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Sample records for antiprotons beam applied

  1. Radial compression of antiproton cloud for production of ultraslow antiproton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroda, N.; Nagata, Y.; Torii, H. A.; Komaki, K.; Barna, D.; Horvath, D.; Eades, J.; Hori, M.; Imao, H.; Mohri, A.; Shibata, M.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2009-03-30

    We report here the radial compression of a large number of antiprotons under ultrahigh vacuum conditions by applying a rotating electric field. The radial compression is a key technique for production of ultraslow antiproton beam extracting from an electromagnetic traps. Such beam will be applicable to synthesizing antiprotonic atoms and antihydrogen atoms.

  2. Antiproton beam polarizer using a dense polarized target

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2011-05-01

    We describe considerations regarding the spin filtering method for the antiproton beam. The proposed investigation of the double polarization cross section for antiproton to nucleon interaction is outlined. It will use a single path of the antiproton beam through a dense polarized target, e.g. 3He or CH2, followed by a polarimeter.

  3. Antiproton Production beam and Reverse Injection System

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, G.

    1981-08-16

    The objectives of this project are two fold: (1) To extract high energy protons from the Main Ring (MR) and target them to produce antiprotons which are subsequently captured in the existing Booster accelerator; and (2) to provide a channel for injecting either protons or antiprotons into the MR from the booster in a direction opposite to that of the normal proton acceleration as colliding beams can be created. The present design, therefore, is in support of two separate larger projects, viz., the collisions of protons in the Tevatron (normal circulation direction) with 'reverse injected' protons in the MR, and the collision of normal direction protons with reverse injected antiprotons either in the MR or in the Tevatron. Figure 1 shows the layout of the project area. It spans the shortest distance between possible injection/ejection points in the existing accelerator structures, hence minimizing costs. The tunnel will lie underground at the level of the MR and booster.

  4. Instabilities of cooled antiproton beam in recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The more beam is cooled, the less stable it is. In the 3.3 km Recycler Ring, stacked 8 GeV antiprotons are cooled both with stochastic (transversely) and electron (3D) cooling. Since the machine is staying near the coupling resonance, coupled optical functions should be used for stability analysis. To stabilize beam against the resistive wall instability, a digital damper is used. Digital dampers can be described as linear operators with explicit time dependence, and that makes a principle difference with analogous dampers. Theoretical description of the digital dampers is presented. Electron cooling makes possible a two-beam instability of the cooled beam with the electron beam. Special features of this instability are described, and the remedy is discussed.

  5. Radial Compression of an Antiproton Cloud for Production of Intense Antiproton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroda, N.; Yamazaki, Y.; Torii, H. A.; Nagata, Y.; Komaki, K.; Shibata, M.; Mohri, A.; Barna, D.; Horvath, D.; Hori, M.; Eades, J.

    2008-05-23

    We report here the radial compression of a large number of antiprotons ({approx}5x10{sup 5}) in a strong magnetic field under ultrahigh vacuum conditions by applying a rotating electric field. Compression without any resonant structures was demonstrated for a range of frequencies from the sideband frequency of 200 kHz to more than 1000 kHz. The radial compression achieved is a key technique for synthesizing and manipulating antihydrogen atoms and antiprotonic atoms.

  6. Radial compression of an antiproton cloud for production of intense antiproton beams.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, N; Torii, H A; Shibata, M; Nagata, Y; Barna, D; Hori, M; Horváth, D; Mohri, A; Eades, J; Komaki, K; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-05-23

    We report here the radial compression of a large number of antiprotons ( approximately 5 x 10(5)) in a strong magnetic field under ultrahigh vacuum conditions by applying a rotating electric field. Compression without any resonant structures was demonstrated for a range of frequencies from the sideband frequency of 200 kHz to more than 1000 kHz. The radial compression achieved is a key technique for synthesizing and manipulating antihydrogen atoms and antiprotonic atoms.

  7. The antiproton cell experiment—do antiprotons offer advantages over other particle beam modalities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellner, Stefan; Boll, Rebecca; Caccia, Massimo; Negrini, Loretta; Straße, Tina; Tegami, Sara; Holzscheiter, Michael H.

    2012-12-01

    The use of heavy charged particles for cancer therapy has the potential for a significant improvement of the therapeutic window compared to standard X-ray treatments. This is due to the improved energy deposition profile, exhibiting a well-defined peak at a depth in target controllable by the initial energy of the beam. Particles heavier than protons in addition show an increase in biological effectiveness. Compared to protons or heavy ions, antiprotons deposit additional annihilation energy, mostly by low energy recoils, resulting in an increase of dose and also adding a component with high biological effectiveness in the target region. The relative magnitude of the physical energy deposition of antiprotons compared to protons was measured at Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) by A. Sullivan, but no study of the biological effect had been conducted prior to the Antiproton Cell Experiment (AD-4/ACE) experiment at CERN. The special conditions found at CERN present significant challenges, but also offer unique opportunities. 500 ns pulses of antiprotons are extracted from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at 500 MeV/c momentum. Biological cell samples are irradiated and clonogenic survival fractions are measured for various doses. To extract biological efficiency, the physical dose deposition is obtained by Monte-Carlo calculations in conjunction with shot-by-shot monitoring of the incoming beam intensity and profile using a silicon pixel detector. Also imaging of the pions resulting from antiproton annihilations in the target using silicon pixel detector technology to determine the actual range in more complex targets with strong variations in material densities was carried out. The feasibility of this technique using a novel arrangement of the detector was demonstrated. This paper describes the ACE experiment and focuses on the different detector activities within the AD-4/ACE collaboration, explaining the experimental set-up, physical and biological methods used

  8. Commissioning of polarized-proton and antiproton beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Yokosawa, A.

    1988-05-04

    The author described the polarized-proton and polarized-antiproton beams up to 200 GeV/c at Fermilab. The beam line, called MP, consists of the 400-m long primary and 350-m long secondary beam line followed by 60-m long experimental hall. We discuss the characteristics of the polarized beams. The Fermilab polarization projects are designated at E-581/704 initiated and carried out by an international collaboration, Argonne (US), Fermilab (US), Kyoto-Kyushu-Hiroshima-KEK (Japan), LAPP (France), Northwestern University (US), Los Alamos Laboratory (US), Rice (US), Saclay (France), Serpukhov (USSR), INFN Trieste (Italy), and University of Texas (US).

  9. Antiprotons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Chamberlain, Owen; Segre, Emilio; Wiegand, Clyde

    1955-11-29

    Since the development of Dirac's theory of the electron and the brilliant confirmation of one of its most startling predictions by the discovery of the positron by Anderson, it has been assumed most likely that the proton would also have its charge conjugate, the antiproton. The properties that define the antiproton are: (a) charge equal to the electron charge (also in sign); (b) mass equal to the proton mass; (c) stability against spontaneous decay; (d) ability to annihilate by interaction with a proton or neutron, probably generating pions and releasing in some manner the energy 2 mc{sup 2}; (e) generation in pairs with ordinary nucleons; (f) magnetic moment equal but opposite to that of the proton; (g) fermion of spin 1/2. Not all these properties are independent, but all might ultimately be subjected to experiment.

  10. Generating a Reduced-energy Antiproton beam using Channeling Electrostatic elements (GRACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, Gerard; Pacifico, Nicola; Aegis Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    A device was designed for Generating a Reduced-energy Antiproton-beam using Channeling Electrostatic elements (GRACE). A series of einzel lenses and electrodes are used to create a slow beam of antiprotons with tunable mean energy (0 to 16 keV with root mean squared value below 20%) using antiprotons (mean energy of 5 MeV) from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. Degrader foil is in place, so GRACE further deflects the beam bunches away from the annihilation products, focusing them on a 14 mm x 14 mm detector. Manufacturing parameters were found using simulations written in C++. The device is currently in use by the Antihydrogen Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy (AEgIS) collaboration at CERN, which seeks to measure the sign of the gravitational constant for antimatter by performing interferometry studies on an antihydrogen beam. GRACE delivers on the order of 10 events per beam bunch from the AD. Antiprotons will eventually be used together with a pulse of positronium atoms to make antihydrogen atoms with horizontal velocity. GRACE is being used to perform intermediary experiments concerning interferometry of antiprotons, an important stepping stone on the way to measuring the sign of gravity. Special thanks to Boston University Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program, Lawrence Sulak, and Michael Doser.

  11. Non-Gaussian beam dynamics in low energy antiproton storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resta-López, J.; Hunt, J. R.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-10-01

    In low energy antiproton facilities, where electron cooling is fundamental, the cooling forces together with heating phenomena causing emittance blow-up, such as Intra Beam Scattering (IBS), result in highly non-Gaussian beam distributions. In these cases, a precise simulation of IBS effects is essential to realistically evaluate the long term beam evolution, taking into account the non-Gaussian characteristics of the beam. Here, we analyse the beam dynamics in the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA), which is a new small synchrotron currently being constructed at CERN to decelerate antiprotons to energies as low as 100 keV. Simulations are performed using the code BETACOOL, comparing different models of IBS.

  12. A new antiproton beam transfer scheme without coalescing

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2003-06-04

    An effective way to increase the luminosity in the Fermilab Tevatron collider program Run2 is to improve the overall antiproton transfer efficiency. During antiproton coalescing in the Main Injector (MI), about 10-15% particles get lost. This loss could be avoided in a new antiproton transfer scheme that removes coalescing from the process. Moreover, this scheme would also eliminate emittance dilution due to coalescing. This scheme uses a 2.5 MHz RF system to transfer antiprotons from the Accumulator to the Main Injector. It is then followed by a bunch rotation in the MI to shorten the bunch length so that it can be captured by a 53 MHz RF bucket. Calculations and ESME simulations show that this scheme works. No new hardware is needed to implement this scheme.

  13. Heating {sup 197}Au nuclei with 8 GeV antiproton and {pi}- beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.; Beaulieu, L.; Breuer, H.; Gushue, S.; Hsi, W.-C.; Korteling, R. G.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Laforest, R.; Lefort, T.; Martin, E.; Pienkowski, L.; Ramakrishnan, E.; Remsberg, L. P.; Viola, V. E.

    1999-05-03

    This contribution stresses results recently obtained from experiment E900 performed at the Brookhaven AGS accelerator with 8 GeV/c antiproton and negative pion beams using the Indiana Silicon Sphere detector array. An investigation of the reaction mechanism is presented, along with source characteristics deduced from a two-component fit to the spectra. An enhancement of deposition energy with the antiproton beam with respect to the pion beam is observed. The results are qualitatively consistent with predictions of an intranuclear cascade code.

  14. Report of the Snowmass T4 working group on particle sources: Positron sources, anti-proton sources and secondary beams

    SciTech Connect

    N. Mokhov et al.

    2002-12-05

    This report documents the activities of the Snowmass 2001 T4 Particle Sources Working Group. T4 was charged with examining the most challenging aspects of positron sources for linear colliders and antiproton sources for proton-antiproton colliders, and the secondary beams of interest to the physics community that will be available from the next generation of high-energy particle accelerators. The leading issues, limiting technologies, and most important R and D efforts of positron production, antiproton production, and secondary beams are discussed in this paper. A listing of T4 Presentations is included.

  15. Using time separation of signals to obtain independent proton and antiproton beam position measurements around the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Independent position measurement of the counter-circulating proton and antiproton beams in the Tevatron, never supported by the original Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system, presents a challenge to upgrading that system. This paper discusses the possibilities and complications of using time separation of proton and antiproton signals at the numerous BPM locations and for the dynamic Tevatron operating conditions. Results of measurements using one such method are presented.

  16. Experimental setup and first measurement of DNA damage induced along and around an antiproton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, J. N.; Currell, F. J.; Timson, D. J.; Holzscheiter, M. H.; Bassler, N.; Herrmann, R.; Prise, K. M.; Schettino, G.

    2010-10-01

    Radiotherapy employs ionizing radiation to induce lethal DNA lesions in cancer cells while minimizing damage to healthy tissues. Due to their pattern of energy deposition, better therapeutic outcomes can, in theory, be achieved with ions compared to photons. Antiprotons have been proposed to offer a further enhancement due to their annihilation at the end of the path. The work presented here aimed to establish and validate an experimental procedure for the quantification of plasmid and genomic DNA damage resulting from antiproton exposure. Immunocytochemistry was used to assess DNA damage in directly and indirectly exposed human fibroblasts irradiated in both plateau and Bragg peak regions of a 126 MeV antiproton beam at CERN. Cells were stained post irradiation with an anti- γ-H2AX antibody. Quantification of the γ-H2AX foci-dose relationship is consistent with a linear increase in the Bragg peak region. A qualitative analysis of the foci detected in the Bragg peak and plateau region indicates significant differences highlighting the different severity of DNA lesions produced along the particle path. Irradiation of desalted plasmid DNA with 5 Gy antiprotons at the Bragg peak resulted in a significant portion of linear plasmid in the resultant solution.

  17. 8 GeV beam line optics optimization for the rapid antiproton transfers at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaslaev, V.; Lebedev, V.; Morgan, J.; Vander Meulen, D.; /Fermilab

    2007-02-01

    Tevatron Run-II upgrade requires a significant increase of the efficiency and speed of the antiproton transfers from the Accumulator to the Recycler. The goal for the total transfer time is challenging a reduction from 1 hour down to a few minutes. Here we discuss the beam line optics aspects of this project. Results of lattice measurements and optimization are analyzed in terms of transport efficiency and stability.

  18. Experiments with Fermilab polarized proton and polarized antiproton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yokosawa, A.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize activities concerning the Fermilab polarized beams. They include a brief description of the polarized-beam facility, measurements of beam polarization by polarimeters, asymmetry measurements in the {pi}{degree} production at high p{sub {perpendicular}} and in the {Lambda} ({Sigma}{degree}), {pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{degree} production at large x{sub F}, and {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(pp, {bar p}p) measurements. 18 refs.

  19. Experiments with Fermilab polarized proton and antiproton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yokosawa, A.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize activities concerning the Fermilab polarized beams. They include a brief description of the polarized-beam facility, measurements of beam polarization by polarimeters, asymmetry measurements in the {pi}{degree} production at high p{sub {perpendicular}} and in the {Lambda} ({Sigma}{degree}), {pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{degree} production at large x{sub F}, and {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(pp, {bar p}p) measurements. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Antiproton radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Niels; Alsner, Jan; Beyer, Gerd; DeMarco, John J; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Jäkel, Oliver; Knudsen, Helge V; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B; Solberg, Timothy D; Sørensen, Brita S; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G; Holzscheiter, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    Antiprotons are interesting as a possible future modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers and exhibit equal radiobiology well before the Bragg-peak. But when the antiprotons come to rest at the Bragg-peak, they annihilate, releasing almost 2 GeV per antiproton-proton annihilation. Most of this energy is carried away by energetic pions, but the Bragg-peak of the antiprotons is still locally augmented with approximately 20-30 MeV per antiproton. Apart from the gain in physical dose, an increased relative biological effect also has been observed, which can be explained by the fact that some of the secondary particles from the antiproton annihilation exhibit high-LET properties. Finally, the weakly interacting energetic pions, which are leaving the target volume, may provide a real time feedback on the exact location of the annihilation peak. We have performed dosimetry experiments and investigated the radiobiological properties using the antiproton beam available at CERN, Geneva. Dosimetry experiments were carried out with ionization chambers, alanine pellets and radiochromic film. Radiobiological experiments were done with V79 WNRE Chinese hamster cells. The radiobiological experiments were repeated with protons and carbon ions at TRIUMF and GSI, respectively, for comparison. Several Monte Carlo particle transport codes were investigated and compared with our experimental data obtained at CERN. The code that matched our data best was used to generate a set of depth dose data at several energies, including secondary particle-energy spectra. This can be used as base data for a treatment planning software such as TRiP. Our findings from the CERN experiments indicate that the biological effect of antiprotons in the plateau region may be reduced by a factor of 4 for the same biological target dose in a spread-out Bragg-peak, when comparing with protons. The

  1. CERN antiproton target: Hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Perillo-Marcone, Antonio; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV /c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 °C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of end-of-pulse tensile waves and its relevance on the overall response (iii) A reduction of 44% in tensile pressure could be obtained by the use of a high density tantalum cladding.

  2. Polarization of antiprotons by antiproton decay

    SciTech Connect

    Yokosawa, A.

    1985-01-01

    The production of polarized antiproton beams at Fermilab is briefly reviewed. Two types of high-energy anti p polarimeters are described - the Coulomb-nuclear polarimeter and the Primakoff-effect polarimeter. The production of 8.9 GeV/c polarized antiprotons before entering the Fermilab accumulator ring is then discussed. 5 refs., 6 figs. (LEW)

  3. The Antiproton-Nucleon Annihilation Process (Antiproton Collaboration Experiment)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Barkas, W. H.; Birge, R. W.; Chupp, W. W.; Ekspong, A. G.; Goldhaber, G.; Goldhaber, S.; Heckman, H. H.; Perkins, D. H.; Sandweiss, J.; Segre, E.; Smith, F. M.; Stork, D. H.; Rossum, L. Van; Amaldi, E.; Baroni, G.; Castagnoli, C.; Franzinetti, C.; Manfredini, A.

    1956-09-10

    In the exposure to a 700-MeV/c negative particle beam, 35 antiproton stars have been found. Of these antiprotons, 21 annihilate in flight and three give large-angle scatters ({Theta} > 15 , T{sub P-} > 50 Mev), while 14 annihilate at rest. From the interactions in flight we obtain the total cross section for antiproton interaction.

  4. Search for Polarization Effects in the Antiproton Production Process

    SciTech Connect

    Grzonka, D.; Kilian, K.; Ritman, J.; Sefzick, T.; Oelert, W.; Diermaier, M.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Głowacz, B.; Moskal, P.; Zieliński, M.; Wolke, M.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Carmignotto, M.; Horn, T.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Asaturyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Tadevosyan, V.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S.; Eyrich, W.; Hauenstein, F.; Zink, A.

    2015-01-01

    For the production of a polarized antiproton beam, various methods have been suggested including the possibility that antiprotons may be produced polarized which will be checked experimentally. The polarization of antiprotons produced under typical conditions for antiproton beam preparation will be measured at the CERN/PS. If the production process creates some polarization, a polarized antiproton beam could be prepared by a rather simple modification of the antiproton beam facility. The detection setup and the expected experimental conditions are described.

  5. Formation spectra of charmed meson-nucleus systems using an antiproton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata-Sekihara, J.; Garcia-Recio, C.; Nieves, J.; Salcedo, L. L.; Tolos, L.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the structure and formation of charmed meson-nucleus systems, with the aim of understanding the charmed meson-nucleon interactions and the properties of the charmed mesons in the nuclear medium. The D bar mesic nuclei are of special interest, since they have tiny decay widths due to the absence of strong decays for the D bar N pair. Employing an effective model for the D bar N and DN interactions and solving the Klein-Gordon equation for D bar and D in finite nuclei, we find that the D--11B system has 1s and 2p mesic nuclear states and that the D0-11B system binds in a 1s state. In view of the forthcoming experiments by the PANDA and CBM Collaborations at the future FAIR facility and the J-PARC upgrade, we calculate the formation spectra of the [D--11B] and [D0-11B] mesic nuclei for an antiproton beam on a 12C target. Our results suggest that it is possible to observe the 2pD- mesic nuclear state with an appropriate experimental setup.

  6. Development of an optical transition radiation detector for profile monitoring of antiproton and proton beams at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpine, V.E.; Lindenmeyer, C.W.; Tassotto, G.R.; Lumpkin, A.H.; /Argonne

    2005-05-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) detectors are being developed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) as part of the collider Run II upgrade program and as part of the NuMI primary beam line. These detectors are designed to measure 150 GeV antiprotons as well as 120 GeV proton beams over a large range of intensities. Design and development of an OTR detector capable of measuring beam in both directions down to beam intensities of {approx}5e9 particles for nominal beam sizes are presented. Applications of these OTR detectors as an on-line emittance monitor for both antiproton transfers and reverse-injected protons, as a Tevatron injection profile monitor, and as a high-intensity beam profile monitor for NuMI are discussed. In addition, different types of OTR foils are being evaluated for operation over the intensity range of {approx}5e9 to 5e13 particles per pulse, and these are described.

  7. Simulations of an acceleration scheme for producing high intensity and low emittance antiproton beam for Fermilab collider operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent; Bhat, C.M.; MacLachlan, J.A.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    During Fermilab collider operation, the Main Injector (MI) provides high intensity and low emittance proton and antiproton beams for the Tevatron. The present coalescing scheme for antiprotons in the Main Injector yields about a factor of two increase in the longitudinal emittance and a factor of 5% to 20% decrease in intensity before injection to the Tevatron. In order to maximize the integrated luminosity delivered to the collider experiments, it is important to minimize the emittance growth and maximize the intensity of the MI beam. To this end, a new scheme using a combination of 2.5 MHz and 53 MHz accelerations has been developed and tested. This paper describes the full simulation of the new acceleration scheme, taking account of space charge, 2.5 MHz and 53 MHz beam loading, and the effect of residual 53 MHz rf voltage during 2.5 MHz acceleration and rf manipulations. The simulations show the longitudinal emittance growth at the 10% level with no beam loss. The experimental test of the new scheme is reported in another PAC05 paper.

  8. Cancer Therapy with Antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Knudsen, Helge

    2005-10-26

    Starting in 2003 the AD-4/ACE collaboration has studied the biological effects of antiprotons annihilating in a human tissue like material on live V-79 Chinese Hamster cells. The main goal of the work is to prove the efficacy of antiprotons for cancer therapy. In this report we discuss a critical point to be considered carefully for all particle beam radiation therapies, namely the loss of primary particles from the beam on the way to a tumor seated some distance below the surface.

  9. PHYSICS WITH ULTRA-LOW ENERGY ANTIPROTONS

    SciTech Connect

    M. HOLZSCHEITER

    2001-02-01

    In this report the author describes the current status of the antiproton deceleration (AD) facility at CERN, and highlights the physics program with ultra-low energy antiproton at this installation. He also comments on future possibilities provided higher intensity antiproton beams become available at Fermilab, and review possibilities for initial experiments using direct degrading of high energy antiprotons in material has been developed and proven at CERN.

  10. Physics with Polarized Antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Lenisa, Paolo

    2008-04-30

    Polarized antiprotons will provide access to a wealth of double- (and single-) spin observables, thereby opening a window to physics uniquely accessible with the HESR at FAIR. This include a first direct measurement of the transversity distribution of the valence quarks in the proton and a first measurement of the moduli and phase of the time-like electric and magnetic form factors G{sub E,M} of the proton. Additional applications of a polarized antiproton beam can be forseen in hadron spectroscopy, and nucleon-antinucleon scattering.

  11. ASTER: Imaging with antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Muratore, R.

    1988-01-01

    Antiprotons are of great promise in biomedical research and in practical biomedical and industrial applications. It is likely that antiprotons will be of far greater utility in the next century than x-rays have been in this century. Antiprotonic STEReography (ASTER), a 3-D photography-like imaging technique, is basic to most of the foreseen applications. This dissertation explores realistic models of ASTER analytically, numerically, and with computer simulations. It carries the understanding of ASTER further than previous work, and its models are adaptable to more powerful computers. In particular, ASTER is portrayed as a robust alternative to the ambiguities inherent in the imaging techniques used in x-ray computer tomography, CT. The scattering of the antiprotons lateral to their initial direction is the limiting factor in ASTERs ability to resolve fine anatomical details. This lateral scattering is calculated with a mathematical term ignored in previous studies, which overestimate the scattering of heavy charged particles in homogeneous media. Optimization techniques are explored and found to provide twice the resolution for a given radiation dose, and to reduce the needed detector size. Proper choice of orientation of the antiproton beam is shown to improve the resolution/dose ratio by an order of magnitude. Comparison of simulated ASTER scans with actual CT scans shows that ASTER imparts about one to two orders of magnitude less dose than that imparted by CT at comparable resolutions. The scanned targets include a random pattern. The target and the image are shown to be more correlated as the number of antiprotons used is increased. Finally, the future of ASTER is considered: further computer simulations are suggested, and implications for medicine and industry are discussed.

  12. Aster: Imaging with Antiprotons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratore, Robert

    Antiprotons are of great promise in biomedical research and in practical biomedical and industrial applications. It is likely that antiprotons will be of far greater utility in the next century than x-rays have been in this century. Antiprotonic STEReography (ASTER), a 3-D photography-like imaging technique, is basic to most of the foreseen applications. This dissertation explores realistic models of ASTER analytically, numerically, and with computer simulations. It carries the understanding of ASTER further than previous work, and its models are adaptable to more powerful computers. In particular, ASTER is portrayed as a robust alternative to the ambiguities inherent in the imaging techniques used in x-ray computer tomography, CT. The scattering of the antiprotons lateral to their initial direction is the limiting factor in ASTER's ability to resolve fine anatomical details. This lateral scattering is calculated with a mathematical term ignored in previous studies, which overestimate the scattering of heavy charged particles in homogeneous media. Optimization techniques are explored and found to provide twice the resolution for a given radiation dose, and to reduce the needed detector size. Proper choice of orientation of the antiproton beam is shown to improve the resolution/dose ratio by an order of magnitude. Comparison of simulated ASTER scans with actual CT scans shows that ASTER imparts about one to two orders of magnitude less dose than that imparted by CT at comparable resolutions. The scanned targets include a random pattern. The target and the image are shown to be more correlated as the number of antiprotons used is increased. Finally, the future of ASTER is considered: further computer simulations are suggested, and implications for medicine and industry are discussed.

  13. Past, present and future low energy antiproton facilities at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmann, W.; Belochitskii, P.; Breuker, H.; Butin, F.; Carli, C.; Eriksson, T.; Maury, S.; Oelert, W.; Pasinelli, S.; Tranquille, G.

    2014-05-01

    Low energy antiprotons are available for physics experiments at CERN since the 1980s and have been used by a large variety of experiments. The Low Energy Antiproton Ring LEAR has been constructed as a complementary use of antiprotons available at that time for high energy physics and delivered beam to experiments mainly using slow extraction. After completion of LEAR exploitation, the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) was constructed (adaptation of the existing Antiproton Collector, AC) to allow for a simpler low energy antiproton scheme (only one accelerator operated with Antiprotons) with fast extraction well suited for trap experiments. The Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring ELENA is a small synchrotron presently constructed to further decelerate antiprotons from the AD in a controlled manner, and to reduce emittances with the help of an electron cooler to improve the capture efficiencies of existing experiments and allow for additional ones.

  14. Applying EVM principles to Tevatron Beam Position Monitor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Bakul; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    At Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), the Tevatron high energy particle collider must meet the increasing scientific demand of higher beam luminosity. To achieve this higher luminosity goal, U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a major upgrade of capabilities of Fermilab's accelerator complex that spans five years and costs over fifty million dollars. Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system upgrade is a part of this project, generally called RunII upgrade project. Since the purpose of the Tevatron collider is to detect the smashing of proton and anti-protons orbiting the circular accelerator in opposite directions, capability to detect positions of both protons and antiprotons at a high resolution level is a desirable functionality of the monitoring system. The original system was installed during early 1980s, along with the original construction of the Tevatron. However, electronic technology available in 1980s did not allow for the detection of significantly smaller resolution of antiprotons. The objective of the upgrade project is to replace the existing BPM system with a new system utilizing capabilities of modern electronics enhanced by a front-end software driven by a real-time operating software. The new BPM system is designed to detect both protons and antiprotons with increased resolution of up to an order of magnitude. The new system is capable of maintaining a very high-level of data integrity and system reliability. The system consists of 27 VME crates installed at 27 service buildings around the Tevatron ring servicing 236 beam position monitors placed underground, inside the accelerator tunnel. Each crate consists of a single Timing Generator Fanout module, custom made by Fermilab staff, one MVME processor card running VxWorks 5.5, multiple Echotek Digital Receiver boards complimented by custom made Filter Board. The VxWorks based front-end software communicates with the Main Accelerator Control software via a special

  15. Antiproton Powered Gas Core Fission Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammash, T.

    Extensive research in recent years has demonstrated that “at rest” annihilation of antiprotons in the uranium isotope U238 leads to fission at nearly 100% efficiency. The resulting highly-ionizing, energetic fission fragments can heat a suitable medium to very high temperatures, making such a process particularly suitable for space propulsion applications. Such an ionized medium, which would serve as a propellant, can be confined by a magnetic field during the heating process, and subsequently ejected through a magnetic nozzle to generate thrust. The gasdynamic mirror (GDM) magnetic configuration is especially suited for this application since the underlying confinement principle is that the plasma be of such density and temperature as to make the ion-ion collision mean free path shorter than the plasma length. Under these conditions the plasma behaves like a fluid, and its escape from the system is analogous to the flow of a gas into vacuum from a vessel with a hole. For the system we propose we envisage radially injecting atomic or U238 plasma beam at a pre-determined position and axially pulsing an antiproton beam which upon interaction with the uranium target gives rise to near isotropic ejection of fission fragments with a total mass of 212 amu and total energy of about 160 MeV. These particles, along with the annihilation products (i.e. pions and muons) will heat the background U238 gas - inserted into the chamber just prior to the release of the antiproton - to one keV temperature. Preliminary analysis reveals that such a propulsion system can produce a specific impulse of about 3000 seconds at a thrust of about 50 kN. When applied to a round trip Mars mission, we find that such a journey can be accomplished in about 142 days with 2 days of thrusting and requiring only one gram of antiprotons to achieve it.

  16. Antiproton Powered Gas Core Fission Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammash, Terry

    2005-02-01

    Extensive research in recent years has demonstrated that "at rest" annihilation of antiprotons in the uranium isotope U238 leads to fission at nearly 100% efficiency. The resulting highly-ionizing, energetic fission fragments can heat a suitable medium to very high temperatures, making such a process particularly suitable for space propulsion applications. Such an ionized medium, which would serve as a propellant, can be confined by a magnetic field during the heating process, and subsequently ejected through a magnetic nozzle to generate thrust. The gasdynamic mirror (GDM) magnetic configuration is especially suited for this application since the underlying confinement principle is that the plasma be of such density and temperature as to make the ion-ion collision mean free path shorter than the plasma length. Under these conditions the plasma behaves like a fluid, and its escape from the system is analogous to the flow of a gas into vacuum from a vessel with a hole. For the system we propose we envisage radially injecting atomic or U238 plasma beam at a pre-determined position and axially pulsing an antiproton beam which upon interaction with the uranium target gives rise to near isotropic ejection of fission fragments with a total mass of 212 amu and total energy of about 160 MeV. These particles, along with the annihilation products (i.e. pions and muons) will heat the background U238 gas — inserted into the chamber just prior to the release of the antiproton — to one keV temperature. Preliminary analysis reveals that such a propulsion system can produce a specific impulse of about 3000 seconds at a thrust of about 50 kN. When applied to a round trip Mars mission, we find that such a journey can be accomplished in about 142 days with 2 days of thrusting and requiring only one gram of antiprotons to achieve it.

  17. Antiproton Powered Gas Core Fission Rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Kammash, Terry

    2005-02-06

    Extensive research in recent years has demonstrated that 'at rest' annihilation of antiprotons in the uranium isotope U238 leads to fission at nearly 100% efficiency. The resulting highly-ionizing, energetic fission fragments can heat a suitable medium to very high temperatures, making such a process particularly suitable for space propulsion applications. Such an ionized medium, which would serve as a propellant, can be confined by a magnetic field during the heating process, and subsequently ejected through a magnetic nozzle to generate thrust. The gasdynamic mirror (GDM) magnetic configuration is especially suited for this application since the underlying confinement principle is that the plasma be of such density and temperature as to make the ion-ion collision mean free path shorter than the plasma length. Under these conditions the plasma behaves like a fluid, and its escape from the system is analogous to the flow of a gas into vacuum from a vessel with a hole. For the system we propose we envisage radially injecting atomic or U238 plasma beam at a pre-determined position and axially pulsing an antiproton beam which upon interaction with the uranium target gives rise to near isotropic ejection of fission fragments with a total mass of 212 amu and total energy of about 160 MeV. These particles, along with the annihilation products (i.e. pions and muons) will heat the background U238 gas - inserted into the chamber just prior to the release of the antiproton - to one keV temperature. Preliminary analysis reveals that such a propulsion system can produce a specific impulse of about 3000 seconds at a thrust of about 50 kN. When applied to a round trip Mars mission, we find that such a journey can be accomplished in about 142 days with 2 days of thrusting and requiring only one gram of antiprotons to achieve it.

  18. Uncoupled thermoelasticity solutions applied on beam dumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouzia, A.; Antonakakis, T.

    2016-06-01

    In particle accelerators the process of beam absorption is vital. At CERN particle beams are accelerated at energies of the order of TeV. In the event of a system failure or following collisions, the beam needs to be safely absorbed by dedicated protecting blocks. The thermal shock caused by the rapid energy deposition within the absorbing block causes thermal stresses that may rise above critical levels. The present paper provides a convenient expression of such stresses under hypotheses described hereafter. The temperature field caused by the beam energy deposition is assumed to be Gaussian. Such a field models a non-diffusive heat deposition. These effects are described as thermoelastic as long as the stresses remain below the proportional limit and can be analytically modeled by the coupled equations of thermoelasticity. The analytical solution to the uncoupled thermoelastic problem in an infinite domain is presented herein and matched with a finite unit radius sphere. The assumption of zero diffusion as well as the validity of the match with a finite geometry is quantified such that the obtained solutions can be rigorously applied to real problems. Furthermore, truncated series solutions, which are not novel, are used for comparison purposes. All quantities are nondimensional and the problem reduces to a dependence of five dimensionless parameters. The equations of elasticity are presented in the potential formulation where the shear potential is assumed to be nil due to the source being a gradient and the absence of boundaries. Nevertheless equivalent three-dimensional stresses are computed using the compressive potential and optimized using standard analytical optimization methods. An alternative algorithm for finding the critical points of the three-dimensional stress function is presented. Finally, a case study concerning the proton synchrotron booster dump is presented where the aforementioned analytical solutions are used and the preceding assumptions

  19. Measurement of interaction between antiprotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Star Collaboration; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; de Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the primary goals of nuclear physics is to understand the force between nucleons, which is a necessary step for understanding the structure of nuclei and how nuclei interact with each other. Rutherford discovered the atomic nucleus in 1911, and the large body of knowledge about the nuclear force that has since been acquired was derived from studies made on nucleons or nuclei. Although antinuclei up to antihelium-4 have been discovered and their masses measured, little is known directly about the nuclear force between antinucleons. Here, we study antiproton pair correlations among data collected by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), where gold ions are collided with a centre-of-mass energy of 200 gigaelectronvolts per nucleon pair. Antiprotons are abundantly produced in such collisions, thus making it feasible to study details of the antiproton-antiproton interaction. By applying a technique similar to Hanbury Brown and Twiss intensity interferometry, we show that the force between two antiprotons is attractive. In addition, we report two key parameters that characterize the corresponding strong interaction: the scattering length and the effective range of the interaction. Our measured parameters are consistent within errors with the corresponding values for proton-proton interactions. Our results provide direct information on the interaction between two antiprotons, one of the simplest systems of antinucleons, and so are fundamental to understanding the structure of more-complex antinuclei and their properties.

  20. Conceptual Design of an Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, Stephen

    2006-10-24

    The Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility (AGSF) creates copious quantities of antiprotons, for bottling and transportation to remote cancer therapy centers. The first step in the generation and storage process is to accelerate an intense proton beam down the Main Linac for injection into the Main Ring, which is a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron that accelerates the protons to high energy. The beam is then extracted from the ring into a transfer line and into a Proton Target. Immediately downstream of the target is an Antiproton Collector that captures some of the antiprotons and focuses them into a beam that is transported sequentially into two antiproton rings. The Precooler ring rapidly manipulates antiproton bunches from short and broad (in momentum) to long and thin. It then performs some preliminary beam cooling, in the fraction of a second before the next proton bunch is extracted from the Main Ring. Pre-cooled antiprotons are passed on to the Accumulator ring before the next antiprotons arrive from the target. The Accumulator ring cools the antiprotons, compressing them into a dense state that is convenient for mass storage over many hours. Occasionally the Accumulator ring decelerates a large number of antiprotons, injecting them into a Deceleration Linac that passes them into a waiting Penning trap.

  1. Proceedings of the Antiproton Technology Workshop held in Upton, New York on 10 May 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordley, Gerald D.

    1989-05-01

    Titles of presentations included: Stopping Power of MeV Proton and Antiproton Beams; Recent Simulation Results of ASTER; Pbar Testing of Hydrogen Effects in Sealed Carbon-Carbon Composites; Potential for Antiprotons in Radiation Oncology; Prospects for a Commercial Antiproton Source; Prospects for Exciting Extreme States in Nuclear Matter with Intense Antiproton Beams; Status of AL Studies Relating to Condensed Antimatter; Electromagnetic Traps for Atomic Antihydrogen; Antihydrogen Production; Headquarters DoE Antiproton Activities; Antiproton Catalyzed Fusion; Antiproton Induced Fusion Reaction; Options for a Laboratory Microfusion Facility; Modeling Antiproton-Plasma Interactions; Concepts for Experimental Determination of Radiation Shielding and Metal Clad Pellet Performance; Introduction to CP Violation Studies with Pbars; Search for CP Violation in Pbar-P to J/psi; Studies of Rare Models of Pbar-P Annihilation; and Antiproton Production Calculation by the Multistring Model VENUS Computer Code.

  2. AMS-02 antiprotons reloaded

    SciTech Connect

    Kappl, Rolf; Reinert, Annika; Winkler, Martin Wolfgang E-mail: areinert@th.physik.uni-bonn.de

    2015-10-01

    The AMS-02 collaboration has released preliminary data on the antiproton fraction in cosmic rays. The surprisingly hard antiproton spectrum at high rigidity has triggered speculations about a possible primary antiproton component originating from dark matter annihilations. In this note, we employ newly available AMS-02 boron to carbon data to update the secondary antiproton flux within the standard two-zone diffusion model. The new background permits a considerably better fit to the measured antiproton fraction compared to previous estimates. This is mainly a consequence of the smaller slope of the diffusion coefficient favored by the new AMS-02 boron to carbon data.

  3. Precision measurement of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitlinger, K.; Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Blüm, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.; Elsener, K.; Gotta, D.; Morenzoni, E.; Simons, L. M.

    1992-09-01

    X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressures. Using the cyclotron trap, a 105 MeV/c antiproton beam from LEAR was stopped with an efficiency of 86% in 30 mbar hydrogen gas in a volume of only 100 cm3. The X-rays were measured with Si(Li) detectors and a Xe-CH4 drift chamber. The strong interaction shift and broadening of the Lyman α transition and the spin-averaged 2p width in antiprotonic hydrogen was measured with unprecedented accuracy. The triplet component of the ground state in antiprotonic hydrogen was determined for the first time.

  4. Antiproton acceleration in the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.; Dinkel, J.; Ducar, R.; Kerns, C.; Kerns, Q.; Meisner, K.; Miller, H.W.; Reid, J.; Tawzer, S.; Wildman, D.

    1987-03-01

    The operation of the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron rf systems for colliding beams physics is discussed. The changes in the rf feedback system required for the accelration of antiprotons, and the methods for achieving proper transfer of both protons and antiprotons are described. Data on acceleration and transfer efficiencies are presented.

  5. Antiproton-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, S.

    1982-01-01

    The antiproton beams from LEAR are a means for uncovering a hopefully fertile source of physics in the interactions of antiparticles with nuclei. Bound or resonant states have been searched for in the anti N N system and perhaps one candidate found. Resonances in the anti N-A system may have an independent origin, unrelated to isolated states in the two-body system but nevertheless very revealing of the essential nature of the two-body forces. The use of antiproton projectiles to study conventional, and occasionally exotic nuclear structure warrants some attention because of the extreme peripherality of many anti p-induced reactions and the expected strong iso-spin selectivity for inelastic excitation of say giant resonances. The annihilation channels which generate strong absorption in the nuclear interior, localize direct reactions in the nuclear surface. In this fashion anti p's ressemble heavy-ion projectiles but possess the virtue of being a rather more elementary probe and it should be possible to calculate the average anti p-A interaction (optical potential) from something closer to first principles. Perhaps the most fundamental reason for using antinucleons is as carriers, into the target, of antiquarks. It is not at all clear that the sea quarks in a hadron, i.e. in the form of quark-antiquark pairs, exist on an equal footing with valence quarks. The production of cc states (and even of s anti s) appears highly suppressed in nucleon-nucleon collisions. This suppression must be taken into account in establishing the relative merits of pp or p anti p colliders in producing say the W-meson. By introducing antiquarks directly via anti N N and anti N-A one should surely obtain more definite information about q anti q interactions with LEAR, at the low momenta presumably crucial for hadron structure. (WHK)

  6. Light antiprotonic atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gotta, Detlev

    2005-10-19

    The present knowledge on strong-interaction effects in light antiprotonic atoms is reviewed. Data were obtained during the LEAR era, where the high flux made possible the use of high-resolution devices like semiconductor detectors and a crystal spectrometer. Open questions and possible extensions at the future antiproton facilities are discussed.

  7. Trapping low-energy antiprotons in an ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Xiang.

    1990-01-01

    A fraction of antiprotons from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) of CERN are slowed from 5.9 MeV to below 3 keV as they pass through thin foils. Transmitted particle energy distribution and low energy antiproton yield are measured by a time-of-flight technique. The difference in the range of protons and antiprotons (known as the Barkas effect) is observed. While still in flight, up to 1.3 {times} 10{sup 5} antiprotons with energies between 0 eV to 3 keV are stored in an ion trap from a single pulse of 5.9 MeV antiprotons leaving LEAR, thus a trapping efficiency exceeding of 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} is established. Trapped antiprotons maintain their initial energy distribution unless allowed to collide with a cloud of trapped electrons, whereupon they slow and cool below 1 meV in 10 s, and fall into a harmonic potential well suited for precision mass measurements. The slowing, trapping and cooling of antiprotons are the main focus of this thesis. The stored antiprotons are in thermal equilibrium at 4.2 K. In this ion trap, the antiproton cyclotron frequency is measured and compared with the proton (or electron) cyclotron frequency. The new measured ratio of the antiproton and proton inertial masses, with its 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} uncertainty, is more than three orders of magnitude more accurate than previous measurements using exotic atoms. This is a most precise test of CPT invariance with baryons. The antiproton lifetime in an ion trap was measured to be more than 103 days by trapping a cloud of antiprotons for 59 days. The indicates the number density of atoms is less than 100/cm{sup 3} which corresponds to the pressure in the vacuum chamber being less than 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}17} Torr at 4.2 K if we apply the ideal gas law.

  8. Deceleration of Antiprotons in Support of Antiproton Storage/Utilization Research

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Steven D.; Jackson, Gerald P.; Pearson, J. Boise; Lewis, Raymond A.

    2005-02-06

    Antimatter has the highest energy density known to mankind. Many concepts have been studied that use antimatter for propulsion. All of these concepts require the development of high density storage. H-bar Technologies, under contract with the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, has undertaken the first step toward development of high density storage. Demonstration of the ability to store antiprotons in a Penning Trap provides the technology to pursue research in alternative storage methods that may lead to eventually to high density concepts. H-bar Technologies has undertaken research activity on the detailed design and operations required to decelerate and redirect the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) antiproton beam to lay the groundwork for a source of low energy antiprotons. We have performed a detailed assessment of an antiproton deceleration scheme using the FNAL Main Injector, outlining the requirements to significantly and efficiently lower the energy of antiprotons. This task shall require a combination of: theoretical/computation simulations, development of specialized accelerator controls programming, modification of specific Main Injector hardware, and experimental testing of the modified system. Testing shall be performed to characterize the system with a goal of reducing the beam momentum from 8.9 GeV/c to a level of 1 GeV/c or less. We have designed an antiproton degrader system that will integrate with the FNAL decelerated/transferred beam. The degrader shall be designed to maximize the number of low energy antiprotons with a beam spot sized for acceptance by the Mark I test hardware.

  9. Photo-Production of Proton Antiproton Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Eugenio; Burnham Stokes

    2007-02-01

    Results are reported on the reaction gammap --> ppp-bar . A high statistic data set was obtained at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility utilizing the CLAS detector and a tagged photon beam of 4.8 to 5.2 GeV incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The focus of this study was to search for possible intermediate resonances which decay to proton-antiproton. Both final state protons were detected in the CLAS apparatus whereas the antiproton was identified via missing mass. General features of the data are presented along with results on narrow and broad resonance studies.

  10. Antiproton distributions in Au+nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Beavis, D.; Debbe, R.; Bennett, M.J.; Chikanian, A.; Kumar, B.S.; Nagle, J.L.; Pope, J.K.; Carroll, J.B.; Hallman, T.J.; Chiba, J.; Tanaka, K.H.; Crawford, H.J.; Cronqvist, M.; Dardenne, Y.; Engelage, J.; Greiner, L.; Kuo, C.; Doke, T.; Kashiwagi, T.; Kikuchi, J.; Hayano, R.S.; Heckman, H.H.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Mitchell, J.W.; Welsh, R.C.

    1997-09-01

    Experiment E878 at the BNL-AGS has measured the invariant cross sections of antiprotons produced near p{sub t}=0 in interactions of 10.8 GeV/c Au beams with targets of Al, Cu, and Au. The data were measured for a wide range of centralities and rapidities using a focusing beamline spectrometer and a high-rate centrality detector. We compare our data with the predictions of simple models and sophisticated transport models to explore the physics of antiproton production and annihilation. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Highly charged ion beam applied to lithography technique.

    PubMed

    Momota, Sadao; Nojiri, Yoichi; Taniguchi, Jun; Miyamoto, Iwao; Morita, Noboru; Kawasegi, Noritaka

    2008-02-01

    In various fields of nanotechnology, the importance of nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) structures is increasing. In order to develop an efficient process to fabricate nanoscale 3D structures, we have applied highly charged ion (HCI) beams to the ion-beam lithography (IBL) technique. Ar-ion beams with various charge states (1+ to 9+) were applied to fabricate spin on glass (SOG) and Si by means of the IBL technique. The Ar ions were prepared by a facility built at Kochi University of Technology, which includes an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (NANOGAN, 10 GHz). IBL fabrication was performed as a function of not only the charge state but also the energy and the dose of Ar ions. The present results show that the application of an Ar(9+) beam reduces the etching time for SOG and enhances the etching depth compared with those observed with Ar ions in lower charged states. Considering the high-energy deposition of HCI at a surface, the former phenomena can be understood consistently. Also, the latter phenomena can be understood based on anomalously deep structural changes, which are remarkable for glasses. Furthermore, it has also been shown that the etching depth can be easily controlled with the kinetic energy of the Ar ions. These results show the possibilities of the IBL technique with HCI beams in the field of nanoscale 3D fabrication. PMID:18315242

  12. A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Wilkens, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

  13. A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Wilkens, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

  14. Polarized Antiprotons - The Quest For A Missing Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Steffens, Erhard

    2009-08-04

    After termination of the LEAR facility in 1996 and the restriction of the CERN antiproton program to Trap experiments, stored antiprotons at low and medium energies are no longer available for experiments. FAIR at GSI (Darmstadt) will provide intense stored antiproton beams in less than a decade from now. This has renewed the interest in polarized antiprotons originally proposed for LEAR. In August 2007, an International Workshop was organized at the Cockcroft Institute (Daresbury) and methods to polarize stored antiprotons were discussed. In June 2008, a Heraeus Seminar at the Physikzentrum in Bad Honnef dealing with the same subject took place. The results of these workshops will be presented with some historical remarks and an account of the recent developments.

  15. Optimization of the 8 GeV AP3-P1 Lattice for Antiproton Transfers

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, Dave; /Fermilab

    2001-01-22

    During 8 GeV antiproton transfers between the Accumulator to the Main Injector, the antiprotons must travel through four separate beam lines, AP3, AP1, P2, and P1. This note describes the optimization of a single lattice that describes these beam lines for 8 GeV antiproton transfers from the Accumulator to the Main Injector and 8 GeV proton transfers from the Main Injector to the Accumulator.

  16. The Antiproton Accumulator and Collector and the discovery of the W & Z intermediate vector bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chohan, Vinod; Maury, Stephan

    The following sections are included: * Preface * Brief outline of the overall scheme for antiprotons of the SPS as a collider * Antiproton production and accumulation * The AA and AC storage rings * Stochastic cooling and stacking * Post-acceleration of antiprotons and beams for SPS Collider * Proton test beams for the AA and AC from the PS * The W and Z discoveries and the Nobel Prize * Accumulator performance * Acknowledgements and conclusions * References

  17. Physics overview of the Fermilab Low Energy Antiproton Facility Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1986-05-01

    A physics overview is presented of the Fermilab workshop to consider a possible high flux, low energy antiproton facility that would use cooled antiprotons from the accumulator ring of the Tevatron collider. Two examples illustrate the power of each a facility to produce narrow states at high rates. Physics topics to which such a facility may be applied are reviewed.

  18. Anti-hydrogen production with positron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Itahashi, Takahisa

    2008-08-08

    In low-energy antiproton physics, it is advantageous to be able to manipulate anti-particles as freely as normal particles. A robust production and storage system for high-quality positrons and antiprotons would be a substantial advance for the development of anti-matter science. The idea of electron beam ion trap could be applied for storage of anti-particle when the electron beam could be replaced by the positron beam. The bright positron beam would be brought about using synchrotron radiation source with a superconducting wiggler. The new scheme for production of anti-particles is proposed by using new accelerator technologies.

  19. Antiproton Trapping for Advanced Space Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gerald A.

    1998-01-01

    The Summary of Research parallels the Statement of Work (Appendix I) submitted with the proposal, and funded effective Feb. 1, 1997 for one year. A proposal was submitted to CERN in October, 1996 to carry out an experiment on the synthesis and study of fundamental properties of atomic antihydrogen. Since confined atomic antihydrogen is potentially the most powerful and elegant source of propulsion energy known, its confinement and properties are of great interest to the space propulsion community. Appendix II includes an article published in the technical magazine Compressed Air, June 1997, which describes CERN antiproton facilities, and ATHENA. During the period of this grant, Prof. Michael Holzscheiter served as spokesman for ATHENA and, in collaboration with Prof. Gerald Smith, worked on the development of the antiproton confinement trap, which is an important part of the ATHENA experiment. Appendix III includes a progress report submitted to CERN on March 12, 1997 concerning development of the ATHENA detector. Section 4.1 reviews technical responsibilities within the ATHENA collaboration, including the Antiproton System, headed by Prof. Holzscheiter. The collaboration was advised (see Appendix IV) on June 13, 1997 that the CERN Research Board had approved ATHENA for operation at the new Antiproton Decelerator (AD), presently under construction. First antiproton beams are expected to be delivered to experiments in about one year. Progress toward assembly of the ATHENA detector and initial testing expected in 1999 has been excellent. Appendix V includes a copy of the minutes of the most recently documented collaboration meeting held at CERN of October 24, 1997, which provides more information on development of systems, including the antiproton trapping apparatus. On February 10, 1998 Prof. Smith gave a 3 hour lecture on the Physics of Antimatter, as part of the Physics for the Third Millennium Lecture Series held at MSFC. Included in Appendix VI are notes and

  20. Antiproton annihilation physics in the Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taasti, Vicki Trier; Knudsen, Helge; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Thomsen, Bjarne; Bassler, Niels

    2015-03-01

    The Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A is designed to simulate therapeutic beams for cancer radiotherapy with fast ions. SHIELD-HIT12A allows creation of antiproton beam kernels for the treatment planning system TRiP98, but first it must be benchmarked against experimental data. An experimental depth dose curve obtained by the AD-4/ACE collaboration was compared with an earlier version of SHIELD-HIT, but since then inelastic annihilation cross sections for antiprotons have been updated and a more detailed geometric model of the AD-4/ACE experiment was applied. Furthermore, the Fermi-Teller Z-law, which is implemented by default in SHIELD-HIT12A has been shown not to be a good approximation for the capture probability of negative projectiles by nuclei. We investigate other theories which have been developed, and give a better agreement with experimental findings. The consequence of these updates is tested by comparing simulated data with the antiproton depth dose curve in water. It is found that the implementation of these new capture probabilities results in an overestimation of the depth dose curve in the Bragg peak. This can be mitigated by scaling the antiproton collision cross sections, which restores the agreement, but some small deviations still remain. Best agreement is achieved by using the most recent antiproton collision cross sections and the Fermi-Teller Z-law, even if experimental data conclude that the Z-law is inadequately describing annihilation on compounds. We conclude that more experimental cross section data are needed in the lower energy range in order to resolve this contradiction, ideally combined with more rigorous models for annihilation on compounds.

  1. Antiproton stacking and un-stacking in the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra Bhat

    2003-06-12

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring (RR) is intended to be used as a future antiproton storage ring for the Run II proton-antiproton collider operation. It is proposed that about 40mA of antiproton beam from the Accumulator Ring will be transferred to the Recycler once for every two to three hours, stacked and cooled. This operation continues for about 10 to 20 hours depending on the collider needs for antiprotons. Eventually, the cooled antiproton beam will be un-stacked from the Recycler and transferred to the Tevatron via the Main Injector. They have simulated stacking and un-stacking of antiprotons in the Recycler using multi-particle beam dynamics simulation code ESME. In this paper they present results of these simulations.

  2. Atomic Physics with Ultra-Slow/Trapped Antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2005-03-17

    Recently, slow and ultra-slow antiprotons are now available, which will open a new field of research in atomic physics as well as in related fields. In realizing this, the combination of an RFQD (Radio Frequency Quadrupole Decelerator) and a large multi-ring trap (MRT) installed in a super-conducting solenoid has been employed. Several million antiprotons have already been accumulated, and a mono-energetic antiproton beam of 10 eV has been extracted and transported through a specially designed beam line. A couple of basic experiments which get feasible by the developments of ultra slow antiproton beam are discussed, which include ionization and antiprotonic atom formation processes and also to study spectroscopic nature of various meta-stable antiprotonic atoms under single collision conditions. A so-called cusp trap configuration is also discussed, which could for the first time synthesize intense spin-polarized antihydrogen beams. At the same time, it could trap antihydrogen atoms for a macroscopic time.

