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Sample records for antisense rna regulates

  1. Regulation of naturally occurring antisense RNA of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) in neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Luther, H P; Bartsch, H; Morano, I; Podlowski, S; Baumann, G

    2005-03-01

    Naturally occurring antisense RNA has been detected for a range of eukaryotic genes. Its abundance compared to levels of its complementary sense mRNA appears to be a factor indicating its possible regulatory function. In previous studies, we detected appreciable levels of antisense RNA against the two isoforms (alpha and beta) of the heavy myosin-chain (MyHC) in the myocardium of rats. If this is to play a significant role in gene expression antisense levels should vary in response to external and internal cellular influences. Recently, a bidirectional promoter located in the alpha/beta MyHC intergenic region was described, which was proposed to regulate coordinated transcription of alpha-MyHC sense and beta-MyHC antisense. To study MyHC antisense regulation in neonatal heart, we investigated cultivated myocytes stimulated with either trijodthyronin (T3) as an inductor of alpha-MyHC or phenylephrine with stimulation of beta-MyHC. RNA-quantification of sense and antisense transcripts of both isoforms was performed by real-time RT-PCR. Stimulation by T3 led to an induction of both sense and antisense of alpha-MyHC and to a decrease of beta-MyHC sense and antisense. Phenylephrine increased sense and antisense beta-MyHC but reduced antisense alpha-MyHC. The sense/antisense of alpha- and beta-MyHC ratio was unchanged compared to control. Results indicate a coregulation of sense and antisense MyHC RNA under stimulation of T3 and phenylephrine in neonatal cardiomyocytes.

  2. Effects of different target sites on antisense RNA-mediated regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Hongmarn; Yoon, Yeongseong; Suk, Shinae; Lee, Ji Young; Lee, Younghoon

    2014-11-01

    Antisense RNA is a type of noncoding RNA (ncRNA) that binds to complementary mRNA sequences and induces gene repression by inhibiting translation or degrading mRNA. Recently, several small ncRNAs (sRNAs) have been identified in Escherichia coli that act as antisense RNA mainly via base pairing with mRNA. The base pairing predominantly leads to gene repression, and in some cases, gene activation. In the current study, we examined how the location of target sites affects sRNA-mediated gene regulation. An efficient antisense RNA expression system was developed, and the effects of antisense RNAs on various target sites in a model mRNA were examined. The target sites of antisense RNAs suppressing gene expression were identified, not only in the translation initiation region (TIR) of mRNA, but also at the junction between the coding region and 3' untranslated region. Surprisingly, an antisense RNA recognizing the upstream region of TIR enhanced gene expression through increasing mRNA stability.

  3. An internal antisense RNA regulates expression of the photosynthesis gene isiA.

    PubMed

    Dühring, Ulf; Axmann, Ilka M; Hess, Wolfgang R; Wilde, Annegret

    2006-05-02

    Small regulatory noncoding RNAs exist in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Most of these RNA transcripts are trans-encoded RNAs with short and only partial antisense complementarity to their target RNAs, which regulate gene expression by modifying mRNA stability and translation. In contrast, reports on the function of cis-encoded, perfectly complementary antisense RNAs in eubacteria are rare. Cyanobacteria respond to iron deficiency by expressing IsiA (iron stress-induced protein A), which forms a giant ring structure around photosystem I. Here, we show that this process is controlled by IsrR (iron stress-repressed RNA), a cis-encoded antisense RNA transcribed from the isiA noncoding strand. Artificial overexpression of IsrR under iron stress causes a strongly diminished number of IsiA-photosystem I supercomplexes, whereas IsrR depletion results in premature expression of IsiA. The coupled degradation of IsrR/isiA mRNA duplexes appears to be a reversible switch that can respond to environmental changes. IsrR is the only RNA known so far to regulate a photosynthesis component.

  4. Chicken GHR natural antisense transcript regulates GHR mRNA in LMH cells

    PubMed Central

    An, Lilong; Ma, Jinge; Qiu, Fengfang; Jia, Rumin; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Dexiang; Luo, Qingbin; Li, Ting; Wang, Zhang; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone receptor (GHR) played key roles in human and animal growth. Both human laron type dwarfism and sex linked dwarf chicken were caused by the mutation of GHR gene. In this study, we identified an endogenously expressed long non-coding natural antisense transcript, GHR-AS, which overlapped with the GHR mRNA (GHR-S) in a tail to tail manner. Spatial and temporal expression analyses indicated that GHR-AS were highly expressed in chicken liver and displayed ascending with the development of chicken from E10 to 3 w of age. Interfering GHR-AS caused GHR-S decreasing, accompanied with increasing of the inactive gene indicator, H3K9me2, in the GHR-S promoter regions in LMH cells. RNase A experiment exhibited that GHR-AS and GHR-S can form double strand RNAs at the last exon of GHR gene in vivo and in vitro, which hinted they could act on each other via the region. In addition, the levels of GHR-S and GHR-AS can be affected by DNA methylation. Compared the normal chicken with the dwarfs, the negative correlation trends were showed between the GHR-S promoter methylation status and the GHR-AS levels. This is the first report of that GHR gene possessed natural antisense transcript and the results presented here further highlight the fine and complicated regulating mechanism of GHR gene in chicken development. PMID:27713155

  5. Regulation of Peripheral Myelination through Transcriptional Buffering of Egr2 by an Antisense Long Non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Moreno, Margot; O'Shea, Timothy Mark; Zepecki, John P; Olaru, Alexander; Ness, Jennifer K; Langer, Robert; Tapinos, Nikos

    2017-08-22

    Precise regulation of Egr2 transcription is fundamentally important to the control of peripheral myelination. Here, we describe a long non-coding RNA antisense to the promoter of Egr2 (Egr2-AS-RNA). During peripheral nerve injury, the expression of Egr2-AS-RNA is increased and correlates with decreased Egr2 transcript and protein levels. Ectopic expression of Egr2-AS-RNA in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures inhibits the expression of Egr2 mRNA and induces demyelination. In vivo inhibition of Egr2-AS-RNA using oligonucleotide GapMers released from a biodegradable hydrogel following sciatic nerve injury reverts the EGR2-mediated gene expression profile and significantly delays demyelination. Egr2-AS-RNA gradually recruits H3K27ME3, AGO1, AGO2, and EZH2 on the Egr2 promoter following sciatic nerve injury. Furthermore, expression of Egr2-AS-RNA is regulated through ERK1/2 signaling to YY1, while loss of Ser184 of YY1 regulates binding to Egr2-AS-RNA. In conclusion, we describe functional exploration of an antisense long non-coding RNA in peripheral nervous system (PNS) biology. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. SsrA (tmRNA) acts as an antisense RNA to regulate Staphylococcus aureus pigment synthesis by base pairing with crtMN mRNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Wu, Na; Dong, Jie; Gao, Yaping; Zhang, Xin; Shao, Ningsheng; Yang, Guang

    2010-10-22

    SsrA RNA (small stable RNA A), also known as tmRNA and 10Sa RNA, functions both as tRNA and mRNA through its unique structure. The carotenoid pigment is the eponymous feature of human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we found that the pigment of the mutant strain with ssrA deletion was increased. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that ssrA could act as an antisense RNA aside from its well-known biological function, and crtMN, encoding two essential enzymes for the pigment synthesis, was identified as target of ssrA. Further investigation showed ssrA could specifically base pair with the RBS (ribosomal binding site) region of the crtMN mRNA. Our results revealed a new mechanism by which ssrA regulated the biosynthesis of pigment in S. aureus.

  7. HMMR antisense RNA 1, a novel long noncoding RNA, regulates the progression of basal-like breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Ma, Jun; Cheng, Yong; Zhang, Hongbo; Luo, Wengguang; Zhang, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, accumulating evidence has suggested that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play crucial roles in carcinogenesis and cancer progression. Hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor (HMMR) is an essential cancer-related gene in basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). In our study, HMMR antisense RNA 1 (HMMR-AS1) was analyzed in BLBC patients through polymerase chain reaction analysis. Here, we found that the expression of HMMR was positively correlated with HMMR-AS1 (RP11-80G.1). When HMMR-AS1 (RP11-80G.1) was knocked down, the expression of HMMR markedly reduced. Furthermore, in MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells, the proliferation and migration abilities were remarkably suppressed via knocking down HMMR-AS1 (RP11-80G.1) in vitro. The results showed that lncRNA HMMR-AS1 (RP11-80G.1) influenced the progression of BLBCs through regulating HMMR, suggesting that HMMR-AS1 (RP11-80G.1) could be regarded as a novel biomarker and therapeutic target in the treatment of BLBCs in future. PMID:27920576

  8. H19 Antisense RNA Can Up-Regulate Igf2 Transcription by Activation of a Novel Promoter in Mouse Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Duputié, Anne; Antoine, Etienne; Aptel, Nathalie; Milligan, Laura; Carbonell, Françoise; Lelay-Taha, Marie-Noëlle; Piette, Jacques; Weber, Michaël; Montarras, Didier; Pinset, Christian; Dandolo, Luisa; Forné, Thierry; Cathala, Guy

    2012-01-01

    It was recently shown that a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), that we named the 91H RNA (i.e. antisense H19 transcript), is overexpressed in human breast tumours and contributes in trans to the expression of the Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 (IGF2) gene on the paternal chromosome. Our preliminary experiments suggested that an H19 antisense transcript having a similar function may also be conserved in the mouse. In the present work, we further characterise the mouse 91H RNA and, using a genetic complementation approach in H19 KO myoblast cells, we show that ectopic expression of the mouse 91H RNA can up-regulate Igf2 expression in trans despite almost complete unmethylation of the Imprinting-Control Region (ICR). We then demonstrate that this activation occurs at the transcriptional level by activation of a previously unknown Igf2 promoter which displays, in mouse tissues, a preferential mesodermic expression (Pm promoter). Finally, our experiments indicate that a large excess of the H19 transcript can counteract 91H-mediated Igf2 activation. Our work contributes, in conjunction with other recent findings, to open new horizons to our understanding of Igf2 gene regulation and functions of the 91H/H19 RNAs in normal and pathological conditions. PMID:22662250

  9. Murine Spam1 mRNA: involvement of AU-rich elements in the 3'UTR and antisense RNA in its tight post-transcriptional regulation in spermatids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Barnoski, Barry L; Sol-Church, Katia; Stabley, Deborah L; Martin-Deleon, Patricia A

    2006-02-01

    Sperm adhesion molecule1 (SPAM1), the best characterized hyaluronidase gene, is abundantly expressed in the testis. We attempted to overexpress mouse Spam1 via transgenesis using either the endogenous promoter in a BAC or a heterologous Protamine1 promoter for a Spam1 cDNA transgene. Although transgene-copy numbers ranged from 2 to 15 and transgenic transcripts were expressed, there was a general failure of overexpression of the RNA and protein in the testis of all seven founders. Also, three transgenic lines showed a modest downregulation or co-suppression of the RNA for Spam1 and Hyal5, present on the BAC. We provide evidence for the potential involvement of two co-ordinating post-transcriptional regulatory processes in the failure of overexpression: abundant endogenous antisense RNA and adenosine-uridine (AU)-rich element-mediated regulation of RNA turnover. We demonstrate that AU-rich elements (AREs) in the 3'UTR of mRNAs, well-known to interact with trans-acting proteins to target the RNA for (in)stability, are present in Spam1 RNA and specifically bind to six testicular cytoplasmic proteins. These AU-binding proteins (AUBPs) were virtually absent from the kidney where transcripts are rare, and were shown to interact with the cytoskeleton, which modulates mRNA turnover. In addition to a role in the RNAi pathway, antisense RNA can also modulate ARE-mediated regulation of mRNA by hybridizing to the AREs and specifically silencing their function. This potentially links the two processes in the regulation of Spam1 expression. We hypothesize that testicular Spam1 RNA is regulated post-transcriptionally by cis-acting ARE(s) in the 3'UTR which recognize AUBPs and which are modulated by antisense transcripts.

  10. Natural antisense and noncoding RNA transcripts as potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Wahlestedt, Claes

    2006-06-01

    Information on the complexity of mammalian RNA transcription has increased greatly in the past few years. Notably, thousands of sense transcripts (conventional protein-coding genes) have antisense transcript partners, most of which are noncoding. Interestingly, a number of antisense transcripts regulate the expression of their sense partners, either in a discordant (antisense knockdown results in sense-transcript elevation) or concordant (antisense knockdown results in concomitant sense-transcript reduction) manner. Two new pharmacological strategies based on the knockdown of antisense RNA transcripts by siRNA (or another RNA targeting principle) are proposed in this review. In the case of discordant regulation, knockdown of antisense transcript elevates the expression of the conventional (sense) gene, thereby conceivably mimicking agonist-activator action. In the case of concordant regulation, knockdown of antisense transcript, or concomitant knockdown of antisense and sense transcripts, results in an additive or even synergistic reduction of the conventional gene expression. Although both strategies have been demonstrated to be valid in cell culture, it remains to be seen whether they provide advantages in other contexts.

  11. Making Sense Out of Antisense RNA Regulation | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Inappropriate gene expression can lead to the development of diseases such as cancer. Because of this possibility, cells employ several mechanisms to ensure that their genomes are properly organized and their genes appropriately expressed. These control mechanisms are carried out by proteins and RNAs within the cell, which are themselves subject to regulation.

  12. Antisense RNA suppression of peroxidase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S.; De Leon, F.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The 5{prime} half the anionic peroxidase cDNA of tobacco was inserted into a CaMV 35S promoter/terminator expression cassette in the antisense configuration. This was inserted into the Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation vector pCIBIO which includes kanamycin selection, transformed into two species of tobacco (N. tabacum and M. sylvestris), and plants were subsequently regenerated on kanamycin. Transgenic plants were analyzed for peroxidase expression and found to have 3-5 fold lower levels of peroxidase than wild-type plants. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that the antisense RNA only suppressed the anionic peroxidase. Wound-induced peroxidase expression was found not to be affected by the antisense RNA. Northern blots show a greater than 5 fold suppression of anionic peroxidase mRNA in leaf tissue, and the antisense RNA was expressed at a level 2 fold over the endogenous mRNA. Plants were self-pollinated and F1 plants showed normal segregation. N. sylvestris transgenic plants with the lowest level of peroxidase are epinastic, and preliminary results indicate elevated auxin levels. Excised pith tissue from both species of transgenic plants rapidly collapse when exposed to air, while pith tissue from wild-type plants showed little change when exposed to air. Further characterization of these phenotypes is currently being made.

  13. Down-regulation of specific members of the glutamine synthetase gene family in alfalfa by antisense RNA technology.

    PubMed

    Temple, S J; Bagga, S; Sengupta-Gopalan, C

    1998-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of NH3 with glutamate to produce glutamine. In plants GS is an octameric enzyme and is located either in the cytoplasm (GS1) or in the chloroplast (GS2). Two distinct classes of GS1 genes with unique 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) have been identified in alfalfa. We have demonstrated that the two classes exhibit differential expression pattern in the different plant organs suggesting different functional roles for the different isozymes. To determine the functional significance of the two classes of GS1 genes in alfalfa, we have utilized antisense gene constructs aimed specifically at the 3'UTR of the two GS1 genes and introduced them individually into alfalfa. Our data show that the gene constructs are effective in lowering the corresponding transcript level very effectively though there were organ-specific differences in the level of reduction. No transcript corresponding to the antisense gene construct was detected in any of the alfalfa transformants though they accumulated to significant levels in transgenic tobacco containing the same construct. This suggests that the antisense transcript was not stable in the presence of the homologous target sequence. Transgenic alfalfa with up to 80% reduction in the transcript level corresponding to each gene class, however, showed no reduction in GS activity or GS1 polypeptide level. The results suggest that GS1 mRNA levels are not rate-limiting for GS1 polypeptide synthesis and that GS levels are controlled both at the transcriptional and translational/post-translational level.

  14. Down-regulation of the long noncoding RNA-HOX transcript antisense intergenic RNA inhibits the occurrence and progression of glioma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Wei, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Bang-Qing; Yang, Hua-Chao; Wang, Jun-Yi; Bu, Xing-Yao

    2017-08-31

    This study aims to explore the role of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA)-HOX transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) in the occurrence and progression of glioma. Fresh glioma and normal brain tissues were classified into a glioma group (n = 67) and a normal group (n = 64) respectively. U87 cells were assigned into the blank, sh-NC and sh-HOTAIR groups. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was utilized to determine HOTAIR expression. Cell proliferation, cell cycle and cell apoptosis rates were detected by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) and flow cytometry (FCM). Scratch test and transwell assay were conducted for cell migration and invasion. Orthotopic glioma tumor model in nude mice was established by inoculating tumor cell suspension. Hematoxylin-Eosin (HE) staining was used to observe the growth and invasion of orthotopic glioma tumors. The expression of HOTAIR and cell viability was found to be lowest in the sh-HOTAIR group among the three groups. The sh-HOTAIR group exhibited a higher apoptotic rate and lower number of cell migration compared with the blank and sh-NC groups. Additionally, the speed of wound healing was slower, the migration distance decreased and the survival time of nude mice was extended in the sh-HOTAIR compared to the other groups. Moreover, the sh-HOTAIR group demonstrated reduced lesion sizes and inflammation, no convulsions or hemiplegia and lesser number of satellite metastases. Our findings support that down-regulation of HOTAIR could inhibit cell proliferation, promote cell apoptosis as well as suppress cell invasion and migration in the progression of glioma. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Neighboring gene regulation by antisense long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Victoria E; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2015-02-03

    Antisense transcription, considered until recently as transcriptional noise, is a very common phenomenon in human and eukaryotic transcriptomes, operating in two ways based on whether the antisense RNA acts in cis or in trans. This process can generate long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), one of the most diverse classes of cellular transcripts, which have demonstrated multifunctional roles in fundamental biological processes, including embryonic pluripotency, differentiation and development. Antisense lncRNAs have been shown to control nearly every level of gene regulation--pretranscriptional, transcriptional and posttranscriptional--through DNA-RNA, RNA-RNA or protein-RNA interactions. This review is centered on functional studies of antisense lncRNA-mediated regulation of neighboring gene expression. Specifically, it addresses how these transcripts interact with other biological molecules, nucleic acids and proteins, to regulate gene expression through chromatin remodeling at the pretranscriptional level and modulation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes by altering the sense mRNA structure or the cellular compartmental distribution, either in the nucleus or the cytoplasm.

  16. Regulated Expression of PTPRJ/CD148 and an Antisense Long Noncoding RNA in Macrophages by Proinflammatory Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Richa K.; Dinger, Marcel E.; Andrew, Megan; Askarian-Amiri, Marjan; Hume, David A.; Kellie, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    PTPRJ/CD148 is a tyrosine phosphatase that has tumour suppressor-like activity. Quantitative PCR of various cells and tissues revealed that it is preferentially expressed in macrophage-enriched tissues. Within lymphoid tissues immunohistochemistry revealed that PTPRJ/CD148 co-localised with F4/80, indicating that macrophages most strongly express the protein. Macrophages express the highest basal level of ptprj, and this is elevated further by treatment with LPS and other Toll-like receptor ligands. In contrast, CSF-1 treatment reduced basal and stimulated Ptprj expression in human and mouse cells, and interferon also repressed Ptprj expression. We identified a 1006 nucleotide long noncoding RNA species, Ptprj-as1 that is transcribed antisense to Ptprj. Ptprj-as1 was highly expressed in macrophage-enriched tissue and was transiently induced by Toll-like receptor ligands with a similar time course to Ptprj. Finally, putative transcription factor binding sites in the promoter region of Ptprj were identified. PMID:23840844

  17. Volatility in mRNA secondary structure as a design principle for antisense.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erik; Srivastava, Ranjan

    2013-02-01

    Designing effective antisense sequences is a formidable problem. A method for predicting efficacious antisense holds the potential to provide fundamental insight into this biophysical process. More practically, such an understanding increases the chance of successful antisense design as well as saving considerable time, money and labor. The secondary structure of an mRNA molecule is believed to be in a constant state of flux, sampling several different suboptimal states. We hypothesized that particularly volatile regions might provide better accessibility for antisense targeting. A computational framework, GenAVERT was developed to evaluate this hypothesis. GenAVERT used UNAFold and RNAforester to generate and compare the predicted suboptimal structures of mRNA sequences. Subsequent analysis revealed regions that were particularly volatile in terms of intramolecular hydrogen bonding, and thus potentially superior antisense targets due to their high accessibility. Several mRNA sequences with known natural antisense target sites as well as artificial antisense target sites were evaluated. Upon comparison, antisense sequences predicted based upon the volatility hypothesis closely matched those of the naturally occurring antisense, as well as those artificial target sites that provided efficient down-regulation. These results suggest that this strategy may provide a powerful new approach to antisense design.

  18. Natural antisense transcript TPM1-AS regulates the alternative splicing of tropomyosin I through an interaction with RNA-binding motif protein 4.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo-Wei; Zhang, Ying-Li; Liao, Lian-Di; Li, En-Min; Xu, Li-Yan

    2017-09-01

    LncRNAs play a vital role in alternative splicing of target genes. However, the mechanisms underlying lncRNAs involvement in splicing are poorly understood. In the present study, we identified a previously uncharacterized lncRNA, which is denoted as TPM1-AS, is reverse-transcribed from the fourth intronic region of the tropomyosin I (TPM1). In situ hybridization and RNA immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that TPM1-AS was located in the nucleus and interacted with RNA-binding motif protein 4 (RBM4) in human esophageal cancer cells. TPM1-AS overexpression or RBM4 knockdown decreased endogenous exon 2a expression of TPM1, resulting in specifically down-regulation of TPM1variant V2 and V7 in human esophageal cancer cells. Mechanismly, the interaction of TPM1-AS with RBM4 hindered binding of RBM4 to TPM1 pre-mRNA and inhibited RBM4 to promote endogenous exon 2a inclusion of TPM1. Importantly, overexpression of TPM1-AS inhibited migration and filopodium formation, whereas TPM1variant V2 and V7 promoted these behaviors of human esophageal cancer cells. Taken together, the results suggest that a natural antisense TPM1-AS regulates the alternative splicing of TPM1 through an interaction with RBM4 and involves in TPM1-mediated filopodium formation and migration of cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. JACALIN-LECTIN LIKE1 Regulates the Nuclear Accumulation of GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN7, Influencing the RNA Processing of FLOWERING LOCUS C Antisense Transcripts and Flowering Time in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jun; Li, Chunhua; Xu, Shujuan; Xing, Lijing; Xu, Yunyuan; Chong, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Lectins selectively recognize sugars or glycans for defense in living cells, but less is known about their roles in the development process and the functional network with other factors. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) JACALIN-LECTIN LIKE1 (AtJAC1) functions in flowering time control. Loss of function of AtJAC1 leads to precocious flowering, whereas overexpression of AtJAC1 causes delayed flowering. AtJAC1 influences flowering through regulation of the key flowering repressor gene FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Genetic analysis revealed that AtJAC1’s function is mostly dependent on GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN7 (GRP7), an upstream regulator of FLC. Biochemical and cell biological data indicated that AtJAC1 interacted physically with GRP7 specifically in the cytoplasm. AtJAC1 influences the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of GRP7, with predominant nuclear localization of GRP7 when AtJAC1 function is lost but retention of GRP7 in the cytoplasm when AtJAC1 is overexpressed. A temporal inducible assay suggested that AtJAC1’s regulation of flowering could be compromised by the nuclear accumulation of GRP7. In addition, GRP7 binds to the antisense precursor messenger RNA of FLC through a conserved RNA motif. Loss of GRP7 function leads to the elevation of total FLC antisense transcripts and reduced proximal-distal polyadenylation ratio, as well as histone methylation changes in the FLC gene body region and increased total functional sense FLC transcript. Attenuating the direct binding of GRP7 with competing artificial RNAs leads to changes of FLC antisense precursor messenger RNA processing and flowering transition. Taken together, our study indicates that AtJAC1 coordinates with GRP7 in shaping plant development through the regulation of RNA processing in Arabidopsis. PMID:26392261

  20. A cis-Encoded Antisense Small RNA Regulated by the HP0165-HP0166 Two-Component System Controls Expression of ureB in Helicobacter pylori▿

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yi; Feng, Jing; Scott, David R.; Marcus, Elizabeth A.; Sachs, George

    2011-01-01

    Expression of urease is essential for gastric colonization by Helicobacter pylori. The increased level of urease in gastric acidity is due, in part, to acid activation of the two-component system (TCS) consisting of the membrane sensor HP0165 and its response regulator, HP0166, which regulates transcription of the seven genes of the urease gene cluster. We now find that there are two major ureAB transcripts: a 2.7-kb full-length ureAB transcript and a 1.4-kb truncated transcript lacking 3′ ureB. Acidic pH (pH 4.5) results in a significant increase in transcription of ureAB, while neutral pH (pH 7.4) increases the truncated 1.4-kb transcript. Northern blot analysis with sense RNA and strand-specific oligonucleotide probes followed by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends detects an antisense small RNA (sRNA) encoded by the 5′ ureB noncoding strand consisting of ∼290 nucleotides (5′ureB-sRNA). Deletion of HP0165 elevates the level of the truncated 1.4-kb transcript along with that of the 5′ureB-sRNA at both pH 7.4 and pH 4.5. Overexpression of 5′ureB-sRNA increases the 1.4-kb transcript, decreases the 2.7-kb transcript, and decreases urease activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay shows that unphosphorylated HP0166 binds specifically to the 5′ureB-sRNA promoter. The ability of the HP0165-HP0166 TCS to both increase and decrease ureB expression at low and high pHs, respectively, facilitates gastric habitation and colonization over the wide range of intragastric pHs experienced by the organism. PMID:20971914

  1. Small Antisense RNA RblR Positively Regulates RuBisCo in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinlu; Li, Tianpei; Xu, Wen; Zhan, Jiao; Chen, Hui; He, Chenliu; Wang, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) function as transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in organisms from all domains of life. Cyanobacteria are thought to have developed a complex RNA-based regulatory mechanism. In the current study, by genome-wide analysis of differentially expressed small RNAs in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under high light conditions, we discovered an asRNA (RblR) that is 113nt in length and completely complementary to its target gene rbcL, which encodes the large chain of RuBisCO, the enzyme that catalyzes carbon fixation. Further analysis of the RblR(+)/(-) mutants revealed that RblR acts as a positive regulator of rbcL under various stress conditions; Suppressing RblR adversely affects carbon assimilation and thus the yield, and those phenotypes of both the wild type and the overexpressor could be downgraded to the suppressor level by carbonate depletion, indicated a regulatory role of RblR in CO2 assimilation. In addition, a real-time expression platform in Escherichia coli was setup and which confirmed that RblR promoted the translation of the rbcL mRNA into the RbcL protein. The present study is the first report of a regulatory RNA that targets RbcL in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and provides strong evidence that RblR regulates photosynthesis by positively modulating rbcL expression in Synechocystis.

  2. Small Antisense RNA RblR Positively Regulates RuBisCo in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinlu; Li, Tianpei; Xu, Wen; Zhan, Jiao; Chen, Hui; He, Chenliu; Wang, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) function as transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in organisms from all domains of life. Cyanobacteria are thought to have developed a complex RNA-based regulatory mechanism. In the current study, by genome-wide analysis of differentially expressed small RNAs in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under high light conditions, we discovered an asRNA (RblR) that is 113nt in length and completely complementary to its target gene rbcL, which encodes the large chain of RuBisCO, the enzyme that catalyzes carbon fixation. Further analysis of the RblR(+)/(−) mutants revealed that RblR acts as a positive regulator of rbcL under various stress conditions; Suppressing RblR adversely affects carbon assimilation and thus the yield, and those phenotypes of both the wild type and the overexpressor could be downgraded to the suppressor level by carbonate depletion, indicated a regulatory role of RblR in CO2 assimilation. In addition, a real-time expression platform in Escherichia coli was setup and which confirmed that RblR promoted the translation of the rbcL mRNA into the RbcL protein. The present study is the first report of a regulatory RNA that targets RbcL in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and provides strong evidence that RblR regulates photosynthesis by positively modulating rbcL expression in Synechocystis. PMID:28261186

  3. rasiRNA pathway controls antisense expression of Drosophila telomeric retrotransposons in the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Shpiz, Sergey; Kwon, Dmitry; Rozovsky, Yakov; Kalmykova, Alla

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres in Drosophila are maintained by the specialized telomeric retrotransposons HeT-A, TART and TAHRE. Sense transcripts of telomeric retroelements were shown to be the targets of a specialized RNA-interference mechanism, a repeat-associated short interfering (rasi)RNA-mediated system. Antisense rasiRNAs play a key role in this mechanism, highlighting the importance of antisense expression in retrotransposon silencing. Previously, bidirectional transcription was reported for the telomeric element TART. Here, we show that HeT-A is also bidirectionally transcribed, and HeT-A antisense transcription in ovaries is regulated by a promoter localized within its 3′ untranslated region. A remarkable feature of noncoding HeT-A antisense transcripts is the presence of multiple introns. We demonstrate that sense and antisense HeT-A-specific rasiRNAs are present in the same tissue, indicating that transcripts of both directions may be considered as natural targets of the rasiRNA pathway. We found that the expression of antisense transcripts of telomeric elements is regulated by the RNA silencing machinery, suggesting rasiRNA-mediated interplay between sense and antisense transcripts in the cell. Finally, this regulation occurs in the nucleus since disruption of the rasiRNA pathway leads to an accumulation of TART and HeT-A transcripts in germ cell nuclei. PMID:19036789

  4. Novel Stress-Inducible Antisense RNAs of Protein-Coding Loci Are Synthesized by RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Akihiro; Iida, Kei; Tanaka, Maho; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Mizuhashi, Kayoko; Kim, Jong-Myong; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Norio; Shigenobu, Shuji; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Seki, Motoaki

    2017-09-01

    Our previous study identified approximately 6,000 abiotic stress-responsive noncoding transcripts existing on the antisense strand of protein-coding genes and implied that a type of antisense RNA was synthesized from a sense RNA template by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR). Expression analyses revealed that the expression of novel abiotic stress-induced antisense RNA on 1,136 gene loci was reduced in the rdr1/2/6 mutants. RNase protection indicated that the RD29A antisense RNA and other RDR1/2/6-dependent antisense RNAs are involved in the formation of dsRNA. The accumulation of stress-inducible antisense RNA was decreased and increased in dcp5 and xrn4, respectively, but not changed in dcl2/3/4, nrpd1a and nrpd1b RNA-seq analyses revealed that the majority of the RDR1/2/6-dependent antisense RNA loci did not overlap with RDR1/2/6-dependent 20-30 nt RNA loci. Additionally, rdr1/2/6 mutants decreased the degradation rate of the sense RNA and exhibited arrested root growth during the recovery stage following a drought stress, whereas dcl2/3/4 mutants did not. Collectively, these results indicate that RDRs have stress-inducible antisense RNA synthesis activity and a novel biological function that is different from the known endogenous small RNA pathways from protein-coding genes. These data reveal a novel mechanism of RNA regulation during abiotic stress response that involves complex RNA degradation pathways. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Improved targeting of miRNA with antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Davis, Scott; Lollo, Bridget; Freier, Susan; Esau, Christine

    2006-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 20-24 nt noncoding RNAs that regulate target mRNAs post-transcriptionally by binding with imperfect complementarity in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) and inhibiting translation or RNA stability. Current understanding of miRNA biology is limited, and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) inhibition is a powerful technique for miRNA functionalization in vitro and in vivo, and for therapeutic targeting of miRNAs. Identification of optimal ASO chemistries for targeting miRNAs is therefore of great interest. We evaluated a number of 2'-sugar and backbone ASO modifications for their ability to inhibit miR-21 activity on a luciferase reporter mRNA. ASO modifications that improved target affinity improved miRNA ASO activity, yet the positioning of high-affinity modifications also had dramatically different effects on miRNA activity, suggesting that more than affinity determined the effectiveness of the miRNA ASOs. We present data in which the activity of a modified miRNA ASO was inversely correlated to its tolerability as an siRNA passenger strand, suggesting that a similar mechanism could be involved in the dissociation of miRNA ASOs and siRNA passenger strands. These studies begin to define the factors important for designing improved miRNA ASOs, enabling more effective miRNA functionalization and therapeutic targeting.

  6. Improved targeting of miRNA with antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Scott; Lollo, Bridget; Freier, Susan; Esau, Christine

    2006-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 20–24 nt noncoding RNAs that regulate target mRNAs post-transcriptionally by binding with imperfect complementarity in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) and inhibiting translation or RNA stability. Current understanding of miRNA biology is limited, and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) inhibition is a powerful technique for miRNA functionalization in vitro and in vivo, and for therapeutic targeting of miRNAs. Identification of optimal ASO chemistries for targeting miRNAs is therefore of great interest. We evaluated a number of 2′-sugar and backbone ASO modifications for their ability to inhibit miR-21 activity on a luciferase reporter mRNA. ASO modifications that improved target affinity improved miRNA ASO activity, yet the positioning of high-affinity modifications also had dramatically different effects on miRNA activity, suggesting that more than affinity determined the effectiveness of the miRNA ASOs. We present data in which the activity of a modified miRNA ASO was inversely correlated to its tolerability as an siRNA passenger strand, suggesting that a similar mechanism could be involved in the dissociation of miRNA ASOs and siRNA passenger strands. These studies begin to define the factors important for designing improved miRNA ASOs, enabling more effective miRNA functionalization and therapeutic targeting. PMID:16690972

  7. Structure and Function of AmtR in Mycobacterium smegmatis: Implications for Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Urea Metabolism through a Small Antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Petridis, Michael; Vickers, Chelsea; Robson, Jennifer; McKenzie, Joanna L; Bereza, Magdalena; Sharrock, Abigail; Aung, Htin Lin; Arcus, Vickery L; Cook, Gregory M

    2016-10-23

    Soil-dwelling bacteria of the phylum actinomycetes generally harbor either GlnR or AmtR as a global regulator of nitrogen metabolism. Mycobacterium smegmatis harbors both of these canonical regulators; GlnR regulates the expression of key genes involved in nitrogen metabolism, while the function and signal transduction pathway of AmtR in M. smegmatis remains largely unknown. Here, we report the structure and function of the M. smegmatis AmtR and describe the role of AmtR in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in response to nitrogen availability. To determine the function of AmtR in M. smegmatis, we performed genome-wide expression profiling comparing the wild-type versus an ∆amtR mutant and identified significant changes in the expression of 11 genes, including an operon involved in urea degradation. An AmtR consensus-binding motif (CTGTC-N4-GACAG) was identified in the promoter region of this operon, and ligand-independent, high-affinity AmtR binding was validated by both electrophoretic mobility shift assays and surface plasmon resonance measurements. We confirmed the transcription of a cis-encoded small RNA complementary to the gene encoding AmtR under nitrogen excess, and we propose a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism for AmtR. The three-dimensional X-ray structure of AmtR at 2.0Å revealed an overall TetR-like dimeric structure, and the alignment of the M. smegmatis AmtR and Corynebacterium glutamicum AmtR regulatory domains showed poor structural conservation, providing a potential explanation for the lack of M. smegmatis AmtR interaction with the adenylylated PII protein. Taken together, our data suggest an AmtR (repressor)/GlnR (activator) competitive binding mechanism for transcriptional regulation of urea metabolism that is controlled by a cis-encoded small antisense RNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The role of antisense long noncoding RNA in small RNA-triggered gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xizhe; Li, Haitang; Rossi, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are known to regulate neighboring protein-coding genes by directing chromatin remodeling complexes, imprinting, and X-chromosome inactivation. In this study, we explore the function of lncRNAs in small RNA-triggered transcriptional gene activation (TGA), a process in which microRNAs (miRNAs) or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) associated with Argonaute (Ago) proteins induce chromatin remodeling and gene activation at promoters with sequence complementarity. We designed a model system with different lncRNA and chromatin environments to elucidate the molecular mechanisms required for mammalian TGA. Using RNA-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR, we demonstrated that small RNA-triggered TGA occurs at sites where antisense lncRNAs are transcribed through the reporter gene and promoter. Small RNA-induced TGA coincided with the enrichment of Ago2 at the promoter region, but Ago2-mediated cleavage of antisense lncRNAs was not observed. Moreover, we examined the allele-specific effects of lncRNAs through a Cre-induced inversion of a poly(A) sequence that was designed to block the transcription of antisense lncRNAs through the reporter gene region in an inducible and reversible manner. Termination of nascent antisense lncRNAs abrogated gene activation triggered by small RNAs, and only allele-specific cis-acting antisense lncRNAs, but not trans-acting lncRNAs, were capable of rescuing TGA. Hence, this model revealed that antisense lncRNAs can mediate TGA in cis and not in trans, serving as a molecular scaffold for a small RNA–Ago2 complex and chromatin remodeling. PMID:25344398

  9. Anticubilin antisense RNA ameliorates adriamycin-induced tubulointerstitial injury in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Li, Kailong; He, Yani; Zhang, Jianguo; Wang, Huiming; Yang, Jurong; Zhan, Jun; Liang, Haijun

    2011-12-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of in vivo anticubilin antisense RNA on the uptake of albumin in tubules and on the tubulointerstitial injury in adriamycin-induced proteinuric rats. Adriamycin-treated rats were subjected to intrarenal delivery of adenoviral vectors encoding empty plasmid, cubilin sense RNA expression vector pAd-CUB or anticubilin antisense RNA expression vector pAd-ACUB on day 3. On days 14 and 28, half of the rats in each group were randomly selected to be killed, and blood samples, kidney tissues and 24-hour urine were collected. The diseased rats treated with pAdEasy-ACUB showed a 60% decrease in serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate. Interestingly, the anticubilin antisense treatment led to a marked increase in albuminuria. Antisense treatment attenuated the histologic changes on both day 14 and day 28. The antisense treatment induced more than 60% recovery of adriamycin-induced injury, accompanied with 85% knockdown in the expression of cubilin protein and markedly decreased albumin deposition. Adriamycin induced an increase in the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, transforming growth factor-β and regulated on activation in normal T-cell expressed and secreted and the number of infiltrating cells, which was reversed by the antisense treatment. Anticubilin antisense RNA delivered by an adenoviral vector ameliorates albuminuria-induced glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial damage in adriamycin nephrotic rats, indicating that cubilin could be a potential therapeutic target in proteinuric nephropathy.

  10. RNA therapeutics: RNAi and antisense mechanisms and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Chery, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    RNA therapeutics refers to the use of oligonucleotides to target primarily ribonucleic acids (RNA) for therapeutic efforts or in research studies to elucidate functions of genes. Oligonucleotides are distinct from other pharmacological modalities, such as small molecules and antibodies that target mainly proteins, due to their mechanisms of action and chemical properties. Nucleic acids come in two forms: deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) and ribonucleic acids (RNA). Although DNA is more stable, RNA offers more structural variety ranging from messenger RNA (mRNA) that codes for protein to non-coding RNAs, microRNA (miRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA), short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). As our understanding of the wide variety of RNAs deepens, researchers have sought to target RNA since >80% of the genome is estimated to be transcribed. These transcripts include non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs and siRNAs that function in gene regulation by playing key roles in the transfer of genetic information from DNA to protein, the final product of the central dogma in biology1. Currently there are two main approaches used to target RNA: double stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) and antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). Both approaches are currently in clinical trials for targeting of RNAs involved in various diseases, such as cancer and neurodegeneration. In fact, ASOs targeting spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown positive results in clinical trials2. Advantages of ASOs include higher affinity due to the development of chemical modifications that increase affinity, selectivity while decreasing toxicity due to off-target effects. This review will highlight the major therapeutic approaches of RNA medicine currently being applied with a focus on RNAi and ASOs. PMID:27570789

  11. The novel cis-encoded antisense RNA AsrC positively regulates the expression of rpoE-rseABC operon and thus enhances the motility of Salmonella enterica serovar typhi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xiaolei; Zhan, Lifang; Zhao, Xin; Xu, Shungao; Sheng, Xiumei; Huang, Xinxiang

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial non-coding RNAs are essential in many cellular processes, including response to environmental stress, and virulence. Deep sequencing analysis of the Salmonella enterica serovar typhi (S. typhi) transcriptome revealed a novel antisense RNA transcribed in cis on the strand complementary to rseC, an activator gene of sigma factor RpoE. In this study, expression of this antisense RNA was confirmed in S. typhi by Northern hybridization. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends and sequence analysis identified an 893 bp sequence from the antisense RNA coding region that covered all of the rseC coding region in the reverse direction of transcription. This sequence of RNA was named as AsrC. After overexpression of AsrC with recombinantant plasmid in S. typhi, the bacterial motility was increased obviously. To explore the mechanism of AsrC function, regulation of rseC and rpoE expression by AsrC was investigated. We found that AsrC increased the levels of rseC mRNA and protein. The expression of rpoE was also increased in S. typhi after overexpression of AsrC, which was dependent on rseC. Thus, we propose that AsrC increased RseC level and indirectly activating RpoE which can initiate fliA expression and promote the motility of S. typhi. PMID:26441919

  12. Antisense Transcript and RNA Processing Alterations Suppress Instability of Polyadenylated mRNA in Chlamydomonas Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yoshiki; Kikis, Elise A.; Zimmer, Sara L.; Komine, Yutaka; Stern, David B.

    2004-01-01

    In chloroplasts, the control of mRNA stability is of critical importance for proper regulation of gene expression. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain Δ26pAtE is engineered such that the atpB mRNA terminates with an mRNA destabilizing polyadenylate tract, resulting in this strain being unable to conduct photosynthesis. A collection of photosynthetic revertants was obtained from Δ26pAtE, and gel blot hybridizations revealed RNA processing alterations in the majority of these suppressor of polyadenylation (spa) strains, resulting in a failure to expose the atpB mRNA 3′ poly(A) tail. Two exceptions were spa19 and spa23, which maintained unusual heteroplasmic chloroplast genomes. One genome type, termed PS+, conferred photosynthetic competence by contributing to the stability of atpB mRNA; the other, termed PS−, was required for viability but could not produce stable atpB transcripts. Based on strand-specific RT-PCR, S1 nuclease protection, and RNA gel blots, evidence was obtained that the PS+ genome stabilizes atpB mRNA by generating an atpB antisense transcript, which attenuates the degradation of the polyadenylated form. The accumulation of double-stranded RNA was confirmed by insensitivity of atpB mRNA from PS+ genome-containing cells to S1 nuclease digestion. To obtain additional evidence for antisense RNA function in chloroplasts, we used strain Δ26, in which atpB mRNA is unstable because of the lack of a 3′ stem-loop structure. In this context, when a 121-nucleotide segment of atpB antisense RNA was expressed from an ectopic site, an elevated accumulation of atpB mRNA resulted. Finally, when spa19 was placed in a genetic background in which expression of the chloroplast exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase was diminished, the PS+ genome and the antisense transcript were no longer required for photosynthesis. Taken together, our results suggest that antisense RNA in chloroplasts can protect otherwise unstable transcripts from 3′→5

  13. Functionalization of an Antisense Small RNA.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Cordero, Teresa; Kushwaha, Manish; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-02-27

    In order to explore the possibility of adding new functions to preexisting genes, we considered a framework of riboregulation. We created a new riboregulator consisting of the reverse complement of a known riboregulator. Using computational design, we engineered a cis-repressing 5' untranslated region that can be activated by this new riboregulator. As a result, both RNAs can orthogonally trans-activate translation of their cognate, independent targets. The two riboregulators can also repress each other by antisense interaction, although not symmetrically. Our work highlights that antisense small RNAs can work as regulatory agents beyond the antisense paradigm and that, hence, they could be interfaced with other circuits used in synthetic biology.

  14. Inhibition of microRNA with antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Esau, Christine C

    2008-01-01

    Antisense inhibition of microRNA (miRNA) function has been an important tool for uncovering miRNA biology. Chemical modification of anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (AMOs) is necessary to improve affinity for target miRNA, stabilize the AMO to nuclease degradation, and to promote tissue uptake for in vivo delivery. Here I summarize the work done to evaluate the effectiveness of various chemically modified AMOs for use in cultured cells and rodent models, and outline important issues to consider when inhibiting miRNAs with antisense oligonucleotides.

  15. Natural Antisense Transcripts and Long Non-Coding RNA in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Arthanari, Yamini; Heintzen, Christian; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Crosthwaite, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) and natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has been reported in a variety of organisms. While a consensus has yet to be reached on their global importance, an increasing number of examples have been shown to be functional, regulating gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Here, we use RNA sequencing data from the ABI SOLiD platform to identify lncRNA and NATs obtained from samples of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown under different light and temperature conditions. We identify 939 novel lncRNAs, of which 477 are antisense to annotated genes. Across the whole dataset, the extent of overlap between sense and antisense transcripts is large: 371 sense/antisense transcripts are complementary over 500 nts or more and 236 overlap by more than 1000 nts. Most prevalent are 3′ end overlaps between convergently transcribed sense/antisense pairs, but examples of divergently transcribed pairs and nested transcripts are also present. We confirm the expression of a subset of sense/antisense transcript pairs by qPCR. We examine the size, types of overlap and expression levels under the different environmental stimuli of light and temperature, and identify 11 lncRNAs that are up-regulated in response to light. We also find differences in transcript length and the position of introns between protein-coding transcripts that have antisense expression and transcripts with no antisense expression. These results demonstrate the ability of N. crassa lncRNAs and NATs to be regulated by different environmental stimuli and provide the scope for further investigation into the function of NATs. PMID:24621812

  16. Natural antisense RNAs as mRNA regulatory elements in bacteria: a review on function and applications.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Fatemeh; Kamali, Mehdi; Najafi, Ali; Yazdanparast, Alavieh; Moghaddam, Mehrdad Moosazadeh

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring antisense RNAs are small, diffusible, untranslated transcripts that pair to target RNAs at specific regions of complementarity to control their biological function by regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. This review focuses on known cases of antisense RNA control in prokaryotes and provides an overview of some natural RNA-based mechanisms that bacteria use to modulate gene expression, such as mRNA sensors, riboswitches and antisense RNAs. We also highlight recent advances in RNA-based technology. The review shows that studies on both natural and synthetic systems are reciprocally beneficial.

  17. Antisense transcript long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HOTAIR is transcriptionally induced by estradiol.

    PubMed

    Bhan, Arunoday; Hussain, Imran; Ansari, Khairul I; Kasiri, Sahba; Bashyal, Aarti; Mandal, Subhrangsu S

    2013-10-09

    HOTAIR (HOX antisense intergenic RNA) is a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) that is transcribed from the antisense strand of homeobox C gene locus in chromosome 12. HOTAIR coordinates with chromatin-modifying enzymes and regulates gene silencing. It is overexpressed in various carcinomas including breast cancer. Herein, we demonstrated that HOTAIR is crucial for cell growth and viability and its knockdown induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells. We also demonstrated that HOTAIR is transcriptionally induced by estradiol (E2). Its promoter contains multiple functional estrogen response elements (EREs). Estrogen receptors (ERs) along with various ER coregulators such as histone methylases MLL1 (mixed lineage leukemia 1) and MLL3 and CREB-binding protein/p300 bind to the promoter of HOTAIR in an E2-dependent manner. Level of histone H3 lysine-4 trimethylation, histone acetylation, and RNA polymerase II recruitment is enriched at the HOTAIR promoter in the presence of E2. Knockdown of ERs and MLLs downregulated the E2-induced HOTAIR expression. Thus, similar to protein-coding gene transcription, E2-induced transcription of antisense transcript HOTAIR is coordinated via ERs and ER coregulators, and this mechanism of HOTAIR overexpression potentially contributes towards breast cancer progression. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Transcriptional interference by antisense RNA is required for circadian clock function

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zhihong; Ye, Qiaohong; Anson, Simon R; Yang, Jichen; Xiao, Guanghua; Kowbel, David; Glass, N. Louise; Crosthwaite, Susan K.; Liu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic circadian oscillators consist of negative feedback loops that generate endogenous rhythmicities1. Natural antisense RNAs are found in a wide range of eukaryotic organisms2-5. Nevertheless, the physiological importance and mode of action of most antisense RNAs is not clear6-9. frequency (frq) encodes a component of the Neurospora core circadian negative feedback loop which was thought to generate sustained rhythmicity10. Transcription of qrf, the long non-coding frq antisense RNA, is light induced, and its level oscillates in antiphase to frq sense RNA3. Here we show that qrf transcription is regulated by both light-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Light-dependent qrf transcription represses frq expression and regulates clock resetting. qrf expression in the dark, on the other hand, is required for circadian rhythmicity. frq transcription also inhibits qrf expression and surprisingly, drives the antiphasic rhythm of qrf transcripts. The mutual inhibition of frq and qrf transcription thus forms a double negative feedback loop that is interlocked with the core feedback loop. Genetic and mathematical modeling analyses indicate that such an arrangement is required for robust and sustained circadian rhythmicity. Moreover, our results suggest that antisense transcription inhibits sense expression by mediating chromatin modifications and premature transcription termination. Together, our results established antisense transcription as an essential feature in a circadian system and shed light on the importance and mechanism of antisense action. PMID:25132551

  19. Reduction of polygalacturonase activity in tomato fruit by antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, R E; Kramer, M; Hiatt, W R

    1988-12-01

    Polygalacturonase [PG; poly(1,4-alpha-D-galacturonide) glycanhydrolase; EC 3.2.1.15] is expressed in tomato only during the ripening stage of fruit development. PG becomes abundant during ripening and has a major role in cell wall degradation and fruit softening. Tomato plants were transformed to produce antisense RNA from a gene construct containing the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and a full-length PG cDNA in reverse orientation. The construct was integrated into the tomato genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The constitutive synthesis of PG antisense RNA in transgenic plants resulted in a substantial reduction in the levels of PG mRNA and enzymatic activity in ripening fruit. The steady-state levels of PG antisense RNA in green fruit of transgenic plants were lower than the levels of PG mRNA normally attained during ripening. However, analysis of transcription in isolated nuclei demonstrated that the antisense RNA construct was transcribed at a higher rate than the tomato PG gene(s). Analysis of fruit from transgenic plants demonstrated a reduction in PG mRNA and enzymatic activity of 70-90%. The reduction in PG activity did not prevent the accumulation of the red pigment lycopene.

  20. Natural antisense RNA promotes 3′ end processing and maturation of MALAT1 lncRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Xinying; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Freier, Susan M.; Fei, Jingyi; Ha, Taekjip; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V.

    2016-01-01

    The RNase P-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage plays a crucial role in the 3′ end processing and cellular accumulation of MALAT1, a nuclear-retained long noncoding RNA that promotes malignancy. The regulation of this cleavage event is largely undetermined. Here we characterize a broadly expressed natural antisense transcript at the MALAT1 locus, designated as TALAM1, that positively regulates MALAT1 levels by promoting the 3′ end cleavage and maturation of MALAT1 RNA. TALAM1 RNA preferentially localizes at the site of transcription, and also interacts with MALAT1 RNA. Depletion of TALAM1 leads to defects in the 3′ end cleavage reaction and compromises cellular accumulation of MALAT1. Conversely, overexpression of TALAM1 facilitates the cleavage reaction in trans. Interestingly, TALAM1 is also positively regulated by MALAT1 at the level of both transcription and RNA stability. Together, our data demonstrate a novel feed-forward positive regulatory loop that is established to maintain the high cellular levels of MALAT1, and also unravel the existence of sense-antisense mediated regulatory mechanism for cellular lncRNAs that display RNase P-mediated 3′ end processing. PMID:26826711

  1. Repair of Thalassemic Human β -globin mRNA in Mammalian Cells by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowska, Halina; Sambade, Maria J.; Agrawal, Sudhir; Kole, Ryszard

    1996-11-01

    In one form of β -thalassemia, a genetic blood disorder, a mutation in intron 2 of the β -globin gene (IVS2-654) causes aberrant splicing of β -globin pre-mRNA and, consequently, β -globin deficiency. Treatment of mammalian cells stably expressing the IVS2-654 human β -globin gene with antisense oligonucleotides targeted at the aberrant splice sites restored correct splicing in a dose-dependent fashion, generating correct human β -globin mRNA and polypeptide. Both products persisted for up to 72 hr posttreatment. The oligonucleotides modified splicing by a true antisense mechanism without overt unspecific effects on cell growth and splicing of other pre-mRNAs. This novel approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore rather than to down-regulate the activity of the target gene is applicable to other splicing mutants and is of potential clinical interest.

  2. Hfq restructures RNA-IN and RNA-OUT and facilitates antisense pairing in the Tn10/IS10 system

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Joseph A.; Ellis, Michael J.; Hossain, Shahan; Haniford, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Hfq functions in post-transcriptional gene regulation in a wide range of bacteria, usually by promoting base-pairing of mRNAs and trans-encoded sRNAs that share partial sequence complementarity. It is less clear if Hfq is required for pairing of cis-encoded RNAs (i.e., antisense RNAs) with their target mRNAs. In the current work, we have characterized the interactions between Escherichia coli Hfq and the components of the Tn10/IS10 antisense system, RNA-IN and RNA-OUT. We show that Hfq interacts with RNA-OUT through its proximal RNA-binding surface, as is typical for Hfq and trans-encoded sRNAs. In contrast, RNA-IN binds both proximal and distal RNA-binding surfaces in Hfq with a higher affinity for the latter, as is typical for mRNA interactions in canonical sRNA-mRNA pairs. Importantly, an amino acid substitution in Hfq that interferes with RNA binding to the proximal site negatively impacts RNA-IN:OUT pairing in vitro and suppresses the ability of Hfq to negatively regulate IS10 transposition in vivo. We also show that Hfq binding to RNA-IN and RNA-OUT alters secondary structure elements in both of these RNAs and speculate that this could be important in how Hfq facilitates RNA-IN:OUT pairing. Based on the results presented here, we suggest that Hfq could be involved in regulating RNA pairing in other antisense systems, including systems encoded by other transposable elements. PMID:23510801

  3. Hfq restructures RNA-IN and RNA-OUT and facilitates antisense pairing in the Tn10/IS10 system.

    PubMed

    Ross, Joseph A; Ellis, Michael J; Hossain, Shahan; Haniford, David B

    2013-05-01

    Hfq functions in post-transcriptional gene regulation in a wide range of bacteria, usually by promoting base-pairing of mRNAs and trans-encoded sRNAs that share partial sequence complementarity. It is less clear if Hfq is required for pairing of cis-encoded RNAs (i.e., antisense RNAs) with their target mRNAs. In the current work, we have characterized the interactions between Escherichia coli Hfq and the components of the Tn10/IS10 antisense system, RNA-IN and RNA-OUT. We show that Hfq interacts with RNA-OUT through its proximal RNA-binding surface, as is typical for Hfq and trans-encoded sRNAs. In contrast, RNA-IN binds both proximal and distal RNA-binding surfaces in Hfq with a higher affinity for the latter, as is typical for mRNA interactions in canonical sRNA-mRNA pairs. Importantly, an amino acid substitution in Hfq that interferes with RNA binding to the proximal site negatively impacts RNA-IN:OUT pairing in vitro and suppresses the ability of Hfq to negatively regulate IS10 transposition in vivo. We also show that Hfq binding to RNA-IN and RNA-OUT alters secondary structure elements in both of these RNAs and speculate that this could be important in how Hfq facilitates RNA-IN:OUT pairing. Based on the results presented here, we suggest that Hfq could be involved in regulating RNA pairing in other antisense systems, including systems encoded by other transposable elements.

  4. Evolution of the Antisense Overlap between Genes for Thyroid Hormone Receptor and Rev-erbα and Characterization of an Exonic G-Rich Element That Regulates Splicing of TRα2 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Stephen H.; Morales, Christopher H.; Duyck, Tessa H.; Waters, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    The α-thyroid hormone receptor gene (TRα) codes for two functionally distinct proteins: TRα1, the α-thyroid hormone receptor; and TRα2, a non-hormone-binding variant. The final exon of TRα2 mRNA overlaps the 3’ end of Rev-erbα mRNA, which encodes another nuclear receptor on the opposite strand of DNA. To understand the evolution of this antisense overlap, we sequenced these genes and mRNAs in the platypus Orthorhynchus anatinus. Despite its strong homology with other mammals, the platypus TRα/Rev-erbα locus lacks elements essential for expression of TRα2. Comparative analysis suggests that alternative splicing of TRα2 mRNA expression evolved in a stepwise fashion before the divergence of eutherian and marsupial mammals. A short G-rich element (G30) located downstream of the alternative 3’splice site of TRα2 mRNA and antisense to the 3’UTR of Rev-erbα plays an important role in regulating TRα2 splicing. G30 is tightly conserved in eutherian mammals, but is absent in marsupials and monotremes. Systematic deletions and substitutions within G30 have dramatically different effects on TRα2 splicing, leading to either its inhibition or its enhancement. Mutations that disrupt one or more clusters of G residues enhance splicing two- to three-fold. These results suggest the G30 sequence can adopt a highly structured conformation, possibly a G-quadruplex, and that it is part of a complex splicing regulatory element which exerts both positive and negative effects on TRα2 expression. Since mutations that strongly enhance splicing in vivo have no effect on splicing in vitro, it is likely that the regulatory role of G30 is mediated through linkage of transcription and splicing. PMID:26368571

  5. RNA sequencing uncovers antisense RNAs and novel small RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Le Rhun, Anaïs; Beer, Yan Yan; Reimegård, Johan; Chylinski, Krzysztof; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pyogenes is a human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild to life-threatening infections. During the infectious process, the temporal and spatial expression of pathogenicity factors is tightly controlled by a complex network of protein and RNA regulators acting in response to various environmental signals. Here, we focus on the class of small RNA regulators (sRNAs) and present the first complete analysis of sRNA sequencing data in S. pyogenes. In the SF370 clinical isolate (M1 serotype), we identified 197 and 428 putative regulatory RNAs by visual inspection and bioinformatics screening of the sequencing data, respectively. Only 35 from the 197 candidates identified by visual screening were assigned a predicted function (T-boxes, ribosomal protein leaders, characterized riboswitches or sRNAs), indicating how little is known about sRNA regulation in S. pyogenes. By comparing our list of predicted sRNAs with previous S. pyogenes sRNA screens using bioinformatics or microarrays, 92 novel sRNAs were revealed, including antisense RNAs that are for the first time shown to be expressed in this pathogen. We experimentally validated the expression of 30 novel sRNAs and antisense RNAs. We show that the expression profile of 9 sRNAs including 2 predicted regulatory elements is affected by the endoribonucleases RNase III and/or RNase Y, highlighting the critical role of these enzymes in sRNA regulation. PMID:26580233

  6. Antisense-RNA mediated control of plasmid replication - pIP501 revisited.

    PubMed

    Brantl, Sabine

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, a wealth of small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) have been discovered in the genomes of almost all bacterial species, where they constitute the most abundant class of posttranscriptional regulators. These sRNAs are key-players in prokaryotic metabolism, stress response and virulence. However, the first bona-fide antisense RNAs had been found already in 1981 in plasmids, where they regulate replication or maintenance. Antisense RNAs involved in plasmid replication control - meanwhile investigated in depth for almost 35 years - employ a variety of mechanisms of action: They regulate primer maturation, inhibit translation of essential replication initiator proteins (Rep proteins) as well as leader peptides or the formation of activator pseudoknots required for efficient rep translation. Alternatively they attenuate transcription or translation of rep mRNAs. Some antisense RNAs collaborate with transcriptional repressors to ensure proper copy-number control. Here, I summarize our knowledge on replication control of the broad-host range plasmid pIP501 that was originally isolated from Streptococcus agalactiae. Plasmid pIP501 uses two copy number-control elements, RNAIII, a cis-encoded antisense RNA, and transcriptional repressor CopR. RNA III mediates transcription attenuation, a rather widespread concept that found its culmination in the recent discovery of riboswitches. A peculiarity of pIP501 is the unusual stability of RNA III, which requires a second function of CopR: CopR does not only repress transcription from the essential repR promoter, but also prevents convergent transcription between rep mRNA and RNAIII, thereby indirectly increasing the amount of RNAIII. The concerted action of these two control elements is necessary to prevent plasmid loss at dangerously low copy numbers.

  7. α-fur, an antisense RNA gene to fur in the extreme acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Lefimil, C; Jedlicki, E; Holmes, D S

    2014-03-01

    A large non-coding RNA, termed α-Fur, of ~1000 nt has been detected in the extreme acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans encoded on the antisense strand to the iron-responsive master regulator fur (ferric uptake regulator) gene. A promoter for α-fur was predicted bioinformatically and validated using gene fusion experiments. The promoter is situated within the coding region and in the same sense as proB, potentially encoding a glutamate 5-kinase. The 3' termination site of the α-fur transcript was determined by 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends to lie 7 nt downstream of the start of transcription of fur. Thus, α-fur is antisense to the complete coding region of fur, including its predicted ribosome-binding site. The genetic context of α-fur is conserved in several members of the genus Acidithiobacillus but not in all acidophiles, indicating that it is monophyletic but not niche specific. It is hypothesized that α-Fur regulates the cellular level of Fur. This is the fourth example of an antisense RNA to fur, although it is the first in an extreme acidophile, and underscores the growing importance of cis-encoded non-coding RNAs as potential regulators involved in the microbial iron-responsive stimulon.

  8. A noncoding RNA antisense to moesin at 5p14.1 in autism.

    PubMed

    Kerin, Tara; Ramanathan, Anita; Rivas, Kasey; Grepo, Nicole; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Campbell, Daniel B

    2012-04-04

    People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are characterized by deficits in social interaction, language, and behavioral flexibility. Rare mutations and copy number variations have been identified in individuals with ASD, but in most patients, the causal variants remain unknown. A genome-wide association study (GWAS), designed to identify genes and pathways that contribute to ASD, indicated a genome-wide significant association of ASD with the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4307059 (P = 10⁻¹⁰), which is located in a gene-poor region of chromosome 5p14.1. We describe here a 3.9-kb noncoding RNA that is transcribed from the region of the chromosome 5p14.1 ASD GWAS association SNP. The noncoding RNA was encoded by the opposite (antisense) strand of moesin pseudogene 1 (MSNP1), and we therefore designated it as MSNP1AS (moesin pseudogene 1, antisense). Chromosome 5p14.1 MSNP1AS was 94% identical and antisense to the X chromosome transcript of MSN, which encodes a protein (moesin) that regulates neuronal architecture. Individuals who carry the ASD-associated rs4307059 T allele showed increased expression of MSNP1AS. The MSNP1AS noncoding RNA bound to MSN, was highly overexpressed (12.7-fold) in postmortem cerebral cortex of individuals with ASD, and could regulate levels of moesin protein in human cell lines. These data reveal a biologically functional element that may contribute to ASD risk.

  9. Programmable control of bacterial gene expression with the combined CRISPR and antisense RNA system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Je; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Leong, Matthew C; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-03-18

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to implement diverse cellular functions by predictably controlling gene expression. Though research has focused more on protein regulators than RNA regulators, recent advances in our understanding of RNA folding and functions have motivated the use of RNA regulators. RNA regulators provide an advantage because they are easier to design and engineer than protein regulators, potentially have a lower burden on the cell and are highly orthogonal. Here, we combine the CRISPR system from Streptococcus pyogenes and synthetic antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in Escherichia coli strains to repress or derepress a target gene in a programmable manner. Specifically, we demonstrate for the first time that the gene target repressed by the CRISPR system can be derepressed by expressing an asRNA that sequesters a small guide RNA (sgRNA). Furthermore, we demonstrate that tunable levels of derepression can be achieved (up to 95%) by designing asRNAs that target different regions of a sgRNA and by altering the hybridization free energy of the sgRNA-asRNA complex. This new system, which we call the combined CRISPR and asRNA system, can be used to reversibly repress or derepress multiple target genes simultaneously, allowing for rational reprogramming of cellular functions.

