2/3. The carrier concentration in tellurides can be derived from 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-lattice relaxation measurements. The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, depends on both n and m* as 1/T1~(m*)3/2n (within classical Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics) or as 1/T1~(m*)2n2/3 (within quantum Fermi-Dirac statistics), which challenges the correct determination of the carrier concentration in some materials by NMR. Here it is shown that the combination of the Seebeck coefficient and 125Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements in complex tellurides provides a unique opportunity to derive the carrier effective mass and then to calculate the carrier concentration. This approach was used to study AgxSbxGe50–2xTe50, well-known GeTe-based high-efficiency tellurium-antimony-germanium-silver thermoelectric materials, where the replacement of Ge by [Ag+Sb] results in significant enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. Thus, values of both m* and n derived using this combination show that the enhancement of thermopower can be attributed primarily to an increase of the carrier effective mass and partially to a decrease of the carrier concentration when the [Ag+Sb] content increases.

  8. Bioinspired inimitable cadmium telluride quantum dots for bioimaging purposes.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Vinay; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Zinjarde, Smita; Gosavi, Suresh

    2013-06-01

    Synthesis of quantum nanoparticles of specific size, shape and composition are an aspect important in nanotechnology research. Although these nanostructures are routinely synthesized by chemical routes, the use of microorganisms has emerged as a promising option. The synthesis of cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots by two hitherto unreported marine bacteria (Bacillus pumilus and Serratia marcescens) is reported here. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy indicated the synthesis of CdTe nanoparticles and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns implicated their crystalline face-centered cubic nature. The size of the synthesized CdTe nanostructures estimated by XRD and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis was found to be approximately 10 nm. Photoluminescence (PL) studies were used to confirm the fluorescence properties of these semi-conducting nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis showed the presence of well-defined nanostructures and energy dispersive spectra (EDS) confirmed the microbial synthesis of these nanoparticles. These bio-inspired CdTe nanostructures could be effectively used in imaging of yeast and animal cells. This work thus describes a cost-effective green method for synthesizing highly fluorescent biocompatible CdTe nanoparticles suitable for bio-labeling purposes.

  9. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOEpatents

    McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.D.

    1998-05-26

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs.

  10. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOEpatents

    McQuaid, James H.; Lavietes, Anthony D.

    1998-05-29

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radio nuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components.

  11. Brief review of cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başol, Bülent M.; McCandless, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is the most commercially successful thin-film photovoltaic technology. Development of CdTe as a solar cell material dates back to the early 1980s when ˜10% efficient devices were demonstrated. Implementation of better quality glass, more transparent conductive oxides, introduction of a high-resistivity transparent film under the CdS junction-partner, higher deposition temperatures, and improved Cl-treatment, doping, and contacting approaches yielded >16% efficient cells in the early 2000s. Around the same time period, use of a photoresist plug monolithic integration process facilitated the demonstration of the first 11% efficient module. The most dramatic advancements in CdTe device efficiencies were made during the 2013 to 2014 time frame when small-area cell conversion efficiency was raised to 20% range and a champion module efficiency of 17% was reported. CdTe technology is attractive in terms of its limited life-cycle greenhouse gas and heavy metal emissions, small carbon footprint, and short energy payback times. Limited Te availability is a challenge for the growth of this technology unless Te utilization rates are greatly enhanced along with device efficiencies.

  12. In-plane optical anisotropy of layered gallium telluride

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Shengxi; Tatsumi, Yuki; Ling, Xi; ...

    2016-08-16

    Layered gallium telluride (GaTe) has attracted much attention recently, due to its extremely high photoresponsivity, short response time, and promising thermoelectric performance. Different from most commonly studied two-dimensional (2D) materials, GaTe has in-plane anisotropy and a low symmetry with the C2h3 space group. Investigating the in-plane optical anisotropy, including the electron–photon and electron–phonon interactions of GaTe is essential in realizing its applications in optoelectronics and thermoelectrics. In this work, the anisotropic light-matter interactions in the low-symmetry material GaTe are studied using anisotropic optical extinction and Raman spectroscopies as probes. Our polarized optical extinction spectroscopy reveals the weak anisotropy in opticalmore » extinction spectra for visible light of multilayer GaTe. Polarized Raman spectroscopy proves to be sensitive to the crystalline orientation of GaTe, and shows the intricate dependences of Raman anisotropy on flake thickness, photon and phonon energies. Such intricate dependences can be explained by theoretical analyses employing first-principles calculations and group theory. Furthermore, these studies are a crucial step toward the applications of GaTe especially in optoelectronics and thermoelectrics, and provide a general methodology for the study of the anisotropy of light-matter interactions in 2D layered materials with in-plane anisotropy.« less

  13. Compensation mechanism of bromine dopants in cadmium telluride single crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Fochuk, P. M.; Verzhak, Ye. V.; ...

    2015-01-02

    We grew single crystals of cadmium telluride, doped with bromine by the Bridgman method, annealed them under a cadmium overpressure (PCd = 10² - 10⁵ Pa) at 800-1100 K, and investigated their electrical properties at high- and low-temperature. The influence of impurities on the crystals' electrical properties were analyzed using the defect subsystem model; the model includes the possibility of the formation of point intrinsic defects (V²⁻Cd, Cd²⁺i, V²⁺Te, Te²⁻i), and substitutional ones (Br⁰Te, Br⁺Te), as well as complexes of point defects, i.e., (Br⁺Te V²⁻Cd)⁻ and (2Br⁺Te V²⁻Cd)⁰. We established the concentration dependence between free charge carriers and themore » parameters of the annealing process. Here, n(T) and n(PCd) are determined by two dominant defects – Br⁺Te and (2Br⁺Te V²⁻Cd)⁰. Their content varies with the annealing temperature and the vapor pressure of the component; the concentration of other defects is much smaller and almost does not affect the electron density.« less

  14. Studies on Seebeck Coefficient of Individual Bismuth Telluride Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duksoo; Du, Renzhong; Yin, Yuewei; Dong, Sining; Li, Xiaoguang; Li, Qi; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2013-03-01

    We have studied on Seebeck coefficient (S) of freestanding individual Bismuth Telluride nanotubes using micro-fabricated thermoelectric workbench at the temperatures from 300 K to 25 K. The thermoelectric workbench is composed of three main elements: heater, thermocouple, and platinum pad. A polysilicon-gold thermocouple accurately measures the temperature, arising from the heat generated at the tips of the test sites from the polysilicon heater located 2 μm apart from the thermocouple. Platinum pads placed on top of the heater and thermocouple structures and electrically isolated from these constitute S measurement circuit. IPA solution containing Bi2Te3 nanotubes was drop-cast on the workbench and the Ebeam Induced Deposition of platinum was used to improve the electrical and thermal contacts between nanotube and platinum pads. The inner and outer diameter of nanotube is 50 nm and 70 nm, respectively. The sign of obtained S was positive which is indicating the nanotube is p-type. And the magnitude was increased compared to the bulk and nanowire types. The measured S (364 μV/K) of nanotube at T = 300 K is 1.65 times larger than that (220 μV/K) of bulk and 1.4 times larger than the previously reported value (260 μV/K) of nanowire. This work is supported by NSF MRSEC (Grant No. DMR-0820404)

  15. Vapor crystal growth technology development: Application to cadmium telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Banish, Michael; Duval, Walter M. B.

    1991-01-01

    Growth of bulk crystals by physical vapor transport was developed and applied to cadmium telluride. The technology makes use of effusive ampoules, in which part of the vapor contents escapes to a vacuum shroud through defined leaks during the growth process. This approach has the advantage over traditional sealed ampoule techniques that impurity vapors and excess vapor constituents are continuously removed from the vicinity of the growing crystal. Thus, growth rates are obtained routinely at magnitudes that are rather difficult to achieve in closed ampoules. Other advantages of this effusive ampoule physical vapor transport (EAPVT) technique include the predetermination of transport rates based on simple fluid dynamics and engineering considerations, and the growth of the crystal from close to congruent vapors, which largely alleviates the compositional nonuniformities resulting from buoyancy driven convective transport. After concisely reviewing earlier work on improving transport rates, nucleation control, and minimization of crystal wall interactions in vapor crystal growth, a detail account is given of the largely computer controlled EAPVT experimentation.

  16. In-plane optical anisotropy of layered gallium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shengxi; Tatsumi, Yuki; Ling, Xi; Guo, Huaihong; Wang, Ziqiang; Watson, Garrett; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.; Kong, Jing; Li, Ju; Yang, Teng; Saito, Riichiro; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2016-08-16

    Layered gallium telluride (GaTe) has attracted much attention recently, due to its extremely high photoresponsivity, short response time, and promising thermoelectric performance. Different from most commonly studied two-dimensional (2D) materials, GaTe has in-plane anisotropy and a low symmetry with the C2h3 space group. Investigating the in-plane optical anisotropy, including the electron–photon and electron–phonon interactions of GaTe is essential in realizing its applications in optoelectronics and thermoelectrics. In this work, the anisotropic light-matter interactions in the low-symmetry material GaTe are studied using anisotropic optical extinction and Raman spectroscopies as probes. Our polarized optical extinction spectroscopy reveals the weak anisotropy in optical extinction spectra for visible light of multilayer GaTe. Polarized Raman spectroscopy proves to be sensitive to the crystalline orientation of GaTe, and shows the intricate dependences of Raman anisotropy on flake thickness, photon and phonon energies. Such intricate dependences can be explained by theoretical analyses employing first-principles calculations and group theory. Furthermore, these studies are a crucial step toward the applications of GaTe especially in optoelectronics and thermoelectrics, and provide a general methodology for the study of the anisotropy of light-matter interactions in 2D layered materials with in-plane anisotropy.

  17. Inverting polar domains via electrical pulsing in metallic germanium telluride.

    PubMed

    Nukala, Pavan; Ren, Mingliang; Agarwal, Rahul; Berger, Jacob; Liu, Gerui; Johnson, A T Charlie; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2017-04-12

    Germanium telluride (GeTe) is both polar and metallic, an unusual combination of properties in any material system. The large concentration of free-carriers in GeTe precludes the coupling of external electric field with internal polarization, rendering it ineffective for conventional ferroelectric applications and polarization switching. Here we investigate alternate ways of coupling the polar domains in GeTe to external electrical stimuli through optical second harmonic generation polarimetry and in situ TEM electrical testing on single-crystalline GeTe nanowires. We show that anti-phase boundaries, created from current pulses (heat shocks), invert the polarization of selective domains resulting in reorganization of certain 71(o) domain boundaries into 109(o) boundaries. These boundaries subsequently interact and evolve with the partial dislocations, which migrate from domain to domain with the carrier-wind force (electrical current). This work suggests that current pulses and carrier-wind force could be external stimuli for domain engineering in ferroelectrics with significant current leakage.

  18. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    PubMed Central

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid. PMID:27966540

  19. Chemical synthesis and supercapacitive properties of lanthanum telluride thin film.

    PubMed

    Patil, S J; Lokhande, A C; Lee, D-W; Kim, J H; Lokhande, C D

    2017-03-15

    Lanthanum telluride (La2Te3) thin films are synthesized via a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The crystal structure, surface morphology and surface wettability properties are investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and contact angle goniometer techniques, respectively. The La2Te3 material exhibits a specific surface area of 51m(2)g(-1) determined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. La2Te3 thin film electrode has a hydrophilic surface which consists of interconnected pine leaf-like flaky arrays that affect the performance of the supercapacitor. The supercapacitive performance of La2Te3 film electrode is evaluated in 1M LiClO4/PC electrolyte using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. La2Te3 film electrode exhibits a specific capacitance of 194Fg(-1) at a scan rate of 5mVs(-1) and stored energy density of 60Whkg(-1) with delivering power density of 7.22kWkg(-1). La2Te3 film electrode showed capacitive retention of 82% over 1000cycles at a scan rate of 100mVs(-1). Further, flexible La2Te3|LiClO4-PVA|La2Te3 supercapacitor cell is fabricated.

  20. Frustrated square lattice Heisenberg model and magnetism in Iron Telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaliznyak, Igor; Xu, Zhijun; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, John; Stone, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    We have measured spin excitations in iron telluride Fe1.1Te, the parent material of (1,1) family of iron-based superconductors. It has been recognized that J1-J2-J3 frustrated Heisenberg model on a square lattice might be relevant for the unusual magnetism and, perhaps, the superconductivity in cuprates [1,2]. Recent neutron scattering measurements show that similar frustrated model might also provide reasonable account for magnetic excitations in iron pnictide materials. We find that it also describes general features of spin excitations in FeTe parent compound observed in our recent neutron measurements, as well as in those by other groups. Results imply proximity of magnetic system to the limit of extreme frustration. Selection of spin ground state under such conditions could be driven by weak extrinsic interactions, such as lattice distortion, or strain. Consequently, different nonuniversal types of magnetic order could arise, both commensurate and incommensurate. These are not necessarily intrinsic to an ideal J1-J2-J3 model, but might result from lifting of its near degeneracy by weak extrinsic perturbations.

  1. Compensation mechanism of bromine dopants in cadmium telluride single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Fochuk, P. M.; Verzhak, Ye. V.; Parashchuk, T. O.; Freik, D. M.; Panchuk, O. E.; James, R. B.; Gorichok, I. V.

    2015-01-02

    We grew single crystals of cadmium telluride, doped with bromine by the Bridgman method, annealed them under a cadmium overpressure (PCd = 10² - 10⁵ Pa) at 800-1100 K, and investigated their electrical properties at high- and low-temperature. The influence of impurities on the crystals' electrical properties were analyzed using the defect subsystem model; the model includes the possibility of the formation of point intrinsic defects (V²⁻Cd, Cd²⁺i, V²⁺Te, Te²⁻i), and substitutional ones (Br⁰Te, Br⁺Te), as well as complexes of point defects, i.e., (Br⁺Te V²⁻Cd)⁻ and (2Br⁺Te V²⁻Cd)⁰. We established the concentration dependence between free charge carriers and the parameters of the annealing process. Here, n(T) and n(PCd) are determined by two dominant defects – Br⁺Te and (2Br⁺Te V²⁻Cd)⁰. Their content varies with the annealing temperature and the vapor pressure of the component; the concentration of other defects is much smaller and almost does not affect the electron density.

  2. Induced Positron Annihiliation Investigation of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Crystal Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Akers

    2005-06-01

    Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) crystals are used in semiconductor radiation detectors for the detection of x-ray and gamma radiation. However, production of detector grade crystals is difficult as small variations in compositional uniformity and primarily the zinc content can significantly affect the ability of the CZT crystal to function as a radiation detector. Currently there are no known nondestructive methods that can be used to identify detector grade crystals. The current test method is to fabricate and test the detector to determine if the crystal is sufficiently uniform and of the correct composition to be considered a detector grade crystal. Consequently, nondestructive detection methods are needed to identify detector grade crystals prior to the fabrication process. The purpose of this feasibility study was to perform a preliminary assessment of the ability of several new, nondestructive technologies based on Induced Positron Annihilation (IPA) to determine if detector grade CZT crystals can be identified. Results of measurements performed on specimens from Fisk University and EV Products, Inc. indicate that both the near surface Distributed Source Positron Annihilation (up to 3 mm penetration) and the volumetric Photon Induced Positron Annihilation methods may be suitable for determining CZT crystal quality. Further work on CZT crystals with a broader range of compositions and detector characteristics is needed to provide a well defined, calibrated, method for assessing CZT crystal quality.

  3. A cadmium-zinc-telluride crystal array spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    H. R. McHugh; W. Quam; T. DeVore; R. Vogle; J. Weslowski

    2003-09-01

    This paper describes a gamma detector employing an array of eight cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) crystals configured as a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer. This detector is part of a more complex instrument that identifies the isotope,displays this information, and records the gamma spectrum. Various alarms and other operator features are incorporated in this battery operated rugged instrument. The CZT detector is the key component of this instrument and will be described in detail in this paper. We have made extensive spectral measurements of the usual laboratory gamma sources, common medical isotopes, and various Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) with this detector. Some of these data will be presented as spectra. We will also present energy resolution and detection efficiency for the basic 8-crystal array. Additional data will also be presented for a 32-crystal array. The basic 8-crystal array development was completed two years ago, and the system electronic design has been imp roved recently. This has resulted in significantly improved noise performance. We expect to have a much smaller detector package, using 8 crystals, in a few months. This package will use flip-chip packaging to reduce the electronics physical size by a factor of 5.

  4. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid.

  5. In-Plane Optical Anisotropy of Layered Gallium Telluride.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shengxi; Tatsumi, Yuki; Ling, Xi; Guo, Huaihong; Wang, Ziqiang; Watson, Garrett; Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B; Kong, Jing; Li, Ju; Yang, Teng; Saito, Riichiro; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2016-09-27

    Layered gallium telluride (GaTe) has attracted much attention recently, due to its extremely high photoresponsivity, short response time, and promising thermoelectric performance. Different from most commonly studied two-dimensional (2D) materials, GaTe has in-plane anisotropy and a low symmetry with the C2h(3) space group. Investigating the in-plane optical anisotropy, including the electron-photon and electron-phonon interactions of GaTe is essential in realizing its applications in optoelectronics and thermoelectrics. In this work, the anisotropic light-matter interactions in the low-symmetry material GaTe are studied using anisotropic optical extinction and Raman spectroscopies as probes. Our polarized optical extinction spectroscopy reveals the weak anisotropy in optical extinction spectra for visible light of multilayer GaTe. Polarized Raman spectroscopy proves to be sensitive to the crystalline orientation of GaTe, and shows the intricate dependences of Raman anisotropy on flake thickness, photon and phonon energies. Such intricate dependences can be explained by theoretical analyses employing first-principles calculations and group theory. These studies are a crucial step toward the applications of GaTe especially in optoelectronics and thermoelectrics, and provide a general methodology for the study of the anisotropy of light-matter interactions in 2D layered materials with in-plane anisotropy.

  6. Simultaneous lead and antimony immobilization in shooting range soil by a combined application of hydroxyapatite and ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shouhei; Katoh, Masahiko; Sato, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether a combined application of hydroxyapatite and ferrihydrite could immobilize lead and antimony in shooting range soil in which the level of lead contamination is markedly higher than that of antimony. In addition, we evaluated the stability of lead and antimony immobilized by the combined application with varying soil pH. The levels of water-soluble lead and antimony for the combined application were lower than those of single applications of hydroxyapatite or ferrihydrite, indicating that the combined application could suppress the levels of water-soluble lead and antimony by 99.9% and 95.5%, respectively, as compared with the levels in shooting range soil without immobilization material. The amounts of residual lead and amorphous Fe/Al oxide-bound antimony fractions in sequential extraction increased with a decrease in the exchangeable and carbonate lead fractions as well as in non-specifically bound and specifically bound antimony fractions. The alteration of lead and antimony phases to chemically more stable ones as a result of the combined application would result in the suppression of their mobility. The stability of immobilized lead and antimony in the combined application was equal to that of lead with a single application of hydroxyapatite and that of antimony with a single application of ferrihydrite within neutral to alkaline pH conditions, respectively. Therefore, this study suggests that the combined application of hydroxyapatite and ferrihydrite can simultaneously immobilize lead and antimony in shooting range soil with neutral to alkaline pH.

  7. Alkali oxide-tantalum, niobium and antimony oxide ionic conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R. S.; Brower, W. S.; Parker, H. S.; Minor, D. B.; Waring, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The phase equilibrium relations of four systems were investigated in detail. These consisted of sodium and potassium antimonates with antimony oxide and tantalum and niobium oxide with rubidium oxide as far as the ratio 4Rb2O:llB2O5 (B=Nb, Ta). The ternary system NaSbO3-Sb2O4-NaF was investigated extensively to determine the actual composition of the body centered cubic sodium antimonate. Various other binary and ternary oxide systems involving alkali oxides were examined in lesser detail. The phases synthesized were screened by ion exchange methods to determine mobility of the mobility of the alkali ion within the niobium, tantalum or antimony oxide (fluoride) structural framework. Five structure types warranted further investigation; these structure types are (1) hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB), (2) pyrochlore, (3) the hybrid HTB-pyrochlore hexagonal ordered phases, (4) body centered cubic antimonates and (5) 2K2O:3Nb2O5. Although all of these phases exhibit good ion exchange properties only the pyrochlore was prepared with Na(+) ions as an equilibrium phase and as a low porosity ceramic. Sb(+3) in the channel interferes with ionic conductivity in this case, although relatively good ionic conductivity was found for the metastable Na(+) ion exchanged analogs of RbTa2O5F and KTaWO6 pyrochlore phases.

  8. Antimony sulphide, an absorber layer for solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, N.; Hussain, Arshad; Ahmed, R.; Shamsuri, W. N. Wan; Shaari, A.; Ahmad, N.; Abbas, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Replacement of the toxic, expensive and scarce materials with nontoxic, cheap and earth-abundant one, in solar cell absorber layer, is immensely needed to realize the vision of green and sustainable energy. Two-micrometre-thin antimony sulphide film is considered to be adequate as an absorbing layer in solar cell applications. In this paper, we synthesize antimony sulphide thin films on glass substrate by physical vapour deposition technique, and the obtained films were then annealed at different temperatures (150-250 °C). The as-deposited and annealed samples were investigated for structural and optoelectronic properties using different characterization techniques. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the annealed samples were polycrystalline with Sb2S3 phase, while the as-deposited sample was amorphous in nature. The optical properties are measured via optical ellipsometric techniques. The measured absorbance of the film is adequately high, and every photon is found to be absorbed in visible and NIR range. The conductivity type of the films measured by hot-point probe technique is determined to be p-type. The optical band gap of the resulted samples was in the range (2.4-1.3 eV) for the as-deposited and annealed films.

  9. Transparent conducting aerogels of antimony-doped tin oxide.

    PubMed

    Correa Baena, Juan Pablo; Agrios, Alexander G

    2014-11-12

    Bulk antimony-doped tin oxide aerogels are prepared by epoxide-initiated sol-gel processing. Tin and antimony precursors are dissolved in ethanol and water, respectively, and propylene oxide is added to cause rapid gelation of the sol, which is then dried supercritically. The Sb:Sn precursor mole ratio is varied from 0 to 30% to optimize the material conductivity and absorbance. The materials are characterized by electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nitrogen physisorption analysis, a four-point probe resistivity measurement, and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The samples possess morphology typical of aerogels without significant change with the amount of doping. Calcination at 450 °C produces a cassiterite crystal structure in all aerogel samples. Introduction of Sb at 15% in the precursor (7.6% Sb by XPS) yields a resistivity more than 3 orders of magnitude lower than an undoped SnO2 aerogel. Calcination at 800 °C reduces the resistivity by an additional 2 orders of magnitude to 30 Ω·cm, but results in a significant decrease in surface area and pore volume.

  10. Antimony contamination and its effect on Trifolium plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales, Isabel; Barceló, Juan; Bech, Jaume; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2014-05-01

    Antimony is not an essential element and soil Sb contents usually are low.However, soil contamination by Sb has increased in the last years due to the human activities (combustion of fossil fuels, mining, waste incineration, smelting, shooting and road traffic). The main objective of this work was to study the effect of different concentrations of antimony (KSb(OH)6) in order to evaluate the effect on growth and Sb uptake on Trifolium pratense cv. Milvus and Trifolium repens. Our results show that Sb accumulated both in roots and shoots of clover without any negative effect on root growth, cellular viability and lipid peroxidation. This absence of toxicity sympthoms in clover plants could be very dangerous because Sb can be inadvertedly incorporated into the trophic chain causing toxic effects both in animals and humans. The absence of toxic effects on plants does not seem to be due to detoxification by phytochelatins because the use of the gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase inhibitor, L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulphoximine (BSO) did not enhance Sb toxicity to plants. (Supported by the Spanish MICINN project BFU2010-14873)

  11. Antimony in the environment: A review focused on natural waters. III. Microbiota relevant interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filella, Montserrat; Belzile, Nelson; Lett, Marie-Claire

    2007-02-01

    Antimony is ubiquitously present in the environment as a result of natural processes and human activities. Antimony is not considered to be an essential element for plants or animals. In this third review paper on the occurrence of antimony in natural waters, the interactions of antimony with microbiota are discussed in relation to its fate in natural waters. This paper covers the following aspects: occurrence in microbiota, uptake transport mechanisms, pathways of Sb(III) removal from cells involved in antimony tolerance, oxidation and reduction of antimony by living organisms, phytochelatin induction and biomethylation. This review is based on a careful and systematic examination of a comprehensive collection of papers on the above mentioned aspects of the subject. All data are quoted from the original sources. Relatively little existing information falls within the strict scope of this review and, when relevant, discussion on the interactions of antimony with reference microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and different protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania, has been included.

  12. Immobilization of antimony waste slag by applying geopolymerization and stabilization/solidification technologies.

    PubMed

    Salihoglu, Güray

    2014-11-01

    During the processing of antimony ore by pyrometallurgical methods, a considerable amount of slag is formed. This antimony waste slag is listed by the European Union as absolutely hazardous waste with a European Waste Catalogue code of 10 08 08. Since the levels of antimony and arsenic in the leachate of the antimony waste slag are generally higher than the landfilling limits, it is necessary to treat the slag before landfilling. In this study, stabilization/solidification and geopolymerization technologies were both applied in order to limit the leaching potential of antimony and arsenic. Different combinations ofpastes by using Portland cement, fly ash, clay, gypsum, and blast furnace slag were prepared as stabilization/solidification or geopoljymer matrixes. Sodium silicate-sodium hydroxide solution and sodium hydroxide solution at 8 M were used as activators for geopolymer samples. Efficiencies of the combinations were evaluated in terms of leaching and unconfined compressive strength. None of the geopolymer samples prepared with the activators yielded arsenic and antimony leaching below the regulatory limit at the same time, although they yielded high unconfined compressive strength levels. On the other hand, the stabilization/solidification samples prepared by using water showed low leaching results meeting the landfilling criteria. Use of gypsum as an additive was found to be successful in immobilizing the arsenic and antimony.

  13. Correlation of tellurium inclusions and carrier lifetime in detector grade cadmium zinc telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Elshazly, Ezzat S.; Tepper, Gary

    2008-07-28

    Carrier lifetimes and tellurium inclusion densities in detector grade cadmium zinc telluride crystals grown by the high pressure Bridgman method were optically measured using pulsed laser microwave cavity perturbation and infrared microscopy. Excess carriers were produced in the material using a pulsed laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm and pulse width of 7 ns, and the electronic decay was measured at room temperature. Spatial mapping of lifetimes and defect densities in cadmium zinc telluride was performed to determine the relationship between tellurium defect density and trapping. A strong correlation was found between the volume fraction of tellurium inclusions and the carrier trapping time.

  14. Fabrication of Nanovoid-Imbedded Bismuth Telluride with Low Dimensional System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A new fabrication method for nanovoids-imbedded bismuth telluride (Bi--Te) material with low dimensional (quantum-dots, quantum-wires, or quantum-wells) structure was conceived during the development of advanced thermoelectric (TE) materials. Bismuth telluride is currently the best-known candidate material for solid-state TE cooling devices because it possesses the highest TE figure of merit at room temperature. The innovative process described here allows nanometer-scale voids to be incorporated in Bi--Te material. The final nanovoid structure such as void size, size distribution, void location, etc. can be also controlled under various process conditions.

  15. Effect of Indium on the Superconducting Transition Temperature of Tin Telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John; Shi, Xiaoya; Li, Qiang; Tranquada, John; Gu, Genda

    2013-03-01

    Indium-doped tin telluride is one of the most appealing topological superconductors. We have grown a series of Sn1-xInxTe crystals with different indium concentrations (0.1 <=x <=1.0). The results show indium doping improves the superconducting transition temperature significantly and is highly related to the indium concentration. The maximum Tc of indium-doped tin telluride polycrystalline is 4.5K for x =0.4. Single crystals of Sn1-xInxTe were also grown by the floating zone method, and their magnetic properties were characterized.

  16. Structural and optical characterization of thermally evaporated bismuth and antimony films for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srimathy, N.; Ruban Kumar, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this present study, the thin film of bismuth and antimony is coated by thermal evaporation system equipped with the inbuilt ultra high vacuum system. XRD analysis confirmed the rhombohedral structure of Bismuth and Antimony on the prepared film. The surface roughness and physical appearance is analyzed by Atomic force microscopy. The results of Raman Spectroscopy show the wave functions and the spectrum of electrons. The preparation technique and conditions strongly influence the crystalline structure and the phase composition of bismuth and antimony thin films. The electrical and optical properties for the prepared film are analyzed. The results show a great interest and promising applications in Photovoltaic devices.

  17. Current transport mechanisms in mercury cadmium telluride diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Vishnu; Li, Qing; He, Jiale; He, Kai; Lin, Chun; Hu, Weida

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the results of modelling of the current-voltage characteristics (I-V) of a planar mid-wave Mercury Cadmium Telluride photodiode in a gate controlled diode experiment. It is reported that the diode exhibits nearly ideal I-V characteristics under the optimum surface potential leading to the minimal surface leakage current. Deviations from the optimum surface potential lead to non ideal I-V characteristics, indicating a strong relationship between the ideality factor of the diode with its surface leakage current. Diode's I-V characteristics have been modelled over a range of gate voltages from -9 V to -2 V. This range of gate voltages includes accumulation, flat band, and depletion and inversion conditions below the gate structure of the diode. It is shown that the I-V characteristics of the diode can be very well described by (i) thermal diffusion current, (ii) ohmic shunt current, (iii) photo-current due to background illumination, and (iv) excess current that grows by the process of avalanche multiplication in the gate voltage range from -3 V to -5 V that corresponds to the optimum surface potential. Outside the optimum gate voltage range, the origin of the excess current of the diode is associated with its high surface leakage currents. It is reported that the ohmic shunt current model applies to small surface leakage currents. The higher surface leakage currents exhibit a nonlinear shunt behaviour. It is also shown that the observed zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode over the entire gate voltage range is the sum of ohmic shunt resistance and estimated zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode from its thermal saturation current.

  18. Anthropogenic impacts on the biogeochemistry and cycling of antimony.

    PubMed

    Shotyk, William; Krachler, Michael; Chen, Bin

    2005-01-01

    Antimony is a potentially toxic trace element with no known biological function. Antimony is commonly enriched in coals, and fossil fuel combustion appears to be the largest single source of anthropogenic Sb to the global atmosphere. Abundant in sulfide minerals, its emission to the atmosphere from anthropogenic activities is linked to the mining and metallurgy of non-ferrous metals, especially Pb, Cu, and Zn. In particular, the geochemical and mineralogical association of Sb with Pb minerals implies that, like Pb, Sb has been emitted to the environment for thousands of years because of Pb mining, smelting, and refining. In the US alone, there are more than 400 former secondary lead smelting operations and worldwide there are 133 Pb-Zn smelters in operation today. Antimony is used in creating and improving dozens of industrial and commercial materials including various alloys, ceramics, glasses, plastics, and synthetic fabrics, making waste incineration another important source of Sb to the environment. Enrichments of Sb in atmospheric aerosols, plants, soils, sediments, as well as alpine and polar snow and ice suggest that Sb contamination is extensive, but there are very few quantitative studies of the geographic extent, intensity, and chronology of this contamination. There is an urgent need to quantify the extent of human impacts and how these have changed with time. The decreasing inventories of anthropogenic Sb with time in peat cores from Switzerland and Scotland suggest that the atmospheric Sb flux may be declining, but there have been too few studies to make any general conclusions. In fact, some studies of sediments and biomonitors in central Europe show little decline in Sb concentrations during the past decades. There is an obvious need for reliable data from well dated archives such as polar snow and ice, peat bogs, and sediments. The air concentrations, extent of enrichment, particle size distribution, and rate of deposition of Sb in urban areas is

  19. Biogeochemistry of Antimony(V) in Microcosms under Sulfidogenic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Loughlin, E. J.; Johnson, C. R.; Antonopoulos, D. A.; Boyanov, M.; Flynn, T. M.; Koval, J. C.; Kemner, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    As the mining and use of antimony continues to increase, environmental concerns involving the element have grown. Antimony(V) and (III) are the two most environmentally-relevant oxidation states, but little is known about the redox transitions between the two in natural systems. To better understand the behavior of antimony in anoxic environments, we examined the transformations of Sb(V) under Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing conditions in aqueous suspensions that contained 2 mM KSb(OH)6, 50 mM Fe(III) (as ferrihydrite), 10 mM sulfate, and 10 mM lactate, and were inoculated with sediment from a wetland on the campus of Argonne National Laboratory in Argonne, Illinois. Samples were collected over time to track changes in the concentrations of Sb, Fe(II), sulfate, and lactate, as well as the composition of the microbial community as determined by 16S rRNA gene inventories. We also examined the interaction of Sb(V) with pure Fe(II) mineral phases in aqueous suspensions containing 2 mM KSb(OH)6 and 50 mM Fe(II) as either magnetite, sideritre, vivianite, green rust, or mackinawite. X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy was used to determine the valence state of Sb and its chemical speciation. Lactate was rapidly fermented to acetate and propionate concomittant with a bloom of Veillonellaceae. Utilization of propionate for dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR) was accompanied by an increase in Desulfobulbaceae. Sb K-edge X-Ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis showed reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III) within 4 weeks, concurrent with DSR and the formation of FeS. We observed variable responses in the ability of specific Fe(II) minerals to reduce Sb(V). No reduction was observed with magnetite, siderite, vivianite, or green rust. In the presence of mackinawite (FeS), however, Sb(V) was reduced to Sb(III) sulfide. These results suggest that the reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III) is not likely under solely Fe(III)-reducing conditions, but is expected in sulfidogenic

  20. Synthesis and characterisation of nano-pore antimony imprinted polymer and its use in the extraction and determination of antimony in water and fruit juice samples.

    PubMed

    Shakerian, Farid; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad; Nili Ahmad Abadi, Maryam

    2014-02-15

    A solid phase extraction method using antimony ion imprinted polymer (IIP) sorbent combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed for the extraction and speciation of antimony. The sorbent has been synthesised in the presence of Sb(III) and ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) using styrene as the monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross linker. The imprinted Sb(III) ions were removed by leaching with HCl (50%v/v) and the polymer was characterised by FT-IR and scanning electron microscopy. The maximum sorption capacity of the IIP for Sb(III) ions was found to be 6.7 mg g(-1). With preconcentration of 60 mL of sample, an enhancement factor of 232 and detection limit of 3.9 ng L(-1) was obtained. Total antimony was determined after the reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III). The method was successfully applied to the determination of antimony species in water samples and total antimony in fruit juices.

  1. Silicon quantum dots with counted antimony donor implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Meenakshi; Pacheco, Jose; Perry, Daniel; Wendt, Joel; Manginell, Ronald; Dominguez, Jason; Pluym, Tammy; Luhman, Dwight; Bielejec, Edward; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    Antimony donor implants next to silicon quantum dots have been detected with integrated solid-state diode detectors with single ion precision. Devices with counted number of donors have been fabricated and low temperature transport measurements have been performed. Charge offsets, indicative of donor ionization and coupling to the quantum dot, have been detected in these devices. The number of offsets corresponds to 10-50% of the number of donors counted. We will report on tunneling time measurements and spin readout measurements on the donor offsets. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Copper, lead, zinc, antimony, and arsenic in Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Max Gregg

    1975-01-01

    Copper localities that merit geological investigation are found in the western Chasai District, in North Waziristan Agency, and in the Salt Range in Mianwali and Sargodha Districts. No high-grade deposits have been .reported from these ,areas and if deposits are developed they will likely be low-grade, high-tonnage, disseminated deposits. Those localities reported from Chitral State are too remote and inaccessible to be of interest now. All lead localities found to date are of minor importance; there has been small production at one .locality in Chasai District and in the southern part of the Hazara District. Zinc, antimony, and arsenic are sparse in Pakistan and no important localities of these metals are reported.

  3. Coherent and incoherent structural dynamics in laser-excited antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldecker, Lutz; Vasileiadis, Thomas; Bertoni, Roman; Ernstorfer, Ralph; Zier, Tobias; Valencia, Felipe H.; Garcia, Martin E.; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the excitation of phonons in photoexcited antimony and demonstrate that the entire electron-lattice interactions, in particular coherent and incoherent electron-phonon coupling, can be probed simultaneously. Using femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) with high temporal resolution, we observe the coherent excitation of the fully symmetric A1 g optical phonon mode via the shift of the minimum of the atomic potential energy surface. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations on laser excited potential energy surfaces are performed to quantify the change in lattice potential and the associated real-space amplitude of the coherent atomic oscillations. Good agreement is obtained between the parameter-free calculations and the experiment. In addition, our experimental configuration allows observing the energy transfer from electrons to phonons via incoherent electron-lattice scattering events. The electron-phonon coupling is determined as a function of electronic temperature from our DFT calculations and the data by applying different models for the energy transfer.

  4. Metabolism of tellurium, antimony and germanium simultaneously administered to rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Akihiro; Ogra, Yasumitsu

    2009-06-01

    Recently, tellurium (Te), antimony (Sb) and germanium (Ge) have been used as an alloy in phase-change optical magnetic disks, such as digital versatile disk-random access memory (DVD-RAM) and DVD-recordable disk (DVD-RW). Although these metalloids, the so-called "exotic" elements, are known to be non-essential and harmful, little is known about their toxic effects and metabolism. Metalloid compounds, tellurite, antimonite and germanium dioxide, were simultaneously administered to rats. Their distributions metabolites were determined and identified by speciation. Te and Sb accumulated in red blood cells (RBCs): Te accumulated in RBCs in the dimethylated form, while Sb accumulated in the inorganic/non-methylated form. In addition, trimethyltelluronium (TMTe) was the urinary metabolite of Te, whereas Sb in urine was not methylated but oxidized. Ge was also not methylated in rats. These results suggest that each metalloid is metabolized via a unique pathway.

  5. Atomistic mechanisms governing structural stability change of zinc antimony thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaolong; Lin, Jianping; Qiao, Guanjun; Wang, Zhao

    2015-01-05

    The structural stability of thermoelectric materials is a subject of growing importance for their energy harvesting applications. Here, we study the microscopic mechanisms governing the structural stability change of zinc antimony at its working temperature, using molecular dynamics combined with experimental measurements of the electrical and thermal conductivity. Our results show that the temperature-dependence of the thermal and electrical transport coefficients is strongly correlated with a structural transition. This is found to be associated with a relaxation process, in which a group of Zn atoms migrates between interstitial sites. This atom migration gradually leads to a stabilizing structural transition of the entire crystal framework, and then results in a more stable crystal structure of β–Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} at high temperature.

  6. Geochemistries of arsenic, antimony, mercury, and related elements in sediments of puget sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crecelius, E.A.; Bothner, Michael H.; Carpenter, R.

    1975-01-01

    The natural distributions of arsenic, antimony mercury, chromium, cobalt, iron, aluminum, and carbon in the surface sediments of Puget Sound are perturbed by two major anthropogenic sources of trace metals: a copper smelter near Tacoma, Wash., that discharges large amounts of arsenic and antimony, and a chlor-alkali plant in Bellingham, Wash., which, in the recent past, discharged significant amounts of mercury. Arsenic and antimony inputs from the smelter over the past 80 years are evident in sediment cores whose accumulation rates have been determined by the lead-210 technique. An arsenic budget for Puget Sound reveals the importance of atmospheric input resulting from smokestack emissions of the smelter. Chemical extraction studies of sediments showed that more than 82% of the mercury was associated with easily oxidizable organic matter, whereas about 50% of both arsenic and antimony was associated with extractable iron and aluminum compounds.

  7. Concentrations of arsenic, antimony, and boron in steam and steam condensate at The Geysers, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, C.L.; Ficklin, W.H.; Thompson, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Studies at The Geysers Geothermal Field, California indicate that under some circumstances elements that are transported in the vapor phase can become enriched in the liquid phase. Waters from two condensate traps (steam traps) on steam lines at The Geysers are enriched with arsenic, antimony, and boron compared to the concentrations of these elements in coexisting steam. Concentrations of boron in condensate-trap waters were as high as 160 mg/L, arsenic as high as 35 mg/L, and antimony as high as 200 ??g/L. Enrichment of arsenic, antimony, and boron is at least partially controlled by the partitioning of these elements into the liquid phase, according to their vapor-liquid distribution coefficients, after they are transported in steam. Several of the elements that are most soluble in steam, including arsenic and antimony, are part of the trace-element suite that characterizes precious-metal epithermal ore deposits. ?? 1987.

  8. Antimony Trioxide (ATO) - Summary of External Peer Review and Public Comments and Disposition

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document summarizes the public and external peer review comments that the EPA’s Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) received for the draft work plan risk assessment for Antimony Trioxide (ATO).

  9. Survey of antimony workers: mortality 1961-1992.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R D

    1994-01-01

    The mortality of a census population and a prospective cohort of men employed on an antimony smelter in the north east of England was followed up from 1961-1992. The workers studied were exposed to a variety of agents including antimony and its oxides, arsenic and arsenic oxides, sulphur dioxide, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The regional mortality rates were used to calculate expected deaths and a group of zircon sand workers employed on the site were used as a comparison group. For the census population of men working on the smelter before 1961 a significant increase in deaths from lung cancer was found (32 observed v 14.7 expected, P < 0.001). A similar excess was seen among maintenance men (12 observed v 5.3 expected P = 0.016). No such excess was found in the cohort recruited after 1960 (5 observed v 9.2 expected, maintenance workers 3 observed v 2.8 expected). There was evidence of a minimum latency period of around 20 years between first exposure and death from lung cancer. No evidence was found for a correlation between length of time worked and mortality from lung cancer. The results show that an increased risk of lung cancer existed in the workers employed before 1961, but it was not possible to attribute this excess to any particular agent. Mortality analysed by five year calendar periods of first exposure show a lessening of effect after 1955. Although the power of the study is clearly less for more recent periods of exposure the absence of any excess in the population after 1960 is encouraging. PMID:7849856

  10. Can microorganisms convert antimony trioxide or potassium antimonyl tartrate to methylated stibines?

    PubMed

    Gates, P N; Harrop, H A; Pridham, J B; Smethurst, B

    1997-10-20

    No evidence could be found for the production, in culture, of methylated antimony compounds from water-insoluble or soluble antimony derivatives by the aerobes, Scopulariopsis brevicaulis or Bacillus sp. or by anaerobes associated with cot mattress materials. The study does not support the hypothesis that volatile organoantimony compounds are a cause of cot deaths. Anaerobic cultures from a polluted pond generated trimethylstibine from potassium antimonyl tartrate.

  11. The effect of annealing on vacuum-evaporated copper selenide and indium telluride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Peranantham, P.; Jeyachandran, Y.L.; Viswanathan, C.; Praveena, N.N.; Chitra, P.C.; Mangalaraj, D. . E-mail: dmraj800@yahoo.com; Narayandass, Sa. K.

    2007-08-15

    Copper selenide and indium telluride thin films were prepared by a vacuum evaporation technique. The as-deposited films were annealed in a vacuum at different temperatures and the influence on composition, structure and optical properties of copper selenide and indium telluride films was investigated using energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and optical transmission measurements. From the compositional analysis, the as-deposited copper selenide and indium telluride films which were annealed at 473 and 523 K, respectively, were found to possess the nearly stoichiometric composition of CuSe and InTe phases. However, the films annealed at 673 K showed the composition of Cu{sub 2}Se and In{sub 4}Te{sub 3} phases. The structural parameters such as, particle size and strain were determined using X-ray diffractograms of the films. Optical transmittance measurements indicated the existence of direct and indirect transitions in copper selenide films and an indirect allowed transition in indium telluride films.

  12. Terrestrial growth of lead-tin-telluride by techniques related to low G growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jesser, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    A modified Bridgman-Stockbarger furnace was constructed for a study of the solidification of silver, germanium and lead-tin-telluride. The melt-solid interface position with respect to the furnace and its temperature profile was determined by measuring the discontinuity in the slope of temperature as a function of position in the melt and in the solid. The results show that the interface position of the semiconductors germanium and lead-tin-telluride was essentially constant with respect to the furnace and hence the growth rate was constant and equal to the sample translation rate of 0.046 cm/min and 0.178 cm/min in each case. The metal, silver, on the other hand showed a continuous interface migration toward the hot zone of the furnace and always exhibited a growth rate which was higher than the ampoule translation rate. The K sub L/K sub S ratio of lead-tin-telluride was determined to be 2.33 + or - 0.06 where K sub L,S denotes the thermal conductivity of the liquid, solid respectively. The value of K sub L was calculated to be about 0.054 Watt 0.1 cm 0.1 K. The diffusion boundary layer thickness was calculated for lead-tin-telluride to be about 0.05 cm using a liquid diffusivity of .00007 sq cm/sec.

  13. Cadmium telluride in tellurium—cadmium films consisting of ultradispersed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuleushev, Yu. Zh.; Volodin, V. N.; Migunova, A. A.; Lisitsyn, V. N.

    2015-08-01

    Solid solutions of tellurium in cadmium, cadmium in tellurium, and cadmium in cadmium telluride synthesized during sputtering are formed for the first time by ion-plasma sputtering and the codeposition of ultradispersed Te and Cd particle fluxes onto substrates moving with respect to the fluxes. This fact supports thermofluctuation melting and coalescence of small particles. The lattice parameter of cadmium telluride, which coexists with an amorphous solid solution of tellurium in cadmium in a coating, is smaller than the tabulated value and reaches it when the cadmium concentration in a coating increases to 70 at %. The lattice parameter of the fcc lattice of cadmium telluride increases with the cadmium concentration in a coating according to the linear relation a = 0.0002CCd + 0.6346 nm (where CCd is the cadmium concentration in the coating, at %), which is likely to indicate a certain broadening of the homogeneity area. The estimation of the particle size shows that the cadmium telluride grain size is 10-15 nm, which implies that the coatings are nanocrystalline. The absorption and transmission spectra of the tellurium—cadmium films at the fundamental absorption edge demonstrate that their energy gaps are larger than that of stoichiometric CdTe, which can be explained by the experimental conditions of crystal structure formation.

  14. Growth of Cadmium-Zinc Telluride Crystals by Controlled Seeding Contactless Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Grasza, K.; Gillies, D.; Jerman, G.

    1996-01-01

    Bulk crystals of cadmium-zinc telluride, 23 mm in diameter and up to 45 grams in weight were grown. Controlled seed formation procedure was used to limit the number of grains in the crystal. Most uniform distribution of ZnTe in the crystals was obtained using excess (Cd + Zn) pressure in the ampoule.

  15. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Cadmium mercury telluride and the new generation of photoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarenko, Vladimir P.

    2003-06-01

    This paper is a 1969-2002 progress report on the development of solid semiconductor solutions of cadmium-mercury tellurides (single crystals and epitaxial layers) as well as of infrared photodetectors based on them (photoresistors and photodiodes, including the array variety).

  16. FRONT ELEVATION OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS 2.5 BY 4FOOT RETORT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT ELEVATION OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS 2.5 BY 4-FOOT RETORT, USED TO FLASH MERCURY FROM GOLD. MERCURY VAPOR THEN CONDENSED ON INSIDE OF HOOD AND WAS COLLECTED FOR REUSE. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  17. Method and making group IIB metal - telluride films and solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Basol, Bulent M.; Kapur, Vijay K.

    1990-08-21

    A technique is disclosed forming thin films (13) of group IIB metal-telluride, such as Cd.sub.x Zn.sub.1-x Te (0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1), on a substrate (10) which comprises depositing Te (18) and at least one of the elements (19) of Cd, Zn, and Hg onto a substrate and then heating the elements to form the telluride. A technique is also provided for doping this material by chemically forming a thin layer of a dopant on the surface of the unreacted elements and then heating the elements along with the layer of dopant. A method is disclosed of fabricating a thin film photovoltaic cell which comprises depositing Te and at least one of the elements of Cd, Zn, and Hg onto a substrate which contains on its surface a semiconductor film (12) and then heating the elements in the presence of a halide of the Group IIB metals, causing the formation of solar cell grade Group IIB metal-telluride film and also causing the formation of a rectifying junction, in situ, between the semiconductor film on the substrate and the Group IIB metal-telluride layer which has been formed.

  18. The Electrodeposition of Lead Telluride Nanowires for Thermoelectric Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Peter

    The electrodeposition of PbTe nanowires for thermoelectric applications is presented in this thesis. The Pb-Te electrochemical system was investigated to determine the optimal conditions for deposition. It was found that citric acid complexed tellurium in solution shifting its reduction potential cathodically. The shift in reduction potential led to the deposition of pure PbTe without any observable excess tellurium. Nanowires of PbTe were doped p-type and n-type through the addition of thallium and indium to the plating solution. Indium-doped nanowire arrays showed a linear relation between lattice parameter and atomic percent indium confirming successful incorporation. The lattice parameter trend in thallium-doped nanowire arrays was linear only after annealing. In the case of thallium doping, thallium tellurides were formed, which upon annealing formed a solid solution with PbTe. The results of the thallium doping study led to the investigation of the Tl-Te electrochemical system. Cyclic voltammagrams were used to determine the deposition mechanism of TlTe and Tl5Te3. Thin films and nanowire arrays of these compounds were deposited. This was the first study of the electrochemical Tl-Te system and the first report of the electrodeposition of TlTe and Tl5Te3. Thermoelectric measurements were conducted on thin films and nanowire arrays of PbTe. The Seebeck coefficient and resistivity of PbTe thin film were measured. Results from thin films were complicated by the Pt substrate on which PbTe was deposited. Subtracting the effects of the Pt layer suggested PbTe thin films could have a large zT, however further work is needed to confirm this result. Resistivity measurements on nanowire arrays were also conducted. Despite efforts to minimize the oxidation of PbTe nanowires, good electrical contacts could not be created. The resistivity of nanowire arrays were orders of magnitude higher than expected. As a result of their low conductivity, the thermoelectric efficiency

  19. Antimony accumulation in Achillea ageratum, Plantago lanceolata and Silene vulgaris growing in an old Sb-mining area.

    PubMed

    Baroni, F; Boscagli, A; Protano, G; Riccobono, F

    2000-08-01

    Preliminary data of a biogeochemical survey concerning antimony transfer from soil to plants in an abandoned Sb-mining area are presented. Achillea ageratum, Plantago lanceolata and Silene vulgaris can strongly accumulate antimony when its extractable fraction in the soil is high (139-793 mg/kg). A. ageratum accumulates in basal leaves (1367 mg/kg) and inflorescences (1105 mg/kg), P. lanceolata in roots (1150 mg/kg) and S. vulgaris in shoots (1164 mg/kg). In these plant species, the efficiency of antimony accumulation decreases when the antimony availability in the soil is high. In A. ageratum and S. vulgaris, the death of the epigeal target part at the end of the growing season contributes to a reduction of the antimony load in the plant. A study to test the use of these species as bioindicators of antimony availability in soil is suggested by our results.

