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Sample records for antisense rna regulates

  1. MYCNOS functions as an antisense RNA regulating MYCN

    PubMed Central

    Vadie, Nadia; Saayman, Sheena; Lenox, Alexandra; Ackley, Amanda; Clemson, Mathew; Burdach, Jon; Hart, Jonathan; Vogt, Peter K; Morris, Kevin V

    2015-01-01

    Amplification or overexpression of neuronal MYC (MYCN) is associated with poor prognosis of human neuroblastoma. Three isoforms of the MYCN protein have been described as well as a protein encoded by an antisense transcript (MYCNOS) that originates from the opposite strand at the MYCN locus. Recent findings suggest that some antisense long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) can play a role in epigenetically regulating gene expression. Here we report that MYCNOS transcripts function as a modulator of the MYCN locus, affecting MYCN promoter usage and recruiting various proteins, including the Ras GTPase-activating protein-binding protein G3BP1, to the upstream MYCN promoter. Overexpression of MYCNOS results in a reduction of upstream MYCN promoter usage and increased MYCN expression, suggesting that the protein-coding MYCNOS also functions as a regulator of MYCN ultimately controlling MYCN transcriptional variants. The observations presented here demonstrate that protein-coding transcripts can regulate gene transcription and can tether regulatory proteins to target loci. PMID:26156430

  2. RNA editing and regulation of Drosophila 4f-rnp expression by sas-10 antisense readthrough mRNA transcripts.

    PubMed

    Peters, Nick T; Rohrbach, Justin A; Zalewski, Brian A; Byrkett, Colleen M; Vaughn, Jack C

    2003-06-01

    We have previously described an example of extensively A-to-G edited cDNA derived from adult heads of the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. In that study, the source of the predicted antisense RNA pairing strand for template recognition by dADAR editase was not identified, and the biological significance of the observed hyperediting was not known. Here, we address each of these questions. 4f-rnp and sas-10 are closely adjacent X-linked genes located on opposite DNA strands that produce convergent transcripts. We show that developmentally regulated antisense sas-10 readthrough mRNA arises by activation of an upstream promoter P2 during the late embryo stage of fly development. The sas-10 readthrough transcripts pair with 4f-rnp mRNA to form double-stranded molecules, as indicated by A-to-G editing observed in both RNA strands. It would be predicted that perfect RNA duplexes would be targeted for modification/degradation by enzyme pathways that recognize double-stranded RNAs, leading to decline in 4f-rnp mRNA levels, and this is what we observe. The observation using quantitative RT-PCR that sas-10 readthrough and 4f-rnp transcript levels are inversely related suggests a role for the antisense RNA in posttranscriptional regulation of 4f-rnp gene expression during development. Potential molecular mechanisms that could lead to this result are discussed, one of which is targeted transcript degradation via the RNAi pathway. Insofar as the dADAR editase and RNAi pathways are known to be constitutive in this system, it is likely that control of antisense RNA transcription is the rate-limiting factor. The results provide insight into roles of naturally occurring antisense RNAs in regulation of eukaryotic gene expression.

  3. Axonal trafficking of an antisense RNA transcribed from a pseudogene is regulated by classical conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Korneev, Sergei A.; Kemenes, Ildiko; Bettini, Natalia L.; Kemenes, George; Staras, Kevin; Benjamin, Paul R.; O'Shea, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are endogenous RNA molecules that are complementary to known RNA transcripts. The functional significance of NATs is poorly understood, but their prevalence in the CNS suggests a role in brain function. Here we investigated a long NAT (antiNOS-2 RNA) associated with the regulation of nitric oxide (NO) production in the CNS of Lymnaea, an established model for molecular analysis of learning and memory. We show the antiNOS-2 RNA is axonally trafficked and demonstrate that this is regulated by classical conditioning. Critically, a single conditioning trial changes the amount of antiNOS-2 RNA transported along the axon. This occurs within the critical time window when neurotransmitter NO is required for memory formation. Our data suggest a role for the antiNOS-2 RNA in establishing memories through the regulation of NO signaling at the synapse. PMID:23293742

  4. Msx1 expression regulation by its own antisense RNA: consequence on tooth development and bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Babajko, Sylvie; Petit, Stéphane; Fernandes, Isabelle; Méary, Fleur; LeBihan, Johanne; Pibouin, Laurence; Berdal, Ariane

    2009-01-01

    Msx homeogenes play an important role in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions leading development. Msx1 is relevant for dental and craniofacial morphogenesis, as suggested by phenotypes of Msx1 mutations in human and Msx1 KO mice. During adulthood, Msx1 is still expressed in the skeleton where its role is largely unknown. Our group showed that the Msx1 gene is submitted to bidirectional transcription generating a long noncoding antisense (AS) RNA. During tooth development, Msx1 sense (S) and AS RNAs showed specific patterns of expression. Thus, the aim of the present study was to analyze the relation between Msx1 S and AS RNAs. In vivo mapping in adult mice showed that both Msx1 RNAs were detected in tested tissues such as bone. In vitro, Msx1 AS RNA decreased endogenous Msx1 S expression and modified Msx1 protein cell distribution. Regulations of Dlx5 and Bmp4 expression involving Msx1 S and AS RNAs showed that Msx1 AS RNA could modulate Msx1 function. The study of Msx1 S and AS RNA status is interesting in the case of tooth agenesis and bone loss to see if a disturbance of this balance could be associated with a disturbance of bone homeostasis. In that sense, our current results suggest a clear involvement of Msx1 in alveolar bone.

  5. Viral escape from antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Bull, J J; Jacobson, A; Badgett, M R; Molineux, I J

    1998-05-01

    RNA coliphage SP was propagated for several generations on a host expressing an inhibitory antisense RNA complementary to bases 31-270 of the positive-stranded genome. Phages evolved that escaped inhibition. Typically, these escape mutants contained 3-4 base substitutions, but different sequences were observed among different isolates. The mutations were located within three different types of structural features within the predicted secondary structure of SP genomic RNA: (i) hairpin loops; (ii) hairpin stems; and (iii) the 5' region of the phage genome complementary to the antisense molecule. Computer modelling of the mutant genomic RNAs showed that all of the substitutions within hairpin stems improved the Watson-Crick pairing of the stem. No major structural rearrangements were predicted for any of the mutant genomes, and most substitutions in coding regions did not alter the amino acid sequence. Although the evolved phage populations were polymorphic for substitutions, many substitutions appeared independently in two selected lines. The creation of a new, perfect, antisense RNA against an escape mutant resulted in the inhibition of that mutant but not of other escape mutants nor of the ancestral, unevolved phage. Thus, at least in this system, a population of viruses that evolved to escape from a single antisense RNA would require a cocktail of several antisense RNAs for inhibition. PMID:9643550

  6. An Antisense RNA-mediated Mechanism Eliminates a Meiosis-specific Copper-regulated Transcript in Mitotic Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Normant, Vincent; Beaudoin, Jude; Labbé, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Sense and antisense transcripts produced from convergent gene pairs could interfere with the expression of either partner gene. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we found that the iss1+ gene produces two transcript isoforms, including a long antisense mRNA that is complementary to the meiotic cum1+ sense transcript, inhibiting cum1+ expression in vegetative cells. Inhibition of cum1+ transcription was not at the level of its initiation because fusion of the cum1+ promoter to the lacZ gene showed that activation of the reporter gene occurs in response to low copper conditions. Further analysis showed that the transcription factor Cuf1 and conserved copper-signaling elements (CuSEs) are required for induction of cum1+-lacZ transcription under copper deficiency. Insertion of a multipartite polyadenylation signal immediately downstream of iss1+ led to the exclusive production of a shorter iss1+ mRNA isoform, thereby allowing accumulation of cum1+ sense mRNA in copper-limited vegetative cells. This finding suggested that the long iss1+ antisense mRNA could pair with cum1+ sense mRNA, thereby producing double-stranded RNA molecules that could induce RNAi. We consistently found that mutant strains for RNAi (dcr1Δ, ago1Δ, rdp1Δ, and clr4Δ) are defective in selectively eliminating cum1+ sense transcript in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Taken together, these results describe the first example of a copper-regulated meiotic gene repressed by an antisense transcription mechanism in vegetative cells. PMID:26229103

  7. An antisense RNA-mediated mechanism eliminates a meiosis-specific copper-regulated transcript in mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Normant, Vincent; Beaudoin, Jude; Labbé, Simon

    2015-09-11

    Sense and antisense transcripts produced from convergent gene pairs could interfere with the expression of either partner gene. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we found that the iss1(+) gene produces two transcript isoforms, including a long antisense mRNA that is complementary to the meiotic cum1(+) sense transcript, inhibiting cum1(+) expression in vegetative cells. Inhibition of cum1(+) transcription was not at the level of its initiation because fusion of the cum1(+) promoter to the lacZ gene showed that activation of the reporter gene occurs in response to low copper conditions. Further analysis showed that the transcription factor Cuf1 and conserved copper-signaling elements (CuSEs) are required for induction of cum1(+)-lacZ transcription under copper deficiency. Insertion of a multipartite polyadenylation signal immediately downstream of iss1(+) led to the exclusive production of a shorter iss1(+) mRNA isoform, thereby allowing accumulation of cum1(+) sense mRNA in copper-limited vegetative cells. This finding suggested that the long iss1(+) antisense mRNA could pair with cum1(+) sense mRNA, thereby producing double-stranded RNA molecules that could induce RNAi. We consistently found that mutant strains for RNAi (dcr1Δ, ago1Δ, rdp1Δ, and clr4Δ) are defective in selectively eliminating cum1(+) sense transcript in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Taken together, these results describe the first example of a copper-regulated meiotic gene repressed by an antisense transcription mechanism in vegetative cells.

  8. Data in support of transcriptional regulation and function of Fas-antisense long noncoding RNA during human erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Villamizar, Olga; Chambers, Christopher B.; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Torry, Donald S.; Hofstrand, Reese; Riberdy, Janice M.; Persons, Derek A.; Wilber, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes data related to a research article titled, “Fas-antisense long noncoding RNA is differentially expressed during maturation of human erythrocytes and confers resistance to Fas-mediated cell death” [1]. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are increasingly appreciated for their capacity to regulate many steps of gene expression. While recent studies suggest that many lncRNAs are functional, the scope of their actions throughout human biology is largely undefined including human red blood cell development (erythropoiesis). Here we include expression data for 82 lncRNAs during early, intermediate and late stages of human erythropoiesis using a commercial qPCR Array. From these data, we identified lncRNA Fas-antisense 1 (Fas-AS1 or Saf) described in the research article. Also included are 5′ untranslated sequences (UTR) for lncRNA Saf with transcription factor target sequences identified. Quantitative RT-PCR data demonstrate relative levels of critical erythroid transcription factors, GATA-1 and KLF1, in K562 human erythroleukemia cells and maturing erythroblasts derived from human CD34+ cells. End point and quantitative RT-PCR data for cDNA prepared using random hexamers versus oligo(dT)18 revealed that lncRNA Saf is not effectively polyadenylated. Finally, we include flow cytometry histograms demonstrating Fas levels on maturing erythroblasts derived from human CD34+ cells transduced using mock conditions or with lentivirus particles encoding for Saf. PMID:27141526

  9. Antisense RNA suppression of peroxidase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S.; De Leon, F.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The 5{prime} half the anionic peroxidase cDNA of tobacco was inserted into a CaMV 35S promoter/terminator expression cassette in the antisense configuration. This was inserted into the Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation vector pCIBIO which includes kanamycin selection, transformed into two species of tobacco (N. tabacum and M. sylvestris), and plants were subsequently regenerated on kanamycin. Transgenic plants were analyzed for peroxidase expression and found to have 3-5 fold lower levels of peroxidase than wild-type plants. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that the antisense RNA only suppressed the anionic peroxidase. Wound-induced peroxidase expression was found not to be affected by the antisense RNA. Northern blots show a greater than 5 fold suppression of anionic peroxidase mRNA in leaf tissue, and the antisense RNA was expressed at a level 2 fold over the endogenous mRNA. Plants were self-pollinated and F1 plants showed normal segregation. N. sylvestris transgenic plants with the lowest level of peroxidase are epinastic, and preliminary results indicate elevated auxin levels. Excised pith tissue from both species of transgenic plants rapidly collapse when exposed to air, while pith tissue from wild-type plants showed little change when exposed to air. Further characterization of these phenotypes is currently being made.

  10. RNA antisense purification (RAP) for mapping RNA interactions with chromatin.

    PubMed

    Engreitz, Jesse; Lander, Eric S; Guttman, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    RNA-centric biochemical purification is a general approach for studying the functions and mechanisms of noncoding RNAs. Here, we describe the experimental procedures for RNA antisense purification (RAP), a method for selective purification of endogenous RNA complexes from cell extracts that enables mapping of RNA interactions with chromatin. In RAP, the user cross-links cells to fix endogenous RNA complexes and purifies these complexes through hybrid capture with biotinylated antisense oligos. DNA loci that interact with the target RNA are identified using high-throughput DNA sequencing.

  11. JACALIN-LECTIN LIKE1 Regulates the Nuclear Accumulation of GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN7, Influencing the RNA Processing of FLOWERING LOCUS C Antisense Transcripts and Flowering Time in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jun; Li, Chunhua; Xu, Shujuan; Xing, Lijing; Xu, Yunyuan; Chong, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Lectins selectively recognize sugars or glycans for defense in living cells, but less is known about their roles in the development process and the functional network with other factors. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) JACALIN-LECTIN LIKE1 (AtJAC1) functions in flowering time control. Loss of function of AtJAC1 leads to precocious flowering, whereas overexpression of AtJAC1 causes delayed flowering. AtJAC1 influences flowering through regulation of the key flowering repressor gene FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Genetic analysis revealed that AtJAC1’s function is mostly dependent on GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN7 (GRP7), an upstream regulator of FLC. Biochemical and cell biological data indicated that AtJAC1 interacted physically with GRP7 specifically in the cytoplasm. AtJAC1 influences the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of GRP7, with predominant nuclear localization of GRP7 when AtJAC1 function is lost but retention of GRP7 in the cytoplasm when AtJAC1 is overexpressed. A temporal inducible assay suggested that AtJAC1’s regulation of flowering could be compromised by the nuclear accumulation of GRP7. In addition, GRP7 binds to the antisense precursor messenger RNA of FLC through a conserved RNA motif. Loss of GRP7 function leads to the elevation of total FLC antisense transcripts and reduced proximal-distal polyadenylation ratio, as well as histone methylation changes in the FLC gene body region and increased total functional sense FLC transcript. Attenuating the direct binding of GRP7 with competing artificial RNAs leads to changes of FLC antisense precursor messenger RNA processing and flowering transition. Taken together, our study indicates that AtJAC1 coordinates with GRP7 in shaping plant development through the regulation of RNA processing in Arabidopsis. PMID:26392261

  12. Neighboring Gene Regulation by Antisense Long Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Victoria E.; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Antisense transcription, considered until recently as transcriptional noise, is a very common phenomenon in human and eukaryotic transcriptomes, operating in two ways based on whether the antisense RNA acts in cis or in trans. This process can generate long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), one of the most diverse classes of cellular transcripts, which have demonstrated multifunctional roles in fundamental biological processes, including embryonic pluripotency, differentiation and development. Antisense lncRNAs have been shown to control nearly every level of gene regulation—pretranscriptional, transcriptional and posttranscriptional—through DNA–RNA, RNA–RNA or protein–RNA interactions. This review is centered on functional studies of antisense lncRNA-mediated regulation of neighboring gene expression. Specifically, it addresses how these transcripts interact with other biological molecules, nucleic acids and proteins, to regulate gene expression through chromatin remodeling at the pretranscriptional level and modulation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes by altering the sense mRNA structure or the cellular compartmental distribution, either in the nucleus or the cytoplasm. PMID:25654223

  13. rasiRNA pathway controls antisense expression of Drosophila telomeric retrotransposons in the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Shpiz, Sergey; Kwon, Dmitry; Rozovsky, Yakov; Kalmykova, Alla

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres in Drosophila are maintained by the specialized telomeric retrotransposons HeT-A, TART and TAHRE. Sense transcripts of telomeric retroelements were shown to be the targets of a specialized RNA-interference mechanism, a repeat-associated short interfering (rasi)RNA-mediated system. Antisense rasiRNAs play a key role in this mechanism, highlighting the importance of antisense expression in retrotransposon silencing. Previously, bidirectional transcription was reported for the telomeric element TART. Here, we show that HeT-A is also bidirectionally transcribed, and HeT-A antisense transcription in ovaries is regulated by a promoter localized within its 3′ untranslated region. A remarkable feature of noncoding HeT-A antisense transcripts is the presence of multiple introns. We demonstrate that sense and antisense HeT-A-specific rasiRNAs are present in the same tissue, indicating that transcripts of both directions may be considered as natural targets of the rasiRNA pathway. We found that the expression of antisense transcripts of telomeric elements is regulated by the RNA silencing machinery, suggesting rasiRNA-mediated interplay between sense and antisense transcripts in the cell. Finally, this regulation occurs in the nucleus since disruption of the rasiRNA pathway leads to an accumulation of TART and HeT-A transcripts in germ cell nuclei. PMID:19036789

  14. Photoregulating RNA digestion using azobenzene linked dumbbell antisense oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; He, Yujian; Tang, Xinjing

    2015-06-17

    Introduction of 4,4'-bis(hydroxymethyl)-azobenzene (azo) to dumbbell hairpin oligonucleotides at the loop position was able to reversibly control the stability of the whole hairpin structure via UV or visible light irradiation. Here, we designed and synthesized a series of azobenzene linked dumbbell antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (asODNs) containing two terminal hairpins that are composed of an asODN and a short inhibitory sense strand. Thermal melting studies of these azobenzene linked dumbbell asODNs indicated that efficient trans to cis photoisomerization of azobenzene moieties induced large difference in thermal stability (ΔTm = 12.1-21.3 °C). In addition, photomodulation of their RNA binding abilities and RNA digestion by RNase H was investigated. The trans-azobenzene linked asODNs with the optimized base pairs between asODN strands and inhibitory sense strands could only bind few percentage of the target RNA, while it was able to recover their binding to the target RNA and degrade it by RNase H after light irradiation. Upon optimization, it is promising to use these azobenzene linked asODNs for reversible spatial and temporal regulation of antisense activities based on both steric binding and RNA digestion by RNase H.

  15. Long non-coding antisense RNA controls Uchl1 translation through an embedded SINEB2 repeat.

    PubMed

    Carrieri, Claudia; Cimatti, Laura; Biagioli, Marta; Beugnet, Anne; Zucchelli, Silvia; Fedele, Stefania; Pesce, Elisa; Ferrer, Isidre; Collavin, Licio; Santoro, Claudio; Forrest, Alistair R R; Carninci, Piero; Biffo, Stefano; Stupka, Elia; Gustincich, Stefano

    2012-11-15

    Most of the mammalian genome is transcribed. This generates a vast repertoire of transcripts that includes protein-coding messenger RNAs, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and repetitive sequences, such as SINEs (short interspersed nuclear elements). A large percentage of ncRNAs are nuclear-enriched with unknown function. Antisense lncRNAs may form sense-antisense pairs by pairing with a protein-coding gene on the opposite strand to regulate epigenetic silencing, transcription and mRNA stability. Here we identify a nuclear-enriched lncRNA antisense to mouse ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (Uchl1), a gene involved in brain function and neurodegenerative diseases. Antisense Uchl1 increases UCHL1 protein synthesis at a post-transcriptional level, hereby identifying a new functional class of lncRNAs. Antisense Uchl1 activity depends on the presence of a 5' overlapping sequence and an embedded inverted SINEB2 element. These features are shared by other natural antisense transcripts and can confer regulatory activity to an artificial antisense to green fluorescent protein. Antisense Uchl1 function is under the control of stress signalling pathways, as mTORC1 inhibition by rapamycin causes an increase in UCHL1 protein that is associated to the shuttling of antisense Uchl1 RNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Antisense Uchl1 RNA is then required for the association of the overlapping sense protein-coding mRNA to active polysomes for translation. These data reveal another layer of gene expression control at the post-transcriptional level.

  16. RNA therapeutics: RNAi and antisense mechanisms and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Chery, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    RNA therapeutics refers to the use of oligonucleotides to target primarily ribonucleic acids (RNA) for therapeutic efforts or in research studies to elucidate functions of genes. Oligonucleotides are distinct from other pharmacological modalities, such as small molecules and antibodies that target mainly proteins, due to their mechanisms of action and chemical properties. Nucleic acids come in two forms: deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) and ribonucleic acids (RNA). Although DNA is more stable, RNA offers more structural variety ranging from messenger RNA (mRNA) that codes for protein to non-coding RNAs, microRNA (miRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA), short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). As our understanding of the wide variety of RNAs deepens, researchers have sought to target RNA since >80% of the genome is estimated to be transcribed. These transcripts include non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs and siRNAs that function in gene regulation by playing key roles in the transfer of genetic information from DNA to protein, the final product of the central dogma in biology1. Currently there are two main approaches used to target RNA: double stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) and antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). Both approaches are currently in clinical trials for targeting of RNAs involved in various diseases, such as cancer and neurodegeneration. In fact, ASOs targeting spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown positive results in clinical trials2. Advantages of ASOs include higher affinity due to the development of chemical modifications that increase affinity, selectivity while decreasing toxicity due to off-target effects. This review will highlight the major therapeutic approaches of RNA medicine currently being applied with a focus on RNAi and ASOs. PMID:27570789

  17. Antisense Transcript and RNA Processing Alterations Suppress Instability of Polyadenylated mRNA in Chlamydomonas Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yoshiki; Kikis, Elise A.; Zimmer, Sara L.; Komine, Yutaka; Stern, David B.

    2004-01-01

    In chloroplasts, the control of mRNA stability is of critical importance for proper regulation of gene expression. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain Δ26pAtE is engineered such that the atpB mRNA terminates with an mRNA destabilizing polyadenylate tract, resulting in this strain being unable to conduct photosynthesis. A collection of photosynthetic revertants was obtained from Δ26pAtE, and gel blot hybridizations revealed RNA processing alterations in the majority of these suppressor of polyadenylation (spa) strains, resulting in a failure to expose the atpB mRNA 3′ poly(A) tail. Two exceptions were spa19 and spa23, which maintained unusual heteroplasmic chloroplast genomes. One genome type, termed PS+, conferred photosynthetic competence by contributing to the stability of atpB mRNA; the other, termed PS−, was required for viability but could not produce stable atpB transcripts. Based on strand-specific RT-PCR, S1 nuclease protection, and RNA gel blots, evidence was obtained that the PS+ genome stabilizes atpB mRNA by generating an atpB antisense transcript, which attenuates the degradation of the polyadenylated form. The accumulation of double-stranded RNA was confirmed by insensitivity of atpB mRNA from PS+ genome-containing cells to S1 nuclease digestion. To obtain additional evidence for antisense RNA function in chloroplasts, we used strain Δ26, in which atpB mRNA is unstable because of the lack of a 3′ stem-loop structure. In this context, when a 121-nucleotide segment of atpB antisense RNA was expressed from an ectopic site, an elevated accumulation of atpB mRNA resulted. Finally, when spa19 was placed in a genetic background in which expression of the chloroplast exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase was diminished, the PS+ genome and the antisense transcript were no longer required for photosynthesis. Taken together, our results suggest that antisense RNA in chloroplasts can protect otherwise unstable transcripts from 3′→5

  18. Natural Antisense Transcripts and Long Non-Coding RNA in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Arthanari, Yamini; Heintzen, Christian; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Crosthwaite, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) and natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has been reported in a variety of organisms. While a consensus has yet to be reached on their global importance, an increasing number of examples have been shown to be functional, regulating gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Here, we use RNA sequencing data from the ABI SOLiD platform to identify lncRNA and NATs obtained from samples of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown under different light and temperature conditions. We identify 939 novel lncRNAs, of which 477 are antisense to annotated genes. Across the whole dataset, the extent of overlap between sense and antisense transcripts is large: 371 sense/antisense transcripts are complementary over 500 nts or more and 236 overlap by more than 1000 nts. Most prevalent are 3′ end overlaps between convergently transcribed sense/antisense pairs, but examples of divergently transcribed pairs and nested transcripts are also present. We confirm the expression of a subset of sense/antisense transcript pairs by qPCR. We examine the size, types of overlap and expression levels under the different environmental stimuli of light and temperature, and identify 11 lncRNAs that are up-regulated in response to light. We also find differences in transcript length and the position of introns between protein-coding transcripts that have antisense expression and transcripts with no antisense expression. These results demonstrate the ability of N. crassa lncRNAs and NATs to be regulated by different environmental stimuli and provide the scope for further investigation into the function of NATs. PMID:24621812

  19. Functionalization of an Antisense Small RNA

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Cordero, Teresa; Kushwaha, Manish; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the possibility of adding new functions to preexisting genes, we considered a framework of riboregulation. We created a new riboregulator consisting of the reverse complement of a known riboregulator. Using computational design, we engineered a cis-repressing 5′ untranslated region that can be activated by this new riboregulator. As a result, both RNAs can orthogonally trans-activate translation of their cognate, independent targets. The two riboregulators can also repress each other by antisense interaction, although not symmetrically. Our work highlights that antisense small RNAs can work as regulatory agents beyond the antisense paradigm and that, hence, they could be interfaced with other circuits used in synthetic biology. PMID:26756967

  20. Natural antisense RNA promotes 3′ end processing and maturation of MALAT1 lncRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Xinying; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Freier, Susan M.; Fei, Jingyi; Ha, Taekjip; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V.

    2016-01-01

    The RNase P-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage plays a crucial role in the 3′ end processing and cellular accumulation of MALAT1, a nuclear-retained long noncoding RNA that promotes malignancy. The regulation of this cleavage event is largely undetermined. Here we characterize a broadly expressed natural antisense transcript at the MALAT1 locus, designated as TALAM1, that positively regulates MALAT1 levels by promoting the 3′ end cleavage and maturation of MALAT1 RNA. TALAM1 RNA preferentially localizes at the site of transcription, and also interacts with MALAT1 RNA. Depletion of TALAM1 leads to defects in the 3′ end cleavage reaction and compromises cellular accumulation of MALAT1. Conversely, overexpression of TALAM1 facilitates the cleavage reaction in trans. Interestingly, TALAM1 is also positively regulated by MALAT1 at the level of both transcription and RNA stability. Together, our data demonstrate a novel feed-forward positive regulatory loop that is established to maintain the high cellular levels of MALAT1, and also unravel the existence of sense-antisense mediated regulatory mechanism for cellular lncRNAs that display RNase P-mediated 3′ end processing. PMID:26826711

  1. Repair of Thalassemic Human β -globin mRNA in Mammalian Cells by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowska, Halina; Sambade, Maria J.; Agrawal, Sudhir; Kole, Ryszard

    1996-11-01

    In one form of β -thalassemia, a genetic blood disorder, a mutation in intron 2 of the β -globin gene (IVS2-654) causes aberrant splicing of β -globin pre-mRNA and, consequently, β -globin deficiency. Treatment of mammalian cells stably expressing the IVS2-654 human β -globin gene with antisense oligonucleotides targeted at the aberrant splice sites restored correct splicing in a dose-dependent fashion, generating correct human β -globin mRNA and polypeptide. Both products persisted for up to 72 hr posttreatment. The oligonucleotides modified splicing by a true antisense mechanism without overt unspecific effects on cell growth and splicing of other pre-mRNAs. This novel approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore rather than to down-regulate the activity of the target gene is applicable to other splicing mutants and is of potential clinical interest.

  2. Hfq restructures RNA-IN and RNA-OUT and facilitates antisense pairing in the Tn10/IS10 system.

    PubMed

    Ross, Joseph A; Ellis, Michael J; Hossain, Shahan; Haniford, David B

    2013-05-01

    Hfq functions in post-transcriptional gene regulation in a wide range of bacteria, usually by promoting base-pairing of mRNAs and trans-encoded sRNAs that share partial sequence complementarity. It is less clear if Hfq is required for pairing of cis-encoded RNAs (i.e., antisense RNAs) with their target mRNAs. In the current work, we have characterized the interactions between Escherichia coli Hfq and the components of the Tn10/IS10 antisense system, RNA-IN and RNA-OUT. We show that Hfq interacts with RNA-OUT through its proximal RNA-binding surface, as is typical for Hfq and trans-encoded sRNAs. In contrast, RNA-IN binds both proximal and distal RNA-binding surfaces in Hfq with a higher affinity for the latter, as is typical for mRNA interactions in canonical sRNA-mRNA pairs. Importantly, an amino acid substitution in Hfq that interferes with RNA binding to the proximal site negatively impacts RNA-IN:OUT pairing in vitro and suppresses the ability of Hfq to negatively regulate IS10 transposition in vivo. We also show that Hfq binding to RNA-IN and RNA-OUT alters secondary structure elements in both of these RNAs and speculate that this could be important in how Hfq facilitates RNA-IN:OUT pairing. Based on the results presented here, we suggest that Hfq could be involved in regulating RNA pairing in other antisense systems, including systems encoded by other transposable elements.

  3. Evolution of the Antisense Overlap between Genes for Thyroid Hormone Receptor and Rev-erbα and Characterization of an Exonic G-Rich Element That Regulates Splicing of TRα2 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Stephen H.; Morales, Christopher H.; Duyck, Tessa H.; Waters, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    The α-thyroid hormone receptor gene (TRα) codes for two functionally distinct proteins: TRα1, the α-thyroid hormone receptor; and TRα2, a non-hormone-binding variant. The final exon of TRα2 mRNA overlaps the 3’ end of Rev-erbα mRNA, which encodes another nuclear receptor on the opposite strand of DNA. To understand the evolution of this antisense overlap, we sequenced these genes and mRNAs in the platypus Orthorhynchus anatinus. Despite its strong homology with other mammals, the platypus TRα/Rev-erbα locus lacks elements essential for expression of TRα2. Comparative analysis suggests that alternative splicing of TRα2 mRNA expression evolved in a stepwise fashion before the divergence of eutherian and marsupial mammals. A short G-rich element (G30) located downstream of the alternative 3’splice site of TRα2 mRNA and antisense to the 3’UTR of Rev-erbα plays an important role in regulating TRα2 splicing. G30 is tightly conserved in eutherian mammals, but is absent in marsupials and monotremes. Systematic deletions and substitutions within G30 have dramatically different effects on TRα2 splicing, leading to either its inhibition or its enhancement. Mutations that disrupt one or more clusters of G residues enhance splicing two- to three-fold. These results suggest the G30 sequence can adopt a highly structured conformation, possibly a G-quadruplex, and that it is part of a complex splicing regulatory element which exerts both positive and negative effects on TRα2 expression. Since mutations that strongly enhance splicing in vivo have no effect on splicing in vitro, it is likely that the regulatory role of G30 is mediated through linkage of transcription and splicing. PMID:26368571

  4. Evolution of the Antisense Overlap between Genes for Thyroid Hormone Receptor and Rev-erbα and Characterization of an Exonic G-Rich Element That Regulates Splicing of TRα2 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Munroe, Stephen H; Morales, Christopher H; Duyck, Tessa H; Waters, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    The α-thyroid hormone receptor gene (TRα) codes for two functionally distinct proteins: TRα1, the α-thyroid hormone receptor; and TRα2, a non-hormone-binding variant. The final exon of TRα2 mRNA overlaps the 3' end of Rev-erbα mRNA, which encodes another nuclear receptor on the opposite strand of DNA. To understand the evolution of this antisense overlap, we sequenced these genes and mRNAs in the platypus Orthorhynchus anatinus. Despite its strong homology with other mammals, the platypus TRα/Rev-erbα locus lacks elements essential for expression of TRα2. Comparative analysis suggests that alternative splicing of TRα2 mRNA expression evolved in a stepwise fashion before the divergence of eutherian and marsupial mammals. A short G-rich element (G30) located downstream of the alternative 3'splice site of TRα2 mRNA and antisense to the 3'UTR of Rev-erbα plays an important role in regulating TRα2 splicing. G30 is tightly conserved in eutherian mammals, but is absent in marsupials and monotremes. Systematic deletions and substitutions within G30 have dramatically different effects on TRα2 splicing, leading to either its inhibition or its enhancement. Mutations that disrupt one or more clusters of G residues enhance splicing two- to three-fold. These results suggest the G30 sequence can adopt a highly structured conformation, possibly a G-quadruplex, and that it is part of a complex splicing regulatory element which exerts both positive and negative effects on TRα2 expression. Since mutations that strongly enhance splicing in vivo have no effect on splicing in vitro, it is likely that the regulatory role of G30 is mediated through linkage of transcription and splicing. PMID:26368571

  5. RNA sequencing uncovers antisense RNAs and novel small RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Le Rhun, Anaïs; Beer, Yan Yan; Reimegård, Johan; Chylinski, Krzysztof; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pyogenes is a human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild to life-threatening infections. During the infectious process, the temporal and spatial expression of pathogenicity factors is tightly controlled by a complex network of protein and RNA regulators acting in response to various environmental signals. Here, we focus on the class of small RNA regulators (sRNAs) and present the first complete analysis of sRNA sequencing data in S. pyogenes. In the SF370 clinical isolate (M1 serotype), we identified 197 and 428 putative regulatory RNAs by visual inspection and bioinformatics screening of the sequencing data, respectively. Only 35 from the 197 candidates identified by visual screening were assigned a predicted function (T-boxes, ribosomal protein leaders, characterized riboswitches or sRNAs), indicating how little is known about sRNA regulation in S. pyogenes. By comparing our list of predicted sRNAs with previous S. pyogenes sRNA screens using bioinformatics or microarrays, 92 novel sRNAs were revealed, including antisense RNAs that are for the first time shown to be expressed in this pathogen. We experimentally validated the expression of 30 novel sRNAs and antisense RNAs. We show that the expression profile of 9 sRNAs including 2 predicted regulatory elements is affected by the endoribonucleases RNase III and/or RNase Y, highlighting the critical role of these enzymes in sRNA regulation. PMID:26580233

  6. α-fur, an antisense RNA gene to fur in the extreme acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Lefimil, C; Jedlicki, E; Holmes, D S

    2014-03-01

    A large non-coding RNA, termed α-Fur, of ~1000 nt has been detected in the extreme acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans encoded on the antisense strand to the iron-responsive master regulator fur (ferric uptake regulator) gene. A promoter for α-fur was predicted bioinformatically and validated using gene fusion experiments. The promoter is situated within the coding region and in the same sense as proB, potentially encoding a glutamate 5-kinase. The 3' termination site of the α-fur transcript was determined by 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends to lie 7 nt downstream of the start of transcription of fur. Thus, α-fur is antisense to the complete coding region of fur, including its predicted ribosome-binding site. The genetic context of α-fur is conserved in several members of the genus Acidithiobacillus but not in all acidophiles, indicating that it is monophyletic but not niche specific. It is hypothesized that α-Fur regulates the cellular level of Fur. This is the fourth example of an antisense RNA to fur, although it is the first in an extreme acidophile, and underscores the growing importance of cis-encoded non-coding RNAs as potential regulators involved in the microbial iron-responsive stimulon.

  7. An antisense RNA that governs the expression kinetics of a multifunctional virulence gene

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Jin; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Genome-wide transcriptome analyses of several bacterial species have recently uncovered a hitherto unappreciated amount of antisense transcription. However, the physiological role, regulation and significance of such antisense transcripts are presently unclear. We now report the identification of a cis-encoded 1.2 kb long antisense RNA – termed AmgR – that is complementary to the mgtC portion of the mgtCBR polycistronic message from Salmonella enterica. The mgtCBR mRNA specifies the MgtC protein, which is necessary for survival within macrophages, virulence in mice and growth in low Mg2+; the Mg2+ transporter MgtB with no apparent role in virulence; and the membrane peptide MgtR mediating MgtC degradation. Expression of AmgR dimished both MgtC and MgtB protein levels in a process requiring RNase E but independent of RNase III, the RNA chaperone Hfq, and the regulatory peptide MgtR. Inactivation of the chromosomal amgR promoter increased MgtC and MgtB protein levels and enhanced Salmonella virulence. Surprisingly, AmgR transcription is governed by the regulatory protein PhoP, which also directs transcription of the sense mgtCBR mRNA. AmgR may function as a timing device that alters MgtC and MgtB levels after the onset of PhoP-inducing conditions. PMID:20398218

  8. Programmable control of bacterial gene expression with the combined CRISPR and antisense RNA system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Je; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Leong, Matthew C; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-03-18

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to implement diverse cellular functions by predictably controlling gene expression. Though research has focused more on protein regulators than RNA regulators, recent advances in our understanding of RNA folding and functions have motivated the use of RNA regulators. RNA regulators provide an advantage because they are easier to design and engineer than protein regulators, potentially have a lower burden on the cell and are highly orthogonal. Here, we combine the CRISPR system from Streptococcus pyogenes and synthetic antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in Escherichia coli strains to repress or derepress a target gene in a programmable manner. Specifically, we demonstrate for the first time that the gene target repressed by the CRISPR system can be derepressed by expressing an asRNA that sequesters a small guide RNA (sgRNA). Furthermore, we demonstrate that tunable levels of derepression can be achieved (up to 95%) by designing asRNAs that target different regions of a sgRNA and by altering the hybridization free energy of the sgRNA-asRNA complex. This new system, which we call the combined CRISPR and asRNA system, can be used to reversibly repress or derepress multiple target genes simultaneously, allowing for rational reprogramming of cellular functions.

  9. Programmable control of bacterial gene expression with the combined CRISPR and antisense RNA system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Je; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Leong, Matthew C.; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-01-01

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to implement diverse cellular functions by predictably controlling gene expression. Though research has focused more on protein regulators than RNA regulators, recent advances in our understanding of RNA folding and functions have motivated the use of RNA regulators. RNA regulators provide an advantage because they are easier to design and engineer than protein regulators, potentially have a lower burden on the cell and are highly orthogonal. Here, we combine the CRISPR system from Streptococcus pyogenes and synthetic antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in Escherichia coli strains to repress or derepress a target gene in a programmable manner. Specifically, we demonstrate for the first time that the gene target repressed by the CRISPR system can be derepressed by expressing an asRNA that sequesters a small guide RNA (sgRNA). Furthermore, we demonstrate that tunable levels of derepression can be achieved (up to 95%) by designing asRNAs that target different regions of a sgRNA and by altering the hybridization free energy of the sgRNA–asRNA complex. This new system, which we call the combined CRISPR and asRNA system, can be used to reversibly repress or derepress multiple target genes simultaneously, allowing for rational reprogramming of cellular functions. PMID:26837577

  10. Inhibition of the synthesis of a cytochrome-c-oxidase subunit isoform by antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Sandonà, D; Bisson, R

    1994-02-01

    To investigate the role of subunit VIIe, an oxygen-regulated subunit isoform of Dictyostelium discoideum cytochrome-c oxidase, the full-length cDNA was inserted into an expression vector under the control of an actin promoter in the sense and antisense orientation. The DNA constructs were used for stable transformation of the slime mold amoebae. In most of the 28 antisense clones tested, the concentration of cytochrome-c oxidase was lowered compared to the wild type, while no significant changes were found in the sense mutants. Antisense RNA was abundantly expressed, leading to a drastic reduction of the steady-state level of the endogenous subunit VIIe mRNA, which was decreased up to 20-30% the level observed in parent cells. In these transformants, the amount of the target polypeptide and cytochrome c oxidase was 40-50% and 60-70% of control, respectively. A similar decrease was found in the level of the remaining nuclear and mitochondrial subunits. Unexpectedly, these changes affected neither basal nor uncoupled cell respiration suggesting an increase of the enzyme specific activity. Hypoxia completely relieved the cytochrome-c-oxidase deficit. These results indicate that subunit VII is needed for an efficient assembly of the protein complex and provide evidence for its involvement in the modulation of the enzyme activity. PMID:8112318

  11. Strand-specific community RNA-seq reveals prevalent and dynamic antisense transcription in human gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Guanhui; Wang, Mingjie; Doak, Thomas G.; Ye, Yuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomics and other meta-omics approaches (including metatranscriptomics) provide insights into the composition and function of microbial communities living in different environments or animal hosts. Metatranscriptomics research provides an unprecedented opportunity to examine gene regulation for many microbial species simultaneously, and more importantly, for the majority that are unculturable microbial species, in their natural environments (or hosts). Current analyses of metatranscriptomic datasets focus on the detection of gene expression levels and the study of the relationship between changes of gene expression and changes of environment. As a demonstration of utilizing metatranscriptomics beyond these common analyses, we developed a computational and statistical procedure to analyze the antisense transcripts in strand-specific metatranscriptomic datasets. Antisense RNAs encoded on the DNA strand opposite a gene’s CDS have the potential to form extensive base-pairing interactions with the corresponding sense RNA, and can have important regulatory functions. Most studies of antisense RNAs in bacteria are rather recent, are mostly based on transcriptome analysis, and have been applied mainly to single bacterial species. Application of our approaches to human gut-associated metatranscriptomic datasets allowed us to survey antisense transcription for a large number of bacterial species associated with human beings. The ratio of protein coding genes with antisense transcription ranges from 0 to 35.8% (median = 10.0%) among 47 species. Our results show that antisense transcription is dynamic, varying between human individuals. Functional enrichment analysis revealed a preference of certain gene functions for antisense transcription, and transposase genes are among the most prominent ones (but we also observed antisense transcription in bacterial house-keeping genes). PMID:26388849

  12. Antisense RNA decreases AP33 gene expression and cytoadherence by T. vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Mundodi, V; Kucknoor, AS; Alderete, JF

    2007-01-01

    Background Host parasitism by Trichomonas vaginalis is complex. Adherence to vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) is mediated by surface proteins. We showed before that antisense down-regulation of expression of adhesin AP65 decreased amounts of protein, which lowered levels of T. vaginalis adherence to VECs. We now perform antisense down-regulation of expression of the ap33 gene to evaluate and confirm a role for AP33 in adherence by T. vaginalis. We also used an established transfection system for heterologous expression of AP33 in T. foetus as an additional confirmatory approach. Results We successfully select stable trichomonads with sense (S) and antisense (AS) plasmids. RT-PCR confirmed decreased amounts of ap33 mRNA in AS-transfected parasites, and decreased amounts of AP33 had no effect on growth and viability when compared to wild-type (wt) trichomonads. Immunoblots of proteins from AS-transfectants gave significant decreased amounts of functional AP33 capable of binding to host cells compared to wt- and S-transfected trichomonads. As expected, AS-transfectants had lower levels of adherence to VECs, which was related to reduction in surface expression of AP33. Stable expression of T. vaginalis AP33::HA fusion in T. foetus was confirmed by immunoblots and fluorescence. The episomally-expressed surface AP33::HA fusion increased adherence of trichomonads to human VECs, which was abrogated with anti-AP33 serum. Conclusion These results using both antisense inhibition of gene expression and AP33 synthesis and the heterologous expression of AP33 in T. foetus confirms a role for this protein as an adhesin in T. vaginalis. PMID:17608941

  13. Chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of the developmental switch gene eud-1 control predatory feeding plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Serobyan, Vahan; Xiao, Hua; Namdeo, Suryesh; Rödelsperger, Christian; Sieriebriennikov, Bogdan; Witte, Hanh; Röseler, Waltraud; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been suggested to act through developmental switches, but little is known about associated molecular mechanisms. In the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, the sulfatase eud-1 was identified as part of a developmental switch controlling mouth-form plasticity governing a predatory versus bacteriovorous mouth-form decision. Here we show that mutations in the conserved histone-acetyltransferase Ppa-lsy-12 and the methyl-binding-protein Ppa-mbd-2 mimic the eud-1 phenotype, resulting in the absence of one mouth-form. Mutations in both genes cause histone modification defects and reduced eud-1 expression. Surprisingly, Ppa-lsy-12 mutants also result in the down-regulation of an antisense-eud-1 RNA. eud-1 and antisense-eud-1 are co-expressed and further experiments suggest that antisense-eud-1 acts through eud-1 itself. Indeed, overexpression of the antisense-eud-1 RNA increases the eud-1-sensitive mouth-form and extends eud-1 expression. In contrast, this effect is absent in eud-1 mutants indicating that antisense-eud-1 positively regulates eud-1. Thus, chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of eud-1 control feeding plasticity in Pristionchus. PMID:27487725

  14. Small RNAs and the regulation of cis-natural antisense transcripts in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hailing; Vacic, Vladimir; Girke, Thomas; Lonardi, Stefano; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2008-01-01

    Background In spite of large intergenic spaces in plant and animal genomes, 7% to 30% of genes in the genomes encode overlapping cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs). The widespread occurrence of cis-NATs suggests an evolutionary advantage for this type of genomic arrangement. Experimental evidence for the regulation of two cis-NAT gene pairs by natural antisense transcripts-generated small interfering RNAs (nat-siRNAs) via the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway has been reported in Arabidopsis. However, the extent of siRNA-mediated regulation of cis-NAT genes is still unclear in any genome. Results The hallmarks of RNAi regulation of NATs are 1) inverse regulation of two genes in a cis-NAT pair by environmental and developmental cues and 2) generation of siRNAs by cis-NAT genes. We examined Arabidopsis transcript profiling data from public microarray databases to identify cis-NAT pairs whose sense and antisense transcripts show opposite expression changes. A subset of the cis-NAT genes displayed negatively correlated expression profiles as well as inverse differential expression changes under at least one of the examined developmental stages or treatment conditions. By searching the Arabidopsis Small RNA Project (ASRP) and Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) small RNA databases as well as our stress-treated small RNA dataset, we found small RNAs that matched at least one gene in 646 pairs out of 1008 (64%) protein-coding cis-NAT pairs, which suggests that siRNAs may regulate the expression of many cis-NAT genes. 209 putative siRNAs have the potential to target more than one gene and half of these small RNAs could target multiple members of a gene family. Furthermore, the majority of the putative siRNAs within the overlapping regions tend to target only one transcript of a given NAT pair, which is consistent with our previous finding on salt- and bacteria-induced nat-siRNAs. In addition, we found that genes encoding plastid- or mitochondrion

  15. On the specificity of antisense RNA to arrest in vitro translation of mRNA coding for Drosophila hsp 23.

    PubMed

    Nicole, L M; Tanguay, R M

    1987-03-01

    The specificity of action of antisense RNA for one of Drosophila low molecular weight heat shock proteins (hsp 23) was tested at the translational level using the rabbit reticulocyte lysate cell-free system. T7 polymerase-driven transcripts of hsp 23 in the antisense orientation were mixed with mRNA from heat-shocked cells under various stringency conditions prior to translation in vitro. Although the four small hsps show considerable sequence homology in their coding sequences, antisense hsp 23 RNA was shown to specifically inhibit hsp 23 mRNA translation under both high (formamide, 45 degrees C) and low stringency (37 degrees C) conditions. This suggests that the 5' leader and the ribosome binding region of mRNA are of prime importance in the specificity of action of antisense RNA at the translational level.

  16. Expansion of antisense lncRNA transcriptomes since the loss of RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Alcid, Eric A.; Tsukiyama, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Antisense long noncoding RNAs (ASlncRNAs) have been implicated in regulating gene expression in response to physiological cues. However, little is known about ASlncRNA evolutionary dynamics, and what underlies the evolution of their expression. Here, using budding yeast species Saccharomyces and Naumovozyma as models, we show that ASlncRNA repertoires have expanded since the loss of RNAi, in terms of their expression levels, their lengths, and their degree of overlap with coding genes. Furthermore, we show RNAi is inhibitory to ASlncRNA transcriptomes, and that elevation of ASlncRNAs in the presence of RNAi is deleterious to Naumovozyma castellii, a natural host of RNAi. Together, our work suggests that the loss of RNAi had a substantial impact on the genome-wide increase in expression of ASlncRNAs across budding yeast evolution. PMID:27018804

  17. PU.1 antisense lncRNA against its mRNA translation promotes adipogenesis in porcine preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Wei, N; Wang, Y; Xu, R-X; Wang, G-Q; Xiong, Y; Yu, T-Y; Yang, G-S; Pang, W-J

    2015-04-01

    Antisense long non-coding RNAs (AS lncRNAs) play important roles in refined regulation of animal gene expression. However, their functions and molecular mechanisms for domestic animal adipogenesis are largely unknown. Here, we found a novel AS lncRNA transcribed from the porcine PU.1 gene (also known as SPI1) by strand-specific RT-PCR. Results showed that PU.1 AS lncRNA was expressed and generally lower than the level of PU.1 mRNA in porcine subcutaneous adipose, heart, liver, spleen, lympha, skeletal muscle and kidney tissues. We further found that the levels of PU.1 mRNA and PU.1 protein were significantly lower in subcutaneous and intermuscular adipose than in mesenteric and greater omentum adipose, whereas the levels of PU.1 AS lncRNA showed no difference in porcine adipose tissues from four different parts of the body. During porcine adipogenesis, levels of PU.1 mRNA increased at day 2 and then gradually decreased. Meanwhile, PU.1 AS lncRNA exhibited an expression trend similar to PU.1 mRNA but sharply decreased after day 2. Interestingly, PU.1 protein level rose during differentiation. In addition, at day 6 after differentiation, knockdown of endogenous PU.1 promoted adipogenesis, whereas knockdown of endogenous PU.1 AS lncRNA had the opposite effect. Moreover, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) and fatty acid synthase (FASN) were significantly upregulated in the PU.1 shRNA treatment group (P < 0.05), whereas they were downregulated in the PU.1 AS shRNA treatment group (P < 0.05). Adipose triglyceride lipase [ATGL; also known as patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 2 (PNPLA2)] and hormone-sensitive lipase [HSL; also known as lipase, hormone-sensitive (LIPE)] contrasted with PPARG and FASN. Finally, the PU.1 mRNA/PU.1 AS lncRNA duplex was detected by an endogenous ribonuclease protection assay combined with RT-PCR. Based on the above results, we suggest that PU.1 AS lncRNA (vs. its mRNA translation) promotes adipogenesis through

  18. Tye7 regulates yeast Ty1 retrotransposon sense and antisense transcription in response to adenylic nucleotides stress

    PubMed Central

    Servant, Géraldine; Pinson, Benoit; Tchalikian-Cosson, Aurélie; Coulpier, Fanny; Lemoine, Sophie; Pennetier, Carole; Bridier-Nahmias, Antoine; Todeschini, Anne Laure; Fayol, Hélène; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Lesage, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Transposable elements play a fundamental role in genome evolution. It is proposed that their mobility, activated under stress, induces mutations that could confer advantages to the host organism. Transcription of the Ty1 LTR-retrotransposon of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated in response to a severe deficiency in adenylic nucleotides. Here, we show that Ty2 and Ty3 are also stimulated under these stress conditions, revealing the simultaneous activation of three active Ty retrotransposon families. We demonstrate that Ty1 activation in response to adenylic nucleotide depletion requires the DNA-binding transcription factor Tye7. Ty1 is transcribed in both sense and antisense directions. We identify three Tye7 potential binding sites in the region of Ty1 DNA sequence where antisense transcription starts. We show that Tye7 binds to Ty1 DNA and regulates Ty1 antisense transcription. Altogether, our data suggest that, in response to adenylic nucleotide reduction, TYE7 is induced and activates Ty1 mRNA transcription, possibly by controlling Ty1 antisense transcription. We also provide the first evidence that Ty1 antisense transcription can be regulated by environmental stress conditions, pointing to a new level of control of Ty1 activity by stress, as Ty1 antisense RNAs play an important role in regulating Ty1 mobility at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional stages. PMID:22379133

  19. Tye7 regulates yeast Ty1 retrotransposon sense and antisense transcription in response to adenylic nucleotides stress.

    PubMed

    Servant, Géraldine; Pinson, Benoit; Tchalikian-Cosson, Aurélie; Coulpier, Fanny; Lemoine, Sophie; Pennetier, Carole; Bridier-Nahmias, Antoine; Todeschini, Anne Laure; Fayol, Hélène; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Lesage, Pascale

    2012-07-01

    Transposable elements play a fundamental role in genome evolution. It is proposed that their mobility, activated under stress, induces mutations that could confer advantages to the host organism. Transcription of the Ty1 LTR-retrotransposon of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated in response to a severe deficiency in adenylic nucleotides. Here, we show that Ty2 and Ty3 are also stimulated under these stress conditions, revealing the simultaneous activation of three active Ty retrotransposon families. We demonstrate that Ty1 activation in response to adenylic nucleotide depletion requires the DNA-binding transcription factor Tye7. Ty1 is transcribed in both sense and antisense directions. We identify three Tye7 potential binding sites in the region of Ty1 DNA sequence where antisense transcription starts. We show that Tye7 binds to Ty1 DNA and regulates Ty1 antisense transcription. Altogether, our data suggest that, in response to adenylic nucleotide reduction, TYE7 is induced and activates Ty1 mRNA transcription, possibly by controlling Ty1 antisense transcription. We also provide the first evidence that Ty1 antisense transcription can be regulated by environmental stress conditions, pointing to a new level of control of Ty1 activity by stress, as Ty1 antisense RNAs play an important role in regulating Ty1 mobility at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional stages. PMID:22379133

  20. Extremely High Expression of Antisense RNA for Wilms' Tumor 1 in Active Osteoclasts: Suppression of Wilms' Tumor 1 Protein Expression during Osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yin-Ji; Kukita, Akiko; Kyumoto-Nakamura, Yukari; Kukita, Toshio

    2016-09-01

    Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1), a zinc-finger transcription regulator of the early growth response family, identified as the product of a tumor suppressor gene of Wilms' tumors, bears potential ability to induce macrophage differentiation in blood cell differentiation. Herein, we examined the involvement of WT1 in the regulation of osteoclastogenesis. We detected a high level of WT1 protein expression in osteoclast precursors; however, WT1 expression was markedly suppressed during osteoclastogenesis. We examined expression of WT1 transcripts in bone tissue by RNA in situ hybridization. We found a high level of antisense transcripts in osteoclasts actively resorbing bone in mandible of newborn rats. Expression of antisense WT1 RNA in mandible was also confirmed by Northern blot analysis and strand-specific RT-PCR. Overexpression of antisense WT1 RNA in RAW-D cells, an osteoclast precursor cell line, resulted in a marked enhancement of osteoclastogenesis, suggesting that antisense WT1 RNA functions to suppress expression of WT1 protein in osteoclastogenesis. High level expression of antisense WT1 RNA may contribute to commitment to osteoclastogenesis, and may allow osteoclasts to maintain or stabilize their differentiation state.

  1. Engineering resistance against tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) using antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Bendahmane, M; Gronenborn, B

    1997-01-01

    One of the most severe diseases of cultivated tomato worldwide is caused by tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), a geminivirus transmitted by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci. Here we describe the application of antisense RNAs to interfere with the disease caused by TYLCV. The target of the antisense RNA is the rare messenger RNA of the Rep protein, encoded by the C1 gene. Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants expressing C1 antisense RNA were obtained and shown to resist infection by TYLCV. Some of the resistant lines are symptomless, and the replication of challenge TYLCV almost completely suppressed. The transgenes mediating resistance were shown to be effective through at least two generations of progeny. PMID:9037152

  2. Expression and regulation of the Msx1 natural antisense transcript during development.

    PubMed

    Coudert, Amélie E; Pibouin, Laurence; Vi-Fane, Brigitte; Thomas, Bethan L; Macdougall, Mary; Choudhury, Anuradha; Robert, Benoît; Sharpe, Paul T; Berdal, Ariane; Lezot, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    Bidirectional transcription, leading to the expression of an antisense (AS) RNA partially complementary to the protein coding sense (S) RNA, is an emerging subject in mammals and has been associated with various processes such as RNA interference, imprinting and transcription inhibition. Homeobox genes do not escape this bidirectional transcription, raising the possibility that such AS transcription occurs during embryonic development and may be involved in the complexity of regulation of homeobox gene expression. According to the importance of the Msx1 homeobox gene function in craniofacial development, especially in tooth development, the expression and regulation of its recently identified AS transcripts were investigated in vivo in mouse from E9.5 embryo to newborn, and compared with the S transcript and the encoded protein expression pattern and regulation. The spatial and temporal expression patterns of S, AS transcripts and protein are consistent with a role of AS RNA in the regulation of Msx1 expression in timely controlled developmental sites. Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions were shown to control the spatial organization of S and also AS RNA expression during early patterning of incisors and molars in the odontogenic mesenchyme. To conclude, this study clearly identifies the Msx1 AS RNA involvement during tooth development and evidences a new degree of complexity in craniofacial developmental biology: the implication of endogenous AS RNAs.

  3. Thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide binding to a structured mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Walton, S Patrick; Stephanopoulos, Gregory N; Yarmush, Martin L; Roth, Charles M

    2002-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides act as exogenous inhibitors of gene expression by binding to a complementary sequence on the target mRNA, preventing translation into protein. Antisense technology is being applied successfully as a research tool and as a molecular therapeutic. However, a quantitative understanding of binding energetics between short oligonucleotides and longer mRNA targets is lacking, and selecting a high-affinity antisense oligonucleotide sequence from the many possibilities complementary to a particular RNA is a critical step in designing an effective antisense inhibitor. Here, we report measurements of the thermodynamics and kinetics of hybridization for a number of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) complementary to the rabbit beta-globin (RBG) mRNA using a binding assay that facilitates rapid separation of bound from free species in solution. A wide range of equilibrium dissociation constants were observed, and association rate constants within the measurable range correlated strongly with binding affinity. In addition, a significant correlation was observed of measured binding affinities with binding affinity values predicted using a thermodynamic model involving DNA and RNA unfolding, ODN hybridization, and RNA restructuring to a final free energy minimum. In contrast to the behavior observed for hybridization of short strands, the association rate constant increased with temperature, suggesting that the kinetics of association are related to disrupting the native structure of the target RNA. The rate of cleavage of the RBG mRNA in the presence of ribonuclease H and ODNs of varying association kinetics displayed apparent first-order kinetics, with the rate constant exhibiting binding-limited behavior at low association rates and reaction-limited behavior at higher rates. Implications for the rational design of effective antisense reagents are discussed. PMID:11751323

  4. Use of an Antisense RNA Strategy To Investigate the Functional Significance of Mn-Catalase in the Extreme Thermophile Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Renata; Hidalgo, Aurelio; Cava, Felipe; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, José Manuel; Berenguer, José

    2004-01-01

    The expression of an antisense RNA revealed that an Mn-catalase was required in Thermus thermophilus for aerobic but not for anaerobic growth. The antisense system is based on the constitutive expression of a “bicistronic” transcript consisting of the kanamycin resistance gene mRNA followed by the antisense RNA against the selected target. PMID:15516595

  5. Antisense Transcription of Retrotransposons in Drosophila: An Origin of Endogenous Small Interfering RNA Precursors.

    PubMed

    Russo, Joseph; Harrington, Andrew W; Steiniger, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    Movement of transposons causes insertions, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements potentially leading to premature lethality in Drosophila melanogaster. To repress these elements and combat genomic instability, eukaryotes have evolved several small RNA-mediated defense mechanisms. Specifically, in Drosophila somatic cells, endogenous small interfering (esi)RNAs suppress retrotransposon mobility. EsiRNAs are produced by Dicer-2 processing of double-stranded RNA precursors, yet the origins of these precursors are unknown. We show that most transposon families are transcribed in both the sense (S) and antisense (AS) direction in Dmel-2 cells. LTR retrotransposons Dm297, mdg1, and blood, and non-LTR retrotransposons juan and jockey transcripts, are generated from intraelement transcription start sites with canonical RNA polymerase II promoters. We also determined that retrotransposon antisense transcripts are less polyadenylated than sense. RNA-seq and small RNA-seq revealed that Dicer-2 RNA interference (RNAi) depletion causes a decrease in the number of esiRNAs mapping to retrotransposons and an increase in expression of both S and AS retrotransposon transcripts. These data support a model in which double-stranded RNA precursors are derived from convergent transcription and processed by Dicer-2 into esiRNAs that silence both sense and antisense retrotransposon transcripts. Reduction of sense retrotransposon transcripts potentially lowers element-specific protein levels to prevent transposition. This mechanism preserves genomic integrity and is especially important for Drosophila fitness because mobile genetic elements are highly active.

  6. Antisense Transcription of Retrotransposons in Drosophila: An Origin of Endogenous Small Interfering RNA Precursors.

    PubMed

    Russo, Joseph; Harrington, Andrew W; Steiniger, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    Movement of transposons causes insertions, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements potentially leading to premature lethality in Drosophila melanogaster. To repress these elements and combat genomic instability, eukaryotes have evolved several small RNA-mediated defense mechanisms. Specifically, in Drosophila somatic cells, endogenous small interfering (esi)RNAs suppress retrotransposon mobility. EsiRNAs are produced by Dicer-2 processing of double-stranded RNA precursors, yet the origins of these precursors are unknown. We show that most transposon families are transcribed in both the sense (S) and antisense (AS) direction in Dmel-2 cells. LTR retrotransposons Dm297, mdg1, and blood, and non-LTR retrotransposons juan and jockey transcripts, are generated from intraelement transcription start sites with canonical RNA polymerase II promoters. We also determined that retrotransposon antisense transcripts are less polyadenylated than sense. RNA-seq and small RNA-seq revealed that Dicer-2 RNA interference (RNAi) depletion causes a decrease in the number of esiRNAs mapping to retrotransposons and an increase in expression of both S and AS retrotransposon transcripts. These data support a model in which double-stranded RNA precursors are derived from convergent transcription and processed by Dicer-2 into esiRNAs that silence both sense and antisense retrotransposon transcripts. Reduction of sense retrotransposon transcripts potentially lowers element-specific protein levels to prevent transposition. This mechanism preserves genomic integrity and is especially important for Drosophila fitness because mobile genetic elements are highly active. PMID:26534950

  7. Stress-induced glucocorticoids suppress the antisense molecular regulation of FGF-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthew G; Der-Avakian, Andre; Bland, Sondra T; Watkins, Linda R; Maier, Steven F

    2007-05-01

    Psychological stress can upregulate basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) expression. Because glucocorticoids can also upregulate FGF-2 expression, the present studies investigated whether stress-induced glucocorticoids mediate the effects of stress on FGF-2. FGF-2 is regulated by an FGF-2 antisense (AS) molecular mechanism and so the present experiments also, for the first time, assessed the effects of stress on FGF-2-AS mRNA, as well as the mediating role of glucocorticoids. The effects of either escapable shock (ES) or yoked-inescapable tail shock (IS) on FGF-2 and FGF-2-AS were determined. To test whether glucocorticoids mediate the effect of stress on FGF-2 and FGF-2-AS, animals were pretreated with temporary corticosterone (CORT) synthesis inhibitors and exposed to IS. To test whether glucocorticoids are sufficient to modulate FGF-2 and FGF-2-AS mRNA, animals were injected with CORT and mRNA measured. ES and IS similarly downregulated FGF-2-AS mRNA at 0 h post-stress and upregulated FGF-2 mRNA 2 h post-stress. Inhibition of CORT synthesis abrogated the effect of IS on both FGF-2-AS and FGF-2 mRNA. Exogenous CORT mimicked the effects of ES and IS on FGF-2, but not FGF-2-AS mRNA. The present study demonstrates that glucocorticoids mediate the effects of stress on FGF-2 and FGF-2-AS.

  8. Suppression of endo B cytokeratin by its antisense RNA inhibits the normal coexpression of endo A cytokeratin.

    PubMed Central

    Trevor, K; Linney, E; Oshima, R G

    1987-01-01

    Antisense endo B cytokeratin RNA encoded by a retrovirus vector was expressed in a derivative of the F9 embryonal carcinoma cell line. Two G418-resistant clones were selected that expressed a colinear transcript containing both neomycin and antisense endo B cytokeratin sequences. Expression of a 5-fold excess of antisense endo B RNA over endogenous, retinoic acid-induced endo B RNA resulted in suppression of endo B cytokeratin protein expression. In addition, the normal induction of endo A protein, the type II cytokeratin that polymerizes with endo B, was suppressed at the RNA and protein levels. Revertant clones, which synthesize little if any neo or antisense endo B RNA, regain the ability to express the affected gene products in response to retinoic acid. These results indicate that the suppression of endo B cytokeratin protein synthesis influences the stable levels of endo A mRNA. Images PMID:2434948

  9. Mitochondrial delivery of antisense RNA by MITO-Porter results in mitochondrial RNA knockdown, and has a functional impact on mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ryo; Yamada, Yuma; Kawamura, Eriko; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial genome-targeting nucleic acids are promising therapeutic candidates for treating mitochondrial diseases. To date, a number of systems for delivering genetic information to the cytosol and the nucleus have been reported, and several successful gene therapies involving gene delivery targeted to the cytosol and the nucleus have been reported. However, much less progress has been made concerning mitochondrial gene delivery systems, and mitochondrial gene therapy has never been achieved. Here, we report on the mitochondrial delivery of an antisense RNA oligonucleotide (ASO) to perform mitochondrial RNA knockdown to regulate mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial delivery of the ASO was achieved using a combination of a MITO-Porter system, which contains mitochondrial fusogenic lipid envelopes for mitochondrial delivery via membrane fusion and D-arm, a mitochondrial import signal of tRNA to the matrix. Mitochondrial delivery of the ASO induces the knockdown of the targeted mitochondria-encoded mRNA and protein, namely cytochrome c oxidase subunit II, a component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Furthermore, the mitochondrial membrane potential was depolarized by the down regulation of the respiratory chain as the result of the mitochondrial delivery of ASO. This finding constitutes the first report to demonstrate that the nanocarrier-mediated mitochondrial genome targeting of antisense RNA effects mitochondrial function.

  10. Two classes of small antisense RNAs in fungal RNA silencing triggered by non-integrative transgenes

    PubMed Central

    Nicolás, Francisco E.; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa M.

    2003-01-01

    Transformation of Mucor circinelloides with self-replicative plasmids containing a wild-type copy of the carotenogenic gene carB causes silencing of the carB function in 3% of transformants. Genomic analyses revealed a relationship between silenced phenotype and number of copies of plasmids. This phenotype results from a reduction of the steady-state levels of carB mRNA, a reduction that is not due to differences in the level of transcription, indicating that silencing is post-transcriptional. Small sense and antisense RNAs have been found to be associated with gene silencing in M.circinelloides. Two size classes of small antisense RNAs, differentially accumulated during the vegetative growth of silenced transformants, have been detected: a long 25-nucleotide RNA and a short 21-nucleotide RNA. Secondary sense and antisense RNAs corresponding to sequences of the endogenous gene downstream of the initial triggering molecule have also been detected, revealing the existence of spreading of RNA targeting in fungi. These findings, together with the self-replicative nature of the triggering molecules, make M.circinelloides a suitable organism for investigating some unresolved questions in RNA silencing. PMID:12881432

  11. Detection of Very Long Antisense Transcripts by Whole Transcriptome RNA-Seq Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes by Semiconductor Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wehner, Stefanie; Mannala, Gopala K.; Qing, Xiaoxing; Madhugiri, Ramakanth; Chakraborty, Trinad; Mraheil, Mobarak A.; Hain, Torsten; Marz, Manja

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis, a severe food-borne infection characterised by abortion, septicaemia, or meningoencephalitis. L. monocytogenes causes outbreaks of febrile gastroenteritis and accounts for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in humans. Listeriosis has one of the highest mortality rates (up to 30%) of all food-borne infections. This human pathogenic bacterium is an important model organism for biomedical research to investigate cell-mediated immunity. L. monocytogenes is also one of the best characterised bacterial systems for the molecular analysis of intracellular parasitism. Recently several transcriptomic studies have also made the ubiquitous distributed bacterium as a model to understand mechanisms of gene regulation from the environment to the infected host on the level of mRNA and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). We have used semiconductor sequencing technology for RNA-seq to investigate the repertoire of listerial ncRNAs under extra- and intracellular growth conditions. Furthermore, we applied a new bioinformatic analysis pipeline for detection, comparative genomics and structural conservation to identify ncRNAs. With this work, in total, 741 ncRNA locations of potential ncRNA candidates are now known for L. monocytogenes, of which 611 ncRNA candidates were identified by RNA-seq. 441 transcribed ncRNAs have never been described before. Among these, we identified novel long non-coding antisense RNAs with a length of up to 5,400 nt e.g. opposite to genes coding for internalins, methylases or a high-affinity potassium uptake system, namely the kdpABC operon, which were confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. RNA-seq, comparative genomics and structural conservation of L. monocytogenes ncRNAs illustrate that this human pathogen uses a large number and repertoire of ncRNA including novel long antisense RNAs, which could be important for intracellular survival within the infected eukaryotic host. PMID

  12. Nanoparticle-Delivered Antisense MicroRNA-21 Enhances the Effects of Temozolomide on Glioblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Ananta, Jeyarama S; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Massoud, Tarik F

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) generally exhibits high IC50 values for its standard drug treatment, temozolomide (TMZ). MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is an oncomiR overexpressed in GBM, thus controlling important aspects of glioma biology. We hypothesized that PLGA nanoparticles carrying antisense miR-21 to glioblastoma cells might beneficially knock down endogenous miR-21 prior to TMZ treatment. PLGA nanoparticles encapsulating antisense miR-21 were effective in intracellular delivery and sustained silencing (p < 0.01) of miR-21 function in U87 MG, LN229, and T98G cells. Prior antisense miR-21 delivery significantly reduced the number of viable cells (p < 0.001), and increased (1.6-fold) cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase upon TMZ treatment in U87 MG cells. There was overexpression of the miR-21 target genes PTEN (by 67%) and caspase-3 (by 15%) upon cotreatment. This promising PLGA nanoparticle-based platform for antisense miR-21 delivery to GBM is an effective cotherapeutic strategy in cell culture, warranting the need for further studies prior to future clinical translation. PMID:26559642

  13. Spt4 selectively regulates the expression of C9orf72 sense and antisense mutant transcripts.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nicholas J; Carlomagno, Yari; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Almeida, Sandra; Cook, Casey N; Gendron, Tania F; Prudencio, Mercedes; Van Blitterswijk, Marka; Belzil, Veronique; Couthouis, Julien; Paul, Joseph West; Goodman, Lindsey D; Daughrity, Lillian; Chew, Jeannie; Garrett, Aliesha; Pregent, Luc; Jansen-West, Karen; Tabassian, Lilia J; Rademakers, Rosa; Boylan, Kevin; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Josephs, Keith A; Parisi, Joseph E; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Boeve, Bradley F; Deng, Ning; Feng, Yanan; Cheng, Tzu-Hao; Dickson, Dennis W; Cohen, Stanley N; Bonini, Nancy M; Link, Christopher D; Gao, Fen-Biao; Petrucelli, Leonard; Gitler, Aaron D

    2016-08-12

    An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in C9orf72 causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (c9FTD/ALS). Therapeutics are being developed to target RNAs containing the expanded repeat sequence (GGGGCC); however, this approach is complicated by the presence of antisense strand transcription of expanded GGCCCC repeats. We found that targeting the transcription elongation factor Spt4 selectively decreased production of both sense and antisense expanded transcripts, as well as their translated dipeptide repeat (DPR) products, and also mitigated degeneration in animal models. Knockdown of SUPT4H1, the human Spt4 ortholog, similarly decreased production of sense and antisense RNA foci, as well as DPR proteins, in patient cells. Therapeutic targeting of a single factor to eliminate c9FTD/ALS pathological features offers advantages over approaches that require targeting sense and antisense repeats separately. PMID:27516603

  14. Antisense targeting of 3' end elements involved in DUX4 mRNA processing is an efficient therapeutic strategy for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a new gene-silencing approach.