  10. Transcriptome analysis of antigenic variation in Plasmodium falciparum - var silencing is not dependent on antisense RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Stuart A; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Mattei, Denise; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Guigon, Ghislaine; Coppee, Jean-Yves; David, Peter H; Scherf, Artur

    2005-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most severe form of malaria, undergoes antigenic variation through successive presentation of a family of antigens on the surface of parasitized erythrocytes. These antigens, known as Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) proteins, are subject to a mutually exclusive expression system, and are encoded by the multigene var family. The mechanism whereby inactive var genes are silenced is poorly understood. To investigate transcriptional features of this mechanism, we conducted a microarray analysis of parasites that were selected to express different var genes by adhesion to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) or CD36. Results In addition to oligonucleotides for all predicted protein-coding genes, oligonucleotide probes specific to each known var gene of the FCR3 background were designed and added to the microarray, as well as tiled sense and antisense probes for a subset of var genes. In parasites selected for adhesion to CSA, one full-length var gene (var2csa) was strongly upregulated, as were sense RNA molecules emanating from the 3' end of a limited subset of other var genes. No global relationship between sense and antisense production of var genes was observed, but notably, some var genes had coincident high levels of both antisense and sense transcript. Conclusion Mutually exclusive expression of PfEMP1 proteins results from transcriptional silencing of non-expressed var genes. The distribution of steady-state sense and antisense RNA at var loci are not consistent with a silencing mechanism based on antisense silencing of inactive var genes. Silencing of var loci is also associated with altered regulation of genes distal to var loci. PMID:16277748

  11. Naturally occurring antisense RNA of histone H2a in mouse cultured cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Hiromi; Tomaru, Yasuhiro; Oho, Yuko; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2005-01-01

    Background An antisense transcript of histone H2a that has no significant protein-coding region has been cloned from a mouse full-length cDNA library. In the present study, we evaluated this transcript by using RT-PCR and compared the expression patterns of the sense and antisense transcripts by using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Results This antisense RNA was expressed in three mouse cell lines. We call it ASH2a. ASH2a includes not only the complementary sequence of the transcript of Hist2h2aa2 (a replication-dependent histone H2a gene), but also that of the promoter of Hist2h2aa2. The upstream genomic sequence of the transcription start site of the ASH2a-coding gene (ASH2a) lacks both CCAAT and TATA boxes. This absence suggests that the regulation of ASH2a is different from that of the replication-dependent histone H2a genes. Findings from qRT-PCR indicated that the expression pattern of ASH2a was different from that of Hist2h2aa2. Expression of Hist2h2aa2 peaked at 2 to 4 h during S-phase, but that of ASH2a peaked at 1 h. Conclusion We showed the existence of ASH2a, a histone H2a antisense RNA, in mouse cultured cells. The expression pattern of ASH2a is different from that of the sense RNA. PMID:15892893

  12. Safety of antisense oligonucleotide and siRNA-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chi, Xuan; Gatti, Philip; Papoian, Thomas

    2017-01-31

    Oligonucleotide-based therapy is an active area of drug development designed to treat a variety of gene-specific diseases. Two of the more promising platforms are the antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), both of which are often directed against similar targets. In light of recent reports on clinical trials of severe thrombocytopenia with two different ASO drugs and increased peripheral neuropathy with an siRNA drug, we compared and contrasted the specific safety characteristics of these two classes of oligonucleotide therapeutic. The objectives were to assess factors that could contribute to the specific toxicities observed with these two classes of promising drugs, and get a better understanding of the potential mechanism(s) responsible for these rare, but serious, adverse events.

  13. Loop structures in the 5' untranslated region and antisense RNA mediate pilE gene expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Masters, Thao L; Wachter, Jenny; Hill, Stuart A

    2016-11-01

    Regulation of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilE gene is ill-defined. In this study, post-transcriptional effects on expression were assessed. In silico analysis predicts the formation of three putative stable stem-loop structures with favourable free energies within the 5' untranslated region of the pilE message. Using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analyses, we show that each loop structure forms, with introduced destabilizing stem-loop mutations diminishing loop stability. Utilizing a series of pilE translational fusions, deletion of either loop 1 or loop 2 caused a significant reduction of pilE mRNA resulting in reduced expression of the reporter gene. Consequently, the formation of the loops apparently protects the pilE transcript from degradation. Putative loop 3 contains the pilE ribosomal binding site. Consequently, its formation may influence translation. Analysis of a small RNA transcriptome revealed an antisense RNA being produced upstream of the pilE promoter that is predicted to hybridize across the 5' untranslated region loops. Insertional mutants were created where the antisense RNA is not transcribed. In these mutants, pilE transcript levels are greatly diminished, with any residual message apparently not being translated. Complementation of these insertion mutants in trans with the antisense RNA gene facilitates pilE translation yielding a pilus + phenotype. Overall, this study demonstrates a complex relationship between loop-dependent transcript protection and antisense RNA in modulating pilE expression levels.

  14. A potential suppressive effect of natural antisense IL-1β RNA on lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-1β expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiawei; Wu, Xiurong; Hong, Mao; Tobias, Peter; Han, Jiahuai

    2013-01-01

    Although more than half of genomic loci are believed to have antisense transcription, whether antisense transcription is involved in cytokine expression has not been studied. Here we show that some loci of innate immunity related genes do have antisense transcripts. We investigated the effect of several antisense RNAs, including anti-4-1BBL, anti-p100 and anti-IL-1β, on their cognate sense gene’s expression in macrophages. We found that overexpression of antisense IL-1β transcript suppressed IL-1β expression. Anti-IL-1β is complementary to the sequence in the 5′ upstream region of the IL-1β promoter. Its mediated inhibition of IL-1β production occurred at the transcriptional level. Anti-IL-1β did not alter the methylation status of the IL-1β promoter. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays revealed that the anti-IL-1β transcript can change the chromatin structure of the IL-1β promoter by decreasing H3K4 trimethylation on the promoter, which is at least part of the mechanism underlying the reduced binding of RNA polymerase II to the IL-1β promoter upon anti-IL-1β expression. Our data suggest that some antisense-transcripts of innate immunity related genes play a role by regulating cytokine expression. PMID:23677478

  15. Chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of the developmental switch gene eud-1 control predatory feeding plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Serobyan, Vahan; Xiao, Hua; Namdeo, Suryesh; Rödelsperger, Christian; Sieriebriennikov, Bogdan; Witte, Hanh; Röseler, Waltraud; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been suggested to act through developmental switches, but little is known about associated molecular mechanisms. In the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, the sulfatase eud-1 was identified as part of a developmental switch controlling mouth-form plasticity governing a predatory versus bacteriovorous mouth-form decision. Here we show that mutations in the conserved histone-acetyltransferase Ppa-lsy-12 and the methyl-binding-protein Ppa-mbd-2 mimic the eud-1 phenotype, resulting in the absence of one mouth-form. Mutations in both genes cause histone modification defects and reduced eud-1 expression. Surprisingly, Ppa-lsy-12 mutants also result in the down-regulation of an antisense-eud-1 RNA. eud-1 and antisense-eud-1 are co-expressed and further experiments suggest that antisense-eud-1 acts through eud-1 itself. Indeed, overexpression of the antisense-eud-1 RNA increases the eud-1-sensitive mouth-form and extends eud-1 expression. In contrast, this effect is absent in eud-1 mutants indicating that antisense-eud-1 positively regulates eud-1. Thus, chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of eud-1 control feeding plasticity in Pristionchus. PMID:27487725

  16. Strand-specific community RNA-seq reveals prevalent and dynamic antisense transcription in human gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Guanhui; Wang, Mingjie; Doak, Thomas G.; Ye, Yuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomics and other meta-omics approaches (including metatranscriptomics) provide insights into the composition and function of microbial communities living in different environments or animal hosts. Metatranscriptomics research provides an unprecedented opportunity to examine gene regulation for many microbial species simultaneously, and more importantly, for the majority that are unculturable microbial species, in their natural environments (or hosts). Current analyses of metatranscriptomic datasets focus on the detection of gene expression levels and the study of the relationship between changes of gene expression and changes of environment. As a demonstration of utilizing metatranscriptomics beyond these common analyses, we developed a computational and statistical procedure to analyze the antisense transcripts in strand-specific metatranscriptomic datasets. Antisense RNAs encoded on the DNA strand opposite a gene’s CDS have the potential to form extensive base-pairing interactions with the corresponding sense RNA, and can have important regulatory functions. Most studies of antisense RNAs in bacteria are rather recent, are mostly based on transcriptome analysis, and have been applied mainly to single bacterial species. Application of our approaches to human gut-associated metatranscriptomic datasets allowed us to survey antisense transcription for a large number of bacterial species associated with human beings. The ratio of protein coding genes with antisense transcription ranges from 0 to 35.8% (median = 10.0%) among 47 species. Our results show that antisense transcription is dynamic, varying between human individuals. Functional enrichment analysis revealed a preference of certain gene functions for antisense transcription, and transposase genes are among the most prominent ones (but we also observed antisense transcription in bacterial house-keeping genes). PMID:26388849

  17. Strand-specific community RNA-seq reveals prevalent and dynamic antisense transcription in human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Bao, Guanhui; Wang, Mingjie; Doak, Thomas G; Ye, Yuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomics and other meta-omics approaches (including metatranscriptomics) provide insights into the composition and function of microbial communities living in different environments or animal hosts. Metatranscriptomics research provides an unprecedented opportunity to examine gene regulation for many microbial species simultaneously, and more importantly, for the majority that are unculturable microbial species, in their natural environments (or hosts). Current analyses of metatranscriptomic datasets focus on the detection of gene expression levels and the study of the relationship between changes of gene expression and changes of environment. As a demonstration of utilizing metatranscriptomics beyond these common analyses, we developed a computational and statistical procedure to analyze the antisense transcripts in strand-specific metatranscriptomic datasets. Antisense RNAs encoded on the DNA strand opposite a gene's CDS have the potential to form extensive base-pairing interactions with the corresponding sense RNA, and can have important regulatory functions. Most studies of antisense RNAs in bacteria are rather recent, are mostly based on transcriptome analysis, and have been applied mainly to single bacterial species. Application of our approaches to human gut-associated metatranscriptomic datasets allowed us to survey antisense transcription for a large number of bacterial species associated with human beings. The ratio of protein coding genes with antisense transcription ranges from 0 to 35.8% (median = 10.0%) among 47 species. Our results show that antisense transcription is dynamic, varying between human individuals. Functional enrichment analysis revealed a preference of certain gene functions for antisense transcription, and transposase genes are among the most prominent ones (but we also observed antisense transcription in bacterial house-keeping genes).

  18. Antisense RNA Strategies for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Ruchir P.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of antisense RNA (as RNA) strategies for metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum. Strain ATCC 824(pRD4) was developed to produce a 102-nucleotide asRNA with 87% complementarity to the butyrate kinase (BK) gene. Strain ATCC 824(pRD4) exhibited 85 to 90% lower BK and acetate kinase specific activities than the control strain. Strain ATCC 824(pRD4) also exhibited 45 to 50% lower phosphotransbutyrylase (PTB) and phosphotransacetylase specific activities than the control strain. This strain exhibited earlier induction of solventogenesis, which resulted in 50 and 35% higher final concentrations of acetone and butanol, respectively, than the concentrations in the control. Strain ATCC 824(pRD1) was developed to putatively produce a 698-nucleotide asRNA with 96% complementarity to the PTB gene. Strain ATCC 824(pRD1) exhibited 70 and 80% lower PTB and BK activities, respectively, than the control exhibited. It also exhibited 300% higher levels of a lactate dehydrogenase activity than the control exhibited. The growth yields of ATCC 824(pRD1) were 28% less than the growth yields of the control. While the levels of acids were not affected in ATCC 824(pRD1) fermentations, the acetone and butanol concentrations were 96 and 75% lower, respectively, than the concentrations in the control fermentations. The lower level of solvent production by ATCC 824(pRD1) was compensated for by ∼100-fold higher levels of lactate production. The lack of any significant impact on butyrate formation fluxes by the lower PTB and BK levels suggests that butyrate formation fluxes are not controlled by the levels of the butyrate formation enzymes. PMID:10049845

  19. Identification and analysis of antisense RNA target regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Rittner, K; Sczakiel, G

    1991-01-01

    Antisense RNA, transcribed intracellularly from constitutive expression cassettes, inhibits the replication of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as demonstrated by a quantitative microinjection assay in human SW480 cells. Infectious proviral HIV-1 DNA was co-microinjected together with a fivefold molar excess of plasmids expressing antisense RNA complementary to a set of ten different HIV-1 target regions. The most inhibitory antisense RNA expression plasmids were targeted against a 1 kb region within the gag open reading frame and against a 562 base region containing the coding sequences for the regulatory viral proteins tat and rev. Experimental evidence is presented that the antisense principle is the inhibitory mechanism in this assay system. PMID:2027749

  20. Antisense RNA transcripts in the blood may be novel diagnostic markers for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Tomohiro; Kohno, Keisuke; Nagai, Kentaro; Chiba, Mitsuru; Pak, Sugiru; Murata, Soichiro; Fukunaga, Kiyoshi; Yasue, Hiroshi; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2017-09-01

    Numerous genetic studies have been conducted regarding the occurrence of colorectal cancer (CRC) and the prognosis using microarrays. However, adequate investigations into the diagnostic application of microarrays have yet to be performed. The simplicity and accuracy of diagnosis and prognosis tracking are important requirements for its processes, and the use of blood cells for diagnosis is considered to be suitable to meet these requirements. The patients involved in the study were 28 preoperative patients with CRC and 6 healthy individuals who served as controls. RNA was extracted from the blood cells of the patients and analyzed using a sense/antisense RNA custom microarray. In the patients with CRC, the expression levels of 20 sense RNA and 20 antisense RNA species were identified as being significantly altered compared with that of the healthy volunteers (P<0.05; fold-change, >2.0). Cluster analysis of these RNA species revealed that the top 10 antisense RNAs significantly clustered patients with cancer and healthy individuals separately. Patients with stage I or II CRC exhibited significant changes in the expression levels of 33 sense and 39 antisense RNA species, as compared with healthy volunteers (P<0.01; fold-change >2.0). Cluster analysis demonstrated that patients with stage I or II CRC and healthy volunteers formed separate clusters only among the top 20 antisense RNA species. A tracking study of expression levels of haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolase domain-containing 1 (HDHD1) antisense RNA was performed and a significant difference was identified between the CRC and healthy groups revealing that the levels at one week and three months following surgical removal of the cancerous tissue, decreased to almost same levels of the healthy individuals. The results of the current study indicate that HDHD1 antisense RNA may serve as a potential biomarker for the prognosis of CRC.

  1. The conditional inhibition of gene expression in cultured Drosophila cells by antisense RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Bunch, T A; Goldstein, L S

    1989-01-01

    Genes producing antisense RNA are becoming important tools for the selective inhibition of gene expression. Experiments in different biological systems, targeting different mRNAs have yielded diverse results with respect to the success of the technique and its mechanism of action. We have examined the potential of three antisense genes, whose transcription is driven by a Drosophila metallothionein promoter, to inhibit the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) or a microtubule associated protein (205K MAP) in cultured Drosophila cells. Expression of ADH was significantly reduced upon induction of the anti-ADH genes. The ADH mRNA does not appear to be destabilized by the presence of antisense RNA but rather exists at similar levels in hybrid form. Hybrids are detected with both spliced and unspliced ADH RNA. In contrast to these results, antisense genes producing antisense RNA in great excess to 205K MAP mRNA, which is itself far less abundant than the ADH mRNA, failed to show any inhibition of 205K MAP expression. Images PMID:2481266

  2. Genetic modification of condensed tannin biosynthesis in Lotus corniculatus. 1. Heterologous antisense dihydroflavonol reductase down-regulates tannin accumulation in "hairy root" cultures.

    PubMed

    Carron, T R; Robbins, M P; Morris, P

    1994-03-01

    An antisense dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR) gene-construct made using the cDNA for DFR from Antirrhinum majus was introduced into the genome of a series of clonal genotypes of Lotus corniculatus via Agrobacterium rhizogenes. After initial screening, 17 antisense and 11 control transformation events were analysed and tannin levels found to be reduced in antisense root cultures. The effect of this antisense construct, (pMAJ2), which consisted of the 5' half of the DFR cDNA sequence, was compared in three different recipient Lotus genotypes. This construct effectively down-regulated tannin biosynthesis in two of the recepient genotypes (s33 and s50); however, this construct was relatively ineffective in a third genotype (s41) which accumulated high levels of condensed tannins in derived transgenic root cultures. Four pMAJ2 antisense and three control lines derived from clonal genotypes s33 and s50 were selected and studied in greater detail. The antisense DFR construct was found to be integrated into the genome of the antisense "hairy root" cultures, and the antisense RNA was shown to be expressed. Tannin levels were much lower in antisense roots compared to the controls and this reduction in tannin levels was accompanied by a change in condensed tannin subunit composition.

  3. Ultra Deep Sequencing of Listeria monocytogenes sRNA Transcriptome Revealed New Antisense RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Sebastian; Widder, Stefanie; Mannala, Gopala Krishna; Qing, Xiaoxing; Madhugiri, Ramakanth; Kefer, Nathalie; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Rattei, Thomas; Hain, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive pathogen, and causative agent of listeriosis, has become a widely used model organism for intracellular infections. Recent studies have identified small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) as important factors for regulating gene expression and pathogenicity of L. monocytogenes. Increased speed and reduced costs of high throughput sequencing (HTS) techniques have made RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) the state-of-the-art method to study bacterial transcriptomes. We created a large transcriptome dataset of L. monocytogenes containing a total of 21 million reads, using the SOLiD sequencing technology. The dataset contained cDNA sequences generated from L. monocytogenes RNA collected under intracellular and extracellular condition and additionally was size fractioned into three different size ranges from <40 nt, 40–150 nt and >150 nt. We report here, the identification of nine new sRNAs candidates of L. monocytogenes and a reevaluation of known sRNAs of L. monocytogenes EGD-e. Automatic comparison to known sRNAs revealed a high recovery rate of 55%, which was increased to 90% by manual revision of the data. Moreover, thorough classification of known sRNAs shed further light on their possible biological functions. Interestingly among the newly identified sRNA candidates are antisense RNAs (asRNAs) associated to the housekeeping genes purA, fumC and pgi and potentially their regulation, emphasizing the significance of sRNAs for metabolic adaptation in L. monocytogenes. PMID:24498259

  4. Genome-wide antisense transcription drives mRNA processing in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lasa, Iñigo; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Dobin, Alexander; Villanueva, Maite; de los Mozos, Igor Ruiz; Vergara-Irigaray, Marta; Segura, Víctor; Fagegaltier, Delphine; Penadés, José R.; Valle, Jaione; Solano, Cristina; Gingeras, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    RNA deep sequencing technologies are revealing unexpected levels of complexity in bacterial transcriptomes with the discovery of abundant noncoding RNAs, antisense RNAs, long 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions, and alternative operon structures. Here, by applying deep RNA sequencing to both the long and short RNA fractions (<50 nucleotides) obtained from the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, we have detected a collection of short RNAs that is generated genome-wide through the digestion of overlapping sense/antisense transcripts by RNase III endoribonuclease. At least 75% of sense RNAs from annotated genes are subject to this mechanism of antisense processing. Removal of RNase III activity reduces the amount of short RNAs and is accompanied by the accumulation of discrete antisense transcripts. These results suggest the production of pervasive but hidden antisense transcription used to process sense transcripts by means of creating double-stranded substrates. This process of RNase III-mediated digestion of overlapping transcripts can be observed in several evolutionarily diverse Gram-positive bacteria and is capable of providing a unique genome-wide posttranscriptional mechanism to adjust mRNA levels. PMID:22123973

  5. Natural antisense transcripts are significantly involved in regulation of drought stress in maize.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Wang, Qi; Freeling, Micheal; Zhang, Xuecai; Xu, Yunbi; Mao, Yan; Tang, Xin; Wu, Fengkai; Lan, Hai; Cao, Moju; Rong, Tingzhao; Lisch, Damon; Lu, Yanli

    2017-05-19

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are a prominent and complex class of regulatory RNAs. Using strand-specific RNA sequencing, we identified 1769 sense and antisense transcript pairs (NAT pairs) in two maize inbreds with different sensitivity to drought, as well as in two derivative recombination inbred lines (RILs). A significantly higher proportion of NATs relative to non-NATs are specifically expressed under water stress (WS). Surprisingly, expression of sense and antisense transcripts produced by NAT pairs is significantly correlated, particularly under WS. We found an unexpected large proportion of NATs with protein coding potential, as estimated by ribosome release scores. Small RNAs significantly accumulate within NAT pairs, with 21 nt smRNA particularly enriched in overlapping regions of these pairs of genes. The abundance of these smRNAs is significantly altered in the leafbladeless1 mutant, suggesting that these genes may be regulated by the tasiRNA pathway. Further, NATs are significantly hypomethylated and include fewer transposable element sequences relative to non-NAT genes. NAT gene regions also exhibit higher levels of H3K36me3, H3K9ac, and H3K4me3, but lower levels of H3K27me3, indicating that NAT gene pairs generally exhibit an open chromatin configuration. Finally, NAT pairs in 368 diverse maize inbreds and 19 segregating populations were specifically enriched for polymorphisms associated with drought tolerance. Taken together, the data highlight the potential impact of that small RNAs and histone modifications have in regulation of NAT expression, and the significance of NATs in response to WS. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Antisense lncRNA FOXC2-AS1 promotes doxorubicin resistance in osteosarcoma by increasing the expression of FOXC2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Lin; Zhu, Kun-Peng; Ma, Xiao-Long

    2017-06-28

    Recent efforts have revealed that numerous natural antisense lncRNAs play a crucial role in the regulation of cancer biology. Here, based on our previous study, we further identified that the lncRNA FOXC2-AS1 and its antisense transcript FOXC2 are positively up-regulated in doxorubicin-resistant osteosarcoma cell lines and tissues, correlate with poor prognosis and promote doxorubicin resistance in osteosarcoma cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, FOXC2-AS1 and FOXC2 are mainly located in the cytoplasm and form an RNA-RNA double-stranded structure in the overlapping region, which is necessary for FOXC2-AS1 to regulate the expression of FOXC2 at both the transcription and post-transcription levels. In addition, transcription factor FOXC2 also contributes to doxorubicin resistance through inducing the expression of the classical multi-drug resistance-related ABCB1 gene similar to FOXC2-AS1. Thus, we concluded that the lncRNA FOXC2-AS1 may promote doxorubicin resistance in OS by increasing the expression of transcription factor FOXC2, further facilitating ABCB1 expression. These findings demonstrate the potential underlying mechanism of FOXC2-AS1 in the regulation of doxorubicin resistance in OS and possibly provide a novel reversing target. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. RdRP-synthesized antisense ribosomal siRNAs silence pre-rRNA via the nuclear RNAi pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xufei; Feng, Xuezhu; Mao, Hui; Li, Mu; Xu, Fei; Hu, Kai; Guang, Shouhong

    2017-03-01

    Expression of rRNA affects cell growth and proliferation, but mechanisms that modulate rRNA levels are poorly understood. We conducted a genetic screen for factors that negatively regulate generation of endogenous short interfering RNA (endo-siRNA) in Caenorhabditis elegans and identified a suppressor of siRNA (susi-1) and antisense ribosomal siRNAs (risiRNAs). risiRNAs show sequence complementary to 18S and 26S rRNAs and require RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) for their production. They act through the nuclear RNA interference (RNAi) pathway to downregulate pre-rRNA. Stress stimuli, including low temperature and UV irradiation, induced the accumulation of risiRNAs. SUSI-1 is a homolog of the human DIS3L2 exonuclease involved in 3'-5' degradation of oligouridylated RNAs. In susi-1 mutant and in low temperature-treated animals, 3'-tail oligouridylated 26S rRNA accumulated. The injection of oligouridylated rRNA elicited nuclear accumulation of NRDE-3. Our findings identify a new subset of 22G-RNAs that regulate pre-rRNA expression and a mechanism to maintain rRNA homeostasis.

  8. Cationic derivatives of biocompatible hyaluronic acids for delivery of siRNA and antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Han, Su-Eun; Kang, Hyungu; Shim, Ga Yong; Kim, Sun Jae; Choi, Han-Gon; Kim, Jiseok; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2009-02-01

    In this study, we tested the use of cationic polymer derivatives of biocompatible hyaluronic acid (HA) as a delivery system of siRNA and antisense oligonucleotides. HA was modified with cationic polymer polyethylenimine (PEI). When compared with PEI alone, cationic PEI derivatives of HA (HA-PEI) provided increased cellular delivery of Small interfering RNA (siRNA) in B16F1, A549, HeLa, and Hep3B tumor cells. Indeed, more than 95% of the cells were positive for siRNA following its delivery with HA-PEI. A survivin-specific siRNA that was delivered using HA-PEI potently reduced the mRNA expression levels of the target gene in all of the cell lines. By contrast, survivin-specific siRNA delivered by PEI alone did not induce a significant reduction in mRNA levels. In green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing 293 T cells, a loss of GFP expression was evident in the cells that had been treated with GFP-specific siRNA and HA-PEI complex. The inhibition of target gene expression by antisense oligonucleotide G3139 was also enhanced after delivery with HA-PEI. Moreover, HA-PEI displayed lower cytotoxicity than PEI alone. These results suggest that HA-PEI could be further developed as biocompatible delivery systems of siRNA and antisense oligonucleotides for enhanced cellular uptake and inhibition of target gene expression.

  9. Therapeutic potentialities of EWS-Fli-1 mRNA-targeted vectorized antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Maksimenko, A; Lambert, G; Bertrand, J R; Fattal, E; Couvreur, P; Malvy, C

    2003-12-01

    We have used structured antisense oligonucleotides (AON), which are protected against extra and intracellular degradation by their internal structure. We have shown that if correctly designed this structure does not prevent them from hybridizing to the mRNA target. This concept allows reducing the number of thioate groups in the oligonucleotide and therefore the potential toxicity. Junction oncogenes are found in cancers such as certain leukemias, Ewing sarcoma, and thyroid papillary carcinomas. Ewing sarcoma is a cancer of children and young adults with bone metastasis. It is caused by a chromosomic translocation t(11;22) (q24;q12) creating a fusion gene between the genes EWS and Fli-1 giving rise to a chimeric protein which is an unnatural transcription factor. Immortalized NIH/3T3 cells transfected by the EWS-Fli-1 cDNA under the control of the LTR retroviral promoter--which do not undergo apoptosis and which became tumoral--were used for this study. As a model of Ewing sarcoma in nude mice, we have used permanently expressing human EWS-Fli-1 cells grafted to nude mice. The nanospheres or nanocapsules have been used to deliver two different AON: a phosphorothioate, and a structured chimeric AON, both targeted toward the junction area of EWS-Fli-1. Both types of AON-loaded nanoparticles inhibited the growth of the xenografted tumor after intratumoral injections into nude mice, whereas similar nanoparticles with control oligonucleotides had no effect. With AON in nanospheres, we have shown after 24 hours that the mRNA of EWS-Fli-1 was specifically down-regulated, confirming the antisense activity of the targeted AON.

  10. Efficient hammerhead ribozyme and antisense RNA targeting in a slow ribosome Escherichia coli mutant.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Ferbeyre, G; Cedergren, R

    1997-05-01

    We have evaluated inhibition of the plasmid-born chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene (CAT) by the hammerhead ribozyme and antisense RNA in Escherichia coli where the translation and transcription rates have been modified. Whereas neither antisense nor the hammerhead had an inhibitory effect on CAT activity in wild-type E. coli, both reduced the level of the messenger RNA and the activity of the CAT gene by almost 60% in a slow ribosome mutant. Streptomycin, which increases the speed of translation in this mutant strain, restored full CAT activity. The level of CAT activity expressed from a T7 RNA polymerase promoter was not affected by the presence of either antisense RNA or the hammerhead ribozyme. When the target gene was expressed from a chromosomal locus in wild-type E. coli, both antisense RNA and the hammerhead ribozyme showed some inhibitory activity, but the level of inhibition was significantly increased in the slow ribosome strain. This bacterial system offers a unique entry to the study of cellular factors which mediate the activity of ribozymes in vivo.

  11. Avian Leukosis Virus Activation of an Antisense RNA Upstream of TERT in B-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Nehyba, Jiri; Malhotra, Sanandan; Winans, Shelby; O'Hare, Thomas H.; Justice, James

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Avian leukosis virus (ALV) induces tumors by integrating its proviral DNA into the chicken genome and altering the expression of nearby genes via strong promoter and enhancer elements. Viral integration sites that contribute to oncogenesis are selected in tumor cells. Deep-sequencing analysis of B-cell lymphoma DNA confirmed that the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene promoter is a common ALV integration target. Twenty-six unique proviral integration sites were mapped between 46 and 3,552 nucleotides (nt) upstream of the TERT transcription start site, predominantly in the opposite transcriptional orientation to TERT. Transcriptome-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis of normal bursa revealed a transcribed region upstream of TERT in the opposite orientation, suggesting the TERT promoter is bidirectional. This transcript appears to be an uncharacterized antisense RNA. We have previously shown that TERT expression is upregulated in tumors with integrations in the TERT promoter region. We now report that the viral promoter drives the expression of a chimeric transcript containing viral sequences spliced to exons 4 through 7 of this antisense RNA. Clonal expansion of cells with ALV integrations driving overexpression of the TERT antisense RNA suggest it may have a role in tumorigenesis. IMPORTANCE The data suggest that ALV integrations in the TERT promoter region drive the overexpression of a novel antisense RNA and contribute to the development of lymphomas. PMID:27512065

  12. Natural antisense RNAs are involved in the regulation of CD45 expression in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Rong, J; Yin, J; Su, Z

    2015-03-01

    CD45 is a transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase that is specifically expressed in hematopoietic cells and can initiate signal transduction via the dephosphorylation of tyrosine. Alternatively spliced transcript variants of this gene encode distinct isoforms, which indicate different functional states of CD45. Among these variants, CD45RO, which contains neither exon 4, 5, or 6, is over-expressed in lymphocytes in autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and type I diabetes. The CD45 RO serves as a marker of the immune response activity and lymphocyte development. Previous studies have indicated that exon splicing is generally correlated with local hypermethylated DNA and acetylated histone modification, while autoimmune diseases are commonly associated with global hypomethylation and histone deacetylation in lymphocytes. Thus, the question arises of how exons 4, 5, and 6 of CD45RO are excluded under the status of global DNA hypomethylation and histone deacetylation in these autoimmune diseases. On the basis of the analyses of the context sequence of CD45 and its natural antisense RNA in GenBank, we proposed that the long noncoding RNA encoded by the natural antisense gene of CD45 contributes to the expressional regulation of the CD45RO splicing variant via recruitment of DNA methyltransferase and histone modification modulators specific to the sense gene CD45; thus, it is associated with the over-expression of CD45RO and the functional regulation of lymphocytes in the pathogenic development of autoimmune diseases.

  13. Dermal/transdermal delivery of small interfering RNA and antisense oligonucleotides- advances and hurdles.

    PubMed

    Ita, Kevin

    2017-03-01

    A diverse array of nucleic acids has been studied by several researchers for the management of several diseases. Among these compounds, small interfering RNA and antisense oligonucleotides have attracted considerable attention. Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA while siRNAs, on the other hand, are double-stranded RNA molecules which can hybridize with a specific mRNA sequence and block the translation of numerous genes. One of the main obstacles in the dermal or transdermal delivery of these compounds is their low skin permeability. In this review, various techniques used to enhance the delivery of these molecules into or across the skin are described and in some cases, the correlation between enhanced dermal/transdermal delivery and therapeutic efficacy is highlighted.

  14. Use of an Antisense RNA Strategy To Investigate the Functional Significance of Mn-Catalase in the Extreme Thermophile Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Renata; Hidalgo, Aurelio; Cava, Felipe; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, José Manuel; Berenguer, José

    2004-01-01

    The expression of an antisense RNA revealed that an Mn-catalase was required in Thermus thermophilus for aerobic but not for anaerobic growth. The antisense system is based on the constitutive expression of a “bicistronic” transcript consisting of the kanamycin resistance gene mRNA followed by the antisense RNA against the selected target. PMID:15516595

  15. Decreased glucocorticoid receptor activity following glucocorticoid receptor antisense RNA gene fragment transfection.

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, M C; Barden, N

    1991-01-01

    Depression is often characterized by increased cortisol secretion caused by hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and by nonsuppression of cortisol secretion following dexamethasone administration. This hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis could result from a reduced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity in neurons involved in its control. To investigate the effect of reduced neuronal GR levels, we have blocked cellular GR mRNA processing and/or translation by introduction of a complementary GR antisense RNA strand. Two cell lines were transfected with a reporter plasmid carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene under control of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter). This gene construction permitted assay of the sensitivity of the cells to glucocorticoid hormones. Cells were also cotransfected with a plasmid containing 1,815 bp of GR cDNA inserted in the reverse orientation downstream from either a neurofilament gene promoter element or the Rous sarcoma virus promoter element. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrated formation of GR antisense RNA strands. Measurement of the sensitivity of CAT activity to exogeneous dexamethasone showed that although dexamethasone increased CAT activity by as much as 13-fold in control incubations, expression of GR antisense RNA caused a 2- to 4-fold decrease in the CAT response to dexamethasone. Stable transfectants bearing the GR antisense gene fragment construction demonstrated a 50 to 70% decrease of functional GR levels compared with normal cells, as evidenced by a ligand-binding assay with the type II glucocorticoid receptor-specific ligand [3H]RU 28362. These results validate the use of antisense RNA to GR to decrease cellular response to glucocorticoids. Images PMID:1996114

  16. Down-regulation of protein kinase Ceta by antisense oligonucleotides sensitises A549 lung cancer cells to vincristine and paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Sonnemann, Jürgen; Gekeler, Volker; Ahlbrecht, Katrin; Brischwein, Klaus; Liu, Chao; Bader, Peter; Müller, Cornelia; Niethammer, Dietrich; Beck, James F

    2004-06-25

    Previous studies point to protein kinase C (PKC) isozyme eta as a resistance factor in cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated whether down-regulation of PKCeta with second generation antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) would sensitise A549 human lung carcinoma cells to cytostatics. The effects were compared to the outcome of Bcl-xL down-regulation. Upon treatment with antisense ODNs, PKCeta and Bcl-xL were both significantly reduced on mRNA and protein level. Down-regulation of either PKCeta or Bcl-xL in combination with vincristine or paclitaxel resulted in a significant increase in caspase-3 activity compared to that in the control oligonucleotide treated cells. In addition, PKCeta down-regulation augmented vincristine-induced dissipation of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. In conclusion, these results confirm that PKCeta might represent a considerable resistance factor and an interesting target to improve anticancer chemotherapy.

  17. Antisense MicroRNA Therapeutics in Cardiovascular Disease: Quo Vadis?

    PubMed

    Philippen, Leonne E; Dirkx, Ellen; Wit, Jan B M; Burggraaf, Koos; de Windt, Leon J; da Costa Martins, Paula A

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the end result of a diverse set of causes such as genetic cardiomyopathies, coronary artery disease, and hypertension and represents the primary cause of hospitalization in Europe. This serious clinical disorder is mostly associated with pathological remodeling of the myocardium, pump failure, and sudden death. While the survival of HF patients can be prolonged with conventional pharmacological therapies, the prognosis remains poor. New therapeutic modalities are thus needed that will target the underlying causes and not only the symptoms of the disease. Under chronic cardiac stress, small noncoding RNAs, in particular microRNAs, act as critical regulators of cardiac tissue remodeling and represent a new class of therapeutic targets in patients suffering from HF. Here, we focus on the potential use of microRNA inhibitors as a new treatment paradigm for HF.

  18. Antisense Transcription of Retrotransposons in Drosophila: An Origin of Endogenous Small Interfering RNA Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Joseph; Harrington, Andrew W.; Steiniger, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    Movement of transposons causes insertions, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements potentially leading to premature lethality in Drosophila melanogaster. To repress these elements and combat genomic instability, eukaryotes have evolved several small RNA-mediated defense mechanisms. Specifically, in Drosophila somatic cells, endogenous small interfering (esi)RNAs suppress retrotransposon mobility. EsiRNAs are produced by Dicer-2 processing of double-stranded RNA precursors, yet the origins of these precursors are unknown. We show that most transposon families are transcribed in both the sense (S) and antisense (AS) direction in Dmel-2 cells. LTR retrotransposons Dm297, mdg1, and blood, and non-LTR retrotransposons juan and jockey transcripts, are generated from intraelement transcription start sites with canonical RNA polymerase II promoters. We also determined that retrotransposon antisense transcripts are less polyadenylated than sense. RNA-seq and small RNA-seq revealed that Dicer-2 RNA interference (RNAi) depletion causes a decrease in the number of esiRNAs mapping to retrotransposons and an increase in expression of both S and AS retrotransposon transcripts. These data support a model in which double-stranded RNA precursors are derived from convergent transcription and processed by Dicer-2 into esiRNAs that silence both sense and antisense retrotransposon transcripts. Reduction of sense retrotransposon transcripts potentially lowers element-specific protein levels to prevent transposition. This mechanism preserves genomic integrity and is especially important for Drosophila fitness because mobile genetic elements are highly active. PMID:26534950

  19. Antisense Oligonucleotides Modulating Activation of a Nonsense-Mediated RNA Decay Switch Exon in the ATM Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kralovicova, Jana; Moreno, Pedro M.D.; Cross, Nicholas C.P.; Pêgo, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) is an important cancer susceptibility gene that encodes a key apical kinase in the DNA damage response pathway. ATM mutations in the germ line result in ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), a rare genetic syndrome associated with hypersensitivity to double-strand DNA breaks and predisposition to lymphoid malignancies. ATM expression is limited by a tightly regulated nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) switch exon (termed NSE) located in intron 28. In this study, we identify antisense oligonucleotides that modulate NSE inclusion in mature transcripts by systematically targeting the entire 3.1-kb-long intron. Their identification was assisted by a segmental deletion analysis of transposed elements, revealing NSE repression upon removal of a distant antisense Alu and NSE activation upon elimination of a long terminal repeat transposon MER51A. Efficient NSE repression was achieved by delivering optimized splice-switching oligonucleotides to embryonic and lymphoblastoid cells using chitosan-based nanoparticles. Together, these results provide a basis for possible sequence-specific radiosensitization of cancer cells, highlight the power of intronic antisense oligonucleotides to modify gene expression, and demonstrate transposon-mediated regulation of NSEs. PMID:27658045

  20. Differential regulation of sense and antisense promoter activity at the Csf1R locus in B cells by the transcription factor PAX5.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Richard M; Valeaux, Stephanie; Wilson, Nicola; Bouhlel, M Amine; Clarke, Deborah; Krüger, Imme; Kulu, Divine; Suske, Guntram; Philipsen, Sjaak; Tagoh, Hiromi; Bonifer, Constanze

    2011-07-01

    The transcription factor PAX5 is essential for the activation of B-cell-specific genes and for the silencing of myeloid-specific genes. We previously determined the molecular mechanism by which PAX5 silences the myeloid-specific colony-stimulating-factor-receptor (Csf1R) gene and showed that PAX5 directly binds to the Csf1r promoter as well as to an intronic enhancer that generates an antisense transcript in B cells. Here we examine the role of PAX5 in the regulation of sense and antisense transcription in B cells. We performed PAX5-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses across the Csfr1 locus. We investigated the role of PAX5 in regulating Csf1r sense and antisense promoter activity by transient transfections and by employing a Pax5(-/-) pro-B-cell line expressing an inducible PAX5 protein. PAX5 interacting factors were identified by pull-down experiments. The role of the transcription factor Sp3 in driving antisense promoter expression was examined in B cells from Sp3 knockout mice. PAX5 differentially regulates the Csf1r promoter and the promoter of the antisense transcript. PAX5 interferes with PU.1 transactivation at the sense promoter by binding to a PAX5 consensus sequence. At the antisense promoter, PAX5 does not specifically recognize DNA, but interacts with Sp3 to upregulate antisense promoter activity. Antisense promoter activation by PAX5 is dependent on the presence of its partial homeo-domain. We demonstrate that PAX5 regulates Csf1r in B cells by reducing the frequency of binding of the basal transcription machinery to the promoter and by activating antisense RNA expression. Copyright © 2011 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Amphiregulin antisense RNA expression inhibits angiogenesis of human breast cancer in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Serova, Maria; Podgorniak, Marie Pierre; Berthois, Yolande; Mourah, Samia; Calvo, Fabien

    2005-09-01

    To investigate the anti-angiogenic effect of amphiregulin (AR) antisense RNA expression in breast cancer. Human AR cDNA antisense plasmid was transfected into NS2T2A1 cells (a human breast cancer cell line). Two selected clones expressed AR antisense RNA (AR AS1 and AR AS3 cell lines) in which AR protein expression was reduced. Control cell line NS2T2A1 V was obtained by empty vector transfection. These cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice. The effects of conditioned media on proliferation of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC) were evaluated and VEGF secreted by the cells was measured by ELISA method. In tumor tissues, VEGF expression levels were measured by quantitative RT-PCR, and CD31-immunostaining was used for intra-tumoral vascular quantification. The proliferation index of HMEC cells grown in conditioned media with AR AS1 and AR AS3 was significantly reduced in comparison with that of control cells, accompanied by a decreased VEGF secretion. In tumors derived from AR AS1 and AR AS3 cells, intra-tumoral vascularization was reduced to about 50% of that derived from control cell line, accompanied with a decrease of VEGF expression. Amphiregulin antisense RNA expression inhibits efficiently the angiogenesis in breast cancer, suggesting this growth factor could represent a novel therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  2. Mitochondrial delivery of antisense RNA by MITO-Porter results in mitochondrial RNA knockdown, and has a functional impact on mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ryo; Yamada, Yuma; Kawamura, Eriko; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial genome-targeting nucleic acids are promising therapeutic candidates for treating mitochondrial diseases. To date, a number of systems for delivering genetic information to the cytosol and the nucleus have been reported, and several successful gene therapies involving gene delivery targeted to the cytosol and the nucleus have been reported. However, much less progress has been made concerning mitochondrial gene delivery systems, and mitochondrial gene therapy has never been achieved. Here, we report on the mitochondrial delivery of an antisense RNA oligonucleotide (ASO) to perform mitochondrial RNA knockdown to regulate mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial delivery of the ASO was achieved using a combination of a MITO-Porter system, which contains mitochondrial fusogenic lipid envelopes for mitochondrial delivery via membrane fusion and D-arm, a mitochondrial import signal of tRNA to the matrix. Mitochondrial delivery of the ASO induces the knockdown of the targeted mitochondria-encoded mRNA and protein, namely cytochrome c oxidase subunit II, a component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Furthermore, the mitochondrial membrane potential was depolarized by the down regulation of the respiratory chain as the result of the mitochondrial delivery of ASO. This finding constitutes the first report to demonstrate that the nanocarrier-mediated mitochondrial genome targeting of antisense RNA effects mitochondrial function.

  3. Detection of Very Long Antisense Transcripts by Whole Transcriptome RNA-Seq Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes by Semiconductor Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wehner, Stefanie; Mannala, Gopala K.; Qing, Xiaoxing; Madhugiri, Ramakanth; Chakraborty, Trinad; Mraheil, Mobarak A.; Hain, Torsten; Marz, Manja

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis, a severe food-borne infection characterised by abortion, septicaemia, or meningoencephalitis. L. monocytogenes causes outbreaks of febrile gastroenteritis and accounts for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in humans. Listeriosis has one of the highest mortality rates (up to 30%) of all food-borne infections. This human pathogenic bacterium is an important model organism for biomedical research to investigate cell-mediated immunity. L. monocytogenes is also one of the best characterised bacterial systems for the molecular analysis of intracellular parasitism. Recently several transcriptomic studies have also made the ubiquitous distributed bacterium as a model to understand mechanisms of gene regulation from the environment to the infected host on the level of mRNA and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). We have used semiconductor sequencing technology for RNA-seq to investigate the repertoire of listerial ncRNAs under extra- and intracellular growth conditions. Furthermore, we applied a new bioinformatic analysis pipeline for detection, comparative genomics and structural conservation to identify ncRNAs. With this work, in total, 741 ncRNA locations of potential ncRNA candidates are now known for L. monocytogenes, of which 611 ncRNA candidates were identified by RNA-seq. 441 transcribed ncRNAs have never been described before. Among these, we identified novel long non-coding antisense RNAs with a length of up to 5,400 nt e.g. opposite to genes coding for internalins, methylases or a high-affinity potassium uptake system, namely the kdpABC operon, which were confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. RNA-seq, comparative genomics and structural conservation of L. monocytogenes ncRNAs illustrate that this human pathogen uses a large number and repertoire of ncRNA including novel long antisense RNAs, which could be important for intracellular survival within the infected eukaryotic host. PMID

  4. Detection of very long antisense transcripts by whole transcriptome RNA-Seq analysis of Listeria monocytogenes by semiconductor sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Wehner, Stefanie; Mannala, Gopala K; Qing, Xiaoxing; Madhugiri, Ramakanth; Chakraborty, Trinad; Mraheil, Mobarak A; Hain, Torsten; Marz, Manja

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis, a severe food-borne infection characterised by abortion, septicaemia, or meningoencephalitis. L. monocytogenes causes outbreaks of febrile gastroenteritis and accounts for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in humans. Listeriosis has one of the highest mortality rates (up to 30%) of all food-borne infections. This human pathogenic bacterium is an important model organism for biomedical research to investigate cell-mediated immunity. L. monocytogenes is also one of the best characterised bacterial systems for the molecular analysis of intracellular parasitism. Recently several transcriptomic studies have also made the ubiquitous distributed bacterium as a model to understand mechanisms of gene regulation from the environment to the infected host on the level of mRNA and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). We have used semiconductor sequencing technology for RNA-seq to investigate the repertoire of listerial ncRNAs under extra- and intracellular growth conditions. Furthermore, we applied a new bioinformatic analysis pipeline for detection, comparative genomics and structural conservation to identify ncRNAs. With this work, in total, 741 ncRNA locations of potential ncRNA candidates are now known for L. monocytogenes, of which 611 ncRNA candidates were identified by RNA-seq. 441 transcribed ncRNAs have never been described before. Among these, we identified novel long non-coding antisense RNAs with a length of up to 5,400 nt e.g. opposite to genes coding for internalins, methylases or a high-affinity potassium uptake system, namely the kdpABC operon, which were confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. RNA-seq, comparative genomics and structural conservation of L. monocytogenes ncRNAs illustrate that this human pathogen uses a large number and repertoire of ncRNA including novel long antisense RNAs, which could be important for intracellular survival within the infected eukaryotic host.

  5. Bulged-out nucleotides protect an antisense RNA from RNase III cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Hjalt, T A; Wagner, E G

    1995-01-01

    Bulged-out nucleotides or internal loops are present in the stem-loop structures of several antisense RNAs. We have used the antisense/target RNA system (CopA/CopT) that controls the copy number of plasmid R1 to examine the possible biological function of bulged-out nucleotides. Two regions within the major stem-loop of the antisense RNA, CopA, carry bulged-out nucleotides. Base pairing in either one or both of these regions of the stem was restored by site-specific mutagenesis and in one case a new internal loop was introduced. The set of mutant and wild-type CopA variants was characterized structurally in vitro. The results reported here indicate a possible function of the bulges: their presence protects CopA RNA from being a substrate for the double-strand-specific enzyme RNase III. In vitro cleavage rates were drastically increased when either the lower or both bulges were absent. This is paralleled by a similar, but not identical, effect of the bulges on metabolic stability of the CopA RNAs in vivo. The degradation pathways of wild-type and mutant CopA in various strain backgrounds are discussed. In the accompanying paper, we address the significance of bulges in CopA for binding to the target RNA in vitro and for its inhibitory efficiency in vivo. Images PMID:7534906

  6. A novel HBV antisense RNA gene delivery system targeting hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chun-Hong; Sun, Wen-Sheng; Tian, Pei-Kun; Gao, Li-Fen; Liu, Su-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Li-Ning; Cao, Ying-Lin; Han, Li-Hui; Liang, Xiao-Hong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct a novel HBV antisense RNA delivery system targeting hapatocellular carcinoma and study its inhibitory effect in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: GE7,a 16-peptide specific to EGFR, and HA20, a homologue of N-terminus of haemagglutinin of influenza viral envelope protein, were synthesized and conjugated with polylysin. The above conjugates were organized into the pEBAF-as-preS2, a hepatocarcinoma specific HBV antisense expression vector, to construct a novel HBV antisense RNA delivery system, named AFP-enhancing 4-element complex. Hepatocelluar carcinoma HepG2.2.15 cells was used to assay the in vitro inhibition of the complex on HBV. Expression of HBV antigen was assayed by ELISA. BALB/c nude mice bearing HepG2.2.15 cells were injected with AFP-enhancing 4-element complex. The expression of HBV antisense RNA was examined by RT-PCR and the size of tumor in nude mice were measured. RESULTS: The AFP-enhancing 4-element complex was constructed and DNA was completely trapped at the slot with no DNA migration when the ratio of polypeptide to plasmid was 1:1.The expression of HBsAg and HBeAg of HepG2.2.15 cells was greatly decreased after being transfected by AFP-enhancing 4-element complex. The inhibitory rates were 33.4% and 58.5% respectively. RT-PCR showed HBV antisense RNA expressed specifically in liver tumor cells of tumor-bearing nude mice. After 4 injections of AFP-enhancing 4-element complex containing 0.2 μg DNA, the diameter of the tumor was 0.995 cm ± 0.35, which was significantly smaller than that of the control groups (2.215 cm ± 0.25, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: AFP-enhancing 4-element complex could deliver HBV antisense RNA targeting on hepatocarcinoma and inhibit both HBV and liver tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:12632498

  7. An Explosive Antisense RNA Strategy for Inhibition of a Lactococcal Bacteriophage†

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Shirley A.; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    2000-01-01

    The coding regions of six putative open reading frames (ORFs) identified near the phage φ31 late promoter and the right cohesive end (cos) of lactococcal bacteriophage φ31 were used to develop antisense constructs to inhibit the proliferation of phage φ31. Two middle-expressed ORFs (ORF 1 and ORF 2) and four late-expressed ORFs (ORF 3 through ORF 6) were cloned individually between the strong Lactobacillus P6 promoter and the T7 terminator (TT7) to yield a series of antisense RNA transcripts. When expressed on a high-copy-number vector from a strong promoter, the constructs had no effect on the efficiency of plaquing (EOP) or the plaque size of phage φ31. To increase the ratio of antisense RNA to the targeted sense mRNA appearing during a phage infection, the antisense cassettes containing the late-expressed ORFs (ORF 3 through ORF 6) were subcloned to pTRK360, a low-copy-number vector containing the phage φ31 origin of replication, ori31. ori31 allows for explosive amplification of the low-copy-number vector upon phage infection, thereby increasing levels of antisense RNA transcripts later in the lytic cycle. In addition, the presence of ori31 also lowers the burst size of phage φ31 fourfold, resulting in fewer sense, target mRNAs being expressed from the phage genome. The combination of ori31 and P6::anti-ORF 4H::TT7 resulted in a threefold decrease in the EOP of phage φ31 (EOP = 0.11 ± 0.03 [mean ± standard deviation]) compared to the presence of ori31 alone (EOP = 0.36). One-step growth curves showed that expression of anti-ORF 4H RNA decreased the percentage of successful centers of infection (75 to 80% for ori31 compared to 35 to 45% for ori31 plus anti-ORF 4H), with no further reduction in burst size. Growth curves performed in the presence of varying levels of phage φ31 showed that ori31 plus anti-ORF 4H offered significant protection to Lactococcus lactis, even at multiplicities of infection of 0.01 and 0.1. These results illustrate a successful

  8. Two discrete elements are required for the replication of a repABC plasmid: an antisense RNA and a stem-loop structure.

    PubMed

    Venkova-Canova, Tatiana; Soberón, Nora E; Ramírez-Romero, Miguel A; Cevallos, Miguel A

    2004-12-01

    The repABC replicons contain an operon encoding the initiator protein (RepC) and partitioning proteins (RepA and RepB). The latter two proteins negatively regulate the transcription of the operon. In this article we have identified two novel regulatory elements, located within the conserved repB-repC intergenic sequence, which negatively modulate the expression of repC, in plasmid p42d of Rhizobium etli. One of them is a small antisense RNA and the other is a stem-loop structure in the repABC mRNA that occludes the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of repC. According to in vivo and in vitro analyses, the small antisense RNA (57-59 nt) resembles canonical negative regulators of replication because: (i) it is transcribed from a strong constitutive promoter (P2), (ii) the transcript overlaps untranslated region upstream of the RepC coding sequences, (iii) the RNA forms one secondary structure acting as a rho-independent terminator, (iv) the antisense RNA is a strong trans-incompatibility factor and (v) its presence reduces the level of repC expression. Surprisingly, both of these seemingly negative regulators are required for efficient plasmid replication.

  9. Spt4 selectively regulates the expression of C9orf72 sense and antisense mutant transcripts.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nicholas J; Carlomagno, Yari; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Almeida, Sandra; Cook, Casey N; Gendron, Tania F; Prudencio, Mercedes; Van Blitterswijk, Marka; Belzil, Veronique; Couthouis, Julien; Paul, Joseph West; Goodman, Lindsey D; Daughrity, Lillian; Chew, Jeannie; Garrett, Aliesha; Pregent, Luc; Jansen-West, Karen; Tabassian, Lilia J; Rademakers, Rosa; Boylan, Kevin; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Josephs, Keith A; Parisi, Joseph E; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Boeve, Bradley F; Deng, Ning; Feng, Yanan; Cheng, Tzu-Hao; Dickson, Dennis W; Cohen, Stanley N; Bonini, Nancy M; Link, Christopher D; Gao, Fen-Biao; Petrucelli, Leonard; Gitler, Aaron D

    2016-08-12

    An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in C9orf72 causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (c9FTD/ALS). Therapeutics are being developed to target RNAs containing the expanded repeat sequence (GGGGCC); however, this approach is complicated by the presence of antisense strand transcription of expanded GGCCCC repeats. We found that targeting the transcription elongation factor Spt4 selectively decreased production of both sense and antisense expanded transcripts, as well as their translated dipeptide repeat (DPR) products, and also mitigated degeneration in animal models. Knockdown of SUPT4H1, the human Spt4 ortholog, similarly decreased production of sense and antisense RNA foci, as well as DPR proteins, in patient cells. Therapeutic targeting of a single factor to eliminate c9FTD/ALS pathological features offers advantages over approaches that require targeting sense and antisense repeats separately.

  10. Antisense targeting of 3' end elements involved in DUX4 mRNA processing is an efficient therapeutic strategy for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a new gene-silencing approach.

    PubMed

    Marsollier, Anne-Charlotte; Ciszewski, Lukasz; Mariot, Virginie; Popplewell, Linda; Voit, Thomas; Dickson, George; Dumonceaux, Julie

    2016-04-15

    Defects in mRNA 3'end formation have been described to alter transcription termination, transport of the mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, stability of the mRNA and translation efficiency. Therefore, inhibition of polyadenylation may lead to gene silencing. Here, we choose facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) as a model to determine whether or not targeting key 3' end elements involved in mRNA processing using antisense oligonucleotide drugs can be used as a strategy for gene silencing within a potentially therapeutic context. FSHD is a gain-of-function disease characterized by the aberrant expression of the Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) transcription factor leading to altered pathogenic deregulation of multiple genes in muscles. Here, we demonstrate that targeting either the mRNA polyadenylation signal and/or cleavage site is an efficient strategy to down-regulate DUX4 expression and to decrease the abnormally high-pathological expression of genes downstream of DUX4. We conclude that targeting key functional 3' end elements involved in pre-mRNA to mRNA maturation with antisense drugs can lead to efficient gene silencing and is thus a potentially effective therapeutic strategy for at least FSHD. Moreover, polyadenylation is a crucial step in the maturation of almost all eukaryotic mRNAs, and thus all mRNAs are virtually eligible for this antisense-mediated knockdown strategy.

  11. PNA-based artificial nucleases as antisense and anti-miRNA oligonucleotide agents.

    PubMed

    Gaglione, M; Milano, G; Chambery, A; Moggio, L; Romanelli, A; Messere, A

    2011-08-01

    Because of its interesting chemical, physical and biological properties, Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) has attracted major attention in molecular biology, for diagnostics purposes and development of biosensors. PNAs have become candidates for gene therapeutic drugs in ANTISENSE (AO) strategy with favorable in vivo biochemical properties. Recently, antisense PNA oligonucleotides have been described in anti-miRNA approach (AMO). We propose PNA-based nucleases as AO and AMO agents. We report the design, synthesis and characterization of two kinds of artificial nucleases composed of a PEG-PNA-PEG domain conjugated to HGG·Cu (A) and DETA (B) as well known cleavage sites. Qualitative (MALDI-TOF) and quantitative (HTS) assays were planned to study nuclease activity of constructs A and B on RNA-3'-FAM target sequence. The results have highlighted the best performance of nuclease B and the relevance of the PEG spacer, in particular for conjugate A, in terms of efficiency of the cleavage, suggesting that conjugates A and B also act as potential antisense and anti-miRNA agents.

  12. Arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides facilitate delivery of antisense oligomers into murine leukocytes and alter pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Marshall, N B; Oda, S K; London, C A; Moulton, H M; Iversen, P L; Kerkvliet, N I; Mourich, D V

    2007-08-31

    Phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMO) are synthetic antisense molecules that interfere with translation, pre-mRNA splicing and RNA synthesis. Like other gene-silencing technologies, PMO are poorly taken up by primary leukocytes without the use of physical or chemical delivery techniques. We sought an alternative delivery mechanism of PMO into immune cells that eliminates the need for such manipulations. Here we demonstrate the first use of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) to deliver PMO (P-PMO) directly into primary murine leukocytes for inhibition of gene expression and promotion of altered pre-mRNA splicing. We compared the P-PMO delivery efficacy of four arginine-rich CPPs including HIV Tat and penetratin, and one histidine rich CPP, and found that the (RXR)(4) peptide was the most efficacious for PMO delivery and targeted antisense effect. The delivery and antisense effects of P-PMO are time- and dose-dependent and influenced by the activation and maturation states of T cells and dendritic cells, respectively. Targeted expression of several genes using P-PMO is shown including surface signaling proteins (CD45 and OX-40), a cytokine (interleukin-2), and a nuclear transcription factor (Foxp3). Considering the abundance of naturally occurring alternatively spliced gene products involved in immune regulation, P-PMO offer an effective method for modulating gene activity for immunological research and applications beyond traditional antisense approaches.

  13. Identification of sense and antisense transcripts regulated by drought in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Lembke, Carolina Gimiliani; Nishiyama, Milton Yutaka; Sato, Paloma Mieko; de Andrade, Rodrigo Fandiño; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2012-07-01

    Sugarcane is an important sugar and energy crop that can be used efficiently for biofuels production. The development of sugarcane cultivars tolerant to drought could allow for the expansion of plantations to sub-prime regions. Knowledge on the mechanisms underlying drought responses and its relationship with carbon partition would greatly help to define routes to increase yield. In this work we studied sugarcane responses to drought using a custom designed oligonucleotide array with 21,901 different probes. The oligoarrays were designed to contain probes that detect transcription in both sense and antisense orientation. We validated the results obtained using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). A total of 987 genes were differentially expressed in at least one sample of sugarcane plants submitted to drought for 24, 72 and 120 h. Among them, 928 were sense transcripts and 59 were antisense transcripts. Genes related to Carbohydrate Metabolism, RNA Metabolism and Signal Transduction were selected for gene expression validation by qPCR that indicated a validation percentage of 90%. From the probes presented on the array, 75% of the sense probes and 11.9% of the antisense probes have signal above background and can be classified as expressed sequences. Our custom sugarcane oligonucleotide array provides sensitivity and good coverage of sugarcane transcripts for the identification of a representative proportion of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) and sense-antisense transcript pairs (SATs). The antisense transcriptome showed, in most cases, co-expression with respective sense transcripts.

  14. Antiproliferative effects of antisense oligonucleotides directed to the RNA of c-myc oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Degols, G; Leonetti, J P; Mechti, N; Lebleu, B

    1991-01-01

    Several groups have reported the use of antisense oligonucleotides to inhibit c-myc gene expression and study its biological role. However high concentrations of free oligonucleotides were generally needed. To lower their concentration and stabilize the antisense effect against c-myc, oligonucleotides were covalently linked to poly(L-lysine) and administered in ternary complexes formed with heparin (100 micrograms/ml). A sequence specific growth inhibition was observed at concentrations lower than 1 microM, while oligonucleotide-poly(L-lysine) conjugates alone were inefficient. Similar results occurred with other polyanionic compounds. Inhibition of proliferation was correlated to a reduction of c-myc protein and to a transient decrease in c-myc mRNA level. However, implication of RNase H in this process could not be demonstrated. Images PMID:1708128

  15. Antisense Oligonucleotides: Rising Stars in Eliminating RNA Toxicity in Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a dominantly inherited, multisystemic disease caused by expanded CTG (type 1, DM1) or CCTG (type 2, DM2) repeats in untranslated regions of the mutated genes. Pathogenesis results from expression of RNAs from the mutated alleles that are toxic because of the expanded CUG or CCUG repeats. Increased understanding of the repeat-containing RNA (C/CUGexp RNA)-induced toxicity has led to the development of multiple strategies targeting the toxic RNA. Among these approaches, antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have demonstrated high potency in reversing the RNA toxicity in both cultured DM1 cells and DM1 animal models, thus offering great promise for the potential treatment of DM1. ASO targeting approaches will also provide avenues for the treatment of other repeat RNA-mediated diseases. PMID:23252746

  16. Expression of the Antisense-to-Latency Transcript Long Noncoding RNA in Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Schifano, Jason M; Corcoran, Kathleen; Kelkar, Hemant; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2017-02-15

    The regulation of latency is central to herpesvirus biology. Recent transcriptome-wide surveys have uncovered evidence for promiscuous transcription across the entirety of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome and postulated the existence of multiple viral long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). Next-generation sequencing studies are highly dependent on the specific experimental approach and particular algorithms of analysis and therefore benefit from independent confirmation of the results. The antisense-to-latency transcript (ALT) lncRNA was discovered by genome-tiling microarray (Chandriani et al., J Virol 86:7934-7942, 2010, https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00645-10). To characterize ALT in detail, we physically isolated this lncRNA by a strand-specific hybrid capture assay and then employed transcriptome sequencing and novel reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assays to distinguish all RNA species in the KSHV latency region. These methods confirm that ALT initiates at positions 120739/121012 and encodes a single splice site, which is shared with the 3'-coterminal K14-vGPCR/ORF74 mRNA, terminating at 130873 (GenBank accession number GQ994935), resulting in an ∼10,000-nucleotide transcript. No shorter ALT isoforms were identified. This study also identified a novel intron within the LANA 5' untranslated region using a splice acceptor at 127888. In summary, ALT joins PAN/nut1/T1.1 as a bona fide lncRNA of KSHV with potentially important roles in viral gene regulation and pathogenesis. Increasing data support the importance of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs (miRNAs) and lncRNAs, which have been shown to exert critical regulatory functions without coding for recognizable proteins. Defining the sequences of these ncRNAs is essential for future studies aiming to functionally characterize a specific ncRNA. Most lncRNA studies are highly dependent on high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatic analyses, few studies follow up on the initial

  17. Widespread anti-sense transcription in apple is correlated with siRNA production and indicates a large potential for transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Celton, Jean-Marc; Gaillard, Sylvain; Bruneau, Maryline; Pelletier, Sandra; Aubourg, Sébastien; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Navarro, Lionel; Laurens, François; Renou, Jean-Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Characterizing the transcriptome of eukaryotic organisms is essential for studying gene regulation and its impact on phenotype. The realization that anti-sense (AS) and noncoding RNA transcription is pervasive in many genomes has emphasized our limited understanding of gene transcription and post-transcriptional regulation. Numerous mechanisms including convergent transcription, anti-correlated expression of sense and AS transcripts, and RNAi remain ill-defined. Here, we have combined microarray analysis and high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs (sRNAs) to unravel the complexity of transcriptional and potential post-transcriptional regulation in eight organs of apple (Malus × domestica). The percentage of AS transcript expression is higher than that identified in annual plants such as rice and Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, we show that a majority of AS transcripts are transcribed beyond 3'UTR regions, and may cover a significant portion of the predicted sense transcripts. Finally we demonstrate at a genome-wide scale that anti-sense transcript expression is correlated with the presence of both short (21-23 nt) and long (> 30 nt) siRNAs, and that the sRNA coverage depth varies with the level of AS transcript expression. Our study provides a new insight on the functional role of anti-sense transcripts at the genome-wide level, and a new basis for the understanding of sRNA biogenesis in plants.

  18. Antisense-Mediated RNA Targeting: Versatile and Expedient Genetic Manipulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zalachoras, Ioannis; Evers, Melvin M.; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M. C.; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke M.; Meijer, Onno C.