  20. SOLID-LIQUID PHASE EQUILIBRIUM IN BINARY SYSTEMS OF TRIPHENYL ANTIMONY WITH BIPHENYL, NAPHTHALENE, AND BENZOIC ACID.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PHASE STUDIES, *ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, SEMICONDUCTORS, SOLID STATE PHYSICS, ANTIMONY COMPOUNDS, EUTECTICS , ZONE MELTING, HALIDES, BISMUTH, ARSENIC, ELECTRONS, NAPHTHALENES , PHASE DIAGRAMS, SOLIDS.

  1. Simulation of antimony adsorption on nano-zero valent iron and kaolinite and analyzing the influencing parameters.

    PubMed

    Saeidnia, Setareh; Asadollahfardi, Gholamreza; Darban, Ahmad Khodadadi; Mohseni, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Antimony is one of the most toxic pollutants in industrial and mineral wastewaters threatening the life of humans and other creatures. We simulated the adsorption of antimony in the presence of nano-zero valent iron (nZVI) adsorbent, on kaolinite and in the presence of nZVI coated on kaolinite from mineral wastewater using VISUAL MINTEQ 3.1 software. Our aim was to determine the factors affecting the adsorption of antimony by applying simulation. The simulation was performed using an adsorption model of a diffuse layer model. The results of the simulation indicated that the nZVI concentration, initial concentrations of antimony and pH factor are effective on the adsorption of antimony. In the conducted stimulation, the optimum pH was 2-5 and the highest adsorption occurred in an acidic state. With increasing initial concentrations of antimony in the simulation, we concluded that nZVI had absorbed various concentrations above 90% and, by increasing the concentration of nZVI, antimony adsorption rate increased. The increased surface area of nZVI and the expansion of more interchangeable surfaces available for reaction with antimony ions causes more antimony ions to be adsorbed. In all cases, the coefficient of determination between the laboratory results and the model predictions that was obtained was more than 0.9.

  2. Indium telluride nanotubes: Solvothermal synthesis, growth mechanism, and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Liyan; Yan, Shancheng; Lu, Tao; Shi, Yi; Wang, Jianyu; Yang, Fan

    2014-03-15

    hydrogen storage, compared with the nanowires. The nanotube device also has a broad light detection range from 300 nm to 1100 nm, covering the UV–visible–NIR region. This good performance of In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes may enable significant advancements of new photodetection and photosensing applications. Highlights: • The In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotube device also has a broad light detection range from 300 nm to 1100 nm. • The nanotube is 137.85 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, which makes it suitable for gas sensing and hydrogen storage. • A possible growth mechanism of the indium telluride nanotubes was proposed. • In addition, no In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes have been reported until now.

  3. New Antimony Lanthanide Disulfide Dibromides LnSbS

    SciTech Connect

    Gout, D.; Jobic, S.; Evain, M.; Brec, R.

    2001-05-01

    CeSbS{sub 2}Br{sub 2} (I), Ce{sub 1/2}La{sub 1/2}SbS{sub 2}Br{sub 2} (II), and LaSbS{sub 2}Br{sub 2} (III) have been synthesized at 700 C from a mixture of LnBr{sub 3}, Ln{sub 2}S{sub 3}, Sb, and S and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The three phases are isostructural (space group P2{sub 1}/c, Z=4) and crystallize in a novel, dense, bidimensional structure with cell parameters a=8.709(3) {angstrom}, b=9.187(2) {angstrom}, c=17.397(5) {angstrom} {beta}=104.26(3) for I, a=8.739(7) {angstrom}, b=9.219(7) {angstrom}, c=17.41(2) {angstrom}, =104.3(1) for II, and a=8.785(1) {angstrom}, b=9.236(2) {angstrom}, c=17.372(3) {angstrom}, {beta}=104.09(2) for III. In these compounds, [Ln S{sub 5}Br{sub 4}] and [Ln S{sub 3}Br{sub 6}] (Ln=Ce, La) distorted tricapped trigonal prisms define infinite {sub {infinity}}{sup 2}[LnS{sub 2}Br{sub 2}] layers counterbalanced and capped by antimony cations. In good accordance with the structural features, the charge balance in these materials is to be written Ln{sup III}Sb{sup III}S{sup -II}{sub 2}Br{sup -I}{sub 2}. These compounds exhibit a yellow hue with a measured absorption threshold of 2.42(1), 2.55(1), and 2.72(1) eV for I, II, and III, respectively. In the two cerium containing bromothioantimonates I and II, the origin of the color is assigned to a Ce-4f{yields}Ce-5d electronic transition, which shifts to higher energy from I to II due either to a matrix effect (increase of the mean Ln-S distances under the substitution of Ce for La) or to an atomic ordering between Ce and La cations on the Ln(1) and Ln(2) crystallographic sites. In contrast, the electronic transition at play in III involves a charge transfer from the bromine and sulfur ions to the antimony ions, the latter contributing substantially to the lowermost levels of the conduction band.

  4. Levels and risk factors of antimony contamination in human hair from an electronic waste recycling area, Guiyu, China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yue; Ni, Wenqing; Chen, Yaowen; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Jingwen; Wu, Kusheng

    2015-05-01

    The primitive electronic waste (e-waste) recycling has brought a series of environmental pollutants in Guiyu, China. Antimony is one of the important metal contaminants and has aroused the global concerns recently. We aimed to investigate concentrations of antimony in human hair from Guiyu and compared them with those from a control area where no e-waste recycling exists, and assessed the potential risk factors. A total of 205 human hair samples from Guiyu and 80 samples from Jinping were collected for analysis. All volunteers were asked to complete a questionnaire including socio-demographic characteristics and other possible factors related to hair antimony exposure. The concentrations of hair antimony were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Our results indicated that the level of hair antimony in volunteers from Guiyu (median, 160.78; range, 6.99-4412.59 ng/g) was significantly higher than those from Jinping (median, 61.74; range, 2.98-628.43 ng/g). The residents who engaged in e-waste recycling activities in Guiyu had higher hair antimony concentrations than others (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference of hair antimony concentrations among different occupation types in e-waste recycling. Multiple stepwise regression analysis indicated that hair antimony concentrations were associated with education level (β = -0.064), the time of residence in Guiyu (β = 0.112), living house also served as e-waste workshop (β = 0.099), the work related to e-waste (β = 0.169), and smoking (β = 0.018). The elevated hair antimony concentrations implied that the residents in Guiyu might be at high risk of antimony contamination, especially the e-waste recycling workers. Work related to e-waste recycling activities and long-time residence in Guiyu contributed to the high hair antimony exposure.

  5. Determination of antimony by using tungsten trap atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titretir, Serap; Kendüzler, Erdal; Arslan, Yasin; Kula, İbrahim; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Ataman, O. Yavuz.

    2008-08-01

    An electrically heated tungsten coil was used as a trap in the determination of antimony. The technique consists of three steps. Initially, SbH 3 is formed by hydride generation procedure; then the analyte species in vapor form are transported to W-coil trap heated at 370 °C. Following the preconcentration step, the trap is heated to 895 °C; analyte species are revolatilized and transported to the flame-heated quartz atom cell where atomization and the formation of signal take place. The experimental parameters were optimized both for trap and no-trap studies. The most important experimental parameters are concentrations of HCl and NaBH 4 solutions, H 2 and Ar gas flow rates, and collection and revolatilization temperatures of W-coil. Accuracy was tested using a certified reference material, waste water EU-L-1. Limit of detection for the system is 16 ng l - 1 using a sample of 36 ml collected in 4.0 min. Enhancement factor in sensitivity was 17.

  6. Calcium-Antimony Alloys as Electrodes for Liquid Metal Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Ouchi, T; Kim, H; Ning, XH; Sadoway, DR

    2014-08-08

    The performance of a calcium-antimony (Ca-Sb) alloy serving as the positive electrode in a Ca vertical bar vertical bar Sb liquid metal battery was investigated in an electrochemical cell, Ca(in Bi) vertical bar LiCl-NaCl-CaCl2 vertical bar Ca(in Sb). The equilibrium potential of the Ca-Sb electrode was found to lie on the interval, 1.2-0.95 V versus Ca, in good agreement with electromotive force (emf) measurements in the literature. During both alloying and dealloying of Ca at the Sb electrode, the charge transfer and mass transport at the interface are facile enough that the electrode potential varies linearly from 0.95 to 0.75 V vs Ca(s) as current density varies from 50 to 500 mA cm(-2). The discharge capacity of the Ca vertical bar vertical bar Sb cells increases as the operating temperature increases due to the higher solubility and diffusivity of Ca in Sb. The cell was successfully cycled with high coulombic efficiency (similar to 100%) and small fade rate (<0.01% cycle(-1)). These data combined with the favorable costs of these metals and salts make the Ca vertical bar vertical bar Sb liquid metal battery attractive for grid-scale energy storage. (C) The Author(s) 2014. Published by ECS. All rights reserved.

  7. Removal of antimony from copper by injection of soda ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapurewicz, Tadeusz T.; Themelis, Nickolas J.

    1990-12-01

    The removal of Sb from molten copper is of importance in the development of processes which can smelt copper concentrates directly into copper in a single furnace. A promising method is injection of oxygen and sodium carbonate in a modified anode furnace. This study encompassed a thermodynamic analysis of the impurity removal reactions and an experimental investigation of antimony removal from molten copper in a 15 kW induction furnace. The results showed that the reaction was controlled by diffusion of Sb in the metal phase. The reaction between metal and injected flux can be divided into two subprocesses-. (1) “transitory contact” reaction to the injected flux particles as they rise through the melt and (2) “permanent contact” reaction across the interface between the metal bath and the supernatant slag layer. On the basis of the experimental work, the overall volumetric mass transfer coefficient (cm3/s) at 1473 K was expressed in terms of the two subprocesses as follows: (k d A) ov = (k d A) pc + (k d A) tc = 1.25Q{g/0.29} + 0.28 (H Q f ) where Q g is the injection gas flow rate in normal liters per minute, H is the depth of injection in centimeters, and Q f the rate of flux injection in grams per second.

  8. Increased metacyclogenesis of antimony-resistant Leishmania donovani clinical lines.

    PubMed

    Ouakad, M; Vanaerschot, M; Rijal, S; Sundar, S; Speybroeck, N; Kestens, L; Boel, L; De Doncker, S; Maes, I; Decuypere, S; Dujardin, J-C

    2011-09-01

    Mathematical models predict that the future of epidemics of drug-resistant pathogens depends in part on the competitive fitness of drug-resistant strains. Considering metacyclogenesis (differentiation process essential for infectivity) as a major contributor to the fitness of Leishmania donovani, we tested its relationship with pentavalent antimony (SbV) resistance in clinical lines. Different methods for the assessment of metacyclogenesis were cross-validated: gene expression profiling (META1 and SHERP), morphometry (microscopy and FACS), in vitro infectivity to macrophages and resistance to complement lysis. This was done on a model constituted by 2 pairs of reference strains cloned from a SbV-resistant and -sensitive isolate. We selected the most adequate parameter and extended the analysis of metacyclogenesis diversity to a sample of 20 clinical lines with different in vitro susceptibility to the drug. The capacity of metacyclogenesis, as measured by the complement lysis test, was shown to be significantly higher in SbV-resistant clinical lines of L. donovani than in SbV-sensitive lines. Together with other lines of evidence, it is concluded that L. donovani constitutes a unique example and model of drug-resistant pathogens with traits of increased fitness. These findings raise a fundamental question about the potential risks of selecting more virulent pathogens through massive chemotherapeutic interventions.

  9. Mitochondrial Proteomics of Antimony and Miltefosine Resistant Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Isabel M.; Racine, Gina; Légaré, Danielle; Ouellette, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Antimony (SbIII) and miltefosine (MIL) are important drugs for the treatment of Leishmania parasite infections. The mitochondrion is likely to play a central role in SbIII and MIL induced cell death in this parasite. Enriched mitochondrial samples from Leishmania promastigotes selected step by step for in vitro resistance to SbIII and MIL were subjected to differential proteomic analysis. A shared decrease in both mutants in the levels of pyruvate dehydrogenase, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase was observed, as well as a differential abundance in two calcium-binding proteins and the unique dynamin-1-like protein of the parasite. Both mutants presented a shared increase in the succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid-coenzyme A transferase and the abundance of numerous hypothetical proteins was also altered in both mutants. In general, the proteomic changes observed in the MIL mutant were less pronounced than in the SbIII mutant, probably due to the early appearance of a mutation in the miltefosine transporter abrogating the need for a strong mitochondrial adaptation. This study is the first analysis of the Leishmania mitochondrial proteome and offers powerful insights into the adaptations to this organelle during SbIII and MIL drug resistance. PMID:28248274

  10. Antimony bioavailability: knowledge and research perspectives for sustainable agricultures.

    PubMed

    Pierart, Antoine; Shahid, Muhammad; Séjalon-Delmas, Nathalie; Dumat, Camille

    2015-05-30

    The increasing interest in urban agriculture highlights the crucial question of crop quality. The main objectives for environmental sustainability are a decrease in chemical inputs, a reduction in the level of pollutants, and an improvement in the soil's biological activity. Among inorganic pollutants emitted by vehicle traffic and some industrial processes in urban areas, antimony (Sb) is observed on a global scale. While this metalloid is known to be potentially toxic, it can transfer from the soil or the atmosphere to plants, and accumulate in their edible parts. Urban agriculture is developing worldwide, and could therefore increasingly expose populations to Sb. The objective of this review was in consequences to gather and interpret actual knowledge of Sb uptake and bioaccumulation by crops, to reveal investigative fields on which to focus. While there is still no legal maximal value for Sb in plants and soils, light has to be shed on its accumulation and the factors affecting it. A relative absence of data exists about the role of soil flora and fauna in the transfer, speciation and compartmentation of Sb in vegetables. Moreover, little information exists on Sb ecotoxicity for terrestrial ecosystems. A human risk assessment has finally been reviewed, with particular focus on Sb bioaccessibility.

  11. Thermal Stability of Nanocrystalline Copper Alloyed with Antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwater, Mark A.; Mula, Suhrit; Scattergood, Ronald O.; Koch, Carl C.

    2013-12-01

    Nanocrystalline copper (Cu) was generated by cryogenic, high-energy ball milling. Antimony (Sb) was added to investigate its utility in stabilizing the grain structure during annealing up to a maximum temperature of 1073 K (800 °C). When alloyed with Sb in quantities up to 1 at. pct, thermal stability was maintained up to 673 K (400 °C). Cu and Sb have very different molar volumes which can drive segregation of the solute due to the elastic strain energy and hence stabilize the grain size by reducing grain boundary energy. The elastic mismatch of Sb in Cu is calculated to be quite large (113 kJ/mol) when molar volume is used, but when an equivalent equation using atomic radius is applied, the driving force is nearly an order of magnitude lower (~12 kJ/mol). The low elastic mismatch is corroborated by the large equilibrium solubility of Sb in Cu. The results for the Cu-Sb system are compared to the nanocrystalline Ni-W system and the large amount of equilibrium solubility of the solute in both cases is thought to hinder thermal stabilization since segregation is not strongly favored.

  12. Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Dominik; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Jan

    2012-05-01

    The emission properties of Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber has been investigated. Luminescence at 2.1 μm corresponding to 5I7--> 5I8 transition in holmium was obtained by energy transfer between Yb3+ and Ho3+ ions. According to the Dexter-Miyakawa model, the parameters of energy migration CDD of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) <--> 2F5/2 (Yb3+) transition and direct energy transfer CDA of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) --> 5I6 (Ho3+) transition was calculated. The optimization of the activator content and the concentration ratio were conducted with the purpose of maximizing the efficiency of energy transfer. It made possible to select best-suited glass which was used to manufacture double-clad optical fiber. Strong and narrow bands of spontaneous emission which formed as a result of energy transfer between ytterbium and holmium ions were observed in the fiber under exciting with radiation at 978 nm wavelength.

  13. Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Dominik; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Jan

    The emission properties of Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber has been investigated. Luminescence at 2.1 μm corresponding to 5I7--> 5I8 transition in holmium was obtained by energy transfer between Yb3+ and Ho3+ ions. According to the Dexter-Miyakawa model, the parameters of energy migration CDD of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) <--> 2F5/2 (Yb3+) transition and direct energy transfer CDA of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) --> 5I6 (Ho3+) transition was calculated. The optimization of the activator content and the concentration ratio were conducted with the purpose of maximizing the efficiency of energy transfer. It made possible to select best-suited glass which was used to manufacture double-clad optical fiber. Strong and narrow bands of spontaneous emission which formed as a result of energy transfer between ytterbium and holmium ions were observed in the fiber under exciting with radiation at 978 nm wavelength.

  14. Electrochemical antimony removal from accumulator acid: results from removal trials in laboratory cells.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, M E Henry; Koparal, A Savas

    2011-11-30

    Regeneration of spent accumulator acid could be an alternative process for crystallization, neutralisation and disposal. Therefore, for the first time in a study of the possibilities of electrochemical removal of antimony and accumulator acid regeneration on a laboratory scale, two synthetic and several real systems containing sulfuric acid of concentrations ranging between 28% and 36%, and antimony species were tested. Discontinuous electrochemical reactors with anion exchange membranes were successfully used in these experiments, which were conducted at a temperature of 35°C. Removal of antimony using cells that were not divided by a separator, however, was not possible. In selected experiments, by varying the electrode material, type of electrolyte, and cell current, the concentration of antimony could be reduced from the range of 5 ppm to 0.15 ppm. This resulted in current efficiencies between 0.00002% and 0.001%, and in specific electroenergy demands between 100 Wh L(-1) and 2000 Wh L(-1). In other experiments on substances with antimony contents up to 3500 mg L(-1), the current efficiencies obtained were more than a thousandfold higher. In contrast to the formally high relative energy consumption parameters absolute demand parameters are relatively small and favour the electrochemical method in small scale application. Besides plate electrodes, 3D-cathodes were used. Copper- and graphite cathodes produced the best results.

  15. Two cases of visceral leishmaniasis in Colombia resistant to meglumine antimonial treatment.

    PubMed

    Vélez, Iván Darío; Colmenares, Lina María; Muñoz, Carlos Aguirre

    2009-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) affects over 500,000 people worldwide each year. The disease occurs in the Mediterranean basin, Central and South America and is caused by Leishmania infantum (syn L. chagasi). VL is an endemic disease in Colombia, particularly along the Caribbean coast and the Magdalena River Valley and 90% of VL cases occur in children under the age of five. The first line of treatment is chemotherapy with pentavalent antimonial compounds, including sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam) and meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime). These compounds are the ones most used in Colombia, at a dose of 20 mg/kg/day for 28 days. Nevertheless resistance of L. infantum to pentavalent antimonials is becoming an important problem. No cases of VL resistant to pentavalent antimonial compounds have previously been reported from Colombia. This report describes the two cases of VL resistance to antimonial compounds in a girl and a boy who did not respond to previous treatment with Pentacarinat and Glucantime regimens but were treated successfully with liposomal amphotericin B. Based on our findings, we recommend liposomal amphotericin B as the first line of treatment for VL due to its low toxicity, shorter administration period and the low price obtained by WHO.

  16. Copper-promoted cementation of antimony in hydrochloric acid system: A green protocol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lian-Kui; Li, Ying-Ying; Cao, Hua-Zhen; Zheng, Guo-Qu

    2015-12-15

    A new method of recovering antimony in hydrochloric acid system by cementation with copper powder was proposed and carried out at laboratory scale. Thermodynamic analysis and cyclic voltammetry test were conducted to study the cementation process. This is a novel antimony removal technology and quite meets the requirements of green chemistry. The main cement product Cu2Sb is a promising anodic material for lithium and sodium ion battery. And nearly all consumed copper powder are transformed into CuCl which is an important industrial material. The effect of reaction temperature, stoichiometric ratio of Cu to Sb(III), stirring rate and concentration of HCl on the cementation efficiency of antimony were investigated in detail. Optimized cementation condition is obtained at 60 °C for 120 min and stirring rate of 600 rpm with Cu/Sb(III) stoichiometric ratio of 6 in 3 mol L(-1) HCl. At this time, nearly all antimony can be removed by copper powder and the cementation efficiency is over 99%. The structure and morphologies of the cement products were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Results show that the reaction temperature has little influence on the morphology of the cement products which consist of particles with various sizes. The activation energy of the cementation antimony on copper is 37.75 kJ mol(-1), indicating a chemically controlled step. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry results show that no stibine generates during the cementation process.

  17. Epitaxial growth of cadmium telluride films on silicon with a buffer silicon carbide layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, V. V.; Kukushkin, S. A.; Osipov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    An epitaxial 1-3-μm-thick cadmium telluride film has been grown on silicon with a buffer silicon carbide layer using the method of open thermal evaporation and condensation in vacuum for the first time. The optimum substrate temperature was 500°C at an evaporator temperature of 580°C, and the growth time was 4 s. In order to provide more qualitative growth of cadmium telluride, a high-quality 100-nm-thick buffer silicon carbide layer was previously synthesized on the silicon surface using the method of topochemical substitution of atoms. The ellipsometric, Raman, X-ray diffraction, and electron-diffraction analyses showed a high structural perfection of the CdTe layer in the absence of a polycrystalline phase.

  18. Ab initio lattice dynamics and thermochemistry of layered bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3).

    PubMed

    Zurhelle, Alexander F; Deringer, Volker L; Stoffel, Ralf P; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-03-23

    We present density-functional theory calculations of the lattice dynamics of bismuth telluride, yielding force constants, mean-square displacements and partial densities of phonon states which corroborate and complement previous nuclear inelastic scattering experiments. From these data, we derive an element- and energy-resolved view of the vibrational anharmonicity, quantified by the macroscopic Grüneisen parameter γ which results in 1.56. Finally, we calculate thermochemical properties in the quasiharmonic approximation, especially the heat capacity at constant pressure and the enthalpy of formation for bismuth telluride; the latter arrives at ΔHf (Bi2Te3)  =  -102 kJ mol(-1) at 298 K.

  19. Method for improving the growth of cadmium telluride on a gallium arsenide substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, J.L.

    1990-12-31

    A method for preparing a gallium arsenide substrate, prior to growing a layer of cadmium telluride on a support surface thereof. The preparation includes the steps of cleaning the gallium arsenide substrate and thereafter forming prepatterned shapes on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate. The layer of cadmium telluride then grown on the prepared substrate results in dislocation densities of approximately 1{times}10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2} or less. The prepatterned shapes on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate are formed by reactive ion etching an original outer surface of the gallium arsenide substrate and into the body of the gallium arsenide substrate to a depth of at least two microns. The prepatterned shapes have the appearance of cylindrical mesas each having a diameter of at lease twelve microns. After the mesas are formed on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate, the substrate is again cleaned.

  20. Development and evaluation of germanium telluride phase change material based ohmic switches for RF applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Muzhi; Rais-Zadeh, Mina

    2017-01-01

    We report on the device structure and performance of germanium telluride phase change material based ohmic RF switches. Two main types of the phase change switches using direct and indirect heating methods have been designed, fabricated and measured to analyze and compare the performance of germanium telluride in RF switch applications. Both types of switches are proven to have an insertion loss of less than 0.6 dB and an isolation of more than 13 dB for up to 20 GHz. Good linearity and power handling capability results are also measured. A reconfigurable bandpass filter using the indirectly heated phase change switch has also been developed, and shows promising performance. Efforts have been made to further analyze the issues with switching reliability, and explore possible ways of improving the performance of phase change RF switches.

  1. Antimony leaching in plastics from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) with various acids and gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tostar, Sandra; Stenvall, Erik; Boldizar, Antal; Foreman, Mark R. St. J.

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • We have proposed a method to recover antimony from electronic plastics. • The most efficient acid solution was sodium hydrogen tartrate in dimethyl sulfoxide. • Gamma irradiation did not influence the antimony leaching ability. - Abstract: There has been a recent interest in antimony since the availability in readily mined areas is decreasing compared to the amounts used. It is important in many applications such as flame retardants and in the production of polyester, which can trigger an investigation of the leachability of antimony from plastics using different acids. In this paper, different types of acids are tested for their ability to leach antimony from a discarded computer housing, made of poly(acrylonitrile butadiene styrene), which is a common plastic type used in electrical and electronic equipment. The acid solutions included sodium hydrogen tartrate (0.5 M) dissolved in either dimethyl sulfoxide or water (at ca. 23 °C and heated to ca. 105 °C). The metal content after leaching was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The most efficient leaching medium was the heated solution of sodium hydrogen tartrate in dimethyl sulfoxide, which leached almost half of the antimony from the poly(acrylonitrile butadiene styrene). Gamma irradiation, which is proposed to improve the mechanical properties in plastics, was used here to investigate the influence of antimony leaching ability. No significant change in the amount of leached antimony could be observed.

  2. First Report on Infant Acute Urticaria after Mother’s Parenteral Use of Meglumine Antimoniate (Glucantime): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    MOZAFARI, Omid; SHOROFI, Seyed Afshin; YOUSEFI, Seyde Sedighe

    2016-01-01

    Pentavalent antimonials are still the first drug of choice for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). Like other treatments, they can cause adverse reactions including musculoskeletal pain, gastrointestinal disturbances, and mild to moderate headaches. In this paper, we report the first case of an infant who developed acute urticaria after her mother’s parenteral use of meglumine antimoniate (glucantime). PMID:27957467

  3. Spectral properties of powder preparations of cadmium telluride and cadmium selenide with controlled nonstoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomyakov, A. V.; Mozhevitina, E. N.; Kuz'min, V. V.; Kon'kova, N. A.; Avetissov, I. Ch.

    2015-03-01

    The reflection spectra of powder preparations of cadmium telluride and cadmium selenide with different contents of overstoichiometric components have been investigated in the range of 800-1700 nm. The reflectance is found to be maximum for samples with compositions close to stoichiometric. An increase in the concentration of overstoichiometric cadmium more radically reduces the reflectance in comparison with preparations containing excess chalcogen. It is shown that halftone images in the near-IR range can be formed by using of these materials.

  4. Exfoliation and characterization of bismuth telluride atomic quintuples and quasi-two-dimensional crystals.

    PubMed

    Teweldebrhan, Desalegne; Goyal, Vivek; Balandin, Alexander A

    2010-04-14

    Bismuth telluride (Bi(2)Te(3)) and its alloys are the best bulk thermoelectric materials known today. In addition, stacked quasi-two-dimensional (2D) layers of Bi(2)Te(3) were recently identified as promising topological insulators. In this Letter we describe a method for "graphene-inspired" exfoliation of crystalline bismuth telluride films with a thickness of a few atoms. The atomically thin films were suspended across trenches in Si/SiO(2) substrates, and subjected to detail material characterization, which included atomic force microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The presence of the van der Waals gaps allowed us to disassemble Bi(2)Te(3) crystal into its quintuple building blocks-five monatomic sheets-consisting of Te((1))-Bi-Te((2))-Bi-Te((1)). By altering the thickness and sequence of atomic planes, we were able to create "designer" nonstoichiometric quasi-2D crystalline films, change their composition and doping, the type of charge carriers as well as other properties. The exfoliated quintuples and ultrathin films have low thermal conductivity, high electrical conductivity, and enhanced thermoelectric properties. The obtained results pave the way for producing stacks of crystalline bismuth telluride quantum wells with the strong spatial confinement of charge carriers and acoustic phonons, beneficial for thermoelectric devices. The developed technology for producing free-standing quasi-2D layers of Te((1))-Bi-Te((2))-Bi-Te((1)) creates an impetus for investigation of the topological insulators and their possible practical applications.

  5. SESPE-FRAZIER, DIABLO, MATILIJA, DRY LAKES, SAWMILL-BADLANDS, CUYAMA, ANTIMONY, AND QUATAL ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frizzell, Virgil A.; Hale, William N.

    1984-01-01

    The study area, consisting of the Sespe-Frazier, Diablo, Matilija, Dry Lakes, Sawmill-Badlands, Cuyama, Antimony, and Quatal Roadless Areas, occupies about 872 sq mi in the Los Padres National Forest, California. Studies indicate that the Sespe-Frazier Roadless Area contains demonstrated resources of gold, gypsum, phosphate and bentonite; deposits in the Cuyama Roadless Area have demonstrated resources of gypsum; mines in the Antimony Roadless Area have demonstrated resources of antimony, gold, silver, and marble; and the Quatal Roadless Area has demonstrated resources of bentonite. The Sespe-Frazier Roadless Area has substantiated potential for geothermal resources suitable for direct-heat purposes, probable and substantiated potential for oil and gas resources, and probable potential for gold resources. Small areas of probable resource potential for antimony and gold were identified in Antimony Roadless Area.

  6. Antimony mediated growth of high-density InAs quantum dots for photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tutu, F. K.; Wu, J.; Lam, P.; Tang, M.; Liu, H.; Miyashita, N.; Okada, Y.; Wilson, J.; Allison, R.

    2013-07-22

    We report enhanced solar cell performance using high-density InAs quantum dots. The high-density quantum dot was grown by antimony mediated molecular beam epitaxy. In-plane quantum dot density over 1 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} was achieved by applying a few monolayers of antimony on the GaAs surface prior to quantum dot growth. The formation of defective large clusters was reduced by optimization of the growth temperature and InAs coverage. Comparing with a standard quantum dot solar cell without the incorporation of antimony, the high-density quantum dot solar cell demonstrates a distinct improvement in short-circuit current from 7.4 mA/cm{sup 2} to 8.3 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  7. Trophic transfer of arsenic and antimony in a freshwater ecosystem: a field study.

    PubMed

    Culioli, Julia-Laurence; Fouquoire, Aurélie; Calendini, Serge; Mori, Christophe; Orsini, Antoine

    2009-10-04

    The distribution of arsenic and antimony discharges related to a past mining activity in the Bravona River and its tributary, the Presa River, was investigated. We determined levels of arsenic and antimony in the water and the biota (bryophytes, benthic macroinvertebrates and fish), along a pollution gradient. Concentrations of metalloids downstream mining wastes were significantly higher than those in reference station sites. The pattern of accumulation of arsenic in the food chain decreased as follows: macroinvertebrates>bryophytes>water>fish tissues. For antimony, the lowest concentrations were found in water. The accumulation of metals in invertebrate taxa depends on their place in the food chain, their feeding behavior, and their specific habit (lenitophilic/rheophilic species). Concentrations of both metalloids decreased with increasing trophic level.

  8. Process for treating spent catalyst including antimony halides from chlorofluorocarbon production

    SciTech Connect

    Kalcevic, V.; McGahan, J.F.

    1988-06-14

    A process for treating spent catalyst from chlorofluorocarbon production is described wherein the catalyst includes antimony halides and undergoes hydrolysis in an aqueous medium to produce insoluble antimony compounds and fluoride ions. The process comprises hydrolyzing the catalyst in an aqueous solution of ferric chloride having a sufficient concentration of ferric ions to complex substantially all of the fluoride ions produced upon hydrolysis of the catalyst, neutralizing the reaction mass present following hydrolysis of the catalyst and complexing of the fluoride ions by contacting the reaction mass with an aqueous suspension of a compound selected from the class consisting of calcium hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide, and separating the insoluble antimony compounds from the neutralized reaction mass.

  9. Study of upscaling possibilities for antimony sulfide solid state sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakopoulou, Archontoula; Raptis, Dimitrios; Dracopoulos, Vasilios; Sygellou, Lamprini; Andrikopoulos, Konstantinos S.; Lianos, Panagiotis

    2015-03-01

    Solid state solar cells of inverted structure were constructed by successive deposition of nanoparticulate titania, antimony sulfide sensitizer and P3HT on FTO electrodes with PEDOT:PSS:Ag as counter electrode. Sensitized photoanode electrodes were characterized by XRD, Raman, XPS, FESEM and UV-vis. Small laboratory scale cells were first constructed and optimized. Functional cells were obtained by annealing the antimony sulfide film either in air or in inert atmosphere. High short-circuit currents were recorded in both cases with air-annealed sample producing more current but lower voltage. Small unit cells were combined to form cell modules. Connection of unit cells in parallel increased current but not proportionally to that of the unit cell. Connection in series preserved current and generated voltage multiplication. Cells were constructed and studied under ambient conditions, without encapsulation. The results encourage upscaling of antimony sulfide solar cells.

  10. Spectrophotometric procedure using rhodamine B for determination of submicrogram quantities of antimony in rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schnepfe, M.M.

    1973-01-01

    A spectrophotometric procedure using Rhodamine B is given for the determination of antimony in mineralized rocks after its separation as stibine. A study of the Rhodamine B reaction points to the importance of the order of addition of reagents in enhancing sensitivity and increasing the stability of the system. The tolerance of some 26 elements is established for the overall procedure. Although the limit of determination is approximately 0??5 ppm Sb in a 0??2-g sample, the procedure is intended primarily for screening samples containing more than 1 ppm Sb. In pure solutions 0??1 ??g of antimony can be determined with a relative standard deviation of 25%. For >0??2 ??g of antimony a relative standard deviation of 15% or less can be expected. ?? 1973.

  11. Concentration transient analysis of antimony surface segregation during Si(100) molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markert, L. C.; Greene, J. E.; Ni, W.-X.; Hansson, G. V.; Sundgren, J.-E.

    1991-01-01

    Antimony surface segregation during Si(100) molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) was investigated at temperatures T(sub s) = 515 - 800 C using concentration transient analysis (CTA). The dopant surface coverage Theta, bulk fraction gamma, and incorporation probability sigma during MBE were determined from secondary-ion mass spectrometry depth profiles of modulation-doped films. Programmed T(sub s) changes during growth were used to trap the surface-segregated dopant overlayer, producing concentration spikes whose integrated area corresponds to Theta. Thermal antimony doping by coevaporation was found to result in segregation strongly dependent on T(sub s) with Theta(sub Sb) values up to 0.9 monolayers (ML): in films doped with Sb(+) ions accelerated by 100 V, Theta(sub Sb) was less than or equal to 4 x 10(exp -3) ML. Surface segregation of coevaporated antimony was kinematically limited for the film growth conditions in these experiments.

  12. Use of Antimony in the Treatment of Leishmaniasis: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Arun Kumar; Sen, Pradip; Roy, Syamal

    2011-01-01

    In the recent past the standard treatment of kala-azar involved the use of pentavalent antimonials Sb(V). Because of progressive rise in treatment failure to Sb(V) was limited its use in the treatment program in the Indian subcontinent. Until now the mechanism of action of Sb(V) is not very clear. Recent studies indicated that both parasite and hosts contribute to the antimony efflux mechanism. Interestingly, antimonials show strong immunostimulatory abilities as evident from the upregulation of transplantation antigens and enhanced T cell stimulating ability of normal antigen presenting cells when treated with Sb(V) in vitro. Recently, it has been shown that some of the peroxovanadium compounds have Sb(V)-resistance modifying ability in experimental infection with Sb(V) resistant Leishmania donovani isolates in murine model. Thus, vanadium compounds may be used in combination with Sb(V) in the treatment of Sb(V) resistance cases of kala-azar. PMID:22091408

  13. Electronic characterization of defects in narrow gap semiconductors: Comparison of electronic energy levels and formation energies in mercury cadmium telluride, mercury zinc telluride, and mercury zinc selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, James D.; Li, Wei-Gang

    1995-03-01

    The project has evolved to that of using Green's functions to predict properties of deep defects in narrow gap materials. Deep defects are now defined as originating from short range potentials and are often located near the middle of the energy gap. They are important because they affect the lifetime of charge carriers and hence the switching time of transistors. We are now moving into the arena of predicting formation energies of deep defects. This will also allow us to make predictions about the relative concentrations of the defects that could be expected at a given temperature. The narrow gap materials mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT), and mercury zinc selenide (MZS) are of interest to NASA because they have commercial value for infrared detecting materials, and because there is a good possibility that they can be grown better in a microgravity environment. The uniform growth of these crystals on earth is difficult because of convection (caused by solute depletion just ahead of the growing interface, and also due to thermal gradients). In general it is very difficult to grow crystals with both radial and axial homogeneity.

  14. Electronic characterization of defects in narrow gap semiconductors: Comparison of electronic energy levels and formation energies in mercury cadmium telluride, mercury zinc telluride, and mercury zinc selenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James D.; Li, Wei-Gang

    1995-01-01

    The project has evolved to that of using Green's functions to predict properties of deep defects in narrow gap materials. Deep defects are now defined as originating from short range potentials and are often located near the middle of the energy gap. They are important because they affect the lifetime of charge carriers and hence the switching time of transistors. We are now moving into the arena of predicting formation energies of deep defects. This will also allow us to make predictions about the relative concentrations of the defects that could be expected at a given temperature. The narrow gap materials mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT), and mercury zinc selenide (MZS) are of interest to NASA because they have commercial value for infrared detecting materials, and because there is a good possibility that they can be grown better in a microgravity environment. The uniform growth of these crystals on earth is difficult because of convection (caused by solute depletion just ahead of the growing interface, and also due to thermal gradients). In general it is very difficult to grow crystals with both radial and axial homogeneity.

  15. The effect of different annealing temperatures on tin and cadmium telluride phases obtained by a modified chemical route

    SciTech Connect

    Mesquita, Anderson Fuzer; Porto, Arilza de Oliveira; Magela de Lima, Geraldo; Paniago, Roberto; Ardisson, José Domingos

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Synthesis of cadmium and tin telluride. ► Chemical route to obtain pure crystalline cadmium and tin telluride. ► Effect of the annealing temperature on the crystalline phases. ► Removal of tin oxide as side product through thermal treatment. -- Abstract: In this work tin and cadmium telluride were prepared by a modification of a chemical route reported in the literature to obtain metallacycles formed by oxidative addition of tin-tellurium bonds to platinum (II). Through this procedure it was possible to obtain tin and cadmium telluride. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the crystalline phases obtained as well as the presence of side products. In the case of tin telluride it was identified potassium chloride, metallic tellurium and tin oxide as contaminants. The tin oxidation states were also monitored by {sup 119}Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy. The annealing in hydrogen atmosphere was chosen as a strategy to reduce the tin oxide and promote its reaction with the excess of tellurium present in the medium. The evolution of this tin oxide phase was studied through the annealing of the sample at different temperatures. Cadmium telluride was obtained with high degree of purity (98.5% relative weight fraction) according to the Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction data. The modified procedure showed to be very effective to obtain amorphous tin and cadmium telluride and the annealing at 450 °C has proven to be useful to reduce the amount of oxide produced as side product.

  16. Future trends of global atmospheric antimony emissions from anthropogenic activities until 2050

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Junrui; Tian, Hezhong; Zhu, Chuanyong; Hao, Jiming; Gao, Jiajia; Wang, Yong; Xue, Yifeng; Hua, Shenbin; Wang, Kun

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the scenario forecast of global atmospheric antimony (Sb) emissions from anthropogenic activities till 2050. The projection scenarios are built based on the comprehensive global antimony emission inventory for the period 1995-2010 which is reported in our previous study. Three scenarios are set up to investigate the future changes of global antimony emissions as well as their source and region contribution characteristics. Trends of activity levels specified as 5 primary source categories are projected by combining the historical trend extrapolation with EIA International energy outlook 2013, while the source-specific dynamic emission factors are determined by applying transformed normal distribution functions. If no major changes in the efficiency of emission control are introduced and keep current air quality legislations (Current Legislation scenario), global antimony emissions will increase by a factor of 2 between 2010 and 2050. The largest increase in Sb emissions is projected from Asia due to large volume of nonferrous metals production and waste incineration. In case of enforcing the pollutant emission standards (Strengthened Control scenario), global antimony emissions in 2050 will stabilize with that of 2010. Moreover, we can anticipate further declines in Sb emissions for all continents with the best emission control performances (Maximum Feasible Technological Reduction scenario). Future antimony emissions from the top 10 largest emitting countries have also been calculated and source category contributions of increasing emissions of these countries present significant diversity. Furthermore, global emission projections in 2050 are distributed within a 1° × 1°latitude/longitude grid. East Asia, Western Europe and North America present remarkable differences in emission intensity under the three scenarios, which implies that source-and-country specific control measures are necessary to be implemented for abating Sb emissions from

  17. Noninferiority of Miltefosine Versus Meglumine Antimoniate for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Rubiano, Luisa Consuelo; Miranda, María Consuelo; Muvdi Arenas, Sandra; Montero, Luz Mery; Rodríguez-Barraquer, Isabel; Garcerant, Daniel; Prager, Martín; Osorio, Lyda; Rojas, Maria Ximena; Pérez, Mauricio; Nicholls, Ruben Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Background. Children have a lower response rate to antimonial drugs and higher elimination rate of antimony (Sb) than adults. Oral miltefosine has not been evaluated for pediatric cutaneous leishmaniasis. Methods. A randomized, noninferiority clinical trial with masked evaluation was conducted at 3 locations in Colombia where Leishmania panamensis and Leishmania guyanensis predominated. One hundred sixteen children aged 2–12 years with parasitologically confirmed cutaneous leishmaniasis were randomized to directly observed treatment with meglumine antimoniate (20 mg Sb/kg/d for 20 days; intramuscular) (n = 58) or miltefosine (1.8–2.5 mg/kg/d for 28 days; by mouth) (n = 58). Primary outcome was treatment failure at or before week 26 after initiation of treatment. Miltefosine was noninferior if the proportion of treatment failures was ≤15% higher than achieved with meglumine antimoniate (1-sided test, α = .05). Results. Ninety-five percent of children (111/116) completed follow-up evaluation. By intention-to-treat analysis, failure rate was 17.2% (98% confidence interval [CI], 5.7%–28.7%) for miltefosine and 31% (98% CI, 16.9%–45.2%) for meglumine antimoniate. The difference between treatment groups was 13.8%, (98% CI, −4.5% to 32%) (P = .04). Adverse events were mild for both treatments. Conclusions. Miltefosine is noninferior to meglumine antimoniate for treatment of pediatric cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) species. Advantages of oral administration and low toxicity favor use of miltefosine in children. Clinical Trial Registration. NCT00487253. PMID:22238470

  18. Microbial Methylation of Metalloids: Arsenic, Antimony, and Bismuth

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Ronald; Chasteen, Thomas G.

    2002-01-01

    A significant 19th century public health problem was that the inhabitants of many houses containing wallpaper decorated with green arsenical pigments experienced illness and death. The problem was caused by certain fungi that grew in the presence of inorganic arsenic to form a toxic, garlic-odored gas. The garlic odor was actually put to use in a very delicate microbiological test for arsenic. In 1933, the gas was shown to be trimethylarsine. It was not until 1971 that arsenic methylation by bacteria was demonstrated. Further research in biomethylation has been facilitated by the development of delicate techniques for the determination of arsenic species. As described in this review, many microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, and yeasts) and animals are now known to biomethylate arsenic, forming both volatile (e.g., methylarsines) and nonvolatile (e.g., methylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid) compounds. The enzymatic mechanisms for this biomethylation are discussed. The microbial conversion of sodium arsenate to trimethylarsine proceeds by alternate reduction and methylation steps, with S-adenosylmethionine as the usual methyl donor. Thiols have important roles in the reductions. In anaerobic bacteria, methylcobalamin may be the donor. The other metalloid elements of the periodic table group 15, antimony and bismuth, also undergo biomethylation to some extent. Trimethylstibine formation by microorganisms is now well established, but this process apparently does not occur in animals. Formation of trimethylbismuth by microorganisms has been reported in a few cases. Microbial methylation plays important roles in the biogeochemical cycling of these metalloid elements and possibly in their detoxification. The wheel has come full circle, and public health considerations are again important. PMID:12040126

  19. Mercury, arsenic, antimony, and selenium contents of sediment from the Kuskokwim River, Bethel, Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, H.E.; Sparck, H.M.

    1993-01-01

    The Kuskokwim River at Bethel, Alaska, drains a major mercury-antimony metallogenic province in its upper reaches and tributaries. Bethel (population 4000) is situated on the Kuskokwim floodplain and also draws its water supply from wells located in river-deposited sediment. A boring through overbank and floodplain sediment has provided material to establish a baseline datum for sediment-hosted heavy metals. Mercury (total), arsenic, antimony, and selenium contents were determined; aluminum was also determined and used as normalizing factor. The contents of the heavy metals were relatively constant with depth and do not reflect any potential enrichment from upstream contaminant sources. ?? 1993 Springer-Verlag.

  20. Composite thin-foil bandpass filter for EUV astronomy Titanium-antimony-titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinsky, P.; Martin, C.; Kimble, R.; Bowyer, S.; Steele, G.

    1983-01-01

    Thin metallic foils of antimony and titanium have been investigated in an attempt to develop an EUV filter with a bandpass from 350 to 550 A. A composite filter has been developed composed of antimony sandwiched between two titanium foils. The transmissions of sample composite foils and of pure titanium foils from 130 to 1216 A are presented. The absorption coefficients of anatimony and titanium and the effect of titanium oxide on the transmission are derived. The composite filter has been found to be quite stable and mechanically rugged. Among other uses, the filter shows substantial promise for EUV astronomy.

  1. Experimental and clinical studies with a new antimonial preparation for the treatment of schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Pedrique, Miguel Ron; Ercoli, Nicolò

    1971-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a clinical study in which a new antimony preparation—a chelate of dimethylcysteine with antimony sodium tartrate (”NAP”)—was administered intramuscularly at a total dosage of 2 g (5×400 mg, corresponding to 290 mg of Sb) to 400 patients with schistosomiasis. Among 108 patients in a rural population the treatment was on the whole well accepted (97% completed the intensive course of injections), thus indicating that NAP would be useful for the mass treatment of schistosomiasis. PMID:5317079

  2. Antimony distribution and mobility in topsoils and plants (Cytisus striatus, Cistus ladanifer and Dittrichia viscosa) from polluted Sb-mining areas in Extremadura (Spain).

    PubMed

    Murciego, A Murciego; Sánchez, A García; González, M A Rodríguez; Gil, E Pinilla; Gordillo, C Toro; Fernández, J Cabezas; Triguero, T Buyolo

    2007-01-01

    A study about topsoil antimony distribution and mobility from the soils to the biomass has been afforded in three abandoned Sb mining areas located at Extremadura. Physico-chemical characteristics of the soils and total antimony levels were measured in soils and autochthonous plant species (Cytisus striatus, Cistus ladanifer and Dittrichia viscosa). Comparison with corresponding values in reference areas isolated from the mining activities is discussed. Antimony mobility in the soils was estimated by measuring the water extractable fraction; low results were obtained for the three soil areas, with no statistical differences. Plant ability to accumulate antimony was estimated by use of plant accumulation coefficients (PAC). Seasonal (spring vs. autumn) effects on the antimony content in the plant species. Cytisus striatus from Mari Rosa mine presented antimony excluder characteristics, whereas Dittrichia viscosa specimens growing in San Antonio mine showed a significant antimony bioaccumulation.

  3. Speciation of antimony(III) and antimony(V) by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after ultrasound-assisted emulsification of solidified floating organic drop microextraction.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shengping; Zhu, Xiashi

    2013-10-15

    A simple, sensitive and efficient method of ultrasound-assisted emulsification of solidified floating organic drop microextraction (USE-SFODME) coupled to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for the speciation of antimony at different oxidation state Sb(III)/Sb(V) in environmental samples was established. In this method, the hydrophobic complex of Sb(III) with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) is extracted by 1-undecanol at pH 9.0, while Sb(V) remains in aqueous phase. Sb(V) content can be calculated by subtracting Sb(III) from the total antimony after reducing Sb(V) to Sb(III) by l-cysteine. Various factors affecting USE-SFODME including pH, extraction solvent and its volume, concentration of DDTC, sonication time, and extraction temperature were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range from 0.05 to 10.0 ng mL(-1), with the limit of detection (3σ) 9.89 ng L(-1) for Sb(III). The relative standard deviation for Sb(III) was 4.5% (n=9, c=1.0 ng mL(-1)). This method was validated against the certified reference materials (GSB 07-1376-2001, GBW07441), and applied to the speciation of antimony in environmental samples (soil and water samples) with satisfactory results.

  4. Electrodeposition and device incorporation of bismuth antimony nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyani, Jennifer

    Thermoelectric materials have the unique property where the application of a potential difference across the material results in the formation of a temperature gradient, and vice versa. There is continued interest in bulk thermoelectric materials for power generation and refrigeration applications, however these materials are not currently in widespread use due to their low conversion efficiency. It has been predicted that nanostructured thermoelectric materials will show enhanced performance over their bulk counterparts. In this study, bismuth antimony (Bi1-xSbx) nanowire arrays have been synthesized and assembled into devices in order to demonstrate an enhanced performance in nanostructured thermoelectric materials. Bi1-xSbx nanowire arrays were fabricated by potentiostatic electrodeposition into porous alumina templates from a dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution. The nanowire composition and texture were studied as a function of the electrodeposition conditions in order to maximize their thermoelectric performance. Energy dispersive spectrometry and electron microprobe analysis were used to study the nanowire composition as a function of the electroactive and non-electroactive species in solution. Texturing in the nanowire arrays was observed by X-ray diffraction and controlled by the applied voltage and presence of supporting electrolyte. The nanowire arrays were also optimized for device incorporation by maximizing the number of nanowires and minimizing their length distribution. The areal density of nanowire arrays was on the order of 1010 wires/cm2 due to the high density of pores in the alumina and the high degree to which those pores were filled with electrodeposited material. A narrow distribution of nanowire lengths was observed by scanning electron microscopy across millimeter-length portions of the arrays. A hybrid nanowire-bulk thermoelectric device was assembled after electrical contacts were electrodeposited over Bi1-xSbx nanowire arrays. Nickel was

  5. Mechanisms of antimony adsorption onto soybean stover-derived biochar in aqueous solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited mechanistic knowledge is available to understand how biochar interacts with trace elements that exist predominantly as oxoanions, such as antimony (Sb). Soybean stover biochars were produced at 300 degrees C (SBC300) and 700 degrees C (SBC700), and were characterized by BET, Boehm titration,...