    PubMed

    Marsollier, Anne-Charlotte; Ciszewski, Lukasz; Mariot, Virginie; Popplewell, Linda; Voit, Thomas; Dickson, George; Dumonceaux, Julie

    2016-04-15

    Defects in mRNA 3'end formation have been described to alter transcription termination, transport of the mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, stability of the mRNA and translation efficiency. Therefore, inhibition of polyadenylation may lead to gene silencing. Here, we choose facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) as a model to determine whether or not targeting key 3' end elements involved in mRNA processing using antisense oligonucleotide drugs can be used as a strategy for gene silencing within a potentially therapeutic context. FSHD is a gain-of-function disease characterized by the aberrant expression of the Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) transcription factor leading to altered pathogenic deregulation of multiple genes in muscles. Here, we demonstrate that targeting either the mRNA polyadenylation signal and/or cleavage site is an efficient strategy to down-regulate DUX4 expression and to decrease the abnormally high-pathological expression of genes downstream of DUX4. We conclude that targeting key functional 3' end elements involved in pre-mRNA to mRNA maturation with antisense drugs can lead to efficient gene silencing and is thus a potentially effective therapeutic strategy for at least FSHD. Moreover, polyadenylation is a crucial step in the maturation of almost all eukaryotic mRNAs, and thus all mRNAs are virtually eligible for this antisense-mediated knockdown strategy. PMID:26787513

  15. VEGF165 antisense RNA suppresses oncogenic properties of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhong-Ping; Wang, Yun-Jie; Li, Jin-Ge; Zhou, Yong-An

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of antisense RNA to vascular endothelial growth factor165 (VEGF165) on human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line EC109 and the feasibility of gene therapy for esophageal carcinoma. METHODS: By using subclone technique, the full length of VEGF165 amino acid cDNA, which was cut from pGEM-3Zf(+), was cloned inversely into the eukaryotic expression vector pCEP4.The recombinant plasmid pCEP-AVEGF165 was transfected into EC109 cell with lipofectamine. After a stable transfection, dot blot, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), laser confocal imaging system analysis, transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry were performed to determine the biological characteristics of EC109 cell line before and after transfection in vitro and whether there was a reversion in the tumorigenic properties of the EC109 cell in vivo. RESULTS: The eukaryotic expression vector pCEP-AVEGF165 was successfully constructed and transfected into EC109 cells. The expression of VEGF165 was significantly decreased in the transfected cells while the biological characteristics of the cells were not influenced by the expression of antisense gene. The tumorigenic and angiogenic capabilities were greatly reduced in nude mice, as demonstrated by reduced tumor end volume (820 ± 112.5) mm3 vs (7930 ± 1035) mm3 and (7850 ± 950) mm3,P£¼0.01£½ and microvessel density(8.5 ± 1.2) mm-2 vs (44.3 ± 9.4) mm-2 and (46.4 ± 12.6) mm-2,P < 0.01) in comparison between experimental groups empty vector transfected group and control group. CONCLUSION: The angiogenesis and tumorigenicity of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were effectively inhibited by VEGF165 antisense RNA. Antisense RNA to VEGF165 can potentially be used as an adjuvant therapy for solid tumors. PMID:11833069

  16. Cytoplasmic Control of Sense-Antisense mRNA Pairs.

    PubMed

    Sinturel, Flore; Navickas, Albertas; Wery, Maxime; Descrimes, Marc; Morillon, Antonin; Torchet, Claire; Benard, Lionel

    2015-09-22

    Transcriptome analyses have revealed that convergent gene transcription can produce many 3'-overlapping mRNAs in diverse organisms. Few studies have examined the fate of 3'-complementary mRNAs in double-stranded RNA-dependent nuclear phenomena, and nothing is known about the cytoplasmic destiny of 3'-overlapping messengers or their impact on gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that the complementary tails of 3'-overlapping mRNAs can interact in the cytoplasm and promote post-transcriptional regulatory events including no-go decay (NGD) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genome-wide experiments confirm that these messenger-interacting mRNAs (mimRNAs) form RNA duplexes in wild-type cells and thus have potential roles in modulating the mRNA levels of their convergent gene pattern under different growth conditions. We show that the post-transcriptional fate of hundreds of mimRNAs is controlled by Xrn1, revealing the extent to which this conserved 5'-3' cytoplasmic exoribonuclease plays an unexpected but key role in the post-transcriptional control of convergent gene expression. PMID:26344770

  17. Post-transcriptional gene silencing triggered by sense transgenes involves uncapped antisense RNA and differs from silencing intentionally triggered by antisense transgenes

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Jean-Sébastien; Jauvion, Vincent; Bouché, Nicolas; Béclin, Christophe; Hachet, Mélanie; Zytnicki, Matthias; Vaucheret, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Although post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) has been studied for more than a decade, there is still a gap in our understanding of how de novo silencing is initiated against genetic elements that are not supposed to produce double-stranded (ds)RNA. Given the pervasive transcription occurring throughout eukaryote genomes, we tested the hypothesis that unintended transcription could produce antisense (as)RNA molecules that participate to the initiation of PTGS triggered by sense transgenes (S-PTGS). Our results reveal a higher level of asRNA in Arabidopsis thaliana lines that spontaneously trigger S-PTGS than in lines that do not. However, PTGS triggered by antisense transgenes (AS-PTGS) differs from S-PTGS. In particular, a hypomorphic ago1 mutation that suppresses S-PTGS prevents the degradation of asRNA but not sense RNA during AS-PTGS, suggesting a different treatment of coding and non-coding RNA by AGO1, likely because of AGO1 association to polysomes. Moreover, the intended asRNA produced during AS-PTGS is capped whereas the asRNA produced during S-PTGS derives from 3′ maturation of a read-through transcript and is uncapped. Thus, we propose that uncapped asRNA corresponds to the aberrant RNA molecule that is converted to dsRNA by RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 6 in siRNA-bodies to initiate S-PTGS, whereas capped asRNA must anneal with sense RNA to produce dsRNA that initiate AS-PTGS. PMID:26209135

  18. Characterization of Natural Antisense Transcript, Sclerotia Development and Secondary Metabolism by Strand-Specific RNA Sequencing of Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chao; Guo, Yong; Lin, Ying; Pan, Li; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus has received much attention owing to its severe impact on agriculture and fermented products induced by aflatoxin. Sclerotia morphogenesis is an important process related to A. flavus reproduction and aflatoxin biosynthesis. In order to obtain an extensive transcriptome profile of A. flavus and provide a comprehensive understanding of these physiological processes, the isolated mRNA of A. flavus CA43 cultures was subjected to high-throughput strand-specific RNA sequencing (ssRNA-seq). Our ssRNA-seq data profiled widespread transcription across the A. flavus genome, quantified vast transcripts (73% of total genes) and annotated precise transcript structures, including untranslated regions, upstream open reading frames (ORFs), alternative splicing variants and novel transcripts. We propose natural antisense transcripts in A. flavus might regulate gene expression mainly on the post-transcriptional level. This regulation might be relevant to tune biological processes such as aflatoxin biosynthesis and sclerotia development. Gene Ontology annotation of differentially expressed genes between the mycelia and sclerotia cultures indicated sclerotia development was related closely to A. flavus reproduction. Additionally, we have established the transcriptional profile of aflatoxin biosynthesis and its regulation model. We identified potential genes linking sclerotia development and aflatoxin biosynthesis. These genes could be used as targets for controlled regulation of aflatoxigenic strains of A. flavus. PMID:24849659

  19. Dynamics of human telomerase RNA structure revealed by antisense oligonucleotide technique.

    PubMed

    Vasilkova, Daria V; Azhibek, Dulat M; Zatsepin, Timofei S; Naraikina, Yulia V; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Prokofjeva, Maria M; Zvereva, Maria I; Rubtsova, Maria P

    2013-12-01

    Telomeres are the nucleoprotein complexes that cap the linear chromosome ends. Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that maintains telomere length in stem, embryonic and cancer cells. Somatic cells don't contain active telomerase and telomere function as mitotic clock and telomere length determines the number of cell divisions. Telomerase RNA (TER) contains the template for telomere synthesis and serves as a structural scaffold for holoenzyme assembly. We compared different oligonucleotide based methods for telomerase RNA inhibition, such as antisense oligonucleotides, knockdown by transient siRNA transfection and silencing by miRNA derived from short expressed RNA hairpin in HEK293 cells. All of these methods were applied to different TER regions. Our results revealed that CR2/CR3 domain of TER is accessible in vitro and in vivo and could serve as an optimal site for oligonucleotide-based telomerase silencing.

  20. Antisense molecular beacon strategy for in situ visualization of snRNA and fibrillarin protein interaction in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Sandipan; Ghosh, Srikanta; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Das, Pradeep

    2004-05-01

    Use of confocal microscopy has provided many recent developments in the study of functional aspects, especially localization and distribution of proteins, DNA and RNA within the cells. In the present investigation, we have applied for the first time, antisense molecular beacon based Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and Flow Cytometric Energy Transfer (FCET) techniques to demonstrate binding and co-localization of fibrillarin protein with small nuclear RNA (snRNA) to form ribonucleoprotein particle (RNPP) complex in Giardia lamblia. It has been observed by FRET and FCET that energy transfer occurs from fluorescence tagged fibrillarin to snRNA antisense molecular beacon confirming the clear physical interaction between them during RNPP complex formation. This is the first demonstration of in situ detection of RNA-protein complex formation by antisense molecular beacon based FRET and FCET in Giardia lamblia.

  1. The Human Hyaluronan Synthase 2 (HAS2) Gene and Its Natural Antisense RNA Exhibit Coordinated Expression in the Renal Proximal Tubular Epithelial Cell♦

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Daryn R.; Phillips, Aled O.; Krupa, Aleksandra; Martin, John; Redman, James E.; Altaher, Abdalsamed; Neville, Rachel D.; Webber, Jason; Kim, Min-young; Bowen, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant expression of the human hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2) gene has been implicated in the pathology of malignancy, pulmonary arterial hypertension, osteoarthritis, asthma, thyroid dysfunction, and large organ fibrosis. Renal fibrosis is associated with increased cortical synthesis of hyaluronan (HA), an extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan, and we have shown that HA is a correlate of interstitial fibrosis in vivo. Our previous in vitro data have suggested that both HAS2 transcriptional induction and subsequent HAS2-driven HA synthesis may contribute to kidney fibrosis via phenotypic modulation of the renal proximal tubular epithelial cell (PTC). Post-transcriptional regulation of HAS2 mRNA synthesis by the natural antisense RNA HAS2-AS1 has recently been described in osteosarcoma cells, but the antisense transcript was not detected in kidney. In this study, PTC stimulation with IL-1β or TGF-β1 induced coordinated temporal profiles of HAS2-AS1 and HAS2 transcription. Constitutive activity of the putative HAS2-AS1 promoter was demonstrated, and transcription factor-binding sequence motifs were identified. Knockdown of Sp1/Sp3 expression by siRNA blunted IL-1β induction of both HAS2-AS1 and HAS2, and Smad2/Smad3 knockdown similarly attenuated TGF-β1 stimulation. Inhibition of IL-1β-stimulated HAS2-AS1 RNA induction using HAS2-AS1-specific siRNAs also suppressed up-regulation of HAS2 mRNA transcription. The thermodynamic feasibility of HAS2-AS1/HAS2 heterodimer formation was demonstrated in silico, and locus-specific cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA was detected in vitro. In summary, our data show that transcriptional induction of HAS2-AS1 and HAS2 occurs simultaneously in PTCs and suggest that transcription of the antisense RNA stabilizes or augments HAS2 mRNA expression in these cells via RNA/mRNA heteroduplex formation. PMID:21357421

  2. Regulating malonyl-CoA metabolism via synthetic antisense RNAs for enhanced biosynthesis of natural products.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yaping; Lin, Yuheng; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J; Yan, Yajun

    2015-05-01

    Malonyl-CoA is the building block for fatty acid biosynthesis and also a precursor to various pharmaceutically and industrially valuable molecules, such as polyketides and biopolymers. However, intracellular malonyl-CoA is usually maintained at low levels, which poses great challenges to efficient microbial production of malonyl-CoA derived molecules. Inactivation of the malonyl-CoA consumption pathway to increase its intracellular availability is not applicable, since it is usually lethal to microorganisms. In this work, we employ synthetic antisense RNAs (asRNAs) to conditionally down-regulate fatty acid biosynthesis and achieve malonyl-CoA enrichment in Escherichia coli. The optimized asRNA constructs with a loop-stem structure exhibit high interference efficiency up to 80%, leading to a 4.5-fold increase in intracellular malonyl-CoA concentration when fabD gene expression is inhibited. Strikingly, this strategy allows the improved production of natural products 4-hydroxycoumarin, resveratrol, and naringenin by 2.53-, 1.70-, and 1.53-fold in E. coli, respectively. In addition, down-regulation of other fab genes including fabH, fabB, and fabF also leads to remarkable increases in 4-hydroxycoumarin production. This study demonstrates a novel strategy to enhance intracellular malonyl-CoA and indicates the effectiveness of asRNA as a powerful tool for use in metabolic engineering.

  3. Strand-specific RNA-seq reveals widespread occurrence of novel cis-natural antisense transcripts in rice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs) are RNAs transcribed from the antisense strand of a gene locus, and are complementary to the RNA transcribed from the sense strand. Common techniques including microarray approach and analysis of transcriptome databases are the major ways to globally identify cis-NATs in various eukaryotic organisms. Genome-wide in silico analysis has identified a large number of cis-NATs that may generate endogenous short interfering RNAs (nat-siRNAs), which participate in important biogenesis mechanisms for transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in rice. However, the transcriptomes are yet to be deeply sequenced to comprehensively investigate cis-NATs. Results We applied high-throughput strand-specific complementary DNA sequencing technology (ssRNA-seq) to deeply sequence mRNA for assessing sense and antisense transcripts that were derived under salt, drought and cold stresses, and normal conditions, in the model plant rice (Oryza sativa). Combined with RAP-DB genome annotation (the Rice Annotation Project Database build-5 data set), 76,013 transcripts corresponding to 45,844 unique gene loci were assembled, in which 4873 gene loci were newly identified. Of 3819 putative rice cis-NATs, 2292 were detected as expressed and giving rise to small RNAs from their overlapping regions through integrated analysis of ssRNA-seq data and small RNA data. Among them, 503 cis-NATs seemed to be associated with specific conditions. The deep sequence data from isolated epidermal cells of rice seedlings further showed that 54.0% of cis-NATs were expressed simultaneously in a population of homogenous cells. Nearly 9.7% of rice transcripts were involved in one-to-one or many-to-many cis-NATs formation. Furthermore, only 17.4-34.7% of 223 many-to-many cis-NAT groups were all expressed and generated nat-siRNAs, indicating that only some cis-NAT groups may be involved in complex regulatory networks. Conclusions Our study profiles an

  4. Analysis of the Mechanism of Action of the Antisense RNA That Controls the Replication of the repABC Plasmid p42d ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes-Rivera, Ramón; Romero-López, Cristina; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo; Cevallos, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    Replication and segregation of the Rhizobium etli symbiotic plasmid (pRetCFN42d) depend on the presence of a repABC operon, which carries all the plasmid-encoded elements required for these functions. All repABC operons share three protein-encoding genes (repA, repB, and repC), an antisense RNA (ctRNA) coding gene, and at least one centromere-like region (parS). The products of repA and repB, in conjunction with the parS region, make up the segregation system, and they negatively regulate operon transcription. The last gene of the operon, repC, encodes the initiator protein. The ctRNA is a negative posttranscriptional regulator of repC. In this work, we analyzed the secondary structures of the ctRNA and its target and mapped the motifs involved in the complex formed between them. Essential residues for the effective interaction localize at the unpaired 5′ end of the antisense molecule and the loop of the target mRNA. In light of our results, we propose a model explaining the mechanism of action of this ctRNA in the regulation of plasmid replication in R. etli. PMID:20435728

  5. Targeting Long Noncoding RNA with Antisense Oligonucleotide Technology as Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tianyuan; Kim, Youngsoo; MacLeod, A Robert

    2016-01-01

    Recent annotation of the human transcriptome revealed that only 2 % of the genome encodes proteins while the majority of human genome is transcribed into noncoding RNAs. Although we are just beginning to understand the diverse roles long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play in molecular and cellular processes, they have potentially important roles in human development and pathophysiology. However, targeting of RNA by traditional structure-based design of small molecule inhibitors has been difficult, due to a lack of understanding of the dynamic tertiary structures most RNA molecules adopt. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are capable of targeting specific genes or transcripts directly through Watson-Crick base pairing and thus can be designed based on sequence information alone. These agents have made possible specific targeting of "non-druggable targets" including RNA molecules. Here we describe how ASOs can be applied in preclinical studies to reduce levels of lncRNAs of interest.

  6. Characterization of a Novel Antisense RNA in the Major Pilin Locus of Neisseria meningitidis Influencing Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Felicia Y. Y.; Wörmann, Mirka E.; Tang, Christoph M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Expression of type four pili (Tfp) is essential for virulence in Neisseria meningitidis. Pili mediate adhesion, bacterial aggregation, and DNA uptake. In N. meningitidis, the major pilin subunit is encoded by the pilE gene. In some strains, PilE is subject to phase and antigenic variation, which can alter Tfp properties and together offer a possible mechanism of immune escape. Pilin expression and antigenic variation can be modulated in response to environmental cues; however, the precise mechanisms of such regulation remain unclear. We identified a promoter in the pilE locus, 3′ of the pilE coding sequence, on the antisense (AS) strand which is conserved in meningococci. We show that this promoter directs transcription of an AS RNA that is expressed during specific growth phases and in response to salt stress. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the transcript encompasses sequences complementary to the entire pilE coding sequence and 5′ untranslated region. AS RNAs can regulate the gene on the sense strand by altering transcript stability or translation. However, by using Northern blotting, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and Western blotting, we found no significant AS RNA-dependent changes in pilE transcript or protein level. Instead, our data indicate that the AS RNA influences pilin antigenic variation. This work provides further insights into the complex regulation of pilin expression and variation in pathogenic Neisseria. IMPORTANCE Pathogenic Neisseria spp. express type four pili (Tfp) which are important for adhesion, aggregation and transformation. Some strains of N. meningitidis are able to vary the sequence of the major subunit (PilE) of the Tfp. The mechanisms underlying this variation are not fully defined, but the process requires several noncoding elements that are found adjacent to the pilE gene. In this work, we identified a cis-encoded RNA antisense to pilE in N. meningitidis. By using Northern blotting and RT

  7. Overaccumulation of the chloroplast antisense RNA AS5 is correlated with decreased abundance of 5S rRNA in vivo and inefficient 5S rRNA maturation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sharwood, Robert E; Hotto, Amber M; Bollenbach, Thomas J; Stern, David B

    2011-02-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation in the chloroplast is exerted by nucleus-encoded ribonucleases and RNA-binding proteins. One of these ribonucleases is RNR1, a 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease of the RNase II family. We have previously shown that Arabidopsis rnr1-null mutants exhibit specific abnormalities in the expression of the rRNA operon, including the accumulation of precursor 23S, 16S, and 4.5S species and a concomitant decrease in the mature species. 5S rRNA transcripts, however, accumulate to a very low level in both precursor and mature forms, suggesting that they are unstable in the rnr1 background. Here we demonstrate that rnr1 plants overaccumulate an antisense RNA, AS5, that is complementary to the 5S rRNA, its intergenic spacer, and the downstream trnR gene, which encodes tRNA(Arg), raising the possibility that AS5 destabilizes 5S rRNA or its precursor and/or blocks rRNA maturation. To investigate this, we used an in vitro system that supports 5S rRNA and trnR processing. We show that AS5 inhibits 5S rRNA maturation from a 5S-trnR precursor, and shorter versions of AS5 demonstrate that inhibition requires intergenic sequences. To test whether the sense and antisense RNAs form double-stranded regions in vitro, treatment with the single-strand-specific mung bean nuclease was used. These results suggest that 5S-AS5 duplexes interfere with a sense-strand secondary structure near the endonucleolytic cleavage site downstream from the 5S rRNA coding region. We hypothesize that these duplexes are degraded by a dsRNA-specific ribonuclease in vivo, contributing to the 5S rRNA deficiency observed in rnr1.

  8. Global transcriptional start site mapping using differential RNA sequencing reveals novel antisense RNAs in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Maureen K; Bischler, Thorsten; Eisenbart, Sara K; Förstner, Konrad U; Zhang, Aixia; Herbig, Alexander; Nieselt, Kay; Sharma, Cynthia M; Storz, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    While the model organism Escherichia coli has been the subject of intense study for decades, the full complement of its RNAs is only now being examined. Here we describe a survey of the E. coli transcriptome carried out using a differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq) approach, which can distinguish between primary and processed transcripts, and an automated prediction algorithm for transcriptional start sites (TSS). With the criterion of expression under at least one of three growth conditions examined, we predicted 14,868 TSS candidates, including 5,574 internal to annotated genes (iTSS) and 5,495 TSS corresponding to potential antisense RNAs (asRNAs). We examined expression of 14 candidate asRNAs by Northern analysis using RNA from wild-type E. coli and from strains defective for RNases III and E, two RNases reported to be involved in asRNA processing. Interestingly, nine asRNAs detected as distinct bands by Northern analysis were differentially affected by the rnc and rne mutations. We also compared our asRNA candidates with previously published asRNA annotations from RNA-seq data and discuss the challenges associated with these cross-comparisons. Our global transcriptional start site map represents a valuable resource for identification of transcription start sites, promoters, and novel transcripts in E. coli and is easily accessible, together with the cDNA coverage plots, in an online genome browser.

  9. Uptake, efficacy, and systemic distribution of naked, inhaled short interfering RNA (siRNA) and locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense.

    PubMed

    Moschos, Sterghios A; Frick, Manfred; Taylor, Bruce; Turnpenny, Paul; Graves, Helen; Spink, Karen G; Brady, Kevin; Lamb, David; Collins, David; Rockel, Thomas D; Weber, Markus; Lazari, Ovadia; Perez-Tosar, Luis; Fancy, Sally A; Lapthorn, Chris; Green, Martin X; Evans, Steve; Selby, Matthew; Jones, Gareth; Jones, Lyn; Kearney, Sarah; Mechiche, Houria; Gikunju, Diana; Subramanian, Romesh; Uhlmann, Eugen; Jurk, Marion; Vollmer, Jörg; Ciaramella, Giuseppe; Yeadon, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and small interfering RNA (siRNA) promise specific correction of disease-causing gene expression. Therapeutic implementation, however, has been forestalled by poor delivery to the appropriate tissue, cell type, and subcellular compartment. Topical administration is considered to circumvent these issues. The availability of inhalation devices and unmet medical need in lung disease has focused efforts in this tissue. We report the development of a novel cell sorting method for quantitative, cell type-specific analysis of siRNA, and locked nucleic acid (LNA) ASO uptake and efficacy after intratracheal (i.t.) administration in mice. Through fluorescent dye labeling, we compare the utility of this approach to whole animal and whole tissue analysis, and examine the extent of tissue distribution. We detail rapid systemic access and renal clearance for both therapeutic classes and lack of efficacy at the protein level in lung macrophages, epithelia, or other cell types. We nevertheless observe efficient redirection of i.t. administered phosphorothioate (PS) LNA ASO to the liver and kidney leading to targeted gene knockdown. These data suggest delivery remains a key obstacle to topically administered, naked oligonucleotide efficacy in the lung and introduce inhalation as a potentially viable alternative to injection for antisense administration to the liver and kidneys.

  10. RNA cleavage products generated by antisense oligonucleotides and siRNAs are processed by the RNA surveillance machinery

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Walt F.; De Hoyos, Cheryl L.; Liang, Xue-hai; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) elicit cleavage of the targeted RNA by the endoribonuclease RNase H1, whereas siRNAs mediate cleavage through the RNAi pathway. To determine the fates of the cleaved RNA in cells, we lowered the levels of the factors involved in RNA surveillance prior to treating cells with ASOs or siRNA and analyzed cleavage products by RACE. The cytoplasmic 5′ to 3′ exoribonuclease XRN1 was responsible for the degradation of the downstream cleavage products generated by ASOs or siRNA targeting mRNAs. In contrast, downstream cleavage products generated by ASOs targeting nuclear long non-coding RNA Malat 1 and pre-mRNA were degraded by nuclear XRN2. The downstream cleavage products did not appear to be degraded in the 3′ to 5′ direction as the majority of these products contained intact poly(A) tails and were bound by the poly(A) binding protein. The upstream cleavage products of Malat1 were degraded in the 3′ to 5′ direction by the exosome complex containing the nuclear exoribonuclease Dis3. The exosome complex containing Dis3 or cytoplasmic Dis3L1 degraded mRNA upstream cleavage products, which were not bound by the 5′-cap binding complex and, consequently, were susceptible to degradation in the 5′ to 3′ direction by the XRN exoribonucleases. PMID:26843429

  11. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator inhibit cAMP-activated but not calcium-activated chloride currents.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, J A; McDonald, T V; Nghiem, P T; Lowe, A W; Schulman, H; Gruenert, D C; Stryer, L; Gardner, P

    1992-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) by cAMP-dependent protein kinase leads to chloride flux in epithelial cells. Is CFTR also required for the calcium-dependent activation of chloride channels? We used antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to CFTR to reduce the expression of CFTR in colonic and tracheal epithelial cells. The antisense oligomers were a pair of adjacent 18-mers complementary to nucleotides 1-18 and 19-36 of CFTR mRNA. Sense and misantisense oligomers served as controls. A 48-h antisense treatment reduced the expression of CFTR protein as assayed by immunoprecipitation and autoradiography to 26% of the level in sense-treated T84 cells. Whole-cell patch clamp revealed that a 48-h antisense treatment of T84 and 56FHTE-8o- fetal tracheal epithelial cells reduced the cAMP-activated chloride current to approximately 10% of that in sense-treated cells. The half-life of functional CFTR is less than 24 h in these cells. In contrast, the calcium-activated chloride current was not affected by antisense treatment. Hence, the cAMP and calcium pathways are separate. CFTR is required for the cAMP pathway but not for the calcium pathway. Images PMID:1379720

  12. Antisense long noncoding RNAs regulate var gene activation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Amit-Avraham, Inbar; Pozner, Guy; Eshar, Shiri; Fastman, Yair; Kolevzon, Netanel; Yavin, Eylon; Dzikowski, Ron

    2015-03-01

    The virulence of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the deadliest form of human malaria, is attributed to its ability to evade human immunity through antigenic variation. These parasites alternate between expression of variable antigens, encoded by members of a multicopy gene family named var. Immune evasion through antigenic variation depends on tight regulation of var gene expression, ensuring that only a single var gene is expressed at a time while the rest of the family is maintained transcriptionally silent. Understanding how a single gene is chosen for activation is critical for understanding mutually exclusive expression but remains a mystery. Here, we show that antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) initiating from var introns are associated with the single active var gene at the time in the cell cycle when the single var upstream promoter is active. We demonstrate that these antisense transcripts are incorporated into chromatin, and that expression of these antisense lncRNAs in trans triggers activation of a silent var gene in a sequence- and dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, interference with these lncRNAs using complement peptide nucleic acid molecules down-regulated the active var gene, erased the epigenetic memory, and induced expression switching. Altogether, our data provide evidence that these antisense lncRNAs play a key role in regulating var gene activation and mutually exclusive expression.

  13. Making sense of antisense: seemingly noncoding RNAs antisense to the master regulator of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic replication do not regulate that transcript but serve as mRNAs encoding small peptides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiyang; Ganem, Don

    2010-06-01

    The mammalian transcriptome is studded with putative noncoding RNAs, many of which are antisense to known open reading frames (ORFs). Roles in the regulation of their complementary mRNAs are often imputed to these antisense transcripts, but few have been experimentally examined, and such functions remain largely conjectural. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes two transcripts that lack obvious ORFs and are complementary to the gene (RTA) encoding the master regulator of the latent/lytic switch. Here, we show that, contrary to expectation, these RNAs do not regulate RTA expression. Rather, they are found on polysomes, and genetic analysis indicates that translational initiation occurs at several AUG codons in the RNA, leading to the presumptive synthesis of peptides of 17 to 48 amino acids. These findings underscore the need for circumspection in the computational assessment of coding potential and raise the possibility that the mammalian proteome may contain many previously unsuspected peptides generated from seemingly noncoding RNAs, some of which could have important biological functions. Irrespective of their function, such peptides could also contribute substantially to the repertoire of T cell epitopes generated in both uninfected and infected cells. PMID:20357088

  14. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense–antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis. PMID:23650872

  15. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-07-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense-antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis.

  16. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-07-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense-antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis. PMID:23650872

  17. Expression analysis of the long non-coding RNA antisense to Uchl1 (AS Uchl1) during dopaminergic cells' differentiation in vitro and in neurochemical models of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Carrieri, Claudia; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Santoro, Claudio; Persichetti, Francesca; Carninci, Piero; Zucchelli, Silvia; Gustincich, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Antisense (AS) transcripts are RNA molecules that are transcribed from the opposite strand to sense (S) genes forming S/AS pairs. The most prominent configuration is when a lncRNA is antisense to a protein coding gene. Increasing evidences prove that antisense transcription may control sense gene expression acting at distinct regulatory levels. However, its contribution to brain function and neurodegenerative diseases remains unclear. We have recently identified AS Uchl1 as an antisense to the mouse Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (Uchl1) gene (AS Uchl1), the synthenic locus of UCHL1/PARK5. This is mutated in rare cases of early-onset familial Parkinson's Disease (PD) and loss of UCHL1 activity has been reported in many neurodegenerative diseases. Importantly, manipulation of UchL1 expression has been proposed as tool for therapeutic intervention. AS Uchl1 induces UchL1 expression by increasing its translation. It is the representative member of SINEUPs (SINEB2 sequence to UP-regulate translation), a new functional class of natural antisense lncRNAs that activate translation of their sense genes. Here we take advantage of FANTOM5 dataset to identify the transcription start sites associated to S/AS pair at Uchl1 locus. We show that AS Uchl1 expression is under the regulation of Nurr1, a major transcription factor involved in dopaminergic cells' differentiation and maintenance. Furthermore, AS Uch1 RNA levels are strongly down-regulated in neurochemical models of PD in vitro and in vivo. This work positions AS Uchl1 RNA as a component of Nurr1-dependent gene network and target of cellular stress extending our understanding on the role of antisense transcription in the brain. PMID:25883552

  18. CTCF regulates the human p53 gene through direct interaction with its natural antisense transcript, Wrap53

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña-Meyer, Ricardo; González-Buendía, Edgar; Guerrero, Georgina; Narendra, Varun; Bonasio, Roberto; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Reinberg, Danny

    2014-01-01

    The multifunctional CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) protein exhibits a broad range of functions, including that of insulator and higher-order chromatin organizer. We found that CTCF comprises a previously unrecognized region that is necessary and sufficient to bind RNA (RNA-binding region [RBR]) and is distinct from its DNA-binding domain. Depletion of cellular CTCF led to a decrease in not only levels of p53 mRNA, as expected, but also those of Wrap53 RNA, an antisense transcript originated from the p53 locus. PAR-CLIP-seq (photoactivatable ribonucleoside-enhanced cross-linking and immunoprecipitation [PAR-CLIP] combined with deep sequencing) analyses indicate that CTCF binds a multitude of transcripts genome-wide as well as to Wrap53 RNA. Apart from its established role at the p53 promoter, CTCF regulates p53 expression through its physical interaction with Wrap53 RNA. Cells harboring a CTCF mutant in its RBR exhibit a defective p53 response to DNA damage. Moreover, the RBR facilitates CTCF multimerization in an RNA-dependent manner, which may bear directly on its role in establishing higher-order chromatin structures in vivo. PMID:24696455

  19. Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting Influenza A Segment 8 Genomic RNA Inhibit Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lenartowicz, Elzbieta; Nogales, Aitor; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Kierzek, Ryszard; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) affects 5%–10% of the world's population every year. Through genome changes, many IAV strains develop resistance to currently available anti-influenza therapeutics. Therefore, there is an urgent need to find new targets for therapeutics against this important human respiratory pathogen. In this study, 2′-O-methyl and locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) were designed to target internal regions of influenza A/California/04/2009 (H1N1) genomic viral RNA segment 8 (vRNA8) based on a base-pairing model of vRNA8. Ten of 14 tested ASOs showed inhibition of viral replication in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. The best five ASOs were 11–15 nucleotides long and showed inhibition ranging from 5- to 25-fold. In a cell viability assay they showed no cytotoxicity. The same five ASOs also showed no inhibition of influenza B/Brisbane/60/2008 (Victoria lineage), indicating that they are sequence specific for IAV. Moreover, combinations of ASOs slightly improved anti-influenza activity. These studies establish the accessibility of IAV vRNA for ASOs in regions other than the panhandle formed between the 5′ and 3′ ends. Thus, these regions can provide targets for the development of novel IAV antiviral approaches. PMID:27463680

  20. Kinetic characteristics of Escherichia coli RNase H1: cleavage of various antisense oligonucleotide-RNA duplexes.

    PubMed Central

    Crooke, S T; Lemonidis, K M; Neilson, L; Griffey, R; Lesnik, E A; Monia, B P

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of variations in substrates on the kinetic properties of Escherichia coli RNase H were studied using antisense oligonucleotides of various types hybridized to complementary oligoribonucleotides. The enzyme displayed minimal sequence preference, initiated cleavage through an endonucleolytic mechanism near the 3' terminus of the RNA in a DNA-RNA chimera and then was processively exonucleolytic. Phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides hybridized to RNA supported cleavage more effectively than phosphodiester oligodeoxynucleotides. Oligonucleotides comprised of 2'-methoxy-, 2'-fluoro- or 2'-propoxy-nucleosides did not support RNase H1 activity. 2. The Km and Vmax. of cleavage of RNA duplexes with full phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides were compared with methoxy-deoxy 'gapmers', i.e.; oligonucleotides with 2'-methoxy wings surrounding a deoxynucleotide centre. Such structural modifications resulted in substantial increases in affinity, but significant reductions in cleavage efficiency. The initial rates of cleavage increased as the deoxynucleotide gap size was increased. Multiple deoxynucleotide gaps increased the Vmax. but had little effect on Km. 3. The effects of several base modifications on the site of initial cleavage, processivity and initial rate of cleavage were also studied. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8526876

  1. The Role of Structural Elements of the 5'-Terminal Region of p53 mRNA in Translation under Stress Conditions Assayed by the Antisense Oligonucleotide Approach

    PubMed Central

    Swiatkowska, Agata; Zydowicz, Paulina; Gorska, Agnieszka; Suchacka, Julia; Dutkiewicz, Mariola; Ciesiołka, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    The p53 protein is one of the major factors responsible for cell cycle regulation and stress response. In the 5’-terminal region of p53 mRNA, an IRES element has been found which takes part in the translational regulation of p53 expression. Two characteristic hairpin motifs are present in this mRNA region: G56-C169, with the first AUG codon, and U180-A218, which interacts with the Hdm2 protein (human homolog of mouse double minute 2 protein). 2′-OMe modified antisense oligomers hybridizing to the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA were applied to assess the role of these structural elements in translation initiation under conditions of cellular stress. Structural changes in the RNA target occurring upon oligomers’ binding were monitored by the Pb2+-induced cleavage method. The impact of antisense oligomers on the synthesis of two proteins, the full-length p53 and its isoform Δ40p53, was analysed in HT-29, MCF-7 and HepG2 cells, under normal conditions and under stress, as well as in vitro conditions. The results revealed that the hairpin U180-A218 and adjacent single-stranded region A219-A228 were predominantly responsible for high efficacy of IRES-mediated translation in the presence of stress factors. These motifs play a role of cis-acting elements which are able to modulate IRES activity, likely via interactions with protein factors. PMID:26513723

  2. Effects of intrathecally administerd NaV1. 8 antisense oligonucleotide on the expression of sodium channel mRNA in dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmin; Yao, Shanglong; Song, Wenge; Wang, Yuelan; Liu, Dong; Zen, Lian

    2005-01-01

    Neuropathic pain has been hypothesized to be the result of aberrant expression and function of sodium channels at the site of injury. To investigate the effects of NaV1. 8 antisense oligonucleotide on the expression of sodium channel mRNA in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in chronic neuropathic pain. 24 Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-260 g were anesthetized with the intraperitoneal injection of 300 mg x kg(-1) choral hydrate. The CCI model was made by loose ligation of sciatic nerve trunk by 4-0 chromic gut. The mechanical and thermal pain threshold were measured before operation and 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 days after operation. A PE-10 catheter was implanted in subarachnoid space at lumbar region. On the 7th postoperative day the animals were randomly divided into 4 groups. The drugs were injected intrathecally twice a day for 5 consecutive days in group 2-4. The animals were decapitated 14 days after the surgery. The L4-L6 DRG of the operated side was removed and crushed, and total RNA was extracted with Trizol reagent. The contralateral side was used as control. The change of NaV1. 8 sodium channel transcripts was determined by RT-PCR. Pain threshold was significantly lowered after CCI as compared with that in control group and was elevated 3 days after antisense oligonucleotide injection. Sensory neuron specific TTX-R sodium channel NaV1. 8 transcript was down-regulated after antisense oligonucleotide injection at the dosage of 45 microg as compared with that in CCI group (P < 0.01), and it was even greater at the dosage of 90 microg. The intrathecally injected NaV1. 8 antisense oligonucleotide can reduce the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia partially by downregulating the SNS transcript expression. PMID:16696329

  3. Regulation of in vitro gene expression using antisense oligonucleotides or antisense expression plasmids transfected using starburst PAMAM dendrimers.

    PubMed Central

    Bielinska, A; Kukowska-Latallo, J F; Johnson, J; Tomalia, D A; Baker, J R

    1996-01-01

    Starburst polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers are a new type of synthetic polymer characterized by a branched spherical shape and a high density surface charge. We have investigated the ability of these dendrimers to function as an effective delivery system for antisense oligonucleotides and 'antisense expression plasmids' for the targeted modulation of gene expression. Dendrimers bind to various forms of nucleic acids on the basis of electrostatic interactions, and the ability of DNA-dendrimer complexes to transfer oligonucleotides and plasmid DNA to mediate antisense inhibition was assessed in an in vitro cell culture system. Cell lines that permanently express luciferase gene were developed using dendrimer mediated transfection. Transfections of antisense oligonucleotides or antisense cDNA plasmids into these cell lines using dendrimers resulted in a specific and dose dependent inhibition of luciferase expression. This inhibition caused approximately 25-50% reduction of baseline luciferase activity. Binding of the phosphodiester oligonucleotides to dendrimers also extended their intracellular survival. While dendrimers were not cytotoxic at the concentrations effective for DNA transfer, some non-specific suppression of luciferase expression was observed. Our results indicate that Starburst dendrimers can be effective carriers for the introduction of regulatory nucleic acids and facilitate the suppression of the specific gene expression. PMID:8668551

  4. Optimizing RNA/ENA chimeric antisense oligonucleotides using in vitro splicing.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Yagi, Mariko; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    A molecular therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) that converts dystrophin mRNA from out-of-frame to in-frame transcripts by inducing exon skipping with antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) is now approaching clinical application. To exploit the broad therapeutic applicability of exon skipping therapy, it is necessary to identify AOs that are able to induce efficient and specific exon skipping. To optimize AOs, we have established an in vitro splicing system using cultured DMD myocytes. Here, we describe the process of identifying the best AO.Cultured DMD myocytes are established from a biopsy sample and the target exon is chosen. A series of AOs are designed to cover the whole target exon sequence. As AOs, we use 15-20-mer chimeric oligonucleotides consisting of 2'-O-methyl RNA and modified nucleic acid (2'-O, 4'-C-ethylene-bridged nucleic acid). Each AO is transfected individually into cultured DMD myocytes, and the resulting mRNA is analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR. The ability of each AO to induce exon skipping is examined by comparing the amount of cDNA with and without exon skipping. If necessary, having roughly localized the target region, another set of AOs are designed and the exon skipping abilities of the new AOs are examined. Finally, one AO is determined as the best for the molecular therapy.Our simple and reliable methods using an in vitro splicing system have enabled us to identify optimized AOs against many exons of the DMD gene.

  5. Cathepsin B expression and down-regulation by gene silencing and antisense DNA in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zwicky, Roman; Müntener, Kathrin; Goldring, Mary B; Baici, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Cathepsin B, a marker of the dedifferentiated chondrocyte phenotype, contributes to cartilage destruction in osteoarthritis and pathological proteolysis in rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. In search of possible means for neutralizing the action of this enzyme, we compared its expression, biosynthesis and distribution in articular chondrocytes and two lines of immortalized human chondrocytes. Native articular chondrocytes in primary culture and the polyclonal T/C-28a2 chondrocyte cell line were similar with respect to the number of endosomes and lysosomes, the distribution of three alternatively spliced cathepsin B mRNA forms, and the cathepsin B activity. In contrast, the clonal C-28/I2 cell line contained four times higher levels of intracellular cathepsin B activity, slightly higher numbers of endosomes and lysosomes, and uniform distribution of all three cathepsin B transcripts and thus resembled subcultured chondrocytes at an early stage of dedifferentiation. Transfection of T/C-28a2 chondrocytes with double-stranded cathepsin B mRNA resulted in inhibition of cathepsin B biosynthesis by up to 70% due to RNA interference, and single-stranded antisense DNAs of various sizes decreased cathepsin B biosynthesis by up to 78%. An antisense oligonucleotide designed to hybridize to the end of cathepsin B's exons 1 and the beginning of exon 3 was successful in specifically inhibiting the mRNA splice variant lacking exon 2. These results indicate that cathepsin B expression and activity may be targeted for gene silencing by RNA interference and antisense DNA in chondrocytes. Furthermore, the differential expression and distribution of cathepsin B and presence of the necessary molecular apparatus for gene silencing in the immortalized human chondrocyte cell lines indicate that they may serve as a useful model for studying the function of relevant enzymes in cartilage pathologies. PMID:12086583

  6. The effects of antisense to Gialpha2 on opioid agonist potency and Gialpha2 protein and mRNA abundance in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Shen, J; Shah, S; Hsu, H; Yoburn, B C

    1998-08-31

    In this study, mice received a single intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. ) injection of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) directed towards the mRNA of Gialpha2. Controls received a saline or a nonsense ODN injection. The subsequent effects on protein levels and mRNA of Gialpha2 were determined in mouse striatum, as well as, the effect on opioid ([d-Ala2, d-Leu5]-enkephalin; DADLE) inhibition of cyclic AMP (cAMP) formation in striatum and morphine analgesic potency. At 48 h after treatment, maximal inhibition (Emax) of cAMP formation was significantly reduced for the antisense group compared to controls. Antisense ODN treatment only changed the Emax and did not significantly alter the IC50s of the dose-effect curves for inhibition of cAMP formation. Antisense ODN, but not nonsense ODN, significantly reduced morphine's analgesic potency by >2-fold, 48 h following treatment. Using a quantitative immunoblotting procedure, antisense treatment was shown to decrease striatal Gialpha2 protein 48 h after antisense injection, while there were no changes in protein levels at 2, 12 and 24 h. In contrast, no changes in Gialpha2 mRNA in mouse striatum were noted at any time after antisense treatment. Taken together, these data suggest that Gialpha2 mediates opioid-induced analgesia and opioid inhibition of cAMP production in the mouse. These data also suggest that antisense reduces target protein by a mechanism independent of changes in mRNA abundance.

  7. Biodegradable polymer nanocarriers for therapeutic antisense microRNA delivery in living animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Sekar, Narayana M.; Sekar, Thillai V.

    2012-03-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous regulators of gene expression, deregulated in several cellular diseases including cancer. Altering the cellular microenvironment by modulating the microRNAs functions can regulate different genes involved in major cellular processes, and this approach is now being investigated as a promising new generation of molecularly targeted anti-cancer therapies. AntagomiRs (Antisense-miRNAs) are a novel class of chemically modified stable oligonucleotides used for blocking the functions of endogenous microRNAs, which are overexpressed. A key challenge in achieving effective microRNAbased therapeutics lies in the development of an efficient delivery system capable of specifically delivering antisense oligonucleotides and target cancer cells in living animals. We are now developing an effective delivery system designed to selectively deliver antagomiR- 21 and antagomiR-10b to triple negative breast cancer cells, and to revert tumor cell metastasis and invasiveness. The FDA-approved biodegradable PLGA-nanoparticles were selected as a carrier for antagomiRs delivery. Chemically modified antagomiRs (antagomiR-21 and antagomiR-10b) were co-encapsulated in PEGylated-PLGA-nanoparticles by using the double-emulsification (W/O/W) solvent evaporation method, and the resulting average particle size of 150-200nm was used for different in vitro and in vivo experiments. The antagomiR encapsulated PLGA-nanoparticles were evaluated for their in vitro antagomiRs delivery, intracellular release profile, and antagomiRs functional effects, by measuring the endogenous cellular targets, and the cell growth and metastasis. The xenografts of tumor cells in living mice were used for evaluating the anti-metastatic and anti-invasive properties of cells. The results showed that the use of PLGA for antagomiR delivery is not only efficient in crossing cell membrane, but can also maintain functional intracellular antagomiRs level for a extended period of time and achieve

  8. The Antisense Transcriptome and the Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Mills, James D; Chen, Bei Jun; Ueberham, Uwe; Arendt, Thomas; Janitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptome of a cell is made up of a varied array of RNA species, including protein-coding RNAs, long non-coding RNAs, short non-coding RNAs, and circular RNAs. The cellular transcriptome is dynamic and can change depending on environmental factors, disease state and cellular context. The human brain has perhaps the most diverse transcriptome profile that is enriched for many species of RNA, including antisense transcripts. Antisense transcripts are produced when both the plus and minus strand of the DNA helix are transcribed at a particular locus. This results in an RNA transcript that has a partial or complete overlap with an intronic or exonic region of the sense transcript. While antisense transcription is known to occur at some level in most organisms, this review focuses specifically on antisense transcription in the brain and how regulation of genes by antisense transcripts can contribute to functional aspects of the healthy and diseased brain. First, we discuss different techniques that can be used in the identification and quantification of antisense transcripts. This is followed by examples of antisense transcription and modes of regulatory function that have been identified in the brain.

  9. Small antisense oligonucleotides against G-quadruplexes: specific mRNA translational switches

    PubMed Central

    Rouleau, Samuel G.; Beaudoin, Jean-Denis; Bisaillon, Martin; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (G4) are intricate RNA structures found throughout the transcriptome. Because they are associated with a variety of biological cellular mechanisms, these fascinating structural motifs are seen as potential therapeutic targets against many diseases. While screening of chemical compounds specific to G4 motifs has yielded interesting results, no single compound successfully discriminates between G4 motifs based on nucleotide sequences alone. This level of specificity is best attained using antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). Indeed, oligonucleotide-based strategies are already used to modulate DNA G4 folding in vitro. Here, we report that, in human cells, the use of short ASO to promote and inhibit RNA G4 folding affects the translation of specific mRNAs, including one from the 5′UTR of the H2AFY gene, a histone variant associated with cellular differentiation and cancer. These results suggest that the relatively high specificity of ASO-based strategies holds significant potential for applications aimed at modulating G4-motif folding. PMID:25510493

  10. Regulation of S-like ribonuclease levels in Arabidopsis. Antisense inhibition of RNS1 or RNS2 elevates anthocyanin accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bariola, P.A.; MacIntosh, G.C.; Green, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    The S-like ribonucleases (RNases) RNS1 and RNS2 of Arabidopsis are members of the widespread T{sub 2} ribonuclease family, whose members also include the S-RNases, involved in gametophytic self-incompatibility in plants. Both RNS1 and RNS2 mRNAs have been shown previously to be induced by inorganic phosphate (Pi) starvation. In this study the authors examined this regulation at the protein level and determined the effects of diminishing RNS1 and RNS2 expression using antisense techniques. The Pi-starvation control of RNS1 and RNS2 was confirmed using antibodies specific for each protein. These specific antibodies also demonstrated that RNS1 is secreted, whereas RNS2 is intracellular. By introducing antisense constructs, mRNA accumulation was inhibited by up to 90% for RNS1 and up to 65% for NS2. These plants contained abnormally high levels of anthocyanins, the production of which is often associated with several forms of stress, including Pi starvation. This effect demonstrates that diminishing the amounts of either RNS1 or RNS2 leads to effects that cannot be compensated for by the actions of other RNases, even though Arabidopsis contains a large number of different RNase activities. These results, together with the differential localization of the proteins, imply that RNS1 and RNS2 have distinct functions in the plant.

  11. Regulation of human heme oxygenase in endothelial cells by using sense and antisense retroviral constructs.

    PubMed

    Quan, S; Yang, L; Abraham, N G; Kappas, A

    2001-10-01

    Our objective was to determine whether overexpression and underexpression of human heme oxygenase (HHO)-1 could be controlled on a long-term basis by introduction of the HO-1 gene in sense (S) and antisense (AS) orientation with an appropriate vector into endothelial cells. Retroviral vector (LXSN) containing viral long terminal repeat promoter-driven human HO-1 S (LSN-HHO-1) and LXSN vectors containing HHO-1 promoter (HOP)-controlled HHO-1 S and AS (LSN-HOP-HHO-1 and LSN-HOP-HHO-1-AS) sequences were constructed and used to transfect rat lung microvessel endothelial cells (RLMV cells) and human dermal microvessel endothelial cells (HMEC-1 cells). RLMV cells transduced with HHO-1 S expressed human HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein associated with elevation in total HO activity compared with nontransduced cells. Vector-mediated expression of HHO-1 S or AS under control of HOP resulted in effective production of HO-1 or blocked induction of endogenous human HO-1 in HMEC-1 cells, respectively. Overexpression of HO-1 AS was associated with a long-term decrease (45%) of endogenous HO-1 protein and an increase (167%) in unmetabolized exogenous heme in HMEC-1 cells. Carbon monoxide (CO) production in HO-1 S- or AS-transduced HMEC-1 cells after heme treatment was increased (159%) or decreased (50%), respectively, compared with nontransduced cells. HO-2 protein levels did not change. These findings demonstrate that HHO-1 S and AS retroviral constructs are functional in enhancing and reducing HO activity, respectively, and thus can be used to regulate cellular heme levels, the activity of heme-dependent enzymes, and the rate of heme catabolism to CO and bilirubin.

  12. Effects of variations in length of hammerhead ribozyme antisense arms upon the cleavage of longer RNA substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Sioud, M

    1997-01-01

    The efficacy of intracellular binding of hammerhead ribozyme to its cleavage site in target RNA is a major requirement for its use as a therapeutic agent. Such efficacy can be influenced by several factors, such as the length of the ribozyme antisense arms and mRNA secondary structures. Analysis of various IL-2 hammerhead ribozymes having different antisense arms but directed to the same site predicts that the hammerhead ribozyme target site is present within a double-stranded region that is flanked by single-stranded loops. Extension of the low cleaving hammerhead ribozyme antisense arms by nucleotides that base pair with the single-stranded regions facilitated the hammerhead ribozyme binding to longer RNA substrates (e.g. mRNA). In addition, a correlation between the in vitro and intracellular results was also found. Thus, the present study would facilitate the design of hammerhead ribozymes directed against higher order structured sites. Further, it emphasises the importance of detailed structural investigations of hammerhead ribozyme full-length target RNAs. PMID:9016562

  13. Inhibition of luciferase expression in transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes by Sindbis virus expression of antisense luciferase RNA

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Barbara W.; Olson, Ken E.; Allen-Miura, Tanya; Rayms-Keller, Alfredo; Carlson, Jonathan O.; Coates, Craig J.; Jasinskiene, Nijole; James, Anthony A.; Beaty, Barry J.; Higgs, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    A rapid and reproducible method of inhibiting the expression of specific genes in mosquitoes should further our understanding of gene function and may lead to the identification of mosquito genes that determine vector competence or are involved in pathogen transmission. We hypothesized that the virus expression system based on the mosquito-borne Alphavirus, Sindbis (Togaviridae), may efficiently transcribe effector RNAs that inhibit expression of a targeted mosquito gene. To test this hypothesis, germ-line-transformed Aedes aegypti that express luciferase (LUC) from the mosquito Apyrase promoter were intrathoracically inoculated with a double subgenomic Sindbis (dsSIN) virus TE/3′2J/anti-luc (Anti-luc) that transcribes RNA complementary to the 5′ end of the LUC mRNA. LUC activity was monitored in mosquitoes infected with either Anti-luc or control dsSIN viruses expressing unrelated antisense RNAs. Mosquitoes infected with Anti-luc virus exhibited 90% reduction in LUC compared with uninfected and control dsSIN-infected mosquitoes at 5 and 9 days postinoculation. We demonstrate that a gene expressed from the mosquito genome can be inhibited by using an antisense strategy. The dsSIN antisense RNA expression system is an important tool for studying gene function in vivo. PMID:10557332

  14. Inhibition of luciferase expression in transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes by Sindbis virus expression of antisense luciferase RNA.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B W; Olson, K E; Allen-Miura, T; Rayms-Keller, A; Carlson, J O; Coates, C J; Jasinskiene, N; James, A A; Beaty, B J; Higgs, S

    1999-11-01

    A rapid and reproducible method of inhibiting the expression of specific genes in mosquitoes should further our understanding of gene function and may lead to the identification of mosquito genes that determine vector competence or are involved in pathogen transmission. We hypothesized that the virus expression system based on the mosquito-borne Alphavirus, Sindbis (Togaviridae), may efficiently transcribe effector RNAs that inhibit expression of a targeted mosquito gene. To test this hypothesis, germ-line-transformed Aedes aegypti that express luciferase (LUC) from the mosquito Apyrase promoter were intrathoracically inoculated with a double subgenomic Sindbis (dsSIN) virus TE/3'2J/anti-luc (Anti-luc) that transcribes RNA complementary to the 5' end of the LUC mRNA. LUC activity was monitored in mosquitoes infected with either Anti-luc or control dsSIN viruses expressing unrelated antisense RNAs. Mosquitoes infected with Anti-luc virus exhibited 90% reduction in LUC compared with uninfected and control dsSIN-infected mosquitoes at 5 and 9 days postinoculation. We demonstrate that a gene expressed from the mosquito genome can be inhibited by using an antisense strategy. The dsSIN antisense RNA expression system is an important tool for studying gene function in vivo. PMID:10557332

  15. Revealing natural antisense transcripts from Plasmodium vivax isolates: evidence of genome regulation in complicated malaria.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, P A; Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Garg, Shilpi; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Pakalapati, Deepak; Saxena, Vishal; Aiyaz, Mohammed; Chand, Bipin; Mugasimangalam, Raja C; Kochar, Sanjay K; Sirohi, Parmendra; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2013-12-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most geographically widespread human malaria parasite causing approximately 130-435 million infections annually. It is an economic burden in many parts of the world and poses a public health challenge along with the other Plasmodium sp. The biology of this parasite is less studied and poorly understood, in spite of these facts. Emerging evidence of severe complications due to infections by this parasite provides an impetus to focus research on the same. Investigating the parasite directly from infected patients is the best way to study its biology and pathogenic mechanisms. Gene expression studies of this parasite directly obtained from the patients has provided evidence of gene regulation resulting in varying amount of transcript levels in the different blood stages. The mechanisms regulating gene expression in malaria parasites are not well understood. Discovery of Natural Antisense Transcripts (NATs) in Plasmodium falciparum has suggested that these might play an important role in regulating gene expression. We report here the genome-wide occurrence of NATs in P. vivax parasites from patients with differing clinical symptoms. A total of 1348 NATs against annotated gene loci have been detected using a custom designed microarray with strand specific probes. Majority of NATs identified from this study shows positive correlation with the expression pattern of the sense (S) transcript. Our data also shows condition specific expression patterns of varying S and antisense (AS) transcript levels. Genes with AS transcripts enrich to various biological processes. To our knowledge this is the first report on the presence of NATs from P. vivax obtained from infected patients with different disease complications. The data suggests differential regulation of gene expression in diverse clinical conditions, as shown by differing sense/antisense ratios and would lead to future detailed investigations of gene regulation.

  16. Changes in Oleic Acid Content of Transgenic Soybeans by Antisense RNA Mediated Posttranscriptional Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Yang, Xiang-dong; Zhang, Yuan-yu; Yang, Jing; Qi, Guang-xun; Guo, Dong-quan; Xing, Guo-jie; Yao, Yao; Xu, Wen-jing; Li, Hai-yun; Li, Qi-yun; Dong, Ying-shan

    2014-01-01

    The Delta-12 oleate desaturase gene (FAD2-1), which converts oleic acid into linoleic acid, is the key enzyme determining the fatty acid composition of seed oil. In this study, we inhibited the expression of endogenous Delta-12 oleate desaturase GmFad2-1b gene by using antisense RNA in soybean Williams 82. By employing the soybean cotyledonary-node method, a part of the cDNA of soybean GmFad2-1b 801 bp was cloned for the construction of a pCAMBIA3300 vector under the soybean seed promoter BCSP. Leaf painting, LibertyLink strip, PCR, Southern blot, qRT-PCR, and fatty acid analysis were used to detect the insertion and expression of GmFad2-1b in the transgenic soybean lines. The results indicate that the metabolically engineered plants exhibited a significant increase in oleic acid (up to 51.71%) and a reduction in palmitic acid (to <3%) in their seed oil content. No structural differences were observed between the fatty acids of the transgenic and the nontransgenic oil extracts. PMID:25197629

  17. Changes in oleic Acid content of transgenic soybeans by antisense RNA mediated posttranscriptional gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Yang, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Yuan-Yu; Yang, Jing; Qi, Guang-Xun; Guo, Dong-Quan; Xing, Guo-Jie; Yao, Yao; Xu, Wen-Jing; Li, Hai-Yun; Li, Qi-Yun; Dong, Ying-Shan

    2014-01-01

    The Delta-12 oleate desaturase gene (FAD2-1), which converts oleic acid into linoleic acid, is the key enzyme determining the fatty acid composition of seed oil. In this study, we inhibited the expression of endogenous Delta-12 oleate desaturase GmFad2-1b gene by using antisense RNA in soybean Williams 82. By employing the soybean cotyledonary-node method, a part of the cDNA of soybean GmFad2-1b 801 bp was cloned for the construction of a pCAMBIA3300 vector under the soybean seed promoter BCSP. Leaf painting, LibertyLink strip, PCR, Southern blot, qRT-PCR, and fatty acid analysis were used to detect the insertion and expression of GmFad2-1b in the transgenic soybean lines. The results indicate that the metabolically engineered plants exhibited a significant increase in oleic acid (up to 51.71%) and a reduction in palmitic acid (to <3%) in their seed oil content. No structural differences were observed between the fatty acids of the transgenic and the nontransgenic oil extracts.

  18. Gene Silencing by Gold Nanoshell-Mediated Delivery and Laser-Triggered Release of Antisense Oligonucleotide and siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Huschka, Ryan; Barhoumi, Aoune; Liu, Qing; Roth, Jack A.; Ji, Lin; Halas, Naomi J.

    2013-01-01

    The approach of RNA interference (RNAi)- using antisense DNA or RNA oligonucleotides to silence activity of a specific pathogenic gene transcript and reduce expression of the encoded protein- is very useful in dissecting genetic function and holds significant promise as a molecular therapeutic. A major obstacle in achieving gene silencing with RNAi technology is the systemic delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. Here we demonstrate an engineered gold nanoshell (NS)-based therapeutic oligonucleotide delivery vehicle, designed to release its cargo on demand upon illumination with a near-infrared (NIR) laser. A poly(L)lysine peptide (PLL) epilayer covalently attached to the NS surface (NS-PLL) is used to capture intact, single-stranded antisense DNA oligonucleotides, or alternatively, double-stranded short-interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules. Controlled release of the captured therapeutic oligonucleotides in each case is accomplished by continuous wave NIR laser irradiation at 800 nm, near the resonance wavelength of the nanoshell. Fluorescently tagged oligonucleotides were used to monitor the time-dependent release process and light-triggered endosomal release. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing human lung cancer H1299 cell line was used to determine cellular uptake and gene silencing mediated by the NS-PLL carrying GFP gene-specific single-stranded DNA antisense oligonucleotide (AON-GFP), or a double-stranded siRNA (siRNA-GFP), in vitro. Light-triggered delivery resulted in ∼ 47% and ∼49% downregulation of the targeted GFP expression by AON-GFP and siRNA-GFP, respectively. Cytotoxicity induced by both the NS-PLL delivery vector and by laser irradiation is minimal, as demonstrated by a XTT cell proliferation assay. PMID:22862291

  19. Pathogenic C9ORF72 Antisense Repeat RNA Forms a Double Helix with Tandem C:C Mismatches.

    PubMed

    Dodd, David W; Tomchick, Diana R; Corey, David R; Gagnon, Keith T

    2016-03-01

    Expansion of a GGGGCC/CCCCGG repeat sequence in the first intron of the C9ORF72 gene is a leading cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In this combined disorder, called c9FTD/ALS, the expansion is bidirectionally transcribed into sense and antisense repeat RNA associated with disease. To better understand the role of C9ORF72 repeat RNA in molecular disease pathology, we determined crystal structures of a [(CCCCGG)3(CCCC)] model antisense repeat RNA to 1.47 Å resolution. The RNA structure was an A-form-like double helix composed of repeating and regularly spaced tandem C:C mismatch pairs that perturbed helical geometry and surface charge. Solution studies revealed a preference for A-form-like helical conformations as the repeat number increased. Results provide a structural starting point for rationalizing the contribution of repeat RNA to c9FTD/ALS molecular disease mechanisms and for developing molecules to target C9ORF72 repeat RNA as potential therapeutics.

  20. Expression of chimeric tRNA-driven antisense transcripts renders NIH 3T3 cells highly resistant to Moloney murine leukemia virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Sullenger, B A; Lee, T C; Smith, C A; Ungers, G E; Gilboa, E

    1990-01-01

    NIH 3T3 cells infected with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) express high levels of virus-specific RNA. To inhibit replication of the virus, we stably introduced chimeric tRNA genes encoding antisense templates into NIH 3T3 cells via a retroviral vector. Efficient expression of hybrid tRNA-MoMLV antisense transcripts and inhibition of MoMLV replication were dependent on the use of a particular type of retroviral vector, the double-copy vector, in which the chimeric tRNA gene was inserted in the 3' long terminal repeat. MoMLV replication was inhibited up to 97% in cells expressing antisense RNA corresponding to the gag gene and less than twofold in cells expressing antisense RNA corresponding to the pol gene. RNA and protein analyses suggest that inhibition was exerted at the level of translation. These results suggest that RNA polymerase III-based antisense inhibition systems can be used to inhibit highly expressed viral genes and render cells resistant to viral replication via intracellular immunization strategies. Images PMID:2247070

  1. Complex organisation and structure of the ghrelin antisense strand gene GHRLOS, a candidate non-coding RNA gene

    PubMed Central

    Seim, Inge; Carter, Shea L; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2008-01-01

    Background The peptide hormone ghrelin has many important physiological and pathophysiological roles, including the stimulation of growth hormone (GH) release, appetite regulation, gut motility and proliferation of cancer cells. We previously identified a gene on the opposite strand of the ghrelin gene, ghrelinOS (GHRLOS), which spans the promoter and untranslated regions of the ghrelin gene (GHRL). Here we further characterise GHRLOS. Results We have described GHRLOS mRNA isoforms that extend over 1.4 kb of the promoter region and 106 nucleotides of exon 4 of the ghrelin gene, GHRL. These GHRLOS transcripts initiate 4.8 kb downstream of the terminal exon 4 of GHRL and are present in the 3' untranslated exon of the adjacent gene TATDN2 (TatD DNase domain containing 2). Interestingly, we have also identified a putative non-coding TATDN2-GHRLOS chimaeric transcript, indicating that GHRLOS RNA biogenesis is extremely complex. Moreover, we have discovered that the 3' region of GHRLOS is also antisense, in a tail-to-tail fashion to a novel terminal exon of the neighbouring SEC13 gene, which is important in protein transport. Sequence analyses revealed that GHRLOS is riddled with stop codons, and that there is little nucleotide and amino-acid sequence conservation of the GHRLOS gene between vertebrates. The gene spans 44 kb on 3p25.3, is extensively spliced and harbours multiple variable exons. We have also investigated the expression of GHRLOS and found evidence of differential tissue expression. It is highly expressed in tissues which are emerging as major sites of non-coding RNA expression (the thymus, brain, and testis), as well as in the ovary and uterus. In contrast, very low levels were found in the stomach where sense, GHRL derived RNAs are highly expressed. Conclusion GHRLOS RNA transcripts display several distinctive features of non-coding (ncRNA) genes, including 5' capping, polyadenylation, extensive splicing and short open reading frames. The gene is also

  2. Antisense mRNA for NPY-Y1 receptor in the medial preoptic area increases prolactin secretion.

    PubMed

    Silveira, N A; Franci, C R

    1999-09-01

    We investigated the participation of neuropeptide Y-Y1 receptors within the medial preoptic area in luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and prolactin release. Four bilateral microinjections of sense (control) or antisense 18-base oligonucleotides of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) (250 ng) corresponding to the NH2-terminus of the neuropeptide Y1 receptor were performed at 12-h intervals for two days into the medial preoptic area of ovariectomized Wistar rats (N = 16), weighing 180 to 200 g, treated with estrogen (50 microg) and progesterone (25 mg) two days before the experiments between 8.00 and 10:00 a.m. Blockade of Y1 receptor synthesis in the medial preoptic area by the antisense mRNA did not change plasma luteinizing hormone or follicle-stimulating hormone but did increase prolactin from 19.6 +/- 5.9 ng/ml in the sense group to 52.9 +/- 9.6 ng/ml in the antisense group. The plasma hormones were measured by radioimmunoassay and the values are reported as mean +/- SEM. These data suggest that endogenous neuropeptide Y in the medial preoptic area has an inhibitory action on prolactin secretion through Y1 receptors.

  3. Identification of REST-regulated genes and pathways using a REST-targeted antisense approach.

    PubMed

    Sedaghat, Yalda; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Mazur, Curt; Monia, Brett P

    2013-12-01

    The repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF) is one of the first negative-acting transcriptional regulators implicated in vertebrate development thought to regulate hundreds of neuron-specific genes. However, its function in the adult system remains elusive. Here we employ second-generation antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to study the impact of rest-mediated suppression on gene expression. We demonstrate specific reductions in REST levels in vitro, and in vivo in mouse liver following treatment with ASOs, and we show that ASO mediated-REST suppression results in the elevation in expression of many neuronal genes including brain-derived neurotrophic factor, Synapsin1 (syn1) and β3-tubulin in BALB/c liver. Furthermore, we show the elevation of the affected proteins in plasma following ASO treatment. Finally, microarray analysis was applied to identify a broad range of genes modulated by REST suppression in mouse liver. Our findings suggest that REST may be an important target for neurodegenerative diseases like Huntington's disease, is also involved in the regulation of a broad range of additional cellular pathways, and that the antisense approach is a viable strategy for selectively modulating REST activity in vivo. PMID:24329414

  4. The lytic replicon of bacteriophage P1 is controlled by an antisense RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, J; Riedel, H D; Rückert, B; Lurz, R; Schuster, H

    1995-01-01

    The lytic replicon of phage P1 is used for DNA replication during the lytic cycle. It comprises about 2% of the P1 genome and contains the P1 C1 repressor-controlled operator-promoter element Op53.P53 and the kilA and the repL genes, in that order. Transcription of the lytic replicon of P53 and synthesis of the product of repL, but not kilA, are required for replicon function. We have identified an additional promoter, termed P53as (antisense), at the 5'-end of the kilA gene from which a 180 base transcript is constitutively synthesized and in the opposite direction to the P53 transcript. By using a promoter probe plasmid we show that transcription from P53 is strongly repressed by the C1 repressor, whereas that of P53as remains unaffected. Accordingly, the C1 repressor inhibits binding of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase to P53, but not to P53as, as shown by electron microscopy. Under non-repressed conditions transcription from P53 appears to be inhibited by P53as activity and vice versa. An inhibitory effect of P53as on the P1 lytic replicon was revealed by the construction and characterization of a P53as promoter-down mutant. Under non-repressed conditions transcription of repL and, as a consequence, replication of the plasmid is strongly enhanced when P53as is inactive. The results suggest a regulatory role for P53as on the P1 lytic replicon. Images PMID:7784198

  5. Targeted degradation of sense and antisense C9orf72 RNA foci as therapy for ALS and frontotemporal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Baughn, Michael; Rigo, Frank; Sun, Shuying; Liu, Patrick; Li, Hai-Ri; Jiang, Jie; Watt, Andrew T.; Chun, Seung; Katz, Melanie; Qiu, Jinsong; Sun, Ying; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Zhu, Qiang; Polymenidou, Magdalini; Drenner, Kevin; Artates, Jonathan W.; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Markmiller, Sebastian; Hutt, Kasey R.; Pizzo, Donald P.; Cady, Janet; Harms, Matthew B.; Baloh, Robert H.; Vandenberg, Scott R.; Yeo, Gene W.; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Bennett, C. Frank; Cleveland, Don W.; Ravits, John

    2013-01-01

    Expanded hexanucleotide repeats in the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene are the most common genetic cause of ALS and frontotemporal degeneration (FTD). Here, we identify nuclear RNA foci containing the hexanucleotide expansion (GGGGCC) in patient cells, including white blood cells, fibroblasts, glia, and multiple neuronal cell types (spinal motor, cortical, hippocampal, and cerebellar neurons). RNA foci are not present in sporadic ALS, familial ALS/FTD caused by other mutations (SOD1, TDP-43, or tau), Parkinson disease, or nonneurological controls. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are identified that reduce GGGGCC-containing nuclear foci without altering overall C9orf72 RNA levels. By contrast, siRNAs fail to reduce nuclear RNA foci despite marked reduction in overall C9orf72 RNAs. Sustained ASO-mediated lowering of C9orf72 RNAs throughout the CNS of mice is demonstrated to be well tolerated, producing no behavioral or pathological features characteristic of ALS/FTD and only limited RNA expression alterations. Genome-wide RNA profiling identifies an RNA signature in fibroblasts from patients with C9orf72 expansion. ASOs targeting sense strand repeat-containing RNAs do not correct this signature, a failure that may be explained, at least in part, by discovery of abundant RNA foci with C9orf72 repeats transcribed in the antisense (GGCCCC) direction, which are not affected by sense strand-targeting ASOs. Taken together, these findings support a therapeutic approach by ASO administration to reduce hexanucleotide repeat-containing RNAs and raise the potential importance of targeting expanded RNAs transcribed in both directions. PMID:24170860

  6. RNA toxicity from the ALS/FTD C9ORF72 expansion is mitigated by antisense intervention.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Christopher J; Zhang, Ping-Wu; Pham, Jacqueline T; Haeusler, Aaron R; Heusler, Aaron R; Mistry, Nipun A; Vidensky, Svetlana; Daley, Elizabeth L; Poth, Erin M; Hoover, Benjamin; Fines, Daniel M; Maragakis, Nicholas; Tienari, Pentti J; Petrucelli, Leonard; Traynor, Bryan J; Wang, Jiou; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Blackshaw, Seth; Sattler, Rita; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2013-10-16

    A hexanucleotide GGGGCC repeat expansion in the noncoding region of the C9ORF72 gene is the most common genetic abnormality in familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The function of the C9ORF72 protein is unknown, as is the mechanism by which the repeat expansion could cause disease. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-differentiated neurons from C9ORF72 ALS patients revealed disease-specific (1) intranuclear GGGGCCexp RNA foci, (2) dysregulated gene expression, (3) sequestration of GGGGCCexp RNA binding protein ADARB2, and (4) susceptibility to excitotoxicity. These pathological and pathogenic characteristics were confirmed in ALS brain and were mitigated with antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) therapeutics to the C9ORF72 transcript or repeat expansion despite the presence of repeat-associated non-ATG translation (RAN) products. These data indicate a toxic RNA gain-of-function mechanism as a cause of C9ORF72 ALS and provide candidate antisense therapeutics and candidate human pharmacodynamic markers for therapy.