    2011-01-01

    A limiting factor in brain research still is the difficulty to evaluate in vivo the role of the increasing number of proteins implicated in neuronal processes. We discuss here the potential of antisense-mediated RNA targeting approaches. We mainly focus on those that manipulate splicing (exon skipping and exon inclusion), but will also briefly discuss mRNA targeting. Classic knockdown of expression by mRNA targeting is only one possible application of antisense oligonucleotides (AON) in the control of gene function. Exon skipping and inclusion are based on the interference of AONs with splicing of pre-mRNAs. These are powerful, specific and particularly versatile techniques, which can be used to circumvent pathogenic mutations, shift splice variant expression, knock down proteins, or to create molecular models using in-frame deletions. Pre-mRNA targeting is currently used both as a research tool, e.g., in models for motor neuron disease, and in clinical trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. AONs are particularly promising in relation to brain research, as the modified AONs are taken up extremely fast in neurons and glial cells with a long residence, and without the need for viral vectors or other delivery tools, once inside the blood brain barrier. In this review we cover (1). The principles of antisense-mediated techniques, chemistry, and efficacy. (2) The pros and cons of AON approaches in the brain compared to other techniques of interfering with gene function, such as transgenesis and short hairpin RNAs, in terms of specificity of the manipulation, spatial, and temporal control over gene expression, toxicity, and delivery issues. (3) The potential applications for Neuroscience. We conclude that there is good evidence from animal studies that the central nervous system can be successfully targeted, but the potential of the diverse AON-based approaches appears to be under-recognized. PMID:21811437

  19. Incorporation of the catalytic domain of a hammerhead ribozyme into antisense RNA enhances its inhibitory effect on the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Homann, M; Tzortzakaki, S; Rittner, K; Sczakiel, G; Tabler, M

    1993-01-01

    The catalytic domain of a hammerhead ribozyme was incorporated into a 413 nucleotides long antisense RNA directed against the 5'-leader/gag region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (pos. +222 to +634). The resulting catalytic antisense RNA was shown to cleave its target RNA in vitro specifically at physiological ion strength and temperature. We compared the antiviral effectiveness of this catalytic antisense RNA with that of the corresponding unmodified antisense RNA and with a mutated catalytic antisense RNA, which did not cleave the substrate RNA in vitro. Each of these RNAs was co-transfected into human SW480 cells together with infectious complete proviral HIV-1 DNA, followed by analysis of HIV-1 replication. The presence of the catalytically active domain resulted in 4 to 7 fold stronger inhibition of HIV-1 replication as compared to the parental antisense RNA and the inactive mutant. Kinetic and structural studies performed in vitro indicated that the ability for double strand formation was not changed in catalytic antisense RNA versus parental antisense RNA. Together, these data suggest that the ability to cleave target RNA is a crucial prerequisite for the observed increase of inhibition of the replication of HIV-1. Images PMID:8332489

  20. Analysis of the Mechanism of Action of the Antisense RNA That Controls the Replication of the repABC Plasmid p42d ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes-Rivera, Ramón; Romero-López, Cristina; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo; Cevallos, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    Replication and segregation of the Rhizobium etli symbiotic plasmid (pRetCFN42d) depend on the presence of a repABC operon, which carries all the plasmid-encoded elements required for these functions. All repABC operons share three protein-encoding genes (repA, repB, and repC), an antisense RNA (ctRNA) coding gene, and at least one centromere-like region (parS). The products of repA and repB, in conjunction with the parS region, make up the segregation system, and they negatively regulate operon transcription. The last gene of the operon, repC, encodes the initiator protein. The ctRNA is a negative posttranscriptional regulator of repC. In this work, we analyzed the secondary structures of the ctRNA and its target and mapped the motifs involved in the complex formed between them. Essential residues for the effective interaction localize at the unpaired 5′ end of the antisense molecule and the loop of the target mRNA. In light of our results, we propose a model explaining the mechanism of action of this ctRNA in the regulation of plasmid replication in R. etli. PMID:20435728

  1. Characterization of a Novel Antisense RNA in the Major Pilin Locus of Neisseria meningitidis Influencing Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Felicia Y. Y.; Wörmann, Mirka E.; Tang, Christoph M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Expression of type four pili (Tfp) is essential for virulence in Neisseria meningitidis. Pili mediate adhesion, bacterial aggregation, and DNA uptake. In N. meningitidis, the major pilin subunit is encoded by the pilE gene. In some strains, PilE is subject to phase and antigenic variation, which can alter Tfp properties and together offer a possible mechanism of immune escape. Pilin expression and antigenic variation can be modulated in response to environmental cues; however, the precise mechanisms of such regulation remain unclear. We identified a promoter in the pilE locus, 3′ of the pilE coding sequence, on the antisense (AS) strand which is conserved in meningococci. We show that this promoter directs transcription of an AS RNA that is expressed during specific growth phases and in response to salt stress. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the transcript encompasses sequences complementary to the entire pilE coding sequence and 5′ untranslated region. AS RNAs can regulate the gene on the sense strand by altering transcript stability or translation. However, by using Northern blotting, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and Western blotting, we found no significant AS RNA-dependent changes in pilE transcript or protein level. Instead, our data indicate that the AS RNA influences pilin antigenic variation. This work provides further insights into the complex regulation of pilin expression and variation in pathogenic Neisseria. IMPORTANCE Pathogenic Neisseria spp. express type four pili (Tfp) which are important for adhesion, aggregation and transformation. Some strains of N. meningitidis are able to vary the sequence of the major subunit (PilE) of the Tfp. The mechanisms underlying this variation are not fully defined, but the process requires several noncoding elements that are found adjacent to the pilE gene. In this work, we identified a cis-encoded RNA antisense to pilE in N. meningitidis. By using Northern blotting and RT

  2. Targeting Long Noncoding RNA with Antisense Oligonucleotide Technology as Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tianyuan; Kim, Youngsoo; MacLeod, A Robert

    2016-01-01

    Recent annotation of the human transcriptome revealed that only 2 % of the genome encodes proteins while the majority of human genome is transcribed into noncoding RNAs. Although we are just beginning to understand the diverse roles long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play in molecular and cellular processes, they have potentially important roles in human development and pathophysiology. However, targeting of RNA by traditional structure-based design of small molecule inhibitors has been difficult, due to a lack of understanding of the dynamic tertiary structures most RNA molecules adopt. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are capable of targeting specific genes or transcripts directly through Watson-Crick base pairing and thus can be designed based on sequence information alone. These agents have made possible specific targeting of "non-druggable targets" including RNA molecules. Here we describe how ASOs can be applied in preclinical studies to reduce levels of lncRNAs of interest.

  3. miR-122 regulation of lipid metabolism revealed by in vivo antisense targeting.

    PubMed

    Esau, Christine; Davis, Scott; Murray, Susan F; Yu, Xing Xian; Pandey, Sanjay K; Pear, Michael; Watts, Lynnetta; Booten, Sheri L; Graham, Mark; McKay, Robert; Subramaniam, Amuthakannan; Propp, Stephanie; Lollo, Bridget A; Freier, Susan; Bennett, C Frank; Bhanot, Sanjay; Monia, Brett P

    2006-02-01

    Current understanding of microRNA (miRNA) biology is limited, and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) inhibition of miRNAs is a powerful technique for their functionalization. To uncover the role of the liver-specific miR-122 in the adult liver, we inhibited it in mice with a 2'-O-methoxyethyl phosphorothioate ASO. miR-122 inhibition in normal mice resulted in reduced plasma cholesterol levels, increased hepatic fatty-acid oxidation, and a decrease in hepatic fatty-acid and cholesterol synthesis rates. Activation of the central metabolic sensor AMPK was also increased. miR-122 inhibition in a diet-induced obesity mouse model resulted in decreased plasma cholesterol levels and a significant improvement in liver steatosis, accompanied by reductions in several lipogenic genes. These results implicate miR-122 as a key regulator of cholesterol and fatty-acid metabolism in the adult liver and suggest that miR-122 may be an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic disease.

  4. The Cellular Processing Capacity Limits the Amounts of Chimeric U7 snRNA Available for Antisense Delivery.

    PubMed

    Eckenfelder, Agathe; Tordo, Julie; Babbs, Arran; Davies, Kay E; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Danos, Olivier

    2012-06-26

    Many genetic diseases are induced by mutations disturbing the maturation of pre-mRNAs, often affecting splicing. Antisense oligoribonucleotides (AONs) have been used to modulate splicing thereby circumventing the deleterious effects of mutations. Stable delivery of antisense sequences is achieved by linking them to small nuclear RNA (snRNAs) delivered by viral vectors, as illustrated by studies where therapeutic exon skipping was obtained in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Yet, clinical translation of these approaches is limited by the amounts of vector to be administered. In this respect, maximizing the amount of snRNA antisense shuttle delivered by the vector is essential. Here, we have used a muscle- and heart-specific enhancer (MHCK) to drive the expression of U7 snRNA shuttles carrying antisense sequences against the human or murine DMD pre-mRNAs. Although antisense delivery and subsequent exon skipping were improved both in tissue culture and in vivo, we observed the formation of additional U7 snRNA by-products following gene transfer. These included aberrantly 3' processed as well as unprocessed species that may arise because of the saturation of the cellular processing capacity. Future efforts to increase the amounts of functional U7 shuttles delivered into a cell will have to take this limitation into account.

  5. The Cellular Processing Capacity Limits the Amounts of Chimeric U7 snRNA Available for Antisense Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Eckenfelder, Agathe; Tordo, Julie; Babbs, Arran; Davies, Kay E; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Danos, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Many genetic diseases are induced by mutations disturbing the maturation of pre-mRNAs, often affecting splicing. Antisense oligoribonucleotides (AONs) have been used to modulate splicing thereby circumventing the deleterious effects of mutations. Stable delivery of antisense sequences is achieved by linking them to small nuclear RNA (snRNAs) delivered by viral vectors, as illustrated by studies where therapeutic exon skipping was obtained in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Yet, clinical translation of these approaches is limited by the amounts of vector to be administered. In this respect, maximizing the amount of snRNA antisense shuttle delivered by the vector is essential. Here, we have used a muscle- and heart-specific enhancer (MHCK) to drive the expression of U7 snRNA shuttles carrying antisense sequences against the human or murine DMD pre-mRNAs. Although antisense delivery and subsequent exon skipping were improved both in tissue culture and in vivo, we observed the formation of additional U7 snRNA by-products following gene transfer. These included aberrantly 3′ processed as well as unprocessed species that may arise because of the saturation of the cellular processing capacity. Future efforts to increase the amounts of functional U7 shuttles delivered into a cell will have to take this limitation into account. PMID:23344083

  6. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis Reveals Novel Insights into Mechanisms of Action of Long Noncoding RNA Hox Transcript Antisense Intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) in HeLa Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Peng; Xiong, Qian; Wu, Ying; Chen, Ying; Chen, Zhuo; Fleming, Joy; Gao, Ding; Bi, Lijun; Ge, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which have emerged in recent years as a new and crucial layer of gene regulators, regulate various biological processes such as carcinogenesis and metastasis. HOTAIR (Hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA), a lncRNA overexpressed in most human cancers, has been shown to be an oncogenic lncRNA. Here, we explored the role of HOTAIR in HeLa cells and searched for proteins regulated by HOTAIR. To understand the mechanism of action of HOTAIR from a systems perspective, we employed a quantitative proteomic strategy to systematically identify potential targets of HOTAIR. The expression of 170 proteins was significantly dys-regulated after inhibition of HOTAIR, implying that they could be potential targets of HOTAIR. Analysis of this data at the systems level revealed major changes in proteins involved in diverse cellular components, including the cytoskeleton and the respiratory chain. Further functional studies on vimentin (VIM), a key protein involved in the cytoskeleton, revealed that HOTAIR exerts its effects on migration and invasion of HeLa cells, at least in part, through the regulation of VIM expression. Inhibition of HOTAIR leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and ultrastructural alterations, suggesting a novel role of HOTAIR in maintaining mitochondrial function in cancer cells. Our results provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the function of HOTAIR in cancer cells. We expect that the methods used in this study will become an integral part of functional studies of lncRNAs. PMID:25762744

  7. Versatile RNA-sensing transcriptional regulators for engineering genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Lucks, Julius B; Qi, Lei; Mutalik, Vivek K; Wang, Denise; Arkin, Adam P

    2011-05-24

    The widespread natural ability of RNA to sense small molecules and regulate genes has become an important tool for synthetic biology in applications as diverse as environmental sensing and metabolic engineering. Previous work in RNA synthetic biology has engineered RNA mechanisms that independently regulate multiple targets and integrate regulatory signals. However, intracellular regulatory networks built with these systems have required proteins to propagate regulatory signals. In this work, we remove this requirement and expand the RNA synthetic biology toolkit by engineering three unique features of the plasmid pT181 antisense-RNA-mediated transcription attenuation mechanism. First, because the antisense RNA mechanism relies on RNA-RNA interactions, we show how the specificity of the natural system can be engineered to create variants that independently regulate multiple targets in the same cell. Second, because the pT181 mechanism controls transcription, we show how independently acting variants can be configured in tandem to integrate regulatory signals and perform genetic logic. Finally, because both the input and output of the attenuator is RNA, we show how these variants can be configured to directly propagate RNA regulatory signals by constructing an RNA-meditated transcriptional cascade. The combination of these three features within a single RNA-based regulatory mechanism has the potential to simplify the design and construction of genetic networks by directly propagating signals as RNA molecules.

  8. Versatile RNA-sensing transcriptional regulators for engineering genetic networks

    PubMed Central

    Lucks, Julius B.; Qi, Lei; Mutalik, Vivek K.; Wang, Denise; Arkin, Adam P.

    2011-01-01

    The widespread natural ability of RNA to sense small molecules and regulate genes has become an important tool for synthetic biology in applications as diverse as environmental sensing and metabolic engineering. Previous work in RNA synthetic biology has engineered RNA mechanisms that independently regulate multiple targets and integrate regulatory signals. However, intracellular regulatory networks built with these systems have required proteins to propagate regulatory signals. In this work, we remove this requirement and expand the RNA synthetic biology toolkit by engineering three unique features of the plasmid pT181 antisense-RNA-mediated transcription attenuation mechanism. First, because the antisense RNA mechanism relies on RNA-RNA interactions, we show how the specificity of the natural system can be engineered to create variants that independently regulate multiple targets in the same cell. Second, because the pT181 mechanism controls transcription, we show how independently acting variants can be configured in tandem to integrate regulatory signals and perform genetic logic. Finally, because both the input and output of the attenuator is RNA, we show how these variants can be configured to directly propagate RNA regulatory signals by constructing an RNA-meditated transcriptional cascade. The combination of these three features within a single RNA-based regulatory mechanism has the potential to simplify the design and construction of genetic networks by directly propagating signals as RNA molecules. PMID:21555549

  9. Overaccumulation of the chloroplast antisense RNA AS5 is correlated with decreased abundance of 5S rRNA in vivo and inefficient 5S rRNA maturation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sharwood, Robert E; Hotto, Amber M; Bollenbach, Thomas J; Stern, David B

    2011-02-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation in the chloroplast is exerted by nucleus-encoded ribonucleases and RNA-binding proteins. One of these ribonucleases is RNR1, a 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease of the RNase II family. We have previously shown that Arabidopsis rnr1-null mutants exhibit specific abnormalities in the expression of the rRNA operon, including the accumulation of precursor 23S, 16S, and 4.5S species and a concomitant decrease in the mature species. 5S rRNA transcripts, however, accumulate to a very low level in both precursor and mature forms, suggesting that they are unstable in the rnr1 background. Here we demonstrate that rnr1 plants overaccumulate an antisense RNA, AS5, that is complementary to the 5S rRNA, its intergenic spacer, and the downstream trnR gene, which encodes tRNA(Arg), raising the possibility that AS5 destabilizes 5S rRNA or its precursor and/or blocks rRNA maturation. To investigate this, we used an in vitro system that supports 5S rRNA and trnR processing. We show that AS5 inhibits 5S rRNA maturation from a 5S-trnR precursor, and shorter versions of AS5 demonstrate that inhibition requires intergenic sequences. To test whether the sense and antisense RNAs form double-stranded regions in vitro, treatment with the single-strand-specific mung bean nuclease was used. These results suggest that 5S-AS5 duplexes interfere with a sense-strand secondary structure near the endonucleolytic cleavage site downstream from the 5S rRNA coding region. We hypothesize that these duplexes are degraded by a dsRNA-specific ribonuclease in vivo, contributing to the 5S rRNA deficiency observed in rnr1.

  10. Antisense Oligonucleotides Reduce RNA Foci in Spinocerebellar Ataxia 36 Patient iPSCs.

    PubMed

    Matsuzono, Kosuke; Imamura, Keiko; Murakami, Nagahisa; Tsukita, Kayoko; Yamamoto, Takuya; Izumi, Yuishin; Kaji, Ryuji; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Toru; Abe, Koji; Inoue, Haruhisa

    2017-09-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 36 is a late-onset, slowly progressive cerebellar syndrome with motor neuron degeneration that is caused by expansions of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGCCTG) in the noncoding region of NOP56 gene, with a histopathological feature of RNA foci formation in postmortem tissues. Here, we report a cellular model using the spinocerebellar ataxia type 36 patient induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We generated iPSCs from spinocerebellar ataxia type 36 patients and differentiated them into neurons. The number of RNA-foci-positive cells was increased in patient iPSCs and iPSC-derived neurons. Treatment of the 2'-O, 4'-C-ethylene-bridged nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting NOP56 pre-mRNA reduced RNA-foci-positive cells to ∼50% in patient iPSCs and iPSC-derived neurons. NOP56 mRNA expression levels were lower in patient iPSCs and iPSC-derived neurons than in healthy control neurons. One of the ASOs reduced the number of RNA-foci-positive cells without altering NOP56 mRNA expression levels in patient iPSCs and iPSC-derived neurons. These data show that iPSCs from spinocerebellar ataxia type 36 patients can be useful for evaluating the effects of ASOs toward GGCCTG repeat expansion in spinocerebellar ataxia type 36. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The antiphasic regulatory module comprising CDF5 and its antisense RNA FLORE links the circadian clock to photoperiodic flowering.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Rossana; Wang, Huan; Liu, Jun; Boix, Marc; Huang, Li-Fang; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2017-07-31

    Circadian rhythms of gene expression are generated by the combinatorial action of transcriptional and translational feedback loops as well as chromatin remodelling events. Recently, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) that are natural antisense transcripts (NATs) to transcripts encoding central oscillator components were proposed as modulators of core clock function in mammals (Per) and fungi (frq/qrf). Although oscillating lncRNAs exist in plants, their functional characterization is at an initial stage. By screening an Arabidopsis thaliana lncRNA custom-made array we identified CDF5 LONG NONCODING RNA (FLORE), a circadian-regulated lncRNA that is a NAT of CDF5. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR confirmed the circadian regulation of FLORE, whereas GUS-staining and flowering time evaluation were used to determine its biological function. FLORE and CDF5 antiphasic expression reflects mutual inhibition in a similar way to frq/qrf. Moreover, whereas the CDF5 protein delays flowering by directly repressing FT transcription, FLORE promotes it by repressing several CDFs (CDF1, CDF3, CDF5) and increasing FT transcript levels, indicating both cis and trans function. We propose that the CDF5/FLORE NAT pair constitutes an additional circadian regulatory module with conserved (mutual inhibition) and unique (function in trans) features, able to fine-tune its own circadian oscillation, and consequently, adjust the onset of flowering to favourable environmental conditions. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Overaccumulation of the chloroplast antisense RNA AS5 is correlated with decreased abundance of 5S rRNA in vivo and inefficient 5S rRNA maturation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sharwood, Robert E.; Hotto, Amber M.; Bollenbach, Thomas J.; Stern, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation in the chloroplast is exerted by nucleus-encoded ribonucleases and RNA-binding proteins. One of these ribonucleases is RNR1, a 3′-to-5′ exoribonuclease of the RNase II family. We have previously shown that Arabidopsis rnr1-null mutants exhibit specific abnormalities in the expression of the rRNA operon, including the accumulation of precursor 23S, 16S, and 4.5S species and a concomitant decrease in the mature species. 5S rRNA transcripts, however, accumulate to a very low level in both precursor and mature forms, suggesting that they are unstable in the rnr1 background. Here we demonstrate that rnr1 plants overaccumulate an antisense RNA, AS5, that is complementary to the 5S rRNA, its intergenic spacer, and the downstream trnR gene, which encodes tRNAArg, raising the possibility that AS5 destabilizes 5S rRNA or its precursor and/or blocks rRNA maturation. To investigate this, we used an in vitro system that supports 5S rRNA and trnR processing. We show that AS5 inhibits 5S rRNA maturation from a 5S-trnR precursor, and shorter versions of AS5 demonstrate that inhibition requires intergenic sequences. To test whether the sense and antisense RNAs form double-stranded regions in vitro, treatment with the single-strand-specific mung bean nuclease was used. These results suggest that 5S–AS5 duplexes interfere with a sense-strand secondary structure near the endonucleolytic cleavage site downstream from the 5S rRNA coding region. We hypothesize that these duplexes are degraded by a dsRNA-specific ribonuclease in vivo, contributing to the 5S rRNA deficiency observed in rnr1. PMID:21148395

  13. RNA cleavage products generated by antisense oligonucleotides and siRNAs are processed by the RNA surveillance machinery

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Walt F.; De Hoyos, Cheryl L.; Liang, Xue-hai; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) elicit cleavage of the targeted RNA by the endoribonuclease RNase H1, whereas siRNAs mediate cleavage through the RNAi pathway. To determine the fates of the cleaved RNA in cells, we lowered the levels of the factors involved in RNA surveillance prior to treating cells with ASOs or siRNA and analyzed cleavage products by RACE. The cytoplasmic 5′ to 3′ exoribonuclease XRN1 was responsible for the degradation of the downstream cleavage products generated by ASOs or siRNA targeting mRNAs. In contrast, downstream cleavage products generated by ASOs targeting nuclear long non-coding RNA Malat 1 and pre-mRNA were degraded by nuclear XRN2. The downstream cleavage products did not appear to be degraded in the 3′ to 5′ direction as the majority of these products contained intact poly(A) tails and were bound by the poly(A) binding protein. The upstream cleavage products of Malat1 were degraded in the 3′ to 5′ direction by the exosome complex containing the nuclear exoribonuclease Dis3. The exosome complex containing Dis3 or cytoplasmic Dis3L1 degraded mRNA upstream cleavage products, which were not bound by the 5′-cap binding complex and, consequently, were susceptible to degradation in the 5′ to 3′ direction by the XRN exoribonucleases. PMID:26843429

  14. Antisense long noncoding RNAs regulate var gene activation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Amit-Avraham, Inbar; Pozner, Guy; Eshar, Shiri; Fastman, Yair; Kolevzon, Netanel; Yavin, Eylon; Dzikowski, Ron

    2015-03-03

    The virulence of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the deadliest form of human malaria, is attributed to its ability to evade human immunity through antigenic variation. These parasites alternate between expression of variable antigens, encoded by members of a multicopy gene family named var. Immune evasion through antigenic variation depends on tight regulation of var gene expression, ensuring that only a single var gene is expressed at a time while the rest of the family is maintained transcriptionally silent. Understanding how a single gene is chosen for activation is critical for understanding mutually exclusive expression but remains a mystery. Here, we show that antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) initiating from var introns are associated with the single active var gene at the time in the cell cycle when the single var upstream promoter is active. We demonstrate that these antisense transcripts are incorporated into chromatin, and that expression of these antisense lncRNAs in trans triggers activation of a silent var gene in a sequence- and dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, interference with these lncRNAs using complement peptide nucleic acid molecules down-regulated the active var gene, erased the epigenetic memory, and induced expression switching. Altogether, our data provide evidence that these antisense lncRNAs play a key role in regulating var gene activation and mutually exclusive expression.

  15. Making sense of antisense: seemingly noncoding RNAs antisense to the master regulator of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic replication do not regulate that transcript but serve as mRNAs encoding small peptides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiyang; Ganem, Don

    2010-06-01

    The mammalian transcriptome is studded with putative noncoding RNAs, many of which are antisense to known open reading frames (ORFs). Roles in the regulation of their complementary mRNAs are often imputed to these antisense transcripts, but few have been experimentally examined, and such functions remain largely conjectural. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes two transcripts that lack obvious ORFs and are complementary to the gene (RTA) encoding the master regulator of the latent/lytic switch. Here, we show that, contrary to expectation, these RNAs do not regulate RTA expression. Rather, they are found on polysomes, and genetic analysis indicates that translational initiation occurs at several AUG codons in the RNA, leading to the presumptive synthesis of peptides of 17 to 48 amino acids. These findings underscore the need for circumspection in the computational assessment of coding potential and raise the possibility that the mammalian proteome may contain many previously unsuspected peptides generated from seemingly noncoding RNAs, some of which could have important biological functions. Irrespective of their function, such peptides could also contribute substantially to the repertoire of T cell epitopes generated in both uninfected and infected cells.

  16. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense–antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis. PMID:23650872

  17. No rosetta stone for a sense-antisense origin of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase classes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tom A; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Fares, Mario A

    2009-02-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRS) are crucial enzymes that join amino acids to their cognate tRNAs, thereby implementing the genetic code. These enzymes fall into two unrelated structural classes whose evolution has not been explained. The leading hypothesis, proposed by Rodin and Ohno, is that the two classes originated as a pair of sense-antisense genes encoded on opposite strands of a single DNA molecule. This unusual idea obtained its main support from reports of a "Rosetta stone": a locus where genes for heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and an Nicotinamide adenine dinulecotide-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH), which are structurally homologous to the two classes of aaRS, overlap extensively on complementary DNA strands. This remarkable locus was first characterized in the oomycete Achlya klebsiana and has since been reported in many other species. Here we present evidence that the open reading frames on the antisense strand of HSP70 genes are spurious, and we identify a more probable candidate for the gene encoding the oomycete NAD-GDH enzyme. These results cast extensive doubt on the Rosetta Stone argument.

  18. Overexpression of a natural chloroplast-encoded antisense RNA in tobacco destabilizes 5S rRNA and retards plant growth

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The roles of non-coding RNAs in regulating gene expression have been extensively studied in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, however few reports exist as to their roles in organellar gene regulation. Evidence for accumulation of natural antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in chloroplasts comes from the expressed sequence tag database and cDNA libraries, while functional data have been largely obtained from artificial asRNAs. In this study, we used Nicotiana tabacum to investigate the effect on sense strand transcripts of overexpressing a natural chloroplast asRNA, AS5, which is complementary to the region which encodes the 5S rRNA and tRNAArg. Results AS5-overexpressing (AS5ox) plants obtained by chloroplast transformation exhibited slower growth and slightly pale green leaves. Analysis of AS5 transcripts revealed four distinct species in wild-type (WT) and AS5ox plants, and additional AS5ox-specific products. Of the corresponding sense strand transcripts, tRNAArg overaccumulated several-fold in transgenic plants whereas 5S rRNA was unaffected. However, run-on transcription showed that the 5S-trnR region was transcribed four-fold more in the AS5ox plants compared to WT, indicating that overexpression of AS5 was associated with decreased stability of 5S rRNA. In addition, polysome analysis of the transformants showed less 5S rRNA and rbcL mRNA associated with ribosomes. Conclusions Our results suggest that AS5 can modulate 5S rRNA levels, giving it the potential to affect Chloroplast translation and plant growth. More globally, overexpression of asRNAs via chloroplast transformation may be a useful strategy for defining their functions. PMID:20920268

  19. Overexpression of a natural chloroplast-encoded antisense RNA in tobacco destabilizes 5S rRNA and retards plant growth.

    PubMed

    Hotto, Amber M; Huston, Zoe E; Stern, David B

    2010-09-29

    The roles of non-coding RNAs in regulating gene expression have been extensively studied in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, however few reports exist as to their roles in organellar gene regulation. Evidence for accumulation of natural antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in chloroplasts comes from the expressed sequence tag database and cDNA libraries, while functional data have been largely obtained from artificial asRNAs. In this study, we used Nicotiana tabacum to investigate the effect on sense strand transcripts of overexpressing a natural chloroplast asRNA, AS5, which is complementary to the region which encodes the 5S rRNA and tRNAArg. AS5-overexpressing (AS5ox) plants obtained by chloroplast transformation exhibited slower growth and slightly pale green leaves. Analysis of AS5 transcripts revealed four distinct species in wild-type (WT) and AS5ox plants, and additional AS5ox-specific products. Of the corresponding sense strand transcripts, tRNAArg overaccumulated several-fold in transgenic plants whereas 5S rRNA was unaffected. However, run-on transcription showed that the 5S-trnR region was transcribed four-fold more in the AS5ox plants compared to WT, indicating that overexpression of AS5 was associated with decreased stability of 5S rRNA. In addition, polysome analysis of the transformants showed less 5S rRNA and rbcL mRNA associated with ribosomes. Our results suggest that AS5 can modulate 5S rRNA levels, giving it the potential to affect Chloroplast translation and plant growth. More globally, overexpression of asRNAs via chloroplast transformation may be a useful strategy for defining their functions.

  20. Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting Influenza A Segment 8 Genomic RNA Inhibit Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lenartowicz, Elzbieta; Nogales, Aitor; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Kierzek, Ryszard; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) affects 5%–10% of the world's population every year. Through genome changes, many IAV strains develop resistance to currently available anti-influenza therapeutics. Therefore, there is an urgent need to find new targets for therapeutics against this important human respiratory pathogen. In this study, 2′-O-methyl and locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) were designed to target internal regions of influenza A/California/04/2009 (H1N1) genomic viral RNA segment 8 (vRNA8) based on a base-pairing model of vRNA8. Ten of 14 tested ASOs showed inhibition of viral replication in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. The best five ASOs were 11–15 nucleotides long and showed inhibition ranging from 5- to 25-fold. In a cell viability assay they showed no cytotoxicity. The same five ASOs also showed no inhibition of influenza B/Brisbane/60/2008 (Victoria lineage), indicating that they are sequence specific for IAV. Moreover, combinations of ASOs slightly improved anti-influenza activity. These studies establish the accessibility of IAV vRNA for ASOs in regions other than the panhandle formed between the 5′ and 3′ ends. Thus, these regions can provide targets for the development of novel IAV antiviral approaches. PMID:27463680

  1. The Role of Structural Elements of the 5'-Terminal Region of p53 mRNA in Translation under Stress Conditions Assayed by the Antisense Oligonucleotide Approach.

    PubMed

    Swiatkowska, Agata; Zydowicz, Paulina; Gorska, Agnieszka; Suchacka, Julia; Dutkiewicz, Mariola; Ciesiołka, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    The p53 protein is one of the major factors responsible for cell cycle regulation and stress response. In the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA, an IRES element has been found which takes part in the translational regulation of p53 expression. Two characteristic hairpin motifs are present in this mRNA region: G56-C169, with the first AUG codon, and U180-A218, which interacts with the Hdm2 protein (human homolog of mouse double minute 2 protein). 2'-OMe modified antisense oligomers hybridizing to the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA were applied to assess the role of these structural elements in translation initiation under conditions of cellular stress. Structural changes in the RNA target occurring upon oligomers' binding were monitored by the Pb2+-induced cleavage method. The impact of antisense oligomers on the synthesis of two proteins, the full-length p53 and its isoform Δ40p53, was analysed in HT-29, MCF-7 and HepG2 cells, under normal conditions and under stress, as well as in vitro conditions. The results revealed that the hairpin U180-A218 and adjacent single-stranded region A219-A228 were predominantly responsible for high efficacy of IRES-mediated translation in the presence of stress factors. These motifs play a role of cis-acting elements which are able to modulate IRES activity, likely via interactions with protein factors.

  2. A modular strategy for engineering orthogonal chimeric RNA transcription regulators

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Melissa K.; Lucks, Julius B.

    2013-01-01

    Antisense RNA transcription attenuators are a key component of the synthetic biology toolbox, with their ability to serve as building blocks for both signal integration logic circuits and transcriptional cascades. However, a central challenge to building more sophisticated RNA genetic circuitry is creating larger families of orthogonal attenuators that function independently of each other. Here, we overcome this challenge by developing a modular strategy to create chimeric fusions between the engineered transcriptional attenuator from plasmid pT181 and natural antisense RNA translational regulators. Using in vivo gene expression assays in Escherichia coli, we demonstrate our ability to create chimeric attenuators by fusing sequences from five different translational regulators. Mutagenesis of these functional attenuators allowed us to create a total of 11 new chimeric attenutaors. A comprehensive orthogonality test of these culminated in a 7 × 7 matrix of mutually orthogonal regulators. A comparison between all chimeras tested led to design principles that will facilitate further engineering of orthogonal RNA transcription regulators, and may help elucidate general principles of non-coding RNA regulation. We anticipate that our strategy will accelerate the development of even larger families of orthogonal RNA transcription regulators, and thus create breakthroughs in our ability to construct increasingly sophisticated RNA genetic circuitry. PMID:23761434

  3. Regulation of Nav1.7: A Conserved SCN9A Natural Antisense Transcript Expressed in Dorsal Root Ganglia.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Jennifer; Werdehausen, Robert; Linley, John E; Habib, Abdella M; Vernon, Jeffrey; Lolignier, Stephane; Eijkelkamp, Niels; Zhao, Jing; Okorokov, Andrei L; Woods, C Geoffrey; Wood, John N; Cox, James J

    2015-01-01

    The Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channel, encoded by SCN9A, is critical for human pain perception yet the transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms that regulate this gene are still incompletely understood. Here, we describe a novel natural antisense transcript (NAT) for SCN9A that is conserved in humans and mice. The NAT has a similar tissue expression pattern to the sense gene and is alternatively spliced within dorsal root ganglia. The human and mouse NATs exist in cis with the sense gene in a tail-to-tail orientation and both share sequences that are complementary to the terminal exon of SCN9A/Scn9a. Overexpression analyses of the human NAT in human embryonic kidney (HEK293A) and human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell lines show that it can function to downregulate Nav1.7 mRNA, protein levels and currents. The NAT may play an important role in regulating human pain thresholds and is a potential candidate gene for individuals with chronic pain disorders that map to the SCN9A locus, such as Inherited Primary Erythromelalgia, Paroxysmal Extreme Pain Disorder and Painful Small Fibre Neuropathy, but who do not contain mutations in the sense gene. Our results strongly suggest the SCN9A NAT as a prime candidate for new therapies based upon augmentation of existing antisense RNAs in the treatment of chronic pain conditions in man.

  4. Antisense-based RNA therapy of factor V deficiency: in vitro and ex vivo rescue of a F5 deep-intronic splicing mutation.

    PubMed

    Nuzzo, Francesca; Radu, Claudia; Baralle, Marco; Spiezia, Luca; Hackeng, Tilman M; Simioni, Paolo; Castoldi, Elisabetta

    2013-11-28

    Antisense molecules are emerging as a powerful tool to correct splicing defects. Recently, we identified a homozygous deep-intronic mutation (F5 c.1296+268A>G) activating a cryptic donor splice site in a patient with severe coagulation factor V (FV) deficiency and life-threatening bleeding episodes. Here, we assessed the ability of 2 mutation-specific antisense molecules (a morpholino oligonucleotide [MO] and an engineered U7 small nuclear RNA [snRNA]) to correct this splicing defect. COS-1 and HepG2 cells transfected with a F5 minigene construct containing the patient's mutation expressed aberrant messenger RNA (mRNA) in excess of normal mRNA. Treatment with mutation-specific antisense MO (1-5 µM) or a construct expressing antisense U7snRNA (0.25-2 µg) dose-dependently increased the relative amount of correctly spliced mRNA by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude, whereas control MO and U7snRNA were ineffective. Patient-derived megakaryocytes obtained by differentiation of circulating progenitor cells did not express FV, but became positive for FV at immunofluorescence staining after administration of antisense MO or U7snRNA. However, treatment adversely affected cell viability, mainly because of the transfection reagents used to deliver the antisense molecules. Our data provide in vitro and ex vivo proof of principle for the efficacy of RNA therapy in severe FV deficiency, but additional cytotoxicity studies are warranted.

  5. Biodegradable polymer nanocarriers for therapeutic antisense microRNA delivery in living animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Sekar, Narayana M.; Sekar, Thillai V.

    2012-03-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous regulators of gene expression, deregulated in several cellular diseases including cancer. Altering the cellular microenvironment by modulating the microRNAs functions can regulate different genes involved in major cellular processes, and this approach is now being investigated as a promising new generation of molecularly targeted anti-cancer therapies. AntagomiRs (Antisense-miRNAs) are a novel class of chemically modified stable oligonucleotides used for blocking the functions of endogenous microRNAs, which are overexpressed. A key challenge in achieving effective microRNAbased therapeutics lies in the development of an efficient delivery system capable of specifically delivering antisense oligonucleotides and target cancer cells in living animals. We are now developing an effective delivery system designed to selectively deliver antagomiR- 21 and antagomiR-10b to triple negative breast cancer cells, and to revert tumor cell metastasis and invasiveness. The FDA-approved biodegradable PLGA-nanoparticles were selected as a carrier for antagomiRs delivery. Chemically modified antagomiRs (antagomiR-21 and antagomiR-10b) were co-encapsulated in PEGylated-PLGA-nanoparticles by using the double-emulsification (W/O/W) solvent evaporation method, and the resulting average particle size of 150-200nm was used for different in vitro and in vivo experiments. The antagomiR encapsulated PLGA-nanoparticles were evaluated for their in vitro antagomiRs delivery, intracellular release profile, and antagomiRs functional effects, by measuring the endogenous cellular targets, and the cell growth and metastasis. The xenografts of tumor cells in living mice were used for evaluating the anti-metastatic and anti-invasive properties of cells. The results showed that the use of PLGA for antagomiR delivery is not only efficient in crossing cell membrane, but can also maintain functional intracellular antagomiRs level for a extended period of time and achieve

  6. Regulation of apoptosis by fau revealed by functional expression cloning and antisense expression.

    PubMed

    Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Kirkham, Lucy; Farzaneh, Farzin; Williams, Gwyn T

    2004-12-16

    Functional expression cloning is a powerful strategy for identifying critical steps in biological pathways independently of prior assumptions. It is particularly suitable for the identification of molecules crucial to the control of apoptosis. Our screen for sequences suppressing T-cell apoptosis isolated a sequence antisense to fau (Finkel-Biskis-Reilly murine sarcoma virus (FBR-MuSV)-associated ubiquitously expressed gene). The fox gene in FBR murine osteosarcoma virus is also antisense to fau and several reports have indicated that fau displays tumour suppressor and oncogenic properties in different contexts. Our observations indicate that the fau antisense sequence suppresses expression of endogenous fau mRNA and produces resistance to apoptosis induced both by the glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone' by ultraviolet radiation, and by the anticancer drug cisplatin. In all cases, colony-forming ability is protected, indicating that fau affects the critical events prior to commitment to cell death. Overexpression of fau in the sense orientation induces cell death, which is inhibited both by Bcl-2 and by inhibition of caspases, in line with its proposed role in apoptosis.

  7. Reversal of the malignant phenotype of cervical cancer CaSki cells through adeno-associated virus-mediated delivery of HPV16 E7 antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sufang; Meng, Li; Wang, Shixuan; Wang, Wei; Xi, Ling; Tian, Xun; Chen, Gang; Wu, Ying; Zhou, Jianfeng; Xu, Gang; Lu, Yunping; Ma, Ding

    2006-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most important risk factor for the development of cervical cancer. The oncogene E7 from high-risk HPV strains has the ability to immortalize epithelial cells and increase cellular transformation in culture. In this study, we explored the possibility of preventing cervical cancer growth by inhibiting HPV16 E7 expression through gene transfer of an antisense construct. A recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector was chosen for the transfer, based on its transfection efficiency, in vivo stability, and lack of detectable pathology. In vitro transfer of an rAAV vector expressing antisense HPV16 E7 (AAV-HPV16E7AS) inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, reduced cell migration, and restrained in vivo proliferation of HPV16/HPV18-positive cervical cancer CaSki cells. These results indicate that down-regulation of HPV16 E7 with antisense RNA is beneficial in reducing the tumorigenicity of CaSki cells, and rAAV vectors ought to be a new efficient approach for delivering the expression of therapeutic genes.

  8. Antisense RNA Modulation of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase Levels in Helicobacter pylori Correlates with Organic Peroxide Toxicity but Not Infectivity▿

    PubMed Central

    Croxen, Matthew A.; Ernst, Peter B.; Hoffman, Paul S.

    2007-01-01

    Much of the gene content of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori (∼1.7-Mb genome) is considered essential. This view is based on the completeness of metabolic pathways, infrequency of nutritional auxotrophies, and paucity of pathway redundancies typically found in bacteria with larger genomes. Thus, genetic analysis of gene function is often hampered by lethality. In the absence of controllable promoters, often used to titrate gene function, we investigated the feasibility of an antisense RNA interference strategy. To test the antisense approach, we targeted alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC), one of the most abundant proteins expressed by H. pylori and one whose function is essential for both in vitro growth and gastric colonization. Here, we show that antisense ahpC (as-ahpC) RNA expression from shuttle vector pDH37::as-ahpC achieved an ∼72% knockdown of AhpC protein levels, which correlated with increased susceptibilities to hydrogen peroxide, cumene, and tert-butyl hydroperoxides but not with growth efficiency. Compensatory increases in catalase levels were not observed in the knockdowns. Expression of single-copy antisense constructs (expressed under the urease promoter and containing an fd phage terminator) from the rdxA locus of mouse-colonizing strain X47 achieved a 32% knockdown of AhpC protein levels (relative to wild-type X47 levels), which correlated with increased susceptibility to organic peroxides but not with mouse colonization efficiency. Our studies indicate that high levels of AhpC are not required for in vitro growth or for primary gastric colonization. Perhaps AhpC, like catalase, assumes a greater role in combating exogenous peroxides arising from lifelong chronic inflammation. These studies also demonstrate the utility of antisense RNA interference in the evaluation of gene function in H. pylori. PMID:17337572

  9. Antisense RNA modulation of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase levels in Helicobacter pylori correlates with organic peroxide toxicity but not infectivity.

    PubMed

    Croxen, Matthew A; Ernst, Peter B; Hoffman, Paul S

    2007-05-01

    Much of the gene content of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori ( approximately 1.7-Mb genome) is considered essential. This view is based on the completeness of metabolic pathways, infrequency of nutritional auxotrophies, and paucity of pathway redundancies typically found in bacteria with larger genomes. Thus, genetic analysis of gene function is often hampered by lethality. In the absence of controllable promoters, often used to titrate gene function, we investigated the feasibility of an antisense RNA interference strategy. To test the antisense approach, we targeted alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC), one of the most abundant proteins expressed by H. pylori and one whose function is essential for both in vitro growth and gastric colonization. Here, we show that antisense ahpC (as-ahpC) RNA expression from shuttle vector pDH37::as-ahpC achieved an approximately 72% knockdown of AhpC protein levels, which correlated with increased susceptibilities to hydrogen peroxide, cumene, and tert-butyl hydroperoxides but not with growth efficiency. Compensatory increases in catalase levels were not observed in the knockdowns. Expression of single-copy antisense constructs (expressed under the urease promoter and containing an fd phage terminator) from the rdxA locus of mouse-colonizing strain X47 achieved a 32% knockdown of AhpC protein levels (relative to wild-type X47 levels), which correlated with increased susceptibility to organic peroxides but not with mouse colonization efficiency. Our studies indicate that high levels of AhpC are not required for in vitro growth or for primary gastric colonization. Perhaps AhpC, like catalase, assumes a greater role in combating exogenous peroxides arising from lifelong chronic inflammation. These studies also demonstrate the utility of antisense RNA interference in the evaluation of gene function in H. pylori.

  10. Antisense regulation of expression and transactivation functions of the tumorigenic HBx and c-myc genes.

    PubMed

    Hung, Le; Kumar, Vijay

    2006-05-26

    Earlier we have shown that the X-myc transgenic mice develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) due to co-expression of c-Myc and HBx protein of hepatitis B virus [R. Lakhtakia, V. Kumar, H. Reddi, M. Mathur, S. Dattagupta, S.K. Panda, Hepatocellular carcinoma in a hepatitis B 'x' transgenic mouse model: a sequential pathological evaluation. J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. 18 (2003) 80-91]. With the aim to develop therapeutic strategies for HCC, we constructed several mono- and bicistronic antisense recombinants against HBx and c-myc genes to regulate their expression as well as transactivation function in a human hepatoma cell line. A dose-dependent inhibition in the expression levels of HBx and c-Myc was observed with monocistronic constructs. Likewise, the bicistronic recombinants also blocked the expression as well as transactivation functions of cognate genes with equal efficacy. Further, expression of the constituent genes from the X-myc transgene could also be inhibited by these antisense constructs in cell culture. Thus, our study points towards clinical implications of antisense regulation of tumor-promoting genes in the management of HCC.

  11. Small antisense oligonucleotides against G-quadruplexes: specific mRNA translational switches

    PubMed Central

    Rouleau, Samuel G.; Beaudoin, Jean-Denis; Bisaillon, Martin; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (G4) are intricate RNA structures found throughout the transcriptome. Because they are associated with a variety of biological cellular mechanisms, these fascinating structural motifs are seen as potential therapeutic targets against many diseases. While screening of chemical compounds specific to G4 motifs has yielded interesting results, no single compound successfully discriminates between G4 motifs based on nucleotide sequences alone. This level of specificity is best attained using antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). Indeed, oligonucleotide-based strategies are already used to modulate DNA G4 folding in vitro. Here, we report that, in human cells, the use of short ASO to promote and inhibit RNA G4 folding affects the translation of specific mRNAs, including one from the 5′UTR of the H2AFY gene, a histone variant associated with cellular differentiation and cancer. These results suggest that the relatively high specificity of ASO-based strategies holds significant potential for applications aimed at modulating G4-motif folding. PMID:25510493

  12. Transcription termination within the iron transport-biosynthesis operon of Vibrio anguillarum requires an antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Stork, Michiel; Di Lorenzo, Manuela; Welch, Timothy J; Crosa, Jorge H

    2007-05-01

    The iron transport-biosynthesis (ITB) operon in Vibrio anguillarum includes four genes for ferric siderophore transport, fatD, -C, -B, and -A, and two genes for siderophore biosynthesis, angR and angT. This cluster plays an important role in the virulence mechanisms of this bacterium. Despite being part of the same polycistronic mRNA, the relative levels of transcription for the fat portion and for the whole ITB message differ profoundly, the levels of the fat transcript being about 17-fold higher. Using S1 nuclease mapping, lacZ transcriptional fusions, and in vitro studies, we were able to show that the differential gene expression within the ITB operon is due to termination of transcription between the fatA and angR genes, although a few transcripts proceeded beyond the termination site to the end of this operon. This termination process requires a 427-nucleotide antisense RNA that spans the intergenic region and acts as a novel transcriptional terminator.

  13. Tetracycline-inducible shRNA targeting antisense long non-coding RNA HIF1A-AS2 represses the malignant phenotypes of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingwei; Zhuang, Chengle; Liu, Yuchen; Li, Jianfa; Dai, Fen; Xia, Ming; Zhan, Yonghao; Lin, Junhao; Chen, Zhicong; He, Anbang; Xu, Wen; Zhao, Guoping; Guo, Yinglu; Cai, Zhiming; Huang, Weiren

    2016-06-28

    Various studies have indicated that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play vital roles in the cancer development and progression. LncRNA hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha antisense RNA-2 (HIF1A-AS2) is upregulated in gastric carcinomas and knockdown of HIF1A-AS2 expression by siRNA could inhibit cell proliferation in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Inspired by these observations, we hypothesized that HIF1A-AS2 possibly plays the analogous roles in bladder cancer. In our study, we first reported that HIF1A-AS2 was up-regulated in bladder cancer tissues and cells, and HIF1A-AS2 expression level in bladder cancer tissues is positively associated with advanced clinical pathologic grade and TNM phase. Cell proliferation inhibition, cell migration suppression and apoptosis induction were observed by silencing HIF1A-AS2 in bladder cancer T24 and 5637 cells. Overexpression of HIF1A-AS2 in SV-HUC-1 cells could promote cell proliferation, cell migration and anti-apoptosis. Besides, we utilized the emerging technology of medical synthetic biology to design tetracycline-inducible small hairpin RNA (shRNA) vector which specifically silenced HIF1A-AS2 in a dosage-dependent manner to inhibit the progression of human bladder cancer. In conclusion, our data suggested that HIF1A-AS2 plays oncogenic roles and can be used as a therapeutic target for treating human bladder cancer. Synthetic "tetracycline-on" switch system that quantitatively controlled the expression of HIF1A-AS2 in bladder cancer can inhibit the progression of bladder cancer cells in a dosage-dependent manner. Our findings provide new insights into the role of the lncRNA HIF1A-AS2 in the bladder cancer.

  14. Effects of variations in length of hammerhead ribozyme antisense arms upon the cleavage of longer RNA substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Sioud, M

    1997-01-01

    The efficacy of intracellular binding of hammerhead ribozyme to its cleavage site in target RNA is a major requirement for its use as a therapeutic agent. Such efficacy can be influenced by several factors, such as the length of the ribozyme antisense arms and mRNA secondary structures. Analysis of various IL-2 hammerhead ribozymes having different antisense arms but directed to the same site predicts that the hammerhead ribozyme target site is present within a double-stranded region that is flanked by single-stranded loops. Extension of the low cleaving hammerhead ribozyme antisense arms by nucleotides that base pair with the single-stranded regions facilitated the hammerhead ribozyme binding to longer RNA substrates (e.g. mRNA). In addition, a correlation between the in vitro and intracellular results was also found. Thus, the present study would facilitate the design of hammerhead ribozymes directed against higher order structured sites. Further, it emphasises the importance of detailed structural investigations of hammerhead ribozyme full-length target RNAs. PMID:9016562

  15. Revealing natural antisense transcripts from Plasmodium vivax isolates: evidence of genome regulation in complicated malaria.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, P A; Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Garg, Shilpi; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Pakalapati, Deepak; Saxena, Vishal; Aiyaz, Mohammed; Chand, Bipin; Mugasimangalam, Raja C; Kochar, Sanjay K; Sirohi, Parmendra; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2013-12-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most geographically widespread human malaria parasite causing approximately 130-435 million infections annually. It is an economic burden in many parts of the world and poses a public health challenge along with the other Plasmodium sp. The biology of this parasite is less studied and poorly understood, in spite of these facts. Emerging evidence of severe complications due to infections by this parasite provides an impetus to focus research on the same. Investigating the parasite directly from infected patients is the best way to study its biology and pathogenic mechanisms. Gene expression studies of this parasite directly obtained from the patients has provided evidence of gene regulation resulting in varying amount of transcript levels in the different blood stages. The mechanisms regulating gene expression in malaria parasites are not well understood. Discovery of Natural Antisense Transcripts (NATs) in Plasmodium falciparum has suggested that these might play an important role in regulating gene expression. We report here the genome-wide occurrence of NATs in P. vivax parasites from patients with differing clinical symptoms. A total of 1348 NATs against annotated gene loci have been detected using a custom designed microarray with strand specific probes. Majority of NATs identified from this study shows positive correlation with the expression pattern of the sense (S) transcript. Our data also shows condition specific expression patterns of varying S and antisense (AS) transcript levels. Genes with AS transcripts enrich to various biological processes. To our knowledge this is the first report on the presence of NATs from P. vivax obtained from infected patients with different disease complications. The data suggests differential regulation of gene expression in diverse clinical conditions, as shown by differing sense/antisense ratios and would lead to future detailed investigations of gene regulation.

  16. Oligonucleotide Antiviral Therapeutics: Antisense and RNA Interference for Highly Pathogenic RNA Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    disrupt RNA virus gene expression as first demonstrated using Rous sarcoma virus and respira- ory syncytial virus, respectively (Stephenson and Zamecnik...specialized lipo - omes can be used to form a stable nucleic acid-lipid particle SNALP) (Geisbert et al., 2006). SNALP-encapsulated siRNAs gainst EBOV L...Dev. 4 (2), 67–69. tephenson, M.L., Zamecnik, P.C., 1978. Inhibition of Rous sarcoma viral RNA translation by a specific oligodeoxyribonucleotide

  17. Mechanisms of Antisense Transcription Initiation from the 3′ End of the GAL10 Coding Sequence In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Shivani; Durairaj, Geetha

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the important regulatory functions of antisense transcripts in gene expression, it remains unknown how antisense transcription is initiated. Recent studies implicated RNA polymerase II in initiation of antisense transcription. However, how RNA polymerase II is targeted to initiate antisense transcription has not been elucidated. Here, we have analyzed the association of RNA polymerase II with the antisense initiation site at the 3′ end of the GAL10 coding sequence in dextrose-containing growth medium that induces antisense transcription. We find that RNA polymerase II is targeted to the antisense initiation site at GAL10 by Reb1p activator as well as general transcription factors (e.g., TFIID, TFIIB, and Mediator) for antisense transcription initiation. Intriguingly, while GAL10 antisense transcription is dependent on TFIID, its sense transcription does not require TFIID. Further, the Gal4p activator that promotes GAL10 sense transcription is dispensable for antisense transcription. Moreover, the proteasome that facilitates GAL10 sense transcription does not control its antisense transcription. Taken together, our results reveal that GAL10 sense and antisense transcriptions are regulated differently and shed much light on the mechanisms of antisense transcription initiation. PMID:23836882

  18. Isolation and identification of cell-specific microRNAs targeting a messenger RNA using a biotinylated anti-sense oligonucleotide capture affinity technique

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Tidi; Smith, Stephen G. J.; Gaughan, Kevin; Oglesby, Irene K.; O’Neill, Shane; McElvaney, Noel G.; Greene, Catherine M.

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate expression by translational repression or messenger RNA (mRNA) degradation. Although numerous bioinformatic prediction models exist to identify miRNA–mRNA interactions, experimental validation of bona fide interactions can be difficult and laborious. Few methods can comprehensively identify miRNAs that target a single mRNA. We have developed an experimental approach to search for miRNAs targeting any mRNA using a capture affinity assay involving a biotinylated DNA anti-sense oligonucleotide. This method identifies miRNAs targeting the full length of the mRNA. The method was tested using three separate mRNA targets: alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) mRNA, interleukin-8 mRNA and secretory leucoprotease inhibitor mRNA. AAT mRNA-specific and total miRNAs from three different cell lines (monocytic THP-1, bronchial epithelial 16HBE14o− and liver HepG2 cells) were profiled, and validation studies revealed that AAT mRNA-specific miRNAs functionally target the AAT mRNA in a cell-specific manner, providing the first evidence of innate miRNAs selectively targeting and modulating AAT mRNA expression. Interleukin-8 and secretory leucoprotease inhibitor mRNAs and their cognate miRNAs were also successfully captured using this approach. This is a simple and an efficient method to potentially identify miRNAs targeting sequences within the full length of a given mRNA transcript. PMID:23325846

  19. The antisense RNA As1_flv4 in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 prevents premature expression of the flv4-2 operon upon shift in inorganic carbon supply.

    PubMed

    Eisenhut, Marion; Georg, Jens; Klähn, Stephan; Sakurai, Isamu; Mustila, Henna; Zhang, Pengpeng; Hess, Wolfgang R; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-09-28

    The functional relevance of natural cis-antisense transcripts is mostly unknown. Here we have characterized the association of three antisense RNAs and one intergenically encoded noncoding RNA with an operon that plays a crucial role in photoprotection of photosystem II under low carbon conditions in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Cyanobacteria show strong gene expression dynamics in response to a shift of cells from high carbon to low levels of inorganic carbon (C(i)), but the regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. Among the most up-regulated genes in Synechocystis are flv4, sll0218, and flv2, which are organized in the flv4-2 operon. The flavodiiron proteins encoded by this operon open up an alternative electron transfer route, likely starting from the Q(B) site in photosystem II, under photooxidative stress conditions. Our expression analysis of cells shifted from high carbon to low carbon demonstrated an inversely correlated transcript accumulation of the flv4-2 operon mRNA and one antisense RNA to flv4, designated as As1_flv4. Overexpression of As1_flv4 led to a decrease in flv4-2 mRNA. The promoter activity of as1_flv4 was transiently stimulated by C(i) limitation and negatively regulated by the AbrB-like transcription regulator Sll0822, whereas the flv4-2 operon was positively regulated by the transcription factor NdhR. The results indicate that the tightly regulated antisense RNA As1_flv4 establishes a transient threshold for flv4-2 expression in the early phase after a change in C(i) conditions. Thus, it prevents unfavorable synthesis of the proteins from the flv4-2 operon.

  20. Changes in Oleic Acid Content of Transgenic Soybeans by Antisense RNA Mediated Posttranscriptional Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Yang, Xiang-dong; Zhang, Yuan-yu; Yang, Jing; Qi, Guang-xun; Guo, Dong-quan; Xing, Guo-jie; Yao, Yao; Xu, Wen-jing; Li, Hai-yun; Li, Qi-yun; Dong, Ying-shan

    2014-01-01

    The Delta-12 oleate desaturase gene (FAD2-1), which converts oleic acid into linoleic acid, is the key enzyme determining the fatty acid composition of seed oil. In this study, we inhibited the expression of endogenous Delta-12 oleate desaturase GmFad2-1b gene by using antisense RNA in soybean Williams 82. By employing the soybean cotyledonary-node method, a part of the cDNA of soybean GmFad2-1b 801 bp was cloned for the construction of a pCAMBIA3300 vector under the soybean seed promoter BCSP. Leaf painting, LibertyLink strip, PCR, Southern blot, qRT-PCR, and fatty acid analysis were used to detect the insertion and expression of GmFad2-1b in the transgenic soybean lines. The results indicate that the metabolically engineered plants exhibited a significant increase in oleic acid (up to 51.71%) and a reduction in palmitic acid (to <3%) in their seed oil content. No structural differences were observed between the fatty acids of the transgenic and the nontransgenic oil extracts. PMID:25197629

  1. Gene Silencing by Gold Nanoshell-Mediated Delivery and Laser-Triggered Release of Antisense Oligonucleotide and siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Huschka, Ryan; Barhoumi, Aoune; Liu, Qing; Roth, Jack A.; Ji, Lin; Halas, Naomi J.

    2013-01-01

    The approach of RNA interference (RNAi)- using antisense DNA or RNA oligonucleotides to silence activity of a specific pathogenic gene transcript and reduce expression of the encoded protein- is very useful in dissecting genetic function and holds significant promise as a molecular therapeutic. A major obstacle in achieving gene silencing with RNAi technology is the systemic delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. Here we demonstrate an engineered gold nanoshell (NS)-based therapeutic oligonucleotide delivery vehicle, designed to release its cargo on demand upon illumination with a near-infrared (NIR) laser. A poly(L)lysine peptide (PLL) epilayer covalently attached to the NS surface (NS-PLL) is used to capture intact, single-stranded antisense DNA oligonucleotides, or alternatively, double-stranded short-interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules. Controlled release of the captured therapeutic oligonucleotides in each case is accomplished by continuous wave NIR laser irradiation at 800 nm, near the resonance wavelength of the nanoshell. Fluorescently tagged oligonucleotides were used to monitor the time-dependent release process and light-triggered endosomal release. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing human lung cancer H1299 cell line was used to determine cellular uptake and gene silencing mediated by the NS-PLL carrying GFP gene-specific single-stranded DNA antisense oligonucleotide (AON-GFP), or a double-stranded siRNA (siRNA-GFP), in vitro. Light-triggered delivery resulted in ∼ 47% and ∼49% downregulation of the targeted GFP expression by AON-GFP and siRNA-GFP, respectively. Cytotoxicity induced by both the NS-PLL delivery vector and by laser irradiation is minimal, as demonstrated by a XTT cell proliferation assay. PMID:22862291

  2. Evidence for a major role of antisense RNAs in cyanobacterial gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Georg, Jens; Voß, Björn; Scholz, Ingeborg; Mitschke, Jan; Wilde, Annegret; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2009-01-01

    Information on the numbers and functions of naturally occurring antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in eubacteria has thus far remained incomplete. Here, we screened the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for asRNAs using four different methods. In the final data set, the number of known noncoding RNAs rose from 6 earlier identified to 60 and of asRNAs from 1 to 73 (28 were verified using at least three methods). Among these, there are many asRNAs to housekeeping, regulatory or metabolic genes, as well as to genes encoding electron transport proteins. Transferring cultures to high light, carbon-limited conditions or darkness influenced the expression levels of several asRNAs, suggesting their functional relevance. Examples include the asRNA to rpl1, which accumulates in a light-dependent manner and may be required for processing the L11 r-operon and the SyR7 noncoding RNA, which is antisense to the murF 5′ UTR, possibly modulating murein biosynthesis. Extrapolated to the whole genome, ∼10% of all genes in Synechocystis are influenced by asRNAs. Thus, chromosomally encoded asRNAs may have an important function in eubacterial regulatory networks. PMID:19756044

  3. Inhibitory effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeting c-myc mRNA on smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed Central

    Biro, S; Fu, Y M; Yu, Z X; Epstein, S E

    1993-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and migration play pivotal roles in restenosis following angioplasty. c-myc is an immediate early response gene induced by various mitogens, and several lines of evidence derived from experiments using transformed or hematopoietic cell lines, or transgenic mice, suggest its protein product plays a role in numerous signaling transduction pathways, including those modulating cell division. We therefore reasoned that a strategy employing oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) complementary to c-myc mRNA (antisense ODNs) might be potent inhibitors of SMC proliferation and, perhaps, of SMC migration. To evaluate this concept, we tested several antisense ODNs targeted to c-myc mRNA (15- or 18-mer ODNs complementary to different c-myc mRNA sequences) by introducing them individually into the medium of cultured rat aortic SMCs. Phosphoroamidate-modified ODNs were employed to retard degradation. Antisense ODNs inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, SMC proliferation and SMC migration. Maximal inhibitory effect was 50% for proliferation and > 90% for migration. These effects were associated with decreased SMC expression of c-myc-encoded protein by Western immunoblotting and immunocytochemical staining. ODNs with the same nucleotides but a scrambled sequence caused no effect. These results indicate that the c-myc gene product is involved in the signal transduction pathways mediating SMC proliferation and migration in the in vitro model we employed. The results also suggest a potential role of antisense strategies designed to inhibit c-myc expression for the prevention of coronary restenosis. Images PMID:8421701

  4. [Connection of magnetic antisense probe with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide detected by high resolution atomic force microscope].

    PubMed

    Tan, Shude; Ouyang, Yu; Li, Xinyou; Wen, Ming; Li, Shaolin

    2011-06-01

    The present paper is aimed to detect superparamagnetic iron oxide labeled c-erbB2 oncogene antisense oligonucleotide probe (magnetic antisense probe) connected with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide by high resolution atomic force microscope (AFM). We transfected SK-Br-3 oncocyte with magnetic antisense probe, then observed the cells by AFM with high resolution and detected protein expression and magnetic resonance imagine (MRI). The high resolution AFM clearly showed the connection of the oligonucleotide remote end of magnetic antisense probe with the mRNA nucleotide of oncocyte. The expression of e-erbB2 protein in SK-Br3 cells were highly inhibited by using magnetic antisense probe. We then obtained the lowest signal to noise ratio (SNR) of SK-Br-3 oncocyte transfected with magnetic antisense probe by MRI (P<0.05). These experiments demonstrated that the high resolution AFM could be used to show the binding of magnetic antisense probe and SK-Br-3 mRNA of tumor cell nuclear.

  5. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeted to MAG mRNA profoundly alter BP and PLP mRNA expression in differentiating oligodendrocytes: a caution.

    PubMed

    Laszkiewicz, I; Wiggins, R C; Konat, G W

    1999-09-01

    The applicability of antisense technology to suppress the expression of myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in cultured oligodendrocytes was evaluated. Differentiating oligodendrocyte precursor cells obtained by the shake-off method were exposed to nine unmodified antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) targeted to the first seven exons of MAG mRNA. After four days, steady-state levels of MAG, proteolipid protein (PLP) and basic protein (BP) mRNAs were determined by Northern blot analysis. Only ODN annealing to 599-618 nt of the MAG mRNA (the junction of exon 5 and 6) resulted in a significant, 75% decrease in the MAG mRNA level. Unexpectedly, six other anti-MAG ODNs which had no significant effect on the MAG message, greatly increased the level of BP mRNA. The highest upregulation of approximately 12 fold was observed with ODN annealing to 139-168 nt (junction of exon 3 and 4). On the other hand, the 997-1016 ODN decreased the levels of BP and PLP messages by 70-80%. The 599-618 ODN also decreased the PLP mRNA by 85%. The results demonstrate that antisense ODNs targeted to one gene may profoundly alter the expression of other genes, and hence, complicate functional analysis of the targeted protein.

  6. Pathogenic C9ORF72 Antisense Repeat RNA Forms a Double Helix with Tandem C:C Mismatches.

    PubMed

    Dodd, David W; Tomchick, Diana R; Corey, David R; Gagnon, Keith T

    2016-03-08

    Expansion of a GGGGCC/CCCCGG repeat sequence in the first intron of the C9ORF72 gene is a leading cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In this combined disorder, called c9FTD/ALS, the expansion is bidirectionally transcribed into sense and antisense repeat RNA associated with disease. To better understand the role of C9ORF72 repeat RNA in molecular disease pathology, we determined crystal structures of a [(CCCCGG)3(CCCC)] model antisense repeat RNA to 1.47 Å resolution. The RNA structure was an A-form-like double helix composed of repeating and regularly spaced tandem C:C mismatch pairs that perturbed helical geometry and surface charge. Solution studies revealed a preference for A-form-like helical conformations as the repeat number increased. Results provide a structural starting point for rationalizing the contribution of repeat RNA to c9FTD/ALS molecular disease mechanisms and for developing molecules to target C9ORF72 repeat RNA as potential therapeutics.

  7. Upregulation of long noncoding RNA zinc finger antisense 1 enhances epithelial-mesenchymal transition in vitro and predicts poor prognosis in glioma.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qiao-Li; Chen, Shu-Hui; Zhang, Xue; Sun, Bao; Hu, Lei; Qu, Qiang; Huang, Yuan-Tao; Wang, Gui-Hua; Liu, Yan-Ling; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2017-03-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that long noncoding RNAs play important roles in development and progression of various cancers. Zinc finger antisense 1 is a novel long noncoding RNA whose clinical significance, biological function, and underlying mechanism are still undetermined in glioma. In this study, we reported that zinc finger antisense 1 expression was markedly upregulated in glioma and tightly correlated with clinical stage. Moreover, patients with high zinc finger antisense 1 expression had shorter survival. Multivariate Cox regression analysis provided a clue that, probably, zinc finger antisense 1 level could serve as an independent prognostic factor for glioma. Functionally, zinc finger antisense 1 acted as an oncogene in glioma because its knockdown could promote apoptosis and significantly inhibit cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Furthermore, zinc finger antisense 1 silencing could result in cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and correspondingly decrease the percentage of S phase cells in both U87 and U251 cell lines. Moreover, it was found that silenced zinc finger antisense 1 could impair migration and invasion by inhibiting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition through reducing the expression of MMP2, MMP9, N-cadherin, Integrin β1, ZEB1, Twist, and Snail as well as increasing E-cadherin level in glioma. Taken together, our data identified that zinc finger antisense 1 might act as a valuable prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target for glioma.