  6. Contrasting role of antimony and bismuth dopants on the thermoelectric performance of lead selenide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeseul; Lo, Shih-Han; Chen, Changqiang; Sun, Hui; Chung, Duck-Young; Chasapis, Thomas C; Uher, Ctirad; Dravid, Vinayak P; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2014-05-02

    Increasing the conversion efficiency of thermoelectric materials is a key scientific driver behind a worldwide effort to enable heat to electricity power generation at competitive cost. Here we report an increased performance for antimony-doped lead selenide with a thermoelectric figure of merit of ~1.5 at 800 K. This is in sharp contrast to bismuth doped lead selenide, which reaches a figure of merit of <1. Substituting antimony or bismuth for lead achieves maximum power factors between ~23-27 μW cm(-1) K(-2) at temperatures above 400 K. The addition of small amounts (~0.25 mol%) of antimony generates extensive nanoscale precipitates, whereas comparable amounts of bismuth results in very few or no precipitates. The antimony-rich precipitates are endotaxial in lead selenide, and appear remarkably effective in reducing the lattice thermal conductivity. The corresponding bismuth-containing samples exhibit smaller reduction in lattice thermal conductivity.

  7. Liposomal amphotericin B versus pentavalent antimony salts for visceral Leishmania in children.

    PubMed

    Apa, Hurşit; Devrim, İlker; Bayram, Nuri; Deveci, Reyhan; Demir-Özek, Gülcihan; Cartı, Özgür Umaç

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a 21-day schedule of liposomal amphotericin B compared to pentavalent antimony salts in the treatment of patients during a first episode of visceral leishmaniasis. In this study, 17 cases of visceral leishmaniasis admitted to Behçet Uz Children's Hospital between January 2005 and April 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The study group was composed of 11 males (64.7%) and 6 females (35.3%). One group included 11 patients who were treated with pentavalent antimony salts, sodium stibogluconate or meglumine antimoniate, intramuscularly for 28 days. The second group was treated with amphotericin B intravenously at a dosage of 3 mg/kg on days 1-5, 10 and 21 (a cumulative dose of 21 mg/kg/day). While pentavalent antimony salts were found to increase biochemical and hematological findings, liposomal amphotericin B was responsible for rapid recovery in fever and shorter hospital stay. As a result, our study shows the advantages of both medications independent of their costs.

  8. An Insight into Sodiation of Antimony from First-Principles Crystal Structure Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Riccarda

    2016-02-01

    Elemental antimony has recently become an attractive anode material for potential application in rechargeable sodium-ion batteries. I present a first-principles study of the structure-composition dependence of the Na-Sb system for both sodiation and desodiation processes. The enthalpy of reaction of x moles of sodium with the hexagonal structure of antimony reveals several stable crystal structures for 0 < x ≤ 3, with variable composition states for 1.25 < x < 2.75. The direct and reverse reactions pass through similar states in terms of enthalpy of formation and symmetry representation of the corresponding optimized structures, in particular for x = 1 and x = 3, confirming the two known phases, namely NaSb and Na3Sb. The calculations suggest that the optimal composition range for reversible sodiation of antimony is 1 < x ≤ 3, thus avoiding the global minimum at x = 1. This can help to rationalize the structure-composition dependence of the electrochemical performance of antimony in Na-ion batteries.

  9. Nanostructured Carbon/Antimony Composites as Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries with Long Life.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yong; Yi, Zheng; Wang, Chunli; Wang, Lidong; Wu, Yaoming; Wang, Limin

    2016-08-05

    A series of nanostructured carbon/antimony composites have been successfully synthesized by a simple sol-gel, high-temperature carbon thermal reduction process. In the carbon/antimony composites, antimony nanoparticles are homogeneously dispersed in the pyrolyzed nanoporous carbon matrix. As an anode material for lithium-ion batteries, the C/Sb10 composite displays a high initial discharge capacity of 1214.6 mAh g(-1) and a reversible charge capacity of 595.5 mAh g(-1) with a corresponding coulombic efficiency of 49 % in the first cycle. In addition, it exhibits a high reversible discharge capacity of 466.2 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 100 mA g(-1) after 200 cycles and a high rate discharge capacity of 354.4 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 1000 mA g(-1) . The excellent cycling stability and rate discharge performance of the C/Sb10 composite could be due to the uniform dispersion of antimony nanoparticles in the porous carbon matrix, which can buffer the volume expansion and maintain the integrity of the electrode during the charge-discharge cycles.

  10. Dismantling and chemical characterization of spent Peltier thermoelectric devices for antimony, bismuth and tellurium recovery.

    PubMed

    Balva, Maxime; Legeai, Sophie; Garoux, Laetitia; Leclerc, Nathalie; Meux, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Major uses of thermoelectricity concern refrigeration purposes, using Peltier devices, mainly composed of antimony, bismuth and tellurium. Antimony was identified as a critical raw material by EU and resources of bismuth and tellurium are not inexhaustible, so it is necessary to imagine the recycling of thermoelectric devices. That for, a complete characterization is needed, which is the aim of this work. Peltier devices were manually dismantled in three parts: the thermoelectric legs, the alumina plates on which remain the electrical contacts and the silicone paste used to connect the plates. The characterization was performed using five Peltier devices. It includes mass balances of the components, X-ray diffraction analysis of the thermoelectric legs and elemental analysis of each part of the device. It appears that alumina represents 45% of a Peltier device in weight. The electrical contacts are mainly composed of copper and tin, and the thermoelectric legs of bismuth, tellurium and antimony. Thermoelectric legs appear to be Se-doped Bi2Te3 and (Bi0,5Sb1,5)Te3 for n type and p type semiconductors, respectively. This work shows that Peltier devices can be considered as a copper ore and that thermoelectric legs contain high amounts of bismuth, tellurium and antimony compared to their traditional resources.

  11. Human biomonitoring of arsenic and antimony in case of an elevated geogenic exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Gebel, T W; Suchenwirth, R H; Bolten, C; Dunkelberg, H H

    1998-01-01

    Part of the northern Palatinate region in Germany is characterized by elevated levels of arsenic and antimony in the soil due to the presence of ore sources and former mining activities. In a biomonitoring study, 218 residents were investigated for a putative increased intake of these elements. Seventy-six nonexposed subjects in a rural region in south lower Saxony were chosen as the reference group. Urine and scalp hair samples were obtained as surrogates to determine the internal exposures to arsenic and antimony. The analyses were performed using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry except for arsenic in urine, which was determined by the hydride technique. This method does not detect organoarsenicals from seafood, which are not toxicologically relevant. In the northern Palatinate subjects, slightly elevated arsenic contents in urine and scalp hair (presumably not hazardous) could be correlated with an increased arsenic content in the soil. On the other hand, the results did not show a correlation between the antimony contents in the soil of the housing area and those in urine and hair. Except for antimony in scalp hair, age tended to be associated with internal exposures to arsenic and antimony in both study groups. Consumption of seafood had a slight impact on the level of urinary arsenic, which is indicative of the presence of low quantities of inorganic arsenicals and dimethylarsinic acid in seafood. The arsenic and antimony contents in scalp hair were positively correlated with the 24-hr arsenic excretion in urine. However, antimony in scalp hair was not correlated with seafood consumption as was arsenic in scalp hair and in urine. This indicated the existence of unidentified common pathways of exposure contributing to the alimentary body burden. Short time peaks in the 24-hr excretion of arsenic in urine, which could not be assigned to a high consumption of seafood, were detected for six study participants. This suggests that additional factors

  12. Electronic Characterization of Defects in Narrow Gap Semiconductors-Comparison of Electronic Energy Levels and Formation Energies in Mercury Cadmium Telluride, Mercury Zinc Telluride, and Mercury Zinc Selenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James D.

    1996-01-01

    We have used a Green's function technique to calculate the energy levels and formation energy of deep defects in the narrow gap semiconductors mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT) and mercury zinc selenide (MZS). The formation energy is calculated from the difference between the total energy with an impurity cluster and the total energy for the perfect crystal. Substitutional (including antisite), interstitial (self and foreign), and vacancy deep defects are considered. Relaxation effects are calculated (with molecular dynamics). By use of a pseudopotential, we generalize the ideal vacancy model so as to be able to consider relaxation for vacancies. Different charge states are considered and the charged state energy shift (as computed by a modified Haldane-Anderson model) can be twice that due to relaxation. Different charged states for vacancies were not calculated to have much effect on the formation energy. For all cases we find deep defects in the energy gap only for cation site s-like orbitals or anion site p-like orbitals, and for the substitutional case only the latter are appreciably effected by relaxation. For most cases for MCT, MZT, MZS, we consider x (the concentration of Cd or Zn) in the range appropriate for a band gap of 0.1 eV. For defect energy levels, the absolute accuracy of our results is limited, but the precision is good, and hence chemical trends are accurately predicted. For the same reason, defect formation energies are more accurately predicted than energy level position. We attempt, in Appendix B, to calculate vacancy formation energies using relatively simple chemical bonding ideas due to Harrison. However, these results are only marginally accurate for estimating vacancy binding energies. Appendix C lists all written reports and publications produced for the grant. We include abstracts and a complete paper that summarizes our work which is not yet available.

  13. Formation of Semimetallic Cobalt Telluride Nanotube Film via Anion Exchange Tellurization Strategy in Aqueous Solution for Electrocatalytic Applications.

    PubMed

    Patil, Supriya A; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Shrestha, Nabeen K; Chang, Jinho; Lee, Joong Kee; Han, Sung-Hwan

    2015-11-25

    Metal telluride nanostructures have demonstrated several potential applications particularly in harvesting and storing green energy. Metal tellurides are synthesized by tellurization process performed basically at high temperature in reducing gas atmosphere, which makes the process expensive and complicated. The development of a facile and economical process for desirable metal telluride nanostructures without complicated manipulation is still a challenge. In an effort to develop an alternative strategy of tellurization, herein we report a thin film formation of self-standing cobalt telluride nanotubes on various conducting and nonconducting substrates using a simple binder-free synthetic strategy based on anion exchange transformation from a thin film of cobalt hydroxycarbonate nanostructures in aqueous solution at room temperature. The nanostructured films before and after ion exchange transformation reaction are characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray analyzer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thin film X-ray diffraction technique, high resolution transmission electron microscope, and selected area electron diffraction analysis technique. After the ion exchange transformation of nanostructures, the film shows conversion from insulator to highly electrical conductive semimetallic characteristic. When used as a counter electrode in I3(-)/I(-) redox electrolyte based dye-sensitized solar cells, the telluride film exhibits an electrocatalytic reduction activity for I3(-) with a demonstration of solar-light to electrical power conversion efficiency of 8.10%, which is highly competitive to the efficiency of 8.20% exhibited by a benchmarked Pt-film counter electrode. On the other hand, the telluride film electrode also demonstrates electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution reaction from oxidation of water.

  14. Feasibility of preparing patterned molybdenum coatings on bismuth telluride thermoelectric modules.

    SciTech Connect

    Sarobol, Pylin; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Miller, Stephen Samuel; Knight, Marlene E.; LePage, William S.; Sobczak, Catherine Elizabeth.; Wesolowski, Daniel Edward

    2013-09-01

    Molybdenum electrical interconnects for thermoelectric modules were produced by air plasma spraying a 30%CE%BCm size molybdenum powder through a laser-cut Kapton tape mask. Initial feasibility demonstrations showed that the molybdenum coating exhibited excellent feature and spacing retention (~170%CE%BCm), adhered to bismuth-telluride, and exhibited electrical conductivity appropriate for use as a thermoelectric module interconnect. A design of experiments approach was used to optimize air plasma spray process conditions to produce a molybdenum coating with low electrical resistivity. Finally, a molybdenum coating was successfully produced on a fullscale thermoelectric module. After the addition of a final titanium/gold layer deposited on top of the molybdenum coating, the full scale module exhibited an electrical resistivity of 128%CE%A9, approaching the theoretical resistivity value for the 6mm module leg of 112%CE%A9. Importantly, air plasma sprayed molybdenum did not show significant chemical reaction with bismuth-telluride substrate at the coating/substrate interface. The molybdenum coating microstructure consisted of lamellar splats containing columnar grains. Air plasma sprayed molybdenum embedded deeply (several microns) into the bismuth-telluride substrate, leading to good adhesion between the coating and the substrate. Clusters of round pores (and cracks radiating from the pores) were found immediately beneath the molybdenum coating. These pores are believed to result from tellurium vaporization during the spray process where the molten molybdenum droplets (2623%C2%B0C) transferred their heat of solidification to the substrate at the moment of impact. Substrate cooling during the molybdenum deposition process was recommended to mitigate tellurium vaporization in future studies.

  15. Fundamental and Practical Studies of Metal Contacts on Mercury Zinc Telluride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-31

    8217UTW FfR F rnpv_ - Fundamental and Practical Studies of Metal Contacts on Mercury Zinc Telluride 00 Lf Sponsored by M0 The Defense Advanced...three models of Schottky barrier pinning on semiconductors (e.g. see Flores and Tejedor [7]) to extrapolate from CdTe to Hgl.xCdxTe. Two of the models of...the CBM, which is at the F point in the Brillouin zone, decreases faster than other parts of the conduction band and the valence band is only slightly

  16. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging of lead tin telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, Bruce; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Black, David; Burdette, Harold; Kuriyama, Masao; Spal, Richard; Simchick, Richard; Fripp, Archibald

    1991-01-01

    High resolution X-ray diffraction images of two directly comparable crystals of lead tin telluride, one Bridgman-grown on Space Shuttle STS 61A and the other terrestrially Bridgman-grown under similar conditions from identical material, present different subgrain structure. In the terrestrial, sample 1 the appearance of an elaborate array of subgrains is closely associated with the intrusion of regions that are out of diffraction in all of the various images. The formation of this elaborate subgrain structure is inhibited by growth in microgravity.

  17. Seeded Physical Vapor Transport of Cadmium-Zinc Telluride Crystals: Growth and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; George, M. A.; Collins, E. E.; Chen, K.-T.; Zhang, Y.; Burger, A.

    1997-01-01

    Crystals of Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te with x = 0.2 and 40 g in weight were grown on monocrystalline cadmium-zinc telluride seeds by closed-ampoule physical vapor transport with or without excess (Cd + Zn) in the vapor phase. Two post-growth cool-down rates were used. The crystals were characterized using low temperature photoluminescence, atomic force microscopy, chemical etching, X-ray diffraction and electrical measurements. No formation of a second, ZnTe-rich phase was observed.

  18. Hexavalent chromium in the ground and surface waters near Telluride, Colorado; preliminary data report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, David B.; Miller, R.L.; Konikow, L.F.; O'Boyle, P. S.

    1979-01-01

    Data showing results of 38 groundwater and 25 surface-water samples analyzed for hexavalent chromium are presented. Most samples were taken within the Telluride, Colo., city limits during October 1978. Twenty-four of the 38 groundwater samples (63%) contained more than 50 micrograms per liter of hexavalent chromium. Excluding the mill tailings pond 6 of the 23 surface-water samples (26%) contained more than 50 micrograms per liter of hexavalent chromium. Hexavalent chromium concentrations in groundwaters ranged from 0 to 2700 micrograms per liter and in surface waters from 0 to 160 micrograms per liter. (USGS)

  19. Metal-insulator-semi-conductor studies of lead telluride. [capacitance and conductance-voltage characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilly, D. A.; Joslin, D. E.; Kan, H. K. A.

    1976-01-01

    The capacitance and conductance-voltage characteristics were measured on metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors fabricated with zirconium dioxide films on single-crystal lead telluride. At 77 K, on both n- and p-type substrates, evidence of surface potential control was obtained. Comparison of the measured capacitance-voltage characteristics with those calculated from the equilibrium solution of the one-dimensional Poisson equation indicated qualitative agreement, although the slope of the measured capacitance in the region near the capacitance minimum was less steep than calculated.

  20. Fabrication of Lanthanum Telluride 14-1-11 Zintl High-Temperature Thermoelectric Couple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravi, Vilupanur A.; Li, Billy Chun-Yip; Fleurial, Pierre; Star, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    The development of more efficient thermoelectric couple technology capable of operating with high-grade heat sources up to 1,275 K is key to improving the performance of radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Lanthanum telluride La3-xTe4 and 14-1-11 Zintls (Yb14MnSb11) have been identified as very promising materials. The fabrication of advanced high-temperature thermoelectric couples requires the joining of several dissimilar materials, typically including a number of diffusion bonding and brazing steps, to achieve a device capable of operating at elevated temperatures across a large temperature differential (up to 900 K). A thermoelectric couple typically comprises a heat collector/ exchanger, metallic interconnects on both hot and cold sides, n-type and ptype conductivity thermoelectric elements, and cold-side hardware to connect to the cold-side heat rejection and provide electrical connections. Differences in the physical, mechanical, and chemical properties of the materials that make up the thermoelectric couple, especially differences in the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE), result in undesirable interfacial stresses that can lead to mechanical failure of the device. The problem is further complicated by the fact that the thermoelectric materials under consideration have large CTE values, are brittle, and cracks can propagate through them with minimal resistance. The inherent challenge of bonding brittle, high-thermal-expansion thermoelectric materials to a hot shoe material that is thick enough to carry the requisite electrical current was overcome. A critical advantage over prior art is that this device was constructed using all diffusion bonds and a minimum number of assembly steps. The fabrication process and the materials used are described in the following steps: (1) Applying a thin refractory metal foil to both sides of lanthanum telluride. To fabricate the n-type leg of the advanced thermoelectric couple, the pre-synthesized lanthanum

  1. Charge Carrier Processes in Photovoltaic Materials and Devices: Lead Sulfide Quantum Dots and Cadmium Telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Paul

    Charge separation, transport, and recombination represent fundamental processes for electrons and holes in semiconductor photovoltaic devices. Here, two distinct materials systems, based on lead sulfide quantum dots and on polycrystalline cadmium telluride, are investigated to advance the understanding of their fundamental nature for insights into the material science necessary to improve the technologies. Lead sulfide quantum dots QDs have been of growing interest in photovoltaics, having recently produced devices exceeding 10% conversion efficiency. Carrier transport via hopping through the quantum dot thin films is not only a function of inter-QD distance, but of the QD size and dielectric media of the surrounding materials. By conducting temperature dependent transmission, photoluminescence, and time resolved photoluminescence measurements, we gain insight into photoluminescence quenching and size-dependent carrier transport through QD ensembles. Turning to commercially relevant cadmium telluride (CdTe), we explore the high concentrations of self-compensating defects (donors and acceptors) in polycrystalline thin films via photoluminescence from recombination at defect sites. Low temperature (25 K) photoluminescence measurements of CdTe reveal numerous radiative transitions due to exciton, trap assisted, and donor-acceptor pair recombination events linked with various defect states. Here we explore the difference between films deposited via close space sublimation (CSS) and radio frequency magnetron sputtering, both as-grown and following a cadmium chloride treatment. The as-grown CSS films exhibited a strong donor-acceptor pair transition associated with deep defect states. Constructing photoluminescence spectra as a function of time from time-resolved photoluminescence data, we report on the temporal evolution of this donor-acceptor transition. Having gained insight into the cadmium telluride film quality from low temperature photoluminescence measurements

  2. Specific features of the photoconductivity of semi-insulating cadmium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Golubyatnikov, V. A.; Grigor’ev, F. I.; Lysenko, A. P. Strogankova, N. I.; Shadov, M. B.; Belov, A. G.

    2014-12-15

    The effect of local illumination providing a high level of free-carrier injection on the conductivity of a sample of semi-insulating cadmium telluride and on the properties of ohmic contacts to the sample is studied. It is found that, irrespective of the illumination region, the contact resistance of ohmic contacts decreases and the concentration of majority carriers in the sample grows in proportion to the illumination intensity. It is shown that inherent heterogeneities in crystals of semi-insulating semiconductors can be studied by scanning with a light probe.

  3. Advanced methods for preparation and characterization of infrared detector materials. [mercury cadmium telluride alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1981-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis data were obtained on mercury cadmium telluride alloys in order to establish the liquidus temperatures for the various alloy compositions. Preliminary theoretical analyses was performed to establish the ternary phase equilibrium parameters for the metal rich region of the phase diagram. Liquid-solid equilibrium parameters were determined for the pseudobinary alloy system. Phase equilibrium was calculated and Hg(l-x) Cd(x) Te alloys were directionally solidified from pseudobinary melts. Electrical resistivity and Hall coefficient measurements were obtained.

  4. Terahertz-field-induced second harmonic generation through Pockels effect in zinc telluride crystal.

    PubMed

    Cornet, Marion; Degert, Jérôme; Abraham, Emmanuel; Freysz, Eric

    2014-10-15

    We report on the second harmonic generation (SHG) of a near-infrared pulse in a zinc telluride crystal through the Pockels effect induced by an intense terahertz pulse. The temporal and angular behaviors of the SHG have been measured and agree well with theoretical predictions. This phenomenon, so far overlooked, makes it possible to generate second harmonic through cascading of two second-order nonlinear phenomena in the near-infrared and terahertz ranges. We also show how this cascading process can be used to sample terahertz pulses.

  5. Operational Studies of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Microstrip Detectors using SVX ASIC Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizmanic, John; Barbier, L. M.; Barthelmy, S.; Bartlett, L.; Birsa, F.; Gehrels, N.; Hanchak, C.; Kurczynski, P.; Odom, J.; Parsons, A.; Palmer, D.; Sheppard, D.; Snodgrass, S.; Stahle, C. M.; Teegarden, B.; Tueller, J.

    1997-04-01

    We have been investigating the operational properties of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) microstrip detectors by using SVX ASIC readout electronics. This research is in conjunction with the development of a CZT-based, next generation gamma-ray telescope for use in the gamma-ray Burst ArcSecond Imaging and Spectroscopy (BASIS) experiment. CZT microstrip detectors with 128 channels and 100 micron strip pitch have been fabricated and were interfaced to SVX electronics at Goddard Space Flight Center. Experimental results involving position sensing, spectroscopy, and CZT operational properties will be presented.

  6. The Effect of Microgravity on the Growth of Lead Tin Telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, R.

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to present a model for the prediction of the effect of the microgravity environment on the growth of Lead Tin Telluride. The attitude change and its relation to the experimental objectives: The main objective for the AADSF experiment on USMP 3 involving LTT growth was to estimate the effect of ampoule orientation on the axial and radial segregation of tin telluride. As the furnace was not situated on a gimbal there was no possibility to reorient the ampoule during the flight. Instead the only way to change the growth orientation was to change the attitude of the orbiter. This was accomplished by vernier rocket firings. In what follows it must be noted that the orbiter body coordinates are such that the positive z axis points outward from the 'belly', the positive 'x' axis points outwards from the nose and the positive 'y' axis points outwards from the starboard side. The furnace which was in the pay load had its axis aligned with the orbiter's 'z' axis with the hot end closest to the shuttle body. There were basically three orientations that were desired. These corresponded to the ampoule being seen as a heated from above (thermally stable-solutally unstable) configuration, the heated from below (where the instabilities were reversed from the first orientation) configuration and an 'in between' case where the ampoule axis was misaligned with respect to the orbiters 'g(sub z)' axis.

  7. Selective speciation of inorganic antimony on tetraethylenepentamine bonded silica gel column and its determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mendil, Durali; Bardak, Hilmi; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2013-03-30

    A speciation system for antimony (III) and antimony (V) ions that based on solid phase extraction on tetraethylenepentamine bonded silica gel has been established. Antimony was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS). Analytical conditions including pH, sample volume, etc., were studied for the quantitative recoveries of Sb (III) and Sb (V). Matrix effects on the recovery were also investigated. The recovery values and detection limit for antimony (III) at optimal conditions were found as >95% and 0.020 μg L(-1), respectively. Preconcentration factor was calculated as 50. The capacity of adsorption for the tetraethylenepentamine bonded silica gel was 7.9 mg g(-1). The validation was checked by analysis of NIST SRM 1573a Tomato laves and GBW 07605 Tea certified reference materials. The procedure was successfully applied to speciation of antimony in tap water, mineral water and spring water samples. Total antimony was determined in refined salt, unrefined salt, black tea, rice, tuna fish and soil samples after microwave digestion and presented enrichment method combination.

  8. Fast sequential determination of antimony and lead in pewter alloys using high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dessuy, Morgana B; de Jesus, Robson M; Brandao, Geovani C; Ferreira, Sergio L C; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    A simple method has been developed to determine antimony and lead in pewter alloy cups produced in Brazil, using fast sequential determination by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The samples were dissolved in HCl and H(2)O(2), employing a cold finger system in order to avoid analyte losses. The main resonance line of lead at 217.001 nm and a secondary line of antimony at 212.739 nm were used. The limits of detection for lead and antimony were 0.02 and 5.7 mg L(-1), respectively. The trueness of the method was established by recovery tests and comparing the results obtained by the proposed method with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The results were compared using a student's t-test and there was no significant difference at a 95% confidence interval. With the developed methods, it was possible to determine accurately antimony and lead in pewter samples. The lead concentration found in the analysed samples was around 1 mg g(-1), which means that they are not lead free; however, the content was below the maximum allowed level of 5 mg g(-1). The antimony content, which was found to be between 40 and 46 mg g(-1), is actually of greater concern, as antimony is known to be potentially toxic already at very low concentrations, although there is no legislation yet for this element.

  9. Antimony leaching in plastics from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) with various acids and gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tostar, Sandra; Stenvall, Erik; Boldizar, Antal; Foreman, Mark R St J

    2013-06-01

    There has been a recent interest in antimony since the availability in readily mined areas is decreasing compared to the amounts used. It is important in many applications such as flame retardants and in the production of polyester, which can trigger an investigation of the leachability of antimony from plastics using different acids. In this paper, different types of acids are tested for their ability to leach antimony from a discarded computer housing, made of poly(acrylonitrile butadiene styrene), which is a common plastic type used in electrical and electronic equipment. The acid solutions included sodium hydrogen tartrate (0.5M) dissolved in either dimethyl sulfoxide or water (at ca. 23°C and heated to ca. 105°C). The metal content after leaching was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The most efficient leaching medium was the heated solution of sodium hydrogen tartrate in dimethyl sulfoxide, which leached almost half of the antimony from the poly(acrylonitrile butadiene styrene). Gamma irradiation, which is proposed to improve the mechanical properties in plastics, was used here to investigate the influence of antimony leaching ability. No significant change in the amount of leached antimony could be observed.

  10. Lithium diffusivity in antimony-based intermetallic and FeSb-TiC composite anodes as measured by GITT.

    PubMed

    Allcorn, Eric; Kim, Sang Ok; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2015-11-21

    The diffusion coefficient of lithium is an important parameter in determining the rate capability of an electrode and its ability to deliver high power output. Galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT) is a quick electrochemical method to determine diffusion coefficients in electrode materials and is applied here to antimony-based anodes for lithium-ion batteries. Like other alloy anodes, antimony suffers from large volume change and a short cycle life, so GITT is also applied to determine the effects on lithium diffusivity of antimony intermetallics and composite electrodes designed to mitigate these issues. Pure antimony is measured to have a diffusion coefficient of 4.0 × 10(-9) cm(2) s(-1), in agreement with previously measured values. The intermetallics NiSb, FeSb, and FeSb2 all demonstrate diffusivity values within an order of magnitude of antimony, while Cu2Sb shows roughly an order of magnitude improvement due to the persistence of the Cu2Sb phase during cycling. The composite electrode FeSb-TiC is shown to offer significant enhancement of the diffusion coefficient positively correlated with higher concentrations of TiC in the composite up to a maximum value of 1.9 × 10(-7) cm(2) s(-1) at 60 wt% TiC, nearly two full orders of magnitude greater than that of pure antimony.

  11. Downregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 of Leishmania donovani field isolates is associated with antimony resistance.

    PubMed

    Ashutosh; Garg, Mansi; Sundar, Shyam; Duncan, Robert; Nakhasi, Hira L; Goyal, Neena

    2012-01-01

    Emergence of resistance to pentavalent antimonials has become a severe obstacle in the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) on the Indian subcontinent. The mechanisms operating in laboratory-generated strains are somewhat known, but the determinants of clinical antimony resistance are not well understood. By utilizing a DNA microarray expression profiling approach, we identified a gene encoding mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) for the kinetoplast protozoan Leishmania donovani (LdMAPK1) that was consistently downregulated in antimony-resistant field isolates. The expression level of the gene was validated by real-time PCR. Furthermore, decreased expression of LdMAPK1 was also confirmed at the protein level in resistant isolates. Primary structure analysis of LdMAPK1 revealed the presence of all of the characteristic features of MAPK1. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant enzyme showed kinase activity with myelin basic protein as the substrate and was inhibited by staurosporine. Interestingly, overexpression of this gene in a drug-sensitive laboratory strain and a resistant field isolate resulted in increased the sensitivity of the transfectants to potassium antimony tartrate, suggesting that it has a role in antimony resistance. Our results demonstrate that downregulation of LdMAPK1 may be in part correlated with antimony drug resistance in Indian VL isolates.

  12. Overexpression of ubiquitin and amino acid permease genes in association with antimony resistance in Leishmania tropica field isolates.

    PubMed

    Kazemi-Rad, Elham; Mohebali, Mehdi; Khadem-Erfan, Mohammad Bagher; Hajjaran, Homa; Hadighi, Ramtin; Khamesipour, Ali; Rezaie, Sassan; Saffari, Mojtaba; Raoofian, Reza; Heidari, Mansour

    2013-08-01

    The mainstay therapy against leishmaniasis is still pentavalent antimonial drugs; however, the rate of antimony resistance is increasing in endemic regions such as Iran. Understanding the molecular basis of resistance to antimonials could be helpful to improve treatment strategies. This study aimed to recognize genes involved in antimony resistance of Leishmania tropica field isolates. Sensitive and resistant L. tropica parasites were isolated from anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis patients and drug susceptibility of parasites to meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime®) was confirmed using in vitro assay. Then, complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) and real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) approaches were utilized on mRNAs from resistant and sensitive L. tropica isolates. We identified 2 known genes, ubiquitin implicated in protein degradation and amino acid permease (AAP3) involved in arginine uptake. Also, we identified 1 gene encoding hypothetical protein. Real-time RT-PCR revealed a significant upregulation of ubiquitin (2.54-fold), and AAP3 (2.86-fold) (P<0.05) in a resistant isolate compared to a sensitive one. Our results suggest that overexpression of ubiquitin and AAP3 could potentially implicated in natural antimony resistance.

  13. Facile preparation of carbon wrapped copper telluride nanowires as high performance anodes for sodium and lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hong; Yang, Jun; Geng, Hongbo; Chao Li, Cheng

    2017-04-01

    Uniform carbon wrapped copper telluride nanowires were successfully prepared by using an in situ conversion reaction. The length of these nanowires is up to several micrometers and the width is around 30–40 nm. The unique one dimensional structure and the presence of conformal carbon coating of copper telluride greatly accommodate the large volumetric changes during cycling, significantly increase the electrical conductivity and reduce charge transfer resistance. The copper telluride nanowires show promising performance in a lithium ion battery with a discharge capacity of 130.2 mA h g‑1 at a high current density of 6.0 A g‑1 (26.74 C) and a stable cycling performance of 673.3 mA h g‑1 during the 60th cycle at 100 mA g‑1. When evaluated as anode material for a sodium ion battery, the copper telluride nanowires deliver a reversible capacity of 68.1 mA h g‑1 at 1.0 A g‑1 (∼4.46 C) and have a high capacity retention of 177.5 mA h g‑1 during the 500th cycle at 100 mA g‑1.

  14. Facile preparation of carbon wrapped copper telluride nanowires as high performance anodes for sodium and lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Yang, Jun; Geng, Hongbo; Li, Cheng Chao

    2017-04-07

    Uniform carbon wrapped copper telluride nanowires were successfully prepared by using an in situ conversion reaction. The length of these nanowires is up to several micrometers and the width is around 30-40 nm. The unique one dimensional structure and the presence of conformal carbon coating of copper telluride greatly accommodate the large volumetric changes during cycling, significantly increase the electrical conductivity and reduce charge transfer resistance. The copper telluride nanowires show promising performance in a lithium ion battery with a discharge capacity of 130.2 mA h g(-1) at a high current density of 6.0 A g(-1) (26.74 C) and a stable cycling performance of 673.3 mA h g(-1) during the 60th cycle at 100 mA g(-1). When evaluated as anode material for a sodium ion battery, the copper telluride nanowires deliver a reversible capacity of 68.1 mA h g(-1) at 1.0 A g(-1) (∼4.46 C) and have a high capacity retention of 177.5 mA h g(-1) during the 500th cycle at 100 mA g(-1).

  15. A Species-Specific Approach to the Use of Non-Antimony Treatments for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Roshan; Talaat, Kawsar R.; Fedorko, Daniel P.; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Nash, Theodore E.

    2011-01-01

    We used a species-specific approach to treat 10 patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis diagnosed using polymerase chain reaction. Non-antimony treatments (oral miltefosine, ketoconazole, and liposomal amphotericin B) were chosen as an alternative to pentavalent antimony drugs based on likely or proven drug efficacy against the infecting species. Leishmania Viannia panamensis was diagnosed in three patients and treated successfully with oral ketoconazole. Miltefosine treatment cured two patients with L. infantum chagasi. A wide variety of Leishmania responded to liposomal amphotericin B administered for 5–7 days. Three patients with L. V. braziliensis, one patient with L. tropica, and two patients with L. infantum chagasi were treated successfully. One person with L. V. braziliensis healed slowly because of a resistant bacterial superinfection, and a second patient with L. infantum chagasi relapsed and was retreated with miltefosine. These drugs were reasonably well-tolerated. In this limited case series, alternative non-antimony–based regimens were convenient, safe, and effective. PMID:21212212

  16. Thermal stability and spectroscopic properties of Er 3+-doped antimony-borosilicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Q.; Zhao, C.; Yang, G. F.; Yang, Z. M.; Zhang, Q. Y.; Jiang, Z. H.

    2008-11-01

    This paper reports on the optical spectroscopic properties and thermal stability of Er 3+-doped antimony-borosilicate glasses for developing 1.5 μm optical amplifiers. Upon excitation at 980 nm laser diode, an intense 1.5 μm infrared fluorescence has been observed with the maximum full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 90 nm for Er 3+-doped antimony-borosilicate glasses. The emission cross-section and the lifetime of the 4I13/2 level of Er 3+ ions are 6.3 × 10 -21 cm 2 and 0.30 ms, respectively. It is noted that the product of the emission cross-section and FWHM of the glass studied is as great as 567 × 10 -21 cm 2 nm, which is comparable or higher than that of bismuthate and tellurite glasses.

  17. Antimony sulfide thin films prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaji, S.; Garcia, L. V.; Loredo, S. L.; Krishnan, B.; Aguilar Martinez, J. A.; Das Roy, T. K.; Avellaneda, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Antimony sulfide (Sb2S3) thin films were prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition (LACBD) technique. These thin films were deposited on glass substrates from a chemical bath containing antimony chloride, acetone and sodium thiosulfate under various conditions of normal chemical bath deposition (CBD) as well as in-situ irradiation of the chemical bath using a continuous laser of 532 nm wavelength. Structure, composition, morphology, optical and electrical properties of the Sb2S3 thin films produced by normal CBD and LACBD were analyzed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis spectroscopy and Photoconductivity. The results showed that LACBD is an effective synthesis technique to obtain Sb2S3 thin films for optoelectronic applications.

  18. Antimony segregation in stressed SiGe heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Drozdov, M. N.; Novikov, A. V.; Yurasov, D. V.

    2013-11-15

    The effects of the growth temperature, composition, and elastic strains in separate layers on the segregation of antimony are studied experimentally for stressed SiGe structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. It is established that the growth conditions and parameters of the structures exert an interrelated influence on the segregation of Sb: the degree of the influence of the composition and elastic stresses in the SiGe layers on Sb segregation depends on the growth temperature. It is shown that usage of a method previously proposed by us for the selective doping of silicon structures with consideration for the obtained dependences of Sb segregation on the growth conditions and parameters of the SiGe layers makes it possible to form SiGe structures selectively doped with antimony.

  19. Sandwich heterostructures of antimony trioxide and bismuth trioxide films: Structural, morphological and optical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condurache-Bota, Simona; Praisler, Mirela; Gavrila, Raluca; Tigau, Nicolae

    2017-01-01

    Thin film heterostructures can be advantageous since they either exhibit novel or a combination of the properties of their components. Here we propose sandwich-type of heterostructures made of antimony trioxide and bismuth trioxide thin films, which were deposited on glass substrates by thermal vacuum deposition at three substrate temperatures, 50° Celsius apart. Their morphology and optical properties are studied as compared to the corresponding monolayers. It was found that even small substrate temperature changes strongly influence their morphology, increasing their roughness, while the optical transmittance shows a slight decrease as compared with the individual layers. The corresponding absorption coefficient exhibits intermediate values as compared to the component oxides, while the energy bandgaps for the indirect allowed transitions move towards the Infrared when overlapping the antimony and bismuth trioxides.

  20. Numerical simulation and experimental characterization of the performance evolution of a liquid antimony anode fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Tianyu; Shi, Yixiang; Wang, Hongjian; Cai, Ningsheng

    2015-06-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with a liquid antimony anode is fabricated based on a smooth single crystal YSZ electrolyte substrate and a porous Pt cathode. The performance of the liquid antimony anode was tested under "battery mode", with the anode chamber shielded in argon throughout the test and the cathode exposed to air. Polarization curves were taken and a long term constant potential discharging test was carried out afterwards. Taking electrochemical reaction, mass transport and microstructure of the liquid Sb anode into consideration, a one dimensional mathematical model was built and then validated by the polarization curve and the constant potential discharging performance curve obtained during the test. This model analyzes the metallic Sb distribution in the anode during cell operation, explains the cell performance evolution base on the microstructural development of the liquid Sb anode and simulates how the anode microstructure affects the cell performance.

  1. Effect of iron plaque on antimony uptake by rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Yu-Jun; Hockmann, Kerstin; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2015-09-01

    Although iron (Fe) plaque has been shown to significantly affect the uptake of toxic antimony (Sb) by rice, knowledge about the influence of iron plaque on antimony (Sb) (amount, mechanisms, etc) is, however, limited. Here, the effect of Fe plaque on Sb(III) and Sb(V) (nominal oxidation states) uptake by rice (Oryza sativa L.) was investigated using hydroponic experiments and synchrotron-based techniques. The results showed that iron plaque immobilized Sb on the surface of rice roots. Although the binding capacity of iron plaque for Sb(III) was markedly greater than that for Sb(V), significantly more Sb(III) was taken up by roots and transported to shoots. In the presence of Fe plaque, Sb uptake into rice roots was significantly reduced, especially for Sb(III). However, this did not translate into decreasing Sb concentrations in rice shoots and even increased shoot Sb concentrations during high Fe-Sb(III) treatment.

  2. Reaction of Antimony-Uranium Composite Oxide in the Chlorination Treatment of Waste Catalyst - 13521

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Kayo; Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Enokida, Youichi

    2013-07-01

    The effect of oxygen gas concentration on the chlorination treatment of antimony-uranium composite oxide catalyst waste was investigated by adding different concentrations of oxygen at 0-6 vol% to its chlorination agent of 0.6 or 6 vol% hydrogen chloride gas at 1173 K. The addition of oxygen tended to prevent the chlorination of antimony in the oxide. When 6 vol% hydrogen chloride gas was used, the addition of oxygen up to 0.1 vol% could convert the uranium contained in the catalyst to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} without any significant decrease in the reaction rate compared to that of the treatment without oxygen. (authors)

  3. Synthesis of Antimony Nanotubes via Facile Template-Free Solvothermal Reactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruxue; Wang, Xiaohua; Wang, Xinwei; Zhang, Haoran; Pan, Jingxin; Tang, Jilong; Fang, Dan; Ma, Xiaohui; Li, Yongfeng; Yao, Bin; Fan, Jie; Wei, Zhipeng

    2016-12-01

    Uniform antimony (Sb) nanotubes were successfully synthesized via a facile solvothermal method without the need for any surfactants or templates. The Sb nanotubes are confirmed to be pure rhombohedral phase and have better crystallinity. These nanotubes show middle-hollow and open-ended structures, as well as multi-walled structures with the wall thickness of about 10 nm. Also, they have an average size of the diameter of about 50 nm and the length of about 350 nm. On the basis of the structural and morphological studies, a possible rolling mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of Sb nanotubes. It is expected that uniform Sb nanotubes can further be used in wide applications. Graphical Abstract A possible rolling-formation mechanism is proposed for forming pure rhombhedral phase and high crystallinity antimony nanotubes without any surfactants or templates via a facile solvothermal method.

  4. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and antibacterial activity of antimony(III) bis(dialkyldithiocarbamato)alkyldithiocarbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, H. P. S.; Bakshi, Abhilasha; Bhatiya, Sumit

    2011-10-01

    Some mixed sulfur donor ligand complexes of antimony(III) of the general formula [(R 2NCS 2)] 2SbS 2COR' where R = CH 3, C 2H 5 and R' = Me, Et, Pr n, Pr i, Bu n and Bu i have been synthesized by the reaction of antimony(III) bis(dialkyldithiocarbamate) chloride with potassium organodithiocarbonate in an equimolar ratio by stirring at room temperature in benzene/CS 2 mixture. These complexes have been characterized by physicochemical [elemental analysis, melting points and molecular weight determinations] and spectral [UV, IR, Far-IR, NMR ( 1H and 13C), FAB + mass and powder X-ray diffraction] studies. Free ligands and synthesized complexes have also been screened against different bacterial strains and results obtained made it desirable to delineate a comparison between free ligands, standard drug used and synthesized complexes.

  5. Evaluation of Antimony Thioantimonate in Three in Vitro Short-Term Assays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-14

    dimethylsulfoxide [Cl potassium chloride DM dimethylnitrosamine MCA 3-me thylcholanthrene CA chromosome aberrations Sb(SbS 4 antimony thioantimonate TG...control compounds, ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) lot #AZG and dImethylnitrosamIne were purchased from Eastman Kodak Company and Sigma Chemical Company...ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) at 248 Lg/ml in the - absence of S9 or dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) at 100 jig/ml in the presence of S9. The cells were treated

  6. Development and characterization of ion selective electrode for the assay of antimony.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, G A E

    2007-03-15

    The construction and general performance characteristics of two novel potentiometric carbon paste electrodes (CPE) responsive to antimony are described. These sensors are based on the use of the ion associate complexes of tetraiodoantimonate (TIA) anion with cetylpyridinium (CP) and triphenyl tetrazolium (TPT) counter cations as ion exchange site in a carbon paste matrix. The two sensors exhibits fast, stable and near-Nernstian for the mono charged TIA anion over the concentration range 1x10(-3) to 10(-6)M at 25 degrees C in the pH range 4-10 with anionic slope of 58.0+/-0.5 and 55.0+/-0.7 per concentration decade for TIA-CP and TIA-TPT, respectively. The lower detection limits are 4 and 5x10(-6)M and response time are 20 and 30s in the same order of both electrodes. Selectivity coefficients for antimony relative to a number of different cations and anions were investigated. There is negligible interference from many inorganic cation and anion except for Hg(2+), Cd(2+), and Bi(3+); however, their effect were eliminated by EDTA. The determination of 1.0-120.0mug/ml of antimony in aqueous solutions shows an average recovery of 99.0 and 97.5% with relative standard deviation of 2.0% for both electrodes at 40mug/ml. The determination of antimony in wastewater and some antibilharzial compounds using the proposed electrodes gave results that compare favorably with those obtained by the atomic absorption spectrometric method. Precipitation titrations involving cetylpyridinium chloride as titrant are monitored with both electrodes with inflection point of 180 and 100mV for TIA-CP and TIA-TPT, respectively.

  7. Bi-antimony capped Keggin polyoxometalate modified with Cu-ligand fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jiao; Han, Zhangang; Zhang, Heng; Yu, Haitao; Zhai, Xueliang

    2012-10-15

    Three polyoxometalates consisting of bi-antimony capped Keggin-type clusters: [Cu(mbpy){sub 2}]{sub 2}[PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}Sb{sub 2}]{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O (1), [Cu(mbpy){sub 2}][PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}Sb{sub 2}] (2) and {l_brace}Cu(mbpy)[Cu(mbpy){sub 2}]{sub 2}{r_brace}[VMo{sub 8}V{sub 4}O{sub 40}Sb{sub 2}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (3) (mbpy=4,4 Prime -dimethyl-2,2 Prime - dipyridyl in 1 and 2; 5,5 Prime -dimethyl-2,2 Prime -dipyridyl in 3) have been synthesized and characterized by IR, X-ray powder diffraction, TG analysis and electrochemical property. Single-crystal analysis revealed that all of three compounds are built upon bi-antimony capped Keggin-type polyoxoanions and Cu-mbpy cations. In 1-3, two Sb{sup III} centers located at the two opposite of anionic surface adopt fundamentally tetragonal pyramidal coordination geometry. Both compounds 1 and 2 consist of P-centered Keggin structure, while compound 3 presents a V-centered Keggin anion. The Keggin-type anions present different structural features: isolated cluster in 1 and Cu-ligand-supported cluster in 2 and 3. - Graphical abstract: Three hybrid compounds consisting of bi-antimony capped Keggin-type clusters modified with Cu-ligand cations have been synthesized and characterized. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three hybrid compounds consisting of bi-antimony capped Keggin-type clusters have been synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two Sb{sup III} centers located at the two opposite of anionic surface adopt tetragonal pyramidal coordination geometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The anions present different structural features: isolated and Cu-ligand-supported cluster.

  8. Chemically deposited thin films of sulfides and selenides of antimony and bismuth as solar energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, M. T.; Nair, Padmanabhan K.; Garcia, V. M.; Pena, Y.; Arenas, O. L.; Garcia, J. C.; Gomez-Daza, O.

    1997-10-01

    Chemical bath deposition techniques for bismuth sulfide, bismuth selenide, antimony sulfide, and antimony selenide thin films of about 0.20 - 0.25 micrometer thickness are reported. All these materials may be considered as solar absorber films: strong optical absorption edges, with absorption coefficient, (alpha) , greater than 104 cm-1, are located at 1.31 eV for Bi2Se3, 1.33 eV for Bi2S3, 1.8 eV for Sb2S3, and 1.35 eV for Sb2Se3. As deposited, all the films are nearly amorphous. However, well defined crystalline peaks matching bismuthinite (JCPDS 17- 0320), paraguanajuatite (JCPDS 33-0214), and stibnite (JCPDS 6-0474) and antimony selenide (JCPDS 15-0861) for Bi2S3, Bi2Se3, Sb2S3 and Sb2Se3 respectively, are observed when the films are annealed in nitrogen at 300 degrees Celsius. This is accompanied by a substantial modification of the electrical conductivity in the films: from 10-7 (Omega) -1 cm-1 (in as prepared films) to 10 (Omega) -1 cm-1 in the case of bismuth sulfide and selenide films, and enhancement of photosensitivity in the case of antimony sulfide films. The chemical deposition of a CuS/CuxSe film on these Vx- VIy films and subsequent annealing at 300 degrees Celsius for 1 h at 1 torr of nitrogen leads to the formation of p-type films (conductivity of 1 - 100 (Omega) -1 cm-1) of multinary composition. Among these, the formation of Cu3BiS3 (JCPDS 9-0488) and Cu3SbS4 (JCPDS 35- 0581), CuSbS2 (JCPDS 35-0413) have been clearly detected. Solar energy applications of these films are suggested.

  9. Long term improvement in the treatment of canine leishmaniosis using an antimony liposomal formulation.

    PubMed

    Valladares, J E; Riera, C; González-Ensenyat, P; Díez-Cascón, A; Ramos, G; Solano-Gallego, L; Gállego, M; Portús, M; Arboix, M; Alberola, J

    2001-05-09

    Pharmacokinetic and clinical effectiveness of liposome-encapsulated N-methylglucamine antimoniate (LMA) was performed in dogs suffering from experimental leishmaniosis. LMA was compared with N-methylglucamine antimoniate (MGA), the same drug in its free form. Sb plasma concentrations for LMA were always higher than those for MGA. Mean residence time (MRT), half-life time (t(1/2)) and clearance (Cl) showed that Sb was eliminated slower after liposome administration. The high volume of distribution (Vd) obtained with LMA suggests that Sb could achieve therapeutic concentrations in parasite-infected tissues. Average plasma concentration at steady state (Css(ave)) shows that Sb body concentrations after LMA treatment (9.8 mg/kg Sb, each 24h) would be effective in Leishmania infantum canine infection. Comparing LMA with MGA in a 1-year follow-up we observed no relapses for LMA and total protein and gammaglobulin concentrations were within normal range, while for MGA both began to rise 3 months after treatment. Use of antimonial liposomal formulations may restore effectiveness to an existing drug and reduce toxicity.

  10. Separation of Arsenic from the Antimony-Bearing Dust through Selective Oxidation Using CuO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Da-Peng; Li, Lei; Tan, Cheng

    2017-04-01

    A pyrometallurgical process of selective oxidation roasting of the antimony-bearing dust using CuO is put forward, in which the antimony component is oxidized to Sb2O4 staying in the roasted residue, and arsenic is volatilized in the form of As2O3. The addition of CuO has an active effect on the arsenic volatilization, because structures of some complicated As-Sb phases in the dust are destroyed after the "Sb" component in them is oxidized to Sb2O4, and this part of arsenic might be transformed to As2O3, which continues to volatilize. However, the arsenic volatilization rate decreases with the CuO amount in a certain range, which is attributed to the greater formation of Cu3 (AsO4)2 and Cu3As. Under the conditions of roasting temperature of 673 K (400 °C), roasting time of 100 minutes, CuO amount of 34.54 mass pct, and N2 flow rate of 30 mL/min, 91.50 pct arsenic and only 8.63 pct antimony go into the smoke.

  11. Separation of Arsenic from the Antimony-Bearing Dust through Selective Oxidation Using CuO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Da-Peng; Li, Lei; Tan, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    A pyrometallurgical process of selective oxidation roasting of the antimony-bearing dust using CuO is put forward, in which the antimony component is oxidized to Sb2O4 staying in the roasted residue, and arsenic is volatilized in the form of As2O3. The addition of CuO has an active effect on the arsenic volatilization, because structures of some complicated As-Sb phases in the dust are destroyed after the "Sb" component in them is oxidized to Sb2O4, and this part of arsenic might be transformed to As2O3, which continues to volatilize. However, the arsenic volatilization rate decreases with the CuO amount in a certain range, which is attributed to the greater formation of Cu3 (AsO4)2 and Cu3As. Under the conditions of roasting temperature of 673 K (400 °C), roasting time of 100 minutes, CuO amount of 34.54 mass pct, and N2 flow rate of 30 mL/min, 91.50 pct arsenic and only 8.63 pct antimony go into the smoke.