  3. Direct measurements of the stopping power for antiprotons of light and heavy targets

    SciTech Connect

    Mo Uggerho Bluhme, H.; Knudsen, H.; Mikkelsen, U.; Paludan, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1997-10-01

    Measurements of antiproton stopping powers around the stopping-power maximum are presented for targets of Al, Si, Ti, Cu, Ag, Ta, Pt, and Au. The Low Energy Antiproton Ring antiproton beam of 5.9 MeV is degraded to 50{endash}700 keV, and the energy loss is found by measuring the antiproton velocity before and after the target. Target thicknesses have been determined accurately by weighing and Rutherford backscattering techniques. The antiproton stopping powers are found to be reduced by around 35{percent} for both light and heavy elements near the electronic stopping-power maximum as compared to the equivalent proton stopping power. The antiproton stopping powers and the Barkas effect; that is, the difference in stopping power between protons and antiprotons is compared to theoretical estimates, based on a harmonic-oscillator model and an electron-gas model, and good agreement is obtained. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Centrality dependence of antiproton production in Au+Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Beavis, D.; Bennett, M.J.; Carroll, J.B.; Chiba, J.; Chikanian, A.; Crawford, H.; Cronqvist, M.; Dardenne, Y.; Debbe, R.; Doke, T.; Engelage, J.; Greiner, L.; Hallman, T.J.; Hayano, R.S.; Heckman, H.H.; Kashiwagi, T.; Kikuchi, J.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, C.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Mitchell, J.W.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J.L.; Pope, J.K.; Stankus, P.; Tanaka, K.H.; Welsh, R.C.; Zhan, W. ||||||||[Universities Space Sciences Research Association

    1995-11-13

    We have measured the yields of antiprotons in Au+Au interactions in the rapidity range 1.2{lt}{ital y}{lt}2.8 as a function of centrality using a beam line spectrometer. The shapes of the invariant multiplicity distributions at {ital p}{sub {ital t}}=0 are used to explore the dynamics of antiproton production and annihilation. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  5. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-08-08

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  6. Observation of Ultra-Slow Antiprotons using Micro-channel Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Imao, H.; Toyoda, H.; Shimoyama, T.; Kanai, Y.; Mohri, A.; Yamazaki, Y.; Torii, H. A.; Nagata, Y.; Enomoto, Y.; Higaki, H.

    2008-08-08

    Our group ASACUSA-MUSASHI has succeeded in accumulating several million antiprotons and extracting them as monochromatic ultra-slow antiproton beams (10 eV-1 keV) at CERN AD. We have observed ultra-slow antiprotons using micro-channel plates (MCP). The integrated pulse area of the output signals generated when the MCP was irradiated by ultra-slow antiprotons was 6 times higher than that by electrons. As a long-term effect, we also observed an increase in the background rate presumably due to the radioactivation of the MCP surface. Irradiating the antiproton beams on the MCP induces antiproton-nuclear annihilations only on the first layer of the surface. Low-energy and short-range secondary particles like charged nuclear fragments caused by the 'surface nuclear reactions' would be the origin of our observed phenomena.

  7. Spin Effects in the Interaction of Antiprotons with the Deuteron at Low and Intermediate Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzikov, Y. N.; Haidenbauer, J.

    2014-08-01

    Antiproton-deuteron scattering is analyzed within the Glauber theory, accounting for the full spin dependence of the underlying amplitudes. The latter are taken from the Jülich models and from a recently published new partial-wave analysis of scattering data. Predictions for differential cross sections and the spin observables , , A xx , A yy are presented for antiproton beam energies up to about 300 MeV. The efficiency of the polarization buildup for antiprotons in a storage ring is investigated.

  8. Antiprotons are another matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    Theories of gravity abound, whereas experiments in gravity are few in number. An important experiment in gravity that has not been performed is the measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Although there have been attempts to infer these properties from those of normal matter, none of these theoretical arguments are compelling. Modern theories of gravity that attempt to unify gravity with the other forces of nature predict that in principle antimatter can fall differently than normal matter in the Earth's field. Some of these supergravity theories predict that antimatter will fall faster, and that normal matter will fall with a small Baryon-number dependance in the earth's field. All of these predictions violate the Weak Equivalence Principle, a cornerstone of General Relativity, but are consistent with CPT conservation. In our approved experiment at LEAR (PS-200) we will test the Weak Equivalence Principle for antimatter by measuring the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton. Through a series of deceleration stages, antiprotons from LEAR will be lowered in energy to approx.4 Kelvin at which energy the gravitational effect will be measureable. The measurement will employ the time-of-flight technique wherein the antiprotons are released vertically in a drift tube. The spectrum of time-of-flight measurements can be used to extract the gravitational acceleration experienced by the particles. The system will be calibrated using H/sup -/ ions which simulates the electromagnetic behavior of the antiproton, yet is a baryon to approx.0.1%. To extract the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton relative to the H/sup -/ ion with a statistical precision of 1% will require the release of approx.10/sup 6/ to 10/sup 7/ particles.

  9. Measurement of proton and anti-proton intensities in the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Pordes et al.

    2003-06-04

    This paper describes the techniques used to measure the intensities of the proton (p) and anti-proton ({bar p}) beams in the Tevatron collider. The systems provide simultaneous measurements of the intensity of the 36 proton and 36 antiproton bunches and their longitudinal profiles.

  10. Observation of Antiprotons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Chamberlain, Owen; Segre, Emilio; Wiegand, Clyde; Ypsilantis, Thomas

    1955-10-19

    One of the striking features of Dirac's theory of the electron was the appearance of solutions to his equations which required the existence of an antiparticle, later identified as the positron. The extension of the Dirac theory to the proton requires the existence of an antiproton, a particle which bears to the proton the same relationship as the positron to the electron. However, until experimental proof of the existence of the antiproton was obtained, it might be questioned whether a proton is a Dirac particle in the same sense as is the electron. For instance, the anomalous magnetic moment of the proton indicates that the simple Dirac equation does not give a complete description of the proton.

  11. Sub-Femtosecond Correlated Dynamics Probed with Antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Welsch, C. P.; Kuehnel, K. U.; Schroeter, C. D.; Ullrich, J.

    2008-08-08

    Low-energy antiprotons are the ideal and perhaps the only tool to study in detail correlated quantum dynamics of few-electron systems in the femto and sub-femtosecond time regime. Unfortunately cooled beams of antiprotons with the necessary beam quality and luminosity are not yet available and cannot be provided with present scientific infrastructures. In order to pave the way for a next-generation low-energy antiproton facility, challenging developments in both, storing and imaging techniques have been launched at MPI-K. A novel ultra-low energy storage ring (USR) to be integrated at the proposed facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research (FLAIR) is being developed to provide electron-cooled beams of antiprotons and possibly highly charged ions in the energy range between 300 and 20 keV/q, maybe even approaching the sub keV regime. To allow for kinematically complete investigations for a variety of different collision processes, a reaction microscope shall be integrated in the ring thus achieving unprecedented luminosities. In this contribution, the present status of experiments in comparison with theory is highlighted and the layout of the USR as well as of the in-ring and an external single-pass reaction microscope is presented.

  12. Production of ultra slow antiprotons, its application to atomic collisions and atomic spectroscopy - ASACUSA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yasunori

    1999-06-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) project aims at studying collision dynamics with slow antiprotons and high precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms. To realize these purposes, the production of high quality ultra slow antiproton beams is essential, which is achieved by the combination of antiproton decelerator (AD) from 3 GeV to 5 MeV, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) decelerator from 5 MeV to 50 keV, and finally an electromagnetic trap from 50 keV to 10 eV. From the atomic physics point of view, an antiproton is an extremely heavy electron and/or a negatively charged proton, i.e., the antiproton is a unique tool to shed light on collision dynamics from the other side of the world. In addition to this fundamentally important feature, the antiproton has also a big practical advantage, i.e., it annihilates with the target nuclei emitting several energetic pions, which provides high detection efficiency with very good time resolution. Many-body effects which are of great importance to several branches of science will be studied through ionization and antiprotonic atom formation processes under single collision conditions. Various antiprotonic atoms including protonium ( p¯p) are expected to be meta-stable in vacuum, which is never true for those in dense media except for antiprotonic helium. High precision spectroscopy of protonium will for the first time become feasible benefited by this meta-stability. The present review reports briefly the production scheme of ultra slow antiproton beams and several topics proposed in the ASACUSA project.

  13. Electron cooling of 8-GeV antiprotons at Fermilab's Recycler: Results and operational implications

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, Alexey V.; Carlson, K.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Kroc, T.; Leibfritz, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; Pruss, S.; Saewert, G.; Schmidt, C.W.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Tupikov, V.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    Electron cooling of 8 GeV antiprotons at Fermilab's Recycler storage ring is now routinely used in the collider operation. It requires a 0.1-0.5 A, 4.3 MeV dc electron beam and is designed to increase the longitudinal phase-space density of the circulating antiproton beam. This paper briefly describes the characteristics of the electron beam that were achieved to successfully cool antiprotons. Then, results from various cooling force measurements along with comparison to a nonmagnetized model are presented. Finally, operational aspects of the implementation of electron cooling at the Recycler are discussed, such as adjustments to the cooling rate and the influence of the electron beam on the antiproton beam lifetime.

  14. ANTIPROTONS PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T.

    2014-08-20

    We present the energy spectrum of an antiproton cosmic ray (CR) component calculated on the basis of the nonlinear kinetic model of CR production in supernova remnants (SNRs). The model includes the reacceleration of antiprotons already existing in the interstellar medium as well as the creation of antiprotons in nuclear collisions of accelerated protons with gas nuclei and their subsequent acceleration by SNR shocks. It is shown that the production of antiprotons in SNRs produces a considerable effect in their resultant energy spectrum, making it essentially flatter above 10 GeV so that the spectrum at TeV energies increases by a factor of 5. The calculated antiproton spectrum is consistent with the PAMELA data, which correspond to energies below 100 GeV. As a consistency check, we have also calculated within the same model the energy spectra of secondary nuclei and show that the measured boron-to-carbon ratio is consistent with the significant SNR contribution.

  15. Physics at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, M.; Walz, J.

    2013-09-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN began operation in 1999 to serve experiments for studies of CPT invariance by precision laser and microwave spectroscopy of antihydrogen (Hbar ) and antiprotonic helium (pbar He) atoms. The first 12 years of AD operation saw cold Hbar synthesized by overlapping clouds of positrons (e+) and antiprotons (pbar ) confined in magnetic Penning traps. Cold Hbar was also produced in collisions between Rydberg positronium (Ps) atoms and pbar . Ground-state Hbar was later trapped for up to ˜1000 s in a magnetic bottle trap, and microwave transitions excited between its hyperfine levels. In the pbar He atom, deep ultraviolet transitions were measured to a fractional precision of (2.3-5)×10-9 by sub-Doppler two-photon laser spectroscopy. From this the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as M/me=1836.1526736(23), which agrees with the p value known to a similar precision. Microwave spectroscopy of pbar He yielded a measurement of the pbar magnetic moment with a precision of 0.3%. More recently, the magnetic moment of a single pbar confined in a Penning trap was measured with a higher precision, as μ=-2.792845(12)μ in nuclear magnetons. Other results reviewed here include the first measurements of the energy loss (-dE/dx) of 1-100 keV pbar traversing conductor and insulator targets; the cross sections of low-energy (<10 keV) pbar ionizing atomic and molecular gas targets; and the cross sections of 5 MeV pbar annihilating on various target foils via nuclear collisions. The biological effectiveness of pbar beams destroying cancer cells was measured as a possible method for radiological therapy. New experiments under preparation attempt to measure the gravitational acceleration of Hbar or synthesize H. Several other future experiments will also be briefly described.

  16. Photon and dilepton production at the Facility for Proton and Anti-Proton Research and beam-energy scan at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider using coarse-grained microscopic transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, Stephan; van Hees, Hendrik; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-05-01

    We present calculations of dilepton and photon spectra for the energy range Elab=2 A to35 A GeV which will be available for the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Proton and Anti-Proton Research (FAIR). The same energy regime will also be covered by phase II of the beam-energy scan at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC-BES). Coarse-grained dynamics from microscopic transport calculations of the Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) model is used to determine temperature and chemical potentials, which allows for the use of dilepton and photon-emission rates from equilibrium quantum-field-theory calculations. The results indicate that nonequilibrium effects, the presence of baryonic matter, and the creation of a deconfined phase might show up in specific manners in the measurable dilepton invariant-mass spectra and in the photon transverse-momentum spectra. However, as the many influences are difficult to disentangle, we argue that the challenge for future measurements of electromagnetic probes will be to provide a high precision with uncertainties much lower than in previous experiments. Furthermore, a systematic study of the whole energy range covered by CBM at FAIR and RHIC-BES is necessary to discriminate between different effects, which influence the spectra, and to identify possible signatures of a phase transition.

  17. Collisional and Spectroscopic Studies of Exotic Atoms Using Ultra-Slow Antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Torii, H. A.; Toyoda, H.; Kuroda, N.; Nagata, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.; Imao, H.; Varentsov, V. L.

    2009-07-10

    Antiproton, the antiparticle of proton, is a unique projectile in the study of atomic collision physics, which can be treated theoretically either as a 'negative proton' or a 'heavy electron'. Atomic capture of an antiproton will result in formation of a highly excited exotic atom. Antiprotonic helium atom has been studied intensively by means of precision laser spectroscopy, which has led to a stringent determination of antiproton mass and charge to a level of ppb. Comparison of these values with those of proton gives one of the best tests of CPT invariance, the most fundamental symmetry in physics. However, the dynamic processes of antiproton capture remain unclarified, except for some indirect information given by those optical and X-ray observations. With an aim to produce an antiproton beam at atomic-physics energies for 'pure' collision experiments, we have so far developed techniques to decelerate, cool and confine antiprotons in vacuo, using a sequential combination of the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN, a Radio-Frequency Quadrupole Decelerator (RFQD), and an electromagnetic trap. Our recent success in stable extraction of monoenergetic ultra-slow antiprotons, about 3x10{sup 5} in number available every 5 minutes, has opened up the possibility to study ionization and atomic capture processes between an antiproton thus provided as a beam and an atom prepared in the form of a supersonic gas-jet target, at an unprecedented low energy from 10 eV to 1 keV under the single-collision condition. Our design and strategy of the cross-beam experiments are discussed.

  18. Response of long, flexible cantilever beams applied root motions. [spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralich, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an analysis of the response of long, flexible cantilever beams to applied root rotational accelerations. Maximum values of deformation, slope, bending moment, and shear are found as a function of magnitude and duration of acceleration input. Effects of tip mass and its eccentricity and rotatory inertia on the response are also investigated. It is shown that flexible beams can withstand large root accelerations provided the period of applied acceleration can be kept small relative to the beam fundamental period.

  19. Centrifugal Separation of Antiprotons and Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Kolthammer, W. S.; McConnell, R.; Richerme, P.; Wrubel, J.; Kalra, R.; Novitski, E.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Zielinski, M.; Sefzick, T.; Borbely, J. S.; Fitzakerley, D.; George, M. C.; Hessels, E. A.; Storry, C. H.; Weel, M.; Muellers, A.; Walz, J.; Speck, A.

    2010-11-19

    Centrifugal separation of antiprotons and electrons is observed, the first such demonstration with particles that cannot be laser cooled or optically imaged. The spatial separation takes place during the electron cooling of trapped antiprotons, the only method available to produce cryogenic antiprotons for precision tests of fundamental symmetries and for cold antihydrogen studies. The centrifugal separation suggests a new approach for isolating low energy antiprotons and for producing a controlled mixture of antiprotons and electrons.

  20. Centrifugal separation of antiprotons and electrons.

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G; Kolthammer, W S; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Wrubel, J; Kalra, R; Novitski, E; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Sefzick, T; Zielinski, M; Borbely, J S; Fitzakerley, D; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Müllers, A; Walz, J; Speck, A

    2010-11-19

    Centrifugal separation of antiprotons and electrons is observed, the first such demonstration with particles that cannot be laser cooled or optically imaged. The spatial separation takes place during the electron cooling of trapped antiprotons, the only method available to produce cryogenic antiprotons for precision tests of fundamental symmetries and for cold antihydrogen studies. The centrifugal separation suggests a new approach for isolating low energy antiprotons and for producing a controlled mixture of antiprotons and electrons.

  1. Autoresonant excitation of antiproton plasmas.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Carpenter, P T; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hurt, J L; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2011-01-14

    We demonstrate controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense, and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination.

  2. Autoresonant Excitation of Antiproton Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Carpenter, P. T.; Hurt, J. L.; Robicheaux, F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2011-01-14

    We demonstrate controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense, and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination.

  3. Status of antiproton accumulation and cooling at Fermilab's Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Bhat, C.M.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, A.; Carlson, K.; Crisp, J.; Derwent, P.; Eddy, N.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Pruss, S.; /Fermilab

    2009-08-01

    The Recycler ring is an 8 GeV permanent magnet storage ring where antiprotons are accumulated and prepared for Fermilab's Tevatron Collider program. With the goal of maximizing the integrated luminosity delivered to the experiments, storing, cooling and extracting antiprotons with high efficiency has been pursued. Over the past two years, while the average accumulation rate doubled, the Recycler continued to operate at a constant level of performance thanks to changes made to the Recycler Electron Cooler (energy stability and regulation, electron beam optics), RF manipulations and operating procedures. In particular, we discuss the current accumulation cycle in which {approx} 400 x 10{sup 10} antiprotons are accumulated and extracted to the Tevatron every {approx}15 hours.

  4. New generation electronics applied to beam position monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unser, Klaus B.

    1997-01-01

    Cellular telephones and global positioning system (GPS) satellite receivers are examples of modern rf engineering. Taking some inspiration from those designs, a precision signal-processor module for beam position monitors was developed. It features a heterodyne receiver (100 MHz to 1 GHz) with more than 90 dB dynamic range. Four multiplexed input channels are able to resolve signal differences lower than 0.0005 dB with good long-term stability. This corresponds to sub-micron resolution when used with a beam position pick-up with 40 mm free aperture. The paper concentrates on circuit design and modern dynamic testing methods, used first during development and later for production tests. The frequency synthesizer of the local oscillator, the phase-locked synchronous detector, and the low-noise preamplifier with automatic gain control are discussed. Other topics are design for immunity to electromagnetic interference to ensure reliable operation in an accelerator environment.

  5. Applying CLIPS to control of molecular beam epitaxy processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabeau, Arthur A.; Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Jamison, Keith D.; Horton, Charles; Ignatiev, Alex; Glover, John R.

    1990-01-01

    A key element of U.S. industrial competitiveness in the 1990's will be the exploitation of advanced technologies which involve low-volume, high-profit manufacturing. The demands of such manufacture limit participation to a few major entities in the U.S. and elsewhere, and offset the lower manufacturing costs of other countries which have, for example, captured much of the consumer electronics market. One such technology is thin-film epitaxy, a technology which encompasses several techniques such as Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE), Chemical Beam Epitaxy (CBE), and Vapor-Phase Epitaxy (VPE). Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) is a technology for creating a variety of electronic and electro-optical materials. Compared to standard microelectronic production techniques (including gaseous diffusion, ion implantation, and chemical vapor deposition), MBE is much more exact, though much slower. Although newer than the standard technologies, MBE is the technology of choice for fabrication of ultraprecise materials for cutting-edge microelectronic devices and for research into the properties of new materials.

  6. Ion Beam Analysis applied to laser-generated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutroneo, M.; Macková, A.; Havranek, V.; Malinsky, P.; Torrisi, L.; Kormunda, M.; Barchuk, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Dudzak, R.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the research activity on Ion Beam Analysis methods performed at Tandetron Laboratory (LT) of the Institute of Nuclear Physics AS CR, Rez, Czech Republic. Recently, many groups are paying attention to implantation by laser generated plasma. This process allows to insert a controllable amount of energetic ions into the surface layers of different materials modifying the physical and chemical properties of the surface material. Different substrates are implanted by accelerated ions from plasma through terawatt iodine laser, at nominal intensity of 1015 W/cm2, at the PALS Research Infrastructure AS CR, in the Czech Republic. This regime of the laser matter interaction generates, multi-MeV proton beams, and multi-charged ions that are tightly confined in time (hundreds ps) and space (source radius of a few microns). These ion beams have a much lower transverse temperature, a much shorter duration and a much higher current than those obtainable from conventional accelerators. The implementation of protons and ions acceleration driven by ultra-short high intensity lasers is exhibited by adopting suitable irradiation conditions as well as tailored targets. An overview of implanted targets and their morphological and structural characterizations is presented and discussed.

  7. Antiprotons in the cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protheroe, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Cosmic ray antiprotons were first detected three years ago by Golden et al. (1979) and Bogomolov et al. (1979). The measured flux at about 10 GeV was found to be a factor of 5 to 10 higher than expected in the leaky box model. More recently, an unexpected high antiproton flux has been measured by Buffington et al. (1981) at about 200 MeV, well below a low energy cut-off in the spectrum expected if the antiprotons are secondary. This paper briefly reviews calculations of the flux of secondary antiprotons expected for different models of cosmic ray propagation and discusses some of the primary origin hypotheses which have been proposed to account for the data.

  8. Experimental Studies of Compensation of Beam-Beam Effects with Tevatron Electron Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Yu.; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Solyak, N.; Wildman, D.; Zhang, X.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; /Fermilab /Los Alamos /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN

    2008-02-01

    Applying the space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam can lead to a significant improvement of the beam-particle lifetime limit arising from the beam-beam interaction in a high-energy collider [1]. In this article we present the results of various beam experiments with 'electron lenses', novel instruments developed for the beam-beam compensation at the Tevatron, which collides 980-GeV proton and antiproton beams. We study the dependencies of the particle betatron tunes on the electron beam current, energy and position; we explore the effects of electron-beam imperfections and noises; and we quantify the improvements of the high-energy beam intensity and the collider luminosity lifetime obtained by the action of the Tevatron Electron Lenses.

  9. Experimental studies of compensation of beam beam effects with Tevatron electron lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Bishofberger, K.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Solyak, N.; Wildman, D.; Zhang, X.-L.; Zimmermann, F.

    2008-04-01

    Applying the space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam can lead to a significant improvement of the beam-particle lifetime limit arising from the beam-beam interaction in a high-energy collider [1]. In this paper, we present the results of various beam experiments with 'electron lenses', novel instruments developed for the beam-beam compensation at the Tevatron, which collides 980 GeV proton and antiproton beams. We study the dependencies of the particle betatron tunes on the electron beam current, energy and position; we explore the effects of electron-beam imperfections and noises; and we quantify the improvements of the high-energy beam intensity and the collider luminosity lifetime obtained by the action of the Tevatron electron lenses.

  10. Comparison of electromagnetic and hadronic models generated using Geant 4 with antiproton dose measured in CERN.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Reiazi, Reza; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    After proposing the idea of antiproton cancer treatment in 1984 many experiments were launched to investigate different aspects of physical and radiobiological properties of antiproton, which came from its annihilation reactions. One of these experiments has been done at the European Organization for Nuclear Research known as CERN using the antiproton decelerator. The ultimate goal of this experiment was to assess the dosimetric and radiobiological properties of beams of antiprotons in order to estimate the suitability of antiprotons for radiotherapy. One difficulty on this way was the unavailability of antiproton beam in CERN for a long time, so the verification of Monte Carlo codes to simulate antiproton depth dose could be useful. Among available simulation codes, Geant4 provides acceptable flexibility and extensibility, which progressively lead to the development of novel Geant4 applications in research domains, especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. In this study, the depth dose corresponding to CERN antiproton beam energy by Geant4 recruiting all the standard physics lists currently available and benchmarked for other use cases were calculated. Overall, none of the standard physics lists was able to draw the antiproton percentage depth dose. Although, with some models our results were promising, the Bragg peak level remained as the point of concern for our study. It is concluded that the Bertini model with high precision neutron tracking (QGSP_BERT_HP) is the best to match the experimental data though it is also the slowest model to simulate events among the physics lists.

  11. Comparison of electromagnetic and hadronic models generated using Geant 4 with antiproton dose measured in CERN

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Reiazi, Reza; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    After proposing the idea of antiproton cancer treatment in 1984 many experiments were launched to investigate different aspects of physical and radiobiological properties of antiproton, which came from its annihilation reactions. One of these experiments has been done at the European Organization for Nuclear Research known as CERN using the antiproton decelerator. The ultimate goal of this experiment was to assess the dosimetric and radiobiological properties of beams of antiprotons in order to estimate the suitability of antiprotons for radiotherapy. One difficulty on this way was the unavailability of antiproton beam in CERN for a long time, so the verification of Monte Carlo codes to simulate antiproton depth dose could be useful. Among available simulation codes, Geant4 provides acceptable flexibility and extensibility, which progressively lead to the development of novel Geant4 applications in research domains, especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. In this study, the depth dose corresponding to CERN antiproton beam energy by Geant4 recruiting all the standard physics lists currently available and benchmarked for other use cases were calculated. Overall, none of the standard physics lists was able to draw the antiproton percentage depth dose. Although, with some models our results were promising, the Bragg peak level remained as the point of concern for our study. It is concluded that the Bertini model with high precision neutron tracking (QGSP_BERT_HP) is the best to match the experimental data though it is also the slowest model to simulate events among the physics lists. PMID:26170558

  12. Comparison of electromagnetic and hadronic models generated using Geant 4 with antiproton dose measured in CERN.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Reiazi, Reza; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    After proposing the idea of antiproton cancer treatment in 1984 many experiments were launched to investigate different aspects of physical and radiobiological properties of antiproton, which came from its annihilation reactions. One of these experiments has been done at the European Organization for Nuclear Research known as CERN using the antiproton decelerator. The ultimate goal of this experiment was to assess the dosimetric and radiobiological properties of beams of antiprotons in order to estimate the suitability of antiprotons for radiotherapy. One difficulty on this way was the unavailability of antiproton beam in CERN for a long time, so the verification of Monte Carlo codes to simulate antiproton depth dose could be useful. Among available simulation codes, Geant4 provides acceptable flexibility and extensibility, which progressively lead to the development of novel Geant4 applications in research domains, especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. In this study, the depth dose corresponding to CERN antiproton beam energy by Geant4 recruiting all the standard physics lists currently available and benchmarked for other use cases were calculated. Overall, none of the standard physics lists was able to draw the antiproton percentage depth dose. Although, with some models our results were promising, the Bragg peak level remained as the point of concern for our study. It is concluded that the Bertini model with high precision neutron tracking (QGSP_BERT_HP) is the best to match the experimental data though it is also the slowest model to simulate events among the physics lists. PMID:26170558

  13. Experiments on Antiprotons: Antiproton-Nucleon Cross Sections

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Chamberlain, Owen; Keller, Donald V.; Mermond, Ronald; Segre, Emilio; Steiner, Herbert M.; Ypsilantis, Tom

    1957-07-22

    In this paper experiments are reported on annihilation and scattering of antiprotons in H{sub 2}O , D{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2}. From the data measured it is possible to obtain an antiproton-proton and an antiproton-deuteron cross section at 457 Mev (lab). Further analysis gives the p-p and p-n cross sections as 104 mb for the p-p reaction cross section and 113 mb for the p-n reaction cross section. The respective annihilation cross sections are 89 and 74 mb. The Glauber correction necessary in order to pass from the p-d to the p-n cross section by subtraction of the p-p cross section is unfortunately large and somewhat uncertain. The data are compared with the p-p and p-n cross sections and with other results on p-p collisions.

  14. The Early Antiproton Work [Nobel Lecture

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Chamberlain, O.

    1959-12-15

    Early work on the antiproton, particularly that part which led to the first paper on the subject, is described. Conclusions that can be drawn purely from the existence of the antiproton are discussed. (W.D.M.)

  15. Applying the laser beam for reconstruction of the upper airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukwa, Andrzej; Tulibacki, Marek P.; Wojtowicz, Piotr; Dudziec, Katarzyna; Oledzka, Iwona

    2000-11-01

    The authors present their own experience in restoration of the upper airway using a different source of high power laser. There are many patients with a stricture of the upper airway. One of the most common cause insufficiency of this is nosal polyps. Surgical treatment of polyps till now is not sufficiently effective. For this reason we work out a Nd:YAG laser applying technique that let us to reduce a hospitalization time with elongation of an asymptotic period of our patients. Nd:YAG energy we apply for conchoplasty benefiting of its profound coagulation as a distinctive role. This type of laser is very useful in removing of granulation tissue from different areas of the upper airway. Other applications of Nd:YAG laser in our hands is very useful for: coagulation of vessels in Kisselbach area, especially in Rendou-Osler's diseases, resection of the nosal Septo-turbinate adhesions, treatment of hemangiomas and small papillomas in nasal cavity, diminishing of the hypertrophied mucosa in the nasopharyngeal space as well as, reduction of the uvula and soft palate in OSAS patients. In our department we use a Nd:YAG for treatment of precancerous and early stages of cancer and for a palliation procedures in an advanced cancer infiltration in mouth, pharynx and laryngeal region. For treatment removing of cicatrix tissue in a larynx and trachea we use to use a Holm: YAG laser their very superficial penetration of tissues is used for a coagulation of small vessels too let us to resect it without bleeding from a bony and mucosa tissue, as a fragments maxillary sinus wall, nosal septum crest or spine with resection of the posterior pole of a turbinate. Both laser are conveyed by fiberoptic, to reach a pathological changes in many plans, places for this reason we are able to continuously work on a new its applications.

  16. Compression of antiproton clouds for antihydrogen trapping.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; El Nasr, S Seif; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-05-23

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  17. Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.

    2008-05-23

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  18. Antiprotons in the Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutter, Scott

    1999-10-01

    The HEAT (High Energy Antimatter Telescope) collaboration flew in May 1999 a balloon-borne instrument to measure the relative abundance of antiprotons and protons in the cosmic rays to kinetic energies of 30 GeV. The instrument uses a multiple energy loss technique to measure the Lorentz factor of through-going cosmic rays, a magnet spectrometer to measure momentum, and several scintillation counters to determine particle charge and direction (up or down in the atmosphere). The antiproton/proton abundance ratio as a function of energy is a probe of the propagation environment of protons through the galaxy. Existing measurements indicate a higher than expected value at both high and low energies. A confirming measurement could indicate peculiar antiproton sources, such as WIMPs or supersymmetric darkmatter candidates. A description of the instrument, details of the flight and instrument performance, and status of the data analysis will be given.

  19. Antiproton annihilation in quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-10-01

    Anti-proton annihilation has a number of important advantages as a probe of QCD in the low energy domain. Exclusive reaction in which complete annihilation of the valance quarks occur. There are a number of exclusive and inclusive /bar p/ reactions in the intermediate momentum transfer domain which provide useful constraints on hadron wavefunctions or test novel features of QCD involving both perturbative and nonperturbative dynamics. Inclusive reactions involving antiprotons have the advantage that the parton distributions are well understood. In these lectures, I will particularly focus on lepton pair production /bar p/A ..-->.. /ell//bar /ell//X as a means to understand specific nuclear features in QCD, including collision broadening, breakdown of the QCD ''target length condition''. Thus studies of low to moderate energy antiproton reactions with laboratory energies under 10 GeV could give further insights into the full structure of QCD. 112 refs., 40 figs.

  20. Cyclotron accelerated beams applied in wear and corrosion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racolta, P. M.; Popa-Simil, L.; Ivanov, E. A.; Alexandreanu, B.

    1996-05-01

    Wear and corrosion processes are characterized by a loss of material that is, for machine parts and components, usually in a micrometer's range. That is why, in the last two decades, many direct applications in machine construction, petrochemical and metallurgical industries based on the Thin Layer Activation (TLA) technique have been developed. In this paper general working patterns together with a few examples of TLA applications carried out using our laboratory's U-120 Cyclotron are presented. The relation between the counting rate of the radiation originating from the component's irradiated zone and the loss of the worn material can be determined mainly by two methods: the oil circulation method and the remnant radioactivity measuring method. The first method is illustrated with some typical examples such as the optimization of the running-in program of a diesel engine and anti-wear features certifying of lubricant oils. There is also presented an example where the second method mentioned above has been applied to corrosion rate determinations for different kinds of unoxidable steels used in inert gas generator construction.

  1. New techniques for trapping antiprotons, positrons, and antihydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Y.

    2005-10-26

    A large number of antiprotons have been accumulated, cooled, compressed, and extracted for the first time. This was accomplished combining the AD(Antiproton Decelerator), the RFQD (Radio Frequency Quadrupole Decelerator) and an MRT (Multi-Ring Trap) installed in a 2.5T solenoid. Some 1.2 x 106 antiprotons were stably stored per one AD shot, which was {approx}50 times better in the accumulation efficiency than conventional methods with thick degrader foils. The trapped antiprotons were then cooled by a preloaded electron plasma({approx} 108/cm3), radially compressed by a rotating electric field, and then extracted from the MRT as mono-energetic DC beams of 10-500eV. A similar system with much higher electron density({approx} 1011/cm3) has enabled a new positron accumulation, the efficiency of which is 360e+/s/mCi, some {approx}30 times better than previous UHV compatible schemes. With these ingredients, a cusp trap is under development, which could synthesize and at the same time trap spin-polarized antihydrogen atoms in their ground states.

  2. Enhancing trappable antiproton populations through deceleration and frictional cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotorev, Max; Sessler, Andrew; Penn, Gregory; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Charman, Andrew E.

    2012-03-20

    CERN currently delivers antiprotons for trapping experiments with the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), which slows the antiprotons down to about 5 MeV.This energy is currently too high for direct trapping, and thick foils are used to slow down the beam to energies which can be trapped.To allow further deceleration to $\\sim 100 \\;\\mbox{keV}$, CERN is initiating the construction of ELENA,consisting of a ring which will combine RF deceleration and electron cooling capabilities. We describe a simple frictionalcooling scheme that can serve to provide significantly improved trapping efficiency, either directly from the AD or first usinga standard deceleration mechanism (induction linac or RFQ). This scheme could be implemented in a short time.The device itself is short in length, uses accessible voltages, and at reasonable cost could serve in the interim beforeELENA becomes operational, or possibly in lieu of ELENA for some experiments. Simple theory and simulations provide a preliminary assessment of theconcept and its strengths and limitations, and highlight important areas for experimental studies, in particular to pin down the level of multiplescattering for low-energy antiprotons. We show that the frictional cooling scheme can provide a similar energy spectrum to that of ELENA,but with higher transverse emittances.

  3. Doubly Strange Hypernuclei Physics with antiprotons at PANDA

    SciTech Connect

    Szymanska, K.; Iazzi, F.

    2010-04-26

    The study of the double hypernuclei will be possible inside the future facility FAIR. A new technique for their production was recently proposed, based on high intensity antiproton beams in connection with a two-target set-up, for the future PANDA experiment at HESR. In particular, the production technique and optimized parameters for the primary target where the hyperon XI{sup -} is produced as well as the expected rates for the stoped XI{sup -} will be discussed.

  4. INDEPENDENT COMPONENT ANALYSIS (ICA) APPLIED TO LONG BUNCH BEAMS IN THE LOS ALAMOS PROTON STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Kolski, Jeffrey S.; Macek, Robert J.; McCrady, Rodney C.; Pang, Xiaoying

    2012-05-14

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a powerful blind source separation (BSS) method. Compared to the typical BSS method, principal component analysis (PCA), which is the BSS foundation of the well known model independent analysis (MIA), ICA is more robust to noise, coupling, and nonlinearity. ICA of turn-by-turn beam position data has been used to measure the transverse betatron phase and amplitude functions, dispersion function, linear coupling, sextupole strength, and nonlinear beam dynamics. We apply ICA in a new way to slices along the bunch and discuss the source signals identified as betatron motion and longitudinal beam structure.

  5. Segmented scintillation detectors with silicon photomultiplier readout for measuring antiproton annihilations

    SciTech Connect

    Sótér, A.; Todoroki, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Barna, D.; Horváth, D.; Hori, M.

    2014-02-15

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN constructed segmented scintillators to detect and track the charged pions which emerge from antiproton annihilations in a future superconducting radiofrequency Paul trap for antiprotons. A system of 541 cast and extruded scintillator bars were arranged in 11 detector modules which provided a spatial resolution of 17 mm. Green wavelength-shifting fibers were embedded in the scintillators, and read out by silicon photomultipliers which had a sensitive area of 1 × 1 mm{sup 2}. The photoelectron yields of various scintillator configurations were measured using a negative pion beam of momentum p ≈ 1 GeV/c. Various fibers and silicon photomultipliers, fiber end terminations, and couplings between the fibers and scintillators were compared. The detectors were also tested using the antiproton beam of the AD. Nonlinear effects due to the saturation of the silicon photomultiplier were seen at high annihilation rates of the antiprotons.

  6. Antiproton induced DNA damage: proton like in flight, carbon-ion like near rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, J. N.; Currell, F. J.; Timson, D. J.; Savage, K. I.; Richard, D. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Hartley, O.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Romano, F.; Prise, K. M.; Bassler, N.; Holzscheiter, M. H.; Schettino, G.

    2013-05-01

    Biological validation of new radiotherapy modalities is essential to understand their therapeutic potential. Antiprotons have been proposed for cancer therapy due to enhanced dose deposition provided by antiproton-nucleon annihilation. We assessed cellular DNA damage and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of a clinically relevant antiproton beam. Despite a modest LET (~19 keV/μm), antiproton spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) irradiation caused significant residual γ-H2AX foci compared to X-ray, proton and antiproton plateau irradiation. RBE of ~1.48 in the SOBP and ~1 in the plateau were measured and used for a qualitative effective dose curve comparison with proton and carbon-ions. Foci in the antiproton SOBP were larger and more structured compared to X-rays, protons and carbon-ions. This is likely due to overlapping particle tracks near the annihilation vertex, creating spatially correlated DNA lesions. No biological effects were observed at 28-42 mm away from the primary beam suggesting minimal risk from long-range secondary particles.

  7. Review of the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James J.; Lewis, Raymond A.; Pearson, J. Boise; Sims, W. Herb; Chakrabarti, Suman; Fant, Wallace E.; McDonald, Stan

    2003-01-01

    Many space propulsion concepts exist that use matter-antimatter reactions. Current antiproton production rates are enough to conduct proof-of-principle evaluation of these concepts. One enabling technology for such experiments is portable storage of low energy antiprotons, to transport antiprotons to experimental facilities. To address this need, HiPAT is being developed, with a design goal of containing 10(exp 12) particles for up to 18 days. HiPAT is a Penning-Malmberg trap with a 4 Tesla superconductor, 20kV electrodes, radio frequency (RF) network, and 10(exp -13) Torr vacuum. 'Normal' matter is being used to evaluate the system. An electron beam ionizes background gas in situ, and particle beams are captured dynamically. The experiment examines ion storage lifetimes, RF plasma diagnostics, charge exchange with background gases, and dynamic ion beam capture.

  8. Two methods for the production of antihydrogen beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ispirian, K.A.; Ispirian, R.K.

    1994-10-01

    The possibility for obtaining antihydrogen beams at the antiproton storage rings in the head-on collisions of antiprotons with synchrotron radiation photons is considered. As a second method, it is proposed that an insertion in which the antiprotons are accompanied with positrons be added; their recombination results in antihydrogen production. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  9. X-rays from antiprotonic3He and4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M.; Bacher, R.; Blüm, P.; Gotta, D.; Heitlinger, K.; Kunold, W.; Rohmann, D.; Egger, J.; Simons, L. M.; Elsener, K.

    1991-06-01

    Antiprotonic X-rays from the helium isotopes have been observed at pressures of 36, 72, 375 and 600 mbar. The antiproton beam from LEAR with momenta of 309 and 202 MeV/c has been stopped at these pressures using the cyclotron trap. The X-rays were detected with Si (Li) and intrinsic Ge semiconductor detectors. Absolute X-ray yields were determined and the strong-interaction 2p shifts and the 2p and 3d broadenings measured to be ɛ2p=(-17±4) eV, Γ2p=(25±9) eV and Γ3d=(2.14 ±0.18) meV for ¯p3He and ɛ2p=(-18±2) eV, Γ2p =(45±5) eV and Γ3d=(2.36±0.10) meV for ¯p4He.

  10. Antiproton powered propulsion with magnetically confined plasma engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1989-01-01

    The reaction of the matter-antimatter annihilation, with its specific energy being over 250 times the specific energy released in nuclear fusion, is considered as an energy source for spacecraft propulsion. A concept of a magnetically confined pulsed plasma engine is described. In this concept, antiproton beams are injected axially into a pulsed magnetic mirror system, where they annihilate with an initially neutral hydrogen gas; the resulting charge annihilation products transfer energy to the hydrogen propellant, which is then exhausted through one end of the pulsed mirror system to provide thrust. Numerical simulations were developed to calculate the annihilation rate of antiprotons in hydrogen and to follow the resulting ion, muon, and electron/positron number density evolutions.

  11. Antiproton Production by CR on Air Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maskalenko, I. V.; Mashnik, S. G.

    2003-01-01

    Recent measurements of the cosmic ray (CR) antiproton flux have been shown to challenge existing CR propagation models. In particular, the conventional reacceleration model designed to match secondary/primary nuclei ratios produces too few antiprotons. Recently there appear some indications that the atmospheric contribution to antiproton production is considerably underestimated, which implies that antiproton CR flux might be lower. This may be the primary reason of the discrepancy discovered in CR propagation. We use the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model code LAQGSM together with available data on antiproton production on nuclei to analyse the accuracy of existing parameterizations of antiproton production cross section. The LAQGSM model has been shown to reproduce well nuclear reactions and hadronic data in the range 0.01-800 GeV/nucleon.

  12. Anitproton-matter interactions in antiproton applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, David L., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    By virtue of the highly energetic particles released when they annihilate in matter, antiprotons have a variety of potentially important applications. Among others, these include remote 3-D density and composition imaging of the human body and also of thick, dense materials, cancer therapy, and spacecraft propulsion. Except for spacecraft propulsion, the required numbers of low energy antiprotons can be produced, stored, and transported through reliance on current or near term technology. Paramount to these applications and to fundamental research involving antiprotons is knowledge of how antiprotons interact with matter. The basic annihilation process is fairly well understood, but the antiproton annihilation and energy loss rates in matter depend in complex ways on a number of atomic processes. The rates, and the corresponding cross sections, were measured or are accurately predictable only for limited combinations of antiproton kinetic energy and material species.

  13. Radiation studies in the antiproton source

    SciTech Connect

    Church, M.

    1990-09-10

    Experiment E760 has a lead glass (Pb-G) calorimeter situated in the antiproton source tunnel in the accumulator ring at location A50. This location is exposed to radiation from several sources during antiproton stacking operations. A series of radiation studies has been performed over the last two years to determine the sources of this radiation and as a result, some shielding has been installed in the antiproton source in order to protect the lead glass from radiation damage.

  14. Antiproton cooling in the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Bolshakov, A.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, Alexey V.; Carlson, K.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Kazakevich, G.; Kramper, B.; Kroc, T.; Leibfritz, J.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Saewert, G; Schmidt, C.W.; Seletskiy, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Tupikov, V.; Warner, A.; Zenkevich, P.; /Fermilab /Moscow, ITEP /Novosibirsk, IYF /Rochester U.

    2005-12-01

    The 8.9-GeV/c Recycler antiproton storage ring is equipped with both stochastic and electron cooling systems. These cooling systems are designed to assist accumulation of antiprotons for the Tevatron collider operations. In this paper we report on an experimental demonstration of electron cooling of high-energy antiprotons. At the time of writing this report, the Recycler electron cooling system is routinely used in collider operations. It has helped to set recent peak luminosity records.

  15. 7Be radioactive beam production at CIRCE and its utilization in basic and applied physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limata, Benedicta Normanna; Gialanella, Lucio; Leva, Antonino Di; Cesare, Nicola De; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Gyurky, G.; Rolfs, Claus; Romano, Mario; Rogalla, Detlef; Rossi, Cesare; Russo, Michele; Somorjai, Endre; Terrasi, Filippo

    2008-05-01

    A pure 7Be beam with an energy E = 1-8 MeV is available for nuclear and applied physics at the 3 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator CIRCE in Caserta. The beam is produced using an offline technique. Typical analyzed beam intensities are about 2 ppA, using cathodes with an activity of the order of 200 MBq. The 7Be implantation has been used for both fundamental nuclear physics and applied physics. In particular, different metals have been implanted with 7Be in order to study the influence of the chemical composition and of the number of quasi-free electrons of the host material on the 7Be half-life. In the field of applied physics, the 7Be implantation turns out to be very interesting for wear measurement. In fact, in this case 7Be is used as a depth-sensitive tracer. The continuous detection of the sample activity during the wear allows a high sensitivity measurement of wearing speed. The 7Be beam production at CIRCE, the implantation procedure and the results obtained from the 7Be half-life measurements and the wear characterization of implanted steel samples are described.

  16. Tevatron beam-beam compensation project progress

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; Kuznetsov, G.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Tiunov, M.; Bishofberger, K.; Bogdanov, I.; Kashtanov, E.; Kozub, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tkachenko, L.; /Serpukhov, IHEP

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we report the progress of the Tevatron Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project [1]. Electron beam induced proton and antiproton tuneshifts have been reported in [2], suppression of an antiproton emittance growth has been observed, too [1]. Currently, the first electron lens (TEL1) is in operational use as the Tevatron DC beam cleaner. We have made a lot of the upgrades to improve its stability [3]. The 2nd Tevatron electron lens (TEL2) is under the final phase of development and preparation for installation in the Tevatron.

  17. Antiproton limits on decaying gravitino dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, Timur; Grefe, Michael E-mail: michael.grefe@uam.es

    2013-12-01

    We derive 95 % CL lower limits on the lifetime of decaying dark matter in the channels Zν, Wℓ and hν using measurements of the cosmic-ray antiproton flux by the PAMELA experiment. Performing a scan over the allowed range of cosmic-ray propagation parameters we find lifetime limits in the range of 8 × 10{sup 28} s to 5 × 10{sup 25} s for dark matter masses from roughly 100 GeV to 10 TeV. We apply these limits to the well-motivated case of gravitino dark matter in scenarios with bilinear violation of R-parity and find a similar range of lifetime limits for the same range of gravitino masses. Converting the lifetime limits to constraints on the size of the R-parity violating coupling we find upper limits in the range of 10{sup −8} to 8 × 10{sup −13}.

  18. The Magnetic Moments of the Proton and the Antiproton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Stefan; Smorra, Christian

    A comparison of the magnetic moments of the proton and the antiproton provides a sensitive test of matter-antimatter symmetry. While the magnetic moment of the proton is known with a relative precision of 10^{-8}, that of the antiproton is only known with moderate accuracy. Important progress towards a high-precision measurement of the particle's magnetic moment was reported in 2011 by a group at Mainz when spin transitions of a single proton stored in a cryogenic Penning trap were observed. To resolve the single-proton spin flips, the so-called 'continuous Stern-Gerlach effect' was utilized. Using this technique, the proton magnetic moment was measured by two groups at Mainz and Harvard with relative precisions of 8.9× 10^{-6} and 2.5× 10^{-6}, respectively. Currently, two collaborations at the CERN antiproton decelerator (AD)—a part of ATRAP and BASE—are pushing their efforts to apply the methods developed for the proton to measure the magnetic moment of the antiproton. Very recently, DiSciacca et al. reported on a measurement of the antiproton's magnetic moment with a relative precision of 4.4 ppm, which is a improvement of the formerly best value by about a factor of 680. Using the so-called double Penning trap technique, both collaborations aim for a precision measurement at the level of at least 10^{-9} in future experiments, which would provide a highly sensitive test of the CPT symmetry using baryons.

  19. Overview of the High Performance Antiproton (HiPAT) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James J.; Sims, William H.; Chakrabarti, Suman; Pearson, Boise; Fant, Wallace E.; Lewis, Raymond A.; Rodgers, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of matter with antimatter represents the highest energy density of any known reaction, producing 10(exp 8) MJ/g, approximately 10 orders of magnitude more energy per unit mass than chemical based combustion. To take the first step towards using this energy for propulsion applications the NASA MSFC Propulsion Research Center (PRC) has initiated a research activity examining the storage of low energy antiprotons. Storage was identified as a key enabling technology since it builds the experience base necessary to understand the handling of antiprotons for virtually all utilization and high-density storage concepts. To address this need, a device referred to as the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) is under development at the NASA MSFC PRC. The HiPAT is an electromagnetic system (Penning-Malmberg design) consisting of a 4 Tesla superconductor, a high voltage confinement electrode system (operation up to 20 KV), and an ultra high vacuum test section (operating in the 10(exp -12) torr range). The system was designed to be portable with an ultimate goal of maintaining 10(exp 12) charged particles with a half-life of 18 days. Currently, this system is being experimentally evaluated using normal matter ions which are cheap to produce and relatively easy to handle. These normal ions provide a good indication of overall trap behavior, with the exception of assessing annihilation losses. The ions are produced external to HiPAT using two hydrogen ion sources, with adjustable beam energy and current. Ion are transported in a beam line and controlled through the use of electrostatic optics. These optics serve to both focus and gate the incoming ions, providing microsecond-timed pulses that are dynamically captured by cycling the HiPAT electric containment field like a 'trap door'. The layout of this system more closely simulates the operations expected at an actual antiproton production facility where 'packets' of antiprotons with pulse widths measured in

  20. On the Utility of Antiprotons as Drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L J; Orth, C D; Tabak, M

    2003-10-20

    By contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90MJ/{micro}g and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons ({bar p}) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both {bar p}-driven ablative compression and {bar p}-driven fast ignition, in association with 0-D and 1-D target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of {approx}3x10{sup 15} injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains - i.e., fusion yields divided by the available p - {bar p} annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88GeV/{bar p}) - range from {approx}3 for volumetric ignition targets to {approx}600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply

  1. Antiproton powered propulsion with magnetically confined plasma engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1989-01-01

    Matter-antimatter annihilation releases more energy per unit mass than any other method of energy production, making it an attractive energy source for spacecraft propulsion. In the magnetically confined plasma engine, antiproton beams are injected axially into a pulsed magnetic mirror system, where they annihilate with an initially neutral hydrogen gas. The resulting charged annihilation products transfer energy to the hydrogen propellant, which is then exhausted through one end of the pulsed mirror system to provide thrust. The calculated energy transfer efficiencies for a low number density (10(14)/cu cm) hydrogen propellant are insufficient to warrant operating the engine in this mode. Efficiencies are improved using moderate propellant number densities (10(16)/cu cm), but the energy transferred to the plasma in a realistic magnetic mirror system is generally limited to less than 2 percent of the initial proton-antiproton annihilation energy. The energy transfer efficiencies are highest for high number density (10(18)/cu cm) propellants, but plasma temperatures are reduced by excessive radiation losses. Low to moderate thrust over a wide range of specific impulse can be generated with moderate propellant number densities, while higher thrust but lower specific impulse may be generated using high propellant number densities. Significant mass will be required to shield the superconducting magnet coils from the high energy gamma radiation emitted by neutral pion decay. The mass of such a radiation shield may dominate the total engine mass, and could severely diminish the performance of antiproton powered engines which utilize magnetic confinement. The problem is compounded in the antiproton powered plasma engine, where lower energy plasma bremsstrahlung radiation may cause shield surface ablation and degradation.

  2. Cooling of stored beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, F.E.

    1986-10-15

    Beam cooling methods developed for the accumulation of antiprotons are being employed to assist in the performance of experiments in Nuclear and Particle Physics with ion beams stored in storage rings. The physics of beam cooling, and the ranges of utility of stochastic and electron cooling are discussed in this paper.

  3. Antiproton acceleration in the Fermilab Main Injector using 2.5 MHz (H=28) and 53 MHz (H=588) rf systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent Wu et al.

    2003-06-10

    During the Run II era at Fermilab, the Recycler stores antiprotons at 8 GeV and the Main Injector accelerates the antiprotons and the protons from 8 GeV to 150 GeV for Tevatron injection. The Recycler injects antiprotons to the Main Injector in 2.5 MHz rf buckets. This report presents an acceleration scheme for the antiprotons that involves a slow ramp with initial 2.5 MHz acceleration and subsequent fast acceleration with 53 MHz rf system. Beam acceleration and rf manipulation with space charge and beam loading effects are simulated using the longitudinal simulation code ESME. Simulation suggests that one can expect about 15% emittance growth for the entire acceleration cycle with beam loading compensations. Preliminary experimental results with proton beam will also be presented.

  4. Performance of the Upgraded Stacktail Momentum Cooling System in the Fermilab Antiproton Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; McGinnis, David; /Fermilab

    1992-01-01

    Major changes in the Stacktail Momentum Stochastic Cooling system have resulted in an improved stacking rate as well as the capability to stack larger quantities of antiprotons. Both these effects result in higher initial and integrated luminosity for colliding beam physics. An overview of the changes and actual system performance is presented.

  5. Direct-aperture optimization applied to selection of beam orientations in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, J. L.; Webb, S.

    2007-01-01

    Direct-aperture optimization (DAO) was applied to iterative beam-orientation selection in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), so as to ensure a realistic segmental treatment plan at each iteration. Nested optimization engines dealt separately with gantry angles, couch angles, collimator angles, segment shapes, segment weights and wedge angles. Each optimization engine performed a random search with successively narrowing step sizes. For optimization of segment shapes, the filtered backprojection (FBP) method was first used to determine desired fluence, the fluence map was segmented, and then constrained direct-aperture optimization was used thereafter. Segment shapes were fully optimized when a beam angle was perturbed, and minimally re-optimized otherwise. The algorithm was compared with a previously reported method using FBP alone at each orientation iteration. An example case consisting of a cylindrical phantom with a hemi-annular planning target volume (PTV) showed that for three-field plans, the method performed better than when using FBP alone, but for five or more fields, neither method provided much benefit over equally spaced beams. For a prostate case, improved bladder sparing was achieved through the use of the new algorithm. A plan for partial scalp treatment showed slightly improved PTV coverage and lower irradiated volume of brain with the new method compared to FBP alone. It is concluded that, although the method is computationally intensive and not suitable for searching large unconstrained regions of beam space, it can be used effectively in conjunction with prior class solutions to provide individually optimized IMRT treatment plans.

  6. That was LEAP 05! or Antiproton Physics in a Nutshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienle, Paul

    2005-10-01

    A personally flavored review of selected topics of LEAP 05 is given, with focus on some recent interesting developments in low and medium energy antiproton physics, such as fundamental symmetries and antihydrogen, antihadron-hadron systems, antiproton-proton annihilation, nuclear structure studies with antiprotons, and the FAIR facility for antiproton and ion research.

  7. Fermilab Tevatron I project target station for antiproton production

    SciTech Connect

    Hojvat, C.; Biallas, G.; Hanson, R.; Heim, J.; Lange, F.

    1983-03-01

    Production of 8-GeV antiprotons in the Fermilab Tevatron I project will utilize 120-GeV protons from the Main Ring. The Target Station consists of an entrance collimator, the target itself, a pulsed lithium lens for anti proton collection, a pulsed magnet for the separation of the 8-GeV secondaries, and a beam dump. These components are mounted on vertical modules within the Target Service Building. Allowance has been made for future improvements to increase the collected anti proton flux. The design of the Target Station and its components is discussed.