  8. Does the linear Sry transcript function as a ceRNA for miR-138? The sense of antisense.

    PubMed

    Granados-Riveron, Javier Tadeo; Aquino-Jarquin, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the sex determining region Y ( Sry) and the cerebellar degeneration-related protein 1 ( CDR1as) RNA transcripts have been described to function as a new class of post-transcriptional regulatory RNAs that behave as circular endogenous RNA sponges for the micro RNAs (miRNAs) miR-138 and miR-7, respectively. A special feature of the Sry gene is its ability to generate linear and circular transcripts, both transcribed in the sense orientation. Here we remark that both sense (e.g. Sry RNA) and antisense (e.g. CDR1as) transcripts could circularize and behave as miRNAs sponges, and importantly, that also protein-coding segments of mRNAs could also assume this role. Thus, it is reasonable to think that the linear Sry sense transcript could additionally act as a miRNA sponge, or as an endogenous competing RNA for miR-138.

  9. Does the linear Sry transcript function as a ceRNA for miR-138? The sense of antisense

    PubMed Central

    Granados-Riveron, Javier Tadeo; Aquino-Jarquin, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the sex determining region Y ( Sry) and the cerebellar degeneration-related protein 1 ( CDR1as) RNA transcripts have been described to function as a new class of post-transcriptional regulatory RNAs that behave as circular endogenous RNA sponges for the micro RNAs (miRNAs) miR-138 and miR-7, respectively. A special feature of the Sry gene is its ability to generate linear and circular transcripts, both transcribed in the sense orientation. Here we remark that both sense (e.g. Sry RNA) and antisense (e.g. CDR1as) transcripts could circularize and behave as miRNAs sponges, and importantly, that also protein-coding segments of mRNAs could also assume this role. Thus, it is reasonable to think that the linear Sry sense transcript could additionally act as a miRNA sponge, or as an endogenous competing RNA for miR-138. PMID:25580223

  10. Spatiotemporal regulation of multiple overlapping sense and novel natural antisense transcripts at the Nrgn and Camk2n1 gene loci during mouse cerebral corticogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ling, King-Hwa; Hewitt, Chelsee A; Beissbarth, Tim; Hyde, Lavinia; Cheah, Pike-See; Smyth, Gordon K; Tan, Seong-Seng; Hahn, Christopher N; Thomas, Tim; Thomas, Paul Q; Scott, Hamish S

    2011-03-01

    Nrgn and Camk2n1 are highly expressed in the brain and play an important role in synaptic long-term potentiation via regulation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. We have shown that the gene loci for these 2 proteins are actively transcribed in the adult cerebral cortex and feature multiple overlapping transcripts in both the sense and antisense orientations with alternative polyadenylation. These transcripts were upregulated in the adult compared with embryonic and P1.5 mouse cerebral cortices, and transcripts with different 3' untranslated region lengths showed differing expression profiles. In situ hybridization (ISH) analysis revealed spatiotemporal regulation of the Nrgn and Camk2n1 sense and natural antisense transcripts (NATs) throughout cerebral corticogenesis. In addition, we also demonstrated that the expression of these transcripts was organ-specific. Both Nrgn and Camk2n1 sense and NATs were also upregulated in differentiating P19 teratocarcinoma cells. RNA fluorescent ISH analysis confirmed the capability of these NATs to form double-stranded RNA aggregates with the sense transcripts in the cytoplasm of cells obtained from the brain. We propose that the differential regulation of multiple sense and novel overlapping NATs at the Nrgn and Camk2n1 loci will increase the diversity of posttranscriptional regulation, resulting in cell- and time-specific regulation of their gene products during cerebral corticogenesis and function.

  11. Pharmacology of Antisense Drugs.

    PubMed

    Bennett, C Frank; Baker, Brenda F; Pham, Nguyen; Swayze, Eric; Geary, Richard S

    2017-01-06

    Recent studies have led to a greater appreciation of the diverse roles RNAs play in maintaining normal cellular function and how they contribute to disease pathology, broadening the number of potential therapeutic targets. Antisense oligonucleotides are the most direct means to target RNA in a selective manner and have become an established platform technology for drug discovery. There are multiple molecular mechanisms by which antisense oligonucleotides can be used to modulate RNAs in cells, including promoting the degradation of the targeted RNA or modulating RNA function without degradation. Antisense drugs utilizing various antisense mechanisms are demonstrating therapeutic potential for the treatment of a broad variety of diseases. This review focuses on some of the advances that have taken place in translating antisense technology from the bench to the clinic.

  12. Plasmid Replication Control by Antisense RNAs.

    PubMed

    Brantl, Sabine

    2014-08-01

    Plasmids are selfish genetic elements that normally constitute a burden for the bacterial host cell. This burden is expected to favor plasmid loss. Therefore, plasmids have evolved mechanisms to control their replication and ensure their stable maintenance. Replication control can be either mediated by iterons or by antisense RNAs. Antisense RNAs work through a negative control circuit. They are constitutively synthesized and metabolically unstable. They act both as a measuring device and a regulator, and regulation occurs by inhibition. Increased plasmid copy numbers lead to increasing antisense-RNA concentrations, which, in turn, result in the inhibition of a function essential for replication. On the other hand, decreased plasmid copy numbers entail decreasing concentrations of the inhibiting antisense RNA, thereby increasing the replication frequency. Inhibition is achieved by a variety of mechanisms, which are discussed in detail. The most trivial case is the inhibition of translation of an essential replication initiator protein (Rep) by blockage of the rep-ribosome binding site. Alternatively, ribosome binding to a leader peptide mRNA whose translation is required for efficient Rep translation can be prevented by antisense-RNA binding. In 2004, translational attenuation was discovered. Antisense-RNA-mediated transcriptional attenuation is another mechanism that has, so far, only been detected in plasmids of Gram-positive bacteria. ColE1, a plasmid that does not need a plasmid-encoded replication initiator protein, uses the inhibition of primer formation. In other cases, antisense RNAs inhibit the formation of an activator pseudoknot that is required for efficient Rep translation.

  13. The lytic replicon of bacteriophage P1 is controlled by an antisense RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, J; Riedel, H D; Rückert, B; Lurz, R; Schuster, H

    1995-01-01

    The lytic replicon of phage P1 is used for DNA replication during the lytic cycle. It comprises about 2% of the P1 genome and contains the P1 C1 repressor-controlled operator-promoter element Op53.P53 and the kilA and the repL genes, in that order. Transcription of the lytic replicon of P53 and synthesis of the product of repL, but not kilA, are required for replicon function. We have identified an additional promoter, termed P53as (antisense), at the 5'-end of the kilA gene from which a 180 base transcript is constitutively synthesized and in the opposite direction to the P53 transcript. By using a promoter probe plasmid we show that transcription from P53 is strongly repressed by the C1 repressor, whereas that of P53as remains unaffected. Accordingly, the C1 repressor inhibits binding of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase to P53, but not to P53as, as shown by electron microscopy. Under non-repressed conditions transcription from P53 appears to be inhibited by P53as activity and vice versa. An inhibitory effect of P53as on the P1 lytic replicon was revealed by the construction and characterization of a P53as promoter-down mutant. Under non-repressed conditions transcription of repL and, as a consequence, replication of the plasmid is strongly enhanced when P53as is inactive. The results suggest a regulatory role for P53as on the P1 lytic replicon. Images PMID:7784198

  14. Gene Isoform Specificity through Enhancer-Associated Antisense Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Courtney S.; Underwood, Jason G.; Katzman, Sol; Jacobs, Frank; Greenberg, David; Salama, Sofie R.; Haussler, David

    2012-01-01

    Enhancers and antisense RNAs play key roles in transcriptional regulation through differing mechanisms. Recent studies have demonstrated that enhancers are often associated with non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), yet the functional role of these enhancer:ncRNA associations is unclear. Using RNA-Sequencing to interrogate the transcriptomes of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and their derived neural precursor cells (NPs), we identified two novel enhancer-associated antisense transcripts that appear to control isoform-specific expression of their overlapping protein-coding genes. In each case, an enhancer internal to a protein-coding gene drives an antisense RNA in mESCs but not in NPs. Expression of the antisense RNA is correlated with expression of a shorter isoform of the associated sense gene that is not present when the antisense RNA is not expressed. We demonstrate that expression of the antisense transcripts as well as expression of the short sense isoforms correlates with enhancer activity at these two loci. Further, overexpression and knockdown experiments suggest the antisense transcripts regulate expression of their associated sense genes via cis-acting mechanisms. Interestingly, the protein-coding genes involved in these two examples, Zmynd8 and Brd1, share many functional domains, yet their antisense ncRNAs show no homology to each other and are not present in non-murine mammalian lineages, such as the primate lineage. The lack of homology in the antisense ncRNAs indicates they have evolved independently of each other and suggests that this mode of lineage-specific transcriptional regulation may be more widespread in other cell types and organisms. Our findings present a new view of enhancer action wherein enhancers may direct isoform-specific expression of genes through ncRNA intermediates. PMID:22937057

  15. RNase H1-Dependent Antisense Oligonucleotides Are Robustly Active in Directing RNA Cleavage in Both the Cytoplasm and the Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Sun, Hong; Nichols, Joshua G; Crooke, Stanley T

    2017-09-06

    RNase H1-dependent antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are active in reducing levels of both cytoplasmic mRNAs and nuclear retained RNAs. Although ASO activity in the nucleus has been well demonstrated, the cytoplasmic activity of ASOs is less clear. Using kinetic and subcellular fractionation studies, we evaluated ASO activity in the cytoplasm. Upon transfection, ASOs targeting exonic regions rapidly reduced cytoplasmically enriched mRNAs, whereas an intron-targeting ASO that only degrades the nuclear pre-mRNA reduced mRNA levels at a slower rate, similar to normal mRNA decay. Importantly, some exon-targeting ASOs can rapidly and vigorously reduce mRNA levels without decreasing pre-mRNA levels, suggesting that pre-existing cytoplasmic mRNAs can be cleaved by RNase H1-ASO treatment. In addition, we expressed a cytoplasm-localized mutant 7SL RNA that contains a partial U16 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) sequence. Treatment with an ASO simultaneously reduced both the nuclear U16 snoRNA and the cytoplasmic 7SL mutant RNA as early as 30 min after transfection in an RNase H1-dependent manner. Both the 5' and 3' cleavage products of the 7SL mutant RNA were accumulated in the cytoplasm. Together, these results demonstrate that RNase H1-dependent ASOs are robustly active in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The use of antisense mRNA to inhibit the tonoplast H+ ATPase in carrot.

    PubMed Central

    Gogarten, J P; Fichmann, J; Braun, Y; Morgan, L; Styles, P; Taiz, S L; DeLapp, K; Taiz, L

    1992-01-01

    Carrot root cells were transformed with the coding or 5' noncoding regions of the carrot vacuolar H+ ATPase A subunit cDNA cloned in the antisense orientation behind the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Bafilomycin-sensitive ATPase, H(+)-pumping, and 14C-O-methyl-glucose uptake activities were specifically inhibited in the tonoplast fractions of mutant cell lines. Protein gel blotting confirmed that the expression of the A subunit was inhibited in the tonoplast fraction, but not in the Golgi fraction. Two-dimensional protein gel blots of total microsomes of wild-type and control transformant cell lines revealed two major immunoreactive polypeptides in the acidic pI range. In contrast, highly purified tonoplast membranes contained only the less acidic polypeptide. Because the less acidic polypeptide was preferentially diminished in the two antisense cell lines, we infer that the antisense constructs specifically blocked expression of a tonoplast-specific isoform of the V-ATPase A subunit in carrot. Regenerated plants containing the antisense constructs exhibited altered leaf morphologies and reduced cell expansion. The altered phenotype was correlated with the presence of the antisense construct. PMID:1392599

  17. Identification of antisense nucleic acid hybridization sites in mRNA molecules with self-quenching fluorescent reporter molecules.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Lida K; Opalinska, Joanna B; Jordan, David; Pattanayak, Vikram; Greenham, Paul; Kalota, Anna; Robbins, Michelle; Vernovsky, Kathy; Rodriguez, Lesbeth C; Do, Bao T; Lu, Ponzy; Gewirtz, Alan M

    2005-02-17

    We describe a physical mRNA mapping strategy employing fluorescent self-quenching reporter molecules (SQRMs) that facilitates the identification of mRNA sequence accessible for hybridization with antisense nucleic acids in vitro and in vivo, real time. SQRMs are 20-30 base oligodeoxynucleotides with 5-6 bp complementary ends to which a 5' fluorophore and 3' quenching group are attached. Alone, the SQRM complementary ends form a stem that holds the fluorophore and quencher in contact. When the SQRM forms base pairs with its target, the structure separates the fluorophore from the quencher. This event can be reported by fluorescence emission when the fluorophore is excited. The stem-loop of the SQRM suggests that SQRM be made to target natural stem-loop structures formed during mRNA synthesis. The general utility of this method is demonstrated by SQRM identification of targetable sequence within c-myb and bcl-6 mRNA. Corresponding antisense oligonucleotides reduce these gene products in cells.

  18. Identification of antisense nucleic acid hybridization sites in mRNA molecules with self-quenching fluorescent reporter molecules

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Lida K.; Opalinska, Joanna B.; Jordan, David; Pattanayak, Vikram; Greenham, Paul; Kalota, Anna; Robbins, Michelle; Vernovsky, Kathy; Rodriguez, Lesbeth C.; Do, Bao T.; Lu, Ponzy; Gewirtz, Alan M.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a physical mRNA mapping strategy employing fluorescent self-quenching reporter molecules (SQRMs) that facilitates the identification of mRNA sequence accessible for hybridization with antisense nucleic acids in vitro and in vivo, real time. SQRMs are 20–30 base oligodeoxynucleotides with 5–6 bp complementary ends to which a 5′ fluorophore and 3′ quenching group are attached. Alone, the SQRM complementary ends form a stem that holds the fluorophore and quencher in contact. When the SQRM forms base pairs with its target, the structure separates the fluorophore from the quencher. This event can be reported by fluorescence emission when the fluorophore is excited. The stem–loop of the SQRM suggests that SQRM be made to target natural stem–loop structures formed during mRNA synthesis. The general utility of this method is demonstrated by SQRM identification of targetable sequence within c-myb and bcl-6 mRNA. Corresponding antisense oligonucleotides reduce these gene products in cells. PMID:15718294

  19. Antisense inhibition of microRNA-21 or -221 arrests cell cycle, induces apoptosis, and sensitizes the effects of gemcitabine in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Kook; Lee, Eun Joo; Esau, Christine; Schmittgen, Thomas D

    2009-10-01

    The contribution of overexpressed microRNA-21 and -221 (miR-21 and miR-221) to the malignant phenotype was determined by inhibiting these miRNAs using antisense oligonucleotides. The effects of antisense to miR-21 and miR-221 on cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis, combinatorial effects with gemcitabine, and effects on target protein levels were studied. Low nanomolar concentrations of both antisense oligonucleotides reduced proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines. Reduced proliferation was less pronounced in the normal ductal epithelial cell line human pancreatic Nestin-expressing cell or in pancreatic cancer cell lines exposed to an irrelevant control oligonucleotide. Inhibition of miR-21 and miR-221 increased the amount of apoptosis in HS766T cells by 3- to 6-fold compared with the control oligonucleotide. HS766T cells exposed to miR-21 antisense resulted in cell cycle arrest (G1 phase). Protein levels of tumor suppressor targets of the miRNAs were increased by antisense to miR-21 (PTEN and RECK) and miR-221 (p27). Antisense to miR-21 and miR-221 sensitized the effects of gemcitabine, and the antisense-gemcitabine combinations were synergistic at high fraction affected. We demonstrate that antisense to miR-21 and miR-221 results in significant cell killing under various conditions and that antisense oligonucleotides targeted to miRNA represents a potential new therapy for pancreatic cancer.

  20. Expression of antisense or sense RNA of an ankyrin repeat-containing gene blocks chloroplast differentiation in arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H; Scheirer, D C; Fowle, W H; Goodman, H M

    1992-01-01

    The Arabidopsis AKR gene that encodes a protein with four ankyrin repeats (a 33-amino acid motif that appears in the 89K domain of the human protein ankyrin) was isolated and characterized. A short sequence outside the ankyrin repeats is similar to that of the protein of the Drosophila muscle segment homeobox (msh) gene. The expression of the AKR gene is light dependent, and transgenic Arabidopsis plants with two or more copies of an antisense or sense AKR construct became chlorotic in a developmentally regulated manner. The chlorotic phenotype was genetically transmitted to the next generation, although most chlorotic plants produced much less seed. Reduced presence of thylakoid membranes and loss of grana are found in the plastids of chlorotic leaves, indicating that antisense or sense AKR has blocked chloroplast differentiation. This study indicates the importance of ankyrin repeat-containing proteins, not only in yeast and animals, but in plants as well. PMID:1281700

  1. Expression of RNA-interference/antisense transgenes by the cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing strategy to study gene functions in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Jiang, Dagang; Zhou, Hai; Li, Feng; Yang, Jiawei; Hong, Laifa; Fu, Xiao; Li, Zhibin; Liu, Zhenlan; Li, Jianming; Zhuang, Chuxiong

    2011-03-03

    Antisense and RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing systems are powerful reverse genetic methods for studying gene function. Most RNAi and antisense experiments used constitutive promoters to drive the expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes; however, several reports showed that constitutive promoters were not expressed in all cell types in cereal plants, suggesting that the constitutive promoter systems are not effective for silencing gene expression in certain tissues/organs. To develop an alternative method that complements the constitutive promoter systems, we constructed RNAi and/or antisense transgenes for four rice genes using a constitutive promoter or a cognate promoter of a selected rice target gene and generated many independent transgenic lines. Genetic, molecular, and phenotypic analyses of these RNAi/antisense transgenic rice plants, in comparison to previously-reported transgenic lines that silenced similar genes, revealed that expression of the cognate promoter-driven RNAi/antisense transgenes resulted in novel growth/developmental defects that were not observed in transgenic lines expressing constitutive promoter-driven gene-silencing transgenes of the same target genes. Our results strongly suggested that expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes by cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing approach to discovery gene function in rice.

  2. Expression of RNA-Interference/Antisense Transgenes by the Cognate Promoters of Target Genes Is a Better Gene-Silencing Strategy to Study Gene Functions in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai; Li, Feng; Yang, Jiawei; Hong, Laifa; Fu, Xiao; Li, Zhibin; Liu, Zhenlan; Li, Jianming; Zhuang, Chuxiong

    2011-01-01

    Antisense and RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing systems are powerful reverse genetic methods for studying gene function. Most RNAi and antisense experiments used constitutive promoters to drive the expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes; however, several reports showed that constitutive promoters were not expressed in all cell types in cereal plants, suggesting that the constitutive promoter systems are not effective for silencing gene expression in certain tissues/organs. To develop an alternative method that complements the constitutive promoter systems, we constructed RNAi and/or antisense transgenes for four rice genes using a constitutive promoter or a cognate promoter of a selected rice target gene and generated many independent transgenic lines. Genetic, molecular, and phenotypic analyses of these RNAi/antisense transgenic rice plants, in comparison to previously-reported transgenic lines that silenced similar genes, revealed that expression of the cognate promoter-driven RNAi/antisense transgenes resulted in novel growth/developmental defects that were not observed in transgenic lines expressing constitutive promoter-driven gene-silencing transgenes of the same target genes. Our results strongly suggested that expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes by cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing approach to discovery gene function in rice. PMID:21408609

  3. Inhibition of bone resorption in vitro by antisense RNA and DNA molecules targeted against carbonic anhydrase II or two subunits of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Laitala, T; Väänänen, H K

    1994-01-01

    The bone resorbing cells, osteoclasts, express high levels of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) and vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) during bone resorption. We have used antisense RNA and DNA molecules targeted against CA II, and against 16- and 60-kD subunits of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase), to block the expression of these proteins in vitro. Osteoclastic bone resorption was studied in two in vitro culture systems: release of 45Calcium from prelabeled newborn mouse calvaria cultures, and resorption pit assays performed with rat osteoclasts cultured on bovine bone slices. Both antisense RNA and DNA against CA II and the V-ATPase were used to compare their specificities as regards inhibiting bone resorption in vitro. The antisense molecules inhibited the synthesis of these proteins by decreasing the amounts of mRNA in the cells in a highly specific manner. In osteoclast cultures treated with the 16-kD V-ATPase antisense RNA, acidification of an unknown population of intracellular vesicles was highly stimulated. The acidification of these vesicles was not sensitive to amiloride or bafilomycin A1. This suggests the existence of a back-up system for acidification of intracellular vesicles, when the expression of the V-ATPase is blocked. Our results further indicate that blocking the expression of CA II and V-ATPase with antisense RNA or DNA leads to decreased bone resorption. Images PMID:8200964

  4. Maternal mRNA knockdown studies: antisense experiments using the host-transfer technique in X. laevis and X. tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Olson, David J.; Hulstrand, Alissa M.; Houston, Douglas W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to inhibit the activity of maternally stored gene products in Xenopus has led to numerous insights into early developmental mechanisms. Oocytes can be cultured and manipulated in vitro and then implanted into the body cavity of a host female to make them competent for fertilization. Here, we summarize the methods for obtaining, culturing and fertilizing Xenopus oocytes, with the goal of inhibiting maternal gene function through antisense oligonucleotide-mediated mRNA knockdown. We describe a simplified technique for implanting donor oocytes into host females using intraperitoneal injection. Also, we present optimized methods for performing the host-transfer procedure with X. tropicalis oocytes. PMID:22956088

  5. RNA toxicity from the ALS/FTD C9ORF72 expansion is mitigated by antisense intervention.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Christopher J; Zhang, Ping-Wu; Pham, Jacqueline T; Haeusler, Aaron R; Heusler, Aaron R; Mistry, Nipun A; Vidensky, Svetlana; Daley, Elizabeth L; Poth, Erin M; Hoover, Benjamin; Fines, Daniel M; Maragakis, Nicholas; Tienari, Pentti J; Petrucelli, Leonard; Traynor, Bryan J; Wang, Jiou; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Blackshaw, Seth; Sattler, Rita; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2013-10-16

    A hexanucleotide GGGGCC repeat expansion in the noncoding region of the C9ORF72 gene is the most common genetic abnormality in familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The function of the C9ORF72 protein is unknown, as is the mechanism by which the repeat expansion could cause disease. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-differentiated neurons from C9ORF72 ALS patients revealed disease-specific (1) intranuclear GGGGCCexp RNA foci, (2) dysregulated gene expression, (3) sequestration of GGGGCCexp RNA binding protein ADARB2, and (4) susceptibility to excitotoxicity. These pathological and pathogenic characteristics were confirmed in ALS brain and were mitigated with antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) therapeutics to the C9ORF72 transcript or repeat expansion despite the presence of repeat-associated non-ATG translation (RAN) products. These data indicate a toxic RNA gain-of-function mechanism as a cause of C9ORF72 ALS and provide candidate antisense therapeutics and candidate human pharmacodynamic markers for therapy.

  6. Altered Levels of MicroRNA-9, -206, and -132 in Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Their Response to Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Catapano, Francesco; Zaharieva, Irina; Scoto, Mariacristina; Marrosu, Elena; Morgan, Jennifer; Muntoni, Francesco; Zhou, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The identification of noninvasive biomarkers to monitor the disease progression in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is becoming increasingly important. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression and are implicated in the pathogenesis of neuromuscular diseases, including motor neuron degeneration. In this study, we selectively characterized the expression of miR-9, miR-206, and miR-132 in spinal cord, skeletal muscle, and serum from SMA transgenic mice, and in serum from SMA patients. A systematic analysis of miRNA expression was conducted in SMA mice with different disease severities (severe type I-like and mild type III-like) at different disease stages (pre-, mid-, and late-symptomatic stages), and in morpholino antisense oligonucleotide-treated mice. There was differential expression of all three miRNAs in spinal cord, skeletal muscle and serum samples in SMA mice. Serum miRNAs were altered prior to the changes in spinal cord and skeletal muscle at the presymptomatic stage. The altered miR-132 levels in spinal cord, muscle, and serum transiently reversed to normal level after a single-dose morpholino antisense oligomer PMO25 treatment in SMA mice. We also confirmed a significant alteration of miR-9 and miR-132 level in serum samples from SMA patients. Our study indicates the potential of developing miRNAs as noninvasive biomarkers in SMA. PMID:27377135

  7. Analysis of sense and naturally occurring antisense transcripts of myosin heavy chain in the human myocardium.

    PubMed

    Luther, H P; Podlowski, S; Hetzer, R; Baumann, G

    2001-01-01

    Naturally occurring antisense RNA has the potential to form a duplex with its complementary sense mRNA, thereby regulating protein expression. Previously, we demonstrated considerable amounts of endogenous antisense RNA for both alpha- and beta-myosin heavy chain (MHC) in rat heart suggesting a role in posttranscriptional MHC-regulation (Luther et al. [1997] J Mol Cell Cardiol 29(1):27-35). To evaluate whether antisense RNA is also involved in MHC regulation in human heart we analyzed ventricular myocardium transcripts in nonfailing hearts (n=3) and hearts from patients undergoing heart transplantation (n=5). Investigation of RNA by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detected an antisense RNA transcript for beta-MHC but none for alpha-MHC. Northern blot analysis of normal and failing hearts detected sense mRNA for beta-MHC, but not alpha-MHC suggesting no functionally relevant levels of alpha-MHC mRNA exist in the human ventricle. The results describe-for the first time-the existence of endogenous polyadenylated MHC antisense transcripts in the human heart. The potential effect of attenuating translation was shown in an in vitro translation assay using a synthetic antisense-oligonucleotide derived from the sequence of the naturally occurring antisense RNA. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Upping the Antisense Ante.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Rick

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is a designer-drug technology called antisense which blocks messenger RNA's ability to carry information to protein producing sites in the cell. The applications of this drug to AIDS research, cancer therapy, and other diseases are discussed. (KR)

  9. Upping the Antisense Ante.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Rick

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is a designer-drug technology called antisense which blocks messenger RNA's ability to carry information to protein producing sites in the cell. The applications of this drug to AIDS research, cancer therapy, and other diseases are discussed. (KR)

  10. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Christopher A.; Hoffman, Jackson A.; Trotter, Kevin W.; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Bennett, Brian D.; Burkholder, Adam B.; Fargo, David C.; Archer, Trevor K.

    2016-01-01

    Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. PMID:27487356

  11. Ribonucleases, antisense RNAs and the control of bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Arraiano, Cecília M; Domingues, Susana

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade regulatory RNAs have emerged as powerful tools to regulate the expression of genes both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes. RNases, by degrading these RNA molecules, control the right amount of regulatory RNAs, which is fundamental for an accurate regulation of gene expression in the cell. Remarkably the first antisense RNAs identified were plasmid-encoded and their detailed study was crucial for the understanding of prokaryotic antisense RNAs. In this review we highlight the role of RNases in the precise modulation of antisense RNAs that control plasmid replication, maintenance and transfer.

  12. Adenoviral expression of XIAP antisense RNA induces apoptosis in glioma cells and suppresses the growth of xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Naumann, U; Bähr, O; Wolburg, H; Altenberend, S; Wick, W; Liston, P; Ashkenazi, A; Weller, M

    2007-01-01

    The expression of inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family members contributes to the resistance of human cancers to apoptosis induced by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. We report that the infection of malignant glioma cells and several other tumor cell lines with adenoviruses encoding antisense RNA to X-linked IAP (XIAP) depletes endogenous XIAP levels and promotes global caspase activation and apoptosis. In contrast, non-neoplastic SV-FHAS human astrocytes and other non-neoplastic cells express XIAP at very low levels and resist these effects of adenovirus-expressing XIAP antisense RNA (Ad-XIAP-as). Caspase inhibitors such as z-Val-Ala-DL-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone (zVAD-fmk) delay caspase processing and XIAP depletion, suggesting that XIAP depletion results both from antisense-mediated interference with protein synthesis and proteolytic cleavage by activated caspases. However, zVAD-fmk neither prevents nor delays cell death, indicating a caspase-independent pathway to cell death triggered by IAP depletion. Similarly, B-cell lymphoma-X(L) (BCL-X(L)) inhibits caspase activity, but fails to rescue from apoptosis. Loss of p65/nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) protein and NF-kappaB activity is an early event triggered by Ad-XIAP-as and probably involved in Ad-XIAP-as-induced apoptosis. Finally, Ad-XIAP-as gene therapy induces cell death in intracranial glioma xenografts, prolongs survival in nude mice and may reduce tumorigenicity in synergy with Apo2L/TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in vivo. Altogether, these data define a powerful survival function for XIAP and reinforce its possible role as a therapeutic target in human glioma cells.

  13. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II CTD is associated with antisense promoter transcription and active enhancers in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Descostes, Nicolas; Heidemann, Martin; Spinelli, Lionel; Schüller, Roland; Maqbool, Muhammad Ahmad; Fenouil, Romain; Koch, Frederic; Innocenti, Charlène; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Eick, Dirk; Andrau, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase (Pol) II consists of 52 conserved heptapeptide repeats containing the consensus sequence Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7. Post-translational modifications of the CTD coordinate the transcription cycle and various steps of mRNA maturation. Here we describe Tyr1 phosphorylation (Tyr1P) as a hallmark of promoter (5′ associated) Pol II in mammalian cells, in contrast to what was described in yeast. Tyr1P is predominantly found in antisense orientation at promoters but is also specifically enriched at active enhancers. Mutation of Tyr1 to phenylalanine (Y1F) prevents the formation of the hyper-phosphorylated Pol IIO form, induces degradation of Pol II to the truncated Pol IIB form, and results in a lethal phenotype. Our results suggest that Tyr1P has evolved specialized and essential functions in higher eukaryotes associated with antisense promoter and enhancer transcription, and Pol II stability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02105.001 PMID:24842994

  14. Control of enzymatic browning in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) by sense and antisense RNA from tomato polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Coetzer, C; Corsini, D; Love, S; Pavek, J; Tumer, N

    2001-02-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of Russet Burbank potato was inhibited by sense and antisense PPO RNAs expressed from a tomato PPO cDNA under the control of the 35S promoter from the cauliflower mosaic virus. Transgenic Russet Burbank potato plants from 37 different lines were grown in the field. PPO activity and the level of enzymatic browning were measured in the tubers harvested from the field. Of the tubers from 28 transgenic lines that were sampled, tubers from 5 lines exhibited reduced browning. The level of PPO activity correlated with the reduction in enzymatic browning in these lines. These results indicate that expression of tomato PPO RNA in sense or antisense orientation inhibits PPO activity and enzymatic browning in the major commercial potato cultivar. Expression of tomato PPO RNA in sense orientation led to the greatest decrease in PPO activity and enzymatic browning, possibly due to cosuppression. These results suggest that expression of closely related heterologous genes can be used to prevent enzymatic browning in a wide variety of food crops without the application of various food additives.

  15. Antisense transcription as a tool to tune gene expression.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Jennifer A N; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-01-14

    A surprise that has emerged from transcriptomics is the prevalence of genomic antisense transcription, which occurs counter to gene orientation. While frequent, the roles of antisense transcription in regulation are poorly understood. We built a synthetic system in Escherichia coli to study how antisense transcription can change the expression of a gene and tune the response characteristics of a regulatory circuit. We developed a new genetic part that consists of a unidirectional terminator followed by a constitutive antisense promoter and demonstrate that this part represses gene expression proportionally to the antisense promoter strength. Chip-based oligo synthesis was applied to build a large library of 5,668 terminator-promoter combinations that was used to control the expression of three repressors (PhlF, SrpR, and TarA) in a simple genetic circuit (NOT gate). Using the library, we demonstrate that antisense promoters can be used to tune the threshold of a regulatory circuit without impacting other properties of its response function. Finally, we determined the relative contributions of antisense RNA and transcriptional interference to repressing gene expression and introduce a biophysical model to capture the impact of RNA polymerase collisions on gene repression. This work quantifies the role of antisense transcription in regulatory networks and introduces a new mode to control gene expression that has been previously overlooked in genetic engineering.

  16. A novel antisense long noncoding RNA within the IGF1R gene locus is imprinted in hematopoietic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingnan; Li, Wei; Sun, Yunpeng; Yu, Dehai; Wen, Xue; Wang, Hong; Cui, Jiuwei; Wang, Guanjun; Hoffman, Andrew R.; Hu, Ji-Fan

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of the insulin-like growth factor type I receptor (IGF1R) has been implicated in the progression and therapeutic resistance of malignancies. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, IGF1R is one of the most abundantly phosphorylated receptor tyrosine kinases, promoting cell growth through the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. However, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying IGF1R gene dysregulation in cancer. We discovered a novel intragenic long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) within the IGF1R locus, named IRAIN, which is transcribed in an antisense direction from an intronic promoter. The IRAIN lncRNA was expressed exclusively from the paternal allele, with the maternal counterpart being silenced. Using both reverse transcription-associated trap and chromatin conformation capture assays, we demonstrate that this lncRNA interacts with chromatin DNA and is involved in the formation of an intrachromosomal enhancer/promoter loop. Knockdown of IRAIN lncRNA with shRNA abolishes this intrachromosomal interaction. In addition, IRAIN was downregulated both in leukemia cell lines and in blood obtained from high-risk AML patients. These data identify IRAIN as a new imprinted lncRNA that is involved in long-range DNA interactions. PMID:25092925

  17. ADAR2-mediated editing of miR-214 and miR-122 precursor and antisense RNA transcripts in liver cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-Hsin; Chen, Chao-Hung; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Li, Chiao-Ling; Wu, Yi-Jinn; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Chen, Pei-Jer; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei

    2013-01-01

    A growing list of microRNAs (miRNAs) show aberrant expression patterns in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the regulatory mechanisms largely remain unclear. RNA editing catalyzed by members of the adenosine deaminase acting on the RNA (ADAR) family could target the miRNA precursors and affect the biogenesis process. Therefore, we investigate whether RNA editing could be one mechanism contributing to the deregulation of specific miRNAs in HCC. By overexpression of individual ADARs in hepatoma cells, RNA editing on the precursors of 16 miRNAs frequently deregulated in HCC was screened by a sensitive high-resolution melting platform. The results identified RNA precursors of miR-214 and miR-122 as potential targets edited by ADAR2. A subset of HCC showing elevated ADAR2 verified the major editings identified in ARAR2 overexpressed hepatoma cells, either with A-to-I or U-to-C changes. The unusual U-to-C editing at specific residues was demonstrated as being attributed to the A-to-I editing on the RNA transcripts complementary to the pri-miRNAs. The editing event caused a decrease of the RNA transcript complementary to pri-miR-214, which led to the decrease of pri-miR-214 and miR-214 and resulted in the increased protein level of its novel target gene Rab15. In conclusion, the current study discovered ADAR2-mediated editing of the complementary antisense transcripts as a novel mechanism for regulating the biogenesis of specific miRNAs during hepatocarcinogenesis.

  18. EGO-1, a C. elegans RdRP, Modulates Gene Expression via Production of mRNA-Templated Short Antisense RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Maniar, Jay M.; Fire, Andrew Z.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Background The development of the germline in Caenorhabditis elegans is a complex process involving the regulation of thousands of genes in a coordinated manner. Several genes required for small RNA biogenesis and function are among those required for the proper organization of the germline. EGO-1 is a putative RNA-directed RNA polymerase (RdRP) that is required for multiple aspects of C. elegans germline development and efficient RNAi of germline-expressed genes. RdRPs have been proposed to act through a variety of mechanisms including the post-transcriptional targeting of specific mRNAs as well as through a direct interaction with chromatin. Despite extensive investigation, the molecular role of EGO-1 has remained enigmatic. Results Here we use high-throughput small RNA and messenger RNA sequencing to investigate EGO-1 function. We found that EGO-1 is required to produce a distinct pool of small RNAs antisense to a number of germline-expressed mRNAs through several developmental stages. These potential mRNA targets fall into distinct classes, including genes required for kinetochore and nuclear pore assembly, histone-modifying activities and centromeric proteins. We also found several RNAi-related genes to be targets of EGO-1. Finally, we show a strong association between the loss of small RNAs and the rise of mRNA levels in ego-1(−) animals. Conclusions Our data support the conclusion that EGO-1 produces triphosphorylated small RNAs derived from mRNA templates and that these small RNAs modulate gene expression through the targeting of their cognate mRNAs. PMID:21396820

  19. Potent inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus replication using a 2-5A-antisense chimera targeted to signals within the virus genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Player, Mark R.; Barnard, Dale L.; Torrence, Paul F.

    1998-01-01

    The 2-5A system is a recognized mechanistic component of the antiviral action of interferon. Interferon-induced 2-5A synthetase generates 2-5A, which, in turn, activates the latent constitutive RNase L that degrades viral RNA. Chemical conjugation of 2-5A to an antisense oligonucleotide can target the 2-5A-dependent RNase L to the antisense-specified RNA and effect its selective destruction. Such a 2-5A-antisense chimera (NIH351) has been developed that targets a consensus sequence within the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) genomic RNA. NIH351 was 50- to 90-fold more potent against RSV strain A2 than was ribavirin, the presently approved drug for clinical management of RSV infection. It was similarly active against a variety of RSV strains of both A and B subgroups and possessed a cell culture selectivity index comparable to ribavirin. In addition, the anti-RSV activity of NIH351 was shown to be virus-specific and a result of a true antisense effect, because a scrambled nucleotide sequence in the antisense domain of NIH351 caused a significant decrease in antiviral activity. The 2-5A system’s RNase L was implicated in the mechanism of action of NIH351 because a congener with a disabled 2-5A moiety was of greatly reduced anti-RSV effectiveness. These findings represent an innovative approach to the control of RSV replication. PMID:9671772

  20. The reduction in small ribosomal subunit abundance in ethanol-stressed cells of Bacillus subtilis is mediated by a SigB-dependent antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Mars, Ruben A T; Mendonça, Karoline; Denham, Emma L; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2015-10-01

    One of the best-characterized general stress responses in bacteria is the σB-mediated stress response of the Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. The σB regulon contains approximately 200 protein-encoding genes and 136 putative regulatory RNAs. One of these σB-dependent RNAs, named S1136-S1134, was recently mapped as being transcribed from the S1136 promoter on the opposite strand of the essential rpsD gene, which encodes the ribosomal primary-binding protein S4. Accordingly, S1136-S1134 transcription results in an rpsD-overlapping antisense RNA (asRNA). Upon exposure of B. subtilis to ethanol, the S1136 promoter was found to be induced, while rpsD transcription was downregulated. By quantitative PCR, we show that the activation of transcription from the S1136 promoter is directly responsible for the downregulation of rpsD upon ethanol exposure. We also show that this downregulation of rpsD leads to a reduced level of the small (30S) ribosomal subunit upon ethanol stress. The activation of the S1136 promoter thus represents the first example of antisense transcription-mediated regulation in the general stress response of B. subtilis and implicates the reduction of ribosomal protein abundance as a new aspect in the σB-dependent stress response. We propose that the observed reduction in the level of the small ribosomal subunit, which contains the ribosome-decoding center, may protect B. subtilis cells against misreading and spurious translation of possibly toxic aberrant peptides under conditions of ethanol stress.

  1. From Cryptic Toward Canonical Pre-mRNA Splicing in Pompe Disease: a Pipeline for the Development of Antisense Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Bergsma, Atze J; in ‘t Groen, Stijn LM; Verheijen, Frans W; van der Ploeg, Ans T; Pijnappel, WWM Pim

    2016-01-01

    While 9% of human pathogenic variants have an established effect on pre-mRNA splicing, it is suspected that an additional 20% of otherwise classified variants also affect splicing. Aberrant splicing includes disruption of splice sites or regulatory elements, or creation or strengthening of cryptic splice sites. For the majority of variants, it is poorly understood to what extent and how these may affect splicing. We have identified cryptic splicing in an unbiased manner. Three types of cryptic splicing were analyzed in the context of pathogenic variants in the acid α-glucosidase gene causing Pompe disease. These involved newly formed deep intronic or exonic cryptic splice sites, and a natural cryptic splice that was utilized due to weakening of a canonical splice site. Antisense oligonucleotides that targeted the identified cryptic splice sites repressed cryptic splicing at the expense of canonical splicing in all three cases, as shown by reverse-transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and by enhancement of acid α-glucosidase enzymatic activity. This argues for a competition model for available splice sites, including intact or weakened canonical sites and natural or newly formed cryptic sites. The pipeline described here can detect cryptic splicing and correct canonical splicing using antisense oligonucleotides to restore the gene defect. PMID:27623443

  2. 2'-O-Methyl RNA/Ethylene-Bridged Nucleic Acid Chimera Antisense Oligonucleotides to Induce Dystrophin Exon 45 Skipping.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tomoko; Awano, Hiroyuki; Yagi, Mariko; Matsumoto, Masaaki; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Goda, Ryoya; Koizumi, Makoto; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2017-02-10

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal muscle-wasting disease characterized by dystrophin deficiency from mutations in the dystrophin gene. Antisense oligonucleotide (AO)-mediated exon skipping targets restoration of the dystrophin reading frame to allow production of an internally deleted dystrophin protein with functional benefit for DMD patients who have out-of-frame deletions. After accelerated US approval of eteplirsen (Exondys 51), which targets dystrophin exon 51 for skipping, efforts are now focused on targeting other exons. For improved clinical benefits, this strategy requires more studies of the delivery method and modification of nucleic acids. We studied a nucleotide with a 2'-O,4'-C-ethylene-bridged nucleic acid (ENA), which shows high nuclease resistance and high affinity for complementary RNA strands. Here, we describe the process of developing a 2'-O-methyl RNA(2'-OMeRNA)/ENA chimera AO to induce dystrophin exon 45 skipping. One 18-mer 2'-OMeRNA/ENA chimera (AO85) had the most potent activity for inducing exon 45 skipping in cultured myotubes. AO85 was administered to mdx mice without significant side effects. AO85 transfection into cultured myotubes from 13 DMD patients induced exon 45 skipping in all samples at different levels and dystrophin expression in 11 patients. These results suggest the possible efficacy of AO-mediated exon skipping changes in individual patients and highlight the 2'-OMeRNA/ENA chimera AO as a potential fundamental treatment for DMD.

  3. Influence of mismatched and bulged nucleotides on SNP-preferential RNase H cleavage of RNA-antisense gapmer heteroduplexes.

    PubMed

    Magner, Dorota; Biala, Ewa; Lisowiec-Wachnicka, Jolanta; Kierzek, Ryszard

    2017-10-02

    This study focused on determining design rules for gapmer-type antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs), that can differentiate cleavability of two SNP variants of RNA in the presence of ribonuclease H based on the mismatch type and position in the heteroduplex. We describe the influence of structural motifs formed by several arrangements of multiple mismatches (various types of mismatches and their position within the ASO/target RNA duplex) on RNase H cleavage selectivity of five different SNP types. The targets were mRNA fragments of APP, SCA3, SNCA and SOD1 genes, carrying C-to-G, G-to-C, G-to-A, A-to-G and C-to-U substitutions. The results show that certain arrangements of mismatches enhance discrimination between wild type and mutant SNP alleles of RNA in vitro as well as in HeLa cells. Among the over 120 gapmers tested, we found two gapmers that caused preferential degradation of the mutant allele APP 692 G and one that led to preferential cleavage of the mutant SNCA 53 A allele, both in vitro and in cells. However, several gapmers promoted selective cleavage of mRNA mutant alleles in in vitro experiments only.

  4. 2′-O-Methyl RNA/Ethylene-Bridged Nucleic Acid Chimera Antisense Oligonucleotides to Induce Dystrophin Exon 45 Skipping

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tomoko; Awano, Hiroyuki; Yagi, Mariko; Matsumoto, Masaaki; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Goda, Ryoya; Koizumi, Makoto; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal muscle-wasting disease characterized by dystrophin deficiency from mutations in the dystrophin gene. Antisense oligonucleotide (AO)-mediated exon skipping targets restoration of the dystrophin reading frame to allow production of an internally deleted dystrophin protein with functional benefit for DMD patients who have out-of-frame deletions. After accelerated US approval of eteplirsen (Exondys 51), which targets dystrophin exon 51 for skipping, efforts are now focused on targeting other exons. For improved clinical benefits, this strategy requires more studies of the delivery method and modification of nucleic acids. We studied a nucleotide with a 2′-O,4′-C-ethylene-bridged nucleic acid (ENA), which shows high nuclease resistance and high affinity for complementary RNA strands. Here, we describe the process of developing a 2′-O-methyl RNA(2′-OMeRNA)/ENA chimera AO to induce dystrophin exon 45 skipping. One 18-mer 2′-OMeRNA/ENA chimera (AO85) had the most potent activity for inducing exon 45 skipping in cultured myotubes. AO85 was administered to mdx mice without significant side effects. AO85 transfection into cultured myotubes from 13 DMD patients induced exon 45 skipping in all samples at different levels and dystrophin expression in 11 patients. These results suggest the possible efficacy of AO-mediated exon skipping changes in individual patients and highlight the 2′-OMeRNA/ENA chimera AO as a potential fundamental treatment for DMD. PMID:28208626

  5. Radiolabeled oligonucleotides for antisense imaging

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Arun K; He, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Oligonucleotides radiolabeled with isotopes emitting γ-rays (for SPECT imaging) or positrons (for PET imaging) can be useful for targeting messenger RNA (mRNA) thereby serving as non-invasive imaging tools for detection of gene expression in vivo (antisense imaging). Radiolabeled oligonucleotides may also be used for monitoring their in vivo fate, thereby helping us better understand the barriers to its delivery for antisense targeting. These developments have led to a new area of molecular imaging and targeting, utilizing radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotides. However, the success of antisense imaging relies heavily on overcoming the barriers for its targeted delivery in vivo. Furthermore, the low ability of the radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotide to subsequently internalize into the cell and hybridize with its target mRNA poses additional challenges in realizing its potentials. This review covers the advances in the antisense imaging probe development for PET and SPECT, with an emphasis on radiolabeling strategies, stability, delivery and in vivo targeting. PMID:21822406

  6. HOX antisense lincRNA HOXA-AS2 is an apoptosis repressor in all trans retinoic acid treated NB4 promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hang; Zhang, Xueqing; Frazão, Josias Brito; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Newburger, Peter E

    2013-10-01

    HOXA cluster antisense RNA 2 (HOXA-AS2) is a long non-coding RNA located between the HOXA3 and HOXA4 genes in the HOXA cluster. Its transcript is expressed in NB4 promyelocytic leukemia cells and human peripheral blood neutrophils, and expression is increased in NB4 cells treated with all trans retinoic acid (ATRA). Knockdown of HOXA-AS2 expression by transduced shRNA decreases the number of viable cells and increases the proportion of apoptotic cells, measured by annexin V binding and by activity and cleavage of caspases-3, -8, and -9. The increase in death of HOXA-AS2 knockdown cells was accompanied by an elevated TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) levels, but ATRA-induced NB4 cells treated with TRAIL did show an increase in HOXA-AS2 expression. These results demonstrate that ATRA induction of HOXA-AS2 suppresses ATRA-induced apoptosis, possibly through a TRAIL-mediated pathway. HOXA-AS2-mediated negative regulation thus contributes to the fine-tuning of apoptosis during ATRA-induced myeloid differentiation in NB4 cells.

  7. The effect of antisense inhibitor of miRNA 106b∼25 on the proliferation, invasion, migration, and apoptosis of gastric cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rupeng; Li, Fangxuan; Wang, Weijia; Wang, Xuejun; Li, Shixia; Liu, Juntian

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating data has demonstrated that miRNA 106b∼25, which are composed of the highly conserved miRNA 106b, miRNA 93, and miRNA 25, play carcinogenic roles in cancers. We investigated the expression of miRNA 106b∼25 in gastric cancer cells (SGC 7901, MGC 803, BGC 823) and normal gastric epithelial cell then inhibited miRNA 106b∼25 expression via transiently transfecting their antisense inhibitor. After miRNA 106b∼25 cluster was inhibited, MTT, Scratch test, Transwell invasion test, and flow cytometry were applied to investigate the proliferation, invasion, migration, cell cycle, and apoptosis of gastric cancer cell. The expression of miRNA 106b, miRNA 93, and miRNA 25 in gastric cancer cells SGC 7901, MGC 803, and BGC 823 was significantly higher than in gastric epithelial cell GES-1. The most significant suppression of miRNA 106b∼25 expressions can be detected in MGC 803 cell after transiently transfecting their antisense inhibitors. So, MGC 803 cell was selected as our research object. After inhibiting miRNA 106b and miRNA 93 respectively and combined, the proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cell MGC 803 were significantly suppressed. The most significant suppression was observed in combined inhibiting group. After miRNA 106b∼25 cluster was inhibited respectively or combined, more gastric cancer cells were arrested in the G0G1 phase. However, there was no statistical difference in comparing with control groups. While the percentages of apoptotic cells increased after miRNA 106b∼25 cluster was inhibited, the statistical difference was detected only in combined inhibiting group. Inhibiting miRNA 106b∼25 cluster via transfecting antisense inhibitor can influence biological behavior of gastric cancer cell.

  8. Positive Regulation of psbA Gene Expression by cis-Encoded Antisense RNAs in Synechocystis sp. PCC 68031[OA

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Isamu; Stazic, Damir; Eisenhut, Marion; Vuorio, Eerika; Steglich, Claudia; Hess, Wolfgang R.; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-01-01

    The D1 protein of photosystem II in the thylakoid membrane of photosynthetic organisms is encoded by psbA genes, which in cyanobacteria occur in the form of a small gene family. Light-dependent up-regulation of psbA gene expression is crucial to ensure the proper replacement of the D1 protein. To gain a high level of gene expression, psbA transcription can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude. Recent transcriptome analyses demonstrated a high number of cis-encoded antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in bacteria, but very little is known about their possible functions. Here, we show the presence of two cis-encoded asRNAs (PsbA2R and PsbA3R) of psbA2 and psbA3 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. These asRNAs are located in the 5′ untranslated region of psbA2 and psbA3 genes. Their expression becomes up-regulated by light and down-regulated by darkness, similar to their target mRNAs. In the PsbA2R-suppressing strain [PsbA2R(−)], the amount of psbA2 mRNA was only about 50% compared with the control strain. Likewise, we identified a 15% lowered activity of photosystem II and a reduced amount of the D1 protein in PsbA2R(−) compared with the control strain. The function of PsbA2R in the stabilization of psbA2 mRNA was shown from in vitro RNase E assay when the AU box and the ribosome-binding site in the 5′ untranslated region of psbA2 mRNA were both covered by PsbA2R. These results add another layer of complexity to the mechanisms that contribute to psbA gene expression and show PsbA2R as a positively acting factor to achieve a maximum level of D1 synthesis. PMID:22858634

  9. Cellular Selenoprotein mRNA Tethering via Antisense Interactions with Ebola and HIV-1 mRNAs May Impact Host Selenium Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ethan Will; Ruzicka, Jan A.; Premadasa, Lakmini; Zhao, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of protein expression by non-coding RNAs typically involves effects on mRNA degradation and/or ribosomal translation. The possibility of virus-host mRNA-mRNA antisense tethering interactions (ATI) as a gain-of-function strategy, via the capture of functional RNA motifs, has not been hitherto considered. We present evidence that ATIs may be exploited by certain RNA viruses in order to tether the mRNAs of host selenoproteins, potentially exploiting the proximity of a captured host selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element to enable the expression of virally-encoded selenoprotein modules, via translation of in-frame UGA stop codons as selenocysteine. Computational analysis predicts thermodynamically stable ATIs between several widely expressed mammalian selenoprotein mRNAs (e.g., isoforms of thioredoxin reductase) and specific Ebola virus mRNAs, and HIV-1 mRNA, which we demonstrate via DNA gel shift assays. The probable functional significance of these ATIs is further supported by the observation that, in both viruses, they are located in close proximity to highly conserved in-frame UGA stop codons at the 3′ end of open reading frames that encode essential viral proteins (the HIV-1 nef protein and the Ebola nucleoprotein). Significantly, in HIV/AIDS patients, an inverse correlation between serum selenium and mortality has been repeatedly documented, and clinical benefits of selenium in the context of multi-micronutrient supplementation have been demonstrated in several well-controlled clinical trials. Hence, in the light of our findings, the possibility of a similar role for selenium in Ebola pathogenesis and treatment merits serious investigation. PMID:26369818

  10. Cellular Selenoprotein mRNA Tethering via Antisense Interactions with Ebola and HIV-1 mRNAs May Impact Host Selenium Biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ethan Will; Ruzicka, Jan A; Premadasa, Lakmini; Zhao, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of protein expression by non-coding RNAs typically involves effects on mRNA degradation and/or ribosomal translation. The possibility of virus-host mRNA-mRNA antisense tethering interactions (ATI) as a gain-of-function strategy, via the capture of functional RNA motifs, has not been hitherto considered. We present evidence that ATIs may be exploited by certain RNA viruses in order to tether the mRNAs of host selenoproteins, potentially exploiting the proximity of a captured host selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element to enable the expression of virally-encoded selenoprotein modules, via translation of in-frame UGA stop codons as selenocysteine. Computational analysis predicts thermodynamically stable ATIs between several widely expressed mammalian selenoprotein mRNAs (e.g., isoforms of thioredoxin reductase) and specific Ebola virus mRNAs, and HIV-1 mRNA, which we demonstrate via DNA gel shift assays. The probable functional significance of these ATIs is further supported by the observation that, in both viruses, they are located in close proximity to highly conserved in-frame UGA stop codons at the 3' end of open reading frames that encode essential viral proteins (the HIV-1 nef protein and the Ebola nucleoprotein). Significantly, in HIV/AIDS patients, an inverse correlation between serum selenium and mortality has been repeatedly documented, and clinical benefits of selenium in the context of multi-micronutrient supplementation have been demonstrated in several well-controlled clinical trials. Hence, in the light of our findings, the possibility of a similar role for selenium in Ebola pathogenesis and treatment merits serious investigation.

  11. Achieving large dynamic range control of gene expression with a compact RNA transcription-translation regulator.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Alexandra M; Lucks, Julius B

    2017-04-06

    RNA transcriptional regulators are emerging as versatile components for genetic network construction. However, these regulators suffer from incomplete repression in their OFF state, making their dynamic range less than that of their protein counterparts. This incomplete repression causes expression leak, which impedes the construction of larger synthetic regulatory networks as leak propagation can interfere with desired network function. To address this, we demonstrate how naturally derived antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional regulators can be configured to regulate both transcription and translation in a single compact RNA mechanism that functions in Escherichia coli. Using in vivo gene expression assays, we show that a combination of transcriptional termination and ribosome binding site sequestration increases repression from 85% to 98%, or activation from 10-fold to over 900-fold, in response to cognate antisense RNAs. We also show that orthogonal repressive versions of this mechanism can be created through engineering minimal antisense RNAs. Finally, to demonstrate the utility of this mechanism, we use it to reduce network leak in an RNA-only cascade. We anticipate these regulators will find broad use as synthetic biology moves beyond parts engineering to the design and construction of more sophisticated regulatory networks.

  12. Achieving large dynamic range control of gene expression with a compact RNA transcription–translation regulator

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract RNA transcriptional regulators are emerging as versatile components for genetic network construction. However, these regulators suffer from incomplete repression in their OFF state, making their dynamic range less than that of their protein counterparts. This incomplete repression causes expression leak, which impedes the construction of larger synthetic regulatory networks as leak propagation can interfere with desired network function. To address this, we demonstrate how naturally derived antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional regulators can be configured to regulate both transcription and translation in a single compact RNA mechanism that functions in Escherichia coli. Using in vivo gene expression assays, we show that a combination of transcriptional termination and ribosome binding site sequestration increases repression from 85% to 98%, or activation from 10-fold to over 900-fold, in response to cognate antisense RNAs. We also show that orthogonal repressive versions of this mechanism can be created through engineering minimal antisense RNAs. Finally, to demonstrate the utility of this mechanism, we use it to reduce network leak in an RNA-only cascade. We anticipate these regulators will find broad use as synthetic biology moves beyond parts engineering to the design and construction of more sophisticated regulatory networks. PMID:28387839

  13. A pseudogene long noncoding RNA network regulates PTEN transcription and translation in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnsson, Per; Ackley, Amanda; Vidarsdottir, Linda; Lui, Weng-Onn; Corcoran, Martin; Grandér, Dan; Morris, Kevin V.

    2013-01-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to be under the regulatory control of a PTEN pseudogene expressed noncoding RNA, PTENpg1. Here, we characterize a previously unidentified PTENpg1 encoded antisense RNA (asRNA), which regulates PTEN transcription and PTEN mRNA stability. We find two PTENpg1 asRNA isoforms, alpha and beta. The alpha isoform functions in trans, localizes to the PTEN promoter, and epigenetically modulates PTEN transcription by the recruitment of DNMT3a and EZH2. In contrast, the beta isoform interacts with PTENpg1 through an RNA:RNA pairing interaction, which affects PTEN protein output via changes of PTENpg1 stability and microRNA sponge activity. Disruption of this asRNA-regulated network induces cell cycle arrest and sensitizes cells to doxorubicin, suggesting a biological function for the respective PTENpg1 expressed asRNAs. PMID:23435381

  14. Regulation of gene expression via retrotransposon insertions and the noncoding RNA 4.5S RNAH.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kentaro; Miyauchi, Kenjyo; Kimura, Yuko; Mito, Mari; Okada, Shunpei; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2015-11-01

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) comprise a significant portion of mammalian genomes and regulate gene expression through a variety of mechanisms. Here, we show that Myodonta clade-specific 4.5S RNAH (4.5SH), an abundant nuclear noncoding RNA that is highly homologous to the retrotransposon SINE B1, controls the expression of reporter gene that contains the antisense insertion of SINE B1 via nuclear retention. The depletion of endogenous 4.5SH with antisense oligonucleotides neutralizes the nuclear retention and changes the subcellular distribution of the reporter transcripts containing the antisense SINE B1 insertion. Importantly, endogenous transcripts with antisense SINE B1 were increased in the cytoplasm after knockdown of 4.5SH, leading to a decrease in cellular growth. We propose a tentative hypothesis that the amplification of the 4.5SH cluster in specific rodent species might delineate their evolutionary direction via the regulation of genes containing the antisense insertion of SINE B1.

  15. Inducible antisense suppression of glycolate oxidase reveals its strong regulation over photosynthesis in rice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huawei; Zhang, Jianjun; Zeng, Jiwu; Jiang, Linrong; Liu, Ee; Peng, Changlian; He, Zhenghui; Peng, Xinxiang

    2009-01-01

    Photorespiration is one of the most intensively studied topics in plant biology. While a number of mutants deficient in photorespiratory enzymes have been identified and characterized for their physiological functions, efforts on glycolate oxidase (GLO; EC 1.1.3.15) have not been so successful. This is a report about the generation of transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants carrying a GLO antisense gene driven by an estradiol-inducible promoter, which allowed for controllable suppressions of GLO and its detailed functional analyses. The GLO-suppressed plants showed typical photorespiration-deficient phenotypes. More intriguingly, it was found that a positive and linear correlation existed between GLO activities and the net photosynthetic rates (P(N)), and photoinhibition subsequently occurred once P(N) reduction surpassed 60%, indicating GLO can exert a strong regulation over photosynthesis. Various expression analyses identified that Rubisco activase was transcriptionally suppressed in the GLO-suppressed plants, consistent with the decreased Rubisco activation states. While the substrate glycolate accumulated substantially, few changes were observed for the product glyoxylate, and for some other downstream metabolites or genes as well in the transgenic plants. Further analyses revealed that isocitrate lyase and malate synthase, two key enzymes in the glyoxylate cycle, were highly up-regulated under GLO deficiency. Taken together, the results suggest that GLO is a typical photorespiratory enzyme and that it can exert a strong regulation over photosynthesis, possibly through a feed-back inhibition on Rubisco activase, and that the glyoxylate cycle may be partially activated to compensate for the photorespiratory glyoxylate when GLO is suppressed in rice.

  16. Manipulation of neuropeptide biosynthesis through the expression of antisense RNA for peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Mains, R E; Bloomquist, B T; Eipper, B A

    1991-02-01

    Stable cell lines with significantly elevated or diminished levels of a key neuropeptide processing enzyme, peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), were generated by transfection of a mouse pituitary cell line with expression vectors containing PAM cDNA in the sense or antisense orientation. By evaluating the ability of these cell lines to alpha-amidate endogenous neuropeptides, a rate-limiting role for PAM in neuropeptide alpha-amidation was demonstrated. Overexpression of either the full-length PAM precursor with its trans-membrane domain or a soluble protein containing only the monooxygenase domain of PAM led to increased alpha-amidation of endogenous neuropeptides. Overexpression of the full-length PAM led to an unexpected decrease in the endoproteolytic processing of endogenous prohormone; conversely, underexpression of PAM led to significantly enhanced endoproteolytic processing of endogenous prohormone. These data suggest that PAM may have additional functions in peptide processing.

  17. Engineering Resistance Against Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus Using Antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Haq, Q M I; Ali, Arif; Malathi, V G

    2010-06-01

    Yellow mosaic disease of cultivated legumes in South-East Asia, is caused by Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) and Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) belonging to the genus Begomovirus of the family Geminiviridae. Efforts to engineer resistance against the genus Begomovirus are focused mainly on silencing of complementary-sense virus genes involved in virus replication. Here we have targeted a complementary-sense gene (ACI) encoding Replication initiation Protein (Rep) to develop resistance against soybean isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus-[India:New Delhi:Soybean 2:1999], a bipartite begomovirus prevalent throughout the Indian subcontinent. We show that the legume host plants co-agroinoculated with infectious constructs of soybean isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus [India:New Delhi:Soybean 2:1999] along with this antisense Rep gene construct show resistance to the virus.

  18. Regulation of S-Like Ribonuclease Levels in Arabidopsis. Antisense Inhibition of RNS1 or RNS2 Elevates Anthocyanin Accumulation1

    PubMed Central

    Bariola, Pauline A.; MacIntosh, Gustavo C.; Green, Pamela J.

    1999-01-01

    The S-like ribonucleases (RNases) RNS1 and RNS2 of Arabidopsis are members of the widespread T2 ribonuclease family, whose members also include the S-RNases, involved in gametophytic self-incompatibility in plants. Both RNS1 and RNS2 mRNAs have been shown previously to be induced by inorganic phosphate (Pi) starvation. In our study we examined this regulation at the protein level and determined the effects of diminishing RNS1 and RNS2 expression using antisense techniques. The Pi-starvation control of RNS1 and RNS2 was confirmed using antibodies specific for each protein. These specific antibodies also demonstrated that RNS1 is secreted, whereas RNS2 is intracellular. By introducing antisense constructs, mRNA accumulation was inhibited by up to 90% for RNS1 and up to 65% for RNS2. These plants contained abnormally high levels of anthocyanins, the production of which is often associated with several forms of stress, including Pi starvation. This effect demonstrates that diminishing the amounts of either RNS1 or RNS2 leads to effects that cannot be compensated for by the actions of other RNases, even though Arabidopsis contains a large number of different RNase activities. These results, together with the differential localization of the proteins, imply that RNS1 and RNS2 have distinct functions in the plant. PMID:9880376

  19. Long antisense non-coding RNAs and the epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vadaie, Nadia; Morris, Kevin V

    2013-08-01

    Shortly after the completion of the human genome project in 2003, the Encode project was launched. The project was set out to identify the functional elements in the human genome, and unexpectedly it was found that >80% of the genome is transcribed. The Encode project identified those transcribed regions of the genome to be encoded by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). With only 2% of the genome carrying gene-encoding proteins, the conundrum was then, what is the function, if any, of these non-coding regions of the genome? These ncRNAs included both short and long RNAs. The focus of this review will be on antisense long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), as these transcripts have been observed to play a role in gene expression of protein-coding genes. Some lncRNAs have been found to regulate protein-coding gene transcription at the epigenetic level, whereby they suppress transcription through the recruitment of protein complexes to target loci in the genome. Conversely, there are lncRNAs that have a positive role in gene expression with less known about mechanism, and some lncRNAs have been shown to be involved in post-transcriptional processes. Additionally, lncRNAs have been observed to regulate their own expression in a positive feedback loop by functioning as a decoy. The biological significance of lncRNAs is only just now becoming evident, with many lncRNAs found to play a significant role in several human diseases.

  20. Regulating Bacterial Virulence with RNA.

    PubMed

    Quereda, Juan J; Cossart, Pascale

    2017-09-08

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) regulating virulence have been identified in most pathogens. This review discusses RNA-mediated mechanisms exploited by bacterial pathogens to successfully infect and colonize their hosts. It discusses the most representative RNA-mediated regulatory mechanisms employed by two intracellular [Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium)] and two extracellular (Vibrio cholerae and Staphylococcus aureus) bacterial pathogens. We review the RNA-mediated regulators (e.g., thermosensors, riboswitches, cis- and trans-encoded RNAs) used for adaptation to the specific niches colonized by these bacteria (intestine, blood, or the intracellular environment, for example) in the framework of the specific pathophysiological aspects of the diseases caused by these microorganisms. A critical discussion of the newest findings in the field of bacterial ncRNAs shows how examples in model pathogens could pave the way for the discovery of new mechanisms in other medically important bacterial pathogens.