  12. Study on Determination of Antimony in Environmental Samples by Neutron Activation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Tassiane Cristina Gomes; Saiki, Mitiko; Zahn, Guilherme Soares

    2011-08-01

    There is an increasing interest in the determination of antimony in environmental samples since this element is cumulative and potentially toxic at very low concentrations. Moreover, the quantification of antimony presents difficulties due to its low concentrations in the samples and to the interference problem in the analyses. In this study, neutron activation analysis procedure was established in order to obtain reliable results for Sb determination in environmental samples. For this study ten reference materials were analyzed. Aliquots of these materials and synthetic standard of Sb were irradiated at the IEA- R1 nuclear reactor under a thermal neutron flux of about 5×1012 n cm-2 s-1 for 8 or 16 hours. The induced gamma activities of 122Sb and 124Sb were measured using a hyperpure Ge detector. Antimony concentrations were calculated by comparative method and the uncertainties of the results were estimated using statistical counting errors of the sample and standard. Relative errors calculated demonstrated that the accuracy of the results depends on the Sb radioisotope measured and the decay time for counting.

  13. Altering the dewetting characteristics of ultrathin gold and silver films using a sacrificial antimony layer.

    PubMed

    Farzinpour, P; Sundar, A; Gilroy, K D; Eskin, Z E; Hughes, R A; Neretina, S

    2012-12-14

    Solid state dewetting of ultrathin films is the most straightforward means of fabricating substrate-supported noble metal nanostructures. This assembly process is, however, quite inflexible, yielding either densely packed smaller structures or widely spaced larger structures. Here, we demonstrate the utility of introducing a sacrificial antimony layer between the substrate and noble metal overlayer. We observe an agglomeration process which is radically altered by the concurrent sublimation of antimony. In stark contrast with conventional dewetting, where the thickness of the deposited metal film determines the characteristic length scales of the assembly process, it is the thickness of the sacrificial antimony layer which dictates both the nanoparticle size and interparticle spacing. The result is a far more flexible self-assembly process where the nanoparticle size and areal density can be varied widely. Demonstrations show nanoparticle areal densities which are varied over four orders of magnitude assembled from the identical gold layer thickness, where the accompanying changes to nanostructure size see a systematic shift in the wavelength of the localized surface plasmon resonance. As a pliable self-assembly process, it offers the opportunity to tailor the properties of an ensemble of nanostructures to meet the needs of specific applications.

  14. Antimony retention and release from drained and waterlogged shooting range soil under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Hockmann, Kerstin; Tandy, Susan; Lenz, Markus; Reiser, René; Conesa, Héctor M; Keller, Martin; Studer, Björn; Schulin, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    Many soils polluted by antimony (Sb) are subject to fluctuating waterlogging conditions; yet, little is known about how these affect the mobility of this toxic element under field conditions. Here, we compared Sb leaching from a calcareous shooting range soil under drained and waterlogged conditions using four large outdoor lysimeters. After monitoring the leachate samples taken at bi-weekly intervals for >1.5 years under drained conditions, two of the lysimeters were subjected to waterlogging with a water table fluctuating according to natural rainfall water infiltration. Antimony leachate concentrations under drained conditions showed a strong seasonal fluctuation between 110 μg L(-1) in summer and <40 μg L(-1) in winter, which closely correlated with fluctuations in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations. With the development of anaerobic conditions upon waterlogging, Sb in leachate decreased to 2-5 μg L(-1) Sb and remained stable at this level. Antimony speciation measurements in soil solution indicated that this decrease in Sb(V) concentrations was attributable to the reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III) and the stronger sorption affinity of the latter to iron (Fe) (hydr)oxide phases. Our results demonstrate the importance of considering seasonal and waterlogging effects in the assessment of the risks from Sb-contaminated sites.

  15. Synthesis of cadmium telluride quantum wires and the similarity of their band gaps to those of equidiameter cadmium telluride quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Sun, Jianwei; Wang, Lin-Wang; Buhro, William E.

    2008-07-11

    High-quality colloidal CdTe quantum wires having purposefully controlled diameters in the range of 5-11 nm are grown by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method, using Bi-nanoparticle catalysts, cadmium octadecylphosphonate and trioctylphosphine telluride as precursors, and a TOPO solvent. The wires adopt the wurtzite structure, and grow along the [002] direction (parallel to the c axis). The size dependence of the band gaps in the wires are determined from the absorption spectra, and compared to the experimental results for high-quality CdTe quantum dots. In contrast to the predictions of an effective-mass approximation, particle-in-a-box model, and previous experimental results from CdSe and InP dot-wire comparisons, the band gaps of CdTe dots and wires of like diameter are found to be experimentally indistinguishable. The present results are analyzed using density functional theory under the local-density approximation by implementing a charge-patching method. The higher-level theoretical analysis finds the general existence of a threshold diameter, above which dot and wire band gaps converge. The origin and magnitude of this threshold diameter is discussed.

  16. Synthesis of cadmium telluride quantum wires and the similarity of their effective band gaps to those of equidiameter cadmium telluride quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianwei; Wang, Lin-Wang; Buhro, William E

    2008-06-25

    High-quality colloidal CdTe quantum wires having purposefully controlled diameters in the range 5-11 nm are grown by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method, using Bi nanoparticle catalysts, cadmium octadecylphosphonate and trioctylphosphine telluride as precursors, and a TOPO solvent. The wires adopt the wurtzite structure and grow along the [002] direction (parallel to the c axis). The size dependence of the effective band gaps in the wires is determined from the absorption spectra and compared to the experimental results for high-quality CdTe quantum dots. In contrast to the predictions of an effective-mass approximation, particle-in-a-box model, and previous experimental results from CdSe and InP dot-wire comparisons, the effective band gaps of CdTe dots and wires of like diameter are found to be experimentally indistinguishable. The present results are analyzed using density functional theory under the local-density approximation by implementing a charge-patching method. The higher-level theoretical analysis finds the general existence of a threshold diameter, above which dot and wire effective band gaps converge. The origin and magnitude of this threshold diameter are discussed.

  17. Accumulation of antimony and other potentially toxic elements in plants around a former antimony mine located in the Ribes Valley (Eastern Pyrenees)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Jaume; Corrales, Isabel; Duran, Paola; Roca, Núria; Tume, Pedro; Barceló, Juan; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2010-05-01

    Soil contamination by antimony is of increasing environmental concern due to the use of this amphoterous p-block element in many industrial applications such as flame retardant, electronics, alloys, rubber and textile industries. However, little is still known about the response of plants to antimony. Here we report on the accumulation of antimony and other potentially toxic elements (mainly As, Pb and Cu) in plants growing around a former antimony mine in the ribes Valley located in the Eastern Pyrenees (424078E, 4686100N alt. 1145 m.a.s.l) that was operating approximately between the years 1870 to 1960. The ore mineral veins are included in quartz gangue. The main ores were: Sulphides: Stibnite (Sb2S3), Pyrite (FeS2), Sphalerite (ZnS), Arsenopyrite (FeAs), Galenite (PbS), Chalcopyrite (CuFeS2), Tetrahydrite (Cu5Sb2S3). Sulphosals: Boulangerite (5PbS•2Sb2S3), Jamesonite (4PbS•FeS•3Sb2S3), Zinckenite (6PbS•7Sb2S3), Plagionite (5PbS•4Sb2S3), Bournonite PbCu (Sb,As)S3, Pyrargirite (Ag3SbS3). Soil and plant samples were taken at five locations with different levels of Sb, As, and polymetallic contamination. Both pseudototal (aqua regia soluble) and extractable (EDTA) concentrations of metals from sites with low (sites 1 and 2), moderate (site 3 and 4) and high (sites 5 and 6) pollutant burdens were studied. The range of agua regia and EDTA values in mgkg-1 is as follows: Sb 8-2904 and 0.88-44; As: 33-16186 and 3.2-167; Pb: 79-4794 and 49-397; Cu: 66-712 and 48-56 mg•kg-1, respectively). While sites 1 to 4 had alkaline soil pH (7.4-8.7), sites 5 and 6 were acidic with values of 6 and 4.6, respectively. Different herbaceous plant species (Poa annua, Echium vulgare, Sonchus asper, Barbera verna among others) at the low and moderately polluted sites were able to efficiently restrict Sb and As transport to shoots showing average concentration ranges between 5.5 and 23 mg/kg As and 1.21 mg/kg and 4.9 mg/kg Sb. However, at the highly polluted acidic sites (5 and

  18. Leishmania panamensis infection and antimonial drugs modulate expression of macrophage drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes: impact on intracellular parasite survival

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Maria Adelaida; Navas, Adriana; Márquez, Ricardo; Rojas, Laura Jimena; Vargas, Deninson Alejandro; Blanco, Victor Manuel; Koren, Roni; Zilberstein, Dan; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Treatment failure is multifactorial. Despite the importance of host cell drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes in the accumulation, distribution and metabolism of drugs targeting intracellular pathogens, their impact on the efficacy of antileishmanials is unknown. We examined the contribution of pharmacologically relevant determinants in human macrophages in the antimony-mediated killing of intracellular Leishmania panamensis and its relationship with the outcome of treatment with meglumine antimoniate. Methods Patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis who failed (n = 8) or responded (n = 8) to treatment were recruited. Gene expression profiling of pharmacological determinants in primary macrophages was evaluated by quantitative RT–PCR and correlated to the drug-mediated intracellular parasite killing. Functional validation was conducted through short hairpin RNA gene knockdown. Results Survival of L. panamensis after exposure to antimonials was significantly higher in macrophages from patients who failed treatment. Sixteen macrophage drug-response genes were modulated by infection and exposure to meglumine antimoniate. Correlation analyses of gene expression and intracellular parasite survival revealed the involvement of host cell metallothionein-2A and ABCB6 in the survival of Leishmania during exposure to antimonials. ABCB6 was functionally validated as a transporter of antimonial compounds localized in both the cell and phagolysosomal membranes of macrophages, revealing a novel mechanism of host cell-mediated regulation of intracellular drug exposure and parasite survival within phagocytes. Conclusions These results provide insight into host cell mechanisms regulating the intracellular exposure of Leishmania to antimonials and variations among individuals that impact parasite survival. Understanding of host cell determinants of intracellular pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics opens new avenues to improved drug efficacy for intracellular

  19. Nanoscaled hydrated antimony (V) oxide as a new approach to first-line antileishmanial drugs

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Antonia MR; Grafova, Iryna; Soares, Fabiane V; Gentile, Gennaro; Wyrepkowski, Claudia DC; Bolson, Marcos A; Sargentini, Ézio; Carfagna, Cosimo; Leskelä, Markku; Grafov, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    Background Coordination compounds of pentavalent antimony have been, and remain, the first-line drugs in leishmaniasis treatment for >70 years. Molecular forms of Sb (V) complexes are commercialized as sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam®) and meglumine antimoniate (MA) (Glucantime®). Ever-increasing drug resistance in the parasites limits the use of antimonials, due to the low drug concentrations being administered against high parasitic counts. Sb5+ toxicity provokes severe side effects during treatment. To enhance therapeutic potency and to increase Sb (V) concentration within the target cells, we decided to try a new active substance form, a hydrosol of Sb2O5·nH2O nanoparticles (NPs), instead of molecular drugs. Methodology/principal findings Sb2O5·nH2O NPs were synthesized by controlled SbCl5 hydrolysis in a great excess of water. Sb2O5·nH2O phase formation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The surface of Sb (V) NPs was treated with ligands with a high affinity for target cell membrane receptors. The mean particle size determined by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy was ~35–45 nm. In vitro tests demonstrated a 2.5–3 times higher antiparasitic activity of Sb (V) nanohybrid hydrosols, when compared to MA solution. A similar comparison for in vivo treatment of experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis with Sb5+ nanohybrids showed a 1.75–1.85 times more effective decrease in the lesions. Microimages of tissue fragments confirmed the presence of NPs inside the cytoplasm of infected macrophages. Conclusion/significance Sb2O5·nH2O hydrosols are proposed as a new form of treatment for cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania amazonensis. The NPs penetrate directly into the affected cells, creating a high local concentration of the drug, a precondition to overcoming the parasite resistance to molecular forms of pentavalent antimonials. The nanohybrids are more effective at a lower dose, when compared to MA, the molecular drug. Our

  20. Solvothermal synthesis and thermoelectric properties of indium telluride nanostring-cluster hierarchical structures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A simple solvothermal approach has been developed to successfully synthesize n-type α-In2Te3 thermoelectric nanomaterials. The nanostring-cluster hierarchical structures were prepared using In(NO3)3 and Na2TeO3 as the reactants in a mixed solvent of ethylenediamine and ethylene glycol at 200°C for 24 h. A diffusion-limited reaction mechanism was proposed to explain the formation of the hierarchical structures. The Seebeck coefficient of the bulk pellet pressed by the obtained samples exhibits 43% enhancement over that of the corresponding thin film at room temperature. The electrical conductivity of the bulk pellet is one to four orders of magnitude higher than that of the corresponding thin film or p-type bulk sample. The synthetic route can be applied to obtain other low-dimensional semiconducting telluride nanostructures. PACS: 65.80.-g, 68.35.bg, 68.35.bt PMID:21711853

  1. An optically-interrogated microwave-Poynting-vector sensor using cadmium manganese telluride.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Chu; Whitaker, John F

    2010-06-07

    A single <110> cadmium-manganese-telluride crystal that exhibits both the Pockels and Faraday effects is used to produce a Poynting-vector sensor for signals in the microwave regime. This multi-birefringent crystal can independently measure either electric or magnetic fields through control of the polarization of the optical probe beam. After obtaining all the relevant electric and magnetic field components, a map of the Poynting vector along a 50-Omega microstrip was experimentally determined without the need for any further transformational calculations. The results demonstrate that this sensor can be used for near-field mapping of the Poynting vector. Utilizing both amplitude and phase information from the fields in the microwave signal, it was confirmed for the case of an open-terminated microstrip that no energy flowed to the load, while for a microstrip with a matched termination, the energy flowed consistently along the transmission line.

  2. Solvothermal synthesis and thermoelectric properties of indium telluride nanostring-cluster hierarchical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Guo'an; Miao, Chunyang; Wang, Yubo; Bai, Yunrui; Zhang, Haiqian; Guo, Wanlin

    2011-12-01

    A simple solvothermal approach has been developed to successfully synthesize n-type α-In2Te3 thermoelectric nanomaterials. The nanostring-cluster hierarchical structures were prepared using In(NO3)3 and Na2TeO3 as the reactants in a mixed solvent of ethylenediamine and ethylene glycol at 200°C for 24 h. A diffusion-limited reaction mechanism was proposed to explain the formation of the hierarchical structures. The Seebeck coefficient of the bulk pellet pressed by the obtained samples exhibits 43% enhancement over that of the corresponding thin film at room temperature. The electrical conductivity of the bulk pellet is one to four orders of magnitude higher than that of the corresponding thin film or p-type bulk sample. The synthetic route can be applied to obtain other low-dimensional semiconducting telluride nanostructures. PACS: 65.80.-g, 68.35.bg, 68.35.bt

  3. Role of Van der Waals interactions in determining the structure of liquid tellurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micoulaut, Matthieu; Flores-Ruiz, Hugo; Coulet, Vanessa; Piarristeguy, Andrea; Johnson, Mark; Cuello, Gabriel; Pradel, Annie

    The simulation of tellurides using standard density functional (DFT) theory based molecular dynamics usually leads to an overestimation of the bond distances and a noticeable mismatch between theory and experiments when e.g. structure functions are being directly compared. Here, the structural properties of several compositions of Ge-Te and Ge-Sb-Te liquids are studied from a combination of neutron diffraction and DFT-based molecular dynamics. Importantly, we find an excellent agreement in the reproduction of the structure in real and reciprocal spaces, resulting from the incorporation of dispersion forces in the simulation. We then investigate structural properties including structure factors, pair distribution functions, angular distributions, coordination numbers, neighbor distributions, and compare our results with experimental findings. References:Physical Review B 92, 134205 (2015)Physical Review B 89, 174205 (2014)Physical Review B 90, 094207 (2014) Support from Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) (Grant No. ANR-11-BS08-0012) is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Experiments and Monte Carlo modeling of a higher resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride detector for safeguards applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borella, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre is engaged in R&D activity in the field of Non Destructive Analysis on nuclear materials, with focus on spent fuel characterization. A 500 mm3 Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) with enhanced resolution was recently purchased. With a full width at half maximum of 1.3% at 662 keV, the detector is very promising in view of its use for applications such as determination of uranium enrichment and plutonium isotopic composition, as well as measurement on spent fuel. In this paper, I report about the work done with such a detector in terms of its characterization. The detector energy calibration, peak shape and efficiency were determined from experimental data. The data included measurements with calibrated sources, both in a bare and in a shielded environment. In addition, Monte Carlo calculations with the MCNPX code were carried out and benchmarked with experiments.

  5. Evaluation of DAST and zinc telluride nonlinear crystals for efficient terahertz generation

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesh, M.; Chaudhary, A. K.; Rao, K. S.

    2015-07-31

    Terahertz (THz) signal is generated from 4-N, N-dimethylamino-4’-N’-methyl-stilbazolium tosylate (i.e. DAST Crystal) and Zinc telluride (ZnTe) nonlinear crystals by employing 140 fs laser pulses at 800 nm with 80 MHz repetition rate. The semi insulating gallium arsenide photoconductive stripline antennas (gap =5 µm, length = 20 µm) is used as a Terahertz detector. The detected temporal profile of Terahertz radiation generated from DAST crystal is high as compared to ZnTe crystal in terms of amplitude. THz effective bandwidths of these crystals are extended up to 1.1 THz range. The potential of THz generation of DAST and ZnTe crystals are evaluated with respect to incident laser power.

  6. Charge Sharing and Charge Loss in a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Fine-Pixel Detector Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, J. A.; Sharma, D. P.; Ramsey, B. D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Because of its high atomic number, room temperature operation, low noise, and high spatial resolution a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) multi-pixel detector is ideal for hard x-ray astrophysical observation. As part of on-going research at MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) to develop multi-pixel CdZnTe detectors for this purpose, we have measured charge sharing and charge loss for a 4x4 (750micron pitch), lmm thick pixel array and modeled these results using a Monte-Carlo simulation. This model was then used to predict the amount of charge sharing for a much finer pixel array (with a 300micron pitch). Future work will enable us to compare the simulated results for the finer array to measured values.

  7. Correlation Between Bulk Material Defects and Spectroscopic Response in Cadmium Zinc Telluride Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Bradford H.; Stahle, C. M.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Parsons, A. M.; Tueller, J.; VanSant, J. T.; Munoz, B. F.; Snodgrass, S. J.; Mullinix, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    One of the critical challenges for large area cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detector arrays is obtaining material capable of uniform imaging and spectroscopic response. Two complementary nondestructive techniques for characterizing bulk CdZnTe have been developed to identify material with a uniform response. The first technique, infrared transmission imaging, allows for rapid visualization of bulk defects. The second technique, x-ray spectral mapping, provides a map of the material spectroscopic response when it is configured as a planar detector. The two techniques have been used to develop a correlation between bulk defect type and detector performance. The correlation allows for the use of infrared imaging to rapidly develop wafer mining maps. The mining of material free of detrimental defects has the potential to dramatically increase the yield and quality of large area CdZnTe detector arrays.

  8. Characterization of a 2-mm thick, 16x16 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Pixel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Richardson, Georgia; Mitchell, Shannon; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul; Sharma, Dharma

    2003-01-01

    The detector under study is a 2-mm-thick, 16x16 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride pixel array with a pixel pitch of 300 microns and inter-pixel gap of 50 microns. This detector is a precursor to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing will degrade energy resolution but will improve our spatial resolution through position interpolation. In addition, we discuss electric field modeling for this specific detector geometry and the role this mapping will play in terms of charge sharing and charge loss in the detector.

  9. New Insights into High-Performance Thermoelectric Tellurides from ^125Te NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E. M.; Hu, Y.-Y.; Cook, B. A.; Harringa, J. L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Kanatzidis, M. G.

    2009-11-01

    Thermoelectric materials are widely used for direct transformation of heat to electricity (Seebeck effect) and for solid state refrigeration (Peltier effect). Efforts to increase the efficiency of high-performance thermoelectrics, which include narrow-gap, doped tellurium-based semiconductors, require detailed knowledge of their local structure and bonding. We have used ^125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a local probe for obtaining better understanding of these high-performance thermoelectric tellurides, specifically PbTe doped with Ag and Sb (LAST materials) and GeTe doped with Ag and Sb (TAGS materials). The resonance frequencies and line shapes of the NMR spectra, as well as spin-lattice relaxation times and chemical shift anisotropies are highly sensitive to the composition and synthesis conditions of LAST and TAGS materials, enabling studies of the local composition, distortion, bonding, and carrier concentration. Several intriguing phenomena including electronic inhomogeneity and local distortions of the crystal lattice have been observed by NMR.

  10. One-step chemical synthesis of samarium telluride thin films and their supercapacitive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbhar, V. S.; Lokhande, A. C.; Gaikwad, N. S.; Lokhande, C. D.

    2016-02-01

    The letter reports synthesis of samarium telluride (Sm2Te3) thin films through a one-step chemical route. The formation of Sm2Te3 is confirmed by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies. The surface morphological study is carried out using field emission scanning electron microscopy and contact angle measurement techniques. The film shows barley-like microstructure with an average length of barley of about 5 μm and diameter of about 300 nm. The Sm2Te3 film surface exhibits lyophilic nature with contact angle of 21.3° for propylene carbonate electrolyte. Cyclic voltammetry results revealed specific capacitance of 207 F g-1 with power density of 14.18 kW kg-1 in LiClO4-propylene carbonate electrolyte.

  11. Transport properties of lithium- lead-vanadium-telluride glass and glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, M.; Eraiah, B.

    2014-04-24

    Glasses with the chemical composition 35Li{sub 2}O-(45-x)V{sub 2}O{sub 5−}20PbO-xTeO{sub 2} (where x = 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 15 mol %) have prepared by conventional melt quenching method. The electrical conductivity of Li{sup +} ion conducting lead vanadium telluride glass samples has been carried out both as a function of temperature and frequency in the temperature range 503K-563K and over frequencies 40 Hz to 10 MHz. The electronic conduction has been observed in the present systems. When these samples annealed around 400°C for 2hour become the glass ceramic, which also shows increase tendency of conductivity. SEM confines glass and glass ceramic nature of the prepared samples.

  12. Infrared spectrum of divinyl telluride and theoretical analysis of divinyl group VI compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohlberg, Karl; Baker, Brian L.; Leary, Scott P.; Owen, Noel L.; Facelli, Julio C.; Trofimov, Boris A.

    1995-07-01

    The infrared spectrum of divinyl telluride (DVT) has been studied for the gaseous, liquid and solid phases as well as in inert matrices at low temperatures. HF-SCF calculations (using triple-zeta quality basis sets) have been carried out on DVT and on the oxygen, sulfur and selenium analogs. In each instance the calculations predict two relatively stable conformations, with the cis/trans form being the more stable for divinyl ether and a near-planar trans/trans form being the more stable for the other three compounds. The infrared spectrum of DVT is consistent with the presence of two rotameric forms of the molecule, and assignments of many of the absorptions are made to normal modes.

  13. Time resolved photo-luminescent decay characterization of mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Soehnel, Grant

    2015-01-20

    The minority carrier lifetime is a measurable material property that is an indication of infrared detector device performance. To study the utility of measuring the carrier lifetime, an experiment has been constructed that can time resolve the photo-luminescent decay of a detector or wafer sample housed inside a liquid nitrogen cooled Dewar. Motorized stages allow the measurement to be scanned over the sample surface, and spatial resolutions as low as 50µm have been demonstrated. A carrier recombination simulation was developed to analyze the experimental data. Results from measurements performed on 4 mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays show strong correlationmore » between spatial maps of the lifetime, dark current, and relative response.« less

  14. Time resolved photo-luminescent decay characterization of mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Soehnel, Grant

    2015-01-20

    The minority carrier lifetime is a measurable material property that is an indication of infrared detector device performance. To study the utility of measuring the carrier lifetime, an experiment has been constructed that can time resolve the photo-luminescent decay of a detector or wafer sample housed inside a liquid nitrogen cooled Dewar. Motorized stages allow the measurement to be scanned over the sample surface, and spatial resolutions as low as 50µm have been demonstrated. A carrier recombination simulation was developed to analyze the experimental data. Results from measurements performed on 4 mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays show strong correlation between spatial maps of the lifetime, dark current, and relative response.

  15. Flexible cadmium telluride thin films grown on electron-beam-irradiated graphene/thin glass substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Won-Oh; Kim, Jihyun; Koo, Yong Hwan; Kim, Byungnam; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Donghwan

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate the close-spaced sublimation growth of polycrystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films on a flexible graphene electrode/thin glass substrate structure. Prior to the growth of CdTe films, chemical-vapor-deposited graphene was transferred onto a flexible glass substrate and subjected to electron-beam irradiation at an energy of 0.2 MeV in order to intentionally introduce the defects into it in a controlled manner. Micro-Raman spectroscopy and sheet resistance measurements were employed to monitor the damage and disorder in the electron-beam irradiated graphene layers. The morphology and optical properties of the CdTe thin films deposited on a graphene/flexible glass substrate were systematically characterized. The integration of the defective graphene layers with a flexible glass substrate can be a useful platform to grow various thin-film structures for flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  16. Multifold Electrical Conductance Enhancements at Metal-Bismuth Telluride Interfaces Modified Using an Organosilane Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Thomas; Kwan, Matthew; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Ramanath, Ganpati

    2017-01-25

    Controlling electrical transport across metal-thermoelectric interfaces is key to realizing high efficiency devices for solid state refrigeration and waste-heat harvesting. We obtain up to 17-fold increases in electrical contact conductivity Σc by inserting a mercaptan-terminated organosilane monolayer at Cu-Bi2Te3 and Ni-Bi2Te3 interfaces, yielding similar Σc for both metals by offsetting an otherwise 7-fold difference. The Σc improvements are underpinned by silane-moiety-induced inhibition of Cu diffusion, promotion of high-conductivity interfacial nickel telluride formation, and mercaptan-induced reduction of Bi2Te3 surface oxides. Our findings should enable incorporating nanomolecular layers with appropriately chosen terminal moieties in thermoelectric device metallization schemes without metal diffusion barriers.

  17. Deposition of heteroepitaxial layer of cadmium selenide and telluride on indium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Buttaev, M.S.; Gasanov, N.G.; Gasanova, R.N.; Magomedov, K.A.

    1986-04-01

    The authors have investigated how the technological deposition regimes influence the surface morphology, growth rate, and structural perfection of heteroepitaxial layers of cadmium selenide and telluride grown on the polar faces of indium arsenide. Investigation of the process of obtaining layers of CdSe on InAs revealed that the orientation of the polar faces of the substrate influences both the morphology of the surface layer and the rate of growth. Photomicrographs are shown of the surfaces of layers with different growth figures. A phenomenum is explained that does not enable one to grow CdTe layers on InAs at high temperatures; this complicates the choice of particular parameters for the deposition process and rules out the use of indium arsenide as a substrate.

  18. Preparation and Characterization of Niobium Doped Lead-Telluride Glass Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, M.; Eraiah, B.; Anavekar, R. V.

    2011-07-15

    Niobium-lead-telluride glass ceramics of composition xNb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-(20-x) pbO-80TeO{sub 2}(where x = 0.1 mol% to 0.5 mol%) were prepared by using conventional melt quenching method. The prepared glass samples were initially amorphous in nature after annealed at 400 deg. c all samples were crystallized. This was confined by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The particle size of these glass ceramics have been calculated by using Debye-Scherer formula and the particle size is in the order of 15 nm to 60 nm. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photograph shows the presence of needle-like crystals in these samples.

  19. A passively mode locked thulium doped fiber laser using bismuth telluride deposited multimode interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, M.; Lee, J.; Song, W.; Lee, Y. L.; Lee, J. H.; Shin, W.

    2016-05-01

    We proposed a multimode interference (MMI) fiber based saturable absorber using bismuth telluride at  ∼2 μm region. Our MMI based saturable absorber was fabricated by fusion splicing with single mode fiber and null core fiber. The MMI functioned as both wavelength fixed filter and saturable absorber. The 3 dB bandwidth and insertion loss of MMI were 42 nm and 3.4 dB at wavelength of 1958 nm, respectively. We have also reported a passively mode locked thulium doped fiber laser operating at a wavelength of 1958 nm using a multimode interference. A temporal bandwidth of  ∼46 ps was experimentally obtained at a repetition rate of 8.58 MHz.

  20. Solvothermal synthesis and thermoelectric properties of indium telluride nanostring-cluster hierarchical structures.

    PubMed

    Tai, Guo'an; Miao, Chunyang; Wang, Yubo; Bai, Yunrui; Zhang, Haiqian; Guo, Wanlin

    2011-04-13

    A simple solvothermal approach has been developed to successfully synthesize n-type α-In2Te3 thermoelectric nanomaterials. The nanostring-cluster hierarchical structures were prepared using In(NO3)3 and Na2TeO3 as the reactants in a mixed solvent of ethylenediamine and ethylene glycol at 200°C for 24 h. A diffusion-limited reaction mechanism was proposed to explain the formation of the hierarchical structures. The Seebeck coefficient of the bulk pellet pressed by the obtained samples exhibits 43% enhancement over that of the corresponding thin film at room temperature. The electrical conductivity of the bulk pellet is one to four orders of magnitude higher than that of the corresponding thin film or p-type bulk sample. The synthetic route can be applied to obtain other low-dimensional semiconducting telluride nanostructures.PACS: 65.80.-g, 68.35.bg, 68.35.bt.

  1. Extended Abstracts of the U.S. Workshop on the Physics and Chemistry of Mercury Cadmium Telluride Held in Orlando, Florida on October 11-13, 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    ELECTRICAL, COMPUTER, AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE TROY, NEW YORK 12180 Mercury cadmium telluride (MCT or Hg 1-. Cd.Te...compensation. The n-type doping levels generally observed were in the range 2 to 4 x 101 cm- 3 , for layers of 20-30% cadmium composition. Arsenic...which is one order of magnitude smaller than Na. -34 I - 35 IMPROVEMENTS IN THE DOPING OF MERCURY CADMIUM TELLURIDE FILMS GROWN BY MOLECULAR BEAM

  2. The origin of electronic band structure anomaly in topological crystalline insulator group-IV tellurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhen-Yu; Deng, Hui-Xiong; Wu, Hui-Zhen; Li, Shu-Shen; Wei, Su-Huai; Luo, Jun-Wei

    2015-11-01

    Group-IV tellurides have exhibited exotic band structures. Specifically, despite the fact that Sn sits between Ge and Pb in the same column of the periodic table, cubic SnTe is a topological crystalline insulator with band inversion, but both isovalent GeTe and PbTe are trivial semiconductors with normal band order. By performing first-principles band structure calculations, we unravel the origin of this abnormal behaviour by using symmetry analysis and the atomic orbital energy levels and atomic sizes of these elements. In group-IV tellurides, the s lone pair band of the group-IV element is allowed by symmetry to couple with the anion valence p band at the L-point, and such s-p coupling leads to the occurrence of bandgap at the L-point. We find that such s-p coupling is so strong in SnTe that it inverts the band order near the bandgap; however, it is not strong enough in both GeTe and PbTe, so they remain normal semiconductors. The reason for this is the incomplete screening of the core of the relatively tight-binding Ge 4s orbital by its 3d orbitals and the large atomic size and strong relativistic effect in Pb, respectively. Interestingly, we also find that the rhombohedral distortion removes the inversion symmetry and the reduced s-p coupling transforms the α-SnTe back to a normal semiconductor. Our study demonstrates that, in addition to spin-orbital coupling, strain and interface dipole fields, inter-orbital coupling is another effective way to engineer the topological insulators.

  3. Fluorescent cadmium telluride quantum dots embedded chitosan nanoparticles: a stable, biocompatible preparation for bio-imaging.

    PubMed

    Ghormade, Vandana; Gholap, Haribhau; Kale, Sonia; Kulkarni, Vaishnavi; Bhat, Suresh; Paknikar, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) are an optically attractive option for bioimaging, but are known to display high cytotoxicity. Nanoparticles synthesized from chitosan, a natural biopolymer of β 1-4 linked glucosamine, display good biocompatibility and cellular uptake. A facile, green synthetic strategy has been developed to embed green fluorescent cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) in biocompatible CNPs to obtain a safer preparation than 'as is' QDs. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed the crystal lattice corresponding to CdTe QDs embedded in CNPs while thermogravimetry confirmed their polymeric composition. Electrostatic interactions between thiol-capped QDs (4 nm, -57 mV) and CNPs (~300 nm, +38 mV) generated CdTe QDs-embedded CNPs that were stable up to three months. Further, viability of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells in vitro increased in presence of QDs-embedded CNPs as compared to bare QDs. At the highest concentration (10 μg/ml), the former shows 34 and 39% increase in viability at 24 and 48 h, respectively, as compared to the latter. This shows that chitosan nanoparticles do not release the QDs up to 48 h and do not cause extended toxicity. Furthermore, hydrolytic enzymes such as lysozyme and chitinase did not degrade chitosan nanoparticles. Moreover, QDs-embedded CNPs show enhanced internalization in NIH3T3 cells as compared to bare QDs. This method offers ease of synthesis and handling of stable, luminescent, biocompatible CdTe QDs-embedded CNPs with a favorable toxicity profile and better cellular uptake with potential for bioimaging and targeted detection of cellular components.

  4. Species-Specific Antimonial Sensitivity in Leishmania Is Driven by Post-Transcriptional Regulation of AQP1

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Goutam; Mandal, Srotoswati; Sharma, Mansi; Charret, Karen Santos; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Mukhopadhyay, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania is a digenetic protozoan parasite causing leishmaniasis in humans. The different clinical forms of leishmaniasis are caused by more than twenty species of Leishmania that are transmitted by nearly thirty species of phlebotomine sand flies. Pentavalent antimonials (such as Pentostam or Glucantime) are the first line drugs for treating leishmaniasis. Recent studies suggest that pentavalent antimony (Sb(V)) acts as a pro-drug, which is converted to the more active trivalent form (Sb(III)). However, sensitivity to trivalent antimony varies among different Leishmania species. In general, Leishmania species causing cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) are more sensitive to Sb(III) than the species responsible for visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Leishmania aquaglyceroporin (AQP1) facilitates the adventitious passage of antimonite down a concentration gradient. In this study, we show that Leishmania species causing CL accumulate more antimonite, and therefore exhibit higher sensitivity to antimonials, than the species responsible for VL. This species-specific differential sensitivity to antimonite is directly proportional to the expression levels of AQP1 mRNA. We show that the stability of AQP1 mRNA in different Leishmania species is regulated by their respective 3’-untranslated regions. The differential regulation of AQP1 mRNA explains the distinct antimonial sensitivity of each species. PMID:25714343

  5. Development of an analytical method for antimony speciation in vegetables by HPLC-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Olivares, David; Bravo, Manuel; Feldmann, Jorg; Raab, Andrea; Neaman, Alexander; Quiroz, Waldo

    2012-01-01

    A new method for antimony speciation in terrestrial edible vegetables (spinach, onions, and carrots) was developed using HPLC with hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Mechanical agitation and ultrasound were tested as extraction techniques. Different extraction reagents were evaluated and optimal conditions were determined using experimental design methodology, where EDTA (10 mmol/L, pH 2.5) was selected because this chelate solution produced the highest extraction yield and exhibited the best compatibility with the mobile phase. The results demonstrated that EDTA prevents oxidation of Sb(III) to Sb(V) and maintains the stability of antimony species during the entire analytical process. The LOD and precision (RSD values obtained) for Sb(V), Sb(III), and trimethyl Sb(V) were 0.08, 0.07, and 0.9 microg/L and 5.0, 5.2, and 4.7%, respectively, for a 100 microL sample volume. The application of this method to real samples allowed extraction of 50% of total antimony content from spinach, while antimony extracted from carrots and onion samples ranged between 50 and 60 and 54 and 70%, respectively. Only Sb(V) was detected in three roots (onion and spinach) that represented 60-70% of the total antimony in the extracts.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of meglumine antimoniate after administration of a multiple dose in dogs experimentally infected with Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Valladares, J E; Riera, C; Alberola, J; Gállego, M; Portús, M; Cristòfol, C; Franquelo, C; Arboix, M

    1998-02-15

    Pharmacokinetics of meglumine antimoniate in dogs with experimentally induced leishmaniosis has been investigated. After infection, dogs received a dose of 75 mg kg-1 of meglumine antimoniate twice daily by subcutaneous injection for 10 days. Blood samples were collected throughout the treatment. No statistical differences were found in the kinetic behaviour of the drug administered as a single dose to healthy dogs and that administered as a multiple dose to infected animals. However, peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) of 30.8 +/- 12.8 micrograms ml-1 found after this dosage regimen were higher than those observed after the single dose administration of 100 mg kg-1 24 h-1. Furthermore, sustained antimony concentrations of 1.14 +/- 0.52 micrograms Sb ml-1 were detected throughout the treatment. No signs of toxicity were found in the animals treated indicating that this regimen would be very appropriate to treat canine leishmaniosis.

  7. Analytical application of nano-sized titanium dioxide for the determination of trace inorganic antimony in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Hagarová, Ingrid; Matúš, Peter; Bujdoš, Marek; Kubová, Jana

    2012-03-01

    In this work, solid phase extraction (SPE) using nano-sized TiO2 as a solid sorbent was used for separation/preconcentration of total inorganic antimony (iSb) before its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). After adsorption of iSb onto nano-sized TiO2, direct TiO2-slurry sampling was used for sample injection into a graphite tube. The conditions for the reliable slurry sampling together with careful control of the temperature program for the slurry solutions were worked out. Extraction conditions for both inorganic antimony species (Sb(III) and Sb(V)) and interference studies of coexisting ions were studied in detail. The accuracy of the optimized method was checked by the certified reference material (CRM) for trace elements in lake water TMDA-61. Finally, the optimized method was used for the determination of trace inorganic antimony in synthetic and natural waters.

  8. Penicillamine as an adjuvant to antimonial therapy of schistosomiasis: effect on liver function tests in rabbits and on antischistosomal activity*

    PubMed Central

    Khayyal, M. T.; Saleh, S.; El Masri, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    Earlier work has shown that penicillamine reduces the acute toxicity of antimonyl potassium tartrate (APT) as well as the abnormal ECG changes it induces. In the present study, the possible protective effect of penicillamine on the hepatic toxicity of APT was investigated. Tests of liver function showed changes in the level of serum aspartate and alanine aminotransferase and of alkaline phosphatase, and in the beta-/alpha-lipoprotein ratio, in response to antimony treatment. The changes were significantly reduced by penicillamine, though the effect depended on the dose. Penicillamine was found to give the best overall protection without affecting the antischistosomal efficacy of the antimonial when a 1:2 APT/penicillamine ratio was used. The findings provide further evidence of the potential usefulness of penicillamine in the antimonial treatment of schistosomiasis. PMID:4543547

  9. Enhanced thermoelectric properties of phase-separating bismuth selenium telluride thin films via a two-step method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashiri, Masayuki; Kurita, Kensuke; Hagino, Harutoshi; Tanaka, Saburo; Miyazaki, Koji

    2015-08-01

    A two-step method that combines homogeneous electron beam (EB) irradiation and thermal annealing has been developed to enhance the thermoelectric properties of nanocrystalline bismuth selenium telluride thin films. The thin films, prepared using a flash evaporation method, were treated with EB irradiation in a N2 atmosphere at room temperature and an acceleration voltage of 0.17 MeV. Thermal annealing was performed under Ar/H2 (5%) at 300 °C for 60 min. X-ray diffraction was used to determine that compositional phase separation between bismuth telluride and bismuth selenium telluride developed in the thin films exposed to higher EB doses and thermal annealing. We propose that the phase separation was induced by fluctuations in the distribution of selenium atoms after EB irradiation, followed by the migration of selenium atoms to more stable sites during thermal annealing. As a result, thin film crystallinity improved and mobility was significantly enhanced. This indicates that the phase separation resulting from the two-step method enhanced, rather than disturbed, the electron transport. Both the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient were improved following the two-step method. Consequently, the power factor of thin films that underwent the two-step method was enhanced to 20 times (from 0.96 to 21.0 μW/(cm K2) that of the thin films treated with EB irradiation alone.

  10. Optimization of the thermoelectric figure of merit of fine-grained semiconductor materials based upon lead telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, D. M.

    1986-02-01

    Lead telluride type semiconductors are used in the fabrication of thermoelectric modules. This report covers the programme to produce materials based upon lead telluride with improved figures of merit and hence greater thermoelectric conversion efficiency. One way of improving the figure of merit is by reducing the lattice thermal conductivity of the material. This can be achieved by increasing phonon grain boundary scattering. A realistic theoretical model has been developed for lead telluride and used to investigate the lattice thermal conductivity as a function of grain size and level of doping. In optimally doped material with a grain size of 1 micrometer, the reduction in lattice thermal conductivity was predicted to be 4-6 percent compared with equivalent single crystal. Thermal diffusivity measurements on small grained compacts supported this prediction. Phonon grain boundary scattering is enhanced in semiconductor alloys because of the presence of disorder scattering and the theoretical model was extended to take this factor into account. PbSnTe and PbGeTe were identified as alloys whose lattice thermal conductivity could be significantly decreased by a reduction in grain size and in optimally doped compacted material with a grain size of 0.5 micrometer the reduction compared to equivalent single crystal material was estimated to be 11 and 14 percent respectively.

  11. Enhanced thermoelectric properties of phase-separating bismuth selenium telluride thin films via a two-step method

    SciTech Connect

    Takashiri, Masayuki Kurita, Kensuke; Hagino, Harutoshi; Miyazaki, Koji; Tanaka, Saburo

    2015-08-14

    A two-step method that combines homogeneous electron beam (EB) irradiation and thermal annealing has been developed to enhance the thermoelectric properties of nanocrystalline bismuth selenium telluride thin films. The thin films, prepared using a flash evaporation method, were treated with EB irradiation in a N{sub 2} atmosphere at room temperature and an acceleration voltage of 0.17 MeV. Thermal annealing was performed under Ar/H{sub 2} (5%) at 300 °C for 60 min. X-ray diffraction was used to determine that compositional phase separation between bismuth telluride and bismuth selenium telluride developed in the thin films exposed to higher EB doses and thermal annealing. We propose that the phase separation was induced by fluctuations in the distribution of selenium atoms after EB irradiation, followed by the migration of selenium atoms to more stable sites during thermal annealing. As a result, thin film crystallinity improved and mobility was significantly enhanced. This indicates that the phase separation resulting from the two-step method enhanced, rather than disturbed, the electron transport. Both the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient were improved following the two-step method. Consequently, the power factor of thin films that underwent the two-step method was enhanced to 20 times (from 0.96 to 21.0 μW/(cm K{sup 2}) that of the thin films treated with EB irradiation alone.

  12. Field-portable-XRF reveals the ubiquity of antimony in plastic consumer products.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew; Filella, Montserrat

    2017-02-09

    Very little systematic information exists on the occurrence and concentrations of antimony (Sb) in consumer products. In this study, a Niton XL3t field-portable-X-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF) spectrometer was deployed in situ and in the laboratory to provide quantitative information on Sb dissipated in plastic items and fixtures (including rubber, textile and foamed materials) from the domestic, school, vehicular and office settings. The metalloid was detected in 18% of over 800 measurements performed, with concentrations ranging from about 60 to 60,000μgg(-1). The highest concentrations were encountered in white, electronic casings and in association with similar concentrations of Br, consistent with the use of antimony oxides (e.g. Sb2O3) as synergistic flame retardants. Concentrations above 1000μgg(-1), and with or without Br, were also encountered in paints, piping and hosing, adhesives, whiteboards, Christmas decorations, Lego blocks, document carriers, garden furniture, upholstered products and interior panels of private motor vehicles. Lower concentrations of Sb were encountered in a wide variety of items but its presence (without Br) in food tray packaging, single-use drinks bottles, straws and small toys were of greatest concern from a human health perspective. While the latter observations are consistent with the use of antimony compounds as catalysts in the production of polyethylene terephthalate, co-association of Sb and Br in many products not requiring flame retardancy suggests that electronic casings are widely recycled. Further research is required into the mobility of Sb when dissipated in new, recycled and aged polymeric materials.

  13. Silver and Nitrate Oppositely Modulate Antimony Susceptibility through Aquaglyceroporin 1 in Leishmania (Viannia) Species

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Juvana M.; Baba, Elio H.; Machado-de-Avila, Ricardo A.; Chavez-Olortegui, Carlos; Demicheli, Cynthia P.; Frézard, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Antimony (Sb) resistance in leishmaniasis chemotherapy has become one of the major challenges to the control of this spreading worldwide public health problem. Since the plasma membrane pore-forming protein aquaglyceroporin 1 (AQP1) is the major route of Sb uptake in Leishmania, functional studies are relevant to characterize drug transport pathways in the parasite. We generated AQP1-overexpressing Leishmania guyanensis and L. braziliensis mutants and investigated their susceptibility to the trivalent form of Sb (SbIII) in the presence of silver and nitrate salts. Both AQP1-overexpressing lines presented 3- to 4-fold increased AQP1 expression levels compared with those of their untransfected counterparts, leading to an increased SbIII susceptibility of about 2-fold. Competition assays using silver nitrate, silver sulfadiazine, or silver acetate prior to SbIII exposure increased parasite growth, especially in AQP1-overexpressing mutants. Surprisingly, SbIII-sodium nitrate or SbIII-potassium nitrate combinations showed significantly enhanced antileishmanial activities compared to those of SbIII alone, especially against AQP1-overexpressing mutants, suggesting a putative nitrate-dependent modulation of AQP1 activity. The intracellular level of antimony quantified by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry showed that the concomitant exposure to SbIII and nitrate favors antimony accumulation in the parasite, increasing the toxicity of the drug and culminating with parasite death. This is the first report showing evidence of AQP1-mediated SbIII susceptibility modulation by silver in Leishmania and suggests the potential antileishmanial activity of the combination of nitrate salts and SbIII. PMID:27161624

  14. Lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery for grid-level energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kangli; Jiang, Kai; Chung, Brice; Ouchi, Takanari; Burke, Paul J.; Boysen, Dane A.; Bradwell, David J.; Kim, Hojong; Muecke, Ulrich; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2014-10-01

    The ability to store energy on the electric grid would greatly improve its efficiency and reliability while enabling the integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies (such as wind and solar) into baseload supply. Batteries have long been considered strong candidate solutions owing to their small spatial footprint, mechanical simplicity and flexibility in siting. However, the barrier to widespread adoption of batteries is their high cost. Here we describe a lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery that potentially meets the performance specifications for stationary energy storage applications. This Li||Sb-Pb battery comprises a liquid lithium negative electrode, a molten salt electrolyte, and a liquid antimony-lead alloy positive electrode, which self-segregate by density into three distinct layers owing to the immiscibility of the contiguous salt and metal phases. The all-liquid construction confers the advantages of higher current density, longer cycle life and simpler manufacturing of large-scale storage systems (because no membranes or separators are involved) relative to those of conventional batteries. At charge-discharge current densities of 275 milliamperes per square centimetre, the cells cycled at 450 degrees Celsius with 98 per cent Coulombic efficiency and 73 per cent round-trip energy efficiency. To provide evidence of their high power capability, the cells were discharged and charged at current densities as high as 1,000 milliamperes per square centimetre. Measured capacity loss after operation for 1,800 hours (more than 450 charge-discharge cycles at 100 per cent depth of discharge) projects retention of over 85 per cent of initial capacity after ten years of daily cycling. Our results demonstrate that alloying a high-melting-point, high-voltage metal (antimony) with a low-melting-point, low-cost metal (lead) advantageously decreases the operating temperature while maintaining a high cell voltage. Apart from the fact that this finding

  15. Antimony film sensor for sensitive rare earth metal analysis in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Makombe, Martin; van der Horst, Charlton; Silwana, Bongiwe; Iwuoha, Emmanuel; Somerset, Vernon

    2016-07-02

    A sensor for the adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of rare earth elements has been developed. The electrochemical procedure is based on the oxidation of the rare earth elements complexed with alizarin complexone at a glassy carbon electrode that was in situ modified with an antimony film, during an anodic scan from -0.2 V to 1.1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) and deposition potential of -0.1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The factors influencing the adsorptive stripping capability were optimised, including the complexing agent concentration, plating concentration of antimony and deposition time. The detection of rare earth elements (La, Ce and Pr) were realised in 0.08 M sodium acetate (pH = 5.8) solution as supporting electrolyte, with 2 × 10(-6) M alizarin complexone and 1.0 mg L(-1) antimony solution. Under the optimised conditions, a deposition time of 360 s was obtained and a linear response was observed between 1 and 25 µg L(-1). The reproducibility of the voltammetric measurements was found to be within 5.0% RSD for 12 replicate measurements of cerium(III) concentration of 5 µg L(-1) using the same electrode surface. The detection limits obtained using stripping analysis was 0.06, 0.42 and 0.71 μg L(-1) for Ce(III), La(III) and Pr(III), respectively. The developed sensor has been successfully applied for the determination of cerium, lanthanum and praseodymium in municipal tap water samples.