  8. Operating Procedure Changes to Improve Antiproton Production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Drendel, B.; Morgan, J.P.; Vander Meulen, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Since the start of Fermilab Collider Run II in 2001, the maximum weekly antiproton accumulation rate has increased from 400 x 10{sup 10} Pbars/week to approximately 3,700 x 10{sup 10} Pbars/week. There are many factors contributing to this increase, one of which involves changes to operational procedures that have streamlined and automated Antiproton Source production. Automation has been added to the beam line orbit control, stochastic cooling power level management, and RF settings. In addition, daily tuning efforts have been streamlined by implementing sequencer driven tuning software.

  9. Secondary antiproton production in relativistic plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, C. D.; Ramaty, R.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility is investigated that the reported excess low energy antiproton component of the cosmic radiation results from proton-proton (p-p) interactions in relativistic plasmas. Because of both target and projectile motion in such plasmas, the antiproton production threshold in the frame of the plasma is much lower than the threshold of antiproton production in cosmic ray interactions with ambient matter. The spectrum of the resultant antiprotons therefore extends to much lower energy than in the cosmic ray case. The antiproton spectrum is calculated for relativistic thermal plasmas and the spectrum is estimated for relativistic nonthermal plasmas. As possible production sites, matter accreting onto compact objects located in the galaxy is considered. Possible overproduction of gamma rays from associated neutral pion production can be avoided if the site is optically thick to the photons but not to the antiprotons. A possible scenario involves a sufficiently large photon density that the neutral pion gamma rays are absorbed by photon-photon pair production. Escape of the antiprotons to the interstellar medium can be mediated by antineutron production.

  10. Instrumentation for measurement of in-flight annihilations of 130 keV antiprotons on thin target foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoroki, K.; Barna, D.; Hayano, R. S.; Aghai-Khozani, H.; Sótér, A.; Corradini, M.; Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V.; Venturelli, L.; Prest, V.; Vallazza, L.; De Salvador, D.; Hori, M.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the instrumentation for an experiment to measure the cross sections of antiprotons with kinetic energies of 130±10 keV annihilating on carbon, palladium, and platinum target foils of sub-100 nm thicknesses. A 120 ns long pulsed beam containing 105 -106 antiprotons was allowed to traverse the foils, and the signal annihilations that resulted from this were isolated using a time-of-flight method. Backgrounds arose from Rutherford scattering of the antiprotons off the target foils, their annihilations in the target chamber walls, and π → μ → e decay of the charged pions that emerged from the annihilations. Some antiprotons slowed down and annihilated in the contamination on the target surfaces. This reduced the signal-to-background ratio of the measurement.

  11. Supersonic molecular beam injection effects on tokamak plasma applied non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hyunsun; In, Y.; Jeon, Y. M.; Lee, H. Y.; Hahn, S. H.; Lee, K. D.; Nam, Y. U.; Yoon, S. W.

    2016-08-01

    The change of tokamak plasma behavior by supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) was investigated by applying a three-dimensional magnetic perturbation that could suppress edge localized modes (ELMs). From the time trace of decreasing electron temperature and with increasing plasma density keeping the total confined energy constant, the SMBI seems to act as a cold pulse on the plasma. However, the ELM behaviors were changed drastically (i.e., the symptom of ELM suppression has disappeared). The plasma collisionality in the edge-pedestal region could play a role in the change of the ELM behaviors.

  12. Evaluation on Geant4 Hadronic Models for Pion Minus, Pion Plus and Neutron Particles as Major Antiproton Annihilation Products.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Reiazi, Reza; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    Geant4 is an open source simulation toolkit based on C++, which its advantages progressively lead to applications in research domains especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. However, it was shown that Geant4 does not give a reasonable result in the prediction of antiproton dose especially in Bragg peak. One of the reasons could be lack of reliable physic model to predict the final states of annihilation products like pions. Considering the fact that most of the antiproton deposited dose is resulted from high-LET nuclear fragments following pion interaction in surrounding nucleons, we reproduced depth dose curves of most probable energy range of pions and neutron particle using Geant4. We consider this work one of the steps to understand the origin of the error and finally verification of Geant4 for antiproton tracking. Geant4 toolkit version 9.4.6.p01 and Fluka version 2006.3 were used to reproduce the depth dose curves of 220 MeV pions (both negative and positive) and 70 MeV neutrons. The geometry applied in the simulations consist a 20 × 20 × 20 cm(3) water tank, similar to that used in CERN for antiproton relative dose measurements. Different physic lists including Quark-Gluon String Precompound (QGSP)_Binary Cascade (BIC)_HP, the recommended setting for hadron therapy, were used. In the case of pions, Geant4 resulted in at least 5% dose discrepancy between different physic lists at depth close to the entrance point. Even up to 15% discrepancy was found in some cases like QBBC compared to QGSP_BIC_HP. A significant difference was observed in dose profiles of different Geant4 physic list at small depths for a beam of pions. In the case of neutrons, large dose discrepancy was observed when LHEP or LHEP_EMV lists were applied. The magnitude of this dose discrepancy could be even 50% greater than the dose calculated by LHEP (or LHEP_EMV) at larger depths. We found that effect different Geant4 physic list in

  13. Evaluation on Geant4 Hadronic Models for Pion Minus, Pion Plus and Neutron Particles as Major Antiproton Annihilation Products

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Reiazi, Reza; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    Geant4 is an open source simulation toolkit based on C++, which its advantages progressively lead to applications in research domains especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. However, it was shown that Geant4 does not give a reasonable result in the prediction of antiproton dose especially in Bragg peak. One of the reasons could be lack of reliable physic model to predict the final states of annihilation products like pions. Considering the fact that most of the antiproton deposited dose is resulted from high-LET nuclear fragments following pion interaction in surrounding nucleons, we reproduced depth dose curves of most probable energy range of pions and neutron particle using Geant4. We consider this work one of the steps to understand the origin of the error and finally verification of Geant4 for antiproton tracking. Geant4 toolkit version 9.4.6.p01 and Fluka version 2006.3 were used to reproduce the depth dose curves of 220 MeV pions (both negative and positive) and 70 MeV neutrons. The geometry applied in the simulations consist a 20 × 20 × 20 cm3 water tank, similar to that used in CERN for antiproton relative dose measurements. Different physic lists including Quark-Gluon String Precompound (QGSP)_Binary Cascade (BIC)_HP, the recommended setting for hadron therapy, were used. In the case of pions, Geant4 resulted in at least 5% dose discrepancy between different physic lists at depth close to the entrance point. Even up to 15% discrepancy was found in some cases like QBBC compared to QGSP_BIC_HP. A significant difference was observed in dose profiles of different Geant4 physic list at small depths for a beam of pions. In the case of neutrons, large dose discrepancy was observed when LHEP or LHEP_EMV lists were applied. The magnitude of this dose discrepancy could be even 50% greater than the dose calculated by LHEP (or LHEP_EMV) at larger depths. We found that effect different Geant4 physic list in

  14. Evaluation on Geant4 Hadronic Models for Pion Minus, Pion Plus and Neutron Particles as Major Antiproton Annihilation Products.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Reiazi, Reza; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    Geant4 is an open source simulation toolkit based on C++, which its advantages progressively lead to applications in research domains especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. However, it was shown that Geant4 does not give a reasonable result in the prediction of antiproton dose especially in Bragg peak. One of the reasons could be lack of reliable physic model to predict the final states of annihilation products like pions. Considering the fact that most of the antiproton deposited dose is resulted from high-LET nuclear fragments following pion interaction in surrounding nucleons, we reproduced depth dose curves of most probable energy range of pions and neutron particle using Geant4. We consider this work one of the steps to understand the origin of the error and finally verification of Geant4 for antiproton tracking. Geant4 toolkit version 9.4.6.p01 and Fluka version 2006.3 were used to reproduce the depth dose curves of 220 MeV pions (both negative and positive) and 70 MeV neutrons. The geometry applied in the simulations consist a 20 × 20 × 20 cm(3) water tank, similar to that used in CERN for antiproton relative dose measurements. Different physic lists including Quark-Gluon String Precompound (QGSP)_Binary Cascade (BIC)_HP, the recommended setting for hadron therapy, were used. In the case of pions, Geant4 resulted in at least 5% dose discrepancy between different physic lists at depth close to the entrance point. Even up to 15% discrepancy was found in some cases like QBBC compared to QGSP_BIC_HP. A significant difference was observed in dose profiles of different Geant4 physic list at small depths for a beam of pions. In the case of neutrons, large dose discrepancy was observed when LHEP or LHEP_EMV lists were applied. The magnitude of this dose discrepancy could be even 50% greater than the dose calculated by LHEP (or LHEP_EMV) at larger depths. We found that effect different Geant4 physic list in

  15. RF Stabilization for Storage of Antiprotons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Lewis, Raymond A.

    2005-01-01

    Portable storage of antimatter is an important step in the experimental exploration of antimatter in propulsion applications. The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is a Penning-Malmberg ion trap being developed to trap and store low energy antiprotons for a period of weeks. The antiprotons can then be transported for use in experiments. HiPAT is being developed and evaluated using normal matter, before an attempt is made to store and transport antiprotons. Stortd ions have inherent instabilities that limit the storage lifetime. RF stabilization at cyclotron resonance frequencies is demonstrated over a period of 6 days for normal matter ion clouds. A variety of particles have been stored, including protons, C+ ions, and H2+ ions. Cyclotron resonance frequencies are defined and experimental evidence presented to demonstrate excitation of cyclotron waves in the plasma for all three species of ions.

  16. Antiproton catalyzed microfission/fusion propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, Pi-Ren; Lewis, Raymond A.; Smith, Gerald A.; Newton, Richard; Dailey, James; Werthman, W. Lance; Chakrabarti, Suman

    1994-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) utilizing an antiproton catalyzed hybrid fission/fusion target is discussed as a potential energy source for interplanetary propulsion. A proof-of-principle experiment underway at Phillips Laboratory, Kirtland AFB and antiproton trapping experiments at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland, are presented. The ICAN propulsion concept is described and results of performance analyses are reviewed. Future work to further define the ICAN concept is outlined.

  17. Evaporative cooling of antiprotons for the production of trappable antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Silveira, D. M.; Cesar, C. L.; Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Wurtele, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Friesen, T.; Hydomako, R.; and others

    2013-03-19

    We describe the implementation of evaporative cooling of charged particles in the ALPHA apparatus. Forced evaporation has been applied to cold samples of antiprotons held in Malmberg-Penning traps. Temperatures on the order of 10 K were obtained, while retaining a significant fraction of the initial number of particles. We have developed a model for the evaporation process based on simple rate equations and applied it succesfully to the experimental data. We have also observed radial re-distribution of the clouds following evaporation, explained by simple conservation laws. We discuss the relevance of this technique for the recent demonstration of magnetic trapping of antihydrogen.

  18. Experimental and simulation studies of beam-beam compensation with Tevatron electron lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Zhang, X.L.; Shatilov, D.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2007-06-01

    Initially the Tevatron Electron Lenses (TELs) were intended for compensation of the beam-beam effect on the antiproton beam [1]. Owing to recent increase in the number of antiprotons and reduction in their emittance, it is the proton beam now that suffers most from the beam-beam effect [2]. We present results of beam studies, compare them with the results of computer simulations using LIFETRAC code and discuss possibilities of further improvements of the Beam-Beam Compensation efficiency in the Tevatron.

  19. Transport from the Recycler Ring to the Antiproton Source Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, M.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    In the post-NOvA era, the protons are directly transported from the Booster ring to the Recycler ring rather than the Main Injector. For Mu2e and g-2 project, the Debuncher ring will be modified into a Delivery ring to deliver the protons to both Mu2e and g-2 experiments. Therefore, it requires the transport of protons from the Recycler Ring to the Delivery ring. A new transfer line from the Recycler ring to the P1 beamline will be constructed to transport proton beam from the Recycler Ring to existing Antiproton Source beamlines. This new beamline provides a way to deliver 8 GeV kinetic energy protons from the Booster to the Delivery ring, via the Recycler, using existing beam transport lines, and without the need for new civil construction. This paper presents the Conceptual Design of this new beamline.

  20. Simulated annealing applied to IMRT beam angle optimization: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Dias, Joana; Rocha, Humberto; Ferreira, Brígida; Lopes, Maria do Carmo

    2015-11-01

    Electing irradiation directions to use in IMRT treatments is one of the first decisions to make in treatment planning. Beam angle optimization (BAO) is a difficult problem to tackle from the mathematical optimization point of view. It is highly non-convex, and optimization approaches based on gradient descent methods will probably get trapped in one of the many local minima. Simulated Annealing (SA) is a local search probabilistic procedure that is known to be able to deal with multimodal problems. SA for BAO was retrospectively applied to ten clinical examples of treated cases of head-and neck tumors signalized as complex cases where proper target coverage and organ sparing proved difficult to achieve. The number of directions to use was considered fixed and equal to 5 or 7. It is shown that SA can lead to solutions that significantly improve organ sparing, even considering a reduced number of angles, without jeopardizing tumor coverage.

  1. Electron beam focusing system

    SciTech Connect

    Dikansky, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    The high energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. Thus, the electron beam focusing system is very important for the performance of electron cooling. A system with and without longitudinal magnetic field is presented for discussion. Interaction of electron beam with the vacuum chamber as well as with the background ions and stored antiprotons can cause the coherent electron beam instabilities. Focusing system requirements needed to suppress these instabilities are presented.

  2. Physics Results from the Antiproton Experiment (APEX) at Fermilab

    DOE Data Explorer

    APEX Collaboration

    Is Antimatter stable? The APEX experiment searches for the decay of antiprotons at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator. Observation of antiproton decay would indicate a violation of the CPT theorem, which is one of the most fundamental theorems of modern physics. The best laboratory limits on antiproton decay come from the APEX experiment which achieved a sensitivity to antiproton lifetimes up to of order 700,000 years for the most sensitive decay modes. Antiproton lifetimes in this range could arise from CPT violation at the Planck scale.[copied from http://www-apex.fnal.gov/] This website presents published results from the APEX Test Experiment (T861) and from the E868 Experiment. Limits were placed on six antiproton decay modes with a muon in the final state and on seven antiproton decay modes with an electron in the final state. See also the summary table and plot and the APEX picture gallery.

  3. The radiation measurement applied to beam lifetime study on the synchrotron radiation facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuxiong; Li, Juexin; Liu, Zuping; Cui, Yonggang; Gong, Guanghua; Shao, Beibei

    2003-06-01

    To collect beam loss information from an accelerator radiation field is helpful to machine study and operation. For a synchrotron radiation storage ring, shower electrons give a distinct clue to loss location and a BLM-XS model detector is suitable to detect them. Recently, we set up a new beam loss monitoring system by this method for National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) storage ring. It does not interfere with the vacuum chamber and machine operation. Different from other systems, the detectors are used in pairs, fixed on opposite sides of the chamber separately. Some interesting phenomena about beam lifetime were observed. We located exactly where an excessive beam loss took place during ramping process and solved the problem. It was proved that gas accumulated at the front ends of photo-beam lines strongly impacted the electron beam and led to beam lifetime decreases. The cause of beam lifetime decrease because of superconducting wiggler is discussed.

  4. Refrigerated hydrogen gas jet for the Fermilab antiproton accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Allspach, D.H.; Kendziora, C.L.; Marinelli, M.

    1995-07-01

    A hydrogen gas jet has been built for use at Fermilab for the study of charmonium spectroscopy in proton-antiproton annihilations. The hydrogen gas jet is part of an upgrade to a previous experiment which ran in the Fermilab 1990-1991 fixed target program utilizing a jet cooled to 80 K with liquid nitrogen. The jet delivers a defined stream of hydrogen gas which travels through a series of vacuum chambers and then intersects the circulating antiproton beam. The goal of the upgrade is to provide a hydrogen gas stream at least twice as dense as used for the earlier experiment to increase the interaction rate and allow an improved study of rare processes. This is achieved by cooling the stream to below 30 K using a Gifford-McMahon refrigerator. The jet apparatus is designed to allow motion in the plane perpendicular to the gas stream as well as angular positioning at the jet nozzle to provide a means of optimizing the interaction rate. Two skimmers located in the vacuum chambers are used to define the gas stream dimensions. The jet target vacuum chambers require constant pumping with turbomolecular pumps. The vacuum space around the jet is designed to have a large system pumping speed so that the chamber pressure can be maintained below an absolute pressure of 1 Pa. The jet will operate in the next fixed target run at Fermilab. Details of the design and test results are discussed.

  5. Study of doubly strange systems using stored antiprotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B.; Erni, W.; Krusche, B.; Steinacher, M.; Walford, N.; Liu, B.; Liu, H.; Liu, Z.; Shen, X.; Wang, C.; Zhao, J.; Albrecht, M.; Erlen, T.; Fink, M.; Heinsius, F.; Held, T.; Holtmann, T.; Jasper, S.; Keshk, I.; Koch, H.; Kopf, B.; Kuhlmann, M.; Kümmel, M.; Leiber, S.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Musiol, P.; Mustafa, A.; Pelizäus, M.; Pychy, J.; Richter, M.; Schnier, C.; Schröder, T.; Sowa, C.; Steinke, M.; Triffterer, T.; Wiedner, U.; Ball, M.; Beck, R.; Hammann, C.; Ketzer, B.; Kube, M.; Mahlberg, P.; Rossbach, M.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitz, R.; Thoma, U.; Urban, M.; Walther, D.; Wendel, C.; Wilson, A.; Bianconi, A.; Bragadireanu, M.; Caprini, M.; Pantea, D.; Patel, B.; Czyzycki, W.; Domagala, M.; Filo, G.; Jaworowski, J.; Krawczyk, M.; Lisowski, E.; Lisowski, F.; Michałek, M.; Poznański, P.; Płażek, J.; Korcyl, K.; Kozela, A.; Kulessa, P.; Lebiedowicz, P.; Pysz, K.; Schäfer, W.; Szczurek, A.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Mindur, B.; Przyborowski, D.; Swientek, K.; Biernat, J.; Kamys, B.; Kistryn, S.; Korcyl, G.; Krzemien, W.; Magiera, A.; Moskal, P.; Psyzniak, A.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Smyrski, J.; Strzempek, P.; Wronska, A.; Augustin, I.; Böhm, R.; Lehmann, I.; Nicmorus Marinescu, D.; Schmitt, L.; Varentsov, V.; Al-Turany, M.; Belias, A.; Deppe, H.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Ehret, A.; Flemming, H.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Gromliuk, A.; Gruber, L.; Karabowicz, R.; Kliemt, R.; Krebs, M.; Kurilla, U.; Lehmann, D.; Löchner, S.; Lühning, J.; Lynen, U.; Orth, H.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Saito, T.; Schepers, G.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Täschner, A.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Voss, B.; Wieczorek, P.; Wilms, A.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G.; Arefiev, A.; Astakhov, V. I.; Barabanov, M. Yu.; Batyunya, B. V.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Efremov, A. A.; Fechtchenko, A.; Fedunov, A. G.; Galoyan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Koshurnikov, E. K.; Lobanov, V. I.; Lobanov, Y. Yu.; Makarov, A. F.; Malinina, L. V.; Malyshev, V. L.; Olshevskiy, A.; Perevalova, E.; Piskun, A. A.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pontecorvo, G.; Rodionov, V.; Rogov, Y.; Salmin, R.; Samartsev, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Shabratova, G.; Skachkov, N. B.; Skachkova, A. N.; Strokovsky, E. A.; Suleimanov, M.; Teshev, R.; Tokmenin, V.; Uzhinsky, V.; Vodopyanov, A.; Zaporozhets, S. A.; Zhuravlev, N. I.; Zorin, A. G.; Branford, D.; Glazier, D.; Watts, D.; Böhm, M.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Dobbs, S.; Seth, K.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T.; Bettoni, D.; Carassiti, V.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Drago, A.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Savriè, M.; Akishina, V.; Kisel, I.; Kozlov, G.; Pugach, M.; Zyzak, M.; Gianotti, P.; Guaraldo, C.; Lucherini, V.; Bersani, A.; Bracco, G.; Macri, M.; Parodi, R. F.; Biguenko, K.; Brinkmann, K.; Di Pietro, V.; Diehl, S.; Dormenev, V.; Drexler, P.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Galuska, M.; Gutz, E.; Hahn, C.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kesselkaul, M.; Kühn, W.; Kuske, T.; Lange, J. S.; Liang, Y.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Nazarenko, S.; Novotny, R.; Quagli, T.; Reiter, S.; Rieke, J.; Rosenbaum, C.; Schmidt, M.; Schnell, R.; Stenzel, H.; Thöring, U.; Ullrich, M.; Wagner, M. N.; Wasem, T.; Wohlfarth, B.; Zaunick, H.; Ireland, D.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B.; Deepak, P. N.; Kulkarni, A.; Apostolou, A.; Babai, M.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Lemmens, P.; Lindemulder, M.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.; Schakel, P.; Smit, H.; Tiemens, M.; van der Weele, J. C.; Veenstra, R.; Vejdani, S.; Dutta, K.; Kalita, K.; Kumar, A.; Roy, A.; Sohlbach, H.; Bai, M.; Bianchi, L.; Büscher, M.; Cao, L.; Cebulla, A.; Dosdall, R.; Gillitzer, A.; Goldenbaum, F.; Grunwald, D.; Herten, A.; Hu, Q.; Kemmerling, G.; Kleines, H.; Lehrach, A.; Nellen, R.; Ohm, H.; Orfanitski, S.; Prasuhn, D.; Prencipe, E.; Pütz, J.; Ritman, J.; Schadmand, S.; Sefzick, T.; Serdyuk, V.; Sterzenbach, G.; Stockmanns, T.; Wintz, P.; Wüstner, P.; Xu, H.; Zambanini, A.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Sun, Z.; Xu, H.; Rigato, V.; Isaksson, L.; Achenbach, P.; Corell, O.; Denig, A.; Distler, M.; Hoek, M.; Karavdina, A.; Lauth, W.; Liu, Z.; Merkel, H.; Müller, U.; Pochodzalla, J.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Ahmadi, H.; Ahmed, S.; Bleser, S.; Capozza, L.; Cardinali, M.; Dbeyssi, A.; Deiseroth, M.; Feldbauer, F.; Fritsch, M.; Fröhlich, B.; Jasinski, P.; Kang, D.; Khaneft, D.; Klasen, R.; Leithoff, H. H.; Lin, D.; Maas, F.; Maldaner, S.; Martìnez Rojo, M.; Marta, M.; Michel, M.; Mora Espì, M. C.; Morales Morales, C.; Motzko, C.; Nerling, F.; Noll, O.; Pflüger, S.; Pitka, A.; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D.; Sanchez Lorente, A.; Steinen, M.; Valente, R.; Weber, T.; Zambrana, M.; Zimmermann, I.; Fedorov, A.; Korjik, M.; Missevitch, O.; Boukharov, A.; Malyshev, O.; Marishev, I.; Balanutsa, P.; Balanutsa, V.; Chernetsky, V.; Demekhin, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Fedorets, P.; Gerasimov, A.; Goryachev, V.; Chandratre, V.; Datar, V.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumawat, H.; Mohanty, A. K.; Parmar, A.; Roy, B.; Sonika, G.; Fritzsch, C.; Grieser, S.; Hergemöller, A. K.; Hetz, B.; Hüsken, N.; Khoukaz, A.; Wessels, J. P.; Khosonthongkee, K.; Kobdaj, C.; Limphirat, A.; Srisawad, P.; Yan, Y.; Barnyakov, M.; Barnyakov, A. Yu.; Beloborodov, K.; Blinov, A. E.; Blinov, V. E.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Kononov, S.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Kuyanov, I. A.; Martin, K.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S.; Sokolov, A.; Tikhonov, Y.; Atomssa, E.; Kunne, R.; Marchand, D.; Ramstein, B.; Van de Wiele, J.; Wang, Y.; Boca, G.; Costanza, S.; Genova, P.; Montagna, P.; Rotondi, A.; Abramov, V.; Belikov, N.; Bukreeva, S.; Davidenko, A.; Derevschikov, A.; Goncharenko, Y.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Kormilitsin, V.; Levin, A.; Melnik, Y.; Minaev, N.; Mochalov, V.; Morozov, D.; Nogach, L.; Poslavskiy, S.; Ryazantsev, A.; Ryzhikov, S.; Semenov, P.; Shein, I.; Uzunian, A.; Vasiliev, A.; Yakutin, A.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Roy, U.; Yabsley, B.; Belostotski, S.; Gavrilov, G.; Izotov, A.; Manaenkov, S.; Miklukho, O.; Veretennikov, D.; Zhdanov, A.; Makonyi, K.; Preston, M.; Tegner, P.; Wölbing, D.; Bäck, T.; Cederwall, B.; Rai, A. K.; Godre, S.; Calvo, D.; Coli, S.; De Remigis, P.; Filippi, A.; Giraudo, G.; Lusso, S.; Mazza, G.; Mignone, M.; Rivetti, A.; Wheadon, R.; Balestra, F.; Iazzi, F.; Introzzi, R.; Lavagno, A.; Olave, J.; Amoroso, A.; Bussa, M. P.; Busso, L.; De Mori, F.; Destefanis, M.; Fava, L.; Ferrero, L.; Greco, M.; Hu, J.; Lavezzi, L.; Maggiora, M.; Maniscalco, G.; Marcello, S.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Martin, A.; Calen, H.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Johansson, T.; Kupsc, A.; Marciniewski, P.; Papenbrock, M.; Pettersson, J.; Schönning, K.; Wolke, M.; Galnander, B.; Diaz, J.; Pothodi Chackara, V.; Chlopik, A.; Kesik, G.; Melnychuk, D.; Slowinski, B.; Trzcinski, A.; Wojciechowski, M.; Wronka, S.; Zwieglinski, B.; Bühler, P.; Marton, J.; Steinschaden, D.; Suzuki, K.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Gerl, Jürgen; Kojouharov, Ivan; Kojouharova, Jasmina

    2016-10-01

    Bound nuclear systems with two units of strangeness are still poorly known despite their importance for many strong interaction phenomena. Stored antiprotons beams in the GeV range represent an unparalleled factory for various hyperon-antihyperon pairs. Their outstanding large production probability in antiproton collisions will open the floodgates for a series of new studies of systems which contain two or even more units of strangeness at the P ‾ ANDA experiment at FAIR. For the first time, high resolution γ-spectroscopy of doubly strange ΛΛ-hypernuclei will be performed, thus complementing measurements of ground state decays of ΛΛ-hypernuclei at J-PARC or possible decays of particle unstable hypernuclei in heavy ion reactions. High resolution spectroscopy of multistrange Ξ--atoms will be feasible and even the production of Ω--atoms will be within reach. The latter might open the door to the | S | = 3 world in strangeness nuclear physics, by the study of the hadronic Ω--nucleus interaction. For the first time it will be possible to study the behavior of Ξ‾+ in nuclear systems under well controlled conditions.

  6. Prototype of a test bench for applied research on Extracted beams of the nuclotron accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldin, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Bradnova, V.; Butenko, A. V.; Fedorov, A. N.; Kudashkin, I. V.

    2016-05-01

    The results of the development and testing of elements of a test bench for investigating the impact of accelerated particle beams on biological objects, electronics, and other targets are presented. The systems for beam monitoring and target positioning were tested on extracted argon beams in the framework of experiments on studying the radiation hardness of electronic components.

  7. Testing CPT Invariance with Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, Dezso

    2008-08-08

    The structure of matter is related to symmetries at every level of study. CPT symmetry is one of the most important laws of field theory: it states the invariance of physical properties when one simultaneously changes the signs of the charge and of the spatial and time coordinates of free elementary particles. Although in general opinion CPT symmetry is not violated in Nature, there are theoretical attempts to develop CPT-violating models. The Antiproton Decelerator at CERN has been built to test CPT invariance. The ASACUSA experiment compares the properties of particles and antiparticles by studying the antiprotonic helium atom via laser spectroscopy and measuring the mass, charge and magnetic moment of the antiproton as compared to those of the proton.

  8. The HEAT Cosmic Ray Antiproton Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutter, Scott

    1998-10-01

    The HEAT (High Energy Antimatter Telescope) collaboration is constructing a balloon-borne instrument to measure the relative abundance of antiprotons and protons in the cosmic rays to kinetic energies of 30 GeV. The instrument uses a multiple energy loss technique to measure the Lorentz factor of through-going cosmic rays, a magnet spectrometer to measure momentum, and several scintillation counters to determine particle charge and direction (up or down in the atmosphere). The antiproton to proton abundance ratio as a function of energy is a probe of the propagation environment of protons through the galaxy. Existing measurements indicate a higher than expected value at both high and low energies. A confirming measurement could indicate peculiar antiproton sources, such as WIMPs or supersymmetric darkmatter candidates.

  9. Antihydrogen formation by collisions of antiprotons with positronium in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, J.; Lutz, H. O.; Sidky, E. Y.; Roller-Lutz, Z.

    2003-08-01

    Using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method, we calculated the charge-transfer cross section for antiprotons colliding with Rydberg positronium, leading to antihydrogen formation. The results show a significant influence of an externally applied magnetic field which causes a reduction of the cross section.

  10. Automatic steering corrections to minimize injection oscillations in the Fermilab Antiproton Source rings

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, D.J.; Riddiford, A.W.

    1989-03-01

    Missteering of particle beam at injection into a circular accelerator produces coherent betatron oscillations. The beam position monitor system in the Antiproton Source at Fermilab can measure the beam position on each turn around the ring during these oscillations. From the amplitude and phase of the oscillations, corrections to the beamline steering are calculated to remove the oscillations. The analysis includes the case where the horizontal and vertical tunes are quite strongly coupled. This technique has proved to be valuable both in operation of the Fermilab Collider and as an analytical tool. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Evaporative cooling of antiprotons to cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wilding, D; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-07-01

    We report the application of evaporative cooling to clouds of trapped antiprotons, resulting in plasmas with measured temperature as low as 9 K. We have modeled the evaporation process for charged particles using appropriate rate equations. Good agreement between experiment and theory is observed, permitting prediction of cooling efficiency in future experiments. The technique opens up new possibilities for cooling of trapped ions and is of particular interest in antiproton physics, where a precise CPT test on trapped antihydrogen is a long-standing goal.

  12. Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Wurtele, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Wilding, D.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.

    2010-07-02

    We report the application of evaporative cooling to clouds of trapped antiprotons, resulting in plasmas with measured temperature as low as 9 K. We have modeled the evaporation process for charged particles using appropriate rate equations. Good agreement between experiment and theory is observed, permitting prediction of cooling efficiency in future experiments. The technique opens up new possibilities for cooling of trapped ions and is of particular interest in antiproton physics, where a precise CPT test on trapped antihydrogen is a long-standing goal.

  13. Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, FAIR, at the GSI site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, Guenther

    2006-11-01

    FAIR is a new large-scale particle accelerator facility to be built at the GSI site in Germany. The research pursued at FAIR will cover a wide range of topics in nuclear and hadron physics, as well as high density plasma physics, atomic and antimatter physics, and applications in condensed matter physics and biology. The working horse of FAIR will be a 1.1km circumference double ring of rapidly cycling 100 and 300Tm synchrotrons, which will be used to produce high intensity secondary beams of short-lived radioactive ions or antiprotons. A subsequent suite of cooler and storage rings will deliver heavy ion and antiproton beams of unprecedented quality. Large experimental facilities are presently being designed by the NUSTAR, PANDA, PAX, CBM, SPARC, FLAIR, HEDgeHOB and BIOMAT collaborations.

  14. Deceleration of MeV antiprotons and muons to keV energies — the anticyclotron A progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Cauz, D.; Chatellard, D.; DeCecco, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.-P.; Elsener, K.; Eugster, P.; Formisano, F.; Gorini, G.; Hauser, P.; Kottmann, F.; Krafcsik, I.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G.; Missimer, J.; Poggiani, R.; Simons, L. M.; Testera, G.; Torelli, G.; Waldner, F.

    1994-03-01

    A progress report is presented on the development of the anticyclotron — deceleration of antiprotons and negative muons via collisions in a low-pressure gas or thin foils during revolutions in a cyclotron field. Beam tests performed at CERN and PSI are reported and future plans for applications outlined.

  15. Recent results from proton-antiproton colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S. . High Energy Physics Lab.)

    1990-03-01

    New results from the CERN and Fermilab proton-antiproton colliders are summarised. The areas covered are jet physics, direct photon production, W and Z production and decay, heavy flavor production, the search for the top quark, and the search for more exotic phenomena. 46 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Double intensity injection for antiproton production

    SciTech Connect

    King-Yuen Ng

    2002-09-30

    A way to increase the luminosity of the Fermilab Tevatron during Run IIa [1] is to increase the number protons delivered to the target for antiproton production. In Ref. [2], a method to inject continuously 12 booster batches into the Main Injector is described in detail. The injection will fill 6/7 of the Main Injector with double intensity, for both antiproton production and the Numi neutrino project in Run IIb [3]. In this paper, they address the special case of filling only one booster-batch length of the Main Injector with double intensity in Run IIa. The problem we are facing is to limit the length of the final proton batch to within a booster-batch length, which is the circumferential length of the antiproton accumulator. Otherwise, losses will occur either at the Main Injector or the antiproton production area. With reasonable sizes of the barrier waves, simulations show that they are able to restrict the double-density protons to 5.9% longer than the booster-batch length before adiabatic capture. After adiabatic capture with 53-MHz rf, 90 buckets are occupied. The protons in the extra 6 buckets at the sides will be lost eventually. However, these amount to only 0.51% of the total proton batch. Some injection parameters of the Main Injector are listed in a table.

  17. High intensity proton injector for facility of antiproton and ion research.

    PubMed

    Berezov, R; Brodhage, R; Chauvin, N; Delferriere, O; Fils, J; Hollinger, R; Ivanova, V; Tuske, O; Ullmann, C

    2016-02-01

    The high current ion source with the low energy beam transport (LEBT) will serve as injector into the proton LINAC to provide primary proton beam for the production of antiprotons. The pulsed ion source developed and built in CEA/Saclay operates with a frequency of 2.45 GHz based on ECR plasma production with two coils with 87.5 mT magnetic field necessary for the electron cyclotron resonance. The compact LEBT consists of two solenoids with a maximum magnetic field of 500 mT including two integrated magnetic steerers to adjust the horizontal and vertical beam positions. The total length of the compact LEBT is 2.3 m and was made as short as possible to reduced emittance growth along the beam line. To measure ion beam intensity behind the pentode extraction system, between solenoids and at the end of the beam line, two current transformers and a Faraday cup are installed. To get information about the beam quality and position, the diagnostic chamber with different equipment will be installed between the two solenoids. This article reports the current status of the proton injector for the facility of antiproton and ion research. PMID:26931923

  18. High intensity proton injector for facility of antiproton and ion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezov, R.; Brodhage, R.; Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.; Fils, J.; Hollinger, R.; Ivanova, V.; Tuske, O.; Ullmann, C.

    2016-02-01

    The high current ion source with the low energy beam transport (LEBT) will serve as injector into the proton LINAC to provide primary proton beam for the production of antiprotons. The pulsed ion source developed and built in CEA/Saclay operates with a frequency of 2.45 GHz based on ECR plasma production with two coils with 87.5 mT magnetic field necessary for the electron cyclotron resonance. The compact LEBT consists of two solenoids with a maximum magnetic field of 500 mT including two integrated magnetic steerers to adjust the horizontal and vertical beam positions. The total length of the compact LEBT is 2.3 m and was made as short as possible to reduced emittance growth along the beam line. To measure ion beam intensity behind the pentode extraction system, between solenoids and at the end of the beam line, two current transformers and a Faraday cup are installed. To get information about the beam quality and position, the diagnostic chamber with different equipment will be installed between the two solenoids. This article reports the current status of the proton injector for the facility of antiproton and ion research.

  19. High intensity proton injector for facility of antiproton and ion research.

    PubMed

    Berezov, R; Brodhage, R; Chauvin, N; Delferriere, O; Fils, J; Hollinger, R; Ivanova, V; Tuske, O; Ullmann, C

    2016-02-01

    The high current ion source with the low energy beam transport (LEBT) will serve as injector into the proton LINAC to provide primary proton beam for the production of antiprotons. The pulsed ion source developed and built in CEA/Saclay operates with a frequency of 2.45 GHz based on ECR plasma production with two coils with 87.5 mT magnetic field necessary for the electron cyclotron resonance. The compact LEBT consists of two solenoids with a maximum magnetic field of 500 mT including two integrated magnetic steerers to adjust the horizontal and vertical beam positions. The total length of the compact LEBT is 2.3 m and was made as short as possible to reduced emittance growth along the beam line. To measure ion beam intensity behind the pentode extraction system, between solenoids and at the end of the beam line, two current transformers and a Faraday cup are installed. To get information about the beam quality and position, the diagnostic chamber with different equipment will be installed between the two solenoids. This article reports the current status of the proton injector for the facility of antiproton and ion research.

  20. Experimental test of a new antiproton acceleration scheme in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, V.; Bhat, C.M.; Chase, B.E.; Dey, J.E.; Meisner, K.G.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    In an effort to provide higher intensity and lower emittance antiproton beam to the Tevatron collider for high luminosity operation, a new Main Injector (MI) antiproton acceleration scheme has been developed [1-4]. In this scheme, beam is accelerated from 8 to 27 GeV using the 2.5 MHz rf system and from 27 to 150 GeV using the 53 MHz rf system. This paper reports the experimental results of beam study. Simulation results are reported in a different PAC'05 paper [5]. Experiments are conducted with proton beam from the Booster. Acceleration efficiency, emittance growth and beam harmonic transfer between 2.5 MHz (h=28) and 53 MHz (h=588) buckets have been studied. Beam study shows that one can achieve an overall acceleration efficiency of about 100%, longitudinal emittance growth less than 20% and negligible transverse emittance growth. accelerated to 150 GeV and injected to the Tevatron. The multi-bunch coalescing process is eliminated in this acceleration scheme. Consequently, longitudinal emittance growth is reduced. Smaller emittance growth reduces beam loss.

  1. Conceptual Design Report. Antiproton - Proton Collider Upgrade 20 GeV Rings. Technical Components and Civil Construction May, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    1988-05-01

    This report contains a description of the design and cost estimate of two new 20 GeV rings which will be required to support the upgrade of the Fermilab Collider with a luminosity goal of 5x10 31 cm-2s-1. The new rings include an antiproton post-accumulator, denoted the Antiproton Super Booster (ASB), and a proton post-booster, denoted the Proton Super Booster (PSB). The siting of the rings is shown in Figure I-1. Both rings are capable of operation at 20 GeV, eliminating the need for ever again injecting beam into the Main Ring below transition, and significantly enhancing Main Ring performance. The Antiproton Super Booster is designed to accept and accumulate up to 4x1012 antiprotons from the existing Antiproton Accumulator, and deliver them to the Main Ring at 20 GeV for acceleration and injection into the Collider. It is also designed to accept diluted antiprotons from the Main Ring at 20 GeV for recooling. The PSB accepts 8.9 GeV protons from the existing Booster and accelerates them to 20 GeV for injection into the Main Ring. The PSB is designed to operate at 5 Hz. The siting shown in Figure I-1 has the attractive feature that it removes all Main Ring injection hardware from the AO straight section, opening the possibility of installing a third proton-antiproton interaction region in the Tevatron Collider.

  2. Multiple-beam satellite repeater tradeoffs applied to a multifunctional system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinal, G. V.

    1973-01-01

    This paper concerns satellite repeater tradeoffs for a multiple-beam, multiple-channel, multiple-connectivity satellite postulated to serve a diversity of domestic U.S. noncommercial requirements, with a substantial portion of the satellite power, weight, and bandwidth dedicated to video distribution and bradcast. The orders-of-magnitude of the requirements are given for the video plus high-rate data traffic category. The designs of two alternative baseline repeater configurations are presented, and estimates of their weight and their prime power consumption are given. These data are the basis for estimating the weight and power consumption of a range of alternative beam coverage, modulation, and channel capacity systems. These estimates are used to illustrate tradeoffs with different performance criteria as the independent variable: number of channels per beam and total number of beam-channels.

  3. The proton injector for the accelerator facility of antiproton and ion research (FAIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, C.; Berezov, R.; Fils, J.; Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.; Hollinger, R.; Kester, O.; Vinzenz, W.

    2014-02-01

    The new international accelerator facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, is one of the largest research projects worldwide and will provide an antiproton production rate of 7 × 1010 cooled pbars per hour. This is equivalent to a primary proton beam current of 2 × 1016 protons per hour. For this request a high intensity proton linac (p-linac) will be built with an operating rf-frequency of 325 MHz to accelerate a 35 mA proton beam at 70 MeV, using conducting crossed-bar H-cavities. The repetition rate is 4 Hz with beam pulse length of 36 μs. The microwave ion source and low energy beam transport developed within a joint French-German collaboration GSI/CEA-SACLAY will serve as an injector of the compact proton linac. The 2.45 GHz ion source allows high brightness ion beams at an energy of 95 keV and will deliver a proton beam current of 100 mA at the entrance of the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) within an acceptance of 0.3π mm mrad (norm., rms).

  4. The proton injector for the accelerator facility of antiproton and ion research (FAIR)

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, C. Kester, O.; Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.

    2014-02-15

    The new international accelerator facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, is one of the largest research projects worldwide and will provide an antiproton production rate of 7 × 10{sup 10} cooled pbars per hour. This is equivalent to a primary proton beam current of 2 × 10{sup 16} protons per hour. For this request a high intensity proton linac (p-linac) will be built with an operating rf-frequency of 325 MHz to accelerate a 35 mA proton beam at 70 MeV, using conducting crossed-bar H-cavities. The repetition rate is 4 Hz with beam pulse length of 36 μs. The microwave ion source and low energy beam transport developed within a joint French-German collaboration GSI/CEA-SACLAY will serve as an injector of the compact proton linac. The 2.45 GHz ion source allows high brightness ion beams at an energy of 95 keV and will deliver a proton beam current of 100 mA at the entrance of the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) within an acceptance of 0.3π mm mrad (norm., rms)

  5. Kickers and power supplies for the Fermilab Tevatron I antiproton source

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, T.; Bartoszek, L.; Tilles, E.; Petter, J.; McCarthy, J.

    1985-05-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source Accumulator and Debuncher rings require 5 kickers in total. These range in design from conventional ferrite delay line type magnets, with ceramic beam tubes to mechanically complex shuttered kickers situated entirely in the Accumulator Ring's 10/sup -10/ torr vacuum. Power supplies are thyratron switched pulse forming networks that produce microsecond width pulses of several kiloamps with less than 30 nanoseconds rise and fall times. Kicker and power supply design requirements for field strength, vacuum, rise and fall time, timing and magnetic shielding of the stacked beam in the accumulator by the eddy current shutter will be discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. The cosmic ray antiproton background for AMS-02

    SciTech Connect

    Kappl, Rolf; Winkler, Martin Wolfgang E-mail: martin.winkler@desy.de

    2014-09-01

    The AMS-02 experiment is measuring the cosmic ray antiproton flux with high precision. The interpretation of the upcoming data requires a thorough understanding of the secondary antiproton background. In this work, we employ newly available data of the NA49 experiment at CERN, in order to recalculate the antiproton source term arising from cosmic ray spallations on the interstellar matter. We systematically account for the production of antiprotons via hyperon decay and discuss the possible impact of isospin effects on antineutron production. A detailed comparison of our calculation with the existing literature as well as with Monte Carlo based evaluations of the antiproton source term is provided. Our most important result is an updated prediction for the secondary antiproton flux which includes a realistic assessment of the particle physics uncertainties at all energies.

  7. Antiproton rate estimates for the 1996 E866 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, J.Y.; Garcia-Solis, E.J.; Stanskas, P.J.

    1996-02-01

    There has always been a strong interest to study antiprotons produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. A specific point has been a puzzle for years in that both ARC and RQMD predict the correct antiproton yield for Au+Au collisions at the AGS, but with two entirely different physical explanations. The RQMD is able to describe available data by relying on the enhanced production of antiprotons, followed by the annihilation of a large fraction of the produced antiprotons. Conversely, ARC describes the data by producing less antiprotons initially, but the annihilation of the antiprotons is {open_quotes}screened{close_quotes} in the high density environment of the collision on account of collisions with mesons. It is then particularly interesting to studying the shadowing effect in the Au-Au collisions at the AGS to shine a light in the theoretical debate in heavy-ion collisions.

  8. MONO1001: A source for singly charged ions applied to the production of multicharged fullerene beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunoury, L.; Andersen, J. U.; Cederquist, H.; Huber, B. A.; Hvelplund, P.; Leroy, R.; Manil, B.; Pacquet, J. Y.; Pedersen, U. V.; Rangamma, J.; Tomita, S.

    2004-05-01

    The present article reports on a recent study of the production of multiply charged fullerene beams based on an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (ECRIS). As collision studies in fundamental physics are demanding intense beams of multiply charged ions of small molecules, clusters, and particularly of fullerenes, we have further developed the ion source ECRIS MONO1000 [P. Jardin et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 789 (2002)], originally devoted to produce singly charged ions, towards the production of multiply charged fullerene beams. In this article, the test measurements performed at the Electrostatic Ion Storage Ring Århus rf power (ELISA) facility will be described. Typical mass spectra (from pure C60 and C70 powder) will be shown and the influence of several source parameters (rf power, support gas, gas pressure,…) will be discussed specifying the conditions necessary for an optimum ion source operation.

  9. Laser-electron beam interaction applied to optical amplifiers and oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantell, R. H.; Piestrup, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    Momentum modulation of a relativistic electron beam by a Nd:YAG laser is demonstrated. The electrons, at 100 MeV energy, interact with the laser light in helium gas at standard temperature and pressure. At an angle of 6.55 mrad between the two wavevectors, corresponding to the Cerenkov angle, a given electron remains in a field of constant phase as it passes through the light beam. The experimental arrangement is illustrated showing the trajectories of the electron and light. The particle momentum is measured by a mass spectrometer, and the angle between the wavevectors is controlled by a rotatable mirror. Experimental results indicate that momentum modulation of an electron beam may be used for amplification. A possible configuration for an optical klystron is illustrated.

  10. Reliability of the Fermilab Antiproton Source

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, E. Jr.

    1993-05-01

    This paper reports on the reliability of the Fermilab Antiproton source since it began operation in 1985. Reliability of the complex as a whole as well as subsystem performance is summarized. Also discussed is the trending done to determine causes of significant machine downtime and actions taken to reduce the incidence of failure. Finally, results of a study to detect previously unidentified reliability limitations are presented.

  11. Engineering Challenges in Antiproton Triggered Fusion Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Cassenti, Brice; Kammash, Terry

    2008-01-21

    During the last decade antiproton triggered fusion propulsion has been investigated as a method for achieving high specific impulse, high thrust in a nuclear pulse propulsion system. In general the antiprotons are injected into a pellet containing fusion fuel with a small amount of fissionable material (i.e., an amount less than the critical mass) where the products from the fission are then used to trigger a fusion reaction. Initial calculations and simulations indicate that if magnetically insulated inertial confinement fusion is used that the pellets should result in a specific impulse of between 100,000 and 300,000 seconds at high thrust. The engineering challenges associated with this propulsion system are significant. For example, the antiprotons must be precisely focused. The pellet must be designed to contain the fission and initial fusion products and this will require strong magnetic fields. The fusion fuel must be contained for a sufficiently long time to effectively release the fusion energy, and the payload must be shielded from the radiation, especially the excess neutrons emitted, in addition to many other particles. We will review the recent progress, possible engineering solutions and the potential performance of these systems.

  12. Computer analysis applied to particle accelerator beam dynamics. January 1970-February 1981 (citations from the NTIS Data Base). Report for Jan 70-Feb 81

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Citations in this retrospective bibliography cover computerized simulation, mathematical modeling, computer programming, and calculations applied to beam dynamics in particle accelerators,e.g., linear accelerators, cyclotrons, and betatrons. Theoretical, experimental, and applied beam dynamics are included. (Contains 37 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  13. Decoupling and observation theory applied to control of a long flexible beam in orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamer, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    Techniques which use decoupling theory and state variable feedback to control the pitch attitude and the flexible mode amplitudes of a long, thin beam are discussed. An observer based on the steady state Kalman filter was incorporated into the control design procedure in order to estimate the values of the modal state variables required for the feedback control law.

  14. Nonlinear optimisation techniques for accelerator performance improvement on-line: recent trials and experiment for the CERN antiproton accumulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chohan, Vinod

    1986-06-01

    The use of function minimisation techniques for optimum design according to given performance criteria is well-known. Given a well-defined criterion and a means of evaluating it precisely, the problem reduces to choosing the best optimisation procedure to suit the problem. Direct search techniques which do not generally rely on the computation of derivatives of the error function are ideal for on-line improvement of the global accelerator performance since the error function is not known analytically, e.g. the number of antiprotons stored in the antiproton accumulator ring on a pulse-to-pulse basis as a function of all the antiproton production and stochastic cooling system parameters. The user-friendliness of the NODAL interpreter at the man-machine interaction level, its capability to easily control and manipulate equipment as well as its capability to synchronise with respect to time events on a cycle-to-cycle basis makes it suitable for an on-line accelerator performance optimisation type of application. A modular procedure, based on the Simplex technique [1] has been implemented recently which allows function minimisation depending on the error function definition module. This enables an easy manipulation of variables and synchronization with machine events. For the antiproton accumulator (AA), while the circulating beam current transformer lacks the resolution to measure the exact number of antiprotons stored on a pulse-to-pulse basis, there are a large number of electrons produced in the production process [2] and a signal emanating from these can be adapted to provide the performance criterion and appropriate parameters used as function variables in the optimisation process. First trials based on optimisation of injection of antiprotons in the AA look promising, but further work is necessary in the direct definition of the error functions.

  15. Preliminary results on time-resolved ion beam induced luminescence applied to the provenance study of lapis lazuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czelusniak, C.; Palla, L.; Massi, M.; Carraresi, L.; Giuntini, L.; Re, A.; Lo Giudice, A.; Pratesi, G.; Mazzinghi, A.; Ruberto, C.; Castelli, L.; Fedi, M. E.; Liccioli, L.; Gueli, A.; Mandò, P. A.; Taccetti, F.

    2016-03-01

    This work will present preliminary results concerning the use of time-resolved ion beam induced luminescence applied to provenance studies of lapis lazuli. Measurements were performed at the pulsed beam facility at LABEC laboratory in Florence. Lapis lazuli is a semi-precious gemstone, used as ornament since the early civilizations that can be found in few places on Earth. The importance of this work lies in understanding the origin of various samples of lapis lazuli, from which it may be possible to gain insight into trade routes from ancient times. The samples studied in this work originated from Chile, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Myanmar, and Siberia. The stones were irradiated with 3 MeV protons and the resulting luminescence was detected by a photomultiplier tube, whose output was acquired using a sampling digitizer VME module (CAEN/V1720). Wavelength discrimination was performed at 430 nm utilizing a range of beam currents. The results showed that, by changing the beam current intensity, one can study different features of lapis lazuli, and this may aid in distinguishing lapis lazuli from different provenances.

  16. Applied Focused Ion Beam Techniques for Sample Preparation of Astromaterials for Integrated Nano-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, G A; Teslich, N E; Kearsley, A T; Stadermann, F J; Stroud, R M; Dai, Z R; Ishii, H A; Hutcheon, I D; Bajt, S; Snead, C J; Weber, P K; Bradley, J P

    2007-02-20

    Sample preparation is always a critical step in study of micrometer sized astromaterials available for study in the laboratory, whether their subsequent analysis is by electron microscopy or secondary ion mass spectrometry. A focused beam of gallium ions has been used to prepare electron transparent sections from an interplanetary dust particle, as part of an integrated analysis protocol to maximize the mineralogical, elemental, isotopic and spectroscopic information extracted from one individual particle. In addition, focused ion beam techniques have been employed to extract cometary residue preserved on the rims and walls of micro-craters in 1100 series aluminum foils that were wrapped around the sample tray assembly on the Stardust cometary sample collector. Non-ideal surface geometries and inconveniently located regions of interest required creative solutions. These include support pillar construction and relocation of a significant portion of sample to access a region of interest. Serial sectioning, in a manner similar to ultramicrotomy, is a significant development and further demonstrates the unique capabilities of focused ion beam microscopy for sample preparation of astromaterials.

  17. Radiation Therapy Photon Beams Dose Conformation According to Dose Distribution Around Intracavitary-Applied Brachytherapy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jurkovic, Slaven Zauhar, Gordana; Faj, Dario; Radojcic, Deni Smilovic; Svabic, Manda

    2010-04-01

    Intracavitary application of brachytherapy sources followed by external beam radiation is essential for the local treatment of carcinoma of the cervix. Due to very high doses to the central portion of the target volume delivered by brachytherapy sources, this part of the target volume must be shielded while being irradiated by photon beams. Several shielding techniques are available, from rectangular block and standard cervix wedge to more precise, customized step wedge filters. Because the calculation of a step wedge filter's shape was usually based on effective attenuation coefficient, an approach that accounts, in a more precise way, for the scattered radiation, is suggested. The method was verified under simulated clinical conditions using film dosimetry. Measured data for various compensators were compared to the numerically determined sum of the dose distribution around brachytherapy sources and one of compensated beam. Improvements in total dose distribution are demonstrated, using our method. Agreement between calculation and measurements were within 3%. Sensitivity of the method on sources displacement during treatment has also been investigated.

  18. The Reason for Beam Cooling: Some of the Physics that Cooling Allows

    SciTech Connect

    Oelert, W.

    2006-03-20

    There are many examples of achievements in physics which would not be possible without cooling. Different mechanisms for cooling exist and some will be presented in this introductory talk where we distinguish between 'relative' and 'absolute' cooling. A short reminder to high and medium energy physics with antiprotons as performed at the accelerators of CERN will be delineated. The success in applying cooling of beams in hadron physics at the internal COSY-11 experiment installed at the cooler synchrotron COSY will be presented. COSY-11 aims for meson production investigations at threshold in nucleon-nucleon collisions. Again, such investigations would not be feasible without cooling especially regarding the precision required and obtained. The need of cooling for the production and trapping of antihydrogen atoms is demonstrated - as an example - by the ATRAP experiment at the CERN antiproton decelerator AD aiming for a comparison of hydrogen (H0) to antihydrogen (H-bar0) atom spectroscopy.

  19. Experimental demonstration of colliding beam lifetime improvement by electron lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Alexahin, Yuri; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Bishofberger, Kip; /Los Alamos

    2007-10-01

    We report successful application of space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam for improvement of particle lifetime determined by beam-beam interaction in high-energy collider. In our experiments, an electron lens, a novel instrument developed for the beam-beam compensation, was set on a 980-GeV proton bunch in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The proton bunch losses due to its interaction with antiproton beam were reduced by a factor of 2 when the electron lens was operating. We describe the principle of electron lens operation and present experimental results.