  7. Altered Levels of MicroRNA-9, -206, and -132 in Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Their Response to Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Catapano, Francesco; Zaharieva, Irina; Scoto, Mariacristina; Marrosu, Elena; Morgan, Jennifer; Muntoni, Francesco; Zhou, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The identification of noninvasive biomarkers to monitor the disease progression in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is becoming increasingly important. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression and are implicated in the pathogenesis of neuromuscular diseases, including motor neuron degeneration. In this study, we selectively characterized the expression of miR-9, miR-206, and miR-132 in spinal cord, skeletal muscle, and serum from SMA transgenic mice, and in serum from SMA patients. A systematic analysis of miRNA expression was conducted in SMA mice with different disease severities (severe type I-like and mild type III-like) at different disease stages (pre-, mid-, and late-symptomatic stages), and in morpholino antisense oligonucleotide-treated mice. There was differential expression of all three miRNAs in spinal cord, skeletal muscle and serum samples in SMA mice. Serum miRNAs were altered prior to the changes in spinal cord and skeletal muscle at the presymptomatic stage. The altered miR-132 levels in spinal cord, muscle, and serum transiently reversed to normal level after a single-dose morpholino antisense oligomer PMO25 treatment in SMA mice. We also confirmed a significant alteration of miR-9 and miR-132 level in serum samples from SMA patients. Our study indicates the potential of developing miRNAs as noninvasive biomarkers in SMA. PMID:27377135

  8. Combinatorial screening and rational optimization for hybridization to folded hepatitis C virus RNA of oligonucleotides with biological antisense activity.

    PubMed

    Lima, W F; Brown-Driver, V; Fox, M; Hanecak, R; Bruice, T W

    1997-01-01

    We describe our initial application of a biochemical strategy, comprising combinatorial screening and rational optimization, which directly identifies oligonucleotides with maximum affinity (per unit length), specificity, and rates of hybridization to structurally preferred sites on folded RNA, to the problem of design of antisense oligonucleotides active against the hepatitis C virus (HCV). A fully randomized sequence DNA oligonucleotide (10-mer) library was equilibrated with each of two folded RNA fragments (200 and 370 nucleotides (nt)), together spanning the 5' 440 nt of an HCV transcript (by overlapping 130 nt), which were varied over a range of concentrations. The equilibrations were performed in solution under conditions determined to preserve RNA structure and to limit all RNA-DNA library oligonucleotide interactions to 1:1 stoichiometry. Subsequent Escherichia coli RNase H (endoribonuclease H: EC 3.1.26.4) cleavage analysis identified two preferred sites of highest affinity heteroduplex hybridization. The lengths and sequences of different substitute chemistry oligonucleotides complementary to these sites were rationally optimized using an iterative and quantitative analysis of binding affinity and specificity. Thus, DNA oligonucleotides that hybridized with the same affinity to the preferred sites in the folded RNA fragments found by screening as to short (< or = 25 nt) RNA complements were identified but were found to vary in length (10-18 nt) from site to site. Phosphorothioate (P=S) and 2'-fluoro (2'-F) uniformly substituted oligonucleotides also were found, which hybridized optimally to these sites, supporting the design of short (10-15-nt) and maximally specific oligonucleotides that are more nuclease-resistant (via P=S) and have higher affinity (via 2'-F) than DNA. Finally, the affinities of DNA and uniform 2'-F-, P=S-substituted 10-20-mer oligonucleotide complements for the best hybridization site, from HCV nt 355 to nt 364-374, closely

  9. Upping the Antisense Ante.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Rick

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is a designer-drug technology called antisense which blocks messenger RNA's ability to carry information to protein producing sites in the cell. The applications of this drug to AIDS research, cancer therapy, and other diseases are discussed. (KR)

  10. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Christopher A; Cannady, Kimberly R; Hoffman, Jackson A; Trotter, Kevin W; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Bennett, Brian D; Burkholder, Adam B; Burd, Craig J; Fargo, David C; Archer, Trevor K

    2016-08-01

    Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. PMID:27487356

  11. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Christopher A.; Hoffman, Jackson A.; Trotter, Kevin W.; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Bennett, Brian D.; Burkholder, Adam B.; Fargo, David C.; Archer, Trevor K.

    2016-01-01

    Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. PMID:27487356

  12. Control of enzymatic browning in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) by sense and antisense RNA from tomato polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Coetzer, C; Corsini, D; Love, S; Pavek, J; Tumer, N

    2001-02-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of Russet Burbank potato was inhibited by sense and antisense PPO RNAs expressed from a tomato PPO cDNA under the control of the 35S promoter from the cauliflower mosaic virus. Transgenic Russet Burbank potato plants from 37 different lines were grown in the field. PPO activity and the level of enzymatic browning were measured in the tubers harvested from the field. Of the tubers from 28 transgenic lines that were sampled, tubers from 5 lines exhibited reduced browning. The level of PPO activity correlated with the reduction in enzymatic browning in these lines. These results indicate that expression of tomato PPO RNA in sense or antisense orientation inhibits PPO activity and enzymatic browning in the major commercial potato cultivar. Expression of tomato PPO RNA in sense orientation led to the greatest decrease in PPO activity and enzymatic browning, possibly due to cosuppression. These results suggest that expression of closely related heterologous genes can be used to prevent enzymatic browning in a wide variety of food crops without the application of various food additives.

  13. Control of enzymatic browning in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) by sense and antisense RNA from tomato polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Coetzer, C; Corsini, D; Love, S; Pavek, J; Tumer, N

    2001-02-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of Russet Burbank potato was inhibited by sense and antisense PPO RNAs expressed from a tomato PPO cDNA under the control of the 35S promoter from the cauliflower mosaic virus. Transgenic Russet Burbank potato plants from 37 different lines were grown in the field. PPO activity and the level of enzymatic browning were measured in the tubers harvested from the field. Of the tubers from 28 transgenic lines that were sampled, tubers from 5 lines exhibited reduced browning. The level of PPO activity correlated with the reduction in enzymatic browning in these lines. These results indicate that expression of tomato PPO RNA in sense or antisense orientation inhibits PPO activity and enzymatic browning in the major commercial potato cultivar. Expression of tomato PPO RNA in sense orientation led to the greatest decrease in PPO activity and enzymatic browning, possibly due to cosuppression. These results suggest that expression of closely related heterologous genes can be used to prevent enzymatic browning in a wide variety of food crops without the application of various food additives. PMID:11262007

  14. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II CTD is associated with antisense promoter transcription and active enhancers in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Descostes, Nicolas; Heidemann, Martin; Spinelli, Lionel; Schüller, Roland; Maqbool, Muhammad Ahmad; Fenouil, Romain; Koch, Frederic; Innocenti, Charlène; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Eick, Dirk; Andrau, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase (Pol) II consists of 52 conserved heptapeptide repeats containing the consensus sequence Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7. Post-translational modifications of the CTD coordinate the transcription cycle and various steps of mRNA maturation. Here we describe Tyr1 phosphorylation (Tyr1P) as a hallmark of promoter (5′ associated) Pol II in mammalian cells, in contrast to what was described in yeast. Tyr1P is predominantly found in antisense orientation at promoters but is also specifically enriched at active enhancers. Mutation of Tyr1 to phenylalanine (Y1F) prevents the formation of the hyper-phosphorylated Pol IIO form, induces degradation of Pol II to the truncated Pol IIB form, and results in a lethal phenotype. Our results suggest that Tyr1P has evolved specialized and essential functions in higher eukaryotes associated with antisense promoter and enhancer transcription, and Pol II stability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02105.001 PMID:24842994

  15. Antisense transcription as a tool to tune gene expression.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Jennifer A N; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-01-14

    A surprise that has emerged from transcriptomics is the prevalence of genomic antisense transcription, which occurs counter to gene orientation. While frequent, the roles of antisense transcription in regulation are poorly understood. We built a synthetic system in Escherichia coli to study how antisense transcription can change the expression of a gene and tune the response characteristics of a regulatory circuit. We developed a new genetic part that consists of a unidirectional terminator followed by a constitutive antisense promoter and demonstrate that this part represses gene expression proportionally to the antisense promoter strength. Chip-based oligo synthesis was applied to build a large library of 5,668 terminator-promoter combinations that was used to control the expression of three repressors (PhlF, SrpR, and TarA) in a simple genetic circuit (NOT gate). Using the library, we demonstrate that antisense promoters can be used to tune the threshold of a regulatory circuit without impacting other properties of its response function. Finally, we determined the relative contributions of antisense RNA and transcriptional interference to repressing gene expression and introduce a biophysical model to capture the impact of RNA polymerase collisions on gene repression. This work quantifies the role of antisense transcription in regulatory networks and introduces a new mode to control gene expression that has been previously overlooked in genetic engineering.

  16. Efficient cationic lipid-mediated delivery of antisense oligonucleotides into eukaryotic cells: down-regulation of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Fuxin; Nomden, Anita; Oberle, Volker; Engberts, Jan. B. F. N.; Hoekstra, Dick

    2001-01-01

    Oligonucleotides (ODNs) can be employed as effective gene-specific regulators. However, before ODNs can reach their targets, several physical barriers have to be overcome, as although ODNs may pass cell membranes, most become sequestered in endocytic compartments. Accordingly, sophisticated strategies are required for efficient delivery. Here we have employed a pyridinium-based synthetic amphiphile, called SAINT-2, which carries ODNs into cells in a highly efficient, essentially non-toxic and serum-insensitive manner. Intracellular delivery was examined by monitoring the trafficking of fluorescent ODNs and lipid, and by measuring the effect of specific antisense ODNs on target mRNA and protein levels of the receptor for the neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF-R), expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. ODN delivery is independent of lipoplex size, and fluorescently tagged ODNs readily acquire access to the nucleus, whereas the carrier itself remains sequestered in the endosomal–lysosomal pathway. While the release is independent of the presence of serum, it is not observed when serum proteins gain access within the lipoplex, and which likely stabilizes the lipoplex membrane. We propose that the amphiphile-dependent aggregate structure governs complex dissociation, and hence, the biological efficiency of ODNs. We demonstrate an essentially non-toxic and effective antisense-specific down-regulation of the CRF-R, both at the mRNA and protein level. PMID:11353077

  17. EGO-1, a C. elegans RdRP, Modulates Gene Expression via Production of mRNA-Templated Short Antisense RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Maniar, Jay M.; Fire, Andrew Z.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Background The development of the germline in Caenorhabditis elegans is a complex process involving the regulation of thousands of genes in a coordinated manner. Several genes required for small RNA biogenesis and function are among those required for the proper organization of the germline. EGO-1 is a putative RNA-directed RNA polymerase (RdRP) that is required for multiple aspects of C. elegans germline development and efficient RNAi of germline-expressed genes. RdRPs have been proposed to act through a variety of mechanisms including the post-transcriptional targeting of specific mRNAs as well as through a direct interaction with chromatin. Despite extensive investigation, the molecular role of EGO-1 has remained enigmatic. Results Here we use high-throughput small RNA and messenger RNA sequencing to investigate EGO-1 function. We found that EGO-1 is required to produce a distinct pool of small RNAs antisense to a number of germline-expressed mRNAs through several developmental stages. These potential mRNA targets fall into distinct classes, including genes required for kinetochore and nuclear pore assembly, histone-modifying activities and centromeric proteins. We also found several RNAi-related genes to be targets of EGO-1. Finally, we show a strong association between the loss of small RNAs and the rise of mRNA levels in ego-1(−) animals. Conclusions Our data support the conclusion that EGO-1 produces triphosphorylated small RNAs derived from mRNA templates and that these small RNAs modulate gene expression through the targeting of their cognate mRNAs. PMID:21396820

  18. Potent inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus replication using a 2-5A-antisense chimera targeted to signals within the virus genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Player, Mark R.; Barnard, Dale L.; Torrence, Paul F.

    1998-01-01

    The 2-5A system is a recognized mechanistic component of the antiviral action of interferon. Interferon-induced 2-5A synthetase generates 2-5A, which, in turn, activates the latent constitutive RNase L that degrades viral RNA. Chemical conjugation of 2-5A to an antisense oligonucleotide can target the 2-5A-dependent RNase L to the antisense-specified RNA and effect its selective destruction. Such a 2-5A-antisense chimera (NIH351) has been developed that targets a consensus sequence within the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) genomic RNA. NIH351 was 50- to 90-fold more potent against RSV strain A2 than was ribavirin, the presently approved drug for clinical management of RSV infection. It was similarly active against a variety of RSV strains of both A and B subgroups and possessed a cell culture selectivity index comparable to ribavirin. In addition, the anti-RSV activity of NIH351 was shown to be virus-specific and a result of a true antisense effect, because a scrambled nucleotide sequence in the antisense domain of NIH351 caused a significant decrease in antiviral activity. The 2-5A system’s RNase L was implicated in the mechanism of action of NIH351 because a congener with a disabled 2-5A moiety was of greatly reduced anti-RSV effectiveness. These findings represent an innovative approach to the control of RSV replication. PMID:9671772

  19. Antisense Modulation of RNA Processing as a Therapeutic Approach in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Spraggon, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation antisense technologies are re-emerging as viable and powerful approaches to the treatment of several genetic diseases. Similar strategies are also being applied to cancer therapy. Re-programming of the expression of endogenous oncogenic products to replace them with functional antagonists, by interfering with alternative splicing or polyadenylation, provides a promising novel approach to address acquired drug resistance and previously undruggable targets. PMID:25589899

  20. Purification of noncoding RNA and bound proteins using FLAG peptide-conjugated antisense-oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Shungo; Natsume, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    To understand the function of certain RNAs, including noncoding RNAs, it is important to identify the proteins that interact with the RNAs. Here we describe the method for purification of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes composed of specific cellular RNAs by pull-down with FLAG peptide-conjugated antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Using this method, we identified a novel protein component of U7 snRNP complex.

  1. Template-directed synthesis of a small molecule-antisense conjugate targeting an mRNA structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Rodriguez, Lilia; Wolfe, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    The targeting of structural features in mRNA with specificity remains a great chemical challenge. A hairpin structure near exon 10 in the pre-mRNA encoding the tau protein controls its splicing, and dementia-causing mutations that disrupt this structure increase exon 10 splicing. We previously reported the discovery of small molecules, mitoxantrone (MTX) and analogs, which bind to the tau RNA hairpin structure and the design of bipartite antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that simultaneously bind to the discontinuous sequences that flank this hairpin. Herein we report the synthesis of a bipartite ASO conjugated to MTX using the tau RNA hairpin and flanking sequences as a template. A set of six MTX analogs, each containing a linker-azide, and a set of ten bipartite ASOs, each containing a branched linker-alkyne, were synthesized and tested in combinatorial fashion for their ability to conjugate in the presence or absence of template RNA. A single template-dependent MTX–ASO conjugate was identified from among the 60 reaction mixtures, demonstrating that the MTX and ASO precursors could simultaneously bind the RNA template and allow proper positioning of azide and alkyne for 1,3-cycloaddition. While the MTX–ASO conjugate proved too cytotoxic for cell-based assays, the conjugate inhibited tau exon 10 splicing under cell-free conditions more effectively than MTX or bipartite ASO alone. PMID:24691171

  2. The reduction in small ribosomal subunit abundance in ethanol-stressed cells of Bacillus subtilis is mediated by a SigB-dependent antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Mars, Ruben A T; Mendonça, Karoline; Denham, Emma L; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2015-10-01

    One of the best-characterized general stress responses in bacteria is the σB-mediated stress response of the Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. The σB regulon contains approximately 200 protein-encoding genes and 136 putative regulatory RNAs. One of these σB-dependent RNAs, named S1136-S1134, was recently mapped as being transcribed from the S1136 promoter on the opposite strand of the essential rpsD gene, which encodes the ribosomal primary-binding protein S4. Accordingly, S1136-S1134 transcription results in an rpsD-overlapping antisense RNA (asRNA). Upon exposure of B. subtilis to ethanol, the S1136 promoter was found to be induced, while rpsD transcription was downregulated. By quantitative PCR, we show that the activation of transcription from the S1136 promoter is directly responsible for the downregulation of rpsD upon ethanol exposure. We also show that this downregulation of rpsD leads to a reduced level of the small (30S) ribosomal subunit upon ethanol stress. The activation of the S1136 promoter thus represents the first example of antisense transcription-mediated regulation in the general stress response of B. subtilis and implicates the reduction of ribosomal protein abundance as a new aspect in the σB-dependent stress response. We propose that the observed reduction in the level of the small ribosomal subunit, which contains the ribosome-decoding center, may protect B. subtilis cells against misreading and spurious translation of possibly toxic aberrant peptides under conditions of ethanol stress. PMID:26115952

  3. Transgenic male-sterile plant induced by an unedited atp9 gene is restored to fertility by inhibiting its expression with antisense RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Zabaleta, E; Mouras, A; Hernould, M; Suharsono; Araya, A

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that the expression of an unedited atp9 chimeric gene correlated with male-sterile phenotype in transgenic tobacco plant. To study the relationship between the expression of chimeric gene and the male-sterile trait, hemizygous and homozygous transgenic tobacco lines expressing the antisense atp9 RNA were constructed. The antisense producing plants were crossed with a homozygous male-sterile line, and the F1 progeny was analyzed. The offspring from crosses between homozygous lines produced only male-fertile plants, suggesting that the expression antisense atp9 RNA abolishes the effect of the unedited chimeric gene. In fact, the plants restored to male fertility showed a dramatic reduction of the unedited atp9 transcript levels, resulting in normal flower development and seed production. These results support our previous observation that the expression of unedited atp9 gene can induce male sterility. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8855343

  4. From Cryptic Toward Canonical Pre-mRNA Splicing in Pompe Disease: a Pipeline for the Development of Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Bergsma, Atze J; In 't Groen, Stijn Lm; Verheijen, Frans W; van der Ploeg, Ans T; Pijnappel, Wwm Pim

    2016-01-01

    While 9% of human pathogenic variants have an established effect on pre-mRNA splicing, it is suspected that an additional 20% of otherwise classified variants also affect splicing. Aberrant splicing includes disruption of splice sites or regulatory elements, or creation or strengthening of cryptic splice sites. For the majority of variants, it is poorly understood to what extent and how these may affect splicing. We have identified cryptic splicing in an unbiased manner. Three types of cryptic splicing were analyzed in the context of pathogenic variants in the acid α-glucosidase gene causing Pompe disease. These involved newly formed deep intronic or exonic cryptic splice sites, and a natural cryptic splice that was utilized due to weakening of a canonical splice site. Antisense oligonucleotides that targeted the identified cryptic splice sites repressed cryptic splicing at the expense of canonical splicing in all three cases, as shown by reverse-transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and by enhancement of acid α-glucosidase enzymatic activity. This argues for a competition model for available splice sites, including intact or weakened canonical sites and natural or newly formed cryptic sites. The pipeline described here can detect cryptic splicing and correct canonical splicing using antisense oligonucleotides to restore the gene defect. PMID:27623443

  5. From Cryptic Toward Canonical Pre-mRNA Splicing in Pompe Disease: a Pipeline for the Development of Antisense Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Bergsma, Atze J; in ‘t Groen, Stijn LM; Verheijen, Frans W; van der Ploeg, Ans T; Pijnappel, WWM Pim

    2016-01-01

    While 9% of human pathogenic variants have an established effect on pre-mRNA splicing, it is suspected that an additional 20% of otherwise classified variants also affect splicing. Aberrant splicing includes disruption of splice sites or regulatory elements, or creation or strengthening of cryptic splice sites. For the majority of variants, it is poorly understood to what extent and how these may affect splicing. We have identified cryptic splicing in an unbiased manner. Three types of cryptic splicing were analyzed in the context of pathogenic variants in the acid α-glucosidase gene causing Pompe disease. These involved newly formed deep intronic or exonic cryptic splice sites, and a natural cryptic splice that was utilized due to weakening of a canonical splice site. Antisense oligonucleotides that targeted the identified cryptic splice sites repressed cryptic splicing at the expense of canonical splicing in all three cases, as shown by reverse-transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and by enhancement of acid α-glucosidase enzymatic activity. This argues for a competition model for available splice sites, including intact or weakened canonical sites and natural or newly formed cryptic sites. The pipeline described here can detect cryptic splicing and correct canonical splicing using antisense oligonucleotides to restore the gene defect. PMID:27623443

  6. A system for Cre-regulated RNA interference in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Patrick; Astrof, Sophie; Erkeland, Stefan J.; Schustak, Joshua; Sharp, Phillip A.; Hynes, Richard O.

    2008-01-01

    We report a system for Cre-regulated expression of RNA interference in vivo. Expression cassettes comprise selectable and FACS-sortable markers in tandem with additional marker genes and shRNAs in the antisense orientation. The cassettes are flanked by tandem LoxP sites arranged so that Cre expression inverts the marker–shRNA construct, allowing its regulated expression (and, at the same time, deletes the original selection/marker genes). The cassettes can be incorporated into retroviral or lentiviral vectors and delivered to cells in culture or used to generate transgenic mice. We describe cassettes incorporating various combinations of reporter genes, miRNA-based RNAi (including two shRNA constructs at once), and oncogenes and demonstrate the delivery of effective RNA interference in cells in culture, efficient transduction into hematopoietic stem cells with cell-type-specific knockdown in their progeny, and rapid generation of regulated shRNA knockdown in transgenic mice. These vector systems allow regulated combinatorial manipulation (both overexpression and loss of function) of gene expression in multiple systems in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18779577

  7. Antisense RNA Controls LRP1 Sense Transcript Expression Through Interaction With a Chromatin-Associated Protein, HMGB2

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Yasunari; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Magistri, Marco; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Lotz, Martin; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) including natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are expressed more extensively than previously anticipated, and have widespread roles in regulating gene expression. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms of action of the majority of NATs remain largely unknown. Here we identify a NAT of Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (Lrp1), referred to as Lrp1-AS, that negatively regulates Lrp1 expression. We show that Lrp1-AS directly binds to High mobility group box 2 (Hmgb2) and inhibits the activity of Hmgb2 to enhance Srebp1a-dependent transcription of Lrp1. Short oligonucleotides targeting Lrp1-AS inhibit the interaction of antisense transcript and Hmgb2 protein, and increase Lrp1 expression by enhancing Hmgb2 activity. qRT-PCR analysis of Alzheimer’s disease brain samples and aged-matched controls revealed upregulation of LRP1-AS and downregulation of LRP1. Our data suggest a new regulatory mechanism whereby a NAT interacts with a ubiquitous chromatin-associated protein to modulate its activity in a locus-specific fashion. PMID:25937287

  8. Cellular Selenoprotein mRNA Tethering via Antisense Interactions with Ebola and HIV-1 mRNAs May Impact Host Selenium Biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ethan Will; Ruzicka, Jan A; Premadasa, Lakmini; Zhao, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of protein expression by non-coding RNAs typically involves effects on mRNA degradation and/or ribosomal translation. The possibility of virus-host mRNA-mRNA antisense tethering interactions (ATI) as a gain-of-function strategy, via the capture of functional RNA motifs, has not been hitherto considered. We present evidence that ATIs may be exploited by certain RNA viruses in order to tether the mRNAs of host selenoproteins, potentially exploiting the proximity of a captured host selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element to enable the expression of virally-encoded selenoprotein modules, via translation of in-frame UGA stop codons as selenocysteine. Computational analysis predicts thermodynamically stable ATIs between several widely expressed mammalian selenoprotein mRNAs (e.g., isoforms of thioredoxin reductase) and specific Ebola virus mRNAs, and HIV-1 mRNA, which we demonstrate via DNA gel shift assays. The probable functional significance of these ATIs is further supported by the observation that, in both viruses, they are located in close proximity to highly conserved in-frame UGA stop codons at the 3' end of open reading frames that encode essential viral proteins (the HIV-1 nef protein and the Ebola nucleoprotein). Significantly, in HIV/AIDS patients, an inverse correlation between serum selenium and mortality has been repeatedly documented, and clinical benefits of selenium in the context of multi-micronutrient supplementation have been demonstrated in several well-controlled clinical trials. Hence, in the light of our findings, the possibility of a similar role for selenium in Ebola pathogenesis and treatment merits serious investigation. PMID:26369818

  9. Cellular Selenoprotein mRNA Tethering via Antisense Interactions with Ebola and HIV-1 mRNAs May Impact Host Selenium Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ethan Will; Ruzicka, Jan A.; Premadasa, Lakmini; Zhao, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of protein expression by non-coding RNAs typically involves effects on mRNA degradation and/or ribosomal translation. The possibility of virus-host mRNA-mRNA antisense tethering interactions (ATI) as a gain-of-function strategy, via the capture of functional RNA motifs, has not been hitherto considered. We present evidence that ATIs may be exploited by certain RNA viruses in order to tether the mRNAs of host selenoproteins, potentially exploiting the proximity of a captured host selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element to enable the expression of virally-encoded selenoprotein modules, via translation of in-frame UGA stop codons as selenocysteine. Computational analysis predicts thermodynamically stable ATIs between several widely expressed mammalian selenoprotein mRNAs (e.g., isoforms of thioredoxin reductase) and specific Ebola virus mRNAs, and HIV-1 mRNA, which we demonstrate via DNA gel shift assays. The probable functional significance of these ATIs is further supported by the observation that, in both viruses, they are located in close proximity to highly conserved in-frame UGA stop codons at the 3′ end of open reading frames that encode essential viral proteins (the HIV-1 nef protein and the Ebola nucleoprotein). Significantly, in HIV/AIDS patients, an inverse correlation between serum selenium and mortality has been repeatedly documented, and clinical benefits of selenium in the context of multi-micronutrient supplementation have been demonstrated in several well-controlled clinical trials. Hence, in the light of our findings, the possibility of a similar role for selenium in Ebola pathogenesis and treatment merits serious investigation. PMID:26369818

  10. Silencing of a gene adjacent to the breakpoint of a widespread Drosophila inversion by a transposon-induced antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Puig, Marta; Cáceres, Mario; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2004-06-15

    Adaptive changes in nature occur by a variety of mechanisms, and Drosophila chromosomal inversions was one of the first studied examples. However, the precise genetic causes of the adaptive value of inversions remain uncertain. Here we investigate the impact of the widespread inversion 2j of Drosophila buzzatii on the expression of the CG13617 gene, whose coding region is located only 12 bp away from the inversion proximal breakpoint. This gene is transcribed into a 2.3-kb mRNA present in all D. buzzatii developmental stages. More importantly, the expression level of CG13617 is reduced 5-fold in embryos of lines homozygous for the 2j inversion compared with lines without the inversion. An antisense RNA that originates in the Foldback-like transposon Kepler inserted at the breakpoint junction in all of the 2j lines and that forms duplexes with the CG13617 mRNA in 2j embryos is most likely responsible for the near silencing of the gene. Few examples of RNA interference caused by transposable elements (TEs) have been previously described, but this mechanism might be prevalent in many organisms and illustrates the potential of TEs as a major source of genetic variation. In addition, because chromosomal rearrangements are usually induced by TEs, position effects might be more common than previously recognized and contribute significantly to the evolutionary success of inversions.

  11. A pseudogene long noncoding RNA network regulates PTEN transcription and translation in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnsson, Per; Ackley, Amanda; Vidarsdottir, Linda; Lui, Weng-Onn; Corcoran, Martin; Grandér, Dan; Morris, Kevin V.

    2013-01-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to be under the regulatory control of a PTEN pseudogene expressed noncoding RNA, PTENpg1. Here, we characterize a previously unidentified PTENpg1 encoded antisense RNA (asRNA), which regulates PTEN transcription and PTEN mRNA stability. We find two PTENpg1 asRNA isoforms, alpha and beta. The alpha isoform functions in trans, localizes to the PTEN promoter, and epigenetically modulates PTEN transcription by the recruitment of DNMT3a and EZH2. In contrast, the beta isoform interacts with PTENpg1 through an RNA:RNA pairing interaction, which affects PTEN protein output via changes of PTENpg1 stability and microRNA sponge activity. Disruption of this asRNA-regulated network induces cell cycle arrest and sensitizes cells to doxorubicin, suggesting a biological function for the respective PTENpg1 expressed asRNAs. PMID:23435381

  12. Sense and antisense transcripts of the developmentally regulated murine hsp70.2 gene are expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping areas in the adult brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the spatial pattern of expression of a member of the hsp70 gene family, hsp70.2, in the mouse central nervous system. Surprisingly, RNA blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed abundant expression of an 'antisense' hsp70.2 transcript in several areas of adult mouse brain. Two different transcripts recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for the hsp70.2 gene were expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping neuronal populations. RNA blot analysis revealed low levels of the 2.7 kb transcript of hsp70.2 in several areas of the brain, with highest signal in the hippocampus. Abundant expression of a slightly larger (approximately 2.8 kb) 'antisense' transcript was detected in several brain regions, notably in the brainstem, cerebellum, mesencephalic tectum, thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus. In situ hybridization revealed that the sense and antisense transcripts were both predominantly neuronal and localized to the same cell types in the granular layer of the cerebellum, trapezoid nucleus of the superior olivary complex, locus coeruleus and hippocampus. The hsp70.2 antisense transcripts were particularly abundant in the frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, subthalamic nucleus, zona incerta, superior and inferior colliculi, central gray, brainstem, and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Our findings have revealed a distinct cellular and spatial localization of both sense and antisense transcripts, demonstrating a new level of complexity in the function of the heat shock genes.

  13. LncRNA HOTAIR: a master regulator of chromatin dynamics and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhan, Arunoday; Mandal, Subhrangsu S.

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are emerging classes of regulatory RNA that play key roles in various cellular and physiological processes such as in gene regulation, chromatin dynamics, cell differentiation, development etc. NcRNAs are dysregulated in a variety of human disorders including cancers, neurological disorders, and immunological disorders. The mechanisms through which ncRNAs regulate various biological processes and human diseases still remain elusive. HOX antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) is a recently discovered long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that plays critical role in gene regulation and chromatin dynamics, appears to be misregulated in a variety of cancers. HOTAIR interacts with key epigenetic regulators such as histone methyltransferase PRC2 and histone demethylase LSD1 and regulates gene silencing. Here, we have reviewed recent advancements in understanding the functions and regulation of HOTAIR and its association with cancer and other diseases. PMID:26208723

  14. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq and simulations to probe structure–function design principles of RNA transcriptional regulators

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Melissa K.; Watters, Kyle E.; Gasper, Paul M.; Abbott, Timothy R.; Carlson, Paul D.; Chen, Alan A.

    2016-01-01

    Antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional regulators are powerful tools for controlling gene expression and creating synthetic gene networks. RNA transcriptional repressors derived from natural mechanisms called attenuators are particularly versatile, though their mechanistic complexity has made them difficult to engineer. Here we identify a new structure–function design principle for attenuators that enables the forward engineering of new RNA transcriptional repressors. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq to characterize the structures of attenuator variants within Escherichia coli, we show that attenuator hairpins that facilitate interaction with antisense RNAs require interior loops for proper function. Molecular dynamics simulations of these attenuator variants suggest these interior loops impart structural flexibility. We further observe hairpin flexibility in the cellular structures of natural RNA mechanisms that use antisense RNA interactions to repress translation, confirming earlier results from in vitro studies. Finally, we design new transcriptional attenuators in silico using an interior loop as a structural requirement and show that they function as desired in vivo. This work establishes interior loops as an important structural element for designing synthetic RNA gene regulators. We anticipate that the coupling of experimental measurement of cellular RNA structure and function with computational modeling will enable rapid discovery of structure–function design principles for a diverse array of natural and synthetic RNA regulators. PMID:27103533

  15. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq and simulations to probe structure-function design principles of RNA transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Melissa K; Watters, Kyle E; Gasper, Paul M; Abbott, Timothy R; Carlson, Paul D; Chen, Alan A; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-06-01

    Antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional regulators are powerful tools for controlling gene expression and creating synthetic gene networks. RNA transcriptional repressors derived from natural mechanisms called attenuators are particularly versatile, though their mechanistic complexity has made them difficult to engineer. Here we identify a new structure-function design principle for attenuators that enables the forward engineering of new RNA transcriptional repressors. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq to characterize the structures of attenuator variants within Escherichia coli, we show that attenuator hairpins that facilitate interaction with antisense RNAs require interior loops for proper function. Molecular dynamics simulations of these attenuator variants suggest these interior loops impart structural flexibility. We further observe hairpin flexibility in the cellular structures of natural RNA mechanisms that use antisense RNA interactions to repress translation, confirming earlier results from in vitro studies. Finally, we design new transcriptional attenuators in silico using an interior loop as a structural requirement and show that they function as desired in vivo. This work establishes interior loops as an important structural element for designing synthetic RNA gene regulators. We anticipate that the coupling of experimental measurement of cellular RNA structure and function with computational modeling will enable rapid discovery of structure-function design principles for a diverse array of natural and synthetic RNA regulators.

  16. Reversible cardiac fibrosis and heart failure induced by conditional expression of an antisense mRNA of the mineralocorticoid receptor in cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Beggah, Ahmed T.; Escoubet, Brigitte; Puttini, Stefania; Cailmail, Stephane; Delage, Vanessa; Ouvrard-Pascaud, Antoine; Bocchi, Brigitte; Peuchmaur, Michel; Delcayre, Claude; Farman, Nicolette; Jaisser, Frederic

    2002-01-01

    Cardiac failure is a common feature in the evolution of cardiac disease. Among the determinants of cardiac failure, the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system has a central role, and antagonism of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy. In this study, we questioned the role of the MR, not of aldosterone, on heart function, using an inducible and cardiac-specific transgenic mouse model. We have generated a conditional knock-down model by expressing solely in the heart an antisense mRNA directed against the murine MR, a transcription factor with unknown targets in cardiomyocytes. Within 2–3 mo, mice developed severe heart failure and cardiac fibrosis in the absence of hypertension or chronic hyperaldosteronism. Moreover, cardiac failure and fibrosis were fully reversible when MR antisense mRNA expression was subsequently suppressed. PMID:11997477

  17. Antisense RNA inactivation of gene expression of a cell-cell adhesion protein (gp64) in the cellular slime mold Polysphondylium pallidum.

    PubMed

    Funamoto, S; Ochiai, H

    1996-05-01

    The gp64 protein of Polysphondylium pallidum has been shown to mediate EDTA-stable cell-cell adhesion. To explore the functional role of gp64, we made an antisense RNA expression construct designed to prevent the gene expression of gp64; the construct was introduced into P. pallidum cells and the transformants were characterised. The antisense RNA-expressing clone L3mc2 which had just been harvested at the growth phase tended to re-form in aggregates smaller in size than did the parental cells in either the presence or absence of 10 mM EDTA. In contrast, 6.5-hour starved L3mc2 cells remained considerably dissociated from each other after 5 minutes gyrating, although aggregation gradually increased by 50% during a further 55 minutes gyrating in the presence of 10 mM EDTA. Correspondingly, L3mc2 lacked specifically the cell-cell adhesion protein, gp64. We therefore conclude that the gp64 protein is involved in forming the EDTA-resistant cell-cell contact. In spite of the absence of gp64, L3mc2 exhibited normal developmental processes, a fact which demonstrates that another cell-cell adhesion system exists in the development of Polysphondylium. This is the first report in which an antisense RNA technique was successfully applied to Polysphondylium. PMID:8743948

  18. A novel antisense RNA from the Salmonella virulence plasmid pSLT expressed by non-growing bacteria inside eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo-Asensio, Jesús; Ortega, Alvaro D; Rico-Pérez, Gadea; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; García-Del Portillo, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) are regulatory molecules playing relevant roles in response to environmental changes, stressful conditions and pathogenesis. The intracellular bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is known to regulate expression of some sRNAs during colonization of fibroblasts. Here, we characterize a previously unknown sRNA encoded in the S. Typhimurium pSLT virulence plasmid that is specifically up-regulated by non-growing dormant bacteria persisting inside fibroblasts. This sRNA was inferred in microarray expression analyses, which unraveled enhanced transcriptional activity in the PSLT047- PSLT046 (mig5) intergenic region. The sRNA transcript was further identified as a 597-nucleotide molecule, which we named IesR-1, for 'Intracellular-expressed-sRNA-1'. IesR-1 expression is low in bacteria growing in axenic cultures across a variety of experimental conditions but displays a marked increase (∼200-300 fold) following bacterial entry into fibroblasts. Remarkably, induction of IesR-1 expression is not prominent in bacteria proliferating within epithelial cells. IesR-1 deletion affects the control of bacterial growth in defined fibroblast cell lines and impairs virulence in a mouse infection model. Expression analyses performed in the PSLT047-iesR-1-PSLT046 (mig5) region support a cis-acting regulatory mechanism of IesR-1 as antisense RNA over the PSLT047 transcript involving interaction at their respective 3' ends and modulation of PSLT047 protein levels. This model is sustained by the scarce production of PSLT047 protein observed in non-growing intracellular bacteria and the high amount of PSLT047 protein produced by bacteria carrying a truncated IesR-1 version with separated 5' and 3' regions. Taken together, these data reveal that S. Typhimurium sRNAs encoded in the pSLT virulence plasmid respond to a state of persistence inside the host cell. As exemplified by IesR-1, some of these sRNAs may contribute to

  19. Genetic Transformation of Citrus Paradisi with Antisense and untranslatable RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase Genes of Citrus Tristeza Closterovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expression of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was studied in vivo and in vitro using a polyclonal antiserum raised against the recombinant CTV-RdRp protein. Although 56 kDa CTV-RdRp is thought to be expressed by a +1 translational frameshift at the carboxyl te...

  20. Direct measurement of the association constant of HER2/neu antisense oligonucleotide to its target RNA sequence using a molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Vijayanathan, Veena; Thomas, Thresia; Sigal, Leonard H; Thomas, T J

    2002-08-01

    A molecular beacon approach was developed to directly determine the association constant of RNA-DNA hybrid formation. The molecular beacon was composed of a 15-nt loop structure containing the antisense sequence that can hybridize with the AUG translational start site of the HER2/neu gene, which is overexpressed in a significant proportion of breast, ovarian, and lung tumors. The equilibrium association constant (Ka) of DNA binding to the RNA oligonucleotide was 6.4 +/- 0.14 x 10(7) M(-1) in the presence of 150 mM NaCl at 22 degrees C. The free energy change (AG) associated with RNA-DNA hybrid formation was -10.7 kcal/mole. The melting temperature (Tm) of RNA-DNA hybrid was 64.4 degrees C +/- 1 degree C in the presence of 150 mM NaCl. The RNA-DNA hybrid was more stable than the corresponding DNA-DNA duplex in 150 mM NaCl, as judged by both Ka and Tm data. We also determined the Ka, deltaG, and Tm values of RNA-DNA and DNA-DNA duplex formation in the presence of three monovalent cations, Li+, K+, and Cs+. The feasibility of this method was also investigated using a phosphorothioate molecular beacon. The information generated through this new approach for thermodynamic measurements might be useful for the design of oligonucleotides for antisense therapeutics.

  1. Cis-Antisense Transcription Gives Rise to Tunable Genetic Switch Behavior: A Mathematical Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Bordoy, Antoni E; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2015-01-01

    Antisense transcription has been extensively recognized as a regulatory mechanism for gene expression across all kingdoms of life. Despite the broad importance and extensive experimental determination of cis-antisense transcription, relatively little is known about its role in controlling cellular switching responses. Growing evidence suggests the presence of non-coding cis-antisense RNAs that regulate gene expression via antisense interaction. Recent studies also indicate the role of transcriptional interference in regulating expression of neighboring genes due to traffic of RNA polymerases from adjacent promoter regions. Previous models investigate these mechanisms independently, however, little is understood about how cells utilize coupling of these mechanisms in advantageous ways that could also be used to design novel synthetic genetic devices. Here, we present a mathematical modeling framework for antisense transcription that combines the effects of both transcriptional interference and cis-antisense regulation. We demonstrate the tunability of transcriptional interference through various parameters, and that coupling of transcriptional interference with cis-antisense RNA interaction gives rise to hypersensitive switches in expression of both antisense genes. When implementing additional positive and negative feed-back loops from proteins encoded by these genes, the system response acquires a bistable behavior. Our model shows that combining these multiple-levels of regulation allows fine-tuning of system parameters to give rise to a highly tunable output, ranging from a simple-first order response to biologically complex higher-order response such as tunable bistable switch. We identify important parameters affecting the cellular switch response in order to provide the design principles for tunable gene expression using antisense transcription. This presents an important insight into functional role of antisense transcription and its importance towards

  2. Cis-Antisense Transcription Gives Rise to Tunable Genetic Switch Behavior: A Mathematical Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bordoy, Antoni E.; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2015-01-01

    Antisense transcription has been extensively recognized as a regulatory mechanism for gene expression across all kingdoms of life. Despite the broad importance and extensive experimental determination of cis-antisense transcription, relatively little is known about its role in controlling cellular switching responses. Growing evidence suggests the presence of non-coding cis-antisense RNAs that regulate gene expression via antisense interaction. Recent studies also indicate the role of transcriptional interference in regulating expression of neighboring genes due to traffic of RNA polymerases from adjacent promoter regions. Previous models investigate these mechanisms independently, however, little is understood about how cells utilize coupling of these mechanisms in advantageous ways that could also be used to design novel synthetic genetic devices. Here, we present a mathematical modeling framework for antisense transcription that combines the effects of both transcriptional interference and cis-antisense regulation. We demonstrate the tunability of transcriptional interference through various parameters, and that coupling of transcriptional interference with cis-antisense RNA interaction gives rise to hypersensitive switches in expression of both antisense genes. When implementing additional positive and negative feed-back loops from proteins encoded by these genes, the system response acquires a bistable behavior. Our model shows that combining these multiple-levels of regulation allows fine-tuning of system parameters to give rise to a highly tunable output, ranging from a simple-first order response to biologically complex higher-order response such as tunable bistable switch. We identify important parameters affecting the cellular switch response in order to provide the design principles for tunable gene expression using antisense transcription. This presents an important insight into functional role of antisense transcription and its importance towards

  3. Natural antisense transcripts associated with salinity response in alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) complimentary to the messenger (sense) RNA (Wang et al. 2014). Many of them are involved in regulation of their own sense transcripts thus playing pivotal biological roles in all processes of organismal development and responses...

  4. Expression of a large LINE-1-driven antisense RNA is linked to epigenetic silencing of the metastasis suppressor gene TFPI-2 in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cruickshanks, Hazel A; Vafadar-Isfahani, Natasha; Dunican, Donncha S; Lee, Andy; Sproul, Duncan; Lund, Jonathan N; Meehan, Richard R; Tufarelli, Cristina

    2013-08-01

    LINE-1 retrotransposons are abundant repetitive elements of viral origin, which in normal cells are kept quiescent through epigenetic mechanisms. Activation of LINE-1 occurs frequently in cancer and can enable LINE-1 mobilization but also has retrotransposition-independent consequences. We previously reported that in cancer, aberrantly active LINE-1 promoters can drive transcription of flanking unique sequences giving rise to LINE-1 chimeric transcripts (LCTs). Here, we show that one such LCT, LCT13, is a large transcript (>300 kb) running antisense to the metastasis-suppressor gene TFPI-2. We have modelled antisense RNA expression at TFPI-2 in transgenic mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and demonstrate that antisense RNA induces silencing and deposition of repressive histone modifications implying a causal link. Consistent with this, LCT13 expression in breast and colon cancer cell lines is associated with silencing and repressive chromatin at TFPI-2. Furthermore, we detected LCT13 transcripts in 56% of colorectal tumours exhibiting reduced TFPI-2 expression. Our findings implicate activation of LINE-1 elements in subsequent epigenetic remodelling of surrounding genes, thus hinting a novel retrotransposition-independent role for LINE-1 elements in malignancy.

  5. Identification of antisense long noncoding RNAs that function as SINEUPs in human cells.

    PubMed

    Schein, Aleks; Zucchelli, Silvia; Kauppinen, Sakari; Gustincich, Stefano; Carninci, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian genomes encode numerous natural antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) that regulate gene expression. Recently, an antisense lncRNA to mouse Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (Uchl1) was reported to increase UCHL1 protein synthesis, representing a new functional class of lncRNAs, designated as SINEUPs, for SINE element-containing translation UP-regulators. Here, we show that an antisense lncRNA to the human protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A (PPP1R12A), named as R12A-AS1, which overlaps with the 5' UTR and first coding exon of the PPP1R12A mRNA, functions as a SINEUP, increasing PPP1R12A protein translation in human cells. The SINEUP activity depends on the aforementioned sense-antisense interaction and a free right Alu monomer repeat element at the 3' end of R12A-AS1. In addition, we identify another human antisense lncRNA with SINEUP activity. Our results demonstrate for the first time that human natural antisense lncRNAs can up-regulate protein translation, suggesting that endogenous SINEUPs may be widespread and present in many mammalian species. PMID:27646849

  6. Identification of antisense long noncoding RNAs that function as SINEUPs in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Schein, Aleks; Zucchelli, Silvia; Kauppinen, Sakari; Gustincich, Stefano; Carninci, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian genomes encode numerous natural antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) that regulate gene expression. Recently, an antisense lncRNA to mouse Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (Uchl1) was reported to increase UCHL1 protein synthesis, representing a new functional class of lncRNAs, designated as SINEUPs, for SINE element-containing translation UP-regulators. Here, we show that an antisense lncRNA to the human protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A (PPP1R12A), named as R12A-AS1, which overlaps with the 5′ UTR and first coding exon of the PPP1R12A mRNA, functions as a SINEUP, increasing PPP1R12A protein translation in human cells. The SINEUP activity depends on the aforementioned sense-antisense interaction and a free right Alu monomer repeat element at the 3′ end of R12A-AS1. In addition, we identify another human antisense lncRNA with SINEUP activity. Our results demonstrate for the first time that human natural antisense lncRNAs can up-regulate protein translation, suggesting that endogenous SINEUPs may be widespread and present in many mammalian species. PMID:27646849

  7. A cis-regulatory antisense RNA represses translation in Vibrio cholerae through extensive complementarity and proximity to the target locus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Howard; Replogle, John Michael; Vather, Naomi; Tsao-Wu, Maya; Mistry, Ronak; Liu, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    As with all facultative pathogens, Vibrio cholerae must optimize its cellular processes to adapt to different environments with varying carbon sources and to environmental stresses. More specifically, in order to metabolize mannitol, V. cholerae must regulate the synthesis of MtlA, a mannitol transporter protein produced exclusively in the presence of mannitol. We previously showed that a cis-acting small RNA (sRNA) expressed by V. cholerae, MtlS, appears to post-transcriptionally downregulate the expression of mtlA and is produced in the absence of mannitol. We hypothesized that since it is complementary to the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of mtlA mRNA, MtlS may affect synthesis of MtlA by forming an mtlA-MtlS complex that blocks translation of the mRNA through occlusion of its ribosome binding site. To test this hypothesis, we used in vitro translation assays in order to examine the role MtlS plays in mtlA regulation and found that MtlS is sufficient to suppress translation of transcripts harboring the 5' UTR of mtlA. However, in a cellular context, the 5' UTR of mtlA is not sufficient for targeted repression by endogenous MtlS; additional segments from the coding region of mtlA play a role in the ability of the sRNA to regulate translation of mtlA mRNA. Additionally, proximity of transcription sites between the sRNA and mRNA significantly affects the efficacy of MtlS.

  8. Antisense therapy for cancer--the time of truth.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Burkhard; Zangemeister-Wittke, Uwe

    2002-11-01

    The recent acceleration in the identification and characterisation of new molecular targets for cancer and the limited effectiveness of conventional treatment strategies has focused considerable interest on the development of new types of anticancer agents. These new drugs are hoped to be highly specific for malignant cells with a favorable side-effect profile due to well-defined mechanisms of action. Antisense oligonucleotides are one such class of new agent--they are short, synthetic stretches of DNA which hybridise with specific mRNA strands that correspond to target genes. By binding to the mRNA, the antisense oligonucleotides prevent the sequence of the target gene being converted into a protein, thereby blocking the action of the gene. Several genes known to be important in the regulation of apoptosis, cell growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis, have been validated as molecular targets for antisense therapy. Furthermore, new targets are rapidly being uncovered through coordinated functional genomics and proteomics initiatives. Phosphorothioate oligonucleotides are the current gold standard for antisense therapy; they have acceptable physical and chemical properties and show reasonable resistance to nucleases. Recently, new generations of these phosphorothioate oligonucleotides that contain 2'-modified nucleoside building blocks to enhance RNA binding affinity and decrease indirect toxic effects have been developed. Antisense therapeutics are, after decades of difficulties, finally close to fulfilling their promise in the clinic.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus RNAIII coordinately represses the synthesis of virulence factors and the transcription regulator Rot by an antisense mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Boisset, Sandrine; Geissmann, Thomas; Huntzinger, Eric; Fechter, Pierre; Bendridi, Nadia; Possedko, Maria; Chevalier, Clément; Helfer, Anne Catherine; Benito, Yvonne; Jacquier, Alain; Gaspin, Christine; Vandenesch, François; Romby, Pascale

    2007-01-01

    RNAIII is the intracellular effector of the quorum-sensing system in Staphylococcus aureus. It is one of the largest regulatory RNAs (514 nucleotides long) that are known to control the expression of a large number of virulence genes. Here, we show that the 3′ domain of RNAIII coordinately represses at the post-transcriptional level, the expression of mRNAs that encode a class of virulence factors that act early in the infection process. We demonstrate that the 3′ domain acts primarily as an antisense RNA and rapidly anneals to these mRNAs, forming long RNA duplexes. The interaction between RNAIII and the mRNAs results in repression of translation initiation and triggers endoribonuclease III hydrolysis. These processes are followed by rapid depletion of the mRNA pool. In addition, we show that RNAIII and its 3′ domain mediate translational repression of rot mRNA through a limited number of base pairings involving two loop–loop interactions. Since Rot is a transcriptional regulatory protein, we proposed that RNAIII indirectly acts on many downstream genes, resulting in the activation of the synthesis of several exoproteins. These data emphasize the multitude of regulatory steps affected by RNAIII and its 3′ domain in establishing a network of S. aureus virulence factors. PMID:17545468

  10. Mechanisms and Regulation of Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing is a critical step in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, providing significant expansion of the functional proteome of eukaryotic organisms with limited gene numbers. Split eukaryotic genes contain intervening sequences or introns disrupting protein-coding exons, and intron removal occurs by repeated assembly of a large and highly dynamic ribonucleoprotein complex termed the spliceosome, which is composed of five small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles, U1, U2, U4/U6, and U5. Biochemical studies over the past 10 years have allowed the isolation as well as compositional, functional, and structural analysis of splicing complexes at distinct stages along the spliceosome cycle. The average human gene contains eight exons and seven introns, producing an average of three or more alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms. Recent high-throughput sequencing studies indicate that 100% of human genes produce at least two alternative mRNA isoforms. Mechanisms of alternative splicing include RNA–protein interactions of splicing factors with regulatory sites termed silencers or enhancers, RNA–RNA base-pairing interactions, or chromatin-based effects that can change or determine splicing patterns. Disease-causing mutations can often occur in splice sites near intron borders or in exonic or intronic RNA regulatory silencer or enhancer elements, as well as in genes that encode splicing factors. Together, these studies provide mechanistic insights into how spliceosome assembly, dynamics, and catalysis occur; how alternative splicing is regulated and evolves; and how splicing can be disrupted by cis- and trans-acting mutations leading to disease states. These findings make the spliceosome an attractive new target for small-molecule, antisense, and genome-editing therapeutic interventions. PMID:25784052

  11. Genome-wide analysis for discovery of new rice miRNA reveals natural antisense miRNA (nat-miRNAs)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small RNAs (21-24nt) are involved in gene regulation through translation inhibition, mRNA cleavage, or directing chromatin modifications. In rice, currently ~240 miRNAs have been annotated. We sequenced more than four million small RNAs from rice and identified another 24 miRNA genes. Among these, w...

  12. Development of an antisense RNA delivery system using conjugates of the MS2 bacteriophage capsids and HIV-1 TAT cell-penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Wei, Baojun; Wei, Yuxiang; Zhang, Kuo; Wang, Jing; Xu, Ruihuan; Zhan, Sien; Lin, Guigao; Wang, Wei; Liu, Min; Wang, Lunan; Zhang, Rui; Li, Jinming

    2009-05-01

    RNA-based therapeutic strategies are used widely due to their highly specific mode of action. However, the major obstacle in any RNA-based therapy is cellular delivery and stability in the cells. The self-assembly of the MS2 bacteriophage capsids has been used to develop virus-like particles (VLPs) for drug delivery. In this study, we utilized the heterobifunctional crosslinker, sulfosuccinimidyl-4-(p-maleimidophenyl)-butyrate (sulfo-SMPB), to conjugate the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) Tat peptide and MS2 VLPs; the antisense RNA against the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) was packaged into these particles by using a two-plasmid coexpression system. The MS2 VLPs conjugated with the Tat peptide were then transferred into Huh-7 cells containing an HCV reporter system. The packaged antisense RNA showed an inhibitory effect on the translation of HCV. This paper describes our initial results with this system using the Tat peptide. PMID:18823738

  13. Inducible expression of Pisum sativum xyloglucan fucosyltransferase in the pea root cap meristem, and effects of antisense mRNA expression on root cap cell wall structural integrity.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fushi; Celoy, Rhodesia M; Nguyen, Trang; Zeng, Weiqing; Keegstra, Kenneth; Immerzeel, Peter; Pauly, Markus; Hawes, Martha C

    2008-07-01

    Mitosis and cell wall synthesis in the legume root cap meristem can be induced and synchronized by the nondestructive removal of border cells from the cap periphery. Newly synthesized cells can be examined microscopically as they differentiate progressively during cap development, and ultimately detach as a new population of border cells. This system was used to demonstrate that Pisum sativum L. fucosyl transferase (PsFut1) mRNA expression is strongly expressed in root meristematic tissues, and is induced >2-fold during a 5-h period when mitosis in the root cap meristem is increased. Expression of PsFut1 antisense mRNA in pea hairy roots under the control of the CaMV35S promoter, which exhibits meristem localized expression in pea root caps, resulted in a 50-60% reduction in meristem localized endogenous PsFut1 mRNA expression measured using whole mount in situ hybridization. Changes in gross levels of cell wall fucosylated xyloglucan were not detected, but altered surface localization patterns were detected using whole mount immunolocalization with CCRC-M1, an antibody that recognizes fucosylated xyloglucan. Emerging hairy roots expressing antisense PsFut1 mRNA appeared normal macroscopically but scanning electron microscopy of tissues with altered CCRC-M1 localization patterns revealed wrinkled, collapsed cell surfaces. As individual border cells separated from the cap periphery, cell death occurred in correlation with extrusion of cellular contents through breaks in the wall.

  14. U1 snRNA as an effective vector for stable expression of antisense molecules and for the inhibition of the splicing reaction.

    PubMed

    Martone, Julie; De Angelis, Fernanda Gabriella; Bozzoni, Irene

    2012-01-01

    We report the use of the U1 snRNA as a vector for the stable expression of antisense molecules against the splice junctions of specific dystrophin exons. The single-stranded 5' terminus of U1 can be replaced by unrelated sequences as long as 50 nucleotides without affecting both the stability and the ability to assemble into snRNP particles. Effective exon skipping has been obtained for different dystrophin exons by antisense sequences against 5' and 3' splice sites alone or in combination with ESE sequences. The efficacy of these molecules has been studied both in in vitro systems and in animals. In both cases the chimeric molecules, delivered as part of lentiviral or AAV vectors (De Angelis et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 99:9456-9461, 2002; Denti et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103: 3758-3763, 2006; Denti et al. Hum Gene Ther 17: 565-743, 2006; Denti et al. Hum Gene Ther 19: 601-608, 2008; Incitti et al. Mol Ther 18: 1675-1682, 2010), provided high skipping activity and efficient rescue of dystrophin synthesis. Moreover, the U1-antisense molecules, delivered to mice via systemic injection of recombinant AAV viruses, displayed body wide transduction, long-term expression, dystrophin rescue as well as morphological and functional benefit (Denti et al. Hum Gene Ther 19: 601-608, 2008). In this Chapter we report methods for producing U1-antisense expression cassettes in the backbone of lentiviral constructs and for testing their activity both in patients' derived myoblasts as well as in fibroblasts reprogrammed to muscle differentiation.

  15. Superfolder GFP reporters validate diverse new mRNA targets of the classic porin regulator, MicF RNA.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Colin P; Podkaminski, Dimitri; Papenfort, Kai; Urban, Johannes H; Hinton, Jay C D; Vogel, Jörg

    2012-05-01

    MicF is a textbook example of a small regulatory RNA (sRNA) that acts on a trans-encoded target mRNA through imperfect base pairing. Discovery of MicF as a post-transcriptional repressor of the major Escherichia coli porin OmpF established the paradigm for a meanwhile common mechanism of translational inhibition, through antisense sequestration of a ribosome binding site. However, whether MicF regulates additional genes has remained unknown for almost three decades. Here, we have harnessed the new superfolder variant of GFP for reporter-gene fusions to validate newly predicted targets of MicF in Salmonella. We show that the conserved 5' end of MicF acts by seed pairing to repress the mRNAs of global transcriptional regulator Lrp, and periplasmic protein YahO, while a second targeting region is also required to regulate the mRNA of the lipid A-modifying enzyme LpxR. Interestingly, MicF targets lpxR at both the ribosome binding site and deep within the coding sequence. MicF binding in the coding sequence of lpxR decreases mRNA stability through exacerbating the use of a native RNase E site proximal to the short MicF-lpxR duplex. Altogether, this study assigns the classic MicF sRNA to the growing class of Hfq-associated regulators that use diverse mechanisms to impact multiple loci.

  16. The Antisense RNA Approach: a New Application for In Vivo Investigation of the Stress Response of Oenococcus oeni, a Wine-Associated Lactic Acid Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Darsonval, Maud; Msadek, Tarek; Alexandre, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is a wine-associated lactic acid bacterium mostly responsible for malolactic fermentation in wine. In wine, O. oeni grows in an environment hostile to bacterial growth (low pH, low temperature, and ethanol) that induces stress response mechanisms. To survive, O. oeni is known to set up transitional stress response mechanisms through the synthesis of heat stress proteins (HSPs) encoded by the hsp genes, notably a unique small HSP named Lo18. Despite the availability of the genome sequence, characterization of O. oeni genes is limited, and little is known about the in vivo role of Lo18. Due to the lack of genetic tools for O. oeni, an efficient expression vector in O. oeni is still lacking, and deletion or inactivation of the hsp18 gene is not presently practicable. As an alternative approach, with the goal of understanding the biological function of the O. oeni hsp18 gene in vivo, we have developed an expression vector to produce antisense RNA targeting of hsp18 mRNA. Recombinant strains were exposed to multiple stresses inducing hsp18 gene expression: heat shock and acid shock. We showed that antisense attenuation of hsp18 affects O. oeni survival under stress conditions. These results confirm the involvement of Lo18 in heat and acid tolerance of O. oeni. Results of anisotropy experiments also confirm a membrane-protective role for Lo18, as previous observations had already suggested. This study describes a new, efficient tool to demonstrate the use of antisense technology for modulating gene expression in O. oeni. PMID:26452552

  17. The Antisense RNA Approach: a New Application for In Vivo Investigation of the Stress Response of Oenococcus oeni, a Wine-Associated Lactic Acid Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Darsonval, Maud; Msadek, Tarek; Alexandre, Hervé; Grandvalet, Cosette

    2015-10-09

    Oenococcus oeni is a wine-associated lactic acid bacterium mostly responsible for malolactic fermentation in wine. In wine, O. oeni grows in an environment hostile to bacterial growth (low pH, low temperature, and ethanol) that induces stress response mechanisms. To survive, O. oeni is known to set up transitional stress response mechanisms through the synthesis of heat stress proteins (HSPs) encoded by the hsp genes, notably a unique small HSP named Lo18. Despite the availability of the genome sequence, characterization of O. oeni genes is limited, and little is known about the in vivo role of Lo18. Due to the lack of genetic tools for O. oeni, an efficient expression vector in O. oeni is still lacking, and deletion or inactivation of the hsp18 gene is not presently practicable. As an alternative approach, with the goal of understanding the biological function of the O. oeni hsp18 gene in vivo, we have developed an expression vector to produce antisense RNA targeting of hsp18 mRNA. Recombinant strains were exposed to multiple stresses inducing hsp18 gene expression: heat shock and acid shock. We showed that antisense attenuation of hsp18 affects O. oeni survival under stress conditions. These results confirm the involvement of Lo18 in heat and acid tolerance of O. oeni. Results of anisotropy experiments also confirm a membrane-protective role for Lo18, as previous observations had already suggested. This study describes a new, efficient tool to demonstrate the use of antisense technology for modulating gene expression in O. oeni.

  18. Adenoviral delivery of an antisense RNA complementary to the 3' coding sequence of transforming growth factor-beta1 inhibits fibrogenic activities of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Arias, Monica; Lahme, Birgit; Van de Leur, Eddy; Gressner, Axel M; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2002-06-01

    Liver fibrosis occurs as a consequence of the transdifferentiationof hepatic stellate cells into myofibroblasts and is associated with an increased expression and activation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1. This pluripotent, profibrogenic cytokine stimulates matrix synthesis and decreases matrix degradation, resulting in fibrosis. Thus, blockade of synthesis or sequestering of mature TGF-beta1 is a primary target for the development of antifibrotic approaches. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the administration of adenoviruses constitutively expressing an antisense mRNA complementary to the 3' coding sequence of TGF-beta1 is able to suppress the synthesis of TGF-beta1 in culture-activated hepatic stellate cells. We demonstrate that the adenoviral vehicle directs high-level expression of the transgene and proved that the transduced antisense is biologically active by immunoprecipitation, Western blot, quantitative TGF-beta1 ELISA, and cell proliferation assays. Additionally, the biological function of the transgene was confirmed by analysis of differential activity of TGF-beta1-responsive genes using cell ELISA, Northern blotting, and by microarray technology, respectively. Furthermore, we examined the effects of that transgene on the expression of TGF-beta2, TGF-beta3, collagen type alpha1(I), latent transforming growth factor binding protein 1, types I and II TGF-beta receptors, and alpha-smooth muscle actin. Our results indicate that the administration of antisense mRNA offers a feasible approach to block autocrine TGF-beta1 signaling in hepatic stellate cells and may be useful and applicable in future to the treatment of fibrosis in chronic liver diseases.

  19. Understanding splicing regulation through RNA splicing maps.

    PubMed

    Witten, Joshua T; Ule, Jernej

    2011-03-01

    Alternative splicing is a highly regulated process that greatly increases the proteome diversity and plays an important role in cellular differentiation and disease. Interactions between RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and pre-mRNA are the principle regulator of splicing decisions. Findings from recent genome-wide studies of protein-RNA interactions have been combined with assays of the global effects of RBPs on splicing to create RNA splicing maps. These maps integrate information from all pre-mRNAs regulated by single RBPs to identify the global positioning principles guiding splicing regulation. Recent studies using this approach have identified a set of positional principles that are shared between diverse RBPs. Here, we discuss how insights from RNA splicing maps of different RBPs inform the mechanistic models of splicing regulation.

  20. Construction of a host-independent T7 expression system with small RNA regulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Li, Qiang; Xu, Dikai; Cui, Mingxin; Sun, Xiao; Xu, Yanyan; Wang, Wenya

    2014-11-10

    It is desirable to build a universal and efficient protein expression system for wild-type prokaryotic strains in biotechnology industry and the outstanding T7 expression system could be a good candidate. However, the current utilization of T7 system depends on the specific DE3 lysogenic hosts, which severely limits its application in wild-type strains. In this study, a host-independent T7 expression system without relying on DE3 lysogenic hosts to provide T7 RNA Polymerase was developed. T7 RNA Polymerase gene (Gene1) and T7 Promoter were successfully integrated into a single plasmid with the regulation of proper antisense RNA to limit T7 RNA Polymerase expression at a non-lethal level. This host-independent T7 expression system realized efficient protein expression in 4 non-DE3 Escherichia coli strains and a wild-type Sinorhizobium strain TH572. PMID:25193711

  1. Making sense of antisense

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, A.S.

    1991-08-02

    Out in the San Joaquin Valley of California grows a field of tomato plants that look like ordinary tomato plants. But these tomatoes are special - one of the first fruits of a new technology that may revolutionize not just commercial plant development but human medicine as well. The new technology uses novel RNAs, called antisense RNAs, to block the activity of specific genes. At first, researchers were mainly interested in antisense RNA as a tool for probing gene function. In the late 1970s, when the technology was first developed, molecular biologists didn't have a good way of mutating genes in the cells of higher organisms so that they could see what happens when the gene activity is lost. Antisense technology, in effect, provided a way of doing that. But the biotechnology industry soon recognized the immense practical potential of a technique that could be used to knock out the activity of bad genes. To make the tomato plants, for example, plant scientists used antisense RNAs to shut off the expression of the gene encoding an enzyme that makes tomatoes mushy, thereby yielding a product that may travel better and last longer on grocery shelves. Recent work by various labs suggests that it may be possible to design antisense compounds that inhibit the activity of viral genes or of the oncogenes thought to contribute to cancer development, without affecting normal cellular genes. That raises the possibility that the technology might aid in producing better, more selective drugs to treat viral diseases, including AIDS, and cancer.

  2. Hepatotoxicity of high affinity gapmer antisense oligonucleotides is mediated by RNase H1 dependent promiscuous reduction of very long pre-mRNA transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Burel, Sebastien A.; Hart, Christopher E.; Cauntay, Patrick; Hsiao, Jill; Machemer, Todd; Katz, Melanie; Watt, Andy; Bui, Huynh-hoa; Younis, Husam; Sabripour, Mahyar; Freier, Susan M.; Hung, Gene; Dan, Amy; Prakash, T.P.; Seth, Punit P.; Swayze, Eric E.; Bennett, C. Frank; Crooke, Stanley T.; Henry, Scott P.

    2016-01-01

    High affinity antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) containing bicylic modifications (BNA) such as locked nucleic acid (LNA) designed to induce target RNA cleavage have been shown to have enhanced potency along with a higher propensity to cause hepatotoxicity. In order to understand the mechanism of this hepatotoxicity, transcriptional profiles were collected from the livers of mice treated with a panel of highly efficacious hepatotoxic or non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. We observed highly selective transcript knockdown in mice treated with non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs, while the levels of many unintended transcripts were reduced in mice treated with hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. This transcriptional signature was concurrent with on-target RNA reduction and preceded transaminitis. Remarkably, the mRNA transcripts commonly reduced by toxic LNA ASOs were generally not strongly associated with any particular biological process, cellular component or functional group. However, they tended to have much longer pre-mRNA transcripts. We also demonstrate that the off-target RNA knockdown and hepatotoxicity is attenuated by RNase H1 knockdown, and that this effect can be generalized to high affinity modifications beyond LNA. This suggests that for a certain set of ASOs containing high affinity modifications such as LNA, hepatotoxicity can occur as a result of unintended off-target RNase H1 dependent RNA degradation. PMID:26553810

  3. Long non-coding antisense RNA KRT7-AS is activated in gastric cancers and supports cancer cell progression by increasing KRT7 expression.

    PubMed

    Huang, B; Song, J H; Cheng, Y; Abraham, J M; Ibrahim, S; Sun, Z; Ke, X; Meltzer, S J

    2016-09-15

    Alterations in long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are associated with human carcinogenesis. One group of lncRNAs, which are antisense in orientation to coding mRNAs (ASs), have been recently described in cancers but are poorly understood. We sought to identify ASs involved in human gastric cancer (GC) and to elucidate their mechanisms of action in carcinogenesis. We performed massively parallel RNA sequencing in GCs and matched normal tissues, as well as in GC-derived and normal gastric epithelial cell lines. One AS, designated Homo sapiens keratin 7 (KRT7-AS), was selected due to its marked upregulation and concordant expression with its cognate sense counterpart, KRT7, in GC tissues and cell lines. KRT7-AS formed an RNA-RNA hybrid with KRT7 and controlled KRT7 expression at both the mRNA and the post-transcriptional levels. Moreover, forced overexpression of the KRT7-overlapping region (OL) of KRT7-AS (but not its non-KRT7-OL portions) increased keratin 7 protein levels in cells. Finally, forced overexpression of full-length KRT7-AS or OL KRT7-AS (but not its non-KRT7-OL regions) promoted GC cell proliferation and migration. We conclude that lncRNA KRT7-AS promotes GC, at least in part, by increasing KRT7 expression. PMID:26876208

  4. Long non-coding antisense RNA KRT7-AS is activated in gastric cancers and supports cancer cell progression by increasing KRT7 expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Binbin; Song, Jee Hoon; Cheng, Yulan; Abraham, John M.; Ibrahim, Sariat; Sun, Zhenguo; Ke, Xiquan

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are associated with human carcinogenesis. One group of lncRNAs, which are antisense in orientation to coding mRNAs (ASs), have been recently described in cancers but are poorly understood. We sought to identify ASs involved in human gastric cancer (GC) and to elucidate their mechanisms of action in carcinogenesis. We performed massively parallel RNA sequencing in GCs and matched normal tissues, as well as in GC-derived and normal gastric epithelial cell lines. One AS, designated KRT7-AS, was selected due to its marked upregulation and concordant expression with its cognate sense counterpart, KRT7, in GC tissues and cell lines. KRT7-AS formed an RNA-RNA hybrid with KRT7 and controlled KRT7 expression at both the mRNA and the post-transcriptional levels. Moreover, forced overexpression of the KRT7-overlapping region (OL) of KRT7-AS (but not its non-KRT7-overlapping portions) increased keratin 7 protein levels in cells. Finally, forced overexpression of full-length (FL) KRT7-AS or OL KRT7-AS (but not its non-KRT7-overlapping regions) promoted GC cell proliferation and migration. We conclude that lncRNA KRT7-AS promotes GC, at least in part, by increasing KRT7 expression. PMID:26876208

  5. Solution structure of a purine rich hexaloop hairpin belonging to PGY/MDR1 mRNA and targeted by antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Joli, Flore; Bouchemal, Nadia; Laigle, Alain; Hartmann, Brigitte; Hantz, Edith

    2006-01-01

    A preferential target of antisense oligonucleotides directed against human PGY/MDR1 mRNA is a hairpin containing a stem with a G•U wobble pair, capped by the purine-rich 5′r(GGGAUG)3′ hexaloop. This hairpin is studied by multidimensional NMR and restrained molecular dynamics, with special emphasis on the conformation of south sugars and non-standard phosphate linkages evidenced in both the stem and the loop. The hairpin is found to be highly structured. The G•U wobble pair, a strong counterion binding site, displays structural particularities that are characteristic of this type of mismatch. The upper part of the stem undergoes distortions that optimize its interactions with the beginning of the loop. The loop adopts a new fold in which the single-stranded GGGA purine tract is structured in A-like conformation stacked in continuity of the stem and displays an extensive hydrogen bonding surface for recognition. The remarkable hairpin stability results from classical inter- and intra-strand interactions reinforced by numerous hydrogen bonds involving unusual backbone conformations and ribose 2′-hydroxyl groups. Overall, this work emphasizes numerous features that account for the well-ordered structure of the whole hairpin and highlights the loop properties that facilitate interaction with antisense oligonucleotides. PMID:17041234

  6. Knockdown of PU.1 mRNA and AS lncRNA regulates expression of immune-related genes in zebrafish Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ning; Pang, Weijun; Wang, Yu; Xiong, Yan; Xu, Ruxiang; Wu, Wenjing; Zhao, Cunzhen; Yang, Gongshe

    2014-06-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 plays a key role in the development of immune system. Recent evidence demonstrated bidirectional transcription and a sense/antisense transcriptional regulatory manner in PU.1 locus. However, the effect of PU.1 mRNA and its antisense long non-coding RNA (AS lncRNA) on adaptive immunity in vivo is still not clear. In this study, we first confirmed the expression of PU.1 AS lncRNA by strand-specific RT-PCR in zebrafish. Additionally, we found that GFP was detected in zebrafish kidney using tissue smears after zebrafish was intraperitoneally injected with pLentiHI-PU.1 shRNA or pLentiHI-PU.1 AS shRNA for 2 days. Moreover, on day 0, 2 and 4, the levels of PU.1 and immune-related genes including TCRAC, Rag2, AID, IgLC-1, mIg, and sIg mRNAs were detected using real-time qPCR. The results showed that the levels of PU.1 and above 6 immune-related gene mRNAs were significantly downregulated on day 2 (P<0.05) and day 4 (P<0.01) by the treatment with the pLentiHI-PU.1 shRNA, whereas these genes were markedly upregulated by the treatment with the pLentiHI-PU.1 AS shRNA. Based on our results, we suggested that the effects of PU.1 transcripts including mRNA and AS lncRNA on immune-related gene expression in zebrafish were opposite. To our knowledge, this was the first report that a novel functional AS lncRNA in adaptive immunity was transcribed from the zebrafish PU.1 locus. Our findings provided novel insight into further exploration on modulating adaptive immunity by regulating PU.1 mRNA and AS lncRNA.