  16. Silver and Nitrate Oppositely Modulate Antimony Susceptibility through Aquaglyceroporin 1 in Leishmania (Viannia) Species.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Juvana M; Baba, Elio H; Machado-de-Avila, Ricardo A; Chavez-Olortegui, Carlos; Demicheli, Cynthia P; Frézard, Frédéric; Monte-Neto, Rubens L; Murta, Silvane M F

    2016-08-01

    Antimony (Sb) resistance in leishmaniasis chemotherapy has become one of the major challenges to the control of this spreading worldwide public health problem. Since the plasma membrane pore-forming protein aquaglyceroporin 1 (AQP1) is the major route of Sb uptake in Leishmania, functional studies are relevant to characterize drug transport pathways in the parasite. We generated AQP1-overexpressing Leishmania guyanensis and L. braziliensis mutants and investigated their susceptibility to the trivalent form of Sb (Sb(III)) in the presence of silver and nitrate salts. Both AQP1-overexpressing lines presented 3- to 4-fold increased AQP1 expression levels compared with those of their untransfected counterparts, leading to an increased Sb(III) susceptibility of about 2-fold. Competition assays using silver nitrate, silver sulfadiazine, or silver acetate prior to Sb(III) exposure increased parasite growth, especially in AQP1-overexpressing mutants. Surprisingly, Sb(III)-sodium nitrate or Sb(III)-potassium nitrate combinations showed significantly enhanced antileishmanial activities compared to those of Sb(III) alone, especially against AQP1-overexpressing mutants, suggesting a putative nitrate-dependent modulation of AQP1 activity. The intracellular level of antimony quantified by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry showed that the concomitant exposure to Sb(III) and nitrate favors antimony accumulation in the parasite, increasing the toxicity of the drug and culminating with parasite death. This is the first report showing evidence of AQP1-mediated Sb(III) susceptibility modulation by silver in Leishmania and suggests the potential antileishmanial activity of the combination of nitrate salts and Sb(III).

  17. Tissue distribution of trivalent antimony in mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Molokhia, M. M.; Smith, H.

    1969-01-01

    The work described in this paper is designed to use the very high analytical sensitivity of neutron-activation analysis. The antimony content of individual organs and pieces of organs have been analysed as part of an investigation of the chemotherapy of schistosomiasis. The results illustrate the great, and as yet relatively unapplied, value of this technique in dealing with the investigation of trace elements in biological systems. Values such as those given form firm bases on which further studies can be built and show that the single animal has the same metabolic reactions as those deduced from bulked samples, but of course with individual variations. PMID:5306316

  18. Pharmacokinetics of experimental pentavalent antimony after intramuscular administration in adult volunteers*

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez, Laura; Scorza Dagert, José V.; Scorza, José V.; Vicuña-Fernández, Nelson; de Peña, Yaneira Petit; López, Sabrina; Bendezú, Herminia; Rojas, Elina; Vásquez, Libia; Pérez, Belén

    2006-01-01

    Background: Pentavalent antimony (SbV) has demonstrated therapeuticeffectiveness against clinical manifestations of leishmaniasis, an infection caused by Leishmania, a genus of flagellate protozoa comprising parasites of worldwide distribution. Approximately 1.8 million new cases are reported annually. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of the investigational generic SbV, Ulamina (pentachloride of antimony + N-methylglucamine), in healthy adult volunteers. Methods: In this study, SbV was administered IM as a single 5-mg/kg dose.Blood samples were collected at 0.25, 0.75, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours after administration; urine samples were collected at 6-hour intervals during the 24-hour postadministration period. Determination of trivalent antimony, SbV, and total antimony concentrations in blood and urine samples was carried out using atomic absorption spectrometry. Clinical history was reviewed and the subjects were monitored before and after administration of SbV using physical examination, weight, and hepatic- and renal-function studies. The pharmacokinetic parameters calculated were Cmax, Tmax, absorption constant (Ka), elimination constant (Kel), AUC2–24h, AUC0-∞, elimination phase (t½β), volume of distribution (Vd), and urinary excretion rate. Results: Five subjects (3 men, 2 women; mean age, 28 years [range, 18–34 years]) were included in the study. One hour after drug administration the following values were obtained: Cmax, 1.1 μg/mL; Tmax, 1.3 hours; Ka, 1.87 hours; Kel, 0.043 hours; AUC0–24h, 12.26 μg/mL · h; AUC0-∞, 19.84 μg/mL · h; t½β, 17.45 hours; Vd, 6.6 L/kg; and urinary excretion rate, 2.8 μg/h; these were mean values for the entire study group. The single dose was well tolerated by all subjects. Conclusions: The investigational generic SbV, Ulamina, was associated with linearelimination after IM administration of a single 5-mg/kg dose. A 2-compartment pharmacokinetic model was observed in

  19. Stripping voltammetric determination of mercury(II) at antimony-coated carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Amir M; Vytřas, Karel

    2011-10-15

    A new procedure was elaborated to determine mercury(II) using an anodic stripping square-wave voltammetry at the antimony film carbon paste electrode (SbF-CPE). In highly acidic medium of 1M hydrochloric acid, voltammetric measurements can be realized in a wide potential window. Presence of cadmium(II) allows to separate peaks of Hg(II) and Sb(III) and apparently catalyses reoxidation of electrolytically accumulated mercury, thus allowing its determination at ppb levels. Calibration dependence was linear up to 100 ppb Hg with a detection limit of 1.3 ppb. Applicability of the method was tested on the real river water sample.

  20. Rajkonkoski gold-telluride ore occurrence: A new high prospective type of complex noble metal mineralization in the Karelian Proterozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, V. I.; Sundblad, K.; Toritsin, A. N.; Golubev, A. I.; Lavrov, O. B.

    2008-11-01

    The Rajkonkoski ore occurrence is located within the region of the Karelian craton (AR2) and the Svecofennian folded belt (PR1) conjugation. It is presented by quartz-carbonate veins in metadoleriles and a zone of brecciation, crumple, and silification of carbonaceous shales within the volcanites of the Soanlakhtinsky suite (PR1). Ore mineralization in black shales and quartz veins has features of genetic similarity presenting different levels of the ore system controlled by different range strike-slip fault dislocations. At the Rajkonkoski ore occurrence, 41 ore minerals have been identified: 12 tellurides (native tellurium, hedleyite, pilsenite, tsumoite, tellurobismuthite, hessite, stuetzite, radclidzhite, joseite-B, altaite, volynskite, petzite); 4 bismuth-tellurides of the following compositions Bi3Te, Bi3Te2, BiTe4, PbBiTe; 3 selenides (clausthalite, tellurolaitakarite, native selenium); and 12 native metals (gold, silver, electrum, copper, iron, lead, tin, bismuth, osmiridium). The contents of the main ore minerals in places exceed 10%, and the concentrations of elements reach as follows: Cu and Pb, 5%; Zn, Bi, 1%; Se, 219 ppm; Te, 171 ppm; Sb, 3 ppm; As, 5 ppm; Ag, >0.1%; Au, 35.28 ppm. Ore mineralization is formed during the temperature interval from 550°C up to <170oC in the conditions of high activity of Se and Te, and beginning from medium temperatures (>300°C) complete miscibilities galenite-clausthalite and galenite-altaite are observed. In aggregate with a wide temperature interval (>400°C) of ore process evolution and mineral specia variety of telluride and native metal mineralizations, the original “torsion” of different temperature mineralizations makes it possible to determine the affiliation of the Rajkonkoski ore occurrence to the xenothermal type deposits or epithermal “alkaline,” gold-telluride A-type characterized by a close connection with magmatism of increased alkalinity and the original geochemical (Te-V-F) and mineral

  1. Enhanced thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride-organic hybrid films via graphene doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Airul Azha Abd; Umar, Akrajas Ali; Chen, Xiaomei; Salleh, Muhamad Mat; Oyama, Munetaka

    2016-02-01

    The thermoelectric properties of graphene-doped bismuth telluride-PEDOT:PSS-glycerol (hybrid) films were investigated. Prior to the study, p-type and n-type hybrid films were prepared by doping the PEDOT:PSS-glycerol with the p- and n-type bismuth telluride. Graphene-doped hybrid films were prepared by adding graphene particles of concentration ranging from 0.02 to 0.1 wt% into the hybrid films. Films of graphene-doped hybrid system were then prepared on a glass substrate using a spin-coating technique. It was found that the electrical conductivity of the hybrid films increases with the increasing of the graphene-dopant concentration and optimum at 0.08 wt% for both p- and n-type films, namely 400 and 195 S/cm, respectively. Further increasing in the concentration caused a decreasing in the electrical conductivity. Analysis of the thermoelectric properties of the films obtained that the p-type film exhibited significant improvement in its thermoelectric properties, where the thermoelectric properties increased with the increasing of the doping concentration. Meanwhile, for the case of n-type film, graphene doping showed a negative effect to the thermoelectrical properties, where the thermoelectric properties decreased with the increasing of doping concentration. Seebeck coefficient (and power factor) for optimum p-type and n-type hybrid thin films, i.e., doped with 0.08 wt% of graphene, is 20 μV/K (and 160 μW m-1 K-2) and 10 μV/K (and 19.5 μW m-1 K-2), respectively. The obtained electrical conductivity and thermoelectric properties of graphene-doped hybrid film are interestingly several orders higher than the pristine hybrid films. A thermocouple device fabricated utilizing the p- and n-type graphene-doped hybrid films can generate an electric voltage as high as 2.2 mV under a temperature difference between the hot-side and the cold-side terminal as only low as 55 K. This is equivalent to the output power as high as 24.2 nW (for output load as high as 50

  2. Antimony oxofluorides - a synthesis concept that yields phase pure samples and single crystals.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sk Imran; Johnsson, Mats

    2016-07-26

    The single crystals of the new isostructural compounds Sb3O4F and Y0.5Sb2.5O4F and the two previously known compounds M-SbOF and α-Sb3O2F5 were successfully grown by a hydrothermal technique at 230 °C. The new compound Sb3O4F crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c; a = 5.6107(5) Å, b = 4.6847(5) Å, c = 20.2256(18) Å, β = 94.145(8)°, z = 4. The replacing part of Sb with Y means a slight increase in the unit cell dimensions. The compounds M-SbOF and α-Sb3O2F5 have not been grown as single crystals before and it can be concluded that hydrothermal synthesis has proved to be a suitable technique for growing single crystals of antimony oxofluorides because of the relatively low solubility of such compounds compared to other antimony oxohalides that most often have been synthesised at high temperatures by solid state reactions or gas-solid reactions.

  3. Effect of indium and antimony doping in SnS single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chaki, Sunil H. Chaudhary, Mahesh D.; Deshpande, M.P.

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Single crystals growth of pure SnS, indium doped SnS and antimony doped SnS by direct vapour transport (DVT) technique. • Doping of In and Sb occurred in SnS single crystals by cation replacement. • The replacement mechanism ascertained by EDAX, XRD and substantiated by Raman spectra analysis. • Dopants concentration affects the optical energy bandgap. • Doping influences electrical transport properties. - Abstract: Single crystals of pure SnS, indium (In) doped SnS and antimony (Sb) doped SnS were grown by direct vapour transport (DVT) technique. Two doping concentrations of 5% and 15% each were employed for both In and Sb dopants. Thus in total five samples were studied viz., pure SnS (S1), 5% In doped SnS (S2), 15% In doped SnS (S3), 5% Sb doped SnS (S4) and 15% Sb doped SnS (S5). The grown single crystal samples were characterized by evaluating their surface microstructure, stoichiometric composition, crystal structure, Raman spectroscopy, optical and electrical transport properties using appropriate techniques. The d.c. electrical resistivity and thermoelectric power variations with temperature showed semiconducting and p-type nature of the as-grown single crystal samples. The room temperature Hall Effect measurements further substantiated the semiconducting and p-type nature of the as-grown single crystal samples. The obtained results are deliberated in detail.

  4. Alkaline reforming of brominated fire-retardant plastics: fate of bromine and antimony.

    PubMed

    Onwudili, Jude A; Williams, Paul T

    2009-02-01

    High-impact polystyrene (HIPS) flame retarded with decabromodiphenyl ether (DDE), has been reacted in supercritical water from 380 to 450 degrees C and 21.5 to 31.0 MPa pressure in a batch reactor. Different concentrations of sodium hydroxide additive were used in situ to neutralize the corrosive inorganic bromine species released during the reactions. It appeared that supercritical water conditions lowered the decomposition temperature of both the fire-retardant DDE and HIPS. The reaction products included oils (up to 76 wt%), char (up to 18 wt%) and gas (up to 2.4 wt%) which was mainly methane. The presence of the alkaline water led to up to 97 wt% debromination of the product oil, producing virtually bromine-free oil feedstock. The removal of antimony from the oil product during processing was of the order of 98 wt%. The oil consisted of many single- and multiple-ringed aromatic compounds, many of which had alkyl substituents and/or aliphatic C(n)-bridges (n=1-4). The major single-ringed compounds included toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, propylbenzene and alpha-methylstyrene. Bibenzyl (diphenylethane), stilbene, diphenylmethane, diphenylpropane, diphenylcyclopropane, diphenylpropene, diphenylbutane, diphenylbutene and diphenylbuta-1,3-diene were the major C(n)-bridged compounds. Diphenyl ether and acetophenone were the major oxygenated compounds found. The process thus has the potential to produce bromine-free and antimony-free oils from fire-retardant plastics.

  5. Application of Hyphenated Techniques in Speciation Analysis of Arsenic, Antimony, and Thallium

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Rajmund; Szopa, Sebastian; Jabłońska, Magdalena; Łyko, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Due to the fact that metals and metalloids have a strong impact on the environment, the methods of their determination and speciation have received special attention in recent years. Arsenic, antimony, and thallium are important examples of such toxic elements. Their speciation is especially important in the environmental and biomedical fields because of their toxicity, bioavailability, and reactivity. Recently, speciation analytics has been playing a unique role in the studies of biogeochemical cycles of chemical compounds, determination of toxicity and ecotoxicity of selected elements, quality control of food products, control of medicines and pharmaceutical products, technological process control, research on the impact of technological installation on the environment, examination of occupational exposure, and clinical analysis. Conventional methods are usually labor intensive, time consuming, and susceptible to interferences. The hyphenated techniques, in which separation method is coupled with multidimensional detectors, have become useful alternatives. The main advantages of those techniques consist in extremely low detection and quantification limits, insignificant interference, influence as well as high precision and repeatability of the determinations. In view of their importance, the present work overviews and discusses different hyphenated techniques used for arsenic, antimony, and thallium species analysis, in different clinical, environmental and food matrices. PMID:22654649

  6. [Liposomal amphotericin B treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis contracted in Djibouti and resistant to meglumine antimoniate].

    PubMed

    Rapp, C; Imbert, P; Darie, H; Simon, F; Gros, P; Debord, T; Roué, R

    2003-08-01

    Pentavalent antimony (PA) compounds remain the main therapeutic agents of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). CL infection resistant to PA is difficult to cure, limited by severe side effects and requiring a long course treatment of parenteral administration of recommended second line drugs. We report a case of CL unresponsive to meglumine antimoniate contracted in Djibouti, successfully treated with a short course treatment of AmBisome. In this case the subject had a recurrent thick crusted erythematous lesion on his left elbow associated with spreading micropapula on arms and thorax. The diagnosis of CL was confirmed by direct examination and genomic amplification by PCR of skin samples, cultures were negative. A short course treatment of parenteral AmBisome (18 mg/kg) has lead to clinical cure with no side effects and no relapse. In our hospital, the high cost of medication was counterbalanced by easiest administration, reduction of hospitalization duration, absence of adverse events and a gain of comfort. For this patient, a short course treatment of AmBisome proved to be a suitable alternative to traditional drugs used in CL resistant to PA.

  7. A Black Phosphate Conversion Coating on Steel Surface Using Antimony(III)-Tartrate as an Additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Wang, Guiping

    2016-05-01

    A novel black phosphate conversion coating was formed on steel surface through a Zn-Mn phosphating bath containing mainly ZnO, H3PO4, Mn(H2PO4)2, and Ca(NO3)2, where antimony(III)-tartrate was used as the blackening agent of phosphatization. The surface morphology and composition of the coating were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Corrosion resistance of the coating was studied by potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The pH value of the solution had significant influence on the formation and corrosion resistance of the coating. The experimental results indicated that the Sb plays a vital role in the blackening of phosphate conversion coating. The optimal concentration of antimony(III)-tartrate in the phosphating bath used in this experiment was 1.0 g L-1, as higher values reduced the corrosion resistance of the coating. In addition, by saponification and oil seals, the corrosion duration of the black phosphate coating in a copper sulfate spot test can be as long as 20 min.

  8. Influence of phosphoric acid on the electrochemistry of lead electrodes in sulfuric acid electrolyte containing antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopalan, S.

    The influence of phosphoric acid (0 to 40 g 1 -1) on the Pb/PbSO 4 reaction and the kinetics of hydrogen evolution on pure, smooth lead and lead alloy electrodes is studied via galvanostatic polarization in the linear and Tafel domains with and without antimony (0 to 10 mg 1 -1) addition to the H 2SO 4 (3 to 10 M) electrolyte. Phosphoric acid is found to offset significantly the adverse effect of antimony. H 3PO 4 is also found to increase the hydrogen overpotential without affecting the Pb/PbSO 4 reaction. This implies that the open-circuit corrosion of lead and the consequent hydrogen evolution rate on lead are reduced in the presence of H 3PO 4. The beneficial effects of H 3PO 4 additive are found to be optimum at around 20 g 1 -1. Suppression of hydrogen evolution on the negative electrode, a crucial criterion for sealed cell operation, can be achieved using a H 3PO 4 additive.

  9. Heterogeneous dislocation nucleation in single crystal copper-antimony solid-solution alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajgarhia, Rahul K.; Spearot, Douglas E.; Saxena, Ashok

    2009-07-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are employed to study the partial dislocation nucleation process in single crystal copper with varying concentrations of antimony (0.0-2.0 at%Sb) under uniaxial tension. A well-established embedded-atom method potential is used to represent the Cu-Cu interactions and a recently developed Lennard-Jones potential is used for the Cu-Sb and Sb-Sb interactions. Antimony atoms are randomly distributed as substitutional defects in the Cu single crystal. MD simulations indicate that the tensile stress required for partial dislocation nucleation in the crystal decreases with increasing concentration of Sb. The strain field around Sb dopant atoms in the Cu lattice reduces the unstable stacking fault energy, which promotes heterogeneous nucleation of partial dislocations and reduces the tensile stresses required for plastic deformation. In addition, the role of Sb on the reduction in the stress required for dislocation nucleation is found to be orientation-dependent. Finally, both temperature and Sb distribution play a role in the statistical variation of the stress required for heterogeneous partial dislocation nucleation; this variation is maximum at moderate levels of Sb concentration (0.20-0.50 at%Sb).

  10. Measurements of spin life time of an antimony-bound electron in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T. M.; Bishop, N. C.; Tracy, L. A.; Blume-Kohout, R.; Pluym, T.; Wendt, J. R.; Dominguez, J.; Lilly, M. P.; Carroll, M. S.

    2013-03-01

    We report our measurements of spin life time of an antimony-bound electron in silicon. The device is a double-top-gated silicon quantum dot with antimony atoms implanted near the quantum dot region. A donor charge transition is identified by observing a charge offset in the transport characteristics of the quantum dot. The tunnel rates on/off the donor are first characterized and a three-level pulse sequence is then used to measure the spin populations at different load-and-wait times in the presence of a fixed magnetic field. The spin life time is extracted from the exponential time dependence of the spin populations. A spin life time of 1.27 seconds is observed at B = 3.25 T. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Organically complexed iron enhances bioavailability of antimony to maize (Zea mays) seedlings in organic soils.

    PubMed

    Ptak, Corey; McBride, Murray

    2015-12-01

    Antimony (Sb) is a metalloid belonging to group 15 of the periodic table. Chemical similarities between arsenic (As) and Sb produce concerns about potential health effects of Sb and enrichment in the environment. Antimony is found in oxic environments predominately as an oxyanionic species, antimonite (Sb[OH](6-)). As a result of its net negative charge, Sb[OH](6-) was not initially predicted to have strong interactions with natural organic matter. Oxyanionic species could bind the negatively charged organic matter via a ternary complexation mechanism, in which cationic metals mediate the strong association between organic matter functional groups and oxyanions. However, these interactions are poorly understood in how they influence the bioavailability of oxyanionic contaminants to plants. Iron (Fe) additions to organic soils have been found to increase the number of organically complexed Fe sites suitable for Sb exchange, resulting in a reduced bioavailable fraction of Sb. The bioavailability of Sb to maize seedlings as a function of organically complexed Fe was examined using a greenhouse study. A significant increase in plant tissue Sb was observed as organically complexed Fe increased, which was not predicted by methods commonly used to assess bioavailable Sb. Extraction of soils with organic acids common to the maize rhizosphere suggested that organic acid exudation can readily mobilize Sb bound by organic Fe complexes.

  12. Migration of antimony from PET containers into regulated EU food simulants.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, María; Pérez-Corona, Teresa; Cámara, Carmen; Madrid, Yolanda

    2013-11-15

    Antimony migration from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) containers into aqueous (distilled water, 3% acetic acid, 10% and 20% ethanol) and fatty food simulants (vegetable oil), as well as into vinegar, was studied. Test conditions were according to the recent European Regulation 10/2011 (EU, 2011). Sb migration was assayed by ICP-MS and HG-AFS. The results showed that Sb migration values ranged from 0.5 to 1.2μg Sb/l, which are far below the maximum permissible migration value for Sb, 40μg Sb/kg, (EU, Regulation 10/2011). Parameters as temperature and bottle re-use influence were studied. To assess toxicity, antimony speciation was performed by HPLC-ICP-MS and HG-AFS. While Sb(V) was the only species detected in aqueous simulants, an additional species (Sb-acetate complex) was measured in wine vinegar. Unlike most of the studies reported in the literature, migration tests were based on the application of the EU directive, which enables comparison and harmonisation of results.

  13. A Telomeric Cluster of Antimony Resistance Genes on Chromosome 34 of Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Tejera Nevado, Paloma; Bifeld, Eugenia; Höhn, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the drug resistance of Leishmania spp. are manifold and not completely identified. Apart from the highly conserved multidrug resistance gene family known from higher eukaryotes, Leishmania spp. also possess genus-specific resistance marker genes. One of them, ARM58, was first identified in Leishmania braziliensis using a functional cloning approach, and its domain structure was characterized in L. infantum. Here we report that L. infantum ARM58 is part of a gene cluster at the telomeric end of chromosome 34 also comprising the neighboring genes ARM56 and HSP23. We show that overexpression of all three genes can confer antimony resistance to intracellular amastigotes. Upon overexpression in L. donovani, ARM58 and ARM56 are secreted via exosomes, suggesting a scavenger/secretion mechanism of action. Using a combination of functional cloning and next-generation sequencing, we found that the gene cluster was selected only under antimonyl tartrate challenge and weakly under Cu2+ challenge but not under sodium arsenite, Cd2+, or miltefosine challenge. The selective advantage is less pronounced in intracellular amastigotes treated with the sodium stibogluconate, possibly due to the known macrophage-stimulatory activity of this drug, against which these resistance markers may not be active. Our data point to the specificity of these three genes for antimony resistance. PMID:27324767

  14. Structural and optical study on antimony-silicate glasses doped with thulium ions.

    PubMed

    Dorosz, D; Zmojda, J; Kochanowicz, M; Miluski, P; Jelen, P; Sitarz, M

    2015-01-05

    Structural, spectroscopic and thermal properties of SiO₂-Al₂O₃-Sb₂O₃-Na₂O glass system doped with 0.2 mol% Tm₂O₃ have been presented. Synthesis of antimony-silicate glasses with relatively low phonon energy (600 cm(-1), which implicates a small non-radiative decay rate) was performed by conventional high-temperature melt-quenching methods. The effect of SiO₂/Sb₂O₃ ratio in fabricated Tm(3+) doped glass on thermal, structural and luminescence properties was investigated. On the basis of structural investigations decomposition of absorption bands in the infrared FTIR region was performed, thus determining that antimony ions are the only glass-forming ions, setting up the lattice of fabricated glasses. Luminescence band at the wavelength of 1.8 μm corresponding to (3)F₄→(3)H₆ transition in thulium ions was obtained under 795 nm laser pumping. It was observed that combination of relatively low phonon energy and greater separation of optically active centers in the fabricated glasses influenced in decreasing the luminescence intensity at 1800 nm.

  15. Evaluation of antimony microparticles supported on biochar for application in the voltammetric determination of paraquat.

    PubMed

    Gevaerd, Ava; de Oliveira, Paulo R; Mangrich, Antonio S; Bergamini, Márcio F; Marcolino-Junior, Luiz H

    2016-05-01

    This work describes the construction and application of carbon paste electrodes modified with biochar and antimony microparticles (SbBCPE) for voltammetric determination of paraquat using a simple and sensitive procedure based on voltammetric stripping analysis. Some parameters such as amount of biochar and antimony used in the composition of the carbon paste and instrumental parameters were examined in detail. Under optimized conditions, an analytical curve was obtained for paraquat determination employing SbBCPE, which showed a linear response ranging from 0.2 to 2.9 μmol L(-1), with limit of detection and quantification of 34 nmol L(-1) and 113 nmol L(-1), respectively, after paraquat pre-concentration of 120 s. The repeatability study presented a RSD=2.0% for 10 consecutive measurements using the same electrode surface and the reproducibility study showed a RSD=2.7% for measurements with 10 different electrode surfaces. The proposed sensor was successfully applied for paraquat determination in tap water and citric fruit juice spiked samples and good recoveries were obtained without any sample pre-treatment, showing its promising analytical performance.

  16. Growth of antimony doped P-type zinc oxide nanowires for optoelectronics

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhong Lin; Pradel, Ken

    2016-09-27

    In a method of growing p-type nanowires, a nanowire growth solution of zinc nitrate (Zn(NO.sub.3).sub.2), hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) and polyethylenemine (800 M.sub.w PEI) is prepared. A dopant solution to the growth solution, the dopant solution including an equal molar ration of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), glycolic acid (C.sub.2H.sub.4O.sub.3) and antimony acetate (Sb(CH.sub.3COO).sub.3) in water is prepared. The dopant solution and the growth solution combine to generate a resulting solution that includes antimony to zinc in a ratio of between 0.2% molar to 2.0% molar, the resulting solution having a top surface. An ammonia solution is added to the resulting solution. A ZnO seed layer is applied to a substrate and the substrate is placed into the top surface of the resulting solution with the ZnO seed layer facing downwardly for a predetermined time until Sb-doped ZnO nanowires having a length of at least 5 .mu.m have grown from the ZnO seed layer.

  17. Multi-stage uplift of the Rocky Mountains: new age constraints on the Telluride Conglomerate and regional compilation of apatite fission track ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, M. S.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Gonzales, D. A.; Pecha, M.; McKeon, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Telluride Conglomerate, exposed on the western flanks of Oligocene caldera complexes of the San Juan Mountains of Colorado, has historically been considered an Eocene alluvial deposit overlying the "Rocky Mountain erosion surface" and pre-dating Oligocene volcanism. Measured sections show that the Telluride preserves an unroofing sequence with basal units dominated by Paleozoic sedimentary clasts transitioning into upper units dominated by locally derived Proterozoic basement mixed with previously unrecognized andesitic Oligocene volcanics. Paleoflow directions and thicknesses of the preserved unit indicate the Telluride Conglomerate was deposited by a large, high-energy WNW- flowing braided river system. Detrital zircon analysis indicates minimum ages for individual grains within the Telluride Conglomerate of 28.0 to 31.5 Ma. This, plus the entrained volcanic clasts, redefines the unit as being of Oligocene age and indicates that conglomeratic deposition overlapped with regional San Juan volcanism and just predated major caldera eruptions at 28.4 Ma (San Juan and Uncompahgre) and 27.6 Ma (Silverton). We interpret the deposition of the Telluride Conglomerate to be the depositional response to regional uplift and erosion related to early stages of San Juan magmatism. These units have undergone significant post-depositional tectonism: the Telluride Conglomerate is found at ~9,000ft elevation near Telluride, CO, but is at ~13,000' at its westernmost exposure at Mt. Wilson. We attribute this differential uplift to be associated with faulting, pluton emplacement, and additional mantle driven uplift associated with the emplacement and cooling of the Wilson Stock in the last 20-22 Ma as documented by Miocene cooling seen in apatite helium (AHe) ages. This cooling fits into our regional compilation of published apatite fission track (AFT) and AHe data showing temporally and spatially partitioned Cenozoic cooling indicative of multistage uplift of the Rocky Mountain

  18. Reproductive toxicity and gender differences induced by cadmium telluride quantum dots in an invertebrate model organism

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Si-Qi; Xing, Rui; Zhou, Yan-Feng; Li, Kai-Le; Su, Yuan-Yuan; Qiu, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hu; Zhang, Ke-Qin; He, Yao; Lu, Xiao-Ping; Xu, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Sexual glands are key sites affected by nanotoxicity, but there is no sensitive assay for measuring reproductive toxicity in animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxic effects of cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs) on gonads in a model organism, Bombyx mori. After dorsal vein injection of 0.32 nmol of CdTe-QDs per individual, the QDs passed through the outer membranes of gonads via the generation of ROS in the membranes of spermatocysts and ovarioles, as well as internal germ cells, thereby inducing early germ cell death or malformations via complex mechanisms related to apoptosis and autophagy through mitochondrial and lysosomal pathways. Histological observations of the gonads and quantitative analyses of germ cell development showed that the reproductive toxicity was characterized by obvious male sensitivity. Exposure to QDs in the early stage of males had severe adverse effects on the quantity and quality of sperm, which was the main reason for the occurrence of unfertilized eggs. Ala- or Gly-conjugated QDs could reduce the nanotoxicity of CdTe-QDs during germ cell development and fertilization of their offspring. The results demonstrate that males are preferable models for evaluating the reproductive toxicity of QDs in combined in vivo/in vitro investigations. PMID:27669995

  19. Reduction of thermal conductivity of bulk nanostructured bismuth telluride composites embedded with silicon nano-inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyala, Nikhil; Tahmasbi Rad, Armin; Zamanipour, Zahra; Norouzzadeh, Payam; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Tayebi, Lobat; Vashaee, Daryoosh

    2014-01-01

    Bulk nanostructured bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) composite with silicon nano-crystallite inclusions was synthesized via sintering approach. The effect of the composite structure formed by the addition of miniscule quantity (5 at. %) of silicon on the thermoelectric properties of bulk nanostructured Bi2Te3 is shown via a 50% drop in thermal conductivity accompanied with a simultaneous enhancement in the Seebeck coefficient. We demonstrate that the addition of silicon nano-inclusions to the nanostructured compound combined with a systematic thermal treatment beneficially reduces the thermal conductivity to less than 1.0 W/mK over the entire temperature range of 300 K to 525 K. It is shown that the combinatorial techniques of nanostructuring, nano-inclusions, and annealing are effective in reducing thermal conductivity by a significant magnitude. This low thermal conductivity is comparable to that of Bi2Te3 based superlattices and significantly lower than that of bulk Bi2Te3. The technique is extendable to (Bi,Se)2(Sb,Te)3 based thermoelectric alloys for enhancing the figure-of-merit.

  20. Transition-metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride laser crystal and lasers

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, William F.; Page, Ralph H.; DeLoach, Laura D.; Payne, Stephen A.

    1996-01-01

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed of transition metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride host crystals which have four fold coordinated substitutional sites. The host crystals include II-VI compounds. The host crystal is doped with a transition metal laser ion, e.g., chromium, cobalt or iron. In particular, Cr.sup.2+ -doped ZnS and ZnSe generate laser action near 2.3 .mu.m. Oxide, chloride, fluoride, bromide and iodide crystals with similar structures can also be used. Important aspects of these laser materials are the tetrahedral site symmetry of the host crystal, low excited state absorption losses and high luminescence efficiency, and the d.sup.4 and d.sup.6 electronic configurations of the transition metal ions. The same materials are also useful as saturable absorbers for passive Q-switching applications. The laser materials can be used as gain media in amplifiers and oscillators; these gain media can be incorporated into waveguides and semiconductor lasers.

  1. Transition-metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride laser crystal and lasers

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.; Page, R.H.; DeLoach, L.D.; Payne, S.A.

    1996-07-30

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed of transition metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride host crystals which have four fold coordinated substitutional sites. The host crystals include II-VI compounds. The host crystal is doped with a transition metal laser ion, e.g., chromium, cobalt or iron. In particular, Cr{sup 2+}-doped ZnS and ZnSe generate laser action near 2.3 {micro}m. Oxide, chloride, fluoride, bromide and iodide crystals with similar structures can also be used. Important aspects of these laser materials are the tetrahedral site symmetry of the host crystal, low excited state absorption losses and high luminescence efficiency, and the d{sup 4} and d{sup 6} electronic configurations of the transition metal ions. The same materials are also useful as saturable absorbers for passive Q-switching applications. The laser materials can be used as gain media in amplifiers and oscillators; these gain media can be incorporated into waveguides and semiconductor lasers. 18 figs.

  2. Low-cost cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors based on electron-transport-only designs

    SciTech Connect

    B. A. Brunett; J. C. Lund; J. M. Van Scyoc; N. R. Hilton; E. Y. Lee; R. B. James

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this project was to utilize a novel device design to build a compact, high resolution, room temperature operated semiconductor gamma ray sensor. This sensor was constructed from a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystal. It was able to both detect total radiation intensity and perform spectroscopy on the detected radiation. CZT detectors produced today have excellent electron charge carrier collection, but suffer from poor hole collection. For conventional gamma-ray spectrometers, both the electrons and holes must be collected with high efficiency to preserve energy resolution. The requirement to collect the hole carriers, which have relatively low lifetimes, limits the efficiency and performance of existing experimental devices. By implementing novel device designs such that the devices rely only on the electron signal for energy information, the sensitivity of the sensors for detecting radiation can be increased substantially. In this report the authors describe a project to develop a new type of electron-only CZT detector. They report on their successful efforts to design, implement and test these new radiation detectors. In addition to the design and construction of the sensors the authors also report, in considerable detail, on the electrical characteristics of the CZT crystals used to make their detectors.

  3. Two-color detector: Mercury-cadmium-telluride as a terahertz and infrared detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sizov, F.; Zabudsky, V.; Petryakov, V.; Golenkov, A.; Andreyeva, K.; Tsybrii, Z.; Dvoretskii, S.

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, issues associated with the development of infrared (IR) and terahertz (THz) radiation detectors based on HgCdTe are discussed. Two-color un-cooled and cooled to 78 K narrow-gap mercury-cadmium-telluride semiconductor thin layers with antennas were considered both as sub-THz (sub-THz) direct detection bolometers and 3–10 μm IR photoconductors. The noise equivalent power (NEP) for one of the detectors studied at ν ≈ 140 GHz reaches NEP{sub 300 K} ≈ 4.5 × 10{sup −10} W/Hz{sup 1/2} and NEP{sub 78 K} ≈ 5 × 10{sup −9} W/Hz{sup 1/2}. The same detector used as an IR photoconductor showed the responsivity at temperatures T = 78 K and 300 K with signal-to-noise ratio S/N ≈ 750 and 50, respectively, under illumination by using IR monochromator and globar as a thermal source.

  4. Cadmium telluride photovoltaic manufacturing technology. Annual subcontract report, 7 January 1994--6 January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Weisiger, D.; Albright, S.P.; Brines, J.; Thompson, R.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes work performed by Golden Photon, Inc. (GPI), to conduct research under the PVMaT program, Phase 2B. The objective of the research is to advance GPI`s manufacturing technology, reduce module production costs, increase average module performance, and identify ways to expand production capacity. More specifically, the tasks established for Phase I were to design and install leasehold improvements for the 2-MW production line; to improve and develop product design, efficiency, and marketability; to ensure uninterrupted qualified supplies and raw materials for production; to address environmental, health, and safety issues encountered during production of photovoltaic modules; and to reduce the cost of manufacturing modules. During the first half of this reporting period, the development, design, and debugging of cell interconnection equipment critical to start-up was completed. During the second and third quarters, the primary focus was on the substrate deposition steps (tin oxide, cadmium sulfide, and cadmium telluride) and cell interconnection steps (division). In general, process development, engineering, and quality teams continued to focus on identifying, baselining, and improving (through redesign) actual process equipment operation parameters to meet the required PV panel specifications and improve process throughput rates and yields.

  5. Reproductive toxicity and gender differences induced by cadmium telluride quantum dots in an invertebrate model organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Si-Qi; Xing, Rui; Zhou, Yan-Feng; Li, Kai-Le; Su, Yuan-Yuan; Qiu, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hu; Zhang, Ke-Qin; He, Yao; Lu, Xiao-Ping; Xu, Shi-Qing

    2016-09-01

    Sexual glands are key sites affected by nanotoxicity, but there is no sensitive assay for measuring reproductive toxicity in animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxic effects of cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs) on gonads in a model organism, Bombyx mori. After dorsal vein injection of 0.32 nmol of CdTe-QDs per individual, the QDs passed through the outer membranes of gonads via the generation of ROS in the membranes of spermatocysts and ovarioles, as well as internal germ cells, thereby inducing early germ cell death or malformations via complex mechanisms related to apoptosis and autophagy through mitochondrial and lysosomal pathways. Histological observations of the gonads and quantitative analyses of germ cell development showed that the reproductive toxicity was characterized by obvious male sensitivity. Exposure to QDs in the early stage of males had severe adverse effects on the quantity and quality of sperm, which was the main reason for the occurrence of unfertilized eggs. Ala- or Gly-conjugated QDs could reduce the nanotoxicity of CdTe-QDs during germ cell development and fertilization of their offspring. The results demonstrate that males are preferable models for evaluating the reproductive toxicity of QDs in combined in vivo/in vitro investigations.

  6. Characterization of Pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Detectors for Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Sharma, Dharma; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Comparisons of charge sharing and charge loss measurements between two pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors are discussed. These properties along with the detector geometry help to define the limiting energy resolution and spatial resolution of the detector in question. The first detector consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 4x4 array of pixels with pixel pitch of 750 microns (inter-pixel gap is 100 microns). Signal readout is via discrete ultra-low-noise preamplifiers, one for each of the 16 pixels. The second detector consists of a 2-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a pixel pitch of 300 microns (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). This crystal is bonded to a custom-built readout chip (ASIC) providing all front-end electronics to each of the 256 independent pixels. These detectors act as precursors to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing will degrade energy resolution but will improve our spatial resolution through position interpolation.

  7. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. L.; Peterson, T. E.

    2014-11-01

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140 keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a -5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time.

  8. The behaviour of Gd in lead and tin tellurides and its effect on their physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayachuk, D. M.; Matulenis, E. L.; Mikityuk, V. I.

    1992-06-01

    The behaviour of gadolinium in Pb 1- xSn xTe (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.3) introduced during Bridgman growth and its effect on the composition profiles and free carrier concentration is investigated. The Gd, Pb, Sn and Te contents in crystals were determined by electron microprobe analysis, and the free carrier concentration was obtained by Hall measurements. The results indicate that Gd behaves like an impurity with a segregation coefficient larger than unity, which strongly depends on the Gd concentration N( L) Gd in the melt and is given by KS = 1 + Aexp( - BN( L) Gd), where A takes values of 8 or 9 and B a value of about 10 -20 cm 3. The effect of such a strong KS( N( L) Gd) dependence is that all the Gd impurity concentrates in the first-to-freeze section, leaving the rest of the ingot free from the impurity. Thus, by introducing Gd during melt growth of lead-tin telluride crystals, one can obtain high quality crystals of the solid solutions studied.

  9. Investigations of Cadmium Manganese Telluride Crystals for Room-Temperature Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Carcelen, V.; Gul, R.; James, R.

    2009-10-06

    Cadmium manganese telluride (CMT) has high potential as a material for room-temperature nuclear-radiation detectors. We investigated indium-doped CMT crystals taken from the stable growth region of the ingot, and compared its characteristics with that from the last-to-freeze region. We employed different techniques, including synchrotron white-beam X-ray topography (SWBXT), current-voltage (I-V) measurements, and low-temperature photoluminescence spectra, and we also assessed their responses as detectors to irradiation exposure. The crystal from the stable growth region proved superior to that from the last-to-freeze region; it is a single-grain crystal, free of twins, and displayed a resistivity higher by two orders-of-magnitude. The segregation of indium dopant in the ingot might be responsible for its better resistivity. Furthermore, we recorded a good response in the detector fabricated from the crystal taken from the stable growth region; its ({mu}{tau}){sub e} value was 2.6 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/V, which is acceptable for thin detectors, including for applications in medicine.

  10. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D L; Peterson, T E

    2014-11-21

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140 keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a -5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time.

  11. Influence of germanium nano-inclusions on the thermoelectric power factor of bulk bismuth telluride alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Satyala, Nikhil; Zamanipour, Zahra; Norouzzadeh, Payam; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tahmasbi Rad, Armin; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-05-28

    Nanocomposite thermoelectric compound of bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) with 5 at. % germanium nano-inclusions was prepared via mechanically alloying and sintering techniques. The influence of Ge nano-inclusions and long duration annealing on the thermoelectric properties of nanostructured Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} were investigated. It was found that annealing has significant effect on the carrier concentration, Seebeck coefficient, and the power factor of the thermoelectric compound. The systematic heat treatment also reduced the density of donor type defects thereby decreasing the electron concentration. While the as-pressed nanocomposite materials showed n-type properties, it was observed that with the increase of annealing time, the nanocomposite gradually transformed to an abundantly hole-dominated (p-type) sample. The long duration annealing (∼500 h) resulted in a significantly enhanced electrical conductivity pertaining to the augmentation in the density and the structural properties of the sample. Therefore, a simultaneous enhancement in both electrical and Seebeck coefficient characteristics resulted in a remarkable increase in the thermoelectric power factor.

  12. A fumonisins immunosensor based on polyanilino-carbon nanotubes doped with palladium telluride quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Masikini, Milua; Mailu, Stephen N; Tsegaye, Abebaw; Njomo, Njagi; Molapo, Kerileng M; Ikpo, Chinwe O; Sunday, Christopher Edozie; Rassie, Candice; Wilson, Lindsay; Baker, Priscilla G L; Iwuoha, Emmanuel I

    2014-12-30

    An impedimetric immunosensor for fumonisins was developed based on poly(2,5-dimethoxyaniline)-multi-wall carbon nanotubes doped with palladium telluride quantum dots onto a glassy carbon surface. The composite was assembled by a layer-by-layer method to form a multilayer film of quantum dots (QDs) and poly(2,5-dimethoxyaniline)-multi-wall carbon nanotubes (PDMA-MWCNT). Preparation of the electrochemical immunosensor for fumonisins involved drop-coating of fumonisins antibody onto the composite modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy response of the FB1 immunosensor (GCE/PT-PDMA-MWCNT/anti-Fms-BSA) gave a linear range of 7 to 49 ng L-1 and the corresponding sensitivity and detection limits were 0.0162 kΩ L ng-1 and 0.46 pg L-1, respectively, hence the limit of detection of the GCE/PT-PDMA-MWCNT immunosensor for fumonisins in corn certified material was calculated to be 0.014 and 0.011 ppm for FB1, and FB2 and FB3, respectively. These results are lower than those obtained by ELISA, a provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI) for fumonisins (the sum of FB1, FB2, and FB3) established by the Joint FAO/WHO expert committee on food additives and contaminants of 2 μg kg-1 and the maximum level recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for protection of human consumption (2-4 mg L-1).

  13. Cadmium telluride quantum dot nanoparticle cytotoxicity and effects on model immune responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kathy C; Seligy, Vern L

    2013-01-01

    This study examines dose effects of cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs) from two commercial sources on model macrophages (J774A.1) and colonic epithelial cells (HT29). Effects on cellular immune signalling responses were measured following sequential exposure to QDs and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA01. At CdTe-QD concentrations between 10-2 and 10 µg/ml, cells exhibited changes in metabolism and morphology. Confocal imaging revealed QD internalisation and changes in cell–cell contacts, shapes and internal organisations. QD doses below 10-2 µg/ml caused no observed effects. When QD exposures at 10-7 to 10-3 µg/ml preceded PA01 (107 bacteria/ml) challenges, there were elevated cytotoxicity (5–22%, p < 0.05) and reduced levels (two- to fivefold, p < 0.001) of nitric oxide (NO), TNF-α, KC/CXC−1 and IL-8, compared with PA01 exposures alone. These results demonstrate that exposures to sub-toxic levels of CdTe-QDs can depress cell immune-defence functions, which if occurred in vivo would likely interfere with normal neutrophil recruitment for defence against bacteria. PMID:22264036

  14. Extraordinary Off-Stoichiometric Bismuth Telluride for Enhanced n-Type Thermoelectric Power Factor.

    PubMed

    Park, Kunsu; Ahn, Kyunghan; Cha, Joonil; Lee, Sanghwa; Chae, Sue In; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Ryee, Siheon; Im, Jino; Lee, Jaeki; Park, Su-Dong; Han, Myung Joon; Chung, In; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2016-11-02

    Thermoelectrics directly converts waste heat into electricity and is considered a promising means of sustainable energy generation. While most of the recent advances in the enhancement of the thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) resulted from a decrease in lattice thermal conductivity by nanostructuring, there have been very few attempts to enhance electrical transport properties, i.e., the power factor. Here we use nanochemistry to stabilize bulk bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) that violates phase equilibrium, namely, phase-pure n-type K0.06Bi2Te3.18. Incorporated potassium and tellurium in Bi2Te3 far exceed their solubility limit, inducing simultaneous increase in the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient along with decrease in the thermal conductivity. Consequently, a high power factor of ∼43 μW cm(-1) K(-2) and a high ZT > 1.1 at 323 K are achieved. Our current synthetic method can be used to produce a new family of materials with novel physical and chemical characteristics for various applications.

  15. Temperature dependent van der Pauw-Hall measurements on sodium doped single crystalline cadmium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Faisal R.

    2015-03-01

    In this report, results of the temperature dependent electrical conductivity measurements conducted on single crystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe), containing sodium (Na) impurities are presented and discussed. The electrical conductivity measurements were conducted using an apparatus that allowed the implementation of a standard van der Pauw-Hall effect technique through which the electrical resistivity, concentration of majority carriers, as well as the carrier mobility were determined for temperatures ranging between 24 K and 350 K. Over this temperature range, the electrical resistivity was observed to change by 7 orders of magnitude. Hall measurements showed that the hole concentration at 300 K was ˜3 × 1015 cm-3 and the hole mobility at the same temperature was ˜80 cm2/V s. Measuring the concentration of holes as a function of the sample temperature enabled the estimation of the acceptor energy level with respect to the valence band maximum to be ˜60 meV. The same data also revealed the potential presence of a compensating donor level. Furthermore, the hole mobility was also analyzed over the entire temperature range and the data revealed that above 100 K, the carrier mobility was dominated by the scattering of holes from lattice vibrations.

  16. A novel approach of chemical mechanical polishing for cadmium zinc telluride wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, Bo; Zhou, Ping; Kang, Renke; Zhang, Bi; Guo, Dongming

    2016-05-01

    A novel approach of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is developed for cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) wafers. The approach uses environment-friendly slurry that consists of mainly silica, hydrogen peroxide, and citric acid. This is different from the previously reported slurries that are usually composed of strong acid, alkali, and bromine methanol, and are detrimental to the environment and operators. Surface roughness 0.5 nm and 4.7 nm are achieved for Ra and peak-to-valley (PV) values respectively in a measurement area of 70 × 50 μm2, using the developed novel approach. Fundamental polishing mechanisms are also investigated in terms of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical measurements. Hydrogen peroxide dominates the passivating process during the CMP of CZT wafers, indicating by the lowest passivation current density among silica, citric acid and hydrogen peroxide solution. Chemical reaction equations are proposed during CMP according to the XPS and electrochemical measurements.

  17. Use of Rutherford backscattering and optical spectroscopy to study boron implantation in cadmium telluride. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, D.N.; Bowman, R.C.; Adams, P.M.; Knudsen, J.F.; Downing, R.G.

    1988-10-03

    The effect of large-dose boron implantation in single-crystal cadmium telluride (CdTe) was investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), with channeling double-crystal x-ray diffraction (DCD), and photoreflectance (PR) spectroscopy. Comparisons are made with the results of identical B implantations of silicon and gallium arsenides crystals. Multiple energy implantations were performed at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature with total doses up to 1.5 x 10 W B ions/sq. cm. The implanted B distribution was measured with neutron depth profiling (NDP) and found to agree well with Monte Carlo ion-range calculations. The RBS results showed that the CdTe crystals had not been rendered completely amorphous even for the highest-dose implantation unlike GaAs and Si. Furthermore, the DCD results showed little implantation-induced structure in the rocking curves from the implanted CdTe crystals, in contrast to GaAs. The consequences of annealing at 500 C in an attempt to regrow the crystal structure are also discussed.

  18. Improved performance of silicon nanowire/cadmium telluride quantum dots/organic hybrid solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zhaoyun; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Renqi; Xue, Zhaoguo; Wang, Hongyu; Xu, Jun; Yu, Yao; Su, Weining; Ma, Zhongyuan; Chen, Kunji

    2015-04-01

    We fabricated silicon nanowire/cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs)/organic hybrid solar cells and investigated their structure and electrical properties. Transmission electron microscope revealed that CdTe QDs were uniformly distributed on the surface of the silicon nanowires, which made PEDOT:PSS easily filled the space between SiNWs. The current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics of hybrid solar cells were investigated both in dark and under illumination. The result shows that the performance of the hybrid solar cells with CdTe QDs layer has an obvious improvement. The optimal short-circuit current density (Jsc) of solar cells with CdTe QDs layer can reach 33.5 mA/cm2. Compared with the solar cells without CdTe QDs, Jsc has an increase of 15.1%. Power conversion efficiency of solar cells also increases by 28.8%. The enhanced performance of the hybrid solar cells with CdTe QDs layers are ascribed to down-shifting effect of CdTe QDs and the modification of the silicon nanowires surface with CdTe QDs. The result of our experiments suggests that hybrid solar cells with CdTe QDs modified are promising candidates for solar cell application.

  19. Atomic ordering in cubic bismuth telluride alloy phases at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loa, I.; Bos, J.-W. G.; Downie, R. A.; Syassen, K.

    2016-06-01

    Pressure-induced transitions from ordered intermetallic phases to substitutional alloys to semi-ordered phases were studied in a series of bismuth tellurides. By using angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction, the compounds Bi4Te5 , BiTe, and Bi2Te were observed to form alloys with the disordered body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal structure upon compression to above 14-19 GPa at room temperature. The BiTe and Bi2Te alloys and the previously discovered high-pressure alloys of Bi2Te3 and Bi4Te3 were all found to show atomic ordering after gentle annealing at very moderate temperatures of ˜100 ∘C . Upon annealing, BiTe transforms from bcc to the B2 (CsCl) crystal-structure type, and the other phases adopt semi-disordered variants thereof, featuring substitutional disorder on one of the two crystallographic sites. The transition pressures and atomic volumes of the alloy phases show systematic variations across the BimTen series including the end members Bi and Te. First-principles calculations were performed to characterize the electronic structure and chemical bonding properties of B2-type BiTe and to identify the driving forces of the ordering transition. The calculated Fermi surface of B2-type BiTe has an intricate structure and is predicted to undergo three topological changes between 20 and 60 GPa.