  20. Unconventional Purcell filter in superferric magnets in the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, P. R.; Dutta Gupta, A.; Nandi, C.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Pal, G.

    2013-11-01

    For the magnets used in beam lines, especially in high resolution applications, the field quality ΔB/B is a very important factor which determines the quality of the beam after passing through the magnets. End-shaping of the poles and introduction of Purcell filters improve field uniformity. However, in most applications, what matters is the uniformity in the total field integrated along the beam path (Δ(∫Bdl)/∫Bdl). With this criterion in mind, we have used unconventional partially penetrating Purcell filters in designing wide aperture highly uniform dipole and quadrupole magnets for the large acceptance low energy beam line in the Super Fragment Separator of the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt. The weight of dipole magnets decreases by the use of such filters.

  1. The universe in the laboratory - Nuclear astrophysics opportunity at the facility for antiproton and ion research

    SciTech Connect

    Langanke, K.

    2014-05-09

    In the next years the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR will be constructed at the GSI Helmholtzze-ntrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. This new accelerator complex will allow for unprecedented and pathbreaking research in hadronic, nuclear, and atomic physics as well as in applied sciences. This manuscript will discuss some of these research opportunities, with a focus on supernova dynamics and nucleosynthesis.

  2. THE DISCOVERY OF GEOMAGNETICALLY TRAPPED COSMIC-RAY ANTIPROTONS

    SciTech Connect

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Borisov, S.; Casolino, M.; De Pascale, M. P.; De Santis, C.; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Consiglio, L.; Carlson, P.; Castellini, G.

    2011-08-20

    The existence of a significant flux of antiprotons confined to Earth's magnetosphere has been considered in several theoretical works. These antiparticles are produced in nuclear interactions of energetic cosmic rays with the terrestrial atmosphere and accumulate in the geomagnetic field at altitudes of several hundred kilometers. A contribution from the decay of albedo antineutrons has been hypothesized in analogy to proton production by neutron decay, which constitutes the main source of trapped protons at energies above some tens of MeV. This Letter reports the discovery of an antiproton radiation belt around the Earth. The trapped antiproton energy spectrum in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region has been measured by the PAMELA experiment for the kinetic energy range 60-750 MeV. A measurement of the atmospheric sub-cutoff antiproton spectrum outside the radiation belts is also reported. PAMELA data show that the magnetospheric antiproton flux in the SAA exceeds the cosmic-ray antiproton flux by three orders of magnitude at the present solar minimum, and exceeds the sub-cutoff antiproton flux outside radiation belts by four orders of magnitude, constituting the most abundant source of antiprotons near the Earth.

  3. Progress with Tevatron Electron Lens Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Valishev, A.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Stancari, G.; Zhang, X.

    2010-05-19

    Tevatron electron lenses have been successfully used to mitigate bunch-to-bunch differences caused by longrange beam-beam interactions. For this purpose, the electron beam with uniform transverse density distribution was used. Another planned application of the electron lens is the suppression of tune spread due to head-on beam-beam collisions. For this purpose, the transverse distribution of the E{sup -} beam must be matched to that of the antiproton beam. In 2009, the Gaussian profile electron gun was installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We report on the first experiments with non-linear beam-beam compensation. Discussed topics include measurement and control of the betatron tune spread, importance of the beam alignment and stability, and effect of electron lens on the antiproton beam lifetime.

  4. Intensity-Frontier Antiproton Physics with The Antiproton Annihilation Spectrometer (TAPAS) at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Asner, David M.; Baldini, Wander; Bartoszek, Larry; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; Chakravorty, Alak; Colas, Paul; Derwent, Paul; Drutskoy, Alexey; Fortner, Michael; /Northern Illinois U. /Saclay /Indian Inst. Tech., Hyderabad

    2011-11-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source is the world's most intense source of antimatter. With the Tevatron program now behind us, this unique facility can help make the case for Fermilab's continued accelerator operations. The Antiproton Source can be used for unique, dedicated antimatter studies, including medium-energy {bar p}-annihilation experiments. We propose to assemble a powerful, yet cost-effective, solenoidal magnetic spectrometer for antiproton-annihilation events, and to use it at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator to measure the charm production cross section, study rare hyperon decays, search for hyperon CP asymmetry, precisely measure the properties of several charmonium and nearby states, and make the first measurements of the Drell-Yan continuum in medium-energy antiproton annihilation. Should the charm production cross section be as large as some have proposed, we will also be able to measure D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with high precision and discover (or sensitively limit) charm CP violation. The observation of charm or hyperon CP violation would be evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, with possible implications for the origin of the baryon asymmetry of the universe - the question of what happened to all the antimatter that must have been produced in the Big Bang. The experiment will be carried out by an international collaboration and will require some four years of running time. As possibly the sole hadron experiment in progress at Fermilab during that time, it will play an important role in maintaining a broad particle physics program at Fermilab and in the U.S. It will thus help us to continue attracting creative and capable young people into science and technology, and introducing them to the important technologies of accelerators, detectors, and data acquisition and analysis - key roles in society that accelerator-based particle physics has historically played.

  5. Low Energy Antiproton Experiments - A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann, Klaus P.

    2005-10-19

    Low energy antiprotons offer excellent opportunities to study properties of fundamental forces and symmetries in nature. Experiments with them can contribute substantially to deepen our fundamental knowledge in atomic, nuclear and particle physics. Searches for new interactions can be carried out by studying discrete symmetries. Known interactions can be tested precisely and fundamental constants can be extracted from accurate measurements on free antiprotons (p-bar's) and bound two- and three-body systems such as antihydrogen (H-bar = p-bare-), the antprotonic helium ion (He++p-bar)+ and the antiprotonic atomcule (He++p-bare-) . The trapping of a single p-bar in a Penning trap, the formation and precise studies of antiprotonic helium ions and atoms and recently the production of H-bar have been among the pioneering experiments. They have led already to precise values for p-bar parameters, accurate tests of bound two- and three-body Quantum Electrodynamics (QED), tests of the CPT theorem and a better understanding of atom formation from their constituents. Future experiments promise more precise tests of the standard theory and have a robust potential to discover new physics. Precision experiments with low energy p-bar's share the need for intense particle sources and the need for time to develop novel instrumentation with all other experiments, which aim for high precision in exotic fundamental systems. The experimental programs - carried out in the past mostly at the former LEAR facility and at present at the AD facility at CERN - would benefit from intense future sources of low energy p-bar's. The highest possible p-bar fluxes should be aimed for at new facilities such as the planned FLAIR facility at GSI in order to maximize the potential of delicate precision experiments to influence model building. Examples of key p-bar experiments are discussed here and compared with other experiments in the field. Among the central issues is their potential to obtain

  6. Stability of the Helium-Antiproton System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    In the course of their Born-Oppenheimer calculations of this system Todd and Armour noted that the lowest-lying state closely resembles the hydrogen negative ion, since the antiproton lies very close to the helium nucleus and shields one unit of nuclear charge. In the present paper this observation will be taken seriously to produce a variationally correct estimate of the total energy of this system, along with a similar estimate of the energy of the once-ionized system. The nonadiabatic effect of exactly treating the reduced masses improves the results.

  7. Efficient design of a truss beam by applying first order optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorik, Filip

    2013-10-01

    Applications of optimization procedures in structural designs are widely discussed problems, which are caused by currently still-increasing demands on structures. Using of optimization methods in efficient designs passes through great development, especially in duplicate production where even small savings might lead to considerable reduction of total costs. The presented paper deals with application and analysis of the First Order optimization technique, which is implemented in the Design Optimization module that uses the main features of multi-physical FEM program ANSYS, in steel truss-beam design. Constraints of the design are stated by EN 1993 Eurocode 3, for uniform compression forces in compression members and tensile resistance moments in tension members. Furthermore, a minimum frequency of the first natural modal shape of the structure is determined. The aim of the solution is minimizing the weight of the structure by changing members' cross-section properties.

  8. That was LEAP 05{exclamation_point} or Antiproton Physics in a Nutshell

    SciTech Connect

    Kienle, Paul

    2005-10-26

    A personally flavored review of selected topics of LEAP 05 is given, with focus on some recent interesting developments in low and medium energy antiproton physics, such as fundamental symmetries and antihydrogen, antihadron-hadron systems, antiproton-proton annihilation, nuclear structure studies with antiprotons, and the FAIR facility for antiproton and ion research.

  9. Ion Dynamic Capture Experiments With The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James; Lewis, Raymond; Chakrabarti, Suman; Sims, William H.; Pearson, J. Boise; Fant, Wallace E.

    2002-01-01

    To take the first step towards using the energy produced from the matter-antimatter annihilation for propulsion applications, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Propulsion Research Center (PRC) has initiated a research activity examining the storage of low energy antiprotons. The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) is an electromagnetic system (Penning-Malmberg design) consisting of a 4 Tesla superconductor, a high voltage electrode confinement system, and an ultra high vacuum test section. It has been designed with an ultimate goal of maintaining 10(exp 12) charged particles with a half-life of 18 days. Currently, this system is being evaluated experimentally using normal matter ions that are cheap to produce, relatively easy to handle, and provide a good indication of overall trap behavior (with the exception of assessing annihilation losses). The ions are produced via a positive hydrogen ion source and transported to HiPAT in a beam line equipped with electrostatic optics. The optics serve to both focus and gate the incoming ions, providing microsecond-timed beam pulses that are dynamically captured by cycling the HiPAT forward containment field like a "trap door". Initial dynamic capture experiments have been successfully performed with beam energy and currents set to 1.9 kV and 23 micro-amps, respectively. At these settings up to 2x10(exp 9) ions have been trapped during a single dynamic cycle.

  10. Experimental demonstration of beam-beam compensation by Tevatron electron lenses and prospects for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Zhang, X.L.; Bishofberger, K.; /Los Alamos

    2007-06-01

    Electromagnetic long-range and head-on interactions of high intensity proton and antiproton beams are significant sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron Collider Run II (2001-present). We present observations of the beam-beam phenomena in the Tevatron and results of relevant beam studies. We analyze the data and various methods employed in high energy physics (HEP) operation, predict the performance for planned luminosity upgrades and discuss ways to improve it.

  11. 2D potential measurements by applying automatic beam adjustment system to heavy ion beam probe diagnostic on the Large Helical Devicea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, A.; Ido, T.; Kurachi, M.; Makino, R.; Nishiura, M.; Kato, S.; Nishizawa, A.; Hamada, Y.

    2014-11-01

    Two-dimensional potential profiles in the Large Helical Device (LHD) were measured with heavy ion beam probe (HIBP). To measure the two-dimensional profile, the probe beam energy has to be changed. However, this task is not easy, because the beam transport line of LHD-HIBP system is very long (˜20 m), and the required beam adjustment consumes much time. To reduce the probe beam energy adjustment time, an automatic beam adjustment system has been developed. Using this system, required time to change the probe beam energy is dramatically reduced, such that two-dimensional potential profiles were able to be successfully measured with HIBP by changing the probe beam energy shot to shot.

  12. 2D potential measurements by applying automatic beam adjustment system to heavy ion beam probe diagnostic on the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, A. Ido, T.; Kato, S.; Hamada, Y.; Kurachi, M.; Makino, R.; Nishiura, M.; Nishizawa, A.

    2014-11-15

    Two-dimensional potential profiles in the Large Helical Device (LHD) were measured with heavy ion beam probe (HIBP). To measure the two-dimensional profile, the probe beam energy has to be changed. However, this task is not easy, because the beam transport line of LHD-HIBP system is very long (∼20 m), and the required beam adjustment consumes much time. To reduce the probe beam energy adjustment time, an automatic beam adjustment system has been developed. Using this system, required time to change the probe beam energy is dramatically reduced, such that two-dimensional potential profiles were able to be successfully measured with HIBP by changing the probe beam energy shot to shot.

  13. Use of a wire scanner for monitoring residual gas ionization in Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility 20 keV/u proton/deuteron low energy beam transport beam line

    SciTech Connect

    Vainas, B.; Eliyahu, I.; Weissman, L.; Berkovits, D.

    2012-02-15

    The ion source end of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility accelerator consists of a proton/deuteron ECR ion source and a low energy beam transport (LEBT) beam line. An observed reduction of the radio frequency quadrupole transmission with increase of the LEBT current prompted additional study of the LEBT beam properties. Numerous measurements have been made with the LEBT bream profiler wire biased by a variable voltage. Current-voltage characteristics in presence of the proton beam were measured even when the wire was far out of the beam. The current-voltage characteristic in this case strongly resembles an asymmetric diodelike characteristic, which is typical of Langmuir probes monitoring plasma. The measurement of biased wire currents, outside the beam, enables us to estimate the effective charge density in vacuum.

  14. Experimental limit on low energy antiprotons in the cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streitmatter, R. E.; Stochaj, S. J.; Ormes, J. F.; Golden, R. L.; Stephens, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from the Low Energy Antiproton Experiment (LEAP), a balloon-borne instrument which was flown in August, 1987. No evidence of antiproton fluxes is found in the kinetic energy range of 120 MeV to 360 MeV, at the top of the atmosphere. The 90-percent is found confidence upper limit on the antiproton/proton ratio in this energy range is 3.5 x 10 to the -5th. In particular, this new experiment places an upper limit on the flux almost an order of magnitude below the reported flux of Buffington et al. (1981).

  15. Evidence for the existence of cosmic-ray antiprotons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, R. L.; Horan, S.; Mauger, B. G.; Badhwar, G. D.; Lacy, J. L.; Stephens, S. A.; Daniel, R. R.; Zipse, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A search for cosmic-ray antiprotons was recently performed with the use of a balloon-borne superconducting-magnet spectrometer. A total of 46 antiproton candidates were observed in the rigidity interval from 5.6 to 12.5 GV/c. Of these events 18.3 are expected to be atmospheric and instrumentation background. The p(-)/p ratio is found to be 0.00052 + or - 0.00015. This ratio is consistent with secondary production of antiprotons in the interstellar medium.

  16. PAX: Polarized Antiproton eXperiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lenisa, P.

    2005-10-06

    Polarized antiprotons produced by spin filtering with an internal polarized gas target provide access to a wealth of single- and double-spin observables, thereby opening a window to physics uniquely accessible with the HESR at FAIR. This includes a first measurement of the transversity distribution of the valence quarks in the proton, and a first measurement of the moduli and the relative phase of the time-like electric and magnetic form factors GE,M of the proton. In polarized and unpolarized pp-bar elastic scattering open questions like the contribution from the odd charge-symmetry Landshoff-mechanism at large vertical bar t vertical bar and spin-effects in the extraction of the forward scattering amplitude at low vertical bar t vertical bar can be addressed.

  17. Conceptual designs for antiproton space propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cassenti, B.N.

    1989-01-01

    Five conceptual designs for antimatter space propulsion systems were compared in terms of their performance characteristics. The systems examined included solid-core liquid-propellant rockets; magnetically confined gaseous-core rockets using liquid or solid propellants; plasma-core rockets; pion rockets, which are driven directly by the mass annihilation products; and ram-augmented rockets, in which antiproton annihilation is used to heat hydrogen collected in interstellar space. It was found that, in general, as the specific impulse of the propulsion system increases, the thrust decreases. The comparison between designs showed that only fusion rockets have the capability to compete in performance with mass annihilation rockets. For very-high-speed interstellar missions, pion rockets, which can have a specific impulse of 20 million sec (although with a thrust-to-engine mass ratios of only 0.01 G) will offer best performance. 36 refs.

  18. Micro-/nanosized cantilever beams and mass sensors under applied axial tensile/compressive force vibrating in vacuum and viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Stachiv, Ivo; Fang, Te-Hua; Chen, Tao-Hsing

    2015-11-15

    Vibrating micro-/nanosized cantilever beams under an applied axial force are the key components of various devices used in nanotechnology. In this study, we perform a complete theoretical investigation of the cantilever beams under an arbitrary value of the axial force vibrating in a specific environment such as vacuum, air or viscous fluid. Based on the results easy accessible expressions enabling one the fast and highly accurate estimations of changes in the Q-factor and resonant frequencies of beam oscillating in viscous fluid caused by the applied axial force are derived and analyzed. It has been also shown that for beam-to-string and string vibrational regimes the mode shape starts to significantly deviate from the one known for a beam without axial force. Moreover, a linear dependency of the vibrational amplitude in resonance on the dimensionless tension parameter has been found. We revealed that only a large axial force, i.e. the string vibrational regime, significantly improves the Q-factor of beams submerged in fluid, while an increase of the axial force in beam and beam-to-string transition regimes has a negligibly small impact on the Q-factor enhancement. Experiments carried out on the carbon nanotubes and nanowires are in a good agreement with present theoretical predictions.

  19. Micro-/nanosized cantilever beams and mass sensors under applied axial tensile/compressive force vibrating in vacuum and viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachiv, Ivo; Fang, Te-Hua; Chen, Tao-Hsing

    2015-11-01

    Vibrating micro-/nanosized cantilever beams under an applied axial force are the key components of various devices used in nanotechnology. In this study, we perform a complete theoretical investigation of the cantilever beams under an arbitrary value of the axial force vibrating in a specific environment such as vacuum, air or viscous fluid. Based on the results easy accessible expressions enabling one the fast and highly accurate estimations of changes in the Q-factor and resonant frequencies of beam oscillating in viscous fluid caused by the applied axial force are derived and analyzed. It has been also shown that for beam-to-string and string vibrational regimes the mode shape starts to significantly deviate from the one known for a beam without axial force. Moreover, a linear dependency of the vibrational amplitude in resonance on the dimensionless tension parameter has been found. We revealed that only a large axial force, i.e. the string vibrational regime, significantly improves the Q-factor of beams submerged in fluid, while an increase of the axial force in beam and beam-to-string transition regimes has a negligibly small impact on the Q-factor enhancement. Experiments carried out on the carbon nanotubes and nanowires are in a good agreement with present theoretical predictions.

  20. Constraining pre-big-bang nucleosynthesis expansion using cosmic antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Schelke, Mia; Catena, Riccardo; Fornengo, Nicolao; Masiero, Antonio; Pietroni, Massimo

    2006-10-15

    A host of dark energy models and nonstandard cosmologies predict an enhanced Hubble rate in the early Universe: perfectly viable models, which satisfy big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), cosmic microwave background and general relativity tests, may nevertheless lead to enhancements of the Hubble rate up to many orders of magnitude. In this paper we show that strong bounds on the pre-BBN evolution of the Universe may be derived, under the assumption that dark matter is a thermal relic, by combining the dark matter relic density bound with constraints coming from the production of cosmic-ray antiprotons by dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy. The limits we derive apply to the Hubble rate around the temperature of dark matter decoupling. For dark matter masses lighter than 100 GeV, the bound on the Hubble rate enhancement ranges from a factor of a few to a factor of 30, depending on the actual cosmological model, while for a mass of 500 GeV the bound falls in the range 50-500. Uncertainties in the derivation of the bounds and situations where the bounds become looser are discussed. We finally discuss how these limits apply to some specific realizations of nonstandard cosmologies: a scalar-tensor gravity model, kination models and a Randall-Sundrum D-brane model.

  1. A recoil detector for the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at angles close to 90°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Bechstedt, U.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Khoukaz, A.; Klehr, F.; Lehrach, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Ritman, J.; Sefzick, T.; Stockmanns, T.; Täschner, A.; Wuestner, P.; Xu, H.

    2014-10-01

    The design and construction of a recoil detector for the measurement of recoil protons of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at scattering angles close to are described. The performance of the recoil detector has been tested in the laboratory with radioactive sources and at COSY with proton beams by measuring proton-proton elastic scattering. The results of laboratory tests and commissioning with beam are presented. Excellent energy resolution and proper working performance of the recoil detector validate the conceptual design of the KOALA experiment at HESR to provide the cross section data needed to achieve a precise luminosity determination at the PANDA experiment.

  2. Detection of low energy antiproton annihilations in a segmented silicon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghion, S.; Ahlén, O.; Belov, A. S.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Bremer, J.; Brusa, R. S.; Burghart, G.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Canali, C.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Cialdi, S.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Derking, J. H.; Di Domizio, S.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Ferragut, R.; Fontana, A.; Genova, P.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Gninenko, S. N.; Haider, S.; Harasimowicz, J.; Huse, T.; Jordan, E.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kaltenbacher, T.; Kellerbauer, A.; Knecht, A.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Magnani, A.; Mariazzi, S.; Matveev, V. A.; Moia, F.; Nebbia, G.; Nédélec, P.; Pacifico, N.; Petráček, V.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Regenfus, C.; Riccardi, C.; Røhne, O.; Rotondi, A.; Sandaker, H.; Sosa, A.; Subieta Vasquez, M. A.; Špaček, M.; Testera, G.; Welsch, C. P.; Zavatarelli, S.

    2014-06-01

    The goal of the AEbar gIS experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN, is to measure directly the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antimatter by measuring the free fall of a pulsed, cold antihydrogen beam. The final position of the falling antihydrogen will be detected by a position sensitive detector. This detector will consist of an active silicon part, where the annihilations take place, followed by an emulsion part. Together, they allow to achieve 1% precision on the measurement of bar g with about 600 reconstructed and time tagged annihilations. We present here the prospects for the development of the AEbar gIS silicon position sentive detector and the results from the first beam tests on a monolithic silicon pixel sensor, along with a comparison to Monte Carlo simulations.

  3. The new Tevatron beam position monitor front-end software

    SciTech Connect

    Piccoli, Luciano; Votava, Margaret; Zhang, Dehong; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The Tevatron is a proton anti-proton accelerator collider operating at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The machine is currently delivering beam for the CDF and D0 experiments, which expect increasing luminosity until the conclusion of Run II, planned for 2009. The Laboratory defined a plan for achieving higher luminosity, and one of the tasks is the upgrade of the accelerator's beam position monitor (BPM). The Tevatron was built during the early eighties and some of its control systems, including the BPMs, are still the original ones. This paper describes the front-end software of the Tevatron BPM upgrade, from the requirements to the implementation, and the underlying hardware setup. The front-end software designed is presented, emphasizing its modularity and reusability, allowing it to be applied to other Fermilab machines.

  4. Observation of longitudinal diffusion and cooling due to intra-beam scattering at the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring is a high-vacuum fixed energy antiproton storage ring with both stochastic (at present) and the future electron cooling systems. In this paper the technique for diffusion rate measurement, beam parameters and the analysis of data are presented, as well as the effect of intra-beam scattering on the operational considerations for the storage and cooling of the antiproton beam in the Recycler.

  5. Progress report on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Shiltsev et al.

    2003-07-09

    We discuss the original idea of beam-beam compensation (BBC) in Section I, sequence of events in 2001-2002 and use of the Tevatron Electron Beam (TEL) for DC beam removal in Section II, (anti)proton lifetime improvement in Section III, experimental data on the BBC attempts in Section IV and, conclusively, Section V is devoted to discussion on important phenomena, needed improvements and future plans.

  6. The experiment PANDA: physics with antiprotons at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, Gianluigi

    2015-05-01

    PANDA is an experiment that will run at the future facility FAIR, Darmstadt, Germany. A high intensity and cooled antiproton beam will collide on a fixed hydrogen or nuclear target covering center-of-mass energies between 2.2 and 5.5 GeV. PANDA addresses various physics aspects from the low energy non-perturbative region towards the perturbative regime of QCD. With the impressive theoretical developments in this field, e.g. lattice QCD, the predictions are becoming more accurate in the course of time. The data harvest with PANDA will, therefore, be an ideal test bench with the aim to provide a deeper understanding of hadronic phenomena such as confinement and the generation of hadron masses. A variety of physics topics will be covered with PANDA, for example: the formation or production of exotic non-qqbar charm meson states connected to the recently observed XYZ spectrum; the study of gluon-rich matter, such as glueballs and hybrids; the spectroscopy of the excited states of strange and charm baryons, their production cross section and their spin correlations; the behaviour of hadrons in nuclear matter; the hypernuclear physics; the electromagnetic proton form factors in the timelike region. The PANDA experiment is designed to achieve the above mentioned physics goals with a setup with the following characteristics: an almost full solid angle acceptance; excellent tracking capabilities with high resolution (1-2 % at 1 GeV/c in the central region); secondary vertex detection with resolution ≈ 100 microns or better; electromagnetic calorimetry for detections of gammas and electrons up to 10 GeV; good particle identification of charge tracks (electrons, muons, pions, kaons, protons); a dedicated interchangeable central apparatus for the hypernuclear physics; detector and data acquisition system capable of working at 20 MHz interaction rate with an intelligent software trigger that can provide maximum flexibility.

  7. Beam profile measurement with flying wires at the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Pishchalnikov, Yu.; Krider, J.; Hu, M.; Lorman, E.; Marchionni, A.; Pordes, S.; Wilson, P.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Flying wires were installed at the Fermilab Recycler Ring for transverse beam profile measurement for both proton and antiproton beams. The following note describes the system configuration, calibration and resolution of the flying wire system, interactions between the wires and the beam, as well as analysis of the transverse beam profile in the presence of a stochastic cooling system.

  8. Spin Filtering of Stored (Anti)Protons: from FILTEX to COSY to AD to FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, Nikolai; Pavlov, Fyodor

    2007-06-13

    We review the theory of spin filtering of stored (anti)protons by multiple passage through the polarized internal target (PIT). Implications for the antiproton polarization buildup in the proposed PAX experiment at FAIR GSI are discussed.

  9. Convergent close-coupling calculations of helium single ionization by antiproton impact

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurakhmanov, I. B.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Fursa, D. V.; Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    2011-12-15

    We apply the fully quantum-mechanical convergent close-coupling method to the calculation of antiproton scattering on the ground state of helium. The helium target is treated as a three-body Coulomb system using frozen-core and multiconfiguration approximations. The electron-electron correlation of the target is fully treated in both cases. Though both calculations yield generally good agreement with experiment for the total ionization cross sections, the multiconfiguration results are substantially higher at the lower energies than the frozen-core ones. Calculated longitudinal ejected electron and recoil-ion momentum distributions for the single ionization of helium are in good agreement with the experiment.

  10. Feasibility of an antiproton catalyzed fission fragment rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Hdinger, D.S.

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of an antiproton catalyzed fission fragment rocket (FFR). The FFR is characterized by the extraction of fission fragments from the fissile fuel, and the utilization of their kinetic energy for thrust generation. A significant drawback to previous FFR designs was the requirement to maintain a critical nuclear pile as the fission fragment source. The author examined the possibility of replacing the critical pile with a sub-critical pile driven by antiprotons. Recent experiments have revealed that antiprotons stimulate highly energetic fissions in {sup 238}U, with a neutron multiplicity of 13.7 neutrons per fission. This interaction was used as a throttled neutron source. The pile consisted of layers of fissile coated fibers which are designed to allow fission fragments to escape them, where the fragments collide with a fluid. The heated fluid is then ejected from the rocket to provide thrust. The calculations performed indicate that each antiproton injected into the pile can stimulate 8 or more fissions while maintaining a neutron multiplication of less than 0.4. Based on the results seen, the engine design presented is inadequate. Limitations introduced by the reaction fluid far outweigh the simplicity-of-design gained. Despite this, the basic idea of using the antiproton-U interaction as a source of spacecraft propulsion warrants further study.

  11. Trapped antiprotons produced by cosmic rays in the Earth's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Pugacheva, G; Gusev, A A; Jayanthi, U B; Schuch, N G; Spjeldvik, W N; Choque, K T

    2004-01-01

    The existence of significant fluxes of antiparticles in the Earth magnetosphere has been predicted on theoretical considerations in this article. These antiparticles (positrons or antiprotons) at several hundred kilometers of altitudes, we believe are not of direct extraterrestrial origin, but are the natural products of nuclear reactions of the high energy primary cosmic rays (CR) and trapped protons (TP) confined in the terrestrial radiation belt, with the constituents of terrestrial atmosphere. Extraterrestrial positrons and antiprotons born in nuclear reactions of the same CR particles passing through only 5-7 g/cm2 of interstellar matter, exhibit lower fluxes compared to the antiprotons born at hundreds of g/cm2 in the atmosphere, which when confined in the magnetic field of the Earth (in any other planet), get accumulated. We present the results of the computations of the antiproton fluxes at 10 MeV to several GeV energies due to CR particle interactions with the matter in the interstellar space, and also with the residual atmosphere at altitudes of approximately 1000 km over the Earth's surface. The estimates show that the magnetospheric antiproton fluxes are greater by two orders of magnitude compared to the extraterrestrial fluxes measured at energies <1-2 GeV.

  12. Search for Resonances in the Photoproduction of Proton-Antiproton Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, Burnham

    2006-01-01

    Results are reported on the reaction γp → p$\\bar{p}$p with beam energy in the range 4.8-5.5 GeV. The data were collected at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in CLAS experiment E01-017(G6C). The focus of this study is an understanding of the mechanisms of photoproduction of proton-antiproton pairs, and to search for intermediate resonances, both narrow and broad, which decay to p$\\bar{p}$. The total measured cross section in the photon energy range 4.8-5.5 GeV is σ = 33 ± 2 nb. Measurement of the cross section as a function of energy is provided. An upper limit on the production of a narrow resonance state previously observed with a mass of 2.02 GeV/c2 is placed at 0.35 nb. No intermediate resonance states were observed. Meson exchange production appears to dominate the production of the proton-antiproton pairs.

  13. New limit on the low-energy antiproton/proton ratio in the Galactic cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlen, S. P.; Beatty, J. J.; Barwick, S.; Gerbier, G.; Bower, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from a balloon-borne apparatus searching for low-energy antiprotons in the Galactic cosmic rays. For energies less than 640 MeV at the top of the atmosphere, no cosmic-ray antiprotons were observed. This yields an upper limit to the antiproton/proton ratio of 0.000046 at the 85-percent confidence level.

  14. Cosmic ray antiproton and positron production in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Golden, R. L.; Brown, M. L.; Lacy, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    We have calculated the energy spectra of cosmic ray secondary antiprotons and positrons using the latest available data on inclusive reactions. Using the measured positron spectrum, we have found that the amount of matter traversed by the cosmic rays in the few GeV region to be 4.7 (+ or - 1.5) g/sq cm of interstellar hydrogen. The computed antiproton to proton ratio is about .0004 for energies 5-10 GeV. This is sufficient to make observations of antiprotons feasible from balloon flights. We have also pointed out the type of information that can be obtained if accurate information of the spectra of these two components becomes available.

  15. Lorentz and CPT tests involving antiprotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Ralf

    2005-10-01

    Perhaps the largest gap in our understanding of nature at the smallest scales is a consistent quantum theory underlying the Standard Model and General Relativity. Substantial theoretical research has been performed in this context, but observational efforts are hampered by the expected Planck suppression of deviations from conventional physics. However, a variety of candidate models predict minute violations of both Lorentz and CPT invariance. Such effects open a promising avenue for experimental research in this field because these symmetries are amenable to Planck-precision tests. The low-energy signatures of Lorentz and CPT breaking are described by an effective field theory called the Standard-Model Extension (SME). In addition to the body of established physics (i.e., the Standard Model and General Relativity), this framework incorporates all Lorentz- and CPT-violating corrections compatible with key principles of physics. To date, the SME has provided the basis for the analysis of numerous tests of Lorentz and CPT symmetry involving protons, neutrons, electrons, muons, and photons. Discovery potential exists in neutrino physics. A particularly promising class of Planck-scale tests involve matter-antimatter comparisons at low temperatures. SME predictions for transition frequencies in such systems include both matter-antimatter differences and sidereal variations. For example, in hydrogen-antihydrogen spectroscopy, leading-order effects in a 1S-2S transition as well as in a 1S Zeeman transition could exist that can be employed to obtain clean constraints. Similarly, tight bounds can be obtained from Penning-trap experiments involving antiprotons.

  16. Lorentz and CPT tests involving antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, Ralf

    2005-10-19

    Perhaps the largest gap in our understanding of nature at the smallest scales is a consistent quantum theory underlying the Standard Model and General Relativity. Substantial theoretical research has been performed in this context, but observational efforts are hampered by the expected Planck suppression of deviations from conventional physics. However, a variety of candidate models predict minute violations of both Lorentz and CPT invariance. Such effects open a promising avenue for experimental research in this field because these symmetries are amenable to Planck-precision tests.The low-energy signatures of Lorentz and CPT breaking are described by an effective field theory called the Standard-Model Extension (SME). In addition to the body of established physics (i.e., the Standard Model and General Relativity), this framework incorporates all Lorentz- and CPT-violating corrections compatible with key principles of physics. To date, the SME has provided the basis for the analysis of numerous tests of Lorentz and CPT symmetry involving protons, neutrons, electrons, muons, and photons. Discovery potential exists in neutrino physics.A particularly promising class of Planck-scale tests involve matter-antimatter comparisons at low temperatures. SME predictions for transition frequencies in such systems include both matter-antimatter differences and sidereal variations. For example, in hydrogen-antihydrogen spectroscopy, leading-order effects in a 1S-2S transition as well as in a 1S Zeeman transition could exist that can be employed to obtain clean constraints. Similarly, tight bounds can be obtained from Penning-trap experiments involving antiprotons.

  17. Three-dimensional annihilation imaging of trapped antiprotons.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, M C; Amoretti, M; Bonomi, G; Bouchta, A; Bowe, P D; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, M; Filippini, V; Fontana, A; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Marchesotti, M; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Montagna, P; Riedler, P; Rotondi, A; Rouleau, G; Testera, G; Variola, A; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2004-02-13

    We demonstrate three-dimensional imaging of antiprotons in a Penning trap, by reconstructing annihilation vertices from the trajectories of the charged annihilation products. The unique capability of antiparticle imaging has allowed, for the first time, the observation of the spatial distribution of the particle loss in a Penning trap. The radial loss of antiprotons on the trap wall is localized to small spots, strongly breaking the azimuthal symmetry expected for an ideal trap. Our observations have important implications for detection of antihydrogen annihilations. PMID:14995248

  18. AMS-02 antiprotons from annihilating or decaying dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Koichi; Moroi, Takeo; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2015-07-01

    Recently the AMS-02 experiment reported an excess of cosmic ray antiprotons over the expected astrophysical background. We interpret the excess as a signal from annihilating or decaying dark matter and find that the observed spectrum is well fitted by adding contributions from the annihilation or decay of dark matter with mass of O (TeV) or larger. Interestingly, Wino dark matter with mass of around 3 TeV, whose thermal relic abundance is consistent with present dark matter abundance, can explain the antiproton excess. We also discuss the implications for the decaying gravitino dark matter with R-parity violation.

  19. Three-dimensional annihilation imaging of trapped antiprotons.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, M C; Amoretti, M; Bonomi, G; Bouchta, A; Bowe, P D; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, M; Filippini, V; Fontana, A; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Marchesotti, M; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Montagna, P; Riedler, P; Rotondi, A; Rouleau, G; Testera, G; Variola, A; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2004-02-13

    We demonstrate three-dimensional imaging of antiprotons in a Penning trap, by reconstructing annihilation vertices from the trajectories of the charged annihilation products. The unique capability of antiparticle imaging has allowed, for the first time, the observation of the spatial distribution of the particle loss in a Penning trap. The radial loss of antiprotons on the trap wall is localized to small spots, strongly breaking the azimuthal symmetry expected for an ideal trap. Our observations have important implications for detection of antihydrogen annihilations.

  20. Prospects of CPT tests using antiprotonic helium and antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hayano, Ryugo S.

    2005-10-19

    Testing CPT to the highest possible precision using the laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms (a neutral three-body system consisting of an antiproton, a helium nucleus and an electron) is the current goal of ASACUSA collaboration at CERN AD. The present status and future prospects are discussed in the first half of the talk. Our program will be extended in the future to include the microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen. The physics motivations and possible measurement schemes are presented in the second half.

  1. Antiproton noise source for the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.; Fellenz, B.

    1992-10-26

    A new system for exciting the beam in the Tevatron has been installed in the A1 service building and in the A17 medium straight section. The purpose of the system is to make betatron tune measurements.

  2. Status of the SPES project, a new tool for fundamental and apply science studies with exotic ion beams at LNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napoli, D. R.; Andrighetto, A.; Antonini, P.; Bellan, L.; Bellato, M.; Benini, D.; Bermudez, J.; Bisoffi, G.; Boratto, E.; Bortolato, D.; Calabretta, L.; Calderolla, M.; Calore, A.; Campo, D.; Carturan, S.; Cinausero, M.; Comunian, M.; Corradetti, S.; De Angelis, G.; De Ruvo, P. L.; Esposito, J.; Ferrari, L.; Galatá, A.; Gelain, F.; Giacchini, M.; Giacomazzi, P.; Gobbi, C.; Gramegna, F.; Gulmini, M.; Lollo, M.; Lombardi, A.; Maggiore, M.; Manzolaro, M.; Michinelli, R.; Modanese, P.; Moisio, M. F.; Monetti, A.; Mozzi, A.; Palmieri, A.; Pasquato, F.; Pedretti, D.; Pegoraro, R.; Pisent, A.; Poggi, M.; Pranovi, L.; Prete, G.; Roncolato, C.; Rossignoli, M.; Russo, A. D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Scarpa, D.; Silingardi, R.; Dobon, J. J. Valiente; Visentin, E.; Vivian, G.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Prete, G. F.

    2016-07-01

    SPES, a new accelerator facility for both the production of exotic ion beams and radio-pharmaceuticals, is presently being installed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro in Italy (LNL). The new cyclotron, which will provide high intensity proton beams for the production of the rare isotopes, has been installed and is now in the commissioning phase. We present here the status of the part of the project devoted to the production and acceleration of fission fragments created in the interaction of an intense proton beam on a production target of UCx. The expected SPES radioactive beams intensities, their quality and their maximum energies (up to 11 MeV/A for A=130) will permit to perform forefront research in nuclear structure and nuclear dynamics far from the stability valley. Another low energy section of the facility is foreseen for new and challenging research, both in the nuclear physics and in the material science frameworks.

  3. DESIGN AND SHIELDING OF A BEAM LINE FROM ELENA TO ATRAP USING ELECTROSTATIC QUADRUPOLE LENSES AND BENDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuri, Yosuke; Lee, Edward P.

    2010-09-01

    The construction of the Extra Low ENergy Antiprotons (ELENA) upgrade to the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) ring has been proposed at CERN to produce a greatly increased current of low-energy antiprotons for various experiments including anti-hydrogen studies. This upgrade involves the addition of a small storage ring and electrostatic beam lines. The 5.3-MeV antiproton beams from AD are decelerated down to 100 keV in the compact ring and transported to each experimental apparatus. In this paper, we describe an electrostatic beam line from the ELENA ring to the ATRAP experimental apparatus and magnetic shielding of the low-energy beam line against the ATRAP superconducting solenoid magnet. A possible rough conceptual design of this system is displayed.

  4. Overview of the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James; Chakrabarti, Suman; Pearson, Boise; Sims, W. Herbert; Lewis, Raymond; Fant, Wallace; Rodgers, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A general overview of the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) Experiment is presented. The topics include: 1) Why Antimatter? 2) HiPAT Applicability; 3) Approach-Goals; 4) HiPAT General Layout; 5) Sizing For Containment; 6) Laboratory Operations; 7) Vacuum System Cleaning; 8) Ion Production Via Electron Gun; 9) Particle Capture Via Ion Sources; 10) Ion Beam Steering/Focusing; 11) Ideal Ion Stacking Sequence; 12) Setup For Dynamic Capture; 13) Dynamic Capture of H(+) Ions; 14) Dynamic Capture; 15) Radio Frequency Particle Detection; 16) Radio Frequency Antenna Modeling; and 17) R.F. Stabilization-Low Frequencies. A short presentation of propulsion applications of Antimatter is also given. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  5. New constraints from PAMELA anti-proton data on annihilating and decaying dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cholis, Ilias

    2011-09-01

    Recently the PAMELA experiment has released its updated anti-proton flux and anti-proton to proton flux ratio data up to energies of ≈ 200GeV. With no clear excess of cosmic ray anti-protons at high energies, one can extend constraints on the production of anti-protons from dark matter. In this letter, we consider both the cases of dark matter annihilating and decaying into standard model particles that produce significant numbers of anti-protons. We provide two sets of constraints on the annihilation cross-sections/decay lifetimes. In the one set of constraints we ignore any source of anti-protons other than dark matter, which give the highest allowed cross-sections/inverse lifetimes. In the other set we include also anti-protons produced in collisions of cosmic rays with interstellar medium nuclei, getting tighter but more realistic constraints on the annihilation cross-sections/decay lifetimes.

  6. Stacking Multiple Ion Captures in The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James J.; Lewis, Raymond A.; Sims, William H.; Chakrabarti, Suman; Pearson, Boise; Fant, Wallace E.

    2004-01-01

    The High performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) research project was initiated by the Marshall Space Flight Center's propulsion Research Center to examining the fundamental behavior of low energy antiprotons. Stored antiproton would ultimately be used for experimental demonstration of basic propulsive concepts. Matter-antimatter annihilation produces approximately 10(exp 8) MJ/g nearly 10 orders of magnitude more energy per unit mass than chemical based combustion, hence NASA's interest. To achieve containment, HiPAT utilizes a type of electromagnetic bottle know as a Penning trap positioned within an ultrahigh vacuum test section. Recently, the HiPAT hardware configuration has been enhanced to facilitate the capture of multiple normal matter ion burst. This endeavor is often referred to as "stacking" and used to increasing the number of captured particles. A prior normal matter experimental effort, successfully demonstrated the effectiveness of single burst capture. The stacking process is accomplished by manipulating the electric field generated by the confinement electrodes i.e. adjusting the well potential depth. These potential well values are initially configured to maximize the quantity of captured ions per burst; shallow wells with a depth of 100 volt or less (referenced to the incoming ion beam energy) are typically selected. Once captured, a cooling interval is required to reduce the energy of trapped particles below the lower extent of the "trap door" (or leading electrode) ion emitting potential. This is necessary such that a new burst of hot ions can be introduced while preventing those already inside from escaping. The cooling time is driven by a combination of mechanisms such as synchrotron radiation, background gas scattering, and resistive damping in a time scale on the order of minutes. A potential for reducing this hold period is to actively manipulate the electric field shape, using the power supply control system, to produce a deeper potential

  7. Secondary antiprotons as a Galactic Dark Matter probe

    SciTech Connect

    Evoli, Carmelo; Gaggero, Daniele; Grasso, Dario E-mail: d.gaggero@uva.nl

    2015-12-01

    We present a novel determination of the astrophysical uncertainties associated to the secondary antiproton flux originating from cosmic-ray spallation on the interstellar gas. We select a set of propagation models compatible with the recent B/C data from PAMELA, and find those providing minimal and maximal antiproton fluxes in different energy ranges. We use this result to determine the most conservative bounds on relevant Dark Matter (DM) annihilation channels: we find that the recent claim of a DM interpretation of a gamma-ray excess in the Galactic Center region cannot be ruled out by current antiproton data. Finally, we discuss the impact of the recently released preliminary data from AMS-02. In particular, we provide a reference model compatible with proton, helium and B/C spectra from this experiment. Remarkably, the main propagation parameters of this model are in agreement with the best fit presented in our earlier statistical analyses. We also show that the antiproton-to-proton ratio does not exhibit any significant anomaly at high energy with respect to our predictions.

  8. Antiproton Accumulator in the Main Injector era (2)

    SciTech Connect

    Visnjic, V.

    1992-12-01

    By adding a single quadrupole per sextant in the Antiproton Accumulator it is possible to obtain a lattice well suited for higher bandwidth stochastic cooling systems such as those anticipated for the Main Injector era. The lattice proposed here has excellent properties concerning both the lattice functions and the stochastic cooling parameters.

  9. Covariance of antiproton yield and source size in nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, Sean; Pruneau, Claude

    2000-04-01

    We confront for the first time the widely-held belief that combined event-by-event information from quark gluon plasma signals can reduce the ambiguity of the individual signals. We illustrate specifically how the measured antiproton yield combined with the information from pion-pion HBT correlations can be used to identify novel event classes. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  10. Beam-beam compensation in Tevatron: Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir D. Shiltsev et al.

    2001-07-12

    The project of beam-beam compensation (BBC) in the Tevatron using electron beams [1] has passed a successful first step in experimental studies. The first Tevatron electron lens (TEL) has been installed in the Tevatron, commissioned, and demonstrated the theoretically predicted shift of betatron frequencies of a high energy proton beam due to a high current low energy electron beam. After the first series of studies in March-April 2001 (total of 7 shifts), we achieved tuneshifts of 980 GeV protons of about dQ=+0.007 with some 3 A of the electron beam current while the proton lifetime was in the range of 10 hours (some 24 hours at the best). Future work will include diagnostics improvement, beam studies with antiprotons, and fabrication of the 2nd TEL.

  11. Constraints on particle dark matter from cosmic-ray antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Fornengo, N.; Vittino, A.; Maccione, L. E-mail: luca.maccione@lmu.de

    2014-04-01

    Cosmic-ray antiprotons represent an important channel for dark matter indirect-detection studies. Current measurements of the antiproton flux at the top of the atmosphere and theoretical determinations of the secondary antiproton production in the Galaxy are in good agreement, with no manifest deviation which could point to an exotic contribution in this channel. Therefore, antiprotons can be used as a powerful tool for constraining particle dark matter properties. By using the spectrum of PAMELA data from 50 MV to 180 GV in rigidity, we derive bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section (or decay rate, for decaying dark matter) for the whole spectrum of dark matter annihilation (decay) channels and under different hypotheses of cosmic-rays transport in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere. For typical models of galactic propagation, the constraints are strong, setting a lower bound on the dark matter mass of a ''thermal'' relic at about 40–80 GeV for hadronic annihilation channels. These bounds are enhanced to about 150 GeV on the dark matter mass, when large cosmic-rays confinement volumes in the Galaxy are considered, and are reduced to 3–4 GeV for annihilation to light quarks (no bound for heavy-quark production) when the confinement volume is small. Bounds for dark matter lighter than few tens of GeV are due to the low energy part of the PAMELA spectrum, an energy region where solar modulation is relevant: to this aim, we have implemented a detailed solution of the transport equation in the heliosphere, which allowed us not only to extend bounds to light dark matter, but also to determine the uncertainty on the constraints arising from solar modulation modelling. Finally, we estimate the impact of soon-to-come AMS-02 data on the antiproton constraints.

  12. [Uncertainty of cross calibration-applied beam quality conversion factor for the Japan Society of Medical Physics 12].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Naoki; Kita, Akinobu; Takemura, Akihiro; Nishimoto, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Toshiki

    2014-09-01

    The uncertainty of the beam quality conversion factor (k(Q,Q0)) of standard dosimetry of absorbed dose to water in external beam radiotherapy 12 (JSMP12) is determined by combining the uncertainty of each beam quality conversion factor calculated for each type of ionization chamber. However, there is no guarantee that ionization chambers of the same type have the same structure and thickness, so there may be individual variations. We evaluated the uncertainty of k(Q,Q0) for JSMP12 using an ionization chamber dosimeter and linear accelerator without a specific device or technique in consideration of the individual variation of ionization chambers and in clinical radiation field. The cross calibration formula was modified and the beam quality conversion factor for the experimental values [(k(Q,Q0))field] determined using the modified formula. It's uncertainty was calculated to be 1.9%. The differences between (k(Q,Q0))field of experimental values and k(Q,Q0) for Japan Society of Medical Physics 12 (JSMP12) were 0.73% and 0.88% for 6- and 10-MV photon beams, respectively, remaining within ± 1.9%. This showed k(Q,Q0) for JSMP12 to be consistent with (k(Q,Q0))field of experimental values within the estimated uncertainty range. Although inter-individual differences may be generated, even when the same type of ionized chamber is used, k(Q,Q0) for JSMP12 appears to be consistent within the estimated uncertainty range of (k(Q,Q0)field.

  13. Fermilab Proton Beam for Mu2e

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Plans to use existing Fermilab facilities to provide beam for the Muon to Electron Conversion Experiment (Mu2e) are under development. The experiment will follow the completion of the Tevatron Collider Run II, utilizing the beam lines and storage rings used today for antiproton accumulation without considerable reconfiguration. The proposed Mu2e operating scenario is described as well as the accelerator issues being addressed to meet the experimental goals.

  14. Some Torsional-damping Measurements of Laminated Beams as Applied to the Propeller Stall-flutter Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Atwood R , Jr

    1953-01-01

    The structural damping in the torsion mode of vibration of a series of untwisted, laminated thin beams simulating propeller blades is presented. The number of lamination were varied, as well as the bonding material and the method of joining lamination. Application of the data to the calculation of the minimum flutter speed of thin propeller blades indicates that appreciable gains in the minimum flutter speed may be obtained for laminated blades using a Cycleweld bond.

  15. First observation of dijet events with an antiproton tag at √s = 1.96 TeV using the D0 Forward Proton Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Strang, Michael Allen

    2005-08-01

    The Forward Proton Detector (FPD) is a new sub-system of the D0 detector, a 5000 ton particle physics detector located at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The FPD was implemented for the Tevatron Run II and gives access to a wide range of diffractive scattering processes, where one or both of the beam particles remain intact. The analysis described in this thesis makes use of the dipole spectrometer of the FPD to tag outgoing antiprotons in events that have a dijet signature in the central D0 calorimeter. Properties of jets with a diffractive tag signature are compared to jets without such a signature yielding the first observation of tagged diffractive dijets at a 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy.

  16. Extended Glauber Model of Antiproton-Nucleus Annihilation for All Energies and Mass Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Teck-Ghee; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Previous analytical formulas in the Glauber model for high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions developed by Wong are utilized and extended to study Antiproton-nucleus annihilations for both high and low energies, after taking into account the effects of Coulomb and nuclear interactions, and the change of the antiproton momentum inside a nucleus. The extended analytical formulas capture the main features of the experimental antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross sections for all energies and mass numbers. At high antiproton energies, they exhibit the granular property for the lightest nuclei and the black-disk limit for the heavy nuclei. At low antiproton energies, they display the effect of the antiproton momentum increase due to the nuclear interaction for the light nuclei, and the effect of the magnification due to the attractive Coulomb interaction for the heavy nuclei.

  17. Antihydrogen formation in collisions of positronium with antiprotons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humberston, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    Antihydrogen, consisting of a positron orbiting around an antiproton, is the simplest few body system consisting entirely of antimatter and as such is of considerable importance in providing additional tests of the validity of charge conjugation invariance. In addition, the nature of the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter might more readily be investigated for an electrically neutral system than one which is charged. Before such studies can be undertaken the antihydrogen must, of course, be produced by attachment of a positron to an antipositron. Several production mechanisms have been proposed, the two most favored of which are radiative capture (spontaneous or stimulated) and charge exchange in positronium-antiproton collisions. The cross section for radiative capture is very much less than that for charge exchange, so that it might be thought that the latter process is greatly to be preferred. Various calculations of the cross section for the charge exchange process are briefly reviewed.

  18. Asymmetric antiproton debuncher: No bad mixing, more good mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Visnjic, V.

    1994-07-01

    An asymmetric lattice for the Fermilab Antiproton Debuncher is designed. The lattice has zero mixing between the pickups and the kickers (bad mixing) while the mixing in the rest of the machine (good mixing) can be varied (even during the operation of the machine) in order to optimize the stochastic cooling. As an example, a lattice with zero bad mixing and twice the good mixing is presented. The betatron cooling rate in this lattice is twice its present value.

  19. Investigation of Antiproton Use for Therapy and Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Angelopoulos, Angelos

    2007-11-26

    The nuclear and elementary particle physics advances during the last century and the technological development produced a number of valuable medical imaging and therapeutical techniques. Today new methods are under investigation in order to improve our arsenal against the diseases. Such a new method is using antiprotons for therapeutical and imaging techniques. The underlying physics is discussed and the current scientific studies on this subject are reviewed.

  20. Antihydrogen Formation via Antiproton Scattering with Excited Positronium.

    PubMed

    Kadyrov, A S; Rawlins, C M; Stelbovics, A T; Bray, I; Charlton, M

    2015-05-01

    Utilizing the two-center convergent close-coupling method, we find a several order of magnitude enhancement in the formation of antihydrogen via antiproton scattering with positronium in an excited state over the ground state. The effect is greatest at the lowest energies considered, which encompass those achievable in experiment. This suggests a practical approach to creating neutral antimatter for testing its interaction with gravity and for spectroscopic measurements.

  1. Antiproton Confinement in a Penning-Ioffe Trap for Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Larochelle, P.; Le Sage, D.; Levitt, B.; Kolthammer, W. S.; Kuljanishvili, I.; McConnell, R.; Wrubel, J.; Esser, F. M.; Glueckler, H.; Hansen, G.; Schillings, J.; Schmitt, M.; Soltner, H.; Grzonka, D.; Martin, S.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.; Zhang, Z.; Comeau, D.

    2007-03-16

    Antiprotons (p) remain confined in a Penning trap, in sufficient numbers to form antihydrogen (H) atoms via charge exchange, when the radial field of a quadrupole Ioffe trap is added. This first demonstration with p suggests that quadrupole Ioffe traps can be superimposed upon p and e{sup +} traps to attempt the capture of H atoms as they form, contrary to conclusions of previous analyses.

  2. Antiproton confinement in a Penning-Ioffe trap for antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G; Larochelle, P; Le Sage, D; Levitt, B; Kolthammer, W S; Kuljanishvili, I; McConnell, R; Wrubel, J; Esser, F M; Glückler, H; Grzonka, D; Hansen, G; Martin, S; Oelert, W; Schillings, J; Schmitt, M; Sefzick, T; Soltner, H; Zhang, Z; Comeau, D; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Speck, A; Nillius, F; Walz, J; Hänsch, T W

    2007-03-16

    Antiprotons (p[over]) remain confined in a Penning trap, in sufficient numbers to form antihydrogen (H[over ) atoms via charge exchange, when the radial field of a quadrupole Ioffe trap is added. This first demonstration with p[over] suggests that quadrupole Ioffe traps can be superimposed upon p[over] and e(+) traps to attempt the capture of H[over] atoms as they form, contrary to conclusions of previous analyses.

  3. Evaluation of resistive-plate-chamber-based TOF-PET applied to in-beam particle therapy monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Espallardo, I.; Diblen, F.; Rohling, H.; Solevi, P.; Gillam, J.; Watts, D.; España, S.; Vandenberghe, S.; Fiedler, F.; Rafecas, M.