  1. Sense and antisense transcripts of the developmentally regulated murine hsp70.2 gene are expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping areas in the adult brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the spatial pattern of expression of a member of the hsp70 gene family, hsp70.2, in the mouse central nervous system. Surprisingly, RNA blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed abundant expression of an 'antisense' hsp70.2 transcript in several areas of adult mouse brain. Two different transcripts recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for the hsp70.2 gene were expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping neuronal populations. RNA blot analysis revealed low levels of the 2.7 kb transcript of hsp70.2 in several areas of the brain, with highest signal in the hippocampus. Abundant expression of a slightly larger (approximately 2.8 kb) 'antisense' transcript was detected in several brain regions, notably in the brainstem, cerebellum, mesencephalic tectum, thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus. In situ hybridization revealed that the sense and antisense transcripts were both predominantly neuronal and localized to the same cell types in the granular layer of the cerebellum, trapezoid nucleus of the superior olivary complex, locus coeruleus and hippocampus. The hsp70.2 antisense transcripts were particularly abundant in the frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, subthalamic nucleus, zona incerta, superior and inferior colliculi, central gray, brainstem, and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Our findings have revealed a distinct cellular and spatial localization of both sense and antisense transcripts, demonstrating a new level of complexity in the function of the heat shock genes.

  2. Sense and antisense transcripts of the developmentally regulated murine hsp70.2 gene are expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping areas in the adult brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the spatial pattern of expression of a member of the hsp70 gene family, hsp70.2, in the mouse central nervous system. Surprisingly, RNA blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed abundant expression of an 'antisense' hsp70.2 transcript in several areas of adult mouse brain. Two different transcripts recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for the hsp70.2 gene were expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping neuronal populations. RNA blot analysis revealed low levels of the 2.7 kb transcript of hsp70.2 in several areas of the brain, with highest signal in the hippocampus. Abundant expression of a slightly larger (approximately 2.8 kb) 'antisense' transcript was detected in several brain regions, notably in the brainstem, cerebellum, mesencephalic tectum, thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus. In situ hybridization revealed that the sense and antisense transcripts were both predominantly neuronal and localized to the same cell types in the granular layer of the cerebellum, trapezoid nucleus of the superior olivary complex, locus coeruleus and hippocampus. The hsp70.2 antisense transcripts were particularly abundant in the frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, subthalamic nucleus, zona incerta, superior and inferior colliculi, central gray, brainstem, and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Our findings have revealed a distinct cellular and spatial localization of both sense and antisense transcripts, demonstrating a new level of complexity in the function of the heat shock genes.

  3. Reduction of the amount of periplasmic hydrogenase in Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) with antisense RNA: direct evidence for an important role of this hydrogenase in lactate metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, W A; van Dongen, W M; Veeger, C

    1991-01-01

    To establish the function of the periplasmic Fe-only hydrogenase in the anaerobic sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough), derivatives with a reduced content of this enzyme were constructed by introduction of a plasmid that directs the synthesis of antisense RNA complementary to hydrogenase mRNA. It was demonstrated that the antisense RNA technique allowed specific suppression of the synthesis of this hydrogenase in D. vulgaris by decreasing the amount of hydrogenase mRNA but did not result in the complete elimination of the enzyme, as is usual with most conventional mutagenesis techniques. The hydrogenase content in these antisense RNA-producing D. vulgaris clones was two- to threefold lower than in the parental strain when the strains were grown in batch cultures with lactate as a substrate and sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor. Under these conditions, several differences in growth parameters were measured between the hydrogenase-suppressed clones and wild-type D. vulgaris: growth rates of the clones decreased two- to threefold, and at excess lactate, growth yields were reduced by 20%. Furthermore, the amount of hydrogen measured in the culture headspaces was reduced three- to fivefold for the clones. These observations indicate that this hydrogenase has an important function during growth on lactate and is involved in hydrogen production from protons and electrons originating from at least one of the two oxidation reactions in the conversion of lactate to acetate. The implications for the energy metabolism of D. vulgaris are discussed. Images PMID:1711025

  4. The role of gsc and BMP-4 in dorsal-ventral patterning of the marginal zone in Xenopus: a loss-of-function study using antisense RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Steinbeisser, H; Fainsod, A; Niehrs, C; Sasai, Y; De Robertis, E M

    1995-01-01

    The dorsal-specific homeobox gene goosecoid (gsc) and the bone morphogenetic protein 4 gene (BMP-4) are expressed in complementary regions of the Xenopus gastrula. Injection of gsc mRNA dorsalizes ventral mesodermal tissue and can induce axis formation in normal and UV-ventralized embryos. On the other hand, BMP-4 mRNA injection, which has a strong ventralizing effect on whole embryos, has been implicated in ventralization by UV, and can rescue tail structures in embryos dorsalized by LiCl. The above-mentioned putative roles for BMP-4 and gsc are based on gain-of-function experiments. In order to determine the in vivo role of these two genes in the patterning of the Xenopus mesoderm during gastrulation, partial loss-of-function experiments were performed using antisense RNA injections. Using marker genes that are expressed early in gastrulation, we show that antisense gsc RNA has a ventralizing effect on embryos, whereas antisense BMP-4 RNA dorsalizes mesodermal tissue. These loss-of-function studies also show a requirement for gsc and BMP-4 in the dorsalization induced by LiCl and in the ventralization generated by UV irradiation, respectively. Thus, both gain- and loss-of-function results for gsc and BMP-4 support the view that these two genes are necessary components of the dorsal and ventral patterning pathways in Xenopus embryos. Images PMID:7489713

  5. Estimating the number of plasmids taken up by a eukaryotic cell during transfection and evidence that antisense RNA abolishes gene expression in Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Materna, Stefan C; Marwan, Wolfgang

    2005-02-01

    We have estimated the statistical distribution of the number of plasmids taken up by individual Jurkat lymphoma cells during electroporation in the presence of two plasmids, one encoding for yellow (EYFP) the other for cyan (ECFP) fluorescent protein. The plasmid concentration at which most of the cells take up only one plasmid or several molecules was determined by statistical analysis. We found that cells behaved slightly heterogeneous in plasmid uptake and describe how the homogeneity of a cell population can be quantified by Poisson statistics in order to identify experimental conditions that yield homogeneously transfection-competent cell populations. The experimental procedure worked out with Jurkat cells was applied to assay the effectiveness of antisense RNA in knocking down gene expression in Physarum polycephalum. Double transfection of flagellates with vectors encoding EYFP and antisense-EYFP revealed for the first time that gene expression can be suppressed by co-expression of antisense RNA in Physarum. Quantitative analysis revealed that one copy of antisense expressing gene per EYFP gene was sufficient to completely suppress formation of the EYFP protein in Physarum.

  6. Antisense transcription licenses nascent transcripts to mediate transcriptional gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Yunkun; Cheng, Jiasen; Sun, Xianyun; Zhou, Zhipeng; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, antisense transcription can regulate sense transcription by induction of epigenetic modifications. We showed previously that antisense transcription triggers Dicer-independent siRNA (disiRNA) production and disiRNA locus DNA methylation (DLDM) in Neurospora crassa. Here we show that the conserved exonuclease ERI-1 (enhanced RNAi-1) is a critical component in this process. Antisense transcription and ERI-1 binding to target RNAs are necessary and sufficient to trigger DLDM. Convergent transcription causes stalling of RNA polymerase II during transcription, which permits ERI-1 to bind nascent RNAs in the nucleus and recruit a histone methyltransferase complex that catalyzes chromatin modifications. Furthermore, we show that, in the cytoplasm, ERI-1 targets hundreds of transcripts from loci without antisense transcription to regulate RNA stability. Together, our results demonstrate a critical role for transcription kinetics in long noncoding RNA-mediated epigenetic modifications and identify ERI-1 as an important regulator of cotranscriptional gene silencing and post-transcriptional RNA metabolism. PMID:27856616

  7. Regulated HIV-2 RNA dimerization by means of alternative RNA conformations

    PubMed Central

    Dirac, Annette M. G.; Huthoff, Hendrik; Kjems, Jørgen; Berkhout, Ben

    2002-01-01

    The dimer initiation site (DIS) hairpin of the HIV-2 untranslated leader RNA mediates in vitro dimerization through ‘loop–loop kissing’ of a loop-exposed palindrome sequence. Premature RNA dimerization must be prevented during the retroviral life cycle. A regulatory mechanism has been proposed for the HIV-1 leader RNA that can adopt an alternative conformation in which the DIS motif is effectively masked by long-distance base pairing with upstream leader sequences. We now report that HIV-2 RNA dimerization is also regulated. Sequestering of the DIS motif by base pairing interactions with downstream leader sequences mediates a switch to a dimerization-impaired conformation. The existence of two alternative conformations of the HIV-2 leader RNA is supported by UV melting experiments. Furthermore, the equilibrium between the two conformations can be shifted by annealing of antisense oligonucleotides or by deletion of certain leader regions. These measures have a profound impact on the dimerization properties of the transcript, demonstrating a mutual exclusivity between the alternative conformation and dimerization, similar to what has been described for the HIV-1 leader. The overall resemblance in regulation of HIV-1 and HIV-2 RNA dimerization suggests that a similar mechanism may be operating in other lentiviruses and perhaps all retroviridae. PMID:12060681

  8. The Antisense Transcript SMN-AS1 Regulates SMN Expression and Is a Novel Therapeutic Target for Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    d'Ydewalle, Constantin; Ramos, Daniel M; Pyles, Noah J; Ng, Shi-Yan; Gorz, Mariusz; Pilato, Celeste M; Ling, Karen; Kong, Lingling; Ward, Amanda J; Rubin, Lee L; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Sumner, Charlotte J

    2017-01-04

    The neuromuscular disorder spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the most common inherited killer of infants, is caused by insufficient expression of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. SMA therapeutics development efforts have focused on identifying strategies to increase SMN expression. We identified a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that arises from the antisense strand of SMN, SMN-AS1, which is enriched in neurons and transcriptionally represses SMN expression by recruiting the epigenetic Polycomb repressive complex-2. Targeted degradation of SMN-AS1 with antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) increases SMN expression in patient-derived cells, cultured neurons, and the mouse central nervous system. SMN-AS1 ASOs delivered together with SMN2 splice-switching oligonucleotides additively increase SMN expression and improve survival of severe SMA mice. This study is the first proof of concept that targeting a lncRNA to transcriptionally activate SMN2 can be combined with SMN2 splicing modification to ameliorate SMA and demonstrates the promise of combinatorial ASOs for the treatment of neurogenetic disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq and simulations to probe structure-function design principles of RNA transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Melissa K; Watters, Kyle E; Gasper, Paul M; Abbott, Timothy R; Carlson, Paul D; Chen, Alan A; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-06-01

    Antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional regulators are powerful tools for controlling gene expression and creating synthetic gene networks. RNA transcriptional repressors derived from natural mechanisms called attenuators are particularly versatile, though their mechanistic complexity has made them difficult to engineer. Here we identify a new structure-function design principle for attenuators that enables the forward engineering of new RNA transcriptional repressors. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq to characterize the structures of attenuator variants within Escherichia coli, we show that attenuator hairpins that facilitate interaction with antisense RNAs require interior loops for proper function. Molecular dynamics simulations of these attenuator variants suggest these interior loops impart structural flexibility. We further observe hairpin flexibility in the cellular structures of natural RNA mechanisms that use antisense RNA interactions to repress translation, confirming earlier results from in vitro studies. Finally, we design new transcriptional attenuators in silico using an interior loop as a structural requirement and show that they function as desired in vivo. This work establishes interior loops as an important structural element for designing synthetic RNA gene regulators. We anticipate that the coupling of experimental measurement of cellular RNA structure and function with computational modeling will enable rapid discovery of structure-function design principles for a diverse array of natural and synthetic RNA regulators. © 2016 Takahashi et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  10. In vitro evaluation of antisense RNA efficacy against filovirus infection, by use of reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Groseth, Allison; Hoenen, Thomas; Alimonti, Judie B; Zielecki, Florian; Ebihara, Hideki; Theriault, Steven; Ströher, Ute; Becker, Stephan; Feldmann, Heinz

    2007-11-15

    Recent reports indicate the possibility of using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to treat filovirus infections; however, they also show that the effectiveness of this approach is highly dependent on target site selection. Therefore, we explored the application of minigenomes as screening tools to identify functional siRNA targets under biosafety level 2 conditions. siRNA candidates were screened using the minigenome system to identify those with potential antiviral activity, compared with controls with poor predicted function on the basis of design guidelines, or those that were noncomplementary to Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV). These findings were then validated in cell culture by use of a previously developed ZEBOV expressing green fluorescent protein (ZEBOV-GFP), which allowed siRNA function to be easily assessed via flow cytometry or focus formation. The most promising siRNA based on minigenome screening, targeting the nucleoprotein (NP) mRNA (ZNP1), also reduced protein expression and decreased viral titers after infection with ZEBOV-GFP to an extent similar to that reported for an siRNA recently shown to be therapeutic in guinea pigs. Minigenome screening appears to be an effective and convenient method of evaluating the therapeutic potential of siRNA targets, and findings suggest that its use would increase success rates in later stages of siRNA testing.

  11. Bacterial Small RNA Regulators: Versatile Roles and Rapidly Evolving Variations

    PubMed Central

    Gottesman, Susan; Storz, Gisela

    2011-01-01

    Small RNA regulators (sRNAs) have been identified in a wide range of bacteria and found to play critical regulatory roles in many processes. The major families of sRNAs include true antisense RNAs, synthesized from the strand complementary to the mRNA they regulate, sRNAs that also act by pairing but have limited complementarity with their targets, and sRNAs that regulate proteins by binding to and affecting protein activity. The sRNAs with limited complementarity are akin to eukaryotic microRNAs in their ability to modulate the activity and stability of multiple mRNAs. In many bacterial species, the RNA chaperone Hfq is required to promote pairing between these sRNAs and their target mRNAs. Understanding the evolution of regulatory sRNAs remains a challenge; sRNA genes show evidence of duplication and horizontal transfer but also could be evolved from tRNAs, mRNAs or random transcription. PMID:20980440

  12. Antigenic variation in Giardia lamblia is regulated by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Prucca, César G; Slavin, Ileana; Quiroga, Rodrigo; Elías, Eliana V; Rivero, Fernando D; Saura, Alicia; Carranza, Pedro G; Luján, Hugo D

    2008-12-11

    Giardia lamblia (also called Giardia intestinalis) is one of the most common intestinal parasites of humans. To evade the host's immune response, Giardia undergoes antigenic variation-a process that allows the parasite to develop chronic and recurrent infections. From a repertoire of approximately 190 variant-specific surface protein (VSP)-coding genes, Giardia expresses only one VSP on the surface of each parasite at a particular time, but spontaneously switches to a different VSP by unknown mechanisms. Here we show that regulation of VSP expression involves a system comprising RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, Dicer and Argonaute, known components of the RNA interference machinery. Clones expressing a single surface antigen efficiently transcribe several VSP genes but only accumulate transcripts encoding the VSP to be expressed. Detection of antisense RNAs corresponding to the silenced VSP genes and small RNAs from the silenced but not for the expressed vsp implicate the RNA interference pathway in antigenic variation. Remarkably, silencing of Dicer and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase leads to a change from single to multiple VSP expression in individual parasites.

  13. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq and simulations to probe structure–function design principles of RNA transcriptional regulators

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Melissa K.; Watters, Kyle E.; Gasper, Paul M.; Abbott, Timothy R.; Carlson, Paul D.; Chen, Alan A.

    2016-01-01

    Antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional regulators are powerful tools for controlling gene expression and creating synthetic gene networks. RNA transcriptional repressors derived from natural mechanisms called attenuators are particularly versatile, though their mechanistic complexity has made them difficult to engineer. Here we identify a new structure–function design principle for attenuators that enables the forward engineering of new RNA transcriptional repressors. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq to characterize the structures of attenuator variants within Escherichia coli, we show that attenuator hairpins that facilitate interaction with antisense RNAs require interior loops for proper function. Molecular dynamics simulations of these attenuator variants suggest these interior loops impart structural flexibility. We further observe hairpin flexibility in the cellular structures of natural RNA mechanisms that use antisense RNA interactions to repress translation, confirming earlier results from in vitro studies. Finally, we design new transcriptional attenuators in silico using an interior loop as a structural requirement and show that they function as desired in vivo. This work establishes interior loops as an important structural element for designing synthetic RNA gene regulators. We anticipate that the coupling of experimental measurement of cellular RNA structure and function with computational modeling will enable rapid discovery of structure–function design principles for a diverse array of natural and synthetic RNA regulators. PMID:27103533

  14. Reversible cardiac fibrosis and heart failure induced by conditional expression of an antisense mRNA of the mineralocorticoid receptor in cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Beggah, Ahmed T.; Escoubet, Brigitte; Puttini, Stefania; Cailmail, Stephane; Delage, Vanessa; Ouvrard-Pascaud, Antoine; Bocchi, Brigitte; Peuchmaur, Michel; Delcayre, Claude; Farman, Nicolette; Jaisser, Frederic

    2002-01-01

    Cardiac failure is a common feature in the evolution of cardiac disease. Among the determinants of cardiac failure, the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system has a central role, and antagonism of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy. In this study, we questioned the role of the MR, not of aldosterone, on heart function, using an inducible and cardiac-specific transgenic mouse model. We have generated a conditional knock-down model by expressing solely in the heart an antisense mRNA directed against the murine MR, a transcription factor with unknown targets in cardiomyocytes. Within 2–3 mo, mice developed severe heart failure and cardiac fibrosis in the absence of hypertension or chronic hyperaldosteronism. Moreover, cardiac failure and fibrosis were fully reversible when MR antisense mRNA expression was subsequently suppressed. PMID:11997477

  15. Dynamics of Co-Transcriptional Pre-mRNA Folding Influences the Induction of Dystrophin Exon Skipping by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian Li; MacDorman, Karl F.; Lai, Poh San; Yee, Woon Chee

    2008-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) mediated exon skipping offers potential therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, the identification of effective AON target sites remains unsatisfactory for lack of a precise method to predict their binding accessibility. This study demonstrates the importance of co-transcriptional pre-mRNA folding in determining the accessibility of AON target sites for AON induction of selective exon skipping in DMD. Because transcription and splicing occur in tandem, AONs must bind to their target sites before splicing factors. Furthermore, co-transcriptional pre-mRNA folding forms transient secondary structures, which redistributes accessible binding sites. In our analysis, to approximate transcription elongation, a “window of analysis” that included the entire targeted exon was shifted one nucleotide at a time along the pre-mRNA. Possible co-transcriptional secondary structures were predicted using the sequence in each step of transcriptional analysis. A nucleotide was considered “engaged” if it formed a complementary base pairing in all predicted secondary structures of a particular step. Correlation of frequency and localisation of engaged nucleotides in AON target sites accounted for the performance (efficacy and efficiency) of 94% of 176 previously reported AONs. Four novel insights are inferred: (1) the lowest frequencies of engaged nucleotides are associated with the most efficient AONs; (2) engaged nucleotides at 3′ or 5′ ends of the target site attenuate AON performance more than at other sites; (3) the performance of longer AONs is less attenuated by engaged nucleotides at 3′ or 5′ ends of the target site compared to shorter AONs; (4) engaged nucleotides at 3′ end of a short target site attenuates AON efficiency more than at 5′ end. PMID:18365002

  16. A Novel Antisense RNA from the Salmonella Virulence Plasmid pSLT Expressed by Non-Growing Bacteria inside Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rico-Pérez, Gadea; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) are regulatory molecules playing relevant roles in response to environmental changes, stressful conditions and pathogenesis. The intracellular bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is known to regulate expression of some sRNAs during colonization of fibroblasts. Here, we characterize a previously unknown sRNA encoded in the S. Typhimurium pSLT virulence plasmid that is specifically up-regulated by non-growing dormant bacteria persisting inside fibroblasts. This sRNA was inferred in microarray expression analyses, which unraveled enhanced transcriptional activity in the PSLT047- PSLT046 (mig5) intergenic region. The sRNA transcript was further identified as a 597-nucleotide molecule, which we named IesR-1, for ‘Intracellular-expressed-sRNA-1′. IesR-1 expression is low in bacteria growing in axenic cultures across a variety of experimental conditions but displays a marked increase (∼200–300 fold) following bacterial entry into fibroblasts. Remarkably, induction of IesR-1 expression is not prominent in bacteria proliferating within epithelial cells. IesR-1 deletion affects the control of bacterial growth in defined fibroblast cell lines and impairs virulence in a mouse infection model. Expression analyses performed in the PSLT047-iesR-1-PSLT046 (mig5) region support a cis-acting regulatory mechanism of IesR-1 as antisense RNA over the PSLT047 transcript involving interaction at their respective 3′ ends and modulation of PSLT047 protein levels. This model is sustained by the scarce production of PSLT047 protein observed in non-growing intracellular bacteria and the high amount of PSLT047 protein produced by bacteria carrying a truncated IesR-1 version with separated 5′ and 3′ regions. Taken together, these data reveal that S. Typhimurium sRNAs encoded in the pSLT virulence plasmid respond to a state of persistence inside the host cell. As exemplified by IesR-1, some of these sRNAs may

  17. A novel antisense RNA from the Salmonella virulence plasmid pSLT expressed by non-growing bacteria inside eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo-Asensio, Jesús; Ortega, Alvaro D; Rico-Pérez, Gadea; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; García-Del Portillo, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) are regulatory molecules playing relevant roles in response to environmental changes, stressful conditions and pathogenesis. The intracellular bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is known to regulate expression of some sRNAs during colonization of fibroblasts. Here, we characterize a previously unknown sRNA encoded in the S. Typhimurium pSLT virulence plasmid that is specifically up-regulated by non-growing dormant bacteria persisting inside fibroblasts. This sRNA was inferred in microarray expression analyses, which unraveled enhanced transcriptional activity in the PSLT047- PSLT046 (mig5) intergenic region. The sRNA transcript was further identified as a 597-nucleotide molecule, which we named IesR-1, for 'Intracellular-expressed-sRNA-1'. IesR-1 expression is low in bacteria growing in axenic cultures across a variety of experimental conditions but displays a marked increase (∼200-300 fold) following bacterial entry into fibroblasts. Remarkably, induction of IesR-1 expression is not prominent in bacteria proliferating within epithelial cells. IesR-1 deletion affects the control of bacterial growth in defined fibroblast cell lines and impairs virulence in a mouse infection model. Expression analyses performed in the PSLT047-iesR-1-PSLT046 (mig5) region support a cis-acting regulatory mechanism of IesR-1 as antisense RNA over the PSLT047 transcript involving interaction at their respective 3' ends and modulation of PSLT047 protein levels. This model is sustained by the scarce production of PSLT047 protein observed in non-growing intracellular bacteria and the high amount of PSLT047 protein produced by bacteria carrying a truncated IesR-1 version with separated 5' and 3' regions. Taken together, these data reveal that S. Typhimurium sRNAs encoded in the pSLT virulence plasmid respond to a state of persistence inside the host cell. As exemplified by IesR-1, some of these sRNAs may contribute to

  18. Expression of long noncoding RNA-HOX transcript antisense intergenic RNA in oral squamous cell carcinoma and effect on cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Xie, Hongjun

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between long noncoding RNA-HOX transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) and the clinical pathological characteristics and prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and to evaluate the effect on cell growth. HOTAIR expressions in 50 surgically resected samples (including tumor and paracancerous tissues) collected from OSCC patients treated in our hospital from January 2009 to December 2010 were detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and the relationship with clinical pathological characteristics and prognosis was analyzed. The effect of small interfering RNA treatment on cell growth (Tca8113, UM-1, and CAL-27 cells) was evaluated by MTT assay, and those on apoptosis and cell cycle were assessed by flow cytometry. HOTAIR was positively expressed in 45 samples (90 %). The expression level in tumor tissues was significantly higher than that in paracancerous tissues (t = 5.459, P < 0.01). Relative expression level of HOTAIR was correlated with tumor size and clinical stage (P < 0.05). More HOTAIR was expressed in OSCC cell lines than in normal oral epithelial cells. Interfering with HOTAIR expression in Tca8113 cells significantly decelerated cell growth, arrested cell cycle, and promoted apoptosis (P < 0.01). HOTAIR was highly expressed in OSCC tissues and facilitated the growth of OSCC cells, thus probably being an eligible molecular marker for OSCC diagnosis and prognosis determination.

  19. How RNase HI (Escherichia coli) promoted site-selective hydrolysis works on RNA in duplex with carba-LNA and LNA substituted antisense strands in an antisense strategy context?

    PubMed

    Plashkevych, Oleksandr; Li, Qing; Chattopadhyaya, Jyoti

    2017-03-29

    A detailed kinetic study of 36 single modified AON-RNA heteroduplexes shows that substitution of a single native nucleotide in the antisense strand (AON) by locked nucleic acid (LNA) or by diastereomerically pure carba-LNA results in site-dependent modulation of RNase H promoted cleavage of complementary mRNA strands by 2 to 5 fold at 5'-GpN-3' cleavage sites, giving up to 70% of the RNA cleavage products. The experiments have been performed using RNase HI of Escherichia coli. The 2nd best cleavage site, being the 5'-ApN-3' sites, cleaves up to 23%, depending upon the substitution site in 36 isosequential complementary AONs. A comparison of the modified AON promoted RNA cleavage rates with that of the native AON shows that sequence-specificity is considerably enhanced as a result of modification. Clearly, relatively weaker 5'-purine (Pu)-pyrimidine (Py)-3' stacking in the complementary RNA strand is preferred (giving ∼90% of total cleavage products), which plays an important role in RNase H promoted RNA cleavage. A plausible mechanism of RNase H mediated cleavage of the RNA has been proposed to be two-fold, dictated by the balancing effect of the aromatic character of the purine aglycone: first, the locally formed 9-guanylate ion (pKa 9.3, ∼18-20% N1 ionized at pH 8) alters the adjoining sugar-phosphate backbone around the scissile phosphate, transforming its sugar N/S conformational equilibrium, to preferential S-type, causing preferential cleavage at 5'-GpN-3' sites around the center of 20 mer complementary mRNA. Second, the weaker nearest-neighbor strength of 5'-Pu-p-Py-3' stacking promotes preferential 5'-GpN-3' and 5'-ApN-3' cleavage, providing ∼90% of the total products, compared to ∼50% in that of the native one, because of the cLNA/LNA substituent effect on the neighboring 5'-Pu-p-Py-3' sites, providing both local steric flexibility and additional hydration. This facilitates both the water and water/Mg(2+) ion availability at the cleavage site

  20. Cis-Antisense Transcription Gives Rise to Tunable Genetic Switch Behavior: A Mathematical Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Bordoy, Antoni E; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2015-01-01

    Antisense transcription has been extensively recognized as a regulatory mechanism for gene expression across all kingdoms of life. Despite the broad importance and extensive experimental determination of cis-antisense transcription, relatively little is known about its role in controlling cellular switching responses. Growing evidence suggests the presence of non-coding cis-antisense RNAs that regulate gene expression via antisense interaction. Recent studies also indicate the role of transcriptional interference in regulating expression of neighboring genes due to traffic of RNA polymerases from adjacent promoter regions. Previous models investigate these mechanisms independently, however, little is understood about how cells utilize coupling of these mechanisms in advantageous ways that could also be used to design novel synthetic genetic devices. Here, we present a mathematical modeling framework for antisense transcription that combines the effects of both transcriptional interference and cis-antisense regulation. We demonstrate the tunability of transcriptional interference through various parameters, and that coupling of transcriptional interference with cis-antisense RNA interaction gives rise to hypersensitive switches in expression of both antisense genes. When implementing additional positive and negative feed-back loops from proteins encoded by these genes, the system response acquires a bistable behavior. Our model shows that combining these multiple-levels of regulation allows fine-tuning of system parameters to give rise to a highly tunable output, ranging from a simple-first order response to biologically complex higher-order response such as tunable bistable switch. We identify important parameters affecting the cellular switch response in order to provide the design principles for tunable gene expression using antisense transcription. This presents an important insight into functional role of antisense transcription and its importance towards

  1. Natural antisense transcripts associated with salinity response in alfalfa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) complimentary to the messenger (sense) RNA (Wang et al. 2014). Many of them are involved in regulation of their own sense transcripts thus playing pivotal biological roles in all processes of organismal development and responses...

  2. Expression of a large LINE-1-driven antisense RNA is linked to epigenetic silencing of the metastasis suppressor gene TFPI-2 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshanks, Hazel A.; Vafadar-Isfahani, Natasha; Dunican, Donncha S.; Lee, Andy; Sproul, Duncan; Lund, Jonathan N.; Meehan, Richard R.; Tufarelli, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    LINE-1 retrotransposons are abundant repetitive elements of viral origin, which in normal cells are kept quiescent through epigenetic mechanisms. Activation of LINE-1 occurs frequently in cancer and can enable LINE-1 mobilization but also has retrotransposition-independent consequences. We previously reported that in cancer, aberrantly active LINE-1 promoters can drive transcription of flanking unique sequences giving rise to LINE-1 chimeric transcripts (LCTs). Here, we show that one such LCT, LCT13, is a large transcript (>300 kb) running antisense to the metastasis-suppressor gene TFPI-2. We have modelled antisense RNA expression at TFPI-2 in transgenic mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and demonstrate that antisense RNA induces silencing and deposition of repressive histone modifications implying a causal link. Consistent with this, LCT13 expression in breast and colon cancer cell lines is associated with silencing and repressive chromatin at TFPI-2. Furthermore, we detected LCT13 transcripts in 56% of colorectal tumours exhibiting reduced TFPI-2 expression. Our findings implicate activation of LINE-1 elements in subsequent epigenetic remodelling of surrounding genes, thus hinting a novel retrotransposition-independent role for LINE-1 elements in malignancy. PMID:23703216

  3. Cytomegalovirus-mediated induction of antisense mRNA expression to UL44 inhibits virus replication in an astrocytoma cell line: identification of an essential gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ripalti, A; Boccuni, M C; Campanini, F; Landini, M P

    1995-01-01

    We have used an antisense RNA approach in the analysis of gene function in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). An astrocytoma cell line (U373-MG) that is permissive for virus replication was permanently transfected with a construct bearing sequence from HCMV UL44 (coding for the major late DNA-binding protein, ppUL44, also known as pp52 or ICP36) in an antisense orientation and under the control of the immediate-early enhancer-promoter element. Upon HCMV infection at a high multiplicity, we found a marked reduction in UL44 protein products (the ICP36 family of proteins) in established cell transfectants and a strong inhibition of virus yield in infected-cell supernatants at two weeks postinfection, while herpes simplex virus replication was not affected. In infected cells, viral DNA replication was strongly inhibited. While gene products such as pUS22 and pUL32 were also inhibited, pUL123 and pUL82 accumulated in the infected cells over time. Our data suggest an essential role for the UL44 family of proteins in HCMV replication and represent a model of virus inhibition by virus-induced antisense RNA synthesis in genetically modified cells. PMID:7884850

  4. Identification of antisense long noncoding RNAs that function as SINEUPs in human cells.

    PubMed

    Schein, Aleks; Zucchelli, Silvia; Kauppinen, Sakari; Gustincich, Stefano; Carninci, Piero

    2016-09-20

    Mammalian genomes encode numerous natural antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) that regulate gene expression. Recently, an antisense lncRNA to mouse Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (Uchl1) was reported to increase UCHL1 protein synthesis, representing a new functional class of lncRNAs, designated as SINEUPs, for SINE element-containing translation UP-regulators. Here, we show that an antisense lncRNA to the human protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A (PPP1R12A), named as R12A-AS1, which overlaps with the 5' UTR and first coding exon of the PPP1R12A mRNA, functions as a SINEUP, increasing PPP1R12A protein translation in human cells. The SINEUP activity depends on the aforementioned sense-antisense interaction and a free right Alu monomer repeat element at the 3' end of R12A-AS1. In addition, we identify another human antisense lncRNA with SINEUP activity. Our results demonstrate for the first time that human natural antisense lncRNAs can up-regulate protein translation, suggesting that endogenous SINEUPs may be widespread and present in many mammalian species.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus RNAIII coordinately represses the synthesis of virulence factors and the transcription regulator Rot by an antisense mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Boisset, Sandrine; Geissmann, Thomas; Huntzinger, Eric; Fechter, Pierre; Bendridi, Nadia; Possedko, Maria; Chevalier, Clément; Helfer, Anne Catherine; Benito, Yvonne; Jacquier, Alain; Gaspin, Christine; Vandenesch, François; Romby, Pascale

    2007-01-01

    RNAIII is the intracellular effector of the quorum-sensing system in Staphylococcus aureus. It is one of the largest regulatory RNAs (514 nucleotides long) that are known to control the expression of a large number of virulence genes. Here, we show that the 3′ domain of RNAIII coordinately represses at the post-transcriptional level, the expression of mRNAs that encode a class of virulence factors that act early in the infection process. We demonstrate that the 3′ domain acts primarily as an antisense RNA and rapidly anneals to these mRNAs, forming long RNA duplexes. The interaction between RNAIII and the mRNAs results in repression of translation initiation and triggers endoribonuclease III hydrolysis. These processes are followed by rapid depletion of the mRNA pool. In addition, we show that RNAIII and its 3′ domain mediate translational repression of rot mRNA through a limited number of base pairings involving two loop–loop interactions. Since Rot is a transcriptional regulatory protein, we proposed that RNAIII indirectly acts on many downstream genes, resulting in the activation of the synthesis of several exoproteins. These data emphasize the multitude of regulatory steps affected by RNAIII and its 3′ domain in establishing a network of S. aureus virulence factors. PMID:17545468

  6. Nucleus-localized antisense small RNAs with 5'-polyphosphate termini regulate long term transcriptional gene silencing in Entamoeba histolytica G3 strain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanbang; Alramini, Hussein; Tran, Vy; Singh, Upinder

    2011-12-30

    In the deep-branching eukaryotic parasite Entamoeba histolytica, transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of the Amoebapore A gene (ap-a) in the G3 strain has been reported with subsequent development of this parasite strain for gene silencing. However, the mechanisms underlying this gene silencing approach are poorly understood. Here we report that antisense small RNAs (sRNAs) specific to the silenced ap-a gene can be identified in G3 parasites. Furthermore, when additional genes are silenced in the G3 strain, antisense sRNAs to the newly silenced genes can also be detected. Characterization of these sRNAs demonstrates that they are ~27 nucleotides in size, have 5'-polyphosphate termini, and persist even after removal of the silencing plasmid. Immunofluorescence analysis (IFA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) show that both the Argonaute protein EhAGO2-2 and antisense sRNAs to the silenced genes are localized to the parasite nucleus. Furthermore, α-EhAGO2-2 immunoprecipitation confirmed the direct association of the antisense sRNAs with EhAGO2-2. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrate that the loci of the silenced genes are enriched for histone H3 and EhAGO2-2, indicating that both chromatin modification and the RNA-induced transcriptional silencing complex are involved in permanent gene silencing in G3 parasites. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that G3-based gene silencing in E. histolytica is mediated by an siRNA pathway, which utilizes antisense 5'-polyphosphate sRNAs. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that 5'- polyphosphate antisense sRNAs can mediate TGS, and it is the first example of RNAi-mediated TGS in protozoan parasites.

  7. A cis-regulatory antisense RNA represses translation in Vibrio cholerae through extensive complementarity and proximity to the target locus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Howard; Replogle, John Michael; Vather, Naomi; Tsao-Wu, Maya; Mistry, Ronak; Liu, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    As with all facultative pathogens, Vibrio cholerae must optimize its cellular processes to adapt to different environments with varying carbon sources and to environmental stresses. More specifically, in order to metabolize mannitol, V. cholerae must regulate the synthesis of MtlA, a mannitol transporter protein produced exclusively in the presence of mannitol. We previously showed that a cis-acting small RNA (sRNA) expressed by V. cholerae, MtlS, appears to post-transcriptionally downregulate the expression of mtlA and is produced in the absence of mannitol. We hypothesized that since it is complementary to the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of mtlA mRNA, MtlS may affect synthesis of MtlA by forming an mtlA-MtlS complex that blocks translation of the mRNA through occlusion of its ribosome binding site. To test this hypothesis, we used in vitro translation assays in order to examine the role MtlS plays in mtlA regulation and found that MtlS is sufficient to suppress translation of transcripts harboring the 5' UTR of mtlA. However, in a cellular context, the 5' UTR of mtlA is not sufficient for targeted repression by endogenous MtlS; additional segments from the coding region of mtlA play a role in the ability of the sRNA to regulate translation of mtlA mRNA. Additionally, proximity of transcription sites between the sRNA and mRNA significantly affects the efficacy of MtlS.

  8. Overlapping Antisense Transcription in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, M. E.; Moore, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates an important role for non-coding RNA molecules in eukaryotic cell regulation. A small number of coding and non-coding overlapping antisense transcripts (OATs) in eukaryotes have been reported, some of which regulate expression of the corresponding sense transcript. The prevalence of this phenomenon is unknown, but there may be an enrichment of such transcripts at imprinted gene loci. Taking a bioinformatics approach, we systematically searched a human mRNA database (RefSeq) for complementary regions that might facilitate pairing with other transcripts. We report 56 pairs of overlapping transcripts, in which each member of the pair is transcribed from the same locus. This allows us to make an estimate of 1000 for the minimum number of such transcript pairs in the entire human genome. This is a surprisingly large number of overlapping gene pairs and, clearly, some of the overlaps may not be functionally significant. Nonetheless, this may indicate an important general role for overlapping antisense control in gene regulation. EST databases were also investigated in order to address the prevalence of cases of imprinted genes with associated non-coding overlapping, antisense transcripts. However, EST databases were found to be completely inappropriate for this purpose. PMID:18628857

  9. Mechanisms and Regulation of Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing is a critical step in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, providing significant expansion of the functional proteome of eukaryotic organisms with limited gene numbers. Split eukaryotic genes contain intervening sequences or introns disrupting protein-coding exons, and intron removal occurs by repeated assembly of a large and highly dynamic ribonucleoprotein complex termed the spliceosome, which is composed of five small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles, U1, U2, U4/U6, and U5. Biochemical studies over the past 10 years have allowed the isolation as well as compositional, functional, and structural analysis of splicing complexes at distinct stages along the spliceosome cycle. The average human gene contains eight exons and seven introns, producing an average of three or more alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms. Recent high-throughput sequencing studies indicate that 100% of human genes produce at least two alternative mRNA isoforms. Mechanisms of alternative splicing include RNA–protein interactions of splicing factors with regulatory sites termed silencers or enhancers, RNA–RNA base-pairing interactions, or chromatin-based effects that can change or determine splicing patterns. Disease-causing mutations can often occur in splice sites near intron borders or in exonic or intronic RNA regulatory silencer or enhancer elements, as well as in genes that encode splicing factors. Together, these studies provide mechanistic insights into how spliceosome assembly, dynamics, and catalysis occur; how alternative splicing is regulated and evolves; and how splicing can be disrupted by cis- and trans-acting mutations leading to disease states. These findings make the spliceosome an attractive new target for small-molecule, antisense, and genome-editing therapeutic interventions. PMID:25784052

  10. Genome-wide analysis for discovery of new rice miRNA reveals natural antisense miRNA (nat-miRNAs)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Small RNAs (21-24nt) are involved in gene regulation through translation inhibition, mRNA cleavage, or directing chromatin modifications. In rice, currently ~240 miRNAs have been annotated. We sequenced more than four million small RNAs from rice and identified another 24 miRNA genes. Among these, w...

  11. Messenger RNA Methylation Regulates Glioblastoma Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Deobrat; Xie, Qi; Rich, Jeremy N; Zhao, Jing Crystal

    2017-04-10

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) modification provides an additional layer of gene regulation in cells. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Zhang et al. report that ALKBH5, a demethylase of the mRNA modification N(6)-methyladenosine, regulates proliferation and self-renewal of glioblastoma stem-like cells by modulating pre-mRNA stability and expression of the FOXM1 gene.

  12. Antisense inhibition of sorbitol synthesis leads to up-regulation of starch synthesis without altering CO2 assimilation in apple leaves.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lailiang; Zhou, Rui; Reidel, Edwin J; Sharkey, Thomas D; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2005-03-01

    Sorbitol is a primary end-product of photosynthesis in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) and many other tree fruit species of the Rosaceae family. Sorbitol synthesis shares a common hexose phosphate pool with sucrose synthesis in the cytosol. In this study, 'Greensleeves' apple was transformed with a cDNA encoding aldose 6-phosphate reductase (A6PR, EC 1.1.1.200) in the antisense orientation. Antisense expression of A6PR decreased A6PR activity in mature leaves to approximately 15-30% of the untransformed control. The antisense plants had lower concentrations of sorbitol but higher concentrations of sucrose and starch in mature leaves at both dusk and predawn. (14)CO(2) pulse-chase labeling at ambient CO(2) demonstrated that partitioning of the newly fixed carbon to starch was significantly increased, whereas that to sucrose remained unchanged in the antisense lines with decreased sorbitol synthesis. Total activities of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.39), sucrose-phosphate synthase (EC 2.4.1.14), and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.27) were not significantly altered in the antisense lines, whereas both stromal and cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) activities were higher in the antisense lines with 15% of the control A6PR activity. Concentrations of glucose 6-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate (F6P) were higher in the antisense plants than in the control, but the 3-phosphoglycerate concentration was lower in the antisense plants with 15% of the control A6PR activity. Fructose 2, 6-bisphosphate concentration increased in the antisense plants, but not to the extent expected from the increase in F6P, comparing sucrose-synthesizing species. There was no significant difference in CO(2) assimilation in response to photon flux density or intercellular CO(2) concentration. We concluded that cytosolic FBPase activity in vivo was down-regulated and starch synthesis was up-regulated in response to decreased sorbitol synthesis

  13. MicroRNA Regulation of Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Elena; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan; Aouizerat, Bradley E.

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNA are structural components of an epigenetic mechanism of post-transcriptional regulation of messenger RNA translation. Recently, there is significant interest in the application of microRNA as a blood-based biomarker of underlying physiologic conditions, and the therapeutic administration of microRNA inhibitors and mimics. The purpose of this review is to describe the current body of knowledge on microRNA regulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism, and to introduce the role of microRNA in development and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:22607769

  14. Highly Expressed Antisense Non-coding RNA in the INK4 Locus Promotes 5 Growth and Invasion of Renal Clear Carcinoma Cells Via the β-catenin Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingchun; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Guangrui; Liang, Yun; Bai, Wei; Li, Hongjun

    2017-03-02

    Long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs) antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL) is involved in several human cancers.However, the role of ANRIL in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains unclear. This study was aimed to explore whether and how ANRIL affects the RCC progression. First of all, the expression of ANRIL in clinical tumor tissues and 4 kinds of RCC cell lines were evaluated. After transfection, the cell viability, colony number, apoptosis, migration and invasion were all assessed. Then, the expression of proteins related to apoptosis, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and β-catenin signaling pathway were all assessed. In addition, the effect of IWR-endo (β-catenin inhibitor) on cell viability, migration and invasion as well as β-catenin expression were also evaluated. Results showed that ANRIL was highly expressed in RCC tissues and RCC cell lines. ANRIL significantly promoted cell proliferation, migration, invasion and EMT but inhibited cell apoptosis. Additionally, the expression levels of β-catenin, Ki-67, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β), phosphorylated GSK-3β, T cell transcription factor 4 (TCF-4) and leukemia enhancer factor 1 (LEF-1) were all markedly up-regulated by ANRIL. The effect of ARNIL silence was opposite to ANRIL overexpression. Besides, the effect of ARNIL on proliferation, migration and invasion of RCC cells could be reversed by IWR-endo. In conclusion, ANRIL, highly expressed in RCC, acted as a carcinogen in RCC cells through activation of β-catenin pathway.

  15. Regulation of Tomato Fruit Polygalacturonase mRNA Accumulation by Ethylene: A Re-Examination1

    PubMed Central

    Sitrit, Yaron; Bennett, Alan B.

    1998-01-01

    Polygalacturonase (PG) is the major enzyme responsible for pectin disassembly in ripening fruit. Despite extensive research on the factors regulating PG gene expression in fruit, there is conflicting evidence regarding the role of ethylene in mediating its expression. Transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruits in which endogenous ethylene production was suppressed by the expression of an antisense 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase gene were used to re-examine the role of ethylene in regulating the accumulation of PG mRNA, enzyme activity, and protein during fruit ripening. Treatment of transgenic antisense ACC synthase mature green fruit with ethylene at concentrations as low as 0.1 to 1 μL/L for 24 h induced PG mRNA accumulation, and this accumulation was higher at concentrations of ethylene up to 100 μL/L. Neither PG enzyme activity nor PG protein accumulated during this 24-h period of ethylene treatment, indicating that translation lags at least 24 h behind the accumulation of PG mRNA, even at high ethylene concentrations. When examined at concentrations of 10 μL/L, PG mRNA accumulated within 6 h of ethylene treatment, indicating that the PG gene responds rapidly to ethylene. Treatment of transgenic tomato fruit with a low level of ethylene (0.1 μL/L) for up to 6 d induced levels of PG mRNA, enzyme activity, and protein after 6 d, which were comparable to levels observed in ripening wild-type fruit. A similar level of internal ethylene (0.15 μL/L) was measured in transgenic antisense ACC synthase fruit that were held for 28 d after harvest. In these fruit PG mRNA, enzyme activity, and protein were detected. Collectively, these results suggest that PG mRNA accumulation is ethylene regulated, and that the low threshold levels of ethylene required to promote PG mRNA accumulation may be exceeded, even in transgenic antisense ACC synthase tomato fruit. PMID:9501147

  16. Superfolder GFP reporters validate diverse new mRNA targets of the classic porin regulator, MicF RNA.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Colin P; Podkaminski, Dimitri; Papenfort, Kai; Urban, Johannes H; Hinton, Jay C D; Vogel, Jörg

    2012-05-01

    MicF is a textbook example of a small regulatory RNA (sRNA) that acts on a trans-encoded target mRNA through imperfect base pairing. Discovery of MicF as a post-transcriptional repressor of the major Escherichia coli porin OmpF established the paradigm for a meanwhile common mechanism of translational inhibition, through antisense sequestration of a ribosome binding site. However, whether MicF regulates additional genes has remained unknown for almost three decades. Here, we have harnessed the new superfolder variant of GFP for reporter-gene fusions to validate newly predicted targets of MicF in Salmonella. We show that the conserved 5' end of MicF acts by seed pairing to repress the mRNAs of global transcriptional regulator Lrp, and periplasmic protein YahO, while a second targeting region is also required to regulate the mRNA of the lipid A-modifying enzyme LpxR. Interestingly, MicF targets lpxR at both the ribosome binding site and deep within the coding sequence. MicF binding in the coding sequence of lpxR decreases mRNA stability through exacerbating the use of a native RNase E site proximal to the short MicF-lpxR duplex. Altogether, this study assigns the classic MicF sRNA to the growing class of Hfq-associated regulators that use diverse mechanisms to impact multiple loci.

  17. Transcriptional regulation of translocator protein (Tspo) via a SINE B2-mediated natural antisense transcript in MA-10 Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2012-05-01

    Translocator protein (18 kDa; TSPO) is a mitochondrial cholesterol- and drug-binding protein involved in cholesterol import into mitochondria, the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis. TSPO is expressed at high levels in Leydig cells of the testis, and its expression levels dictate the ability of the cells to form androgen. In search of mechanisms that regulate Tspo expression, a number of transcription factors acting on its promoter region have been identified. We report herein the presence of a mechanism of regulation of Tspo expression via complementation with a natural antisense transcript (NAT). At the Tspo locus, a short interspersed repetitive element (SINE) of the SINE B2 family has the potential for high transcriptional activity. The extension of the SINE B2 element-mediated transcript overlapped with exon 3 of the Tspo gene and formed a NAT specific for Tspo (Tspo-NAT) in MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells. The identified Tspo-NAT was also found in testis and kidney tissues. Overexpression of the Tspo-NAT regulated Tspo gene expression and its function in steroid formation in MA-10 cells. Time-course studies have indicated that Tspo-NAT expression is regulated by cAMP and could regulate TSPO levels to maintain optimal steroid production by MA-10 Leydig cells. Taken together, these results suggest a new micro-transcriptional mechanism that regulates Tspo expression and thus steroidogenesis via an intron-based SINE B2-driven NAT specific for the Tspo gene.

  18. Programmed fluctuations in sense/antisense transcript ratios drive sexual differentiation in S. pombe

    PubMed Central

    Bitton, Danny A; Grallert, Agnes; Scutt, Paul J; Yates, Tim; Li, Yaoyong; Bradford, James R; Hey, Yvonne; Pepper, Stuart D; Hagan, Iain M; Miller, Crispin J

    2011-01-01

    Strand-specific RNA sequencing of S. pombe revealed a highly structured programme of ncRNA expression at over 600 loci. Waves of antisense transcription accompanied sexual differentiation. A substantial proportion of ncRNA arose from mechanisms previously considered to be largely artefactual, including improper 3′ termination and bidirectional transcription. Constitutive induction of the entire spk1+, spo4+, dis1+ and spo6+ antisense transcripts from an integrated, ectopic, locus disrupted their respective meiotic functions. This ability of antisense transcripts to disrupt gene function when expressed in trans suggests that cis production at native loci during sexual differentiation may also control gene function. Consistently, insertion of a marker gene adjacent to the dis1+ antisense start site mimicked ectopic antisense expression in reducing the levels of this microtubule regulator and abolishing the microtubule-dependent ‘horsetail' stage of meiosis. Antisense production had no impact at any of these loci when the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery was removed. Thus, far from being simply ‘genome chatter', this extensive ncRNA landscape constitutes a fundamental component in the controls that drive the complex programme of sexual differentiation in S. pombe. PMID:22186733

  19. The Effects of Antisense miRNA-20a Alone or in Combination with Imatinib on K562 Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; He, Dongmei; Zeng, Jinrong; Bao, Shijie; Lai, Jing; Weng, Yujun; Chen, Shengting

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The effects of microRNA-20a (miR-20a) antisense oligonucleotides (ASODNs) on the proliferation and apoptosis of K562 cells were investigated, and the effects of these ASODNs in combination with imatinib on K562 cells were preliminarily observed. Methods: miR-20a ASODNs and scrambled oligonucleotides (SODNs) were chemically synthesized, and the later was used as the control. miR-20a ASODNs were transfected into K562 cells using Lipofectamine 2000 transfection reagent, and the expression of miR-20a was detected using real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). The CCK8 assay was performed to detect the inhibition of the cell growth rate. The cells were stained by Hoechst 33258 to detect apoptotic cell morphology. Annexin V/PI double staining was used to detect the cell apoptosis rate using flow cytometry. The protein expression levels of E2F1, P21, and Bim in the K562 cell line were detected using western blotting. Results: The qRT-PCR results showed that the expression level of miR-20a in K562 cells transfected with miR-20a ASODNs was lower than those in the normal control, SODN and blank transfection groups (p < 0.05). miR-20a ASODNs significantly inhibited the growth of K562 cells as compared to the controls (p < 0.05). The Hoechst staining results showed morphological changes, suggesting apoptosis. The cell apoptosis rates in the ASODN group was (13.9 ± 1.5)%, which was significantly higher than that in the normal control group (1.84 ± 0.21)%, blank transfection group (3.21 ± 0.32)%, and SODN group (3.72 ± 0.44)% (p < 0.05). The protein expression of E2F1 and P21 in K562 cells transfected with miR-20a ASODNs were higher, while the level of Bim protein was significantly lower than that in the control groups. When miR-20a ASODNs were combined with imatinib, the growth of K562 cells was significantly inhibited as compared to the ASODN treatment alone, imatinib alone, and SODN+imatinib groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions: miR-20a ASODNs could induce apoptosis

  20. MicroRNA Regulation of RNA Virus Replication and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Trobaugh, Derek W; Klimstra, William B

    2017-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that regulate many processes within a cell by manipulating protein levels through direct binding to mRNA and influencing translation efficiency, or mRNA abundance. Recent evidence demonstrates that miRNAs can also affect RNA virus replication and pathogenesis through direct binding to the RNA virus genome or through virus-mediated changes in the host transcriptome. Here, we review the current knowledge on the interaction between RNA viruses and cellular miRNAs. We also discuss how cell and tissue-specific expression of miRNAs can directly affect viral pathogenesis. Understanding the role of cellular miRNAs during viral infection may lead to the identification of novel mechanisms to block RNA virus replication or cell-specific regulation of viral vector targeting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Antisense RNA Approach: a New Application for In Vivo Investigation of the Stress Response of Oenococcus oeni, a Wine-Associated Lactic Acid Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Darsonval, Maud; Msadek, Tarek; Alexandre, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is a wine-associated lactic acid bacterium mostly responsible for malolactic fermentation in wine. In wine, O. oeni grows in an environment hostile to bacterial growth (low pH, low temperature, and ethanol) that induces stress response mechanisms. To survive, O. oeni is known to set up transitional stress response mechanisms through the synthesis of heat stress proteins (HSPs) encoded by the hsp genes, notably a unique small HSP named Lo18. Despite the availability of the genome sequence, characterization of O. oeni genes is limited, and little is known about the in vivo role of Lo18. Due to the lack of genetic tools for O. oeni, an efficient expression vector in O. oeni is still lacking, and deletion or inactivation of the hsp18 gene is not presently practicable. As an alternative approach, with the goal of understanding the biological function of the O. oeni hsp18 gene in vivo, we have developed an expression vector to produce antisense RNA targeting of hsp18 mRNA. Recombinant strains were exposed to multiple stresses inducing hsp18 gene expression: heat shock and acid shock. We showed that antisense attenuation of hsp18 affects O. oeni survival under stress conditions. These results confirm the involvement of Lo18 in heat and acid tolerance of O. oeni. Results of anisotropy experiments also confirm a membrane-protective role for Lo18, as previous observations had already suggested. This study describes a new, efficient tool to demonstrate the use of antisense technology for modulating gene expression in O. oeni. PMID:26452552

  2. Understanding splicing regulation through RNA splicing maps.

    PubMed

    Witten, Joshua T; Ule, Jernej

    2011-03-01

    Alternative splicing is a highly regulated process that greatly increases the proteome diversity and plays an important role in cellular differentiation and disease. Interactions between RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and pre-mRNA are the principle regulator of splicing decisions. Findings from recent genome-wide studies of protein-RNA interactions have been combined with assays of the global effects of RBPs on splicing to create RNA splicing maps. These maps integrate information from all pre-mRNAs regulated by single RBPs to identify the global positioning principles guiding splicing regulation. Recent studies using this approach have identified a set of positional principles that are shared between diverse RBPs. Here, we discuss how insights from RNA splicing maps of different RBPs inform the mechanistic models of splicing regulation.

  3. Understanding splicing regulation through RNA splicing maps

    PubMed Central

    Witten, Joshua T.; Ule, Jernej

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a highly regulated process that greatly increases the proteome diversity and plays an important role in cellular differentiation and disease. Interactions between RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and pre-mRNA are the principle regulator of splicing decisions. Findings from recent genome-wide studies of protein–RNA interactions have been combined with assays of the global effects of RBPs on splicing to create RNA splicing maps. These maps integrate information from all pre-mRNAs regulated by single RBPs to identify the global positioning principles guiding splicing regulation. Recent studies using this approach have identified a set of positional principles that are shared between diverse RBPs. Here, we discuss how insights from RNA splicing maps of different RBPs inform the mechanistic models of splicing regulation. PMID:21232811

  4. [Antisense transcription within the hns locus of Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Tututkina, M N; Shavkunov, K S; Masulis, I S; Ozolin', O N

    2010-01-01

    Scanning the entire genome of E. coli by means of pattern-recognition software PlatProm spotted out more than a thousand of potential start points for antisense transcription. Taking into account possible role of antisense RNAs in the cell regulatory networks, our top-priority interest was focused on the promoter-like sites found within genes of transcription regulators. One of them (hns) encodes a major nucleoid protein affecting expression pattern of many genomic loci. Several potential start points for antisense transcription were found within its coding sequence. Gel-retardation assays, potassium permanganate and DNAse I foot-printings confirmed the ability of the intragenic promoter located approximately 280 bp downstream of ATG to bind RNA polymerase. Primer extension revealed the cDNA of the expected size while Northern blot hybridization assumes the presence of aRNA among cellular RNAs. Relative abundance of antisense RNA and hns-mRNA in vivo exhibited dependence on growth conditions thus assuming existence of regulatory pathways keeping cellular concentration of these two transcripts at the optimal level.

  5. Optimization of a novel biophysical model using large scale in vivo antisense hybridization data displays improved prediction capabilities of structurally accessible RNA regions.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Anderson, Jorge; Mihailovic, Mia K; Baldridge, Kevin C; Reyes, Kristofer G; Haning, Katie; Cho, Seung Hee; Amador, Paul; Powell, Warren B; Contreras, Lydia M

    2017-05-19

    Current approaches to design efficient antisense RNAs (asRNAs) rely primarily on a thermodynamic understanding of RNA-RNA interactions. However, these approaches depend on structure predictions and have limited accuracy, arguably due to overlooking important cellular environment factors. In this work, we develop a biophysical model to describe asRNA-RNA hybridization that incorporates in vivo factors using large-scale experimental hybridization data for three model RNAs: a group I intron, CsrB and a tRNA. A unique element of our model is the estimation of the availability of the target region to interact with a given asRNA using a differential entropic consideration of suboptimal structures. We showcase the utility of this model by evaluating its prediction capabilities in four additional RNAs: a group II intron, Spinach II, 2-MS2 binding domain and glgC 5΄ UTR. Additionally, we demonstrate the applicability of this approach to other bacterial species by predicting sRNA-mRNA binding regions in two newly discovered, though uncharacterized, regulatory RNAs. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Transcriptome interrogation of human myometrium identifies differentially expressed sense-antisense pairs of protein-coding and long non-coding RNA genes in spontaneous labor at term.

    PubMed

    Romero, Roberto; Tarca, Adi L; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Miranda, Jezid; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Jia, Hui; Hassan, Sonia S; Kalita, Cynthia A; Cai, Juan; Yeo, Lami; Lipovich, Leonard

    2014-09-01

    To identify differentially expressed long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes in human myometrium in women with spontaneous labor at term. Myometrium was obtained from women undergoing cesarean deliveries who were not in labor (n = 19) and women in spontaneous labor at term (n = 20). RNA was extracted and profiled using an Illumina® microarray platform. We have used computational approaches to bound the extent of long non-coding RNA representation on this platform, and to identify co-differentially expressed and correlated pairs of long non-coding RNA genes and protein-coding genes sharing the same genomic loci. We identified co-differential expression and correlation at two genomic loci that contain coding-lncRNA gene pairs: SOCS2-AK054607 and LMCD1-NR_024065 in women in spontaneous labor at term. This co-differential expression and correlation was validated by qRT-PCR, an experimental method completely independent of the microarray analysis. Intriguingly, one of the two lncRNA genes differentially expressed in term labor had a key genomic structure element, a splice site, that lacked evolutionary conservation beyond primates. We provide, for the first time, evidence for coordinated differential expression and correlation of cis-encoded antisense lncRNAs and protein-coding genes with known as well as novel roles in pregnancy in the myometrium of women in spontaneous labor at term.

  7. Altered antisense-to-sense transcript ratios in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Reo; Shipitsin, Michail; Choudhury, Sibgat; Wu, Zhenhua; Protopopov, Alexei; Yao, Jun; Lo, Pang-Kuo; Bessarabova, Marina; Ishkin, Alex; Nikolsky, Yuri; Liu, X Shirley; Sukumar, Saraswati; Polyak, Kornelia

    2012-02-21

    Transcriptome profiling studies suggest that a large fraction of the genome is transcribed and many transcripts function independent of their protein coding potential. The relevance of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in normal physiological processes and in tumorigenesis is increasingly recognized. Here, we describe consistent and significant differences in the distribution of sense and antisense transcripts between normal and neoplastic breast tissues. Many of the differentially expressed antisense transcripts likely represent long ncRNAs. A subset of genes that mainly generate antisense transcripts in normal but not cancer cells is involved in essential metabolic processes. These findings suggest fundamental differences in global RNA regulation between normal and cancer cells that might play a role in tumorigenesis.

  8. Making sense of antisense

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, A.S.

    1991-08-02

    Out in the San Joaquin Valley of California grows a field of tomato plants that look like ordinary tomato plants. But these tomatoes are special - one of the first fruits of a new technology that may revolutionize not just commercial plant development but human medicine as well. The new technology uses novel RNAs, called antisense RNAs, to block the activity of specific genes. At first, researchers were mainly interested in antisense RNA as a tool for probing gene function. In the late 1970s, when the technology was first developed, molecular biologists didn't have a good way of mutating genes in the cells of higher organisms so that they could see what happens when the gene activity is lost. Antisense technology, in effect, provided a way of doing that. But the biotechnology industry soon recognized the immense practical potential of a technique that could be used to knock out the activity of bad genes. To make the tomato plants, for example, plant scientists used antisense RNAs to shut off the expression of the gene encoding an enzyme that makes tomatoes mushy, thereby yielding a product that may travel better and last longer on grocery shelves. Recent work by various labs suggests that it may be possible to design antisense compounds that inhibit the activity of viral genes or of the oncogenes thought to contribute to cancer development, without affecting normal cellular genes. That raises the possibility that the technology might aid in producing better, more selective drugs to treat viral diseases, including AIDS, and cancer.

  9. Expression of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase or coproporphyrinogen oxidase antisense RNA in tobacco induces pathogen defense responses conferring increased resistance to tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Mock, H P; Heller, W; Molina, A; Neubohn, B; Sandermann, H; Grimm, B

    1999-02-12

    Transgenic tobacco plants with reduced activity of either uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase or coproporphyrinogen oxidase, two enzymes of the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway, are characterized by the accumulation of photosensitizing tetrapyrrole intermediates, antioxidative responses, and necrotic leaf lesions. In this study we report on cellular responses in uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase and coproporphyrinogen oxidase antisense plants, normally associated with pathogen defense. These plants accumulate the highly fluorescent coumarin scopolin in their leaves. They also display increased pathogenesis-related protein expression and higher levels of free and conjugated salicylic acid. Upon tobacco mosaic virus inoculation, the plants with leaf lesions and high levels of PR-1 mRNA expression show reduced accumulation of virus RNA relative to wild-type controls. This result is indicative of an increased resistance to tobacco mosaic virus. We conclude that porphyrinogenesis as a result of deregulated tetrapyrrole synthesis induces a set of defense responses that resemble the hypersensitive reaction observed after pathogen attack.

  10. MicroRNA-143 regulates adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Esau, Christine; Kang, Xiaolin; Peralta, Eigen; Hanson, Elaine; Marcusson, Eric G; Ravichandran, Lingamanaidu V; Sun, Yingqing; Koo, Seongjoon; Perera, Ranjan J; Jain, Ravi; Dean, Nicholas M; Freier, Susan M; Bennett, C Frank; Lollo, Bridget; Griffey, Richard

    2004-12-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenously expressed 20-24 nucleotide RNAs thought to repress protein translation through binding to a target mRNA (1-3). Only a few of the more than 250 predicted human miRNAs have been assigned any biological function. In an effort to uncover miRNAs important during adipocyte differentiation, antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting 86 human miRNAs were transfected into cultured human pre-adipocytes, and their ability to modulate adipocyte differentiation was evaluated. Expression of 254 miRNAs in differentiating adipocytes was also examined on a miRNA microarray. Here we report that the combination of expression data and functional assay results identified a role for miR-143 in adipocyte differentiation. miR-143 levels increased in differentiating adipocytes, and inhibition of miR-143 effectively inhibited adipocyte differentiation. In addition, protein levels of the proposed miR-143 target ERK5 (4) were higher in ASO-treated adipocytes. These results demonstrate that miR-143 is involved in adipocyte differentiation and may act through target gene ERK5.

  11. Hepatotoxicity of high affinity gapmer antisense oligonucleotides is mediated by RNase H1 dependent promiscuous reduction of very long pre-mRNA transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Burel, Sebastien A.; Hart, Christopher E.; Cauntay, Patrick; Hsiao, Jill; Machemer, Todd; Katz, Melanie; Watt, Andy; Bui, Huynh-hoa; Younis, Husam; Sabripour, Mahyar; Freier, Susan M.; Hung, Gene; Dan, Amy; Prakash, T.P.; Seth, Punit P.; Swayze, Eric E.; Bennett, C. Frank; Crooke, Stanley T.; Henry, Scott P.