  20. A novel approach of chemical mechanical polishing for cadmium zinc telluride wafers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, Bo; Zhou, Ping; Kang, Renke; Zhang, Bi; Guo, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is developed for cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) wafers. The approach uses environment-friendly slurry that consists of mainly silica, hydrogen peroxide, and citric acid. This is different from the previously reported slurries that are usually composed of strong acid, alkali, and bromine methanol, and are detrimental to the environment and operators. Surface roughness 0.5 nm and 4.7 nm are achieved for Ra and peak-to-valley (PV) values respectively in a measurement area of 70 × 50 μm2, using the developed novel approach. Fundamental polishing mechanisms are also investigated in terms of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical measurements. Hydrogen peroxide dominates the passivating process during the CMP of CZT wafers, indicating by the lowest passivation current density among silica, citric acid and hydrogen peroxide solution. Chemical reaction equations are proposed during CMP according to the XPS and electrochemical measurements. PMID:27225310

  1. Resonant Enhancement of Charge Density Wave Diffraction in the Rare-Earth Tri-Tellurides

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.S.; Sorini, A.P.; Yi, M.; Chuang, Y.D.; Moritz, B.; Yang, W.L.; Chu, J.-H.; Kuo, H.H.; Gonzalez, A.G.Cruz; Fisher, I.R.; Hussain, Z.; Devereau, T.P.; Shen, Z.X.

    2012-05-15

    We performed resonant soft X-ray diffraction on known charge density wave (CDW) compounds, rare earth tri-tellurides. Near the M{sub 5} (3d - 4f) absorption edge of rare earth ions, an intense diffraction peak is detected at a wavevector identical to that of CDW state hosted on Te{sub 2} planes, indicating a CDW-induced modulation on the rare earth ions. Surprisingly, the temperature dependence of the diffraction peak intensity demonstrates an exponential increase at low temperatures, vastly different than that of the CDW order parameter. Assuming 4f multiplet splitting due to the CDW states, we present a model to calculate X-ray absorption spectrum and resonant profile of the diffraction peak, agreeing well with experimental observations. Our results demonstrate a situation where the temperature dependence of resonant X-ray diffraction peak intensity is not directly related to the intrinsic behavior of the order parameter associated with the electronic order, but is dominated by the thermal occupancy of the valence states.

  2. Advanced methods for preparation and characterization of infrared detector materials. [mercury cadmium tellurides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Martin, B. G.

    1980-01-01

    Mercury cadmium telluride crystals were prepared by the Bridgman method with a wide range of crystal growth rates and temperature gradients adequate to prevent constitutional supercooling under diffusion-limited, steady state, growth conditions. The longitudinal compositional gradients for different growth conditions and alloy compositions were calculated and compared with experimental data to develop a quantitative model of the crystal growth kinetics for the Hg(i-x)CdxTe alloys, and measurements were performed to ascertain the effect of growth conditions on radial compositional gradients. The pseudobinary HgTe-CdTe constitutional phase diagram was determined by precision differential thermal analysis measurements and used to calculate the segregation coefficient of Cd as a function of x and interface temperature. Computer algorithms specific to Hg(1-x)CdxTe were developed for calculations of the charge carrier concentrations, charge carrier mobilities, Hall coefficient, optical absorptance, and Fermi energy as functions of x, temperature, ionized donor and acceptor concentrations, and neutral defect concentrations.

  3. Novel Cadmium Zinc Telluride Devices for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging-Technological Aspects and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Ben-Haim, Simona; Kennedy, John; Keidar, Zohar

    2016-07-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging plays an important role in the assessment of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease and is well established for diagnosis and for prognostic evaluation in these patients. The dedicated cardiac SPECT cameras with solid-state cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors were first introduced a decade ago. A large body of evidence is building up, showing the superiority of the new technology compared with conventional gamma cameras. Not only the CZT detectors, but also new collimator geometries, the ability to perform focused imaging optimized for the heart and advances in data processing algorithms all contribute to the significantly improved sensitivity up to 8-10 times, as well as improved energy resolution and improved reconstructed spatial resolution compared with conventional technology. In this article, we provide an overview of the physical characteristics of the CZT cameras, as well as a review of the literature published so far, including validation studies in comparison with conventional myocardial perfusion imaging and with invasive coronary angiography, significant reduction in radiation dose, and new imaging protocols enabled by the new technology.

  4. Spectroscopic ellipsometry as a process control tool for manufacturing cadmium telluride thin film photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Westcott P.

    In recent decades, there has been concern regarding the sustainability of fossil fuels. One of the more promising alternatives is Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices. Improved quality measurement techniques may aid in improving this existing technology. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is a common, non-destructive technique for measuring thin films in the silicon wafer industry. SE results have also been tied to properties believed to play a role in CdTe PV device efficiency. A study assessing the potential of SE for use as a quality measurement tool had not been previously reported. Samples of CdTe devices produced by both laboratory and industrial scale processes were measured by SE and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Mathematical models of the optical characteristics of the devices were developed and fit to SE data from multiple angles and locations on each sample. Basic statistical analysis was performed on results from the automated fits to provide an initial evaluation of SE as a quantitative quality measurement process. In all cases studied, automated SE models produced average stack thickness values within 10% of the values produced by SEM, and standard deviations for the top bulk layer thickness were less than 1% of the average values.

  5. Directional Solidification of Mercury Cadmium Telluride During the Second United States Microgravity Payload Mission (USMP-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Watring, D. A.; Alexander, H. A.; Jerman, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    As a solid solution semiconductor having, a large separation between liquidus and solidus, mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) presents a formidable challenge to crystal growers desiring an alloy of high compositional uniformity. To avoid constitutional supercooling during Bridgman crystal growth it is necessary to solidify slowly in a high temperature gradient region. The necessary translation rate of less than 1 mm/hr results in a situation where fluid flow induced by gravity on earth is a significant factor in material transport. The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) is equipped to provide the stable thermal environment with a high gradient, and the required slow translation rate needed. Ground based experiments in AADSF show clearly the dominance of flow driven transport. The first flight of AADSF in low gravity on USMP-2 provided an opportunity to test theories of fluid flow in MCT and showed several solidification regimes which are very different from those observed on earth. Residual acceleration vectors in the orbiter during the mission were measured by the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), and correlated well with observed compositional differences in the samples.

  6. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, DL; Peterson, TE

    2014-01-01

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140-keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a −5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time. PMID:25360792

  7. Study of a high-resolution, 3D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y.; Matteson, J. L.; Skelton, R. T.; Deal, A. C.; Stephan, E. A.; Duttweiler, F.; Gasaway, T. M.; Levin, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06 ± 0.39% at 511 keV throughout most of the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44 ± 0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78 ± 0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes—as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system.

  8. Study of a high-resolution, 3D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET.

    PubMed

    Gu, Y; Matteson, J L; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M; Levin, C S

    2011-03-21

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06 ± 0.39% at 511 keV throughout most of the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44 ± 0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78 ± 0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes-as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system.

  9. Inhibition of autophagy contributes to the toxicity of cadmium telluride quantum dots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Junpeng; Shao, Ming; Lai, Lu; Liu, Yi; Xie, Zhixiong

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) are used as near-infrared probes in biologic and medical applications, but their cytological effects and mechanism of potential toxicity are still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of CdTe QDs of different sizes and investigated their mechanism of toxicity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A growth inhibition assay revealed that orange-emitting CdTe (O-CdTe) QDs (half inhibitory concentration [IC50] =59.44±12.02 nmol/L) were more toxic than green-emitting CdTe QDs (IC50 =186.61±19.74 nmol/L) to S. cerevisiae. Further studies on toxicity mechanisms using a transmission electron microscope and green fluorescent protein tagged Atg8 processing assay revealed that O-CdTe QDs could partially inhibit autophagy at a late stage, which differs from the results reported in mammalian cells. Moreover, autophagy inhibited at a late stage by O-CdTe QDs could be partially recovered by enhancing autophagy with rapamycin (an autophagy activator), combined with an increased number of living cells. These results indicate that inhibition of autophagy acts as a toxicity mechanism of CdTe QDs in S. cerevisiae. This work reports a novel toxicity mechanism of CdTe QDs in yeast and provides valuable information on the effect of CdTe QDs on the processes of living cells. PMID:27524895

  10. Study of a high-resolution, 3-D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Y; Matteson, J L; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M; Levin, C S

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3-D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06±0.39% at 511 keV throughout most the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44±0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78±0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes – as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system. PMID:21335649

  11. Nanostructure Characterization of Bismuth Telluride-Based Powders and Extruded Alloys by Various Experimental Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilevskiy, D.; Bourbia, O.; Gosselin, S.; Turenne, S.; Masut, R. A.

    2011-05-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations of mechanically alloyed powders and bulk extruded alloys give experimental evidence of nanosized grains in bismuth telluride-based materials. In this study we combine HRTEM observations and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, of both mechanically alloyed powders and extruded samples, with mechanical spectroscopy (MS) of extruded rods. Both HRTEM and XRD show that nanostructures with an average grain size near 25 nm can be achieved within 2 h of mechanical alloying from pure elements in an attritor-type milling machine. Residual strain orthogonal to the c-axis of powder nanoparticles has been evaluated at about 1.2% by XRD peak broadening. In contrast, XRD has been found unreliable for evaluation of grain size in highly textured extruded materials for which diffraction conditions are similar to those of single crystals, while MS appears promising for study of bulk extruded samples. Nanostructured extruded alloys at room temperature exhibit an internal friction (IF) background that is one order of magnitude higher than that of conventional zone-melted material with a grain size of several millimeters. IF as a function of sample temperature gives activation energies that are also different between bulk materials having nano- and millimeter-size grains, a result that is attributed to different creep mechanisms. Nanograin size, as well as orientation and volumetric proportion, provide valuable information for optimization of technological parameters of thermoelectric alloys and should be carefully cross-examined by various independent methods.

  12. Spectral x-ray computed tomography scanner using a cadmium telluride detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2016-10-01

    To obtain four tomograms with four different photon energy ranges simultaneously, we have developed a quad-energy Xray photon counter with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector and four sets of comparators and frequency-voltage converters (FVCs). X-ray photons are detected using the CdTe detector, and the event pulses from a shaping amplifier are sent to four comparators simultaneously to regulate four threshold energies of 20, 35, 50 and 65 keV. Using this counter, the energy ranges are 20-100, 35-100, 50-100 and 65-100 keV; the maximum energy corresponds to the tube voltage. Xray photons in the four ranges are counted using the comparators, and the logical pulses from the comparators are input to the FVCs. The outputs from the four FVCs are input to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter (ADC) to carry out quad-energy imaging. To observe contrast variations with changes in the threshold energy, we performed spectral computed tomography utilizing the quad-energy photon counter at a tube voltage of 100 kV and a current of 8.0 μA. In the spectral CT, four tomograms were obtained simultaneously with four energy ranges. The image contrast varied with changes in the threshold energy, and the exposure time for tomography was 9.8 min.

  13. Friction Consolidation Processing of n-Type Bismuth-Telluride Thermoelectric Material

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, Scott A.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Catalini, David; Overman, Nicole R.; Sharp, Jeffrey

    2016-04-13

    This work focused on the development of a new mechanical processing route, called Friction Consolidation Processing (FCP), for densifying bismuth-telluride (Bi2Te3) powders into bulk form. FCP is a solid-state process wherein a rotating tool was used to generate severe plastic deformation within the Bi2Te3 powder, resulting in a recrystallizing flow of material. Upon cooling, the non-equilibrium microstructure within the flow was locked into the material. FCP was demonstrated on -325 mesh (~44 micron) n-type Bi2Te3 feedstock powder to form pucks with 92% theoretical density having a diameter of 25.4mm and thickness of 4.2mm. FCP was shown to achieve highly textured bulk materials, with sub-micron grain size, directly from coarse particle feedstock powders in a single process. An average grain size of 0.8 microns was determined for one sample and a multiple of uniform distribution (MUD) value of 15.49 was calculated for the (0001) pole figure from another sample. These results indicate that FCP can yield highly refined grains and textural alignment of the (0001) basal planes in Bi2Te3. ZT=0.37 at 336K was achieved for undoped stoichiometric Bi2Te3, which is near the “text book” value of ZT=0.5.

  14. Cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as adsorbent for removal of sunset yellow.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Hekmati Jah, A; Khodadoust, S; Sahraei, R; Daneshfar, A; Mihandoost, A; Purkait, M K

    2012-05-01

    Adsorption is a promising technique for decolorization of effluents of textile dyeing industries but its application is limited due to requirement of high amounts of adsorbent required. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded onto activated carbon (CdTN-AC) for the removal of sunset yellow (SY) dye from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch mode varying solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration, CdTN-AC dose, and temperature. In order to investigate the efficiency of SY adsorption on CdTN-AC, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models were studied. It was observed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better than other kinetic models with good correlation coefficient. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy, entropy, activation energy, and sticking probability were also calculated. It was found that the sorption of SY onto CdTN-AC was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The proposed adsorbent is applicable for SY removal from waste of real effluents including pea-shooter, orange drink and jelly banana with efficiency more than 97%.

  15. Cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as adsorbent for removal of sunset yellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, M.; Hekmati Jah, A.; Khodadoust, S.; Sahraei, R.; Daneshfar, A.; Mihandoost, A.; Purkait, M. K.

    2012-05-01

    Adsorption is a promising technique for decolorization of effluents of textile dyeing industries but its application is limited due to requirement of high amounts of adsorbent required. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded onto activated carbon (CdTN-AC) for the removal of sunset yellow (SY) dye from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch mode varying solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration, CdTN-AC dose, and temperature. In order to investigate the efficiency of SY adsorption on CdTN-AC, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models were studied. It was observed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better than other kinetic models with good correlation coefficient. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy, entropy, activation energy, and sticking probability were also calculated. It was found that the sorption of SY onto CdTN-AC was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The proposed adsorbent is applicable for SY removal from waste of real effluents including pea-shooter, orange drink and jelly banana with efficiency more than 97%.

  16. Fate and transport evaluation of potential leaching risks from cadmium telluride photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Parikhit; Balas, Robert; Krueger, Lisa; Wade, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Fate and transport analysis has been performed to evaluate potential exposures to cadmium (Cd) from cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaics (PV) for rainwater leaching from broken modules in a commercial building scenario. Leaching from broken modules is modeled using the worst-case scenario of total release of Cd, and residential screening levels are used to evaluate potential health impacts to on-site workers and off-site residents. A rooftop installation was considered rather than a ground-mount installation because rainwater runoff is concentrated via building downspouts in a rooftop installation rather than being dispersed across large areas in a ground-mount installation. Fate and transport of Cd from leachate to soil are modeled using equilibrium soil/soil-water partitioning. Subsequent migration to ambient air as windblown dust is evaluated with a screening Gaussian plume dispersion model, and migration to groundwater is evaluated with a dilution-attenuation factor approach. Exposure point concentrations in soil, air, and groundwater are one to six orders of magnitude below conservative (residential soil, residential air, drinking water) human health screening levels in both a California and southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg) exposure scenario. Potential exposures to Cd from rainwater leaching of broken modules in a commercial building scenario are highly unlikely to pose a potential health risk to on-site workers or off-site residents.

  17. Thermal transport in bismuth telluride quintuple layer: mode-resolved phonon properties and substrate effects

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Cheng; Bao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The successful exfoliation of atomically-thin bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) quintuple layer (QL) attracts tremendous research interest in this strongly anharmonic quasi-two-dimensional material. The thermal transport properties of this material are not well understood, especially the mode-wise properties and when it is coupled with a substrate. In this work, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations and normal mode analysis to study the mode-resolved thermal transport in freestanding and supported Bi2Te3 QL. The detailed mode-wise phonon properties are calculated and the accumulated thermal conductivities with respect to phonon mean free path (MFP) are constructed. It is shown that 60% of the thermal transport is contributed by phonons with MFP longer than 20 nm. Coupling with a-SiO2 substrate leads to about 60% reduction of thermal conductivity. Through varying the interfacial coupling strength and the atomic mass of substrate, we also find that phonon in Bi2Te3 QL is more strongly scattered by interfacial potential and its transport process is less affected by the dynamics of substrate. Our study provides an in-depth understanding of heat transport in Bi2Te3 QL and is helpful in further tailoring its thermal property through nanostructuring. PMID:27263656

  18. Toward Nanostructured Thermoelectrics. Synthesis and Characterization of Lead Telluride Gels and Aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, Shreyashi; Brock, Stephanie L.

    2011-05-12

    The synthesis and characterization of lead telluride (PbTe) gels and aerogels with nanostructured features of potential benefit for enhanced thermoelectrics is reported. In this approach, discrete thiolate-capped PbTe nanoparticles were synthesized by a solution-based approach followed by oxidation-induced nanoparticle assembly with tetranitromethane or hydrogen peroxide to form wet gels. Drying of the wet gels by supercritical CO₂ extraction yielded aerogels, whereas xerogels were produced by ambient pressure bench top drying. The gels consist of an interconnected network of colloidal nanoparticles and pores with surface areas up to 74 m² g-1. The thermal stability of the nanostructures relative to nanoparticles was probed with the help of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The aerogels were observed to sublime at a higher temperature and over a larger range (425–500 °C) relative to the precursor nanoparticles. TGA-DSC suggests that organic capping groups can be removed in the region 250–450 °C, and melting of PbTe nanoparticles occurs near the temperature for bulk materials (ca. 920 °C). The good thermal stability combined with the presence of nanoscale interfaces suggests PbTe gels may show promise in thermoelectric devices.

  19. Displaying and evaluating engineering properties and natural hazards using geomorphic mapping techniques: Telluride, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Gunawan, I.; Giardino, J.R.; Tchakerian, V.P. . Geography Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    Telluride, located in the San Juan mountains of southwestern Colorado, is situated in a glacially carved, fluvially modified alpine valley. Today this chic setting is experiencing rapid urban development resulting from flourishing tourist traffic during both the winter ski season and the summer vacation period. A new development, Mountain Village, is being built on an extensive and complex landslide that has only received superficial scrutiny. Recent fast growth is placing considerable pressure on pristine, undeveloped land. This timely quandary incorporates the interaction between prospective development, geomorphic processes, engineering factors, economic feasibility, and landuse adjudication. In an attempt to respond to these issues the State of Colorado enacted Senate Bill 35 (1972) and House Bills 1034 (1974) and 1041 (1974), all mandating assessment of the natural hazards of an area, preparatory to development. The key to evaluating the natural hazards is to comprehend the geomorphic processes. The area is highly-faulted with associated mineralization. Whereas the upper slopes are composed of massive rhyodacitic-tuff breccias and flows, the valley is sculpted from shales, sandstones, and conglomerates. Several periods of glaciation occurred in the area. Glacial till, talus slopes, avalanche chutes and cones, rock glaciers, alluvium, and landslides have been identified in the field and mapped on aerial photographs. Many of the slopes in the area are active. The authors have constructed a geomorphic map (1:12,500) that shows geology, landforms, geomorphic processes and engineering properties. This map can be used by regulatory agencies in identifying areas of natural hazards potentially sensitive to development.

  20. Measurement and Modeling of Blocking Contacts for Cadmium Telluride Gamma Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Patrick R.

    2010-01-07

    Gamma ray detectors are important in national security applications, medicine, and astronomy. Semiconductor materials with high density and atomic number, such as Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), offer a small device footprint, but their performance is limited by noise at room temperature; however, improved device design can decrease detector noise by reducing leakage current. This thesis characterizes and models two unique Schottky devices: one with an argon ion sputter etch before Schottky contact deposition and one without. Analysis of current versus voltage characteristics shows that thermionic emission alone does not describe these devices. This analysis points to reverse bias generation current or leakage through an inhomogeneous barrier. Modeling the devices in reverse bias with thermionic field emission and a leaky Schottky barrier yields good agreement with measurements. Also numerical modeling with a finite-element physics-based simulator suggests that reverse bias current is a combination of thermionic emission and generation. This thesis proposes further experiments to determine the correct model for reverse bias conduction. Understanding conduction mechanisms in these devices will help develop more reproducible contacts, reduce leakage current, and ultimately improve detector performance.

  1. Two successive single crystal phase transitions involving the coordination sphere of antimony in PhSb(dmit), the first organo-antimony(III) dithiolene complex.

    PubMed

    Avarvari, N; Faulques, E; Fourmigué, M

    2001-05-21

    PhSb(dmit) (dmit(2)(-), 4,5-dithiolato-1,3-dithiole-2-thione), the first neutral organo-antimony dithiolene complex, has been synthesized by addition of PhSbCl(2) on a suspension of Na(2)(dmit). The complex was characterized by spectroscopic ((1)H and (13)C NMR and IR) methods and elemental analysis. Its crystal structure was determined by X-ray diffraction at room temperature in the monoclinic P2(1)/c space group, with a = 12.580(3), b = 8.9756(18), c = 15.905(3) A, beta = 109.06(3) degrees, V = 1697.5(6) A(3), Z = 4. A coordinating THF molecule was found in the structure and the coordination geometry around the antimony atom is of distorted pseudopentagonal bipyramid type, if taking into account the Sb.O and secondary Sb.S interactions, as well as the stereochemically active 5s(2) lone pair. The intermolecular Sb.S and S.S contacts, shorter than the sum of van der Waals radii of corresponding atoms, lead to the formation of a three-dimensional polymeric network in the solid state. A second X-ray diffraction experiment, performed at 85 K, revealed a very similar monoclinic unit cell with the noncentrosymmetrical space group P2(1) with a = 12.613(3), b = 8.9876(18), c = 15.109(3) A, beta = 107.01(3) degrees, V = 1637.8(6), Z = 4. The structural differences with the first one are basically due to the rotation of the THF ligand in the coordination sphere of the antimony center, leading to the loss of every inversion center found at room temperature. A temperature variable X-ray diffraction study on a PhSb(dmit) single-crystal allowed the detection, with a remarkable accuracy, of two successive first-order phase transitions, the first occurring at T = 162.5 K, while the second was observed at T = 182.5 K. Subsequently, a third set of X-ray data was collected at 180 K and the resulting structure (monoclinic, P2(1)/c, a = 16.736(3), b = 8.9653(18), c = 33.132(7) A, beta = 91.98(3) degrees, V = 4968.2(17), Z = 12) derives from the two others by a common b axis, a 3-fold

  2. Chemical vapor generation for sample introduction into inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy: vaporization of antimony(III) with bromide.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Molinero, A; Mendoza, O; Callizo, A; Chamorro, P; Castillo, J R

    2002-10-01

    A new method for antimony determination in soils is proposed. It is based on the chemical vapor generation of Sb(III) with bromide, after a reaction in sulfuric acid media and transport of the gaseous phase into an inductively coupled plasma for atomic emission spectrometry. The experimental variables influencing the method were delimited by experimental design and the most important were finally optimized by the modified Simplex method. In optimized conditions the method involves the reaction of 579 microl concentrated sulfuric acid with 120 microl 5% w/v KBr and 250 microl antimony solution. Measurement of antimony emission intensity at 217.581 nm provides a method with an absolute detection limit of 3.5 ng and a precision (RSD) of 5.8% for the injection of five replicates of 175 ng Sb(III) (250 microl of 0.7 microg ml(-1) solution). The interference of common anions and cations on the antimony signal was evaluated. A 21% Sb(III) volatilization efficiency was calculated from the mean of six experiments at optimum conditions. The accuracy of the methodology was checked by the analysis of one standard reference soil after acid decomposition heating in a microwave oven.

  3. Identification of antimony resistance markers in Leishmania tropica field isolates through a cDNA-AFLP approach.

    PubMed

    Kazemi-Rad, Elham; Mohebali, Mehdi; Khadem-Erfan, Mohammad Bagher; Saffari, Mojtaba; Raoofian, Reza; Hajjaran, Homa; Hadighi, Ramtin; Khamesipour, Ali; Rezaie, Sassan; Abedkhojasteh, Hoda; Heidari, Mansour

    2013-10-01

    Pentavalent antimonial compounds have been the first line therapy for leishmaniasis; unfortunately the rate of treatment failure of anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) is increasing due to emerging of drug resistance. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms operating in antimony resistance is critical for development of new strategies for treatment. Here, we used a cDNA-AFLP approach to identify gene(s) which are differentially expressed in resistant and sensitive Leishmania tropica field isolates. We identified five genes, aquaglyceroporin (AQP1) acts in drug uptake, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter (MRPA) involved in sequestration of drug, phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) implicated in glycolysis metabolism, mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) responsible for phosphorylation pathway. The results were confirmed using real time RT-PCR which revealed an upregulation of MRPA, PTP and PGK genes and downregulation of AQP1 and MAPK genes in resistant isolate. To our knowledge, this is the first report of identification of PTP and PGK genes potentially implicated in resistance to antimonials. Our findings support the idea that distinct biomolecules might be involved in antimony resistance in L. tropica field isolates.

  4. Successful treatment of imported mucosal Leishmania infantum leishmaniasis with miltefosine after severe hypokalemia under meglumine antimoniate treatment.

    PubMed

    Neumayr, Andreas L C; Walter, Clemens; Stoeckle, Marcel; Braendle, Natalie; Glatz, Kathrin; Blum, Johannes A

    2012-01-01

    Old World mucosal leishmaniasis is a rare but regularly reported disease in Southern Europe. We report the case of a 64-year-old woman who developed severe hypokalemia under meglumine antimoniate treatment and was successfully treated under second line therapy with miltefosine.

  5. Lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery for grid-level energy storage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangli; Jiang, Kai; Chung, Brice; Ouchi, Takanari; Burke, Paul J; Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Kim, Hojong; Muecke, Ulrich; Sadoway, Donald R

    2014-10-16

    The ability to store energy on the electric grid would greatly improve its efficiency and reliability while enabling the integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies (such as wind and solar) into baseload supply. Batteries have long been considered strong candidate solutions owing to their small spatial footprint, mechanical simplicity and flexibility in siting. However, the barrier to widespread adoption of batteries is their high cost. Here we describe a lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery that potentially meets the performance specifications for stationary energy storage applications. This Li||Sb-Pb battery comprises a liquid lithium negative electrode, a molten salt electrolyte, and a liquid antimony-lead alloy positive electrode, which self-segregate by density into three distinct layers owing to the immiscibility of the contiguous salt and metal phases. The all-liquid construction confers the advantages of higher current density, longer cycle life and simpler manufacturing of large-scale storage systems (because no membranes or separators are involved) relative to those of conventional batteries. At charge-discharge current densities of 275 milliamperes per square centimetre, the cells cycled at 450 degrees Celsius with 98 per cent Coulombic efficiency and 73 per cent round-trip energy efficiency. To provide evidence of their high power capability, the cells were discharged and charged at current densities as high as 1,000 milliamperes per square centimetre. Measured capacity loss after operation for 1,800 hours (more than 450 charge-discharge cycles at 100 per cent depth of discharge) projects retention of over 85 per cent of initial capacity after ten years of daily cycling. Our results demonstrate that alloying a high-melting-point, high-voltage metal (antimony) with a low-melting-point, low-cost metal (lead) advantageously decreases the operating temperature while maintaining a high cell voltage. Apart from the fact that this

  6. Antimony and arsenic behaviours in soils from three abandoned gold mining areas in northern Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Paula; Neiva, Ana; Silva, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The Valongo anticline located 18 km at East of Porto is characterized by the occurrence of several gold deposits, which were exploited until the end of the nineteenth century. This anticline comprises Cambrian to Carboniferous metasediments. The Cambrian schist-graywacke complex crops out in the western limb of the anticline and is intersected by several Sb-Au quartz veins, mainly Montalto and Tapada. At the eastern limb of the anticline, As-Au quartz veins cut Ordovician black slates and were exploited at the Banjas mine. The Sb-Au quartz veins contain mainly quartz, arsenopyrite, pyrrhotite, pyrite, marcasite, sphalerite, chalcophyrite, galena, gold, tetrahedrite, jamesonite, plagionite, berthierite, stibnite, antimony and carbonates. The As-Au quartz veins consist of quartz, arsenopyrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, cobaltite, glaucodote, sphalerite, boulangerite, tetrahedrite and siderite. Stibnite and arsenopyrite are the most abundant sulphides in Sb-Au and As-Au quartz veins, respectively. Therefore, antimony and arsenic are potential contaminants in the surrounding environments of these old mines. The principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to organic matter, pH, cation exchange capacity, clay size particle and reducible, oxidizable and aqua regia Fe, Mn, As and Sb concentrations obtained by the BCR method in 29 soil samples. The PCA shows a substantial distinction between Sb and As behaviours in soils from the old mining areas of Montalto, Tapada and Banjas. The arsenic concentration ranges between 16.98 mg/kg and 1116 mg/kg, whereas the Sb concentration ranges from 6.4 mg/kg to 21775 mg/kg. The antimony is statistically more correlated with Fe and Mn in the oxides fraction, whereas As in the reducible fraction dependents on pH values. Moreover, Fe and Mn concentrations in the oxidizable fraction are highly correlated with the organic matter, suggesting that pyrite, the main host mineral of Fe, was probably totally altered. However, the As concentration in

  7. Preliminary Data on Bismuth Telluride from Izerskie Garby Zone, Karkonosze-Izera Block, South-Western Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybicki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the first occurrence of bismuth telluride in the Izerskie Garby contact zone. In nature, there are 4 known bismuth tellurides: hedleyite (Bi7Te3), pilsenite (Bi4Te3), tsumoite (BiTe) and tellurobismuthite (Bi2Te3). They are typical accessory minerals of the polymetallic skarns. The Ca-skarns of the "Stanisław" quarry in the Izerskie Garby, bismuth telluride occurs in association with pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and wollastonite and tend to form irregular clusters up to 40μm long and 15μm width . Research methods used so far (SEM) does not allow for unequivocal identification of studied mineral. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct further tests using the electron microprobe. Niniejsza praca opisuje pierwsze wystąpienie tellurku bizmutu w strefie kontaktowej Izerskich Garbów. W przyrodzie znane są 4 tellurki bizmutu: hedleyit (Bi7Te3), pilsenit (Bi4Te3), tsumoit (BiTe) oraz tellurobizmutyt (Bi2Te3). Są to typowe minerały akcesoryczne występujące głównie w polimetalicznych skarnach. W Ca-skarnach z kopalni "Stanisław" w Izerskich Garbach, tellurek bizmutu występuje w asocjacji z pirotynem, chalkopirytem, sfalerytem oraz wollastonitem i tworzy nieregularne skupienia o długości do 40 μm i szerkości 15 μm. Wykorzystane do tej pory metody badawcze (SEM) nie pozwalają na jednoznaczną identyfikację tego minerału. W związku z tym konieczne jest przeprowadzenie dalszych badań z wykorzystaniem mikrosondy elektronowej.

  8. Preparation of bismuth telluride based thermoelectric nanomaterials via low-energy ball milling and their property characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Christopher A.

    Thermoelectric materials are able to convert energy between heat and electricity with no moving parts, making them very appealing for power generation purposes. This is particularly appealing since many forms of energy generation lose energy to waste heat. The Livermore National Laboratory estimates that up to 55% of the energy created in traditional power plants is lost through heat generation [1]. As greenhouse gas emissions become a more important issue, large sources of waste like this will need to be harnessed. Adoption of these materials has been limited due to the cost and efficiency of current technology. Bismuth telluride based alloys have a dimensionless figure of merit, a measure of efficiency, near one at room temperature, which makes it the best current material. In order to compete with other forms of energy generation, this needs to be increased to three or higher [2]. Recently, improvements in performance have come in the form of random nanostructured materials [3]. Bulk bismuth telluride is subjected to particle size reduction via high-energy ball milling in order to scatter phonons between grains. This reduces the lattice thermal conductivity which in turn increases the performance of the material. In this work, we investigate the use of low-energy ball milling as a method of creating nanoparticles of n-type and p-type Bi2Te3 alloys for thermoelectric applications. Optimization of parameters such as milling containers, milling media, contamination and milling time has resulted in creating 15nm particles of bismuth telluride alloys. After creating solid pellets of the resulting powders via hot pressing, the material's thermal and electrical conductivities as well as Seebeck coefficients were measured. The ZT of n-type Bi2Te2.7Se3 created using this method is 0.32, while the p-type Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 exhibits a higher ZT of 1.24, both at room temperature.

  9. Chemiluminescence studies between aqueous phase synthesized mercaptosuccinic acid capped cadmium telluride quantum dots and luminol-H2O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviyarasan, Kulandaivelu; Anandan, Sambandam; Mangalaraja, Ramalinga Viswanathan; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Wu, Jerry J.

    2016-08-01

    Mercaptosuccinic acid capped Cadmium telluride quantum dots have been successfully synthesized via aqueous phase method. The products were well characterized by a number of analytical techniques, including FT-IR, XRD, HRTEM, and a corrected particle size analysis by the statistical treatment of several AFM measurements. Chemiluminescence experiments were performed to explore the resonance energy transfer between chemiluminescence donor (luminol-H2O2 system) and acceptor CdTe QDs. The combination of such donor and acceptor dramatically reduce the fluorescence while compared to pristine CdTe QDs without any exciting light source, which is due to the occurrence of chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) processes.

  10. Iron isotope constraints on the mineralization processes of the Sandaowanzi telluride gold deposit, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Liu, Junlai; Lu, Di; Ren, Shunli; Liu, Zhengyang

    2016-04-01

    Iron isotopes have been widely applied to interpret the fluid evolution, supergene alteration and the metallogenic material sources of the hydrothermal deposit. It may also have significant potentials on the research of the deposit. The Sandaowanzi telluride gold deposit, located in the Great Hinggan Range metallogenic Belt in NE China, is a large epithermal gold deposit of low-sulphidation type. It has a total reserve of ≥25t of Au and an average of 15 g/t. Gold-bearing quartz veins or gold lodes strike to the NW and dip 50-80°northeastward. Ore bodies, including low-grade ores along margins and high-grade ores in the central parts, principally occur in quartz veins. More than the 95 percent Au budgets are hosted in gold-silver tellurides. A six-stage paragenetic sequence of mineralization is revealed according to the compositions and microstructures of the mineral assemblages. Although sulfide minerals in the bonanza quartz veins are rare, pyrite are widespread in quartz veins and altered host rocks. Meanwhile there are always chalcopyrite veins within bonanza quartz veins. Pyrite Fe isotope compositions from different levels (from +50m to +210m) of the main ore body of the Sandaowanzi gold ore deposit are investigated. There is an overall variation in δ57Fe values from -0.09 to +0.99 (av. 0.33). Among them, twenty three samples from different mining levels give positiveδ57Fe values, with the maximum positive value at the economic bonanza ores (level +130m). Four samples, however, possess negative values, one at level 170m, one at level 130m, and two at level 50m, respectively. The two negative values from the levels 170m and 130m are near the cores of the high grade ore body. The two negative values from the level 50m occur at one end of the lode ore body. The above data set shows that the δ57Fe values are not homogeneous at different levels of the ore body. On the other hand, a general trend for the positive values is that the highest δ57Fe value is

  11. Telluride, Tom Cruise, and Land Use Codes: Science, Policy, and Community Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raby, K. S.; Williams, M. W.

    2003-12-01

    Mountain areas throughout the western US have experienced a surge in popularity in the last decade, resulting in degradation of the resources that drew people to the area in the first place. Traditional economic interests, recreational users, and environmentalists all have opposing priorities. Thus, resource managers and planners face increasingly critical and controversial decisions regarding development and protection of watersheds. Best Management Practices (BMPs) are generally an attempt to improve land and water quality after degradation. Here we report on our work with local stakeholders in the San Miguel River drainage-home of Telluride Ski Area and Hollywood moguls such as Tom Cruise-to prevent degradation of headwater catchments while providing for reasonable economic and recreational activities. We developed new tools for resource managers by mapping landscape types and associated water quality parameters so as to develop sensitivity criteria that are displayed visually using GIS maps. Using these results, San Miguel County Commissioners adopted land use codes to restrict development, including an 800-sqft building footprint, and bans on septic systems and winter plowing. This case study lays the foundation for science-based policy at the catchment scale, but is dependent on local culture and politics. Preliminary fieldwork was conducted in the summer of 2003 as the first steps toward similar work in adjacent San Juan County, which has a strong mining heritage. The San Juan County Planning Commission identified priority basins for study, and extensive physical field surveys were conducted in these drainages to map spatial distribution and aerial extent of numerous landscape types. Again, water quality parameters will be associated with different land covers to enable alpine sensitivity analysis at the landscape unit scale. Results will be provided to the San Juan Planning Commission to augment current planning tools. However, because of the different

  12. Mitochondrial Toxicity of Cadmium Telluride Quantum Dot Nanoparticles in Mammalian Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kathy C.; Rippstein, Peter; Tayabali, Azam F.; Willmore, William G.

    2015-01-01

    There are an increasing number of studies indicating that mitochondria are relevant targets in nanomaterial-induced toxicity. However, the underlying mechanisms by which nanoparticles (NPs) interact with these organelles and affect their functions are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cadmium telluride quantum dot (CdTe-QD) NPs on mitochondria in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. CdTe-QD treatment resulted in the enlargement of mitochondria as examined with transmission electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. CdTe-QDs appeared to associate with the isolated mitochondria as detected by their inherent fluorescence. Further analyses revealed that CdTe-QD caused disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, increased intracellular calcium levels, impaired cellular respiration, and decreased adenosine triphosphate synthesis. The effects of CdTe-QDs on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation were evidenced by changes in levels and activities of the enzymes of the electron transport chain. Elevation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator levels after CdTe-QD treatment suggested the effects of CdTe-QDs on mitochondrial biogenesis. Our results also showed that the effects of CdTe-QDs were similar or greater to those of cadmium chloride at equivalent concentrations of cadmium, suggesting that the toxic effects of CdTe-QDs were not solely due to cadmium released from the NPs. Overall, the study demonstrated that CdTe-QDs induced multifarious toxicity by causing changes in mitochondrial morphology and structure, as well as impairing their function and stimulating their biogenesis. PMID:25809595

  13. Wafer-scale patterning of lead telluride nanowires: structure, characterization, and electrical properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongan; Taggart, David K; Brown, Matthew A; Xiang, Chengxiang; Kung, Sheng-Chin; Yang, Fan; Hemminger, John C; Penner, Reginald M

    2009-12-22

    Nanowires of lead telluride (PbTe) were patterned on glass surfaces using lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE). LPNE involved the fabrication by photolithography of a contoured nickel nanoband that is recessed by approximately 300 nm into a horizontal photoresist trench. Cubic PbTe was then electrodeposited from a basic aqueous solution containing Pb(2+) and TeO(3)(2-) at the nickel nanoband using a cyclic deposition/stripping potential program in which lead-rich PbTe was first deposited in a negative-going potential scan and excess lead was then anodically stripped from the nascent nanowire by scanning in the positive direction to produce near stoichiometric PbTe. Repeating this scanning procedure permitted PbTe nanowires 60-400 nm in width to be obtained. The wire height was controlled over the range of 20-100 nm based upon the nickel film thickness. Nanowires with lengths exceeding 1 cm were prepared in this study. We report the characterization of these nanowires using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface chemical composition of PbTe nanowires was monitored by XPS as a function of time during the exposure of these nanowires to laboratory air. One to two monolayers of a mixed Pb and Te oxide are formed during a 24 h exposure. The electrical conductivity of PbTe nanowires was strongly affected by air oxidation, declining from an initial value of 2.0(+/-1.5) x 10 (4) S/m by 61% (for nanowires with a 20 nm thickness), 55% (for 40 nm), and 12% (for 60 nm).

  14. Studies regarding the homogeneity range of the zirconium phosphide telluride Zr 2+δPTe 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschulik, Kristina; Hoffmann, Stefan; Fokwa, Boniface P. T.; Gilleßen, Michael; Schmidt, Peer

    2010-12-01

    The phosphide tellurides Zr 2+ δPTe 2 (0 ≤ δ ≤ 1) can be synthesized from the elements in a solid state reaction or by thermal decomposition of Z. Zr 2PTe 2 decomposes under release of Te 2(g) + P 4(g) forming the homogeneity range Zr 2+ δPTe 2. The growth of single crystals of Zr 2+δPTe 2 succeeded by chemical vapour transport using iodine as transport agent from 830 °C in direction of higher temperatures up to 900 °C. Zr 2+ δPTe 2 crystallizes in the rhombohedral space group R3¯m (no. 166) with lattice parameters a = 383(1)…386(1) pm and c = 2935(4)…2970(4) pm for δ = 0…1, respectively. Single crystal data have been determined for Zr 2.40(2)PTe 2 with lattice parameters a = 385.24(4) pm and c = 2967.8(4) pm. The electronic structure and chemical bonding in Zr 2+ δPTe 2 was investigated by the linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) method. Both Zr 2PTe 2 and Zr 3PTe 2 show non-vanishing DOS values at the Fermi level ( EF) indicating metallic character. According to COHP bonding analyses, mainly the heteroatomic Zr-P and Zr-Te bonds are responsible for the structural stability of Zr 3PTe 2. The new Zr2-Te bond, which is not present in Zr 2PTe 2, is stronger than Zr1-Te and is thought to be responsible for the stability of phases having Zr in excess.

  15. Evaluation of Fully 3-D Emission Mammotomography With a Compact Cadmium Zinc Telluride Detector

    PubMed Central

    Tornai, Martin P.; McKinley, Randolph L.; Bowsher, James E.

    2015-01-01

    A compact, dedicated cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) gamma camera coupled with a fully three-dimensional (3-D) acquisition system may serve as a secondary diagnostic tool for volumetric molecular imaging of breast cancers, particularly in cases when mammographic findings are inconclusive. The developed emission mammotomography system comprises a medium field-of-view, quantized CZT detector and 3-D positioning gantry. The intrinsic energy resolution, sensitivity and spatial resolution of the detector are evaluated with Tc-99m (140 keV) filled flood sources, capillary line sources, and a 3-D frequency-resolution phantom. To mimic realistic human pendant, uncompressed breast imaging, two different phantom shapes of an average sized breast, and three different lesion diameters are imaged to evaluate the system for 3-D mammotomography. Acquisition orbits not possible with conventional emission, or transmission, systems are designed to optimize the viewable breast volume while improving sampling of the breast and anterior chest wall. Complications in camera positioning about the patient necessitate a compromise in these two orbit design criteria. Image quality is evaluated with signal-to-noise ratios and contrasts of the lesions, both with and without additional torso phantom background. Reconstructed results indicate that 3-D mammotomography, incorporating a compact CZT detector, is a promising, dedicated breast imaging technique for visualization of tumors <1 cm in diameter. Additionally, there are no outstanding trajectories that consistently yield optimized quantitative lesion imaging parameters. Qualitatively, imaging breasts with realistic torso backgrounds (out-of-field activity) substantially alters image characteristics and breast morphology unless orbits which improve sampling are utilized. In practice, the sampling requirement may be less strict than initially anticipated. PMID:16011316

  16. Charge Loss and Charge Sharing Measurements for Two Different Pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Sharma, Dharma; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul

    2003-01-01

    As part of ongoing research at Marshall Space Flight Center, Cadmium-Zinc- Telluride (CdZnTe) pixilated detectors are being developed for use at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope. HERO requires a 64x64 pixel array with a spatial resolution of around 200 microns (with a 6m focal length) and high energy resolution (< 2% at 60keV). We are currently testing smaller arrays as a necessary first step towards this goal. In this presentation, we compare charge sharing and charge loss measurements between two devices that differ both electronically and geometrically. The first device consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe that is sputtered with a 4x4 array of pixels with pixel pitch of 750 microns (inter-pixel gap is 100 microns). The signal is read out using discrete ultra-low-noise preamplifiers, one for each of the 16 pixels. The second detector consists of a 2-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe that is sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a pixel pitch of 300 microns (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). Instead of using discrete preamplifiers, the crystal is bonded to an ASIC that provides all of the front-end electronics to each of the 256 pixels. what degree the bias voltage (i.e. the electric field) and hence the drift and diffusion coefficients affect our measurements. Further, we compare the measured results with simulated results and discuss to

  17. Simultaneous Analysis of the 2nu2, nu1, and nu3 Bands of Hydrogen Telluride

    PubMed

    Flaud; Betrencourt; Arcas; Burger; Polanz; Lafferty

    1997-04-01

    Spectra of a natural sample of hydrogen telluride as well as a spectrum of monoisotopic H2 130Te have been recorded by means of Fourier transform spectrometry with a resolution of 0.003 cm-1 in the spectral domain 7.5-4.3 μm where it is easy to observe the main absorbing bands nu1 and nu3. We have located and assigned for the first time the 2nu2 band which appears in the lower wavenumber range of the recorded spectral domain near 1700 cm-1. It proved necessary to treat simultaneously the three states (020), (100), and (001). nu1 and nu3 are indeed Coriolis-coupled vibration-rotation bands and it was observed that a few rotational levels of (001) could not be fitted to within their experimental accuracy without considering the second-order Coriolis interaction between the rotational levels of (020) and (001). In this way all the experimental levels were calculated to within the experimental uncertainty, and precise sets of vibrational energies and rotational and coupling constants were obtained for the seven most abundant H2Te isotopic species, namely H2 130Te, H2 128Te, H2 126Te, H2 125Te, H2 124Te, H2 123Te, and H2 122Te. For the most abundant isotopic species H2 130Te the bands centers arenu0 (2nu2) = 1715.9568, nu0 (nu1) = 2065.2709, nu0 (nu3) = 2072.1101 cm-1. Copyright 1997Academic Press

  18. Breast composition measurement with a cadmium-zinc-telluride based spectral computed tomography system

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of breast tissue composition in terms of water, lipid, and protein with a cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) based computed tomography (CT) system to help better characterize suspicious lesions. Methods: Simulations and experimental studies were performed using a spectral CT system equipped with a CZT-based photon-counting detector with energy resolution. Simulations of the figure-of-merit (FOM), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the dual energy image with respect to the square root of mean glandular dose (MGD), were performed to find the optimal configuration of the experimental acquisition parameters. A calibration phantom 3.175 cm in diameter was constructed from polyoxymethylene plastic with cylindrical holes that were filled with water and oil. Similarly, sized samples of pure adipose and pure lean bovine tissues were used for the three-material decomposition. Tissue composition results computed from the images were compared to the chemical analysis data of the tissue samples. Results: The beam energy was selected to be 100 kVp with a splitting energy of 40 keV. The tissue samples were successfully decomposed into water, lipid, and protein contents. The RMS error of the volumetric percentage for the three-material decomposition, as compared to data from the chemical analysis, was estimated to be approximately 5.7%. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the CZT-based photon-counting detector may be employed in the CT system to quantify the water, lipid, and protein mass densities in tissue with a relatively good agreement. PMID:22380361

  19. Novel doxorubicin loaded PEGylated cuprous telluride nanocrystals for combined photothermal-chemo cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianwen; Ma, Yan; Chen, Huajian; Wu, Xiaoyi; Qian, Haisheng; Yang, Xianzhu; Zha, Zhengbao

    2017-02-06

    Recently, combined photothermal-chemo therapy has attracted great attention due to its enhanced anti-tumor efficiency via synergistic effects. Herein, PEGylated cuprous telluride nanocrystals (PEGylated Cu2Te NCs) were developed as novel drug nanocarriers for combined photothermal-chemo treatment of cancer cells. PEGylated Cu2Te NCs were fabricated through a simple two-step process, comprised of hot injection and thin-film hydration. The as-prepared PEGylated Cu2Te NCs (average diameter of 5.21±1.05nm) showed a noticeable photothermal conversion efficiency of 33.1% and good capacity to load hydrophobic anti-cancer drug. Due to the protonated amine group at low pH, the doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded PEGylated Cu2Te NCs (PEGylated Cu2Te-DOX NCs) exhibited an acidic pH promoted drug release profile. Moreover, a three-parameter model, which considers the effects of drug-carrier interactions on the initial burst release and the sustained release of drug from micro- and nano-sized carriers, was used to gain insight into how pH and laser irradiation affect drug release from PEGylated Cu2Te-DOX NCs. Based on the results from in vitro cell study, PEGylated Cu2Te-DOX NCs revealed remarkably photothermal-chemo synergistic effect to HeLa cells, attributed to both the PEGylated Cu2Te NCs mediated photothermal ablation and enhanced cellular uptake of the drug. Thus, our results encourage the usage of Cu2Te-DOX drug nanocarriers for enhanced treatment of cancer cells by combined photothermal-chemo therapy.

  20. A Cadmium telluride micro-Spectometers Hard X ray Polarimeter for a balloon borne payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroli, Ezio; Hernanz, Margarita; Ferrando, Philippe; Del Sordo, Stefano; Stephen, John; Laurent, Philippe; Alvarez, Jose M.; Auricchio, Natalia; Budtz-Jorgensen, Carl; Curado da Silva4, Rui M.; Limousin, Olivier; Galvez, Jose L.; Gloster, Paul Colin; Isern, Jordi; Maia, Jorge M.

    2012-07-01

    In the next generation of space instrumentation for hard X-ray astrophysics, the measurement of the polarization status of cosmic sources will be a key observational parameter in order to help understand the various production mechanisms and the source geometry. As polarisation observations are very difficult to perform, new telescopes operating in this energy range should be optimized for this type of measurement. In this perspective, we present the concept of a small high-performance spectrometer designed to operate as a scattering polarimeter between 100 and 500 keV and suitable for a stratospheric balloon-borne payload: CμSP (Cadmium telluride μ-Spectrometers Polarimeter). This instrument will be dedicated to perform an accurate and reliable measurement of the polarization status of the Crab pulsar, i.e. the polarization level and direction. The detector with 3D spatial resolution is made of CZT spectrometers in a highly segmented configuration in order to enhance as much as possible the sensitivity to the linear polarisation of detected photons. We discuss different configurations based on recent development results as well as possible improvements under study. Furthermore we describe a possible baseline design of the payload, which can also be seen as a pathfinder for a high performance detector for the next generation of hard X and soft gamma ray telescopes based on high energy focussing optics (e.g. Laue lenses) and/or advanced Compton instruments. Finally, we present Monte Carlo evaluations of the achievable sensitivity to polarisation as a function of different detector characteristics.