    2015-05-01

    Particle therapy is a highly conformal radiotherapy technique which reduces the dose deposited to the surrounding normal tissues. In order to fully exploit its advantages, treatment monitoring is necessary to minimize uncertainties related to the dose delivery. Up to now, the only clinically feasible technique for the monitoring of therapeutic irradiation with particle beams is Positron Emission Tomography (PET). In this work we have compared a Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC)-based PET scanner with a scintillation-crystal-based PET scanner for this application. In general, the main advantages of the RPC-PET system are its excellent timing resolution, low cost, and the possibility of building large area systems. We simulated a partial-ring scanner based on an RPC prototype under construction within the Fondazione per Adroterapia Oncologica (TERA). For comparison with the crystal-based PET scanner we have chosen the geometry of a commercially available PET scanner, the Philips Gemini TF. The coincidence time resolution used in the simulations takes into account the current achievable values as well as expected improvements of both technologies. Several scenarios (including patient data) have been simulated to evaluate the performance of different scanners. Initial results have shown that the low sensitivity of the RPC hampers its application to hadron-beam monitoring, which has an intrinsically low positron yield compared to diagnostic PET. In addition, for in-beam PET there is a further data loss due to the partial ring configuration. In order to improve the performance of the RPC-based scanner, an improved version of the RPC detector (modifying the thickness of the gas and glass layers), providing a larger sensitivity, has been simulated and compared with an axially extended version of the crystal-based device. The improved version of the RPC shows better performance than the prototype, but the extended version of the crystal-based PET outperforms all other options.

  4. Spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms and its contribution to the fundamental physical constants

    PubMed Central

    Hayano, Ryugo S.

    2010-01-01

    Antiprotonic helium atom, a metastable neutral system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus, was serendipitously discovered, and has been studied at CERN’s antiproton decelerator facility. Its transition frequencies have recently been measured to nine digits of precision by laser spectroscopy. By comparing these experimental results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron massratio was determined as 1836.152674(5). This result contributed to the CODATA recommended values of the fundamental physical constants. PMID:20075605

  5. A novel antiproton radial diagnostic based on octupole induced ballistic loss

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-03-15

    We report results from a novel diagnostic that probes the outer radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds. The diagnostic allows us to determine the profile by monitoring the time history of antiproton losses that occur as an octupole field in the antiproton confinement region is increased. We show several examples of how this diagnostic helps us to understand the radial dynamics of antiprotons in normal and nested Penning-Malmberg traps. Better understanding of these dynamics may aid current attempts to trap antihydrogen atoms.

  6. Design of 2-4 GHz Equalizers for the Antiproton Accumulator Stacktail System

    SciTech Connect

    Deibele, C.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    1999-01-01

    The antiproton source at Fermilab requires storage of antiprotons during the production of antiprotons. A fundamental part of the storage process involves stochastic cooling, which requires that the frequency spectrum from the pickups has notches at the revolution frequency and harmonics of the revolution frequency of the antiprotons in the storage ring. A system has been developed for broadband notches but suffers from dispersion. The dispersion inhibits the cooling process and therefore an equalizer is required. The process for designing the equalizers is described and results shown.

  7. Validation of an optical model applied to the beam down CSP facility at the Masdar Institute Solar Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grange, Benjamin; Kumar, Vikas; Torres, Juliana Beltran; Perez, Victor G.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Slocum, Alexander; Calvet, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    In the framework of the CSPonD Demo project, the optical characterization of the Beam Down Optical Experiment (BDOE) heliostats field is an important step to certify the required power is provided. To achieve this goal, an experiment involving a single heliostat is carried out. The results of the experiment and the comparison with simulated results are presented in this paper. Only the reflection on the heliostat is observed in order to have a better assessment of its optical performance. The heliostat reflectance is modified and the experimental and simulated concentration distribution are confronted. Results indicate that the shapes of the concentration distributions are quite similar, hence validating the optical model respects the geometry of the BDOE. Moreover these results lead to an increase of the optimized heliostat reflectance when the incident angle on the heliostat decreases. Further investigation is required to validate this method with all the individual heliostats of the BDOE solar field.

  8. Study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Nodulman, L.; Aaltonen, T; Albrow, M; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (p(T) > 0.5 GeV/c, vertical bar eta vertical bar < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at total center-of-mass energies root s = 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of eta - phi space: "toward", "away", and "transverse." The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the "underlying event." The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the "hard component" (initial and final-state radiation) from the "beam-beam remnant" and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event is studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  9. Study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Albrow, M.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucá, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We study charged particle production (pT>0.5 GeV /c , |η |<0.8 ) in proton-antiproton collisions at total center-of-mass energies √{s }=300 GeV , 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of η -ϕ space: "toward", "away", and "transverse." The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the "underlying event." The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the "hard component" (initial and final-state radiation) from the "beam-beam remnant" and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event is studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  10. A study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (pT > 0.5 GeV/c, |η| < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of η-Φspace; “toward”, “away”, and “transverse”. Furthermore, the average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the “underlying event”. The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the “hard component” (initial and final-state radiation) from the “beam-beam remnant” and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. We found that the center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event are studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  11. A Scintillation Counter System Design To Detect Antiproton Annihilation using the High Performance Antiproton Trap(HiPAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James J.; Lewis, Raymond A.; Stanojev, Boris

    2003-01-01

    The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT), a system designed to hold up to l0(exp 12) charge particles with a storage half-life of approximately 18 days, is a tool to support basic antimatter research. NASA's interest stems from the energy density represented by the annihilation of matter with antimatter, 10(exp 2)MJ/g. The HiPAT is configured with a Penning-Malmberg style electromagnetic confinement region with field strengths up to 4 Tesla, and 20kV. To date a series of normal matter experiments, using positive and negative ions, have been performed evaluating the designs performance prior to operations with antiprotons. The primary methods of detecting and monitoring stored normal matter ions and antiprotons within the trap includes a destructive extraction technique that makes use of a micro channel plate (MCP) device and a non-destractive radio frequency scheme tuned to key particle frequencies. However, an independent means of detecting stored antiprotons is possible by making use of the actual annihilation products as a unique indicator. The immediate yield of the annihilation event includes photons and pie mesons, emanating spherically from the point of annihilation. To "count" these events, a hardware system of scintillators, discriminators, coincident meters and multi channel scalars (MCS) have been configured to surround much of the HiPAT. Signal coincidence with voting logic is an essential part of this system, necessary to weed out the single cosmic ray events from the multi-particle annihilation shower. This system can be operated in a variety of modes accommodating various conditions. The first is a low-speed sampling interval that monitors the background loss or "evaporation" rate of antiprotons held in the trap during long storage periods; provides an independent method of validating particle lifetimes. The second is a high-speed sample rate accumulating information on a microseconds time-scale; useful when trapped antiparticles are extracted

  12. A Framework for Applying Point Clouds Grabbed by Multi-Beam LIDAR in Perceiving the Driving Environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Liang, Huawei; Wang, Zhiling; Chen, Xiangcheng

    2015-08-31

    The quick and accurate understanding of the ambient environment, which is composed of road curbs, vehicles, pedestrians, etc., is critical for developing intelligent vehicles. The road elements included in this work are road curbs and dynamic road obstacles that directly affect the drivable area. A framework for the online modeling of the driving environment using a multi-beam LIDAR, i.e., a Velodyne HDL-64E LIDAR, which describes the 3D environment in the form of a point cloud, is reported in this article. First, ground segmentation is performed via multi-feature extraction of the raw data grabbed by the Velodyne LIDAR to satisfy the requirement of online environment modeling. Curbs and dynamic road obstacles are detected and tracked in different manners. Curves are fitted for curb points, and points are clustered into bundles whose form and kinematics parameters are calculated. The Kalman filter is used to track dynamic obstacles, whereas the snake model is employed for curbs. Results indicate that the proposed framework is robust under various environments and satisfies the requirements for online processing.

  13. A Framework for Applying Point Clouds Grabbed by Multi-Beam LIDAR in Perceiving the Driving Environment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Liang, Huawei; Wang, Zhiling; Chen, Xiangcheng

    2015-01-01

    The quick and accurate understanding of the ambient environment, which is composed of road curbs, vehicles, pedestrians, etc., is critical for developing intelligent vehicles. The road elements included in this work are road curbs and dynamic road obstacles that directly affect the drivable area. A framework for the online modeling of the driving environment using a multi-beam LIDAR, i.e., a Velodyne HDL-64E LIDAR, which describes the 3D environment in the form of a point cloud, is reported in this article. First, ground segmentation is performed via multi-feature extraction of the raw data grabbed by the Velodyne LIDAR to satisfy the requirement of online environment modeling. Curbs and dynamic road obstacles are detected and tracked in different manners. Curves are fitted for curb points, and points are clustered into bundles whose form and kinematics parameters are calculated. The Kalman filter is used to track dynamic obstacles, whereas the snake model is employed for curbs. Results indicate that the proposed framework is robust under various environments and satisfies the requirements for online processing. PMID:26404290

  14. Review of the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) Experiment at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. B.; Sims, Herb; Martin, James; Chakrabarti, Suman; Lewis, Raymond; Fant, Wallace

    2003-01-01

    The significant energy density of matter-antimatter annihilation is attractive to the designers of future space propulsion systems, with the potential to offer a highly compact source of power. Many propulsion concepts exist that could take advantage of matter-antimatter reactions, and current antiproton production rates are sufficient to support basic proof-of-principle evaluation of technology associated with antimatter- derived propulsion. One enabling technology for such experiments is portable storage of low energy antiprotons, allowing antiprotons to be trapped, stored, and transported for use at an experimental facility. To address this need, the Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Research Center is developing a storage system referred to as the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) with a design goal of containing 10(exp 12) particles for up to 18 days. The HiPAT makes use of an electromagnetic system (Penning- Malmberg design) consisting of a 4 Telsa superconductor, high voltage electrode structure, radio frequency (RF) network, and ultra high vacuum system. To evaluate the system normal matter sources (both electron guns and ion sources) are used to generate charged particles. The electron beams ionize gas within the trapping region producing ions in situ, whereas the ion sources produce the particles external to the trapping region and required dynamic capture. A wide range of experiments has been performed examining factors such as ion storage lifetimes, effect of RF energy on storage lifetime, and ability to routinely perform dynamic ion capture. Current efforts have been focused on improving the FW rotating wall system to permit longer storage times and non-destructive diagnostics of stored ions. Typical particle detection is performed by extracting trapped ions from HiPAT and destructively colliding them with a micro-channel plate detector (providing number and energy information). This improved RF system has been used to detect various

  15. The PS 200 catching trap: A new tool for ultra-low energy antiproton physics

    SciTech Connect

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Dyer, P.L.; King, N.S.P.; Lizon, D.C.; Morgan, G.L.; Schauer, M.M.; Schecker, J.A.; Hoibraten, S.; Lewis, R.A.; Otto, T.; Rochet, J.

    1994-04-01

    Approximately one million antiprotons have been trapped and electron cooled in the PS200 catching trap from a single fast extracted pulse from LEAR. The system is described in detail, different extraction schemes are discussed, and possible applications of this instrument to ultra-low energy atomic and nuclear physics with antiprotons are mentioned.

  16. Measurement of the antiproton stopping power of gold - the Barkas effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Møller, S. P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1991-05-01

    The stopping power of gold has been measured for antiprotons in the energy range 0.2-3 MeV using a novel time-of-flight technique. The antiproton stopping power is found to be less than half the equivalent proton stopping power near the electronic stopping power maximum. In the high-energy limit the two stopping powers merge.

  17. Trapping of antiprotons -- a first step on the way to antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Holzscheiter, M.H.

    1993-07-01

    A first step towards producing and effectively utilizing antihydrogen atoms consists of trapping antiprotons. The immediate next step must then be to control, i.e. trap the produced antihydrogen. The current state of the art in trapping antiprotons and positrons is reviewed, and the challenges in trapping the resulting neutral particles are discussed.

  18. Ionization of atomic hydrogen by 30 1000 keV antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, H.; Mikkelsen, U.; Paludan, K.; Kirsebom, K.; Moller, S.P.; Uggerhoj, E.; Slevin, J.; Charlton, M.; Morenzoni, E.

    1995-06-05

    Ionization in collisions between antiprotons and atomic hydrogen is perhaps the least complicated and most fundamental process that can be treated by atomic-collision theory. We present measurements of the ionization cross section for 30--1000 keV antiprotons colliding with atomic hydrogen.

  19. Electron-beam-induced current measurements with applied bias provide insight to locally resolved acceptor concentrations at p-n junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Ras, D.; Schäfer, N.; Baldaz, N.; Brunken, S.; Boit, C.

    2015-07-01

    Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements have been employed for the investigation of the local electrical properties existing at various types of electrical junctions during the past decades. In the standard configuration, the device under investigation is analyzed under short-circuit conditions. Further insight into the function of the electrical junction can be obtained when applying a bias voltage. The present work gives insight into how EBIC measurements at applied bias can be conducted at the submicrometer level, at the example of CuInSe2 solar cells. From the EBIC profiles acquired across ZnO/CdS/CuInSe2/Mo stacks exhibiting p-n junctions with different net doping densities in the CuInSe2 layers, values for the width of the space-charge region, w, were extracted. For all net doping densities, these values decreased with increasing applied voltage. Assuming a linear relationship between w2 and the applied voltage, the resulting net doping densities agreed well with the ones obtained by means of capacitance-voltage measurements.

  20. Electron-beam-induced current measurements with applied bias provide insight to locally resolved acceptor concentrations at p-n junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Ras, D. Schäfer, N.; Baldaz, N.; Brunken, S.; Boit, C.

    2015-07-15

    Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements have been employed for the investigation of the local electrical properties existing at various types of electrical junctions during the past decades. In the standard configuration, the device under investigation is analyzed under short-circuit conditions. Further insight into the function of the electrical junction can be obtained when applying a bias voltage. The present work gives insight into how EBIC measurements at applied bias can be conducted at the submicrometer level, at the example of CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells. From the EBIC profiles acquired across ZnO/CdS/CuInSe{sub 2}/Mo stacks exhibiting p-n junctions with different net doping densities in the CuInSe{sub 2} layers, values for the width of the space-charge region, w, were extracted. For all net doping densities, these values decreased with increasing applied voltage. Assuming a linear relationship between w{sup 2} and the applied voltage, the resulting net doping densities agreed well with the ones obtained by means of capacitance-voltage measurements.

  1. Nuclear multifragmentation: Antiprotons versus photons and heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Cugnon, J.

    1994-09-01

    Nuclear multifragmentation is the phenomenon by which a nucleus breaks into many pieces of intermediate size. It occurs in the excitation-energy regime, between the spallation + evaporation regime and the explosive fragmentation regime. The various models of multifragmentation are briefly reviewed and the possibility of critical behavior in the multifragmentation process is underlined. Unanswered problems are stated. It is shown, by model calculations, that antiproton annihilation is, in many respects, better suited than proton-nucleus and heavy-ion collisions for studying multifragmentation and, in other respects, complementary to these other tools. 36 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Evaluation of the Antiproton Flux from the Antineutrino Electron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, V. V.; Belotsky, K. M.; Bogomolov, Yu V.; Budaev, R. I.; Dunaeva, O. A.; Kirillov, A. A.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Laletin, M. N.; Lukyanov, A. D.; Malakhov, V. V.; Mayorov, A. G.; Mayorova, M. A.; Mosichkin, A. F.; Okrugin, A. A.; Rodenko, S. A.; Shitova, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Recent experiments in high enegry cosmic ray physics, PAMELA and AMS-02, excite a new interest to the mechanisms of generation of galactic antiparticles. In spite of the fact that global picture coincides with the predictions of the standard model, there are some black spots stimulating scientists to involve into research a particularly new physics like dark matter. In the present work, we make an attempt to estimate the impact of standard neutrino processes into the total flux of secondary antiprotons detected by contemporary experiments.

  3. Multi-ring trap as a reservoir of cooled antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Ichioka, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Higaki, H.; Komaki, K.; Hori, M.; Oshima, N.; Mohri, A.; Kuroki, K.

    1999-12-10

    For the ASACUSA project, a new charged particle trap was designed and constructed. Like a Penning-Malmberg trap, static electric and static magnetic fields are used. Multi-ring electrode is exploited to generate a harmonic potential on the trap axis. It enables the confinement of a number of antiprotons and electrons for the electron cooling. Upon its design, plasma behavior of trapped particle clouds was taken into consideration. As the first step, trap performances have been checked with electrons. Current status are presented.

  4. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandale, Walter

    2015-02-01

    In the last five decades, proton-proton and proton-antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion-ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  5. Transverse velocity dependence of the proton-antiproton ratio as a signature of the QCD critical point.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, M; Bass, S A; Müller, B; Nonaka, C

    2008-09-19

    The presence of a critical point in the QCD phase diagram can deform the trajectories describing the evolution of the expanding fireball in the mu_B-T phase diagram. If the average emission time of hadrons is a function of transverse velocity, as microscopic simulations of the hadronic freeze-out dynamics suggest, the deformation of the hydrodynamic trajectories will change the transverse velocity (beta_T) dependence of the proton-antiproton ratio when the fireball passes in the vicinity of the critical point. An unusual beta_T dependence of the [over]p/p ratio in a narrow beam energy window would thus signal the presence of the critical point.

  6. Transverse Velocity Dependence of the Proton-Antiproton Ratio as a Signature of the QCD Critical Point

    SciTech Connect

    Asakawa, M.; Bass, S. A.; Mueller, B.; Nonaka, C.

    2008-09-19

    The presence of a critical point in the QCD phase diagram can deform the trajectories describing the evolution of the expanding fireball in the {mu}{sub B}-T phase diagram. If the average emission time of hadrons is a function of transverse velocity, as microscopic simulations of the hadronic freeze-out dynamics suggest, the deformation of the hydrodynamic trajectories will change the transverse velocity ({beta}{sub T}) dependence of the proton-antiproton ratio when the fireball passes in the vicinity of the critical point. An unusual {beta}{sub T} dependence of the p/p ratio in a narrow beam energy window would thus signal the presence of the critical point.

  7. Beam performance and luminosity limitations in the high-energy storage ring (HESR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehrach, A.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Hinterberger, F.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.

    2006-06-01

    The high-energy storage ring (HESR) of the future International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt is planned as an antiproton synchrotron storage ring in the momentum range 1.5-15 GeV/ c. An important feature of this new facility is the combination of phase space cooled beams and dense internal targets (e.g. pellet targets), which results in demanding beam parameter requirements for two operation modes: high luminosity mode with peak luminosities to 2×10 32 cm -2 s -1, and high-resolution mode with a momentum spread down to 10 -5. To reach these beam parameters one needs a very powerful phase space cooling, utilizing high-energy electron cooling and high-bandwidth stochastic cooling. The effects of beam-target scattering and intra-beam interaction are investigated in order to study beam equilibria and beam losses for the two different operation modes.

  8. A study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (pT > 0.5 GeV/c, |η| < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of η-Φspace; “toward”, “away”, and “transverse”. Furthermore, the average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the “underlying event”. The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the “hard component” (initial and final-state radiation) from the “beam-beammore » remnant” and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. We found that the center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event are studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.« less

  9. Precise Measurements of the Cosmic Ray Antiproton Spectrum with BESS Including the Effects of Solar Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. W.; Abe, K.; Anraku, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Fujikawa, M.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Ikeda, N.; Imori, M.

    2002-01-01

    The Balloon Borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS) has measured the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons between 0.18 and 4.20 GeV in eight flights between 1993 and 2002. Above about 1 GeV, models in which antiprotons are secondary products of the interactions of primary cosmic rays with the interstellar gas agree with the BESS antiproton spectrum. Below 1 GeV, the data show a possible excess antiproton flux compared to secondary model predictions, suggesting the presence of an additional source of antiprotons. The antiproton/proton ratios measured between 1993 and 1999, during the Sun's positive-polarity phase, are consistent with simple models of solar modulation. However, results from the 2000 flight, following the solar magnetic field reversal, show a sudden increase in the antiproton/proton ratio and tend to favor a charge-sign-dependent drift model. To extend BESS measurements to lower energies, an evolutionary instrument, BESS-Polar, is under construction for polar flight in 2004.

  10. RF Manipulation and Detection of Protons in the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James J.; Lewis, Raymond A.; Pearson, J. Boise; Sims, W. Herb; Chakrabarti, Suman; Fant, Wallace E.; McDonald, Stan

    2003-01-01

    The significant energy density of matter-antimatter annihilation is attractive to the designers of future space propulsion systems, with the potential to offer a highly compact source of power. Many propulsion concepts exist that could take advantage of matter-antimatter reactions, and current antiproton production rates are sufficient to support basic proof-of-principle evaluation of technology associated with antimatter-derived propulsion. One enabling technology for such experiments is portable storage of low energy antiprotons, allowing antiprotons to be trapped, stored, and transported for use at an experimental facility.

  11. Attainment of a high-quality electron beam for Fermilab's 4.3 MeV cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Burov, Alexey V.; Carlson, K.; Hu, M.; Kazakevich, G.; Kramper, B.; Kroc, T.; Leibfritz, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Saewert, G.; Schmidt, C.W.; Seletskiy, S.; Sutherland, M.; Tupikov, V.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab /Novosibirsk, IYF /Rochester U.

    2005-11-01

    The recent demonstration of electron cooling of antiprotons in the Recycler ring required a stable 4.3 MeV electron beam with a DC current of hundreds of mA and an angular spread in the cooling section of a fraction of a mrad. This paper describes the achieved parameters of the Fermilab cooler's electron beam and details of operation.

  12. Spin Filtering of Stored (Anti)Protons: from FILTEX to COSY to AD to FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, Nikolai; Pavlov, Fyodor

    2008-04-30

    We review the theory of spin filtering of stored (anti) protons by multiple passage through a polarized internal target (PIT). The implications for the antiproton polarization buildup in the proposed PAX experiment at FAIR are discussed.

  13. Experimental and computational study of the injection of antiprotons into a positron plasma for antihydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Amole, C.; Capra, A.; Menary, S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Little, A.; So, C.; Zhmoginov, A.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Silveira, D. M.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Isaac, C. A.; Madsen, N.; Napoli, S. C.; Shields, C. R.; Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2013-04-15

    One of the goals of synthesizing and trapping antihydrogen is to study the validity of charge-parity-time symmetry through precision spectroscopy on the anti-atoms, but the trapping yield achieved in recent experiments must be significantly improved before this can be realized. Antihydrogen atoms are commonly produced by mixing antiprotons and positrons stored in a nested Penning-Malmberg trap, which was achieved in ALPHA by an autoresonant excitation of the antiprotons, injecting them into the positron plasma. In this work, a hybrid numerical model is developed to simulate antiproton and positron dynamics during the mixing process. The simulation is benchmarked against other numerical and analytic models, as well as experimental measurements. The autoresonant injection scheme and an alternative scheme are compared numerically over a range of plasma parameters which can be reached in current and upcoming antihydrogen experiments, and the latter scheme is seen to offer significant improvement in trapping yield as the number of available antiprotons increases.

  14. Relative abundances of positrons and antiprotons in the primary cosmic ray flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Golden, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Observations on the ratio of positrons to the electron-positron sum made in the 5 to 50 GeV range by Buffington et al. (1974) are used to put an upper limit on the ratio of antiprotons to protons at various energies. The calculation of the latter ratio is based on detailed measurements of the cross section of antiproton production up to intersecting storage ring energies.

  15. Primary populations of metastable antiprotonic (4)He and (3)He atoms.

    PubMed

    Hori, M; Eades, J; Hayano, R S; Ishikawa, T; Sakaguchi, J; Tasaki, T; Widmann, E; Yamaguchi, H; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Horváth, D; Yamazaki, T

    2002-08-26

    Initial distributions of metastable antiprotonic (4)He and (3)He atoms over principal (n) and angular momentum (l) quantum numbers have been deduced using laser spectroscopy experiments. The regions n = 37-40 and n = 35-38 in the two atoms account for almost all of the observed fractions [(3.0 +/- 0.1)% and (2.4 +/- 0.1)%] of antiprotons captured into metastable states. PMID:12190401

  16. Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A P; Pusa, P; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2009-12-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen assembly has been used to destructively measure the radial profile of cold, confined antiprotons, electrons, and positrons in the ALPHA experiment, with the goal of using these trapped particles for antihydrogen creation and confinement. The response of the MCP to low energy (10-200 eV, <1 eV spread) antiproton extractions is compared to that of electrons and positrons.

  17. Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Kerrigan, S. J.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A. P.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2009-12-15

    A microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen assembly has been used to destructively measure the radial profile of cold, confined antiprotons, electrons, and positrons in the ALPHA experiment, with the goal of using these trapped particles for antihydrogen creation and confinement. The response of the MCP to low energy (10-200 eV, <1 eV spread) antiproton extractions is compared to that of electrons and positrons.

  18. Can AMS-02 discriminate the origin of an anti-proton signal?

    SciTech Connect

    Pettorino, Valeria; Busoni, Giorgio; Simone, Andrea De; Morgante, Enrico; Riotto, Antonio; Xue, Wei E-mail: giorgio.busoni@sissa.it E-mail: enrico.morgante@unige.ch E-mail: wei.xue@sissa.it

    2014-10-01

    Indirect searches can be used to test dark matter models against expected signals in various channels, in particular antiprotons. With antiproton data available soon at higher and higher energies, it is important to test the dark matter hypothesis against alternative astrophysical sources, e.g. econdaries accelerated in supernova remnants. We investigate the two signals from different dark matter models and different supernova remnant parameters, as forecasted for the AMS-02, and show that they present a significant degeneracy.

  19. Fermilab main injector: High intensity operation and beam loss control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bruce C.; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Chou, Weiren; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton K.; Seiya, Kiyomi; Wu, Guan Hong; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2013-07-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  20. Toward a cold electron beam in the Fermilab's Electron Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Vitali S. Tupikov et al.

    2004-05-12

    Fermilab is developing a high-energy electron cooling system to cool 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring [1]. Cooling of antiprotons requires a round electron beam with a small angular spread propagating through 20-m long cooling section with a kinetic energy of 4.3 MeV. To confine the electron beam tightly and to keep its transverse angles below 0.1 mrad, the cooling section will be immersed into a solenoidal field of 50-150G. This paper describes the technique of measuring and adjusting the magnetic field quality in the cooling section and presents preliminary results of beam quality measurements in the cooler prototype.

  1. Challenging Cosmic Ray Propagation with Antiprotons: Evidence for a "Fresh" Nuclei Component?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; Mashnik, Stepan G.; Ormes, Jonathan F.

    2002-01-01

    Recent measurements of the cosmic ray (CR) antiproton flux have been shown to challenge existing CR propagation models. It was shown that the reacceleration models designed to match secondary to primary nuclei ratio (e.g., Boron/Carbon) produce too few antiprotons, while the traditional non-reacceleration models can reproduce the antiproton flux but fall short of explaining the low-energy decrease in the secondary to primary nuclei ratio. Matching both the secondary to primary nuclei ratio and antiproton flux requires artificial breaks in the diffusion coefficient and the primary injection spectrum suggesting the need for other approaches. In the present paper we discuss one possibility to overcome these difficulties. Using the measured antiproton flux to fix the diffusion coefficient, we show that the spectra of primary nuclei as measured in the heliosphere may contain a fresh local unprocessed component at low energies, thus decreasing the measured secondary to primary nuclei ratio. A model reproducing antiprotons, B/C ratio, and abundances up to Ni is presented.

  2. P-986 Letter of Intent: Medium-Energy Antiproton Physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David M.; Phillips, Thomas J.; Apollinari, Giorgio; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; Christian, David C.; Derwent, Paul; Gollwitzer, Keith; Hahn, Alan; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Stefanski, Ray; /Fermilab /INFN, Ferrara /Hbar Technol., West Chicago /IIT, Chicago /CHEP, Taegu /Luther Coll. /Michigan U. /Northwestern U. /Notre Dame U. /St. Xavier U., Chicago

    2009-02-05

    Fermilab has long had the world's most intense antiproton source. Despite this, the opportunities for medium-energy antiproton physics at Fermilab have been limited in the past and - with the antiproton source now exclusively dedicated to serving the needs of the Tevatron Collider - are currently nonexistent. The anticipated shutdown of the Tevatron in 2010 presents the opportunity for a world-leading medium-energy antiproton program. We summarize the current status of the Fermilab antiproton facility and review some physics topics for which the experiment we propose could make the world's best measurements. Among these, the ones with the clearest potential for high impact and visibility are in the area of charm mixing and CP violation. Continued running of the Antiproton Source following the shutdown of the Tevatron is thus one of the simplest ways that Fermilab can restore a degree of breadth to its future research program. The impact on the rest of the program will be minor. We request a small amount of effort over the coming months in order to assess these issues in more detail.

  3. Centrality and collision system dependence of antiproton production from p+A to Au+Au collisions at AGS energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sako, H.; Ahle, L.; Akiba, Y.; Ashktorab, K.; Baker, M. D.; Beavis, D.; Britt, H. C.; Chang, J.; Chasman, C.; Chen, Z.; Chu, Y. Y.; Cianciolo, V.; Cole, B. A.; Crawford, H. J.; Cumming, J. B.; Debbe, R.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eldredge, W.; Engelage, J.; Fung, S.-Y.

    1997-01-01

    Antiproton production in heavy ion collisions reflects subtle interplay between initial production and absorption by nucleons. Because the AGS energies (10--20 A(center-dot)GeV/c) are close to the antiproton production threshold, antiproton may be sensitive to cooperative processes such as QGP and hadronic multi-step processes. On the other hand, antiproton has been proposed as a probe of baryon density due to large N(anti N) annihilation cross sections. Cascade models predict the maximum baryon density reaches about 10 times the normal nucleus density in central Au+Au collisions, where the strong antiproton absorption is expected. In this paper, the authors show systematic studies of antiproton production from p+A to Au+Au collisions.

  4. Measurement of the stopping power of silicon for antiprotons between 0.2 and 3 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Møller, S. P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1991-05-01

    Our previous measurement of the stopping power of silicon for antiprotons has been extended down to 200 keV. The antiproton stopping power is found to be more than 30% lower than that for equivelocity protons at 200 keV. The " Z13 contribution" to the stopping power (the Barkas effect) is deduced by comparing the stopping power for protons and antiprotons. Comparisons to theoretical estimates are made.

  5. Measurement of the Z31 contribution to the stopping power using MeV protons and antiprotons: The Barkas effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, L. H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Möller, S. P.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Uggerhöj, E.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1989-04-01

    The stopping power for antiprotons has been measured for the first time. The antiproton stopping power of silicon is found to be 3%-19% lower than for equivelocity protons over the energy range 3.01 to 0.538 MeV. The ``Z31 contribution'' to the stopping power (the Barkas effect) is deduced by comparing the stopping power for protons and antiprotons.

  6. Beam manipulation and compression using broadband rf systems in the Fermilab Main Injector and Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    G William Foster et al.

    2004-07-09

    A novel method for beam manipulation, compression, and stacking using a broad band RF system in circular accelerators is described. The method uses a series of linear voltage ramps in combination with moving barrier pulses to azimuthally compress, expand, or cog the beam. Beam manipulations can be accomplished rapidly and, in principle, without emittance growth. The general principle of the method is discussed using beam dynamics simulations. Beam experiments in the Fermilab Recycler Ring convincingly validate the concept. Preliminary experiments in the Fermilab Main Injector to investigate its potential for merging two ''booster batches'' to produce high intensity proton beams for neutrino and antiproton production are described.

  7. Bunch coalescing in the main ring to form intense proton and antiproton bunches without RF counterphasing

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, J.E.; MacLachlan, J.A.; Nicholls, G.N.; Qian, Z.B.

    1984-08-09

    Both the proton and antiproton bunches which will collide in the Tevatron have longitudinal emittance greater than can be accelerated by the main ring from 8 GeV without large loss and emittance growth. We have previously described the technique of combining several smaller bunches at the Tevatron injection energy with little increase in the total emittance and negligible loss. This technique requires adiabatic debunching of several adjacent 53 MHz bunches by smooth reduction of the RF voltage from approx. 1 MV to approx. 100 V. The very low voltage is extremely difficult to attain with a high-Q system designed for megavolt accelerating potential. The counterphasing technique of voltage reduction which we have used in main ring experiments and proposed for the TeV I project is to divide the accelerating cavities into two closely matched groups and to smoothly shift the relative phase of the drive to the two groups by 180 degrees. When the net voltage has been reduced by this means to the lowest practical level, about 10 kV, the final voltage reduction may be performed by turning off the high-Q system and using a low-Q cavity. The voltage induced on the undriven gaps of the high-Q system is low enough not to be a major problem because the total intensity is low. However, the effects are not negligible, and dynamic beam loading compensation is required. This memo proposes that the process described above be simplified somewhat by replacing the counterphasing voltage reduction with a zero-voltage spreading of the bunches for several milliseconds followed by a few hundred microseconds of rotation to minimum energy spread in buckets produced at high voltage.

  8. Near-threshold behavior of positronium-antiproton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrikant, I. I.; Bray, A. W.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2016-07-01

    Using the convergent close-coupling theory we study the threshold behavior of cross sections for positronium (Ps) of energy E scattering on antiprotons. In the case of Ps (1 s ) elastic scattering, simple power laws are observed for all partial waves studied. The partial-wave summed cross section is nearly constant, and dominates the antihydrogen formation cross section at all considered energies, even though the latter is exothermic and behaves as 1 /E1 /2 . For Ps (2 s ), oscillations spanning orders of magnitude on top of the 1 /E behavior are found in the elastic and quasielastic cross sections. The antihydrogen formation is influenced by dipole-supported resonances below the threshold of inelastic processes. Resonance energies form a geometric progression relative to the threshold. The exothermic antihydrogen formation cross sections behave as 1 /E at low energies, but are oscillation free. We demonstrate that all these rich features are reproduced by the threshold theory developed by Gailitis [J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 15, 3423 (1982), 10.1088/0022-3700/15/19/012].

  9. First observation of two hyperfine transitions in antiprotonic 3He

    PubMed Central

    Friedreich, S.; Barna, D.; Caspers, F.; Dax, A.; Hayano, R.S.; Hori, M.; Horváth, D.; Juhász, B.; Kobayashi, T.; Massiczek, O.; Sótér, A.; Todoroki, K.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the first experimental results for microwave spectroscopy of the hyperfine structure of p¯3He+. Due to the helium nuclear spin, p¯3He+ has a more complex hyperfine structure than p¯4He+, which has already been studied before. Thus a comparison between theoretical calculations and the experimental results will provide a more stringent test of the three-body quantum electrodynamics (QED) theory. Two out of four super-super-hyperfine (SSHF) transition lines of the (n,L)=(36,34) state were observed. The measured frequencies of the individual transitions are 11.12559(14) GHz and 11.15839(18) GHz, less than 1 MHz higher than the current theoretical values, but still within their estimated errors. Although the experimental uncertainty for the difference of these frequencies is still very large as compared to that of theory, its measured value agrees with theoretical calculations. This difference is crucial to be determined because it is proportional to the magnetic moment of the antiproton. PMID:21822351

  10. Antihydrogen formation from antiprotons in a pure positron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Eric M.; Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2009-01-15

    This paper investigates the evolution in binding energy of antihydrogen atoms formed from stationary antiprotons located within a strongly magnetized positron plasma. Three-body recombination and a collisional cascade to deeper binding, limited by a kinetic bottleneck at a binding energy of 4T, dominate the initial antihydrogen formation process. A classical Monte-Carlo simulation is used to determine the collisional transition rate between atomic binding energies, using the drift approximation for initial conditions that allow it, and full dynamics for initial conditions resulting in chaotic motion. These transition rates are employed in determining mean energy-loss rates for an ensemble of atoms, as well as in a numerical solution of the master equation to find the rate at which atoms are formed over a range of binding energies. The highly excited atoms formed by this process separate into guiding-center drift atoms and chaotic atoms. The phase-space distributions of the atoms are investigated, along with their implications for magnetic confinement and radiative energy loss. Estimates of radiative energy loss indicate that radiation is unimportant for guiding-center atoms, but increases rapidly near the chaotic regime, taking over as the dominant energy-loss process for parameters typical of recent experiments. Furthermore, the fraction of low-magnetic field seekers is considerably larger than suggested by estimates of the magnetic moment based on guiding-center dynamics, due to effects associated with chaos.

  11. Direct detection of antiprotons with the Timepix3 in a new electrostatic selection beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacifico, N.; Aghion, S.; Alozy, J.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Bremer, J.; Brusa, R. S.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Campbell, M.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Chlouba, K.; Cialdi, S.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Ereditato, A.; Evans, C.; Ferragut, R.; Fesel, J.; Fontana, A.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Guatieri, F.; Haider, S.; Holmestad, H.; Huse, T.; Jordan, E.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kimura, M.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lansonneur, P.; Lawler, G.; Lebrun, P.; Llopart, X.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Marx, L.; Matveev, V.; Mazzotta, Z.; Nebbia, G.; Nedelec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pagano, D.; Penasa, L.; Petracek, V.; Pistillo, C.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Ravelli, L.; Resch, L.; Røhne, O. M.; Rotondi, A.; Sacerdoti, M.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Scampoli, P.; Smestad, L.; Sorrentino, F.; Spacek, M.; Storey, J.; Strojek, I. M.; Testera, G.; Tietje, I.; Tlustos, L.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zmeskal, J.; Zurlo, N.

    2016-09-01

    We present here the first results obtained employing the Timepix3 for the detection and tagging of annihilations of low energy antiprotons. The Timepix3 is a recently developed hybrid pixel detector with advanced Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold capabilities and has the potential of allowing precise kinetic energy measurements of low energy charged particles from their time of flight. The tagging of the characteristic antiproton annihilation signature, already studied by our group, is enabled by the high spatial and energy resolution of this detector. In this study we have used a new, dedicated, energy selection beamline (GRACE). The line is symbiotic to the AEgIS experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator and is dedicated to detector tests and possibly antiproton physics experiments. We show how the high resolution of the Timepix3 on the Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold information allows for a precise 3D reconstruction of the annihilation prongs. The presented results point at the potential use of the Timepix3 in antimatter-research experiments where a precise and unambiguous tagging of antiproton annihilations is required.

  12. Evidence for the Heavy Baryon Resonance State Lambda b*0 Observed with the CDF II Detector, and Studies of New Particle Tracking Technologies Using the LANSCE Proton Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palni, Prabhakar

    To discover and probe the properties of new particles, we need to collide highly energetic particles. The Tevatron at Fermilab has collided protons and anti-protons at very high energies. These collisions produce short lived and stable particles, some known and some previously unknown. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions and discover new elementary particles. To study the interaction between high energy charged particles and the detector materials often requires development of new instruments. Thus this dissertation involves a measurement at a contemporary experiment and development of technologies for related future experiments that will build on the contemporary one. Using data from proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96TeV recorded by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, evidence for the excited resonance state Lambda_b. *0 is presented in its Lambda_b. 0 pi. + pi. - decay,followed by the Lambda_b. 0 -> Lambda_c. + pi. - and Lambda_c. + -> p K. - pi. +decays. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.6 fb. -1 collected by an online event selection process basedon charged particle tracks displaced from the proton-antiproton interaction point. The significance of the observed signal is 3.5sigma The mass of the observed state is found to be 5919.22 +/- 0.76 MeV/c 2 in agreement with similar findings in proton-proton collision experiments. To predict the radiation damage to the components of new particle tracking detectors, prototype devices are irradiated at test beam facilities that reproduce the radiation conditions expected. The profile of the test beam and the fluence applied per unit time must be known. We have developed a technique to monitor in real time the beam profile and fluence using an array of pin semiconductor diodes whose forward voltage is linear with fluence over the fluence regime relevant to, for example, silicon tracking detectors in the LHC upgrade era

  13. Upper limit to antiproton flux in cosmic radiation above 100 GeV using muon charge ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    Upper limits to the fraction of antiprotons in cosmic radiation have been estimated from the observed charge ratio of muons at sea-level. Using these values, it is shown that constraints can be set on the extragalactic hypothesis of the observed antiprotons in the framework of energy-dependent confinement of cosmic rays in the galaxy.

  14. Experimental study of magnetically confined hollow electron beams in the Tevatron as collimators for intense high-energy hadron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable losses. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and tested at Fermilab for this purpose. It was installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses in the summer of 2010. We present the results of the first experimental tests of the hollow-beam collimation concept on 980-GeV antiproton bunches in the Tevatron.

  15. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices.

    PubMed

    Pilan, N; Antoni, V; De Lorenzi, A; Chitarin, G; Veltri, P; Sartori, E

    2016-02-01

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF6 instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming. PMID:26932053

  16. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices.

    PubMed

    Pilan, N; Antoni, V; De Lorenzi, A; Chitarin, G; Veltri, P; Sartori, E

    2016-02-01

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF6 instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming.

  17. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilan, N.; Antoni, V.; De Lorenzi, A.; Chitarin, G.; Veltri, P.; Sartori, E.

    2016-02-01

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF6 instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming.

  18. Fermilab Main Injector Beam Position Monitor Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, B.; Barker, W.; Bledsoe, S.; Boes, T.; Briegel, C.; Capista, D.; Deuerling, G.; Dysert, R.; Forster, R.; Foulkes, S.; Haynes, W.; Hendricks, B.; Kasza, T.; Kutschke, R.; Marchionni, A.; Olson, M.; Pavlicek, V.; Piccoli, L.; Prieto, P.; Rapisarda, S.; Saewert, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    An upgrade of the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) signal processing and data acquisition system for the Fermilab Main Injector is described. The Main Injector is a fast cycling synchrotron that accelerates protons or antiprotons from 8 to 150 GeV. Each Main Injector cycle can have a totally different magnet ramp, RF frequency configuration, beam bunch structure, and injection/extraction pattern from the previous cycle. The new BPM system provides the capabilities and flexibility required by the dynamic and complex machine operations. The system offers measurement capability in the 2.5 MHz and 53 MHz channels to detect the range of bunch structures for protons and antiprotons in both wideband (turn-by-turn) and narrowband (closed-orbit) modes. The new BPM read-out system is based on the digital receiver concept and is highly configurable, allowing the signal processing of nearly all Main Injector beam conditions, including the detection of individual batches. An overview of the BPM system in the Main Injector operating environment, some technology details and first beam measurements are presented.

  19. Fermilab Main Injector Beam Position Monitor Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, B.; Barker, W.; Bledsoe, S.; Boes, T.; Briegel, C.; Capista, D.; Deuerling, G.; Dysert, R.; Forster, R.; Foulkes, S.; Haynes, W.; Hendricks, B.; Kasza, T.; Kutschke, R.; Marchionni, A.; Olson, M.; Pavlicek, V.; Piccoli, L.; Prieto, P.; Rapisarda, S.

    2006-11-20

    An upgrade of the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) signal processing and data acquisition system for the Fermilab Main Injector is described. The Main Injector is a fast cycling synchrotron that accelerates protons or antiprotons from 8 to 150 GeV, Each Main Injector cycle can have a totally different magnet ramp, RF frequency configuration, beam bunch structure, and injection/extraction pattern from the previous cycle. The new BPM system provides the capabilities and flexibility required by the dynamic and complex machine operations. The system offers measurement capability in the 2.5 MHz and 53 MHz channels to detect the range of bunch structures for protons and antiprotons in both wideband (turn-by-turn) and narrowband (closed-orbit) modes. The new BPM read-out system is based on the digital receiver concept and is highly configurable, allowing the signal processing of nearly all Main Injector beam conditions, including the detection of individual batches. An overview of the BPM system in the Main Injector operating environment, some technology details and first beam measurements are presented.

  20. Measurements of Electron Spectra in the Forward Direction in Slow-Antiproton Carbon-Foil Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yasunori; Kuroki, Kenro; Komaki, Ken-Ichiro; Andersen, Lars H.; Horsdal-Pedersen, Erik; Hvelplund, Preben; Knudsen, Helge; M{ø}ller, S{ø}ren P.; Uggerh{ø}j, Erik; Elsener, Konrad

    1990-08-01

    The spectrta of electrons emitted in the forward direction from antiproton and proton bombardments on carbon foils have been studied for projectile energies from 500 to 750 keV. Our main observation is that at the electron energy where the well-known convoy peak is observed for proton impact, the spectrum for equivelocity antiprotons is smooth, showing no indication of a deep anticusp. However, around 50 eV below the electron energy where the cusp is observed for proton impact, we have observed a small peak for antiproton impact. The energy and the relative intensity of the bump are found to be consistent with those predicted for electrons released from a wake-riding state.

  1. Heating due to momentum transfer in low-energy positronium-antiproton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, M.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the consequences of unexpectedly large elastic cross sections for the scattering of low-energy antiprotons from n ≤3 positronium (Ps) on the experimental implementation of antihydrogen formation via Ps-antiproton collisions. The integrated elastic cross sections, obtained using the two-center convergent close-coupling theory, can be up to three orders of magnitude greater than their counterparts for antihydrogen formation. The differential momentum transfer cross sections, which suppress the large cross sections at forward scattering angles, show remarkably rich behavior across all scattering angles. We discuss the implications of these findings for the heating, via momentum transfer, of clouds of trapped antiprotons that are typically used for the creation of antihydrogen.

  2. Solar Modulation of Low-Energy Antiproton and Proton Spectra Measured by BESS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, John W.; Abe, Ko; Fuke, Hideyuki; Haino, Sadakazu; Hams, Thomas; Horikoshi, Atsushi; Kim, Ki-Chun; Lee, MooHyun; Makida, Yashuhiro; Matsuda, Shinya; Moiseev, Alexander; Nishimura, Jun; Nozaki, Mitsuaki

    2007-01-01

    The spectra of low-energy cosmic-ray protons and antiprotons have been measured by BESS in nine high-latitude balloon flights between 1993 and 2004. These measurements span a range of solar activity from the previous solar minimum through solar ma>:im%am and the onset of the present solar minimum, as well as a solar magnetic field reversal from positive to negative in 2000. Because protons and antiprotons differ only in charge sign, these simultaneous measurements provide a sensitive probe of charge dependent solar modulation. The antiproton to proton ratio measured by BESS is consistent with simple spherically symmetric models of solar modulation during the Sun's positive polarity phase, but favor charge-sign-dependent drift models during the negative phase. The BESS measurements will be presented and compared to various models of solar modulation.

  3. Evaluation of the dosimetric impact of applying flattening filter-free beams in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for early-stage upper thoracic carcinoma of oesophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wuzhe; Lin, Zhixiong; Yang, Zhining; Fang, Weisheng; Lai, Peibo; Lu, Jiayang; Wu, Vincent WC

    2015-06-15

    Flattening filter-free (FFF) radiation beams have recently become clinically available on modern linear accelerators in radiation therapy. This study aimed to evaluate the dosimetric impact of using FFF beams in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early-stage upper thoracic oesophageal cancer. Eleven patients with primary stage upper thoracic oesophageal cancer were recruited. For each patient, two IMRT plans were computed using conventional beams (Con-P) and FFF beams (FFF-P), respectively. Both plans employed a five-beam arrangement and were prescribed with 64 Gy to (planning target volume) PTV1 and 54 Gy to PTV2 in 32 fractions using 6 MV photons. The dose parameters of the target volumes and organs at risks (OARs), and treatment parameters including the monitor units (MU) and treatment time (TT) for Con-P and FFF-P were recorded and compared. The mean D{sub 5} of PTV1 and PTV2 were higher in FFF-P than Con-P by 0.4 Gy and 0.3 Gy, respectively. For the OARs, all the dose parameters did not show significant difference between the two plans except the mean V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the lung in which the FFF-P was lower (46.7% vs. 47.3% and 39.1% vs. 39.6%, respectively). FFF-P required 54% more MU but 18.4% less irradiation time when compared to Con-P. The target volume and OARs dose distributions between the two plans were comparable. However, FFF-P was more effective in sparing the lung from low dose and reduced the mean TT compared with Con-P. Long-term clinical studies are suggested to evaluate the radiobiological effects of FFF beams.

  4. High-power Ti:sapphire lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms and radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, M.; Dax, A.; Soter, A.

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed injection-seeded Ti:sapphire lasers of linewidth Γpl ˜ 6 MHz, pulse energy 50-100 mJ, and output wavelength λ = 726-941 nm. They are being used in two-photon spectroscopy experiments of antiprotonic helium atoms at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. Ti:sapphire lasers of larger linewidth Γpl ˜ 100 MHz but more robust design will also be used in collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiments of neutron-deficient francium ions at the ISOLDE facility.

  5. High-power Ti:sapphire lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms and radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, M.; Dax, A.; Soter, A.

    2012-12-01

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed injection-seeded Ti:sapphire lasers of linewidth Γpl ˜ 6 MHz, pulse energy 50-100 mJ, and output wavelength λ = 726-941 nm. They are being used in two-photon spectroscopy experiments of antiprotonic helium atoms at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. Ti:sapphire lasers of larger linewidth Γpl ˜ 100 MHz but more robust design will also be used in collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiments of neutron-deficient francium ions at the ISOLDE facility.

  6. Falling antimatter: An experiment to measure the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, P.; Camp, J.; Holzscheiter, M.H.; Graessle, S.

    1988-01-01

    According to some theories of gravity, antimatter will fall faster than matter in the earth's gravitational field. An experiment to measure the gravitational force on the antiproton is under construction. Antiprotons of a few MeV from the LEAR facility of CERN will be slowed down and caught in a large Penning electromagnetic trap. They will then be cooled and transferred to Penning cooling and launching traps. The gravitational acceleration will be measured by the time-of-flight in a drift tube shielding stray electronic fields, and will be compared with that measured for H/sup /minus// ions. Progress on a number of fronts is described. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Single ionization of helium by 40-3000-keV antiprotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, L. H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Møller, S. P.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Tang-Petersen, S.; Uggerhøj, E.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1990-06-01

    Measurements of single-ionization cross sections for antiproton impact on helium atoms are reported for impact energies ranging from 40 keV to 3 MeV. It is found that the measured cross sections are in good agreement with recent theoretical estimates based on the continuum-distorted-wave approximation. From a comparison with similar proton data, the ratio between antiproton and proton results is obtained. The energy dependence of this ratio is compared with various theoretical estimates and explained as a result of polarization and binding effects.

  8. Centrifugal separation and equilibration dynamics in an electron-antiproton plasma.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2011-04-01

    Charges in cold, multiple-species, non-neutral plasmas separate radially by mass, forming centrifugally separated states. Here, we report the first detailed measurements of such states in an electron-antiproton plasma, and the first observations of the separation dynamics in any centrifugally separated system. While the observed equilibrium states are expected and in agreement with theory, the equilibration time is approximately constant over a wide range of parameters, a surprising and as yet unexplained result. Electron-antiproton plasmas play a crucial role in antihydrogen trapping experiments.

  9. Centrifugal Separation and Equilibration Dynamics in an Electron-Antiproton Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Humphries, A. J.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Cesar, C. L.; Friesen, T.

    2011-04-08

    Charges in cold, multiple-species, non-neutral plasmas separate radially by mass, forming centrifugally separated states. Here, we report the first detailed measurements of such states in an electron-antiproton plasma, and the first observations of the separation dynamics in any centrifugally separated system. While the observed equilibrium states are expected and in agreement with theory, the equilibration time is approximately constant over a wide range of parameters, a surprising and as yet unexplained result. Electron-antiproton plasmas play a crucial role in antihydrogen trapping experiments.

  10. First measurement of the antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross section at 125 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghai-Khozani, H.; Barna, D.; Corradini, M.; De Salvador, D.; Hayano, R.; Hori, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V.; Prest, M.; Seiler, D.; Soter, A.; Todoroki, K.; Vallazza, E.; Venturelli, L.

    2015-08-01

    The first observation of in-flight antiproton-nucleus annihilation at ˜130 keV obtained with the ASACUSA detector has demonstrated that the measurement of the cross section of the process is feasible at such extremely low energies Aghai-Khozani, H., et al., Eur. Phys. J. Plus 127, 55 (2012). Here we present the results of the data analysis with the evaluations of the antiproton annihilation cross sections on carbon, palladium and platinum targets at ˜125 keV.

  11. Pion, Kaon, Proton and Antiproton Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Inclusive pion, kaon, proton, and antiproton production from proton-proton collisions is studied at a variety of proton energies. Various available parameterizations of Lorentz-invariant differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity are compared with experimental data. The Badhwar and Alper parameterizations are moderately satisfactory for charged pion production. The Badhwar parameterization provides the best fit for charged kaon production. For proton production, the Alper parameterization is best, and for antiproton production the Carey parameterization works best. However, no parameterization is able to fully account for all the data.

  12. Optics of electron beam in the Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, Alexey V.; Kazakevich, G.; Kroc, T.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Tiunov, M.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2005-11-01

    Electron cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring (Fermilab) requires high current and good quality of the DC electron beam. Electron trajectories of {approx}0.2 A or higher DC electron beam have to be parallel in the cooling section, within {approx}0.2 mrad, making the beam envelope cylindrical. These requirements yielded a specific scheme of the electron transport from a gun to the cooling section, with electrostatic acceleration and deceleration in the Pelletron. Recuperation of the DC beam limits beam losses at as tiny level as {approx}0.001%, setting strict requirements on the return electron line to the Pelletron and a collector. To smooth the beam envelope in the cooling section, it has to be linear and known at the transport start. Also, strength of the relevant optic elements has to be measured with good accuracy. Beam-based optic measurements are being carried out and analyzed to get this information. They include beam simulations in the Pelletron, differential optic (beam response) measurements and simulation, beam profile measurements with optical transition radiation, envelope measurements and analysis with orifice scrapers. Current results for the first half-year of commissioning are presented. Although electron cooling is already routinely used for pbar stacking, its efficiency is expected to be improved.

  13. APPA at FAIR: From fundamental to applied research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöhlker, Th.; Bagnoud, V.; Blaum, K.; Blazevic, A.; Bräuning-Demian, A.; Durante, M.; Herfurth, F.; Lestinsky, M.; Litvinov, Y.; Neff, S.; Pleskac, R.; Schuch, R.; Schippers, S.; Severin, D.; Tauschwitz, A.; Trautmann, C.; Varentsov, D.; Widmann, E.

    2015-12-01

    FAIR with its intense beams of ions and antiprotons provides outstanding and worldwide unique experimental conditions for extreme matter research in atomic and plasma physics and for application oriented research in biophysics, medical physics and materials science. The associated research programs comprise interaction of matter with highest electromagnetic fields, properties of plasmas and of solid matter under extreme pressure, density, and temperature conditions, simulation of galactic cosmic radiation, research in nanoscience and charged particle radiotherapy. A broad variety of APPA-dedicated facilities including experimental stations, storage rings, and traps, equipped with most sophisticated instrumentation will allow the APPA community to tackle new challenges. The worldwide most intense source of slow antiprotons will expand the scope of APPA related research to the exciting field of antimatter.