  7. RNA polymerase and the regulation of transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Reznikoff, W.S.; Gross, C.A.; Burgess, R.R.; Record, M.T.; Dahlberg, J.E.; Wickens, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of eight sections, each containing several papers. The section titles are: RNA Polymerases; Transcription Initiation - Bacterial; Regulation of Bacterial Transcription Initiation; Stable RNA Synthesis in Eukaryotes: Chromatin Structure; Promoters; Enhancers; and the Global Control of Eukaryotic Transcription; Specific Eukaryotic Transcription Factors; Termination of Transcription; and Short Communications.

  8. Regulation of Flavivirus RNA synthesis and replication.

    PubMed

    Selisko, Barbara; Wang, Chunling; Harris, Eva; Canard, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    RNA synthesis and replication of the members of the Flavivirus genus (including dengue, West Nile and Japanese encephalitis viruses) is regulated by a wide variety of mechanisms and actors. These include the sequestration of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) for functions other than RNA synthesis, regulatory interactions with other viral and host proteins within the replication complex (RC), and regulatory elements within the RNA genome itself. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of the multiple levels at which Flavivirus RNA synthesis is controlled. We aim to bring together two active research fields: the structural and functional biology of individual proteins of the RC and the impressive wealth of knowledge acquired regarding the viral genomic RNA. PMID:25462437

  9. Regulation of Flavivirus RNA synthesis and replication

    PubMed Central

    Selisko, Barbara; Wang, Chunling; Harris, Eva; Canard, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    RNA synthesis and replication of the members of the Flavivirus genus (including dengue, West Nile and Japanese encephalitis viruses) is regulated by a wide variety of mechanisms and actors. These include the sequestration of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) for functions other than RNA synthesis, regulatory interactions with other viral and host proteins within the replication complex (RC), and regulatory elements within the RNA genome itself. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of the multiple levels at which Flavivirus RNA synthesis is controlled. We aim to bring together two active research fields: the structural and functional biology of individual proteins of the RC and the impressive wealth of knowledge acquired regarding the viral genomic RNA. PMID:25462437

  10. Antisense down-regulation of the strawberry β-galactosidase gene FaβGal4 increases cell wall galactose levels and reduces fruit softening

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Candelas; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Barceló-Muñoz, Marta; García-Gago, Juan A.; Waldron, Keith W.; Quesada, Miguel A.; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Strawberry softening is characterized by an increase in the solubilization and depolymerization of pectins from cell walls. Galactose release from pectin side chains by β-galactosidase enzymes has been proposed as one reason for the increase in soluble pectins. A putative β-galactosidase gene, FaβGal4, has been identified using a custom-made oligonucleotide-based strawberry microarray platform. FaβGal4 was expressed mainly in the receptacle during fruit ripening, and was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. To ascertain the role of FaβGal4 in strawberry softening, transgenic plants containing an antisense sequence of this gene under the control of the CaMV35S promoter were generated. Phenotypic analyses were carried out in transgenic plants during three consecutive growing seasons, using non-transformed plants as control. Two out of nine independent transgenic lines yielded fruits that were 30% firmer than control at the ripe stage. FaβGal4 mRNA levels were reduced by 70% in ripe fruits from these selected transgenic lines, but they also showed significant silencing of FaβGal1, although the genes did not share significant similarity. These two transgenic lines also showed an increase in pectin covalently bound to the cell wall, extracted using Na2CO3. The amount of galactose in cell walls from transgenic fruits was 30% higher than in control; notably, the galactose increase was larger in the 1 M KOH fraction, which is enriched in hemicellulose. These results suggest that FaβGal4 participates in the solubilization of covalently bound pectins during ripening, reducing strawberry fruit firmness. PMID:26585222

  11. Antisense down-regulation of the strawberry β-galactosidase gene FaβGal4 increases cell wall galactose levels and reduces fruit softening.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Candelas; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Barceló-Muñoz, Marta; García-Gago, Juan A; Waldron, Keith W; Quesada, Miguel A; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, José A

    2016-02-01

    Strawberry softening is characterized by an increase in the solubilization and depolymerization of pectins from cell walls. Galactose release from pectin side chains by β-galactosidase enzymes has been proposed as one reason for the increase in soluble pectins. A putative β-galactosidase gene, FaβGal4, has been identified using a custom-made oligonucleotide-based strawberry microarray platform. FaβGal4 was expressed mainly in the receptacle during fruit ripening, and was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. To ascertain the role of FaβGal4 in strawberry softening, transgenic plants containing an antisense sequence of this gene under the control of the CaMV35S promoter were generated. Phenotypic analyses were carried out in transgenic plants during three consecutive growing seasons, using non-transformed plants as control. Two out of nine independent transgenic lines yielded fruits that were 30% firmer than control at the ripe stage. FaβGal4 mRNA levels were reduced by 70% in ripe fruits from these selected transgenic lines, but they also showed significant silencing of FaβGal1, although the genes did not share significant similarity. These two transgenic lines also showed an increase in pectin covalently bound to the cell wall, extracted using Na2CO3. The amount of galactose in cell walls from transgenic fruits was 30% higher than in control; notably, the galactose increase was larger in the 1 M KOH fraction, which is enriched in hemicellulose. These results suggest that FaβGal4 participates in the solubilization of covalently bound pectins during ripening, reducing strawberry fruit firmness. PMID:26585222

  12. Antisense down-regulation of the strawberry β-galactosidase gene FaβGal4 increases cell wall galactose levels and reduces fruit softening.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Candelas; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Barceló-Muñoz, Marta; García-Gago, Juan A; Waldron, Keith W; Quesada, Miguel A; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, José A

    2016-02-01

    Strawberry softening is characterized by an increase in the solubilization and depolymerization of pectins from cell walls. Galactose release from pectin side chains by β-galactosidase enzymes has been proposed as one reason for the increase in soluble pectins. A putative β-galactosidase gene, FaβGal4, has been identified using a custom-made oligonucleotide-based strawberry microarray platform. FaβGal4 was expressed mainly in the receptacle during fruit ripening, and was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. To ascertain the role of FaβGal4 in strawberry softening, transgenic plants containing an antisense sequence of this gene under the control of the CaMV35S promoter were generated. Phenotypic analyses were carried out in transgenic plants during three consecutive growing seasons, using non-transformed plants as control. Two out of nine independent transgenic lines yielded fruits that were 30% firmer than control at the ripe stage. FaβGal4 mRNA levels were reduced by 70% in ripe fruits from these selected transgenic lines, but they also showed significant silencing of FaβGal1, although the genes did not share significant similarity. These two transgenic lines also showed an increase in pectin covalently bound to the cell wall, extracted using Na2CO3. The amount of galactose in cell walls from transgenic fruits was 30% higher than in control; notably, the galactose increase was larger in the 1 M KOH fraction, which is enriched in hemicellulose. These results suggest that FaβGal4 participates in the solubilization of covalently bound pectins during ripening, reducing strawberry fruit firmness.

  13. Long Non-coding RNA BGas Regulates the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator.

    PubMed

    Saayman, Sheena M; Ackley, Amanda; Burdach, Jon; Clemson, Matthew; Gruenert, Dieter C; Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Chivukula, Pad; Weinberg, Marc S; Morris, Kevin V

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening genetic disease. The root cause of CF is heritable recessive mutations that affect the cystic fibrosis transmembrance conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and the subsequent expression and activity of encoded ion channels at the cell surface. We show that CFTR is regulated transcriptionally by the actions of a novel long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), designated as BGas, that emanates from intron 11 of the CFTR gene and is expressed in the antisense orientation relative to the protein coding sense strand. We find that BGas functions in concert with several proteins including HMGA1, HMGB1, and WIBG to modulate the local chromatin and DNA architecture of intron 11 of the CFTR gene and thereby affects transcription. Suppression of BGas or its associated proteins results in a gain of both CFTR expression and chloride ion function. The observations described here highlight a previously underappreciated mechanism of transcriptional control and suggest that BGas may serve as a therapeutic target for specifically activating expression of CFTR. PMID:27434588

  14. Long Non-coding RNA BGas Regulates the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Saayman, Sheena M; Ackley, Amanda; Burdach, Jon; Clemson, Matthew; Gruenert, Dieter C; Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Chivukula, Pad; Weinberg, Marc S; Morris, Kevin V

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening genetic disease. The root cause of CF is heritable recessive mutations that affect the cystic fibrosis transmembrance conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and the subsequent expression and activity of encoded ion channels at the cell surface. We show that CFTR is regulated transcriptionally by the actions of a novel long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), designated as BGas, that emanates from intron 11 of the CFTR gene and is expressed in the antisense orientation relative to the protein coding sense strand. We find that BGas functions in concert with several proteins including HMGA1, HMGB1, and WIBG to modulate the local chromatin and DNA architecture of intron 11 of the CFTR gene and thereby affects transcription. Suppression of BGas or its associated proteins results in a gain of both CFTR expression and chloride ion function. The observations described here highlight a previously underappreciated mechanism of transcriptional control and suggest that BGas may serve as a therapeutic target for specifically activating expression of CFTR. PMID:27434588

  15. MicroRNA-221 and -222 Regulate Radiation Sensitivity by Targeting the PTEN Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Chunzhi; Kang Chunsheng; Wang Ping; Cao Yongzhen; Lv Zhonghong; Yu Shizhu; Wang Guangxiu; Zhang Anling; Jia Zhifan; Han Lei; Yang Chunying; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Teh, Bin S.; Xu Bo; Pu Peiyu

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs inhibiting expression of numerous target genes by posttranscriptional regulation. miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 (miRNA-221/-222) expression is elevated in radioresistant tumor cell lines; however, it is not known whether and how miRNAs control cellular responses to ionizing irradiation. Methods and Materials: We used bioinformatic analyses, luciferase reporter assay, and genetic knockdown and biochemical assays to characterize the regulation pathways of miRNA-221/-222 in response to radiation treatment. Results: We identified the PTEN gene as a target of miRNA-221/-222. Furthermore, we found that knocking down miRNA-221/-222 by antisense oligonucleotides upregulated PTEN expression. Upregulated PTEN expression suppressed AKT activity and increased radiation-induced apoptosis, resulting in enhancement of radiosensitivity in tumor cells. Conclusions: miRNA-221/-222 control radiation sensitivity by regulating the PTEN/AKT pathway and can be explored as novel targets for radiosensitization.

  16. Mutually exclusive sense–antisense transcription at FLC facilitates environmentally induced gene repression

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Stefanie; Duncan, Susan; Dean, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Antisense transcription through genic regions is pervasive in most genomes; however, its functional significance is still unclear. We are studying the role of antisense transcripts (COOLAIR) in the cold-induced, epigenetic silencing of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), a regulator of the transition to reproduction. Here we use single-molecule RNA FISH to address the mechanistic relationship of FLC and COOLAIR transcription at the cellular level. We demonstrate that while sense and antisense transcripts can co-occur in the same cell they are mutually exclusive at individual loci. Cold strongly upregulates COOLAIR transcription in an increased number of cells and through the mutually exclusive relationship facilitates shutdown of sense FLC transcription in cis. COOLAIR transcripts form dense clouds at each locus, acting to influence FLC transcription through changed H3K36me3 dynamics. These results may have general implications for other loci showing both sense and antisense transcription. PMID:27713408

  17. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  18. An in vivo and in silico approach to study cis-antisense: a short cut to higher order response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Colleen; Varanasi, Usha; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    Antisense interactions are present in all domains of life. Typically sense, antisense RNA pairs originate from overlapping genes with convergent face to face promoters, and are speculated to be involved in gene regulation. Recent studies indicate the role of transcriptional interference (TI) in regulating expression of genes in convergent orientation. Modeling antisense, TI gene regulation mechanisms allows us to understand how organisms control gene expression. We present a modeling and experimental framework to understand convergent transcription that combines the effects of transcriptional interference and cis-antisense regulation. Our model shows that combining transcriptional interference and antisense RNA interaction adds multiple-levels of regulation which affords a highly tunable biological output, ranging from first order response to complex higher-order response. To study this system we created a library of experimental constructs with engineered TI and antisense interaction by using face-to-face inducible promoters separated by carefully tailored overlapping DNA sequences to control expression of a set of fluorescent reporter proteins. Studying this gene expression mechanism allows for an understanding of higher order behavior of gene expression networks.

  19. The Role of Transcription Factors at Antisense-Expressing Gene Pairs in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Thiemicke, Alexander; Hsu, Tiffany Y.; Brem, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoded close to one another on the chromosome are often coexpressed, by a mechanism and regulatory logic that remain poorly understood. We surveyed the yeast genome for tandem gene pairs oriented tail-to-head at which expression antisense to the upstream gene was conserved across species. The intergenic region at most such tandem pairs is a bidirectional promoter, shared by the downstream gene mRNA and the upstream antisense transcript. Genomic analyses of these intergenic loci revealed distinctive patterns of transcription factor regulation. Mutation of a given transcription factor verified its role as a regulator in trans of tandem gene pair loci, including the proximally initiating upstream antisense transcript and downstream mRNA and the distally initiating upstream mRNA. To investigate cis-regulatory activity at such a locus, we focused on the stress-induced NAD(P)H dehydratase YKL151C and its downstream neighbor, the metabolic enzyme GPM1. Previous work has implicated the region between these genes in regulation of GPM1 expression; our mutation experiments established its function in rich medium as a repressor in cis of the distally initiating YKL151C sense RNA, and an activator of the proximally initiating YKL151C antisense RNA. Wild-type expression of all three transcripts required the transcription factor Gcr2. Thus, at this locus, the intergenic region serves as a focal point of regulatory input, driving antisense expression and mediating the coordinated regulation of YKL151C and GPM1. Together, our findings implicate transcription factors in the joint control of neighboring genes specialized to opposing conditions and the antisense transcripts expressed between them. PMID:27190003

  20. Identification and characterization of high affinity antisense PNAs for the human unr (upstream of N-ras) mRNA which is uniquely overexpressed in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Huafeng; Yue, Xuan; Li, Xiaoxu; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2005-01-01

    We have recently shown that an MCF-7 tumor can be imaged in a mouse by PET with 64Cu-labeled Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) tethered to the permeation peptide Lys4 that recognize the uniquely overexpressed and very abundant upstream of N-ras or N-ras related gene (unr mRNA) expressed in these cells. Herein we describe how the high affinity antisense PNAs to the unr mRNA were identified and characterized. First, antisense binding sites on the unr mRNA were mapped by an reverse transcriptase random oligonucleotide library (RT-ROL) method that we have improved, and by a serial analysis of antisense binding sites (SAABS) method that we have developed which is similar to another recently described method. The relative binding affinities of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) complementary to the antisense binding sites were then qualitatively ranked by a new Dynabead-based dot blot assay. Dissociation constants for a subset of the ODNs were determined by a new Dynabead-based solution assay and were found to be 300 pM for the best binders in 1 M salt. PNAs corresponding to the ODNs with the highest affinities were synthesized with an N-terminal CysTyr and C-terminal Lys4 sequence. Dissociation constants of these hybrid PNAs were determined by the Dynabead-based solution assay to be about 10 pM for the highest affinity binders. PMID:16314303

  1. Differential RNA-seq of Vibrio cholerae identifies the VqmR small RNA as a regulator of biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Papenfort, Kai; Förstner, Konrad U; Cong, Jian-Ping; Sharma, Cynthia M; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-02-17

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process of cell-to-cell communication that enables bacteria to transition between individual and collective lifestyles. QS controls virulence and biofilm formation in Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera disease. Differential RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of wild-type V. cholerae and a locked low-cell-density QS-mutant strain identified 7,240 transcriptional start sites with ∼ 47% initiated in the antisense direction. A total of 107 of the transcripts do not appear to encode proteins, suggesting they specify regulatory RNAs. We focused on one such transcript that we name VqmR. vqmR is located upstream of the vqmA gene encoding a DNA-binding transcription factor. Mutagenesis and microarray analyses demonstrate that VqmA activates vqmR transcription, that vqmR encodes a regulatory RNA, and VqmR directly controls at least eight mRNA targets including the rtx (repeats in toxin) toxin genes and the vpsT transcriptional regulator of biofilm production. We show that VqmR inhibits biofilm formation through repression of vpsT. Together, these data provide to our knowledege the first global annotation of the transcriptional start sites in V. cholerae and highlight the importance of posttranscriptional regulation for collective behaviors in this human pathogen.

  2. MicroRNA-34a Modulates Cytoskeletal Dynamics through Regulating RhoA/Rac1 Cross-talk in Chondroblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongkyun; Song, Jinsoo; Kim, Sunhyo; Park, Hyang Mi; Chun, Churl-Hong; Sonn, Jongkyung; Jin, Eun-Jung

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in various cellular processes, such as cell fate determination, cell death, and tumorigenesis. In the present study, we investigated the role of miRNA-34a (miR-34a) in the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, which is essential for chondrocyte differentiation. miRNA arrays to identify genes that appeared to be up-regulated or down-regulated during chondrogenesis were applied with chondrogenic progenitors treated with JNK inhibitor. PNA-based antisense oligonucleotides and miRNA precursor were used for investigation of the functional roles of miR-34a. We found that, in chick chondroprogenitors treated with JNK inhibitor, which suppresses chondrogenic differentiation, the expression levels of miR-34a and RhoA1 are up-regulated through modulation of Rac1 expression. Blockade of miR-34a via the use of PNA-based antisense oligonucleotides was associated with decreased protein expression of RhoA (a known modulator of stress fiber expression), down-regulation of stress fibers, up-regulation of Rac1, and recovery of protein level of type II collagen. miR-34a regulates RhoA/Rac1 cross-talk and negatively modulates reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, which is one of the essential processes for establishing chondrocyte-specific morphology. PMID:22351754

  3. Synthesis, Improved Antisense Activity and Structural Rationale for the Divergent RNA Affinities of 3;#8242;-Fluoro Hexitol Nucleic Acid (FHNA and Ara-FHNA) Modified Oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, Martin; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Allerson, Charles R.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Berdeja, Andres; Yu, Jinghua; Lee, Sam; Watt, Andrew; Gaus, Hans; Bhat, Balkrishen; Swayze, Eric E.; Seth, Punit P.

    2012-03-16

    The synthesis, biophysical, structural, and biological properties of both isomers of 3'-fluoro hexitol nucleic acid (FHNA and Ara-FHNA) modified oligonucleotides are reported. Synthesis of the FHNA and Ara-FHNA thymine phosphoramidites was efficiently accomplished starting from known sugar precursors. Optimal RNA affinities were observed with a 3'-fluorine atom and nucleobase in a trans-diaxial orientation. The Ara-FHNA analog with an equatorial fluorine was found to be destabilizing. However, the magnitude of destabilization was sequence-dependent. Thus, the loss of stability is sharply reduced when Ara-FHNA residues were inserted at pyrimidine-purine (Py-Pu) steps compared to placement within a stretch of pyrimidines (Py-Py). Crystal structures of A-type DNA duplexes modified with either monomer provide a rationalization for the opposing stability effects and point to a steric origin of the destabilization caused by the Ara-FHNA analog. The sequence dependent effect can be explained by the formation of an internucleotide C-F {hor_ellipsis} H-C pseudo hydrogen bond between F3' of Ara-FHNA and C8-H of the nucleobase from the 3'-adjacent adenosine that is absent at Py-Py steps. In animal experiments, FHNA-modified antisense oligonucleotides formulated in saline showed a potent downregulation of gene expression in liver tissue without producing hepatotoxicity. Our data establish FHNA as a useful modification for antisense therapeutics and also confirm the stabilizing influence of F(Py) {hor_ellipsis} H-C(Pu) pseudo hydrogen bonds in nucleic acid structures.

  4. Regulation of Pluripotency by RNA Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Julia; Blelloch, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Establishment, maintenance, and exit from pluripotency require precise coordination of a cell’s molecular machinery. Substantial headway has been made in deciphering many aspects of this elaborate system, particularly with respect to epigenetics, transcription, and noncoding RNAs. Less attention has been paid to posttranscriptional regulatory processes such as alternative splicing, RNA processing and modification, nuclear export, regulation of transcript stability, and translation. Here, we introduce the RNA binding proteins that enable the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, summarizing current and ongoing research on their roles at different regulatory points and discussing how they help script the fate of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25192462

  5. Oligonucleotides antisense to the interleukin 1 receptor mRNA block the effects of interleukin 1 in cultured murine and human fibroblasts and in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Burch, R M; Mahan, L C

    1991-01-01

    Phosphodiester and phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (18 mers) were constructed antisense to sequences of the recently cloned murine and human IL-1 receptors. Murine antisense oligonucleotides inhibited IL-1-stimulated PGE2 synthesis by murine fibroblasts in culture in a time (days) and concentration-dependent (3 microM-30 microM) fashion. Murine sense oligonucleotide and an oligonucleotide antisense to human IL-1 receptor were without effect. Moreover, murine antisense oligonucleotides did not affect tumor necrosis factor- or bradykinin-stimulated PGE2 synthesis by murine fibroblasts. Similarly, antisense oligonucleotides to the human, but not the murine, IL-1 receptor inhibited IL-1-stimulated PGE2 synthesis by cultured human fibroblasts. The attenuation of the cellular response to IL-1 caused by the antisense oligonucleotides correlated with a loss in cell surface receptors for IL-1, without any change in the number of bradykinin receptors on these cells. When antisense oligonucleotides were encapsulated in liposomes, they blocked completely the appearance of newly synthesized IL-1 receptors and IL-1-stimulated PGE2 synthesis. In mice, subcutaneous injection with an oligonucleotide antisense to the murine IL-1 receptor markedly inhibited the infiltration of neutrophils in response to subsequent injection of IL-1. These data suggest that antisense oligodeoxynucleotides may share a role in the design of antiinflammatory therapeutics. Images PMID:1833422

  6. Antisense-mediated depletion of p300 in human cells leads to premature G1 exit and up-regulation of c-MYC.

    PubMed

    Kolli, S; Buchmann, A M; Williams, J; Weitzman, S; Thimmapaya, B

    2001-04-10

    The cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein and p300 are two highly conserved transcriptional coactivators and histone acetyltransferases that integrate signals from diverse signal transduction pathways in the nucleus and also link chromatin remodeling with transcription. In this report, we have examined the role of p300 in the control of the G(1) phase of the cell cycle in nontransformed immortalized human breast epithelial cells (MCF10A) and fibroblasts (MSU) by using adenovirus vectors expressing p300-specific antisense sequences. Quiescent MCF10A and MSU cells expressing p300-specific antisense sequences synthesized p300 at much reduced levels and exited G(1) phase without serum stimulation. These cells also showed an increase in cyclin A and cyclin A- and E-associated kinase activities characteristic of S phase induction. Further analysis of the p300-depleted quiescent MCF10A cells revealed a 5-fold induction of c-MYC and a 2-fold induction of c-JUN. A direct target of c-MYC, CAD, which is required for DNA synthesis, was also found to be up-regulated, indicating that up-regulation of c-MYC functionally contributed to DNA synthesis. Furthermore, S phase induction in p300-depleted cells was reversed when antisense c-MYC was expressed in these cells, indicating that up-regulation of c-MYC may directly contribute to S phase induction. Adenovirus E1A also induced DNA synthesis and increased the levels of c-MYC and c-JUN in serum-starved MCF10A cells in a p300-dependent manner. Our results suggest an important role of p300 in cell cycle regulation at G(1) and raise the possibility that p300 may negatively regulate early response genes, including c-MYC and c-JUN, thereby preventing DNA synthesis in quiescent cells.

  7. Transcriptome interrogation of human myometrium identifies differentially expressed sense-antisense pairs of protein-coding and long non-coding RNA genes in spontaneous labor at term

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Roberto; Tarca, Adi; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Miranda, Jezid; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Jia, Hui; Hassan, Sonia S.; Kalita, Cynthia A.; Cai, Juan; Yeo, Lami; Lipovich, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Objective The mechanisms responsible for normal and abnormal parturition are poorly understood. Myometrial activation leading to regular uterine contractions is a key component of labor. Dysfunctional labor (arrest of dilatation and/or descent) is a leading indication for cesarean delivery. Compelling evidence suggests that most of these disorders are functional in nature, and not the result of cephalopelvic disproportion. The methodology and the datasets afforded by the post-genomic era provide novel opportunities to understand and target gene functions in these disorders. In 2012, the ENCODE Consortium elucidated the extraordinary abundance and functional complexity of long non-coding RNA genes in the human genome. The purpose of the study was to identify differentially expressed long non-coding RNA genes in human myometrium in women in spontaneous labor at term. Materials and Methods Myometrium was obtained from women undergoing cesarean deliveries who were not in labor (n=19) and women in spontaneous labor at term (n=20). RNA was extracted and profiled using an Illumina® microarray platform. The analysis of the protein coding genes from this study has been previously reported. Here, we have used computational approaches to bound the extent of long non-coding RNA representation on this platform, and to identify co-differentially expressed and correlated pairs of long non-coding RNA genes and protein-coding genes sharing the same genomic loci. Results Upon considering more than 18,498 distinct lncRNA genes compiled nonredundantly from public experimental data sources, and interrogating 2,634 that matched Illumina microarray probes, we identified co-differential expression and correlation at two genomic loci that contain coding-lncRNA gene pairs: SOCS2-AK054607 and LMCD1-NR_024065 in women in spontaneous labor at term. This co-differential expression and correlation was validated by qRT-PCR, an independent experimental method. Intriguingly, one of the two lncRNA

  8. Efficient down-regulation of PKC-α gene expression in A549 lung cancer cells mediated by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides in dendrosomes.

    PubMed

    Movassaghian, Sara; Moghimi, Hamid R; Shirazi, Farshad H; Koshkaryev, Alexander; Trivedi, Malav S; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2013-01-30

    The completion of human genome project has increased our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of many diseases, including cancer, thus providing new opportunities for gene therapy. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AsODN) possess great potential as sequence-specific therapeutic agents, which in contrast to classic treatments provide more efficient and target-specific approach to modulate disease-related genes. To be therapeutically effective, sufficient concentrations of intact AsODN must bypass membrane barriers and access the site of action. In this study, a dendrosome delivery strategy was designed to improve the encapsulation of AsODN in non-cationic liposomes to target PKC-α in lung cancer cells in vitro. Subcellular trafficking of fluorescently labeled AsODN was visualized using confocal microscopy. Uptake and expression of mRNA and target protein after AsODN delivery was measured by flow cytometry, qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. Dendrosomes showed favorable physicochemical parameters: high encapsulation efficiency and uptake in serum-containing medium with no apparent cytotoxicity. AsODN encapsulated in dendrosome efficiently and specifically suppress the target gene at both mRNA and protein levels. Additional in vivo studies on the application of dendrosome as a delivery system for nucleic acid molecules may lead to improvement of this technology and facilitate the development of therapeutic antisense techniques. PMID:23262426

  9. The 5′-tail of antisense RNAII of pMV158 plays a critical role in binding to the target mRNA and in translation inhibition of repB

    PubMed Central

    López-Aguilar, Celeste; Romero-López, Cristina; Espinosa, Manuel; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo; del Solar, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Rolling-circle replication of streptococcal plasmid pMV158 is controlled by the concerted action of two trans-acting elements, namely transcriptional repressor CopG and antisense RNAII, which inhibit expression of the repB gene encoding the replication initiator protein. The pMV158-encoded antisense RNAII exerts its activity of replication control by inhibiting translation of the essential repB gene. RNAII is the smallest and simplest among the characterized antisense RNAs involved in control of plasmid replication. Structure analysis of RNAII revealed that it folds into an 8-bp-long stem containing a 1-nt bulge and closed by a 6-nt apical loop. This hairpin is flanked by a 17-nt-long single-stranded 5′-tail and an 8-nt-long 3′-terminal U-rich stretch. Here, the 3′ and 5′ regions of the 5′-tail of RNAII are shown to play a critical role in the binding to the target mRNA and in the inhibition of repB translation, respectively. In contrast, the apical loop of the single hairpin of RNAII plays a rather secondary role and the upper stem region hardly contributes to the binding or inhibition processes. The entire 5′-tail is required for efficient inhibition of repB translation, though only the 8-nt-long region adjacent to the hairpin seems to be essential for rapid binding to the mRNA. These results show that a “kissing” interaction involving base-pairing between complementary hairpin loops in RNAII and mRNA is not critical for efficient RNA/RNA binding or repB translation inhibition. A singular binding mechanism is envisaged whereby initial pairing between complementary single-stranded regions in the antisense and sense RNAs progresses upwards into the corresponding hairpin stems to form the intermolecular duplex. PMID:26175752

  10. Chromatin-associated RNA interference components contribute to transcriptional regulation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cernilogar, Filippo M; Onorati, Maria Cristina; Kothe, Greg O; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Parsi, Krishna Mohan; Breiling, Achim; Lo Sardo, Federica; Saxena, Alka; Miyoshi, Keita; Siomi, Haruhiko; Siomi, Mikiko C; Carninci, Piero; Gilmour, David S; Corona, Davide F V; Orlando, Valerio

    2011-11-06

    RNA interference (RNAi) pathways have evolved as important modulators of gene expression that operate in the cytoplasm by degrading RNA target molecules through the activity of short (21-30 nucleotide) RNAs. RNAi components have been reported to have a role in the nucleus, as they are involved in epigenetic regulation and heterochromatin formation. However, although RNAi-mediated post-transcriptional gene silencing is well documented, the mechanisms of RNAi-mediated transcriptional gene silencing and, in particular, the role of RNAi components in chromatin dynamics, especially in animal multicellular organisms, are elusive. Here we show that the key RNAi components Dicer 2 (DCR2) and Argonaute 2 (AGO2) associate with chromatin (with a strong preference for euchromatic, transcriptionally active, loci) and interact with the core transcription machinery. Notably, loss of function of DCR2 or AGO2 showed that transcriptional defects are accompanied by the perturbation of RNA polymerase II positioning on promoters. Furthermore, after heat shock, both Dcr2 and Ago2 null mutations, as well as missense mutations that compromise the RNAi activity, impaired the global dynamics of RNA polymerase II. Finally, the deep sequencing of the AGO2-associated small RNAs (AGO2 RIP-seq) revealed that AGO2 is strongly enriched in small RNAs that encompass the promoter regions and other regions of heat-shock and other genetic loci on both the sense and antisense DNA strands, but with a strong bias for the antisense strand, particularly after heat shock. Taken together, our results show that DCR2 and AGO2 are globally associated with transcriptionally active loci and may have a pivotal role in shaping the transcriptome by controlling the processivity of RNA polymerase II.

  11. Targeting Cancer with Antisense Oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Hnatowich, DJ

    2008-10-28

    With financial assistance from the Department of Energy, we have shown definitively that radiolabeled antisense DNAs and other oligomers will accumulate in target cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by an antisense mechanism. We have also shown that the number of mRNA targets for our antisense oligomers in the cancer cell types that we have investigated so far is sufficient to provide and antisense image and/or radiotherapy of cancer in mice. These studies have been reported in about 10 publications. However our observation over the past several years has shown that radiolabeled antisense oligomers administered intravenously in their native and naked form will accumulate and be retained in target xenografts by an antisense mechanism but will also accumulate at high levels in normal organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys. We have investigated unsuccessfully several commercially available vectors. Thus the use of radiolabeled antisense oligomers for the imaging of cancer must await novel approaches to delivery. This laboratory has therefore pursued two new paths, optical imaging of tumor and Auger radiotherapy. We are developing a novel method of optical imaging tumor using antisense oligomers with a fluorophore is administered while hybridized with a shorter complementary oligomer with an inhibitor. In culture and in tumored mice that the duplex remains intact and thus nonfluorescent until it encounters its target mRNA at which time it dissociates and the antisense oligomer binds along with its fluorophore to the target. Simultaneous with the above, we have also observed, as have others, that antisense oligomers migrate rapidly and quantitatively to the nucleus upon crossing cell membranes. The Auger electron radiotherapy path results from this observation since the nuclear migration properties could be used effectively to bring and to retain in the nucleus an Auger emitting radionuclide such as 111In or 125I bound to the antisense oligomer. Since the object becomes

  12. Regulation of functional KCNQ1OT1 lncRNA by β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Sunamura, Naohiro; Ohira, Takahito; Kataoka, Miki; Inaoka, Daigo; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Nakayama, Yuji; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Kugoh, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been implicated in many biological processes through epigenetic mechanisms. We previously reported that KCNQ1OT1, an imprinted antisense lncRNA in the human KCNQ1 locus on chromosome 11p15.5, is involved in cis-limited silencing within an imprinted KCNQ1 cluster. Furthermore, aberration of KCNQ1OT1 transcription was observed with a high frequency in colorectal cancers. However, the molecular mechanism of the transcriptional regulation and the functional role of KCNQ1OT1 in colorectal cancer remain unclear. Here, we show that the KCNQ1OT1 transcriptional level was significantly increased in human colorectal cancer cells in which β-catenin was excessively accumulated in the nucleus. Additionally, overexpression of β-catenin resulted in an increase in KCNQ1OT1 lncRNA-coated territory. On the other hand, knockdown of β-catenin resulted in significant decrease of KCNQ1OT1 lncRNA-coated territory and an increase in the mRNA expression of the SLC22A18 and PHLDA2 genes that are regulated by KCNQ1OT1. We showed that β-catenin can promote KCNQ1OT1 transcription through direct binding to the KCNQ1OT1 promoter. Our evidence indicates that β-catenin signaling may contribute to development of colorectal cancer by functioning as a novel lncRNA regulatory factor via direct targeting of KCNQ1OT1. PMID:26868975

  13. Exon 45 skipping through U1-snRNA antisense molecules recovers the Dys-nNOS pathway and muscle differentiation in human DMD myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Cazzella, Valentina; Martone, Julie; Pinnarò, Chiara; Santini, Tiziana; Twayana, Shyam Sundar; Sthandier, Olga; D'Amico, Adele; Ricotti, Valeria; Bertini, Enrico; Muntoni, Francesco; Bozzoni, Irene

    2012-11-01

    Exon skipping has been demonstrated to be a successful strategy for the gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD): the rational being to convert severe Duchenne forms into milder Becker ones. Here, we show the selection of U1 snRNA-antisense constructs able to confer effective rescue of dystrophin synthesis in a Δ44 Duchenne genetic background, through skipping of exon 45; moreover, we demonstrate that the resulting dystrophin is able to recover timing of myogenic marker expression, to relocalize neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and to rescue expression of miRNAs previously shown to be sensitive to the Dystrophin-nNOS-HDAC2 pathway. Becker mutations display different phenotypes, likely depending on whether the shorter protein is able to reconstitute the wide range of wild-type functions. Among them, efficient assembly of the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) and nNOS localization are important. Comparing different Becker deletions we demonstrate the correlation between the ability of the mutant dystrophin to relocalize nNOS and the expression levels of two miRNAs, miR-1 and miR29c, known to be involved in muscle homeostasis and to be controlled by the Dys-nNOS-HDAC2 pathway.

  14. Internalization of oligodeoxynucleotide antisense to type-1 plasminogen activator inhibitor mRNA in endothelial cells: a three-dimensional reconstruction by confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E; Pawlowska, Z; Kobylanska, A; Pluskota, E; Maszewska, M; Stec, W J; Cierniewski, C S

    1996-01-01

    A three-dimensional reconstruction analysis of localization of phosphodiester and phosphorothioate oligonucleotide antisense to type-1 plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) mRNA within endothelial cells is described. When EA.hy 926 cells were incubated with fluorescently labelled phosphodiester (PO-16) or phosphorothioate (PS-16) oligonucleotides at low, not cytotoxical concentrations, the relative brightness composition of the images of the particular samples was much higher for PS-16 than PO-16 and dependent upon the extracellular concentration and the incubation time. The 3-D reconstructions based on the series of optical sections of the samples, spaced every 1.5 microns, showed the punctuate accumulation of the oligonucleotides and a striking difference in a spatial distribution between PO-16 and PS-16 within the cytoplasm. Even after 24 h incubation of endothelial cells with 2.5 microM of PO-16 and PS-16 oligonucleotides, there was a predominant oligonucleotide localization within the cytoplasm and only traces of oligonucleotides could be seen in the cell nucleus and/or perinuclear organelles.

  15. APeg3: regulation of Peg3 through an evolutionarily conserved ncRNA

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Wesley D.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian APeg3 is an antisense gene that is localized within the 3′-untranslated region of the imprinted gene, Peg3. APeg3 is expressed only in the vasopressinergic neurons of the hypothalamus, thus is predicted to play significant roles in this specific area of the brain. In the current study, we investigate the functions of APeg3 with comparative genomics and cell line-based functional approaches. The transcribed region of APeg3 displays high levels of sequence conservation among placental mammals, but without any obvious open reading frame, suggesting that APeg3 may have been selected as a ncRNA gene during eutherian evolution. This has been further supported by the detection of a conserved local RNA secondary structure within APeg3. RNA secondary structure analyses indicate a single conserved hairpin-loop structure towards the 5′ end of the transcript. The results from cell line-based transfection experiments demonstrate that APeg3 has the potential to down-regulate the transcription and protein levels of Peg3. The observed down-regulation by APeg3 is also somewhat orientation-independent. Overall, these results suggest that APeg3 has evolved as a ncRNA gene and controls the function of its sense gene Peg3 within specific neuronal cells. PMID:24582979

  16. Synthesis and Antisense Properties of Fluoro Cyclohexenyl Nucleic Acid (F-CeNA) – A Nuclease Stable Mimic of 2′-Fluoro RNA

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Punit P.; Yu, Jinghua; Jazayeri, Ali; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Allerson, Charles R; Østergaard, Michael E.; Liu, Fengwu; Herdewijn, Piet; Egli, Martin; Swayze, Eric E.

    2013-01-01

    -CeNA gapmer ASO showed similar RNA affinity but significantly improved activity compared to that of a sequence matched MOE ASO, thus establishing F-CeNA as a useful modification for antisense applications. PMID:22591005

  17. Antisense DNAs as multisite genomic modulators identified by DNA microarray

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yee Sook; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Cheadle, Chris; Neary, Catherine; Becker, Kevin G.; Cho-Chung, Yoon S.

    2001-01-01

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides can selectively block disease-causing genes, and cancer genes have been chosen as potential targets for antisense drugs to treat cancer. However, nonspecific side effects have clouded the true antisense mechanism of action and hampered clinical development of antisense therapeutics. Using DNA microarrays, we have conducted a systematic characterization of gene expression in cells exposed to antisense, either exogenously or endogenously. Here, we show that in a sequence-specific manner, antisense targeted to protein kinase A RIα alters expression of the clusters of coordinately expressed genes at a specific stage of cell growth, differentiation, and activation. The genes that define the proliferation-transformation signature are down-regulated, whereas those that define the differentiation-reverse transformation signature are up-regulated in antisense-treated cancer cells and tumors, but not in host livers. In this differentiation signature, the genes showing the highest induction include genes for the G proteins Rap1 and Cdc42. The expression signature induced by the exogenously supplied antisense oligodeoxynucleotide overlaps strikingly with that induced by endogenous antisense gene overexpression. Defining antisense DNAs on the basis of their effects on global gene expression can lead to identification of clinically relevant antisense therapeutics and can identify which molecular and cellular events might be important in complex biological processes, such as cell growth and differentiation. PMID:11481453

  18. A negative regulation loop of long noncoding RNA HOTAIR and p53 in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Nailiang; Xia, Yongfu; Yin, Rui; Liu, Jinping; Gao, Fuquan

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide, and the 5-year survival rate is still low despite advances in diagnosis and therapeutics. A long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HOX antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) has been revealed to play important roles in NSCLC carcinogenesis but the detailed mechanisms are still unclear. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the regulation between the lncRNA HOTAIR and p53 in the NSCLC patient samples and cell lines. Our results showed that HOTAIR expression was significantly higher in the cancer tissues than that in the adjacent normal tissue, and was negatively correlated with p53 functionality rather than expression. When p53 was overexpressed in A549 cells, the lncRNA HOTAIR expression was downregulated, and the cell proliferation rate and cell invasion capacity decreased as a consequence. We identified two binding sites of p53 on the promoter region of HOTAIR, where the p53 protein would bind to and suppress the HOTAIR mRNA transcription. Inversely, overexpression of lncRNA HOTAIR inhibited the expression of p53 in A549 cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that HOTAIR modified the promoter of p53 and enhanced histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3). These studies identified a specific negative regulation loop of lncRNA HOTAIR and p53 in NSCLC cells, which revealed a new understanding of tumorigenesis in p53 dysfunction NSCLC cells.

  19. The noncoding RNA MALAT1 is a critical regulator of the metastasis phenotype of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gutschner, Tony; Hämmerle, Monika; Eissmann, Moritz; Hsu, Jeff; Kim, Youngsoo; Hung, Gene; Revenko, Alexey; Arun, Gayatri; Stentrup, Marion; Gross, Matthias; Zörnig, Martin; MacLeod, A Robert; Spector, David L; Diederichs, Sven

    2013-02-01

    The long noncoding RNA MALAT1 (metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1), also known as MALAT-1 or NEAT2 (nuclear-enriched abundant transcript 2), is a highly conserved nuclear noncoding RNA (ncRNA) and a predictive marker for metastasis development in lung cancer. To uncover its functional importance, we developed a MALAT1 knockout model in human lung tumor cells by genomically integrating RNA destabilizing elements using zinc finger nucleases. The achieved 1,000-fold MALAT1 silencing provides a unique loss-of-function model. Proposed mechanisms of action include regulation of splicing or gene expression. In lung cancer, MALAT1 does not alter alternative splicing but actively regulates gene expression including a set of metastasis-associated genes. Consequently, MALAT1-deficient cells are impaired in migration and form fewer tumor nodules in a mouse xenograft. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) blocking MALAT1 prevent metastasis formation after tumor implantation. Thus, targeting MALAT1 with ASOs provides a potential therapeutic approach to prevent lung cancer metastasis with this ncRNA serving as both predictive marker and therapeutic target. Finally, regulating gene expression, but not alternative splicing, is the critical function of MALAT1 in lung cancer metastasis. In summary, 10 years after the discovery of the lncRNA MALAT1 as a biomarker for lung cancer metastasis, our loss-of-function model unravels the active function of MALAT1 as a regulator of gene expression governing hallmarks of lung cancer metastasis.

  20. Increased BACE1 mRNA and noncoding BACE1-antisense transcript in sporadic inclusion body myositis muscle fibers – possibly caused by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Nogalska, Anna; Engel, W. King; Askanas, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Sporadic inclusion-body myositis (s-IBM) is the most common muscle disease of older persons. Its muscle-fiber phenotype shares several molecular similarities with Alzheimer-disease (AD) brain, including increased AβPP, accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ), and increased BACE1 protein. Aβ42 is prominently increased in AD brain and within s-IBM fibers, and its oligomers are putatively toxic to both tissues -- accordingly, minimizing Aβ42 production can be a therapeutic objective in both tissues. The pathogenic development of s-IBM is unknown, including the mechanisms of BACE1 protein increase. BACE1 is an enzyme essential for production from AβPP of Aβ42 and Aβ40, which are proposed to be detrimental within s-IBM muscle fibers. Novel noncoding BACE1-antisense (BACE1-AS) was recently shown a)to be increased in AD brain, and b) to increase BACE1 mRNA and BACE1 protein. We studied BACE1-AS and BACE1 transcripts by real-time PCR a) in 10 s-IBM and 10 age-matched normal muscle biopsies; and b) in our established ER-Stress-Human-Muscle-Culture IBM Model, in which we previously demonstrated increased BACE1 protein. Our study demonstrated for the first time that a) in s-IBM biopsies BACE1-AS and BACE1 transcripts were significantly increased, suggesting that their increased expression can be responsible for the increase of BACE1 protein; and b) experimental induction of ER stress significantly increased both BACE1-AS and BACE1 transcripts, suggesting that ER stress can participate in their induction in s-IBM muscle. Accordingly, decreasing BACE1 through a targeted downregulation of its regulatory BACE1-AS, or reducing ER stress, might be therapeutic strategies in s-IBM, assuming that it would not impair any normal cellular functions of BACE1. PMID:20236612

  1. Development of Antisense Drugs for Dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Fumito; Harada-Shiba, Mariko

    2016-09-01

    Abnormal elevation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in plasma as well as dysfunction of anti-atherogenic high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have both been recognized as essential components of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and are classified as dyslipidemia. This review describes the arc of development of antisense oligonucleotides for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Chemically-armed antisense candidates can act on various kinds of transcripts, including mRNA and miRNA, via several different endogenous antisense mechanisms, and have exhibited potent systemic anti-dyslipidemic effects. Here, we present specific cutting-edge technologies have recently been brought into antisense strategies, and describe how they have improved the potency of antisense drugs in regard to pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In addition, we discuss perspectives for the use of armed antisense oligonucleotides as new clinical options for dyslipidemia, in the light of outcomes of recent clinical trials and safety concerns indicated by several clinical and preclinical studies. PMID:27466159

  2. Undetected antisense tRNAs in mitochondrial genomes?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The hypothesis that both mitochondrial (mt) complementary DNA strands of tRNA genes code for tRNAs (sense-antisense coding) is explored. This could explain why mt tRNA mutations are 6.5 times more frequently pathogenic than in other mt sequences. Antisense tRNA expression is plausible because tRNA punctuation signals mt sense RNA maturation: both sense and antisense tRNAs form secondary structures potentially signalling processing. Sense RNA maturation processes by default 11 antisense tRNAs neighbouring sense genes. If antisense tRNAs are expressed, processed antisense tRNAs should have adapted more for translational activity than unprocessed ones. Four tRNA properties are examined: antisense tRNA 5' and 3' end processing by sense RNA maturation and its accuracy, cloverleaf stability and misacylation potential. Results Processed antisense tRNAs align better with standard tRNA sequences with the same cognate than unprocessed antisense tRNAs, suggesting less misacylations. Misacylation increases with cloverleaf fragility and processing inaccuracy. Cloverleaf fragility, misacylation and processing accuracy of antisense tRNAs decrease with genome-wide usage of their predicted cognate amino acid. Conclusions These properties correlate as if they adaptively coevolved for translational activity by some antisense tRNAs, and to avoid such activity by other antisense tRNAs. Analyses also suggest previously unsuspected particularities of aminoacylation specificity in mt tRNAs: combinations of competition between tRNAs on tRNA synthetases with competition between tRNA synthetases on tRNAs determine specificities of tRNA amino acylations. The latter analyses show that alignment methods used to detect tRNA cognates yield relatively robust results, even when they apparently fail to detect the tRNA's cognate amino acid and indicate high misacylation potential. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr Juergen Brosius, Dr Anthony M Poole and Dr Andrei S Rodin (nominated

  3. Unmasking Upstream Gene Expression Regulators with miRNA-corrected mRNA Data.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, Stephanie; Bu, Dengpan; Wang, Jiaqi; Bionaz, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Expressed micro-RNA (miRNA) affects messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance, hindering the accuracy of upstream regulator analysis. Our objective was to provide an algorithm to correct such bias. Large mRNA and miRNA analyses were performed on RNA extracted from bovine liver and mammary tissue. Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%). Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%) and four levels of the magnitude of miRNA effect (ME) on mRNA expression (30%, 50%, 75%, and 83% mRNA reduction), we generated 17 different datasets (including the original dataset). For each dataset, we performed upstream regulator analysis using two bioinformatics tools. We detected an increased effect on the upstream regulator analysis with larger miRNA:mRNA pair bins and higher ME. The miRNA correction allowed identification of several upstream regulators not present in the analysis of the original dataset. Thus, the proposed algorithm improved the prediction of upstream regulators.

  4. Unmasking Upstream Gene Expression Regulators with miRNA-corrected mRNA Data

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Stephanie; Bu, Dengpan; Wang, Jiaqi; Bionaz, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Expressed micro-RNA (miRNA) affects messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance, hindering the accuracy of upstream regulator analysis. Our objective was to provide an algorithm to correct such bias. Large mRNA and miRNA analyses were performed on RNA extracted from bovine liver and mammary tissue. Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%). Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%) and four levels of the magnitude of miRNA effect (ME) on mRNA expression (30%, 50%, 75%, and 83% mRNA reduction), we generated 17 different datasets (including the original dataset). For each dataset, we performed upstream regulator analysis using two bioinformatics tools. We detected an increased effect on the upstream regulator analysis with larger miRNA:mRNA pair bins and higher ME. The miRNA correction allowed identification of several upstream regulators not present in the analysis of the original dataset. Thus, the proposed algorithm improved the prediction of upstream regulators. PMID:27279737

  5. MicroRNA Regulation of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Mark W; Moore, Kathryn J

    2016-02-19

    Atherosclerosis and its attendant clinical complications, such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral artery disease, are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western societies. In response to biochemical and biomechanical stimuli, atherosclerotic lesion formation occurs from the participation of a range of cell types, inflammatory mediators, and shear stress. Over the past decade, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as evolutionarily conserved, noncoding small RNAs that serve as important regulators and fine-tuners of a range of pathophysiological cellular effects and molecular signaling pathways involved in atherosclerosis. Accumulating studies reveal the importance of miRNAs in regulating key signaling and lipid homeostasis pathways that alter the balance of atherosclerotic plaque progression and regression. In this review, we highlight current paradigms of miRNA-mediated effects in atherosclerosis progression and regression. We provide an update on the potential use of miRNAs diagnostically for detecting increasing severity of coronary disease and clinical events. Finally, we provide a perspective on therapeutic opportunities and challenges for miRNA delivery in the field.

  6. MicroRNA-9 and microRNA-326 regulate human dopamine D2 receptor expression, and the microRNA-mediated expression regulation is altered by a genetic variant.

    PubMed

    Shi, Sandra; Leites, Catherine; He, Deli; Schwartz, Daniel; Moy, Winton; Shi, Jianxin; Duan, Jubao

    2014-05-01

    The human dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Most antipsychotic drugs influence dopaminergic transmission through blocking dopamine receptors, primarily DRD2. We report here the post-transcriptional regulation of DRD2 expression by two brain-expressed microRNAs (miRs), miR-326 and miR-9, in an ex vivo mode, and show the relevance of miR-mediated DRD2 expression regulation in human dopaminergic neurons and in developing human brains. Both miRs targeted the 3'-UTR (untranslated region) of DRD2 in NT2 (neuron-committed teratocarcinoma, which endogenously expresses DRD2) and CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cell lines, decreasing luciferase activity measured by a luciferase reporter gene assay. miR-326 overexpression reduced DRD2 mRNA and DRD2 receptor synthesis. Both antisense miR-326 and antisense miR-9 increased DRD2 protein abundance, suggesting an endogenous repression of DRD2 expression by both miRs. Furthermore, a genetic variant (rs1130354) within the DRD2 3'-UTR miR-targeting site interferes with miR-326-mediated repression of DRD2 expression. Finally, co-expression analysis identified an inverse correlation of DRD2 expression with both miR-326 and miR-9 in differentiating dopaminergic neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and in developing human brain regions implicated in schizophrenia. Our study provides empirical evidence suggesting that miR-326 and miR-9 may regulate dopaminergic signaling, and miR-326 and miR-9 may be considered as potential drug targets for the treatment of disorders involving abnormal DRD2 function, such as schizophrenia.

  7. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  8. New methods as alternative or corrective measures for the pitfalls and artifacts of reverse transcription and polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) in cloning chimeric or antisense-accompanied RNA.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chengfu; Liu, Yongming; Yang, Min; Liao, D Joshua

    2013-06-01

    We established new methods for cloning cDNA ends that start with reverse transcription (RT) and soon proceed with the synthesis of the second cDNA strand, avoiding manipulations of fragile RNA. Our 3'-end cloning method does not involve poly-dT primers and polymerase chain reactions (PCR), is low in efficiency but high in fidelity and can clone those RNAs without a poly-A tail. We also established a cDNA protection assay to supersede RNA protection assay. The protected cDNA can be amplified, cloned and sequenced, enhancing sensitivity and fidelity. We report that RT product using gene-specific primer (GSP) cannot be gene- or strand-specific because RNA sample contains endogenous random primers (ERP). The gene-specificity may be improved by adding a linker sequence at the 5'-end of the GSP to prime RT and using the linker as a primer in the ensuing PCR. The strand-specificity may be improved by using strand-specific DNA oligos in our protection assay. The CDK4 mRNA and TSPAN31 mRNA are transcribed from the opposite DNA strands and overlap at their 3' ends. Using this relationship as a model, we found that the overlapped sequence might serve as a primer with its antisense as the template to create a wrong-template extension in RT or PCR. We infer that two unrelated RNAs or cDNAs overlapping at the 5'- or 3'-end might create a spurious chimera in this way, and many chimeras with a homologous sequence may be such artifacts. The ERP and overlapping antisense together set complex pitfalls, which one should be aware of.

  9. Bioinformatic analyses of sense and antisense expression from terminal inverted repeat transposons in Drosophila somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrew W; Steiniger, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding regulation of transposon movement in somatic cells is important as mobile elements can cause detrimental genomic rearrangements. Generally, transposons move via one of 2 mechanisms; retrotransposons utilize an RNA intermediate, therefore copying themselves and amplifying throughout the genome, while terminal inverted repeat transposons (TIR Tns) excise DNA sequences from the genome and integrate into a new location. Our recently published work indicates that retrotransposons in Drosophila tissue culture cells are actively transcribed in the antisense direction. Our data support a model in which convergent transcription of retrotransposons from intra element transcription start sites results in complementary RNAs that hybridize to form substrates for Dicer-2, the endogenous small interfering (esi)RNA generating enzyme. Here, we extend our previous analysis to TIR Tns. In contrast to retrotransposons, our data show that antisense TIR Tn RNAs result from transcription of intronic TIR Tns oriented antisense to their host genes. Also, disproportionately less esiRNAs are generated from TIR transcripts than from retrotransposons and transcription of very few individual TIR Tns could be confirmed. Collectively, these data support a model in which TIR Tns are regulated at the level of Transposase production while retrotransposons are regulated with esiRNA post-transcriptional mechanisms in Drosophila somatic cells. PMID:26986720

  10. The role of RNA structure at 5' untranslated region in microRNA-mediated gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wanjun; Xu, Yuming; Xie, Xueying; Wang, Ting; Ko, Jae-Hong; Zhou, Tong

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the secondary structure of the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of messenger RNA (mRNA) is important for microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene regulation in humans. mRNAs that are targeted by miRNA tend to have a higher degree of local secondary structure in their 5' UTR; however, the general role of the 5' UTR in miRNA-mediated gene regulation remains unknown. We systematically surveyed the secondary structure of 5' UTRs in both plant and animal species and found a universal trend of increased mRNA stability near the 5' cap in mRNAs that are regulated by miRNA in animals, but not in plants. Intra-genome comparison showed that gene expression level, GC content of the 5' UTR, number of miRNA target sites, and 5' UTR length may influence mRNA structure near the 5' cap. Our results suggest that the 5' UTR secondary structure performs multiple functions in regulating post-transcriptional processes. Although the local structure immediately upstream of the start codon is involved in translation initiation, RNA structure near the 5' cap site, rather than the structure of the full-length 5' UTR sequences, plays an important role in miRNA-mediated gene regulation.

  11. The new (dis)order in RNA regulation.

    PubMed

    Järvelin, Aino I; Noerenberg, Marko; Davis, Ilan; Castello, Alfredo

    2016-04-06

    RNA-binding proteins play a key role in the regulation of all aspects of RNA metabolism, from the synthesis of RNA to its decay. Protein-RNA interactions have been thought to be mostly mediated by canonical RNA-binding domains that form stable secondary and tertiary structures. However, a number of pioneering studies over the past decades, together with recent proteome-wide data, have challenged this view, revealing surprising roles for intrinsically disordered protein regions in RNA binding. Here, we discuss how disordered protein regions can mediate protein-RNA interactions, conceptually grouping these regions into RS-rich, RG-rich, and other basic sequences, that can mediate both specific and non-specific interactions with RNA. Disordered regions can also influence RNA metabolism through protein aggregation and hydrogel formation. Importantly, protein-RNA interactions mediated by disordered regions can influence nearly all aspects of co- and post-transcriptional RNA processes and, consequently, their disruption can cause disease. Despite growing interest in disordered protein regions and their roles in RNA biology, their mechanisms of binding, regulation, and physiological consequences remain poorly understood. In the coming years, the study of these unorthodox interactions will yield important insights into RNA regulation in cellular homeostasis and disease.

  12. NAMPT regulates senescence, proliferation, and migration of endothelial progenitor cells through the SIRT1 AS lncRNA/miR-22/SIRT1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ming, Guang-Feng; Wu, Kai; Hu, Kai; Chen, Yao; Xiao, Jian

    2016-09-23

    The importance of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in cardiovascular diseases has been demonstrated by numerous studies. Previous studies have shown that Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) plays a role in EPC development by regulating Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), but the specific mechanism has not yet been elucidated. After stimulating EPCs with NAMPT, expression of SIRT1 and SIRT1 antisense long non-coding RNA (AS lncRNA) was upregulated. Upon transfection of an SIRT1 AS lncRNA overexpression vector into EPCs, SIRT1 expression was upregulated. Upon transfection of a small interfering RNA (siRNA) that targets SIRT1 AS lncRNA along with NAMPT, SIRT1 AS lncRNA was downregulated and NAMPT-induced SIRT1 expression was reduced. We used software analyses and a dual-luciferase reporter assay to demonstrate that microRNA (miR)-22 regulated SIRT1 and SIRT1 AS lncRNA. Our data suggest that SIRT1 AS lncRNA relieves miR-22-induced SIRT1 downregulation by competitively sponging miR-22. By measuring EPC senescence, proliferation, and migration, we found that NAMPT inhibited EPC senescence through an SIRT1 AS lncRNA/miR-22/SIRT1 pathway and promoted EPC proliferation and migration. These findings provide a new theoretical basis for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis (AS) and other cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27569277

  13. Transcriptional regulation of mammalian miRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Schanen, Brian C.; Li, Xiaoman

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are members of a growing family of non-coding transcripts, 21-23 nucleotides long, which regulate a diverse collection of biological processes and various diseases by RNA-mediated gene-silencing mechanisms. While currently many studies focus on defining the regulatory functions of miRNAs, few are directed towards how miRNA genes are themselves transcriptionally regulated. Recent studies of miRNA transcription have elucidated RNA polymerase II as the major polymerase of miRNAs, however, little is known of the structural features of miRNA promoters, especially those of mammalian miRNAs. Here, we review the current literature regarding features conserved among miRNA promoters useful for their detection and the current novel methodologies available to enable researchers to advance our understanding of the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. PMID:20977933

  14. A small RNA controls a protein regulator involved in antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Eyraud, Alex; Tattevin, Pierre; Chabelskaya, Svetlana; Felden, Brice

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Staphylococcus aureus strains that are resistant to glycopeptides has led to alarming scenarios where serious staphylococcal infections cannot be treated. The bacterium expresses many small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that have unknown biological functions for the most part. Here we show that an S. aureus sRNA, SprX (alias RsaOR), shapes bacterial resistance to glycopeptides, the invaluable treatments for Methicillin-resistant staphylococcal infections. Modifying SprX expression levels influences Vancomycin and Teicoplanin glycopeptide resistance. Comparative proteomic studies have identified that SprX specifically downregulates stage V sporulation protein G, SpoVG. SpoVG is produced from the yabJ-spoVG operon and contributes to S. aureus glycopeptide resistance. SprX negatively regulates SpoVG expression by direct antisense pairings at the internal translation initiation signals of the second operon gene, without modifying bicistronic mRNA expression levels or affecting YabJ translation. The SprX and yabJ-spoVG mRNA domains involved in the interaction have been identified, highlighting the importance of a CU-rich loop of SprX in the control of SpoVG expression. We have shown that SpoVG might not be the unique SprX target involved in the glycopeptide resistance and demonstrated that the regulation of glycopeptide sensitivity involves the CU-rich domain of SprX. Here we report the case of a sRNA influencing antibiotic resistance of a major human pathogen. PMID:24557948

  15. Light-Triggered RNA Annealing by an RNA Chaperone.

    PubMed

    Panja, Subrata; Paul, Rakesh; Greenberg, Marc M; Woodson, Sarah A

    2015-06-15

    Non-coding antisense RNAs regulate bacterial genes in response to nutrition or environmental stress, and can be engineered for artificial gene control. The RNA chaperone Hfq accelerates antisense pairing between non-coding RNAs and their mRNA targets, by a mechanism still unknown. We used a photocaged guanosine derivative in an RNA oligonucleotide to temporally control Hfq catalyzed annealing. Using a fluorescent molecular beacon as a reporter, we observed RNA duplex formation within 15 s following irradiation (3 s) of photocaged RNA complexed with Hfq. The results showed that the Hfq chaperone directly stabilizes the initiation of RNA base pairs, and suggests a strategy for light-activated control of gene expression by non-coding RNAs.

  16. MicroRNA-339 and microRNA-556 regulate Klotho expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mehi, Stephen J; Maltare, Astha; Abraham, Carmela R; King, Gwendalyn D

    2014-02-01

    Klotho is an anti-aging protein with direct effects on life-span in mice. Klotho functions to regulate pathways classically associated with longevity including insulin/IGF1 and Wnt signaling. Decreased Klotho protein expression is observed throughout the body during the normal aging process. While increased methylation of the Klotho promoter is reported, other epigenetic mechanisms could contribute to age-related downregulation of Klotho expression, including microRNA-mediated regulation. Following in silico identification of potential microRNA binding sites within the Klotho 3' untranslated region, reporter assays reveal regulation by microRNA-339, microRNA-556, and, to a lesser extent, microRNA-10 and microRNA-199. MicroRNA-339 and microRNA-556 were further found to directly decrease Klotho protein expression indicating that, if upregulated in aging tissue, these microRNA could play a role in age-related downregulation of Klotho messenger RNA. These microRNAs are differentially regulated in cancer cells compared to normal cells and may imply a role for microRNA-mediated regulation of Klotho in cancer. PMID:23818104

  17. SUMOylation of TARBP2 regulates miRNA/siRNA efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Zhu, Changhong; Huang, Jian; Zhao, Xian; Deng, Rong; Zhang, Hailong; Dou, Jinzhuo; Chen, Qin; Xu, Ming; Yuan, Haihua; Wang, Yanli; Yu, Jianxiu

    2015-01-01

    Small RNA-induced gene silencing is essential for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression; however, it remains unclear how miRNA/siRNA efficiency is regulated. Here we show that TARBP2 is SUMOylated at K52, which can be enhanced by its phosphorylation. This modification can stabilize TARBP2 via repressing its K(48)-linked ubiquitination. We find that TARBP2 SUMOylation does not influence the overall production of mature miRNAs, but it regulates miRNA/siRNA efficiency. SUMOylated TARBP2 recruits Ago2 to constitute the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)-loading complex (RLC), and simultaneously promotes more pre-miRNAs to load into the RLC. Consequently, Ago2 is stabilized and miRNAs/siRNAs bound by TARBP2/Dicer is effectively transferred to Ago2. Thus, these processes lead to the formation of the effective RISC for RNA interference (RNAi). Collectively, our data suggest that SUMOylation of TARBP2 is required for regulating miRNA/siRNA efficiency, which is a general mechanism of miRNA/siRNA regulation. PMID:26582366

  18. Diversification of antisense research and development: review of the Ringberg meeting, April 1994. Mechanisms of antisense-mediated gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, J W; Nellen, W

    1994-01-01

    Antisense technology has established itself as a new and vibrant entrant into the discipline of molecular biology. As such, it has contributed to basic research by providing tools for the molecular dissection of diverse experimental systems. In applied research, antisense approaches have contributed to development of agricultural products (D. Grierson) now coming to market and to the design of a number of oligonucleotide drugs, now in clinical trials. However, few activities to date have focused on the study of antisense per se. Further, few conceptual perspectives have regarded antisense as an integral part of cellular function and genetic regulation. The Ringberg conference showcased a number of systems that would seem unrelated if we regard antisense as a superficial tool to be imposed on nature. On the other hand, if we want to begin to regard antisense as a field of its own with deeper biological and genetic rationales, the Ringberg meeting provided much tantalizing evidence to do so.

  19. A Universal Positive-Negative Selection System for Gene Targeting in Plants Combining an Antibiotic Resistance Gene and Its Antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Nonaka, Satoko; Osakabe, Keishi; Saika, Hiroaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-09-01

    Gene targeting (GT) is a useful technology for accurate genome engineering in plants. A reproducible approach based on a positive-negative selection system using hygromycin resistance and the diphtheria toxin A subunit gene as positive and negative selection markers, respectively, is now available. However, to date, this selection system has been applied exclusively in rice (Oryza sativa). To establish a universally applicable positive-negative GT system in plants, we designed a selection system using a combination of neomycin phosphotransferaseII (nptII) and an antisense nptII construct. The concomitant transcription of both sense and antisense nptII suppresses significantly the level of expression of the sense nptII gene, and transgenic calli and plants become sensitive to the antibiotic geneticin. In addition, we were able to utilize the sense nptII gene as a positive selection marker and the antisense nptII construct as a negative selection marker for knockout of the endogenous rice genes Waxy and 33-kD globulin through GT, although negative selection with this system is relatively less efficient compared with diphtheria toxin A subunit. The approach developed here, with some additional improvements, could be applied as a universal selection system for the enrichment of GT cells in several plant species. PMID:26143254

  20. Identifying miRNA/mRNA negative regulation pairs in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xile; Xu, Xiangming; Wang, Jinhai; Lin, Jianjiang; Chen, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in the molecular biology of Colorectal cancer (CRC), novel approaches are still required to uncover the detailed molecular mechanism of CRC. We aim to explore the potential negatively regulated miRNA-mRNA pairs and investigate their regulatory roles so as to elaborate the potential roles of the critical proteins in the signaling pathways enriched by the differential target genes of negatively regulated miRNA in CRC. Firstly, the differential miRNA-mRNA pairs were selected, followed by pairs of miRNA and their target genes. The obtained relationships were subjected to do functional enrichment analysis and those enriched in CRC pathways were chose to further construct a protein interaction network. Finally, we analyzed the regulatory roles of these relationships and constructed a regulatory network of negatively regulated miRNA and mRNA relationships. A total of 372 pairs of miRNA-mRNA were found and 108 target genes of miRNA were obtained. Three miRNAs including hsa-mir-23b, hsa-mir-365-1 and hsa-mir-365-2 showed significant influence on prognosis of CRC patients. To conclude, the miRNA/mRNA deregulations pairs identified in this study have high potentials to be further applied in diagnosis and treatment of CRC. PMID:26269151

  1. Circular RNA Expression: Its Potential Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Salzman, Julia

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, a new feature of eukaryotic gene expression emerged: ubiquitous expression of circular RNA (circRNA) from genes traditionally thought to express messenger or linear noncoding (nc)RNA only. CircRNAs are covalently closed, circular RNA molecules that typically comprise exonic sequences and are spliced at canonical splice sites. This feature of gene expression was first recognized in humans and mouse, but it quickly emerged that it was common across essentially all eukaryotes studied by molecular biologists. CircRNA abundance, and even which alternatively spliced circRNA isoforms are expressed, varies by cell type and can exceed the abundance of the traditional linear mRNA or ncRNA transcript. CircRNAs are enriched in the brain and increase in abundance during fetal development. Together, these features raise fundamental questions regarding the regulation of circRNA in cis and in trans, and its function. PMID:27050930

  2. The Pokeweed Leaf mRNA Transcriptome and Its Regulation by Jasmonic Acid.

    PubMed

    Neller, Kira C M; Klenov, Alexander; Hudak, Katalin A

    2016-01-01

    The American pokeweed plant, Phytolacca americana, is recognized for synthesizing pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) that inhibits the replication of several plant and animal viruses. The plant is also a heavy metal accumulator with applications in soil remediation. However, little is known about pokeweed stress responses, as large-scale sequencing projects have not been performed for this species. Here, we sequenced the mRNA transcriptome of pokeweed in the presence and absence of jasmonic acid (JA), a hormone mediating plant defense. Trinity-based de novo assembly of mRNA from leaf tissue and BLASTx homology searches against public sequence databases resulted in the annotation of 59 096 transcripts. Differential expression analysis identified JA-responsive genes that may be involved in defense against pathogen infection and herbivory. We confirmed the existence of several PAP isoforms and cloned a potentially novel isoform of PAP. Expression analysis indicated that PAP isoforms are differentially responsive to JA, perhaps indicating specialized roles within the plant. Finally, we identified 52 305 natural antisense transcript pairs, four of which comprised PAP isoforms, suggesting a novel form of RIP gene regulation. This transcriptome-wide study of a Phytolaccaceae family member provides a source of new genes that may be involved in stress tolerance in this plant. The sequences generated in our study have been deposited in the SRA database under project # SRP069141.