    2016-01-01

    High affinity antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) containing bicylic modifications (BNA) such as locked nucleic acid (LNA) designed to induce target RNA cleavage have been shown to have enhanced potency along with a higher propensity to cause hepatotoxicity. In order to understand the mechanism of this hepatotoxicity, transcriptional profiles were collected from the livers of mice treated with a panel of highly efficacious hepatotoxic or non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. We observed highly selective transcript knockdown in mice treated with non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs, while the levels of many unintended transcripts were reduced in mice treated with hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. This transcriptional signature was concurrent with on-target RNA reduction and preceded transaminitis. Remarkably, the mRNA transcripts commonly reduced by toxic LNA ASOs were generally not strongly associated with any particular biological process, cellular component or functional group. However, they tended to have much longer pre-mRNA transcripts. We also demonstrate that the off-target RNA knockdown and hepatotoxicity is attenuated by RNase H1 knockdown, and that this effect can be generalized to high affinity modifications beyond LNA. This suggests that for a certain set of ASOs containing high affinity modifications such as LNA, hepatotoxicity can occur as a result of unintended off-target RNase H1 dependent RNA degradation. PMID:26553810

  12. Functional consequences of anti-sense RNA-mediated inhibition of CD8 surface expression in a human T cell clone

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    An experimental approach for defining the function of CD8 has been developed by linking anti-sense RNA mutagenesis and T cell cloning technologies. We have transfected an anti-sense CD8 episomal expression vector into a CD8+ nontransformed human T cell clone that is specific for the human class I alloantigen HLA-B35. Expression of CD8 on this T cell clone, JH.ARL.1, was selectively and efficiently inhibited. Stimulation of this CD8- variant with specific alloantigen resulted in a marked loss of a number of functional responses, including cytotoxicity, proliferation, IL-2 secretion, and IL-2-R expression. However, these same functional responses could be elicited with stimuli that do not require antigen recognition to activate the T cell (anti- CD3 mAbs, PHA). The results of our study support the hypothesis that CD8 is required for recognition of class I MHC alloantigens that results in activation of T cell functional responses. PMID:2459296

  13. Restoration of Full-Length SMN Promoted by Adenoviral Vectors Expressing RNA Antisense Oligonucleotides Embedded in U7 snRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Geib, Till; Hertel, Klemens J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease that leads to specific loss of motor neurons. It is caused by deletions or mutations of the survival of motor neuron 1 gene (SMN1). The remaining copy of the gene, SMN2, generates only low levels of the SMN protein due to a mutation in SMN2 exon 7 that leads to exon skipping. Methodology/Principal Findings To correct SMN2 splicing, we use Adenovirus type 5–derived vectors to express SMN2-antisense U7 snRNA oligonucleotides targeting the SMN intron 7/exon 8 junction. Infection of SMA type I–derived patient fibroblasts with these vectors resulted in increased levels of exon 7 inclusion, upregulating the expression of SMN to similar levels as in non–SMA control cells. Conclusions/Significance These results show that Adenovirus type 5–derived vectors delivering U7 antisense oligonucleotides can efficiently restore full-length SMN protein and suggest that the viral vector-mediated oligonucleotide application may be a suitable therapeutic approach to counteract SMA. PMID:19997596

  14. Upstream Anti-sense Promoters are Hubs of Transcription Factor Binding and Active Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Scruggs, Benjamin S.; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Nechaev, Sergei; Muse, Ginger W.; Burkholder, Adam; Fargo, David C.; Adelman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Anti-sense transcription originating upstream of mammalian protein-coding genes is a well-documented phenomenon, but remarkably little is known about the regulation or function of anti-sense promoters and the non-coding RNAs they generate. Here we define at nucleotide resolution the divergent transcription start sites (TSSs) near mouse mRNA genes. We find that coupled sense and anti-sense TSSs precisely define the boundaries of a nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) that is highly enriched in transcription factor (TF) motifs. Notably, as the distance between sense and anti-sense TSSs increases, so does the size of the NDR, the level of signal-dependent TF binding and gene activation. We further discover a group of anti-sense TSSs in macrophages with an enhancer-like chromatin signature. Interestingly, this signature identifies divergent promoters that are activated during immune challenge. We propose that anti-sense promoters serve as platforms for TF binding and establishment of active chromatin to further regulate or enhance sense-strand mRNA expression. PMID:26028540

  15. Statistical Evaluation of the Rodin–Ohno Hypothesis: Sense/Antisense Coding of Ancestral Class I and II Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Srinivas Niranj; Yardimci, Galip Gürkan; Erdogan, Ozgün; Roach, Jeffrey; Carter, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    We tested the idea that ancestral class I and II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases arose on opposite strands of the same gene. We assembled excerpted 94-residue Urgenes for class I tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) and class II Histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS) from a diverse group of species, by identifying and catenating three blocks coding for secondary structures that position the most highly conserved, active-site residues. The codon middle-base pairing frequency was 0.35 ± 0.0002 in all-by-all sense/antisense alignments for 211 TrpRS and 207 HisRS sequences, compared with frequencies between 0.22 ± 0.0009 and 0.27 ± 0.0005 for eight different representations of the null hypothesis. Clustering algorithms demonstrate further that profiles of middle-base pairing in the synthetase antisense alignments are correlated along the sequences from one species-pair to another, whereas this is not the case for similar operations on sets representing the null hypothesis. Most probable reconstructed sequences for ancestral nodes of maximum likelihood trees show that middle-base pairing frequency increases to approximately 0.42 ± 0.002 as bacterial trees approach their roots; ancestral nodes from trees including archaeal sequences show a less pronounced increase. Thus, contemporary and reconstructed sequences all validate important bioinformatic predictions based on descent from opposite strands of the same ancestral gene. They further provide novel evidence for the hypothesis that bacteria lie closer than archaea to the origin of translation. Moreover, the inverse polarity of genetic coding, together with a priori α-helix propensities suggest that in-frame coding on opposite strands leads to similar secondary structures with opposite polarity, as observed in TrpRS and HisRS crystal structures. PMID:23576570

  16. Statistical evaluation of the Rodin-Ohno hypothesis: sense/antisense coding of ancestral class I and II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Srinivas Niranj; Yardimci, Galip Gürkan; Erdogan, Ozgün; Roach, Jeffrey; Carter, Charles W

    2013-07-01

    We tested the idea that ancestral class I and II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases arose on opposite strands of the same gene. We assembled excerpted 94-residue Urgenes for class I tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) and class II Histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS) from a diverse group of species, by identifying and catenating three blocks coding for secondary structures that position the most highly conserved, active-site residues. The codon middle-base pairing frequency was 0.35 ± 0.0002 in all-by-all sense/antisense alignments for 211 TrpRS and 207 HisRS sequences, compared with frequencies between 0.22 ± 0.0009 and 0.27 ± 0.0005 for eight different representations of the null hypothesis. Clustering algorithms demonstrate further that profiles of middle-base pairing in the synthetase antisense alignments are correlated along the sequences from one species-pair to another, whereas this is not the case for similar operations on sets representing the null hypothesis. Most probable reconstructed sequences for ancestral nodes of maximum likelihood trees show that middle-base pairing frequency increases to approximately 0.42 ± 0.002 as bacterial trees approach their roots; ancestral nodes from trees including archaeal sequences show a less pronounced increase. Thus, contemporary and reconstructed sequences all validate important bioinformatic predictions based on descent from opposite strands of the same ancestral gene. They further provide novel evidence for the hypothesis that bacteria lie closer than archaea to the origin of translation. Moreover, the inverse polarity of genetic coding, together with a priori α-helix propensities suggest that in-frame coding on opposite strands leads to similar secondary structures with opposite polarity, as observed in TrpRS and HisRS crystal structures.

  17. Antisense down-regulation of the strawberry β-galactosidase gene FaβGal4 increases cell wall galactose levels and reduces fruit softening

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Candelas; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Barceló-Muñoz, Marta; García-Gago, Juan A.; Waldron, Keith W.; Quesada, Miguel A.; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Strawberry softening is characterized by an increase in the solubilization and depolymerization of pectins from cell walls. Galactose release from pectin side chains by β-galactosidase enzymes has been proposed as one reason for the increase in soluble pectins. A putative β-galactosidase gene, FaβGal4, has been identified using a custom-made oligonucleotide-based strawberry microarray platform. FaβGal4 was expressed mainly in the receptacle during fruit ripening, and was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. To ascertain the role of FaβGal4 in strawberry softening, transgenic plants containing an antisense sequence of this gene under the control of the CaMV35S promoter were generated. Phenotypic analyses were carried out in transgenic plants during three consecutive growing seasons, using non-transformed plants as control. Two out of nine independent transgenic lines yielded fruits that were 30% firmer than control at the ripe stage. FaβGal4 mRNA levels were reduced by 70% in ripe fruits from these selected transgenic lines, but they also showed significant silencing of FaβGal1, although the genes did not share significant similarity. These two transgenic lines also showed an increase in pectin covalently bound to the cell wall, extracted using Na2CO3. The amount of galactose in cell walls from transgenic fruits was 30% higher than in control; notably, the galactose increase was larger in the 1 M KOH fraction, which is enriched in hemicellulose. These results suggest that FaβGal4 participates in the solubilization of covalently bound pectins during ripening, reducing strawberry fruit firmness. PMID:26585222

  18. Antisense down-regulation of the strawberry β-galactosidase gene FaβGal4 increases cell wall galactose levels and reduces fruit softening.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Candelas; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Barceló-Muñoz, Marta; García-Gago, Juan A; Waldron, Keith W; Quesada, Miguel A; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, José A

    2016-02-01

    Strawberry softening is characterized by an increase in the solubilization and depolymerization of pectins from cell walls. Galactose release from pectin side chains by β-galactosidase enzymes has been proposed as one reason for the increase in soluble pectins. A putative β-galactosidase gene, FaβGal4, has been identified using a custom-made oligonucleotide-based strawberry microarray platform. FaβGal4 was expressed mainly in the receptacle during fruit ripening, and was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. To ascertain the role of FaβGal4 in strawberry softening, transgenic plants containing an antisense sequence of this gene under the control of the CaMV35S promoter were generated. Phenotypic analyses were carried out in transgenic plants during three consecutive growing seasons, using non-transformed plants as control. Two out of nine independent transgenic lines yielded fruits that were 30% firmer than control at the ripe stage. FaβGal4 mRNA levels were reduced by 70% in ripe fruits from these selected transgenic lines, but they also showed significant silencing of FaβGal1, although the genes did not share significant similarity. These two transgenic lines also showed an increase in pectin covalently bound to the cell wall, extracted using Na2CO3. The amount of galactose in cell walls from transgenic fruits was 30% higher than in control; notably, the galactose increase was larger in the 1 M KOH fraction, which is enriched in hemicellulose. These results suggest that FaβGal4 participates in the solubilization of covalently bound pectins during ripening, reducing strawberry fruit firmness. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  19. Regulation of the apolipoprotein gene cluster by a long noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Halley, Paul; Kadakkuzha, Beena M; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Magistri, Marco; Zeier, Zane; Khorkova, Olga; Coito, Carlos; Hsiao, Jane; Lawrence, Matthew; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2014-01-16

    Apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1) is the major protein component of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in plasma. We have identified an endogenously expressed long noncoding natural antisense transcript, APOA1-AS, which acts as a negative transcriptional regulator of APOA1 both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of APOA1-AS in cultured cells resulted in the increased expression of APOA1 and two neighboring genes in the APO cluster. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses of a ∼50 kb chromatin region flanking the APOA1 gene demonstrated that APOA1-AS can modulate distinct histone methylation patterns that mark active and/or inactive gene expression through the recruitment of histone-modifying enzymes. Targeting APOA1-AS with short antisense oligonucleotides also enhanced APOA1 expression in both human and monkey liver cells and induced an increase in hepatic RNA and protein expression in African green monkeys. Furthermore, the results presented here highlight the significant local modulatory effects of long noncoding antisense RNAs and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of manipulating the expression of these transcripts both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulation of Flavivirus RNA Synthesis and Capping

    PubMed Central

    Saeedi, Bejan J.; Geiss, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    RNA viruses, such as flaviviruses, are able to efficiently replicate and cap their RNA genomes in vertebrate and invertebrate cells. Flaviviruses use several specialized proteins to first make an uncapped negative strand copy of the viral genome that is used as a template for the synthesis of large numbers of capped genomic RNAs. Despite using relatively simple mechanisms to replicate their RNA genomes, there are significant gaps in our understanding of how flaviviruses switch between negative and positive strand RNA synthesis and how RNA capping is regulated. Recent work has begun to provide a conceptual framework for flavivirus RNA replication and capping and shown some surprising roles for genomic RNA during replication and pathogenesis. PMID:23929625

  1. MicroRNA-30b-Mediated Regulation of Catalase Expression in Human ARPE-19 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rashidul; Chun, Eugene; Howell, Jennifer C.; Sengupta, Trisha; Chen, Dan; Kim, Hana

    2012-01-01

    Background Oxidative injury to retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and retinal photoreceptors has been linked to a number of retinal diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated gene expression has been extensively studied at transcriptional levels. Also, the post-transcriptional control of gene expression at the level of translational regulation has been recently reported. However, the microRNA (miRNA/miR)-mediated post-transcriptional regulation in human RPE cells has not been thoroughly looked at. Increasing evidence points to a potential role of miRNAs in diverse physiological processes. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrated for the first time in a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19) that the post-transcriptional control of gene expression via miRNA modulation regulates human catalase, an important and potent component of cell's antioxidant defensive network, which detoxifies hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) radicals. Exposure to several stress-inducing agents including H2O2 has been reported to alter miRNA expression profile. Here, we demonstrated that a sublethal dose of H2O2 (200 µM) up-regulated the expression of miR-30b, a member of the miR-30 family, which inhibited the expression of endogenous catalase both at the transcript and protein levels. However, antisense (antagomirs) of miR-30b was not only found to suppress the miR-30b mimics-mediated inhibitions, but also to dramatically increase the expression of catalase even under an oxidant environment. Conclusions/Significance We propose that a microRNA antisense approach could enhance cytoprotective mechanisms against oxidative stress by increasing the antioxidant defense system. PMID:22880027

  2. Long Non-coding RNA BGas Regulates the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Saayman, Sheena M; Ackley, Amanda; Burdach, Jon; Clemson, Matthew; Gruenert, Dieter C; Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Chivukula, Pad; Weinberg, Marc S; Morris, Kevin V

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening genetic disease. The root cause of CF is heritable recessive mutations that affect the cystic fibrosis transmembrance conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and the subsequent expression and activity of encoded ion channels at the cell surface. We show that CFTR is regulated transcriptionally by the actions of a novel long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), designated as BGas, that emanates from intron 11 of the CFTR gene and is expressed in the antisense orientation relative to the protein coding sense strand. We find that BGas functions in concert with several proteins including HMGA1, HMGB1, and WIBG to modulate the local chromatin and DNA architecture of intron 11 of the CFTR gene and thereby affects transcription. Suppression of BGas or its associated proteins results in a gain of both CFTR expression and chloride ion function. The observations described here highlight a previously underappreciated mechanism of transcriptional control and suggest that BGas may serve as a therapeutic target for specifically activating expression of CFTR. PMID:27434588

  3. Chimeric snRNA molecules carrying antisense sequences against the splice junctions of exon 51 of the dystrophin pre-mRNA induce exon skipping and restoration of a dystrophin synthesis in Δ48-50 DMD cells

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Fernanda Gabriella; Sthandier, Olga; Berarducci, Barbara; Toso, Silvia; Galluzzi, Giuliana; Ricci, Enzo; Cossu, Giulio; Bozzoni, Irene

    2002-01-01

    Deletions and point mutations in the dystrophin gene cause either the severe progressive myopathy Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or the milder Becker muscular dystrophy, depending on whether the translational reading frame is lost or maintained. Because internal in-frame deletions in the protein produce only mild myopathic symptoms, it should be possible, by preventing the inclusion of specific mutated exon(s) in the mature dystrophin mRNA, to restore a partially corrected phenotype. Such control has been previously accomplished by the use of synthetic oligonucleotides; nevertheless, a significant drawback to this approach is caused by the fact that oligonucleotides would require periodic administrations. To circumvent this problem, we have produced several constructs able to express in vivo, in a stable fashion, large amounts of chimeric RNAs containing antisense sequences. In this paper we show that antisense molecules against exon 51 splice junctions are able to direct skipping of this exon in the human DMD deletion 48–50 and to rescue dystrophin synthesis. We also show that the highest skipping activity was found when antisense constructs against the 5′ and 3′ splice sites are coexpressed in the same cell. PMID:12077324

  4. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  5. Characterization of a Streptococcus mutans intergenic region containing a small toxic peptide and its cis-encoded antisense small RNA antitoxin.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Stephanie; Lévesque, Céline M

    2013-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules consist of a pair of genes that encode two components: a protein toxin and an antitoxin, which may be in the form of either a labile protein or an antisense small RNA. Here we describe, to the best of our knowledge, the first functional chromosomal type I TA system in streptococci. Our model organism is the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans. Our results showed that the genome of S. mutans UA159 reference strain harbors a previously unannotated Fst-like toxin (Fst-Sm) and its cis-encoded small RNA antitoxin (srSm) converging towards the end of the toxin gene in IGR176, a small intergenic region of 318 nt. Fst-Sm is a small hydrophobic peptide of 32 amino acid residues with homology to the Fst toxin family. Transcripts of ∼200 nt and ∼70 nt specific to fst-Sm mRNA and srSm RNA, respectively, were detected by Northern blot analysis throughout S. mutans growth. The toxin mRNA was considerably more stable than its cognate antitoxin. The half-life of srSm RNA was determined to be ∼30 min, while fst-Sm mRNA had a half-life of ∼90 min. Both fst-Sm and srSm RNAs were transcribed across direct tandem repeats providing a region of complementarity for inhibition of toxin translation. Overproduction of Fst-Sm had a toxic effect on E. coli and S. mutans cells which can be neutralized by coexpression of srSm RNA. Deletion of fst-Sm/srSm locus or overexpression of Fst-Sm/srSm had no effect on S. mutans cell growth in liquid medium and no differences in the total biofilm biomass were noted. In contrast, mild-overproduction of Fst-Sm/srSm type I TA system decreases the levels of persister cells tolerant to bacterial cell wall synthesis inhibitors.

  6. MicroRNA-221 and -222 Regulate Radiation Sensitivity by Targeting the PTEN Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Chunzhi; Kang Chunsheng; Wang Ping; Cao Yongzhen; Lv Zhonghong; Yu Shizhu; Wang Guangxiu; Zhang Anling; Jia Zhifan; Han Lei; Yang Chunying; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Teh, Bin S.; Xu Bo; Pu Peiyu

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs inhibiting expression of numerous target genes by posttranscriptional regulation. miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 (miRNA-221/-222) expression is elevated in radioresistant tumor cell lines; however, it is not known whether and how miRNAs control cellular responses to ionizing irradiation. Methods and Materials: We used bioinformatic analyses, luciferase reporter assay, and genetic knockdown and biochemical assays to characterize the regulation pathways of miRNA-221/-222 in response to radiation treatment. Results: We identified the PTEN gene as a target of miRNA-221/-222. Furthermore, we found that knocking down miRNA-221/-222 by antisense oligonucleotides upregulated PTEN expression. Upregulated PTEN expression suppressed AKT activity and increased radiation-induced apoptosis, resulting in enhancement of radiosensitivity in tumor cells. Conclusions: miRNA-221/-222 control radiation sensitivity by regulating the PTEN/AKT pathway and can be explored as novel targets for radiosensitization.

  7. Development and media regulate alternative splicing of a methyltransferase pre-mRNA in Monascus pilosus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Yong; Miyake, Tsuyoshi

    2009-05-27

    Two alternatively spliced mRNAs (d- and l-MpLaeA) of a methyltransferase gene (MpLaeA) were identified from Monascus pilosus IFO4520 and its mutant MK-1. Alternative splicing of the MpLaeA pre-mRNA occurred in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR). The alternative splicing patterns of MpLaeA were regulated by the fungal growth stage and the principal nutrients: that is, the short l-MpLaeA mRNA was a constitutive transcript at all growth stages and different carbon or nitrogen sources, but the glutamate and NaNO(3) as main nitrogen source could up-regulate the long d-MpLaeA mRNA form. The long spliced 5'-UTR of d-MpLaeA blocked GFP expression in Escherichia coli , suggesting that d-MpLaeA mRNA was an ineffective spliced mRNA. Down-regulation of MpLaeA by transgenic antisense d-MpLaeA cDNA resulted in decreasing synthesis of monacolin K in M. pilosus. This suggested that the alternative splicing of MpLaeA mRNA might regulate the synthesis of monacolin K.

  8. Mutually exclusive sense–antisense transcription at FLC facilitates environmentally induced gene repression

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Stefanie; Duncan, Susan; Dean, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Antisense transcription through genic regions is pervasive in most genomes; however, its functional significance is still unclear. We are studying the role of antisense transcripts (COOLAIR) in the cold-induced, epigenetic silencing of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), a regulator of the transition to reproduction. Here we use single-molecule RNA FISH to address the mechanistic relationship of FLC and COOLAIR transcription at the cellular level. We demonstrate that while sense and antisense transcripts can co-occur in the same cell they are mutually exclusive at individual loci. Cold strongly upregulates COOLAIR transcription in an increased number of cells and through the mutually exclusive relationship facilitates shutdown of sense FLC transcription in cis. COOLAIR transcripts form dense clouds at each locus, acting to influence FLC transcription through changed H3K36me3 dynamics. These results may have general implications for other loci showing both sense and antisense transcription. PMID:27713408

  9. An in vivo and in silico approach to study cis-antisense: a short cut to higher order response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Colleen; Varanasi, Usha; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    Antisense interactions are present in all domains of life. Typically sense, antisense RNA pairs originate from overlapping genes with convergent face to face promoters, and are speculated to be involved in gene regulation. Recent studies indicate the role of transcriptional interference (TI) in regulating expression of genes in convergent orientation. Modeling antisense, TI gene regulation mechanisms allows us to understand how organisms control gene expression. We present a modeling and experimental framework to understand convergent transcription that combines the effects of transcriptional interference and cis-antisense regulation. Our model shows that combining transcriptional interference and antisense RNA interaction adds multiple-levels of regulation which affords a highly tunable biological output, ranging from first order response to complex higher-order response. To study this system we created a library of experimental constructs with engineered TI and antisense interaction by using face-to-face inducible promoters separated by carefully tailored overlapping DNA sequences to control expression of a set of fluorescent reporter proteins. Studying this gene expression mechanism allows for an understanding of higher order behavior of gene expression networks.

  10. Orlistat and antisense-miRNA-loaded PLGA-PEG nanoparticles for enhanced triple negative breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava-Shah, Aarohi; Foygel, Kira; Devulapally, Rammohan; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study explores the use of hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-PEG-NPs) as delivery system to improve the antitumor effect of antiobesity drug orlistat for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) therapy by improving its bioavailability. Materials & methods: PLGA-PEG-NPs were synthesized by emulsion-diffusion-evaporation method, and the experiments were conducted in vitro in MDA-MB-231 and SKBr3 TNBC and normal breast fibroblast cells. Results: Delivery of orlistat via PLGA-PEG-NPs reduced its IC50 compared with free orlistat. Combined treatment of orlistat-loaded NPs and doxorubicin or antisense-miR-21-loaded NPs significantly enhanced apoptotic effect compared with independent doxorubicin, anti-miR-21-loaded NPs, orlistat-loaded NPs or free orlistat treatments. Conclusion: We demonstrate that orlistat in combination with antisense-miR-21 or current chemotherapy holds great promise as a novel and versatile treatment agent for TNBC. PMID:26787319

  11. The Role of Transcription Factors at Antisense-Expressing Gene Pairs in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Thiemicke, Alexander; Hsu, Tiffany Y; Brem, Rachel B

    2016-06-27

    Genes encoded close to one another on the chromosome are often coexpressed, by a mechanism and regulatory logic that remain poorly understood. We surveyed the yeast genome for tandem gene pairs oriented tail-to-head at which expression antisense to the upstream gene was conserved across species. The intergenic region at most such tandem pairs is a bidirectional promoter, shared by the downstream gene mRNA and the upstream antisense transcript. Genomic analyses of these intergenic loci revealed distinctive patterns of transcription factor regulation. Mutation of a given transcription factor verified its role as a regulator in trans of tandem gene pair loci, including the proximally initiating upstream antisense transcript and downstream mRNA and the distally initiating upstream mRNA. To investigate cis-regulatory activity at such a locus, we focused on the stress-induced NAD(P)H dehydratase YKL151C and its downstream neighbor, the metabolic enzyme GPM1 Previous work has implicated the region between these genes in regulation of GPM1 expression; our mutation experiments established its function in rich medium as a repressor in cis of the distally initiating YKL151C sense RNA, and an activator of the proximally initiating YKL151C antisense RNA. Wild-type expression of all three transcripts required the transcription factor Gcr2. Thus, at this locus, the intergenic region serves as a focal point of regulatory input, driving antisense expression and mediating the coordinated regulation of YKL151C and GPM1 Together, our findings implicate transcription factors in the joint control of neighboring genes specialized to opposing conditions and the antisense transcripts expressed between them.

  12. The Role of Transcription Factors at Antisense-Expressing Gene Pairs in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Thiemicke, Alexander; Hsu, Tiffany Y.; Brem, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoded close to one another on the chromosome are often coexpressed, by a mechanism and regulatory logic that remain poorly understood. We surveyed the yeast genome for tandem gene pairs oriented tail-to-head at which expression antisense to the upstream gene was conserved across species. The intergenic region at most such tandem pairs is a bidirectional promoter, shared by the downstream gene mRNA and the upstream antisense transcript. Genomic analyses of these intergenic loci revealed distinctive patterns of transcription factor regulation. Mutation of a given transcription factor verified its role as a regulator in trans of tandem gene pair loci, including the proximally initiating upstream antisense transcript and downstream mRNA and the distally initiating upstream mRNA. To investigate cis-regulatory activity at such a locus, we focused on the stress-induced NAD(P)H dehydratase YKL151C and its downstream neighbor, the metabolic enzyme GPM1. Previous work has implicated the region between these genes in regulation of GPM1 expression; our mutation experiments established its function in rich medium as a repressor in cis of the distally initiating YKL151C sense RNA, and an activator of the proximally initiating YKL151C antisense RNA. Wild-type expression of all three transcripts required the transcription factor Gcr2. Thus, at this locus, the intergenic region serves as a focal point of regulatory input, driving antisense expression and mediating the coordinated regulation of YKL151C and GPM1. Together, our findings implicate transcription factors in the joint control of neighboring genes specialized to opposing conditions and the antisense transcripts expressed between them. PMID:27190003

  13. Optimization of a novel biophysical model using large scale in vivo antisense hybridization data displays improved prediction capabilities of structurally accessible RNA regions

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Anderson, Jorge; Mihailovic, Mia K.; Baldridge, Kevin C.; Reyes, Kristofer G.; Haning, Katie; Cho, Seung Hee; Amador, Paul; Powell, Warren B.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Current approaches to design efficient antisense RNAs (asRNAs) rely primarily on a thermodynamic understanding of RNA–RNA interactions. However, these approaches depend on structure predictions and have limited accuracy, arguably due to overlooking important cellular environment factors. In this work, we develop a biophysical model to describe asRNA–RNA hybridization that incorporates in vivo factors using large-scale experimental hybridization data for three model RNAs: a group I intron, CsrB and a tRNA. A unique element of our model is the estimation of the availability of the target region to interact with a given asRNA using a differential entropic consideration of suboptimal structures. We showcase the utility of this model by evaluating its prediction capabilities in four additional RNAs: a group II intron, Spinach II, 2-MS2 binding domain and glgC 5΄ UTR. Additionally, we demonstrate the applicability of this approach to other bacterial species by predicting sRNA–mRNA binding regions in two newly discovered, though uncharacterized, regulatory RNAs. PMID:28334800

  14. Modeling sRNA-Regulated Plasmid Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We study a theoretical model for the toxin-antitoxin (hok/sok) mechanism for plasmid maintenance in bacteria. Toxin-antitoxin systems enforce the maintenance of a plasmid through post-segregational killing of cells that have lost the plasmid. Key to their function is the tight regulation of expression of a protein toxin by an sRNA antitoxin. Here, we focus on the nonlinear nature of the regulatory circuit dynamics of the toxin-antitoxin mechanism. The mechanism relies on a transient increase in protein concentration rather than on the steady state of the genetic circuit. Through a systematic analysis of the parameter dependence of this transient increase, we confirm some known design features of this system and identify new ones: for an efficient toxin-antitoxin mechanism, the synthesis rate of the toxin’s mRNA template should be lower that of the sRNA antitoxin, the mRNA template should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin, and the mRNA-sRNA complex should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin. Moreover, a short half-life of the protein toxin is also beneficial to the function of the toxin-antitoxin system. In addition, we study a therapeutic scenario in which a competitor mRNA is introduced to sequester the sRNA antitoxin, causing the toxic protein to be expressed. PMID:28085919

  15. Mutually exclusive RNA secondary structures regulate translation initiation of DinQ in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Knut I; Weel-Sneve, Ragnhild; Booth, James A; Bjørås, Magnar

    2016-11-01

    Protein translation can be affected by changes in the secondary structure of mRNA. The dinQ gene in Escherichia coli encodes a primary transcript (+1) that is inert to translation. Ribonucleolytic removal of the 44 first nucleotides converts the +1 transcript into a translationally active form, but the mechanism behind this structural change is unknown. Here we present experimental evidence for a mechanism where alternative RNA secondary structures in the two dinQ mRNA variants affect translation initiation by mediating opening or closing of the ribosome binding sequence. This structural switch is determined by alternative interactions of four sequence elements within the dinQ mRNA and also by the agrB antisense RNA. Additionally, the structural conformation of +1 dinQ suggests a locking mechanism comprised of an RNA stem that both stabilizes and prevents translation initiation from the full-length dinQ transcript. BLAST search and multiple sequence alignments define a new family of dinQ-like genes widespread in Enterobacteriaceae with close RNA sequence similarities in their 5' untranslated regions. Thus, it appears that a whole new family of genes is regulated by the same mechanism of alternative secondary RNA structures. © 2016 Kristiansen et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  16. Differential RNA-seq of Vibrio cholerae identifies the VqmR small RNA as a regulator of biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Papenfort, Kai; Förstner, Konrad U.; Cong, Jian-Ping; Sharma, Cynthia M.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process of cell-to-cell communication that enables bacteria to transition between individual and collective lifestyles. QS controls virulence and biofilm formation in Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera disease. Differential RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of wild-type V. cholerae and a locked low-cell-density QS-mutant strain identified 7,240 transcriptional start sites with ∼47% initiated in the antisense direction. A total of 107 of the transcripts do not appear to encode proteins, suggesting they specify regulatory RNAs. We focused on one such transcript that we name VqmR. vqmR is located upstream of the vqmA gene encoding a DNA-binding transcription factor. Mutagenesis and microarray analyses demonstrate that VqmA activates vqmR transcription, that vqmR encodes a regulatory RNA, and VqmR directly controls at least eight mRNA targets including the rtx (repeats in toxin) toxin genes and the vpsT transcriptional regulator of biofilm production. We show that VqmR inhibits biofilm formation through repression of vpsT. Together, these data provide to our knowledege the first global annotation of the transcriptional start sites in V. cholerae and highlight the importance of posttranscriptional regulation for collective behaviors in this human pathogen. PMID:25646441

  17. RNA Polymerase III Regulates Cytosolic RNA:DNA Hybrids and Intracellular MicroRNA Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Christine Xing'er; Kobiyama, Kouji; Shen, Yu J.; LeBert, Nina; Ahmad, Shandar; Khatoo, Muznah; Aoshi, Taiki; Gasser, Stephan; Ishii, Ken J.

    2015-01-01

    RNA:DNA hybrids form in the nuclei and mitochondria of cells as transcription-induced R-loops or G-quadruplexes, but exist only in the cytosol of virus-infected cells. Little is known about the existence of RNA:DNA hybrids in the cytosol of virus-free cells, in particular cancer or transformed cells. Here, we show that cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids are present in various human cell lines, including transformed cells. Inhibition of RNA polymerase III (Pol III), but not DNA polymerase, abrogated cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids. Cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids bind to several components of the microRNA (miRNA) machinery-related proteins, including AGO2 and DDX17. Furthermore, we identified miRNAs that are specifically regulated by Pol III, providing a potential link between RNA:DNA hybrids and the miRNA machinery. One of the target genes, exportin-1, is shown to regulate cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids. Taken together, we reveal previously unknown mechanism by which Pol III regulates the presence of cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids and miRNA biogenesis in various human cells. PMID:25623070

  18. The expression and significance of HOX transcript antisense RNA and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related factors in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Da, Chunli; Zhan, Yiyi; Li, Yu; Tan, Yao; Li, Ruiguang; Wang, Ruozheng

    2017-04-01

    The present study investigated the correlation and significance of HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related factors in the occurrence and metastasis of esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC) progression. The mRNA and protein expression levels of HOTAIR and EMT‑related factors were detected in 96 ESCC and para‑carcinoma tissues using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The expression levels of these factors, and the correlation between these factors and clinicopathological characteristics were subsequently analyzed. HOTAIR mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in ESCC compared with in para-carcinoma tissues, and HOTAIR mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in the groups with lymph node involvement or organ metastasis compared with the group without. Furthermore, HOTAIR expression levels demonstrated a significant increasing trend from well‑differentiated cancer to poorly differentiated cancer. The mRNA and protein expression levels of zinc finger protein SNAI1 (Snail) and β‑catenin in ESCC were significantly higher compared with para-carcinoma tissues, whereas E‑cadherin mRNA and protein expression levels were lower in ESCC tissues compared with in para-carcinoma tissues. Snail mRNA and protein expression levels were also significantly higher in groups with lymph node involvement or organ metastasis compared with those without, and β‑catenin protein expression levels were significantly higher in the groups with lymph node involvement or organ metastasis compared with the group without. In the 96 ESCC tissues, HOTAIR mRNA expression levels were positively correlated with Snail mRNA and protein expression levels, and were negatively correlated with E‑cadherin expression levels. HOTAIR mRNA expression levels were also positively correlated with β‑catenin mRNA expression levels. In conclusion, HOTAIR may be involved in

  19. Coexistence of sense and anti-sense mRNAs of variant surface protein in Giardia lamblia trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junli; Zheng, Wenyu; Wang, Yuehua; Li, Yao; Lu, Siqi; Feng, Xianmin

    2014-02-14

    A strategy of the parasitic protozoan Giardia lamblia to evade attack from the host immune system is periodic changes of its surface antigen, a member of the variant surface protein (VSP) family. A post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism has been proposed to explain the presence of only one among many possible VSPs at any time. To investigate this phenomenon further, we extracted total RNA from cultured trophozoites of the G. lamblia C2 isolate, and cDNA was reverse-transcribed from the RNA. Sense and anti-sense VSPs were amplified from the total cDNA using nested PCR with primers designed from the 3'-conserved region and the known 5' or 3' end of the cDNA library. Sequence analyses of the amplified products revealed more than 34 full-length antisense VSPs and a smear of sense VSPs. Sequence alignments and comparisons revealed that these VSPs contained variable N-termini and conserved C-termini, and could be classified into 5 clades based on the sizes and variations of the N-terminal sequence. All antisense VSPs existed in the sense forms, but no corresponding antisense VSP existed for sense RNA (snsRNA) 16. The coexistence of sense and antisense VSP mRNAs in cultured G. lamblia supports the post-transcriptional regulation of VSP expression. We propose that VSPs transcribed simultaneously in the sense and antisense forms form double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) which are degraded by the Dicer endonuclease, while a VSP without an antisense transcription (e.g., snsRNA16) will be expressed on the surface of Giardia. In addition, in the course of this investigation VSPs were identified that were previously not known. PCR-based amplification of specific sense and antisense VSP cDNAs can be used to identify the specific VSP on G. lamblia trophozoites, which is easier than using specific monoclonal antibody approaches. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Antisense versus proopiomelanocortin mRNA reduces vascular risk in a murine model of type-2 diabetes following stress exposure in early post-natal life.

    PubMed

    Loizzo, Alberto; Spampinato, Santi M; Fortuna, Andrea; Vella, Stefano; Fabi, Fulvia; Del Basso, Paola; Campana, Gabriele; Loizzo, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    Mechanisms of vascular complications in type-2 diabetes patients and animal models are matter of debate. We previously demonstrated that a double-stress model applied to male mice during nursing period produces enduring hyperfunction of endogenous opioid and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-corticosteroid systems, accompanied by type-2 diabetes-like alterations in adult animals. Administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, or of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide versus proopiomelanocortin mRNA, capable to block the pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides β-endorphin and ACTH, selectively prevent these alterations. Here, we investigated alterations produced by our stress model on aorta endothelium-dependent relaxation and contractile responses. Mice, stressed during nursing period, showed in the adulthood hormonal and metabolic type-2 diabetes-like alterations, including hyperglycemia, increased body weight and increased plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels. Ex vivo isolated aorta rings, gathered from stressed mice, were less sensitive to noradrenaline-induced contractions versus controls. This effect was blocked by nitric-oxide synthase-inhibitor l-N(G)-nitroarginine added to bath organ solution. Aorta rings relaxation caused by acetylcholine was enhanced in stressed mice versus controls, but following treatment with the nitric-oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, concentration-relaxation curves in aorta from stressed groups were similar to controls. Therefore, vascular response alterations to physiologic-pharmacologic stimuli were apparently due to nitric-oxide hyperfunction-dependent mechanisms. Aorta functional alterations, and plasma stress hormones enhancement, were prevented in mice stressed and treated with antisense oligodeoxinucleotide, addressed to reduce ACTH- and corticosteroid-mediated hyperfunction. This study demonstrates the key role of ACTH-corticosteroid axis hyperfunction for the triggering of vascular conditions in male adult rodents

  1. Synthesis, Improved Antisense Activity and Structural Rationale for the Divergent RNA Affinities of 3′-Fluoro Hexitol Nucleic Acid (FHNA and Ara-FHNA) Modified Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Martin; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Allerson, Charles R.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Berdeja, Andres; Yu, Jinghua; Lee, Sam; Watt, Andrew; Gaus, Hans; Bhat, Balkrishen; Swayze, Eric E.; Seth, Punit P.

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis, biophysical, structural and biological properties of both isomers of 3′-fluoro hexitol nucleic acid (FHNA and Ara-FHNA) modified oligonucleotides are reported. Synthesis of the FHNA and Ara-FHNA thymine phosphoramidites was efficiently accomplished starting from known sugar precursors. Optimal RNA affinities were observed with 3′-fluorine atom and nucleobase in a trans-diaxial orientation. The Ara-FHNA analog with an equatorial fluorine was found to be destabilizing. However, the magnitude of destabilization was sequence-dependent. Thus, the loss of stability is sharply reduced when Ara-FHNA residues were inserted at pyrimidine-purine (Py-Pu) steps compared to placement within a stretch of pyrimidines (Py-Py). Crystal structures of A-type DNA duplexes modified with either monomer, provide a rationalization for the opposing stability effects and point to a steric origin of the destabilization caused by the Ara-FHNA analog. The sequence dependent effect can be explained by the formation of an inter-nucleotide C-F…H-C pseudo hydrogen bond between F3′ of Ara-FHNA and C8-H of the nucleobase from the 3′-adjacent adenosine that is absent at Py-Py steps. In animal experiments, FHNA-modified antisense oligonucleotides formulated in saline showed potent downregulation of gene expression in liver tissue without producing hepatotoxicity. Our data establish FHNA as a useful modification for antisense therapeutics and also confirm the stabilizing influence of F(Py)…H-C(Pu) pseudo hydrogen bonds in nucleic acid structures. PMID:21919455

  2. Synthesis, Improved Antisense Activity and Structural Rationale for the Divergent RNA Affinities of 3;#8242;-Fluoro Hexitol Nucleic Acid (FHNA and Ara-FHNA) Modified Oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, Martin; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Allerson, Charles R.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Berdeja, Andres; Yu, Jinghua; Lee, Sam; Watt, Andrew; Gaus, Hans; Bhat, Balkrishen; Swayze, Eric E.; Seth, Punit P.

    2012-03-16

    The synthesis, biophysical, structural, and biological properties of both isomers of 3'-fluoro hexitol nucleic acid (FHNA and Ara-FHNA) modified oligonucleotides are reported. Synthesis of the FHNA and Ara-FHNA thymine phosphoramidites was efficiently accomplished starting from known sugar precursors. Optimal RNA affinities were observed with a 3'-fluorine atom and nucleobase in a trans-diaxial orientation. The Ara-FHNA analog with an equatorial fluorine was found to be destabilizing. However, the magnitude of destabilization was sequence-dependent. Thus, the loss of stability is sharply reduced when Ara-FHNA residues were inserted at pyrimidine-purine (Py-Pu) steps compared to placement within a stretch of pyrimidines (Py-Py). Crystal structures of A-type DNA duplexes modified with either monomer provide a rationalization for the opposing stability effects and point to a steric origin of the destabilization caused by the Ara-FHNA analog. The sequence dependent effect can be explained by the formation of an internucleotide C-F {hor_ellipsis} H-C pseudo hydrogen bond between F3' of Ara-FHNA and C8-H of the nucleobase from the 3'-adjacent adenosine that is absent at Py-Py steps. In animal experiments, FHNA-modified antisense oligonucleotides formulated in saline showed a potent downregulation of gene expression in liver tissue without producing hepatotoxicity. Our data establish FHNA as a useful modification for antisense therapeutics and also confirm the stabilizing influence of F(Py) {hor_ellipsis} H-C(Pu) pseudo hydrogen bonds in nucleic acid structures.

  3. MicroRNA-Targeted and Small Interfering RNA–Mediated mRNA Degradation Is Regulated by Argonaute, Dicer, and RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ronemus, Michael; Vaughn, Matthew W.; Martienssen, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1) of Arabidopsis thaliana mediates the cleavage of microRNA (miRNA)-targeted mRNAs, and it has also been implicated in the posttranscriptional silencing of transgenes and the maintenance of chromatin structure. Mutations in AGO1 severely disrupt plant development, indicating that miRNA function and possibly other aspects of RNA interference are essential for maintaining normal patterns of gene expression. Using microarrays, we found that 1 to 6% of genes display significant expression changes in several alleles of ago1 at multiple developmental stages, with the majority showing higher levels. Several classes of known miRNA targets increased markedly in ago1, whereas others showed little or no change. Cleavage of mRNAs within miRNA-homologous sites was reduced but not abolished in an ago1 -null background, indicating that redundant slicer activity exists in Arabidopsis. Small interfering RNAs and larger 30- to 60-nucleotide RNA fragments corresponding to highly upregulated miRNA target genes accumulated in wild-type plants but not in ago1, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase mutants rdr2 and rdr6, or the Dicer-like mutants dcl1 and dcl3. Both sense and antisense RNAs corresponding to these miRNA targets accumulated in the ago1 and dcl1 backgrounds. These results indicate that a subset of endogenous mRNA targets of RNA interference may be regulated through a mechanism of second-strand RNA synthesis and degradation initiated by or in addition to miRNA-mediated cleavage. PMID:16798886

  4. Silencing of the Aspergillopepsin B (pepB) Gene of Aspergillus awamori by Antisense RNA Expression or Protease Removal by Gene Disruption Results in a Large Increase in Thaumatin Production

    PubMed Central

    Moralejo, Francisco J.; Cardoza, Rosa Elena; Gutierrez, Santiago; Lombraña, Marta; Fierro, Francisco; Martín, Juan F.

    2002-01-01

    Aspergillopepsin B was identified in culture broths of Aspergillus awamori by in situ detection of its proteolytic activity and by immunodetection with anti-aspergillopepsin B antibodies. Severe thaumatin degradation was observed after in vitro treatment of thaumatin with purified aspergillopepsin B. The pepB gene encoding aspergillopepsin B of A. awamori was cloned and characterized. It is located in chromosome IV of A. awamori, as shown by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and encodes a protein of 282 amino acids with high similarity to the aspergillopepsin B of Aspergillus niger var. macrosporus. The pepB gene is expressed at high rates as a monocistronic 1.0-kb transcript in media with casein at acidic pH values. An antisense cassette constructed by inserting the pepB gene in the antisense orientation downstream from the gpdA promoter resulted in a good level of antisense mRNA, as shown by reverse transcription-PCR. Partial silencing of the pepB gene by the antisense mRNA resulted in a 31% increase in thaumatin yield. However, significant residual degradation of thaumatin still occurred. To completely remove aspergillopepsin B, the pepB gene was deleted by double crossover. Two of the selected transformants lacked the endogenous pepB gene and did not form aspergillopepsin B. Thaumatin yields increased by between 45% in transformant APB 7/25 and 125% in transformant 7/36 with respect to the parental strain. Reduction of proteolytic degradation by gene silencing with antisense mRNA or total removal of the aspergillopepsin B by directed gene deletion was a very useful method for improving thaumatin production in A. awamori. PMID:12089041

  5. Silencing of the aspergillopepsin B (pepB) gene of Aspergillus awamori by antisense RNA expression or protease removal by gene disruption results in a large increase in thaumatin production.

    PubMed

    Moralejo, Francisco J; Cardoza, Rosa Elena; Gutierrez, Santiago; Lombraña, Marta; Fierro, Francisco; Martín, Juan F

    2002-07-01

    Aspergillopepsin B was identified in culture broths of Aspergillus awamori by in situ detection of its proteolytic activity and by immunodetection with anti-aspergillopepsin B antibodies. Severe thaumatin degradation was observed after in vitro treatment of thaumatin with purified aspergillopepsin B. The pepB gene encoding aspergillopepsin B of A. awamori was cloned and characterized. It is located in chromosome IV of A. awamori, as shown by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and encodes a protein of 282 amino acids with high similarity to the aspergillopepsin B of Aspergillus niger var. macrosporus. The pepB gene is expressed at high rates as a monocistronic 1.0-kb transcript in media with casein at acidic pH values. An antisense cassette constructed by inserting the pepB gene in the antisense orientation downstream from the gpdA promoter resulted in a good level of antisense mRNA, as shown by reverse transcription-PCR. Partial silencing of the pepB gene by the antisense mRNA resulted in a 31% increase in thaumatin yield. However, significant residual degradation of thaumatin still occurred. To completely remove aspergillopepsin B, the pepB gene was deleted by double crossover. Two of the selected transformants lacked the endogenous pepB gene and did not form aspergillopepsin B. Thaumatin yields increased by between 45% in transformant APB 7/25 and 125% in transformant 7/36 with respect to the parental strain. Reduction of proteolytic degradation by gene silencing with antisense mRNA or total removal of the aspergillopepsin B by directed gene deletion was a very useful method for improving thaumatin production in A. awamori.

  6. The β-actin mRNA zipcode regulates epithelial adherens junction assembly but not maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Natasha; Eromobor, Itua; Petrie, Ryan J.; Vedula, Pavan; Cruz, Lissette; Rodriguez, Alexis J.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cell-cell contact stimulates actin cytoskeleton remodeling to down-regulate branched filament polymerization-driven lamellar protrusion and subsequently to assemble linear actin filaments required for E-cadherin anchoring during adherens junction complex assembly. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that de novo protein synthesis, the β-actin 3′ UTR, and the β-actin mRNA zipcode are required for epithelial adherens junction complex assembly but not maintenance. Specifically, we demonstrate that perturbing cell-cell contact-localized β-actin monomer synthesis causes epithelial adherens junction assembly defects. Consequently, inhibiting β-actin mRNA zipcode/ZBP1 interactions with β-actin mRNA zipcode antisense oligonucleotides, to intentionally delocalize β-actin monomer synthesis, is sufficient to perturb adherens junction assembly following epithelial cell-cell contact. Additionally, we demonstrate active RhoA, the signal required to drive zipcode-mediated β-actin mRNA targeting, is localized at epithelial cell-cell contact sites in a β-actin mRNA zipcode-dependent manner. Moreover, chemically inhibiting Src kinase activity prevents the local stimulation of β-actin monomer synthesis at cell-cell contact sites while inhibiting epithelial adherens junction assembly. Together, these data demonstrate that epithelial cell-cell contact stimulates β-actin mRNA zipcode-mediated monomer synthesis to spatially regulate actin filament remodeling, thereby controlling adherens junction assembly to modulate cell and tissue adhesion. PMID:24681968

  7. High expression of long non-coding HOX antisense transcript RNA and its clinical significance in cancer tissues: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhao, Yandong; Qin, Yi; Xuan, Yunpeng; Qiu, Tong; Fu, Bo; Ren, Xiaoyang; Jiao, Wenjie

    2017-09-01

    HOX antisense transcript RNA (HOTAIR) is a 2148 nt long, intergenic, non-coding RNA molecule, which is reported to be highly expressed in many types of cancers. This meta-analysis summarizes its expression in cancer. We searched all eligible papers on the prognostic impact of HOTAIR in cancer from inception to 30 September 2015 in PubMed, CBMdisc, and the CNKI database. Only full texts were included. Revman 5.3 was used for meta-analysis. A total of 11 studies of 1010 cases were included in the meta-analysis. HOTAIR expression was higher in: cancer tissues in than adjacent or normal tissues (odds ratio [OR] 37.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 18.94-74.31; P  < 0.00001); in cancer tissues with lymph node metastasis than in those without lymph node metastasis (OR 3.37, 95% CI 2.36-4.82; P  < 0.00001); and in histological grades II-III than in histological gradeI(OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.29-0.75; P  = 0.002). This study shows that HOTAIR may play an important role in cancer occurrence and development, but whether it is a marker of cancer diagnosis and reliable prognosis remains to be confirmed. More rigorous design and meticulous quality epidemiological studies are required. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Antisense oligonucleotide binding to U5 snRNP induces a conformational change that exposes the conserved loop of U5 snRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ast, G; Weiner, A M

    1997-01-01

    Conformational rearrangements of the spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs (U snRNAs) are essential for proper assembly of the active site prior to the first catalytic step of splicing. We have previously shown that conformational changes caused by binding of an antisense 2'-O-methyl RNA oligonucleotide (BU5Ae) to U5 snRNA nt 68-88 disrupted the U4/U5/U6 complex and induced formation of the U1/U4/U5 and U2/U6 complexes. Here we show that the conformational change induced by BU5Ae exposes the invariant loop of U5 that binds the 5'exon and also reorganizes internal loop 1 (IL1) and the top of stem 2. Interestingly, we have also previously found that the U1/U4/U5 complex induced by BU5Ae brings the invariant loop of U5 into close proximity with the 5'-end of U1. Taken together, these data suggest that U1 and U5 may both contribute to the ability of the U1/U4/U5 complex to bind the 5' splice site. PMID:9254712

  9. Regulation of cytoplasmic mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Schoenberg, Daniel R.; Maquat, Lynne E.

    2012-01-01

    Discoveries made over the past 20 years highlight the importance of mRNA decay as a means to modulate gene expression and thereby protein production. Up until recently, studies focused largely on identifying cis-acting sequences that serve as mRNA stability or instability elements, the proteins that bind these elements, how the process of translation influences mRNA decay, and the ribonucleases that catalyze decay. Now, current studies have begun to elucidate how the decay process is regulated. This review examines our current understanding of how mammalian-cell mRNA decay is controlled by different signaling pathways and lays out a framework for future research. PMID:22392217

  10. MicroRNA 21 promotes glioma invasion by targeting matrix metalloproteinase regulators.

    PubMed

    Gabriely, Galina; Wurdinger, Thomas; Kesari, Santosh; Esau, Christine C; Burchard, Julja; Linsley, Peter S; Krichevsky, Anna M

    2008-09-01

    Substantial data indicate that microRNA 21 (miR-21) is significantly elevated in glioblastoma (GBM) and in many other tumors of various origins. This microRNA has been implicated in various aspects of carcinogenesis, including cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. We demonstrate that miR-21 regulates multiple genes associated with glioma cell apoptosis, migration, and invasiveness, including the RECK and TIMP3 genes, which are suppressors of malignancy and inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Specific inhibition of miR-21 with antisense oligonucleotides leads to elevated levels of RECK and TIMP3 and therefore reduces MMP activities in vitro and in a human model of gliomas in nude mice. Moreover, downregulation of miR-21 in glioma cells leads to decreases of their migratory and invasion abilities. Our data suggest that miR-21 contributes to glioma malignancy by downregulation of MMP inhibitors, which leads to activation of MMPs, thus promoting invasiveness of cancer cells. Our results also indicate that inhibition of a single oncomir, like miR-21, with specific antisense molecules can provide a novel therapeutic approach for "physiological" modulation of multiple proteins whose expression is deregulated in cancer.

  11. A microRNA derived from an apparent canonical biogenesis pathway regulates variant surface protein gene expression in Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Saraiya, Ashesh A.; Li, Wei; Wang, Ching C.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that a snoRNA-derived microRNA, miR2, in Giardia lamblia potentially regulates the expression of 22 variant surface protein (VSP) genes. Here, we identified another miRNA, miR4, also capable of regulating the expression of several VSPs but derived from an unannotated open reading frame (ORF) rather than a snoRNA, suggesting a canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway in Giardia. miR4 represses expression of a reporter containing two miR4 antisense sequences at the 3′ UTR without causing a corresponding decrease in the mRNA level. This repression requires the presence of the Giardia Argonaute protein (GlAgo) and is reversed by 2′ O–methylated antisense oligo to miR4, suggesting an RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)–mediated mechanism. Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro evidence suggested that the Giardia Dicer protein (GlDcr) is required for miR4 biogenesis. Coimmunoprecipitation of miR4 with GlAgo further verified miR4 as a miRNA. A total of 361 potential target sites for miR4 were bioinformatically identified in Giardia, out of which 69 (32.7%) were associated with VSP genes. miR4 reduces the expression of a reporter containing two copies of the target site from VSP (GL50803_36493) at the 3′ UTR. Sixteen of the 69 VSP genes were further found to contain partially overlapping miR2 and miR4 targeting sites. Expression of a reporter carrying the two overlapping sites was inhibited by either miR2 or miR4, but the inhibition was neither synergistic nor additive, suggesting a complex mechanism of miRNA regulation of VSP expression and the presence of a rich miRNAome in Giardia. PMID:22033329

  12. Characterization of a Streptococcus mutans Intergenic Region Containing a Small Toxic Peptide and Its cis-Encoded Antisense Small RNA Antitoxin

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Stephanie; Lévesque, Céline M.

    2013-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules consist of a pair of genes that encode two components: a protein toxin and an antitoxin, which may be in the form of either a labile protein or an antisense small RNA. Here we describe, to the best of our knowledge, the first functional chromosomal type I TA system in streptococci. Our model organism is the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans. Our results showed that the genome of S. mutans UA159 reference strain harbors a previously unannotated Fst-like toxin (Fst-Sm) and its cis-encoded small RNA antitoxin (srSm) converging towards the end of the toxin gene in IGR176, a small intergenic region of 318 nt. Fst-Sm is a small hydrophobic peptide of 32 amino acid residues with homology to the Fst toxin family. Transcripts of ∼200 nt and ∼70 nt specific to fst-Sm mRNA and srSm RNA, respectively, were detected by Northern blot analysis throughout S. mutans growth. The toxin mRNA was considerably more stable than its cognate antitoxin. The half-life of srSm RNA was determined to be ∼30 min, while fst-Sm mRNA had a half-life of ∼90 min. Both fst-Sm and srSm RNAs were transcribed across direct tandem repeats providing a region of complementarity for inhibition of toxin translation. Overproduction of Fst-Sm had a toxic effect on E. coli and S. mutans cells which can be neutralized by coexpression of srSm RNA. Deletion of fst-Sm/srSm locus or overexpression of Fst-Sm/srSm had no effect on S. mutans cell growth in liquid medium and no differences in the total biofilm biomass were noted. In contrast, mild-overproduction of Fst-Sm/srSm type I TA system decreases the levels of persister cells tolerant to bacterial cell wall synthesis inhibitors. PMID:23326602

  13. Transcriptome interrogation of human myometrium identifies differentially expressed sense-antisense pairs of protein-coding and long non-coding RNA genes in spontaneous labor at term

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Roberto; Tarca, Adi; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Miranda, Jezid; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Jia, Hui; Hassan, Sonia S.; Kalita, Cynthia A.; Cai, Juan; Yeo, Lami; Lipovich, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Objective The mechanisms responsible for normal and abnormal parturition are poorly understood. Myometrial activation leading to regular uterine contractions is a key component of labor. Dysfunctional labor (arrest of dilatation and/or descent) is a leading indication for cesarean delivery. Compelling evidence suggests that most of these disorders are functional in nature, and not the result of cephalopelvic disproportion. The methodology and the datasets afforded by the post-genomic era provide novel opportunities to understand and target gene functions in these disorders. In 2012, the ENCODE Consortium elucidated the extraordinary abundance and functional complexity of long non-coding RNA genes in the human genome. The purpose of the study was to identify differentially expressed long non-coding RNA genes in human myometrium in women in spontaneous labor at term. Materials and Methods Myometrium was obtained from women undergoing cesarean deliveries who were not in labor (n=19) and women in spontaneous labor at term (n=20). RNA was extracted and profiled using an Illumina® microarray platform. The analysis of the protein coding genes from this study has been previously reported. Here, we have used computational approaches to bound the extent of long non-coding RNA representation on this platform, and to identify co-differentially expressed and correlated pairs of long non-coding RNA genes and protein-coding genes sharing the same genomic loci. Results Upon considering more than 18,498 distinct lncRNA genes compiled nonredundantly from public experimental data sources, and interrogating 2,634 that matched Illumina microarray probes, we identified co-differential expression and correlation at two genomic loci that contain coding-lncRNA gene pairs: SOCS2-AK054607 and LMCD1-NR_024065 in women in spontaneous labor at term. This co-differential expression and correlation was validated by qRT-PCR, an independent experimental method. Intriguingly, one of the two lncRNA

  14. The 5′-tail of antisense RNAII of pMV158 plays a critical role in binding to the target mRNA and in translation inhibition of repB

    PubMed Central

    López-Aguilar, Celeste; Romero-López, Cristina; Espinosa, Manuel; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo; del Solar, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Rolling-circle replication of streptococcal plasmid pMV158 is controlled by the concerted action of two trans-acting elements, namely transcriptional repressor CopG and antisense RNAII, which inhibit expression of the repB gene encoding the replication initiator protein. The pMV158-encoded antisense RNAII exerts its activity of replication control by inhibiting translation of the essential repB gene. RNAII is the smallest and simplest among the characterized antisense RNAs involved in control of plasmid replication. Structure analysis of RNAII revealed that it folds into an 8-bp-long stem containing a 1-nt bulge and closed by a 6-nt apical loop. This hairpin is flanked by a 17-nt-long single-stranded 5′-tail and an 8-nt-long 3′-terminal U-rich stretch. Here, the 3′ and 5′ regions of the 5′-tail of RNAII are shown to play a critical role in the binding to the target mRNA and in the inhibition of repB translation, respectively. In contrast, the apical loop of the single hairpin of RNAII plays a rather secondary role and the upper stem region hardly contributes to the binding or inhibition processes. The entire 5′-tail is required for efficient inhibition of repB translation, though only the 8-nt-long region adjacent to the hairpin seems to be essential for rapid binding to the mRNA. These results show that a “kissing” interaction involving base-pairing between complementary hairpin loops in RNAII and mRNA is not critical for efficient RNA/RNA binding or repB translation inhibition. A singular binding mechanism is envisaged whereby initial pairing between complementary single-stranded regions in the antisense and sense RNAs progresses upwards into the corresponding hairpin stems to form the intermolecular duplex. PMID:26175752

  15. Molecular networks involved in mouse cerebral corticogenesis and spatio-temporal regulation of Sox4 and Sox11 novel antisense transcripts revealed by transcriptome profiling.

    PubMed

    Ling, King-Hwa; Hewitt, Chelsee A; Beissbarth, Tim; Hyde, Lavinia; Banerjee, Kakoli; Cheah, Pike-See; Cannon, Ping Z; Hahn, Christopher N; Thomas, Paul Q; Smyth, Gordon K; Tan, Seong-Seng; Thomas, Tim; Scott, Hamish S

    2009-01-01

    Development of the cerebral cortex requires highly specific spatio-temporal regulation of gene expression. It is proposed that transcriptome profiling of the cerebral cortex at various developmental time points or regions will reveal candidate genes and associated molecular pathways involved in cerebral corticogenesis. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) libraries were constructed from C57BL/6 mouse cerebral cortices of age embryonic day (E) 15.5, E17.5, postnatal day (P) 1.5 and 4 to 6 months. Hierarchical clustering analysis of 561 differentially expressed transcripts showed regionalized, stage-specific and co-regulated expression profiles. SAGE expression profiles of 70 differentially expressed transcripts were validated using quantitative RT-PCR assays. Ingenuity pathway analyses of validated differentially expressed transcripts demonstrated that these transcripts possess distinctive functional properties related to various stages of cerebral corticogenesis and human neurological disorders. Genomic clustering analysis of the differentially expressed transcripts identified two highly transcribed genomic loci, Sox4 and Sox11, during embryonic cerebral corticogenesis. These loci feature unusual overlapping sense and antisense transcripts with alternative polyadenylation sites and differential expression. The Sox4 and Sox11 antisense transcripts were highly expressed in the brain compared to other mouse organs and are differentially expressed in both the proliferating and differentiating neural stem/progenitor cells and P19 (embryonal carcinoma) cells. We report validated gene expression profiles that have implications for understanding the associations between differentially expressed transcripts, novel targets and related disorders pertaining to cerebral corticogenesis. The study reports, for the first time, spatio-temporally regulated Sox4 and Sox11 antisense transcripts in the brain, neural stem/progenitor cells and P19 cells, suggesting they have an

  16. Chromatin-associated RNA interference components contribute to transcriptional regulation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cernilogar, Filippo M; Onorati, Maria Cristina; Kothe, Greg O; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Parsi, Krishna Mohan; Breiling, Achim; Lo Sardo, Federica; Saxena, Alka; Miyoshi, Keita; Siomi, Haruhiko; Siomi, Mikiko C; Carninci, Piero; Gilmour, David S; Corona, Davide F V; Orlando, Valerio

    2011-11-06

    RNA interference (RNAi) pathways have evolved as important modulators of gene expression that operate in the cytoplasm by degrading RNA target molecules through the activity of short (21-30 nucleotide) RNAs. RNAi components have been reported to have a role in the nucleus, as they are involved in epigenetic regulation and heterochromatin formation. However, although RNAi-mediated post-transcriptional gene silencing is well documented, the mechanisms of RNAi-mediated transcriptional gene silencing and, in particular, the role of RNAi components in chromatin dynamics, especially in animal multicellular organisms, are elusive. Here we show that the key RNAi components Dicer 2 (DCR2) and Argonaute 2 (AGO2) associate with chromatin (with a strong preference for euchromatic, transcriptionally active, loci) and interact with the core transcription machinery. Notably, loss of function of DCR2 or AGO2 showed that transcriptional defects are accompanied by the perturbation of RNA polymerase II positioning on promoters. Furthermore, after heat shock, both Dcr2 and Ago2 null mutations, as well as missense mutations that compromise the RNAi activity, impaired the global dynamics of RNA polymerase II. Finally, the deep sequencing of the AGO2-associated small RNAs (AGO2 RIP-seq) revealed that AGO2 is strongly enriched in small RNAs that encompass the promoter regions and other regions of heat-shock and other genetic loci on both the sense and antisense DNA strands, but with a strong bias for the antisense strand, particularly after heat shock. Taken together, our results show that DCR2 and AGO2 are globally associated with transcriptionally active loci and may have a pivotal role in shaping the transcriptome by controlling the processivity of RNA polymerase II.

  17. Reversible RNA adenosine methylation in biological regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guifang; Fu, Ye; He, Chuan

    2012-01-01

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is a ubiquitous modification in messenger RNA (mRNA) and other RNAs across most eukaryotes. For many years, however, the exact functions of m6A were not clearly understood. The discovery that the fat mass and obesity associated protein (FTO) is an m6A demethylase indicates that this modification is reversible and dynamically regulated, suggesting it has regulatory roles. In addition, it has been shown that m6A affects cell fate decisions in yeast and plant development. Recent affinity-based m6A profiling in mouse and human cells further showed that this modification is a widespread mark in coding and non-coding RNA transcripts and is likely dynamically regulated throughout developmental processes. Therefore, reversible RNA methylation, analogous to reversible DNA and histone modifications, may affect gene expression and cell fate decisions by modulating multiple RNA-related cellular pathways, which potentially provides rapid responses to various cellular and environmental signals, including energy and nutrient availability in mammals. PMID:23218460

  18. Targeting Cancer with Antisense Oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Hnatowich, DJ

    2008-10-28

    With financial assistance from the Department of Energy, we have shown definitively that radiolabeled antisense DNAs and other oligomers will accumulate in target cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by an antisense mechanism. We have also shown that the number of mRNA targets for our antisense oligomers in the cancer cell types that we have investigated so far is sufficient to provide and antisense image and/or radiotherapy of cancer in mice. These studies have been reported in about 10 publications. However our observation over the past several years has shown that radiolabeled antisense oligomers administered intravenously in their native and naked form will accumulate and be retained in target xenografts by an antisense mechanism but will also accumulate at high levels in normal organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys. We have investigated unsuccessfully several commercially available vectors. Thus the use of radiolabeled antisense oligomers for the imaging of cancer must await novel approaches to delivery. This laboratory has therefore pursued two new paths, optical imaging of tumor and Auger radiotherapy. We are developing a novel method of optical imaging tumor using antisense oligomers with a fluorophore is administered while hybridized with a shorter complementary oligomer with an inhibitor. In culture and in tumored mice that the duplex remains intact and thus nonfluorescent until it encounters its target mRNA at which time it dissociates and the antisense oligomer binds along with its fluorophore to the target. Simultaneous with the above, we have also observed, as have others, that antisense oligomers migrate rapidly and quantitatively to the nucleus upon crossing cell membranes. The Auger electron radiotherapy path results from this observation since the nuclear migration properties could be used effectively to bring and to retain in the nucleus an Auger emitting radionuclide such as 111In or 125I bound to the antisense oligomer. Since the object becomes

  19. Genome-wide analysis of rice cis-natural antisense transcription under cadmium exposure using strand-specific RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Oono, Youko; Yazawa, Takayuki; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Harumi; Mori, Satomi; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2017-10-06

    The elucidation of novel transcripts and their expression in response to various stress conditions is necessary to understand the transcriptional network of plants as an adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. We performed strand-specific RNA-Seq (ssRNA-Seq) on rice exposed to cadmium (Cd) for 24 h and investigated the expression of cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs), a class of endogenous coding or non-protein-coding RNAs with sequence complementarity to the opposite strands of RAP transcripts. Many RAP transcripts possessed cis-NATs and these cis-NATs were responsive to some extent. Cis-NATs were upregulated from 26, 266 and 409 RAP gene loci, while 2054, 2501 and 2825 RAP transcripts were upregulated from 38,123 RAP loci under high Cd exposure in roots at 1, 12 and 24 h, respectively. In addition, most of the upregulated cis-NATs showed little upregulation under ABA or cold treatment. A number of cis-NATs were upregulated from less than 35 RAP gene loci in different tissue and time-point combinations under low Cd exposure, suggesting that cis-NATs respond to environmental stress. Furthermore, 409 RAP transcripts with upregulated cis-NATs were classified into three groups based on the expression of the RAP transcripts from the opposite DNA strand, including 138 upregulated, 128 invariable, and 143 downregulated transcripts, although the responses of cis-NATs and RAP transcripts were not always correlated. We have shown that the cis-NATs identified by ssRNA-Seq analysis are novel genes and that some of them are stress-specific and show different responses depending on the degree of stress and tissue. These results improve our understanding of the complete molecular mechanism of plant adaptation to Cd exposure.