  14. Experimental determination of the lateral dose response functions of detectors to be applied in the measurement of narrow photon-beam dose profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppinga, D.; Meyners, J.; Delfs, B.; Muru, A.; Harder, D.; Poppe, B.; Looe, HK

    2015-12-01

    This study aims at the experimental determination of the detector-specific 1D lateral dose response function K(x) and of its associated rotational symmetric counterpart K(r) for a set of high-resolution detectors presently used in narrow-beam photon dosimetry. A combination of slit-beam, radiochromic film, and deconvolution techniques served to accomplish this task for four detectors with diameters of their sensitive volumes ranging from 1 to 2.2 mm. The particular aim of the experiment was to examine the existence of significant negative portions of some of these response functions predicted by a recent Monte-Carlo-simulation (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-607). In a 6 MV photon slit beam formed by the Siemens Artiste collimation system and a 0.5 mm wide slit between 10 cm thick lead blocks serving as the tertiary collimator, the true cross-beam dose profile D(x) at 3 cm depth in a large water phantom was measured with radiochromic film EBT3, and the detector-affected cross-beam signal profiles M(x) were recorded with a silicon diode, a synthetic diamond detector, a miniaturized scintillation detector, and a small ionization chamber. For each detector, the deconvolution of the convolution integral M(x)  =  K(x)  ∗  D(x) served to obtain its specific 1D lateral dose response function K(x), and K(r) was calculated from it. Fourier transformations and back transformations were performed using function approximations by weighted sums of Gaussian functions and their analytical transformation. The 1D lateral dose response functions K(x) of the four types of detectors and their associated rotational symmetric counterparts K(r) were obtained. Significant negative curve portions of K(x) and K(r) were observed in the case of the silicon diode and the diamond detector, confirming the Monte-Carlo-based prediction (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-607). They are typical for the perturbation of the secondary electron field by a detector with

  15. A comparative study of high resolution cone beam X-ray tomography and synchrotron tomography applied to Fe- and Al-alloys.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Johann; Harrer, Bernhard; Requena, Guillermo; Brunke, Oliver

    2010-10-01

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) has become a very important method for non-destructive 3D-characterization and evaluation of materials. Due to measurement speed and quality, XCT systems with cone beam geometry and matrix detectors have gained general acceptance. Continuous improvements in the quality and performance of X-ray tubes and XCT devices have led to cone beam CT systems that can now achieve spatial resolutions down to 1 μm and even below. However, the polychromatic nature of the source, limited photon flux and cone beam artefacts mean that there are limits to the quality of the CT-data achievable; these limits are particularly pronounced with materials of higher density like metals. Synchrotron radiation offers significant advantages by its monochromatic and parallel beam of high brilliance. These advantages usually cause fewer artefacts, improved contrast and resolution.Tomography data of a steel sample and of two multi-phase Al-samples (AlSi12Ni1, AlMg5Si7) are recorded by advanced cone beam XCT-systems with a μ-focus (μXCT) and a sub-μm (nano-focus, sub-μXCT) X-ray source with voxel dimensions between 0.4 and 3.5 μm and are compared with synchrotron computed tomography (sXCT) with 0.3 μm/voxel. CT data features like beam hardening and ring artefacts, detection of details, sharpness, contrast, signal-to-noise ratio and the grey value histogram are systematically compared. In all cases μXCT displayed the lowest performance. Sub-μXCT gives excellent results in the detection of details, spatial and contrast resolution, which are comparable to synchrotron-XCT recordings. The signal-to-noise ratio is usually significantly lower for sub-μXCT compared with the two other methods. With regard to measurement costs "for industrial users", scanning volume, accessibility and user-friendliness sub-μXCT has significant advantages in comparison to synchrotron-XCT.

  16. Perspective study of exotics and flavour baryons in antiproton-proton annihilation and proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabanov, Mikhail; Vodopyanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Abstract. The spectroscopy of exotic states with hidden charm is discussed. Together with charmonium, these provide a good tool for testing theories of the strong interactions including both perturbative and non-perturbative QCD, lattice QCD, potential and other phenomenological models. An elaborated analysis of exotics spectrum is given, and attempts to interpret recent experimentally observed states with masses above the DD̅ threshold region are considered. Experimental results from different collaborations (BES, BaBar, Belle, LHCb) are analyzed with special attention given to recently discovered hidden charm states. Some of these states can be interpreted as higher-lying charmonium states and others as tetraquarks with hidden charm. It has been shown that charged/neutral tetraquarks must have their neutral/charge partners with mass values differ by at most a few MeV/c2, hypotheses that tend to coincide with those proposed by Maiani and Polosa. However, measurements of different decay modes are needed before firm conclusions can be made. These data can be derived directly from the experiments using ahigh quality antiproton beam with momentum up to 15 GeV/c and proton-proton collisions with momentum up to 26 GeV/c. DD

  17. PARTICLE BEAM TRACKING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, O.A.

    1959-05-01

    >A particle-beam tracking and correcting circuit is described. Beam induction electrodes are placed on either side of the beam, and potentials induced by the beam are compared in a voltage comparator or discriminator. This comparison produces an error signal which modifies the fm curve at the voltage applied to the drift tube, thereby returning the orbit to the preferred position. The arrangement serves also to synchronize accelerating frequency and magnetic field growth. (T.R.H.)

  18. Three-body Coulomb dynamics in hydrogen ionization by protons and antiprotons at intermediate collision velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitkiv, A. B.; Ullrich, J.

    2003-06-01

    We consider ionization of atomic hydrogen with emission of low-energy electrons by proton and antiproton impact in the range of impact velocities 3 a.u.⩽vp⩽6 a.u., where the electron capture by protons is already of minor importance but the differences in hydrogen ionization due to proton and antiproton impact can still be substantial. By calculating various differential cross sections within the first and second Born and continuum-distorted-wave eikonal-initial-state (CDW-EIS) approximations we attempt to analyze the dynamics of hydrogen ionization by protons and antiprotons. We discuss in some detail the role of (i) the interaction between the projectile and the target nucleus and (ii) multiphoton exchanges between the projectile and the target electron. Profound charge-sign effects are suggested by CDW-EIS and second Born calculations for the fully differential emission pattern. Although after the integration over the electron emission angles these effects substantially diminish, they still remain noticeable even in the total ionization cross section suggesting, in particular, that protons are more effective, compared to antiprotons, in producing soft electron emission from hydrogen in the range of collision velocities under consideration.

  19. Long-lived states of antiprotonic lithium pLi {sup +} produced in p+ Li collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sakimoto, Kazuhiro

    2011-09-15

    Antiproton capture by lithium atoms (p+Li{yields}pLi{sup +}+e) is investigated at collision energies from 0.01 to 10 eV by using a semiclassical (also know as quantum-classical hybrid) method, in which the radial distance between the antiproton and the Li{sup +} ion is treated as a classical variable, and the other degrees of freedom are described by quantum mechanics. Analyzing the wave packet of the emitted electrons and making use of the energy conservation rule enable us to calculate the state distribution of the produced antiprotonic lithium pLi{sup +} atoms and also to distinguish between the capture and ionization ({yields}p+Li{sup +}+e) channels at collisional energies above the ionization threshold. This method is tested for the capture of negative muons by hydrogen atoms, which was rigorously investigated in previous quantum mechanical studies. Most of the pLi{sup +} atoms produced in p+Li are found to be sufficiently stable against Auger decays and are experimentally observable as long-lived states. The present system bears close similarities to the system of p+He(2S). It is therefore expected that long-lived antiprotonic helium pHe{sup +} atoms can be efficiently produced in the p capture by metastable He(2 {sup 3}S) atoms.

  20. The CERN antiproton source: Controls aspects of the additional collector ring and fast sampling devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chohan, V.

    1990-08-01

    The upgrade of the CERN antiproton source, meant to gain an order of magnitude in antiproton flux, required the construction of an additional ring to complement the existing antiproton accumulator (AA) and an entire rebuild of the target zone. The AA also needed major modifications to handle the increased flux and perform purely as an accumulator, preceded by collection in the collector ring (AC). The upgrade, known as the ACOL (antiproton collector) project, was approved under strict time and budgetary constraints and the existing AA control system, based on the Proton Synchrotron (PS) Divisional norms of CAMAC and Norsk-Data computers, had to be extended in the light of this. The limited (9 months) installation period for the whole upgrade meant that substantial preparatory and planning activities had to be carried out during the normal running of the AA. Advantage was taken of the upgrade to improve and consolidate the AA. Some aspects of the control system related to this upgrade are discussed together with the integration of new applications and instrumentation. The overall machine installation and running-in was carried out within the defined milestones and the project has now achieved the physics design goals.

  1. FAIR - An International Accelerator Facility for Research with Ions and Antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, Walter

    2005-06-08

    An overview is given on the international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI, its science motivation and goals, the facility lay-out and characteristics, the accelerator design challenges, the schedule for construction, and the international interest/participation in the project.

  2. An Antiproton Ion Collider (AIC) for Measuring Neutron and Proton Distributions in Stable and Radioactive Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kienle, Paul

    2005-10-19

    An antiproton-ion collider is proposed to independently determine mean square radii for protons and neutrons in stable and short lived nuclei by means of antiproton absorption at medium energies. The experiment makes use of the electron ion collider complex (ELISE) of the GSI FAIR project with appropriate modifications of the electron ring to store, cool and collide antiprotons of 30 MeV energy with 740A MeV energy ions.The total absorption cross-section of antiprotons by the stored ions will be measured by detecting their loss by means of the Schottky noise spectroscopy method. Cross sections for the absorption on protons and neutrons, respectively, will be studied by detection of residual nuclei with A-1 either by the Schottky method or by analysing them in recoil detectors after the first dipole stage of the NESR following the interaction zone. With a measurement of the A-1 fragment momentum distribution, one can test the momentum wave functions of the annihilated neutron and proton, respectively. Furthermore by changing the incident ion energy the tails of neutron and proton distribution can be measured.The absorption cross section is at asymptotic energies in leading order proportional to the mean square radius of the nucleus. Predicted cross sections and luminosities show that the method is applicable to nuclei with production rates of about 105 s-1 or lower, depending on the lifetime of the ions in the NESR, and for half-lives down to 1 second.

  3. Antiproton signatures from astrophysical and dark matter sources at the galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Gammaldi, V.; Maroto, A. L.

    2015-03-01

    The center of our Galaxy is a complex region characterized by extreme phenomena. The presence of the supermassive Sagittarius A* black hole, a high dark matter density and an even higher baryonic density are able to produce very energetic processes. Indeed, high energetic gamma-rays have been observed by different telescopes, although their origin is not clear. In this work, we estimate the possible antiproton flux component associated with this signal. The expected secondary astrophysical antiproton background already saturates the observed data. It implies that any other important astrophysical source leads to an inconsistent excess. We estimate the sensitivity of PAMELA to this new primary antiproton source, which depends on the diffusion model and its spectral features. In particular, we consider antiproton spectra described by a power-law, a monochromatic signal and a Standard Model particle-antiparticle channel production. This latter spectrum is typical in the production from annihilating or decaying dark matter. We pay particular attention to the case of a heavy dark matter candidate, which could be associated with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) data observed from the J1745-290 source.

  4. Measurement of {phi}- and {omega}-meson production in antiproton annihilation at rest on deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Ableev, V.G.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Gorchakov, O.E.

    1994-10-01

    The branching ratios of {phi}{pi}{sup {minus}} and {omega}{pi}{sup {minus}} final states were measured for the antiproton annihilation at rest on gaseous deuterium. Significant deviation from the OZI-rule prediction was found from the value of the {phi}/{omega} ratio. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Relativistic-beam Pickup Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Simpson, J.; Konecny, R.; Suddeth, D.

    1983-01-01

    The electrical response of pickups and cavities to charged particle beams has been an area of considerable activity and concern for accelerator systems. With the advent of stochastic beam cooling, the position and frequency response of beam pickups has become a crucial parameter in determining the performance of these systems. The most frequently used method for measuring and calibrating beam pickups has been the use of current carrying wires to simulate relativistic beams. This method has sometimes led to incorrect predictions of the pickup response to particle beams. The reasons for the differences are not always obvious but could arise from: (1) wires are incapable of exciting or permitting many of the modes that beams excite or (2) the interaction of the wire with large arrays of pickups produce results which are not easily predicted. At Argonne these deficiencies are resolved by calibrating pickups with a relativistic electron beam. This facility is being used extensively by several groups to measure beam pickup devices and is the primary calibration facility for pickups to be used in the FNAL TEV-I Antiproton Source.

  6. Measurement of inclusive antiprotons from Au+Au collisions at square root of s(NN) = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lynn, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Radomski, S; Rai, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Symons, T J; de Toledo, A S; Szarwas, P; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-12-24

    We report the first measurement of inclusive antiproton production at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at square root of s(NN) = 130 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The antiproton transverse mass distributions in the measured transverse momentum range of 0.25antiproton rapidity density is found to scale approximately with the negative hadron multiplicity density. PMID:11800830

  7. Simple numerical models for antiproton-hydrogen scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan Jr., D. L., LLNL

    1996-08-23

    A diode-side-pumped discrete-optic E{sup 3+}:YAG laser employs pump-light coupling through a sapphire plate diffusion-bonded to the laser slab, giving reduced thermal lensing and exceptional beam quality (M{sup 2} {approx} 1.3.) The novel architecture is also applicable to other side-pumped lasers.

  8. Do Unpolarized Electrons Affect the Polarization of a Stored Beam?

    SciTech Connect

    Rathmann, Frank

    2009-08-04

    We present a short overview of the PAX physics case for polarized antiprotons. In order to progress towards a stored polarized antiproton beam, it is crucial to understand the interaction of polarized protons with unpolarized electrons. Therefore investigations that address in particular the contributions of electrons to the polarization buildup of a stored proton beam are presented here in more detail. The measurement of the depolarizing p-vectore cross section settled a long-standing controversy about the role of electrons in the polarization buildup of a stored beam by spin-filtering. Instead of studying the buildup of polarization in an initially unpolarized beam, here the inverse situation was investigated by observation of the depolarization of an initially polarized beam. For the first time, electrons in the electron cooler have been used as a target to study their depolarizing effect on a 49.3 MeV proton beam orbiting in COSY. The foreseen spin-filtering experiments at COSY-Juelich and at the AD of CERN are briefly discussed as well.

  9. Beam-Beam Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sramek, Christopher

    2003-09-05

    At the interaction point of a particle accelerator, various phenomena occur which are known as beam-beam effects. Incident bunches of electrons (or positrons) experience strong electromagnetic fields from the opposing bunches, which leads to electron deflection, beamstrahlung and the creation of electron/positron pairs and hadrons due to two-photon exchange. In addition, the beams experience a ''pinch effect'' which focuses each beam and results in either a reduction or expansion of their vertical size. Finally, if a beam's disruption parameter is too large, the beam can develop a sinusoidal distortion, or two-stream (kink) instability. This project simulated and studied these effects as they relate to luminosity, deflection angles and energy loss in order to optimize beam parameters for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Using the simulation program Guinea-Pig, luminosity, deflection angle and beam energy data was acquired for different levels of beam offset and distortion. Standard deflection curves and luminosity plots agreed with theoretical models but also made clear the difficulties of e-e- feedback. Simulations emphasizing kink instability in modulated and straight beam collisions followed qualitative behavioral predictions and roughly fit recent analytic calculations. Finally, a study of e-e- collisions under design constraints for the NLC provided new estimates of how luminosity, beamstrahlung energy loss, upsilon parameter and deflection curve width scale with beam spotsizes.

  10. Testing the Weak Equivalence Principle with an antimatter beam at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Aghion, S.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Belov, A.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Bremer, J.; Brusa, R. S.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Chlouba, K.; Cialdi, S.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Derking, H.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Ereditato, A.; Ferragut, R.; Fontana, A.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Gninenko, S.; Haider, S.; Holmestad, H.; Huse, T.; Jordan, E. J.; Kawada, J.; Kellerbauer, A.; Krasnicky, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lehner, S.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Matveev, V.; Mazzotta, Z.; Nebbia, G.; Nedelec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pacifico, N.; Pagano, D.; Penasa, L.; Petracek, V.; Pistillo, C.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Ravelli, L.; Riccardi, C.; Røhne, O. M.; Rosenberger, S.; Rotondi, A.; Sacerdoti, M.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Scampoli, P.; Sorrentino, F.; Spacek, M.; Strojek, I. M.; Storey, J.; Subieta, M.; Testera, G.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zmeskal, J.; (AEgIS Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The goal of the AEgIS experiment is to measure the gravitational acceleration of antihydrogen - the simplest atom consisting entirely of antimatter - with the ultimate precision of 1%. We plan to verify the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP), one of the fundamental laws of nature, with an antimatter beam. The experiment consists of a positron accumulator, an antiproton trap and a Stark accelerator in a solenoidal magnetic field to form and accelerate a pulsed beam of antihydrogen atoms towards a free-fall detector. The antihydrogen beam passes through a moiré deflectometer to measure the vertical displacement due to the gravitational force. A position and time sensitive hybrid detector registers the annihilation points of the antihydrogen atoms and their time-of-flight. The detection principle has been successfully tested with antiprotons and a miniature moiré deflectometer coupled to a nuclear emulsion detector.

  11. BEAM-BEAM 2003 SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.SEN,T.

    2003-05-19

    This paper summarizes the presentations and discussions of the Beam-Beam'03 workshop, held in Montauk, Long Island, from May 19 to 23, 2003. Presentations and discussions focused on halo generation from beam-beam interactions; beam-beam limits, especially coherent limits and their effects on existing and future hadron colliders; beam-beam compensation techniques, particularly for long-range interactions; and beam-beam study tools in theory, simulation, and experiment.

  12. Tevatron beam position monitor upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbers, Stephen; Banerjee, B.; Barker, B.; Bledsoe, S.; Boes, T.; Bowden, M.; Cancelo, G.; Forster, B.; Duerling, G.; Haynes, B.; Hendricks, B.; Kasza, T.; Kutschke, R.; Mahlum, R.; Martens, M.; Mengel, M.; Olson, M.; Pavlicek, V.; Pham, T.; Piccoli, L.; Steimel, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) readout electronics and software have been upgraded to improve measurement precision, functionality and reliability. The original system, designed and built in the early 1980's, became inadequate for current and future operations of the Tevatron. The upgraded system consists of 960 channels of new electronics to process analog signals from 240 BPMs, new front-end software, new online and controls software, and modified applications to take advantage of the improved measurements and support the new functionality. The new system reads signals from both ends of the existing directional stripline pickups to provide simultaneous proton and antiproton position measurements. Measurements using the new system are presented that demonstrate its improved resolution and overall performance.

  13. An applied light-beam induced current study of dye-sensitised solar cells: Photocurrent uniformity mapping and true photoactive area evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Timothy W.; Feron, Krishna; Anderson, Kenrick F.; Duck, Benjamin C.; Wilson, Gregory J.

    2014-07-01

    The conditions for light-beam induced current (LBIC) measurement were experimentally optimised for dye-sensitised solar cells. The impacts of too fast a laser diode modulation frequency (f) and too short a dwell time (t0) were investigated for their distortions, artefacts, and noise on the overall photocurrent map image. Optimised mapping conditions for fastest measurement were obtained at a f = 15 Hz and t0 = 900 ms. Whole device maps (nominal area 4 × 4 mm2) were obtained on devices in which fabrication defects were intentionally induced. The defects were readily resolved with the LBIC setup and conditions. The inclusion of defects had the effect of broadening the photocurrent distribution and producing a sub-optimal tail to photocurrent histograms. Photoactive areas were derived from LBIC maps and were larger than those predicted by the projected screen printing pattern by up to 25%, which has obvious implications for efficiency measurements made on nominal projected active area.

  14. The Bess Investigation of the Origin of Cosmic-ray Antiprotons and Search for Cosmological Antimatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, John; Yamamoto, Akira; Yoshimura, Koji; Makida, Yasuhiro; Matsuda, Shinya; Hasegawa, Masaya; Horikoshi, Atsushi; Tanaka,Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Junichi; Nishimura, Jun; Sakai, Ken-ichi; Shinoda, Ryoko; Orito, Rei; Matsukawa, Yosuke; Kusumoto, Akira; Fuke, Hideyuki; Mitchell, John W.; Streitmatter, Robert E.; Hams, Thomas; Sasaki, Makoto; Seo, Eun-suj; Lee, Moo-hyon; Kim, Ki-chun; Thakur, Neeharika; Ormes, Jonathan F.

    2008-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS) collaboration has made precise measurements of the spectra of cosmic ray antiprotons and light nuclei and conducted a sensitive search for antinuclei. Ten BESS high-latitude flights, eight from Canada and two from Antarctica, span more than a Solar cycle between 1993 and 2007/2008. BESS measurements of low-energy antiprotons constrain candidate models for dark matter including the possible signature of primordial black hole evaporation. The stringent BESS measurements of antiprotons and the elemental and isotopic spectra of H and He provide strong constraints on models of cosmic-ray transport in the Galaxy and Solar System. BESS has also reported the first antideuterium upper limit. BESS employs a superconducting magnetic-rigity spectrometer with time-of-flight and aerogel Cherenkov detectors to identify incident particles by charge, charge sign, mass, and energy. The BESS-Polar long-duration instrument has reduced lower energy limit of 100 MeV (top of the atmosphere) to increase its sensitivity to possible primary antiproton sources. BESS-Polar II was rebuilt with extended magnet lifetime, improved detector and electronic performance, and greater data storage capacity. It was flown fro Antarctica December 2007-January 2008, recording about 4.6 bission events during 24.5 days at float altitude with the magnet on. During the flight the influence of a high-speed stream in the Solar wind was observed. Details of the BESS-Polar II instrument and flight performance are reported elsewhere at this conference. The successful BESS-Polar II flight at Solar minimum is especially important. Most cosmic-ray antiprotons are secondary products of nuclear interactions of primary cosmic-ray nuclei with the interstellar gas, giving a spectrum that peaks at about 2 GeV and falls rapidly to higher and lower energies. However, BESS data taken in the previous Solar minimum show a small excess over secondary

  15. Transient beam loading compensation in the Fermilab Main Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wildman, D.

    1985-10-01

    A requirement for bunch coalescing and bunch rotation for antiproton production in the Fermilab Main Ring is that the net rf voltages be reduced below about 1 kV. At high beam intensities, the fields generated by the beam in a single pass through the rf cavities will exceed this limit. The new compensation system monitors the component of the beam current at the fundamental rf frequency as a function of time. This information is then delayed by a single turn and fed back into the high level rf system to cancel the beam-induced fields. The system has compensated the beam-induced voltage generated by a single booster batch to 5% of its initial value.

  16. Sub-GeV galactic cosmic-ray antiprotons from primordial black holes in the Randall-Sundrum braneworld

    SciTech Connect

    Sendouda, Yuuiti; Kohri, Kazunori; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Sato, Katsuhiko

    2005-03-15

    We investigate cosmic-ray antiprotons emitted from the galactic primordial black holes (PBHs) in the Randall-Sundrum type-2 braneworld. The recent results of the Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS) antiproton observation imply the existence of exotic primary sub-GeV antiprotons, one of whose most probable origin is PBHs in our Galaxy. We show that the magnitude of antiproton flux from PBHs in the Randall-Sundrum braneworld is proportional to negative power of the anti-de Sitter radius and immediately find that a large extra dimension can relax upper limits on the abundance of the galactic PBHs. If actually there are more PBHs than the known upper limit obtained in the pure 4D case, they set a lower bound on the size of the extra dimension above at least 10{sup 20} times 4D Planck length to avoid inconsistency. On completion of the numerical studies, we show that these constraints on the AdS radius are comparable to those obtained from the diffuse photon background by some of the authors in the previous paper. Moreover, in the low accretion rate case, only antiprotons can constrain the braneworld. We show that we will detect signatures of the braneworld as a difference between the flux of the antiprotons predicted in 4D and 5D by future observations in sub-GeV region with a few percent precision.

  17. Further studies of double ionization of He, Ne, and Ar by fast and slow antiprotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, L. H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Møller, S. P.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Tang-Petersen, S.; Uggerhøj, E.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1989-12-01

    Measurements of the ratio R between double- and single-ionization cross sections for antiproton impact on He, Ne, and Ar targets are reported for impact energies ranging from 65 keV to 20 MeV. At high energies the results are found to merge with proton results at around 20 MeV, and the high-energy limit of the common ratio is in good agreement with recent first-Born-calculation results for the helium target. The large difference previously observed in the ratio R for protons and antiprotons at energies between 0.5 and 5 MeV is found to persist down to the lowest energies investigated here.

  18. The cosmic-ray antiproton flux - An upper limit near that predicted for secondary production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cleghorn, T.; Golden, R. L.; Lacy, J. L.; Zipse, J. E.; Daniel, R. R.; Stephens, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    Data gathered from a balloon flight of a superconducting-magnet spectrometer have been examined for the presence of cosmic-ray antiprotons. The ratio of antiprotons to protons, p(-)/p, in cosmic rays was found to be (0.03 + or - 3.3) ten-thousandths in the rigidity interval from 4.2 to 12.5 GV. The 95%-confidence-level upper limit for p(-)/p is thus 0.00066. This upper limit is in strong contradiction to the prediction of the closed-galaxy model of Rasmussen and Peters (1975), but is not inconsistent with the prediction of the modified closed-galaxy model of Peters and Westergaard (1977). It is nearly equal to the predictions of conventional propagation models. This result provides an independent confirmation of the absence of primary antimatter in the cosmic rays at a level of approximately a few ten-thousandths.

  19. a Precision Comparison of the Proton-Antiproton Charge-To Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, David Forrest

    A new comparison of the antiproton-proton charge -to-mass ratios has been completed. The measured ratio of charge-to-mass ratios for the antiproton and proton is 1.000 000 001 5 +/- 0.000 000 001 1. Comparing the cyclotron frequencies of a single p and p in a Penning tray improves upon the accuracy of earlier techniques by a factor of 45,000. This comparison is the most accurate mass spectroscopy of particles of opposite charge in a Penning trap and the most accurate test of the CPT theorem with baryons. Because of the high precision of the measurement, relativistic shifts in the cyclotron frequency provide a clean demonstration of the "relativistic" mass shift for typical cyclotron energies of 10-100 eV.

  20. 10 GeV dark matter candidates and cosmic-ray antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Lavalle, Julien

    2010-10-15

    Recent measurements performed with some direct dark matter detection experiments, e.g. CDMS-II and CoGENT (after DAMA/LIBRA), have unveiled a few events compatible with weakly interacting massive particles. The preferred mass range is around 10 GeV, with a quite large spin-independent cross section of 10{sup -43}-10{sup -41} cm{sup 2}. In this paper, we recall that a light dark matter particle with dominant couplings to quarks should also generate cosmic-ray antiprotons. Taking advantage of recent works constraining the Galactic dark matter mass profile on the one hand and on cosmic-ray propagation on the other hand, we point out that considering a thermal annihilation cross section for such low mass candidates very likely results in an antiproton flux in tension with the current data, which should be taken into account in subsequent studies.

  1. A program to study antiprotons in the cosmic rays: Arizona collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Theodore

    1987-01-01

    The Low Energy AntiProton (LEAP) experiment was designed to measure the primary antiproton flux in the 200 MeV to 1 GeV kinetic energy range. A superconducting magnetic spectrometer, a time-of-flight (TOF) detector, and a Cherenkov counter are the main components of LEAP. An additional scintillation detector was designed and constructed to detect the passage of particles through the bottom of the Cherenkov counter. The LEAP package was launched on August 22, 1987, and enjoyed a 27 hour flight, with 23 hours of data at high altitude. Preliminary plans for data analysis include using the Micro-Vax at the University of Arizona for data reduction of the Cherenkov and S2 signals.

  2. 132 ns Bunch Spacing in the Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, S.D.; Holt, J.; Johnstone, J.A.; Marriner, J.; Martens, M.; McGinnis, D.

    1994-12-01

    Following completion of the Fermilab Main Injector it is expected that the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider will be operating at a luminosity in excess of 5{times}10{sup 3l} cm{sup {minus}2} with 36 proton and antiproton bunches spaced at 396 nsec. At this luminosity, each of the experimental detectors will see approximately 1.3 interactions per crossing. Potential improvements to the collider low beta and rf systems could push the luminosity beyond 10{times}10{sup 3l} cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1}, resulting in more than three interactions per crossing if the bunch separation is left unchanged. This paper discusses issues related to moving to {approx}100 bunch operation, with bunch spacings of 132 nsec, in the Tevatron. Specific scenarios and associated hardware requirements are described.

  3. An applied light-beam induced current study of dye-sensitised solar cells: Photocurrent uniformity mapping and true photoactive area evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Timothy W. Anderson, Kenrick F.; Duck, Benjamin C.; Wilson, Gregory J.; Feron, Krishna

    2014-07-28

    The conditions for light-beam induced current (LBIC) measurement were experimentally optimised for dye-sensitised solar cells. The impacts of too fast a laser diode modulation frequency (f) and too short a dwell time (t{sub 0}) were investigated for their distortions, artefacts, and noise on the overall photocurrent map image. Optimised mapping conditions for fastest measurement were obtained at a f = 15 Hz and t{sub 0} = 900 ms. Whole device maps (nominal area 4 × 4 mm{sup 2}) were obtained on devices in which fabrication defects were intentionally induced. The defects were readily resolved with the LBIC setup and conditions. The inclusion of defects had the effect of broadening the photocurrent distribution and producing a sub-optimal tail to photocurrent histograms. Photoactive areas were derived from LBIC maps and were larger than those predicted by the projected screen printing pattern by up to 25%, which has obvious implications for efficiency measurements made on nominal projected active area.

  4. Cosmic-ray antiprotons as a probe of a photino-dominated universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.; Srednicki, M.

    1984-01-01

    Observational tests of the hypothesis that the universe is flat and dominated by dark matter in the form of massive photinos include the production of significant fluxes of cosmic rays and gamma rays in our galactic halo. Specification of the cosmological photino density and the masses of scalar quarks and leptons determines the present annihilation rate. The predicted number of low-energy cosmic-ray antiprotons is comparable to the observed flux.

  5. Progress towards antihydrogen production by the reaction of cold antiprotons with positronium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, M.; Laricchia, G.; Deutch, B.I.

    1995-03-01

    An experiment aimed at producing antihydrogen atoms by the reaction of cold antiprotons stored in a Penning trap with injected ground state positronium atoms is described. The apparatus developed in an attempt to observe the charge conjugate reaction using proton projectiles is discussed. Technically feasible upgrades to this apparatus are identified which may allow, in conjunction with the PS200 trap, antihydrogen production at LEAR.

  6. Polarized χc2-charmonium production in antiproton-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, A. B.; Strikman, M.; Bleicher, M.

    2014-01-01

    Starting from the Feynman diagram representation of multiple scattering we consider the polarized χc(1P)-charmonia production in antiproton-nucleus reactions close to the threshold (plab=5-7 GeV/c). The rescattering and absorption of the incoming antiproton and outgoing charmonium on nucleons are taken into account, including the possibility of the elastic and nondiagonal (flavor-conserving) scattering χcJN →χcJ' N, J, J'=0,1,2. The elementary amplitudes of the latter processes are evaluated by expanding the physical χc states in the Clebsch-Gordan series of the cc ¯ states with fixed values of internal orbital angular momentum (Lz) and spin projections on the χc momentum axis. The total interaction cross sections of these cc ¯ states with nucleons have been calculated in previous works using the QCD factorization theorem and the nonrelativistic quarkonium model, and turned out to be strongly Lz dependent due to the transverse size difference. This directly leads to finite values of the χc-nucleon nondiagonal scattering amplitudes. We show that the χc0N →χc2N transitions significantly influence the χc2 production with helicity zero at small transverse momenta. This can serve as a signal in future experimental tests of the quark structure of χc states by the PANDA Collaboration at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR).

  7. Galactic antiproton spectrum at high energies: Background expectation versus exotic contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bringmann, Torsten; Salati, Pierre

    2007-04-15

    A new generation of upcoming space-based experiments will soon start to probe the spectrum of cosmic-ray antiparticles with an unprecedented accuracy and, in particular, will open up a window to energies much higher than those accessible so far. It is thus timely to carefully investigate the expected antiparticle fluxes at high energies. Here, we perform such an analysis for the case of antiprotons. We consider both standard sources as the collision of other cosmic rays with interstellar matter, as well as exotic contributions from dark matter annihilations in the galactic halo. Up to energies well above 100 GeV, we find that the background flux in antiprotons is almost uniquely determined by the existing low-energy data on various cosmic-ray species; for even higher energies, however, the uncertainties in the parameters of the underlying propagation model eventually become significant. We also show that if the dark matter is composed of particles with masses at the TeV scale, which is naturally expected in extra-dimensional models as well as in certain parameter regions of supersymmetric models, the annihilation flux can become comparable to--or even dominate--the antiproton background at the high energies considered here.

  8. CPT Test with (anti)proton Magnetic Moments Based on Quantum Logic Cooling and Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, M.; Paschke, A.-G.; Dubielzig, T.; Ulmer, S.; Ospelkaus, C.

    2014-01-01

    Dehmelt and VanDyck's famous 1987 measurement of the electron and positron g-factor is still the most precise g-factor comparison in the lepton sector, and a sensitive test of possible CPT violation. A complementary g-factor comparison between the proton and the antiproton is highly desirable to test CPT symmetry in the baryon sector. Current experiments, based on Dehmelt's continuous Stern-Gerlach effect and the double Penning-trap technique, are making rapid progress. They are, however, extremely difficult to carry out because ground state cooling using cryogenic techniques is virtually impossible for heavy baryons, and because the continous Stern-Gerlach effect scales as μ/m, where m is the mass of the particle and μ its magnetic moment. Both difficulties will ultimately limit the accuracy. We discuss experimental prospects of realizing an alternative approach to a g-factor comparison with single (anti)protons, based on quantum logic techniques proposed by Heinzen and Wineland and by Wineland et al. The basic idea is to cool, control and measure single (anti)protons through interaction with a well-controlled atomic ion.

  9. Transverse Beam Size Effects in Beam Position Monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    2001-04-01

    The fields produced by a long beam with a given transverse charge distribution in a homogeneous vacuum chamber are studied. Signals induced by the displaced finite-size beam on electrodes of a beam position monitor (BPM) are calculated and compared to those from a pencil beam. The corrections to BPM signals due to a finite beam size are found analytically for a few particular transverse distributions of the beam current. The results for fields can also be directly applied for calculating the beam coupling impedances of small discontinuities.

  10. PAMELA Results on the Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Flux from 60 MeV to 180 GeV in Kinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Adriani, O.; Bonechi, L.; Spillantini, P.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Bellotti, R.; Bruno, A.; Monaco, A.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Pizzolotto, C.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Vasilyev, G.

    2010-09-17

    The satellite-borne experiment PAMELA has been used to make a new measurement of the cosmic-ray antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio which extends previously published measurements down to 60 MeV and up to 180 GeV in kinetic energy. During 850 days of data acquisition approximately 1500 antiprotons were observed. The measurements are consistent with purely secondary production of antiprotons in the Galaxy. More precise secondary production models are required for a complete interpretation of the results.

  11. Scintillating screens sensitivity and resolution studies for low energy, low intensity beam diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio; Welsch, Carsten P

    2010-10-01

    In order to investigate the limits of scintillating screens for beam profile monitoring in the ultra-low energy, ultra-low intensity regime, CsI:Tl, YAG:Ce, and a Tb glass-based scintillating fiber optic plate (SFOP) were tested. The screens response to 200 and 50 keV proton beams with intensities ranging from a few picoampere down to the subfemtoampere region was examined. In the following paper, the sensitivity and resolution studies are presented in detail for CsI:Tl and the SFOP, the two most sensitive screens. In addition, a possible use of scintillators for ultra-low energy antiproton beam monitoring is discussed.

  12. Shielding experiments by the JASMIN Collaboration at Fermilab (II) - radioactivity measurement induced by secondary particles from the anti-proton production target

    DOE PAGES

    Hiroshi, Yashima; Norihiro, Matsuda; Yoshimi, Kasugai; Hiroshi, Nakashima; Yukio, Sakamoto; Hiroshi, Matsumura; Hiroshi, Iwase; Norikazu, Kinoshita; David, Boehnlein; Gary, Lautenschlager; et al

    2011-08-01

    The JASMIN Collaboration has performed an experiment to conduct measurements of nuclear reaction rates around the anti-proton production (Pbar) target at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). At the Pbar target station, the target, consisting of an Inconel 600 cylinder, was irradiated by a 120 GeV/c proton beam from the FNAL Main Injector. The beam intensity was 3.6 x 1012 protons per second. The samples of Al, Nb, Cu, and Au were placed near the target to investigate the spatial and energy distribution of secondary particles emitted from it. After irradiation, the induced activities of the samples were measured bymore » studying their gamma ray spectra using HPGe detectors. The production rates of 30 nuclides induced in Al, Nb, Cu, Au samples were obtained. These rates increase for samples placed in a forward (small angle) position relative to the target. The angular dependence of these reaction rates becomes larger for increasing threshold energy. These experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations. The calculated results generally agree with the experimental results to within a factor of 2 to 3.« less

  13. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  14. Synchrotron frequency spread independence of bunched-beam stochastic cooling at the Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, Alexey V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Neuffer, D.; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    It is generally accepted that longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched beams is not possible without a synchrotron frequency spread. Experiments in the Recycler storage ring (Fermilab) demonstrate the opposite: with an antiproton bunch in a parabolic potential well (no synchrotron frequency spread), the cooling was almost as efficient as in a trapezoidal potential well (with a relative synchrotron frequency spread of {approx} 100%). A possible explanation is that, at Recycler parameters, diffusion processes are sufficient to provide particle mixing.

  15. Uniform longitudinal beam profiles in the Fermilab Recycler using adaptive rf correction

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Martin; Broemmelsiek, Daniel Robert; Chase, Brian; Crisp, James L.; Eddy, Nathan; Joireman, Paul W.; Ng, King Yuen; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring is a permanent magnet based 8 GeV anti-proton storage ring. A wideband RF system, driven with ARB's (ARBitrary waveform generators), allows the system to produce programmable barrier waveforms. Beam current profile distortion was observed, its origin verified both experimentally and theoretically, and an FPGA-based correction system was designed, tested and implemented to level the bunch profile.

  16. The BESS Search for Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Origins and for Cosmological Antimatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, John; Yamamoto, Akira

    2009-01-01

    The apex of the Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS) program was reached with the Antarctic flight of BESS-Polar II, during the 2007-2008 Austral Summer, that obtained 24.5 days of data on over 4.7 billion cosmic-ray events. The US-Japan BESS Collaboration uses elementary particle measurements to study the early Universe and provides fundamental data on the spectra of light cosmic-ray elements and isotopes. BESS measures the energy spectra of cosmic-ray antiprotons to investigate signatures of possible exotic sources, such as dark-matter candidates, and searches for heavier antinuclei that might reach Earth from antimatter domains formed during symmetry breaking processes in the early Universe. Since 1993, BESS has carried out eleven high-latitude balloon flights, two of long duration, that together have defined the study of antiprotons below about 4 GeV, provided standard references for light element and isotope spectra, and set the most sensitive limits on the existence of antideuterons and antihelium. The BESS-Polar II flight took place at Solar Minimum, when the sensitivity of the low-energy antiproton measurements to a primary source is greatest. The rich BESS-Polar II dataset more than doubles the combined data from all earlier BESS flights and has 10-20 times the statistics of BESS data from the previous Solar Minimum. Here, we summarize the scientific results of BESS program, focusing on the results obtained using data from the long-duration flights of BESS-Polar I (2004) and BESS-Polar II.

  17. What does the PAMELA antiproton spectrum tell us about dark matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim; Mertsch, Philipp E-mail: trlinden@uchicago.edu

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of the cosmic ray antiproton spectrum can be used to search for contributions from annihilating dark matter and to constrain the dark matter annihilation cross section. Depending on the assumptions made regarding cosmic ray propagation in the Galaxy, such constraints can be quite stringent. We revisit this topic, utilizing a set of propagation models fit to the cosmic ray boron, carbon, oxygen and beryllium data. We derive upper limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section and find that when the cosmic ray propagation parameters are treated as nuisance parameters (as we argue is appropriate), the resulting limits are significantly less stringent than have been previously reported. We also note (as have several previous groups) that simple GALPROP-like diffusion-reacceleration models predict a spectrum of cosmic ray antiprotons that is in good agreement with PAMELA's observations above ∼ 5 GeV, but that significantly underpredict the flux at lower energies. Although the complexity of modeling cosmic ray propagation at GeV-scale energies makes it difficult to determine the origin of this discrepancy, we consider the possibility that the excess antiprotons are the result of annihilating dark matter. Suggestively, we find that this excess is best fit for m{sub DM} ∼ 35 GeV and σ v ∼ 10{sup −26} cm{sup 3}/s (to b b-bar ), in good agreement with the mass and cross section previously shown to be required to generate the gamma-ray excess observed from the Galactic Center.

  18. Atomic physics at the future facility for antiproton and ion research: status report 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumberidze, A.; Stöhlker, Th; Litvinov, Yu A.; SPARC Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    In this contribution, a brief overview of the Stored Particle Atomic physics Research Collaboration scientific program at the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is given. The program comprises a very broad range of research topics addressing atomic structure and dynamics in hitherto unexplored regimes, light-matter interactions, lepton pair production phenomena, precision tests of quantum electrodynamics and standard model in the regime of extreme fields and many more. We also present the current strategy for the realization of the envisioned physics program within the modularized start version (MSV) of FAIR.

  19. Highlights on gamma rays, neutrinos and antiprotons from TeV Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammaldi, Viviana

    2016-07-01

    It has been shown that the gamma-ray flux observed by HESS from the J1745-290 Galactic Center source is well fitted as the secondary gamma-rays photons generated from Dark Matter annihilating into Standard Model particles in combination with a simple power law background. The neutrino flux expected from such Dark Matter source has been also analyzed. The main results of such analyses for 50 TeV Dark Matter annihilating into W+W- gauge boson and preliminary results for antiprotons are presented.

  20. A program to study antiprotons in the cosmic rays: Arizona collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Theodore

    1992-01-01

    The Cherenkov detector designed and built for the LEAP (Low Energy AntiProton) experiment utilized a novel design to achieve appreciable sensitive area (02. sq m) with a refractive index of 1.25 in a magnetic fringe field region (500-1000 Gauss). The weight was held to only 64 kg by using 16 unshielded Hamamatsu R2490-01 photomultiplier tubes, each aligned with its local magnetic field. A filling and reservoir system for the highly volatile FC-72 liquid Cherenkov radiator also presented many design challenges. Relativistic particles yielded about 72 photoelectrons, total.

  1. The CMS barrel calorimeter response to particle beams from 2 to 350 GeV/ c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullin, S.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B.; Adam, N.; Adams, M.; Adzic, P.; Akchurin, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Almeida, N.; Anagnostou, G.; Andelin, D.; Anderson, E. W.; Anfreville, M.; Anicin, I.; Antchev, G.; Antunovic, Z.; Arcidiacono, R.; Arenton, M. W.; Auffray, E.; Argiro, S.; Askew, A.; Atramentov, O.; Ayan, S.; Arcidy, M.; Aydin, S.; Aziz, T.; Baarmand, M.; Babich, K.; Baccaro, S.; Baden, D.; Baffioni, S.; Bakirci, M. N.; Balazs, M.; Banerjee, Sud.; Banerjee, Sun.; Bard, R.; Barge, D.; Barnes, V.; Barney, D.; Barone, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Baty, C.; Bawa, H.; Baiatian, G.; Bandurin, D.; Beauceron, S.; Bell, K. W.; Bencze, G.; Benetta, R.; Bercher, M.; Beri, S.; Bernet, C.; Berntzon, L.; Berthon, U.; Besancon, M.; Betev, B.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Biino, C.; Blaha, J.; Bloch, P.; Blyth, S.; Bodek, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bose, S.; Bose, T.; Bourotte, J.; Brett, A. M.; Brown, R. M.; Britton, D.; Budd, H.; Buehler, M.; Burchesky, K.; Busson, P.; Camanzi, B.; Camporesi, T.; Cankoçak, K.; Carrell, K.; Carrera, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Cavallari, F.; Cerci, S.; Cerutti, M.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Charlot, C.; Chen, E. A.; Chen, W. T.; Chen, Z.; Chendvankar, S.; Chipaux, R.; Choudhary, B. C.; Choudhury, R. K.; Chung, Y.; Clarida, W.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Combaret, C.; Conetti, S.; Cossutti, F.; Cox, B.; Cremaldi, L.; Cushman, P.; Cussans, D. G.; Dafinei, I.; Damgov, J.; da Silva di Calafiori, D. R.; Daskalakis, G.; Davatz, G.; David, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Debbins, P.; Deiters, K.; Dejardin, M.; Djordjevic, M.; Deliomeroglu, M.; Della Negra, R.; Della Ricca, G.; Del Re, D.; Demianov, A.; de Min, A.; Denegri, D.; Depasse, P.; de Visser, T.; Descamps, J.; Deshpande, P. V.; Diaz, J.; Diemoz, M.; di Marco, E.; Dimitrov, L.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Djambazov, L.; Dobrzynski, L.; Drndarevic, S.; Duboscq, J. E.; Dugad, S.; Dumanoglu, I.; Duru, F.; Dutta, D.; Dzelalija, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Elias, J.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Elvira, D.; Emeliantchik, I.; Eno, S.; Ershov, A.; Erturk, S.; Esen, S.; Eskut, E.; Evangelou, I.; Evans, D. L.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Fay, J.; Fenyvesi, A.; Ferri, F.; Fisher, W.; Flower, P. S.; Franci, D.; Franzoni, G.; Freeman, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Funk, W.; Ganjour, S.; Gargiulo, C.; Gascon, S.; Gataullin, M.; Gaultney, V.; Gamsizkan, H.; Gavrilov, V.; Geerebaert, Y.; Genchev, V.; Gentit, F. X.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Ghezzi, A.; Ghodgaonkar, M. D.; Gilly, J.; Givernaud, A.; Gleyzer, S.; Gninenko, S.; Go, A.; Gobbo, B.; Godinovic, N.; Golubev, N.; Golutvin, I.; Goncharov, P.; Gong, D.; Govoni, P.; Grant, N.; Gras, P.; Grassi, T.; Green, D.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gribushin, A.; Grinev, B.; Guevara Riveros, L.; Guillaud, J. P.; Gurtu, A.; Murat Güler, A.; Gülmez, E.; Gümüş, K.; Haelen, T.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Haguenauer, M.; Halyo, V.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Hansen, M.; Hashemi, M.; Hauptman, J.; Hazen, E.; Heath, H. F.; Heering, A.; Heister, A.; Heltsley, B.; Hill, J. A.; Hintz, W.; Hirosky, R.; Hobson, P. R.; Honma, A.; Hou, G. W. S.; Hsiung, Y.; Hunt, A.; Husejko, M.; Ille, B.; Ilyina, N.; Imlay, R.; Ingram, D.; Ingram, Q.; Isiksal, E.; Jarry, P.; Jarvis, C.; Jeong, C.; Jessop, C.; Johnson, K.; Jones, J.; Jovanovic, D.; Kaadze, K.; Kachanov, V.; Kaftanov, V.; Kailas, S.; Kalagin, V.; Kalinin, A.; Kalmani, S.; Karmgard, D.; Kataria, S. K.; Kaur, M.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Kellogg, R.; Kennedy, B. W.; Khmelnikov, A.; Kim, H.; Kisselevich, I.; Kloukinas, K.; Kodolova, O.; Kohli, J.; Kokkas, P.; Kolberg, T.; Kolossov, V.; Korablev, A.; Korneev, Y.; Kosarev, I.; Kramer, L.; Krasnikov, N.; Krinitsyn, A.; Krokhotin, A.; Krpic, D.; Kryshkin, V.; Kubota, Y.; Kubrik, A.; Kuleshov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kunori, S.; Kuo, C. M.; Kurt, P.; Kyberd, P.; Kyriakis, A.; Laasanen, A.; Ladygin, V.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Laszlo, A.; Lawlor, C.; Lazic, D.; Lebeau, M.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lee, S.-W.; Leshev, G.; Lethuillier, M.; Levchuk, L.; Lin, S. W.; Lin, W.; Linn, S.; Lintern, A. L.; Litvine, V.; Litvintsev, D.; Litov, L.; Lobolo, L.; Locci, E.; Lodge, A. B.; Longo, E.; Loukas, D.; Los, S.; Lubinsky, V.; Luckey, P. D.; Lukanin, V.; Lustermann, W.; Lynch, C.; Ma, Y.; Machado, E.; Mahlke-Krueger, H.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Malberti, M.; Malclès, J.; Maletic, D.; Mandjavidze, I.; Mans, J.; Manthos, N.; Maravin, Y.; Marchica, C.; Marinelli, N.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Marlow, D.; Markowitz, P.; Marone, M.; Martinez, G.; Mathez, H.; Matveev, V.; Mavrommatis, C.; Maurelli, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Meridiani, P.; Merlo, J. P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mescheryakov, G.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Mikhailin, V.; Milenovic, P.; Miller, M.; Milleret, G.; Miné, P.; Moeller, A.; Mohammadi-Najafabadi, M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moissenz, P.

    2009-04-01

    The response of the CMS barrel calorimeter (electromagnetic plus hadronic) to hadrons, electrons and muons over a wide momentum range from 2 to 350 GeV/ c has been measured. To our knowledge, this is the widest range of momenta in which any calorimeter system has been studied. These tests, carried out at the H2 beam-line at CERN, provide a wealth of information, especially at low energies. The analysis of the differences in calorimeter response to charged pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons and a detailed discussion of the underlying phenomena are presented. We also show techniques that apply corrections to the signals from the considerably different electromagnetic (EB) and hadronic (HB) barrel calorimeters in reconstructing the energies of hadrons. Above 5 GeV/ c, these corrections improve the energy resolution of the combined system where the stochastic term equals 84.7±1.6% and the constant term is 7.4±0.8%. The corrected mean response remains constant within 1.3% rms.

  2. Stability of beam in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, C.S.; Harfoush, F.A.

    1993-08-01

    The Fermilab Main Injector is a new 150 GeV protron synchrotron, designed to remove the limitations of the Main Ring in the delivery of high intensity protron and antiproton beams to the Tevatron. Extensive studies have been made to understand the performance of the Main Injector. In this paper, we present a study of the Main Injector lattice, which includes magnetic and misalignment errors. These calculations shows the Main Injector`s dynamical aperture is larger than its design value of 40{pi} mm mradian at injection.

  3. Determination of the Antiproton-to-Electron Mass Ratio by Precision Laser Spectroscopy of pHe{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, M.; Dax, A.; Eades, J.; Gomikawa, K.; Hayano, R.S.; Ono, N.; Pirkl, W.; Widmann, E.; Torii, H.A.; Juhasz, B.; Barna, D.; Horvath, D.

    2006-06-23

    A femtosecond optical frequency comb and continuous-wave pulse-amplified laser were used to measure 12 transition frequencies of antiprotonic helium to fractional precisions of (9-16)x10{sup -9}. One of these is between two states having microsecond-scale lifetimes hitherto unaccessible to our precision laser spectroscopy method. Comparisons with three-body QED calculations yielded an antiproton-to-electron mass ratio of M{sub p}/m{sub e}=1836.152 674(5)

  4. Effect of secondary ions on the electron beam optics in the Recycler Electron Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Prost, L.; Saewert, G.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Antiprotons in Fermilab's Recycler ring are cooled by a 4.3 MeV, 0.1-0.5 A DC electron beam (as well as by a stochastic cooling system). The unique combination of the relativistic energy ({gamma} = 9.49), an Ampere-range DC beam, and a relatively weak focusing makes the cooling efficiency particularly sensitive to ion neutralization. A capability to clear ions was recently implemented by way of interrupting the electron beam for 1-30 {micro}s with a repetition rate of up to 40 Hz. The cooling properties of the electron beam were analyzed with drag rate measurements and showed that accumulated ions significantly affect the beam optics. For a beam current of 0.3 A, the longitudinal cooling rate was increased by factor of {approx}2 when ions were removed.

  5. Error-Induced Beam Degradation in Fermilab's Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-Young Phil

    2008-01-01

    In Part I, three independent models of Fermilab's Booster synchrotron are presented. All three models are constructed to investigate and explore the effects of unavoidable machine errors on a proton beam under the influence of space-charge effects. The first is a stochastic noise model. Electric current fluctuations arising from power supplies are ubiquitous and unavoidable and are a source of instabilities in accelerators of all types. A new noise module for generating the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) stochastic noise is first created and incorporated into the existing Object-oriented Ring Beam Injection and Tracking (ORBIT-FNAL) package. After being convinced with a preliminary model that the noise, particularly non-white noise, does matter to beam quality, we proceeded to measure directly current ripples and common-mode voltages from all four Gradient Magnet Power Supplies (GMPS). Then, the current signals are Fourier-analyzed. Based upon the power spectra of current signals, we tune up the Ornstein-Uhlnbeck noise model. As a result, we are able to closely match the frequency spectra between current measurements and the modeled O-U stochastic noise. The stochastic noise modeled upon measurements is applied to the Booster beam in the presence of the full space-charge effects. This noise model, accompanied by a suite of beam diagnostic calculations, manifests that the stochastic noise, impinging upon the beam and coupled to the space-charge effects, can substantially enhance the beam degradation process throughout the injection period. The second model is a magnet misalignment model. It is the first time to utilize the latest beamline survey data for building a magnet-by-magnet misalignment model. Given as-found survey fiducial coordinates, we calculate all types of magnet alignment errors (station error, pitch, yaw, roll, twists, etc.) are implemented in the model. We then follow up with statistical analysis to understand how each type of alignment errors are

  6. Effect of Coulomb interaction on time of flight of cold antiprotons launched from an ion trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, J. B.; Witteborn, F. C.

    1993-01-01

    Time-of-flight spectra for Maxwell-Boltzman (MB) distributions of antiprotons initially held in an ion trap and detected after being launched through a 50-cm-long shielding drift tube have been calculated. The distributions used are of temperature 0.4-40 K, cubic length 0.003-3.0 cm, and number 10-100 particles. The mutual Coulomb repulsion of the particles causes a reduction in the number of late arrival particles expected from the MB velocity distribution. The Coulomb energy is not equally divided among the particles during the expansion. The energy is transferred preferentially to the outer particles so that the reduction in the number of slow particles is not necessarily large. The reduction factor is found to be greater than unity when the potential energy of the trapped ions is greater than about 5 percent of the ions' kinetic energy and is about 2 for the launch parameters of the Los Alamos antiproton gravity experiment.