  3. The Pokeweed Leaf mRNA Transcriptome and Its Regulation by Jasmonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Neller, Kira C. M.; Klenov, Alexander; Hudak, Katalin A.

    2016-01-01

    The American pokeweed plant, Phytolacca americana, is recognized for synthesizing pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) that inhibits the replication of several plant and animal viruses. The plant is also a heavy metal accumulator with applications in soil remediation. However, little is known about pokeweed stress responses, as large-scale sequencing projects have not been performed for this species. Here, we sequenced the mRNA transcriptome of pokeweed in the presence and absence of jasmonic acid (JA), a hormone mediating plant defense. Trinity-based de novo assembly of mRNA from leaf tissue and BLASTx homology searches against public sequence databases resulted in the annotation of 59 096 transcripts. Differential expression analysis identified JA-responsive genes that may be involved in defense against pathogen infection and herbivory. We confirmed the existence of several PAP isoforms and cloned a potentially novel isoform of PAP. Expression analysis indicated that PAP isoforms are differentially responsive to JA, perhaps indicating specialized roles within the plant. Finally, we identified 52 305 natural antisense transcript pairs, four of which comprised PAP isoforms, suggesting a novel form of RIP gene regulation. This transcriptome-wide study of a Phytolaccaceae family member provides a source of new genes that may be involved in stress tolerance in this plant. The sequences generated in our study have been deposited in the SRA database under project # SRP069141. PMID:27014307

  4. Splicing of a non-coding antisense transcript controls LEF1 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, Manuel; Aparicio-Prat, Estel; Mazzolini, Rocco; Millanes-Romero, Alba; Massó, Pere; Jenner, Richard G.; Díaz, Víctor M.; Peiró, Sandra; de Herreros, Antonio García

    2015-01-01

    In this report we have analyzed the role of antisense transcription in the control of LEF1 transcription factor expression. A natural antisense transcript (NAT) is transcribed from a promoter present in the first intron of LEF1 gene and undergoes splicing in mesenchymal cells. Although this locus is silent in epithelial cells, and neither NAT transcript nor LEF1 mRNA are expressed, in cell lines with an intermediate epithelial-mesenchymal phenotype presenting low LEF1 expression, the NAT is synthesized and remains unprocessed. Contrarily to the spliced NAT, this unspliced NAT down-regulates the main LEF1 promoter activity and attenuates LEF1 mRNA transcription. Unspliced LEF1 NAT interacts with LEF1 promoter and facilitates PRC2 binding to the LEF1 promoter and trimethylation of lysine 27 in histone 3. Expression of the spliced form of LEF1 NAT in trans prevents the action of unspliced NAT by competing for interaction with the promoter. Thus, these results indicate that LEF1 gene expression is attenuated by an antisense non-coding RNA and that this NAT function is regulated by the balance between its spliced and unspliced forms. PMID:25990740

  5. Antisense therapeutics in oncology: current status

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Rehman, Zia ur; Muntane, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing progress in translational oncology and tremendous breakthroughs have been made as evidenced by preclinical and clinical trials. Data obtained from high-throughput technologies are deepening our understanding about the molecular and gene network in cancer cells and rapidly emerging in vitro and in vivo evidence is highlighting the role of antisense agents as specific inhibitors of the expression of target genes, thus modulating the response of cancer cells to different therapeutic strategies. Much information is continuously being added into various facets of molecular oncology and it is now understood that overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenes, oncogenic microRNAs (miRNA), and fusion proteins make cancer cells difficult to target. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotides has remained a challenge and technological developments have helped in overcoming hurdles by improving the ability to penetrate cells, effective and targeted binding to gene sequences, and downregulation of target gene function. Different delivery systems, including stable nucleic acid lipid particles, have shown potential in enhancing the delivery of cargo to the target site. In this review, we attempt to summarize the current progress in the development of antisense therapeutics and their potential in medical research. We partition this multicomponent review into introductory aspects about recent breakthroughs in antisense therapeutics. We also discuss how antisense therapeutics have shown potential in resensitizing resistant cancer cells to apoptosis by targeted inhibition of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenic miRNAs, and BCR-ABL. PMID:25395862

  6. Is the Efficiency of RNA Silencing Evolutionarily Regulated?

    PubMed Central

    Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2016-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression in a sequence-specific manner. Genes with partial complementarity to siRNA/miRNA sequences in their 3′-untranslated regions (UTRs) are suppressed by a mechanism referred to as the siRNA off-target effect or miRNA-mediated RNA silencing. However, the determinants of such RNA silencing efficiency are poorly understood. Previously, I and co-workers reported that the efficiency of RNA silencing is strongly correlated with the thermodynamic stability of base pairing in the duplex formed within an siRNA/miRNA and between the seed region and its target mRNA. In this review, I first summarize our previous studies that identified the thermodynamic parameter to estimate the silencing efficiency using the calculated base pairing stability: siRNAs downregulate the expression of off-target genes depending on the stability of binding between the siRNA seed region (nucleotides 2–8) and off-target mRNAs, and miRNAs downregulate target mRNA expression depending on the stability of the duplex formed between the 5′ terminus of the miRNA and its target mRNA. I further discuss the possibility that such thermodynamic features of silencing efficiency may have arisen during evolution with increasing body temperature in various organisms. PMID:27187367

  7. Simian Varicella Virus Expresses a Latency-Associated Transcript That Is Antisense to Open Reading Frame 61 (ICP0) mRNA in Neural Ganglia of Latently Infected Monkeys▿

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Yang; Davis, Kara A.; Traina-Dorge, Vicki; Gray, Wayne L.

    2007-01-01

    Simian varicella virus (SVV) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) are closely related alphaherpesviruses that cause varicella (chickenpox) in nonhuman primates and humans, respectively. After resolution of the primary disease, SVV and VZV establish latent infection of neural ganglia and may later reactivate to cause a secondary disease (herpes zoster). This study investigated SVV gene expression in neural ganglia derived from latently infected vervet monkeys. SVV transcripts were detected in neural ganglia, but not in liver or lung tissues, of latently infected animals. A transcript mapping to open reading frame (ORF) 61 (herpes simplex virus type 1 [HSV-1] ICP0 homolog) was consistently detected in latently infected trigeminal, cervical, and lumbar ganglia by reverse transcriptase PCR. Further analysis confirmed that this SVV latency-associated transcript (LAT) was oriented antisense to the gene 61 mRNA. SVV ORF 21 transcripts were also detected in 42% of neural ganglia during latency. In contrast, SVV ORF 28, 29, 31, 62, and 63 transcripts were not detected in ganglia, liver, or lung tissues of latently infected animals. The results demonstrate that viral gene expression is limited during SVV latency and that a LAT antisense to an ICP0 homolog is expressed. In this regard, SVV gene expression during latency is similar to that of HSV-1 and other neurotropic animal alphaherpesviruses but differs from that reported for VZV. PMID:17507490

  8. N6-methyladenosine-dependent RNA structural switches regulate RNA-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nian; Dai, Qing; Zheng, Guanqun; He, Chuan; Parisien, Marc; Pan, Tao

    2015-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins control many aspects of cellular biology through binding single-stranded RNA binding motifs (RBM)1-3. However, RBMs can be buried within their local RNA structures4-7, thus inhibiting RNA-protein interactions. N6-methyladenosine (m6A), the most abundant and dynamic internal modification in eukaryotic messenger RNA8-19, can be selectively recognized by the YTHDF2 protein to affect the stability of cytoplasmic mRNAs15, but how m6A achieves wide-ranging physiological significance needs further exploration. Here we show that m6A controls the RNA-structure-dependent accessibility of RBMs to affect RNA-protein interactions for biological regulation; we term this mechanism “m6A-switch”. We found that m6A alters the local structure in mRNA and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) to facilitate binding of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNP C), an abundant nuclear RNA-binding protein responsible for pre-mRNA processing20-24. Combining PAR-CLIP and m6A/MeRIP approaches enabled us to identify 39,060 m6A-switches among hnRNP C binding sites; and global m6A reduction decreased hnRNP C binding at 2,798 high confidence m6A-switches. We determined that these m6A-switch-regulated hnRNP C binding activities affect the abundance as well as alternative splicing of target mRNAs, demonstrating the regulatory role of m6A-switches on gene expression and RNA maturation. Our results illustrate how RNA-binding proteins gain regulated access to their RBMs through m6A-dependent RNA structural remodeling, and provide a new direction for investigating RNA-modification-coded cellular biology. PMID:25719671

  9. Sense-, antisense- and RNAi-4CL1 regulate soluble phenolic acids, cell wall components and growth in transgenic Populus tomentosa Carr.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaoming; Xie, Jin; Zhao, Yanling; Lu, Hai; Liu, Shichang; Qu, Long; Li, Jianmei; Gai, Ying; Jiang, Xiangning

    2013-04-01

    Regulation of lignin biosynthesis affects plant growth and wood properties. Transgenic downregulation of 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL, EC 6.2.1.12) may reduce lignin content in cell walls, which could improve the qualities of pulp in papermaking and increase the efficiency of bioenergy applications. To determine the effects of Ptc4CL1 on lignin biosynthesis and plant growth, Populus tomentosa Carr. was transformed using sense-, antisense-, and RNAi-4CL1 genes. The growth properties, gene expression, enzyme activity, lignin content and composition and content of soluble phenolic acids were investigated in 1-year-old field-grown transgenic poplar trees. Transgenic up- and down-regulation of 4CL1 altered lignin content and composition in transgenic poplars, but there were no negative effects on the growth of transgenic plants. In addition, the severe changes in auxin observed in transgenic lines led to significantly enhanced growth performance. Furthermore, lignin content was tightly correlated with the alteration of 4CL1 enzymatic activity, which was correlated with 4CL1 gene expression. A significant increase in S units in lignin with a slight increase in sinapic acid was observed in 4CL1 down-regulated transgenic poplars. These results suggest that 4CL1 is a traffic control gene in monolignol biosynthesis and confirm that 4CL1 activity has been implicated with sinapoyl activation. Finally, our data demonstrate that there is cross-correlation among 4CL1 gene expression, 4CL1 enzyme activity, soluble phenolic acid, lignin monomer biosynthesis, and lignin content. PMID:23434928

  10. A negative regulation loop of long noncoding RNA HOTAIR and p53 in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Nailiang; Xia, Yongfu; Yin, Rui; Liu, Jinping; Gao, Fuquan

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide, and the 5-year survival rate is still low despite advances in diagnosis and therapeutics. A long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HOX antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) has been revealed to play important roles in NSCLC carcinogenesis but the detailed mechanisms are still unclear. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the regulation between the lncRNA HOTAIR and p53 in the NSCLC patient samples and cell lines. Our results showed that HOTAIR expression was significantly higher in the cancer tissues than that in the adjacent normal tissue, and was negatively correlated with p53 functionality rather than expression. When p53 was overexpressed in A549 cells, the lncRNA HOTAIR expression was downregulated, and the cell proliferation rate and cell invasion capacity decreased as a consequence. We identified two binding sites of p53 on the promoter region of HOTAIR, where the p53 protein would bind to and suppress the HOTAIR mRNA transcription. Inversely, overexpression of lncRNA HOTAIR inhibited the expression of p53 in A549 cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that HOTAIR modified the promoter of p53 and enhanced histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3). These studies identified a specific negative regulation loop of lncRNA HOTAIR and p53 in NSCLC cells, which revealed a new understanding of tumorigenesis in p53 dysfunction NSCLC cells. PMID:27695348

  11. Rapid and dynamic transcriptome regulation by RNA editing and RNA modifications.

    PubMed

    Licht, Konstantin; Jantsch, Michael F

    2016-04-11

    Advances in next-generation sequencing and mass spectrometry have revealed widespread messenger RNA modifications and RNA editing, with dramatic effects on mammalian transcriptomes. Factors introducing, deleting, or interpreting specific modifications have been identified, and analogous with epigenetic terminology, have been designated "writers," "erasers," and "readers." Such modifications in the transcriptome are referred to as epitranscriptomic changes and represent a fascinating new layer of gene expression regulation that has only recently been appreciated. Here, we outline how RNA editing and RNA modification can rapidly affect gene expression, making both processes as well suited to respond to cellular stress and to regulate the transcriptome during development or circadian periods.

  12. Rapid and dynamic transcriptome regulation by RNA editing and RNA modifications.

    PubMed

    Licht, Konstantin; Jantsch, Michael F

    2016-04-11

    Advances in next-generation sequencing and mass spectrometry have revealed widespread messenger RNA modifications and RNA editing, with dramatic effects on mammalian transcriptomes. Factors introducing, deleting, or interpreting specific modifications have been identified, and analogous with epigenetic terminology, have been designated "writers," "erasers," and "readers." Such modifications in the transcriptome are referred to as epitranscriptomic changes and represent a fascinating new layer of gene expression regulation that has only recently been appreciated. Here, we outline how RNA editing and RNA modification can rapidly affect gene expression, making both processes as well suited to respond to cellular stress and to regulate the transcriptome during development or circadian periods. PMID:27044895

  13. MicroRNA regulation of lymphocyte tolerance and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Laura J; Ansel, K Mark

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the cell-intrinsic cues that permit self-reactivity in lymphocytes, and therefore autoimmunity, requires an understanding of the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression in these cells. In this Review, we address seminal and recent research on microRNA (miRNA) regulation of central and peripheral tolerance. Human and mouse studies demonstrate that the PI3K pathway is a critical point of miRNA regulation of immune cell development and function that affects the development of autoimmunity. We also discuss how miRNA expression profiling in human autoimmune diseases has inspired mechanistic studies of miRNA function in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, type 1 diabetes, and asthma. PMID:26030228

  14. Autoregulatory loop of Msx1 expression involving its antisense transcripts.

    PubMed

    Petit, Stéphane; Meary, Fleur; Pibouin, Laurence; Jeanny, Jean-Claude; Fernandes, Isabelle; Poliard, Anne; Hotton, Dominique; Berdal, Ariane; Babajko, Sylvie

    2009-08-01

    The Msx1 homeogene plays an important role in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions leading organogenesis. Msx1 gene is submitted to bidirectional transcription generating a long non-coding antisense (AS) RNA potentially involved in Msx1 expression regulation. RT-Q-PCR and RNA-FISH studies indicated that transient overexpression of the Msx1 AS transcript in 705IC5 mouse odontoblasts decreased the abundance of endogenous Msx1 S mRNA at the post-transcriptional level. Conversely, Msx1 overexpression increased the AS RNA level probably by activating AS transcription. In vivo mapping by RT-PCR evidenced both Msx1 RNAs in all adult mouse tissues tested raising the issue of Msx1 function during adulthood. The expression patterns of the two RNAs were similar, confirming the tight S/AS relationship. In particular, both Msx1 mRNAs and Msx1 protein were similarly distributed in eyes, and were found in regions with a common ectodermic origin and in cells potentially involved in regeneration. In conclusion, we report that Msx1 S RNA is negatively controlled by its AS RNA at a post-transcriptional level, and that the AS RNA is retrocontrolled positively by Msx1. The tight link between Msx1 S and AS RNAs constitutes a regulatory loop resulting in a fine-tuned expression of Msx1 which appears to be significant for adult homeostasis.

  15. Chemical modification study of antisense gapmers.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Robert; Sciabola, Simone; Salatto, Christopher; Weng, Yan; Moshinsky, Debra; Little, Jeremy; Walters, Evan; Kreeger, John; DiMattia, Debra; Chen, Tracy; Clark, Tracey; Liu, Mei; Qian, Jessie; Roy, Marc; Dullea, Robert

    2012-10-01

    A series of insertion patterns for chemically modified nucleotides [2'-O-methyl (2'-OMe), 2'-fluoro (2'-F), methoxyethyl (MOE), locked nucleic acid (LNA), and G-Clamp] within antisense gapmers is studied in vitro and in vivo in the context of the glucocorticoid receptor. Correlation between lipid transfection and unassisted (gymnotic--using no transfection agent) in vitro assays is seen to be dependent on the chemical modification, with the in vivo results corresponding to the unassisted assay in vitro. While in vitro mRNA knockdown assays are typically reasonable predictors of in vivo results, G-Clamp modified antisense oligonucleotides have poor in vivo mRNA knockdown as compared to transfected cell based assays. For LNA gapmers, knockdown is seen to be highly sensitive to the length of the antisense and number of LNA insertions, with longer 5LNA-10DNA-5LNA compounds giving less activity than 3LNA-10DNA-3LNA derivatives. Additionally, the degree of hepatoxicity for antisense gapmers with identical sequences was seen to vary widely with only subtle changes in the chemical modification pattern. While the optimization of knockdown and hepatic effects remains a sequence specific exercise, general trends emerge around preferred physical properties and modification patterns.

  16. Theoretical studies on sRNA-mediated regulation in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xiao-Xue; Xu, Liu-Fang; Shi, Hua-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Small RNA(sRNA)-mediated post-transcriptional regulation differs from protein-mediated regulation. Through base-pairing, sRNA can regulate the target mRNA in a catalytic or stoichiometric manner. Some theoretical models were built for comparison of the protein-mediated and sRNA-mediated modes in the steady-state behaviors and noise properties. Many experiments demonstrated that a single sRNA can regulate several mRNAs, which causes crosstalk between the targets. Here, we focus on some models in which two target mRNAs are silenced by the same sRNA to discuss their crosstalk features. Additionally, the sequence-function relationship of sRNA and its role in the kinetic process of base-pairing have been highlighted in model building. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB834100), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11121403 and 11274320), the Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Grant No. Y4KF171CJ1), the National Natural Science Foundation for Young Scholar of China (Grant No. 11304115), and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2013M541282).

  17. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta 1) is an autocrine positive regulator of colon carcinoma U9 cells in vivo as shown by transfection of a TGF beta 1 antisense expression plasmid.

    PubMed

    Huang, F; Newman, E; Theodorescu, D; Kerbel, R S; Friedman, E

    1995-12-01

    A transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF beta1) antisense expression plasmid under constitutive control of the Rous sarcoma virus promoter was introduced into the highly tumorigenic and invasive colon carcinoma U9A cell line, which uses its autocrine TGF beta1 as a growth-stimulating factor. Stable transfectants were infrequent, and only the K6 transfectant exhibited 39 and 33%, respectively, of the levels of TGF beta1 mRNA and active, secreted TGF beta1 protein of the parental line. K6 exhibited no change in TGF beta2 expression, and TGF beta3 expression was not detected in either parental or transfectant cells. Compared to the parental line, the K6 antisense transfectant exhibited a 3-fold increase in lag time in anchorage-dependent colony formation. The parental line was 44 times as invasive through a collagen l-coated polycarbonate membrane in vitro as K6 cells and, after s.c. injection at low-cell inocula, U9A cells induced tumors 75 times as large in vivo as did the K6 antisense transfectant. The decreases in in vitro invasion and anchorage-dependent colony formation seen in K6 cells were largely reversed by the addition of TGF beta1. Tumors that did arise from the K6 antisense transfectant cells had lost antisense TGF beta1 expression and expressed the same TGF beta1 mRNA levels as controls. U9A cells were more metastatic to the liver after intrasplenic injection than K6 cells. These findings demonstrate a role for autocrine TGE beta1 in colon cancer tumorigenicity and invasion. They also show that a relatively small decrease in TGF beta1 levels was enough to markedly decrease colon carcinoma cell aggressiveness. This is not unprecedented, as we had found in an earlier study that a small, 2-4-fold increase in TGF beta1 protein levels in human colon cancers correlated with disease progression to metastases (E. Friedman et al., Cancer Epidemiol, Biomarkers & Prev., 4:549-554, 1995).

  18. PCSK9 LNA antisense oligonucleotides induce sustained reduction of LDL cholesterol in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Marie W; Elmén, Joacim; Fisker, Niels; Hansen, Henrik F; Persson, Robert; Møller, Marianne R; Rosenbohm, Christoph; Ørum, Henrik; Straarup, Ellen M; Koch, Troels

    2012-02-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) has emerged as a therapeutic target for the reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). PCSK9 increases the degradation of the LDL receptor, resulting in high LDL-C in individuals with high PCSK9 activity. Here, we show that two locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotides targeting PCSK9 produce sustained reduction of LDL-C in nonhuman primates after a loading dose (20 mg/kg) and four weekly maintenance doses (5 mg/kg). PCSK9 messenger RNA (mRNA) and serum PCSK9 protein were reduced by 85% which resulted in a 50% reduction in circulating LDL-C. Serum total cholesterol (TC) levels were reduced to the same extent as LDL-C with no reduction in high-density lipoprotein levels, demonstrating a specific pharmacological effect on LDL-C. The reduction in hepatic PCSK9 mRNA correlated with liver LNA oligonucleotide content. This verified that anti-PCSK9 LNA oligonucleotides regulated LDL-C through an antisense mechanism. The compounds were well tolerated with no observed effects on toxicological parameters (liver and kidney histology, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, urea, and creatinine). The pharmacologic evidence and initial safety profile of the compounds used in this study indicate that LNA antisense oligonucleotides targeting PCSK9 provide a viable therapeutic strategy and are potential complements to statins in managing high LDL-C.

  19. RNA exosome-regulated long non-coding RNA transcription controls super-enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Wang, Jiguang; Rothschild, Gerson; Lim, Junghyun; Kazadi, David; Sun, Jianbo; Federation, Alexander; Chao, Jaime; Elliott, Oliver; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Economides, Aris N; Bradner, James E; Rabadan, Raul; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-05-01

    We have ablated the cellular RNA degradation machinery in differentiated B cells and pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by conditional mutagenesis of core (Exosc3) and nuclear RNase (Exosc10) components of RNA exosome and identified a vast number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) with emergent functionality. Unexpectedly, eRNA-expressing regions accumulate R-loop structures upon RNA exosome ablation, thus demonstrating the role of RNA exosome in resolving deleterious DNA/RNA hybrids arising from active enhancers. We have uncovered a distal divergent eRNA-expressing element (lncRNA-CSR) engaged in long-range DNA interactions and regulating IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer function. CRISPR-Cas9-mediated ablation of lncRNA-CSR transcription decreases its chromosomal looping-mediated association with the IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer and leads to decreased class switch recombination efficiency. We propose that the RNA exosome protects divergently transcribed lncRNA expressing enhancers by resolving deleterious transcription-coupled secondary DNA structures, while also regulating long-range super-enhancer chromosomal interactions important for cellular function.

  20. Development of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stepkowski, S M

    2000-06-01

    Over last ten years antisense technology has been improved to provide powerful tools to selectively inhibit production of different mRNAs. This technology has been applied in transplantation to prolong the survival of organ allografts and to prevent development of ischemic/reperfusion injury in grafts. The present review describes technological progress in chemical modifications from antisense phosphodiester oligonucleotides to phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and the most advanced chimeric oligonucleotides with methoxyethyl groups attached at both ends or at one end of the oligonucleotide. Results indicate that phosphorothioate oligonucleotides, designed to block intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), extended the survival of heart and kidney allografts when administered to donors or recipients. Combination of ICAM-1 antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide and cyclosporine (CsA) produced a potent synergistic interaction on allograft survival in comparison with each drug alone. The same ICAM-1 phosphorothioate oligonucleotide used for perfusion of kidney grafts prevented development of ischemic/reperfusion injury. We also compared the effect of c-raf mRNA inhibition on heart allograft survival by phosphorothioate oligonucleotide or phosphorothioate/methoxyethyl oligonucleotide used alone or in combination with CsA or sirolimus (SRL). The results documented that addition of methoxyethyl modifications at both ends or at one end of oligonucleotides significantly improved the in vivo antisense activity. Combined therapy with c-raf antisense phosphorothioate/methoxyethyl oligonucleotide and SRL synergistically extended the survival of heart allografts. Thus, antisense technology may provide not only tools to examine the effects of selective inhibition of different molecules involved in allograft rejection but also act as potential therapeutic agents.

  1. Regulation by c-Myc of ncRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Kenneth, Niall S; White, Robert J

    2009-02-01

    Deregulated activity of the proto-oncogene product c-Myc is instrumental in promoting many human cancers. As it is a transcription factor, priority has been given to identifying the genes that it regulates. Until recently, all the attention was focused on protein-encoding genes. It is now clear, however, that c-Myc also controls the production of many non-coding (nc) RNAs, including tRNA, rRNA and miRNAs. This involves it regulating the transcriptional activity of three different RNA polymerases. These ncRNAs are likely to contribute substantially to the complex biology and pathology that is associated with c-Myc.

  2. Regulation of miRNA Processing and miRNA Mediated Gene Repression in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bajan, Sarah; Hutvagner, Gyorgy

    2014-01-01

    The majority of human protein-coding genes are predicted to be targets of miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. The widespread influence of miRNAs is illustrated by their essential roles in all biological processes. Regulated miRNA expression is essential for maintaining cellular differentiation; therefore alterations in miRNA expression patterns are associated with several diseases, including various cancers. High-throughput sequencing technologies revealed low level expressing miRNA isoforms, termed isomiRs. IsomiRs may differ in sequence, length, target preference and expression patterns from their parental miRNA and can arise from differences in miRNA biosynthesis, RNA editing, or SNPs inherent to the miRNA gene. The association between isomiR expression and disease progression is largely unknown. Misregulated miRNA expression is thought to contribute to the formation and/or progression of cancer. However, due to the diversity of targeted transcripts, miRNAs can function as both tumor-suppressor genes and oncogenes as defined by cellular context. Despite this, miRNA profiling studies concluded that the differential expression of particular miRNAs in diseased tissue could aid the diagnosis and treatment of some cancers. PMID:25069508

  3. Selection of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides against glutathione S-transferase Mu.

    PubMed Central

    't Hoen, Peter A C; Out, Ruud; Commandeur, Jan N M; Vermeulen, Nico P E; van Batenburg, F H D; Manoharan, Muthiah; van Berkel, Theo J C; Biessen, Erik A L; Bijsterbosch, Martin K

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify functional antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) against the rat glutathione S-transferase Mu (GSTM) isoforms, GSTM1 and GSTM2. These antisense ODNs would enable the study of the physiological consequences of GSTM deficiency. Because it has been suggested that the effectiveness of antisense ODNs is dependent on the secondary mRNA structures of their target sites, we made mRNA secondary structure predictions with two software packages, Mfold and STAR. The two programs produced only marginally similar structures, which can probably be attributed to differences in the algorithms used. The effectiveness of a set of 18 antisense ODNs was evaluated with a cell-free transcription/translation assay, and their activity was correlated with the predicted secondary RNA structures. Four phosphodiester ODNs specific for GSTM1, two ODNs specific for GSTM2, and four ODNs targeted at both GSTM isoforms were found to be potent, sequence-specific, and RNase H-dependent inhibitors of protein expression. The IC50 value of the most potent ODN was approximately 100 nM. Antisense ODNs targeted against regions that were predicted by STAR to be predominantly single stranded were more potent than antisense ODNs against double-stranded regions. Such a correlation was not found for the Mfold prediction. Our data suggest that simulation of the local folding of RNA facilitates the discovery of potent antisense sequences. In conclusion, we selected several promising antisense sequences, which, when synthesized as biologically stable oligonucleotides, can be applied for study of the physiological impact of reduced GSTM expression. PMID:12515389

  4. Patterns and regulation of ribosomal RNA transcription in Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Borrelia burgdorferi contains one 16S and two tandem sets of 23S-5S ribosomal (r) RNA genes whose patterns of transcription and regulation are unknown but are likely to be critical for survival and persistence in its hosts. Results RT-PCR of B. burgdorferi N40 and B31 revealed three rRNA region transcripts: 16S rRNA-alanine transfer RNA (tRNAAla); tRNAIle; and both sets of 23S-5S rRNA. At 34°C, there were no differences in growth rate or in accumulation of total protein, DNA and RNA in B31 cultured in Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly (BSK)-H whether rabbit serum was present or not. At 23°C, B31 grew more slowly in serum-containing BSK-H than at 34°C. DNA per cell was higher in cells in exponential as compared to stationary phase at either temperature; protein per cell was similar at both temperatures in both phases. Similar amounts of rRNA were produced in exponential phase at both temperatures, and rRNA was down-regulated in stationary phase at either temperature. Interestingly, a relBbu deletion mutant unable to generate (p)ppGpp did not down-regulate rRNA at transition to stationary phase in serum-containing BSK-H at 34°C, similar to the relaxed phenotype of E. coli relA mutants. Conclusions We conclude that rRNA transcription in B. burgdorferi is complex and regulated both by growth phase and by the stringent response but not by temperature-modulated growth rate. PMID:21251259

  5. Long noncoding RNA-HOTAIR affects chemoresistance by regulating HOXA1 methylation in small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shun; Gao, Hongyi; Tong, Yue; Yang, Jie; Tang, Ruixiang; Niu, Yuchun; Li, Man; Guo, Linlang

    2016-01-01

    Homeobox (HOX) transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR), a long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA), has been reported to play an oncogenic role in various cancers including small cell lung cancer (SCLC). However, it is not known whether HOTAIR can modulate chemoresistance in SCLC. The aim of this study is to investigate the roles of HOTAIR in chemoresistance of SCLC and its possible molecular mechanism. Knockdown of HOTAIR was carried out in SCLC multidrug-resistant cell lines (H69AR and H446AR) and the parental cell lines (H69 and H446) to assess its influence on chemoresistance. The results showed that downregulation of HOTAIR increased cell sensitivity to anticancer drugs through increasing cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, HOXA1 methylation increased in the resistant cells using bisulfite sequencing PCR. Depletion of HOTAIR reduced HOXA1 methylation by decreasing DNMT1 and DNMT3b expression. The interaction between HOTAIR and HOXA1 was validated by RNA immunoprecipitation. Taken together, our study suggested that HOTAIR mediates chemoresistance of SCLC by regulating HOXA1 methylation and could be utilized as a potential target for new adjuvant therapies against chemoresistance.

  6. Single cell analysis of RNA-mediated histone H3.3 recruitment to a cytomegalovirus promoter-regulated transcription site.

    PubMed

    Newhart, Alyshia; Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U; Yang, Tian; Joo, Lucy M; Powers, Sara Lawrence; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Lopez-Jones, Melissa; Singer, Robert H; Showe, Louise C; Skordalakes, Emmanuel; Janicki, Susan M

    2013-07-01

    Unlike the core histones, which are incorporated into nucleosomes concomitant with DNA replication, histone H3.3 is synthesized throughout the cell cycle and utilized for replication-independent (RI) chromatin assembly. The RI incorporation of H3.3 into nucleosomes is highly conserved and occurs at both euchromatin and heterochromatin. However, neither the mechanism of H3.3 recruitment nor its essential function is well understood. Several different chaperones regulate H3.3 assembly at distinct sites. The H3.3 chaperone, Daxx, and the chromatin-remodeling factor, ATRX, are required for H3.3 incorporation and heterochromatic silencing at telomeres, pericentromeres, and the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. By evaluating H3.3 dynamics at a CMV promoter-regulated transcription site in a genetic background in which RI chromatin assembly is blocked, we have been able to decipher the regulatory events upstream of RI nucleosomal deposition. We find that at the activated transcription site, H3.3 accumulates with sense and antisense RNA, suggesting that it is recruited through an RNA-mediated mechanism. Sense and antisense transcription also increases after H3.3 knockdown, suggesting that the RNA signal is amplified when chromatin assembly is blocked and attenuated by nucleosomal deposition. Additionally, we find that H3.3 is still recruited after Daxx knockdown, supporting a chaperone-independent recruitment mechanism. Sequences in the H3.3 N-terminal tail and αN helix mediate both its recruitment to RNA at the activated transcription site and its interaction with double-stranded RNA in vitro. Interestingly, the H3.3 gain-of-function pediatric glioblastoma mutations, G34R and K27M, differentially affect H3.3 affinity in these assays, suggesting that disruption of an RNA-mediated regulatory event could drive malignant transformation. PMID:23689370

  7. Computational Design of Artificial RNA Molecules for Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Laganà, Alessandro; Veneziano, Dario; Russo, Francesco; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba; Croce, Carlo Maria; Ferro, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool for the regulation of gene expression. Small exogenous noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) such as siRNA and shRNA are the active silencing agents, intended to target and cleave complementary mRNAs in a specific way. They are widely and successfully employed in functional studies, and several ongoing and already completed siRNA-based clinical trials suggest encouraging results in the regulation of overexpressed genes in disease. siRNAs share many aspects of their biogenesis and function with miRNAs, small ncRNA molecules transcribed from endogenous genes which are able to repress the expression of target mRNAs by either inhibiting their translation or promoting their degradation. Although siRNA and artificial miRNA molecules can significantly reduce the expression of overexpressed target genes, cancer and other diseases can also be triggered or sustained by upregulated miRNAs. Thus, in the past recent years, molecular tools for miRNA silencing, such as antagomiRs and miRNA sponges, have been developed. These molecules have shown their efficacy in the derepression of genes downregulated by overexpressed miRNAs. In particular, while a single antagomiR is able to inhibit a single complementary miRNA, an artificial sponge construct usually contains one or more binding sites for one or more miRNAs and functions by competing with the natural targets of these miRNAs. As a consequence, natural miRNA targets are reexpressed at their physiological level. In this chapter we review the most successful methods for the computational design of siRNAs, antagomiRs, and miRNA sponges and describe the most popular tools that implement them. PMID:25577393

  8. Differential regulation of plastid mRNA stability. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, D.B.

    1993-09-01

    Our goal is to identify cis-acting sequences and transacting factors that function in plastid mRNA maturation, stabilization, and/or decay through an in vitro and in vivo analysis of mRNA:protein interactions. Our previous results emphasized the study of 3{prime}end inverted repeat sequences (IRs) that serve both as mRNA processing elements and stability determinants, and associate with plastid proteins that potentially play enzymatic, structural and/or regulatory roles. We seek to define, by single base and internal deletion mutagenesis, the sequence and structural requirements for protein binding to the 3{prime} IRs of petD and psbA mRNAs; to purify RNA-binding proteins that demonstrate gene- or sequence-specific binding, or that are implicated in RNA stabilization or decay; and to investigate the native form of mRNA in the plastid, by attempting to purify ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles from organelles. Our view of mRNA decay is that it is regulated by three interactive components: RNA structure, ribonucleases and RNA-binding proteins. We have used mutagenesis to study the role of RNA structure in regulating RNA decay rates, and to identify protein binding and endonuclease recognition sites. We have identified at least three endonuclease activities; one that cleaves psbA RNA; and two whose cleavage patterns with petD 3{prime} IR-RNA has been studied (endoC1 and endoC2). Additionally, we have continued to analyze the properties of the major RNA processing exoribonuclease. We have concentrated our efforts on three RNA-binding proteins. A 100 kd protein with properties suggestive of a mammalian RNP component has been purified. A protein of 55 kd that may also be an endonuclease has been partially purified. We have studied the interaction of a 29 kd protein with the petD stem/loop, and its role in RNA processing. Recently, we have used a novel gel shift/SDS-PAGE technique to identify new RNA-binding proteins.

  9. Long Noncoding RNA Regulation of Pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Alessandro; Ballarino, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represent a unique kind of stem cell, as they are able to indefinitely self-renew and hold the potential to differentiate into any derivative of the three germ layers. As such, human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESCs) and human induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (hiPSCs) provide a unique opportunity for studying the earliest steps of human embryogenesis and, at the same time, are of great therapeutic interest. The molecular mechanisms underlying pluripotency represent a major field of research. Recent evidence suggests that a complex network of transcription factors, chromatin regulators, and noncoding RNAs exist in pluripotent cells to regulate the balance between self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. Regulatory noncoding RNAs come in two flavors: short and long. The first class includes microRNAs (miRNAs), which are involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of cell cycle and differentiation in PSCs. Instead, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent a heterogeneous group of long transcripts that regulate gene expression at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. In this review, we focus on the role played by lncRNAs in the maintenance of pluripotency, emphasizing the interplay between lncRNAs and other pivotal regulators in PSCs.

  10. MicroRNA 33 Regulates Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Cristina M.; Goedeke, Leigh; Rotllan, Noemi; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Cirera-Salinas, Daniel; Mattison, Julie A.; Suárez, Yajaira; de Cabo, Rafael; Gorospe, Myriam

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases are characterized by the failure of regulatory genes or proteins to effectively orchestrate specific pathways involved in the control of many biological processes. In addition to the classical regulators, recent discoveries have shown the remarkable role of small noncoding RNAs (microRNAs [miRNAs]) in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. In this regard, we have recently demonstrated that miR-33a and miR33b, intronic miRNAs located within the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) genes, regulate lipid metabolism in concert with their host genes. Here, we show that miR-33b also cooperates with SREBP1 in regulating glucose metabolism by targeting phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC), key regulatory enzymes of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Overexpression of miR-33b in human hepatic cells inhibits PCK1 and G6PC expression, leading to a significant reduction of glucose production. Importantly, hepatic SREBP1c/miR-33b levels correlate inversely with the expression of PCK1 and G6PC upon glucose infusion in rhesus monkeys. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-33b works in concert with its host gene to ensure a fine-tuned regulation of lipid and glucose homeostasis, highlighting the clinical potential of miR-33a/b as novel therapeutic targets for a range of metabolic diseases. PMID:23716591

  11. Long Noncoding RNA Regulation of Pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Ballarino, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represent a unique kind of stem cell, as they are able to indefinitely self-renew and hold the potential to differentiate into any derivative of the three germ layers. As such, human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESCs) and human induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (hiPSCs) provide a unique opportunity for studying the earliest steps of human embryogenesis and, at the same time, are of great therapeutic interest. The molecular mechanisms underlying pluripotency represent a major field of research. Recent evidence suggests that a complex network of transcription factors, chromatin regulators, and noncoding RNAs exist in pluripotent cells to regulate the balance between self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. Regulatory noncoding RNAs come in two flavors: short and long. The first class includes microRNAs (miRNAs), which are involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of cell cycle and differentiation in PSCs. Instead, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent a heterogeneous group of long transcripts that regulate gene expression at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. In this review, we focus on the role played by lncRNAs in the maintenance of pluripotency, emphasizing the interplay between lncRNAs and other pivotal regulators in PSCs. PMID:26697072

  12. mRNA modifications: Dynamic regulators of gene expression?

    PubMed Central

    Hoernes, Thomas Philipp; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Erlacher, Matthias David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The expression of a gene is a tightly regulated process and is exerted by a myriad of different mechanisms. Recently, RNA modifications located in coding sequences of mRNAs, have been identified as potential regulators of gene expression. N6-methyladenosine (m6A), 5-methylcytosine (m5C), pseudouridine (Ψ) and N1-methyladenosine (m1A) have been found within open reading frames of mRNAs. The presence of these mRNA modifications has been implicated to modulate the fate of an mRNA, ranging from maturation to its translation and even degradation. However, many aspects concerning the biological functions of mRNA modifications remain elusive. Recently, systematic in vitro studies allowed a first glimpse of the direct interplay of mRNA modifications and the efficiency and fidelity of ribosomal translation. It thereby became evident that the effects of mRNA modifications were, astonishingly versatile, depending on the type, position or sequence context. The incorporation of a single modification could either prematurely terminate protein synthesis, reduce the peptide yield or alter the amino acid sequence identity. These results implicate that mRNA modifications are a powerful mechanism to post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. PMID:27351916

  13. microRNA regulation of fruit growth.

    PubMed

    José Ripoll, Juan; Bailey, Lindsay J; Mai, Quynh-Anh; Wu, Scott L; Hon, Cindy T; Chapman, Elisabeth J; Ditta, Gary S; Estelle, Mark; Yanofsky, Martin F

    2015-01-01

    Growth is a major factor in plant organ morphogenesis and is influenced by exogenous and endogenous signals including hormones. Although recent studies have identified regulatory pathways for the control of growth during vegetative development, there is little mechanistic understanding of how growth is controlled during the reproductive phase. Using Arabidopsis fruit morphogenesis as a platform for our studies, we show that the microRNA miR172 is critical for fruit growth, as the growth of fruit is blocked when miR172 activity is compromised. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the FRUITFULL (FUL) MADS-domain protein and Auxin Response Factors (ARFs) directly activating the expression of a miR172-encoding gene to promote fruit valve growth. We have also revealed that MADS-domain (such as FUL) and ARF proteins directly associate in planta. This study defines a novel and conserved microRNA-dependent regulatory module integrating developmental and hormone signalling pathways in the control of plant growth. PMID:27247036

  14. microRNA regulation of fruit growth.

    PubMed

    José Ripoll, Juan; Bailey, Lindsay J; Mai, Quynh-Anh; Wu, Scott L; Hon, Cindy T; Chapman, Elisabeth J; Ditta, Gary S; Estelle, Mark; Yanofsky, Martin F

    2015-03-30

    Growth is a major factor in plant organ morphogenesis and is influenced by exogenous and endogenous signals including hormones. Although recent studies have identified regulatory pathways for the control of growth during vegetative development, there is little mechanistic understanding of how growth is controlled during the reproductive phase. Using Arabidopsis fruit morphogenesis as a platform for our studies, we show that the microRNA miR172 is critical for fruit growth, as the growth of fruit is blocked when miR172 activity is compromised. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the FRUITFULL (FUL) MADS-domain protein and Auxin Response Factors (ARFs) directly activating the expression of a miR172-encoding gene to promote fruit valve growth. We have also revealed that MADS-domain (such as FUL) and ARF proteins directly associate in planta. This study defines a novel and conserved microRNA-dependent regulatory module integrating developmental and hormone signalling pathways in the control of plant growth.

  15. MicroRNA-mediated regulation in the mammalian circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaihui; Wang, Ruiqi

    2012-07-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythms have been extensively studied for many years and many computational models have been presented. Most of the circadian rhythms are based on interlocked positive and negative feedback loops involving coding regions of some 'clock' genes. Recent works have implicated that microRNAs (miRNAs) may play crucial roles in modulating the circadian clock. Here we develop a computational model involving four genes, Per, Cry, Bmal1, and Clock, and two miRNAs, miRNA-219 and miRNA-132, to show their post-transcriptional roles in the modulation of the circadian rhythm. The model is based on experimental observations, by which the miRNAs are incorporated into a classic model including only coding genes. In agreement with experimental observations, the model predicts that miRNA-mediated regulation plays critical roles in modulating the circadian clock. In addition, parameter sensitivity analysis indicates that the period of circadian rhythm with miRNA-mediated regulation is more insensitive to perturbations, showing that the miRNA-mediated regulation can enhance the robustness of the circadian rhythms. This study may help us understand the microRNA-mediated regulation in the mammalian circadian rhythm more clearly.

  16. Principles of microRNA Regulation Revealed Through Modeling microRNA Expression Quantitative Trait Loci.

    PubMed

    Budach, Stefan; Heinig, Matthias; Marsico, Annalisa

    2016-08-01

    Extensive work has been dedicated to study mechanisms of microRNA-mediated gene regulation. However, the transcriptional regulation of microRNAs themselves is far less well understood, due to difficulties determining the transcription start sites of transient primary transcripts. This challenge can be addressed using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) whose regulatory effects represent a natural source of perturbation of cis-regulatory elements. Here we used previously published cis-microRNA-eQTL data for the human GM12878 cell line, promoter predictions, and other functional annotations to determine the relationship between functional elements and microRNA regulation. We built a logistic regression model that classifies microRNA/SNP pairs into eQTLs or non-eQTLs with 85% accuracy; shows microRNA-eQTL enrichment for microRNA precursors, promoters, enhancers, and transcription factor binding sites; and depletion for repressed chromatin. Interestingly, although there is a large overlap between microRNA eQTLs and messenger RNA eQTLs of host genes, 74% of these shared eQTLs affect microRNA and host expression independently. Considering microRNA-only eQTLs we find a significant enrichment for intronic promoters, validating the existence of alternative promoters for intragenic microRNAs. Finally, in line with the GM12878 cell line derived from B cells, we find genome-wide association (GWA) variants associated to blood-related traits more likely to be microRNA eQTLs than random GWA and non-GWA variants, aiding the interpretation of GWA results. PMID:27260304

  17. Principles of microRNA Regulation Revealed Through Modeling microRNA Expression Quantitative Trait Loci.

    PubMed

    Budach, Stefan; Heinig, Matthias; Marsico, Annalisa

    2016-08-01

    Extensive work has been dedicated to study mechanisms of microRNA-mediated gene regulation. However, the transcriptional regulation of microRNAs themselves is far less well understood, due to difficulties determining the transcription start sites of transient primary transcripts. This challenge can be addressed using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) whose regulatory effects represent a natural source of perturbation of cis-regulatory elements. Here we used previously published cis-microRNA-eQTL data for the human GM12878 cell line, promoter predictions, and other functional annotations to determine the relationship between functional elements and microRNA regulation. We built a logistic regression model that classifies microRNA/SNP pairs into eQTLs or non-eQTLs with 85% accuracy; shows microRNA-eQTL enrichment for microRNA precursors, promoters, enhancers, and transcription factor binding sites; and depletion for repressed chromatin. Interestingly, although there is a large overlap between microRNA eQTLs and messenger RNA eQTLs of host genes, 74% of these shared eQTLs affect microRNA and host expression independently. Considering microRNA-only eQTLs we find a significant enrichment for intronic promoters, validating the existence of alternative promoters for intragenic microRNAs. Finally, in line with the GM12878 cell line derived from B cells, we find genome-wide association (GWA) variants associated to blood-related traits more likely to be microRNA eQTLs than random GWA and non-GWA variants, aiding the interpretation of GWA results.

  18. Principles of microRNA Regulation Revealed Through Modeling microRNA Expression Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Budach, Stefan; Heinig, Matthias; Marsico, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Extensive work has been dedicated to study mechanisms of microRNA-mediated gene regulation. However, the transcriptional regulation of microRNAs themselves is far less well understood, due to difficulties determining the transcription start sites of transient primary transcripts. This challenge can be addressed using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) whose regulatory effects represent a natural source of perturbation of cis-regulatory elements. Here we used previously published cis-microRNA-eQTL data for the human GM12878 cell line, promoter predictions, and other functional annotations to determine the relationship between functional elements and microRNA regulation. We built a logistic regression model that classifies microRNA/SNP pairs into eQTLs or non-eQTLs with 85% accuracy; shows microRNA-eQTL enrichment for microRNA precursors, promoters, enhancers, and transcription factor binding sites; and depletion for repressed chromatin. Interestingly, although there is a large overlap between microRNA eQTLs and messenger RNA eQTLs of host genes, 74% of these shared eQTLs affect microRNA and host expression independently. Considering microRNA-only eQTLs we find a significant enrichment for intronic promoters, validating the existence of alternative promoters for intragenic microRNAs. Finally, in line with the GM12878 cell line derived from B cells, we find genome-wide association (GWA) variants associated to blood-related traits more likely to be microRNA eQTLs than random GWA and non-GWA variants, aiding the interpretation of GWA results. PMID:27260304

  19. The sweet side of RNA regulation: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as a noncanonical RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    White, Michael R; Garcin, Elsa D

    2016-01-01

    The glycolytic protein, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), has a vast array of extraglycolytic cellular functions, including interactions with nucleic acids. GAPDH has been implicated in the translocation of transfer RNA (tRNA), the regulation of cellular messenger RNA (mRNA) stability and translation, as well as the regulation of replication and gene expression of many single-stranded RNA viruses. A growing body of evidence supports GAPDH-RNA interactions serving as part of a larger coordination between intermediary metabolism and RNA biogenesis. Despite the established role of GAPDH in nucleic acid regulation, it is still unclear how and where GAPDH binds to its RNA targets, highlighted by the absence of any conserved RNA-binding sequences. This review will summarize our current understanding of GAPDH-mediated regulation of RNA function. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:53-70. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1315 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  20. Role of microRNA-101a in the regulation of goat skeletal muscle satellite cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Zhan, Siyuan; Wang, Yilin; Wang, Linjie; Zhong, Tao; Li, Li; Fan, Jingsheng; Xiong, Chaorui; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Hongping

    2015-11-10

    MicroRNAs are a class of small, non-coding RNAs that participate in the regulation of diverse biological processes including skeletal muscle development. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood, particularly in goat. Here, we identified goat miR-101a as a novel myogenic microRNA mediating myogenic differentiation. The expression of miR-101a was enriched in goat skeletal muscles and up-regulated during satellite cell differentiation. After transfection with a miR-101a mimic and culturing in differentiation medium, satellite cell differentiation was promoted, accompanied by a significant increase in mRNA expression of the myogenic marker, MyoG, and decreased expression of MyoD. In contrast, blocking the function of miR-101a with a 2'-O-methylated antisense oligonucleotide inhibitor repressed satellite cell differentiation. However, both gain- and loss-of-function studies demonstrated that miR-101a had no significant influence on satellite cell proliferation. Therefore, our results provide a new insight on miR-101a in the regulation of goat skeletal muscle satellite cell proliferation and differentiation.

  1. Elucidation of gene function using C-5 propyne antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, W M; Su, L L; Wagner, R W

    1996-09-01

    Identification of human disease-causing genes continues to be an intense area of research. While cloning of genes may lead to diagnostic tests, development of a cure requires an understanding of the gene's function in both normal and diseased cells. Thus, there exists a need for a reproducible and simple method to elucidate gene function. We evaluate C-5 propyne pyrimidine modified phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides (ONs) targeted against two human cell cycle proteins that are aberrantly expressed in breast cancer: p34cdc2 kinase and cyclin B1. Dose-dependent, sequence-specific, and gene-specific inhibition of both proteins was achieved at nanomolar concentrations of ONs in normal and breast cancer cells. Precise binding of the antisense ONs to their target RNA was absolutely required for antisense activity. Four or six base-mismatched ONs eliminated antisense activity confirming the sequence specificity of the antisense ONs. Antisense inhibition of p34cdc2 kinase resulted in a significant accumulation of cells in the Gap2/mitosis phase of the cell cycle in normal cells, but caused little effect on cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. These data demonstrate the potency, specificity, and utility of C-5 propyne modified antisense ONs as biological tools and illustrate the redundancy of cell cycle protein function that can occur in cancer cells. PMID:9631067

  2. PARP13 and RNA regulation in immunity and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Todorova, Tanya; Bock, Florian; Chang, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Posttranscriptional regulation of RNA is an important mechanism for activating and resolving cellular stress responses. Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-13 (PARP13), also known as ZC3HAV1 and Zinc-finger Antiviral Protein (ZAP), is an RNA-binding protein that regulates the stability, and translation of specific mRNAs, and modulates the miRNA silencing pathway to globally impact miRNA targets. These functions of PARP13 are important components of the cellular response to stress. In addition, the ability of PARP13 to restrict oncogenic viruses and to repress the pro-survival cytokine receptor TRAILR4 suggests that it can be protective against malignant transformation and cancer development. The relevance of PARP13 to human health and disease make it a promising therapeutic target. PMID:25851173

  3. Exaptive origins of regulated mRNA decay in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Fursham M.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is extensively controlled at the level of mRNA stability and the mechanisms underlying this regulation are markedly different from their archaeal and bacterial counterparts. We propose that two such mechanisms, nonsense‐mediated decay (NMD) and motif‐specific transcript destabilization by CCCH‐type zinc finger RNA‐binding proteins, originated as a part of cellular defense against RNA pathogens. These branches of the mRNA turnover pathway might have been used by primeval eukaryotes alongside RNA interference to distinguish their own messages from those of RNA viruses and retrotransposable elements. We further hypothesize that the subsequent advent of “professional” innate and adaptive immunity systems allowed NMD and the motif‐triggered mechanisms to be efficiently repurposed for regulation of endogenous cellular transcripts. This scenario explains the rapid emergence of archetypical mRNA destabilization pathways in eukaryotes and argues that other aspects of post‐transcriptional gene regulation in this lineage might have been derived through a similar exaptation route. PMID:27438915

  4. PTBP1-dependent regulation of USP5 alternative RNA splicing plays a role in glioblastoma tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Izaguirre, Daisy I; Zhu, Wen; Hai, Tao; Cheung, Hannah C; Krahe, Ralf; Cote, Gilbert J

    2012-11-01

    Aberrant RNA splicing is thought to play a key role in tumorigenesis. The assessment of its specific contributions is limited by the complexity of information derived from genome-wide array-based approaches. We describe how performing splicing factor-specific comparisons using both tumor and cell line data sets may more readily identify physiologically relevant tumor-specific splicing events. Affymetrix exon array data derived from glioblastoma (GBM) tumor samples with defined polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1) levels were compared with data from U251 GBM cells with and without PTBP1 knockdown. This comparison yielded overlapping gene sets that comprised only a minor fraction of each data set. The identification of a novel GBM-specific splicing event involving the USP5 gene led us to further examine its role in tumorigenesis. In GBM, USP5 generates a shorter isoform 2 through recognition of a 5' splice site within exon 15. Production of the USP5 isoform 2 was strongly correlated with PTBP1 expression in GBM tumor samples and cell lines. Splicing regulation was consistent with the presence of an intronic PTBP1 binding site and could be modulated through antisense targeting of the isoform 2 splice site to force expression of isoform 1 in GBM cells. The forced expression of USP5 isoform 1 in two GBM cell lines inhibited cell growth and migration, implying an important role for USP5 splicing in gliomagenesis. These results support a role for aberrant RNA splicing in tumorigenesis and suggest that changes in relatively few genes may be sufficient to drive the process.

  5. A Long Noncoding RNA Regulates Sister Chromatid Cohesion.

    PubMed

    Marchese, Francesco P; Grossi, Elena; Marín-Béjar, Oskar; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Raimondi, Ivan; González, Jovanna; Martínez-Herrera, Dannys Jorge; Athie, Alejandro; Amadoz, Alicia; Brosh, Robert M; Huarte, Maite

    2016-08-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in diverse cellular processes through multiple mechanisms. Here, we describe a previously uncharacterized human lncRNA, CONCR (cohesion regulator noncoding RNA), that is transcriptionally activated by MYC and is upregulated in multiple cancer types. The expression of CONCR is cell cycle regulated, and it is required for cell-cycle progression and DNA replication. Moreover, cells depleted of CONCR show severe defects in sister chromatid cohesion, suggesting an essential role for CONCR in cohesion establishment during cell division. CONCR interacts with and regulates the activity of DDX11, a DNA-dependent ATPase and helicase involved in DNA replication and sister chromatid cohesion. These findings unveil a direct role for an lncRNA in the establishment of sister chromatid cohesion by modulating DDX11 enzymatic activity. PMID:27477908

  6. Hormone-dependent expression of a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein natural antisense transcript in MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol transport is essential for many physiological processes, including steroidogenesis. In steroidogenic cells hormone-induced cholesterol transport is controlled by a protein complex that includes steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Star is expressed as 3.5-, 2.8-, and 1.6-kb transcripts that differ only in their 3'-untranslated regions. Because these transcripts share the same promoter, mRNA stability may be involved in their differential regulation and expression. Recently, the identification of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has added another level of regulation to eukaryotic gene expression. Here we identified a new NAT that is complementary to the spliced Star mRNA sequence. Using 5' and 3' RACE, strand-specific RT-PCR, and ribonuclease protection assays, we demonstrated that Star NAT is expressed in MA-10 Leydig cells and steroidogenic murine tissues. Furthermore, we established that human chorionic gonadotropin stimulates Star NAT expression via cAMP. Our results show that sense-antisense Star RNAs may be coordinately regulated since they are co-expressed in MA-10 cells. Overexpression of Star NAT had a differential effect on the expression of the different Star sense transcripts following cAMP stimulation. Meanwhile, the levels of StAR protein and progesterone production were downregulated in the presence of Star NAT. Our data identify antisense transcription as an additional mechanism involved in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis.

  7. Profiling of T helper cell-derived small RNAs reveals unique antisense transcripts and differential association of miRNAs with argonaute proteins 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Polikepahad, Sumanth; Corry, David B.

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference mediated through antisense transcripts is a fundamentally important mechanism regulating gene expression that remains incompletely understood. Here, we have used next-generation sequencing to determine from mouse CD4+ T cells the functional implications of antisense transcripts binding to argonaute (AGO) proteins that mediate RNA interference and post-transcriptional gene silencing. This effort identified 90 new microRNAs (miRNAs) and six endogenous hairpin RNA-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) mapping to distinct introns. Unexpectedly, 69 miRNAs were expressed as non-canonical isomiRs as the dominant AGO-binding transcript, with extensive 3′ terminal nucleotide modifications. Furthermore, differential expression analysis between AGO1- and AGO2-bound miRNAs suggested preferential binding of isomiRs ending with 3′ adenine residues to AGO1 and 3′ uridine residues to AGO2. Analysis of the putative targets of all miRNAs suggested a striking preference for regulating transcription and transcription factors with additional evidence of a functional division of labor between AGO proteins in this regard. We further provide evidence that multiple mitochondrial genomic loci serve as the source of endogenous cis-natural antisense transcripts. These findings imply diversity in AGO protein function based on differential miRNA binding and indicate that RNA interference-based gene regulation is more complex than previously recognized. PMID:23185045

  8. Allogeneic T cell responses are regulated by a specific miRNA-mRNA network

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yaping; Tawara, Isao; Zhao, Meng; Qin, Zhaohui S.; Toubai, Tomomi; Mathewson, Nathan; Tamaki, Hiroya; Nieves, Evelyn; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Reddy, Pavan

    2013-01-01

    Donor T cells that respond to host alloantigens following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) induce graft-versus-host (GVH) responses, but their molecular landscape is not well understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene (mRNA) expression and fine-tune the molecular responses of T cells. We stimulated naive T cells with either allogeneic or nonspecific stimuli and used argonaute cross-linked immunoprecipitation (CLIP) with subsequent ChIP microarray analyses to profile miR responses and their direct mRNA targets. We identified a unique expression pattern of miRs and mRNAs following the allostimulation of T cells and a high correlation between the expression of the identified miRs and a reduction of their mRNA targets. miRs and mRNAs that were predicted to be differentially regulated in allogeneic T cells compared with nonspecifically stimulated T cells were validated in vitro. These analyses identified wings apart-like homolog (Wapal) and synaptojanin 1 (Synj1) as potential regulators of allogeneic T cell responses. The expression of these molecular targets in vivo was confirmed in MHC-mismatched experimental BMT. Targeted silencing of either Wapal or Synj1 prevented the development of GVH response, confirming a role for these regulators in allogeneic T cell responses. Thus, this genome-wide analysis of miRNA-mRNA interactions identifies previously unrecognized molecular regulators of T cell responses. PMID:24216511

  9. MicroRNA 21 regulates the proliferation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells and high-fat diet-induced obesity alters microRNA 21 expression in white adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Jeong; Hwang, Soo Hyun; Cho, Hyun Hwa; Shin, Keun Koo; Bae, Yong Chan; Jung, Jin Sup

    2012-01-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs) differentiation could provide new insights into a number of diseases including obesity. Our previous study demonstrated that microRNA-21 (miR-21) controls the adipogenic differentiation of hASCs. In this study, we determined the expression of miR-21 in white adipose tissues in a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity mouse model to examine the relationship between miR-21 and obesity and the effect of miR-21 on hASCs proliferation. Our study showed biphasic changes of miR-21 expression and a correlation between miR-21 level and adipocyte number in the epididymal fat of HFD mice. Over-expression of miR-21 decreased cell proliferation, whereas inhibiting miR-21 with 2'-O-methyl-antisense RNA increased it. Over-expression of miR-21 decreased both protein and mRNA levels of STAT3, whereas inhibiting miR-21 with 2'-O-methyl-antisense RNA increased these levels. The activity of a luciferase construct containing the miR-21 target site from the STAT3 3'UTR was lower in LV-miR21-infected hASCs than in LV-miLacZ infected cells. RNA interference-mediated down-regulation of STAT3 decreased cell proliferation without affecting adipogenic differentiation. These findings provide the evidence of the correlation between miR-21 level and adipocyte number in the white adipose tissue of HFD-induced obese mice, which provides new insights into the mechanisms of obesity.

  10. [Control of gene expression by antisense nucleic acids].

    PubMed

    Lebleu, B; Clarenc, J P; Degols, G; Leonetti, J P; Milhaud, P

    1992-01-01

    The use of antisense RNA or of antisense oligonucleotides for the specific control of viral or cellular genes expression has undergone rapid developments recently; their respective advantages and drawbacks will be discussed. Progresses in oligonucleotides chemistry have lead to the synthesis of analogs with improved pharmacological properties. Besides the antisense approach, which usually targets translation initiation or splicing sites, it is possible to interfere specifically with gene expression through triple helix formation (anti-gene strategy) or through the titration of regulatory proteins (sense approach). A major problem encountered in the use of synthetic oligonucleotides is their delivery to their nuclear or cytoplasmic targets after cell uptake by an endocytic pathway; our own work in this field will be discussed. Finally, we will describe the strategies followed by our group to improve the bioavailability of antisense oligonucleotides, as for instance conjugation to poly (L-lysine) or encapsidation in antibody-targeted liposomes.

  11. Small regulatory RNAs in lambdoid bacteriophages and phage-derived plasmids: Not only antisense.

    PubMed

    Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Licznerska, Katarzyna; Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-03-01

    Until recently, only two small regulatory RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages were known. These transcripts are derived from paQ and pO promoters. The former one is supposed to act as an antisense RNA for expression of the Q gene, encoding a transcription antitermination protein. The latter transcript, called oop RNA, was initially proposed to have a double role, in establishing expression of the cI gene and in providing a primer for DNA replication. Although the initially proposed mechanisms by which oop RNA could influence the choice between two alternative developmental pathways of the phage and the initiation of phage DNA replication were found not true, the pO promoter has been demonstrated to be important for both regulation of phage development and control of DNA replication. Namely, the pO-derived transcript is an antisense RNA for expression of the cII gene, and pO is a part of a dual promoter system responsible for regulation of initiation of DNA synthesis from the oriλ region. Very recent studies identified a battery of small RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages existing as prophages in chromosomes of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains. Some of them have very interesting functions, like anti-small RNAs.

  12. Small RNA mediated regulation of seed germination

    PubMed Central

    Das, Shabari Sarkar; Karmakar, Prakash; Nandi, Asis Kumar; Sanan-Mishra, Neeti

    2015-01-01

    Mature seeds of most of the higher plants harbor dormant embryos and go through the complex process of germination under favorable environmental conditions. The germination process involves dynamic physiological, cellular and metabolic events that are controlled by the interplay of several gene products and different phytohormones. The small non-coding RNAs comprise key regulatory modules in the process of seed dormancy and germination. Recent studies have implicated the small RNAs in plant growth in correlation with various plant physiological processes including hormone signaling and stress response. In this review we provide a brief overview of the regulation of seed germination or dormancy while emphasizing on the current understanding of the role of small RNAs in this regard. We have also highlighted specific examples of stress responsive small RNAs in seed germination and discussed their future potential. PMID:26528301

  13. TP53 regulates miRNA association with AGO2 to remodel the miRNA-mRNA interaction network.

    PubMed

    Krell, Jonathan; Stebbing, Justin; Carissimi, Claudia; Dabrowska, Aleksandra F; de Giorgio, Alexander; Frampton, Adam E; Harding, Victoria; Fulci, Valerio; Macino, Giuseppe; Colombo, Teresa; Castellano, Leandro

    2016-03-01

    DNA damage activates TP53-regulated surveillance mechanisms that are crucial in suppressing tumorigenesis. TP53 orchestrates these responses directly by transcriptionally modulating genes, including microRNAs (miRNAs), and by regulating miRNA biogenesis through interacting with the DROSHA complex. However, whether the association between miRNAs and AGO2 is regulated following DNA damage is not yet known. Here, we show that, following DNA damage, TP53 interacts with AGO2 to induce or reduce AGO2's association of a subset of miRNAs, including multiple let-7 family members. Furthermore, we show that specific mutations in TP53 decrease rather than increase the association of let-7 family miRNAs, reducing their activity without preventing TP53 from interacting with AGO2. This is consistent with the oncogenic properties of these mutants. Using AGO2 RIP-seq and PAR-CLIP-seq, we show that the DNA damage-induced increase in binding of let-7 family members to the RISC complex is functional. We unambiguously determine the global miRNA-mRNA interaction networks involved in the DNA damage response, validating them through the identification of miRNA-target chimeras formed by endogenous ligation reactions. We find that the target complementary region of the let-7 seed tends to have highly fixed positions and more variable ones. Additionally, we observe that miRNAs, whose cellular abundance or differential association with AGO2 is regulated by TP53, are involved in an intricate network of regulatory feedback and feedforward circuits. TP53-mediated regulation of AGO2-miRNA interaction represents a new mechanism of miRNA regulation in carcinogenesis. PMID:26701625

  14. FOXO regulates RNA interference in Drosophila and protects from RNA virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Spellberg, Michael J.; Marr, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Small RNA pathways are important players in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. These pathways play important roles in all aspects of cellular physiology from development to fertility to innate immunity. However, almost nothing is known about the regulation of the central genes in these pathways. The forkhead box O (FOXO) family of transcription factors is a conserved family of DNA-binding proteins that responds to a diverse set of cellular signals. FOXOs are crucial regulators of cellular homeostasis that have a conserved role in modulating organismal aging and fitness. Here, we show that Drosophila FOXO (dFOXO) regulates the expression of core small RNA pathway genes. In addition, we find increased dFOXO activity results in an increase in RNA interference (RNAi) efficacy, establishing a direct link between cellular physiology and RNAi. Consistent with these findings, dFOXO activity is stimulated by viral infection and is required for effective innate immune response to RNA virus infection. Our study reveals an unanticipated connection among dFOXO, stress responses, and the efficacy of small RNA-mediated gene silencing and suggests that organisms can tune their gene silencing in response to environmental and metabolic conditions. PMID:26553999

  15. NrrA directly regulates expression of the fraF gene and antisense RNAs for fraE in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Ehira, Shigeki; Ohmori, Masayuki

    2014-05-01

    The heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 grows as linear multicellular filaments that can contain hundreds of cells. Heterocysts, which are specialized cells for nitrogen fixation, are regularly intercalated among photosynthetic vegetative cells, and these cells are metabolically dependent on each other. Thus, multicellularity is essential for diazotrophic growth of heterocystous cyanobacteria. In Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the fraF gene, which is required to limit filament length, is induced by nitrogen deprivation. The fraF transcripts extend to the fraE gene, which lies on the opposite DNA strand and could possess dual functionality, mRNAs for fraF and antisense RNAs for fraE. In the present study, we found that NrrA, a nitrogen-regulated response regulator, directly regulated expression of fraF. Induction of fraF by nitrogen deprivation was abolished by the nrrA disruption. NrrA specifically bound to the promoter region of fraF, and recognized an inverted repeat sequence. Thus, it is concluded that NrrA controls expression of mRNAs for fraF and antisense RNAs for fraE in response to nitrogen deprivation.

  16. NrrA directly regulates expression of the fraF gene and antisense RNAs for fraE in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Ehira, Shigeki; Ohmori, Masayuki

    2014-05-01

    The heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 grows as linear multicellular filaments that can contain hundreds of cells. Heterocysts, which are specialized cells for nitrogen fixation, are regularly intercalated among photosynthetic vegetative cells, and these cells are metabolically dependent on each other. Thus, multicellularity is essential for diazotrophic growth of heterocystous cyanobacteria. In Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the fraF gene, which is required to limit filament length, is induced by nitrogen deprivation. The fraF transcripts extend to the fraE gene, which lies on the opposite DNA strand and could possess dual functionality, mRNAs for fraF and antisense RNAs for fraE. In the present study, we found that NrrA, a nitrogen-regulated response regulator, directly regulated expression of fraF. Induction of fraF by nitrogen deprivation was abolished by the nrrA disruption. NrrA specifically bound to the promoter region of fraF, and recognized an inverted repeat sequence. Thus, it is concluded that NrrA controls expression of mRNAs for fraF and antisense RNAs for fraE in response to nitrogen deprivation. PMID:24554757

  17. [The first steps of chlorophyll synthesis: RNA involvement and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Soell, D.

    1992-01-01

    Glu-tRNA[sup Glu] is synthesized from glutamate and tRNA[sup Glu] by glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS). Recent work has demonstrated that Glu-tRNA[sup Glu] has dual functions and is a precursor for protein and 5-aminolevulinate (ALA) synthesis. Current data does not provide compelling evidence for the notion that GluRS is regulated by chlorophyll precursors or in concert with the other enzymes of ALA synthesis. We have redefined the C5-pathway as a two-step route to ALA starting with Glu-tRNA[sup Glu]. Only two enzymes, Glu-tRNA reductase (GluTR) and GSA-2,1-amino-mutase (GSA-AM), are specifically involved in ALA synthesis. We have purified these enzymatic activities from Chlamydomonas and demonstrated that the two purified proteins in the presence of their cofactors NADPH and pyridoxal phosphate are sufficient for the in vitro Glu-tRNA [yields] ALA conversion. We have cloned the genes encoding GluTR. The sequences of the GluTR proteins deduced from these genes share highly conserved regions with those of bacterial origin. We havealso cloned and analyzed the gene encoding GSA-AM from Arabidopsis. As in Salmonella typhimurium, there are indications of the existence of an additional pathway for ALA formation in E. coli. To shed light on the recognition of the single tRNA[sup Glu] by the chloroplast enzymes GluTR, GluRS we characterized a chlorophyll-deficient mutant of Euglena having tRNA[sup Glu] with a point mutation in the T[Psi]C-loop. The altered tRNA supports protein but not ALA synthesis.

  18. Long non-coding RNA regulation of reproduction and development.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David H; Chu, Erin Tsi-Jia; Spektor, Roman; Soloway, Paul D

    2015-12-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have long been known to play vital roles in eukaryotic gene regulation. Studies conducted over a decade ago revealed that maturation of spliced, polyadenylated coding mRNA occurs by reactions involving small nuclear RNAs and small nucleolar RNAs; mRNA translation depends on activities mediated by transfer RNAs and ribosomal RNAs, subject to negative regulation by micro RNAs; transcriptional competence of sex chromosomes and some imprinted genes is regulated in cis by ncRNAs that vary by species; and both small-interfering RNAs and piwi-interacting RNAs bound to Argonaute-family proteins regulate post-translational modifications on chromatin and local gene expression states. More recently, gene-regulating noncoding RNAs have been identified, such as long intergenic and long noncoding RNAs (collectively referred to as lncRNAs)--a class totaling more than 100,000 transcripts in humans, which include some of the previously mentioned RNAs that regulate dosage compensation and imprinted gene expression. Here, we provide an overview of lncRNA activities, and then review the role of lncRNAs in processes vital to reproduction, such as germ cell specification, sex determination and gonadogenesis, sex hormone responses, meiosis, gametogenesis, placentation, non-genetic inheritance, and pathologies affecting reproductive tissues. Results from many species are presented to illustrate the evolutionarily conserved processes lncRNAs are involved in.

  19. Vitamin D and the RNA transcriptome: more than mRNA regulation

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Moray J.