  20. Specialized box C/D snoRNPs act as antisense guides to target RNA base acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Watzinger, Peter; Kötter, Peter; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.; Granneman, Sander; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Box C/D snoRNAs are known to guide site-specific ribose methylation of ribosomal RNA. Here, we demonstrate a novel and unexpected role for box C/D snoRNAs in guiding 18S rRNA acetylation in yeast. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that the acetylation of two cytosine residues in 18S rRNA catalyzed by Kre33 is guided by two orphan box C/D snoRNAs–snR4 and snR45 –not known to be involved in methylation in yeast. We identified Kre33 binding sites on these snoRNAs as well as on the 18S rRNA, and demonstrate that both snR4 and snR45 establish extended bipartite complementarity around the cytosines targeted for acetylation, similar to pseudouridylation pocket formation by the H/ACA snoRNPs. We show that base pairing between these snoRNAs and 18S rRNA requires the putative helicase activity of Kre33, which is also needed to aid early pre-rRNA processing. Compared to yeast, the number of orphan box C/D snoRNAs in higher eukaryotes is much larger and we hypothesize that several of these may be involved in base-modifications. PMID:28542199

  1. Specialized box C/D snoRNPs act as antisense guides to target RNA base acetylation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunny; Yang, Jun; van Nues, Rob; Watzinger, Peter; Kötter, Peter; Lafontaine, Denis L J; Granneman, Sander; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2017-05-01

    Box C/D snoRNAs are known to guide site-specific ribose methylation of ribosomal RNA. Here, we demonstrate a novel and unexpected role for box C/D snoRNAs in guiding 18S rRNA acetylation in yeast. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that the acetylation of two cytosine residues in 18S rRNA catalyzed by Kre33 is guided by two orphan box C/D snoRNAs-snR4 and snR45 -not known to be involved in methylation in yeast. We identified Kre33 binding sites on these snoRNAs as well as on the 18S rRNA, and demonstrate that both snR4 and snR45 establish extended bipartite complementarity around the cytosines targeted for acetylation, similar to pseudouridylation pocket formation by the H/ACA snoRNPs. We show that base pairing between these snoRNAs and 18S rRNA requires the putative helicase activity of Kre33, which is also needed to aid early pre-rRNA processing. Compared to yeast, the number of orphan box C/D snoRNAs in higher eukaryotes is much larger and we hypothesize that several of these may be involved in base-modifications.

  2. Reduction of Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase by Antisense RNA in the C4 Plant Flaveria bidentis Leads to Reduced Assimilation Rates and Increased Carbon Isotope Discrimination.

    PubMed Central

    Von Caemmerer, S.; Millgate, A.; Farquhar, G. D.; Furbank, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    Transgenic Flaveria bidentis (a C4 species) plants with an antisense gene directed against the mRNA of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) were used to examine the relationship between the CO2 assimilation rate, Rubisco content, and carbon isotope discrimination. Reduction in the amount of Rubisco in the transgenic plants resulted in reduced CO2 assimilation rates and increased carbon isotope discrimination of leaf dry matter. The H2O exchange was similar in transgenic and wild-type plants, resulting in higher ratios of intercellular to ambient CO2 partial pressures. Carbon isotope discrimination was measured concurrently with CO2 and H2O exchange on leaves of the control plants and T1 progeny with a 40% reduction in Rubisco. From the theory of carbon isotope discrimination in the C4 species, we conclude that the reduction in the Rubisco content in the transgenic plants has led to an increase in bundle-sheath CO2 concentration and CO2 leakage from the bundle sheath; however, some down-regulation of the C4 cycle also occurred. PMID:12223620

  3. Cellular antisense activity of peptide nucleic acid (PNAs) targeted to HIV-1 polypurine tract (PPT) containing RNA

    PubMed Central

    Boutimah-Hamoudi, Fatima; Leforestier, Erwan; Sénamaud-Beaufort, Catherine; Nielsen, Peter E.; Giovannangeli, Carine; Saison-Behmoaras, Tula Ester

    2007-01-01

    DNA and RNA oligomers that contain stretches of guanines can associate to form stable secondary structures including G-quadruplexes. Our study shows that the (UUAAAAGAAAAGGGGGGAU) RNA sequence, from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 polypurine tract or PPT sequence) forms in vitro a stable folded structure involving the G-run. We have investigated the ability of pyrimidine peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers targeted to the PPT sequence to invade the folded RNA and exhibit biological activity at the translation level in vitro and in cells. We find that PNAs can form stable complexes even with the structured PPT RNA target at neutral pH. We show that T-rich PNAs, namely the tridecamer-I PNA (C4T4CT4) forms triplex structures whereas the C-rich tridecamer-II PNA (TC6T4CT) likely forms a duplex with the target RNA. Interestingly, we find that both C-rich and T-rich PNAs arrested in vitro translation elongation specifically at the PPT target site. Finally, we show that T-rich and C-rich tridecamer PNAs that have been identified as efficient and specific blockers of translation elongation in vitro, specifically inhibit translation in streptolysin-O permeabilized cells where the PPT target sequence has been introduced upstream the reporter luciferase gene. PMID:17537815

  4. Cellular antisense activity of peptide nucleic acid (PNAs) targeted to HIV-1 polypurine tract (PPT) containing RNA.

    PubMed

    Boutimah-Hamoudi, Fatima; Leforestier, Erwan; Sénamaud-Beaufort, Catherine; Nielsen, Peter E; Giovannangeli, Carine; Saison-Behmoaras, Tula Ester

    2007-01-01

    DNA and RNA oligomers that contain stretches of guanines can associate to form stable secondary structures including G-quadruplexes. Our study shows that the (UUAAAAGAAAAGGGGGGAU) RNA sequence, from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 polypurine tract or PPT sequence) forms in vitro a stable folded structure involving the G-run. We have investigated the ability of pyrimidine peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers targeted to the PPT sequence to invade the folded RNA and exhibit biological activity at the translation level in vitro and in cells. We find that PNAs can form stable complexes even with the structured PPT RNA target at neutral pH. We show that T-rich PNAs, namely the tridecamer-I PNA (C4T4CT4) forms triplex structures whereas the C-rich tridecamer-II PNA (TC6T4CT) likely forms a duplex with the target RNA. Interestingly, we find that both C-rich and T-rich PNAs arrested in vitro translation elongation specifically at the PPT target site. Finally, we show that T-rich and C-rich tridecamer PNAs that have been identified as efficient and specific blockers of translation elongation in vitro, specifically inhibit translation in streptolysin-O permeabilized cells where the PPT target sequence has been introduced upstream the reporter luciferase gene.

  5. Long noncoding RNA FOXD3-AS1 regulates oxidative stress-induced apoptosis via sponging microRNA-150.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Duo; Lee, Heedoo; Haspel, Jeffrey A; Jin, Yang

    2017-10-01

    The function of most human long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) remains unclear. Our studies identified a highly up-regulated mammalian lncRNA, FOXD3-AS1, known as linc1623 in mice, in the setting of hyperoxia/reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced lung injury. We found that ROS induced a robust expression of FOXD3-AS1 in mouse lung tissue. Functionally, FOXD3-AS1 promoted oxidative stress-induced lung epithelial cell death. In human lung epithelial cells, the microRNA-150 (miR-150) was identified to interact with FOXD3-AS1; this finding was confirmed using the luciferase reporter assays. Consistently, mutation on the miR-150 pairing sequence in FOXD3-AS1 abolished the interactions between FOXD3-AS1 and miR-150. Additionally, miR-150 mimics suppressed the level of FOXD3-AS1. The antisense oligos of FOXD3-AS1 significantly augmented the intracellular level of miR-150, supporting the theory of sponging effects of FOXD3-AS1 on miR-150. We further investigated the cellular function of miR-150 in our lung injury models. MiR-150 conferred a cytoprotective role in lung epithelial cells after oxidative stress, whereas FOXD3-AS1 promoted cell death. Taken together, our studies indicated that FOXD3-AS1 serves as a sponge or as a competing endogenous noncoding RNA for miR-150, restricting its capability to promote cell growth and thereby exaggerating hyperoxia-induced lung epithelial cell death.-Zhang, D., Lee, H., Haspel, J. A., Jin, Y. Long noncoding RNA FOXD3-AS1 regulates oxidative stress-induced apoptosis via sponging microRNA-150. © FASEB.

  6. Antisense Oligonucleotides Used to Target the DUX4 mRNA as Therapeutic Approaches in FaciosScapuloHumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD).

    PubMed

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Vanderplanck, Céline; Wauters, Armelle; Harper, Scott Q; Coppée, Frédérique; Belayew, Alexandra

    2017-03-03

    FacioScapuloHumeral muscular Dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most prevalent hereditary myopathies and is generally characterized by progressive muscle atrophy affecting the face, scapular fixators; upper arms and distal lower legs. The FSHD locus maps to a macrosatellite D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4q35. Each D4Z4 unit contains a DUX4 gene; the most distal of which is flanked by a polyadenylation site on FSHD-permissive alleles, which allows for production of stable DUX4 mRNAs. In addition, an open chromatin structure is required for DUX4 gene transcription. FSHD thus results from a gain of function of the toxic DUX4 protein that normally is only expressed in germ line and stem cells. Therapeutic strategies are emerging that aim to decrease DUX4 expression or toxicity in FSHD muscle cells. We review here the heterogeneity of DUX4 mRNAs observed in muscle and stem cells; and the use of antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) targeting the DUX4 mRNA to interfere either with transcript cleavage/polyadenylation or intron splicing. We show in primary cultures that DUX4-targeted AOs suppress the atrophic FSHD myotube phenotype; but do not improve the disorganized FSHD myotube phenotype which could be caused by DUX4c over-expression. Thus; DUX4c might constitute another therapeutic target in FSHD.

  7. Antisense Oligonucleotides Used to Target the DUX4 mRNA as Therapeutic Approaches in FaciosScapuloHumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD)

    PubMed Central

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Vanderplanck, Céline; Wauters, Armelle; Harper, Scott Q.; Coppée, Frédérique; Belayew, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    FacioScapuloHumeral muscular Dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most prevalent hereditary myopathies and is generally characterized by progressive muscle atrophy affecting the face, scapular fixators; upper arms and distal lower legs. The FSHD locus maps to a macrosatellite D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4q35. Each D4Z4 unit contains a DUX4 gene; the most distal of which is flanked by a polyadenylation site on FSHD-permissive alleles, which allows for production of stable DUX4 mRNAs. In addition, an open chromatin structure is required for DUX4 gene transcription. FSHD thus results from a gain of function of the toxic DUX4 protein that normally is only expressed in germ line and stem cells. Therapeutic strategies are emerging that aim to decrease DUX4 expression or toxicity in FSHD muscle cells. We review here the heterogeneity of DUX4 mRNAs observed in muscle and stem cells; and the use of antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) targeting the DUX4 mRNA to interfere either with transcript cleavage/polyadenylation or intron splicing. We show in primary cultures that DUX4-targeted AOs suppress the atrophic FSHD myotube phenotype; but do not improve the disorganized FSHD myotube phenotype which could be caused by DUX4c over-expression. Thus; DUX4c might constitute another therapeutic target in FSHD. PMID:28273791

  8. C-type starch from high-amylose rice resistant starch granules modified by antisense RNA inhibition of starch branching enzyme.

    PubMed

    Wei, Cunxu; Xu, Bin; Qin, Fengling; Yu, Huaguang; Chen, Chong; Meng, Xianglen; Zhu, Lijia; Wang, Youping; Gu, Minghong; Liu, Qiaoquan

    2010-06-23

    High-amylose starch is a source of resistant starch (RS) which has a great benefit on human health. A transgenic rice line (TRS) enriched amylose and RS had been developed by antisense RNA inhibition of starch branching enzymes. In this study, the native starch granules were isolated from TRS grains as well as the wild type, and their crystalline type was carefully investigated before and after acid hydrolysis. In high-amylose TRS rice, the C-type starch, which might result from the combination of both A-type and B-type starch, was observed and subsequently confirmed by multiple physical techniques, including X-ray powder diffraction, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, and Fourier transform infrared. Moreover, the change of starch crystalline structure from C- to B-type during acid hydrolysis was also observed in this RS-rich rice. These data could add to our understanding of not only the polymorph structure of cereal starch but also why high-amylose starch is more resistant to digestion.

  9. Dynamic RNA Modifications in Gene Expression Regulation.

    PubMed

    Roundtree, Ian A; Evans, Molly E; Pan, Tao; He, Chuan

    2017-06-15

    Over 100 types of chemical modifications have been identified in cellular RNAs. While the 5' cap modification and the poly(A) tail of eukaryotic mRNA play key roles in regulation, internal modifications are gaining attention for their roles in mRNA metabolism. The most abundant internal mRNA modification is N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A), and identification of proteins that install, recognize, and remove this and other marks have revealed roles for mRNA modification in nearly every aspect of the mRNA life cycle, as well as in various cellular, developmental, and disease processes. Abundant noncoding RNAs such as tRNAs, rRNAs, and spliceosomal RNAs are also heavily modified and depend on the modifications for their biogenesis and function. Our understanding of the biological contributions of these different chemical modifications is beginning to take shape, but it's clear that in both coding and noncoding RNAs, dynamic modifications represent a new layer of control of genetic information. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. An antisense microwalk reveals critical role of an intronic position linked to a unique long-distance interaction in pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Natalia N.; Hollinger, Katrin; Bhattacharya, Dhruva; Singh, Ravindra N.

    2010-01-01

    Here we report a novel finding of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) microwalk in which we examined the position-specific role of intronic residues downstream from the 5′ splice site (5′ ss) of SMN2 exon 7, skipping of which is associated with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant mortality. Our results revealed the inhibitory role of a cytosine residue at the 10th intronic position (10C), which is neither conserved nor associated with any known splicing motif. Significance of 10C emerged from the splicing pattern of SMN2 exon 7 in presence of a 14-mer ASO (L14) that sequestered two adjacent hnRNP A1 motifs downstream from 10C and yet promoted SMN2 exon 7 skipping. Another 14-mer ASO (F14) that sequestered both, 10C and adjacent hnRNP A1 motifs, led to a strong stimulation of SMN2 exon 7 inclusion. The inhibitory role of 10C was found to be tightly linked to its unpaired status and specific positioning immediately upstream of a RNA:RNA helix formed between the targeting ASO and its intronic target. Employing a heterologous context as well as changed contexts of SMN2 intron 7, we show that the inhibitory effect of unpaired 10C is dependent upon a long-distance interaction involving downstream intronic sequences. Our report furnishes one of the rare examples in which an ASO-based approach could be applied to unravel the critical role of an intronic position that may not belong to a linear motif and yet play significant role through long-distance interactions. PMID:20413618

  11. Inefficient cationic lipid-mediated siRNA and antisense oligonucleotide transfer to airway epithelial cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Griesenbach, Uta; Kitson, Chris; Garcia, Sara Escudero; Farley, Raymond; Singh, Charanjit; Somerton, Luci; Painter, Hazel; Smith, Rbecca L; Gill, Deborah R; Hyde, Stephen C; Chow, Yu-Hua; Hu, Jim; Gray, Mike; Edbrooke, Mark; Ogilvie, Varrie; MacGregor, Gordon; Scheule, Ronald K; Cheng, Seng H; Caplen, Natasha J; Alton, Eric WFW

    2006-01-01

    Background The cationic lipid Genzyme lipid (GL) 67 is the current "gold-standard" for in vivo lung gene transfer. Here, we assessed, if GL67 mediated uptake of siRNAs and asODNs into airway epithelium in vivo. Methods Anti-lacZ and ENaC (epithelial sodium channel) siRNA and asODN were complexed to GL67 and administered to the mouse airway epithelium in vivo Transfection efficiency and efficacy were assessed using real-time RT-PCR as well as through protein expression and functional studies. In parallel in vitro experiments were carried out to select the most efficient oligonucleotides. Results In vitro, GL67 efficiently complexed asODNs and siRNAs, and both were stable in exhaled breath condensate. Importantly, during in vitro selection of functional siRNA and asODN we noted that asODNs accumulated rapidly in the nuclei of transfected cells, whereas siRNAs remained in the cytoplasm, a pattern consistent with their presumed site of action. Following in vivo lung transfection siRNAs were only visible in alveolar macrophages, whereas asODN also transfected alveolar epithelial cells, but no significant uptake into conducting airway epithelial cells was seen. SiRNAs and asODNs targeted to β-galactosidase reduced βgal mRNA levels in the airway epithelium of K18-lacZ mice by 30% and 60%, respectively. However, this was insufficient to reduce protein expression. In an attempt to increase transfection efficiency of the airway epithelium, we increased contact time of siRNA and asODN using the in vivo mouse nose model. Although highly variable and inefficient, transfection of airway epithelium with asODN, but not siRNA, was now seen. As asODNs more effectively transfected nasal airway epithelial cells, we assessed the effect of asODN against ENaC, a potential therapeutic target in cystic fibrosis; no decrease in ENaC mRNA levels or function was detected. Conclusion This study suggests that although siRNAs and asODNs can be developed to inhibit gene expression in culture

  12. A-to-I RNA Editing Up-regulates Human Dihydrofolate Reductase in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masataka; Fukami, Tatsuki; Gotoh, Saki; Nakajima, Miki

    2017-03-24

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) plays a key role in folate metabolism and is a target molecule of methotrexate. An increase in the cellular expression level of DHFR is one of the mechanisms of tumor resistance to methotrexate. The present study investigated the possibility that adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing, which causes nucleotide conversion by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes, might modulate DHFR expression. In human breast adenocarcinoma-derived MCF-7 cells, 26 RNA editing sites were identified in the 3'-UTR of DHFR. Knockdown of ADAR1 decreased the RNA editing levels of DHFR and resulted in a decrease in the DHFR mRNA and protein levels, indicating that ADAR1 up-regulates DHFR expression. Using a computational analysis, miR-25-3p and miR-125a-3p were predicted to bind to the non-edited 3'-UTR of DHFR but not to the edited sequence. The decrease in DHFR expression by the knockdown of ADAR1 was restored by transfection of antisense oligonucleotides for these miRNAs, suggesting that RNA editing mediated up-regulation of DHFR requires the function of these miRNAs. Interestingly, we observed that the knockdown of ADAR1 decreased cell viability and increased the sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to methotrexate. ADAR1 expression levels and the RNA editing levels in the 3'-UTR of DHFR in breast cancer tissues were higher than those in adjacent normal tissues. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that ADAR1 positively regulates the expression of DHFR by editing the miR-25-3p and miR-125a-3p binding sites in the 3'-UTR of DHFR, enhancing cellular proliferation and resistance to methotrexate.

  13. Targeted Therapy of Human Breast Cancer by 2-5A-Antisense Directed Against Telomerase RNA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    results in chromosome instability and cell death . To overcome this problem most cancer cells re-express the telomerase enzyme which prevents telomere...selectively destroy the target RNA. Using this system we have shown that targeting telomerase causes rapid cell death in several different breast cancer...cell lines in vitro. This cell death is not seen when the cells are treated with control oligos carrying mismatches in the target sequence. Cell death is due to apoptosis.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Crooke, Stanley T

    2017-04-01

    In 1987, when I became interested in the notion of antisense technology, I returned to my roots in RNA biochemistry and began work to understand how oligonucleotides behave in biological systems. Since 1989, my research has focused primarily on this topic, although I have been involved in most areas of research in antisense technology. I believe that the art of excellent science is to frame large important questions that are perhaps not immediately answerable with existing knowledge and methods, and then conceive a long-term (multiyear) research strategy that begins by answering the most pressing answerable questions on the path to the long-term goals. Then, a step-by-step research pathway that will address the strategic questions posed must be implemented, adjusting the plan as new things are learned. This is the approach we have taken at Ionis. Obviously, to create antisense technology, we have had to address a wide array of strategic questions, for example, the medicinal chemistry of oligonucleotides, manufacturing and analytical methods, pharmacokinetics and toxicology, as well as questions about the molecular pharmacology of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). Each of these endeavors has consumed nearly three decades of scientific effort, is still very much a work-in-progress, and has resulted in hundreds of publications. As a recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award 2016 granted by the Oligonucleotide Therapeutic Society, in this note, my goal is to summarize the contributions of my group to the efforts to understand the molecular mechanisms of ASOs.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Antisense Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In 1987, when I became interested in the notion of antisense technology, I returned to my roots in RNA biochemistry and began work to understand how oligonucleotides behave in biological systems. Since 1989, my research has focused primarily on this topic, although I have been involved in most areas of research in antisense technology. I believe that the art of excellent science is to frame large important questions that are perhaps not immediately answerable with existing knowledge and methods, and then conceive a long-term (multiyear) research strategy that begins by answering the most pressing answerable questions on the path to the long-term goals. Then, a step-by-step research pathway that will address the strategic questions posed must be implemented, adjusting the plan as new things are learned. This is the approach we have taken at Ionis. Obviously, to create antisense technology, we have had to address a wide array of strategic questions, for example, the medicinal chemistry of oligonucleotides, manufacturing and analytical methods, pharmacokinetics and toxicology, as well as questions about the molecular pharmacology of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). Each of these endeavors has consumed nearly three decades of scientific effort, is still very much a work-in-progress, and has resulted in hundreds of publications. As a recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award 2016 granted by the Oligonucleotide Therapeutic Society, in this note, my goal is to summarize the contributions of my group to the efforts to understand the molecular mechanisms of ASOs. PMID:28080221

  16. Analysis of Antisense Expression by Whole Genome Tiling Microarrays and siRNAs Suggests Mis-Annotation of Arabidopsis Orphan Protein-Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Casey R.; Luo, Qing-Jun; Gontcharova, Viktoria; Jiang, Ying-Wen; Samanta, Manoj; Youn, Eunseog; Rock, Christopher D.

    2010-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and trans-acting small-interfering RNAs (tasi-RNAs) are small (20–22 nt long) RNAs (smRNAs) generated from hairpin secondary structures or antisense transcripts, respectively, that regulate gene expression by Watson-Crick pairing to a target mRNA and altering expression by mechanisms related to RNA interference. The high sequence homology of plant miRNAs to their targets has been the mainstay of miRNA prediction algorithms, which are limited in their predictive power for other kingdoms because miRNA complementarity is less conserved yet transitive processes (production of antisense smRNAs) are active in eukaryotes. We hypothesize that antisense transcription and associated smRNAs are biomarkers which can be computationally modeled for gene discovery. Principal Findings We explored rice (Oryza sativa) sense and antisense gene expression in publicly available whole genome tiling array transcriptome data and sequenced smRNA libraries (as well as C. elegans) and found evidence of transitivity of MIRNA genes similar to that found in Arabidopsis. Statistical analysis of antisense transcript abundances, presence of antisense ESTs, and association with smRNAs suggests several hundred Arabidopsis ‘orphan’ hypothetical genes are non-coding RNAs. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found novel Arabidopsis homologues of some MIRNA genes on the antisense strand of previously annotated protein-coding genes. A Support Vector Machine (SVM) was applied using thermodynamic energy of binding plus novel expression features of sense/antisense transcription topology and siRNA abundances to build a prediction model of miRNA targets. The SVM when trained on targets could predict the “ancient” (deeply conserved) class of validated Arabidopsis MIRNA genes with an accuracy of 84%, and 76% for “new” rapidly-evolving MIRNA genes. Conclusions Antisense and smRNA expression features and computational methods may identify novel MIRNA genes and other non

  17. Synthesis and Antisense Properties of Fluoro Cyclohexenyl Nucleic Acid (F-CeNA) – A Nuclease Stable Mimic of 2′-Fluoro RNA

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Punit P.; Yu, Jinghua; Jazayeri, Ali; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Allerson, Charles R; Østergaard, Michael E.; Liu, Fengwu; Herdewijn, Piet; Egli, Martin; Swayze, Eric E.

    2013-01-01

    -CeNA gapmer ASO showed similar RNA affinity but significantly improved activity compared to that of a sequence matched MOE ASO, thus establishing F-CeNA as a useful modification for antisense applications. PMID:22591005

  18. Synthesis and antisense properties of fluoro cyclohexenyl nucleic acid (F-CeNA), a nuclease stable mimic of 2'-fluoro RNA.

    PubMed

    Seth, Punit P; Yu, Jinghua; Jazayeri, Ali; Pallan, Pradeep S; Allerson, Charles R; Østergaard, Michael E; Liu, Fengwu; Herdewijn, Piet; Egli, Martin; Swayze, Eric E

    2012-06-01

    -CeNA gapmer ASO showed similar RNA affinity but significantly improved activity compared to that of a sequence matched MOE ASO, thus establishing F-CeNA as a useful modification for antisense applications.

  19. Why so narrow: Distribution of anti-sense regulated, type I toxin-antitoxin systems compared with type II and type III systems

    PubMed Central

    Coray, Dorien S.; Heinemann, Jack A.; Gardner, Paul P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are gene modules that appear to be horizontally mobile across a wide range of prokaryotes. It has been proposed that type I TA systems, with an antisense RNA-antitoxin, are less mobile than other TAs that rely on direct toxin-antitoxin binding but no direct comparisons have been made. We searched for type I, II and III toxin families using iterative searches with profile hidden Markov models across phyla and replicons. The distribution of type I toxin families were comparatively narrow, but these patterns weakened with recently discovered families. We discuss how the function and phenotypes of TA systems as well as biases in our search methods may account for differences in their distribution. PMID:28067598

  20. Murine transcription factor alpha A-crystallin binding protein I. Complete sequence, gene structure, expression, and functional inhibition via antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Brady, J P; Kantorow, M; Sax, C M; Donovan, D M; Piatigorsky, J

    1995-01-20

    alpha A-crystallin binding protein I (alpha A-CRYBP1) is a ubiquitously expressed DNA binding protein that was previously identified by its ability to interact with a functionally important sequence in the mouse alpha A-crystallin gene promoter. Here, we have cloned a single copy gene with 10 exons spanning greater than 70 kb of genomic DNA that encodes alpha A-CRYBP1. The mouse alpha A-CRYBP1 gene specifies a 2,688-amino acid protein with 72% amino acid identity to its human homologue, PRDII-BF1. Both the human and the mouse proteins contain two sets of consensus C2H2 zinc fingers at each end as well a central nonconsensus zinc finger. The alpha A-CRYBP1 gene produces a 9.5-kb transcript in 11 different tissues as well as a testis-specific, 7.7-kb transcript. alpha A-CRYBP1 cDNA clones were isolated from adult mouse brain and testis as well as from cell lines derived from mouse lens (alpha TN4-1) and muscle (C2C12). A single clone isolated from the muscle C2C12 library contains an additional exon near the 5'-end that would prevent production of a functional protein if the normal translation start site were utilized; however, there is another potential initiation codon located downstream that is in frame with the rest of the coding region. In addition, we identified multiple cDNAs from the testis in which the final intron is still present. Finally, we used an antisense expression construct derived from an alpha A-CRYBP1 cDNA clone to provide the first functional evidence that alpha A-CRYBP1 regulates gene expression. When introduced into the alpha TN4-1 mouse lens cell line, the antisense construct significantly inhibited expression from a heterologous promoter that utilized the alpha A-CRYBP1 binding site as an enhancer.

  1. Effect of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to endothelin-converting enzyme-1c (ECE-1c) on ECE-1c mRNA, ECE-1 protein and endothelin-1 synthesis in bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Barker, S; Khan, N Q; Wood, E G; Corder, R

    2001-02-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is secreted from endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) after intracellular hydrolysis of big ET-1 by endothelin converting enzyme (ECE). The metallopeptidase called ECE-1 is widely thought to be the physiological ECE, but unequivocal evidence of this role has yet to be provided. Endothelial cells express four isoforms of ECE-1 (ECE-1a, ECE-1b, ECE-1c, and ECE-1d), but the identity of ECE-1 isoforms expressed in VSMC is less clear. Here, we describe the characterization of ECE-1 isoforms in bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (BPASMC) and the effect on ET-1 synthesis of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) to ECE-1c. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) evaluation of total RNA from BPASMC showed that ECE-1a and ECE-1d were not expressed. Sequencing of cloned ECE-1 cDNA products and semiquantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that ECE-1b and ECE-1c were expressed in BPASMC, with ECE-1c being the predominant isoform. Basal release of ET-1 from BPASMC was low. Treatment for 24 h with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) stimulated ET-1 production by up to 10-fold with parallel increases in levels of preproET-1 mRNA. Levels of ECE-1c mRNA were also raised after TNFalpha, whereas amounts of ECE-1b mRNA were decreased significantly. Treatment of BPASMC with a phosphorothioate antisense ODN to ECE-1c caused a marked reduction in ECE-1c mRNA levels and ECE-1 protein levels. However, basal and TNFalpha-stimulated ET-1 release were largely unaffected by the ECE-1c antisense ODN despite the inhibition of ECE-1c synthesis. Hence, an endopeptidase distinct from ECE-1 is mainly responsible big ET-1 processing in BPASMC.

  2. Granule structure and distribution of allomorphs in C-type high-amylose rice starch granule modified by antisense RNA inhibition of starch branching enzyme.

    PubMed

    Wei, Cunxu; Qin, Fengling; Zhou, Weidong; Yu, Huaguang; Xu, Bin; Chen, Chong; Zhu, Lijia; Wang, Youping; Gu, Minghong; Liu, Qiaoquan

    2010-11-24

    C-type starch, which is a combination of both A-type and B-type crystal starch, is usually found in legumes and rhizomes. We have developed a high-amylose transgenic line of rice (TRS) by antisense RNA inhibition of starch branching enzymes. The starch in the endosperm of this TRS was identified as typical C-type crystalline starch, but its fine granular structure and allomorph distribution remained unclear. In this study, we conducted morphological and spectroscopic studies on this TRS starch during acid hydrolysis to determine the distribution of A- and B-type allomorphs. The morphology of starch granules after various durations of acid hydrolysis was compared by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that amorphous regions were located at the center part of TRS starch subgranules. During acid hydrolysis, starch was degraded from the interior of the subgranule to the outer surface, while the peripheral part of the subgranules and the surrounding band of the starch granule were highly resistant to acid hydrolysis. The spectroscopic changes detected by X-ray powder diffraction, 13C cross-polarization magic-angle spinning NMR, and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared showed that the A-type allomorph was hydrolyzed more rapidly than the B-type, and that the X-ray diffraction profile gradually changed from a native C-type to a CB-type with increasing hydrolysis time. Our results showed that, in TRS starch, the A-type allomorph was located around the amorphous region, and was surrounded by the B-type allomorph located in the peripheral region of the subgranules and the surrounding band of the starch granule. Thus, the positions of A- and B-type allomorphs in the TRS C-type starch granule differ markedly from those in C-type legume and rhizome starch.

  3. Development of Antisense Drugs for Dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Fumito; Harada-Shiba, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal elevation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in plasma as well as dysfunction of anti-atherogenic high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have both been recognized as essential components of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and are classified as dyslipidemia. This review describes the arc of development of antisense oligonucleotides for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Chemically-armed antisense candidates can act on various kinds of transcripts, including mRNA and miRNA, via several different endogenous antisense mechanisms, and have exhibited potent systemic anti-dyslipidemic effects. Here, we present specific cutting-edge technologies have recently been brought into antisense strategies, and describe how they have improved the potency of antisense drugs in regard to pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In addition, we discuss perspectives for the use of armed antisense oligonucleotides as new clinical options for dyslipidemia, in the light of outcomes of recent clinical trials and safety concerns indicated by several clinical and preclinical studies. PMID:27466159

  4. Antisense-mediated down-regulation of putrescine N-methyltransferase activity in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum L. can lead to elevated levels of anatabine at the expense of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Chintapakorn, Yupynn; Hamill, John D

    2003-09-01

    Nicotiana tabacum L. produces a number of pyridine alkaloids, with nicotine representing the major component and anatabine comprising most of the remainder of the alkaloid fraction. An antisense approach was used here to down-regulate activity of the important enzyme putrescine N-methyltransferase (PMT) in transformed roots of this species to determine effects upon alkaloid metabolism. Transformed root lines were produced that contained markedly reduced PMT activity, with a concomitant reduction in nicotine content compared to controls. No negative effects upon growth were observed. Several antisense-PMT transformed root lines, and also leaf tissues of regenerated transformed plants, showed a substantial increase in anatabine content relative to controls. Northern hybridization experiments indicated that the antisense-PMT manipulation had little or no effect upon the transcript levels of other genes encoding enzymes involved in alkaloid metabolism, including quinolinate acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QPT). The latter enzyme plays a key role in regulating the synthesis of nicotinic acid which supplies the pyridine ring necessary for both nicotine and anatabine synthesis. We suggest that elevated anatabine levels in antisense-PMT lines are a direct consequence of a relative oversupply of nicotinic acid which, in the absence of adequate levels of 1-methyl-delta(1)-pyrrolinium cation (the ultimate product of PMT activity), is used to synthesise anatabine directly. As is discussed, no naturally occurring species or varieties of Nicotiana are known that typically produce high levels of anatabine in root or leaf tissues, meaning that the antisense PMT transgenics produced in this study have no natural counterpart. These experiments thus represent an example of metabolic engineering of plant pyridine metabolism, via antisense down-regulation of gene expression in a contributing pathway leading to secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

  5. Synthesis of FinP RNA by plasmids F and pSLT is regulated by DNA adenine methylation.

    PubMed Central

    Torreblanca, J; Marqués, S; Casadesús, J

    1999-01-01

    DNA adenine methylase mutants of Salmonella typhimurium contain reduced amounts of FinP, an antisense RNA encoded by the virulence plasmid pSLT. Lowered FinP levels are detected in both Dam- FinO+ and Dam- FinO- backgrounds, suggesting that Dam methylation regulates FinP production rather than FinP half-life. Reduced amounts of F-encoded FinP RNA are likewise found in Dam- mutants of Escherichia coli. A consequence of FinP RNA scarcity in the absence of DNA adenine methylation is that Dam- mutants of both S. typhimurium and E. coli show elevated levels of F plasmid transfer. Inhibition of F fertility by the S. typhimurium virulence plasmid is also impaired in a Dam- background. PMID:10408954

  6. Phosphorylation regulates coilin activity and RNA association

    PubMed Central

    Broome, Hanna J.; Carrero, Zunamys I.; Douglas, Heather E.; Hebert, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Cajal body (CB) is a domain of concentrated components found within the nucleus of cells in an array of species that is functionally important for the biogenesis of telomerase and small nuclear ribonucleoproteins. The CB is a dynamic structure whose number and size change during the cell cycle and is associated with other nuclear structures and gene loci. Coilin, also known as the marker protein for the CB, is a phosphoprotein widely accepted for its role in maintaining CB integrity. Recent studies have been done to further elucidate functional activities of coilin apart from its structural role in the CB in an attempt to explore the rationale for coilin expression in cells that have few CBs or lack them altogether. Here we show that the RNA association profile of coilin changes in mitosis with respect to that during interphase. We provide evidence of transcriptional and/or processing dysregulation of several CB-related RNA transcripts as a result of ectopic expression of both wild-type and phosphomutant coilin proteins. We also show apparent changes in transcription and/or processing of these transcripts upon coilin knockdown in both transformed and primary cell lines. Additionally, we provide evidence of specific coilin RNase activity regulation, on both U2 and hTR transcripts, by phosphorylation of a single residue, serine 489. Collectively, these results point to additional functions for coilin that are regulated by phosphorylation. PMID:23616925

  7. MicroRNA regulation of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Mark W.; Moore, Kathryn J.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and its attendant clinical complications such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral artery disease, are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in western societies. In response to biochemical and biomechanical stimuli, atherosclerotic lesion formation occurs from the participation of a range of cell types, inflammatory mediators, and shear stress. Over the past decade, microRNAs have emerged as evolutionarily conserved, non-coding small RNAs that serve as important regulators and “fine-tuners” of a range of pathophysiological cellular effects and molecular signaling pathways involved in atherosclerosis. Accumulating studies reveal the importance of miRNAs in regulating key signaling and lipid homeostasis pathways that alter the balance of atherosclerotic plaque progression and regression. In this review, we highlight current paradigms of microRNA-mediated effects in atherosclerosis progression and regression. We provide an update on the potential use of miRNAs diagnostically for detecting increasing severity of coronary disease and clinical events. Finally, we provide a perspective on therapeutic opportunities and challenges for miRNA delivery in the field. PMID:26892968

  8. DAG1, no gene for RNA regulation?

    PubMed

    Brancaccio, Andrea

    2012-04-10

    DAG1 encodes for a precursor protein that liberates the two subunits featured by the dystroglycan (DG) adhesion complex that are involved in an increasing number of cellular functions in a wide variety of cells and tissues. Aside from the proteolytic events producing the α and β subunits, especially the former undergoes extensive "post-production" modifications taking place within the ER/Golgi where its core protein is both N- and O-decorated with sugars. These post-translational events, that are mainly orchestrated by a plethora of certified, or putative, glycosyltransferases, prelude to the excocytosis-mediated trafficking and targeting of the DG complex to the plasma membrane. Extensive genetic and biochemical evidences have been accumulated so far on α-DG glycosylation, while little is know on possible regulatory events underlying the chromatine activation, transcription or post-transcription (splicing and escape from the nucleus) of DAG1 or of its mRNA. A scenario is envisaged in which cells would use a sort of preferential, and scarcely regulated, route for DAG1 activation, that would imply fast mRNA transcription, maturation and export to the cytosol, and would prelude to the multiple time-consuming enzymatic post-translational activities needed for its glycosylation. Such a provocative view might be helpful to trigger future work aiming at disclosing the complete molecular mechanisms underlying DAG1 activation and at improving our knowledge of any pre-translational step that is involved in dystroglycan regulation.

  9. PRMT1 methylates the single Argonaute of Toxoplasma gondii and is important for the recruitment of Tudor nuclease for target RNA cleavage by antisense guide RNA

    PubMed Central

    Musiyenko, Alla; Majumdar, Tanmay; Andrews, Joel; Adams, Brian; Barik, Sailen

    2013-01-01

    Summary Argonaute (Ago) plays a central role in RNA interference in metazoans, but its status in lower organisms remains ill-defined. We report on the Ago complex of the unicellular protozoan, Toxoplasma gondii (Tg), an obligatory pathogen of mammalian hosts. The PIWI-like domain of TgAgo lacked the canonical DDE/H catalytic triad, explaining its weak target RNA cleavage activity. However, TgAgo associated with a stronger RNA slicer, a Tudor staphylococcal nuclease (TSN), and with a protein Arg methyl transferase, PRMT1. Mutational analysis suggested that the N-terminal RGG-repeat domain of TgAgo was methylated by PRMT1, correlating with the recruitment of TSN. The slicer activity of TgAgo was Mg2+-dependent and required perfect complementarity between the guide RNA and the target. In contrast, the TSN activity was Ca2+-dependent and required an imperfectly paired guide RNA. Ago knockout parasites showed essentially normal growth, but in contrast, the PRMT1 knockouts grew abnormally. Chemical inhibition of Arg-methylation also had an anti-parasitic effect. These results suggest that the parasitic PRMT1 plays multiple roles, and its loss affects the recruitment of a more potent second slicer to the parasitic RNA silencing complex, the exact mechanism of which remains to be determined. PMID:22309152

  10. Transcriptional Regulation of Translocator Protein (Tspo) via a SINE B2-Mediated Natural Antisense Transcript in MA-10 Leydig Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Translocator protein (18 kDa; TSPO) is a mitochondrial cholesterol- and drug-binding protein involved in cholesterol import into mitochondria, the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis. TSPO is expressed at high levels in Leydig cells of the testis, and its expression levels dictate the ability of the cells to form androgen. In search of mechanisms that regulate Tspo expression, a number of transcription factors acting on its promoter region have been identified. We report herein the presence of a mechanism of regulation of Tspo expression via complementation with a natural antisense transcript (NAT). At the Tspo locus, a short interspersed repetitive element (SINE) of the SINE B2 family has the potential for high transcriptional activity. The extension of the SINE B2 element-mediated transcript overlapped with exon 3 of the Tspo gene and formed a NAT specific for Tspo (Tspo-NAT) in MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells. The identified Tspo-NAT was also found in testis and kidney tissues. Overexpression of the Tspo-NAT regulated Tspo gene expression and its function in steroid formation in MA-10 cells. Time-course studies have indicated that Tspo-NAT expression is regulated by cAMP and could regulate TSPO levels to maintain optimal steroid production by MA-10 Leydig cells. Taken together, these results suggest a new micro-transcriptional mechanism that regulates Tspo expression and thus steroidogenesis via an intron-based SINE B2-driven NAT specific for the Tspo gene. PMID:22378763

  11. Cloning of human Ca2+ homoeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein (CHERP): regulated expression of antisense cDNA depletes CHERP, inhibits intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and decreases cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Laplante, J M; O'Rourke, F; Lu, X; Fein, A; Olsen, A; Feinstein, M B

    2000-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody which blocks InsP(3)-induced Ca(2+) release from isolated endoplasmic reticulum was used to isolate a novel 4.0 kb cDNA from a human erythroleukaemia (HEL) cell cDNA expression library. A corresponding mRNA transcript of approx. 4.2 kb was present in all human cell lines and tissues examined, but cardiac and skeletal muscle had an additional transcript of 6.4 kb. The identification in GenBank(R) of homologous expressed sequence tags from many tissues and organisms suggests that the gene is ubiquitously expressed in higher eukaryotes. The gene was mapped to human chromosome 19p13.1. The cDNA predicts a 100 kDa protein, designated Ca(2+) homoeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein (CHERP), with two putative transmembrane domains, multiple consensus phosphorylation sites, a polyglutamine tract of 12 repeats and regions of imperfect tryptophan and histadine octa- and nona-peptide repeats. In vitro translation of the full-length cDNA produced proteins of M(r) 128000 and 100000, corresponding to protein bands detected by Western blotting of many cell types. CHERP was co-localized in HEL cells with the InsP(3) receptor by two-colour immunofluorescence. Transfection of HEL cells with antisense cDNA led to an 80% decline in CHERP within 5 days of antisense induction, with markedly decreased intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization by thrombin, decreased DNA synthesis and growth arrest, indicating that the protein has an important function in Ca(2+) homoeostasis, growth and proliferation. PMID:10794731

  12. Design, assembly, and activity of antisense DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Keum, Jung-Won; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Bermudez, Harry

    2011-12-16

    Discrete DNA nanostructures allow simultaneous features not possible with traditional DNA forms: encapsulation of cargo, display of multiple ligands, and resistance to enzymatic digestion. These properties suggested using DNA nanostructures as a delivery platform. Here, DNA pyramids displaying antisense motifs are shown to be able to specifically degrade mRNA and inhibit protein expression in vitro, and they show improved cell uptake and gene silencing when compared to linear DNA. Furthermore, the activity of these pyramids can be regulated by the introduction of an appropriate complementary strand. These results highlight the versatility of DNA nanostructures as functional devices.

  13. Antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutics for malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Ho, P T; Parkinson, D R

    1997-04-01

    The continued progress in our understanding of the biology of neoplasia and in the identification, cloning, and sequencing of genes critical to tumor cell function permits the exploitation of this information to develop specific agents that may directly modulate the function of these genes or their protein products. Antisense oligonucleotides are being investigated as a potential therapeutic modality that takes direct advantage of molecular sequencing. The antisense approach uses short oligonucleotides designed to hybridize to a target mRNA transcript through Watson-Crick base pairing. The formation of this oligonucleotide: RNA heteroduplex results in mRNA inactivation and consequent inhibition of synthesis of the protein product. A fundamental attraction of the antisense approach is that this method potentially may be applied to any gene product, in theory, for the treatment of malignant and non-malignant diseases. However, this simple and attractive model has proven to be much more complex in practice. A number of important challenges in the preclinical development of antisense oligonucleotides have been identified, including stability, sequence length, cellular uptake, target sequence selection, appropriate negative controls, oligonucleotide: protein interactions, and cost of manufacture. Although the biological activity of an oligonucleotide against its molecular target is theoretically sequence-dependent, the animal pharmacokinetics and toxicology of phosphorothioate analogues directed against vastly disparate gene products appear relatively non-sequence-specific. In oncology, a number of clinical trials have been initiated with antisense oligonucleotides directed against molecular targets including: p53; bcl-2; raf kinase; protein kinase C-alpha; c-myb. The experience gained from these early clinical trials will be applicable to the next generation of antisense agents in development. These may include molecules with novel backbones or other structural

  14. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  15. Archaeal RNA polymerase and transcription regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Sung-Hoon; Reichlen, Matthew J.; Tajiri, Momoko; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of transcription by cellular RNA polymerases (RNAPs), high resolution X-ray crystal structures together with structure-guided biochemical, biophysical and genetics studies are essential. The recently-solved X-ray crystal structures of archaeal RNA polymerase (RNAP) allow a structural comparison of the transcription machinery among all three domains of life. The archaea were once thought of closely related to bacteria, but they are now considered to be more closely related to the eukaryote at the molecular level than bacteria. According to these structures, the archaeal transcription apparatus, which includes RNAP and general transcription factors, is similar to the eukaryotic transcription machinery. Yet, the transcription regulators, activators and repressors, encoded by archaeal genomes are closely related to bacterial factors. Therefore, archaeal transcription appears to possess an intriguing hybrid of eukaryotic-type transcription apparatus and bacterial-like regulatory mechanisms. Elucidating the transcription mechanism in archaea, which possesses a combination of bacterial and eukaryotic transcription mechanisms that are commonly regarded as separate and mutually exclusive, can provide data that will bring basic transcription mechanisms across all three domains of life. PMID:21250781

  16. Antisense technologies targeting fatty acid synthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinshun; Liu, Feng; Jiang, Yuyang

    2012-05-01

    Fatty acid synthesis is a coordinated process involving multiple enzymes. Overexpression of some of these enzymes plays important roles in tumor growth and development. Therefore, these enzymes are attractive targets for cancer therapies. Antisense agents provide highly specific inhibition of the expression of target genes and thus have served as powerful tools for gene functional studies and potential therapeutic agents for cancers. This article reviews different types of antisense agents and their applications in the modulation of fatty acid synthesis. Patents of antisense agents targeting fatty acid synthetic enzymes are introduced. In addition, miR-122 has been shown to regulate the expression of fatty acid synthetic enzymes, and thus antisense agent patents that inhibit miR-122 expression are also discussed.

  17. Antisense Therapy in Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joshua J.A.; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Antisense therapy is an approach to fighting diseases using short DNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides. Recently, antisense therapy has emerged as an exciting and promising strategy for the treatment of various neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders. Previous and ongoing pre-clinical and clinical trials have provided encouraging early results. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), Huntington’s disease (HD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), dysferlinopathy (including limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2B; LGMD2B, Miyoshi myopathy; MM, and distal myopathy with anterior tibial onset; DMAT), and myotonic dystrophy (DM) are all reported to be promising targets for antisense therapy. This paper focuses on the current progress of antisense therapies in neurology. PMID:25562650

  18. Novel lnc RNA regulated by HIF-1 inhibits apoptotic cell death in the renal tubular epithelial cells under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Imari; Hirakawa, Yosuke; Kanki, Yasuharu; Kushida, Natsuki; Nakaki, Ryo; Suzuki, Yutaka; Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2017-04-01

    Chronic tubulointerstitial hypoxia plays an important role as the final common pathway to end-stage renal disease. HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor-1) is a master transcriptional factor under hypoxia, regulating downstream target genes. Genome-wide analysis of HIF-1 binding sites using high-throughput sequencers has clarified various kinds of downstream targets and made it possible to demonstrate the novel roles of HIF-1. Our aim of this study is to identify novel HIF-1 downstream epigenetic targets which may play important roles in the kidney. Immortalized tubular cell lines (HK2; human kidney-2) and primary cultured cells (RPTEC; renal proximal tubular cell lines) were exposed to 1% hypoxia for 24-72 h. We performed RNA-seq to clarify the expression of mRNA and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). We also examined ChIP-seq to identify HIF-1 binding sites under hypoxia. RNA-seq identified 44 lncRNAs which are up-regulated under hypoxic condition in both cells. ChIP-seq analysis demonstrated that HIF-1 also binds to the lncRNAs under hypoxia. The expression of novel lncRNA, DARS-AS1 (aspartyl-tRNA synthetase anti-sense 1), is up-regulated only under hypoxia and HIF-1 binds to its promoter region, which includes two hypoxia-responsive elements. Its expression is also up-regulated with cobalt chloride exposure, while it is not under hypoxia when HIF-1 is knocked down by siRNA To clarify the biological roles of DARS-AS1, we measured the activity of caspase 3/7 using anti-sense oligo of DARS-AS1. Knockdown of DARS-AS1 deteriorated apoptotic cell death. In conclusion, we identified the novel lncRNAs regulated by HIF-1 under hypoxia and clarified that DARS-AS1 plays an important role in inhibiting apoptotic cell death in renal tubular cells. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  19. Long Noncoding RNA-Directed Epigenetic Regulation of Gene Expression Is Associated With Anxiety-like Behavior in Mice.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Paola A; Flavell, Charlotte R; Widagdo, Jocelyn; Ratnu, Vikram S; Troup, Michael; Ragan, Chikako; Mattick, John S; Bredy, Timothy W

    2015-12-15

    RNA-directed regulation of epigenetic processes has recently emerged as an important feature of mammalian differentiation and development. Perturbation of this regulatory system in the brain may contribute to the development of neuropsychiatric disorders. RNA sequencing was used to identify changes in the experience-dependent expression of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) within the medial prefrontal cortex of adult mice. Transcripts were validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and a candidate lncRNA, Gomafu, was selected for further investigation. The functional role of this schizophrenia-related lncRNA was explored in vivo by antisense oligonucleotide-mediated gene knockdown in the medial prefrontal cortex, followed by behavioral training and assessment of fear-related anxiety. Long noncoding RNA-directed epigenetic regulation of gene expression was investigated by chromatin and RNA immunoprecipitation assays. RNA sequencing analysis revealed changes in the expression of a significant number of genes related to neural plasticity and stress, as well as the dynamic regulation of lncRNAs. In particular, we detected a significant downregulation of Gomafu lncRNA. Our results revealed that Gomafu plays a role in mediating anxiety-like behavior and suggest that this may occur through an interaction with a key member of the polycomb repressive complex 1, BMI1, which regulates the expression of the schizophrenia-related gene beta crystallin (Crybb1). We also demonstrated a novel role for Crybb1 in mediating fear-induced anxiety-like behavior. Experience-dependent expression of lncRNAs plays an important role in the epigenetic regulation of adaptive behavior, and the perturbation of Gomafu may be related to anxiety and the development of neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Targeting the Notch-regulated non-coding RNA TUG1 for glioma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Katsushima, Keisuke; Natsume, Atsushi; Ohka, Fumiharu; Shinjo, Keiko; Hatanaka, Akira; Ichimura, Norihisa; Sato, Shinya; Takahashi, Satoru; Kimura, Hiroshi; Totoki, Yasushi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Naito, Mitsuru; Kim, Hyun Jin; Miyata, Kanjiro; Kataoka, Kazunori; Kondo, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Targeting self-renewal is an important goal in cancer therapy and recent studies have focused on Notch signalling in the maintenance of stemness of glioma stem cells (GSCs). Understanding cancer-specific Notch regulation would improve specificity of targeting this pathway. In this study, we find that Notch1 activation in GSCs specifically induces expression of the lncRNA, TUG1. TUG1 coordinately promotes self-renewal by sponging miR-145 in the cytoplasm and recruiting polycomb to repress differentiation genes by locus-specific methylation of histone H3K27 via YY1-binding activity in the nucleus. Furthermore, intravenous treatment with antisense oligonucleotides targeting TUG1 coupled with a drug delivery system induces GSC differentiation and efficiently represses GSC growth in vivo. Our results highlight the importance of the Notch-lncRNA axis in regulating self-renewal of glioma cells and provide a strong rationale for targeting TUG1 as a specific and potent therapeutic approach to eliminate the GSC population. PMID:27922002

  1. The role of RNA structure at 5' untranslated region in microRNA-mediated gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wanjun; Xu, Yuming; Xie, Xueying; Wang, Ting; Ko, Jae-Hong; Zhou, Tong

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the secondary structure of the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of messenger RNA (mRNA) is important for microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene regulation in humans. mRNAs that are targeted by miRNA tend to have a higher degree of local secondary structure in their 5' UTR; however, the general role of the 5' UTR in miRNA-mediated gene regulation remains unknown. We systematically surveyed the secondary structure of 5' UTRs in both plant and animal species and found a universal trend of increased mRNA stability near the 5' cap in mRNAs that are regulated by miRNA in animals, but not in plants. Intra-genome comparison showed that gene expression level, GC content of the 5' UTR, number of miRNA target sites, and 5' UTR length may influence mRNA structure near the 5' cap. Our results suggest that the 5' UTR secondary structure performs multiple functions in regulating post-transcriptional processes. Although the local structure immediately upstream of the start codon is involved in translation initiation, RNA structure near the 5' cap site, rather than the structure of the full-length 5' UTR sequences, plays an important role in miRNA-mediated gene regulation. © 2014 Gu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  2. Intracellular distribution of microinjected antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, J P; Mechti, N; Degols, G; Gagnor, C; Lebleu, B

    1991-04-01

    Antisense oligomers constitute an attractive class of specific tools for genetic analysis and for potential therapeutic applications. Targets with different cellular locations have been described, such as mRNA translation initiation sites, pre-mRNA splicing sites, or the genes themselves. However the mechanism(s) of action and the intracellular distribution of antisense oligomers remain poorly understood. Antisense oligomers conjugated with various fluorochromes or with BrdUrd were microinjected into the cytoplasm of somatic cells, and their cellular distribution was monitored by fluorescence microscopy in fixed and nonfixed cells. A fast translocation in the nuclei and a concentration on nuclear structures were observed whatever probe was used. Nuclear transport occurs by diffusion since it is not affected by depletion of the intracellular ATP pool, temperature, or excess unlabeled oligomer. Accumulation of the oligomers in the nuclei essentially takes place on a set of proteins preferentially extracted between 0.2 M and 0.4 M NaCl as revealed by crosslinking of photosensitive oligomers. The relationship between nuclear location of antisense oligomers and their mechanism of action remains to be ascertained and could be of major interest in the design of more efficient antisense molecules.

  3. Intracellular distribution of microinjected antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Leonetti, J P; Mechti, N; Degols, G; Gagnor, C; Lebleu, B

    1991-01-01

    Antisense oligomers constitute an attractive class of specific tools for genetic analysis and for potential therapeutic applications. Targets with different cellular locations have been described, such as mRNA translation initiation sites, pre-mRNA splicing sites, or the genes themselves. However the mechanism(s) of action and the intracellular distribution of antisense oligomers remain poorly understood. Antisense oligomers conjugated with various fluorochromes or with BrdUrd were microinjected into the cytoplasm of somatic cells, and their cellular distribution was monitored by fluorescence microscopy in fixed and nonfixed cells. A fast translocation in the nuclei and a concentration on nuclear structures were observed whatever probe was used. Nuclear transport occurs by diffusion since it is not affected by depletion of the intracellular ATP pool, temperature, or excess unlabeled oligomer. Accumulation of the oligomers in the nuclei essentially takes place on a set of proteins preferentially extracted between 0.2 M and 0.4 M NaCl as revealed by crosslinking of photosensitive oligomers. The relationship between nuclear location of antisense oligomers and their mechanism of action remains to be ascertained and could be of major interest in the design of more efficient antisense molecules. Images PMID:1849273

  4. The RNA-binding protein Musashi-1 regulates neural development through the translational repression of p21WAF-1.

    PubMed

    Battelli, Chiara; Nikopoulos, George N; Mitchell, Jane G; Verdi, Joseph M

    2006-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins regulate cell fate decisions during nervous system development. The Msi family of RNA-binding proteins is expressed in multipotential neural progenitors, and is required for maintaining cells in a proliferative state. We demonstrate that Msi-1's ability to regulate progenitor maintenance is through the translational inhibition of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF-1. Msi-1 ectopic expression increases the proliferation rate and the capacity to regulate p21WAF-1 protein expression, independent of p53. The 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the native p21(WAF-1) mRNA contains a Msi-1 consensus-binding site that permits Msi-1 to directly repress the translation of p21WAF-1 protein. Reduction of Msi-1 through antisense leads to aberrant p21WAF-1 expression, which significantly impairs neural differentiation. A double knockdown for p21WAF-1 and Msi-1 rescues the production of mature MAP+ neurons. Our results further elucidate the symbiotic relationship between cell cycle withdrawal and the onset of differentiation in the developing nervous system, as well as increasing the understanding of the influence that RNA-binding proteins serve in regulating these processes.

  5. Bioinformatic analyses of sense and antisense expression from terminal inverted repeat transposons in Drosophila somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrew W; Steiniger, Mindy

    2016-01-02

    Understanding regulation of transposon movement in somatic cells is important as mobile elements can cause detrimental genomic rearrangements. Generally, transposons move via one of 2 mechanisms; retrotransposons utilize an RNA intermediate, therefore copying themselves and amplifying throughout the genome, while terminal inverted repeat transposons (TIR Tns) excise DNA sequences from the genome and integrate into a new location. Our recently published work indicates that retrotransposons in Drosophila tissue culture cells are actively transcribed in the antisense direction. Our data support a model in which convergent transcription of retrotransposons from intra element transcription start sites results in complementary RNAs that hybridize to form substrates for Dicer-2, the endogenous small interfering (esi)RNA generating enzyme. Here, we extend our previous analysis to TIR Tns. In contrast to retrotransposons, our data show that antisense TIR Tn RNAs result from transcription of intronic TIR Tns oriented antisense to their host genes. Also, disproportionately less esiRNAs are generated from TIR transcripts than from retrotransposons and transcription of very few individual TIR Tns could be confirmed. Collectively, these data support a model in which TIR Tns are regulated at the level of Transposase production while retrotransposons are regulated with esiRNA post-transcriptional mechanisms in Drosophila somatic cells.

  6. Regulating the Ribosome: A Spotlight on RNA Dark Matter

    PubMed Central

    Lintner, Nathanael G.; Cate, Jamie H.D.

    2014-01-01

    In this issue Pircher et al.(2014) show that an abundant ribosome-associated 18-nt noncoding RNA (ncRNA),derived from the open reading frame of an mRNA,acts directly on the ribosome and regulates global translation levels in response to hypertonic shock. PMID:24725592

  7. New methods as alternative or corrective measures for the pitfalls and artifacts of reverse transcription and polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) in cloning chimeric or antisense-accompanied RNA

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chengfu; Liu, Yongming; Yang, Min; Liao, D. Joshua

    2013-01-01

    We established new methods for cloning cDNA ends that start with reverse transcription (RT) and soon proceed with the synthesis of the second cDNA strand, avoiding manipulations of fragile RNA. Our 3′-end cloning method does not involve poly-dT primers and polymerase chain reactions (PCR), is low in efficiency but high in fidelity and can clone those RNAs without a poly-A tail. We also established a cDNA protection assay to supersede RNA protection assay. The protected cDNA can be amplified, cloned and sequenced, enhancing sensitivity and fidelity. We report that RT product using gene-specific primer (GSP) cannot be gene- or strand-specific because RNA sample contains endogenous random primers (ERP). The gene-specificity may be improved by adding a linker sequence at the 5′-end of the GSP to prime RT and using the linker as a primer in the ensuing PCR. The strand-specificity may be improved by using strand-specific DNA oligos in our protection assay. The CDK4 mRNA and TSPAN31 mRNA are transcribed from the opposite DNA strands and overlap at their 3′ ends. Using this relationship as a model, we found that the overlapped sequence might serve as a primer with its antisense as the template to create a wrong-template extension in RT or PCR. We infer that two unrelated RNAs or cDNAs overlapping at the 5′- or 3′-end might create a spurious chimera in this way, and many chimeras with a homologous sequence may be such artifacts. The ERP and overlapping antisense together set complex pitfalls, which one should be aware of. PMID:23618925

  8. Transcriptional regulation of mammalian miRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Schanen, Brian C.; Li, Xiaoman

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are members of a growing family of non-coding transcripts, 21-23 nucleotides long, which regulate a diverse collection of biological processes and various diseases by RNA-mediated gene-silencing mechanisms. While currently many studies focus on defining the regulatory functions of miRNAs, few are directed towards how miRNA genes are themselves transcriptionally regulated. Recent studies of miRNA transcription have elucidated RNA polymerase II as the major polymerase of miRNAs, however, little is known of the structural features of miRNA promoters, especially those of mammalian miRNAs. Here, we review the current literature regarding features conserved among miRNA promoters useful for their detection and the current novel methodologies available to enable researchers to advance our understanding of the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. PMID:20977933

  9. NAMPT regulates senescence, proliferation, and migration of endothelial progenitor cells through the SIRT1 AS lncRNA/miR-22/SIRT1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ming, Guang-Feng; Wu, Kai; Hu, Kai; Chen, Yao; Xiao, Jian

    2016-09-23

    The importance of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in cardiovascular diseases has been demonstrated by numerous studies. Previous studies have shown that Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) plays a role in EPC development by regulating Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), but the specific mechanism has not yet been elucidated. After stimulating EPCs with NAMPT, expression of SIRT1 and SIRT1 antisense long non-coding RNA (AS lncRNA) was upregulated. Upon transfection of an SIRT1 AS lncRNA overexpression vector into EPCs, SIRT1 expression was upregulated. Upon transfection of a small interfering RNA (siRNA) that targets SIRT1 AS lncRNA along with NAMPT, SIRT1 AS lncRNA was downregulated and NAMPT-induced SIRT1 expression was reduced. We used software analyses and a dual-luciferase reporter assay to demonstrate that microRNA (miR)-22 regulated SIRT1 and SIRT1 AS lncRNA. Our data suggest that SIRT1 AS lncRNA relieves miR-22-induced SIRT1 downregulation by competitively sponging miR-22. By measuring EPC senescence, proliferation, and migration, we found that NAMPT inhibited EPC senescence through an SIRT1 AS lncRNA/miR-22/SIRT1 pathway and promoted EPC proliferation and migration. These findings provide a new theoretical basis for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis (AS) and other cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of siRNA Technology to Prevent Scar Formation in Tendon Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Specific down-regulation of connective tissue growth factor attenuates progression of nephropathy in mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes . Faseb...Groups and Antisense Oligonucleotide (ASO) Treatment : Anti-sense RNA technologies: Under normal conditions cells produce small interfering (si) RNAs...into four treatment groups: (1) Control (scrambled siRNA; 300microgram/microliter); and (2) Smad3 ASO, (3) Tgf-beta 1 ASO, or (4) Ctgf (Connective

  11. Identification of targets of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 in fulvestrant-resistant breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Sun, Manna; Jiang, Wenhua; Zhao, Jinkun; Liang, Chunyong; Zhang, Huilai

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) regulated by microRNA (miRNA)-221 and miRNA-222 that are associated with the resistance of breast cancer to fulvestrant. The GSE19777 transcription profile was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, and includes data from three samples of antisense miRNA-221-transfected fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR breast cancer cells, three samples of antisense miRNA-222-transfected fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR cells and three samples of control inhibitor (green fluorescent protein)-treated fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR cells. The linear models for microarray data package in R/Bioconductor was employed to screen for DEGs in the miRNA-transfected cells, and the pheatmap package in R was used to perform two-way clustering. Pathway enrichment was conducted using the Gene Set Enrichment Analysis tool. Furthermore, a miRNA-messenger (m) RNA regulatory network depicting interactions between miRNA-targeted upregulated DEGs was constructed and visualized using Cytoscape. In total, 492 and 404 DEGs were identified for the antisense miRNA-221-transfected MCF7-FR cells and the antisense miRNA-222-transfected MCF7-FR cells, respectively. Genes of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) were significantly enriched in the antisense miRNA-221-transfected MCF7-FR cells. In addition, components of the Wnt signaling pathway and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) were significantly enriched in the antisense miRNA-222-transfected MCF7-FR cells. In the miRNA-mRNA regulatory network, miRNA-222 was demonstrated to target protocadherin 10 (PCDH10). The results of the present study suggested that the PPP and Wnt signaling pathways, as well as CAMs and PCDH10, may be associated with the resistance of breast cancer to fulvestrant. PMID:27895744

  12. Identification of targets of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 in fulvestrant-resistant breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Sun, Manna; Jiang, Wenhua; Zhao, Jinkun; Liang, Chunyong; Zhang, Huilai

    2016-11-01

    The present study aimed to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) regulated by microRNA (miRNA)-221 and miRNA-222 that are associated with the resistance of breast cancer to fulvestrant. The GSE19777 transcription profile was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, and includes data from three samples of antisense miRNA-221-transfected fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR breast cancer cells, three samples of antisense miRNA-222-transfected fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR cells and three samples of control inhibitor (green fluorescent protein)-treated fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR cells. The linear models for microarray data package in R/Bioconductor was employed to screen for DEGs in the miRNA-transfected cells, and the pheatmap package in R was used to perform two-way clustering. Pathway enrichment was conducted using the Gene Set Enrichment Analysis tool. Furthermore, a miRNA-messenger (m) RNA regulatory network depicting interactions between miRNA-targeted upregulated DEGs was constructed and visualized using Cytoscape. In total, 492 and 404 DEGs were identified for the antisense miRNA-221-transfected MCF7-FR cells and the antisense miRNA-222-transfected MCF7-FR cells, respectively. Genes of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) were significantly enriched in the antisense miRNA-221-transfected MCF7-FR cells. In addition, components of the Wnt signaling pathway and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) were significantly enriched in the antisense miRNA-222-transfected MCF7-FR cells. In the miRNA-mRNA regulatory network, miRNA-222 was demonstrated to target protocadherin 10 (PCDH10). The results of the present study suggested that the PPP and Wnt signaling pathways, as well as CAMs and PCDH10, may be associated with the resistance of breast cancer to fulvestrant.