  7. Relative abundance of antiprotons and antihelium in the primary cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Golden, R. L.; Lacy, J. L.; Zipse, J. E.; Daniel, R. R.; Stephens, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reports measurement of the antiproton-to-proton and antihelium-to-helium ratios in the 4-100 GeV/c range. A superconducting magnet spectrophotometer obtained the data during a balloon flight in May 1976. The upper limit value for the antiproton ratio is 0.0005 in the 4.2-12.5 GeV/c range. This value is only slightly higher than the expected value for a leaky box-model and nearly equal to the value expected in the Peter-Westergard model. It is suggested that this upper limit value rules out the closed galaxy model. Upper limit values for the antihelium ratio are 0.000058 in the 4-10 GeV/c range; less than 0.0001 in the 4-33 GeV/c range; and less than 0.01 in the 33-100 GeV/c range. The interpretation of the raw data is explained.

  8. Two Ions Simultaneously Trapped to Measure the Antiproton Charge-to-Mass Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabbaz, A.; Hall, D. S.; Gabrielse, G.; Heimann, C.; Kalinowsky, H.; Jhe, W.

    1998-05-01

    The antiproton (barp) and proton (php) charge-to-mass ratios are improved by an order of magnitude(G. Gabrielse, D. Phillips, W. Quint, H. Kalinowsky, G. Rouleau, W. Jhe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77), 3544 (1995).. A single php, dressed with two electrons to form the negative hydrogen ion (H^-), is simultaneously trapped with a single barp in a Penning Trap. With the barp excited into a large cyclotron orbit, the eigenfrequencies of the centered H^- are measured. Next, roles are reversed and the eigenfrequencies of the centered barp are measured. After including the well known proton-to-electron mass ratio and the H^- binding energy, the H^- and barp frequency comparison determines the ratio of (q/m) for the antiproton/proton. The biggest systematic of the previous measurement is eliminated since we compare particles of the same sign of charge, and the time between measurements is shorter. This measurement is among the most accurate mass spectroscopy measurements made, is the first precise measurement made with two ions trapped at the same time, and confirms most accurately that CPT holds for protons.

  9. Search for Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Origins and for Cosmological Antimatter with BESS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, A.; Mitchell, J. W.; Yoshimura, K.; Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Itazaki, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kumazawa, T.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, M.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Moiseev, A. A.; Myers, Z.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Sasaki, M.; Streitmatter, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    The balloon-borne experiment with a superconducting spectrometer (BESS) has performed cosmic-ray observations as a US-Japan cooperative space science program, and has provided fundamental data on cosmic rays to study elementary particle phenomena in the early Universe. The BESS experiment has measured the energy spectra of cosmic-ray antiprotons to investigate signatures of possible exotic origins such as dark matter candidates or primordial black holes. and searched for heavier antinuclei that might reach Earth from antimatter domains formed in the early Universe. The apex of the BESS program was reached with the Antarctic flight of BESS-Polar II, during the 2007- 2008 Austral Summer, that obtained over 4.7 billion cosmic-ray events from 24.5 days of observation. The flight took place at the expected solar minimum, when the sensitivity of the low-energy antiproton measurements to a primary source is greatest. Here, we report the scientific restults, focusing on the long-duration flights of BESS-Polar I (2004) and BESS-Polar II (2007-2008).

  10. Ion Storage with the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James; Lewis, Raymond; Chakrabarti, Suman; Pearson, Boise

    2002-01-01

    The matter antimatter reaction represents the densest form of energy storage/release known to modern physics: as such it offers one of the most compact sources of power for future deep space exploration. To take the first steps along this path, NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center is developing a storage system referred to as the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) with a goal of maintaining 10(exp 12) particles for up to 18 days. Experiments have been performed with this hardware using normal matter (positive hydrogen ions) to assess the device's ability to hold charged particles. These ions are currently created using an electron gun method to ionize background gas; however, this technique is limited by the quantity that can be captured. To circumvent this issue, an ion source is currently being commissioned which will greatly increase the number of ions captured and more closely simulate actual operations expected at an antiproton production facility. Ions have been produced, stored for various time intervals, and then extracted against detectors to measure species, quantity and energy. Radio frequency stabilization has been tested as a method to prolong ion lifetime: results show an increase in the baseline 1/e lifetime of trapped particles from hours to days. Impurities in the residual background gas (typically carbon-containing species CH4, CO, CO2, etc.) present a continuing problem by reducing the trapped hydrogen population through the mechanism of ion charge exchange.

  11. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Ali Cavasonza, L; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H S; Li, J Q; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, X; Wang, X Q; Wang, Z X; Wei, C C; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J H; Zhang, S D; Zhang, S W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhu, Z Q; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-08-26

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×10^{5} antiproton events and 2.42×10^{9} proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p[over ¯], proton p, and positron e^{+} fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e^{-} flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  12. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, M.; Ali Cavasonza, L.; Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Aupetit, S.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bindi, V.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Bueno, E. F.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Creus, W.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, Y. M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Dong, F.; Donnini, F.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Eronen, T.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Formato, V.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R. J.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gómez-Coral, D. M.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kang, S. C.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Konak, C.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. S.; Li, J. Q.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, Hu; Lu, S. Q.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Nelson, T.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Pilo, F.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Qin, X.; Qu, Z. Y.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schulz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shi, J. Y.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Song, J. W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vázquez Acosta, M.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Vitale, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. Q.; Wang, Z. X.; Wei, C. C.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Willenbrock, M.; Wu, H.; Wu, X.; Xia, X.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Yang, Y.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, S. D.; Zhang, S. W.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; AMS Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49 ×1 05 antiproton events and 2.42 ×1 09 proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ˜60 to ˜500 GV , the antiproton p ¯, proton p , and positron e+ fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e- flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p ¯/p ), (p ¯/e+), and (p /e+) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ˜60 to ˜500 GV , the (p ¯/p ), (p ¯/e+), and (p /e+) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  13. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Ali Cavasonza, L; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H S; Li, J Q; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, X; Wang, X Q; Wang, Z X; Wei, C C; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J H; Zhang, S D; Zhang, S W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhu, Z Q; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-08-26

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×10^{5} antiproton events and 2.42×10^{9} proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p[over ¯], proton p, and positron e^{+} fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e^{-} flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos. PMID:27610839

  14. Measurement of Event Shapes in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at Center-of-Mass Energy 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    A study of event shape observables in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The data for this analysis were recorded by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. The variables studied are the transverse thrust and thrust minor, both defined in the plane perpendicular to the beam direction. The observables are measured using energies from unclustered calorimeter cells. In addition to studies of the differential distributions, we present the dependence of event shape mean values on the leading jet transverse energy. Data are compared with pythia Tune A and to resummed parton level predictions that were matched to fixed order results at NLO accuracy (NLO+NLL). Predictions from pythia Tune A agree fairly well with the data. However, the underlying event contributes significantly to these observables, making it difficult to make direct comparisons to the NLO+NLL predictions, which do not account for the underlying event. To overcome this difficulty, we introduce a new observable, a weighted difference of the mean values of the thrust and thrust minor, which is less sensitive to the underlying event, allowing for a comparison with NLO+NLL. Both pythia Tune A and the NLO+NLL calculations agree well within the 20% theoretical uncertainty with the data for this observable, indicating that perturbative QCD successfully describes shapes of the hadronic final states.

  15. High-permitivity cerium oxide prepared by molecular beam deposition as gate dielectric and passivation layer and applied to AlGaN/GaN power high electron mobility transistor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Yu Sheng; Liao, Jen Ting; Lin, Yueh Chin; Chien Liu, Shin; Lin, Tai Ming; Iwai, Hiroshi; Kakushima, Kuniyuki; Chang, Edward Yi

    2016-05-01

    High-κ cerium oxide (CeO2) was applied to AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) as a gate insulator and a passivation layer by molecular beam deposition (MBD) for high-power applications. From capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement results, the dielectric constant of the CeO2 film was 25.2. The C-V curves showed clear accumulation and depletion behaviors with a small hysteresis (20 mV). Moreover, the interface trap density (D it) was calculated to be 5.5 × 1011 eV-1 cm-2 at 150 °C. A CeO2 MOS-HEMT was fabricated and demonstrated a low subthreshold swing (SS) of 87 mV/decade, a high ON/OFF drain current ratio (I ON/I OFF) of 1.14 × 109, and a low gate leakage current density (J leakage) of 2.85 × 10-9 A cm-2 with an improved dynamic ON-resistance (R ON), which is about one order of magnitude lower than that of a conventional HEMT.

  16. Symmetric form-invariant dual Pearcey beams.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhijun; Fan, Changjiang; Shi, Yile; Chen, Bo

    2016-08-01

    We introduce another type of Pearcey beam, namely, dual Pearcey (DP) beams, based on the Pearcey function of catastrophe theory. DP beams are experimentally generated by applying Fresnel diffraction of bright elliptic rings. Form-invariant Bessel distribution beams can be regarded as a special case of DP beams. Subsequently, the basic propagation characteristics of DP beams are identified. DP beams are the result of the interference of two half DP beams instead of two classical Pearcey beams. Moreover, we also verified that half DP beams (including special-case parabolic-like beams) generated by half elliptical rings (circular rings) are a new member of the family of form-invariant beams. PMID:27505650

  17. Polarized proton and antiproton experiments at Fermilab E-581/704

    SciTech Connect

    Yokosawa, A.

    1988-01-01

    We summarize activities concerning the Fermilab polarized beams. They include a description of the polarized-beam facility, measurements of beam polarization by polarimeters, asymmetry measurements in the production at large x, and experiments with polarized beams during the next fixed-target period. 8 refs., 9 figs.

  18. High-precision comparison of the antiproton-to-proton charge-to-mass ratio.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, S; Smorra, C; Mooser, A; Franke, K; Nagahama, H; Schneider, G; Higuchi, T; Van Gorp, S; Blaum, K; Matsuda, Y; Quint, W; Walz, J; Yamazaki, Y

    2015-08-13

    Invariance under the charge, parity, time-reversal (CPT) transformation is one of the fundamental symmetries of the standard model of particle physics. This CPT invariance implies that the fundamental properties of antiparticles and their matter-conjugates are identical, apart from signs. There is a deep link between CPT invariance and Lorentz symmetry--that is, the laws of nature seem to be invariant under the symmetry transformation of spacetime--although it is model dependent. A number of high-precision CPT and Lorentz invariance tests--using a co-magnetometer, a torsion pendulum and a maser, among others--have been performed, but only a few direct high-precision CPT tests that compare the fundamental properties of matter and antimatter are available. Here we report high-precision cyclotron frequency comparisons of a single antiproton and a negatively charged hydrogen ion (H(-)) carried out in a Penning trap system. From 13,000 frequency measurements we compare the charge-to-mass ratio for the antiproton (q/m)p- to that for the proton (q/m)p and obtain (q/m)p-/(q/m)p − 1 =1(69) × 10(-12). The measurements were performed at cyclotron frequencies of 29.6 megahertz, so our result shows that the CPT theorem holds at the atto-electronvolt scale. Our precision of 69 parts per trillion exceeds the energy resolution of previous antiproton-to-proton mass comparisons as well as the respective figure of merit of the standard model extension by a factor of four. In addition, we give a limit on sidereal variations in the measured ratio of <720 parts per trillion. By following the arguments of ref. 11, our result can be interpreted as a stringent test of the weak equivalence principle of general relativity using baryonic antimatter, and it sets a new limit on the gravitational anomaly parameter of |α − 1| < 8.7 × 10(-7). PMID:26268189

  19. Switchable circular beam deflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaobing; Joshi, Pankaj; Tan, Jin-Yi; De Smet, Jelle; Cuypers, Dieter; Baghdasaryan, Tigran; Vervaeke, Michael; Thienpont, Hugo; De Smet, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we report two types of electrically tunable photonic devices with circularly symmetric polarization independent beam steering performance (beam condensing resp. beam broadening). The devices consist of circular micro grating structures combined with nematic liquid crystal (LC) layers with anti-parallel alignment. A single beam deflector converts a polarized and monochromatic green laser beam (λ =543.5 nm) into a diffraction pattern, with the peak intensity appearing at the third order when 0~{{V}\\text{pp}} is applied and at the zeroth order (no deflection) for voltages above 30~{{V}\\text{pp}} . Depending on the shape of the grating structure (non-inverted or inverted), the deflection is inwards or outwards. Both grating types can be made starting from the same diamond-tooled master mold. A polarized white light beam is symmetrically condensed resp. broadened over 2° in the off state and is passed through unchanged in the on state. By stacking two such devices with mutually orthogonal LC alignment layers, polarization independent switchable circular beam deflectors are realized with a high transmittance (>80%), and with the same beam steering performance as the polarization dependent single devices.

  20. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  1. Antiproton-impact ionization of Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurakhmanov, I. B.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Fursa, D. V.; Avazbaev, S. K.; Bailey, J. J.; Bray, I.

    2015-02-01

    We calculate antiproton-impact total single ionization of Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and H2O using a time-dependent convergent close-coupling approach. The Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atom wave functions are described in a model of six p -shell electrons above a frozen Hartree-Fock core with only one-electron excitations from the outer p shell allowed. For treating the water molecule we use a neonization method recently proposed by Montanari and Miraglia [J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 47, 015201 (2014), 10.1088/0953-4075/47/1/015201], which describes the ten-electron water molecule as a dressed Ne-like atom in a pseudospherical potential. In the present work the target states of noble gas atoms and water are obtained using a Laguerre basis expansion. For the noble gas atoms there is reasonably good agreement with the calculated single-ionization cross sections.

  2. Temporally controlled modulation of antihydrogen production and the temperature scaling of antiproton-positron recombination.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, M C; Amoretti, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bouchta, A; Bowe, P D; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, M; Fontana, A; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Kellerbauer, A; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Mitchard, D; Montagna, P; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; Venturelli, L; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y; Zurlo, N

    2008-08-01

    We demonstrate temporally controlled modulation of cold antihydrogen production by periodic RF heating of a positron plasma during antiproton-positron mixing in a Penning trap. Our observations have established a pulsed source of atomic antimatter, with a rise time of about 1 s, and a pulse length ranging from 3 to 100 s. Time-sensitive antihydrogen detection and positron plasma diagnostics, both capabilities of the ATHENA apparatus, allowed detailed studies of the pulsing behavior, which in turn gave information on the dependence of the antihydrogen production process on the positron temperature T. Our data are consistent with power law scaling T (-1.1+/-0.5) for the production rate in the high temperature regime from approximately 100 meV up to 1.5 eV. This is not in accord with the behavior accepted for conventional three-body recombination.

  3. Theoretical motivation for gravitation experiments on ultra-low energy antiprotons and antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    It is known that the generally accepted theories of gravity and quantum mechanics are fundamentally incompatible. Thus, when one tries to combine these theories, one must beware of physical pitfalls. Modern theories of quantum gravity are trying to overcome these problems. Any ideas must confront the present agreement with general relativity, but yet be free to wonder about not understood phenomena, such as the dark matter problem. This all has led some {open_quotes}intrepid{close_quotes} theorists to consider a new gravitational regime, that of antimatter. Even more {open_quotes}daring{close_quotes} experimentalists are attempting, or considering attempting, the measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter, including low-energy antiprotons and, perhaps most enticing, antihydrogen.

  4. Propagation and secondary production of low energy antiprotons in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, T.; Moats, A.

    1985-01-01

    Current theories, in which the observed antiproton component is attributed strictly to secondary production in high energy inelastic collisions of protons with the interstellar medium or the atmosphere, apparently fail to explain the relatively high p vertical intensities measured at mountain and balloon altitudes. Therefore, a more careful calculation of the theoretical secondary intensity spectra is required before more exotic sources for these excess p's can be explored. A one dimensional diffusion equation is used to calculate the expected vertical intensity of p's due only to secondary production in the atmosphere; any assumed primary p spectrum is also included. Two adjustable parameters, the inelasticity and charge exchange in nucleon-nucleus collisions, were included in the algorithm. In order to obtain an independent estimate of their values the proton vertical intensities in the atmosphere were calculated, adjusting the parameters until the curves fit the experimental proton data, and then assumed that these values were identical in antinucleon-nucleus collisions.

  5. Role of pentaquark components in ϕ meson production proton-antiproton annihilation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srisuphaphon, S.; Kaewsnod, A.; Limphirat, A.; Khosonthongkee, K.; Yan, Y.

    2016-02-01

    The pentaquark component uuds s ¯ is included in the proton wave functions to study ϕ meson production proton-antiproton annihilation reactions. With all possible configurations of the uuds subsystem proposed for describing the strangeness spin and magnetic moment of the proton, we estimate the branching ratios of the annihilation reactions at rest p p ¯→ϕ X (X =π0,η ,ρ0,ω ) from atomic p p ¯ S - and P -wave states by using effective quark line diagrams incorporating the 3P0 model. The best agreement of theoretical prediction with the experimental data is found when the pentaquark configuration of the proton wave function takes the flavor-spin symmetry [4] FS[22] F[22] S .

  6. RF Manipulation of Ions in the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Martin, James J.; Sims, William H.; Chakrabarti, Suman; Lewis, Raymond A.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of antimatter provides the highest mass specific energy of any other known reaction. Proper harnessing of this energy holds great promise for future space propulsion systems. Many different propulsion concepts have been proposed that take advantage of antimatter, either using matter-antimatter as the primary fuel, or as a 'spark plug' for fusion and fission systems. In order to begin to address these concepts experimentally, a method of storing and transporting antimatter must be developed. The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) is a first-generation storage and transportation device designed to store and transport 10(exp 12) antiprotons with a storage half-life of 18 days. It uses a Penning-Malmberg ion trap with a 4T magnetic field and 20 kV potential. This will enable researchers much more flexibility in the design of antimatter experiments related to propulsion. Ions cannot be stored indefinitely in a real trap, as ion cloud instabilities develop from imperfections in manufacturing and misalignments in assembly. Previous work has been done at both the National Institute of Standards and University of California in San Diego in using RF (radio frequency) signals to both diagnose and confine the ion cloud. Two electrodes in the trap have been segmented to allow both reception and transmission of RF waves in the ion cloud. Experiments are underway to determine the number of ions and density in the cloud by "listening" to protons contained in the HiPAT. Currently we believe the density of ions stored in the trap is roughly 10(exp 15) m(exp -3). Development of non-destructive techniques is vital to the project goals, enabling continuous monitoring of the quantities stored in the system. Experimental work is also being done in identifying RF transmission frequencies that can manipulate the density of the cloud, by exchanging energy and momentum between the RF wave and the ions. Preliminary experiments have demonstrated this interaction.

  7. Heavy ion linac as a high current proton beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Winfried; Adonin, Aleksey; Appel, Sabrina; Gerhard, Peter; Heilmann, Manuel; Heymach, Frank; Hollinger, Ralph; Vinzenz, Wolfgang; Vormann, Hartmut; Yaramyshev, Stepan

    2015-05-01

    A significant part of the experimental program at Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is dedicated to pbar physics requiring a high number of cooled pbars per hour. The primary proton beam has to be provided by a 70 MeV proton linac followed by two synchrotrons. The new FAIR proton linac will deliver a pulsed proton beam of up to 35 mA of 36 μ s duration at a repetition rate of 4 Hz (maximum). The GSI heavy ion linac (UNILAC) is able to deliver world record uranium beam intensities for injection into the synchrotrons, but it is not suitable for FAIR relevant proton beam operation. In an advanced machine investigation program it could be shown that the UNILAC is able to provide for sufficient high intensities of CH3 beam, cracked (and stripped) in a supersonic nitrogen gas jet into protons and carbon ions. This advanced operational approach will result in up to 3 mA of proton intensity at a maximum beam energy of 20 MeV, 1 0 0 μ s pulse duration and a repetition rate of up to 2.7 Hz delivered to the synchrotron SIS18. Recent linac beam measurements will be presented, showing that the UNILAC is able to serve as a proton FAIR injector for the first time, while the performance is limited to 25% of the FAIR requirements.

  8. The CMS barrel calorimeter response to particle beams from 2-GeV/c to 350-GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullin, S.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B.; Adam, N.; Adams, M.; Adzic, P.; Akchurin, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Almeida, N.; /Lisbon, LIFEP /Democritos Nucl. Res. Ctr. /Virginia U. /Iowa State U.

    2009-01-01

    The response of the CMS barrel calorimeter (electromagnetic plus hadronic) to hadrons, electrons and muons over a wide momentum range from 2 to 350 GeV/c has been measured. To our knowledge, this is the widest range of momenta in which any calorimeter system has been studied. These tests, carried out at the H2 beam-line at CERN, provide a wealth of information, especially at low energies. The analysis of the differences in calorimeter response to charged pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons and a detailed discussion of the underlying phenomena are presented. We also show techniques that apply corrections to the signals from the considerably different electromagnetic (EB) and hadronic (HB) barrel calorimeters in reconstructing the energies of hadrons. Above 5 GeV/c, these corrections improve the energy resolution of the combined system where the stochastic term equals 84.7 {+-} 1.6% and the constant term is 7.4 {+-} 0.8%. The corrected mean response remains constant within 1.3% rms.

  9. Beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-08-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the {open_quotes}Booster{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ATLAS{close_quotes} linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates.

  10. An explanation of the elliptic flow difference between proton and anti-proton from the UrQMD model with hadron potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, QingFeng; Wang, YongJia; Wang, XiaoBao; Shen, CaiWan

    2016-03-01

    The time evolution of both proton and anti-proton v 2 flows from Au+Au collisions at √{{S_{NN}}} = 7.7 GeV are examined by using both pure cascade and mean-field potential versions of the UrQMD model. Due to a stronger repulsion at the early stage introduced by the repulsive potentials and hence much less annihilation probabilities, anti-protons are frozen out earlier with smaller v 2 values. Therefore, the experimental data of anti-proton v 2 as well as the flow difference between proton and anti-proton can be reasonably described with the potential version of UrQMD.

  11. Beam emittance measurements at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Manfred; Eddy, Nathan; Hu, Martin; Scarpine, Victor; Syphers, Mike; Tassotto, Gianni; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Yang, Ming-Jen; Zagel, James; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    We give short overview of various beam emittance measurement methods, currently applied at different machine locations for the Run II collider physics program at Fermilab. All these methods are based on beam profile measurements, and we give some examples of the related instrumentation techniques. At the end we introduce a multi-megawatt proton source project, currently under investigation at Fermilab, with respect to the beam instrumentation challenges.

  12. Beam halo collimation in heavy ion synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strašík, I.; Prokhorov, I.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a systematic study of the halo collimation of ion beams from proton up to uranium in synchrotrons. The projected Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research synchrotron SIS100 is used as a reference case. The concepts are separated into fully stripped (e.g., 238U92+ ) and partially stripped (e.g., 238U28+ ) ion collimation. An application of the two-stage betatron collimation system, well established for proton accelerators, is intended also for fully stripped ions. The two-stage system consists of a primary collimator (a scattering foil) and secondary collimators (bulky absorbers). Interaction of the particles with the primary collimator (scattering, momentum losses, and nuclear interactions) was simulated by using fluka. Particle-tracking simulations were performed by using mad-x. Finally, the dependence of the collimation efficiency on the primary ion species was determined. The influence of the collimation system adjustment, lattice imperfections, and beam parameters was estimated. The concept for the collimation of partially stripped ions employs a thin stripping foil in order to change their charge state. These ions are subsequently deflected towards a dump location using a beam optical element. The charge state distribution after the stripping foil was obtained from global. The ions were tracked by using mad-x.

  13. Obtaining slow beam spills at the SSC collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ritson, D.

    1993-08-01

    There is substantial interest in providing slow-spill external proton beams in parallel with ``interaction running`` at the 20 TeV SSC collider. The proposal is to cause a flux of particles to impinge on a target consisting of a bent crystal extraction channel. Additionally, a slow spill onto a conventional internal target could be used as a source of secondary beams for physics or test purposes and might also be used for B-physics as proposed for HERA. The ``natural`` beam loss rates from elastic and diffractive beam gas scattering and IP collisions are not sufficient to provide suitably intense external proton beams. To prevent loss of luminosity, the rf excitation is non-linear and preferentially blows up the halo of the beam. The ``target`` is to be located at a region of high dispersion forcing particles at the edge of the momentum space onto the target. T. Lohse in this workshop has described a proposed internal target to be used at HERA that will not employ rf excitation but will use the finite loss rates observed at the HERA machine. The Hera losses are caused by a variety of sources in addition to beam gas scattering or IP interactions. Initially, the beam lifetime at HERA was too short to obtain satisfactory integrated luminosities. Subsequently, through careful attention to detail, the beam lifetime was increased to > 20 hours. Even with these changes, present loss rates provide the required intensity onto an internal target. The Tevatron and SPS proton anti-proton colliders have had similar experiences with their investigations of loss rates and also find that beam lifetimes may be substantially shorter than expected solely from beam gas and IP interactions. This paper proposes deliberately introducing controlled errors li

  14. A beam source model for scanned proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimstrand, Peter; Traneus, Erik; Ahnesjö, Anders; Grusell, Erik; Glimelius, Bengt; Tilly, Nina

    2007-06-01

    A beam source model, i.e. a model for the initial phase space of the beam, for scanned proton beams has been developed. The beam source model is based on parameterized particle sources with characteristics found by fitting towards measured data per individual beam line. A specific aim for this beam source model is to make it applicable to the majority of the various proton beam systems currently available or under development, with the overall purpose to drive dose calculations in proton beam treatment planning. The proton beam phase space is characterized by an energy spectrum, radial and angular distributions and deflections for the non-modulated elementary pencil beam. The beam propagation through the scanning magnets is modelled by applying experimentally determined focal points for each scanning dimension. The radial and angular distribution parameters are deduced from measured two-dimensional fluence distributions of the elementary beam in air. The energy spectrum is extracted from a depth dose distribution for a fixed broad beam scan pattern measured in water. The impact of a multi-slab range shifter for energy modulation is calculated with an own Monte Carlo code taking multiple scattering, energy loss and straggling, non-elastic and elastic nuclear interactions in the slab assembly into account. Measurements for characterization and verification have been performed with the scanning proton beam system at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. Both in-air fluence patterns and dose points located in a water phantom were used. For verification, dose-in-water was calculated with the Monte Carlo code GEANT 3.21 instead of using a clinical dose engine with approximations of its own. For a set of four individual pencil beams, both with the full energy and range shifted, 96.5% (99.8%) of the tested dose points satisfied the 1%/1 mm (2%/2 mm) gamma criterion.

  15. A beam source model for scanned proton beams.

    PubMed

    Kimstrand, Peter; Traneus, Erik; Ahnesjö, Anders; Grusell, Erik; Glimelius, Bengt; Tilly, Nina

    2007-06-01

    A beam source model, i.e. a model for the initial phase space of the beam, for scanned proton beams has been developed. The beam source model is based on parameterized particle sources with characteristics found by fitting towards measured data per individual beam line. A specific aim for this beam source model is to make it applicable to the majority of the various proton beam systems currently available or under development, with the overall purpose to drive dose calculations in proton beam treatment planning. The proton beam phase space is characterized by an energy spectrum, radial and angular distributions and deflections for the non-modulated elementary pencil beam. The beam propagation through the scanning magnets is modelled by applying experimentally determined focal points for each scanning dimension. The radial and angular distribution parameters are deduced from measured two-dimensional fluence distributions of the elementary beam in air. The energy spectrum is extracted from a depth dose distribution for a fixed broad beam scan pattern measured in water. The impact of a multi-slab range shifter for energy modulation is calculated with an own Monte Carlo code taking multiple scattering, energy loss and straggling, non-elastic and elastic nuclear interactions in the slab assembly into account. Measurements for characterization and verification have been performed with the scanning proton beam system at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. Both in-air fluence patterns and dose points located in a water phantom were used. For verification, dose-in-water was calculated with the Monte Carlo code GEANT 3.21 instead of using a clinical dose engine with approximations of its own. For a set of four individual pencil beams, both with the full energy and range shifted, 96.5% (99.8%) of the tested dose points satisfied the 1%/1 mm (2%/2 mm) gamma criterion.

  16. Alignment of H(2p) in collisions of protons and antiprotons with hydrogen atoms with screened Coulomb interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakimovski, Dragan; Janev, Ratko K.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of screened Coulomb interaction on the alignment of H(2p) state produced in collisions of hydrogen atoms with protons and antiprotons are investigated in the energy range 1-200 keV by using the two-center atomic orbital close-coupling (TC-AOCC) method. It is shown that the decrease of the binding energy of hydrogen nl-states and the reduction of the number of bound states with increasing the strength of the screening affect significantly the alignment degree and its energy dependence. In the case of antiproton-H collision the difference between the alignments with screened and unscreened Coulomb potential increases with increasing the strength of the screening in the entire energy range above 2 keV/u, while in the case of proton-H collision it does so only in the energy range 5-25 keV/u.

  17. Scaling properties of proton and antiproton production in sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV Au+Au collisions.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, G; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, L D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2003-10-24

    We report on the yield of protons and antiprotons, as a function of centrality and transverse momentum, in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV measured at midrapidity by the PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. In central collisions at intermediate transverse momenta (1.5antiprotons. They show a centrality-scaling behavior different from that of pions. The pmacr;/pi and p/pi ratios are enhanced compared to peripheral Au+Au, p+p, and e(+)e(-) collisions. This enhancement is limited to p(T)<5 GeV/c as deduced from the ratio of charged hadrons to pi(0) measured in the range 1.5

  18. Liquid helium-free cryostat and hermetically sealed cryogenic microwave cavity for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium.

    PubMed

    Massiczek, O; Friedreich, S; Juhász, B; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2011-12-11

    The design and properties of a new cryogenic set-up for laser-microwave-laser hyperfine structure spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium - an experiment performed at the CERN-Antiproton Decelerator (AD), Geneva, Switzerland - are described. Similar experiments for (4)He have been performed at the AD for several years. Due to the usage of a liquid helium operated cryostat and therefore necessary refilling of coolants, a loss of up to 10% beamtime occurred. The decision was made to change the cooling system to a closed-circuit cryocooler. New hermetically sealed target cells with minimised (3)He gas volume and different dimensions of the microwave resonator for measuring the (3)He transitions were needed. A new set-up has been designed and tested at Stefan Meyer Institute in Vienna before being used for the 2009 and 2010 beamtimes at the AD. PMID:22267883

  19. Liquid helium-free cryostat and hermetically sealed cryogenic microwave cavity for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium.

    PubMed

    Massiczek, O; Friedreich, S; Juhász, B; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2011-12-11

    The design and properties of a new cryogenic set-up for laser-microwave-laser hyperfine structure spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium - an experiment performed at the CERN-Antiproton Decelerator (AD), Geneva, Switzerland - are described. Similar experiments for (4)He have been performed at the AD for several years. Due to the usage of a liquid helium operated cryostat and therefore necessary refilling of coolants, a loss of up to 10% beamtime occurred. The decision was made to change the cooling system to a closed-circuit cryocooler. New hermetically sealed target cells with minimised (3)He gas volume and different dimensions of the microwave resonator for measuring the (3)He transitions were needed. A new set-up has been designed and tested at Stefan Meyer Institute in Vienna before being used for the 2009 and 2010 beamtimes at the AD.

  20. Liquid helium-free cryostat and hermetically sealed cryogenic microwave cavity for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    PubMed Central

    Massiczek, O.; Friedreich, S.; Juhász, B.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2011-01-01

    The design and properties of a new cryogenic set-up for laser–microwave–laser hyperfine structure spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium – an experiment performed at the CERN-Antiproton Decelerator (AD), Geneva, Switzerland – are described. Similar experiments for 4He have been performed at the AD for several years. Due to the usage of a liquid helium operated cryostat and therefore necessary refilling of coolants, a loss of up to 10% beamtime occurred. The decision was made to change the cooling system to a closed-circuit cryocooler. New hermetically sealed target cells with minimised 3He gas volume and different dimensions of the microwave resonator for measuring the 3He transitions were needed. A new set-up has been designed and tested at Stefan Meyer Institute in Vienna before being used for the 2009 and 2010 beamtimes at the AD. PMID:22267883

  1. New Measurement of the Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio up to 100 GeV in the Cosmic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Adriani, O.; Bonechi, L.; Fedele, D.; Spillantini, P.; Taddei, E.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Bellotti, R.; Bruno, A.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Vasilyev, G.

    2009-02-06

    A new measurement of the cosmic-ray antiproton-to-proton flux ratio between 1 and 100 GeV is presented. The results were obtained with the PAMELA experiment, which was launched into low-Earth orbit on-board the Resurs-DK1 satellite on June 15th 2006. During 500 days of data collection a total of about 1000 antiprotons have been identified, including 100 above an energy of 20 GeV. The high-energy results are a tenfold improvement in statistics with respect to all previously published data. The data follow the trend expected from secondary production calculations and significantly constrain contributions from exotic sources, e.g., dark matter particle annihilations.

  2. Maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mottershead, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the formalism of maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography as applied to the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) prototype accelerator. The same formalism has also been used with streak camera data to produce an ultrahigh speed movie of the beam profile of the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) at Livermore. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Attainment of Electron Beam Suitable for Medium Energy Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskiy, Sergei M.

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling of charged particle beams is a well-established technique at electron energies of up to 300 keV. However, up to the present time the advance of electron cooling to the MeV-range energies has remained a purely theoretical possibility. The electron cooling project at Fermilab has recently demonstrated the ¯rst cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring, and therefore, has proved the validity of the idea of relativistic electron cool- ing. The Recycler Electron Cooler (REC) is the key component of the Teva- tron Run II luminosity upgrade project. Its performance depends critically on the quality of electron beam. A stable electron beam of 4.3 MeV car- rying 0.5 A of DC current is required. The beam suitable for the Recycler Electron Cooler must have an angular spread not exceeding 200 ¹rad. The full-scale prototype of the REC was designed, built and tested at Fermilab in the Wideband laboratory to study the feasibility of attaining the high-quality electron beam. In this thesis I describe various aspects of development of the Fermilab electron cooling system, and the techniques used to obtain the electron beam suitable for the cooling process. In particular I emphasize those aspects of the work for which I was principally responsible.

  4. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Voutilainen, Mikko Antero

    2008-07-01

    This thesis studies the high-energy collisions of protons and antiprotons. The data used in the measurement were collected during 2004-2005 with the D0 detector at the Tevatron Collider of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and correspond to 0.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. High energy hadron collisions usually produce collimated sprays of particles called jets. The energy of the jets is measured using a liquid Argon-Uranium calorimeter and the production angle is determined with the help of silicon microstrip and scintillating fiber trackers. The inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions is measured as a function of jet transverse momentum pT in six bins of jet rapidity at the center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. The measurement covers jet transerve momenta from 50 GeV up to 600 GeV and jet rapidities up to |y| = 2.4. The data are collected using a set of seven single jet triggers. Event and jet cuts are applied to remove non-physical backgrounds and cosmic-ray interactions. The data are corrected for jet energy calibration, cut and trigger efficiencies and finite jet pT resolution. The corrections are determined from data and the methods are tested with Monte Carlo simulation. The main experimental challenges in the measurement are the calibration of jet energies and the determination of the jet pT resolution. New methods are developed for the jet energy calibration that take into account physical differences between the {gamma}+jet and dijet calibration samples arising from quark and gluon jet differences. The uncertainty correlations are studied and provided as a set of uncertainty sources. The production of particle jets in hadron collisions is described by the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). When the transverse jet momentum is large, the contributions from long-distance physics processes are small and the production rates of jets can be predicted by perturbative QCD. The

  5. A New Time-Dependent Scattering Theory: Application to the Capture of Antiprotons by Hydrogen Atoms and Helium Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, X. M.; Hino, K.; Toshima, N.

    2008-08-08

    We present a theoretical method for Coulomb three-body rearrangement collisions solving a Chew-Goldberger-type integral equation directly. The scattering boundary condition is automatically satisfied by adiabatically switching on the interaction between the projectile and target. Hence the outgoing wave function is obtained without the tedious procedure of adjusting the total wave function in the asymptotic region. All the dynamical information can be derived from the scattering wave function obtained on pseudo-spectral grids numerically. Using this method, we obtained the state-specified capture cross sections when antiprotons collide with hydrogen atoms or helium atoms. Differing from the capture processes of antiprotons by hydrogen atoms, the anomalous bumpy structures are revealed in the total angular momentum dependent capture cross sections by helium atoms. Further analysis shows that the bumps arise from the partial channel closing due to the removal of the energy degeneracy in the antiprotonic helium atom. The ejected electron energy distributions are also provided for the comparison with future experiments.

  6. Spectral Intensities of Antiprotons and the Nested Leaky-box Model for Cosmic Rays in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowsik, R.; Madziwa-Nussinov, T.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we note that the spectral intensities of antiprotons observed in Galactic cosmic rays in the energy range ˜1–300 GeV by BESS, PAMELA, and AMS instruments display nearly the same spectral shape as that generated by primary cosmic rays through their interaction with matter in the interstellar medium, without any significant modifications. More importantly, a constant residence time of ˜2.3 ± 0.7 million years in the Galactic volume, independent of the energy of cosmic rays, matches the observed intensities. A small additional component of secondary antiprotons in the energy range below 10 GeV, generated in cocoon-like regions surrounding the cosmic-ray sources, seems to be present. We discuss this result in the context of observations of other secondary components such as positrons and boron, and the bounds on anisotropy of cosmic rays. In the nested leaky-box model the spectral intensities of antiprotons and positrons can be interpreted as secondary products of cosmic-ray interactions.

  7. Shaping propagation invariant laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soskind, Michael; Soskind, Rose; Soskind, Yakov

    2015-11-01

    Propagation-invariant structured laser beams possess several unique properties and play an important role in various photonics applications. The majority of propagation invariant beams are produced in the form of laser modes emanating from stable laser cavities. Therefore, their spatial structure is limited by the intracavity mode formation. We show that several types of anamorphic optical systems (AOSs) can be effectively employed to shape laser beams into a variety of propagation invariant structured fields with different shapes and phase distributions. We present a propagation matrix approach for designing AOSs and defining mode-matching conditions required for preserving propagation invariance of the output shaped fields. The propagation matrix approach was selected, as it provides a more straightforward approach in designing AOSs for shaping propagation-invariant laser beams than the alternative technique based on the Gouy phase evolution, especially in the case of multielement AOSs. Several practical configurations of optical systems that are suitable for shaping input laser beams into a diverse variety of structured propagation invariant laser beams are also presented. The laser beam shaping approach was applied by modeling propagation characteristics of several input laser beam types, including Hermite-Gaussian, Laguerre-Gaussian, and Ince-Gaussian structured field distributions. The influence of the Ince-Gaussian beam semifocal separation parameter and the azimuthal orientation between the input laser beams and the AOSs onto the resulting shape of the propagation invariant laser beams is presented as well.

  8. Beam shaping for holographic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2014-09-01

    Uniform intensity of laser radiation is very important in holographic and interferometry technologies, therefore transformation of typical Gaussian distribution of a TEM00 laser to flat-top (top hat) is an actual technical task, it is solved by applying beam shaping optics. Holography and interferometry have specific requirements to a uniform laser beam, most important of them are flatness of phase front and extended depth of field. There are different refractive and diffractive beam shaping approaches used in laser industrial and scientific applications, but only few of them are capable to fulfil the optimum conditions for beam quality demanding holography and interferometry. We suggest applying refractive field mapping beam shapers piShaper, which operational principle presumes almost lossless transformation of Gaussian to flat-top beam with flatness of output wavefront, conserving of beam consistency, providing collimated low divergent output beam, high transmittance, extended depth of field, negligible wave aberration, and achromatic design provides capability to work with several lasers with different wavelengths simultaneously. This approach is used in SLM-based technologies of Computer Generated Holography, Dot-Matrix mastering of security holograms, holographic data storage, holographic projection, lithography, interferometric recording of Volume Bragg Gratings. High optical quality of resulting flat-top beam allows applying additional optical components to vary beam size and shape, thus adapting an optical system to requirements of a particular application. This paper will describe design basics of refractive beam shapers and optical layouts of their applying in holographic systems. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  9. Square shaped flat-top beam in refractive beam shapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2015-08-01

    Lossless transformation of round Gaussian to square shaped flat-top collimated beam is important in building highpower solid state laser systems to improve optical pumping or amplification. There are industrial micromachining applications like scribing, display repair, which performance is improved when a square shaped spot with uniform intensity is created. Proved beam shaping solutions to these techniques are refractive field mapping beam shapers having some important features: flatness of output phase front, small output divergence, high transmittance, extended depth of field, operation with TEM00 and multimode lasers. Usual approach to design refractive beam shapers implies that input and output beams have round cross-section, therefore the only way to create a square shaped output beam is using a square mask, which leads to essential losses. When an input laser beam is linearly polarized it is suggested to generate square shaped flat-top output by applying beam shaper lenses from birefringent materials or by using additional birefringent components. Due to birefringence there is introduced phase retardation in beam parts and is realized a square shaped interference pattern at the beam shaper output. Realization of this approach requires small phase retardation, therefore weak birefringence effect is enough and birefringent optical components, operating in convergent or divergent beams, can be made from refractive materials, which crystal optical axis is parallel to optical axis of entire beam shaper optical system. There will be considered design features of beam shapers creating square shaped flat-top beams. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  10. Plasma-beam traps and radiofrequency quadrupole beam coolers

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiore, M. Cavenago, M.; Comunian, M.; Chirulotto, F.; Galatà, A.; De Lazzari, M.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Stark, S.; Caruso, A.; Longhitano, A.; Cavaliere, F.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R.; Romé, M.

    2014-02-15

    Two linear trap devices for particle beam manipulation (including emittance reduction, cooling, control of instabilities, dust dynamics, and non-neutral plasmas) are here presented, namely, a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) beam cooler and a compact Penning trap with a dust injector. Both beam dynamics studies by means of dedicated codes including the interaction of the ions with a buffer gas (up to 3 Pa pressure), and the electromagnetic design of the RFQ beam cooler are reported. The compact multipurpose Penning trap is aimed to the study of multispecies charged particle samples, primarily electron beams interacting with a background gas and/or a micrometric dust contaminant. Using a 0.9 T solenoid and an electrode stack where both static and RF electric fields can be applied, both beam transport and confinement operations will be available. The design of the apparatus is presented.

  11. Beam-Beam Simulations with the Gaussian Code TRS

    SciTech Connect

    Matter, Regina S.

    2000-06-26

    The authors have summarized the main features of the beam-beam simulation code TRS and presented two sample applications to the PEP-II collider. The code has been successfully tested against analytic results and against other simulation codes whenever such comparisons are meaningful. The soft-gaussian approximation is believed to represent reliably incoherent beam-beam effects. The code has been used to perform studies for the PEP-II collider. For example, simulated tune scans reveal undesirable operating points due to beam blowup from synchrotron sidebands. The dynamical beta effect, clearly seen in these simulations, also influences the choice of a working point. The code has been used to establish the adequate beam separation at the parasitic collision points [24], and has been applied to the proposed muon collider [25], including the effects from the instability of the muon.

  12. Beam tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    A program for configuring the linac, based on previously run configurations for any desired beam was used during the past year. This program uses only a small number of empirical tunes to scale resonator fields to properly accelerate a beam with a different charge-to-mass (q/A) ratio from the original tune configuration. The program worked very well for the PII linac section where we can easily match a new beam`s arrival phase and velocity to the tuned value. It was also fairly successful for the Booster and ATLAS sections of the linac, but not as successful as for the PII linac. Most of the problems are associated with setting the beam arrival time correctly for each major linac section. This problem is being addressed with the development of the capacitive pickup beam phase monitor discussed above. During the next year we expect to improve our ability to quickly configure the linac for new beams and reduce the time required for linac tuning. Already the time required for linac tuning as a percentage of research hours has decreased from 22% in FY 1993 to 15% in the first quarter of FY 1995.

  13. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  14. Bunch length effects in the beam-beam compensation with an electron lens

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Montag, C.

    2010-02-25

    Electron lenses for the head-on beam-beam compensation are under construction at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The bunch length is of the same order as the {beta}-function at the interaction point, and a proton passing through another proton bunch experiences a substantial phase shift which modifies the beam-beam interaction. We review the effect of the bunch length in the single pass beam-beam interaction, apply the same analysis to a proton passing through a long electron lens, and study the single pass beam-beam compensation with long bunches. We also discuss the beam-beam compensation of the electron beam in an electron-ion collider ring.

  15. An investigation of antiprotons collisions with positronium atom in Debye plasma environments

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, M. K. Lin, Y.-C.; Ho, Y. K.

    2015-05-15

    The effects of Debye plasmas on antihydrogen formation and ionization processes are investigated in antiprotons (p{sup ¯}) and positronium (Ps) collisions. The classical trajectory Monte Carlo method with Debye Hückel potentials has been used for cross section calculations. In this process, antihydrogen formation and ionization cross sections have been calculated in unscreened as well as in Debye plasmas conditions in energies ranging from 1 to 500 keV. Partial cross sections for antihydrogen formation are also calculated which show the largest cross sections correspond to production of antihydrogen in the n = 2 (2s, 2p) states. Comparative study has been carried out to determine the differences of cross sections in screening and unscreening cases. The results show that the cross sections for both antihydrogen formation and positronium ionization depend on Debye screening lengths as well as on collision energies. The effects of plasmas conditions on antihydrogen formation and positronium ionization are explained in terms of classical trajectory framework. Our results for the unscreened case are in agreement with previously reported results.

  16. Exclusive Central $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ Production in Proton Antiproton Collisions at the CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Exclusive $\\pi^{=}\\pi^{-}$ production in proton-antiproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9 and 1.96 TeV in the Collider Detector at Fermilab has been measured. We select events with two particles with opposite charge in pseudorapidity region -1.3 < $\\eta$ < 1.3 with no other particles detected in -5.9 < $\\eta$ < 5.9. Particles are assumed to be pions. The $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$system is required to have rapidity -1.0 < $y$ < 1.0. The data are expected to be dominated by the double pomeron exchange mechanism. Therefore, the quantum numbers of the central state are constrained. The data extend up to dipion mass M($\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$) = 5000 MeV/$c^2$. Resonance structures consistent with $f_0$ and $f_2$(1270) mesons are visible. The results are valuable for light hadron spectroscopy and for providing information about the nature of the pomeron in a region between non-perturbative and perturbative quantum chromodynamics

  17. Study of Events with a Muon Accompanied by Jets at the CERN Proton-Antiproton Collider.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xin

    1990-01-01

    During the 1988 and 1989 running periods of the CERN Proton-Antiproton Collider, at sqrt {s} = 630 GeV, the UA1 experiment collected 4.7 pb^{-1} data with muon triggers. Events containing an energetic muon and hadronic jets are studied in detail. The data is found to be in good agreement with expectations from known physics processes, mainly from beauty and charm quark production and decay, and from backgrounds such as pion and kaon decays in flight. Based on the understanding of the sources of the muon+jet data sample, a search is carried out for the sixth quark, the top quark. No evidence of top quark production is found in this data sample. Combining this result with those from searches in other UA1 data samples (a total of 5.4 pb^{-1}, a lower limit on the mass of the top quark is obtained: m _{rm top} > 60 GeV/c^2 (95% confidence level). The muon+jet data sample is also used for a search for Z^0 to tau^+tau^- production in pp collisions, by selecting events where one tau decays to a muon and the other tau decays to hadrons. The data is found to be consistent with lepton universality. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253 -1690.).

  18. Paris NN potential constrained by recent antiprotonic-atom data and np total cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    El-Bennich, B.; Lacombe, M.; Loiseau, B.; Wycech, S.

    2009-05-15

    We report on an updated Paris NN optical potential. The long- and intermediate-range real parts are obtained by G-parity transformation of the Paris NN potential based on a theoretical dispersion-relation treatment of the correlated and uncorrelated two-pion exchange. The short-range imaginary potential parametrization results from the calculation of the NN annihilation box diagram into two mesons with a nucleon-antinucleon intermediate state in the crossed channel. The parametrized real and imaginary short range parts are determined by fitting not only the existing experimental data included in the 1999 version of the Paris NN potential, but also the recent antiprotonic-hydrogen data and np total cross sections. The description of these new observables is improved. Only this readjusted potential generates an isospin zero {sup 1}S{sub 0}, 52 MeV broad quasibound state at 4.8 MeV below the threshold. Recent BES data on J/{psi} decays could support the existence of such a state.

  19. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-16

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. Therefore, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transverse beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.

  20. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE PAGES

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-16

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. Therefore, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transversemore » beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.« less

  1. Beam-beam deflection and signature curves for elliptic beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, V.

    1990-10-22

    In this note we will present closed expressions for the beam-beam deflection angle for arbitrary elliptic beams including tilt. From these expressions signature curves, i.e., systematic deviations from the round beam deflection curve due to ellipticity or tilt are derived. In the course of the presentation we will prove that it is generally impossible to infer individual beam sizes from beam-beam deflection scans. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Beam test results of 3D silicon pixel sensors for future upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellist, C.; Gligorova, A.; Huse, T.; Pacifico, N.; Sandaker, H.

    2013-12-01

    3D silicon has undergone an intensive beam test programme which has resulted in the successful qualification for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) upgrade project to be installed in 2013-2014. This paper presents selected results from this study with a focus on the final IBL test beam of 2012 where IBL prototype sensors were investigated. 3D devices were studied with 4 GeV positrons at DESY and 120 GeV pions at the SPS at CERN. Measurements include tracking efficiency, charge sharing, time over threshold and cluster size distributions as a function of incident angle for IBL 3D design sensors. Studies of 3D silicon sensors in an anti-proton beam test for the AEgIS experiment are also presented.

  3. Recycler Electron Cooling Project: Mechanical vibrations in the Pelletron and their effect on the beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakevich, Grigory M.; Burov, A.; Boffo, C.; Joireman, P.; Saewert, G.; Schmidt, C.W.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    The Fermilab's Recycler ring will employ an electron cooler to cool stored 8.9 GeV antiprotons [1]. The cooler is based on an electrostatic accelerator, Pelletron [2], working in an energy-recovery regime. A full-scale prototype of the cooler has been assembled and commissioned in a separate building [3]. The main goal of the experiments with the prototype was to demonstrate stable operation with a 3.5 MeV, 0.5 A DC electron beam while preserving a high beam quality in the cooling section. The quality is characterized, first of all, by a spread of electron velocities in the cooling section, which may be significantly affected by mechanical vibration of the Pelletron elements. This paper describes the results of vibration measurements in the Pelletron terminal and correlates them with the beam motion in the cooling section.

  4. Applied Enzymology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manoharan, Asha; Dreisbach, Joseph H.

    1988-01-01

    Describes some examples of chemical and industrial applications of enzymes. Includes a background, a discussion of structure and reactivity, enzymes as therapeutic agents, enzyme replacement, enzymes used in diagnosis, industrial applications of enzymes, and immobilizing enzymes. Concludes that applied enzymology is an important factor in…

  5. Measurement of the Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Spectrum at Solar Minimum with a Long-Duration Balloon Flight over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Mitchell, J. W.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J. F.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E. S.; Shinoda, R.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, K.; Thakur, N.

    2012-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons (p-bar's) from 0.17 to 3.5 GeV has been measured using 7886 p-bar's detected by BESS-Polar II during a long-duration flight over Antarctica near solar minimum in December 2007 and January 2008. This shows good consistency with secondary p-bar calculations. Cosmologically primary p-bar's have been investigated by comparing measured and calculated p-bar spectra. BESS-Polar II data.show no evidence of primary p-bar's from the evaporation of primordial black holes.

  6. An experiment to measure the energy spectrum of cosmic ray antiprotons from 100 to 1000 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salamon, M. H.; Price, P. B.; Barwick, S. W.; Lowder, D. M.; Ahlen, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Production models were developed and the confirmation of each one had significant astrophysical impact. These include radical modifications of propagation models, cosmic ray antiprotons injection from neighboring domains of antimatter, p production by evaporating primordial black holes, and cosmic ray p's as annihilation products of supersymmetry particles that might make up the dark dynamical mass of the Galaxy. It is that p's originating from supersymmetric parents might have distinct spectral features that would survive solar modulation; in one model, higgsino annihilation proceeds through the bb quark-antiquark channel, producing a spectral bump at approx. 0.3 GeV in the p spectrum.

  7. Measurement of Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Spectrum at Solar Minimum with a Long-Duration Balloon Flight in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Mitchell, J. W.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J. F.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E. S.; Shinoda, R.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, K.; Thakur, N.

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons (p(raised bar)'s) collected by the BESS-Polar II instrument during a long-duration flight over Antarctica in the solar minimum period of December 2007 through January 2008. The p(raised bar) spectrum measured by BESS-Polar II shows good consistency with secondary p(raised bar) calculations. Cosmologically primary p(raised bar)'s have been searched for by comparing the observed and calculated p(raised bar) spectra. The BESSPolar II result shows no evidence of primary p(raised bar)'s originating from the evaporation of PBH.

  8. The W boson transverse momentum spectrum in proton-antiproton collisions at radical s = 1. 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Winer, B.L.

    1991-02-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) was used to measure the transverse momentum distribution of W boson produced in proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron collider. The W bosons were identified by the decay W {yields} e{nu}. The results are in good agreement with a next-to-leading order calculation. The cross section for W production with P{sub T} > 50 GeV/c is 423 {plus minus} 58 (stat.) {plus minus} 108 (sys.) pb. 58 refs., 53 figs., 16 tabs.