    2014-01-01

    The GRCh37.p13 primary assembly of the human genome contains 20805 protein coding mRNA, and 37147 non-protein coding genes and pseudogenes that as a result of RNA processing and editing generate 196501 gene transcripts. Given the size and diversity of the human transcriptome, it is timely to revisit what is known of VDR function in the regulation and targeting of transcription. Early transcriptomic studies using microarray approaches focused on the protein coding mRNA that were regulated by the VDR, usually following treatment with ligand. These studies quickly established the approximate size, and surprising diversity of the VDR transcriptome, revealing it to be highly heterogenous and cell type and time dependent. With the discovery of microRNA, investigators also considered VDR regulation of these non-protein coding RNA. Again, cell and time dependency has emerged. Attempts to integrate mRNA and miRNA regulation patterns are beginning to reveal patterns of co-regulation and interaction that allow for greater control of mRNA expression, and the capacity to govern more complex cellular events. As the awareness of the diversity of non-coding RNA increases, it is increasingly likely it will be revealed that VDR actions are mediated through these molecules also. Key knowledge gaps remain over the VDR transcriptome. The causes for the cell and type dependent transcriptional heterogenetiy remain enigmatic. ChIP-Seq approaches have confirmed that VDR binding choices differ very significantly by cell type, but as yet the underlying causes distilling VDR binding choices are unclear. Similarly, it is clear that many of the VDR binding sites are non-canonical in nature but again the mechanisms underlying these interactions are unclear. Finally, although alternative splicing is clearly a very significant process in cellular transcriptional control, the lack of RNA-Seq data centered on VDR function are currently limiting the global assessment of the VDR transcriptome. VDR

  20. MicroRNA-regulated viral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Anja; Fechner, Henry

    2016-05-20

    Safe and effective gene therapy approaches require targeted tissue-specific transfer of a therapeutic transgene. Besides traditional approaches, such as transcriptional and transductional targeting, microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional suppression of transgene expression has been emerging as powerful new technology to increase the specificity of vector-mediated transgene expression. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs and often expressed in a tissue-, lineage-, activation- or differentiation-specific pattern. They typically regulate gene expression by binding to imperfectly complementary sequences in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the mRNA. To control exogenous transgene expression, tandem repeats of artificial microRNA target sites are usually incorporated into the 3' UTR of the transgene expression cassette, leading to subsequent degradation of transgene mRNA in cells expressing the corresponding microRNA. This targeting strategy, first shown for lentiviral vectors in antigen presenting cells, has now been used for tissue-specific expression of vector-encoded therapeutic transgenes, to reduce immune response against the transgene, to control virus tropism for oncolytic virotherapy, to increase safety of live attenuated virus vaccines and to identify and select cell subsets for pluripotent stem cell therapies, respectively. This review provides an introduction into the technical mechanism underlying microRNA-regulation, highlights new developments in this field and gives an overview of applications of microRNA-regulated viral vectors for cardiac, suicide gene cancer and hematopoietic stem cell therapy, as well as for treatment of neurological and eye diseases. PMID:27226955

  1. MicroRNA-regulated viral vectors for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Anja; Fechner, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Safe and effective gene therapy approaches require targeted tissue-specific transfer of a therapeutic transgene. Besides traditional approaches, such as transcriptional and transductional targeting, microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional suppression of transgene expression has been emerging as powerful new technology to increase the specificity of vector-mediated transgene expression. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs and often expressed in a tissue-, lineage-, activation- or differentiation-specific pattern. They typically regulate gene expression by binding to imperfectly complementary sequences in the 3’ untranslated region (UTR) of the mRNA. To control exogenous transgene expression, tandem repeats of artificial microRNA target sites are usually incorporated into the 3’ UTR of the transgene expression cassette, leading to subsequent degradation of transgene mRNA in cells expressing the corresponding microRNA. This targeting strategy, first shown for lentiviral vectors in antigen presenting cells, has now been used for tissue-specific expression of vector-encoded therapeutic transgenes, to reduce immune response against the transgene, to control virus tropism for oncolytic virotherapy, to increase safety of live attenuated virus vaccines and to identify and select cell subsets for pluripotent stem cell therapies, respectively. This review provides an introduction into the technical mechanism underlying microRNA-regulation, highlights new developments in this field and gives an overview of applications of microRNA-regulated viral vectors for cardiac, suicide gene cancer and hematopoietic stem cell therapy, as well as for treatment of neurological and eye diseases. PMID:27226955

  2. RNA Splicing: Regulation and Dysregulation in the Heart.

    PubMed

    van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M G; Pinto, Yigal M; Creemers, Esther E

    2016-02-01

    RNA splicing represents a post-transcriptional mechanism to generate multiple functional RNAs or proteins from a single transcript. The evolution of RNA splicing is a prime example of the Darwinian function follows form concept. A mutation that leads to a new mRNA (form) that encodes for a new functional protein (function) is likely to be retained, and this way, the genome has gradually evolved to encode for genes with multiple isoforms, thereby creating an enormously diverse transcriptome. Advances in technologies to characterize RNA populations have led to a better understanding of RNA processing in health and disease. In the heart, alternative splicing is increasingly being recognized as an important layer of post-transcriptional gene regulation. Moreover, the recent identification of several cardiac splice factors, such as RNA-binding motif protein 20 and SF3B1, not only provided important insight into the mechanisms underlying alternative splicing but also revealed how these splicing factors impact functional properties of the heart. Here, we review our current knowledge of alternative splicing in the heart, with a particular focus on the major and minor spliceosome, the factors controlling RNA splicing, and the role of alternative splicing in cardiac development and disease. PMID:26846640

  3. RNA Splicing: Regulation and Dysregulation in the Heart.

    PubMed

    van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M G; Pinto, Yigal M; Creemers, Esther E

    2016-02-01

    RNA splicing represents a post-transcriptional mechanism to generate multiple functional RNAs or proteins from a single transcript. The evolution of RNA splicing is a prime example of the Darwinian function follows form concept. A mutation that leads to a new mRNA (form) that encodes for a new functional protein (function) is likely to be retained, and this way, the genome has gradually evolved to encode for genes with multiple isoforms, thereby creating an enormously diverse transcriptome. Advances in technologies to characterize RNA populations have led to a better understanding of RNA processing in health and disease. In the heart, alternative splicing is increasingly being recognized as an important layer of post-transcriptional gene regulation. Moreover, the recent identification of several cardiac splice factors, such as RNA-binding motif protein 20 and SF3B1, not only provided important insight into the mechanisms underlying alternative splicing but also revealed how these splicing factors impact functional properties of the heart. Here, we review our current knowledge of alternative splicing in the heart, with a particular focus on the major and minor spliceosome, the factors controlling RNA splicing, and the role of alternative splicing in cardiac development and disease.

  4. Posttranscriptional regulation of retroviral gene expression: primary RNA transcripts play three roles as pre-mRNA, mRNA, and genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Jason; Weil, Jason; Beemon, Karen

    2013-01-01

    After reverse transcription of the retroviral RNA genome and integration of the DNA provirus into the host genome, host machinery is used for viral gene expression along with viral proteins and RNA regulatory elements. Here, we discuss co-transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of retroviral gene expression, comparing simple and complex retroviruses. Cellular RNA polymerase II synthesizes full-length viral primary RNA transcripts that are capped and polyadenylated. All retroviruses generate a singly spliced env mRNA from this primary transcript, which encodes the viral glycoproteins. In addition, complex viral RNAs are alternatively spliced to generate accessory proteins, such as Rev, which is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of HIV-1 RNA. Importantly, the splicing of all retroviruses is incomplete; they must maintain and export a fraction of their primary RNA transcripts. This unspliced RNA functions both as the major mRNA for Gag and Pol proteins and as the packaged genomic RNA. Different retroviruses export their unspliced viral RNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by either Tap-dependent or Rev/CRM1-dependent routes. Translation of the unspliced mRNA involves frame-shifting or termination codon suppression so that the Gag proteins, which make up the capsid, are expressed more abundantly than the Pol proteins, which are the viral enzymes. After the viral polyproteins assemble into viral particles and bud from the cell membrane, a viral encoded protease cleaves them. Some retroviruses have evolved mechanisms to protect their unspliced RNA from decay by nonsense-mediated RNA decay and to prevent genome editing by the cellular APOBEC deaminases. PMID:23754689

  5. Myc Regulation of mRNA Cap Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Victoria H.; Cole, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    The c-myc proto-oncogene regulates the expression of 15% to 20% of all genes, depending on the cell type, and the regulation is usually modest (1.5- to 2.0-fold). The authors discovered that in addition to regulating mRNA abundance, c-Myc regulates the formation of the 7-methylguanosine cap on many mRNAs, including transcriptional target genes and others not transcriptionally activated. Because the 7-methylguanosine cap is required for effective translation, enhanced methyl cap formation leads to increased protein production from Myc-responsive genes that exceeds the transcriptional induction. Increased cap methylation is linked to Myc-dependent enhanced activity of 2 critical kinases, TFIIH and p-TEFb, which phosphorylate the RNA polymerase II carboxy-terminal domain (CTD). Phosphorylation of the CTD recruits RNGTT and RNMT, the enzymes involved in mRNA capping, to the nascent transcript. Evidence is accumulating that enhanced cap methylation makes a significant contribution to Myc-dependent gene regulation and protein production. PMID:21170289

  6. Antisense Down-Regulation of 4CL Expression Alters Lignification, Tree Growth, and Saccharification Potential of Field-Grown Poplar1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Voelker, Steven L.; Lachenbruch, Barbara; Meinzer, Frederick C.; Jourdes, Michael; Ki, Chanyoung; Patten, Ann M.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Gunter, Lee; Decker, Stephen R.; Selig, Michael J.; Sykes, Robert; Himmel, Michael E.; Kitin, Peter; Shevchenko, Olga; Strauss, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic down-regulation of the Pt4CL1 gene family encoding 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) has been reported as a means for reducing lignin content in cell walls and increasing overall growth rates, thereby improving feedstock quality for paper and bioethanol production. Using hybrid poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba), we applied this strategy and examined field-grown transformants for both effects on wood biochemistry and tree productivity. The reductions in lignin contents obtained correlated well with 4CL RNA expression, with a sharp decrease in lignin amount being observed for RNA expression below approximately 50% of the nontransgenic control. Relatively small lignin reductions of approximately 10% were associated with reduced productivity, decreased wood syringyl/guaiacyl lignin monomer ratios, and a small increase in the level of incorporation of H-monomers (p-hydroxyphenyl) into cell walls. Transgenic events with less than approximately 50% 4CL RNA expression were characterized by patches of reddish-brown discolored wood that had approximately twice the extractive content of controls (largely complex polyphenolics). There was no evidence that substantially reduced lignin contents increased growth rates or saccharification potential. Our results suggest that the capacity for lignin reduction is limited; below a threshold, large changes in wood chemistry and plant metabolism were observed that adversely affected productivity and potential ethanol yield. They also underline the importance of field studies to obtain physiologically meaningful results and to support technology development with transgenic trees. PMID:20729393

  7. Loss of (2'-5')oligoadenylate synthetase activity by production of antisense RNA results in lack of protection by interferon from viral infections

    SciTech Connect

    De Benedetti, A.; Pytel, B.A.; Baglioni, C.

    1987-02-01

    An expression vector was constructed that carries part of the human BK papovavirus with 0.5 kilobases of (2'-5')oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase cDNA inserted in inverted orientation downstream from the virion proteins (VP) promoter and the neomycin-resistance gene neo under the control of a simian virus 40 promoter. Cells transfected with this vector and selected for resistance to the neomycin derivative G418 synthesized RNA complementary to 2-5A synthetase mRNA. These cells lacked 2-5A synthetase activity, and the enzyme was not inducible by interferon. In contrast, 2-5A synthetase was induced in cells transfected with a control vector without the cDNA insert. Such cells were protected by interferon from RNA viruses, whereas cells lacking 2-5A synthetase were not protected from encephalomyocarditis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and Sindbis virus but were fully protected from influenza virus. These findings show that a high level of 2-5A synthetase is required for interferon-induced protection from the cytoplasmic RNA viruses tested.

  8. Loss of (2'-5')oligoadenylate synthetase activity by production of antisense RNA results in lack of protection by interferon from viral infections.

    PubMed Central

    De Benedetti, A; Pytel, B A; Baglioni, C

    1987-01-01

    An expression vector was constructed that carries part of the human BK papovavirus with 0.5 kilobases of (2'-5')oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase cDNA inserted in inverted orientation downstream from the virion proteins (VP) promoter and the neomycin-resistance gene neo under the control of a simian virus 40 promoter. Cells transfected with this vector and selected for resistance to the neomycin derivative G418 synthesized RNA complementary to 2-5A synthetase mRNA. These cells lacked 2-5A synthetase activity, and the enzyme was not inducible by interferon. In contrast, 2-5A synthetase was induced in cells transfected with a control vector without the cDNA insert. Such cells were protected by interferon from RNA viruses, whereas cells lacking 2-5A synthetase were not protected from encephalomyocarditis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and Sindbis virus but were fully protected from influenza virus. These findings show that a high level of 2-5A synthetase is required for interferon-induced protection from the cytoplasmic RNA viruses tested. Images PMID:2433688

  9. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition as a potent diagnostic tool for gene function in plant biology

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Christer; Sun, Chuanxin; Ghebramedhin, Haile; Hoglund, Anna-Stina; Jansson, Christer

    2008-01-15

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) inhibition emerges as an effective means for probing gene function in plant cells. Employing this method we have established the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor for regulation of starch synthesis in barley endosperm, and arrived at a model for the role of the SUSIBAs in sugar signaling and source-sink commutation during cereal endosperm development. In this addendum we provide additional data demonstrating the suitability of the antisense ODN technology in studies on starch branching enzyme activities in barley leaves. We also comment on the mechanism for ODN uptake in plant cells. Antisense ODNs are short (12-25 nt-long) stretches of single-stranded ODNs that hybridize to the cognate mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, thereby inhibiting gene expression. They are naturally occurring in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes where they partake in gene regulation and defense against viral infection. The mechanisms for antisense ODN inhibition are not fully understood but it is generally considered that the ODN either sterically interferes with translation or promotes transcript degradation by RNase H activation. The earliest indication of the usefulness of antisense ODN technology for the purposes of molecular biology and medical therapy was the demonstration in 1978 that synthetic ODNs complementary to Raos sarcoma virus could inhibit virus replication in tissue cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts. Since then the antisense ODN technology has been widely used in animal sciences and as an important emerging therapeutic approach in clinical medicine. However, antisense ODN inhibition has been an under-exploited strategy for plant tissues, although the prospects for plant cells in suspension cultures to take up single-stranded ODNs was reported over a decade ago. In 2001, two reports from Malho and coworker demonstrated the use of cationic-complexed antisense ODNs to suppress expression of genes encoding pollen

  10. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, John; Agrawal, Sudhir; Civeira, Maria P.; Sarin, Prem S.; Sun, Daisy; Zamecnik, Paul C.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs.

  11. CLIP Identifies Nova-Regulated RNA Networks in the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ule, Jernej; Jensen, Kirk B.; Ruggiu, Matteo; Mele, Aldo; Ule, Aljaž; Darnell, Robert B.

    2003-11-01

    Nova proteins are neuron-specific antigens targeted in paraneoplastic opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia (POMA), an autoimmune neurologic disease characterized by abnormal motor inhibition. Nova proteins regulate neuronal pre-messenger RNA splicing by directly binding to RNA. To identify Nova RNA targets, we developed a method to purify protein-RNA complexes from mouse brain with the use of ultraviolet cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP). Thirty-four transcripts were identified multiple times by Nova CLIP. Three-quarters of these encode proteins that function at the neuronal synapse, and one-third are involved in neuronal inhibition. Splicing targets confirmed in Nova-/- mice include c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2, neogenin, and gephyrin; the latter encodes a protein that clusters inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid and glycine receptors, two previously identified Nova splicing targets. Thus, CLIP reveals that Nova coordinately regulates a biologically coherent set of RNAs encoding multiple components of the inhibitory synapse, an observation that may relate to the cause of abnormal motor inhibition in POMA.

  12. Negative Regulation of Cytoplasmic RNA-Mediated Antiviral Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Komuro, Akihiko; Bamming, Darja

    2008-01-01

    The recent, rapid progress in our understanding of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral innate immune signaling was initiated by the discovery of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) as a sensor of viral RNA [1]. It is now widely recognized that RIG-I and related RNA helicases, melanoma differentiated-associated gene-5 (MDA5) and laboratory of genetics and physiology-2 (LGP2), can initiate and/or regulate RNA and virus -mediated type I IFN production and antiviral responses. As with other cytokine systems, production of type I IFN is a transient process, and can be hazardous to the host if unregulated, resulting in chronic cellular toxicity or inflammatory and autoimmune diseases [2-9]. In addition, the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) system is a fundamental target for virus-encoded immune suppression, with many indirect and direct examples of interference described. In this article, we review the current understanding of endogenous negative regulation in RLR signaling and explore direct inhibition of RLR signaling by viruses as a host immune evasion strategy. PMID:18703349

  13. MicroRNA: Key regulators of oligodendrocyte development and pathobiology.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, John-Mark K; Anderson, Rebecca C; McDermott, Kieran W

    2015-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) are a group of small non-coding RNAs that function through binding to messenger RNA (mRNA) targets and downregulating gene expression. miRNAs have been shown to regulate many cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, development and apoptosis. Recently, evidence has grown which shows the involvement of miRs in oligodendrocyte (OL) specification and development. In particular, miRs-138, -219, -338, and -9 have been classified as key regulators of OL development, acting at various points in the OL lineage and influencing precursor cell transit into mature myelinating OLs. Many studies have emerged which link miRNAs with OL and myelin pathology in various central nervous system (CNS) diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS), ischemic stroke, spinal cord injury, and adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD).

  14. MicroRNA Regulators of Anxiety and Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Meydan, Chanan; Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Shani; Soreq, Hermona

    2016-09-01

    Anxiety-related and metabolic disorders are under intense research focus. Anxiety-induced microRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging as regulators that are not only capable of suppressing inflammation but can also induce metabolic syndrome-related processes. We summarize here evidence linking miRNA pathways which share regulatory networks in metabolic and anxiety-related conditions. In particular, miRNAs involved in these disorders include regulators of acetylcholine signaling in the nervous system and their accompanying molecular machinery. These have been associated with anxiety-prone states in individuals, while also acting as inflammatory suppressors. In peripheral tissues, altered miRNA pathways can lead to dysregulated metabolism. Common pathways in metabolic and anxiety-related phenomena might offer an opportunity to reclassify 'healthy' and 'unhealthy', as well as metabolic and anxiety-prone biological states, and inform putative strategies to treat these disorders. PMID:27496210

  15. The role of RNA structure at 5′ untranslated region in microRNA-mediated gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuming; Xie, Xueying; Wang, Ting; Ko, Jae-Hong; Zhou, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the secondary structure of the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR) of messenger RNA (mRNA) is important for microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene regulation in humans. mRNAs that are targeted by miRNA tend to have a higher degree of local secondary structure in their 5′ UTR; however, the general role of the 5′ UTR in miRNA-mediated gene regulation remains unknown. We systematically surveyed the secondary structure of 5′ UTRs in both plant and animal species and found a universal trend of increased mRNA stability near the 5′ cap in mRNAs that are regulated by miRNA in animals, but not in plants. Intra-genome comparison showed that gene expression level, GC content of the 5′ UTR, number of miRNA target sites, and 5′ UTR length may influence mRNA structure near the 5′ cap. Our results suggest that the 5′ UTR secondary structure performs multiple functions in regulating post-transcriptional processes. Although the local structure immediately upstream of the start codon is involved in translation initiation, RNA structure near the 5′ cap site, rather than the structure of the full-length 5′ UTR sequences, plays an important role in miRNA-mediated gene regulation. PMID:25002673

  16. [Epigenetic factors in atherogenesis: microRNA].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, A V; Sukhorukov, V N; Karagodin, V P; Orekhov, A N

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (~22 nucleotides in length) noncoding RNA sequences regulating gene expression at posttranscriptional level. MicroRNAs bind complementarily to certain mRNA and cause gene silencing. The involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of lipid metabolism, inflammatory response, cell cycle progression and proliferation, oxidative stress, platelet activation, endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) function, angiogenesis and plaque formation and rapture indicates important roles in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. The key role of microRNAs in pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), including atherosclerosis, was demonstrated in recent studies. Creating antisense oligonucleotides is a novel technique for selective changes in gene expression both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we draw attention to the role of miRNAs in atherosclerosis progression, using miRNA as the potential biomarkers and targets in the CVDs, as well as possible application of antisense oligonucleotides. PMID:27143369

  17. RNA polymerase pausing regulates translation initiation by providing additional time for TRAP-RNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Yakhnin, Alexander V; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul

    2006-11-17

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) pause sites have been identified in several prokaryotic genes. Although the presumed biological function of RNAP pausing is to allow synchronization of RNAP position with regulatory factor binding and/or RNA folding, a direct causal link between pausing and changes in gene expression has been difficult to establish. RNAP pauses at two sites in the Bacillus subtilis trpEDCFBA operon leader. Pausing at U107 and U144 participates in transcription attenuation and trpE translation control mechanisms, respectively. Substitution of U144 caused a substantial pausing defect in vitro and in vivo. These mutations led to increased trp operon expression that was suppressed by overproduction of TRAP, indicating that pausing at U144 provides additional time for TRAP to bind to the nascent transcript and promote formation of an RNA structure that blocks translation of trpE. These results establish that pausing is capable of playing a role in regulating translation in bacteria. PMID:17114058

  18. Long non-coding RNA ANRIL regulates inflammatory responses as a novel component of NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao; Han, Xiaorui; Wittfeldt, Ann; Sun, Jingzhi; Liu, Chujun; Wang, Xiaoxia; Gan, Li-Ming; Cao, Huiqing; Liang, Zicai

    2016-01-01

    Antisense Noncoding RNA in the INK4 Locus (ANRIL) is the prime candidate gene at Chr9p21, the well-defined genetic risk locus associated with multiple human diseases including coronary artery disease (CAD), while little is known regarding its role in the pathological processes. Endothelial dysfunction triggers atherosclerotic processes that are causatively linked to CAD. To evaluate the function of ANRIL in human endothelial cells (ECs), we examined ANRIL expression under pathological stimuli and found ANRIL was markedly induced by pro-inflammatory factors. Loss-of-function and chromatin immunoprecipitation approaches revealed that NF-κB mediates TNF-α induced ANRIL expression. RNA sequencing revealed that ANRIL silencing dysregulated expression of inflammatory genes including IL6 and IL8 under TNF-α treatment. We explored the regulatory mechanism of ANRIL on IL6/8 and found that Yin Yang 1 (YY1), an ANRIL binding transcriptional factor revealed by RNA immunoprecipitation, was required for IL6/8 expression under TNF-α treatment. YY1 was enriched at promoter loci of IL6/8 and ANRIL silencing impaired the enrichment, indicating a cooperation between ANRIL and YY1 in the regulation of inflammatory genes. For the first time, we establish the connection between ANRIL and NF-κB pathway and show that ANRIL regulates inflammatory responses through binding with YY1. The newly identified TNF-α-NF-κB-ANRIL/YY1-IL6/8 pathway enhances understanding of the etiology of CAD and provides potential therapeutic target for treatment of CAD.

  19. Regulation of glucose-dependent gene expression by the RNA helicase Dbp2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Beck, Zachary T; Cloutier, Sara C; Schipma, Matthew J; Petell, Christopher J; Ma, Wai Kit; Tran, Elizabeth J

    2014-11-01

    Cellular homeostasis requires a fine balance between energy uptake, utilization, and growth. Dbp2 is a member of the DEAD-box protein family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with characterized ATPase and helicase activity in vitro. DEAD-box RNA helicases are a class of enzymes that utilize ATP hydrolysis to remodel RNA and/or RNA-protein (RNP) composition. Dbp2 has been proposed to utilize its helicase activity in vivo to promote RNA-protein complex assembly of both messenger (m)RNAs and long noncoding (lnc)RNAs. Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated that loss of DBP2 enhances the lncRNA-dependent transcriptional induction of the GAL genes by abolishing glucose-dependent repression. Herein, we report that either a carbon source switch or glucose deprivation results in rapid export of Dbp2 to the cytoplasm. Genome-wide RNA sequencing identified a new class of antisense hexose transporter transcripts that are specifically upregulated upon loss of DBP2. Further investigation revealed that both sense and antisense hexose transporter (HXT) transcripts are aberrantly expressed in DBP2-deficient cells and that this expression pathway can be partially mimicked in wild-type cells by glucose depletion. We also find that Dbp2 promotes ribosome biogenesis and represses alternative ATP-producing pathways, as loss of DBP2 alters the transcript levels of ribosome biosynthesis (snoRNAs and associated proteins) and respiration gene products. This suggests that Dbp2 is a key integrator of nutritional status and gene expression programs required for energy homeostasis.

  20. Regulation of Chemoresistance Via Alternative Messenger RNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Eblen, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    The acquisition of drug resistance to chemotherapy is a significant problem in the treatment of cancer, greatly increasing patient morbidity and mortality. Tumors are often sensitive to chemotherapy upon initial treatment, but repeated treatments can select for those cells that have were able to survive initial therapy and have acquired cellular mechanisms to enhance their resistance to subsequent chemotherapy treatment. Many cellular mechanisms of drug resistance have been identified, most of which result from changes in gene and protein expression. While changes at the transcriptional level have been duly noted, it is primarily the post-transcriptional processing of pre-mRNA into mature mRNA that regulates the composition of the proteome and it is the proteome that actually regulates the cell’s response to chemotherapeutic insult, inducing cell survival or death. During pre-mRNA processing, intronic non-protein-coding sequences are removed and protein-coding exons are spliced to form a continuous template for protein translation. Alternative splicing involves the differential inclusion or exclusion of exonic sequences into the mature transcript, generating different mRNA templates for protein production. This regulatory mechanism enables the potential to produce many different protein isoforms from the same gene. In this review I will explain the mechanism of alternative pre-mRNA splicing and look at some specific examples of how splicing factors, splicing factor kinases and alternative splicing of specific pre-mRNAs from genes have been shown to contribute to acquisition of the drug resistant phenotype. PMID:22248731

  1. Inositol pyrophosphates regulate RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Thota, Swarna Gowri; Unnikannan, C P; Thampatty, Sitalakshmi R; Manorama, R; Bhandari, Rashna

    2015-02-15

    Ribosome biogenesis is an essential cellular process regulated by the metabolic state of a cell. We examined whether inositol pyrophosphates, energy-rich derivatives of inositol that act as metabolic messengers, play a role in ribosome synthesis in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast strains lacking the inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) kinase Kcs1, which is required for the synthesis of inositol pyrophosphates, display increased sensitivity to translation inhibitors and decreased protein synthesis. These phenotypes are reversed on expression of enzymatically active Kcs1, but not on expression of the inactive form. The kcs1Δ yeast cells exhibit reduced levels of ribosome subunits, suggesting that they are defective in ribosome biogenesis. The rate of rRNA synthesis, the first step of ribosome biogenesis, is decreased in kcs1Δ yeast strains, suggesting that RNA polymerase I (Pol I) activity may be reduced in these cells. We determined that the Pol I subunits, A190, A43 and A34.5, can accept a β-phosphate moiety from inositol pyrophosphates to undergo serine pyrophosphorylation. Although there is impaired rRNA synthesis in kcs1Δ yeast cells, we did not find any defect in recruitment of Pol I on rDNA, but observed that the rate of transcription elongation was compromised. Taken together, our findings highlight inositol pyrophosphates as novel regulators of rRNA transcription.

  2. Dual role for argonautes in microRNA processing and posttranscriptional regulation of microRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Diederichs, Sven; Haber, Daniel A

    2007-12-14

    MicroRNAs are small endogenous noncoding RNAs involved in posttranscriptional gene regulation. During microRNA biogenesis, Drosha and Dicer process the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) through a precursor hairpin (pre-miRNA) to the mature miRNA. The miRNA is incorporated into the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) with Argonaute proteins, the effector molecules in RNA interference (RNAi). Here, we show that all Argonautes elevate mature miRNA expression posttranscriptionally, independent of RNase activity. Also, we identify a role for the RISC slicer Argonaute2 (Ago2) in cleaving the pre-miRNA to an additional processing intermediate, termed Ago2-cleaved precursor miRNA or ac-pre-miRNA. This endogenous, on-pathway intermediate results from cleavage of the pre-miRNA hairpin 12 nucleotides from its 3'-end. By analogy to siRNA processing, Ago2 cleavage may facilitate removal of the nicked passenger strand from RISC after maturation. The multiple roles of Argonautes in the RNAi effector phase and miRNA biogenesis and maturation suggest coordinate regulation of microRNA expression and function.

  3. MicroRNA profiling identifies miR-29 as a regulator of disease-associated pathways in experimental biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Hand, Nicholas J; Horner, Amber M; Master, Zankhana R; Boateng, LaTasha A; LeGuen, Claire; Uvaydova, Marina; Friedman, Joshua R

    2012-02-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a pediatric liver disease of unknown underlying etiology, in which fibroinflammatory destruction of the extrahepatic biliary system leads to obstructive cholestasis. MicroRNAs are a class of short (18-23 nucleotide), noncoding RNA molecules, which act as negative regulators of target mRNA stability and translation. The importance of these molecules in normal and diseased liver has been demonstrated, but their potential role in the pathogenesis of BA has not been addressed. We have profiled changes in liver microRNA levels in an established mouse model of the disease, identified significantly altered transcripts, and defined the spatial expression patterns of selected microRNAs. Two of these, miR-29a/29b1, are upregulated in experimental BA. Using antisense oligonucleotide-mediated inhibition in mice, we have delineated the full set of hepatic genes regulated by miR-29 and identified 2 mRNA targets of potential pathological relevance in experimental BA, Igf1 and Il1RAP. We have used reporter assays to confirm that Igf1 and Il1RAP are direct targets of miR-29.

  4. Position-specific binding of FUS to nascent RNA regulates mRNA length

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Akio; Takeda, Jun-ichi; Okuno, Tatsuya; Okamoto, Takaaki; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Sobue, Gen

    2015-01-01

    More than half of all human genes produce prematurely terminated polyadenylated short mRNAs. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely elusive. CLIP-seq (cross-linking immunoprecipitation [CLIP] combined with deep sequencing) of FUS (fused in sarcoma) in neuronal cells showed that FUS is frequently clustered around an alternative polyadenylation (APA) site of nascent RNA. ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP] combined with deep sequencing) of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) demonstrated that FUS stalls RNAP II and prematurely terminates transcription. When an APA site is located upstream of an FUS cluster, FUS enhances polyadenylation by recruiting CPSF160 and up-regulates the alternative short transcript. In contrast, when an APA site is located downstream from an FUS cluster, polyadenylation is not activated, and the RNAP II-suppressing effect of FUS leads to down-regulation of the alternative short transcript. CAGE-seq (cap analysis of gene expression [CAGE] combined with deep sequencing) and PolyA-seq (a strand-specific and quantitative method for high-throughput sequencing of 3' ends of polyadenylated transcripts) revealed that position-specific regulation of mRNA lengths by FUS is operational in two-thirds of transcripts in neuronal cells, with enrichment in genes involved in synaptic activities. PMID:25995189

  5. Regulation of Senescence by microRNA Biogenesis Factors

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Srikantan, Subramanya; Kang, Min-Ju; Gorospe, Myriam

    2012-01-01

    Senescence represents a state of indefinite growth arrest in cells that have reached their replicative life span, have become damaged, or express aberrant levels of cancer-related proteins. While senescence is widely considered to represent tumor-suppressive mechanism, the accumulation of senescent cells in tissues of older organisms is believed to underlie age-associated losses in physiologic function and age-related diseases. With the emergence of microRNAs (miRNAs) as a major class of molecular regulators of senescence, we review the transcriptional and post-transcriptional factors that control senescence-associated microRNA biosynthesis. Focusing on their enhancement or repression of senescence, we describe the transcription factors that govern the synthesis of primary (pri-)miRNAs, the proteins that control the nuclear processing of pri-miRNAs into precursor (pre-)miRNAs, including RNA editing enzymes, RNases, and RNA helicases, and the cytoplasmic proteins that affect the final processing of pre-miRNAs into mature miRNAs. We discuss how miRNA biogenesis proteins enhance or repress senescence, and thus influence the senescent phenotype that affects normal tissue function and pathology. PMID:22306790

  6. Translational regulation of MOS messenger RNA in pig oocytes.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yanfeng; Newman, Barbara; Moor, Robert

    2005-11-01

    The temporal and spatial translation control of stored mRNA in oocytes is regulated by elements in their 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR). The MOS 3'-UTR in pig oocytes is both heterogeneous (180, 480, or 530 nucleotides), and it contains multiple U-rich elements and extensive A-rich sequences (CA13CA5CA5CA6). We have examined the role of these potential regulatory elements by fusing wild-type or mutant MOS 3'-UTRs to luciferase mRNA and then injecting these chimeric transcripts into oocytes. We draw six main conclusions. First, the length of the MOS 3'-UTR tightly controls the level of translation of luciferase during oocyte maturation. Second, two U-rich (U5A) elements and the hexanucleotide signal (AAUAAA) are required for translation. Third, mutations, duplications, or relocations of the A-rich sequence reduce or block translation. Fourth, the relative importance of the A-rich and U-rich elements in controlling the level of translation differs. Fifth, none of our MOS 3'-UTR manipulations relieved translational repression before germinal vesicle breakdown. Sixth, all the MOS mRNA variants underwent polyadenylation during maturation. Whereas mutations to the hexanucleotide signal block both polyadenylation and translation, mutations to either the A-rich sequence or the U-rich elements block translation without fully blocking polyadenylation. We conclude that MOS mRNA translation in pig oocytes is subject to a more extensive series of controls than that in lower vertebrates.

  7. A BRCA1-interacting lncRNA regulates homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek; Khurana, Simran; Kubben, Nard; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Oberdoerffer, Philipp; Gorospe, Myriam; Misteli, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important players in diverse biological processes. Upon DNA damage, cells activate a complex signaling cascade referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR). Using a microarray screen, we identify here a novel lncRNA, DDSR1 (DNA damage-sensitive RNA1), which is induced upon DNA damage. DDSR1 induction is triggered in an ATM-NF-κB pathway-dependent manner by several DNA double-strand break (DSB) agents. Loss of DDSR1 impairs cell proliferation and DDR signaling and reduces DNA repair capacity by homologous recombination (HR). The HR defect in the absence of DDSR1 is marked by aberrant accumulation of BRCA1 and RAP80 at DSB sites. In line with a role in regulating HR, DDSR1 interacts with BRCA1 and hnRNPUL1, an RNA-binding protein involved in DNA end resection. Our results suggest a role for the lncRNA DDSR1 in modulating DNA repair by HR.

  8. SMN and coilin negatively regulate dyskerin association with telomerase RNA

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Aaron R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein comprising telomerase RNA and associated proteins. The formation of the telomerase holoenzyme takes place in the Cajal body (CB), a subnuclear domain that participates in the formation of ribonucleoproteins. CBs also contribute to the delivery of telomerase to telomeres. The protein WRAP53 is enriched within the CB and is instrumental for the targeting of telomerase RNA to CBs. Two other CB proteins, SMN and coilin, are also suspected of taking part in some aspect of telomerase biogenesis. Here we demonstrate newly discovered associations between SMN and coilin with telomerase components, and further show that reduction of SMN or coilin is correlated with increased association of telomerase RNA with one these components, dyskerin. These findings argue that SMN and coilin may negatively regulate the formation of telomerase. Furthermore, clinically defined SMN mutants found in individuals with spinal muscular atrophy are altered in their association with telomerase complex proteins. Additionally, we observe that a coilin derivative also associates with dyskerin, and the amount of this protein in the complex is regulated by SMN, WRAP53 and coilin levels. Collectively, our findings bolster the link between SMN, coilin and the coilin derivative in the biogenesis of telomerase. PMID:27215323

  9. Methods of double-stranded RNA-mediated gene inactivation in Arabidopsis and their use to define an essential gene in methionine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Levin, J Z; de Framond, A J; Tuttle, A; Bauer, M W; Heifetz, P B

    2000-12-01

    Controlled down-regulation of endogenous plant gene expression is a useful tool, but antisense and sense silencing lack predictability. Recent studies show that expression of both antisense and sense RNA together is an effective means of inactivating reporter and viral genes in plants. We created transgenic plants expressing antisense and sense RNA together in a single 'double-stranded RNA' (dsRNA) transcript. This approach shows great promise as a highly effective means for reducing gene function. With this approach, we demonstrated that the Arabidopsis cystathionine beta-lyase gene, which encodes a methionine biosynthetic enzyme, is essential for viability. Inactivation of this gene was rescued by the addition of methionine to the growth medium. Compared to antisense and sense constructs, the dsRNA construct showed a much more consistent and complete suppression of gene activity. Additionally, expression of a transcript with a spacer sequence containing an unrelated gene between antisense and sense luciferase gene fragments led to stronger inactivation of a second luciferase transgene than did constructs with a minimal spacing between sense and antisense fragments. However, the gene in the spacer region was neither functionally expressed nor functional in silencing a second, unlinked homologous transgene.

  10. Inhibition of iridovirus protein synthesis and virus replication by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides targeted to the major capsid protein, the 18 kDa immediate-early protein, and a viral homolog of RNA polymerase II

    SciTech Connect

    Sample, Robert; Bryan, Locke; Long, Scott; Majji, Sai; Hoskins, Glenn; Sinning, Allan; Olivier, Jake; Chinchar, V. Gregory . E-mail: vchinchar@microbio.umsmed.edu

    2007-02-20

    Frog virus 3 (FV3) is a large DNA virus that encodes {approx} 100 proteins. Although the general features of FV3 replication are known, the specific roles that most viral proteins play in the virus life cycle have not yet been elucidated. To address the question of viral gene function, antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (asMOs) were used to transiently knock-down expression of specific viral genes and thus infer their role in virus replication. We designed asMOs directed against the major capsid protein (MCP), an 18 kDa immediate-early protein (18K) that was thought to be a viral regulatory protein, and the viral homologue of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (vPol-II{alpha}). All three asMOs successfully inhibited translation of the targeted protein, and two of the three asMOs resulted in marked phenotypic changes. Knock-down of the MCP resulted in a marked reduction in viral titer without a corresponding drop in the synthesis of other late viral proteins. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that in cells treated with the anti-MCP MO assembly sites were devoid of viral particles and contained numerous aberrant structures. In contrast, inhibition of 18K synthesis did not block virion formation, suggesting that the 18K protein was not essential for replication of FV3 in fathead minnow (FHM) cells. Finally, consistent with the view that late viral gene expression is catalyzed by a virus-encoded or virus-modified Pol-II-like protein, knock-down of vPol-II{alpha} triggered a global decline in late gene expression and virus yields without affecting the synthesis of early viral genes. Collectively, these results demonstrate the utility of using asMOs to elucidate the function of FV3 proteins.

  11. Nanoparticle Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotides and Their Application in the Exon Skipping Strategy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Passarelli, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Antisense therapy is a powerful tool for inducing post-transcriptional modifications and thereby regulating target genes associated with disease. There are several classes of antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) with therapeutic use, such as double-stranded RNAs (interfering RNAs, utilized for gene silencing, and single-stranded AONs with various chemistries, which are useful for antisense targeting of micro-RNAs and mRNAs. In particular, the use of AONs for exon skipping, by targeting pre-mRNA, is proving to be a highly promising therapy for some genetic disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy. However, AONs are unable to cross the plasma membrane unaided, and several other obstacles still remain to be overcome, in particular their instability due to their nuclease sensitivity and their lack of tissue specificity. Various drug delivery systems have been explored to improve the bioavailability of nucleic acids, and nanoparticles (NPs) have been suggested as potential vectors for DNA/RNA. This review describes the recent progress in AON conjugation with natural and synthetic delivery systems, and provides an overview of the efficacy of NP-AON complexes as an exon-skipping treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:24506782

  12. RNA structures regulating ribosomal protein biosynthesis in bacilli.

    PubMed

    Deiorio-Haggar, Kaila; Anthony, Jon; Meyer, Michelle M

    2013-07-01

    In Bacilli, there are three experimentally validated ribosomal-protein autogenous regulatory RNAs that are not shared with E. coli. Each of these RNAs forms a unique secondary structure that interacts with a ribosomal protein encoded by a downstream gene, namely S4, S15, and L20. Only one of these RNAs that interacts with L20 is currently found in the RNA Families Database. We created, or modified, existing structural alignments for these three RNAs and used them to perform homology searches. We have determined that each structure exhibits a narrow phylogenetic distribution, mostly relegated to the Firmicute class Bacilli. This work, in conjunction with other similar work, demonstrates that there are most likely many non-homologous RNA regulatory elements regulating ribosomal protein biosynthesis that still await discovery and characterization in other bacterial species. PMID:23611891

  13. RNA structures regulating ribosomal protein biosynthesis in bacilli

    PubMed Central

    Deiorio-Haggar, Kaila; Anthony, Jon; Meyer, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    In Bacilli, there are three experimentally validated ribosomal-protein autogenous regulatory RNAs that are not shared with E. coli. Each of these RNAs forms a unique secondary structure that interacts with a ribosomal protein encoded by a downstream gene, namely S4, S15, and L20. Only one of these RNAs that interacts with L20 is currently found in the RNA Families Database. We created, or modified, existing structural alignments for these three RNAs and used them to perform homology searches. We have determined that each structure exhibits a narrow phylogenetic distribution, mostly relegated to the Firmicute class Bacilli. This work, in conjunction with other similar work, demonstrates that there are most likely many non-homologous RNA regulatory elements regulating ribosomal protein biosynthesis that still await discovery and characterization in other bacterial species. PMID:23611891

  14. Bacterial antisense RNAs are mainly the product of transcriptional noise

    PubMed Central

    Lloréns-Rico, Verónica; Cano, Jaime; Kamminga, Tjerko; Gil, Rosario; Latorre, Amparo; Chen, Wei-Hua; Bork, Peer; Glass, John I.; Serrano, Luis; Lluch-Senar, Maria

    2016-01-01

    cis-Encoded antisense RNAs (asRNAs) are widespread along bacterial transcriptomes. However, the role of most of these RNAs remains unknown, and there is an ongoing discussion as to what extent these transcripts are the result of transcriptional noise. We show, by comparative transcriptomics of 20 bacterial species and one chloroplast, that the number of asRNAs is exponentially dependent on the genomic AT content and that expression of asRNA at low levels exerts little impact in terms of energy consumption. A transcription model simulating mRNA and asRNA production indicates that the asRNA regulatory effect is only observed above certain expression thresholds, substantially higher than physiological transcript levels. These predictions were verified experimentally by overexpressing nine different asRNAs in Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Our results suggest that most of the antisense transcripts found in bacteria are the consequence of transcriptional noise, arising at spurious promoters throughout the genome. PMID:26973873

  15. Bacterial antisense RNAs are mainly the product of transcriptional noise.

    PubMed

    Lloréns-Rico, Verónica; Cano, Jaime; Kamminga, Tjerko; Gil, Rosario; Latorre, Amparo; Chen, Wei-Hua; Bork, Peer; Glass, John I; Serrano, Luis; Lluch-Senar, Maria

    2016-03-01

    cis-Encoded antisense RNAs (asRNAs) are widespread along bacterial transcriptomes. However, the role of most of these RNAs remains unknown, and there is an ongoing discussion as to what extent these transcripts are the result of transcriptional noise. We show, by comparative transcriptomics of 20 bacterial species and one chloroplast, that the number of asRNAs is exponentially dependent on the genomic AT content and that expression of asRNA at low levels exerts little impact in terms of energy consumption. A transcription model simulating mRNA and asRNA production indicates that the asRNA regulatory effect is only observed above certain expression thresholds, substantially higher than physiological transcript levels. These predictions were verified experimentally by overexpressing nine different asRNAs in Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Our results suggest that most of the antisense transcripts found in bacteria are the consequence of transcriptional noise, arising at spurious promoters throughout the genome. PMID:26973873

  16. RNA-directed epigenetic regulation of DNA rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-09-20

    Ciliated protozoa undergo extensive DNA rearrangements, including DNA elimination, chromosome breakage and DNA unscrambling, when the germline micronucleus produces the new macronucleus during sexual reproduction. It has long been known that many of these events are epigenetically controlled by DNA sequences of the parental macronuclear genome. Recent studies in some model ciliates have revealed that these epigenetic regulations are mediated by non-coding RNAs. DNA elimination in Paramecium and Tetrahymena is regulated by small RNAs that are produced and operated by an RNAi (RNA interference)-related mechanism. It has been proposed that the small RNAs from the micronuclear genome can be used to identify eliminated DNAs by whole-genome comparison of the parental macronucleus and the micronucleus. In contrast, DNA unscrambling in Oxytricha is guided by long non-coding RNAs that are produced from the somatic parental macronuclear genome. These RNAs are proposed to act as templates for the direct unscrambling events that occur in the developing macronucleus. The possible evolutionary benefits of these RNA-directed epigenetic regulations of DNA rearrangement in ciliates are discussed in the present chapter. PMID:20822488

  17. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing. PMID:26553470

  18. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing.

  19. Engineered riboswitches: Expanding researchers' toolbox with synthetic RNA regulators.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Alexander; Suess, Beatrix

    2012-07-16

    Riboswitches are natural RNA-based genetic switches that sense small-molecule metabolites and regulate in response the expression of the corresponding metabolic genes. Within the last years, several engineered riboswitches have been developed that act on various stages of gene expression. These switches can be engineered to respond to any ligand of choice and are therefore of great interest for synthetic biology. In this review, we present an overview of engineered riboswitches and discuss their application in conditional gene expression systems. We will provide structural and mechanistic insights and point out problems and recent trends in the development of engineered riboswitches. PMID:22710175

  20. Regulation of mRNA translation during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Weissman, Jonathan S; Vale, Ronald D

    2015-01-01

    Passage through mitosis is driven by precisely-timed changes in transcriptional regulation and protein degradation. However, the importance of translational regulation during mitosis remains poorly understood. Here, using ribosome profiling, we find both a global translational repression and identified ∼200 mRNAs that undergo specific translational regulation at mitotic entry. In contrast, few changes in mRNA abundance are observed, indicating that regulation of translation is the primary mechanism of modulating protein expression during mitosis. Interestingly, 91% of the mRNAs that undergo gene-specific regulation in mitosis are translationally repressed, rather than activated. One of the most pronounced translationally-repressed genes is Emi1, an inhibitor of the anaphase promoting complex (APC) which is degraded during mitosis. We show that full APC activation requires translational repression of Emi1 in addition to its degradation. These results identify gene-specific translational repression as a means of controlling the mitotic proteome, which may complement post-translational mechanisms for inactivating protein function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07957.001 PMID:26305499

  1. Regulation of mRNA translation during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Weissman, Jonathan S; Vale, Ronald D

    2015-08-25

    Passage through mitosis is driven by precisely-timed changes in transcriptional regulation and protein degradation. However, the importance of translational regulation during mitosis remains poorly understood. Here, using ribosome profiling, we find both a global translational repression and identified ~200 mRNAs that undergo specific translational regulation at mitotic entry. In contrast, few changes in mRNA abundance are observed, indicating that regulation of translation is the primary mechanism of modulating protein expression during mitosis. Interestingly, 91% of the mRNAs that undergo gene-specific regulation in mitosis are translationally repressed, rather than activated. One of the most pronounced translationally-repressed genes is Emi1, an inhibitor of the anaphase promoting complex (APC) which is degraded during mitosis. We show that full APC activation requires translational repression of Emi1 in addition to its degradation. These results identify gene-specific translational repression as a means of controlling the mitotic proteome, which may complement post-translational mechanisms for inactivating protein function.

  2. Arabidopsis RNA-binding Protein FCA Regulates MicroRNA172 Processing in Thermosensory Flowering*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae-Hoon; Seo, Pil Joon; Ahn, Ji Hoon; Park, Chung-Mo

    2012-01-01

    Ambient temperature fluctuates diurnally and seasonally. It profoundly influences the timing of flowering in plants. The floral integrator FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) mediates ambient temperature signals via the thermosensory pathway in Arabidopsis flowering. microRNA172 (miR172), which promotes flowering by inducing FT, also responds to changes in ambient temperature. However, it is largely unknown how miR172 integrates ambient temperature signals into the flowering genetic network. Here, we show that Arabidopsis RNA-binding protein FCA promotes the processing of primary microRNA172 transcripts (pri-miR172) in response to changes in ambient temperature. Ambient temperature regulates miR172 biogenesis primarily at the pri-miR172 processing step. miR172 abundance is elevated at 23 °C but not at 16 °C. miR172 accumulation at 23 °C requires functional FCA. FCA binds to the flanking sequences of the stem-loop within the pri-miR172 transcripts via the RNA recognition motif. FCA also binds to the primary transcripts of other temperature-responsive miRNAs, such as miR398 and miR399. Notably, levels of FCA mRNAs and proteins increase at 23 °C but remain low at 16 °C, supporting the role of FCA in temperature perception. Our data show that FCA regulation of miR172 processing is an early event in the thermosensory flowering pathway. We propose that the FCA-miR172 regulon provides an adaptive strategy that fine tunes the onset of flowering under fluctuating ambient temperature conditions. PMID:22431732

  3. Involvement of a novel intronic microRNA in cross regulation of N-methyltransferase genes involved in caffeine biosynthesis in Coffea canephora.

    PubMed

    Mohanan, Shibin; Gowda, Kalpashree; Kandukuri, Satyanarayana V; Chandrashekar, Arun

    2013-04-25

    There are numerous reports on intronic miRNAs from plants, most of which are involved in the regulation of unrelated genes. Some of the target genes are antagonistic to the host genes. Intronic miRNAs in animal systems, however, are known to have synergistic effects. This article is the first to report a similar regulatory effect of a miRNA originating from an intron in plants. NMT genes involved in caffeine biosynthesis were silenced to obtain transformants with reduced caffeine. Transcript analysis revealed the accumulation of transcripts for a related NMT gene (CaMTL1) in transformants bearing either antisense or RNAi constructs. The altered expression was assumed to relate to the silencing of the NMT genes. Bioinformatics analysis of the genes involved in biosynthesis revealed the presence of an intronic miRNA originating from the intron of the theobromine synthase gene targeting CaMTL1. The putative miRNA was cloned and sequenced. Modified 5'-RLM-RACE mapping of the cleavage site and subsequent Northern blotting experimentally demonstrated the presence and activity of such a miRNA in Coffea canephora. This novel regulatory mechanism previously unreported in plants will shed more light onto the evolution of multigene families and the role of introns in this process.

  4. Function and regulation of the mammalian Musashi mRNA translational regulator.

    PubMed

    MacNicol, Angus M; Wilczynska, Anna; MacNicol, Melanie C

    2008-06-01

    The evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding protein, Musashi, regulates neural stem cell self-renewal. Musashi expression is also indicative of stem cell populations in breast and intestinal tissues and is linked to cell overproliferation in cancers of these tissues. Musashi has been primarily implicated as a repressor of target mRNAs in stem cell populations. However, little is known about the mechanism by which Musashi exerts mRNA translational control or how Musashi function is regulated. Recent findings in oocytes of the frog, Xenopus, indicate an unexpected role for Musashi as an activator of a number of maternal mRNAs during meiotic cell cycle progression. Given the importance of Musashi function in stem cell biology and the implications of aberrant Musashi expression in cancer, it is critical that we understand the molecular processes that regulate Musashi function.

  5. Antisense-mediated silencing of a gene encoding a major ryegrass pollen allergen.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, P L; Swoboda, I; Singh, M B

    1999-09-28

    Type 1 allergic reactions, such as hay fever and allergic asthma, triggered by grass pollen allergens are a global health problem that affects approximately 20% of the population in cool, temperate climates. Ryegrass is the dominant source of allergens because of its prodigious production of airborne pollen. Lol p 5 is the major allergenic protein of ryegrass pollen, judging from the fact that almost all of the individuals allergic to grass pollen show presence of serum IgE antibodies against this protein. Moreover, nearly two-thirds of the IgE reactivity of ryegrass pollen has been attributed to this protein. Therefore, it can be expected that down-regulation of Lol p 5 production can significantly reduce the allergic potential of ryegrass pollen. Here, we report down-regulation of Lol p 5 with an antisense construct targeted to the Lol p 5 gene in ryegrass. The expression of antisense RNA was regulated by a pollen-specific promoter. Immunoblot analysis of proteins with allergen-specific antibodies did not detect Lol p 5 in the transgenic pollen. The transgenic pollen showed remarkably reduced allergenicity as reflected by low IgE-binding capacity of pollen extract as compared with that of control pollen. The transgenic ryegrass plants in which Lol p 5 gene expression is perturbed showed normal fertile pollen development, indicating that genetic engineering of hypoallergenic grass plants is possible.

  6. Identification of lung cancer miRNA-miRNA co-regulation networks through a progressive data refining approach.

    PubMed

    Song, Renhua; Catchpoole, Daniel R; Kennedy, Paul J; Li, Jinyan

    2015-09-01

    Co-regulations of miRNAs have been much less studied than the research on regulations between miRNAs and their target genes, although these two problems are equally important for understanding the entire mechanisms of complex post-transcriptional regulations. The difficulty to construct a miRNA-miRNA co-regulation network lies in how to determine reliable miRNA pairs from various resources of data related to the same disease such as expression levels, gene ontology (GO) databases, and protein-protein interactions. Here we take a novel integrative approach to the discovery of miRNA-miRNA co-regulation networks. This approach can progressively refine the various types of data and the computational analysis results. Applied to three lung cancer miRNA expression data sets of different subtypes, our method has identified a miRNA-miRNA co-regulation network and co-regulating functional modules common to lung cancer. An example of these functional modules consists of genes SMAD2, ACVR1B, ACVR2A and ACVR2B. This module is synergistically regulated by let-7a/b/c/f, is enriched in the same GO category, and has a close proximity in the protein interaction network. We also find that the co-regulation network is scale free and that lung cancer related miRNAs have more synergism in the network. According to our literature survey and database validation, many of these results are biologically meaningful for understanding the mechanism of the complex post-transcriptional regulations in lung cancer.

  7. Identification of miRNA/mRNA-Negative Regulation Pairs in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Minglei; Zhu, Kangru; Qian, Xinmei; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a common malignancy in South-East Asia. NPC is characterized by distant metastasis and poor prognosis. The pathophysiological mechanism of nasopharyngeal carcinoma is unknown. This study aimed to identify the crucial miRNAs in nasopharyngeal carcinoma and their target genes, and to discover the potential mechanism of nasopharyngeal carcinoma development. Material/Methods Microarray expression profiling of miRNA and mRNA from the Gene Expression Omnibus database was downloaded, and we performed a significance analysis of differential expression. An interaction network of miRNAs and target genes was constructed. The underlying function of differentially expressed genes was predicted through Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment analyses. To validate the microarray analysis data, significantly different expression levels of miRNAs and target genes were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results We identified 27 differentially expressed miRNAs and 982 differentially expressed mRNAs between NPC and normal control tissues. 12 miRNAs and 547 mRNAs were up-regulated and 15 miRNAs and 435 mRNAs were down-regulated in NPC samples. We found a total of 1185 negative correlation pairs between miRNA and mRNA. Differentially expressed target genes were significantly enriched in pathways in cancer, cell cycle, and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction signaling pathways. Significantly differentially expressed miRNAs and genes, such as hsa-miR-205, hsa-miR-18b, hsa-miR-632, hsa-miR-130a, hsa-miR-34b, PIGR, SMPD3, CD22, DTX4, and CDC6, may play essential roles in the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Conclusions hsa-miR-205, hsa-miR-18b, hsa-miR-632, hsa-miR-130a, and hsa-miR-34b may be related to the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma by regulating the genes involved in pathways in cancer and cell cycle signaling pathways. PMID:27350400

  8. Simultaneous characterization of sense and antisense genomic processes by the double-stranded hidden Markov model.

    PubMed

    Glas, Julia; Dümcke, Sebastian; Zacher, Benedikt; Poron, Don; Gagneur, Julien; Tresch, Achim

    2016-03-18

    Hidden Markov models (HMMs) have been extensively used to dissect the genome into functionally distinct regions using data such as RNA expression or DNA binding measurements. It is a challenge to disentangle processes occurring on complementary strands of the same genomic region. We present the double-stranded HMM (dsHMM), a model for the strand-specific analysis of genomic processes. We applied dsHMM to yeast using strand specific transcription data, nucleosome data, and protein binding data for a set of 11 factors associated with the regulation of transcription.The resulting annotation recovers the mRNA transcription cycle (initiation, elongation, termination) while correctly predicting strand-specificity and directionality of the transcription process. We find that pre-initiation complex formation is an essentially undirected process, giving rise to a large number of bidirectional promoters and to pervasive antisense transcription. Notably, 12% of all transcriptionally active positions showed simultaneous activity on both strands. Furthermore, dsHMM reveals that antisense transcription is specifically suppressed by Nrd1, a yeast termination factor. PMID:26578558

  9. Distinct transcripts are recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for a member of the murine HSP70 gene family, HSP70.2, in various reproductive tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    The expression of hsp70.2, an hsp70 gene family member, originally characterized by its high levels of expression in germ cells in the adult mouse testis, was detected in several other reproductive tissues, including epididymis, prostate, and seminal vesicles, as well as in extraembryonic tissues of mid-gestation fetuses. In addition, hybridization with RNA probes transcribed in the sense orientation surprisingly indicated the presence of slightly larger "antisense" transcripts in several tissues. The levels of antisense transcripts varied among the tissues, with the highest signal detected in the prostate and no signal being detectable in the testis. Consistent with these results, in situ hybridization analysis clearly localized the sense-orientation transcripts to pachytene spermatocytes, while no antisense-orientation transcripts were observed in adjacent sections of the same tubules. Our findings have thus shown that although hsp70.2 was expressed abundantly and in a highly stage-specific manner in the male germ line, it was also expressed in other murine tissues. Furthermore, we have made the surprising observation of antisense transcription of the hsp70.2 gene in several mouse tissues, revealing another level of complexity in the regulation and function of heat shock proteins.

  10. Specific inhibition of transforming growth factor-beta2 expression in human osteoblast cells by antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z J; Kim, S K; Kwon, O S; Lee, Y S; Moon, B J

    2001-04-01

    To elucidate the role of endogenous transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta2 on human osteoblast cell, antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (S-ODNs) complementary to regions in mRNA of TGF-beta2 were synthesized and examined their effects on TGF-beta2 production and cell proliferation in a human osteoblast cell line ROS 17/2. Antisense S-ODNs were designated for three different target regions in the mRNA of TGF-beta2. Among several antisense S-ODN analyzed, an oligonucleotide (AS-11) complementary to the translation initiation site of mRNA of TGF-beta2 demonstrated a selective and strong inhibitory effect on TGF-beta2 production in osteoblast cells. Other antisense S-ODNs which were designated for other regions in mRNA of TGF-beta2 and one- or three-base mismatched analogs of AS-11 showed little or much less antisense activities than AS-11. Therefore, the most effective target site in mRNA of TGF-beta2 is at the initiation codon region. The antisense effects of AS-11 were observed without reduction of levels of mRNA of TGF-beta2. Furthermore, the inhibition of TGF-beta2 expression by antisense S-ODN appeared to enhance cell proliferation, demonstrating the growth inhibitory effect of autocrine TGF-beta2 in osteoblast cells.

  11. Antagonistic functions between the RNA chaperone Hfq and an sRNA regulate sensitivity to the antibiotic colicin.

    PubMed

    Salvail, Hubert; Caron, Marie-Pier; Bélanger, Justine; Massé, Eric

    2013-10-16

    The RNA chaperone Hfq is a key regulator of the function of small RNAs (sRNAs). Hfq has been shown to facilitate sRNAs binding to target mRNAs and to directly regulate translation through the action of sRNAs. Here, we present evidence that Hfq acts as the repressor of cirA mRNA translation in the absence of sRNA. Hfq binding to cirA prevents translation initiation, which correlates with cirA mRNA instability. In contrast, RyhB pairing to cirA mRNA promotes changes in RNA structure that displace Hfq, thereby allowing efficient translation as well as mRNA stabilization. Because CirA is a receptor for the antibiotic colicin Ia, in addition to acting as an Fur (Ferric Uptake Regulator)-regulated siderophore transporter, translational activation of cirA mRNA by RyhB promotes colicin sensitivity under conditions of iron starvation. Altogether, these results indicate that Fur and RyhB modulate an unexpected feed-forward loop mechanism related to iron physiology and colicin sensitivity. PMID:24065131

  12. Antagonistic functions between the RNA chaperone Hfq and an sRNA regulate sensitivity to the antibiotic colicin

    PubMed Central

    Salvail, Hubert; Caron, Marie-Pier; Bélanger, Justine; Massé, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The RNA chaperone Hfq is a key regulator of the function of small RNAs (sRNAs). Hfq has been shown to facilitate sRNAs binding to target mRNAs and to directly regulate translation through the action of sRNAs. Here, we present evidence that Hfq acts as the repressor of cirA mRNA translation in the absence of sRNA. Hfq binding to cirA prevents translation initiation, which correlates with cirA mRNA instability. In contrast, RyhB pairing to cirA mRNA promotes changes in RNA structure that displace Hfq, thereby allowing efficient translation as well as mRNA stabilization. Because CirA is a receptor for the antibiotic colicin Ia, in addition to acting as an Fur (Ferric Uptake Regulator)-regulated siderophore transporter, translational activation of cirA mRNA by RyhB promotes colicin sensitivity under conditions of iron starvation. Altogether, these results indicate that Fur and RyhB modulate an unexpected feed-forward loop mechanism related to iron physiology and colicin sensitivity. PMID:24065131

  13. MicroRNA networks regulate development of brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Trajkovski, Mirko; Lodish, Harvey

    2013-09-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is specialized for heat generation and energy expenditure as a defense against cold and obesity; in both humans and mice increased amounts of BAT are associated with a lean phenotype and resistance to development of the metabolic syndrome and its complications. Here we summarize recent research showing that several BAT-expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in regulating differentiation and metabolism of brown and beige adipocytes; we discuss the key mRNA targets downregulated by these miRNAs and show how these miRNAs affect directly or indirectly transcription factors important for BAT development. We suggest that these miRNAs could be part of novel therapeutics to increase BAT in humans.

  14. Polyploidy and small RNA regulation of cotton fiber development.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xueying; Song, Qingxin; Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2014-08-01

    Cotton is not only the most important source of renewal textile fibers, but also an excellent model for studying cell fate determination and polyploidy effects on gene expression and evolution of domestication traits. The combination of A and D-progenitor genomes into allotetraploid cotton induces intergenomic interactions and epigenetic effects, leading to the unequal expression of homoeologous genes. Small RNAs regulate the expression of transcription and signaling factors related to cellular growth, development and adaptation. An example is miRNA-mediated preferential degradation of homoeologous mRNAs encoding MYB-domain transcription factors that are required for the initiation of leaf trichomes in Arabidopsis and of seed fibers in cotton. This example of coevolution between small RNAs and their homoeologous targets could shape morphological traits such as fibers during the selection and domestication of polyploid crops.

  15. Dynamic regulation of RNA editing in human brain development and disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Taeyoung; Park, Chul-Kee; Leung, Anthony K L; Gao, Yuan; Hyde, Thomas M; Kleinman, Joel E; Rajpurohit, Anandita; Tao, Ran; Shin, Joo Heon; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2016-08-01

    RNA editing is increasingly recognized as a molecular mechanism regulating RNA activity and recoding proteins. Here we surveyed the global landscape of RNA editing in human brain tissues and identified three unique patterns of A-to-I RNA editing rates during cortical development: stable high, stable low and increasing. RNA secondary structure and the temporal expression of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) contribute to cis- and trans-regulatory mechanisms of these RNA editing patterns, respectively. Interestingly, the increasing pattern was associated with neuronal maturation, correlated with mRNA abundance and potentially influenced miRNA binding energy. Gene ontology analyses implicated the increasing pattern in vesicle or organelle membrane-related genes and glutamate signaling pathways. We also found that the increasing pattern was selectively perturbed in spinal cord injury and glioblastoma. Our findings reveal global and dynamic aspects of RNA editing in brain, providing new insight into epitranscriptional regulation of sequence diversity. PMID:27348216

  16. Runx2/DICER/miRNA Pathway in Regulating Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Leilei; Tu, Qisheng; Meng, Shu; Zhang, Lan; Yu, Liming; Song, Jinlin; Hu, Yun; Sui, Lei; Zhang, Jin; Dard, Michel; Cheng, Jessica; Murray, Dana; Tang, Yin; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Gary S; Chen, Jake

    2017-01-01

    DICER is the central enzyme that cleaves precursor microRNAs (miRNAs) into 21-25 nucleotide duplex in cell lineage differentiation, identity, and survival. In the current study, we characterized the specific bone metabolism genes and corresponding miRNAs and found that DICER and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) expressions increased simultaneously during osteogenic differentiation. Luciferase assay showed that Runx2 significantly increased the expression levels of DICER luciferase promoter reporter. Our analysis also revealed weaker DICER expression in embryos of Runx2 knock out mice (Runx2 -/-) compared with that of Runx2 +/- and Runx2 +/+ mice. We further established the calvarial bone critical-size defect (CSD) mouse model. The bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) transfected with siRNA targeting DICER were combined with silk scaffolds and transplanted into calvarial bone CSDs. Five weeks post-surgery, micro-CT analysis revealed impaired bone formation, and repairing in calvarial defects with the siRNA targeting DICER group. In conclusion, our results suggest that DICER is specifically regulated by osteogenic master gene Runx2 that binds to the DICER promoter. Consequently, DICER cleaves precursors of miR-335-5p and miR-17-92 cluster to form mature miRNAs, which target and decrease the Dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK1), and proapoptotic factor BIM levels, respectively, leading to an enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. These intriguing results reveal a central mechanism underlying lineage-specific regulation by a Runx2/DICER/miRNAs cascade during osteogenic differentiation and bone development. Our study, also suggests a potential application of modulating DICER expression for bone tissue repair and regeneration. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 182-191, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Runx2/DICER/miRNA Pathway in Regulating Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Leilei; Tu, Qisheng; Meng, Shu; Zhang, Lan; Yu, Liming; Song, Jinlin; Hu, Yun; Sui, Lei; Zhang, Jin; Dard, Michel; Cheng, Jessica; Murray, Dana; Tang, Yin; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Gary S; Chen, Jake

    2017-01-01

    DICER is the central enzyme that cleaves precursor microRNAs (miRNAs) into 21-25 nucleotide duplex in cell lineage differentiation, identity, and survival. In the current study, we characterized the specific bone metabolism genes and corresponding miRNAs and found that DICER and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) expressions increased simultaneously during osteogenic differentiation. Luciferase assay showed that Runx2 significantly increased the expression levels of DICER luciferase promoter reporter. Our analysis also revealed weaker DICER expression in embryos of Runx2 knock out mice (Runx2 -/-) compared with that of Runx2 +/- and Runx2 +/+ mice. We further established the calvarial bone critical-size defect (CSD) mouse model. The bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) transfected with siRNA targeting DICER were combined with silk scaffolds and transplanted into calvarial bone CSDs. Five weeks post-surgery, micro-CT analysis revealed impaired bone formation, and repairing in calvarial defects with the siRNA targeting DICER group. In conclusion, our results suggest that DICER is specifically regulated by osteogenic master gene Runx2 that binds to the DICER promoter. Consequently, DICER cleaves precursors of miR-335-5p and miR-17-92 cluster to form mature miRNAs, which target and decrease the Dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK1), and proapoptotic factor BIM levels, respectively, leading to an enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. These intriguing results reveal a central mechanism underlying lineage-specific regulation by a Runx2/DICER/miRNAs cascade during osteogenic differentiation and bone development. Our study, also suggests a potential application of modulating DICER expression for bone tissue repair and regeneration. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 182-191, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27064596

  18. Altered RNA editing in 3′ UTR perturbs microRNA-mediated regulation of oncogenes and tumor-suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liye; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Varelas, Xaralabos; Monti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    RNA editing is a molecular event that alters specific nucleotides in RNA post-transcriptionally. RNA editing has the potential to impact a variety of cellular processes and is implicated in diseases such as cancer. Yet, the precise mechanisms by which RNA editing controls cellular processes are poorly understood. Here, we characterize sequences altered by RNA editing in patient samples from lymphoma, neuroblastoma and head and neck cancers. We show that A-to-I RNA editing sites are highly conserved across samples of the same tissue type and that most editing sites identified in tumors are also detectable in normal tissues. Next, we identify the significant changes in editing levels of known sites between tumor and paired “normal” tissues across 14 cancer types (627 pairs) from The Cancer Genome Atlas project and show that the complexity of RNA editing regulation cannot be captured by the activity of ADAR family genes alone. Our pan-cancer analysis confirms previous results on individual tumor types and suggests that changes of RNA editing levels in coding and 3′UTR regions could be a general mechanism to promote tumor growth. We also propose a model explaining how altered RNA editing levels affect microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of oncogenes and tumor-suppressors. PMID:26980570

  19. Context-dependent regulation of Musashi-mediated mRNA translation and cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    MacNicol, Melanie C; Cragle, Chad E; MacNicol, Angus M

    2011-01-01

    Musashi-mediated mRNA translational control has been implicated in the promotion of physiological and pathological stem cell proliferation. During self-renewal of mammalian stem cells, Musashi has been proposed to act to repress the translation of mRNAs encoding inhibitors of cell cycle progression. By contrast, in maturing Xenopus oocytes Musashi activates translation of target mRNAs that encode proteins promoting cell cycle progression. The mechanisms directing Musashi to differentially control mRNA translation in mammalian stem cells and Xenopus oocytes is unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the mechanisms defining Musashi function lie within the cellular context. Specifically, we show that murine Musashi acts as an activator of translation in maturing Xenopus oocytes while Xenopus Musashi functions as a repressor of target mRNA translation in mammalian cells. We further demonstrate that within the context of a primary mammalian neural stem/progenitor cell, Musashi can be converted from a repressor of mRNA translation to an activator of translation in response to extracellular stimuli. We present current models of Musashi-mediated mRNA translational control and discuss possible mechanisms for regulating Musashi function. An understanding of these mechanisms presents exciting possibilities for development of therapeutic targets to control physiological and pathological stem cell proliferation.

  20. Regulation of the cycling of timeless (tim) RNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, G K; Ousley, A; Darlington, T K; Chen, D; Chen, Y; Fu, W; Hickman, L J; Kay, S A; Sehgal, A

    2001-06-01

    Circadian rhythms in Drosophila depend upon expression of the timeless (tim) and period (per) genes, which encode interacting components of the endogenous clock. These two clock genes show a robust circadian oscillation in transcription rate as well as RNA and protein levels. Transcriptional activation of both genes requires the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) PAS transcription factors dCLOCK (dCLK) and CYCLE (CYC), which bind E-box elements. We investigated the role of E-box elements in regulating behavioral rhythmicity and tim gene expression. We show that mutation of the upstream E-box in the tim gene prevents the rescue by tim cDNA sequences of the arrhythmic tim(01) phenotype. RNA encoded by this mutated tim transgene fails to cycle and is expressed at low levels. While a tim transgene carrying a wild-type E-box restores behavioral rhythms, tim RNA levels are intermediate to those of the mutant E-box transgenic lines and wild type, and do not display high amplitude cycling. On the other hand, high-amplitude RNA cycling was consistently obtained with a tim transgene that contains genomic, rather than cDNA, sequences. To identify additional sequences that may be required for tim cycling, we investigated the role of an E-box in the first intron of the tim gene through cell culture experiments. In these experiments, the presence of this intron did not have any effect on the activation of tim transcription by dCLK/CYC. As the upstream E-box was implicated in activation by dCLK/CYC in cell culture, we assayed sequences containing this E-box for association with proteins in fly head extracts. These studies provide the first biochemical evidence for an in vivo complex containing dCLK and CYC that binds the tim upstream sequence and is detected at all times of day. Together, these data highlight molecular mechanisms that are critical for behavioral rhythms.