  1. Effect of bismuth telluride concentration on the thermoelectric properties of PEDOT:PSS-glycerol organic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Airul Azha Abd; Ali Umar, Akrajas; Othman, Mohamad Habrul Ulum

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the effect of bismuth-telluride concentration on the thermoelectric properties of PEDOT:PSS-Glycerol thin films is investigated. A thermoelectric device was fabricated by depositing the n-type and the p-type Bi2Te3 (BT) doped-PEDOT:PSS-Glycerol on a glass substrate via a spin coating method at 500 rpm. Room-temperature electrical properties characterization shows that the electrical conductivity of both type thin film increases with increasing of BT doping concentration and optimum at concentration of 0.8 wt% for both p-type and n-type thin films, i.e. 17.9 S/cm and 7.78 S/cm, respectively. However, the study of the temperature effect on the thin films electrical conductivity suggested that the thermoelectric properties of both types' samples improved with increasing of BT concentration and optimum at 0.8 and 0.6 wt% for p-type and n-type thin films, respectively. It then decreased if the BT concentration further increased. The Sebeeck coefficient for these samples is as high as -11.9 and -15.7 uV/K, which is equivalent to a power factors of 0.26 and 0.19 μS V2/ (m K2), respectively. A thermoelectric device resembling a thermocouple system that was fabricated using the optimum p-type and n-type thin films can generate a voltage as high as 1.1 V at a temperature difference as low as 55 K, which is equivalent to a maximum power of 6.026 μW at Vmax.power of 0.5489 V (for an estimated matched-load of 50 Ω). The present materials system is potential for powering low power consumption electronic devices.

  2. Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride Focal Plane Array Performance Under Non-Standard Operating Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Bruce, Carl F.; Green, Robert O.; Coles, J. B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper highlights a new technique that allows the Teledyne Scientific & Imaging LLC TCM6604A Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) Focal Plane Array (FPA) to operate at room temperature. The Teledyne MCT FPA has been a standard in Imaging Spectroscopy since its creation in the 1980's. This FPA has been used in applications ranging from space instruments such as CRISM, M3 and ARTEMIS to airborne instruments such as MaRS and the Next Generation AVIRIS Instruments1. Precise focal plane alignment is always a challenge for such instruments. The current FPA alignment process results in multiple cold cycles requiring week-long durations, thereby increasing the risk and cost of a project. These alignment cycles are necessary because optimal alignment is approached incrementally and can only be measured with the FPA and Optics at standard operating conditions, requiring a cold instrument. Instruments using this FPA are normally cooled to temperatures below 150K for the MCT FPA to properly function. When the FPA is run at higher temperatures the dark current increases saturating the output. This paper covers the prospect of warm MCT FPA operation from a theoretical and experimental perspective. We discuss the empirical models and physical laws that govern MCT material properties and predict the optimal settings that will result in the best MCT PA performance at 300K. Theoretical results are then calculated for the proposed settings. We finally present the images and data obtained using the actual system with the warm MCT FPA settings. The paper concludes by emphasizing the strong positive correlation between the measured values and the theoretical results.

  3. Cadmium zinc telluride based infrared interferometry for X-ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lohstroh, A. Della Rocca, I.; Parsons, S.; Langley, A.; Shenton-Taylor, C.; Blackie, D.

    2015-02-09

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is a wide band gap semiconductor for room temperature radiation detection. The electro-optic Pockels effect of the material has been exploited in the past to study electric field non-uniformities and their consequence on conventional detector signals in CZT, by imaging the intensity distribution of infrared (IR) light transmitted through a device placed between crossed polarizers. Recently, quantitative monitoring of extremely high intensity neutron pulses through the change of transmitted IR intensity was demonstrated, offering the advantage to place sensitive electronics outside the measured radiation field. In this work, we demonstrate that X-ray intensity can be deduced directly from measuring the change in phase of 1550 nm laser light transmitted through a 7 × 7 × 2 mm{sup 3} CZT based Pockels cell in a simple Mach Zehnder interferometer. X-rays produced by a 50 kVp Mo X-ray tube incident on the CZT cathode surface placed at 7 mm distance cause a linearly increasing phase shift above 0.3 mA tube current, with 1.58 ± 0.02 rad per mA for an applied bias of 500 V across the 2 mm thick device. Pockels images confirm that the sample properties are in agreement with the literature, exhibiting electric field enhancement near the cathode under irradiation, which may cause the non-linearity at low X-ray tube anode current settings. The laser used to probe the X-ray intensity causes itself some space charge, whose spatial distribution does not seem to be exclusively determined by the incident laser position, i.e., charge carrier generation location, with respect to the electrodes.

  4. Sequential solvent extraction for forms of antimony in five selected coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, C.; Liu, Gaisheng; Kong, Y.; Chou, C.-L.; Wang, R.

    2008-01-01

    Abundance of antimony in bulk samples has been determined in five selected coals, three coals from Huaibei Coalfield, Anhui, China, and two from the Illinois Basin in the United States. The Sb abundance in these samples is in the range of 0.11-0.43 ??g/g. The forms of Sb in coals were studied by sequential solvent extraction. The six forms of Sb are water soluble, ion changeable, organic matter bound, carbonate bound, silicate bound, and sulfide bound. Results of sequential extraction show that silicate-bound Sb is the most abundant form in these coals. Silicate- plus sulfide-bound Sb accounts for more than half of the total Sb in all coals. Bituminous coals are higher in organic matterbound Sb than anthracite and natural coke, indicating that the Sb in the organic matter may be incorporated into silicate and sulfide minerals during metamorphism. ?? 2008 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis and optical properties of antimony oxide glasses doped with holmium trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunatha, S.; Eraiah, B.

    2016-05-01

    Holmium doped lithium-antimony-lead borate glasses having 1mol% AgNO3 with composition 50B2O3-20PbO-25Sb2O3-5Li2O have been prepared using single step melt quenching technique. The XRD spectrum confirms amorphous nature of glasses. The optical absorbance studies were carried out on these glasses. The optical direct band gap energies were found to be in the range of 3.10 eV to 3.31 eV and indirect band gap energies were found to be in the range of 2.28 eV to 3.00 eV. The refractive indexes have been calculated by using Lorentz-Lorenz formula and the calculated values in the range of 2.31 to 2.37.

  6. Biological monitoring of exposures to aluminium, gallium, indium, arsenic, and antimony in optoelectronic industry workers.

    PubMed

    Liao, Y-H; Yu, H-S; Ho, C-K; Wu, M-T; Yang, C-Y; Chen, J-R; Chang, C-C

    2004-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate aluminum, gallium, indium, arsenic, and antimony exposures on blood and urine levels in the optoelectronic workers. One hundred seventy subjects were enrolled in this cohort study. Whole blood and urine levels were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Blood indium and urine gallium and arsenic levels in the 103 workers were significantly higher than that in 67 controls during the follow-up period. In regression models, the significant risk factors of exposure were job title, preventive equipment, Quetelet's index, sex, and education level. The findings of this study suggest that gallium, indium, and arsenic exposure levels may affect their respective levels in blood and urine. The use of clean, preventive equipment is recommended when prioritizing the administration of safety and hygiene in optoelectronics industries.

  7. Controlled growth of antimony-doped tin dioxide thin films by atomic layer epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viirola, H.; Niinistoe, L.

    1994-11-01

    Antimony-doped tin dioxide thin films were deposited on glass substrates by atomic layer epitaxy using SnCl4, SbCl5 and H2O as reactants. The growth experiments were carried out at 500 C. The effect of Sb doping on the growth rate, crystal texture and electrical and optical properties was studied. Spectrophotometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, as well as sheet resistance and Hall measurements were used to characterize the films. The films were highly uniform with only small thickness and sheet resistance variations. The films were polycrystalline with their crystallites having a preferred orientation, which depended on the Sb doping level and film thickness.

  8. Potentiometric stripping analysis (PSA) for monitoring of antimony in samples of vegetation from a mining area.

    PubMed

    Toro Gordillo, M C; Pinilla Gil, E; Rodríguez González, M A; Murciego Murciego, A; Ostapczuk, P

    2001-06-01

    A potentiometric stripping analysis (PSA) method has been developed and checked for the fast and reliable determination of antimony in vegetation samples of Cistus ladanifer from a mining area in Badajoz, Southwest Spain. The method, modified from previous PSA methods for Sb in environmental samples, is based on dry ashing of the homogenized leaves, dissolution in hydrochloric acid, and PSA analysis on a mercury film plated on to a glassy carbon disk electrode. The influence of experimental variables such as the deposition potential, the deposition time, the signal stability and the calibration parameters, has been investigated. The method has been compared with an independent technique (instrumental neutron activation analysis) by analysis of standards and reference materials and comparison of the results. As a result of automation of the PSA equipment, the proposed method enables unattended analysis of 20 digested samples in a total time of 2 h, thus providing a useful tool for Sb monitoring of a large number of samples.

  9. Rashba effect in single-layer antimony telluroiodide SbTeI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Houlong L.; Cooper, Valentino R.; Xu, Haixuan; Ganesh, P.; Hennig, Richard G.; Kent, P. R. C.

    2015-09-01

    Exploring spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in single-layer materials is important for potential spintronics applications. Using first-principles calculations, we show that single-layer antimony telluroiodide SbTeI behaves as a two-dimensional semiconductor exhibiting a G0W0 band gap of 1.82 eV. More importantly, we observe the Rashba spin splitting in the SOC band structure of single-layer SbTeI with a sizable Rashba coupling parameter of 1.39 eV Å , which is significantly larger than that of a number of two-dimensional systems including surfaces and interfaces. The low formation energy and real phonon modes of single-layer SbTeI imply that it is stable. Our study suggests that single-layer SbTeI is a candidate single-layer material for applications in spintronics devices.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of copper antimony tin sulphide thin films for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, N.; Hussain, A.; Ahmed, R.; Wan Shamsuri, W. N.; Fu, Y. Q.

    2016-12-01

    Low price thin film modules based on Copper antimony tin sulphide (CATS) are introduced for solar harvesting to compete for the already developed compound semiconductors. Here, CATS thin films were deposited on soda lime glass by thermal evaporation technique followed by a rapid thermal annealing in an argon atmosphere. From Our XRD analysis, it was revealed that the annealed samples were poly-crystalline and their crystallinity was improved with increasing annealing temperature. The constituent elements and their corresponding chemical states were identified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The obtained optical band gap of 1.4 eV for CATS thin film is found nearly equal to GaAs - one of the highly efficient thin film material for solar cell technology. Furthermore, our observed good optical absorbance and low transmittance for the annealed CATS thin films in the visible region of light spectrum assured the aptness of the CATS thin films for solar cell applications.

  11. Synthesis of Antimony Nanotubes via Facile Template-Free Solvothermal Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruxue; Wang, Xiaohua; Wang, Xinwei; Zhang, Haoran; Pan, Jingxin; Tang, Jilong; Fang, Dan; Ma, Xiaohui; Li, Yongfeng; Yao, Bin; Fan, Jie; Wei, Zhipeng

    2016-11-01

    Uniform antimony (Sb) nanotubes were successfully synthesized via a facile solvothermal method without the need for any surfactants or templates. The Sb nanotubes are confirmed to be pure rhombohedral phase and have better crystallinity. These nanotubes show middle-hollow and open-ended structures, as well as multi-walled structures with the wall thickness of about 10 nm. Also, they have an average size of the diameter of about 50 nm and the length of about 350 nm. On the basis of the structural and morphological studies, a possible rolling mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of Sb nanotubes. It is expected that uniform Sb nanotubes can further be used in wide applications.

  12. Formation of the properties of antimony matrix alloys for frame-type composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulevskii, V. A.; Antipov, V. I.; Vinogradov, L. V.; Kolmakov, A. G.; Lazarev, E. M.; Samarina, A. M.; Mukhina, Yu. E.

    2009-12-01

    A frame-type composite material (CM) produced upon impregnation represents a system consisting of a rigid porous frame and a matrix material filling its voids. When metals are used as a matrix material, they bring up specific problems related to melting of a metal, such as the thermal effect of the metal on the frame and the chemical interaction of the matrix and frame with the formation of brittle compounds. A CM that combines the best characteristics of its components can be produced. Since impregnation is, as a rule, performed under vacuum, melting of a matrix metal is accompanied by an increase in the evaporation rate. The evaporation of a matrix metal can be decreased by controlling its chemical composition, decreasing the melting temperature of the melt, and controlling the cooling rate. In this work, antimony alloys are used as a matrix material and their properties are studied.

  13. Sequential solvent extraction for forms of antimony in five selected coals

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, C.C.; Liu, G.J.; Kang, Y.; Chou, C.L.; Wang, R.W.

    2008-03-15

    Abundance of antimony in bulk samples has been determined in five selected coals, three coals from Huaibei Coalfield, Anhui, China, and two from the Illinois Basin in the United States. The Sb abundance in these samples is in the range of 0.11-0.43 {mu} g/g. The forms of Sb in coals were studied by sequential solvent extraction. The six forms of Sb are water soluble, ion changeable, organic matter bound, carbonate bound, silicate bound, and sulfide bound. Results of sequential extraction show that silicate-bound Sb is the most abundant form in these coals. Silicate-plus sulfide-bound Sb accounts for more than half of the total Sb in all coals. Bituminous coals are higher in organic matter bound Sb than anthracite and natural coke, indicating that the Sb in the organic matter may be incorporated into silicate and sulfide minerals during metamorphism.

  14. The electrical characterizations of selenium (Se) doped gallium antimony (GaSb) single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhari, Rashmi; Deshpande, Manisha; Maske, Dilip; Gadkari, Dattatray

    2016-05-01

    The growth of Se doped GaSb bulk crystal is carried out using Vertical directional solidification (VDS) technique. High purity Gallium and Antimony is taken as source material and selenium as doping material. From grown ingot substrate were obtained in wafer form using diamond cutter. The electrical characteristics such as Hall measurement is used to find the carrier concentration and mobility, while Van der pauw for measuring resistivity of the sample The GaSb:Se sample shows high resistivity and mobility. The grown crystal was detached from the ampoule wall with high crystal quality. The measured resistivity of GaSb:Se is 9.9×10-3ohm-cm, the mobility is 1464cm3/Vsec and carrier concentration is 5.08×1017 per cm3.

  15. Rashba effect in single-layer antimony telluroiodide SbTeI

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Houlong L.; Cooper, Valentino R.; Xu, Haixuan; Ganesh, P.; Hennig, Richard G.; Kent, P. R. C.

    2015-09-04

    Exploring spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in single-layer materials is important for potential spintronics applications. In this paper, using first-principles calculations, we show that single-layer antimony telluroiodide SbTeI behaves as a two-dimensional semiconductor exhibiting a G0W0 band gap of 1.82 eV. More importantly, we observe the Rashba spin splitting in the SOC band structure of single-layer SbTeI with a sizable Rashba coupling parameter of 1.39 eV Å, which is significantly larger than that of a number of two-dimensional systems including surfaces and interfaces. The low formation energy and real phonon modes of single-layer SbTeI imply that it is stable. Finally, our study suggests that single-layer SbTeI is a candidate single-layer material for applications in spintronics devices.

  16. Distributions and impact factors of antimony in topsoils and moss in Ny-Ålesund, Arctic.

    PubMed

    Jia, Nan; Sun, Liguang; He, Xin; You, Kehua; Zhou, Xin; Long, Nanye

    2012-12-01

    The distribution of antimony (Sb) in topsoil and moss (Dicranum angustum) in disturbed and undisturbed areas, as well as coal and gangue, in Ny-Ålesund, Arctic was examined. Results show that the weathering of coal bed could not contribute to the increase of Sb concentrations in topsoil and moss in the study area. The distribution of Sb is partially associated with traffic and historical mining activities. The occurrence of the maximum Sb concentration is due to the contribution of human activities. In addition, the decrease of Sb content in topsoil near the coastline may be caused by the washing of seawater. Compared with topsoils, moss could be a useful tool for monitoring Sb in both highly and lightly polluted areas.

  17. Antimony uptake by Zea mays (L.) and Helianthus annuus (L.) from nutrient solution.

    PubMed

    Tschan, Martin; Robinson, Brett; Schulin, Rainer

    2008-04-01

    We investigated the extent of Sb uptake by maize (Zea mays) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus) from nutrient solutions containing concentrations from 3 to 24 mg/L of potassium antimonate, with the aim of determining the potential of Sb to enter the food chain. The maximum shoot Sb concentrations in Z. mays and H. annuus were 41 mg/kg and 77 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. There was no significant difference in Sb uptake between species. The average bioaccumulation coefficients (the plant/solution concentration quotients) were 1.02 and 1.93 for Z. mays and H. annuus, respectively. Phosphate addition did not affect plant growth or Sb uptake. Antimony uptake by both Z. mays and H. annuus is unlikely to pose a health risk to animals and humans.

  18. Properties of antimony doped ZnO thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sadananda Kumar, N. Bangera, Kasturi V.; Shivakumar, G. K.

    2015-07-15

    Antimony (Sb) doped zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films were deposited on the glass substrate at 450°C using spray pyrolysis technique. Effect of Sb doping on surface morphology structural, optical and electrical properties were studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed that both the undoped and doped ZnO thin films are polycrystalline in nature with (101) preferred orientation. SEM analysis showed a change in surface morphology of Sb doped ZnO thin films. Doping results in a marked increase in conductivity without affecting the transmittance of the films. ZnO films prepared with 3 at % Sb shows the lowest resistivity of 0.185 Ohm cm with a Hall mobility of 54.05 cm{sup 2} V{sup –1} s{sup –1}, and a hole concentration of 6.25 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup –3}.

  19. Image contrast mechanisms in dynamic friction force microscopy: Antimony particles on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Felix; Göddenhenrich, Thomas; Dietzel, Dirk; Schirmeisen, Andre

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic Friction Force Microscopy (DFFM) is a technique based on Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) where resonance oscillations of the cantilever are excited by lateral actuation of the sample. During this process, the AFM tip in contact with the sample undergoes a complex movement which consists of alternating periods of sticking and sliding. Therefore, DFFM can give access to dynamic transition effects in friction that are not accessible by alternative techniques. Using antimony nanoparticles on graphite as a model system, we analyzed how combined influences of friction and topography can effect different experimental configurations of DFFM. Based on the experimental results, for example, contrast inversion between fractional resonance and band excitation imaging strategies to extract reliable tribological information from DFFM images are devised.

  20. Spectroscopic properties of Eu-doped antimony-germanate glass and glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmojda, J.; Kochanowicz, M.; Miluski, P.; Ragin, T.; Dorosz, D.; ZajÄ c, A.

    2016-09-01

    In our work we focused on possibility of obtaining phosphate nano-phase structures in antimony-germanate glasses doped with europium ions. The glasses with molar composition of 50(Sb2O3 - GeO2) - 50(SiO2 - Al2O3 - Na2O) doped with 0.5mol% Eu2O3 were prepared by standard melt-quenching method. In order to optimize glass-ceramic system the influence of phosphate concentration (up to 10mol%) on spectroscopic properties have been investigated. The symmetry nature of molecular structure around europium ions have been determined from the intensity ratio between (5D0 →7F2)/(5D0 →7F1) transitions. The effect of prominent Stark splitting of luminescence band at 612 nm characterised as "hypersensitive transition" into 3 sub-wavelength was observed in glasses with 1mol% and 3mol% of P2O5.

  1. First-Principles Study of Antimony Doping Effects on the Iron-Based Superconductor CaFe(SbxAs1-x)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Yuki; Nakamura, Hiroki; Machida, Masahiko; Kuroki, Kazuhiko

    2015-09-01

    We study antimony doping effects on the iron-based superconductor CaFe(SbxAs1-x)2 by using the first-principles calculation. The calculations reveal that the substitution of a doped antimony atom into As of the chainlike As layers is more stable than that into FeAs layers. This prediction can be checked by experiments. Our results suggest that doping homologous elements into the chainlike As layers, which only exist in the novel 112 system, is responsible for rising up the critical temperature. We discuss antimony doping effects on the electronic structure. It is found that the calculated band structures with and without the antimony doping are similar to each other within our framework.

  2. Food crop accumulation and bioavailability assessment for antimony (Sb) compared with arsenic (As) in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Susan C; Tighe, Matthew; Paterson, Ewan; Ashley, Paul M

    2014-10-01

    Field samples and a 9-week glasshouse growth trial were used to investigate the accumulation of mining derived arsenic (As) and antimony (Sb) in vegetable crops growing on the Macleay River Floodplain in Northern New South Wales, Australia. The soils were also extracted using EDTA to assess the potential for this extractant to be used as a predictor of As and Sb uptake in vegetables, and a simplified bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET) to understand potential for uptake in the human gut with soil ingestion. Metalloids were not detected in any field vegetables sampled. Antimony was not detected in the growth trial vegetable crops over the 9-week greenhouse trial. Arsenic accumulation in edible vegetable parts was <10 % total soil-borne As with concentrations less than the current Australian maximum residue concentration for cereals. The results indicate that risk of exposure through short-term vegetable crops is low. The data also demonstrate that uptake pathways for Sb and As in the vegetables were different with uptake strongly impacted by soil properties. A fraction of soil-borne metalloid was soluble in the different soils resulting in Sb soil solution concentration (10.75 ± 0.52 μg L(-1)) that could present concern for contamination of water resources. EDTA proved a poor predictor of As and Sb phytoavailability. Oral bioaccessibility, as measured by SBET, was <7 % for total As and <3 % total Sb which is important to consider when estimating the real risk from soil borne As and Sb in the floodplain environment.

  3. Speciation of inorganic antimony (III & V) employing polyurethane foam loaded with bromopyrogallol red.

    PubMed

    Vinhal, Jonas O; Gonçalves, Aline D; Cruz, Graziela F B; Cassella, Ricardo J

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the speciation analysis of inorganic antimony (Sb(III) and Sb(V)) is proposed using polyurethane foam loaded with bromopyrogallol red (PUF-BPR) as a selective sorbent for Sb(III). The quantification of Sb in the solutions was performed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS), and several variables that could affect the performance of the method were carefully evaluated. The best conditions for the sorption of Sb(III) were achieved by shaking 50mg of PUF-BPR with the solutions containing Sb(III) at pH 4.0 for 90 min. In this condition, the retention of Sb(V) was not significant, whereas the removal of Sb(III) from the solution was higher than 95%. The desorption of Sb(III) from loaded PUF-BPR was possible by shaking the loaded foam with 7.5 mL of a 2.5 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution for 30 min. No interference of metal cations was observed on the solid-phase extraction of Sb(III) by PUF-BPR. The developed method was applied in the speciation analysis of antimony in river water samples fortified with different concentrations of Sb(III) and Sb(V). Also, we performed the determination of Sb(III) in a sample of a Sb-based drug utilized in the treatment of leishmaniasis. The results show that Sb(III) can be separated from high concentrations of Sb(V), since recoveries in the range of 81-110% were obtained in the analysis of the samples. The method presented limits of detection and quantification of 0.6 and 2 µg L(-1), respectively, for Sb(III) and 1 and 3 µg L(-1) for Sb(V), respectively.

  4. A New ABC Half-Transporter in Leishmania major Is Involved in Resistance to Antimony

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, J. I.; García-Hernández, R.; Castanys, S.

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of ABCI4, a new intracellular ATP-binding cassette (ABC) half-transporter in Leishmania major, is described. We show that ABCI4 is involved in heavy metal export, thereby conferring resistance to Pentostam, to Sb(III), and to As(III) and Cd(II). Parasites overexpressing ABCI4 showed a lower mitochondrial toxic effect of antimony by decreasing reactive oxygen species production and maintained higher values of both the mitochondrial electrochemical potential and total ATP levels with respect to controls. The ABCI4 half-transporter forms homodimers as determined by a coimmunoprecipitation assay. A combination of subcellular localization studies under a confocal microscope and a surface biotinylation assay using parasites expressing green fluorescent protein- and FLAG-tagged ABCI4 suggests that the transporter presents a dual localization in both mitochondria and the plasma membrane. Parasites overexpressing ABCI4 present an increased replication in mouse peritoneal macrophages. We have determined that porphyrins are substrates for ABCI4. Consequently, the overexpression of ABCI4 confers resistance to some toxic porphyrins, such as zinc-protoporphyrin, due to the lower accumulation resulting from a significant efflux, as determined using the fluorescent zinc-mesoporphyrin, a validated heme analog. In addition, ABCI4 has a significant ability to efflux thiol after Sb(III) incubation, thus meaning that ABCI4 could be considered to be a potential thiol-X-pump that is able to recognize metal-conjugated thiols. In summary, we have shown that this new ABC transporter is involved in drug sensitivity to antimony and other compounds by efflux as conjugated thiol complexes. PMID:23716044

  5. The effect of phosphate application on the mobility of antimony in firing range soils.

    PubMed

    Griggs, Christopher S; Martin, W Andy; Larson, Steven L; O'Connnor, Greg; Fabian, Gene; Zynda, Greg; Mackie, David

    2011-05-15

    Chemical and biogenic sources of phosphate are commonly accepted in situ treatment methods for immobilization of lead (Pb) in soil. The metalloid antimony (Sb), commonly associated with Pb in the environment, exists as either a neutral species or a negatively charged oxyanion. Antimony is used in the manufacture of bullets as a hardening agent, constituting approximately 3% of the bullet mass. Technological solutions to reduce the migration of metals from small arms firing range (SAFR) soils for environmental compliance purposes must be robust with respect to multi-component systems containing both cationic and anionic contaminants. The effect of varying physico-chemical soil properties on Sb mobility post-firing was assessed in this study for six soil types using common analytical protocols and methods related to regulatory criteria. The sands (SM and SP) demonstrated the greatest Sb solubility in post-firing leachate samples and therefore were selected to evaluate the effects of five commercially available stabilization amendments on Sb mobility. Enhanced Sb leaching was experimentally confirmed in the phosphate-treated soils compared to both the untreated control soil and the sulfur-based amendment, and thus suggests competition for negative sorption sites between Sb and phosphate. However, the 5% Buffer Block® calcium phosphate amendment did not exhibit the same enhanced Sb release. This can be attributed to the inclusion of aluminum hydroxide in the amendment composition. Technologies are needed that will adequately immobilize Pb without mobilizing oxyanions such as Sb. Further research will be required to elucidate binding mechanisms and redox conditions that govern the mobility of Sb on SAFRs.

  6. Fatty acid profiles in Leishmania spp. isolates with natural resistance to nitric oxide and trivalent antimony.

    PubMed

    de Azevedo, Alana Freire; Dutra, Jorge Luís de Lisboa; Santos, Micheli Luize Barbosa; Santos, Darlisson de Alexandria; Alves, Péricles Barreto; de Moura, Tatiana Rodrigues; de Almeida, Roque Pacheco; Fernandes, Marcelo Ferreira; Scher, Ricardo; Fernandes, Roberta Pereira Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids, especially those from phospholipids (PLFA), are essential membrane components that are present in relatively constant proportions in biological membranes under natural conditions. However, under harmful growth conditions, such as diseases, environmental changes, and chemical exposure, the fatty acid proportions might vary. If such changes could be identified and revealed to be specific for adverse situations, they could be used as biomarkers. Such biomarkers could facilitate the identification of virulence and resistance mechanisms to particular chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, specific biomarkers could lead to better therapeutic decisions that would, in turn, enhance treatment effectiveness. The objective of this study was to compare the fatty acid profiles of trivalent antimony and nitric oxide (NO)-resistant and -sensitive Leishmania chagasi and Leishmania amazonensis isolates. Fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) were obtained from total lipids (MIDI), ester-linked lipids (ELFA), and ester-linked phospholipids (PLFA). FAMEs were analyzed by chromatography and mass spectrometry. Species- or resistance-associated differences in FAME profiles were assessed by nonmetric multidimensional scaling, multiresponse permutation procedures, and indicator species analyses. The isolate groups had different MIDI-FAME profiles. However, neither the ELFA nor PLFA profiles differed between the sensitive and resistant isolates. Levels of the fatty acid 18:1 Δ9c were increased in sensitive isolates (p < 0,001), whereas the fatty acid 20:4 Δ5,8,11,14 showed the opposite trend (p < 0.01). We conclude that these two fatty acids are potential biomarkers for NO and antimony resistance in L. chagasi and L. amazonensis and that they could be helpful in therapeutic diagnoses.

  7. The origin and behavior of lead, cadmium and antimony in MSW incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Kinoshita, Sayuri; Takatsuki, Hiroshi

    1996-12-31

    The Amendment to the Waste Disposal and Public Cleansing Law in Japan has introduced new regulation of waste requiring strict management. In this regulation, the fly ash generated in the Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) incinerator process was designated as specially controlled solid waste because of relatively high concentrations of lead and cadmium. Furthermore, antimony is a regulated constituent within the Basel Convention on the control of transboundary movements of hazardous wastes and their disposal and was designated a monitor item of environmental standards on water pollution. Thus, in order to understand where the problems lie, the behaviors of these heavy metals in the MSW incinerator was investigated. Also investigated were the kinds of products causing the fly ash to be contaminated. As a result, the amount of lead, cadmium and antimony in household waste was about 120, 3.5 and 7.6 g/T, respectively. The major origins of Pb, Cd and Sb from household waste are small sealed lead batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries and flame-proofed products such as curtains and plastic covers. By incineration treatment, these metals shifted to the fly ash (EP ash); the transfer ratio of Pb, Cd and Sb was about 33, 92 and 45%, respectively. The observed results indicated that the partitioning of metals in the MSW incinerator showed the influence of the vapor pressure of the elements and their compounds. Clearly, to produce precise estimates of this behavior, it will be necessary to determine not only the concentration of the elements in the waste but also the compounds used and the changes these would undergo in the furnace. Finally, several measures which will be helpful in solving these problems are introduced to discuss the future direction of environmentally-friendly social systems.

  8. Structural, optical, and transport properties of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride thin films treated with homogeneous electron beam irradiation and thermal annealing.

    PubMed

    Takashiri, Masayuki; Asai, Yuki; Yamauchi, Kazuki

    2016-08-19

    We investigated the effects of homogeneous electron beam (EB) irradiation and thermal annealing treatments on the structural, optical, and transport properties of bismuth telluride thin films. Bismuth telluride thin films were prepared by an RF magnetron sputtering method at room temperature. After deposition, the films were treated with homogeneous EB irradiation, thermal annealing, or a combination of both the treatments (two-step treatment). We employed Williamson-Hall analysis for separating the strain contribution from the crystallite domain contribution in the x-ray diffraction data of the films. We found that strain was induced in the thin films by EB irradiation and was relieved by thermal annealing. The crystal orientation along c-axis was significantly enhanced by the two-step treatment. Scanning electron microscopy indicated the melting and aggregation of nano-sized grains on the film surface by the two-step treatment. Optical analysis indicated that the interband transition of all the thin films was possibly of the indirect type, and that thermal annealing and two-step treatment methods increased the band gap of the films due to relaxation of the strain. Thermoelectric performance was significantly improved by the two-step treatment. The power factor reached a value of 17.2 μW (cm(-1) K(-2)), approximately 10 times higher than that of the as-deposited thin films. We conclude that improving the crystal orientation and relaxing the strain resulted in enhanced thermoelectric performance.

  9. Structural, optical, and transport properties of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride thin films treated with homogeneous electron beam irradiation and thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashiri, Masayuki; Asai, Yuki; Yamauchi, Kazuki

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effects of homogeneous electron beam (EB) irradiation and thermal annealing treatments on the structural, optical, and transport properties of bismuth telluride thin films. Bismuth telluride thin films were prepared by an RF magnetron sputtering method at room temperature. After deposition, the films were treated with homogeneous EB irradiation, thermal annealing, or a combination of both the treatments (two-step treatment). We employed Williamson-Hall analysis for separating the strain contribution from the crystallite domain contribution in the x-ray diffraction data of the films. We found that strain was induced in the thin films by EB irradiation and was relieved by thermal annealing. The crystal orientation along c-axis was significantly enhanced by the two-step treatment. Scanning electron microscopy indicated the melting and aggregation of nano-sized grains on the film surface by the two-step treatment. Optical analysis indicated that the interband transition of all the thin films was possibly of the indirect type, and that thermal annealing and two-step treatment methods increased the band gap of the films due to relaxation of the strain. Thermoelectric performance was significantly improved by the two-step treatment. The power factor reached a value of 17.2 μW (cm-1 K-2), approximately 10 times higher than that of the as-deposited thin films. We conclude that improving the crystal orientation and relaxing the strain resulted in enhanced thermoelectric performance.

  10. Determination of Antimony (III) in Real Samples by Anodic Stripping Voltammetry Using a Mercury Film Screen-Printed Electrode.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Gómez González, M Jesús; Arcos-Martínez, M Julia

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a procedure for the determination of antimony (III) by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry using a mercury film screen-printed electrode as the working electrode. The procedure has been optimized using experimental design methodology. Under these conditions, in terms of Residual Standard Deviation (RSD), the repeatability (3.81 %) and the reproducibility (5.07 %) of the constructed electrodes were both analyzed. The detection limit for Sb (III) was calculated at a value of 1.27×10(-8) M. The linear range obtained was between 0.99 × 10(-8) - 8.26 × 10(-8) M. An analysis of possible effects due to the presence of foreign ions in the solution was performed and the procedure was successfully applied to the determination of antimony levels in pharmaceutical preparations and sea water samples.

  11. Cyanide and antimony thermodynamic database for the aqueous species and solids for the EPA-MINTEQ geochemical code

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1989-05-01

    Thermodynamic data for aqueous species and solids that contain cyanide and antimony were tabulated from several commonly accepted, published sources of thermodynamic data and recent journal article. The review does not include gases or organic complexes of either antimony or cyanide, nor does the review include the sulfur compounds of cyanide. The basic thermodynamic data, ..delta..G/sub f,298//sup o/, ..delta..H/sub f,298//sup o/, and S/sub f//sup o/ values, were chosen to represent each solid phase and aqueous species for which data were available in the appropriate standard state. From these data the equilibrium constants (log K/sub r,298//sup o/) and enthalpies of reaction (..delta..H/sub r,298//sup o/) at 298 K (25/degree/C) were calculated for reactions involving the formation of these aqueous species and solids from the basic components. 34 refs., 14 tabs.

  12. Determination of Antimony (III) in Real Samples by Anodic Stripping Voltammetry Using a Mercury Film Screen-Printed Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Gómez González, M. Jesús; Arcos-Martínez, M. Julia

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a procedure for the determination of antimony (III) by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry using a mercury film screen-printed electrode as the working electrode. The procedure has been optimized using experimental design methodology. Under these conditions, in terms of Residual Standard Deviation (RSD), the repeatability (3.81 %) and the reproducibility (5.07 %) of the constructed electrodes were both analyzed. The detection limit for Sb (III) was calculated at a value of 1.27×10−8 M. The linear range obtained was between 0.99 × 10−8 − 8.26 × 10−8 M. An analysis of possible effects due to the presence of foreign ions in the solution was performed and the procedure was successfully applied to the determination of antimony levels in pharmaceutical preparations and sea water samples. PMID:22389596

  13. Co-administration of glycyrrhizic acid with the antileishmanial drug sodium antimony gluconate (SAG) cures SAG-resistant visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Amrita; Majumder, Saikat; Majumdar, Suchandra Bhattacharyya; Choudhuri, Soumitra Kumar; Roy, Syamal; Majumdar, Subrata

    2015-03-01

    Since there are very few affordable antileishmanial drugs available, antimonial resistance has crippled antileishmanial therapy, thereby emphasising the need for development of novel therapeutic strategies. This study aimed to evaluate the antileishmanial role of combined therapy with sodium antimony gluconate (SAG) and the triterpenoid glycyrrhizic acid (GA) against infection with SAG-resistant Leishmania (GE1F8R). Combination therapy with GA and SAG successfully limited infection with SAG-resistant Leishmania in a synergistic manner (fractional inhibitory concentration index <1.0). At the same time, mice infected with SAG-resistant Leishmania and co-treated with GA and SAG exhibited a significant reduction in hepatic and splenic parasite burden. In probing the mechanism, it was observed that GA treatment suppressed the expression and efflux activity of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), two host ABC transporters responsible for antimony efflux from host cells infected with SAG-resistant parasites. This suppression correlated with greater intracellular antimony retention during SAG therapy both in vitro and in vivo, which was reflected in the reduced parasite load. Furthermore, co-administration of GA and SAG induced a shift in the cytokine balance towards a Th1 phenotype by augmenting pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as IL-12, IFNγ and TNFα) and inducing nitric oxide generation in GE1F8R-infected macrophages as well as GE1F8R-infected mice. This study aims to provide an affordable leishmanicidal alternative to expensive antileishmanial drugs such as miltefosine and amphotericin B. Furthermore, this report explores the role of GA as a resistance modulator in MRP1- and P-gp-overexpressing conditions.

  14. Miltefosine and Antimonial Drug Susceptibility of Leishmania Viannia Species and Populations in Regions of High Transmission in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Olga Lucía; Diaz-Toro, Yira; Muvdi, Sandra; Rodríguez, Isabel; Gomez, María Adelaida; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2014-01-01

    Background Pentavalent antimonials have been the first line treatment for dermal leishmaniasis in Colombia for over 30 years. Miltefosine is administered as second line treatment since 2005. The susceptibility of circulating populations of Leishmania to these drugs is unknown despite clinical evidence supporting the emergence of resistance. Methodology/Principal Findings In vitro susceptibility was determined for intracellular amastigotes of 245 clinical strains of the most prevalent Leishmania Viannia species in Colombia to miltefosine (HePC) and/or meglumine antimoniate (SbV); 163, (80%) were evaluated for both drugs. Additionally, susceptibility to SbV was examined in two cohorts of 85 L. V. panamensis strains isolated between 1980–1989 and 2000–2009 in the municipality of Tumaco. Susceptibility to each drug differed among strains of the same species and between species. Whereas 68% of L. V. braziliensis strains presented in vitro resistance to HePC, 69% were sensitive to SbV. Resistance to HePC and SbV occurred respectively, in 20% y 21% of L. panamensis strains. Only 3% of L. V. guyanensis were resistant to HePC, and none to SbV. Drug susceptibility differed between geographic regions and time periods. Subpopulations having disparate susceptibility to SbV were discerned among L. V. panamensis strains isolated during 1980–1990 in Tumaco where resistant strains belonged to zymodeme 2.3, and sensitive strains to zymodeme 2.2. Conclusions/Significance Large scale evaluation of clinical strains of Leishmania Viannia species demonstrated species, population, geographic, and epidemiologic differences in susceptibility to meglumine antimoniate and miltefosine, and provided baseline information for monitoring susceptibility to these drugs. Sensitive and resistant clinical strains within each species, and zymodeme as a proxy marker of antimony susceptibility for L. V. panamensis, will be useful in deciphering factors involved in susceptibility and the distribution

  15. Indium donor/metal vacancy defect complexes in cadmium telluride studied with perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, John Warren

    Semi-insulating, powder samples of Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) have been studied using 111In Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) Spectroscopy. The samples have been lightly doped (˜10 12 cm-3) with 111In atoms, which occupy well-defined metal (Cd) lattice sites and act as probes of the local environment. These substitutional donors form a single defect complex in CdTe. This complex has been identified and characterized as a function of temperature. Those indium probes that are not complexed occupy metal lattice sites with no defect in the local vicinity. Samples containing metal vacancy concentrations as large as 500 ppm have been prepared by a high temperature anneal and quench. The defect complex involves the trapping of a cadmium metal vacancy bound to the indium probe. The electric field gradient (EFG) experienced by probe atoms has a coupling constant of nuQ = 61.5(5) MHz and is not axially symmetric, with the asymmetry parameter given by eta = 0.16(4). It is believed that this asymmetry results from a relaxation of the chalcogen (Te) atoms adjacent to the metal vacancy, with the tellurium atom shared by the probe atom and the vacancy providing the dominant contribution. The fraction of complexed probe atoms increases as the sample temperature is decreased, and is still increasing at room temperature. Complexed fractions are reproducible on cycling within the temperature range 40 to 200°C. The binding energy of the complex has been measured to be 0.15(2) eV and is independent of metal vacancy concentration, which varies and is dependent on the details of the quench. In rapidly cooled samples, a non-equilibrium number of these defect complexes is observed. This state equilibrates with a time constant of 45(5) hours at 15°C, implying that at least one of the two constituents involved in the complex has a significant diffusion rate at this temperature. Under the assumption that vacancy diffusion mechanisms dominate at this temperature, it is

  16. Point defect mechanisms in diffusion and interdiffusion in mercury cadmium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleixner, Stacy Holander

    Mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) is a variable bandgap semiconductor that can be tuned to different energies by altering the HgTe/CdTe ratio. Photodiodes are fabricated in Hgsb{0.7}Cdsb{0.3}Te and Hgsb{0.8}Cdsb{0.2}Te to detect infrared radiation in the 3-5 and 8-14 mum ranges, which correspond to windows in the atmospheric absorption spectrum. In this work, numerical and analytical models are developed to simulate p-n junction formation and stability in Hgsb{0.8}Cdsb{0.2}Te photodiodes and Hgsb{(1-x)}CdsbxTe/Hgsb{(1-y)}CdsbyTe double layer heterojunctions. The models are based on the fundamental physics of the diffusion and interaction of point defects and dopants. The simulation tools developed can be used to reduce the time and expense required to fabricate HgCdTe devices. In the processing of Hgsb{0.8}Cdsb{0.2}Te photodiodes, excess Hg interstitials annihilate vacancies and exchange places with substitutional dopant atoms (generating mobile dopant interstitials). A grown-in donor is revealed in the region exposed to excess interstitials. To simulate this, numerical models are developed which solve partial differential equations for the diffusion and interaction of Hg interstitials, vacancies, dopant interstitials, and dopant substitutional atoms. Hg interstitials and vacancies are coupled through Frenkel generation/recombination. The Hg point defects are coupled to the dopant through the Frank-Turnbull and kick-out mechanisms by which Hg interstitials and vacancies mediate exchanges of the dopant atom on and off the cation sub-lattice. The models developed are used to study junction formation and stability in ion implanted, Au doped Hgsb{0.8}Cdsb{0.2}Te. Interdiffusion occurs in Hgsb(1-x)CdsbxTe/Hgsb(1-y)CdsbyTe double layer heterojunctions due to gradients in composition at the junction. Models are derived which simulate this by solving for the diffusion and interaction of Hg and Cd substitutional and interstitial atoms. The models are used to understand

  17. Chemical and electronic structure of surfaces and interfaces in cadmium telluride based photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Douglas Arthur

    The surface and interface properties are of the upmost importance in the understanding, optimization, and application for photovoltaic devices. Often the chemical, electronic, and morphological properties of the films are empirically optimized, however when progress slows, a fundamental understanding of these properties can lead to breakthroughs. In this work, surfaces and interfaces of solar cell-relevant films are probed with a repertoire of X-ray analytical and microanalysis techniques including X-ray photoelectron (XPS), X-ray excited Auger electron (XAES), X-ray emission (XES) spectroscopies, and atomic force (AFM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopies. Silicon-based devices currently dominate the solar market, which is rather inflexible in application. Cadmium telluride (CdTe)-based technologies offer a cost-effective alternative with additional benefits including roll-to-roll production and high conversion efficiencies. This, like other next generation thin film solar cells, needs more optimization to replace Si. The charge transport across a heterojunction is of great importance to drive up the conversion efficiency of the device. The interface of a CdS buffer layer and SnO2:F front contact was investigated as a function of CdCl2-treatment. In order to measure the fully formed interface, after subsequent layer deposition and heat treatments, mechanical stressing of the layer stack resulted in physical separation at the desired interface. By combining multiple spectroscopic and morphologic methods a complete picture has evolved. CdS is often used as a buffer layer in CdTe based devices. This layer is empirically optimized to be very thin (˜100 nm) due to the parasitic light absorption in and around the 2 eV range. By widening the band gap or replacing it with a more transparent material, more photons can be absorbed by the CdTe layer and significantly increase the overall conversion efficiency of the device. CdS:O and Zn(1-x)MgxO were studied as possible

  18. Thermodynamics of post-growth annealing of cadmium zinc telluride nuclear radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Aaron Lee

    Nuclear Radiation Detectors are used for detecting, tracking, and identifying radioactive materials which emit high-energy gamma and X-rays. The use of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors is particularly attractive because of the detector's ability to operate at room temperature and measure the energy spectra of gamma-ray sources with a high resolution, typically less than 1% at 662 keV. While CdZnTe detectors are acceptable imperfections in the crystals limit their full market potential. One of the major imperfections are Tellurium inclusions generated during the crystal growth process by the retrograde solubility of Tellurium and Tellurium-rich melt trapped at the growth interface. Tellurium inclusions trap charge carriers generated by gamma and X-ray photons and thus reduce the portion of generated charge carriers that reach the electrodes for collection and conversion into a readable signal which is representative of the ionizing radiation's energy and intensity. One approach in resolving this problem is post-growth annealing which has the potential of removing the Tellurium inclusions and associated impurities. The goal of this project is to use experimental techniques to study the thermodynamics of Tellurium inclusion migration in post-growth annealing of CdZnTe nuclear detectors with the temperature gradient zone migration (TGZM) technique. Systematic experiments will be carried out to provide adequate thermodynamic data that will inform the engineering community of the optimum annealing parameters. Additionally, multivariable correlations that involve the Tellurium diffusion coefficient, annealing parameters, and CdZnTe properties will be analyzed. The experimental approach will involve systematic annealing experiments (in Cd vapor overpressure) on different sizes of CdZnTe crystals at varying temperature gradients ranging from 0 to 60°C/mm (used to migrate the Tellurium inclusion to one side of the crystal), and at annealing temperatures ranging

  19. Migration of antimony from PET bottles into beverages: determination of the activation energy of diffusion and migration modelling compared with literature data.

    PubMed

    Welle, F; Franz, R

    2011-01-01

    Plastics bottles made from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) are increasingly used for soft drinks, mineral water, juices and beer. In this study a literature review is presented concerning antimony levels found both in PET materials as well as in foods and food simulants. On the other hand, 67 PET samples from the European bottle market were investigated for their residual antimony concentrations. A mean value of 224 ± 32 mg kg(-1) was found, the median was 220 mg kg(-1). Diffusion coefficients for antimony in PET bottle materials were experimentally determined at different temperature between 105 and 150°C. From these data, the activation energy of diffusion for antimony species from the PET bottle wall into beverages and food simulants was calculated. The obtained value of 189 kJ mol(-1) was found to be in good agreement with published data on PET microwave trays (184 kJ mol(-1)). Based on these results, the migration of antimony into beverages was predicted by mathematical migration modelling for different surface/volume ratios and antimony bottle wall concentrations. The results were compared with literature data as well as international legal limits and guidelines values for drinking water and the migration limit set from food packaging legislation. It was concluded that antimony levels in beverages due to migration from PET bottles manufactured according to the state of the art can never reach or exceed the European-specific migration limit of 40 microg kg(-1). Maximum migration levels caused by room-temperature storage even after 3 years will never be essentially higher than 2.5 microg kg(-1) and in any case will be below the European limit of 5 microg kg(-1) for drinking water. The results of this study confirm that the exposure of the consumer by antimony migration from PET bottles into beverages and even into edible oils reaches approximately 1% of the current tolerable daily intake (TDI) established by World Health Organisation (WHO). Having

  20. PANCREATIC TOXICITY AS AN ADVERSE EFFECT INDUCED BY MEGLUMINE ANTIMONIATE THERAPY IN A CLINICAL TRIAL FOR CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Marcelo Rosandiski; Passos, Sonia Regina Lambert; Pimentel, Maria Inês Fernandes; Bedoya-Pacheco, Sandro Javier; Valete-Rosalino, Cláudia Maria; Vasconcellos, Erica Camargo Ferreira; Antonio, Liliane Fatima; Saheki, Mauricio Naoto; Salgueiro, Mariza Mattos; Santos, Ginelza Peres Lima; Ribeiro, Madelon Noato; Conceição-Silva, Fatima; Madeira, Maria Fatima; Silva, Jorge Luiz Nunes; Fagundes, Aline; Schubach, Armando Oliveria

    2016-09-22

    American tegumentary leishmaniasis is an infectious disease caused by a protozoan of the genus Leishmania. Pentavalent antimonials are the first choice drugs for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), although doses are controversial. In a clinical trial for CL we investigated the occurrence of pancreatic toxicity with different schedules of treatment with meglumine antimoniate (MA). Seventy-two patients were allocated in two different therapeutic groups: 20 or 5 mg of pentavalent antimony (Sb5+)/kg/day for 20 or 30 days, respectively. Looking for adverse effects, patients were asked about abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or anorexia in each medical visit. We performed physical examinations and collected blood to evaluate serum amylase and lipase in the pre-treatment period, and every 10 days during treatment and one month post-treatment. Hyperlipasemia occurred in 54.8% and hyperamylasemia in 19.4% patients. Patients treated with MA 20 mg Sb5+ presented a higher risk of hyperlipasemia (p = 0.023). Besides, higher MA doses were associated with a 2.05 higher risk ratio (p = 0.003) of developing more serious (moderate to severe) hyperlipasemia. The attributable fraction was 51% in this group. Thirty-six patients presented abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or anorexia but only 47.2% of those had hyperlipasemia and/ or hyperamylasemia. These findings suggest the importance of the search for less toxic therapeutic regimens for the treatment of CL.

  1. Separation of Lead from Crude Antimony by Pyro-Refining Process with NaPO3 Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Longgang; Hu, Yuejie; Xia, Zhimei; Chen, Yongming

    2016-06-01

    The main purpose of this study was to separate lead from crude antimony through an oxidation pyro-refining process and by using sodium metaphosphate as a lead elimination reagent. The process parameters that will affect the refining results were optimized experimentally under controlled conditions, such as the sodium metaphosphate charging dosage, the refining temperature and duration, and the air flow rate, to determine their effect on the lead content in refined antimony and the lead removal rate. A minimum lead content of 0.0522 wt.% and a 98.6% lead removal rate were obtained under the following optimal conditions: W_{{{NaPO}_{{3}} }} = 15% W Sb (where W represents weight), a refining temperature of 800°C, a refining time of 30 min, and an air flow rate of 3 L/min. X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy showed that high-purity antimony was obtained. The smelting operation is free from smoke or ammonia pollution when using monobasic sodium phosphate or ammonium dihydrogen phosphate as the lead elimination reagent. However, this refining process can also remove a certain amount of sulfur, cobalt, and silicon simultaneously, and smelting results also suggest that sodium metaphosphate can be used as a potential lead elimination reagent for bismuth and copper refining.