  9. Beam loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanGinneken, A.; Edwards, D.; Harrison, M.

    1989-04-01

    This paper presents results from simulations of beam losses during the operation of a superconducting accelerator. The calculations use a combination of hadron/electromagnetic cascade plus elastic scattering codes with accelerator tracking routines. These calculations have been used in conjunction with the design of the Fermilab Tevatron. First accelerator geometry is described. The rest of the paper discusses a detailed attempt to simulate a fast extraction cycle, essentially in chronological order. Beginning with an unperturbed beam, the simulation generates proton phase-space distributions incident on the electrostatic septum. These interact either elastically or inelastically with the septum wires, and the products of these interactions are traced through the machine. Where these leave the accelerator, energy deposition levels in the magnets are calculated together with the projected response of the beam-loss monitors in this region. Finally, results of the calculation are compared with experimental data. (AIP)

  10. Applied geophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Dohr, G.

    1981-01-01

    This book discusses techniques which play a predominant role in petroleum and natural gas exploration. Particular emphasis has been placed on modern seismics which today claims over 90% of man-power and financial resources in exploration. The processing of geophysical data is the most important factor in applied physics and emphasis is placed on it in the discussion of exploration problems. Chapter titles include: refraction seismics; reflection seismics; seismic field techniques; digital seismics-electronic data processing; digital seismics-practical application; recent developments, special seismic procedures; gravitational methods; magnetic methods; geoelectric methods; well-logging; and miscellaneous methods in applied geophysics (thermal methods, radioactive dating, natural radioactivity surveys, and surface detection of gas. (DMC)

  11. Applied Nanotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Hobson, David W; Roberts, Stephen M; Shvedova, Anna A; Warheit, David B; Hinkley, Georgia K; Guy, Robin C

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials, including nanoparticles and nanoobjects, are being incorporated into everyday products at an increasing rate. These products include consumer products of interest to toxicologists such as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, food, food packaging, household products, and so on. The manufacturing of products containing or utilizing nanomaterials in their composition may also present potential toxicologic concerns in the workplace. The molecular complexity and composition of these nanomaterials are ever increasing, and the means and methods being applied to characterize and perform useful toxicologic assessments are rapidly advancing. This article includes presentations by experienced toxicologists in the nanotoxicology community who are focused on the applied aspect of the discipline toward supporting state of the art toxicologic assessments for food products and packaging, pharmaceuticals and medical devices, inhaled nanoparticle and gastrointestinal exposures, and addressing occupational safety and health issues and concerns. This symposium overview article summarizes 5 talks that were presented at the 35th Annual meeting of the American College of Toxicology on the subject of "Applied Nanotechnology." PMID:26957538

  12. Non-Neutral Plasma Confinement In A Cusp-Trap And Possible Application To Anti-Hydrogen Beam Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Mohri, Akihiro; Kanai, Yasuyuki; Nakai, Yoichi; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2005-10-19

    A new scheme for synthesizing antihydrogen by trapping positrons and antiprotons in a field consisting of a magnetic quadrupole and an electric octupole (cusp -trap) is now under investigation. The total electric field of the octupole with the space charge of a nonneutral plasma composed of particles of the same sign of charge, i.e., positrons or mixture of electrons and antiprotons, is expected to form a potential well for particles of the opposite sign of charge. Particles trapped in the well are mixed with the present dense particles, where positrons and antiprotons will combine to produce antihydrogen atoms. A considerable fraction of antihydrogen atoms in low-field seeking states will be transported outside as a beam.Experiments on electron confinement in the cusp-trap were carried out in a strong magnetic quadrupole (3.8T at the maximum on the axis). The confinement time reached 400s for the trapped electron number N0= 3.6x107. The time decreased with N0 but it was still about 100s for N0= 1.6x108.An electron plasma initially formed around the zero-field point rapidly expanded and settled down onto a quasi-stable state. Cross-sectional density profiles had shapes like a high volcano with a big crater. Analysis of the density profile shows that a potential well for oppositely charged particles (positive ions in this case) is probably formed inside the trapped electrons.

  13. Measurement of Emittance of Beam in the Debuncher During Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Halling, Mike

    1991-12-11

    The emittance of antiprotons in the debuncher was measured using two methods during normal stacking conditions. With 2.3 seconds of cooling the vertical emittance was found to be 3.6 {pi} mm-mr using scraper D:TJ308, and 2.9 {pi} mm-mr using the profile on SEM806. With 6.9 seconds of cooling time time the measured horizontal emittance was 2.1 {pi} mm-mr using D:RJ306 v.s. 1.9 {pi} mm-mr using SEM806; but with 2.3 seconds of cooling the measured emittance in the debuncher was larger than in the DTOA line, 4.5 {pi} mm-mr v.s. 2.8 {pi} mm-mr. This suggests that some beam is being scraped on a horizontal aperture restriction someplace in the extraction process.

  14. Beam rotation and shear in a large electron beam diode

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, C.R.; Oona, H.; Shurter, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    The time averaged electron beam current distribution of one of the electron guns of the Large Aperture Module (LAM) of the Aurora laser was measured as part of a larger set of experiments designed to study the electron beam transport to and energy deposition in the LAM laser chamber. The LAM laser chamber has a 1-m {times} 1-m aperture and is pumped from two sides along a 2-m length. A 10 ga. stainless steel sheet was placed inside the laser chamber and served multiple purposes. First, it was used to convert high energy electrons into X-rays in order to make radiograms of the electron beam. Second, the sheet was used as a Faraday cup to measure the total beam current. Third, individual Faraday cups were mounted on the plate to sample the time history of the electron beam at various positions. Each of the LAM electron gun diodes produces a beam of 750 kV electrons with a total current of about 500 kA which is relatively uniform over the cathode area of 1 m {times} 2 m. An applied magnetic field of about 1300 Gauss is used to prevent pinch of the beam during beam transport.

  15. Transverse digital damper system for the Fermilab anti-proton recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, N.; Crisp, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    A transverse damping system is used in the Recycler at Fermilab to damp beam instabilities which arise from large beam intensities with electron cooling. Initial tests of electron cooling demonstrated beam loss due to transverse beam motion when the beam was cooled past the beam density threshold. The transverse damper system consists of two horizontal and two vertical pickups whose signals are amplified and passed into an analog hybrid to generate a difference signal from each pickup. The difference signals are input to a custom digital damper board which digitizes the analog signals at 212mhz, performs digital processing of the signals inside a large Altera Stratix II FPGA, then provides analog output at 212mhz via digital to analog converters. The digital damper output is sent to amplifiers which drive one horizontal and one vertical kicker. An initial prototype digital damper board has been successfully used in the Recycler for over six months. Currently, work is underway to replace the prototype board with an upgraded VME version.

  16. Applied Koopmanisma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budišić, Marko; Mohr, Ryan; Mezić, Igor

    2012-12-01

    A majority of methods from dynamical system analysis, especially those in applied settings, rely on Poincaré's geometric picture that focuses on "dynamics of states." While this picture has fueled our field for a century, it has shown difficulties in handling high-dimensional, ill-described, and uncertain systems, which are more and more common in engineered systems design and analysis of "big data" measurements. This overview article presents an alternative framework for dynamical systems, based on the "dynamics of observables" picture. The central object is the Koopman operator: an infinite-dimensional, linear operator that is nonetheless capable of capturing the full nonlinear dynamics. The first goal of this paper is to make it clear how methods that appeared in different papers and contexts all relate to each other through spectral properties of the Koopman operator. The second goal is to present these methods in a concise manner in an effort to make the framework accessible to researchers who would like to apply them, but also, expand and improve them. Finally, we aim to provide a road map through the literature where each of the topics was described in detail. We describe three main concepts: Koopman mode analysis, Koopman eigenquotients, and continuous indicators of ergodicity. For each concept, we provide a summary of theoretical concepts required to define and study them, numerical methods that have been developed for their analysis, and, when possible, applications that made use of them. The Koopman framework is showing potential for crossing over from academic and theoretical use to industrial practice. Therefore, the paper highlights its strengths in applied and numerical contexts. Additionally, we point out areas where an additional research push is needed before the approach is adopted as an off-the-shelf framework for analysis and design.

  17. Double excitation of He and H{sup {minus}} by fast proton and anti-proton impact

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, Ken-ichi |; Moribayashi, K.; Nagase, M.; Matsuzawa, M.; Kimura, M. |

    1993-12-31

    Theoretical investigation has been made on double excitation processes of He and H{sup {minus}} by fast proton and anti-proton impact in the MeV/u-energy region. The cross sections are calculated by use of both the close-coupling and the perturbation expansion methods, and the wave functions of target atoms are generated based on the hyperspherical coordinate method. The excitation to the 2p{sup 2} {sup 1}D{sup e} state of H{sup {minus}} by anti-proton impact is dominant by about three times in comparison with that by proton impact at the incident energy of 0.1 MeV/u. The spectral shape of an ejected electron from the 2s2p {sup 1}p{sup o} state of H{sup {minus}} at the incident energy of 1.5 MeV/u is consistent with the line profile of the H{sup {minus}} photodetachment observed by Bryant et al.

  18. Applied geodesy

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is based on the proceedings of the CERN Accelerator School's course on Applied Geodesy for Particle Accelerators held in April 1986. The purpose was to record and disseminate the knowledge gained in recent years on the geodesy of accelerators and other large systems. The latest methods for positioning equipment to sub-millimetric accuracy in deep underground tunnels several tens of kilometers long are described, as well as such sophisticated techniques as the Navstar Global Positioning System and the Terrameter. Automation of better known instruments such as the gyroscope and Distinvar is also treated along with the highly evolved treatment of components in a modern accelerator. Use of the methods described can be of great benefit in many areas of research and industrial geodesy such as surveying, nautical and aeronautical engineering, astronomical radio-interferometry, metrology of large components, deformation studies, etc.

  19. External Beam Therapy (EBT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z External Beam Therapy (EBT) External beam therapy (EBT) is a ... follow-up should I expect? What is external beam therapy and how is it used? External beam ...

  20. Limits on the antiproton/proton ratio in the cosmic radiation from 100 MeV to 1580 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salamon, M. H.; Mckee, S.; Musser, J. A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch, A.

    1990-01-01

    A search for antiprotons (p-bars) in the cosmic radiation with energies below 1580 MeV at the top of the atmosphere was performed using the PBAR balloon-borne magnetic spectrometer. No antiprotons were observed in 124,000 proton events. For the energy interval 100-640 MeV, an upper limit is reported to the p-bar/p ratio of 2.8 x 10 to the -5th at the top of the atmosphere, after correcting for instrumental efficiencies and contributions from secondary particles. No antiproton was observed in the energy interval 640-1580 MeV, which yields an upper limit to the p-bar/p ratio of 6.1 x 10. By combining both data sets, the limits on the p-bar/p ratio can be improved to 2.0 x 10 to the -5th. The detector performance and instrumental efficiencies of the individual detector components are discussed. A detail Monte Carlo calculation was used to evaluate the instrumental efficiency for both antiprotons and protons as a function of momentum.

  1. CEBAF beam loss accounting

    SciTech Connect

    Ursic, R.; Mahoney, K.; Hovater, C.; Hutton, A.; Sinclair, C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a beam loss accounting system for the CEBAF electron accelerator. This system samples the beam curent throughout the beam path and measures the beam current accurately. Personnel Safety and Machine Protection systems use this system to turn off the beam when hazardous beam losses occur.

  2. Search for azimuthal asymmetry of. pi. sup 0 -meson production in beam fragmentation region on polarized protons and deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Apokin, V.D.; Astafiev, O.V.; Belikov, N.I.; Chujko, B.V.; Derevshchikov, A.A.; Ermolin, Yu.V.; Grachev, O.A.; Matulenko, Yu.A.; Matveev, M.Yu.; Meshchanin, A.P.; Morozov, A.A.; Mochalov, V.V.; Mysnik, A.I.; Mjalitsyn, V.K.; Nurushev, S.B.; Prudkogliad, A.F.; Rykov, V.L.; Solovianov, V.L.; Soloviev, L.F.; Sytin, A.N.; Vasiliev, A.N. ); Borisov, N.S.; Kazarinov, Yu.M.; Khachaturov, B.A.; Liburg, M.Yu.; Matafonov, V.N.; Neganov, A.B.; Usov, Yu.A. ); Bagaturia, Yu.Sh.; Glonti, L.N.; Macharashvili, G.G.; Ocherashvili, A.I.; Sakhelashvili, T.M. )

    1989-05-01

    The inclusive production of {pi}{sup 0}'s in the interaction of unpolarized {pi}{sup {minus}}, {ital k}{sup {minus}}, and antiproton beams with polarized proton and deuteron targets has been studied at IHEP. The absolute value of the asymmetry for {pi}{sup 0} production in the polarized proton and deuteron targets is between zero and fiften percent for large {ital x}={ital P}*/{ital P}*{sub max} and small {ital P}{sub {ital t}} and independent on the quark flavor. Results are presented and compared with theoretical calculations. (AIP)

  3. Reducing the momentum spread of 8-GeV proton beam via the bunch rotation in Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Padilla, Rene; Pellico, William A.; Dey, Joseph E.; Koba, Kiyomi; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    It requires Booster to be able to deliver 8-GeV proton beams to Main Injector at the intensity of 4.5 x 10{sup 12} per batch with a longitudinal emittance of 0.12 eV {center_dot} sec and a momentum spread ({Delta}p) of 18 MeV in order to achieve the antiproton production rate of 24 x 10{sup 10} per hour. Bunch rotation via the RFSUM reduction at the end of a cycle has been implemented to reach the goal. Afterward, it is important for us to develop diagnostic tools and tuning capabilities to make bunch rotation operationally reliable.

  4. Golden beam data for proton pencil-beam scanning.

    PubMed

    Clasie, Benjamin; Depauw, Nicolas; Fransen, Maurice; Gomà, Carles; Panahandeh, Hamid Reza; Seco, Joao; Flanz, Jacob B; Kooy, Hanne M

    2012-03-01

    Proton, as well as other ion, beams applied by electro-magnetic deflection in pencil-beam scanning (PBS) are minimally perturbed and thus can be quantified a priori by their fundamental interactions in a medium. This a priori quantification permits an optimal reduction of characterizing measurements on a particular PBS delivery system. The combination of a priori quantification and measurements will then suffice to fully describe the physical interactions necessary for treatment planning purposes. We consider, for proton beams, these interactions and derive a 'Golden' beam data set. The Golden beam data set quantifies the pristine Bragg peak depth-dose distribution in terms of primary, multiple Coulomb scatter, and secondary, nuclear scatter, components. The set reduces the required measurements on a PBS delivery system to the measurement of energy spread and initial phase space as a function of energy. The depth doses are described in absolute units of Gy(RBE) mm² Gp⁻¹, where Gp equals 10⁹ (giga) protons, thus providing a direct mapping from treatment planning parameters to integrated beam current. We used these Golden beam data on our PBS delivery systems and demonstrated that they yield absolute dosimetry well within clinical tolerance.

  5. Golden beam data for proton pencil-beam scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clasie, Benjamin; Depauw, Nicolas; Fransen, Maurice; Gomà, Carles; Panahandeh, Hamid Reza; Seco, Joao; Flanz, Jacob B.; Kooy, Hanne M.

    2012-03-01

    Proton, as well as other ion, beams applied by electro-magnetic deflection in pencil-beam scanning (PBS) are minimally perturbed and thus can be quantified a priori by their fundamental interactions in a medium. This a priori quantification permits an optimal reduction of characterizing measurements on a particular PBS delivery system. The combination of a priori quantification and measurements will then suffice to fully describe the physical interactions necessary for treatment planning purposes. We consider, for proton beams, these interactions and derive a ‘Golden’ beam data set. The Golden beam data set quantifies the pristine Bragg peak depth-dose distribution in terms of primary, multiple Coulomb scatter, and secondary, nuclear scatter, components. The set reduces the required measurements on a PBS delivery system to the measurement of energy spread and initial phase space as a function of energy. The depth doses are described in absolute units of Gy(RBE) mm2 Gp-1, where Gp equals 109 (giga) protons, thus providing a direct mapping from treatment planning parameters to integrated beam current. We used these Golden beam data on our PBS delivery systems and demonstrated that they yield absolute dosimetry well within clinical tolerance.

  6. Generation of electron Airy beams.

    PubMed

    Voloch-Bloch, Noa; Lereah, Yossi; Lilach, Yigal; Gover, Avraham; Arie, Ady

    2013-02-21

    Within the framework of quantum mechanics, a unique particle wave packet exists in the form of the Airy function. Its counterintuitive properties are revealed as it propagates in time or space: the quantum probability wave packet preserves its shape despite dispersion or diffraction and propagates along a parabolic caustic trajectory, even though no force is applied. This does not contradict Newton's laws of motion, because the wave packet centroid propagates along a straight line. Nearly 30 years later, this wave packet, known as an accelerating Airy beam, was realized in the optical domain; later it was generalized to an orthogonal and complete family of beams that propagate along parabolic trajectories, as well as to beams that propagate along arbitrary convex trajectories. Here we report the experimental generation and observation of the Airy beams of free electrons. These electron Airy beams were generated by diffraction of electrons through a nanoscale hologram, which imprinted on the electrons' wavefunction a cubic phase modulation in the transverse plane. The highest-intensity lobes of the generated beams indeed followed parabolic trajectories. We directly observed a non-spreading electron wavefunction that self-heals, restoring its original shape after passing an obstacle. This holographic generation of electron Airy beams opens up new avenues for steering electronic wave packets like their photonic counterparts, because the wave packets can be imprinted with arbitrary shapes or trajectories.

  7. Beam dynamics for induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Edward P.

    2014-01-01

    An induction linac uses pulsed power that is applied directly, without any intervening resonant cavities, to accelerate a charged particle pulse. This approach can accommodate a large multiple-beam focusing lattice capable of transporting a large total beam current with a long pulse duration, which may be compressed while accelerating as well as afterward. The mean accelerating gradient is relatively low (less than about 1.5 MV/m), but the potential efficiency of energy transfer can be large up to about 50%. A multiple-beam induction linac is therefore a natural candidate accelerator for a heavy ion fusion (HIF) driver. However, the accelerated beams must meet stringent requirements on occupied phase space volume in order to be focused accurately and with small radius onto the fusion target. Dynamical considerations in the beam injector and linac, as well as in the final compression, final focus, and the fusion chamber, determine the quality of the driver beams as they approach the target. Requirements and tolerances derived from beam dynamics strongly influence the linac configuration and component design.

  8. Robinson instability and beam loading

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, B.C. III

    1985-01-01

    The Robinson instability problem is developed in three stages. The first step is to derive the synchrotron oscillation equations in the absence of beam loading (unloaded case). Next, the equations are evaluated in the presence of beam loading at the fundamental rf frequency (statically loaded case). Finally, the system is redeveloped taking into account beam loading at the synchrotron sidebands (dynamically loaded case). Following the theoretical development, the results are applied to calculate the synchrotron frequency in the presence of beam-loading, automatic-gain-control, and automatic-tune-control. The results of this calculation are compared with data from the NSLS vuv-ring, a 750 MeV electron storage ring. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  9. Composite box beam analysis - Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauchau, O. A.; Coffenberry, B. S.; Rehfield, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    Beam theory is widely used as a first approximation in numerous structural applications. When applied to composite beams, the accuracy of beam theory becomes questionable because (1) the shearing and warping deformations become significant, as the shearing stiffness of composite laminates is often very low, and (2) several elastic couplings can occur that strongly influence the behavior of composite beams. The torsional behavior of thin-walled composite beams has important implications for aeronautical structures and is deeply modified by the above nonclassical effects. This paper presents two comprehensive analysis methodologies for composite beams and describes experimental results obtained from a thin-walled, rectangular cross-sectional beam. The theoretical predictions are found in good agreement with the observed twist and strain distributions. Out-of-plane torsional warping of the cross-section is found to be the key factor for an accurate modeling of the torsional behavior of such structures.

  10. Spiral laser beams in inhomogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Mahalov, Alex; Suazo, Erwin; Suslov, Sergei K

    2013-08-01

    Explicit solutions of the inhomogeneous paraxial wave equation in a linear and quadratic approximation are applied to wave fields with invariant features, such as oscillating laser beams in a parabolic waveguide and spiral light beams in varying media. A similar effect of superfocusing of particle beams in a thin monocrystal film, harmonic oscillations of cold trapped atoms, and motion in magnetic field are also mentioned. PMID:23903135

  11. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, Richard A. Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify

  12. Signatures of a Two Million Year Old Supernova in the Spectra of Cosmic Ray Protons, Antiprotons, and Positrons.

    PubMed

    Kachelrieß, M; Neronov, A; Semikoz, D V

    2015-10-30

    The locally observed cosmic ray spectrum has several puzzling features, such as the excess of positrons and antiprotons above ~20  GeV and the discrepancy in the slopes of the spectra of cosmic ray protons and heavier nuclei in the TeV-PeV energy range. We show that these features are consistently explained by a nearby source which was active approximately two million years ago and has injected (2-3)×10^{50} erg in cosmic rays. The transient nature of the source and its overall energy budget point to the supernova origin of this local cosmic ray source. The age of the supernova suggests that the local cosmic ray injection was produced by the same supernova that has deposited ^{60}Fe isotopes in the deep ocean crust.

  13. Phenomenological study of exclusive binary light particle production from antiproton-proton annihilation at FAIR/PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Wang

    2016-08-01

    Exclusive binary annihilation reactions induced by antiprotons of momentum from 1.5 to 15 GeV/c can be extensively investigated at FAIR/PANDA [1]. We are especially interested in the channel of charged pion pairs. Whereas this very probable channel constitutes the major background for other processes of interest in the PANDA experiment, it carries unique physical information on the quark content of proton, allowing to test different models (quark counting rules, statistical models,..). To study the binary reactions of light meson formation, we are developing an effective Lagrangian model based on Feynman diagrams which takes into account the virtuality of the exchanged particles. Regge factors [2] and form factors are introduced with parameters which may be adjusted on the existing data. We present preliminary results of our formalism for different reactions of light meson production leading to reliable predictions of cross sections, energy and angular dependencies in the PANDA kinematical range.

  14. Subthreshold antiproton production in /sup 28/Si+/sup 28/Si collisions at 2. 1 GeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.B.; Carlson, S.; Gordon, J.; Hallman, T.; Igo, G.; Kirk, P.; Krebs, G.F.; Lindstrom, P.; McMahan, M.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; and others

    1989-04-17

    We report on the first observation of subthreshold antiproton production in nucleus-nucleus collisions. This measurement was made for the system /sup 28/Si+/sup 28/Si at a bombarding energy of 2.1 GeV/nucleon (kinetic energy per NN pair in the c.m. frame /similar to/850 MeV). A differential cross section d/sup 2/sigma/dP d ..cap omega.. of 80 +- 40 nb/sr (GeV/c) was measured for p-bar production at 1.9 GeV/c and 0/sup 0/. This result is 3 orders of magnitude larger than that predicted by a calculation incorporating internal motion of the nucleons in the colliding nuclei.

  15. Observation and study of bottom-meson decays to a charm meson, a proton-antiproton pair, and pions

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tae Min

    2010-04-27

    Bottom-meson decays with baryons show two unusual features—the branching fractions are enhanced for multibody decays and the baryon-antibaryon subsystem recoils against the other decay products—and their reasons are not yet well understood. Moreover, measurements using explicit reconstruction techniques constitute only about 1% out of about 8% of such decays. This Dissertation reports the study of ten bottom-meson decays (labeled 0– 9) to a proton-antiproton pair, a charm meson, and a system of up to two pions, using the BABAR Experiment’s 455×106 BB pairs produced with the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  16. Signatures of a Two Million Year Old Supernova in the Spectra of Cosmic Ray Protons, Antiprotons, and Positrons.

    PubMed

    Kachelrieß, M; Neronov, A; Semikoz, D V

    2015-10-30

    The locally observed cosmic ray spectrum has several puzzling features, such as the excess of positrons and antiprotons above ~20  GeV and the discrepancy in the slopes of the spectra of cosmic ray protons and heavier nuclei in the TeV-PeV energy range. We show that these features are consistently explained by a nearby source which was active approximately two million years ago and has injected (2-3)×10^{50} erg in cosmic rays. The transient nature of the source and its overall energy budget point to the supernova origin of this local cosmic ray source. The age of the supernova suggests that the local cosmic ray injection was produced by the same supernova that has deposited ^{60}Fe isotopes in the deep ocean crust. PMID:26565453

  17. Midrapidity antiproton-to-proton ratio from Au+Au collisions at sqrt [s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Bossingham, R; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Caines, H; de la Barca Sánchez, M C; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Conin, L; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Ferguson, M I; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Greiner, D; Grigoriev, V; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Igo, G J; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Khodinov, A; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T; Leontiev, V M; Leszczynski, P; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lynn, D; Madansky, L; Majka, R; Maliszewski, A; Margetis, S; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; McShane, T S; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Nystrand, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Ogilvie, C A; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Pinganaud, W; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Radomski, S; Rai, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Stroebele, H; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Symons, T J; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Trainor, T; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zhang, J; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-05-21

    We report results on the ratio of midrapidity antiproton-to-proton yields in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)] = 130 GeV per nucleon pair as measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. Within the rapidity and transverse momentum range of /y/<0.5 and 0.4

  18. Properties of W + jet events in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Drucker, R. B.

    1993-11-22

    W boson + QCD Jet events, produced in 1.8 TeV proton-antiproton collisions and measured by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), were used to measure the center-of-mass production angle of the W + jet system, and were also used to place limits on the production of excited quark states. The center-of-mass production angular distribution agrees well with leading order and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. Excited quark states were searched for in the reaction q + g {yields} q* {yields} q + W. Upper limits on the q* cross section, as a function of the q* mass, are shown. Comparison with a theoretical prediction for q* production excludes excited quark states with a mass in the range 150--530 GeV/c{sup 2}, at 95% confidence.

  19. Beam-Bem interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Jin; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    In high energy storage-ring colliders, the nonlinear effect arising from beam-beam interactions is a major source that leads to the emittance growth, the reduction of beam life time, and limits the collider luminosity. In this paper, two models of beam-beam interactions are introduced, which are weak-strong and strong-strong beam-beam interactions. In addition, space-charge model is introduced.

  20. Simulation of radiolysis in the near field of a nuclear repository and the spectrophotometric investigation of the formation of radiolysis by-products by applying high energy beam-like experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, T.; Paviet-Hartmann, P.; Wetteland, C. J.; Lu, N.; Ware, S. D.; Sage, S.

    2002-01-01

    In the event of inundation of a nuclear waste repository located in a geological salt formation, chloride brines in contact with nuclear waste will be exposed to different kind of radiation depending on waste-form conditions. Ionizing radiations, however, have the ability to significantly affect the groundwater chemistry of the brines through the formation of free radicals, ionic- and molecular species; among them the typical byproducts of a-radiolysis: hypochlorite (OC1-) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl). In the absence of effects which arc supposed to dominate the redox conditions in the repository (corrosion of metals, microbial activity) the presence of OC1- is known to increase the redox potential of the brines and further to influence the stability of actinide waste-forms by accelerating their dissolution arid - most importantly - to oxidize actinides to their higlier oxidation states, whicli are gcncrally the most soluble ones. We are presenting a new approach to determine the radiation-induced formation rates of hypochlorite and hypochlorous acid as a first step to assess long-term steady-state repository conditions. To ovt:rcome the serious constraints of conventional radiocheinical work with GBq activity levels, we are simulating a-irradiation of chloride brines by the adaptation of ion-beam-line experiments. Therefore, we irradiate liquid chloride brine targets with 5 MeV protons, and 5 MeV helium ions. The irradiation-induced formation rates of OCX- and HOC1 were determined by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. To give an example, the measured G values for the HOCl formation in 3.7 M MgC12.6H20, pW 4.42, irradiated by 5 MeV protons was determined to be 0.0374 {+-} 0.0022, and 0.0536 {+-} 49 by irradiating with 5 MeV helium. The distinguished ltnowledge about the radiation-induced production of oxo-chloride species is the first step towards the assumption of their steady-state concentrations in the irradiation field of the repository.

  1. Optimization of beam configuration in laser fusion based on the laser beam pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Teng; Xu, Lixin; Wang, Anting; Gu, Chun; Wang, Shengbo; Liu, Jing; Wei, Ankun

    2013-12-15

    A simple method based on the laser beam pattern is proposed and numerically demonstrated to optimize a beam configuration for direct drive laser fusion. In this method, both the geometrical factor G{sub l} and the single beam factor B{sub l} are considered. By diminishing the product of B{sub l}·G{sub l}, the irradiation nonuniformity can be decreased to the order of 10{sup −5}. This optimization method can be applied on the design of irradiation systems for an arbitrary number of beams and any axially symmetric beam patterns.

  2. Elastic antiproton-proton photoproduction between threshold and 4.8 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, D. P.; Dainton, J. B.; Lee, L. C. Y.; Marshall, R.; Thompson, J. C.; Williams, D. T.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Frost, G.; Newton, D.; Patrick, G. N.; Pearce, G. F.; Sloan, T.; Brookes, G. R.; Haynes, W. J.; Wilkes, P. B.

    1980-03-01

    The cross section for the process γ p → overlineppp has been measured from threshold up to 4.8 GeV using a tagged photon beam and a multiparticle spectrometer which detected all final state particles. The production cross section rises rapidly from threshold to a constant value of 35 nb. No evidence is found in the mass spectra for the production of narrow meson resonances decaying into overlinepp.

  3. Simple beam profile monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B.

    2012-12-19

    An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

  4. Bunched beam echos in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Kewisch, J.; Brennan, J.M.

    1998-08-01

    Beam echos have been measured at FNAL and CERN in coasting beams. A coherent oscillation introduced by a short RF burst decoheres quickly, but a coherent echo of this oscillation can be observed if the decohered oscillation is bounced off a second RF burst. In this report the authors describe first longitudinal echo measurements of bunched beam in the AGS accelerator. They applied a method proposed by Stupakov for transverse beam echos, where the initial oscillation is produced by a dipole kick and is bounced off a quadrupole kick. In the longitudinal case the dipole and quadrupole kicks are produced by cavities operating at a 90 and 0{degree} phase shift, respectively.

  5. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Wetherington, Jr., Grady R.

    1985-01-01

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  6. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  7. Beam imaging sensor

    DOEpatents

    McAninch, Michael D.; Root, Jeffrey J.

    2016-07-05

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  8. NK Muon Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, G.

    1988-09-28

    The NK Muon Beam will be a modified version of the existing NT beam line. The decision to employ a modified version of the NT beam line was made based on considerations of cost and availability of the beam line. Preliminary studies considered use of other beam lines, e.g., the NW beam line, and even of moving the bubble chamber with its superconducting coils but were rejected for reasons such as cost, personnel limitations, and potential conflicts with other users.

  9. Tunable beam displacer

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar-Serrano, Luis José; Valencia, Alejandra; Torres, Juan P.

    2015-03-15

    We report the implementation of a tunable beam displacer, composed of a polarizing beam splitter (PBS) and two mirrors, that divides an initially polarized beam into two parallel beams whose separation can be continuously tuned. The two output beams are linearly polarized with either vertical or horizontal polarization and no optical path difference is introduced between them. The wavelength dependence of the device as well as the maximum separation between the beams achievable is limited mainly by the PBS characteristics.

  10. Rapidity and centrality dependence of proton and anti-proton production from 197Au+197Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 130 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Corral, M.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; et al.

    2003-06-20

    We report on the rapidity and centrality dependence of proton and anti-proton transverse mass distributions from {sup 197}Au + {sup 197}Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV as measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. Our results are from the rapidity and transverse momentum range of |y| < 0.5 and 0.35 < p{sub t} < 1.00 GeV/c. For both protons and anti-protons, transverse mass distributions become more convex from peripheral to central collisions demonstrating characteristics of collective expansion. The measured rapidity distributions and the mean transverse momenta versus rapidity are flat within |y| < 0.5. Comparisons of our data with results from model calculations indicate that in order to obtain a consistent picture of the proton(anti-proton) yields and transverse mass distributions the possibility of pre-hadronic collective expansion may have to be taken into account.

  11. Classical-trajectory Monte Carlo calculations of the electronic stopping cross section for keV protons and antiprotons impinging on hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Custidiano, Ernesto R.; Jakas, Mario M.

    2005-08-15

    Using the classical-trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method, the electronic stopping cross sections of hydrogen atoms by protons and antiprotons impact are calculated. The results show that the CTMC method compares fairly well with previous quantum mechanics calculations of the stopping cross sections for the same colliding pairs. It turns out therefore that the CTMC method constitutes a reliable and, computationally speaking, convenient alternative to calculate the stopping of ions in matter. The present results also show that the stopping appears to be particularly sensitive to the angular momentum (L) of the electron orbit. In the case of protons, the highest sensitivity to L becomes evident around the energy of the maximum stopping. While for antiprotons the largest sensitivity of the stopping to L is observed down at low bombarding energies, i.e., below 10 keV.

  12. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR HIGH POWER HADRON BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will describe developments in the beam diagnostics which support the understanding and operation of high power hadron accelerators. These include the measurement of large dynamic range transverse and longitudinal beam profiles, beam loss detection, and non-interceptive diagnostics.

  13. Propagation-invariant beams with quantum pendulum spectra: from Bessel beams to Gaussian beam-beams.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Mark R; Ring, James D

    2013-09-01

    We describe a new class of propagation-invariant light beams with Fourier transform given by an eigenfunction of the quantum mechanical pendulum. These beams, whose spectra (restricted to a circle) are doubly periodic Mathieu functions in azimuth, depend on a field strength parameter. When the parameter is zero, pendulum beams are Bessel beams, and as the parameter approaches infinity, they resemble transversely propagating one-dimensional Gaussian wave packets (Gaussian beam-beams). Pendulum beams are the eigenfunctions of an operator that interpolates between the squared angular momentum operator and the linear momentum operator. The analysis reveals connections with Mathieu beams, and insight into the paraxial approximation.

  14. A Search for universal extra dimensions in the multi-lepton channel from proton anti-proton collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chun

    2005-12-01

    In this thesis we present the results of a search for Universal Extra Dimensions (UED) with compactification radius near the TeV scale in the multi-lepton channel from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. This is the first UED search in the multi-lepton channel performed at the Tevatron.

  15. Composite vortex beams by coaxial superposition of Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sujuan; Miao, Zhuang; He, Chao; Pang, Fufei; Li, Yingchun; Wang, Tingyun

    2016-03-01

    We propose the generation of novel composite vortex beams by coaxial superposition of Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams with common waist position and waist parameter. Computer-generated holography by conjugate-symmetric extension is applied to produce the holograms of several composite vortex beams. Utilizing the holograms, fantastic light modes including optical ring lattice, double dark-ring and double bright-ring composite vortex beams etc. are numerically reconstructed. The generated composite vortex beams show diffraction broadening with some of them showing dynamic rotation around beam centers while propagating. Optical experiments based on a computer-controlled spatial light modulator (SLM) verify the numerical results. These novel composite vortex beams possess more complicated distribution and more controllable parameters for their potential application in comparison to conventional optical ring lattice.

  16. Feasibility study of beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron with wires

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Tanaji; Erdelyi, Bela; /Northern Illinois U.

    2005-05-01

    We explore the possibility of compensating long-range beam-beam interactions in the Tevatron by current carrying wires. Compensation strategies depend on whether the compensation is done close to the interaction or nonlocally, on the aspect ratio of the strong beam and on other details. Strategies for each case have been developed and applied to the Tevatron. We discuss the results of these strategies at injection and collision energy.

  17. Antenna Beam Coverage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, Polly; Motamedi, Masoud

    1990-01-01

    The strawman Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) design calls for the use of a CONUS beam for transmission between the supplier and the satellite and for fixed beams for transmission between the basic personal terminal and the satellite. The satellite uses a 3 m main reflector for transmission at 20 GHz and a 2 m main reflector for reception at 30 GHz. There are several types of spot beams under consideration for the PASS system besides fixed beams. The beam pattern of a CONUS coverage switched beam is shown along with that of a scanning beam. A switched beam refers to one in which the signal from the satellite is connected alternatively to various feed horns. Scanning beams are taken to mean beams whose footprints are moved between contiguous regions in the beam's coverage area. The advantages and disadvantages of switched and/or scanning beams relative to fixed beams. The consequences of using switched/scanning in lieu of fixed beams in the PASS design and attempts are made to evaluate the listed advantages and disadvantages. Two uses of switched/scanning beams are examined. To illustrate the implications of switched beams use on PASS system design, operation at two beam scan rates is explored.

  18. Measurement of Long-Range Angular Correlation and Quadrupole Anisotropy of Pions and (Anti)Protons in Central d +Au Collisions at √{sN N }=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'Ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Appelt, E.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Ben-Benjamin, J.; Bennett, R.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Broxmeyer, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Castera, P.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Harper, C.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; John, D.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotov, D.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, T.; Savastio, M.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shim, H. H.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Sodre, T.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Utsunomiya, K.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We present azimuthal angular correlations between charged hadrons and energy deposited in calorimeter towers in central d +Au and minimum bias p +p collisions at √{sN N }=200 GeV . The charged hadron is measured at midrapidity |η |<0.35 , and the energy is measured at large rapidity (-3.7 <η <-3.1 , Au-going direction). An enhanced near-side angular correlation across |Δ η |>2.75 is observed in d +Au collisions. Using the event plane method applied to the Au-going energy distribution, we extract the anisotropy strength v2 for inclusive charged hadrons at midrapidity up to pT=4.5 GeV /c . We also present the measurement of v2 for identified π± and (anti)protons in central d +Au collisions, and observe a mass-ordering pattern similar to that seen in heavy-ion collisions. These results are compared with viscous hydrodynamic calculations and measurements from p +Pb at √{sN N }=5.02 TeV . The magnitude of the mass ordering in d +Au is found to be smaller than that in p +Pb collisions, which may indicate smaller radial flow in lower energy d +Au collisions.

  19. Measurement of long-range angular correlation and quadrupole anisotropy of pions and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta’ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-05-12

    In this study, we present azimuthal angular correlations between charged hadrons and energy deposited in calorimeter towers in central d+Au and aluminum bias p+p collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. The charged hadron is measured at midrapidity lηl < 0.35, and the energy us measured at large rapidity (–3.7 < η < –3.1, Au-going direction). An enhanced near-side angular correlation across lΔηl > 2.75 is observed in d+Au collisions. Using the event plane method applied to the Au-going energy distribution, we extract the anisotropy strength v₂ for inclusive charged hadrons at midrapidity up to pT = 4.5 GeV/c. We alsomore » present the measurement of v₂ for identified π± and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions, and observe a mass-ordering pattern similar to that seen in heavy ion collisions. These results are compared with viscous hydrodynamic calculations and measurements from p+Pb at √sNN = 5.02 TeV. The magnitude of the mass-ordering in d+Au is found to be smaller than that in p+Pb collisions, which may indicate smaller radial flow in lower energy d+Au collisions.« less

  20. Measurement of Long-Range Angular Correlation and Quadrupole Anisotropy of Pions and (Anti)Protons in Central d+Au Collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Ta'ani, H; Alexander, J; Andrews, K R; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Appelt, E; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Ben-Benjamin, J; Bennett, R; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Broxmeyer, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Castera, P; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gal, C; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Harper, C; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; John, D; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D J; Kim, E-J; Kim, Y-J; Kim, Y K; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotov, D; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mitchell, J T; Miyachi, Y; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, T; Savastio, M; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shim, H H; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Sodre, T; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tennant, E; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Utsunomiya, K; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vossen, A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Yoo, J S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zelenski, A; Zhou, S

    2015-05-15

    We present azimuthal angular correlations between charged hadrons and energy deposited in calorimeter towers in central d+Au and minimum bias p+p collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 GeV. The charged hadron is measured at midrapidity |η|<0.35, and the energy is measured at large rapidity (-3.7<η<-3.1, Au-going direction). An enhanced near-side angular correlation across |Δη|>2.75 is observed in d+Au collisions. Using the event plane method applied to the Au-going energy distribution, we extract the anisotropy strength v_{2} for inclusive charged hadrons at midrapidity up to p_{T}=4.5 GeV/c. We also present the measurement of v_{2} for identified π^{±} and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions, and observe a mass-ordering pattern similar to that seen in heavy-ion collisions. These results are compared with viscous hydrodynamic calculations and measurements from p+Pb at sqrt[s_{NN}]=5.02 TeV. The magnitude of the mass ordering in d+Au is found to be smaller than that in p+Pb collisions, which may indicate smaller radial flow in lower energy d+Au collisions.

  1. Measurement of Long-Range Angular Correlation and Quadrupole Anisotropy of Pions and (Anti)Protons in Central d+Au Collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Ta'ani, H; Alexander, J; Andrews, K R; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Appelt, E; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Ben-Benjamin, J; Bennett, R; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Broxmeyer, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Castera, P; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gal, C; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Harper, C; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; John, D; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D J; Kim, E-J; Kim, Y-J; Kim, Y K; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotov, D; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mitchell, J T; Miyachi, Y; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, T; Savastio, M; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shim, H H; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Sodre, T; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tennant, E; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Utsunomiya, K; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vossen, A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Yoo, J S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zelenski, A; Zhou, S

    2015-05-15

    We present azimuthal angular correlations between charged hadrons and energy deposited in calorimeter towers in central d+Au and minimum bias p+p collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 GeV. The charged hadron is measured at midrapidity |η|<0.35, and the energy is measured at large rapidity (-3.7<η<-3.1, Au-going direction). An enhanced near-side angular correlation across |Δη|>2.75 is observed in d+Au collisions. Using the event plane method applied to the Au-going energy distribution, we extract the anisotropy strength v_{2} for inclusive charged hadrons at midrapidity up to p_{T}=4.5 GeV/c. We also present the measurement of v_{2} for identified π^{±} and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions, and observe a mass-ordering pattern similar to that seen in heavy-ion collisions. These results are compared with viscous hydrodynamic calculations and measurements from p+Pb at sqrt[s_{NN}]=5.02 TeV. The magnitude of the mass ordering in d+Au is found to be smaller than that in p+Pb collisions, which may indicate smaller radial flow in lower energy d+Au collisions. PMID:26024164

  2. Beam purification by photodetachment (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Beene, J. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Havener, C. C.; Andersson, P.; Forstner, O.; Gottwald, T.; Wendt, K.; Hanstorp, D.; Lindahl, A. O.

    2012-02-15

    Ion beam purity is of crucial importance to many basic and applied studies in nuclear science. Selective photodetachment has been proposed to suppress unwanted species in negative ion beams while preserving the intensity of the species of interest. A highly efficient technique based on photodetachment in a gas-filled radio frequency quadrupole ion cooler has been demonstrated. In off-line experiments with stable ions, up to 10{sup 4} times suppression of the isobar contaminants in a number of interesting radioactive negative ion beams has been demonstrated. For selected species, this technique promises new experimental possibilities in studies on exotic nuclei, accelerator mass spectrometry, and fundamental properties of negative atomic and molecular ions.

  3. ALCBEAM - Neutral beam formation and propagation code for beam-based plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespamyatnov, I. O.; Rowan, W. L.; Liao, K. T.

    2012-03-01

    the ion source by high voltage applied to the extraction and accelerating grids. The current distribution of a single beamlet emitted from a single pore of IOS depends on the shape of the plasma boundary in the emission region. Total beam extracted by IOS is calculated at every point of 3D mesh as sum of all contributions from each grid pore. The code effectively unifies the ion beam formation, extraction and neutralization processes with neutral beam attenuation and excitation in plasma and neutral gas and beam stopping by the beam apertures. Running time: 10 min for a standard run.

  4. Beam based alignment of sector-1 of the SLC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Emma, P.

    1992-03-01

    A technique is described which uses the beam to simultaneously measure quadrupole magnet and beam position monitor (BPM) transverse misalignments. The technique is applied to sector-1 of the SLC linac where simultaneous acceleration of electron and positron beams with minimal steering elements and BPMs makes quadrupole alignment critical for high transmission of the large transverse emittance positron beam. Simulation results as well as measurements are presented.

  5. On Solutions for the Transient Response of Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Robert W.

    1959-01-01

    Williams type modal solutions of the elementary and Timoshenko beam equations are presented for the response of several uniform beams to a general applied load. Example computations are shown for a free-free beam subject to various concentrated loads at its center. Discussion includes factors influencing the convergence of modal solutions and factors to be considered in a choice of beam theory. Results obtained by two numerical procedures, the traveling-wave method and Houbolt's method, are also presented and discussed.

  6. Telecommunication using muon beams

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location.

  7. Tumortherapy with ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, G.; Heary Ion Therapy Collaboration

    2000-11-01

    Beams of heavy-charged particles like protons or carbon ions represent the optimum tool for the treatment of deep-seated inoperable tumors: in contrast to the conventionally used photons the dose increases along with the penetration depth through the body, culminating in a sharp maximum at the end of the particle range. In order to achieve a precisely conform irradiation of the selected target volume, this maximum can be shifted in depth by energy variation and distributed laterally through magnetic deflection of the particle beam. Because carbon ions have a lateral scattering of only about 1 mm at 10 cm depth they offer the most conform irradiation. In addition to this excellent physical selectivity the biological efficiency concerning cell killing increases towards the end of the carbon ions' range. Therefore, the increase in dose is potentiated by an increase in biological efficiency. Finally, the stopping of the carbon ions can be monitored by tracing a small amount of β + active 10C and 11C ions which are produced in nuclear reactions with atoms of the penetrated tissue. This β + distribution can be visualized by applying PET-techniques, thus allowing a good control of the beam distribution. At GSI Darmstadt a heavy-ion therapy unit has been designed and constructed in collaboration with the Radiological Clinic and the DKFZ Heidelberg and the FZR Dresden. The layout of this facility as well as the treatment of now more than 30 patients will be reported on. The proposal for the layout of a dedicated medical facility at Heidelberg will be presented

  8. Electron beam modeling on LTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalkowski, Gregory; Majeski, Richard; Schmitt, John

    2014-10-01

    The lithium tokamak experiment (LTX) is a low aspect ratio tokamak with a steel clad copper shell that can be heated to 300-400 °C and coated with lithium. The lithium coating has been shown to decrease impurities in the plasma and decrease the recycling coefficient, improving plasma performance. The coating is applied to the walls by heating the shells, then using an electron beam to evaporate a pool of lithium located at the bottom of the shell. The beam is steered using the magnetic field generated by the field coils. This method allows for rapid evaporation of the lithium, producing a 50-100 nm coating in approximately 5 minutes. The current electron beam system can only coat half of the shell surface. A new electron beam system has been installed on LTX to coat the remaining shell surface. A model of this electron gun has been created using the AMaze program series (Field Precision LCC). The model will be used to find the magnetic fields needed to steer the electron beam produced by the gun to the lithium pool. The model will also show the electropotential produced both at the electron gun head and in the vessel. The model may also be used to find the dispersion of the beam and therefore the effective power density of the beam as it impacts the lithium pool. Supported by US DOE Contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC52-07NA27344 and in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship.

  9. Beam loss reduction by magnetic shielding using beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, J.; Ogiwara, N.; Hotchi, H.; Hayashi, N.; Kinsho, M.

    2014-11-01

    One of the main sources of beam loss in high power accelerators is unwanted stray magnetic fields from magnets near the beam line, which can distort the beam orbit. The most effective way to shield such magnetic fields is to perfectly surround the beam region without any gaps with a soft magnetic high permeability material. This leads to the manufacture of vacuum chambers (beam pipes and bellows) with soft magnetic materials. A Ni-Fe alloy (permalloy) was selected for the material of the pipe parts and outer bellows parts, while a ferritic stainless steel was selected for the flanges. An austenitic stainless steel, which is non-magnetic material, was used for the inner bellows for vacuum tightness. To achieve good magnetic shielding and vacuum performances, a heat treatment under high vacuum was applied during the manufacturing process of the vacuum chambers. Using this heat treatment, the ratio of the integrated magnetic flux density along the beam orbit between the inside and outside of the beam pipe and bellows became small enough to suppress beam orbit distortion. The outgassing rate of the materials with this heat treatment was reduced by one order magnitude compared to that without heat treatment. By installing the beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials as part of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron beam line, the closed orbit distortion (COD) was reduced by more than 80%. In addition, a 95.5% beam survival ratio was achieved by this COD improvement.

  10. Parabolic scaling beams.

    PubMed

    Gao, Nan; Xie, Changqing

    2014-06-15

    We generalize the concept of diffraction free beams to parabolic scaling beams (PSBs), whose normalized intensity scales parabolically during propagation. These beams are nondiffracting in the circular parabolic coordinate systems, and all the diffraction free beams of Durnin's type have counterparts as PSBs. Parabolic scaling Bessel beams with Gaussian apodization are investigated in detail, their nonparaxial extrapolations are derived, and experimental results agree well with theoretical predictions.

  11. Automated beam builder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muench, W. K.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements for the space fabrication of large space structures are considered with emphasis on the design, development, manufacture, and testing of a machine which automatically produces a basic building block aluminum beam. Particular problems discussed include those associated with beam cap forming; brace storage, dispensing, and transporting; beam component fastening; and beam cut-off. Various critical process tests conducted to develop technology for a machine to produce composite beams are also discussed.

  12. SUMMARY OF BEAM BEAM OBSERVATIONS DURING STORES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.

    2003-05-19

    During stores, the beam-beam interaction has a significant impact on the beam and luminosity lifetimes in RHIC. This was observed in heavy ion, and even more pronounced in proton collisions. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. In addition, RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. Coherent beam-beam modes were observed, and suppressed by tune changes. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made during stores so far.

  13. Generation of plane shocks using intense heavy ion beams: Application to Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tahir, N. A.; Stoehlker, Th.; Shutov, A.; Zharkov, A. P.; Piriz, A. R.

    2011-03-15

    A design of a novel experiment that allows the generation of a well defined, steady, and strong plane shock wave employing an intense uranium ion beam that is incident on a wedge shaped compound target is presented. This technique will open up the possibility of carrying out unique high energy density physics experiments using these shock waves. One such experiment is to study the growth of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in fluids as well as in solids, both in the linear and nonlinear regimes, as shown by detailed numerical simulations presented in this paper. The ion beam parameters used in this study correspond to those that will be available at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt.

  14. Search for Electroweak Single Top Quark Production in 1.96 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Stelzer, Bernd

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the first search for electroweak single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data sample used for this analysis corresponds to 162 pb-1 recorded by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab. The search is performed by doing a classic maximum likelihood fit to the HT distribution in data. The kinematic variable HT is the scalar sum of transverse energies of all final state particles in the event. This variable has the advantage that its distribution looks very similar for both contributing (s-channel and t-channel) single top processes, but is different for background processes. The combination of both channels to one signal improves the sensitivity of the search. No significant evidence for electroweak single top quark production is found and we set an upper limit at the 95% confidence level on the combined single top quark production cross section of 17.8 pb.

  15. SINGLE BUNCH BEAM BREAKUP - A GENERAL SOLUTION.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,J.M.; MANE,S.R.; TOWNE,N.

    2000-06-26

    Caporaso, Barletta and Neil (CBN) found in a solution to the problem of the single-bunch beam breakup in a linac[1]. However, their method applies only to the case of a beam traveling in a strongly betatron-focused linac under the influence of the resistive wall impedance. We suggest in this paper a method for dealing with the same problem. Our methods is more general; it applies to the same problem under any impedance, and it applies to a linac with or without external betatron focusing.

  16. Oscillatory bending of a poroelastic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dajun; Cowin, Stephen C.

    1994-10-01

    An analytical solution of the oscillatory axial and bending loading of a poroelastic beam is presented. The pore pressure behavior in the beam is explored as a function of frequency of the applied load, the ratio of the bending to axial applied loading, and the leakage at the top and bottom of the beam. The conditions under which the pore pressure carries its largest fraction of the total applied loading are determined. The solution is illustrated using the values of the material parameters appropriate for living bone, which is a poroelastic medium. At high frequencies, in the free leakage case, our results are consistent with the notion that the percentage of the applied load carried by the pore fluid pressure is equal to the porosity of the medium.

  17. Propagation of a narrow plasma beam in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Adams, D.; Drum, S.; Evans, K.; Manson, J.; Price, T.; Urayama, P.; Wessel, F.J. )

    1992-10-01

    The propagation of an intense neutralized ion beam ({ital v}{similar to}5{times}10{sup 8} cm/sec, {ital n}{similar to}10{sup 10} cm{sup {minus}3}) through a large insulated vacuum chamber is measured as a function of magnetic field strength and direction. When the beam propagates parallel to the applied field, beam divergence is reduced. When the beam propagates perpendicular to the applied field, the downstream beam density decreases with increasing field strength. When the beam velocity vector intersects the magnetic field at an oblique angle, beam propagation is determined primarily by the perpendicular component of the field.

  18. Propagation of a narrow plasma beam in an oblique magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidbrink, W. W.; Adams, D.; Drum, S.; Evans, K.; Manson, J.; Price, T.; Urayama, P.; Wessel, F. J.

    1992-01-01

    The propagation of an intense neutralized ion beam (v is about 5 x 10 exp 8 cm/sec, n is about 10 exp 10/cu cm) through a large insulated vacuum chamber is measured as a function of magnetic field strength and direction. When the beam propagates parallel to the applied field, beam divergence is reduced. When the beam propagates perpendicular to the applied fields, the downstream beam density decreases with increasing field strength. When the beam velocity vector intersects the magnetic field at an oblique angle, beam propagation is determined primarily by the perpendicular component of the field.

  19. ION BEAM COLLIMATOR

    DOEpatents

    Langsdorf, A.S. Jr.

    1957-11-26

    A device is described for defining a beam of high energy particles wherein the means for defining the beam in the horizontal and vertical dimension are separately adjustable and the defining members are internally cooled. In general, the device comprises a mounting block having a central opening through which the beam is projected, means for rotatably supporting two pairs of beam- forming members, passages in each member for the flow of coolant; the beam- forming members being insulated from each other and the block, and each having an end projecting into the opening. The beam-forming members are adjustable and may be cooperatively positioned to define the beam passing between the end of the members. To assist in projecting and defining the beam, the member ends have individual means connected thereto for indicating the amount of charge collected thereon due to beam interception.

  20. Angular-momentum-dominated electron beams and flat-beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yin-e

    2005-06-01

    In the absence of external forces, if the dynamics within an electron beam is dominated by its angular momentum rather than other effects such as random thermal motion or self Coulomb-repulsive force (i.e., space-charge force), the beam is said to be angular-momentum-dominated. Such a beam can be directly applied to the field of electron-cooling of heavy ions; or it can be manipulated into an electron beam with large transverse emittance ratio, i.e., a flat beam. A flat beam is of interest for high-energy electron-positron colliders or accelerator-based light sources. An angular-momentum-dominated beam is generated at the Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector Laboratory (FNPL) and is accelerated to an energy of 16 MeV. The properties of such a beam is investigated systematically in experiment. The experimental results are in very good agreement with analytical expectations and simulation results. This lays a good foundation for the transformation of an angular-momentum-dominated beam into a flat beam. The round-to-flat beam transformer is composed of three skew quadrupoles. Based on a good knowledge of the angular-momentum-dominated beam, the quadrupoles are set to the proper strengths in order to apply a total torque which removes the angular momentum, resulting in a flat beam. For bunch charge around 0.5 nC, an emittance ratio of 100 ± 5 was measured, with the smaller normalized root-mean-square emittance around 0.4 mm-mrad. Effects limiting the flat-beam emittance ratio are investigated, such as the chromatic effects in the round-to-flat beam transformer, asymmetry in the initial angular-momentum-dominated beam, and space-charge effects. The most important limiting factor turns out to be the uncorrelated emittance growth caused by space charge when the beam energy is low, for example, in the rf gun area. As a result of such emittance growth prior to the round-to-flat beam transformer, the emittance ratio achievable in simulation decreases from orders of thousands to