  1. Endogenous Msx1 antisense transcript: in vivo and in vitro evidences, structure, and potential involvement in skeleton development in mammals.

    PubMed

    Blin-Wakkach, C; Lezot, F; Ghoul-Mazgar, S; Hotton, D; Monteiro, S; Teillaud, C; Pibouin, L; Orestes-Cardoso, S; Papagerakis, P; Macdougall, M; Robert, B; Berdal, A

    2001-06-19

    Msx1 is a key factor for the development of tooth and craniofacial skeleton and has been proposed to play a pivotal role in terminal cell differentiation. In this paper, we demonstrated the presence of an endogenous Msx1 antisense RNA (Msx1-AS RNA) in mice, rats, and humans. In situ analysis revealed that this RNA is expressed only in differentiated dental and bone cells with an inverse correlation with Msx1 protein. These in vivo data and overexpression of Msx1 sense and AS RNA in an odontoblastic cell line (MO6-G3) showed that the balance between the levels of the two Msx1 RNAs is related to the expression of Msx1 protein. To analyze the impact of this balance in the Msx-Dlx homeoprotein pathway, we analyzed the effect of Msx1, Msx2, and Dlx5 overexpression on proteins involved in skeletal differentiation. We showed that the Msx1-AS RNA is involved in crosstalk between the Msx-Dlx pathways because its expression was abolished by Dlx5. Msx1 was shown to down-regulate a master gene of skeletal cells differentiation, Cbfa1. All these data strongly suggest that the ratio between Msx1 sense and antisense RNAs is a very important factor in the control of skeletal terminal differentiation. Finally, the initiation site for Msx1-AS RNA transcription was located by primer extension in both mouse and human in an identical region, including a consensus TATA box, suggesting an evolutionary conservation of the AS RNA-mediated regulation of Msx1 gene expression.

  2. Competition for XPO5 binding between Dicer mRNA, pre-miRNA and viral RNA regulates human Dicer levels.

    PubMed

    Bennasser, Yamina; Chable-Bessia, Christine; Triboulet, Robinson; Gibbings, Derrick; Gwizdek, Carole; Dargemont, Catherine; Kremer, Eric J; Voinnet, Olivier; Benkirane, Monsef

    2011-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, noncoding RNAs that function by regulating gene expression post-transcriptionally. Alterations in miRNA expression can strongly influence cellular physiology. Here we demonstrated cross-regulation between two components of the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery in human cells. Inhibition of exportin-5, the karyopherin responsible for pre-miRNA export, downregulated expression of Dicer, the RNase III required for pre-miRNA maturation. This effect was post-transcriptional and resulted from an increased nuclear localization of Dicer mRNA. In vitro assays and cellular RNA immunoprecipitation experiments showed that exportin-5 interacted directly with Dicer mRNA. Titration of exportin-5 by overexpression of either pre-miRNA or the adenoviral VA1 RNA resulted in loss of Dicer mRNA-exportin-5 interaction and reduction of Dicer level. This saturation also occurred during adenoviral infection and enhanced viral replication. Our study reveals an important cross-regulatory mechanism between pre-miRNA or viral small RNAs and Dicer through exportin-5.

  3. Reciprocal regulation of microRNA and mRNA profiles in neuronal development and synapse formation

    PubMed Central

    Manakov, Sergei A; Grant, Seth GN; Enright, Anton J

    2009-01-01

    Background Synapse formation and the development of neural networks are known to be controlled by a coordinated program of mRNA synthesis. microRNAs are now recognized to be important regulators of mRNA translation and stability in a wide variety of organisms. While specific microRNAs are known to be involved in neural development, the extent to which global microRNA and mRNA profiles are coordinately regulated in neural development is unknown. Results We examined mouse primary neuronal cultures, analyzing microRNA and mRNA expression. Three main developmental patterns of microRNA expression were observed: steady-state levels, up-regulated and down-regulated. Co-expressed microRNAs were found to have related target recognition sites and to be encoded in distinct genomic locations. A number of 43 differentially expressed miRNAs were located in five genomic clusters. Their predicted mRNA targets show reciprocal levels of expression. We identified a set of reciprocally expressed microRNAs that target mRNAs encoding postsynaptic density proteins and high-level steady-state microRNAs that target non-neuronal low-level expressed mRNAs. Conclusion We characterized hundreds of miRNAs in neuronal culture development and identified three major modes of miRNA expression. We predict these miRNAs to regulate reciprocally expressed protein coding genes, including many genes involved in synaptogenesis. The identification of miRNAs that target mRNAs during synaptogenesis indicates a new level of regulation of the synapse. PMID:19737397

  4. The long non-coding RNA HOTAIR promotes the proliferation of serous ovarian cancer cells through the regulation of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Jun-jun; Wang, Yan; Ding, Jing-xin; Jin, Hong-yan; Yang, Gong; Hua, Ke-qin

    2015-05-01

    HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) is a well-known long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) whose dysregulation correlates with poor prognosis and malignant progression in many forms of cancer. Here, we investigate the expression pattern, clinical significance, and biological function of HOTAIR in serous ovarian cancer (SOC). Clinically, we found that HOTAIR levels were overexpressed in SOC tissues compared with normal controls and that HOTAIR overexpression was correlated with an advanced FIGO stage and a high histological grade. Multivariate analysis revealed that HOTAIR is an independent prognostic factor for predicting overall survival in SOC patients. We demonstrated that HOTAIR silencing inhibited A2780 and OVCA429 SOC cell proliferation in vitro and that the anti-proliferative effects of HOTAIR silencing also occurred in vivo. Further investigation into the mechanisms responsible for the growth inhibitory effects by HOTAIR silencing revealed that its knockdown resulted in the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through certain cell cycle-related and apoptosis-related proteins. Together, these results highlight a critical role of HOTAIR in SOC cell proliferation and contribute to a better understanding of the importance of dysregulated lncRNAs in SOC progression. - Highlights: • HOTAIR overexpression correlates with an aggressive tumour phenotype and a poor prognosis in SOC. • HOTAIR promotes SOC cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. • The proliferative role of HOTAIR is associated with regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis.

  5. Intracellular Calcium Regulates Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay

    PubMed Central

    Nickless, Andrew; Jackson, Erin; Marasa, Jayne; Nugent, Patrick; Mercer, Robert W.; Piwnica-Worms, David; You, Zhongsheng

    2014-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway selectively eliminates aberrant transcripts containing premature translation termination codons (PTCs) and regulates the levels of a number of physiological mRNAs. NMD modulates the clinical outcome of a variety of human diseases, including cancer and many genetic disorders, and may represent an important target for therapeutic intervention. Here we have developed a novel multicolored, bioluminescence-based reporter system that can specifically and effectively assay NMD in live human cells. Using this reporter system, we conducted a robust high-throughput small-molecule screen in human cells and, unpredictably, identified a group of cardiac glycosides including ouabain and digoxin as potent inhibitors of NMD. Cardiac glycoside-mediated effects on NMD are dependent on binding and inhibiting the Na+/K+-ATPase on the plasma membrane and subsequent elevation of intracellular calcium levels. Induction of calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum also leads to inhibition of NMD. Thus, this study reveals intracellular calcium as a key regulator of NMD and has important implications for exploiting NMD in the treatment of disease. PMID:25064126

  6. Androgen receptor regulates SRC expression through microRNA-203.

    PubMed

    Siu, Man Kit; Chen, Wei-Yu; Tsai, Hong-Yuan; Yeh, Hsiu-Lien; Yin, Juan Juan; Liu, Shih-Yang; Liu, Yen-Nien

    2016-05-01

    The SRC kinase has pivotal roles in multiple developmental processes and in tumor progression. An inverse relationship has been observed between androgen receptor (AR) activity and SRC signaling in advanced prostate cancer (PCa); however, the modulation of AR/SRC crosstalk that leads to metastatic PCa is unclear. Here, we showed that patients with high SRC levels displayed correspondingly low canonical AR gene signatures. Our results demonstrated that activated AR induced miR-203 and reduced SRC levels in PCa model systems. miR-203 directly binds to the 3' UTR of SRC and regulates the stability of SRC mRNA upon AR activation. Moreover, we found that progressive PCa cell migration and growth were associated with a decrease in AR-regulated miR-203 and an increase in SRC. Relationships among AR, miR-203, and SRC were also confirmed in clinical datasets and specimens. We suggest that the induction of SRC results in increased PCa metastasis that is linked to the dysregulation of the AR signaling pathway through the inactivation of miR-203.

  7. Androgen receptor regulates SRC expression through microRNA-203

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hong-Yuan; Yeh, Hsiu-Lien; Yin, Juan Juan; Liu, Shih-Yang; Liu, Yen-Nien

    2016-01-01

    The SRC kinase has pivotal roles in multiple developmental processes and in tumor progression. An inverse relationship has been observed between androgen receptor (AR) activity and SRC signaling in advanced prostate cancer (PCa); however, the modulation of AR/SRC crosstalk that leads to metastatic PCa is unclear. Here, we showed that patients with high SRC levels displayed correspondingly low canonical AR gene signatures. Our results demonstrated that activated AR induced miR-203 and reduced SRC levels in PCa model systems. miR-203 directly binds to the 3′ UTR of SRC and regulates the stability of SRC mRNA upon AR activation. Moreover, we found that progressive PCa cell migration and growth were associated with a decrease in AR-regulated miR-203 and an increase in SRC. Relationships among AR, miR-203, and SRC were also confirmed in clinical datasets and specimens. We suggest that the induction of SRC results in increased PCa metastasis that is linked to the dysregulation of the AR signaling pathway through the inactivation of miR-203. PMID:27028864

  8. The identification of an ESCC susceptibility SNP rs920778 that regulates the expression of lncRNA HOTAIR via a novel intronic enhancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojiao; Zhou, Liqing; Fu, Guobin; Sun, Fang; Shi, Juan; Wei, Jinyu; Lu, Chao; Zhou, Changchun; Yuan, Qipeng; Yang, Ming

    2014-09-01

    Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR), which could induce genome-wide retargeting of polycomb-repressive complex 2, trimethylates histone H3 lysine-27 (H3K27me3) and deregulation of multiple downstream genes, is involved in development and progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We hypothesized that the functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in HOTAIR may affect HOTAIR expression and/or its function and, thus, ESCC risk. Therefore, we examined the association between three haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNP) across the whole HOTAIR locus and ESCC risk as well as the functional relevance of an ESCC susceptibility SNP rs920778. Genotypes were determined in three independent case-control sets consisted of 2098 ESCC patients and 2150 controls. The allele-specific regulation on HOTAIR expression by the rs920778 SNP was investigated in vitro and in vivo. We found that the HOTAIR rs920778 TT carriers had a 1.37-fold, 1.78-fold and 2.08-fold increased ESCC risk in Jinan, Shijiazhuang and Huaian populations, respectively, compared with the CC carriers (P = 0.003, 7.7 × 10(-4) and 5.9 × 10(-4)). During inspecting functional relevance of the rs920778 SNP, we identified a novel intronic HOTAIR enhancer locating between +1719bp and +2353bp from the transcriptional start site through reporter assays. Moreover, there is an allelic regulation of rs920778 on HOTAIR expression via this enhancer in both ESCC cell lines and normal esophageal tissue specimens, with higher HOTAIR expression among T allele carriers. These results demonstrate that functional genetic variants influencing lncRNA regulation may explain a fraction of ESCC genetic basis.

  9. Regulation of Gene Expression in Plants through miRNA Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanji; Ziegler, Todd E.; Roberts, James K.; Heck, Gregory R.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic organisms possess a complex RNA-directed gene expression regulatory network allowing the production of unique gene expression patterns. A recent addition to the repertoire of RNA-based gene regulation is miRNA target decoys, endogenous RNA that can negatively regulate miRNA activity. miRNA decoys have been shown to be a valuable tool for understanding the function of several miRNA families in plants and invertebrates. Engineering and precise manipulation of an endogenous RNA regulatory network through modification of miRNA activity also affords a significant opportunity to achieve a desired outcome of enhanced plant development or response to environmental stresses. Here we report that expression of miRNA decoys as single or heteromeric non-cleavable microRNA (miRNA) sites embedded in either non-protein-coding or within the 3′ untranslated region of protein-coding transcripts can regulate the expression of one or more miRNA targets. By altering the sequence of the miRNA decoy sites, we were able to attenuate miRNA inactivation, which allowed for fine regulation of native miRNA targets and the production of a desirable range of plant phenotypes. Thus, our results demonstrate miRNA decoys are a flexible and robust tool, not only for studying miRNA function, but also for targeted engineering of gene expression in plants. Computational analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome revealed a number of potential miRNA decoys, suggesting that endogenous decoys may have an important role in natural modulation of expression in plants. PMID:21731706

  10. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; et al

    2015-08-20

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected themore » splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. In conclusion, this large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs.« less

  11. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-08-20

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected the splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. In conclusion, this large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs.

  12. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected the splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. This large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs. PMID:26294686

  13. Down regulated lncRNA MEG3 eliminates mycobacteria in macrophages via autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Hanisch, Carlos; Palma Vera, Sergio Eliseo; Einspanier, Ralf; Sharbati, Soroush

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNA play a major part in host response to bacterial agents. However, the role of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) in this context remains unknown. LncRNA regulate gene expression by acting e.g. as transcriptional coactivators, RNA decoys or microRNA sponges. They control development, differentiation and cellular processes such as autophagy in disease conditions. Here, we provide an insight into the role of lncRNA in mycobacterial infections. Human macrophages were infected with Mycobacterium bovis BCG and lncRNA expression was studied early post infection. For this purpose, lncRNA with known immune related functions were preselected and a lncRNA specific RT-qPCR protocol was established. In addition to expression-based prediction of lncRNA function, we assessed strategies for thorough normalisation of lncRNA. Arrayed quantification showed infection-dependent repression of several lncRNA including MEG3. Pathway analysis linked MEG3 to mTOR and PI3K-AKT signalling pointing to regulation of autophagy. Accordingly, IFN-γ induced autophagy in infected macrophages resulted in sustained MEG3 down regulation and lack of IFN-γ allowed for counter regulation of MEG3 by viable M. bovis BCG. Knockdown of MEG3 in macrophages resulted in induction of autophagy and enhanced eradication of intracellular M. bovis BCG. PMID:26757825

  14. Antisense downregulation of polyphenol oxidase results in enhanced disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Thipyapong, Piyada; Hunt, Michelle D; Steffens, John C

    2004-11-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs; EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.10.3.2) catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, highly reactive intermediates whose secondary reactions are responsible for much of the oxidative browning that accompanies plant senescence, wounding, and responses to pathogens. To assess the impact of PPO expression on resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato we introduced a chimeric antisense potato PPO cDNA into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.). Oxidation of caffeic acid, the dominant o-diphenolic aglycone of tomato foliage, was decreased ca. 40-fold by antisense expression of PPO. All members of the PPO gene family were downregulated: neither immunoreactive PPO nor PPO-specific mRNA were detectable in the transgenic plants. In addition, the antisense PPO construct suppressed inducible increases in PPO activity. Downregulation of PPO in antisense plants did not affect growth, development, or reproduction of greenhouse-grown plants. However, antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility to P. syringae expressing the avirulence gene avrPto in both Pto and pto backgrounds. In a compatible (pto) interaction, plants constitutively expressing an antisense PPO construct exhibited a 55-fold increase in bacterial growth, three times larger lesion area, and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. In an incompatible (Pto) interaction, antisense PPO plants exhibited 100-fold increases in bacterial growth and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. Although it is not clear whether hypersusceptibility of antisense plants is due to low constitutive PPO levels or failure to induce PPO upon infection, these findings suggest a critical role for PPO-catalyzed phenolic oxidation in limiting disease development. As a preliminary effort to understand the role of induced PPO in limiting disease development, we also examined the response of PPO promoter::beta-glucuronidase constructs when plants are challenged with P

  15. Post-transcriptional regulation tends to attenuate the mRNA noise and to increase the mRNA gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Changhong; Wang, Shuqiang; Zhou, Tianshou; Jiang, Yiguo

    2015-10-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is ubiquitous in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, but how it impacts gene expression remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze a simple gene model in which we assume that mRNAs are produced in a constitutive manner but are regulated post-transcriptionally by a decapping enzyme that switches between the active state and the inactive state. We derive the analytical mRNA distribution governed by a chemical master equation, which can be well used to analyze the mechanism of how post-transcription regulation influences the mRNA expression level including the mRNA noise. We demonstrate that the mean mRNA level in the stochastic case is always higher than that in the deterministic case due to the stochastic effect of the enzyme, but the size of the increased part depends mainly on the switching rates between two enzyme states. More interesting is that we find that in contrast to transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional regulation tends to attenuate noise in mRNA. Our results provide insight into the role of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling the transcriptional noise.

  16. IGF-1 Antisense Strategies for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y X; Anthony, D D

    2000-01-01

    The technical approaches to gene therapy for cancer utilize ex vivo and in vivo gene-transfer methodology. This chapter focuses on applicability and use of an ex vivo approach using an IGF-1 antisense RNA strategy of treatment. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF-2 have pivotal roles in cell proliferation and development (for review, see 1-6). The preponderance of peptide synthesis and activity occur during fetal development, and protein synthesis is downregulated in most mature tissues except for adult liver. Further modulating the activities of these proteins are the levels of their respective cell-surface receptors and ligand-receptor interactions (3,5,6).

  17. Antisense oligonucleotides, microRNAs, and antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dávalos, Alberto; Chroni, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    The specificity of Watson-Crick base pairing and the development of several chemical modifications to oligonucleotides have enabled the development of novel drug classes for the treatment of different human diseases. This review focuses on promising results of recent preclinical or clinical studies on targeting HDL metabolism and function by antisense oligonucleotides and miRNA-based therapies. Although many hurdles regarding basic mechanism of action, delivery, specificity, and toxicity need to be overcome, promising results from recent clinical trials and recent approval of these types of therapy to treat dyslipidemia suggest that the treatment of HDL dysfunction will benefit from these unique clinical opportunities. Moreover, an overview of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) developed for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease and currently being tested in clinical studies is provided. Initial studies have shown that these compounds are generally safe and well tolerated, but ongoing large clinical studies will assess their long-term safety and efficacy.

  18. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of RNA Polymerase II Levels in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Dalley, B. K.; Rogalski, T. M.; Tullis, G. E.; Riddle, D. L.; Golomb, M.

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the regulation of RNA polymerase II levels in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have constructed nematode strains having one, two, or three copies of ama-1, the gene for the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Steady-state levels of RNA polymerase II polypeptides and solubilized enzyme activity are invariant with gene dosage, indicating regulatory compensation. However, steady-state levels of ama-1 mRNA are directly proportional to gene dosage. These results imply that RNA polymerase II levels in C. elegans are regulated post-transcriptionally. PMID:8436272

  19. MicroRNA-34a regulation of endothelial senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Takashi; Yagi, Shusuke; Yamakuchi, Munekazu

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) regulates senescence and cell cycle progression in endothelial cells. {yields} MiR-34a expression increases during endothelial cell senescence and in older mice. {yields} SIRT1 is a miR-34a target gene in endothelial cells. {yields} SIRT1 mediates the effects of miR-34a upon cell senescence in endothelial cells. -- Abstract: Endothelial senescence is thought to play a role in cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that endothelial microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate endothelial survival and senescence. We found that miR-34a is highly expressed in primary endothelial cells. We observed that miR-34a expression increases in senescent human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in heart and spleen of older mice. MiR-34a over-expression induces endothelial cell senescence and also suppresses cell proliferation by inhibiting cell cycle progression. Searching for how miR-34a affects senescence, we discovered that SIRT1 is a target of miR-34a. Over-expressing miR-34a inhibits SIRT1 protein expression, and knocking down miR-34a enhances SIRT1 expression. MiR-34a triggers endothelial senescence in part through SIRT1, since forced expression of SIRT1 blocks the ability of miR-34a to induce senescence. Our data suggest that miR-34a contributes to endothelial senescence through suppression of SIRT1.

  20. Cholesterol-lowering Action of BNA-based Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting PCSK9 in Atherogenic Diet-induced Hypercholesterolemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Nakatani, Moeka; Wada, Shunsuke; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Narukawa, Keisuke; Sasaki, Kiyomi; Shibata, Masa-Aki; Torigoe, Hidetaka; Yamaoka, Tetsuji; Imanishi, Takeshi; Obika, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings in molecular biology implicate the involvement of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) in low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) protein regulation. The cholesterol-lowering potential of anti-PCSK9 antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) modified with bridged nucleic acids (BNA-AONs) including 2′,4′-BNA (also called as locked nucleic acid (LNA)) and 2′,4′-BNANC chemistries were demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. An in vitro transfection study revealed that all of the BNA-AONs induce dose-dependent reductions in PCSK9 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels concomitantly with increases in LDLR protein levels. BNA-AONs were administered to atherogenic diet-fed C57BL/6J mice twice weekly for 6 weeks; 2′,4′-BNA-AON that targeted murine PCSK9 induced a dose-dependent reduction in hepatic PCSK9 mRNA and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C); the 43% reduction of serum LDL-C was achieved at a dose of 20 mg/kg/injection with only moderate increases in toxicological indicators. In addition, the serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels increased. These results support antisense inhibition of PCSK9 as a potential therapeutic approach. When compared with 2′,4′-BNA-AON, 2′,4′-BNANC-AON showed an earlier LDL-C–lowering effect and was more tolerable in mice. Our results validate the optimization of 2′,4′-BNANC-based anti-PCSK9 antisense molecules to produce a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:23344002

  1. Prognostic significance of NPM1 mutation-modulated microRNA-mRNA regulation in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Y-C; Tsai, M-H; Chou, W-C; Liu, Y-C; Kuo, Y-Y; Hou, H-A; Lu, T-P; Lai, L-C; Chen, Y; Tien, H-F; Chuang, E Y

    2016-02-01

    Distinct microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA signatures were reported in nucleophosmin (NPM1)-mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, it remains unknown whether the mutation participates in the dynamic interaction between miRNA and mRNA. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of NPM1 mutation in modulating miRNA-mRNA regulation (MMR). From the sample-paired miRNA/mRNA microarrays of 181 de novo AML patients, we found that MMR was dynamic and could be affected by NPM1 mutation. By a systematic framework, we identified 493 NPM1 mutation-modulated MMR pairs, where the strength of MMR was significantly attenuated in patients carrying NPM1 mutations, compared to those with wild-type NPM1. These miRNAs/mRNAs were associated with pathways implicated in cancer and known functions of NPM1 mutation. Such modulation of MMR was validated in two independent cohorts as well as in cells with different NPM1 mutant burdens. Furthermore, we showed that the regulatory strength of nine MMR pairs could predict patients' outcomes. Combining these pairs, a scoring system was proposed and shown to predict survival in discovery and validation data sets, independent of other known prognostic factors. Our study provides novel biological insights into the role of NPM1 mutation as a modulator of MMR, based on which a novel prognostic marker is proposed in AML. PMID:26376228

  2. Prognostic significance of NPM1 mutation-modulated microRNA-mRNA regulation in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Y-C; Tsai, M-H; Chou, W-C; Liu, Y-C; Kuo, Y-Y; Hou, H-A; Lu, T-P; Lai, L-C; Chen, Y; Tien, H-F; Chuang, E Y

    2016-02-01

    Distinct microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA signatures were reported in nucleophosmin (NPM1)-mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, it remains unknown whether the mutation participates in the dynamic interaction between miRNA and mRNA. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of NPM1 mutation in modulating miRNA-mRNA regulation (MMR). From the sample-paired miRNA/mRNA microarrays of 181 de novo AML patients, we found that MMR was dynamic and could be affected by NPM1 mutation. By a systematic framework, we identified 493 NPM1 mutation-modulated MMR pairs, where the strength of MMR was significantly attenuated in patients carrying NPM1 mutations, compared to those with wild-type NPM1. These miRNAs/mRNAs were associated with pathways implicated in cancer and known functions of NPM1 mutation. Such modulation of MMR was validated in two independent cohorts as well as in cells with different NPM1 mutant burdens. Furthermore, we showed that the regulatory strength of nine MMR pairs could predict patients' outcomes. Combining these pairs, a scoring system was proposed and shown to predict survival in discovery and validation data sets, independent of other known prognostic factors. Our study provides novel biological insights into the role of NPM1 mutation as a modulator of MMR, based on which a novel prognostic marker is proposed in AML.

  3. A long noncoding RNA critically regulates Bcr-Abl-mediated cellular transformation by acting as a competitive endogenous RNA.

    PubMed

    Guo, G; Kang, Q; Zhu, X; Chen, Q; Wang, X; Chen, Y; Ouyang, J; Zhang, L; Tan, H; Chen, R; Huang, S; Chen, J-L

    2015-04-01

    Aberrant expression of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) is associated with various human cancers. However, the role of lncRNAs in Bcr-Abl-mediated chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is unknown. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of lncRNAs in human CML cells using an lncRNA cDNA microarray and identified an lncRNA termed lncRNA-BGL3 that acted as a key regulator of Bcr-Abl-mediated cellular transformation. Notably, we observed that lncRNA-BGL3 was highly induced in response to disruption of Bcr-Abl expression or by inhibiting Bcr-Abl kinase activity in K562 cells and leukemic cells derived from CML patients. Ectopic expression of lncRNA-BGL3 sensitized leukemic cells to undergo apoptosis and inhibited Bcr-Abl-induced tumorigenesis. Furthermore, transgenic (TG) mice expressing lncRNA-BGL3 were generated. We found that TG expression of lncRNA-BGL3 alone in mice was sufficient to impair primary bone marrow transformation by Bcr-Abl. Interestingly, we identified that lncRNA-BGL3 was a target of miR-17, miR-93, miR-20a, miR-20b, miR-106a and miR-106b, microRNAs that repress mRNA of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). Further experiments demonstrated that lncRNA-BGL3 functioned as a competitive endogenous RNA for binding these microRNAs to cross-regulate PTEN expression. Additionally, our experiments have begun to address the mechanism of how lncRNA-BGL3 is regulated in the leukemic cells and showed that Bcr-Abl repressed lncRNA-BGL3 expression through c-Myc-dependent DNA methylation. Taken together, these results reveal that Bcr-Abl-mediated cellular transformation critically requires silence of tumor-suppressor lncRNA-BGL3 and suggest a potential strategy for the treatment of Bcr-Abl-positive leukemia.

  4. Regulation of gene expression by the RNA-binding protein Sam68 in cancer.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Prabhakar; Gaughan, Luke; Dalgliesh, Caroline; El-Sherif, Amira; Robson, Craig N; Leung, Hing Y; Elliott, David J

    2008-06-01

    Sam68 (Src-associated in mitosis 68 kDa) is the prototypical member of the STAR (signal transducer and activator of RNA) family of RNA-binding proteins. Sam68 is implicated in a number of cellular processes including signal transduction, transcription, RNA metabolism, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. In the present review, we summarize the functions of Sam68 as a transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression, with particular relevance to cancer. PMID:18481990

  5. Robust gene silencing mediated by antisense small RNAs in the pathogenic protist Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Morf, Laura; Pearson, Richard J.; Wang, Angelia S.; Singh, Upinder

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference uses small RNAs (sRNA), which target genes for sequence-specific silencing. The parasite Entamoeba histolytica contains an abundant repertoire of 27 nt antisense (AS) sRNA with 5′-polyphosphate termini, but their roles in regulating gene expression have not been well established. We demonstrate that a gene-coding region to which large numbers of AS sRNAs map can serve as a ‘trigger’ and silence the gene fused to it. Silencing is mediated by generation of AS sRNAs with 5′-polyphosphate termini that have sequence specificity to the fused gene. The mechanism of silencing is independent of the placement of the trigger relative to the silenced gene but is dependent on the sRNA concentration to the trigger. Silencing requires transcription of the trigger-gene fusion and is maintained despite loss of the trigger plasmid. We used this approach to silence multiple amebic genes, including an E. histolytica Myb gene, which is upregulated during oxidative stress response. Silencing of the EhMyb gene decreased parasite viability under oxidative stress conditions. Thus, we have developed a new tool for genetic manipulation in E. histolytica with many advantages over currently available technologies. Additionally, these data shed mechanistic insights into a eukaryotic RNA interference pathway with many novel aspects. PMID:23935116

  6. Btg2 is a Negative Regulator of Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy through a Decrease in Cytosolic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Masumura, Yuki; Higo, Shuichiro; Asano, Yoshihiro; Kato, Hisakazu; Yan, Yi; Ishino, Saki; Tsukamoto, Osamu; Kioka, Hidetaka; Hayashi, Takaharu; Shintani, Yasunori; Yamazaki, Satoru; Minamino, Tetsuo; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Komuro, Issei; Takashima, Seiji; Sakata, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Under hypertrophic stimulation, cardiomyocytes enter a hypermetabolic state and accelerate biomass accumulation. Although the molecular pathways that regulate protein levels are well-studied, the functional implications of RNA accumulation and its regulatory mechanisms in cardiomyocytes remain elusive. Here, we have elucidated the quantitative kinetics of RNA in cardiomyocytes through single cell imaging and c-Myc (Myc)-mediated hypermetabolic analytical model using cultured cardiomyocytes. Nascent RNA labeling combined with single cell imaging demonstrated that Myc protein significantly increased the amount of global RNA production per cardiomyocyte. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with high-throughput sequencing clarified that overexpressed Myc bound to a specific set of genes and recruits RNA polymerase II. Among these genes, we identified Btg2 as a novel target of Myc. Btg2 overexpression significantly reduced cardiomyocyte surface area. Conversely, shRNA-mediated knockdown of Btg2 accelerated adrenergic stimulus-induced hypertrophy. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we determined that Btg2 binds a series of proteins that comprise mRNA deadenylation complexes. Intriguingly, Btg2 specifically suppresses cytosolic, but not nuclear, RNA levels. Btg2 knockdown further enhances cytosolic RNA accumulation in cardiomyocytes under adrenergic stimulation, suggesting that Btg2 negatively regulates reactive hypertrophy by negatively regulating RNA accumulation. Our findings provide insight into the functional significance of the mechanisms regulating RNA levels in cardiomyocytes. PMID:27346836

  7. Developmental abnormalities and reduced fruit softening in tomato plants expressing an antisense Rab11 GTPase gene.

    PubMed

    Lu, C; Zainal, Z; Tucker, G A; Lycett, G W

    2001-08-01

    A cDNA clone from tomato fruit encodes a protein with strong homology with the rab11/YPT3 class of small GTPases that is thought to be involved in the control of protein trafficking within cells. The gene, LeRab11a, showed a pattern consistent with a single copy in DNA gel blots. The corresponding mRNA was developmentally regulated during fruit ripening, and its expression was inhibited in several ripening mutants. Its reduced expression in the Never-ripe mutant indicates that it may be induced by ethylene in fruit. The ripening-induced expression in tissues that are undergoing cell wall loosening immediately suggests a possible role in trafficking of cell wall-modifying enzymes. The message also was produced in leaves and flowers but not in roots. Antisense transformation was used to generate a "mutant phenotype." Antisense fruit changed color as expected but failed to soften normally. This was accompanied by reduced levels of two cell wall hydrolases, pectinesterase and polygalacturonase. There were other phenotypic effects in the plants, including determinate growth, reduced apical dominance, branched inflorescences, abnormal floral structure, and ectopic shoots on the leaves. In some plants, ethylene production was reduced. These data suggest an alternative or additional role in exocytosis or endocytosis of homeotic proteins, hormone carriers, or receptors.

  8. Antisense inhibition of threonine synthase leads to high methionine content in transgenic potato plants.

    PubMed

    Zeh, M; Casazza, A P; Kreft, O; Roessner, U; Bieberich, K; Willmitzer, L; Hoefgen, R; Hesse, H

    2001-11-01

    Methionine (Met) and threonine (Thr) are members of the aspartate family of amino acids. In plants, their biosynthetic pathways diverge at the level of O-phosphohomo-serine (Ser). The enzymes cystathionine gamma-synthase and Thr synthase (TS) compete for the common substrate O-phosphohomo-Ser with the notable feature that plant TS is activated through S-adenosyl-Met, a metabolite derived from Met. To investigate the regulation of this branch point, we engineered TS antisense potato (Solanum tuberosum cv Désirée) plants using the constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. In leaf tissues, these transgenics exhibit a reduction of TS activity down to 6% of wild-type levels. Thr levels are reduced to 45% wild-type controls, whereas Met levels increase up to 239-fold depending on the transgenic line and environmental conditions. Increased levels of homo-Ser and homo-cysteine indicate increased carbon allocation into the aspartate pathway. In contrast to findings in Arabidopsis, increased Met content has no detectable effect on mRNA or protein levels or on the enzymatic activity of cystathionine gamma-synthase in potato. Tubers of TS antisense potato plants contain a Met level increased by a factor of 30 and no reduction in Thr. These plants offer a major biotechnological advance toward the development of crop plants with improved nutritional quality. PMID:11706163

  9. Genome-wide prediction of cis-acting RNA elements regulating tissue-specific pre-mRNA alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Kejun; Radovich, Milan; Wang, Yue; Wang, Guohua; Feng, Weixing; Sanford, Jeremy R; Liu, Yunlong

    2009-01-01

    Background Human genes undergo various patterns of pre-mRNA splicing across different tissues. Such variation is primarily regulated by trans-acting factors that bind on exonic and intronic cis-acting RNA elements (CAEs). Here we report a computational method to mechanistically identify cis-acting RNA elements that contribute to the tissue-specific alternative splicing pattern. This method is an extension of our previous model, SplicingModeler, which predicts the significant CAEs that contribute to the splicing differences between two tissues. In this study, we introduce tissue-specific functional levels estimation step, which allows evaluating regulatory functions of predicted CAEs that are involved in more than two tissues. Results Using a publicly available Affymetrix Genechip® Human Exon Array dataset, our method identifies 652 cis-acting RNA elements (CAEs) across 11 human tissues. About one third of predicted CAEs can be mapped to the known RBP (RNA binding protein) binding sites or match with other predicted exonic splicing regulator databases. Interestingly, the vast majority of predicted CAEs are in intronic regulatory regions. A noticeable exception is that many exonic elements are found to regulate the alternative splicing between cerebellum and testes. Most identified elements are found to contribute to the alternative splicing between two tissues, while some are important in multiple tissues. This suggests that genome-wide alternative splicing patterns are regulated by a combination of tissue-specific cis-acting elements and "general elements" whose functional activities are important but differ across multiple tissues. Conclusion In this study, we present a model-based computational approach to identify potential cis-acting RNA elements by considering the exon splicing variation as the combinatorial effects of multiple cis-acting regulators. This methodology provides a novel evaluation on the functional levels of cis-acting RNA elements by estimating

  10. EBV noncoding RNA EBER2 interacts with host RNA-binding proteins to regulate viral gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nara; Yario, Therese A; Gao, Jessica S; Steitz, Joan A

    2016-03-22

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) produces a highly abundant noncoding RNA called EBV-encoded RNA 2 (EBER2) that interacts indirectly with the host transcription factor paired box protein 5 (PAX5) to regulate viral latent membrane protein 1/2 (LMP1/2) gene expression as well as EBV lytic replication. To identify intermediary proteins, we isolated EBER2-PAX5-containing complexes and analyzed the protein components by mass spectrometry. The top candidates include three host proteins splicing factor proline and glutamine rich (SFPQ), non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein (NONO), and RNA binding motif protein 14 (RBM14), all reported to be components of nuclear bodies called paraspeckles. In vivo RNA-protein crosslinking indicates that SFPQ and RBM14 contact EBER2 directly. Binding studies using recombinant proteins demonstrate that SFPQ and NONO associate with PAX5, potentially bridging its interaction with EBER2. Similar to EBER2 or PAX5 depletion, knockdown of any of the three host RNA-binding proteins results in the up-regulation of viral LMP2A mRNA levels, supporting a physiologically relevant interaction of these newly identified factors with EBER2 and PAX5. Identification of these EBER2-interacting proteins enables the search for cellular noncoding RNAs that regulate host gene expression in a manner similar to EBER2. PMID:26951683

  11. EBV noncoding RNA EBER2 interacts with host RNA-binding proteins to regulate viral gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nara; Yario, Therese A; Gao, Jessica S; Steitz, Joan A

    2016-03-22

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) produces a highly abundant noncoding RNA called EBV-encoded RNA 2 (EBER2) that interacts indirectly with the host transcription factor paired box protein 5 (PAX5) to regulate viral latent membrane protein 1/2 (LMP1/2) gene expression as well as EBV lytic replication. To identify intermediary proteins, we isolated EBER2-PAX5-containing complexes and analyzed the protein components by mass spectrometry. The top candidates include three host proteins splicing factor proline and glutamine rich (SFPQ), non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein (NONO), and RNA binding motif protein 14 (RBM14), all reported to be components of nuclear bodies called paraspeckles. In vivo RNA-protein crosslinking indicates that SFPQ and RBM14 contact EBER2 directly. Binding studies using recombinant proteins demonstrate that SFPQ and NONO associate with PAX5, potentially bridging its interaction with EBER2. Similar to EBER2 or PAX5 depletion, knockdown of any of the three host RNA-binding proteins results in the up-regulation of viral LMP2A mRNA levels, supporting a physiologically relevant interaction of these newly identified factors with EBER2 and PAX5. Identification of these EBER2-interacting proteins enables the search for cellular noncoding RNAs that regulate host gene expression in a manner similar to EBER2.

  12. microRNA regulation of molecular networks mapped by global microRNA, mRNA, and protein expression in activated T-lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryev, Yevgeniy A.; Kurian, Sunil M.; Hart, Traver; Nakorchevsky, Aleksey A.; Chen, Caifu; Campbell, Daniel; Head, Steven R.; Yates, John R.; Salomon, Daniel. R

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate specific immune mechanisms but their genome-wide regulation of T-lymphocyte activation is largely unknown. We performed a multidimensional functional genomics analysis to integrate genome-wide differential mRNA, miRNA, and protein expression as a function of human T-lymphocyte activation and time. We surveyed expression of 420 human miRNAs in parallel with genome-wide mRNA expression. We identified a unique signature of 71 differentially expressed miRNAs, 57 of which were previously not known as regulators of immune activation. The majority of miRNAs are upregulated, mRNA expression of these target genes is downregulated and this is a function of binding multiple miRNAs (combinatorial targeting). Our data reveal that consideration of this complex signature, rather than single miRNAs, is necessary to construct a full picture of miRNA-mediated regulation. Molecular network mapping of miRNA targets revealed the regulation of activation-induced immune signaling. In contrast, pathways populated by genes that are not miRNA targets are enriched for metabolism and biosynthesis. Finally, we specifically validated miR-155 (known) and miR-221 (novel in T-lymphocytes) using locked nucleic acid inhibitors. Inhibition of these 2 highly upregulated miRNAs in CD4+ T cells were shown to increase proliferation by removing suppression of 4 target genes linked to proliferation and survival. Thus, multiple lines of evidence link top functional networks directly to T-lymphocyte immunity underlining the value of mapping global gene, protein and miRNA expression. PMID:21788445

  13. RNA Exosome Complex Regulates Stability of the Hepatitis B Virus X-mRNA Transcript in a Non-stop-mediated (NSD) RNA Quality Control Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Aly, Hussein H; Suzuki, Junya; Watashi, Koichi; Chayama, Kazuaki; Hoshino, Shin-Ichi; Hijikata, Makoto; Kato, Takanobu; Wakita, Takaji

    2016-07-29

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a stealth virus, minimally inducing the interferon system required for efficient induction of both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, 90% of acutely infected adults can clear the virus, suggesting the presence of other, interferon-independent pathways leading to viral clearance. Given the known ability of helicases to bind viral nucleic acids, we performed a functional screening assay to identify helicases that regulate HBV replication. We identified the superkiller viralicidic activity 2-like (SKIV2L) RNA helicase (a homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ski2 protein) on the basis of its direct and preferential interaction with HBV X-mRNA. This interaction was essential for HBV X-mRNA degradation at the RNA exosome. The degradation of HBV X-mRNA at the RNA exosome was also mediated by HBS1L (HBS1-like translational GTPase) protein, a known component of the host RNA quality control system. We found that the redundant HBV-precore translation initiation site present at the 3'-end of HBV X-mRNA (3' precore) is translationally active. The initiation of translation from this site without a proper stop codon was identified by the non-stop-mediated RNA decay mechanism leading to its degradation. Although 3' precore is present in the five main HBV-RNA transcripts, only X-mRNA lacks the presence of an upstream start codons for large, middle, and small (L, M, and S) HBV surface proteins. These upstream codons are in-frame with 3' precore translation initiation site, blocking its translation from the other HBV-mRNA transcripts. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the anti-viral function of the non-stop-mediated RNA decay mechanism. PMID:27281821

  14. Identification of a Male-Specific RNA Binding Protein That Regulates Sex-Specific Splicing of Bmdsx by Increasing RNA Binding Activity of BmPSI▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka G.; Imanishi, Shigeo; Dohmae, Naoshi; Asanuma, Miwako; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2010-01-01

    Bmdsx is a sex-determining gene in the silkworm and is alternatively spliced in males and females. CE1 is a splicing silencer element responsible for the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx. To identify sex-specific factors implicated in the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx, we performed RNA affinity chromatography using CE1 RNA as a ligand. We have identified BmIMP, a Bombyx homolog of IGF-II mRNA binding protein (IMP), as a male-specific factor that specifically binds to CE1. The gene encoding BmIMP is localized on the Z chromosome and is male-specifically expressed in various tissues. Antisense inhibition of BmIMP expression increased female-specific splicing of Bmdsx pre-mRNA. Coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown analyses demonstrated that BmIMP physically interacts with BmPSI, which has been identified as a factor implicated in the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx, through the KH domains of BmIMP. The functional consequence of this interaction was examined using RNA mobility shift analysis. BmIMP increased BmPSI-CE1 RNA binding activity by decreasing the rate of BmPSI dissociation from CE1 RNA. Truncation analysis of BmIMP suggested that the KH domains are responsible for enhancing BmPSI-CE1 RNA binding activity. These results suggest that BmIMP may enhance the male-specific splicing of Bmdsx pre-mRNA by increasing RNA binding activity of BmPSI. PMID:20956562

  15. Regulation of microRNA expression and function by nuclear receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA transcripts that affect various cellular pathways by serving as regulators of gene expression at the translational and transcriptional level. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate gene transcription by binding to the promoter region or by interacting with other transcription factors. NRs can regulate miRNA expression either at the transcriptional level, or through posttranscriptional maturation by interacting with miRNA processing factors. This review will summarize recent advances in knowledge of the modulation of miRNA expression by NRs. Increased understanding of the molecular basis of miRNA expression may enable new therapeutic interventions that modulate miRNA activities through NR-mediated signaling. PMID:21936947

  16. Sequence-non-specific effects of RNA interference triggers and microRNA regulators

    PubMed Central

    Olejniczak, Marta; Galka, Paulina; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.

    2010-01-01

    RNA reagents of diverse lengths and structures, unmodified or containing various chemical modifications are powerful tools of RNA interference and microRNA technologies. These reagents which are either delivered to cells using appropriate carriers or are expressed in cells from suitable vectors often cause unintended sequence-non-specific immune responses besides triggering intended sequence-specific silencing effects. This article reviews the present state of knowledge regarding the cellular sensors of foreign RNA, the signaling pathways these sensors mobilize and shows which specific features of the RNA reagents set the responsive systems on alert. The representative examples of toxic effects caused in the investigated cell lines and tissues by the RNAs of specific types and structures are collected and may be instructive for further studies of sequence-non-specific responses to foreign RNA in human cells. PMID:19843612

  17. Antisense oligonucleotides: is the glass half full or half empty?

    PubMed

    Bennett, C F

    1998-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides are widely used as tools to explore the pharmacological effects of inhibiting expression of a selected gene product. In addition, they are being investigated as therapeutic agents for the treatment of viral infections, cancers, and inflammatory disorders. Proof that the pharmacological effects produced by the oligonucleotides are attributable to an antisense mechanism of action requires careful experimentation. Central to this problem is the finding that oligonucleotides are capable of interacting with and modulating function of specific proteins in both a sequence-independent and -dependent manner. Despite these undesired interactions, it has been possible to demonstrate that oligonucleotides are capable of binding to a specific RNA in cultured cells, or within tissues, resulting in selective reduction of the targeted gene product and pharmacological activity. In general, these oligonucleotides were identified after a selection process in which multiple oligonucleotides targeting different regions on the RNA were evaluated for direct inhibition of targeted gene product, resulting in the identification of a potent and selective oligonucleotide. Similar to other drug-receptor interactions, selection of the most potent inhibitor results in an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio, yielding increased confidence that activity observed is the result of a desired effect of the inhibitor. With careful selection, proper controls, and careful dose-response curves it is possible to utilize antisense oligonucleotides as effective research tools and potentially as therapeutic agents. PMID:9413924

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells alleviate experimental rheumatoid arthritis through microRNA-regulated IκB expression

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xin; Cen, Yurong; Wang, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation reduces the severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice, which is a model for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in humans. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain ill-defined. Here, we showed that MSC transplantation reduced the activities of NF-κB signaling and decreased microRNA-548e (miR-548e) levels in the joint tissue in CIA-mice, seemingly through activation of transforming growth factor β receptor signaling. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that miR-548e inhibited protein translation of the NF-κB inhibitor, IκB, through binding to the 3′-UTR of the IκB mRNA. MSCs co-transplanted with adeno-associated virus (AAV) carrying miR-548e abolished the therapeutic effects of MSCs on CIA. On the other hand, transplantation of AAV carrying antisense of miR-548e (as-miR-548e) partially mimicked the effects of MSC transplantation on CIA. Together, these data suggest that MSC transplantation may alleviate experimental RA partially through suppressing miR-548e-mediated IκB inhibition. PMID:27354158

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells alleviate experimental rheumatoid arthritis through microRNA-regulated IκB expression.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xin; Cen, Yurong; Wang, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation reduces the severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice, which is a model for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in humans. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain ill-defined. Here, we showed that MSC transplantation reduced the activities of NF-κB signaling and decreased microRNA-548e (miR-548e) levels in the joint tissue in CIA-mice, seemingly through activation of transforming growth factor β receptor signaling. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that miR-548e inhibited protein translation of the NF-κB inhibitor, IκB, through binding to the 3'-UTR of the IκB mRNA. MSCs co-transplanted with adeno-associated virus (AAV) carrying miR-548e abolished the therapeutic effects of MSCs on CIA. On the other hand, transplantation of AAV carrying antisense of miR-548e (as-miR-548e) partially mimicked the effects of MSC transplantation on CIA. Together, these data suggest that MSC transplantation may alleviate experimental RA partially through suppressing miR-548e-mediated IκB inhibition. PMID:27354158

  20. Polyuridylation in Eukaryotes: A 3'-End Modification Regulating RNA Life.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Tello, Paola; Rajappa, Lional; Coquille, Sandrine; Thore, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, mRNA polyadenylation is a well-known modification that is essential for many aspects of the protein-coding RNAs life cycle. However, modification of the 3' terminal nucleotide within various RNA molecules is a general and conserved process that broadly modulates RNA function in all kingdoms of life. Numerous types of modifications have been characterized, which are generally specific for a given type of RNA such as the CCA addition found in tRNAs. In recent years, the addition of nontemplated uridine nucleotides or uridylation has been shown to occur in various types of RNA molecules and in various cellular compartments with significantly different outcomes. Indeed, uridylation is able to alter RNA half-life both in positive and in negative ways, highlighting the importance of the enzymes in charge of performing this modification. The present review aims at summarizing the current knowledge on the various processes leading to RNA 3'-end uridylation and on their potential impacts in various diseases.

  1. Novel RNA- and FMRP-binding protein TRF2-S regulates axonal mRNA transport and presynaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peisu; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Liu, Yong; Tominaga-Yamanaka, Kumiko; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Ioannis, Grammatikakis; Martindale, Jennifer L; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G; Yang, In Hong; Gorospe, Myriam; Mattson, Mark P

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable evidence that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) regulate mRNA transport and local translation in dendrites, roles for axonal RBPs are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that a non-telomeric isoform of telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2-S) is a novel RBP that regulates axonal plasticity. TRF2-S interacts directly with target mRNAs to facilitate their axonal delivery. The process is antagonized by fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Distinct from the current RNA-binding model of FMRP, we show that FMRP occupies the GAR domain of TRF2-S protein to block the assembly of TRF2-S-mRNA complexes. Overexpressing TRF2-S and silencing FMRP promotes mRNA entry to axons and enhances axonal outgrowth and neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals. Our findings suggest a pivotal role for TRF2-S in an axonal mRNA localization pathway that enhances axon outgrowth and neurotransmitter release. PMID:26586091

  2. Novel RNA- and FMRP-binding protein TRF2-S regulates axonal mRNA transport and presynaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peisu; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Liu, Yong; Tominaga-Yamanaka, Kumiko; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Ioannis, Grammatikakis; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G.; Yang, In Hong; Gorospe, Myriam; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable evidence that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) regulate mRNA transport and local translation in dendrites, roles for axonal RBPs are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that a non-telomeric isoform of telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2-S) is a novel RBP that regulates axonal plasticity. TRF2-S interacts directly with target mRNAs to facilitate their axonal delivery. The process is antagonized by fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Distinct from the current RNA-binding model of FMRP, we show that FMRP occupies the GAR domain of TRF2-S protein to block the assembly of TRF2-S–mRNA complexes. Overexpressing TRF2-S and silencing FMRP promotes mRNA entry to axons and enhances axonal outgrowth and neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals. Our findings suggest a pivotal role for TRF2-S in an axonal mRNA localization pathway that enhances axon outgrowth and neurotransmitter release. PMID:26586091

  3. Identification of microRNA-regulated pathways using an integration of microRNA-mRNA microarray and bioinformatics analysis in CD34+ cells of myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Zhu, Yang; He, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Shi, Wen-Hui; Liu, Li; Chang, Chun-Kang; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The effect of microRNA (miRNA) and targeted mRNA on signal transduction is not fully understood in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Here, we tried to identify the miRNAs-regulated pathways through a combination of miRNA and mRNA microarray in CD34+ cells from MDS patients. We identified 34 differentially expressed miRNAs and 1783 mRNAs in MDS. 25 dysregulated miRNAs and 394 targeted mRNAs were screened by a combination of Pearson's correlation analysis and software prediction. Pathway analysis showed that several pathways such as Notch, PI3K/Akt might be regulated by those miRNA-mRNAs pairs. Through a combination of Pathway and miRNA-Gene or GO-Network analysis, miRNAs-regulated pathways, such as miR-195-5p/DLL1/Notch signaling pathway, were identified. Further qRT-PCR showed that miR-195-5p was up-regulated while DLL1 was down-regulated in patients with low-grade MDS compared with normal controls. Luciferase assay showed that DLL1 was a direct target of miR-195-5p. Overexpression of miR-195-5p led to increased cell apoptosis and reduced cell growth through inhibition of Notch signaling pathway. In conclusion, alteration expression of miRNAs and targeted mRNAs might have an important impact on cancer-related cellular pathways in MDS. Inhibition of Notch signaling pathway by miR-195-5p-DLL1 axis contributes to the excess apoptosis in low-grade MDS. PMID:27571714

  4. Identification of microRNA-regulated pathways using an integration of microRNA-mRNA microarray and bioinformatics analysis in CD34+ cells of myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Zhu, Yang; He, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Shi, Wen-Hui; Liu, Li; Chang, Chun-Kang; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The effect of microRNA (miRNA) and targeted mRNA on signal transduction is not fully understood in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Here, we tried to identify the miRNAs-regulated pathways through a combination of miRNA and mRNA microarray in CD34+ cells from MDS patients. We identified 34 differentially expressed miRNAs and 1783 mRNAs in MDS. 25 dysregulated miRNAs and 394 targeted mRNAs were screened by a combination of Pearson’s correlation analysis and software prediction. Pathway analysis showed that several pathways such as Notch, PI3K/Akt might be regulated by those miRNA-mRNAs pairs. Through a combination of Pathway and miRNA-Gene or GO-Network analysis, miRNAs-regulated pathways, such as miR-195-5p/DLL1/Notch signaling pathway, were identified. Further qRT-PCR showed that miR-195-5p was up-regulated while DLL1 was down-regulated in patients with low-grade MDS compared with normal controls. Luciferase assay showed that DLL1 was a direct target of miR-195-5p. Overexpression of miR-195-5p led to increased cell apoptosis and reduced cell growth through inhibition of Notch signaling pathway. In conclusion, alteration expression of miRNAs and targeted mRNAs might have an important impact on cancer-related cellular pathways in MDS. Inhibition of Notch signaling pathway by miR-195-5p-DLL1 axis contributes to the excess apoptosis in low-grade MDS. PMID:27571714

  5. Circadian rhythms of sense and antisense transcription in sugarcane, a highly polyploid crop.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Carlos Takeshi; Nishiyama, Milton Yutaka; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2013-01-01

    Commercial sugarcane (Saccharum hybrid) is a highly polyploid and aneuploid grass that stores large amounts of sucrose in its stem. We have measured circadian rhythms of sense and antisense transcription in a commercial cultivar (RB855453) using a custom oligoarray with 14,521 probes that hybridize to sense transcripts (SS) and 7,380 probes that hybridize to antisense transcripts (AS).We estimated that 32% of SS probes and 22% AS probes were rhythmic. This is a higher proportion of rhythmic probes than the usually found in similar experiments in other plant species. Orthologs and inparalogs of Arabidopsis thaliana, sugarcane, rice, maize and sorghum were grouped in ortholog clusters. When ortholog clusters were used to compare probes among different datasets, sugarcane also showed a higher proportion of rhythmic elements than the other species. Thus, it is possible that a higher proportion of transcripts are regulated by the sugarcane circadian clock. Thirty-six percent of the identified AS/SS pairs had significant correlated time courses and 64% had uncorrelated expression patterns. The clustering of transcripts with similar function, the anticipation of daily environmental changes and the temporal compartmentation of metabolic processes were some properties identified in the circadian sugarcane transcriptome. During the day, there was a dominance of transcripts associated with photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism, including sucrose and starch synthesis. During the night, there was dominance of transcripts associated with genetic processing, such as histone regulation and RNA polymerase, ribosome and protein synthesis. Finally, the circadian clock also regulated hormone signalling pathways: a large proportion of auxin and ABA signalling components were regulated by the circadian clock in an unusual biphasic distribution.

  6. The TOR signaling pathway regulates starvation-induced pseudouridylation of yeast U2 snRNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guowei; Radwan, Mohamed K; Xiao, Mu; Adachi, Hironori; Fan, Jason; Yu, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-01

    Pseudouridine (Ψ) has been identified in various types of RNAs, including mRNA, rRNA, tRNA, snRNA, and many other noncoding RNAs. We have previously shown that RNA pseudouridylation, like DNA and protein modifications, can be induced by stress. For instance, growing yeast cells to saturation induces the formation of Ψ93 in U2 snRNA. Here, we further investigate this inducible RNA modification. We show that switching yeast cells from nutrient-rich medium to different nutrient-deprived media (including water) results in the formation of Ψ93 in U2 snRNA. Using gene deletion/conditional depletion as well as rapamycin treatment, we further show that the TOR signaling pathway, which controls cell entry into stationary phase, regulates Ψ93 formation. The RAS/cAMP signaling pathway, which parallels the TOR pathway, plays no role in this inducible modification.

  7. TP53 regulates miRNA association with AGO2 to remodel the miRNA–mRNA interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Krell, Jonathan; Stebbing, Justin; Carissimi, Claudia; Dabrowska, Aleksandra F.; de Giorgio, Alexander; Frampton, Adam E.; Harding, Victoria; Fulci, Valerio; Macino, Giuseppe; Colombo, Teresa; Castellano, Leandro

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage activates TP53-regulated surveillance mechanisms that are crucial in suppressing tumorigenesis. TP53 orchestrates these responses directly by transcriptionally modulating genes, including microRNAs (miRNAs), and by regulating miRNA biogenesis through interacting with the DROSHA complex. However, whether the association between miRNAs and AGO2 is regulated following DNA damage is not yet known. Here, we show that, following DNA damage, TP53 interacts with AGO2 to induce or reduce AGO2's association of a subset of miRNAs, including multiple let-7 family members. Furthermore, we show that specific mutations in TP53 decrease rather than increase the association of let-7 family miRNAs, reducing their activity without preventing TP53 from interacting with AGO2. This is consistent with the oncogenic properties of these mutants. Using AGO2 RIP-seq and PAR-CLIP-seq, we show that the DNA damage–induced increase in binding of let-7 family members to the RISC complex is functional. We unambiguously determine the global miRNA–mRNA interaction networks involved in the DNA damage response, validating them through the identification of miRNA-target chimeras formed by endogenous ligation reactions. We find that the target complementary region of the let-7 seed tends to have highly fixed positions and more variable ones. Additionally, we observe that miRNAs, whose cellular abundance or differential association with AGO2 is regulated by TP53, are involved in an intricate network of regulatory feedback and feedforward circuits. TP53-mediated regulation of AGO2–miRNA interaction represents a new mechanism of miRNA regulation in carcinogenesis. PMID:26701625

  8. Long Non-coding RNA HOTAIR Promotes Parkinson's Disease Induced by MPTP Through up-regulating the Expression of LRRK2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sen; Cui, Bei; Dai, Zhen-xia; Shi, Peng-ke; Wang, Zhao-hui; Guo, Yuan-yuan

    2016-01-01

    Homeobox (HOX) transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR), as a long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA), is known to be overexpressed in several cancers. However, the role of HOTAIR in Parkinson's disease (PD) remains unclear. A mouse model of PD was developed by intraperitoneal injection of MPTP (N-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6- tetrahydropyridine). The expression of HOTAIR and LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2) were detected in the PD mice and in Human neuroblastoma cell lines SH-SY5Y pretreated with MPP+ (N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium). The effect of HOTAIR on the expression of LRRK2 was examined in SH-SY5Y cells through overexpressing HOTAIR. A MTT (3- (4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide) assay was performed to measure the cell viability of SH-SY5Y cells. si-HOTAIR (siRNA-HOTAIR) was utilized to investigate the effect of HOTAIR on the expression of LRRK2 in vivo. In this study, upregulation of HOTAIR and LRRK2 were found in the midbrain of PD mice induced by MPTP and in SH-SY5Y cells pretreated with MPP+. With the presence of HOTAIR overexpression in SH-SY5Y cells, the expression of LRRK2 was increased compared with that in the control. HOTAIR knockdown showed a protective effect on the cell viability of SH-SY5Y cells pretreated with MPP+, which was abrogated by overexpression of LRRK2. In mouse model of PD treated with si-HOTAIR, the expression of LRRK2 was decreased. In conclusion, high expression of HOTAIR promoted the onset of PD induced by MPTP. Moreover, the finding that HOTAIR promoted PD induced by MPTP through regulating LRRK2 expression could add our understanding of the molecular mechanisms in PD. PMID:26979073

  9. A novel RNA binding protein that interacts with NMDA R1 mRNA: regulation by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Anji, Antje; Kumari, Meena

    2006-05-01

    Excitatory NMDA receptors are an important target of ethanol. Chronic ethanol exposure, in vivo and in vitro, increases polypeptide levels of NR1 subunit, the key subunit of functional NMDA receptors. In vitro, chronic ethanol treatment increases the half-life of NR1 mRNA and this observation is dependent on new protein synthesis. The present study was undertaken to locate cis-acting region(s) within the NR1 3'-untranslated region (UTR) and identify NR1 3'-UTR binding trans-acting proteins expressed in mouse fetal cortical neurons. Utilizing RNA gel shift assays we identified a 156-nt cis-acting region that binds to polysomal trans-acting proteins. This binding was highly specific as inclusion of cyclophilin RNA or tRNA did not interfere with cis-trans interactions. Importantly, the 3'-UTR binding activity was significantly up-regulated in the presence of ethanol. UV cross-link analysis detected three NR1 3'-UTR binding proteins and their molecular mass calculated by Northwestern analysis was approximately 88, 60 and 47 kDa, respectively. Northwestern analysis showed a significant up-regulation of the 88-kDa protein after chronic ethanol treatment. The 88-kDa protein was purified and identified by tandem mass spectrometry as the beta subunit of alpha glucosidase II (GIIbeta). That GIIbeta is indeed a trans-acting protein and binds specifically to 3'-UTR of NR1 mRNA was confirmed by RNA gel mobility supershift assays and immuno RT-PCR. Western blotting data established a significant increase of GIIbeta polypeptide in chronic ethanol-exposed fetal cortical neurons. We hypothesize that the identified cis-acting region and the associated RNA-binding proteins are important regulators of NR1 subunit gene expression.

  10. RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL as a critical regulator of lymphocyte homeostasis and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xing

    2016-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins orchestrate posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, such as messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing, RNA stability regulation, and translation regulation. Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding proteins (hnRNPs) refer to a collection of unrelated RNA-binding proteins predominantly located in the nucleus (Han et al. Biochem J 2010, 430:379-392). Although canonical functions of hnRNPs are to promote pre-mRNA splicing, they are involved in all the processes of RNA metabolism through recognizing specific cis-elements on RNA (Dreyfuss et al. Annu Rev Biochem 1993, 62:289-321; Huelga et al. Cell Rep 2012, 1:167-178; Krecic and Swanson. Curr Opin Cell Biol 1999, 11:363-371). Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding protein L like (hnRNPLL) is a tissue-specific hnRNP, which was identified as a regulator of CD45RA to CD45RO switching during memory T-cell development (Oberdoerffer et al. Science 2008, 321:686-691; Topp et al. RNA 2008, 14:2038-2049; Wu et al. Immunity 2008, 29:863-875). Since then, hnRNPLL has emerged as a critical regulator of lymphocyte homeostasis and terminal differentiation, controlling alternative splicing or expression of critical genes for the lymphocytes development (Wu et al. Immunity 2008, 29:863-875; Chang et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2015, 112:E1888-E1897). This review will summarize recent advances in understanding the functions of hnRNPLL, focusing on its biochemical functions and physiological roles in lymphocyte differentiation and homeostasis. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:295-302. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1335 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  11. RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL as a critical regulator of lymphocyte homeostasis and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xing

    2016-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins orchestrate posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, such as messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing, RNA stability regulation, and translation regulation. Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding proteins (hnRNPs) refer to a collection of unrelated RNA-binding proteins predominantly located in the nucleus (Han et al. Biochem J 2010, 430:379-392). Although canonical functions of hnRNPs are to promote pre-mRNA splicing, they are involved in all the processes of RNA metabolism through recognizing specific cis-elements on RNA (Dreyfuss et al. Annu Rev Biochem 1993, 62:289-321; Huelga et al. Cell Rep 2012, 1:167-178; Krecic and Swanson. Curr Opin Cell Biol 1999, 11:363-371). Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding protein L like (hnRNPLL) is a tissue-specific hnRNP, which was identified as a regulator of CD45RA to CD45RO switching during memory T-cell development (Oberdoerffer et al. Science 2008, 321:686-691; Topp et al. RNA 2008, 14:2038-2049; Wu et al. Immunity 2008, 29:863-875). Since then, hnRNPLL has emerged as a critical regulator of lymphocyte homeostasis and terminal differentiation, controlling alternative splicing or expression of critical genes for the lymphocytes development (Wu et al. Immunity 2008, 29:863-875; Chang et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2015, 112:E1888-E1897). This review will summarize recent advances in understanding the functions of hnRNPLL, focusing on its biochemical functions and physiological roles in lymphocyte differentiation and homeostasis. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:295-302. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1335 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26821996

  12. Global regulation of alternative splicing by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR)

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Oz; Oren, Shirley; Safran, Michal; Deshet-Unger, Naamit; Akiva, Pinchas; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Cesarkas, Karen; Kabesa, Reut; Amariglio, Ninette; Unger, Ron; Rechavi, Gideon; Eyal, Eran

    2013-01-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing is a major mechanism for gene regulation and transcriptome diversity. Despite the extent of the phenomenon, the regulation and specificity of the splicing machinery are only partially understood. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing of pre-mRNA by ADAR enzymes has been linked to splicing regulation in several cases. Here we used bioinformatics approaches, RNA-seq and exon-specific microarray of ADAR knockdown cells to globally examine how ADAR and its A-to-I RNA editing activity influence alternative mRNA splicing. Although A-to-I RNA editing only rarely targets canonical splicing acceptor, donor, and branch sites, it was found to affect splicing regulatory elements (SREs) within exons. Cassette exons were found to be significantly enriched with A-to-I RNA editing sites compared with constitutive exons. RNA-seq and exon-specific microarray revealed that ADAR knockdown in hepatocarcinoma and myelogenous leukemia cell lines leads to global changes in gene expression, with hundreds of genes changing their splicing patterns in both cell lines. This global change in splicing pattern cannot be explained by putative editing sites alone. Genes showing significant changes in their splicing pattern are frequently involved in RNA processing and splicing activity. Analysis of recently published RNA-seq data from glioblastoma cell lines showed similar results. Our global analysis reveals that ADAR plays a major role in splicing regulation. Although direct editing of the splicing motifs does occur, we suggest it is not likely to be the primary mechanism for ADAR-mediated regulation of alternative splicing. Rather, this regulation is achieved by modulating trans-acting factors involved in the splicing machinery. PMID:23474544

  13. Breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 coordinately regulates metastasis-associated microRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Mick D.; Hurst, Douglas R.; Vaidya, Kedar S.; Stafford, Lewis J.; Chen, Dongquan; Welch, Danny R.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1) suppresses metastasis of multiple tumor types without blocking tumorigenesis. BRMS1 forms complexes with SIN3, histone deacetylases and selected transcription factors that modify metastasis-associated gene expression (e.g., EGFR, OPN, PI4P5K1A, PLAU). microRNA (miRNA) are a recently discovered class of regulatory, noncoding RNA, some of which are involved in neoplastic progression. Based on these data, we hypothesized that BRMS1 may also exert some of its antimetastatic effects by regulating miRNA expression. Micro-RNA arrays were done comparing small RNAs that were purified from metastatic MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 and their non-metastatic BRMS1-transfected counterparts. miRNA expression changed by BRMS1 were validated using SYBR Green RT-PCR. BRMS1 decreased metastasis-promoting (miR-10b, -373 and -520c) miRNA, with corresponding reduction of their downstream targets (e.g., RhoC which is downstream of miR-10b). Concurrently, BRMS1 increased expression of metastasis suppressing miRNA (miR-146a, -146b and -335). Collectively, these data show that BRMS1 coordinately regulates expression of multiple metastasis-associated miRNA and suggests that recruitment of BRMS1-containing SIN3:HDAC complexes to, as yet undefined, miRNA promoters might be involved in the regulation of cancer metastasis. PMID:19585508

  14. Impact of down-regulation of starch branching enzyme IIb in rice by artificial microRNA- and hairpin RNA-mediated RNA silencing

    PubMed Central

    Butardo, Vito M.; Fitzgerald, Melissa A.; Bird, Anthony R.; Gidley, Michael J.; Flanagan, Bernadine M.; Larroque, Oscar; Resurreccion, Adoracion P.; Laidlaw, Hunter K. C.; Jobling, Stephen A.; Morell, Matthew K.; Rahman, Sadequr

    2011-01-01

    The inactivation of starch branching IIb (SBEIIb) in rice is traditionally associated with elevated apparent amylose content, increased peak gelatinization temperature, and a decreased proportion of short amylopectin branches. To elucidate further the structural and functional role of this enzyme, the phenotypic effects of down-regulating SBEIIb expression in rice endosperm were characterized by artificial microRNA (amiRNA) and hairpin RNA (hp-RNA) gene silencing. The results showed that RNA silencing of SBEIIb expression in rice grains did not affect the expression of other major isoforms of starch branching enzymes or starch synthases. Structural analyses of debranched starch showed that the doubling of apparent amylose content was not due to an increase in the relative proportion of amylose chains but instead was due to significantly elevated levels of long amylopectin and intermediate chains. Rices altered by the amiRNA technique produced a more extreme starch phenotype than those modified using the hp-RNA technique, with a greater increase in the proportion of long amylopectin and intermediate chains. The more pronounced starch structural modifications produced in the amiRNA lines led to more severe alterations in starch granule morphology and crystallinity as well as digestibility of freshly cooked grains. The potential role of attenuating SBEIIb expression in generating starch with elevated levels of resistant starch and lower glycaemic index is discussed. PMID:21791436

  15. Biophysical and biological characterization of hairpin and molecular beacon RNase H active antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, Michael E; Thomas, George; Koller, Erich; Southwell, Amber L; Hayden, Michael R; Seth, Punit P

    2015-05-15

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are single stranded, backbone modified nucleic acids, which mediate cleavage of complementary RNA by directing RNase H cleavage in cell culture and in animals. It has generally been accepted that the single stranded state in conjunction with the phosphorothioate modified backbone is necessary for cellular uptake and transport to the active compartment. Herein, we examine the effect of using hairpin structured ASOs to (1) determine if an ASO agent requires a single stranded conformation for efficient RNA knock down, (2) use a fluorophore-quencher labeled ASO to evaluate which moieties the ASO interacts with in cells and examine if cellular distribution can be determined with such probes, and (3) evaluate if self-structured ASOs can improve allele selective silencing between closely related huntingtin alleles. We show that hairpin shaped ASOs can efficiently down-regulate RNA in vitro, but potency correlates strongly negatively with increasing stability of the hairpin structure. Furthermore, self-structured ASOs can efficiently reduce huntingtin mRNA in the central nervous system of mice.