  2. Effect of GeO2 content on structural and spectroscopic properties of antimony glasses doped with Sm3+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmojda, J.; Kochanowicz, M.; Miluski, P.; Leśniak, M.; Sitarz, M.; Pisarski, W.; Pisarska, J.; Dorosz, D.

    2016-12-01

    Antimony-based glasses with different germanium oxide content doped with Sm3+ ions have been developed. On the basis of decomposition of absorption bands (FTIR) in the mid infrared region, was determined that antimony and germanium ions are the glass-forming ions, setting up the lattice of fabricated glasses. The effect of GeO2/Sb2O3 ratio in fabricated glass doped with samarium ions on thermal, structural and luminescent properties was also investigated. Characteristic bright reddish-orange luminescence from the 4G5/2 state to the lower lying levels 6HJ with J = 5/2, 7/2, 9/2 and 11/2 with maximum intensity at the wavelength of 603 nm originating from 4G5/2 → 6H7/2 transition was observed. The asymmetry nature of molecular structure around samarium ion have been determined from intensity ratio between 4G5/2 → 6H9/2 (ED) and 4G5/2 → 6H5/2 (MD) transitions. An introduction of GeO2 to the antimony glass results in the increasing of 4G5/2 lifetime and decreasing of the orange-to-red intensity ratio, which is are related to reduction of non-briding oxygens.

  3. Remobilization of pentavalent antimony and vanadium from a granular iron hydroxide material--a comparative study of different leaching systems.

    PubMed

    Kolbe, Falko; Weiss, Holger; Wennrich, Rainer; Lorenz, Wilhelm Georg; Daus, Birgit

    2011-09-30

    The remobilization of antimony and vanadium from previously loaded commercial granular ferric-hydroxide GEH material (intended for water treatment) was examined by using a sequential extraction procedure and three different leaching systems to evaluate their physicochemical mobility and potential availability under different simulated environmental conditions. A classical batch extraction, an extraction cell (EC) and rotating-coiled columns (RCC) were used as extraction systems. For each system it could be shown that the content of ion-exchangeable antimony and vanadium in previously loaded material is negligible (<1.5%). The oxyanions were sorbed strongly and could be predominantly remobilized through reducing agents, which means through dissolution of the iron (hydr)oxide matrix. The major advantages of dynamic systems in comparison to batchwise fractionation technique are the drastically reduced extraction time and the possibility of generating information to the leaching kinetics. It is shown that the efficiency of the three leaching systems is quite different employing Wenzel's sequential fractionation protocol. Only by working with RCC, the iron (hydr)oxide matrix was completely dissolved within four steps resulting in the total mobilization of antimony and vanadium. EC seems to be less suitable for leaching studies of Sb and V sorbed on iron(hydr)oxide. The remobilizable proportion of the several fractions was lower in comparison to batch and RCC and seems to be a result of an agglomeration of the GEH in the EC device.

  4. Potentiometric stripping analysis of antimony based on carbon paste electrode modified with hexathia crown ether and rice husk.

    PubMed

    Gadhari, Nayan S; Sanghavi, Bankim J; Srivastava, Ashwini K

    2011-10-03

    An electrochemical method based on potentiometric stripping analysis (PSA) employing a hexathia 18C6 (HT18C6) and rice husk (RH) modified carbon paste electrode (HT18C6-RH-CPE) has been proposed for the subnanomolar determination of antimony. The characterization of the electrode surface has been carried out by means of scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronocoulometry. By employing HT18C6-RH-CPE, a 12-fold enhancement in the PSA signal (dt/dE) was observed as compared to plain carbon paste electrode (PCPE). Under the optimized conditions, dt/dE (sV(-1)) was proportional to the Sb(III) concentration in the range of 1.42×10(-8) to 6.89×10(-11)M (r=0.9944) with the detection limit (S/N=3) of 2.11×10(-11)M. The practical analytical utilities of the modified electrode were demonstrated by the determination of antimony in pharmaceutical formulations, human hair, sea water, urine and blood serum samples. The prepared modified electrode showed several advantages, such as simple preparation method, high sensitivity, very low detection limit and excellent reproducibility. Moreover, the results obtained for antimony analysis in commercial and real samples using HT18C6-RH-CPE and those obtained by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) are in agreement at the 95% confidence level.

  5. Determination of indium in high purity antimony by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) using boric acid as a modifier.

    PubMed

    Dash, K; Thangavel, S; Chaurasia, S C; Arunachalam, J

    2006-10-15

    The use of boric acid as a modifier for the determination of trace amount of indium in high purity antimony by electrothermal atomic absorption is described. It was found that the negative influence of the hydrofluoric acid, used for the digestion could not be eliminated by using stabilized temperature platform furnace (STPF) alone. Due to the high dissociation energy (D(0)=506kJmol(-1)) of indium fluoride, it is difficult to dissociate in the gas phase and hence is lost. In presence of HF (used for the dissolution of antimony), the universal Pd-Mg modifier does not work satisfactorily. Additionally, rising corrosion and reduced tube lifetime were observed when the acid digested (HF-HNO(3)) antimony solution was injected in to the platform. Improvement in platform life and elimination of interferences were achieved by the addition of boric acid as a chemical modifier together with ruthenium coating of the platform. Corrosive changes of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) platform surface were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The standard addition method was applied. A characteristic mass of 36pg was obtained. The detection limit of the proposed method is around 0.04mugg(-1). The developed method was applied to the determination of indium in real samples. The data obtained by this method were in good agreement with those obtained by ICP-MS.

  6. PANCREATIC TOXICITY AS AN ADVERSE EFFECT INDUCED BY MEGLUMINE ANTIMONIATE THERAPY IN A CLINICAL TRIAL FOR CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS

    PubMed Central

    LYRA, Marcelo Rosandiski; PASSOS, Sonia Regina Lambert; PIMENTEL, Maria Inês Fernandes; BEDOYA-PACHECO, Sandro Javier; VALETE-ROSALINO, Cláudia Maria; VASCONCELLOS, Erica Camargo Ferreira; ANTONIO, Liliane Fatima; SAHEKI, Mauricio Naoto; SALGUEIRO, Mariza Mattos; SANTOS, Ginelza Peres Lima; RIBEIRO, Madelon Noato; CONCEIÇÃO-SILVA, Fatima; MADEIRA, Maria Fatima; SILVA, Jorge Luiz Nunes; FAGUNDES, Aline; SCHUBACH, Armando Oliveria

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY American tegumentary leishmaniasis is an infectious disease caused by a protozoan of the genus Leishmania. Pentavalent antimonials are the first choice drugs for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), although doses are controversial. In a clinical trial for CL we investigated the occurrence of pancreatic toxicity with different schedules of treatment with meglumine antimoniate (MA). Seventy-two patients were allocated in two different therapeutic groups: 20 or 5 mg of pentavalent antimony (Sb5+)/kg/day for 20 or 30 days, respectively. Looking for adverse effects, patients were asked about abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or anorexia in each medical visit. We performed physical examinations and collected blood to evaluate serum amylase and lipase in the pre-treatment period, and every 10 days during treatment and one month post-treatment. Hyperlipasemia occurred in 54.8% and hyperamylasemia in 19.4% patients. Patients treated with MA 20 mg Sb5+ presented a higher risk of hyperlipasemia (p = 0.023). Besides, higher MA doses were associated with a 2.05 higher risk ratio (p = 0.003) of developing more serious (moderate to severe) hyperlipasemia. The attributable fraction was 51% in this group. Thirty-six patients presented abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or anorexia but only 47.2% of those had hyperlipasemia and/ or hyperamylasemia. These findings suggest the importance of the search for less toxic therapeutic regimens for the treatment of CL. PMID:27680173

  7. Comparative study of hematological responses to platinum group metals, antimony and silver nanoparticles in animal models.

    PubMed

    Newkirk, Catherine E; Gagnon, Zofia E; Pavel Sizemore, Ioana E

    2014-01-01

    Research was conducted to examine the hematological effects of heavy metals (platinum (Pt ((IV))), palladium (Pd ((II))), rhodium (Rh ((III))), antimony (Sb ((III)) and Sb ((V))), and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)) on white blood cells in mammalian (rat) and avian (chick embryo) models. These metals are used in many everyday products and are accumulating in our environment. Six-week old Sprague-Dawley female rats were treated daily by gavage and six-day old, fertile, specific pathogen-free white leghorn strain chick embryos' eggs were injected on days 7 and 14 of incubation with 0.0, 1.0, 5.0 or 10.0 ppm concentrations of Pt ((IV)) and a platinum group metal (PGM) mix of Pt ((IV)), Pd ((II)) and Rh ((III)). Chick embryos were also tested with 1.0 or 5.0 ppm of antimony compounds (Sb ((III)) and Sb ((V))) and 0.0, 15.0, 30.0, 60.0, or 100.0 ppm of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). After 8 weeks of treatment, blood was obtained from the rats by jugular cut down and from chick embryos on day 20 of incubation by heart puncture. Blood smears were made and stained and a differential white cell count was performed on each. Examination of the smears revealed unconventional dose responses, stimulation of the immune response, and decreases in leukocyte production with various metals and concentrations. Chick embryos responded differently than rats to Pt and the PGM mix; suggesting that species differences and/or stage of development are important components of response to heavy metals. Route of administration of the metals might also influence the response. All of the heavy metals tested affected the immune responses of the tested animals as demonstrated by changes in the types and numbers of leukocytes. Our findings warrant further research to determine the mechanism of these effects and to understand and prevent toxicological effects in humans and other living organisms.

  8. Comparative toxicity and tissue distribution of antimony potassium tartrate in rats and mice dosed by drinking water or intraperitoneal injection.

    PubMed

    Dieter, M P; Jameson, C W; Elwell, M R; Lodge, J W; Hejtmancik, M; Grumbein, S L; Ryan, M; Peters, A C

    1991-09-01

    Antimony potassium tartrate (APT) is a complex salt that until recently was used worldwide as an antischistosomal drug. Treatment was efficacious only if APT was administered intravenously to humans at a near lethal total dose of 36 mg/kg. Because unconfirmed epidemiologic studies suggested there might be an association between APT treatment and bladder cancer, we initiated prechronic toxicity studies with the drug to select a route of administration and doses in the event that chronic studies of APT were needed. The toxicity and concentration of tissue antimony levels were compared in 14-d studies with F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice administered APT in the drinking water or by ip injection to determine the most appropriate route for longer term studies. Drinking water doses estimated by water consumption were 0, 16, 28, 59, 94 and 168 mg/kg in rats and 0, 59, 98, 174, 273, and 407 mg/kg in mice. APT was poorly absorbed and relatively nontoxic orally, whereas ip administration of the drug caused mortality, body weight decrements, and lesions in the liver and kidney at doses about one order of magnitude below those in drinking water. Because of these data and the dose-related accumulation of antimony in the target organs, an ip dose regimen was selected for subsequent studies. Both sexes of F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice were given 0, 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 mg/kg doses of APT every other day for 90 d by ip injection. There were no clinical signs of toxicity nor gross or microscopic lesions in mice that could be attributed to toxicity of APT, although elevated concentrations of antimony were detected in the liver and spleen of mice. Rats were more sensitive than mice to the toxic effects of APT, exhibiting dose-related mortality, body weight decrements, and hepatotoxicity. The concentrations of antimony measured in liver, blood, kidney, spleen, and heart of rats were proportional to dose, but there were no biochemical changes indicative of toxicity except in the liver

  9. Local bonding structure of tellurium and antimony in the phase change chalcogenides germanium-antimony-tellurium: A nuclear magnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobela, David C.

    Recent technological applications of some chalcogenide materials, compounds containing a group VI atom, have prompted studies of the local atomic structure of the amorphous phase. In the case of Ge2Sb2Te 5, metastability in the local bonding structure is responsible for its usefulness as a phase-change memory material. There is no consensus on the exact phase-change mechanism, which is partly due to the inadequacy of standard scattering techniques to probe the structure of the amorphous phase. Nuclear magnetic resonance methods, on the other hand, are well suited to study local structural order even in the absence of a periodic lattice. In this technique, structural information is encoded as an oscillating voltage caused by the nuclear spin. For the tellurium isotope, 125Te (spin = 1/2 in the ground state), the dominant interaction comes from the core and valence electrons that carry angular momentum. This interaction is helpful in identifying Te sites of different local coordination since the number of neighboring atoms should markedly change the local electronic structure. The antimony isotope 125Sb has a spin = 5/2 in the ground state and possesses an asymmetric nuclear charge. This quadrupole moment will interact with an electric field gradient at the nuclear site, which is provided by an asymmetric electron cloud surrounding the nucleus. The frequency-space spectra will reflect the strength of the interaction as well as the symmetry of the local electronic environment. This work investigates the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of 125Te and 125Sb in the crystalline and amorphous forms of several GexSbyTe 1-x-y compounds where 0 < (x, y) < 1. Results from the crystalline phase 125Te data show a trend in the spectral position that can be related to the tellurium bonded to three and six neighbors. In the amorphous phase, the same trend is observed, and the nuclear magnetic resonance fingerprint of two-fold and three-fold coordinated tellurium is obtained. It

  10. Gold distribution in As-deficient pyrite and telluride mineralogy of the Yangzhaiyu gold deposit, Xiaoqinling district, southern North China craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Shi-Jian; Li, Jian-Wei; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Li, Zhan-Ke

    2011-12-01

    The Mesozoic Yangzhaiyu lode gold deposit is situated in the southern edge of the North China craton. Gold mineralization is hosted in Archean amphibolite facies metamorphic rocks, and consists mainly of auriferous quartz veins. Pyrite is the predominant sulfide mineral, with minor amounts of chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and galena. Based on morphology and paragenesis, there are three generations of pyrite, termed as first generation (G1), second generation (G2), and third generation (G3). They have distinct contents, occurrences, and distribution patterns of gold. The coarse-grained, euhedral G1 pyrite contains negligible to low levels of gold, whereas both invisible and visible gold are present in the fine- to medium-grained G2 pyrite that is characterized by abundance of microfractures and porosities, forming a foam-like texture. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) depth profiles indicate that invisible gold occurs either as solid solution or as nanoparticles of gold-bearing tellurides in the G2 pyrite. Visible gold is widespread and present as irregular grains and stringers of native gold mostly along grain boundaries or filling microfractures of pyrite, likely resulting from remobilization of invisible gold once locked in the G2 pyrite. The G3 pyrite, invariably intergrown with chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and galena, contains the highest levels of invisible gold. There is a positive correlation between Au, Ag, and Te, indicating that gold occurs as submicroscopic Au-bearing telluride inclusions in the host minerals. Whenever gold, either invisible or visible, is present, As is always below or only marginally higher than the detection limit of LA-ICP-MS. This indicates that As played an insignificant role in gold mineralization. Tellurides are widespread in the auriferous quartz veins, consisting mainly of petzite, calaverite, hessite, altaite, and tellurobismuthite. Native gold commonly occurs as intergrowths with tellurides

  11. Antimony release from contaminated mine soils and its migration in four typical soils using lysimeter experiments.

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Yu-Xian; Zhao, Long; Qin, Yusheng; Hou, Hong; Zhang, Naiming

    2016-11-01

    Antimony (Sb) can pose great risks to the environment in mining and smelting areas. The migration of Sb in contaminated mine soil was studied using lysimeter experiments. The exchangeable concentration of soil Sb decreased with artificial leaching. The concentrations of Sb retained in the subsoil layers (5-25cm deep) were the highest for Isohumosol and Ferrosol and the lowest for Sandy soil. The Sb concentrations in soil solutions decreased with soil depth, and were adequately simulated using a logarithmic function. The Sb migration pattern in Sandy soil was markedly different from the patterns in the other soils which suggested that Sb may be transported in soil colloids. Environmental factors such as water content, soil temperature, and oxidation-reduction potential of the soil had different effects on Sb migration in Sandy soil and Primosol. The high Fe and Mn contents in Ferrosol and Isohumosol significantly decreased the mobility of Sb in these soils. The Na and Sb concentrations in soils used in the experiments positively correlated with each other (P<0.01). The Sb concentrations in soil solutions, the Sb chemical fraction patterns, and the Sb/Na ratios decreased in the order Sandy soil>Primosol>Isohumosol>Ferrosol, and we concluded that the Sb mobility in the soils also decreased in that order.

  12. Atomic oxygen interaction with nickel multilayer and antimony oxide doped MoS{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, M.T.

    1994-12-31

    Sputtered MoS{sub 2} is a solid lubricant capable of ultralow friction coefficients (below 0.05) load-bearing capacity. Since it exhibits low friction in vacuum, low outgassing rate, is non-migrating and lacks organic binders, this material is an attractive lubricant for space mechanisms. To exploit these new materials to their fullest potential, designers of space-based motion systems require data on the effects of atomic oxygen exposure on dense, sputtered MoS{sub 2}. This paper describes the effects of atomic oxygen in low earth orbit on the friction and surface composition of sputtered MoS{sub 2} films. Sputtered multilayer films of MoS{sub 2} with nickel (0.7 nm Ni per 10 nm MoS{sub 2}, for 1 {mu}m total film thickness), and MoS{sub 2} cosputtered with antimony oxide (nominally 2 {mu}m thick) were exposed to 2.2 to 2.5 x 10{sup 20} oxygen/cm{sup 2} over a period of 42.25 hours in earth orbit on the United States space shuttle. Identical specimens were kept as controls in desiccated storage for the duration of the mission, and another set was exposed to an equivalent fluence of atomic oxygen in the laboratory. The friction coefficient in air and vacuum, and the composition of worn surfaces, were determined prior to the shuttle flight and again after the shuttle flight. Results are described.

  13. Mitigation of Sulfur Poisoning of Ni/Zirconia SOFC Anodes by Antimony and Tin

    SciTech Connect

    Marina, Olga A.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Pederson, Larry R.

    2011-02-28

    Surface Ni/Sb and Ni/Sb alloys were found to efficiently minimize the negative effects of sulfur on the performance of Ni/zirconia anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Prior to operating on fuel gas containing low concentrations of H2S, the nickel/zirconia anodes were briefly exposed to antimony or tin vapor, which only slightly affected the SOFC performance. During the subsequent exposures to 1 and 5 ppm H2S, increases in anodic polarization losses were minimal compared to those observed for the standard nickel/zirconia anodes. Post-test XPS analyses showed that Sb and Sn tended to segregate to the surface of Ni particles, and further confirmed a significant reduction of adsorbed sulfur on the Ni surface in Ni/Sn and Ni/Sb samples compared to the Ni. The effect may be the result of weaker sulfur adsorption on bimetallic surfaces, adsorption site competition between sulfur and Sb or Sn on Ni, or other factors. The use of dilute binary alloys of Ni-Sb or Ni-Sn in the place of Ni, or brief exposure to Sb or Sn vapor, may be effective means to counteract the effects of sulfur poisoning in SOFC anodes and Ni catalysts. Other advantages, including suppression of coking or tailoring the anode composition for the internal reforming, are also expected.

  14. Spatial distribution and transport characteristics of heavy metals around an antimony mine area in central China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Yang, Hong; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Yunguo; Xu, Weihua; Wu, Youe; Lan, Shiming

    2017-03-01

    The spatial distribution and transport characteristics of heavy metals in an antimony mine area (Xikuangshan, China) were systematically studied using a field survey and geostatistical analytical methods. In the study area, 52 soil and sediment samples were collected from bare land, grassland, woodland and river sediments covering a surface area of 20 km(2). The soil properties and heavy metal concentrations were measured by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, respectively. Correlation analysis and principal component analysis suggest that Cu, Zn, Cd, As, Pb and Sb can be attributed to anthropogenic inputs, whereas Cr, Mn and Ni are of natural origin. Distribution maps of heavy metals were generated using the Kriging interpolation method to identify their distribution trends. The results show the influence of wind, river, distance and vegetation on the spatial distribution. The results also revealed that windborne transport may play a significant role in the spreading of contaminants. In addition, the environmental risk of heavy metal pollution was evaluated using their geoaccumulation indexes in the whole region. All of the results indicate that the heavy metal distributions in the soils were consistent with the local prevailing wind direction. In addition, the environmental quality could be seriously threatened by heavy metal contaminants from the smelter and tailings.

  15. Antimony-Doped Tin Oxide Thin Films Grown by Home Made Spray Pyrolysis Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusuf, Gbadebo; Babatola, Babatunde Keji; Ishola, Abdulahi Dimeji; Awodugba, Ayodeji O.; Solar cell Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Transparent conducting antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) films have been deposited on glass substrates by home made spray pyrolysis technique. The structural, electrical and optical properties of the ATO films have been investigated as a function of Sb-doping level and annealing temperature. The optimum target composition for high conductivity and low resistivity was found to be 20 wt. % SnSb2 + 90 wt. ATO. Under optimized deposition conditions of 450oC annealing temperature, electrical resistivity of 5.2×10-4 Ω -cm, sheet resistance of 16.4 Ω/sq, average optical transmittance of 86% in the visible range, and average optical band-gap of 3.34eV were obtained. The film deposited at lower annealing temperature shows a relatively rough, loosely bound slightly porous surface morphology while the film deposited at higher annealing temperature shows uniformly distributed grains of greater size. Keywords: Annealing, Doping, Homemade spray pyrolysis, Tin oxide, Resistivity

  16. Risk assessment from exposure to arsenic, antimony, and selenium in urban gardens (Madrid, Spain).

    PubMed

    De Miguel, Eduardo; Izquierdo, Miguel; Gómez, Amaia; Mingot, Juan; Barrio-Parra, Fernando

    2017-02-01

    The authors discuss the geochemical behavior of arsenic (As), antimony (Sb), and selenium (Se) in urban gardens and the human health implications associated with urban agriculture. A total of 42 samples from 7 urban gardens in Madrid, Spain, were collected from the top 20 cm of soil. Concentrations of As, Sb, and Se and the main soil properties (i.e., total iron, pH, texture, calcium carbonate, and organic matter) were determined. A significant correlation was found between As and Sb and calcium carbonate, indicating the possibility of surface adsorption or ligand exchange with the carbonate group. Also, Sb seemed to form stable chelates with soil organic matter. On the other hand, Se showed a significant association with clay and iron content. The concentration of Sb in soil exceeded the recommended value for agricultural use in 70% of the urban gardens. A human health risk assessment resulted in acceptable levels of both noncarcinogenic and carcinogenic risks (although with elevated values of the latter), with As as the main risk driver and soil and food ingestion as the main exposure pathways. The numerical results of the risk assessment should be interpreted with caution given the considerable uncertainties in some exposure variables and the lack of quantitative values for the suspected carcinogenicity of Sb and Se. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:544-550. © 2016 SETAC.

  17. Ornithine decarboxylase or gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase overexpression protects Leishmania (Vianna) guyanensis against antimony.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Maisa S; Comini, Marcelo A; Resende, Bethânia V; Santi, Ana Maria M; Zoboli, Antônio P; Moreira, Douglas S; Murta, Silvane M F

    2017-04-01

    Trypanosomatids present a unique mechanism for detoxification of peroxides that is dependent on trypanothione (bisglutathionylspermidine). Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) produce molecules that are direct precursors of trypanothione. In this study, Leishmania guyanensis odc and gsh1 overexpressor cell lines were generated to investigate the contribution of these genes to the trivalent antimony (Sb(III))-resistance phenotype. The ODC- or GSH1-overexpressors parasites presented an increase of two and four-fold in Sb(III)-resistance index, respectively, when compared with the wild-type line. Pharmacological inhibition of ODC and GSH1 with the specific inhibitors α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), respectively, increased the antileishmanial effect of Sb(III) in all cell lines. However, the ODC- and GSH1-overexpressor were still more resistant to Sb(III) than the parental cell line. Together, our data shows that modulation of ODC and GSH1 levels and activity is sufficient to affect L. guyanensis susceptibility to Sb(III), and confirms a role of these genes in the Sb(III)-resistance phenotype.

  18. Facile synthesis of antimony-doped tin oxide nanoparticles by a polymer-pyrolysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan-Qing; Wang, Jian-Lei; Fu, Shao-Yun; Mei, Shi-Gang; Zhang, Jian-Min; Yong, Kang

    2010-06-15

    In this article, antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) nanoparticles was synthesized by a facile polymer-pyrolysis method. The pyrolysis behaviors of the polymer precursors prepared via in situ polymerization of metal salts and acrylic acid were analyzed by simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC). The structural and morphological characteristics of the products were studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results reveal that the ATO nanoparticles calcined at 600 {sup o}C show good crystallinity with the cassiterite structure and cubic-spherical like morphology. The average particle size of ATO decreases from 200 to 15 nm as the Sb doping content increases from 5 mol% to 15 mol%. Electrical resistivity measurement shows that the resistivity for the 10-13 mol% Sb-doped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles is reduced by more than three orders compared with the pure SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles. In addition, due to its versatility this polymer-pyrolysis method can be extended to facile synthesis of other doped n-type semiconductor, such as In, Ga, Al doped ZnO, Sn doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  19. Assessment and distribution of antimony in soils around three coal mines, Anhui, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, C.; Liu, Gaisheng; Kang, Y.; Lam, P.K.S.; Chou, C.

    2011-01-01

    Thirty-three soil samples were collected from the Luling, Liuer, and Zhangji coal mines in the Huaibei and Huainan areas of Anhui Province, China. The samples were analyzed for antimony (Sb) by inductively coupled plasmaoptical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) method. The average Sb content in the 33 samples was 4 mg kg-1, which is lower than in coals from this region (6.2 mg kg-1). More than 75% of the soils sampled showed a significant degree of Sb pollution (enrichment factors [EFs] 5-20). The soils collected near the gob pile and coal preparation plant were higher in Sb content than those collected from residential areas near the mines. The gob pile and tailings from the preparation plant were high in mineral matter content and high in Sb. They are the sources of Sb pollution in surface soils in the vicinity of coal mines. The spatial dispersion of Sb in surface soil in the mine region shows that Sb pollution could reach out as far as 350 m into the local environment conditions. Crops in rice paddies may adsorb some Sb and reduce the Sb content in soils from paddyfields. Vertical distribution of Sb in two soil profiles indicates that Sb is normally relatively immobile in soils. ?? 2011 Air & Waste Management Association.

  20. Silver antimony Ohmic contacts to moderately doped n-type germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Dumas, D. C. S.; Gallacher, K.; Millar, R.; Paul, D. J.; MacLaren, I.; Myronov, M.; Leadley, D. R.

    2014-04-21

    A self doping contact consisting of a silver/antimony alloy that produces an Ohmic contact to moderately doped n-type germanium (doped to a factor of four above the metal-insulator transition) has been investigated. An evaporation of a mixed alloy of Ag/Sb (99%/1%) onto n-Ge (N{sub D}=1×10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}) annealed at 400 °C produces an Ohmic contact with a measured specific contact resistivity of (1.1±0.2)×10{sup −5} Ω-cm{sup 2}. It is proposed that the Ohmic behaviour arises from an increased doping concentration at the Ge surface due to the preferential evaporation of Sb confirmed by transmission electron microscope analysis. It is suggested that the doping concentration has increased to a level where field emission will be the dominate conduction mechanism. This was deduced from the low temperature electrical characterisation of the contact, which exhibits Ohmic behaviour down to a temperature of 6.5 K.

  1. [Interlaboratory study on migration test of antimony and germanium for food-contact polyethylene terephthalate].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Ryo; Mutsuga, Motoh; Abe, Takashi; Abe, Yutaka; Ohsaka, Ikue; Ohno, Haruka; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Yuichiro; Ozaki, Asako; Kakihara, Yoshiteru; Kawasaki, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Hisashi; Shibata, Hiroshi; Shirono, Katsuhiro; Sekido, Haruko; Sonobe, Hironori; Takasaka, Noriko; Tajima, Yoshiyasu; Tanaka, Aoi; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Nomura, Chie; Haneishi, Nahoko; Hikida, Akinori; Miura, Toshihiko; Watanabe, Kazunari; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    An interlaboratory study was performed to evaluate a migration test method of antimony (Sb) and germanium (Ge), based on the Japanese Food Sanitation Law for food- contact polyethylene terephthalate. Eighteen laboratories participated, and quantified Sb and Ge in three test solutions as blind duplicates using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) or induced coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Statistical analysis revealed that the trueness, repeatability and reproducibility were 98-107%, 1.7-7.5% and 2.0-18.8% by using GF-AAS and ICP-OES. The performance of these methods is sufficient for testing the specifications. The performance parameters of ICP-MS were 99-106%, 0.7-2.2% and 2.2-10.5%, respectively. ICP-MS is available as an alternative measuring method. However, in some laboratories, the quantitative values of Sb were higher than the addition levels. We found that Sb in working solutions is absorbed on glass vessels. Careful control of concentration in working solutions is required for Sb analysis.

  2. Rashba effect in single-layer antimony telluroiodide SbTeI

    DOE PAGES

    Zhuang, Houlong L.; Cooper, Valentino R.; Xu, Haixuan; ...

    2015-09-04

    Exploring spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in single-layer materials is important for potential spintronics applications. In this paper, using first-principles calculations, we show that single-layer antimony telluroiodide SbTeI behaves as a two-dimensional semiconductor exhibiting a G0W0 band gap of 1.82 eV. More importantly, we observe the Rashba spin splitting in the SOC band structure of single-layer SbTeI with a sizable Rashba coupling parameter of 1.39 eV Å, which is significantly larger than that of a number of two-dimensional systems including surfaces and interfaces. The low formation energy and real phonon modes of single-layer SbTeI imply that it is stable. Finally, our studymore » suggests that single-layer SbTeI is a candidate single-layer material for applications in spintronics devices.« less

  3. A Multiplatform Metabolomic Approach to the Basis of Antimonial Action and Resistance in Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Castilho-Martins, Emerson A.; Tavares, Marina F. M.; Barbas, Coral; López-Gonzálvez, Ángeles; Rivas, Luis

    2015-01-01

    There is a rising resistance against antimony drugs, the gold-standard for treatment until some years ago. That is a serious problem due to the paucity of drugs in current clinical use. In a research to reveal how these drugs affect the parasite during treatment and to unravel the underlying basis for their resistance, we have employed metabolomics to study treatment in Leishmania infantum promastigotes. This was accomplished first through the untargeted analysis of metabolic snapshots of treated and untreated parasites both resistant and responders, utilizing a multiplatform approach to give the widest as possible coverage of the metabolome, and additionally through novel monitoring of the origin of the detected alterations through a 13C traceability experiment. Our data stress a multi-target metabolic alteration with treatment, affecting in particular the cell redox system that is essential to cope with detoxification and biosynthetic processes. Additionally, relevant changes were noted in amino acid metabolism. Our results are in agreement with other authors studying other Leishmania species. PMID:26161866

  4. Cryogenic Thermoelectric Properties of the Bismuth-Magnesium and Bismuth-Antimony-Magnesium Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orovets, Christine; Jin, Hyungyu; Wiendlocha, Bartlomiej; Heremans, Joseph P.

    2012-02-01

    There is a need to increase the Figure of Merit of thermoelectric materials used in low temperature cooling applications. Band structure calculations show that substitutional magnesium in bismuth can form sharp density of states peaks, suggesting the presence of a resonant level. Single crystal samples of (Bi1-xSbx)1-yMgy (0 <= x <= 12% and 0 <= y <= 0.7% nominally) were synthesized in evacuated ampoules. The composition of each ingot was analyzed using x-ray diffraction, and transport properties were measured using a Thermal Transport Option (TTO) in a Physical Properties Measurement System (PPMS) from 300K to 2K. It is apparent that the addition of magnesium strongly influences thermopower; the data for Bi90Sb10Mg0.7 shows a second minimum in thermopower at 20K, in addition to the expected minimum at approximately 50-60K. This could be due to the resonant scattering at the cryogenic temperatures which arises from the excess density of states. The addition of magnesium also appears to decrease thermal conductivity below 30K. We present systematic experimental approaches and the results to elucidate the role of magnesium in bismuth and bismuth-antimony systems.

  5. Semimetal Nanomaterials of Antimony as Highly Efficient Agent for Photoacoustic Imaging and Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanwan; Rong, Pengfei; Yang, Kai; Huang, Peng; Sun, Kang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    In this study we report semimetal naonmaterials of antimony (Sb) as highly efficient agent for photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and photothermal therapy (PTT). The Sb nanorod bundles have been synthesized through a facile route by mixing 1-octadecane (ODE) and oleyl amine (OAm) as the solvent. The aqueous dispersion of PEGylated Sb NPs, due to its broad and strong photoabsorption ranging from ultraviolet (UV) to near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths, is applicable as a photothermal agent driven by 808 nm laser with photothermal conversion efficiency up to 41%, noticeably higher than most of the PTT agents reported before. Our in vitro experiments also showed that cancer cell ablation effect of PEGylated Sb NPs was dependent on laser power. By intratumoral administration of PEGylated Sb NPs, 100% tumor ablation can be realized by using NIR laser irradiation with a lower power of 1 W/cm2 for 5 min (or 0.5 W/cm2 for 10 min) and no obvious toxic side effect is identified after photothermal treatment. Moreover, intense PA signal was also observed after intratumoral injection of PEGylated Sb NPs and NIR laser irradiation due to their strong NIR photoabsorption, suggesting PEGylated Sb NPs as a potential NIR PA agent. Based on the findings of this work, futher development of using other smimetal nanocrystals as highly efficient NIR agents can be achieved for vivo tumor imaging and PTT. PMID:25662491

  6. Antimony nanoparticles anchored in three-dimensional carbon network as promising sodium-ion battery anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wen; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Xuanpeng; Li, Qidong; Dong, Yifan; Hua, Jingchen; Zhou, Liang; Mai, Liqiang

    2016-02-01

    A novel composite with antimony (Sb) nanoparticles anchored in three-dimensional carbon network (denoted as SbNPs@3D-C) is successfully synthesized via a NaCl template-assisted self-assembly strategy, followed by freeze-drying and one-step in-situ carbonization. The three-dimensional interconnected macroporous carbon framework can not only stabilize the architecture and buffer the volume expansion for Sb nanoparticles, but also provide high electrical conductivity for the whole electrode. Consequently, as a sodium-ion battery anode, the SbNPs@3D-C delivers a high reversible capacity (456 mAh g-1 at 100 mA g-1), stable cycling performance (94.3% capacity retention after 500 cycles at 100 mA g-1) as well as superior rate capability (270 mAh g-1 at 2000 mA g-1). When compared with commercial Sb particles, the SbNPs@3D-C exhibits dramatically enhanced electrochemical performance. Free from expensive template sources and complex manipulation, this work might shed some light on the synthesis of low-cost and high-performance materials for the next "beyond lithium" battery generation.

  7. Synthesis of Copper-Antimony-Sulfide Nanocrystals for Solution-Processed Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Satoshi; Horita, Keisuke; Yuasa, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Tooru; Fujita, Katsuhiko; Ishiwata, Yoichi; Shimanoe, Kengo; Kida, Tetsuya

    2015-08-17

    The p-type nanocrystals (NCs) of copper-based chalcogenides, such as CuInSe2 and Cu2ZnSnS4, have attracted increasing attention in photovoltaic applications due to their potential to produce cheap solution-processed solar cells. Herein, we report the synthesis of copper-antimony-sulfide (CAS) NCs with different crystal phases including CuSbS2, Cu3SbS4, and Cu12Sb4S13. In addition, their morphology, crystal phase, and optical properties were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, UV-vis-near-IR spectroscopy, and photoemission yield spectroscopy. The morphology, crystal phase, and electronic structure were significantly dependent on the chemical composition in the CAS system. Devices were fabricated using particulate films consisting of CAS NCs prepared by spin coating without a high-temperature treatment. The CAS NC-based devices exhibited a diode-like current-voltage characteristic when coupled with an n-type CdS layer. In particular, the CuSbS2 NC devices exhibited photovoltaic responses under simulated sunlight, demonstrating its applicability for use in solution-processed solar cells.

  8. Usage of antimony segregation for selective doping of Si in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Yurasov, D. V.; Drozdov, M. N.; Murel, A. V.; Shaleev, M. V.; Novikov, A. V.; Zakharov, N. D.

    2011-06-01

    An original approach to selective doping of Si by antimony (Sb) in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is proposed and verified experimentally. This approach is based on controllable utilization of the effect of Sb segregation. In particular, the sharp dependence of Sb segregation on growth temperature in the range of 300-550 deg. C is exploited. The growth temperature variations between the kinetically limited and maximum segregation regimes are suggested to be utilized in order to obtain selectively doped structures with abrupt doping profiles. It is demonstrated that the proposed technique allows formation of selectively doped Si:Sb layers, including delta ({delta}-)doped layers in which Sb concentrations can be varied from 5 x 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. The obtained doped structures are shown to have a high crystalline quality and the short-term growth interruptions, which are needed to change the substrate temperature, do not lead to any significant accumulation of background impurities in grown samples. Realization of the proposed approach requires neither too low (<300 deg. C), nor too high (>600 deg. C) growth temperatures or any special equipment for the MBE machines.

  9. Direct Band Gap Gallium Antimony Phosphide (GaSbxP1−x) Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Russell, H. B.; Andriotis, A. N.; Menon, M.; Jasinski, J. B.; Martinez-Garcia, A.; Sunkara, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report direct band gap transition for Gallium Phosphide (GaP) when alloyed with just 1–2 at% antimony (Sb) utilizing both density functional theory based computations and experiments. First principles density functional theory calculations of GaSbxP1−x alloys in a 216 atom supercell configuration indicate that an indirect to direct band gap transition occurs at x = 0.0092 or higher Sb incorporation into GaSbxP1−x. Furthermore, these calculations indicate band edge straddling of the hydrogen evolution and oxygen evolution reactions for compositions ranging from x = 0.0092 Sb up to at least x = 0.065 Sb making it a candidate for use in a Schottky type photoelectrochemical water splitting device. GaSbxP1−x nanowires were synthesized by reactive transport utilizing a microwave plasma discharge with average compositions ranging from x = 0.06 to x = 0.12 Sb and direct band gaps between 2.21 eV and 1.33 eV. Photoelectrochemical experiments show that the material is photoactive with p-type conductivity. This study brings attention to a relatively uninvestigated, tunable band gap semiconductor system with tremendous potential in many fields. PMID:26860470

  10. Effects of antimony trisulfide (Sb2S3) on sliding friction of automotive brake friction materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wan Kyu; Rhee, Tae Hee; Kim, Hyun Seong; Jang, Ho

    2013-09-01

    The effect of antimony trisulfide (Sb2S3) on the tribological properties of automotive brake friction materials was investigated using a Krauss type tribometer and a 1/5 scale dynamometer with a rigid caliper. Results showed that Sb2S3 improved fade resistance by developing transfer films on the disc surface at elevated temperatures. On the other hand, the rubbing surfaces of the friction material exhibited contact plateaus with a broader height distribution when it contained Sb2S3, indicating fewer contact junctions compared to the friction material with graphite. The friction material with Sb2S3 also exhibited a lower stick-slip propensity than the friction material with graphite. The improved fade resistance with Sb2S3 is attributed to its lubricating capability sustained at high temperatures, while the lower stick-slip propensity of the friction material with Sb2S3 is associated with the slight difference between its static and kinetic coefficients of friction and high normal stiffness.

  11. Linear and nonlinear optical response of bismuth and antimony implanted fused silica: annealing effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Morgan, S. H.; Henderson, D. O.; Park, S. Y.; Weeks, R. A.; Magruder, R. H.; Zuhr, R. A.

    1995-10-01

    We report the linear and nonlinear optical response of bismuth and antimony implanted fused silica with doses of 6 × 10 16 ions/cm 2. The nonlinear refractive index, n2, was measured using a Z-scan technique with a mode locked Ti:sapphire laser operating in 140 fs pulse duration at 770 nm wavelength. It is found that the nonlinear refractive index n2 of as-implanted samples is large, in the order of 10 -10 cm 2/W and the n2 value of Bi as-implanted sample is about 2.4 times lager than that of Sb as-implanted sample. The large n2 response is attributed to the presence of nanosized metal particles in the implanted layer observed by transmission electron microscopy. We also report the changes of linear and nonlinear optical response when implanted samples were subsequently annealed at temperatures from 500 to 1000 C in argon and oxygen atmospheres. The annealing effect on optical properties is found to be strongly dependent on the annealing atmospheres. Our results indicate that annealing treatment in O 2 affects the local environment of the implanted metal ions and hence the linear and nonlinear optical properties of the metal-dielectric composite. We suggest that a new phase of metal-oxygen-silicate was formed during annealing in O 2 atmosphere.

  12. Inkjet-printing of antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) films for transparent conducting electrodes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jongwoo; Jeong, Bong Yong; Yoon, Ho Gyu; Lee, Sung-Nam; Kim, Jihoon

    2012-02-01

    Antimony-doped Tin oxide (ATO) films have been prepared by inkjet-printing method using ATO nanoparticle inks. The electrical and optical properties of the ATO films were investigated in order to understand the effects of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) temperatures. The decrease in the sheet resistance and resistivity of the inkjet-printed ATO films was observed as the annealing temperature increased. The film annealed at 700 degrees C showed the sheet resistance of 1.7 x 10(3) Omega/sq with the film thickness of 350 nm. The optical transmittance of the films remained constant regardless of their annealing temperatures. In order to further reduce the sheet resistance of the films as well as the annealing temperature, Ag-grid was printed in between two layers of inkjet-printed ATO. With 1.5 mm Ag line spacing, the Ag-grid embedded ATO film showed the sheet resistance of 25.6 Omega/sq after RTA at 300 degrees C.

  13. Speciation and bioavailability of selenium and antimony in non-flooded and wetland soils: a review.

    PubMed

    Nakamaru, Yasuo M; Altansuvd, Javkhlantuya

    2014-09-01

    Studies on the sorption behaviors of selenium (Se) and antimony (Sb) are reviewed. Both Se and Sb chemical speciation can be controlled by pH and redox potential, and both of them are likely to be sorbed onto oxy-hydroxides of aluminum, iron or manganese in soils. For agricultural soils especially, there are important physico-chemical and biological differences between non-flooded and wetland soils. Se forms Se(VI), Se(IV), Se(0), Se(-II), and organic Se species at soil pH and redox conditions. Under non-flooded conditions Se solubility is governed by an adsorption mechanism onto metal oxy-hydroxides rather than by precipitation and dissolution reactions; however, for the conditions of wetland soils, it can be expected that Se(0) and organic matter-bound Se play an important role. For Sb, in the soil environment, the dominant Sb forms are Sb(III) and Sb(V). Under aerobic soil conditions, Sb(III) is likely to be oxidized to Sb(V), and the dominant sorbed Sb species should be Sb(V). Under reducing conditions Sb mobility should be lower than under oxidizing conditions due to the lower mobility of Sb(III); however, reduction of Fe and Mn oxides could lead to dissolution of Fe and Mn-bound Sb. This indicates that the risk of Sb contamination to the food chain could be increased in wetland systems.

  14. Assessment and distribution of antimony in soils around three coal mines, Anhui, China.

    PubMed

    Qi, Cuicui; Liu, Guijian; Kang, Yu; Lam, Paul K S; Chou, Chenlin

    2011-08-01

    Thirty-three soil samples were collected from the Luling, Liuer, and Zhangji coal mines in the Huaibei and Huainan areas of Anhui Province, China. The samples were analyzed for antimony (Sb) by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) method. The average Sb content in the 33 samples was 4 mg kg(-1), which is lower than in coals from this region (6.2 mg kg(-1)). More than 75% of the soils sampled showed a significant degree of Sb pollution (enrichment factors [EFs] 5-20). The soils collected near the gob pile and coal preparation plant were higher in Sb content than those collected from residential areas near the mines. The gob pile and tailings from the preparation plant were high in mineral matter content and high in Sb. They are the sources of Sb pollution in surface soils in the vicinity of coal mines. The spatial dispersion of Sb in surface soil in the mine region shows that Sb pollution could reach out as far as 350 m into the local environment conditions. Crops in rice paddies may adsorb some Sb and reduce the Sb content in soils from paddyfields. Vertical distribution of Sb in two soil profiles indicates that Sb is normally relatively immobile in soils.

  15. High levels of antimony in dust from e-waste recycling in southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiangyang; Li, Zhonggen; Zhuang, Xiaochun; Han, Zhixuan; Yang, Wenlin

    2011-11-01

    Environmental contamination due to uncontrolled e-waste recycling is an emerging global issue. Antimony (Sb) is a toxic element used in semiconductor components and flame retardants for circuit board within electronic equipment. When e-waste is recycled, Sb is released and contaminates the surrounding environment; however, few studies have characterized the extent of this problem. In this study, we investigated Sb and arsenic (As) distributions in indoor dust from 13 e-waste recycling villages in Guiyu, Guangdong Province, southeastern China. Results revealed significantly elevated concentrations of Sb (6.1-232 mg/kg) in dust within all villages, which were 3.9-147 times higher than those from the non e-waste sites, indicating e-waste recycling was an important source of Sb pollution. On the contrary, As concentrations (5.4-17.7 mg/kg) in e-waste dusts were similar to reference values from the control sites. Therefore, dusts emitted from e-waste recycling may be characterized by high Sb/As ratios, which may help identify the contamination due to the e-waste recycling activities.

  16. Effect of antimony addition on the optical behaviour of germanium selenide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Parikshit; Rangra, V. S.; Sharma, Pankaj; Katyal, S. C.

    2008-11-01

    This paper reports the influence of antimony (Sb) addition on the optical properties (optical energy gap and refractive index) of thin solid films of the chalcogenide glassy Ge0.17Se0.83-xSbx(x = 0, 0.03, 0.09, 0.12, 0.15) system. This has been done by analysing the transmittance (T) and reflectance (R) spectra in the spectral region 400-2000 nm. It was found that the optical energy gap decreases with increasing Sb content from 1.92 to 1.63 eV with an uncertainty of ± 0.01 eV. The results were interpreted in terms of bond energies and on the basis of the concept of electronegativity. The refractive index has been found to increase with increasing Sb content. The increase in the refractive index has been explained on the basis of polarizability. Dispersion of refractive index has been analysed using the Wemple-DiDomenico single oscillator model. The static refractive index increased from 2.45 to 2.91 for the studied compositions. An estimate of the energy gap has also been taken theoretically and it has been found that both the optical energy gap (measured from T and R spectra) and the theoretical energy gap follow similar trends.

  17. A Multiplatform Metabolomic Approach to the Basis of Antimonial Action and Resistance in Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Rojo, David; Canuto, Gisele A B; Castilho-Martins, Emerson A; Tavares, Marina F M; Barbas, Coral; López-Gonzálvez, Ángeles; Rivas, Luis

    2015-01-01

    There is a rising resistance against antimony drugs, the gold-standard for treatment until some years ago. That is a serious problem due to the paucity of drugs in current clinical use. In a research to reveal how these drugs affect the parasite during treatment and to unravel the underlying basis for their resistance, we have employed metabolomics to study treatment in Leishmania infantum promastigotes. This was accomplished first through the untargeted analysis of metabolic snapshots of treated and untreated parasites both resistant and responders, utilizing a multiplatform approach to give the widest as possible coverage of the metabolome, and additionally through novel monitoring of the origin of the detected alterations through a 13C traceability experiment. Our data stress a multi-target metabolic alteration with treatment, affecting in particular the cell redox system that is essential to cope with detoxification and biosynthetic processes. Additionally, relevant changes were noted in amino acid metabolism. Our results are in agreement with other authors studying other Leishmania species.

  18. Influence of combined pollution of antimony and arsenic on culturable soil microbial populations and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiongshan; He, Mengchang; Wang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    The effects of both combined and single pollution of antimony (Sb) and arsenic (As) in different concentrations on culturable soil microbial populations and enzyme activities were studied under laboratory conditions. Joint effects of both Sb and As were different from that of Sb or As alone. The inhibition rate of culturable soil microbial populations under Sb and As pollution followed the order: bacterial > fungi > actinomycetes. There existed antagonistic inhibiting effect on urease and acid phophatase and synergistic inhibiting effect on protease under the combined pollution of Sb (III) and As (III). Only urease appeared to be the most sensitive indicator under Sb (V) and As (V) pollution, and there existed antagonistic inhibiting effect on acid phophatase and synergistic inhibiting effect on urease and protease under Sb (V) and As (V) combined pollution at most time. In this study, we also confirmed that the trivalent states of Sb and As were more toxic to all the microbes tested and more inhibitory on microbial enzyme activities then their pentavalent counterparts. The results also suggest that not only the application rate of the two metalloids but also the chemical form of metalloids should be considered while assessing the effect of metalloid on culturable microbial populations and enzyme activities. Urease and acid phosphatase can be used as potential biomarkers to evaluate the intensity of Sb (III) and As (III) stress.

  19. Electron-deficient telluride Cs3Cu20Te13 with sodalite-type network: syntheses, structures, and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Huai, Wen-Juan; Shen, Jin-Ni; Lin, Hua; Chen, Ling; Wu, Li-Ming

    2014-06-02

    The first sodalite-type telluride, Cs3Cu20Te13, has been successfully synthesized by solid-state reactions. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction data reveal its cubic symmetry and lattice parameters of a = 14.7557(6) Å, V = 3212.8(2) Å(3), and Z = 4. The three-dimensional network is constructed by (CuTe)12 tetrakaidecahedra centered by different guest species (either a Cs(+) or a Te(2-)@Cu8 cube) extending in a 2 × 2 × 2 supercell with respect to the conventional sodalite. Density functional theory analysis uncovers the unique feature of the p-type metallic sodalite framework accommodating anionic guest species, which agrees well with the experimental metallic electrical conductivity and Pauli paramagnetism.

  20. A rapid and sensitive assay for determination of doxycycline using thioglycolic acid-capped cadmium telluride quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Tashkhourian, Javad; Absalan, Ghodratollah; Jafari, Marzieh; Zare, Saber

    2016-01-05

    A rapid, simple and inexpensive spectrofluorimetric sensor for determination of doxycycline based on its interaction with thioglycolic acid-capped cadmium telluride quantum dots (TGA/CdTe QDs) has been developed. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the sensor exhibited a fast response time of <10s. The results revealed that doxycycline could quench the fluorescence of TGA/CdTe QDs via electron transfer from the QDs to doxycycline through a dynamic quenching mechanism. The sensor permitted determination of doxycycline in a concentration range of 1.9×10(-6)-6.1×10(-5)molL(-1) with a detection limit of 1.1×10(-7)molL(-1). The sensor was applied for determination of doxycycline in honey and human serum samples.