  16. A simple three-step method for design and affinity testing of new antisense peptides: an example of erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Štambuk, Nikola; Manojlović, Zoran; Turčić, Petra; Martinić, Roko; Konjevoda, Paško; Weitner, Tin; Wardega, Piotr; Gabričević, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Antisense peptide technology is a valuable tool for deriving new biologically active molecules and performing peptide-receptor modulation. It is based on the fact that peptides specified by the complementary (antisense) nucleotide sequences often bind to each other with a higher specificity and efficacy. We tested the validity of this concept on the example of human erythropoietin, a well-characterized and pharmacologically relevant hematopoietic growth factor. The purpose of the work was to present and test simple and efficient three-step procedure for the design of an antisense peptide targeting receptor-binding site of human erythropoietin. Firstly, we selected the carboxyl-terminal receptor binding region of the molecule (epitope) as a template for the antisense peptide modeling; Secondly, we designed an antisense peptide using mRNA transcription of the epitope sequence in the 3'→5' direction and computational screening of potential paratope structures with BLAST; Thirdly, we evaluated sense-antisense (epitope-paratope) peptide binding and affinity by means of fluorescence spectroscopy and microscale thermophoresis. Both methods showed similar Kd values of 850 and 816 µM, respectively. The advantages of the methods were: fast screening with a small quantity of the sample needed, and measurements done within the range of physicochemical parameters resembling physiological conditions. Antisense peptides targeting specific erythropoietin region(s) could be used for the development of new immunochemical methods. Selected antisense peptides with optimal affinity are potential lead compounds for the development of novel diagnostic substances, biopharmaceuticals and vaccines. PMID:24865486

  17. Genome-Wide Profiling of Yeast DNA:RNA Hybrid Prone Sites with DRIP-Chip

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Phoebe Y. T.; Luo, Zongli; Hamza, Akil; Kobor, Michael S.; Stirling, Peter C.; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    DNA:RNA hybrid formation is emerging as a significant cause of genome instability in biological systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe the genome-wide distribution of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA:RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP) followed by hybridization on tiling microarray. These profiles show that DNA:RNA hybrids preferentially accumulated at rDNA, Ty1 and Ty2 transposons, telomeric repeat regions and a subset of open reading frames (ORFs). The latter are generally highly transcribed and have high GC content. Interestingly, significant DNA:RNA hybrid enrichment was also detected at genes associated with antisense transcripts. The expression of antisense-associated genes was also significantly altered upon overexpression of RNase H, which degrades the RNA in hybrids. Finally, we uncover mutant-specific differences in the DRIP profiles of a Sen1 helicase mutant, RNase H deletion mutant and Hpr1 THO complex mutant compared to wild type, suggesting different roles for these proteins in DNA:RNA hybrid biology. Our profiles of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci provide a resource for understanding the properties of hybrid-forming regions in vivo, extend our knowledge of hybrid-mitigating enzymes, and contribute to models of antisense-mediated gene regulation. A summary of this paper was presented at the 26th International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, August 2013. PMID:24743342

  18. Genome-wide profiling of yeast DNA:RNA hybrid prone sites with DRIP-chip.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yujia A; Aristizabal, Maria J; Lu, Phoebe Y T; Luo, Zongli; Hamza, Akil; Kobor, Michael S; Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Philip

    2014-04-01

    DNA:RNA hybrid formation is emerging as a significant cause of genome instability in biological systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe the genome-wide distribution of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA:RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP) followed by hybridization on tiling microarray. These profiles show that DNA:RNA hybrids preferentially accumulated at rDNA, Ty1 and Ty2 transposons, telomeric repeat regions and a subset of open reading frames (ORFs). The latter are generally highly transcribed and have high GC content. Interestingly, significant DNA:RNA hybrid enrichment was also detected at genes associated with antisense transcripts. The expression of antisense-associated genes was also significantly altered upon overexpression of RNase H, which degrades the RNA in hybrids. Finally, we uncover mutant-specific differences in the DRIP profiles of a Sen1 helicase mutant, RNase H deletion mutant and Hpr1 THO complex mutant compared to wild type, suggesting different roles for these proteins in DNA:RNA hybrid biology. Our profiles of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci provide a resource for understanding the properties of hybrid-forming regions in vivo, extend our knowledge of hybrid-mitigating enzymes, and contribute to models of antisense-mediated gene regulation. A summary of this paper was presented at the 26th International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, August 2013. PMID:24743342

  19. RNA helicase Belle/DDX3 regulates transgene expression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lo, Pang-Kuo; Huang, Yi-Chun; Poulton, John S; Leake, Nicholas; Palmer, William H; Vera, Daniel; Xie, Gengqiang; Klusza, Stephen; Deng, Wu-Min

    2016-04-01

    Belle (Bel), the Drosophila homolog of the yeast DEAD-box RNA helicase DED1 and human DDX3, has been shown to be required for oogenesis and female fertility. Here we report a novel role of Bel in regulating the expression of transgenes. Abrogation of Bel by mutations or RNAi induces silencing of a variety of P-element-derived transgenes. This silencing effect depends on downregulation of their RNA levels. Our genetic studies have revealed that the RNA helicase Spindle-E (Spn-E), a nuage RNA helicase that plays a crucial role in regulating RNA processing and PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) biogenesis in germline cells, is required for loss-of-bel-induced transgene silencing. Conversely, Bel abrogation alleviates the nuage-protein mislocalization phenotype in spn-E mutants, suggesting a competitive relationship between these two RNA helicases. Additionally, disruption of the chromatin remodeling factor Mod(mdg4) or the microRNA biogenesis enzyme Dicer-1 (Dcr-1) also alleviates the transgene-silencing phenotypes in bel mutants, suggesting the involvement of chromatin remodeling and microRNA biogenesis in loss-of-bel-induced transgene silencing. Finally we show that genetic inhibition of Bel function leads to de novo generation of piRNAs from the transgene region inserted in the genome, suggesting a potential piRNA-dependent mechanism that may mediate transgene silencing as Bel function is inhibited. PMID:26900887

  20. Regulation of Human RNA Polymerase III Transcription by DNMT1 and DNMT3a DNA Methyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumar, Tharakeswari; Gjidoda, Alison; Hovde, Stacy L.; Henry, R. William

    2012-01-01

    The human small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and small cytoplasmic RNA (scRNA) gene families encode diverse non-coding RNAs that influence cellular growth and division. Many snRNA and scRNA genes are related via their compact and yet powerful promoters that support RNA polymerase III transcription. We have utilized the human U6 snRNA gene family to examine the mechanism for regulated transcription of these potent transcription units. Analysis of nine U6 family members showed enriched CpG density within the promoters of actively transcribed loci relative to inert genes, implying a relationship between gene potency and DNA methylation. Indeed, both pharmacological inhibition of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and the forced diminution of DNMT-1, DNMT-3a, and DNMT-3b by siRNA targeting resulted in increased U6 levels in asynchronously growing MCF7 adenocarcinoma cells. In vitro transcription assays further showed that template methylation impedes U6 transcription by RNA polymerase III. Both DNMT-1 and DNMT-3a were detected at the U6-1 locus by chromatin immunoprecipitation directly linking these factors to RNA polymerase III regulation. Despite this association, the endogenous U6-1 locus was not substantially methylated in actively growing cells. However, both DNMT occupancy and low frequency methylation were correlated with increased Retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB) expression, suggesting that the RB status can influence specific epigenetic marks. PMID:22219193

  1. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several technical challenges so far prevent a broad clinical application of this approach for other forms of IRD. Many of the mutations leading to these retinal diseases affect pre-mRNA splicing of the mutated genes . Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated splice modulation appears to be a powerful approach to correct the consequences of such mutations at the pre-mRNA level , as demonstrated by promising results in clinical trials for several inherited disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hypercholesterolemia and various types of cancer. In this mini-review, we summarize ongoing pre-clinical research on AON-based therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD , speculate on other potential therapeutic targets, and discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead to translate splice modulation therapy for retinal disorders to the clinic.

  2. NTZIP antisense plants show reduced chlorophyll levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Yang, Yu-Tao; Liu, Han-Hua; Yang, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Nai-Hua; Zheng, Cheng Chao

    2004-04-01

    We have isolated and characterized a new photosynthetic tissue-specific gene NTZIP (Nicotiana tabacum leucine zipper) from tobacco (N. tabacum). Its deduced amino acid sequence has two highly conserved regions, leucine zipper and [EX(n)DEXRH](2) motifs, which are related to the gene's biochemical functions. NTZIP was expressed in leaves and stems, but was not detected in roots or flowers, suggesting that its physiological functions might be associated with photosynthesis. Northern blot analysis showed that NTZIP mRNA accumulation was induced by light signals, increased greatly under low temperatures and was repressed by strong light illumination. Furthermore, a number of homologs of NTZIP were isolated from cucumber (Cucumis sativus), rape (Brassica napus), clover (Trifolium repens), willow (Salix babylonica), rosebush (Rusa dovurica), wheat (Triticum aestivum) and spinach (Spinacia oleracea), proving the ubiquitous existence of the NTZIP-like genes in higher plants. Transgenic tobaccos constitutively expressing antisense RNA to NTZIP displayed chlorosis and a lack of ability to turn green even under normal growth conditions. The chlorophyll deficiency was further confirmed by chlorophyll content determination and gas exchange analysis. Based on these observations, we propose that NTZIP may be involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis, and might define a novel family of evolutionarily conserved proteins with its homologs in other plant species.

  3. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1: Mechanisms of its synergistic regulation by growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xiaoling

    2010-01-01

    My research is on the synergistic regulation of PAI-1 by EGF and TGF-β. The mechanism of synergistic regulation of PAI-1 by EGF and TGF-β are addressed. Methods are described for effective identification of RNA accessible sites for antisense oligodexoxynucleotides (ODNs) and siRNA. In this study effective AS-ODN sequences for both Lcn2 and Bcl2 were identified by in vitro tiled microarray studies. Our results suggest that hybridization of ODN arrays to a target mRNA under physiological conditions might be used as a rapid and reliable in vitro method to accurately identify targets on mRNA molecules for effective antisense and potential siRNA activity in vivo.

  4. tRNA-like structure regulates translation of Brome mosaic virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Barends, Sharief; Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle; Florentz, Catherine; Giegé, Richard; Pleij, Cornelis W A; Kraal, Barend

    2004-04-01

    For various groups of plant viruses, the genomic RNAs end with a tRNA-like structure (TLS) instead of the 3' poly(A) tail of common mRNAs. The actual function of these TLSs has long been enigmatic. Recently, however, it became clear that for turnip yellow mosaic virus, a tymovirus, the valylated TLS(TYMV) of the single genomic RNA functions as a bait for host ribosomes and directs them to the internal initiation site of translation (with N-terminal valine) of the second open reading frame for the polyprotein. This discovery prompted us to investigate whether the much larger TLSs of a different genus of viruses have a comparable function in translation. Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a bromovirus, has a tripartite RNA genome with a subgenomic RNA4 for coat protein expression. All four RNAs carry a highly conserved and bulky 3' TLS(BMV) (about 200 nucleotides) with determinants for tyrosylation. We discovered TLS(BMV)-catalyzed self-tyrosylation of the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase but could not clearly detect tyrosine incorporation into any virus-encoded protein. We established that BMV proteins do not need TLS(BMV) tyrosylation for their initiation. However, disruption of the TLSs strongly reduced the translation of genomic RNA1, RNA2, and less strongly, RNA3, whereas coat protein expression from RNA4 remained unaffected. This aberrant translation could be partially restored by providing the TLS(BMV) in trans. Intriguingly, a subdomain of the TLS(BMV) could even almost fully restore translation to the original pattern. We discuss here a model with a central and dominant role for the TLS(BMV) during the BMV infection cycle.

  5. NF-kappaB signaling differentially regulates influenza virus RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naveen; Xin, Zhong-Tao; Liang, Yuhong; Ly, Hinh; Liang, Yuying

    2008-10-01

    The NF-kappaB signaling pathway has previously been shown to be required for efficient influenza A virus replication, although the molecular mechanism is not well understood. In this study, we identified a specific step of the influenza virus life cycle that is influenced by NF-kappaB signaling by using two known NF-kappaB inhibitors and a variety of influenza virus-specific assays. The results of time course experiments suggest that the NF-kappaB inhibitors Bay11-7082 and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate inhibited an early postentry step of viral infection, but they did not appear to affect the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of the viral ribonucleoprotein complex. Instead, we found that the levels of influenza virus genomic RNA (vRNA), but not the corresponding cRNA or mRNA, were specifically reduced by the inhibitors in virus-infected cells, indicating that NF-kappaB signaling is intimately involved in the vRNA synthesis. Furthermore, we showed that the NF-kappaB inhibitors specifically diminished influenza virus RNA transcription from the cRNA promoter but not from the vRNA promoter in a reporter assay, a result which is consistent with data obtained from virus-infected cells. The overexpression of the p65 NF-kappaB molecule could not only eliminate the inhibition but also activate influenza virus RNA transcription from the cRNA promoter. Finally, using p65-specific small interfering RNA, we have shown that p65 knockdown reduced the levels of influenza virus replication and vRNA synthesis. In summary, we have provided evidence showing, for the first time, that the NF-kappaB host signaling pathway can differentially regulate influenza virus RNA synthesis, which may also offer some new perspectives into understanding the host regulation of RNA synthesis by other RNA viruses.

  6. Smooth Muscle Enriched Long Noncoding RNA (SMILR) Regulates Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, Margaret D.; Pinel, Karine; Dakin, Rachel; Vesey, Alex T.; Diver, Louise; Mackenzie, Ruth; Garcia, Raquel; Welsh, Paul; Sattar, Naveed; Hamilton, Graham; Joshi, Nikhil; Dweck, Marc R.; Miano, Joseph M.; McBride, Martin W.; Newby, David E.; McDonald, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background— Phenotypic switching of vascular smooth muscle cells from a contractile to a synthetic state is implicated in diverse vascular pathologies, including atherogenesis, plaque stabilization, and neointimal hyperplasia. However, very little is known about the role of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) during this process. Here, we investigated a role for lncRNAs in vascular smooth muscle cell biology and pathology. Methods and Results— Using RNA sequencing, we identified >300 lncRNAs whose expression was altered in human saphenous vein vascular smooth muscle cells following stimulation with interleukin-1α and platelet-derived growth factor. We focused on a novel lncRNA (Ensembl: RP11-94A24.1), which we termed smooth muscle–induced lncRNA enhances replication (SMILR). Following stimulation, SMILR expression was increased in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, and was detected in conditioned media. Furthermore, knockdown of SMILR markedly reduced cell proliferation. Mechanistically, we noted that expression of genes proximal to SMILR was also altered by interleukin-1α/platelet-derived growth factor treatment, and HAS2 expression was reduced by SMILR knockdown. In human samples, we observed increased expression of SMILR in unstable atherosclerotic plaques and detected increased levels in plasma from patients with high plasma C-reactive protein. Conclusions— These results identify SMILR as a driver of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and suggest that modulation of SMILR may be a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce vascular pathologies. PMID:27052414

  7. Xp54 and related (DDX6-like) RNA helicases: roles in messenger RNP assembly, translation regulation and RNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Andrew; Sommerville, John

    2006-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA helicase Xp54 is an integral component of the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particles of Xenopus oocytes. In oocytes, several abundant proteins bind pre-mRNA transcripts to modulate nuclear export, RNA stability and translational fate. Of these, Xp54, the mRNA-masking protein FRGY2 and its activating protein kinase CK2α, bind to nascent transcripts on chromosome loops, whereas an Xp54-associated factor, RapA/B, binds to the mRNP complex in the cytoplasm. Over-expression, mutation and knockdown experiments indicate that Xp54 functions to change the conformation of mRNP complexes, displacing one subset of proteins to accommodate another. The sequence of Xp54 is highly conserved in a wide spectrum of organisms. Like Xp54, Drosophila Me31B and Caenorhabditis CGH-1 are required for proper meiotic development, apparently by regulating the translational activation of stored mRNPs and also for sorting certain mRNPs into germplasm-containing structures. Studies on yeast Dhh1 and mammalian rck/p54 have revealed a key role for these helicases in mRNA degradation and in earlier remodelling of mRNP for entry into translation, storage or decay pathways. The versatility of Xp54 and related helicases in modulating the metabolism of mRNAs at all stages of their lifetimes marks them out as key regulators of post-transcriptional gene expression. PMID:16769775

  8. The long noncoding RNA ASNR regulates degradation of Bcl-2 mRNA through its interaction with AUF1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiahui; Liu, Lihui; Wei, Guifeng; Wu, Wei; Luo, Huaxia; Yuan, Jiao; Luo, Jianjun; Chen, Runsheng

    2016-01-01

    The identification and characterization of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in diverse biological processes has recently developed rapidly. The large amounts of non-coding RNAs scale consistent with developmental complexity in eukaryotes, indicating that most of these transcripts may have functions in the regulation of biological processes and disorder in the organisms. In particular, Understanding of the overall biological significance of lncRNAs in cancers still remains limited. Here, we found a nuclear-retained lncRNA, termed Lnc_ASNR (apoptosis suppressing-noncoding RNA), which serves as a repressor of apoptosis. Lnc_ASNR was discovered in a set of microarray data derived from four kinds of tumor and adjacent normal tissue samples, and displayed significant up-regulation in the tumor tissues. Using an RNA-pull down assay, we found that Lnc_ASNR interacted with the protein ARE/poly (U)-binding/degradation factor 1(AUF1), which is reported to promote rapid degradation of the Bcl-2 mRNA, an inhibitor of apoptosis. Lnc_ASNR binds to AUFI in nucleus, decreasing the cytoplasmic proportion of AUF1 which targets the B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) mRNA. Taken together, the overall effect of Lnc_ASNR expression is thus a decrease in cell apoptosis indicating that Lnc_ASNR may play a vital role in tumorigenesis and carcinogenesis. PMID:27578251

  9. The long noncoding RNA ASNR regulates degradation of Bcl-2 mRNA through its interaction with AUF1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiahui; Liu, Lihui; Wei, Guifeng; Wu, Wei; Luo, Huaxia; Yuan, Jiao; Luo, Jianjun; Chen, Runsheng

    2016-01-01

    The identification and characterization of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in diverse biological processes has recently developed rapidly. The large amounts of non-coding RNAs scale consistent with developmental complexity in eukaryotes, indicating that most of these transcripts may have functions in the regulation of biological processes and disorder in the organisms. In particular, Understanding of the overall biological significance of lncRNAs in cancers still remains limited. Here, we found a nuclear-retained lncRNA, termed Lnc_ASNR (apoptosis suppressing-noncoding RNA), which serves as a repressor of apoptosis. Lnc_ASNR was discovered in a set of microarray data derived from four kinds of tumor and adjacent normal tissue samples, and displayed significant up-regulation in the tumor tissues. Using an RNA-pull down assay, we found that Lnc_ASNR interacted with the protein ARE/poly (U)-binding/degradation factor 1(AUF1), which is reported to promote rapid degradation of the Bcl-2 mRNA, an inhibitor of apoptosis. Lnc_ASNR binds to AUFI in nucleus, decreasing the cytoplasmic proportion of AUF1 which targets the B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) mRNA. Taken together, the overall effect of Lnc_ASNR expression is thus a decrease in cell apoptosis indicating that Lnc_ASNR may play a vital role in tumorigenesis and carcinogenesis. PMID:27578251

  10. Global effects of the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway on the transcriptional landscape.

    PubMed

    Cecere, Germano; Hoersch, Sebastian; O'Keeffe, Sean; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Grishok, Alla

    2014-04-01

    Argonaute proteins and their small RNA cofactors short interfering RNAs are known to inhibit gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Argonaute CSR-1 binds thousands of endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) that are antisense to germline transcripts. However, its role in gene expression regulation remains controversial. Here we used genome-wide profiling of nascent RNA transcripts and found that the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway promoted sense-oriented RNA polymerase II transcription. Moreover, a loss of CSR-1 function resulted in global increase in antisense transcription and ectopic transcription of silent chromatin domains, which led to reduced chromatin incorporation of centromere-specific histone H3. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the CSR-1 pathway helps maintain the directionality of active transcription, thereby propagating the distinction between transcriptionally active and silent genomic regions.

  11. Right ventricular long noncoding RNA expression in human heart failure.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, Thomas G; Guo, Yan; Su, Yan Ru; Clark, Travis; Brittain, Evan; Absi, Tarek; Maltais, Simon; Hemnes, Anna

    2015-03-01

    The expression of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human heart failure (HF) has not been widely studied. Using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), we compared lncRNA expression in 22 explanted human HF hearts with lncRNA expression in 5 unused donor human hearts. We used Cufflinks to identify isoforms and DESeq to identify differentially expressed genes. We identified the noncoding RNAs by cross-reference to Ensembl release 73 (Genome Reference Consortium human genome build 37) and explored possible functional roles using a variety of online tools. In HF hearts, RNA-Seq identified 84,793 total messenger RNA coding and noncoding different transcripts, including 13,019 protein-coding genes, 2,085 total lncRNA genes, and 1,064 pseudogenes. By Ensembl noncoding RNA categories, there were 48 lncRNAs, 27 pseudogenes, and 30 antisense RNAs for a total of 105 differentially expressed lncRNAs in HF hearts. Compared with donor hearts, HF hearts exhibited differential expression of 7.7% of protein-coding genes, 3.7% of lncRNAs (including pseudogenes), and 2.5% of pseudogenes. There were not consistent correlations between antisense lncRNAs and parent genes and between pseudogenes and parent genes, implying differential regulation of expression. Exploratory in silico functional analyses using online tools suggested a variety of possible lncRNA regulatory roles. By providing a comprehensive profile of right ventricular polyadenylated messenger RNA transcriptome in HF, RNA-Seq provides an inventory of differentially expressed lncRNAs, including antisense transcripts and pseudogenes, for future mechanistic study.

  12. The RNA-binding protein ELAV regulates Hox RNA processing, expression and function within the Drosophila nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Rogulja-Ortmann, Ana; Picao-Osorio, Joao; Villava, Casandra; Patraquim, Pedro; Lafuente, Elvira; Aspden, Julie; Thomsen, Stefan; Technau, Gerhard M.; Alonso, Claudio R.

    2014-01-01

    The regulated head-to-tail expression of Hox genes provides a coordinate system for the activation of specific programmes of cell differentiation according to axial level. Recent work indicates that Hox expression can be regulated via RNA processing but the underlying mechanisms and biological significance of this form of regulation remain poorly understood. Here we explore these issues within the developing Drosophila central nervous system (CNS). We show that the pan-neural RNA-binding protein (RBP) ELAV (Hu antigen) regulates the RNA processing patterns of the Hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) within the embryonic CNS. Using a combination of biochemical, genetic and imaging approaches we demonstrate that ELAV binds to discrete elements within Ubx RNAs and that its genetic removal reduces Ubx protein expression in the CNS leading to the respecification of cellular subroutines under Ubx control, thus defining for the first time a specific cellular role of ELAV within the developing CNS. Artificial provision of ELAV in glial cells (a cell type that lacks ELAV) promotes Ubx expression, suggesting that ELAV-dependent regulation might contribute to cell type-specific Hox expression patterns within the CNS. Finally, we note that expression of abdominal A and Abdominal B is reduced in elav mutant embryos, whereas other Hox genes (Antennapedia) are not affected. Based on these results and the evolutionary conservation of ELAV and Hox genes we propose that the modulation of Hox RNA processing by ELAV serves to adapt the morphogenesis of the CNS to axial level by regulating Hox expression and consequently activating local programmes of neural differentiation. PMID:24803653

  13. MicroRNA 665 Regulates Dentinogenesis through MicroRNA-Mediated Silencing and Epigenetic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Heair, Hannah M.; Kemper, Austin G.; Roy, Bhaskar; Lopes, Helena B.; Rashid, Harunur; Clarke, John C.; Afreen, Lubana K.; Ferraz, Emanuela P.; Kim, Eddy; Javed, Amjad; Beloti, Marcio M.; MacDougall, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Studies of proteins involved in microRNA (miRNA) processing, maturation, and silencing have indicated the importance of miRNAs in skeletogenesis, but the specific miRNAs involved in this process are incompletely defined. Here, we identified miRNA 665 (miR-665) as a potential repressor of odontoblast maturation. Studies with cultured cell lines and primary embryonic cells showed that miR-665 represses the expression of early and late odontoblast marker genes and stage-specific proteases involved in dentin maturation. Notably, miR-665 directly targeted Dlx3 mRNA and decreased Dlx3 expression. Furthermore, RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) immunoprecipitation and biotin-labeled miR-665 pulldown studies identified Kat6a as another potential target of miR-665. KAT6A interacted physically and functionally with RUNX2, activating tissue-specific promoter activity and prompting odontoblast differentiation. Overexpression of miR-665 reduced the recruitment of KAT6A to Dspp and Dmp1 promoters and prevented KAT6A-induced chromatin remodeling, repressing gene transcription. Taken together, our results provide novel molecular evidence that miR-665 functions in an miRNA-epigenetic regulatory network to control dentinogenesis. PMID:26124283

  14. Roquin binds microRNA-146a and Argonaute2 to regulate microRNA homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Monika; Duan, Guowen; Kershaw, Nadia J.; Athanasopoulos, Vicki; Yeo, Janet H. C.; Ose, Toyoyuki; Hu, Desheng; Brown, Simon H. J.; Jergic, Slobodan; Patel, Hardip R.; Pratama, Alvin; Richards, Sashika; Verma, Anil; Jones, E. Yvonne; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Preiss, Thomas; Dixon, Nicholas E.; Chong, Mark M. W.; Babon, Jeffrey J.; Vinuesa, Carola G.

    2015-01-01

    Roquin is an RNA-binding protein that prevents autoimmunity and inflammation via repression of bound target mRNAs such as inducible costimulator (Icos). When Roquin is absent or mutated (Roquinsan), Icos is overexpressed in T cells. Here we show that Roquin enhances Dicer-mediated processing of pre-miR-146a. Roquin also directly binds Argonaute2, a central component of the RNA-induced silencing complex, and miR-146a, a microRNA that targets Icos mRNA. In the absence of functional Roquin, miR-146a accumulates in T cells. Its accumulation is not due to increased transcription or processing, rather due to enhanced stability of mature miR-146a. This is associated with decreased 3′ end uridylation of the miRNA. Crystallographic studies reveal that Roquin contains a unique HEPN domain and identify the structural basis of the ‘san’ mutation and Roquin’s ability to bind multiple RNAs. Roquin emerges as a protein that can bind Ago2, miRNAs and target mRNAs, to control homeostasis of both RNA species. PMID:25697406

  15. ARGONAUTE PIWI domain and microRNA duplex structure regulate small RNA sorting in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Niu, DongDong; Carbonell, Alberto; Wang, Airong; Lee, Angel; Tun, Vinnary; Wang, Zonghua; Carrington, James C.; Chang, Chia-en A.; Jin, Hailing

    2014-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) are loaded into ARGONAUTE (AGO) proteins to induce gene silencing. In plants, the 5′-terminal nucleotide is important for sRNA sorting into different AGOs. Here, we show that miRNA duplex structure also contributes to miRNA sorting. Base-pairing at the 15th nucleotide of a miRNA duplex is important for miRNA sorting in both Arabidopsis AGO1 and AGO2. AGO2 favors miRNA duplexes with no middle mismatches, whereas AGO1 tolerates, or prefers, duplexes with central mismatches. AGO structure modeling and mutational analyses reveal that the QF-V motif within the conserved PIWI domain contributes to recognition of base-pairing at the 15th nucleotide of a duplex, while the DDDE catalytic core of AtAGO2 is important for recognition of the central nucleotides. Finally, we rescued the adaxialized phenotype of ago1-12, which is largely due to miR165 loss-of-function, by changing miR165 duplex structure which we predict redirects it to AGO2. PMID:25406978

  16. mTOR signaling regulates the processing of pre-rRNA in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Iadevaia, Valentina; Zhang, Ze; Jan, Eric; Proud, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin, complex 1 (mTORC1), positively regulates the transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and the synthesis of ribosomal proteins, thereby promoting the complex process of ribosome biogenesis. The major rRNAs are transcribed as a single precursor, which must be processed to create the 5.8S, 18S and 28S rRNAs. We used a new non-radioactive labeling approach to study the effects of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, on rRNA synthesis. Rapamycin not only impaired synthesis of new 18S, 28S or 5S rRNA but also induced their decay. This prompted us to examine the effects of rapamycin on rRNA processing. We show that rapamycin also interferes with the processing events that generate 18S and 28S rRNA. rRNA transcription and processing occur in regions of the nucleus known as nucleoli. We find that the mTORC1 components raptor and mTOR are both present in nucleoli, where they may regulate rRNA maturation events. While rapamycin has no effect on overall nucleolar morphology or its proteome, it does induce loss of mTOR and raptor from them. These data show that mTORC1 is located in nucleoli where it acts to regulate events involved in ribosome biogenesis including the maturation of rRNA molecules. PMID:22121221

  17. The adaptor Grb7 links netrin-1 signaling to regulation of mRNA translation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Nien-Pei; Bi, Jing; Wei, Li-Na

    2007-01-01

    We previously reported a novel biological activity of Netrin-1 in translational stimulation of kappa opioid receptor (KOR). We now identify Grb7 as a new RNA-binding protein that serves as the molecular adaptor for transmitting Netrin-1 signals, through focal adhesion kinase (FAK), to the translation machinery. Grb7 binds specifically to the first stem loop of kor mRNA 5′-UTR through a new RNA-binding domain located in its amino terminus. Upon binding to its capped, target mRNA, Grb7 blocks the recruitment of eIF4E, rendering mRNA untranslatable. The RNA-binding and translation-repressive activity is reduced by FAK-mediated hyperphosphorylation on two tyrosine residues of its carboxyl terminus. This study reports an adaptor protein Grb7 that transmits the stimulating signals of Netrin-1 to the translational machinery to rapidly regulate mRNA translation. PMID:17318180

  18. RNA Polymerase Backtracking in Gene Regulation and Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Nudler, Evgeny

    2013-01-01

    RNA polymerase is a ratchet machine that oscillates between productive and backtracked states at numerous DNA positions. The amount of backtracking (reversible sliding of the enzyme along DNA and RNA) varies from one to many nucleotides. Since its first description 15 years ago, backtracking has been implicated in a plethora of critical processes in bacteria and eukaryotic cells. Here we review the most fundamental roles of this phenomenon in controlling transcription elongation, pausing, termination, fidelity, and genome instability. We also discuss recent progress in understanding the structural and mechanistic properties of the backtracking process. PMID:22726433

  19. A novel mRNA 3' untranslated region translational control sequence regulates Xenopus Wee1 mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi Ying; Charlesworth, Amanda; Byrd, Shannon M; Gregerson, Robert; MacNicol, Melanie C; MacNicol, Angus M

    2008-05-15

    Cell cycle progression during oocyte maturation requires the strict temporal regulation of maternal mRNA translation. The intrinsic basis of this temporal control has not been fully elucidated but appears to involve distinct mRNA 3' UTR regulatory elements. In this study, we identify a novel translational control sequence (TCS) that exerts repression of target mRNAs in immature oocytes of the frog, Xenopus laevis, and can direct early cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translational activation during oocyte maturation. The TCS is functionally distinct from the previously characterized Musashi/polyadenylation response element (PRE) and the cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE). We report that TCS elements exert translational repression in both the Wee1 mRNA 3' UTR and the pericentriolar material-1 (Pcm-1) mRNA 3' UTR in immature oocytes. During oocyte maturation, TCS function directs the early translational activation of the Pcm-1 mRNA. By contrast, we demonstrate that CPE sequences flanking the TCS elements in the Wee1 3' UTR suppress the ability of the TCS to direct early translational activation. Our results indicate that a functional hierarchy exists between these distinct 3' UTR regulatory elements to control the timing of maternal mRNA translational activation during oocyte maturation.

  20. E. coli 6S RNA: a universal transcriptional regulator within the centre of growth adaptation.

    PubMed

    Geissen, René; Steuten, Benedikt; Polen, Tino; Wagner, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial 6S RNA has been shown to bind with high affinity to σ(70)-containing RNA polymerase, suppressing σ(70)-dependent transcription during stationary phase, when 6S RNA concentrations are highest. We recently reported a genome-wide transcriptional comparison of wild-type and 6S RNA deficient E. coli strains. Contrary to the expected σ(70)- and stationary phase-specific regulatory effect of 6S RNA it turned out that mRNA levels derived from many alternative sigma factors, including σ(38) or σ(32), were affected during exponential and stationary growth. Among the most noticeably down-regulated genes at stationary growth are ribosomal proteins and factors involved in translation. In addition, a striking number of mRNA levels coding for enzymes involved in the purine metabolism, for transporters and stress regulators are altered both during log- and stationary phase. During the study we discovered a link between 6S RNA and the general stress alarmone ppGpp, which has a higher basal level in cells deficient in 6S RNA. This finding points to a functional interrelation of 6S RNA and the global network of stress and growth adaptation. PMID:20930516

  1. The Regulation of rRNA Gene Transcription during Directed Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong; Zhao, Rui; Giles, Keith E.

    2016-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that proper cellular control of pluripotency and differentiation is related to the regulation of rRNA synthesis. To further our understanding of the role that the regulation of rRNA synthesis has in pluripotency we monitored rRNA synthesis during the directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We discovered that the rRNA synthesis rate is reduced ~50% within 6 hours of ACTIVIN A treatment. This precedes reductions in expression of specific stem cell markers and increases in expression of specific germ layer markers. The reduction in rRNA synthesis is concomitant with dissociation of the Pol I transcription factor, UBTF, from the rRNA gene promoter and precedes any increase to heterochromatin throughout the rRNA gene. To directly investigate the role of rRNA synthesis in pluripotency, hESCs were treated with the Pol I inhibitor, CX-5461. The direct reduction of rRNA synthesis by CX-5461 induces the expression of markers for all three germ layers, reduces the expression of pluripotency markers, and is overall similar to the ACTIVIN A induced changes. This work indicates that the dissociation of UBTF from the rRNA gene, and corresponding reduction in transcription, represent early regulatory events during the directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:27299313

  2. Bolaamphiphile-based nanocomplex delivery of phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, John P; Krzeminski, Jacek; Sharma, Arun K; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Weissig, Volkmar; Stewart, David B

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a conceptually appealing alternative to conventional antibiotics, a major challenge toward the successful implementation of antisense treatments for bacterial infections is the development of efficient oligonucleotide delivery systems. Cationic vesicles (bolasomes) composed of dequalinium chloride (“DQAsomes”) have been used to deliver plasmid DNA across the cardiolipin-rich inner membrane of mitochondria. As cardiolipin is also a component of many bacterial membranes, we investigated the application of cationic bolasomes to bacteria as an oligonucleotide delivery system. Antisense sequences designed in silico to target the expression of essential genes of the bacterial pathogen, Clostridium difficile, were synthesized as 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). These antisense gapmers were quantitatively assessed for their ability to block mRNA translation using luciferase reporter and C. difficile protein expression plasmid constructs in a coupled transcription–translation system. Cationic bolaamphiphile compounds (dequalinium derivatives) of varying alkyl chain length were synthesized and bolasomes were prepared via probe sonication of an aqueous suspension. Bolasomes were characterized by particle size distribution, zeta potential, and binding capacities for anionic oligonucleotide. Bolasomes and antisense gapmers were combined to form antisense nanocomplexes. Anaerobic C. difficile log phase cultures were treated with serial doses of gapmer nanocomplexes or equivalent amounts of empty bolasomes for 24 hours. Antisense gapmers for four gene targets achieved nanomolar minimum inhibitory concentrations for C. difficile, with the lowest values observed for oligonucleotides targeting polymerase genes rpoB and dnaE. No inhibition of bacterial growth was observed from treatments at matched dosages of scrambled gapmer nanocomplexes or plain, oligonucleotide-free bolasomes compared to untreated control cultures. We

  3. Bolaamphiphile-based nanocomplex delivery of phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, John P; Krzeminski, Jacek; Sharma, Arun K; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Weissig, Volkmar; Stewart, David B

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a conceptually appealing alternative to conventional antibiotics, a major challenge toward the successful implementation of antisense treatments for bacterial infections is the development of efficient oligonucleotide delivery systems. Cationic vesicles (bolasomes) composed of dequalinium chloride ("DQAsomes") have been used to deliver plasmid DNA across the cardiolipin-rich inner membrane of mitochondria. As cardiolipin is also a component of many bacterial membranes, we investigated the application of cationic bolasomes to bacteria as an oligonucleotide delivery system. Antisense sequences designed in silico to target the expression of essential genes of the bacterial pathogen, Clostridium difficile, were synthesized as 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). These antisense gapmers were quantitatively assessed for their ability to block mRNA translation using luciferase reporter and C. difficile protein expression plasmid constructs in a coupled transcription-translation system. Cationic bolaamphiphile compounds (dequalinium derivatives) of varying alkyl chain length were synthesized and bolasomes were prepared via probe sonication of an aqueous suspension. Bolasomes were characterized by particle size distribution, zeta potential, and binding capacities for anionic oligonucleotide. Bolasomes and antisense gapmers were combined to form antisense nanocomplexes. Anaerobic C. difficile log phase cultures were treated with serial doses of gapmer nanocomplexes or equivalent amounts of empty bolasomes for 24 hours. Antisense gapmers for four gene targets achieved nanomolar minimum inhibitory concentrations for C. difficile, with the lowest values observed for oligonucleotides targeting polymerase genes rpoB and dnaE. No inhibition of bacterial growth was observed from treatments at matched dosages of scrambled gapmer nanocomplexes or plain, oligonucleotide-free bolasomes compared to untreated control cultures. We describe

  4. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference.

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, N A; Speiseder, T; Lam, E; Rubtsov, P M; Tonaeva, Kh D; Borzenok, S A; Dobner, T; Prassolov, V S

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy.

  5. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Nikitenko, N. A.; Speiseder, T.; Lam, E.; Rubtsov, P. M.; Tonaeva, Kh. D.; Borzenok, S. A.; Dobner, T.; Prassolov, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy. PMID:26483965

  6. Regulation of mRNA trafficking by nuclear pore complexes.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Amandine; Palancade, Benoit

    2014-09-02

    Over the last two decades, multiple studies have explored the mechanisms governing mRNA export out of the nucleus, a crucial step in eukaryotic gene expression. During transcription and processing, mRNAs are assembled into messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs). mRNPs are then exported through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), which are large multiprotein assemblies made of several copies of a limited number of nucleoporins. A considerable effort has been put into the dissection of mRNA export through NPCs at both cellular and molecular levels, revealing the conserved contributions of a subset of nucleoporins in this process, from yeast to vertebrates. Several reports have also demonstrated the ability of NPCs to sort out properly-processed mRNPs for entry into the nuclear export pathway. Importantly, changes in mRNA export have been associated with post-translational modifications of nucleoporins or changes in NPC composition, depending on cell cycle progression, development or exposure to stress. How NPC modifications also impact on cellular mRNA export in disease situations, notably upon viral infection, is discussed.

  7. Regulation of mRNA Trafficking by Nuclear Pore Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Amandine; Palancade, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades, multiple studies have explored the mechanisms governing mRNA export out of the nucleus, a crucial step in eukaryotic gene expression. During transcription and processing, mRNAs are assembled into messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs). mRNPs are then exported through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), which are large multiprotein assemblies made of several copies of a limited number of nucleoporins. A considerable effort has been put into the dissection of mRNA export through NPCs at both cellular and molecular levels, revealing the conserved contributions of a subset of nucleoporins in this process, from yeast to vertebrates. Several reports have also demonstrated the ability of NPCs to sort out properly-processed mRNPs for entry into the nuclear export pathway. Importantly, changes in mRNA export have been associated with post-translational modifications of nucleoporins or changes in NPC composition, depending on cell cycle progression, development or exposure to stress. How NPC modifications also impact on cellular mRNA export in disease situations, notably upon viral infection, is discussed. PMID:25184662

  8. PLGA-PEG-PLGA microspheres as a delivery vehicle for antisense oligonucleotides to CTGF: Implications on post-surgical peritoneal adhesion prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeke, John Imuetinyan-Jesu, Jr.

    Abdominal adhesions are the aberrant result of peritoneal wound healing commonly associated with surgery and inflammation. A subject of a large number of studies since the first half of the last century, peritoneal adhesion prevention has, for the most part, evaded the scientific community and continues to cost Americans an estimated $2-4 billion annually. It is known that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) plays a key role in the wound healing cascade; however, suppression of this multifunctional growth factor's activity may have more harmful consequences than can be tolerated. As a result, much attention has fallen on connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a downstream mediator of TGF-beta's fibrotic action. It has been demonstrated in several in vitro models, that the suppression of CTGF hinders fibroblast proliferation, a necessary condition for fibrosis. Furthermore, antisense oligonucleotides (antisense oligos, AO) to CTGF have been shown to knock down CTGF mRNA levels by specifically hindering the translation of CTGF protein. Antisense technologies have met with a great deal of excitement as a viable means of preventing diseases such as adhesions by hindering protein translation at the mRNA level. However, the great challenge associated with the use of these drugs lies in the short circulation time when administered "naked". Viral delivery systems, although excellent platforms in metabolic studies, are not ideal for diagnostic use because of the inherent danger associated with viral vectors. Microparticles made of biodegradable polymers have therefore presented themselves as a viable means of delivering these drugs to target cells over extended periods. Herein, we present two in vivo studies confirming the up-regulation of TGF-beta protein and CTGF mRNA following injury to the uterine tissues of female rats. We were able to selectively knockdown post-operative CTGF protein levels following surgery, however, our observations led us to conclude that

  9. Antisense treatment directed against mutated Ki-ras in human colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Andreyev, H; Ross, P; Cunningham, D; Clarke, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Kirsten ras (Ki-ras) mutations are common in gastrointestinal cancer and one codon 12 mutation, glycine to valine, is particularly aggressive in colorectal cancer.
AIMS—To investigate if this valine point mutation could be targeted with antisense oligonucleotides and to determine the efficacy of any antisense/mRNA interaction.
METHODS—Twenty nine antisense oligonucleotides were screened against target and control Ki-ras RNA in a cell free system and against target and control cell lines in culture.
RESULTS—The activity and specificity of the oligonucleotides varied. Results for the individual oligonucleotides were consistent in a cell free model and in cell culture using two different uptake promoters. Only one oligonucleotide was specific in its cleavage of target Ki-ras mRNA in the cell free system and appeared specific in cell culture, although changes in Ki-ras mRNA and protein expression following a single treatment could not be detected. Experiments in the cell free system showed that the point mutation is relatively inaccessible to oligonucleotides. Other sites on the Ki-ras RNA molecule, away from the point mutation, can be targeted more effectively.
CONCLUSIONS—Successful targeting of the clinically relevant Ki-ras point mutation with antisense oligonucleotides is difficult because of RNA structure at the mutated site and is inefficient compared with other sites on the Ki-ras mRNA.


Keywords: Ki-ras mutation; antisense treatment; colorectal carcinoma PMID:11156646

  10. Structural Insights into RNA Recognition by the Alternate-Splicing Regulator CUG-Binding Protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    M Teplova; J Song; H Gaw; A Teplov; D Patel

    2011-12-31

    CUG-binding protein 1 (CUGBP1) regulates multiple aspects of nuclear and cytoplasmic mRNA processing, with implications for onset of myotonic dystrophy. CUGBP1 harbors three RRM domains and preferentially targets UGU-rich mRNA elements. We describe crystal structures of CUGBP1 RRM1 and tandem RRM1/2 domains bound to RNAs containing tandem UGU(U/G) elements. Both RRM1 in RRM1-RNA and RRM2 in RRM1/2-RNA complexes use similar principles to target UGU(U/G) elements, with recognition mediated by face-to-edge stacking and water-mediated hydrogen-bonding networks. The UG step adopts a left-handed Z-RNA conformation, with the syn guanine recognized through Hoogsteen edge-protein backbone hydrogen-bonding interactions. NMR studies on the RRM1/2-RNA complex establish that both RRM domains target tandem UGUU motifs in solution, whereas filter-binding assays identify a preference for recognition of GU over AU or GC steps. We discuss the implications of CUGBP1-mediated targeting and sequestration of UGU(U/G) elements on pre-mRNA alternative-splicing regulation, translational regulation, and mRNA decay.

  11. Cooperative gene regulation by microRNA pairs and their identification using a computational workflow

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Ulf; Lai, Xin; Winter, Felix; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio; Gupta, Shailendra K.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an integral part of gene regulation at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, it has been shown that pairs of miRNAs can repress the translation of a target mRNA in a cooperative manner, which leads to an enhanced effectiveness and specificity in target repression. However, it remains unclear which miRNA pairs can synergize and which genes are target of cooperative miRNA regulation. In this paper, we present a computational workflow for the prediction and analysis of cooperating miRNAs and their mutual target genes, which we refer to as RNA triplexes. The workflow integrates methods of miRNA target prediction; triplex structure analysis; molecular dynamics simulations and mathematical modeling for a reliable prediction of functional RNA triplexes and target repression efficiency. In a case study we analyzed the human genome and identified several thousand targets of cooperative gene regulation. Our results suggest that miRNA cooperativity is a frequent mechanism for an enhanced target repression by pairs of miRNAs facilitating distinctive and fine-tuned target gene expression patterns. Human RNA triplexes predicted and characterized in this study are organized in a web resource at www.sbi.uni-rostock.de/triplexrna/. PMID:24875477

  12. Antisense-mediated exon skipping: taking advantage of a trick from Mother Nature to treat rare genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Veltrop, Marcel; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2014-07-01

    Rare diseases can be caused by genetic mutations that disrupt normal pre-mRNA splicing. Antisense oligonucleotide treatment to the splicing thus has therapeutic potential for many rare diseases. In this review we will focus on the state of the art on exon skipping using antisense oligonucleotides as a potential therapy for rare genetic diseases, outlining how this versatile approach can be exploited to correct for different mutations.

  13. MYC Regulation of Cell Growth through Control of Transcription by RNA Polymerases I and III

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kirsteen J.; White, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    MYC’s tumorigenic potential involves increased ribosome biogenesis and translational capacity, which supply the cell with protein required for enhanced cell growth and subsequent cell division. In addition to activation of protein-encoding genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II, MYC must stimulate transcription by RNA polymerase I and RNA polymerase III to meet this synthetic demand. In the past decade our knowledge of the mechanisms and importance of MYC regulation of RNA polymerases I and III has flourished. Here we discuss MYC’s influence on transcription by these “odd” RNA polymerases and the physiological impact of this regulation is evaluated with relevance to cancer development and treatment. PMID:24789877

  14. Riboswitch-Mediated Gene Regulation: Novel RNA Architectures Dictate Gene Expression Responses.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Anna V; Henkin, Tina M

    2016-09-01

    Riboswitches are RNA elements that act on the mRNA with which they are cotranscribed to modulate expression of that mRNA. These elements are widely found in bacteria, where they have a broad impact on gene expression. The defining feature of riboswitches is that they directly recognize a physiological signal, and the resulting shift in RNA structure affects gene regulation. The majority of riboswitches respond to cellular metabolites, often in a feedback loop to repress synthesis of the enzymes used to produce the metabolite. Related elements respond to the aminoacylation status of a specific tRNA or to a physical parameter, such as temperature or pH. Recent studies have identified new classes of riboswitches and have revealed new insights into the molecular mechanisms of signal recognition and gene regulation. Application of structural and biophysical approaches has complemented previous genetic and biochemical studies, yielding new information about how different riboswitches operate. PMID:27607554

  15. Emerging roles of RNA processing factors in regulating long non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiming; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) can be important regulators of various biological processes such as RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). In the RdDM pathway, recruitment of the DNA methylation complex is mediated through complementary pairing between scaffold RNAs and Argonaute-associated siRNAs. Scaffold RNAs are chromatin-associated lncRNAs transcribed by RNA polymerase Pol V or Pol II, while siRNAs originate from Pol IV- or Pol II-dependent production of lncRNAs. In contrast to the vast literature on co-transcriptional and post-transcriptional processing of mRNAs, information is limited for lncRNA regulation that enables their production and function. Recently Arabidopsis RRP6L1, a plant paralog of the conserved nuclear RNA surveillance protein Rrp6, was shown to mediate RdDM through retention of lncRNAs in the chromatin, thereby revealing that accumulation of functional lncRNAs requires more than simply RNA polymerases. By focusing on the canonical RdDM pathway, here we summarize recent evidence that indicate co-transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional regulation of lncRNAs, and highlight the emerging theme of lncRNA regulation by RNA processing factors. PMID:25144332

  16. Regulation of the alkaloid biosynthesis by miRNA in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Boke, Hatice; Ozhuner, Esma; Turktas, Mine; Parmaksiz, Iskender; Ozcan, Sebahattin; Unver, Turgay

    2015-04-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is an important medicinal plant producing benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIA). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small RNAs (sRNAs) of approximately 21 nucleotides. They are noncoding, but regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. Although many studies have been conducted on the identification and functions of plant miRNA, scarce researches on miRNA regulation of alkaloid biosynthesis have been reported. In this study, a total of 316 conserved and 11 novel miRNAs were identified in opium poppy using second-generation sequencing and direct cloning. Tissue-specific regulation of miRNA expression was comparatively analysed by miRNA microarray assays. A total of 232 miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed among four tissues. Likewise, 1469 target transcripts were detected using in silico and experimental approaches. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses indicated that miRNA putatively regulates carbohydrate metabolism and genetic-information processing. Additionally, miRNA target transcripts were mostly involved in response to stress against various factors and secondary-metabolite biosynthesis processes. Target transcript identification analyses revealed that some of the miRNAs might be involved in BIA biosynthesis, such as pso-miR13, pso-miR2161 and pso-miR408. Additionally, three putatively mature miRNA sequences were predicted to be targeting BIA-biosynthesis genes.

  17. Regulation of the alkaloid biosynthesis by miRNA in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Boke, Hatice; Ozhuner, Esma; Turktas, Mine; Parmaksiz, Iskender; Ozcan, Sebahattin; Unver, Turgay

    2015-04-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is an important medicinal plant producing benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIA). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small RNAs (sRNAs) of approximately 21 nucleotides. They are noncoding, but regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. Although many studies have been conducted on the identification and functions of plant miRNA, scarce researches on miRNA regulation of alkaloid biosynthesis have been reported. In this study, a total of 316 conserved and 11 novel miRNAs were identified in opium poppy using second-generation sequencing and direct cloning. Tissue-specific regulation of miRNA expression was comparatively analysed by miRNA microarray assays. A total of 232 miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed among four tissues. Likewise, 1469 target transcripts were detected using in silico and experimental approaches. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses indicated that miRNA putatively regulates carbohydrate metabolism and genetic-information processing. Additionally, miRNA target transcripts were mostly involved in response to stress against various factors and secondary-metabolite biosynthesis processes. Target transcript identification analyses revealed that some of the miRNAs might be involved in BIA biosynthesis, such as pso-miR13, pso-miR2161 and pso-miR408. Additionally, three putatively mature miRNA sequences were predicted to be targeting BIA-biosynthesis genes. PMID:25735537

  18. Staged miRNA re-regulation patterns during reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MiRNAs often operate in feedback loops with transcription factors and represent a key mechanism for fine-tuning gene expression. In transcription factor-induced reprogramming, miRNAs play a critical role; however, detailed analyses of miRNA expression changes during reprogramming at the level of deep sequencing have not been previously reported. Results We use four factor reprogramming to induce pluripotent stem cells from mouse fibroblasts and isolate FACS-sorted Thy1- and SSEA1+ intermediates and Oct4-GFP+ induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Small RNAs from these cells, and two partial-iPSC lines, another iPSC line, and mouse embryonic stem cells (mES cells) were deep sequenced. A comprehensive resetting of the miRNA profile occurs during reprogramming; however, analysis of miRNA co-expression patterns yields only a few patterns of change. Dlk1-Dio3 region miRNAs dominate the large pool of miRNAs experiencing small but significant fold changes early in reprogramming. Overexpression of Dlk1-Dio3 miRNAs early in reprogramming reduces reprogramming efficiency, suggesting the observed downregulation of these miRNAs may contribute to reprogramming. As reprogramming progresses, fewer miRNAs show changes in expression, but those changes are generally of greater magnitude. Conclusions The broad resetting of the miRNA profile during reprogramming that we observe is due to small changes in gene expression in many miRNAs early in the process, and large changes in only a few miRNAs late in reprogramming. This corresponds with a previously observed transition from a stochastic to a more deterministic signal. PMID:24380417

  19. Modification of antisense phosphodiester oligodeoxynucleotides by a 5' cholesteryl moiety increases cellular association and improves efficacy.

    PubMed Central

    Krieg, A M; Tonkinson, J; Matson, S; Zhao, Q; Saxon, M; Zhang, L M; Bhanja, U; Yakubov, L; Stein, C A

    1993-01-01

    Phosphodiester oligodeoxynucleotides bearing a 5' cholesteryl (chol) modification bind to low density lipoprotein (LDL), apparently by partitioning the chol-modified oligonucleotides into the lipid layer. Both HL60 cells and primary mouse spleen T and B cells incubated with fluorescently labeled chol-modified oligonucleotide showed substantially increased cellular association by flow cytometry and increased internalization by confocal microscopy compared to an identical molecule not bearing the chol group. Cellular internalization of chol-modified oligonucleotide occurred at least partially through the LDL receptor; it was increased in mouse spleen cells by cell culture in lipoprotein-deficient medium and/or lovastatin, and it was decreased by culture in high serum medium. To determine whether chol-modified oligonucleotides are more potent antisense agents, we titered antisense unmodified phosphodiester and chol-modified oligonucleotides targeted against a mouse immunosuppressive protein. Murine spleen cells cultured with 20 microM phosphodiester antisense oligonucleotides had a 2-fold increase in RNA synthesis, indicating the expected lymphocyte activation. Antisense chol-modified oligonucleotides showed an 8-fold increase in relative potency: they caused a 2-fold increase in RNA synthesis at just 2.5 microM. The increased efficacy was blocked by heparin and was further increased by cell culture in 1% (vs. 10%) fetal bovine serum, suggesting that the effect may, at least in part, be mediated via the LDL receptor. Antisense chol-modified oligonucleotides are sequence specific and have increased potency as compared to unmodified oligonucleotides. Images PMID:8430072

  20. Bioinformatics-Based Identification of MicroRNA-Regulated and Rheumatoid Arthritis-Associated Genes.

    PubMed

    Song, Yi-Jiang; Li, Guiling; He, Jian-Hua; Guo, Yao; Yang, Li

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act as epigenetic markers and regulate the expression of their target genes, including those characterized as regulators in autoimmune diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases. The potential roles of miRNA-regulated genes in RA pathogenesis have greatly aroused the interest of clinicians and researchers in recent years. In the current study, RA-related miRNAs records were obtained from PubMed through conditional literature retrieval. After analyzing the selected records, miRNA targeted genes were predicted. We identified 14 RA-associated miRNAs, and their sub-analysis in 5 microarray or RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) datasets was performed. The microarray and RNA-seq data of RA were also downloaded from NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and Sequence Read Archive (SRA), analyzed, and annotated. Using a bioinformatics approach, we identified a series of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) by comparing studies on RA and the controls. The RA-related gene expression profile was thus obtained and the expression of miRNA-regulated genes was analyzed. After functional annotation analysis, we found GO molecular function (MF) terms significantly enriched in calcium ion binding (GO: 0005509). Moreover, some novel dysregulated target genes were identified in RA through integrated analysis of miRNA/mRNA expression. The result revealed that the expression of a number of genes, including ROR2, ABI3BP, SMOC2, etc., was not only affected by dysregulated miRNAs, but also altered in RA. Our findings indicate that there is a close association between negatively correlated mRNA/miRNA pairs and RA. These findings may be applied to identify genetic markers for RA diagnosis and treatment in the future.

  1. Regulation of hypothalamic somatostatin and growth hormone releasing hormone mRNA levels by inhibin.

    PubMed

    Carro, E; Señarís, R M; Mallo, F; Diéguez, C

    1999-03-20

    Although it is well established that inhibin plays a major role in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, its influence in the regulation of other neuroendocrine functions is still poorly understood. Recent results indicate that inhibin suppresses plasma GH levels, but its site of action is yet unknown. Therefore, in the present work we investigated the effects of inhibin on somatostatin and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) mRNA levels in the hypothalamus by 'in situ' hybridization. We found that inhibin administration (4, 12 and 24 h, i.c.v.) led to an increase in somatostatin mRNA levels in the periventricular nucleus, and to a decrease in GHRH mRNA content in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. These findings indicate that inhibin regulates the hypothalamic levels of somatostatin and GHRH mRNA.

  2. An in silico model for identification of small RNAs in whole bacterial genomes: characterization of antisense RNAs in pathogenic Escherichia coli and Streptococcus agalactiae strains

    PubMed Central

    Pichon, Christophe; du Merle, Laurence; Caliot, Marie Elise; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Le Bouguénec, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of small non-coding ribonucleic acids (sRNA) among the large volume of data generated by high-throughput RNA-seq or tiling microarray analyses remains a challenge. Thus, there is still a need for accurate in silico prediction methods to identify sRNAs within a given bacterial species. After years of effort, dedicated software were developed based on comparative genomic analyses or mathematical/statistical models. Although these genomic analyses enabled sRNAs in intergenic regions to be efficiently identified, they all failed to predict antisense sRNA genes (asRNA), i.e. RNA genes located on the DNA strand complementary to that which encodes the protein. The statistical models enabled any genomic region to be analyzed theorically but not efficiently. We present a new model for in silico identification of sRNA and asRNA candidates within an entire bacterial genome. This model was successfully used to analyze the Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Streptococcus agalactiae. In both bacteria, numerous asRNAs are transcribed from the complementary strand of genes located in pathogenicity islands, strongly suggesting that these asRNAs are regulators of the virulence expression. In particular, we characterized an asRNA that acted as an enhancer-like regulator of the type 1 fimbriae production involved in the virulence of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli. PMID:22139924

  3. An in silico model for identification of small RNAs in whole bacterial genomes: characterization of antisense RNAs in pathogenic Escherichia coli and Streptococcus agalactiae strains.

    PubMed

    Pichon, Christophe; du Merle, Laurence; Caliot, Marie Elise; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Le Bouguénec, Chantal

    2012-04-01

    Characterization of small non-coding ribonucleic acids (sRNA) among the large volume of data generated by high-throughput RNA-seq or tiling microarray analyses remains a challenge. Thus, there is still a need for accurate in silico prediction methods to identify sRNAs within a given bacterial species. After years of effort, dedicated software were developed based on comparative genomic analyses or mathematical/statistical models. Although these genomic analyses enabled sRNAs in intergenic regions to be efficiently identified, they all failed to predict antisense sRNA genes (asRNA), i.e. RNA genes located on the DNA strand complementary to that which encodes the protein. The statistical models enabled any genomic region to be analyzed theorically but not efficiently. We present a new model for in silico identification of sRNA and asRNA candidates within an entire bacterial genome. This model was successfully used to analyze the Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Streptococcus agalactiae. In both bacteria, numerous asRNAs are transcribed from the complementary strand of genes located in pathogenicity islands, strongly suggesting that these asRNAs are regulators of the virulence expression. In particular, we characterized an asRNA that acted as an enhancer-like regulator of the type 1 fimbriae production involved in the virulence of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli.

  4. rMAPS: RNA map analysis and plotting server for alternative exon regulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Juw Won; Jung, Sungbo; Rouchka, Eric C.; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a critical role in the regulation of alternative splicing (AS), a prevalent mechanism for generating transcriptomic and proteomic diversity in eukaryotic cells. Studies have shown that AS can be regulated by RBPs in a binding-site-position dependent manner. Depending on where RBPs bind, splicing of an alternative exon can be enhanced or suppressed. Therefore, spatial analyses of RBP motifs and binding sites around alternative exons will help elucidate splicing regulation by RBPs. The development of high-throughput sequencing technologies has allowed transcriptome-wide analyses of AS and RBP–RNA interactions. Given a set of differentially regulated alternative exons obtained from RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) experiments, the rMAPS web server (http://rmaps.cecsresearch.org) performs motif analyses of RBPs in the vicinity of alternatively spliced exons and creates RNA maps that depict the spatial patterns of RBP motifs. Similarly, rMAPS can also perform spatial analyses of RBP–RNA binding sites identified by cross-linking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq) experiments. We anticipate rMAPS will be a useful tool for elucidating RBP regulation of alternative exon splicing using high-throughput sequencing data. PMID:27174931

  5. Nucleolar DEAD-Box RNA Helicase TOGR1 Regulates Thermotolerant Growth as a Pre-rRNA Chaperone in Rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Qin, Baoxiang; Li, Xiang; Tang, Ding; Zhang, Yu'e; Cheng, Zhukuan; Xue, Yongbiao

    2016-02-01

    Plants have evolved a considerable number of intrinsic tolerance strategies to acclimate to ambient temperature increase. However, their molecular mechanisms remain largely obscure. Here we report a DEAD-box RNA helicase, TOGR1 (Thermotolerant Growth Required1), prerequisite for rice growth themotolerance. Regulated by both temperature and the circadian clock, its expression is tightly coupled to daily temperature fluctuations and its helicase activities directly promoted by temperature increase. Located in the nucleolus and associated with the small subunit (SSU) pre-rRNA processome, TOGR1 maintains a normal rRNA homeostasis at high temperature. Natural variation in its transcript level is positively correlated with plant height and its overexpression significantly improves rice growth under hot conditions. Our findings reveal a novel molecular mechanism of RNA helicase as a key chaperone for rRNA homeostasis required for rice thermotolerant growth and provide a potential strategy to breed heat-tolerant crops by modulating the expression of TOGR1 and its orthologs. PMID:26848586

  6. Nucleolar DEAD-Box RNA Helicase TOGR1 Regulates Thermotolerant Growth as a Pre-rRNA Chaperone in Rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Qin, Baoxiang; Li, Xiang; Tang, Ding; Zhang, Yu'e; Cheng, Zhukuan; Xue, Yongbiao

    2016-02-01

    Plants have evolved a considerable number of intrinsic tolerance strategies to acclimate to ambient temperature increase. However, their molecular mechanisms remain largely obscure. Here we report a DEAD-box RNA helicase, TOGR1 (Thermotolerant Growth Required1), prerequisite for rice growth themotolerance. Regulated by both temperature and the circadian clock, its expression is tightly coupled to daily temperature fluctuations and its helicase activities directly promoted by temperature increase. Located in the nucleolus and associated with the small subunit (SSU) pre-rRNA processome, TOGR1 maintains a normal rRNA homeostasis at high temperature. Natural variation in its transcript level is positively correlated with plant height and its overexpression significantly improves rice growth under hot conditions. Our findings reveal a novel molecular mechanism of RNA helicase as a key chaperone for rRNA homeostasis required for rice thermotolerant growth and provide a potential strategy to breed heat-tolerant crops by modulating the expression of TOGR1 and its orthologs.

  7. Novel miRNA-31 and miRNA-200a-Mediated Regulation of Retinoblastoma Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Vanessa; Fan, Hanli; Bryar, Paul J; Weinstein, Joanna L; Mets, Marilyn B; Feng, Gang; Martin, Joshua; Martin, Alissa; Jiang, Hongmei; Laurie, Nikia A

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular tumor in children. Current management includes broad-based treatments such as chemotherapy, enucleation, laser therapy, or cryotherapy. However, therapies that target specific pathways important for retinoblastoma progression could provide valuable alternatives for treatment. MicroRNAs are short, noncoding RNA transcripts that can regulate the expression of target genes, and their aberrant expression often facilitates disease. The identification of post-transcriptional events that occur after the initiating genetic lesions could further define the rapidly aggressive growth displayed by retinoblastoma tumors. In this study, we used two phenotypically different retinoblastoma cell lines to elucidate the roles of miRNA-31 and miRNA-200a in tumor proliferation. Our approach confirmed that miRNAs-31 and -200a expression is significantly reduced in human retinoblastomas. Moreover, overexpression of these two miRNAs restricts the expansion of a highly proliferative cell line (Y79), but does not restrict the growth rate of a less aggressive cell line (Weri1). Gene expression profiling of miRNA-31 and/or miRNA-200a-overexpressing cells identified differentially expressed mRNAs associated with the divergent response of the two cell lines. This work has the potential to enhance the development of targeted therapeutic approaches for retinoblastoma and improve the efficacy of treatment. PMID:26379276

  8. Novel miRNA-31 and miRNA-200a-Mediated Regulation of Retinoblastoma Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Vanessa; Fan, Hanli; Bryar, Paul J.; Weinstein, Joanna L.; Mets, Marilyn B.; Feng, Gang; Martin, Joshua; Martin, Alissa; Jiang, Hongmei; Laurie, Nikia A.

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular tumor in children. Current management includes broad-based treatments such as chemotherapy, enucleation, laser therapy, or cryotherapy. However, therapies that target specific pathways important for retinoblastoma progression could provide valuable alternatives for treatment. MicroRNAs are short, noncoding RNA transcripts that can regulate the expression of target genes, and their aberrant expression often facilitates disease. The identification of post-transcriptional events that occur after the initiating genetic lesions could further define the rapidly aggressive growth displayed by retinoblastoma tumors. In this study, we used two phenotypically different retinoblastoma cell lines to elucidate the roles of miRNA-31 and miRNA-200a in tumor proliferation. Our approach confirmed that miRNAs-31 and -200a expression is significantly reduced in human retinoblastomas. Moreover, overexpression of these two miRNAs restricts the expansion of a highly proliferative cell line (Y79), but does not restrict the growth rate of a less aggressive cell line (Weri1). Gene expression profiling of miRNA-31 and/or miRNA-200a-overexpressing cells identified differentially expressed mRNAs associated with the divergent response of the two cell lines. This work has the potential to enhance the development of targeted therapeutic approaches for retinoblastoma and improve the efficacy of treatment. PMID:26379276

  9. Nucleolar DEAD-Box RNA Helicase TOGR1 Regulates Thermotolerant Growth as a Pre-rRNA Chaperone in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ding; Zhang, Yu’e; Cheng, Zhukuan; Xue, Yongbiao

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved a considerable number of intrinsic tolerance strategies to acclimate to ambient temperature increase. However, their molecular mechanisms remain largely obscure. Here we report a DEAD-box RNA helicase, TOGR1 (Thermotolerant Growth Required1), prerequisite for rice growth themotolerance. Regulated by both temperature and the circadian clock, its expression is tightly coupled to daily temperature fluctuations and its helicase activities directly promoted by temperature increase. Located in the nucleolus and associated with the small subunit (SSU) pre-rRNA processome, TOGR1 maintains a normal rRNA homeostasis at high temperature. Natural variation in its transcript level is positively correlated with plant height and its overexpression significantly improves rice growth under hot conditions. Our findings reveal a novel molecular mechanism of RNA helicase as a key chaperone for rRNA homeostasis required for rice thermotolerant growth and provide a potential strategy to breed heat-tolerant crops by modulating the expression of TOGR1 and its orthologs. PMID:26848586

  10. Ccr4-Not Regulates RNA Polymerase I Transcription and Couples Nutrient Signaling to the Control of Ribosomal RNA Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Laribee, R. Nicholas; Hosni-Ahmed, Amira; Workman, Jason J.; Chen, Hongfeng

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA synthesis is controlled by nutrient signaling through the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway. mTORC1 regulates ribosomal RNA expression by affecting RNA Polymerase I (Pol I)-dependent transcription of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) but the mechanisms involved remain obscure. This study provides evidence that the Ccr4-Not complex, which regulates RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) transcription, also functions downstream of mTORC1 to control Pol I activity. Ccr4-Not localizes to the rDNA and physically associates with the Pol I holoenzyme while Ccr4-Not disruption perturbs rDNA binding of multiple Pol I transcriptional regulators including core factor, the high mobility group protein Hmo1, and the SSU processome. Under nutrient rich conditions, Ccr4-Not suppresses Pol I initiation by regulating interactions with the essential transcription factor Rrn3. Additionally, Ccr4-Not disruption prevents reduced Pol I transcription when mTORC1 is inhibited suggesting Ccr4-Not bridges mTORC1 signaling with Pol I regulation. Analysis of the non-essential Pol I subunits demonstrated that the A34.5 subunit promotes, while the A12.2 and A14 subunits repress, Ccr4-Not interactions with Pol I. Furthermore, ccr4Δ is synthetically sick when paired with rpa12Δ and the double mutant has enhanced sensitivity to transcription elongation inhibition suggesting that Ccr4-Not functions to promote Pol I elongation. Intriguingly, while low concentrations of mTORC1 inhibitors completely inhibit growth of ccr4Δ, a ccr4Δ rpa12Δ rescues this growth defect suggesting that the sensitivity of Ccr4-Not mutants to mTORC1 inhibition is at least partially due to Pol I deregulation. Collectively, these data demonstrate a novel role for Ccr4-Not in Pol I transcriptional regulation that is required for bridging mTORC1 signaling to ribosomal RNA synthesis. PMID:25815716

  11. MicroRNA regulation of DNA repair gene expression in hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Meredith E; Kulshreshtha, Ritu; Ivan, Mircea; Glazer, Peter M

    2009-02-01

    Genetic instability is a hallmark of cancer; the hypoxic tumor microenvironment has been implicated as a cause of this phenomenon. MicroRNAs (miR) are small nonprotein coding RNAs that can regulate various cellular pathways. We report here that two miRs, miR-210 and miR-373, are up-regulated in a hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha-dependent manner in hypoxic cells. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that these miRs could regulate factors implicated in DNA repair pathways. Forced expression of miR-210 was found to suppress the levels of RAD52, which is a key factor in homology-dependent repair (HDR); the forced expression of miR-373 led to a reduction in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) protein, RAD23B, as well as in RAD52. Consistent with these results, both RAD52 and RAD23B were found to be down-regulated in hypoxia, but in both cases, the hypoxia-induced down-regulation could be partially reversed by antisense inhibition of miR-210 and miR-373. Importantly, luciferase reporter assays indicated that miR-210 is capable of interacting with the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of RAD52 and that miR-373 can act on the 3' UTR of RAD23B. These results indicate that hypoxia-inducible miR-210 and miR-373 play roles in modulating the expression levels of key proteins involved in the HDR and NER pathways, providing new mechanistic insight into the effect of hypoxia on DNA repair and genetic instability in cancer.

  12. Translational control at the synapse: role of RNA regulators

    PubMed Central

    Iacoangeli, Anna; Tiedge, Henri

    2012-01-01

    Translational control of gene expression is instrumental in the regulation of eukaryotic cellular form and function. Neurons in particular rely on this form of control as their numerous synaptic connections need to be independently modulated in an input-specific manner. Brain cytoplasmic (BC) RNAs implement translational control at neuronal synapses. BC RNAs regulate protein synthesis by interacting with eIF4 translation initiation factors. Recent evidence suggests that such regulation is required to control synaptic strength, and that dysregulation of local protein synthesis precipitates neuronal hyperexcitability and a propensity for epileptogenic responses. A similar phenotype results from lack of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), indicating that BC RNAs and FMRP use overlapping and convergent modes of action in neuronal translational regulation. PMID:23218750

  13. SNP Regulation of microRNA Expression and Subsequent Colon Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, Lila E.; Wolff, Roger K.; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Buas, Matthew F.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and as such have been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer. MiRNAs regulate mRNAs through binding of the miRNA 5’ seed sequence (~7–8 nucleotides) to the mRNA 3’ UTRs; polymorphisms in these regions have the potential to alter miRNA-mRNA target associations. SNPs in miRNA genes as well as miRNA-target genes have been proposed to influence cancer risk through altered miRNA expression levels. Methods MiRNA-SNPs and miRNA-target gene-SNPs were identified through the literature. We used SNPs from Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) data that were matched to individuals with miRNA expression data generated from an Agilent platform for colon tumor and non-tumor paired tissues. These samples were used to evaluate 327 miRNA-SNP pairs for associations between SNPs and miRNA expression levels as well as for SNP associations with colon cancer. Results Twenty-two miRNAs expressed in non-tumor tissue were significantly different by genotype and 21 SNPs were associated with altered tumor/non-tumor differential miRNA expression across genotypes. Two miRNAs were associated with SNP genotype for both non-tumor and tumor/non-tumor differential expression. Of the 41 miRNAs significantly associated with SNPs all but seven were significantly differentially expressed in colon tumor tissue. Two of the 41 SNPs significantly associated with miRNA expression levels were associated with colon cancer risk: rs8176318 (BRCA1), ORAA 1.31 95% CI 1.01, 1.78, and rs8905 (PRKAR1A), ORGG 2.31 95% CI 1.11, 4.77. Conclusion Of the 327 SNPs identified in the literature as being important because of their potential regulation of miRNA expression levels, 12.5% had statistically significantly associations with miRNA expression. However, only two of these SNPs were significantly associated with colon cancer. PMID:26630397

  14. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Cristian; Bartholomäus, Alexander; Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-10-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of pos