  13. Dimeric RNA recognition regulates HIV-1 genome packaging.

    PubMed

    Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Dilley, Kari A; Fu, William; Gorelick, Robert J; Tai, S-H Sheldon; Soheilian, Ferri; Ptak, Roger G; Nagashima, Kunio; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2013-03-01

    How retroviruses regulate the amount of RNA genome packaged into each virion has remained a long-standing question. Our previous study showed that most HIV-1 particles contain two copies of viral RNA, indicating that the number of genomes packaged is tightly regulated. In this report, we examine the mechanism that controls the number of RNA genomes encapsidated into HIV-1 particles. We hypothesize that HIV-1 regulates genome packaging by either the mass or copy number of the viral RNA. These two distinct mechanisms predict different outcomes when the genome size deviates significantly from that of wild type. Regulation by RNA mass would result in multiple copies of a small genome or one copy of a large genome being packaged, whereas regulation by copy number would result in two copies of a genome being packaged independent of size. To distinguish between these two hypotheses, we examined the packaging of viral RNA that was larger (≈17 kb) or smaller (≈3 kb) than that of wild-type HIV-1 (≈9 kb) and found that most particles packaged two copies of the viral genome regardless of whether they were 17 kb or 3 kb. Therefore, HIV-1 regulates RNA genome encapsidation not by the mass of RNA but by packaging two copies of RNA. To further explore the mechanism that governs this regulation, we examined the packaging of viral RNAs containing two packaging signals that can form intermolecular dimers or intramolecular dimers (self-dimers) and found that one self-dimer is packaged. Therefore, HIV-1 recognizes one dimeric RNA instead of two copies of RNA. Our findings reveal that dimeric RNA recognition is the key mechanism that regulates HIV-1 genome encapsidation and provide insights into a critical step in the generation of infectious viruses.

  14. Implication of CcpN in the regulation of a novel untranslated RNA (SR1) in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Licht, Andreas; Preis, Sven; Brantl, Sabine

    2005-10-01

    Antisense-RNAs have been investigated in detail over the past 20 years as the principal regulators in accessory DNA elements such as plasmids, phages and transposons. However, only a few examples of chromosomally encoded bacterial antisense RNAs were known. Meanwhile, approximately 70 small non-coding RNAs from the Escherichia coli genome have been found, the functions of the majority of which remain to be elucidated. Only one systematic search has been performed for Gram-positive bacteria, so far. Here, we report the identification of a novel small (205 nt) non-translated RNA--SR1--encoded in the Bacillus subtilis genome. SR1 was predicted by a computational approach and verified by Northern blotting. Knockout or overexpression of SR1 did not affect growth. SR1 was derepressed under conditions of gluconeogenesis, but repressed under glycolytic conditions. Two regulatory levels could be identified, one involving CcpA, the second, more important, involving the recently identified regulator CcpN.

  15. SR Proteins: Binders, Regulators, and Connectors of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sunjoo

    2017-01-01

    Serine and arginine-rich (SR) proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) known as constitutive and alternative splicing regulators. As splicing is linked to transcriptional and post-transcriptional steps, SR proteins are implicated in the regulation of multiple aspects of the gene expression program. Recent global analyses of SR-RNA interaction maps have advanced our understanding of SR-regulated gene expression. Diverse SR proteins play partially overlapping but distinct roles in transcription-coupled splicing and mRNA processing in the nucleus. In addition, shuttling SR proteins act as adaptors for mRNA export and as regulators for translation in the cytoplasm. This mini-review will summarize the roles of SR proteins as RNA binders, regulators, and connectors from transcription in the nucleus to translation in the cytoplasm. PMID:28152302

  16. A Universal Positive-Negative Selection System for Gene Targeting in Plants Combining an Antibiotic Resistance Gene and Its Antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Nonaka, Satoko; Osakabe, Keishi; Saika, Hiroaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-09-01

    Gene targeting (GT) is a useful technology for accurate genome engineering in plants. A reproducible approach based on a positive-negative selection system using hygromycin resistance and the diphtheria toxin A subunit gene as positive and negative selection markers, respectively, is now available. However, to date, this selection system has been applied exclusively in rice (Oryza sativa). To establish a universally applicable positive-negative GT system in plants, we designed a selection system using a combination of neomycin phosphotransferaseII (nptII) and an antisense nptII construct. The concomitant transcription of both sense and antisense nptII suppresses significantly the level of expression of the sense nptII gene, and transgenic calli and plants become sensitive to the antibiotic geneticin. In addition, we were able to utilize the sense nptII gene as a positive selection marker and the antisense nptII construct as a negative selection marker for knockout of the endogenous rice genes Waxy and 33-kD globulin through GT, although negative selection with this system is relatively less efficient compared with diphtheria toxin A subunit. The approach developed here, with some additional improvements, could be applied as a universal selection system for the enrichment of GT cells in several plant species.

  17. SUMOylation of TARBP2 regulates miRNA/siRNA efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng; Zhu, Changhong; Huang, Jian; Zhao, Xian; Deng, Rong; Zhang, Hailong; Dou, Jinzhuo; Chen, Qin; Xu, Ming; Yuan, Haihua; Wang, Yanli; Yu, Jianxiu

    2015-01-01

    Small RNA-induced gene silencing is essential for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression; however, it remains unclear how miRNA/siRNA efficiency is regulated. Here we show that TARBP2 is SUMOylated at K52, which can be enhanced by its phosphorylation. This modification can stabilize TARBP2 via repressing its K48-linked ubiquitination. We find that TARBP2 SUMOylation does not influence the overall production of mature miRNAs, but it regulates miRNA/siRNA efficiency. SUMOylated TARBP2 recruits Ago2 to constitute the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)-loading complex (RLC), and simultaneously promotes more pre-miRNAs to load into the RLC. Consequently, Ago2 is stabilized and miRNAs/siRNAs bound by TARBP2/Dicer is effectively transferred to Ago2. Thus, these processes lead to the formation of the effective RISC for RNA interference (RNAi). Collectively, our data suggest that SUMOylation of TARBP2 is required for regulating miRNA/siRNA efficiency, which is a general mechanism of miRNA/siRNA regulation. PMID:26582366

  18. G-quadruplexes regulate Epstein-Barr virus–encoded nuclear antigen 1 mRNA translation

    PubMed Central

    Murat, Pierre; Zhong, Jie; Lekieffre, Lea; Cowieson, Nathan P; Clancy, Jennifer L; Preiss, Thomas; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Khanna, Rajiv; Tellam, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Viruses that establish latent infections have evolved unique mechanisms to avoid host immune recognition. Maintenance proteins of these viruses regulate their synthesis to levels sufficient for maintaining persistent infection but below threshold levels for host immune detection. The mechanisms governing this finely tuned regulation of viral latency are unknown. Here we show that mRNAs encoding gammaherpesviral maintenance proteins contain within their open reading frames clusters of unusual structural elements, G-quadruplexes, which are responsible for the cis-acting regulation of viral mRNA translation. By studying the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) mRNA, we demonstrate that destabilization of G-quadruplexes using antisense oligonucleotides increases EBNA1 mRNA translation. In contrast, pretreatment with a G-quadruplex-stabilizing small molecule, pyridostatin, decreases EBNA1 synthesis, highlighting the importance of G-quadruplexes within virally encoded transcripts as unique regulatory signals for translational control and immune evasion. Furthermore, these findings suggest alternative therapeutic strategies focused on targeting RNA structure within viral ORFs. PMID:24633353

  19. The Pokeweed Leaf mRNA Transcriptome and Its Regulation by Jasmonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Neller, Kira C. M.; Klenov, Alexander; Hudak, Katalin A.

    2016-01-01

    The American pokeweed plant, Phytolacca americana, is recognized for synthesizing pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) that inhibits the replication of several plant and animal viruses. The plant is also a heavy metal accumulator with applications in soil remediation. However, little is known about pokeweed stress responses, as large-scale sequencing projects have not been performed for this species. Here, we sequenced the mRNA transcriptome of pokeweed in the presence and absence of jasmonic acid (JA), a hormone mediating plant defense. Trinity-based de novo assembly of mRNA from leaf tissue and BLASTx homology searches against public sequence databases resulted in the annotation of 59 096 transcripts. Differential expression analysis identified JA-responsive genes that may be involved in defense against pathogen infection and herbivory. We confirmed the existence of several PAP isoforms and cloned a potentially novel isoform of PAP. Expression analysis indicated that PAP isoforms are differentially responsive to JA, perhaps indicating specialized roles within the plant. Finally, we identified 52 305 natural antisense transcript pairs, four of which comprised PAP isoforms, suggesting a novel form of RIP gene regulation. This transcriptome-wide study of a Phytolaccaceae family member provides a source of new genes that may be involved in stress tolerance in this plant. The sequences generated in our study have been deposited in the SRA database under project # SRP069141. PMID:27014307

  20. The Pokeweed Leaf mRNA Transcriptome and Its Regulation by Jasmonic Acid.

    PubMed

    Neller, Kira C M; Klenov, Alexander; Hudak, Katalin A

    2016-01-01

    The American pokeweed plant, Phytolacca americana, is recognized for synthesizing pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) that inhibits the replication of several plant and animal viruses. The plant is also a heavy metal accumulator with applications in soil remediation. However, little is known about pokeweed stress responses, as large-scale sequencing projects have not been performed for this species. Here, we sequenced the mRNA transcriptome of pokeweed in the presence and absence of jasmonic acid (JA), a hormone mediating plant defense. Trinity-based de novo assembly of mRNA from leaf tissue and BLASTx homology searches against public sequence databases resulted in the annotation of 59 096 transcripts. Differential expression analysis identified JA-responsive genes that may be involved in defense against pathogen infection and herbivory. We confirmed the existence of several PAP isoforms and cloned a potentially novel isoform of PAP. Expression analysis indicated that PAP isoforms are differentially responsive to JA, perhaps indicating specialized roles within the plant. Finally, we identified 52 305 natural antisense transcript pairs, four of which comprised PAP isoforms, suggesting a novel form of RIP gene regulation. This transcriptome-wide study of a Phytolaccaceae family member provides a source of new genes that may be involved in stress tolerance in this plant. The sequences generated in our study have been deposited in the SRA database under project # SRP069141.

  1. Genome-wide exonic small interference RNA-mediated gene silencing regulates sexual reproduction in the homothallic fungus Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ae Ran; Lim, Jae Yun; Shin, Chanseok

    2017-01-01

    Various ascomycete fungi possess sex-specific molecular mechanisms, such as repeat-induced point mutations, meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA, and unusual adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing, for genome defense or gene regulation. Using a combined analysis of functional genetics and deep sequencing of small noncoding RNA (sRNA), mRNA, and the degradome, we found that the sex-specifically induced exonic small interference RNA (ex-siRNA)-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) mechanism has an important role in fine-tuning the transcriptome during ascospore formation in the head blight fungus Fusarium graminearum. Approximately one-third of the total sRNAs were produced from the gene region, and sRNAs with an antisense direction or 5′-U were involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation by reducing the stability of the corresponding gene transcripts. Although both Dicers and Argonautes partially share their functions, the sex-specific RNAi pathway is primarily mediated by FgDicer1 and FgAgo2, while the constitutively expressed RNAi components FgDicer2 and FgAgo1 are responsible for hairpin-induced RNAi. Based on our results, we concluded that F. graminearum primarily utilizes ex-siRNA-mediated RNAi for ascosporogenesis but not for genome defenses and other developmental stages. Each fungal species appears to have evolved RNAi-based gene regulation for specific developmental stages or stress responses. This study provides new insights into the regulatory role of sRNAs in fungi and other lower eukaryotes. PMID:28146558

  2. Lack of pharmacokinetic interaction of mipomersen sodium (ISIS 301012), a 2'-O-methoxyethyl modified antisense oligonucleotide targeting apolipoprotein B-100 messenger RNA, with simvastatin and ezetimibe.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rosie Z; Geary, Richard S; Flaim, Joann D; Riley, Gina C; Tribble, Diane L; vanVliet, André A; Wedel, Mark K

    2009-01-01

    Mipomersen sodium (ISIS 301012) is a 20-mer phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide that is complementary to human apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100) messenger RNA and subsequently reduces translation of ApoB-100 protein, the major apolipoprotein of very low-density lipoprotein, intermediate-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Mipomersen sodium is currently being studied in phase II/III clinical studies to determine its clinical utility as add-on therapy to HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors or other lipid-lowering agents in subjects with hypercholesterolaemia. The aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetic interactions of mipomersen sodium with simvastatin and ezetimibe. Another aim was to evaluate the ability of mipomersen sodium to inhibit major cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes in vitro. In a phase I clinical study, ten healthy subjects per cohort received a single oral dose of simvastatin 40 mg or ezetimibe 10 mg followed by four 2-hour intravenous doses of mipomersen sodium 200 mg over an 8-day period, with simvastatin 40 mg or ezetimibe 10 mg being administered again with the last dose of mipomersen sodium. Mipomersen sodium pharmacokinetic profiles were assessed following the first dose (mipomersen sodium alone) and the last dose (mipomersen sodium in combination with simvastatin or ezetimibe). Plasma samples for measurement of simvastatin, simvastatin acid, and free and total ezetimibe concentrations were collected at various timepoints following their first and last oral dosing. A comparative pharmacokinetic analysis was performed to determine if there were any effects resulting from coadministration of mipomersen sodium with these lipid-lowering drugs. In addition to the clinical pharmacokinetic analysis, the ability of mipomersen sodium to inhibit the major CYP isoform enzymes (namely CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4) was evaluated in cryo-preserved human hepatocytes in vitro. The area under the plasma concentration

  3. The Regulation of Non-Coding RNA Expression in the Liver of Mice Fed DDC

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Joan; Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia; French, Barbara A; Li, Jun; French, Samuel W

    2010-01-01

    Mallory-Denk bodies (MDBs) are found in the liver of patients with alcoholic and chronic nonalcoholic liver disease, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Diethyl 1,4-dihydro-2,4,6,-trimethyl-3,5-pyridinedicarboxylate (DDC) is used as a model to induce the formation of MDBs in mouse liver. Previous studies in this laboratory showed that DDC induced epigenetic modifications in DNA and histones. The combination of these modifications changes the phenotype of the MDB forming hepatocytes, as indicated by the marker FAT10. These epigenetic modifications are partially prevented by adding to the diet S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) or betaine, both methyl donors. The expression of three imprinted ncRNA genes was found to change in MDB forming hepatocytes, which is the subject of this report. NcRNA expression was quantitated by Real-Time PCR and RNA FISH in liver sections. Microarray analysis showed that the expression of three ncRNAs was regulated by DDC: up regulation of H19, antisense Igf2r (AIR), and down regulation of GTL2 (also called MEG3). S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) feeding prevented these changes. Betaine, another methyl group donor, prevented only H19 and AIR up regulation induced by DDC, on microarrays. The results of the SAMe and betaine groups were confirmed by Real-Time PCR, except for AIR expression. After 1 month of drug withdrawal, the expression of the three ncRNAs tended toward control levels of expression. Liver tumors that developed also showed up regulation of H19 and AIR. The RNA FISH approach showed that the MDB forming cells’ phenotype changed the level of expression of AIR, H19 and GTL2, compared to the surrounding cells. Furthermore, over expression of H19 and AIR was demonstrated in tumors formed in mice withdrawn for 9 months. The disregulation of ncRNA in MDB forming liver cells has been observed for the first time in drug primed mice associated with liver preneoplastic foci and tumors. PMID:19362547

  4. The up-regulation of ferritin expression using a small-molecule ligand to the native mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Tibodeau, Jennifer D.; Fox, Paige M.; Ropp, Patricia A.; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Thorp, H. Holden

    2006-01-01

    The binding of small molecules to distinctive three-dimensional structures in mRNA provides a new dimension in RNA control, previously limited to the targeting of secondary structures with antisense and RNA interference; such targeting can modulate mRNA function and rates of protein biosynthesis. Small molecules that selectively bind the iron-responsive element (IRE), a specific three-dimensional structure in the noncoding region of the ferritin mRNA model that is recognized by the iron-regulatory protein repressor, were identified by using chemical footprinting. The assay used involved an oxoruthenium(IV) complex that oxidizes guanine bases in RNA sequences. Small molecules that blocked oxidation of guanines in the internal loop region were expected to selectively increase the rate of ferritin synthesis, because the internal loop region of the ferritin IRE is distinctive from those of other IREs. The natural product yohimbine was found (based on gel mobility shifts) to block cleavage of the internal loop RNA site by >50% and seemed to inhibit protein binding. In the presence of yohimbine, the rate of biosynthesis of ferritin in a cell-free expression system (rabbit reticulocyte lysate) increased by 40%. Assignment of the IRE–yohimbine interaction as the origin of this effect was supported by a similar increase in synthesis of luciferase protein in a chimera of the IRE and luciferase gene. The identification of a small, drug-like molecule that recognizes a naturally occurring three-dimensional mRNA structure and regulates protein biosynthesis rates raises the possibility that small molecules can regulate protein biosynthesis by selectively binding to mRNA. PMID:16381820

  5. Antisense therapeutics in oncology: current status

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Rehman, Zia ur; Muntane, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing progress in translational oncology and tremendous breakthroughs have been made as evidenced by preclinical and clinical trials. Data obtained from high-throughput technologies are deepening our understanding about the molecular and gene network in cancer cells and rapidly emerging in vitro and in vivo evidence is highlighting the role of antisense agents as specific inhibitors of the expression of target genes, thus modulating the response of cancer cells to different therapeutic strategies. Much information is continuously being added into various facets of molecular oncology and it is now understood that overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenes, oncogenic microRNAs (miRNA), and fusion proteins make cancer cells difficult to target. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotides has remained a challenge and technological developments have helped in overcoming hurdles by improving the ability to penetrate cells, effective and targeted binding to gene sequences, and downregulation of target gene function. Different delivery systems, including stable nucleic acid lipid particles, have shown potential in enhancing the delivery of cargo to the target site. In this review, we attempt to summarize the current progress in the development of antisense therapeutics and their potential in medical research. We partition this multicomponent review into introductory aspects about recent breakthroughs in antisense therapeutics. We also discuss how antisense therapeutics have shown potential in resensitizing resistant cancer cells to apoptosis by targeted inhibition of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenic miRNAs, and BCR-ABL. PMID:25395862

  6. Transcriptional regulation of human small nuclear RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Jawdekar, Gauri W.; Henry, R. William

    2009-01-01

    The products of human snRNA genes have been frequently described as performing housekeeping functions and their synthesis refractory to regulation. However, recent studies have emphasized that snRNA and other related non-coding RNA molecules control multiple facets of the central dogma, and their regulated expression is critical to cellular homeostasis during normal growth and in response to stress. Human snRNA genes contain compact and yet powerful promoters that are recognized by increasingly well-characterized transcription factors, thus providing a premier model system to study gene regulation. This review summarizes many recent advances deciphering the mechanism by which the transcription of human snRNA and related genes are regulated. PMID:18442490

  7. Dynamic regulation of mRNA decay during neural development.

    PubMed

    Burow, Dana A; Umeh-Garcia, Maxine C; True, Marie B; Bakhaj, Crystal D; Ardell, David H; Cleary, Michael D

    2015-04-21

    Gene expression patterns are determined by rates of mRNA transcription and decay. While transcription is known to regulate many developmental processes, the role of mRNA decay is less extensively defined. A critical step toward defining the role of mRNA decay in neural development is to measure genome-wide mRNA decay rates in neural tissue. Such information should reveal the degree to which mRNA decay contributes to differential gene expression and provide a foundation for identifying regulatory mechanisms that affect neural mRNA decay. We developed a technique that allows genome-wide mRNA decay measurements in intact Drosophila embryos, across all tissues and specifically in the nervous system. Our approach revealed neural-specific decay kinetics, including stabilization of transcripts encoding regulators of axonogenesis and destabilization of transcripts encoding ribosomal proteins and histones. We also identified correlations between mRNA stability and physiologic properties of mRNAs; mRNAs that are predicted to be translated within axon growth cones or dendrites have long half-lives while mRNAs encoding transcription factors that regulate neurogenesis have short half-lives. A search for candidate cis-regulatory elements identified enrichment of the Pumilio recognition element (PRE) in mRNAs encoding regulators of neurogenesis. We found that decreased expression of the RNA-binding protein Pumilio stabilized predicted neural mRNA targets and that a PRE is necessary to trigger reporter-transcript decay in the nervous system. We found that differential mRNA decay contributes to the relative abundance of transcripts involved in cell-fate decisions, axonogenesis, and other critical events during Drosophila neural development. Neural-specific decay kinetics and the functional specificity of mRNA decay suggest the existence of a dynamic neurodevelopmental mRNA decay network. We found that Pumilio is one component of this network, revealing a novel function for this RNA

  8. Is the Efficiency of RNA Silencing Evolutionarily Regulated?

    PubMed

    Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2016-05-12

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression in a sequence-specific manner. Genes with partial complementarity to siRNA/miRNA sequences in their 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) are suppressed by a mechanism referred to as the siRNA off-target effect or miRNA-mediated RNA silencing. However, the determinants of such RNA silencing efficiency are poorly understood. Previously, I and co-workers reported that the efficiency of RNA silencing is strongly correlated with the thermodynamic stability of base pairing in the duplex formed within an siRNA/miRNA and between the seed region and its target mRNA. In this review, I first summarize our previous studies that identified the thermodynamic parameter to estimate the silencing efficiency using the calculated base pairing stability: siRNAs downregulate the expression of off-target genes depending on the stability of binding between the siRNA seed region (nucleotides 2-8) and off-target mRNAs, and miRNAs downregulate target mRNA expression depending on the stability of the duplex formed between the 5' terminus of the miRNA and its target mRNA. I further discuss the possibility that such thermodynamic features of silencing efficiency may have arisen during evolution with increasing body temperature in various organisms.

  9. Neuronal exosomal miRNA-dependent translational regulation of astroglial glutamate transporter GLT1.

    PubMed

    Morel, Lydie; Regan, Melissa; Higashimori, Haruki; Ng, Seng Kah; Esau, Christine; Vidensky, Svetlana; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Yang, Yongjie

    2013-03-08

    Perisynaptic astrocytes express important glutamate transporters, especially excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2, rodent analog GLT1) to regulate extracellular glutamate levels and modulate synaptic activation. In this study, we investigated an exciting new pathway, the exosome-mediated transfer of microRNA (in particular, miR-124a), in neuron-to-astrocyte signaling. Exosomes isolated from neuron-conditioned medium contain abundant microRNAs and small RNAs. These exosomes can be directly internalized into astrocytes and increase astrocyte miR-124a and GLT1 protein levels. Direct miR-124a transfection also significantly and selectively increases protein (but not mRNA) expression levels of GLT1 in cultured astrocytes. Consistent with our in vitro findings, intrastriatal injection of specific antisense against miR-124a into adult mice dramatically reduces GLT1 protein expression and glutamate uptake levels in striatum without reducing GLT1 mRNA levels. MiR-124a-mediated regulation of GLT1 expression appears to be indirect and is not mediated by its suppression of the putative GLT1 inhibitory ligand ephrinA3. Moreover, miR-124a is selectively reduced in the spinal cord tissue of end-stage SOD1 G93A mice, the mouse model of ALS. Subsequent exogenous delivery of miR-124a in vivo through stereotaxic injection significantly prevents further pathological loss of GLT1 proteins, as determined by GLT1 immunoreactivity in SOD1 G93A mice. Together, our study characterized a new neuron-to-astrocyte communication pathway and identified miRNAs that modulate GLT1 protein expression in astrocytes in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Neuronal Exosomal miRNA-dependent Translational Regulation of Astroglial Glutamate Transporter GLT1*

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Lydie; Regan, Melissa; Higashimori, Haruki; Ng, Seng Kah; Esau, Christine; Vidensky, Svetlana; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Yang, Yongjie

    2013-01-01

    Perisynaptic astrocytes express important glutamate transporters, especially excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2, rodent analog GLT1) to regulate extracellular glutamate levels and modulate synaptic activation. In this study, we investigated an exciting new pathway, the exosome-mediated transfer of microRNA (in particular, miR-124a), in neuron-to-astrocyte signaling. Exosomes isolated from neuron-conditioned medium contain abundant microRNAs and small RNAs. These exosomes can be directly internalized into astrocytes and increase astrocyte miR-124a and GLT1 protein levels. Direct miR-124a transfection also significantly and selectively increases protein (but not mRNA) expression levels of GLT1 in cultured astrocytes. Consistent with our in vitro findings, intrastriatal injection of specific antisense against miR-124a into adult mice dramatically reduces GLT1 protein expression and glutamate uptake levels in striatum without reducing GLT1 mRNA levels. MiR-124a-mediated regulation of GLT1 expression appears to be indirect and is not mediated by its suppression of the putative GLT1 inhibitory ligand ephrinA3. Moreover, miR-124a is selectively reduced in the spinal cord tissue of end-stage SOD1 G93A mice, the mouse model of ALS. Subsequent exogenous delivery of miR-124a in vivo through stereotaxic injection significantly prevents further pathological loss of GLT1 proteins, as determined by GLT1 immunoreactivity in SOD1 G93A mice. Together, our study characterized a new neuron-to-astrocyte communication pathway and identified miRNAs that modulate GLT1 protein expression in astrocytes in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23364798

  11. Lack of pharmacokinetic interaction for ISIS 113715, a 2'-0-methoxyethyl modified antisense oligonucleotide targeting protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B messenger RNA, with oral antidiabetic compounds metformin, glipizide or rosiglitazone.

    PubMed

    Geary, Richard S; Bradley, JoAnn D; Watanabe, Tanya; Kwon, Younggil; Wedel, Mark; van Lier, Jan J; VanVliet, André A

    2006-01-01

    ISIS 113715 is a 20-mer phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) that is complementary to the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP-1B) messenger RNA and subsequently reduces translation of the PTP-1B protein, a negative regulator of insulin receptor. ISIS 113715 is currently being studied in early phase II clinical studies to determine its ability to improve or restore insulin receptor sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Future work will investigate the combination of ISIS 113715 with antidiabetic compounds. In vitro ultrafiltration human plasma protein binding displacement studies and a phase I clinical study were used to characterise the potential for pharmacokinetic interaction of ISIS 113715 and three marketed oral antidiabetic agents. ISIS 113715 was co-incubated with glipizide and rosiglitazone in whole human plasma and tested for increased free drug concentrations. In a phase I clinical study, 23 healthy volunteers received a single oral dose of an antidiabetic compound (either metformin, glipizide or rosiglitazone) both alone and together with subcutaneous ISIS 113715 200 mg in a sequential crossover design. A comparative pharmacokinetic analysis was performed to determine if there were any effects that resulted from coadministration of ISIS 113715 with these antidiabetic compounds. In vitro human plasma protein binding displacement studies showed only minor effects on rosiglitazone and no effect on glipizide when co-incubated with ISIS 113715. The results of the phase I clinical study further indicate that there were no measurable changes in glipizide (5 mg), metformin (500 mg) or rosiglitazone (2 mg) exposure parameters, maximum plasma concentration and the area under the concentration-time curve, or pharmacokinetic parameter, elimination half-life when coadministered with ISIS 113715. Furthermore, there was no effect of ISIS 113715, administered in combination with metformin, on the urinary excretion of metformin. Conversely

  12. Simian varicella virus expresses a latency-associated transcript that is antisense to open reading frame 61 (ICP0) mRNA in neural ganglia of latently infected monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yang; Davis, Kara A; Traina-Dorge, Vicki; Gray, Wayne L

    2007-08-01

    Simian varicella virus (SVV) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) are closely related alphaherpesviruses that cause varicella (chickenpox) in nonhuman primates and humans, respectively. After resolution of the primary disease, SVV and VZV establish latent infection of neural ganglia and may later reactivate to cause a secondary disease (herpes zoster). This study investigated SVV gene expression in neural ganglia derived from latently infected vervet monkeys. SVV transcripts were detected in neural ganglia, but not in liver or lung tissues, of latently infected animals. A transcript mapping to open reading frame (ORF) 61 (herpes simplex virus type 1 [HSV-1] ICP0 homolog) was consistently detected in latently infected trigeminal, cervical, and lumbar ganglia by reverse transcriptase PCR. Further analysis confirmed that this SVV latency-associated transcript (LAT) was oriented antisense to the gene 61 mRNA. SVV ORF 21 transcripts were also detected in 42% of neural ganglia during latency. In contrast, SVV ORF 28, 29, 31, 62, and 63 transcripts were not detected in ganglia, liver, or lung tissues of latently infected animals. The results demonstrate that viral gene expression is limited during SVV latency and that a LAT antisense to an ICP0 homolog is expressed. In this regard, SVV gene expression during latency is similar to that of HSV-1 and other neurotropic animal alphaherpesviruses but differs from that reported for VZV.

  13. The cellular factor TRP-185 regulates RNA polymerase II binding to HIV-1 TAR RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wu-Baer, F; Lane, W S; Gaynor, R B

    1995-01-01

    Activation of HIV-1 gene expression by the transactivator Tat is dependent on an RNA regulatory element located downstream of the transcription initiation site known as TAR. To characterize cellular factors that bind to TAR RNA and are involved in the regulation of HIV-1 transcription, HeLa nuclear extract was fractionated and RNA gel-retardation analysis was performed. This analysis indicated that only two cellular factors, RNA polymerase II and the previously characterized TAR RNA loop binding protein TRP-185, were capable of binding specifically to TAR RNA. To elucidate the function of TRP-185, it was purified from HeLa nuclear extract, amino acid microsequence analysis was performed and a cDNA encoding TRP-185 was isolated. TRP-185 is a novel protein of 1621 amino acids which contains a leucine zipper and potentially a novel RNA binding motif. In gel-retardation assays, the binding of both recombinant TRP-185 and RNA polymerase II was dependent on the presence of an additional group of proteins designated cellular cofactors. Both the TAR RNA loop and bulge sequences were critical for RNA polymerase II binding, while TRP-185 binding was dependent only on TAR RNA loop sequences. Since binding of TRP-185 and RNA polymerase II to TAR RNA was found to be mutually exclusive, our results suggest that TRP-185 may function either alone or in conjunction with Tat to disengage RNA polymerase II which is stalled upon binding to nascently synthesized TAR RNA during transcriptional elongation. Images PMID:8846792

  14. Estrogen Regulation of Messenger RNA Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-17

    ribonuclease inhibitor, inhibits activity of RNase A-type enzymes. RNP-CS- ribonucleoprotein consensus sequence (K/R)G(F/Y)(G/A)FVX(F/Y) rRNA - ribosomal...CJ r i ɡ a 5S ^ S i C9 3 3 *» • - M 19 > • h- O C9 ^ h- 5 C9 > l - « < • - U f t - o CJ k u a u Q. < 2 C9 S C9 3 3 "ai t- 41 (9...mRNA molecules will need to be examined. Which of these factors degrade mRNAs? Which factors degrade other types of RNA molecules such as rRNA and

  15. N6-methyladenosine-dependent RNA structural switches regulate RNA-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nian; Dai, Qing; Zheng, Guanqun; He, Chuan; Parisien, Marc; Pan, Tao

    2015-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins control many aspects of cellular biology through binding single-stranded RNA binding motifs (RBM)1-3. However, RBMs can be buried within their local RNA structures4-7, thus inhibiting RNA-protein interactions. N6-methyladenosine (m6A), the most abundant and dynamic internal modification in eukaryotic messenger RNA8-19, can be selectively recognized by the YTHDF2 protein to affect the stability of cytoplasmic mRNAs15, but how m6A achieves wide-ranging physiological significance needs further exploration. Here we show that m6A controls the RNA-structure-dependent accessibility of RBMs to affect RNA-protein interactions for biological regulation; we term this mechanism “m6A-switch”. We found that m6A alters the local structure in mRNA and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) to facilitate binding of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNP C), an abundant nuclear RNA-binding protein responsible for pre-mRNA processing20-24. Combining PAR-CLIP and m6A/MeRIP approaches enabled us to identify 39,060 m6A-switches among hnRNP C binding sites; and global m6A reduction decreased hnRNP C binding at 2,798 high confidence m6A-switches. We determined that these m6A-switch-regulated hnRNP C binding activities affect the abundance as well as alternative splicing of target mRNAs, demonstrating the regulatory role of m6A-switches on gene expression and RNA maturation. Our results illustrate how RNA-binding proteins gain regulated access to their RBMs through m6A-dependent RNA structural remodeling, and provide a new direction for investigating RNA-modification-coded cellular biology. PMID:25719671

  16. Synthesis and properties of double-stranded antisense oligonucleotides connected with a pentaerythritol linker.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Aya; Ueno, Yoshihito; Matsuda, Akira; Kitade, Yukio

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and properties of double-stranded antisense oligonucleotides connected with a pentaerythritol linker. We found that double-stranded antisense oligonucleotides with aminomethyl residues have high affinity for single-stranded DNA or RNA in buffer solutions both with and without MgCl(2). Thus, these oligonucleotides would be useful as antisense oligonucleotides for targeting single-stranded RNA through triplex formation.

  17. Functions and Regulation of RNA Editing by ADAR Deaminases

    PubMed Central

    Nishikura, Kazuko

    2010-01-01

    One type of RNA editing converts adenosines to inosines (A→I editing) in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. A→I RNA editing is mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes. A→I RNA editing of protein-coding sequences of a limited number of mammalian genes results in recoding and subsequent alterations of their functions. However, A→I RNA editing most frequently targets repetitive RNA sequences located within introns and 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs). Although the biological significance of noncoding RNA editing remains largely unknown, several possibilities, including its role in the control of endogenous short interfering RNAs (esiRNAs), have been proposed. Furthermore, recent studies have revealed that the biogenesis and functions of certain microRNAs (miRNAs) are regulated by the editing of their precursors. Here, I review the recent findings that indicate new functions for A→I editing in the regulation of noncoding RNAs and for interactions between RNA editing and RNA interference mechanisms. PMID:20192758

  18. Regulation through the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel

    PubMed Central

    Symersky, Jindrich; Perederina, Anna; Vassylyeva, Marina N.; Svetlov, Vladimir; Artsimovitch, Irina; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.

    2006-01-01

    Gre factors enhance the intrinsic endonucleolytic activity of RNA polymerase to rescue arrested transcription complexes and are thought to confer the high fidelity and processivity of RNA synthesis. The Gre factors insert the extended α-helical coiled-coil domains into the RNA polymerase secondary channel to position two invariant acidic residues at the coiled-coil tip near the active site to stabilize the catalytic metal ion. Gfh1, a GreA homolog from Thermus thermophilus, inhibits rather than activates RNA cleavage. Here we report the structure of the T. thermophilus Gfh1 at 2.4 Å resolution revealing a two-domain architecture closely resembling that of GreA. However, the interdomain orientation is strikingly distinct (~162° rotation) between the two proteins. In contrast to GreA, which has two acidic residues on a well fixed self-stabilized α-turn, the tip of the Gfh1 coiled-coil is flexible and contains four acidic residues. This difference is likely the key to the Gre functional diversity, while Gfh1 inhibits exo- and endonucleolytic cleavage, RNA synthesis, and pyrophosphorolysis, GreA enhances only the endonucleolytic cleavage. We propose that Gfh1 acidic residues stabilize the RNA polymerase active center in a catalytically inactive configuration through Mg2+-mediated interactions. The excess of the acidic residues and inherent flexibility of the coiled-coil tip might allow Gfh1 to adjust its activity to structurally distinct substrates, thereby inhibiting diverse catalytic reactions of RNA polymerase. PMID:16298991

  19. Intrinsic noise of microRNA-regulated genes and the ceRNA hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Noorbakhsh, Javad; Lang, Alex H; Mehta, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that regulate genes post-transciptionally by binding and degrading target eukaryotic mRNAs. We use a quantitative model to study gene regulation by inhibitory microRNAs and compare it to gene regulation by prokaryotic small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs). Our model uses a combination of analytic techniques as well as computational simulations to calculate the mean-expression and noise profiles of genes regulated by both microRNAs and sRNAs. We find that despite very different molecular machinery and modes of action (catalytic vs stoichiometric), the mean expression levels and noise profiles of microRNA-regulated genes are almost identical to genes regulated by prokaryotic sRNAs. This behavior is extremely robust and persists across a wide range of biologically relevant parameters. We extend our model to study crosstalk between multiple mRNAs that are regulated by a single microRNA and show that noise is a sensitive measure of microRNA-mediated interaction between mRNAs. We conclude by discussing possible experimental strategies for uncovering the microRNA-mRNA interactions and testing the competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) hypothesis.

  20. Antisense oligonucleotides in therapy for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Evers, Melvin M; Toonen, Lodewijk J A; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2015-06-29

    Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA. They can not only reduce expression of mutant proteins by breakdown of the targeted transcript, but also restore protein expression or modify proteins through interference with pre-mRNA splicing. There has been a recent revival of interest in the use of antisense oligonucleotides to treat several neurodegenerative disorders using different approaches to prevent disease onset or halt disease progression and the first clinical trials for spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis showing promising results. For these trials, intrathecal delivery is being used but direct infusion into the brain ventricles and several methods of passing the blood brain barrier after peripheral administration are also under investigation.

  1. Antisense Down-Regulation of the FaPG1 Gene Reveals an Unexpected Central Role for Polygalacturonase in Strawberry Fruit Softening1[W

    PubMed Central

    Quesada, Miguel A.; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Posé, Sara; García-Gago, Juan A.; Jiménez-Bermúdez, Silvia; Muñoz-Serrano, Andrés; Caballero, José L.; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Mercado, José A.; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan

    2009-01-01

    The strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa ‘Chandler’) fruit undergoes a fast softening during ripening. Polygalacturonase (PG) activity is low during this process, but two ripening-related PG genes, FaPG1 and FaPG2, have been cloned. Both genes were up-regulated during fruit ripening and were also negatively regulated by auxin. To further assess the role of FaPG1 on strawberry softening, transgenic plants containing an antisense sequence of this gene under the control of the 35S promoter (APG lines) were obtained. Sixteen out of 30 independent transgenic lines showed fruit yields similar to those of the control. Several quality parameters were measured in ripe fruits from these 16 lines. Fruit weight was slightly reduced in four lines, and most of them showed an increase in soluble solid content. Half of these lines yielded fruits significantly firmer than did the control. Four APG lines were selected, their ripened fruits being on average 163% firmer than the control. The postharvest softening of APG fruits was also diminished. Ripened fruits from the four selected lines showed a 90% to 95% decrease in FaPG1 transcript abundance, whereas the level of FaPG2 was not significantly altered. Total PG activity was reduced in three of these lines when compared with control fruits. Cell wall extracts from APG fruits showed a reduction in pectin solubilization and an increase in pectins covalently bound to the cell wall. A comparative transcriptomic analysis of gene expression between the ripened receptacle of the control and those of the APG fruits (comprising 1,250 receptacle expressed sequence tags) did not show any statistically significant change. These results indicate that FaPG1 plays a central role in strawberry softening. PMID:19395408

  2. Theoretical studies on sRNA-mediated regulation in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xiao-Xue; Xu, Liu-Fang; Shi, Hua-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Small RNA(sRNA)-mediated post-transcriptional regulation differs from protein-mediated regulation. Through base-pairing, sRNA can regulate the target mRNA in a catalytic or stoichiometric manner. Some theoretical models were built for comparison of the protein-mediated and sRNA-mediated modes in the steady-state behaviors and noise properties. Many experiments demonstrated that a single sRNA can regulate several mRNAs, which causes crosstalk between the targets. Here, we focus on some models in which two target mRNAs are silenced by the same sRNA to discuss their crosstalk features. Additionally, the sequence-function relationship of sRNA and its role in the kinetic process of base-pairing have been highlighted in model building. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB834100), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11121403 and 11274320), the Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Grant No. Y4KF171CJ1), the National Natural Science Foundation for Young Scholar of China (Grant No. 11304115), and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2013M541282).

  3. MicroRNAs, macrocontrol: regulation of miRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Slezak-Prochazka, Izabella; Durmus, Selvi; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; van den Berg, Anke

    2010-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a set of small, non-protein-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Maturation of miRNAs comprises several regulated steps resulting in approximately 22-nucleotide single-stranded mature miRNAs. Regulation of miRNA expression can occur both at the transcriptional level and at the post-transcriptional level during miRNA processing. Recent studies have elucidated specific aspects of the well-regulated nature of miRNA processing involving various regulatory proteins, editing of miRNA transcripts, and cellular location. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms in miRNA genes can also affect the processing efficiency of primary miRNA transcripts. In this review we present an overview of the currently known regulatory pathways of miRNA processing and provide a basis to understand how aberrant miRNA processing may arise and may be involved in pathophysiological conditions such as cancer.

  4. Functional Complexity and Regulation through RNA Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Dethoff, Elizabeth A.; Chugh, Jeetender; Mustoe, Anthony M.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2012-01-01

    Preface Conformational changes involving coding and non-coding RNAs form the basis for genetic regulatory elements and provide an important source of complexity for driving many fundamental processes of life. While RNA is highly flexible, the underlying dynamics are robust and limited to transitions between the few conformations that preserve favorable base-pairing and stacking interactions. The mechanisms by which cellular processes harness RNA’s intrinsic dynamic behavior and steer it towards functionally productive pathways are complex. Versatile functions and ease of integration into a wide variety of genetic circuits and biochemical pathways suggests a general and fundamental role for RNA dynamics in cellular processes. PMID:22337051

  5. RNA-based gene circuits for cell regulation

    PubMed Central

    KARAGIANNIS, Peter; FUJITA, Yoshihiko; SAITO, Hirohide

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of synthetic biology is to control cell behavior. RNA-mediated genetic switches (RNA switches) are devices that serve this purpose, as they can control gene expressions in response to input signals. In general, RNA switches consist of two domains: an aptamer domain, which binds to an input molecule, and an actuator domain, which controls the gene expression. An input binding to the aptamer can cause the actuator to alter the RNA structure, thus changing access to translation machinery. The assembly of multiple RNA switches has led to complex gene circuits for cell therapies, including the selective killing of pathological cells and purification of cell populations. The inclusion of RNA binding proteins, such as L7Ae, increases the repertoire and precision of the circuit. In this short review, we discuss synthetic RNA switches for gene regulation and their potential therapeutic applications. PMID:27840389

  6. Epigenetic and microRNA regulation during osteoarthritis development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Di; Shen, Jie; Hui, Tianqian

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative joint disease, the pathological mechanism of which is currently unknown. Genetic alteration is one of the key contributing factors for OA pathology. Recent evidence suggests that epigenetic and microRNA regulation of critical genes may contribute to OA development. In this article, we review the epigenetic and microRNA regulations of genes related to OA development. Potential therapeutic strategies may be developed on the basis of novel findings. PMID:27508054

  7. Antisense down-regulation of 4CL expression alters lignification, tree growth, and saccharification potential of field-grown poplar

    Treesearch

    Steven L. Voelker; Barbara Lachenbruch; Frederick C. Meinzer; Michael Jourdes; Chanyoung Ki; Ann M. Patten; Laurence B. Davin; Norman G. Lewis; Gerald A. Tuskan; Lee Gunter; Stephen R. Decker; Michael J. Selig; Robert Sykes; Michael E. Himmel; Peter Kitin; Olga Shevchenko; Steven H. Strauss

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic down-regulation of the Pt4CL1 gene family encoding 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) has been reported as a means for reducing lignin content in cell walls and increasing overall growth rates, thereby improving feedstock quality for paper and bioethanol production. Using hybrid poplar (Populus tremula...

  8. Widespread Antisense Transcription in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dornenburg, James E.; DeVita, Anne M.; Palumbo, Michael J.; Wade, Joseph T.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT The vast majority of annotated transcripts in bacteria are mRNAs. Here we identify ~1,000 antisense transcripts in the model bacterium Escherichia coli. We propose that these transcripts are generated by promiscuous transcription initiation within genes and that many of them regulate expression of the overlapping gene. PMID:20689751

  9. RNA exosome regulated long non-coding RNA transcription controls super-enhancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Wang, Jiguang; Rothschild, Gerson; Lim, Junghyun; Kazadi, David; Sun, Jianbo; Federation, Alexander; Chao, Jaime; Elliott, Oliver; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Economides, Aris N.; Bradner, James E.; Rabadan, Raul; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-01-01

    We have ablated the cellular RNA degradation machinery in differentiated B cells and pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells by conditional mutagenesis of core (Exosc3) and nuclear RNase (Exosc10) components of RNA exosome and identified a vast number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) with emergent functionality. Unexpectedly, eRNA-expressing regions accumulate R-loop structures upon RNA exosome ablation, thus demonstrating the role of RNA exosome in resolving deleterious DNA/RNA hybrids arising from active enhancers. We have uncovered a distal divergent eRNA-expressing element (lncRNA-CSR) engaged in long-range DNA interactions and regulating IgH 3′ regulatory region super-enhancer function. CRISPR-Cas9 mediated ablation of lncRNA-CSR transcription decreases its chromosomal looping-mediated association with the IgH 3′regulatory region super-enhancer and leads to decreased class switch recombination efficiency. We propose that the RNA exosome protects divergently transcribed lncRNA expressing enhancers, by resolving deleterious transcription-coupled secondary DNA structures, while also regulating long-range super-enhancer chromosomal interactions important for cellular function. PMID:25957685

  10. AUF1 regulation of coding and noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    White, Elizabeth J F; Matsangos, Aerielle E; Wilson, Gerald M

    2017-03-01

    AUF1 is a family of four RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) generated by alternative pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing, with canonical roles in controlling the stability and/or translation of mRNA targets based on recognition of AU-rich sequences within mRNA 3' untranslated regions. However, recent studies identifying AUF1 target sites across the transcriptome have revealed that these canonical functions are but a subset of its roles in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. In this review, we describe recent developments in our understanding of the RNA-binding properties of AUF1 together with their biochemical implications and roles in directing mRNA decay and translation. This is then followed by a survey of newly discovered activities for AUF1 proteins in control of miRNA synthesis and function, including miRNA assembly into microRNA (miRNA)-loaded RNA-induced silencing complexes (miRISCs), miRISC targeting to mRNA substrates, interplay with an expanding network of other cellular RBPs, and reciprocal regulatory relationships between miRNA and AUF1 synthesis. Finally, we discuss recently reported relationships between AUF1 and long noncoding RNAs and regulatory roles on viral RNA substrates. Cumulatively, these findings have significantly expanded our appreciation of the scope and diversity of AUF1 functions in the cell, and are prompting an exciting array of new questions moving forward. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1393. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1393 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  11. ASBEL, an ANA/BTG3 antisense transcript required for tumorigenicity of ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Satoshi; Taniue, Kenzui; Sugimasa, Hironobu; Nasu, Emiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Mana; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Okamoto, Aikou; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian genomes encode numerous antisense non-coding RNAs, which are assumed to be involved in the regulation of the sense gene expression. However, the mechanisms of their action and involvement in the development of diseases have not been well elucidated. The ANA/BTG3 protein is an antiproliferative protein whose expression is downregulated in prostate and lung cancers. Here we show that an antisense transcript of the ANA/BTG3 gene, termed ASBEL, negatively regulates the levels of ANA/BTG3 protein, but not of ANA/BTG3 mRNA and is required for proliferation and tumorigenicity of ovarian clear cell carcinoma. We further show that knockdown of ANA/BTG3 rescues growth inhibition caused by ASBEL knockdown. Moreover, we demonstrate that ASBEL forms duplexes with ANA/BTG3 mRNA in the nucleus and suppresses its cytoplasmic transportation. Our findings illustrate a novel function for an antisense transcript that critically promotes tumorigenesis by suppressing translation of the sense gene by inhibiting its cytoplasmic transportation.

  12. Multiple small RNA pathways regulate the silencing of repeated and foreign genes in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sylvia E.J.; Pan, Qi; Breen, Peter C.; Qi, Yan; Shi, Zhen; Zhang, Chi; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Gene segments from other organisms, such as viruses, are detected as foreign and targeted for silencing by RNAi pathways. A deep-sequencing map of the small RNA response to repeated transgenes introduced to Caenorhabditis elegans revealed that specific segments are targeted by siRNAs. Silencing of the foreign gene segments depends on an antiviral response that involves changes in active and silent chromatin modifications and altered levels of antisense siRNAs. Distinct Argonaute proteins target foreign genes for silencing or protection against silencing. We used a repeated transgene in a genome-wide screen to identify gene disruptions that enhance silencing of foreign genetic elements and identified 69 genes. These genes cluster in four groups based on overlapping sets of coexpressed genes, including a group of germline-expressed genes that are likely coregulated by the E2F transcription factor. Many of the gene inactivations enhance exogenous RNAi. About half of the 69 genes have roles in endogenous RNAi pathways that regulate diverse processes, including silencing of duplicated genes and transposons and chromosome segregation. Of these newly identified genes, several are required for siRNA biogenesis or stability in the oocyte-specific ERGO-1 pathway, including eri-12, encoding an interactor of the RNAi-defective protein RDE-10, and ntl-9/CNOT9, one of several CCR4/NOT complex genes that we identified. The conserved ARF-like small GTPase ARL-8 is required specifically for primary siRNA biogenesis or stability in the sperm-specific ALG-3/4 endogenous RNAi pathway. PMID:24352423

  13. Multiple small RNA pathways regulate the silencing of repeated and foreign genes in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sylvia E J; Pan, Qi; Breen, Peter C; Qi, Yan; Shi, Zhen; Zhang, Chi; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-12-15

    Gene segments from other organisms, such as viruses, are detected as foreign and targeted for silencing by RNAi pathways. A deep-sequencing map of the small RNA response to repeated transgenes introduced to Caenorhabditis elegans revealed that specific segments are targeted by siRNAs. Silencing of the foreign gene segments depends on an antiviral response that involves changes in active and silent chromatin modifications and altered levels of antisense siRNAs. Distinct Argonaute proteins target foreign genes for silencing or protection against silencing. We used a repeated transgene in a genome-wide screen to identify gene disruptions that enhance silencing of foreign genetic elements and identified 69 genes. These genes cluster in four groups based on overlapping sets of coexpressed genes, including a group of germline-expressed genes that are likely coregulated by the E2F transcription factor. Many of the gene inactivations enhance exogenous RNAi. About half of the 69 genes have roles in endogenous RNAi pathways that regulate diverse processes, including silencing of duplicated genes and transposons and chromosome segregation. Of these newly identified genes, several are required for siRNA biogenesis or stability in the oocyte-specific ERGO-1 pathway, including eri-12, encoding an interactor of the RNAi-defective protein RDE-10, and ntl-9/CNOT9, one of several CCR4/NOT complex genes that we identified. The conserved ARF-like small GTPase ARL-8 is required specifically for primary siRNA biogenesis or stability in the sperm-specific ALG-3/4 endogenous RNAi pathway.

  14. RNA editing regulates transposon-mediated heterochromatic gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Savva, Yiannis A; Jepson, James E C; Chang, Yao-Jen; Whitaker, Rachel; Jones, Brian C; St Laurent, Georges; Tackett, Michael R; Kapranov, Philipp; Jiang, Nan; Du, Guyu; Helfand, Stephen L; Reenan, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Heterochromatin formation drives epigenetic mechanisms associated with silenced gene expression. Repressive heterochromatin is established through the RNA interference pathway, triggered by double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) that can be modified via RNA editing. However, the biological consequences of such modifications remain enigmatic. Here we show that RNA editing regulates heterochromatic gene silencing in Drosophila. We utilize the binding activity of an RNA-editing enzyme to visualize the in vivo production of a long dsRNA trigger mediated by Hoppel transposable elements. Using homologous recombination, we delete this trigger, dramatically altering heterochromatic gene silencing and chromatin architecture. Furthermore, we show that the trigger RNA is edited and that dADAR serves as a key regulator of chromatin state. Additionally, dADAR auto-editing generates a natural suppressor of gene silencing. Lastly, systemic differences in RNA editing activity generates interindividual variation in silencing state within a population. Our data reveal a global role for RNA editing in regulating gene expression.

  15. Post-transcriptional gene regulation by long noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Je-Hyun; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Gorospe, Myriam

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells transcribe a vast number of noncoding RNA species. Among them, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been widely implicated in the regulation of gene transcription. However, examples of post-transcriptional gene regulation by lncRNAs are emerging. For example, through extended base-pairing, lncRNAs can stabilize or promote the translation of target mRNAs, while partial base-pairing facilitates mRNA decay or inhibits target mRNA translation. In the absence of complementarity, lncRNAs can suppress pre-mRNA splicing and translation by acting as decoys of RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs, and can compete for microRNA-mediated inhibition leading to increased expression of the mRNA. Through these regulatory mechanisms, lncRNAs can elicit differentiation, proliferation, and cytoprotective programs, underscoring the rising recognition of lncRNA roles in human disease. In this review, we summarize the mechanism of post-transcriptional gene regulation by lncRNAs. PMID:23178169

  16. Neuronal Activity Regulates Hippocampal miRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Eacker, Stephen M.; Keuss, Matthew J.; Berezikov, Eugene; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal activity regulates a broad range of processes in the hippocampus, including the precise regulation of translation. Disruptions in proper translational control in the nervous system are associated with a variety of disorders that fall in the autistic spectrum. MicroRNA (miRNA) represent a relatively recently discovered player in the regulation of translation in the nervous system. We have conducted an in depth analysis of how neuronal activity regulates miRNA expression in the hippocampus. Using deep sequencing we exhaustively identify all miRNAs, including 15 novel miRNAs, expressed in hippocampus of the adult mouse. We identified 119 miRNAs documented in miRBase but less than half of these miRNA were expressed at a level greater than 0.1% of total miRNA. Expression profiling following induction of neuronal activity by electroconvulsive shock demonstrates that most miRNA show a biphasic pattern of expression: rapid induction of specific mature miRNA expression followed by a decline in expression. These results have important implications into how miRNAs influence activity-dependent translational control. PMID:21984899

  17. microRNA expression in autonomous thyroid adenomas: Correlation with mRNA regulation.

    PubMed

    Floor, Sébastien L; Trésallet, Christophe; Hébrant, Aline; Desbuleux, Alice; Libert, Frédérick; Hoang, Catherine; Capello, Matteo; Andry, Guy; van Staveren, Wilma C G; Maenhaut, Carine

    2015-08-15

    The objective of the study was to identify the deregulated miRNA in autonomous adenoma and to correlate the data with mRNA regulation. Seven autonomous adenoma with adjacent healthy thyroid tissues were investigated. Twelve miRNAs were downregulated and one was upregulated in the tumors. Combining bioinformatic mRNA target prediction and microarray data on mRNA regulations allowed to identify mRNA targets of our deregulated miRNAs. A large enrichment in mRNA encoding proteins involved in extracellular matrix organization and different phosphodiesterases were identified among these putative targets. The direct interaction between miR-101-3p and miR-144-3p and PDE4D mRNA was experimentally validated. The global miRNA profiles were not greatly modified, confirming the definition of these tumors as minimal deviation tumors. These results support a role for miRNA in the regulation of extracellular matrix proteins and tissue remodeling occurring during tumor development, and in the important negative feedback of the cAMP pathway, which limits the consequences of its constitutive activation in these tumors.

  18. 6S RNA Mimics B-Form DNA to Regulate Escherichia coli RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Chen, James; Wassarman, Karen M; Feng, Shili; Leon, Katherine; Feklistov, Andrey; Winkelman, Jared T; Li, Zongli; Walz, Thomas; Campbell, Elizabeth A; Darst, Seth A

    2017-10-04

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) regulate gene expression in all organisms. Bacterial 6S RNAs globally regulate transcription by binding RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme and competing with promoter DNA. Escherichia coli (Eco) 6S RNA interacts specifically with the housekeeping σ(70)-holoenzyme (Eσ(70)) and plays a key role in the transcriptional reprogramming upon shifts between exponential and stationary phase. Inhibition is relieved upon 6S RNA-templated RNA synthesis. We report here the 3.8 Å resolution structure of a complex between 6S RNA and Eσ(70) determined by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy and validation of the structure using footprinting and crosslinking approaches. Duplex RNA segments have A-form C3' endo sugar puckers but widened major groove widths, giving the RNA an overall architecture that mimics B-form promoter DNA. Our results help explain the specificity of Eco 6S RNA for Eσ(70) and show how an ncRNA can mimic B-form DNA to directly regulate transcription by the DNA-dependent RNAP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The regulation and functions of the nuclear RNA exosome complex.

    PubMed

    Kilchert, Cornelia; Wittmann, Sina; Vasiljeva, Lidia

    2016-04-01

    The RNA exosome complex is the most versatile RNA-degradation machine in eukaryotes. The exosome has a central role in several aspects of RNA biogenesis, including RNA maturation and surveillance. Moreover, it is emerging as an important player in regulating the expression levels of specific mRNAs in response to environmental cues and during cell differentiation and development. Although the mechanisms by which RNA is targeted to (or escapes from) the exosome are still not fully understood, general principles have begun to emerge, which we discuss in this Review. In addition, we introduce and discuss novel, previously unappreciated functions of the nuclear exosome, including in transcription regulation and in the maintenance of genome stability.

  20. Temporal regulation of adenovirus major late alternative RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Akusjarvi, Goran

    2008-05-01

    Adenovirus makes extensive use of alternative RNA splicing to produce a complex set of spliced mRNAs during replication. The accumulation of viral mRNAs is subjected to a temporal regulation, a mechanism that ensures that proteins that are needed at certain stages of the virus life cycle are produced in a timely fashion. The complex interactions between the virus and the host cell RNA splicing machinery has been studied in detail during the last decade. These studies have resulted in the characterization of two viral proteins, E4-ORF4 and L4-33K, that adenovirus uses to remodel the host cell RNA splicing machinery. Here I will review the current knowledge of how mRNA expression from the adenovirus major late transcription unit is controlled with a particular emphasis on how cis-acting sequence element, trans-acting factors and mechanisms regulating adenovirus major late L1 alternative RNA splicing is controlled.

  1. Integrated bioinformatics analysis of chromatin regulator EZH2 in regulating mRNA and lncRNA expression by ChIP sequencing and RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Luo, Mei; Shi, Xuejiao; Lu, Zhiliang; Sun, Shouguo; Huang, Jianbing; Chen, Zhaoli; He, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), a dynamic chromatin regulator in cancer, represents a potential therapeutic target showing early signs of promise in clinical trials. EZH2 ChIP sequencing data in 19 cell lines and RNA sequencing data in ten cancer types were downloaded from GEO and TCGA, respectively. Integrated ChIP sequencing analysis and co-expressing analysis were conducted and both mRNA and long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) targets were detected. We detected a median of 4,672 mRNA targets and 4,024 lncRNA targets regulated by EZH2 in 19 cell lines. 20 mRNA targets and 27 lncRNA targets were found in all 19 cell lines. These mRNA targets were enriched in pathways in cancer, Hippo, Wnt, MAPK and PI3K-Akt pathways. Co-expression analysis confirmed numerous targets, mRNA genes (RRAS, TGFBR2, NUF2 and PRC1) and lncRNA genes (lncRNA LINC00261, DIO3OS, RP11-307C12.11 and RP11-98D18.9) were potential targets and were significantly correlated with EZH2. We predicted genome-wide potential targets and the role of EZH2 in regulating as a transcriptional suppressor or activator which could pave the way for mechanism studies and the targeted therapy of EZH2 in cancer. PMID:27835578

  2. Insights into MiRNA Regulation of the Human Glycome

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Brian T.; Koppolu, Sujeethraj; Mahal, Lara K.

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation is an intricate process requiring the coordinated action of multiple proteins, including glycosyltransferases, glycosidases, sugar nucleotide transporters and trafficking proteins. Work by several groups points to a role for microRNA (miRNA) in controlling the levels of specific glycosyltransferases involved in cancer, neural migration and osteoblast formation. Recent work in our laboratory suggests that miRNA are a principal regulator of the glycome, translating genomic information into the glycocode through tuning of enzyme levels. Herein we overlay predicted miRNA regulation of glycosylation related genes (glycogenes) onto maps of the common N-linked and O-linked glycan biosynthetic pathways to identify key regulatory nodes of the glycome. Our analysis provides insights into glycan regulation and suggests that at the regulatory level, glycogenes are non-redundant. PMID:24463102

  3. Regulation of miRNA Processing and miRNA Mediated Gene Repression in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bajan, Sarah; Hutvagner, Gyorgy

    2014-01-01

    The majority of human protein-coding genes are predicted to be targets of miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. The widespread influence of miRNAs is illustrated by their essential roles in all biological processes. Regulated miRNA expression is essential for maintaining cellular differentiation; therefore alterations in miRNA expression patterns are associated with several diseases, including various cancers. High-throughput sequencing technologies revealed low level expressing miRNA isoforms, termed isomiRs. IsomiRs may differ in sequence, length, target preference and expression patterns from their parental miRNA and can arise from differences in miRNA biosynthesis, RNA editing, or SNPs inherent to the miRNA gene. The association between isomiR expression and disease progression is largely unknown. Misregulated miRNA expression is thought to contribute to the formation and/or progression of cancer. However, due to the diversity of targeted transcripts, miRNAs can function as both tumor-suppressor genes and oncogenes as defined by cellular context. Despite this, miRNA profiling studies concluded that the differential expression of particular miRNAs in diseased tissue could aid the diagnosis and treatment of some cancers. PMID:25069508

  4. Molecular breeding of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with high RNA content by harnessing essential ribosomal RNA transcription regulator.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Kariya, Takahiro; Usugi, Shogo; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Harashima, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    As yeast is commonly used for RNA production, it is industrially important to breed strains with high RNA contents. The upstream activating factor (UAF) plays an important role in transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), a major constituent of intracellular RNA species. Here, we targeted the essential rRNA transcription regulator Rrn5 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a component of the UAF complex, and disrupted the genomic RRN5 gene using a helper plasmid carrying an RRN5 gene. Then we isolated nine suppressor mutants (Sup mutants) of RRN5 gene disruption, causing deficiency in rRNA transcription. The Sup mutants had RNA contents of approximately 40% of the wild type level and expansion of rDNA repeats to ca. 400-700 copies. Reintroduction of a functional RRN5 gene into Sup mutants caused a reduction in the number of rDNA repeats to close to the wild type level but did not change RNA content. However, we found that reintroduction of RRN5 into the Sup16 mutant (in which the FOB1 gene encoding the rDNA replication fork barrier site binding protein was disrupted) resulted in a significant increase (17%) in RNA content compared with wild type, although the rDNA repeat copy number was almost identical to the wild type strain. In this case, upregulated transcription of non-transcribed spacers (NTS) occurred, especially in the NTS2 region; this was likely mediated by RNA polymerase II and accounted for the increased RNA content. Thus, we propose a novel breeding strategy for developing high RNA content yeast by harnessing the essential rRNA transcription regulator.

  5. Specific RNP capture with antisense LNA/DNA mixmers

    PubMed Central

    Rogell, Birgit; Fischer, Bernd; Rettel, Mandy; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Castello, Alfredo; Hentze, Matthias W.

    2017-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play essential roles in RNA biology, responding to cellular and environmental stimuli to regulate gene expression. Important advances have helped to determine the (near) complete repertoires of cellular RBPs. However, identification of RBPs associated with specific transcripts remains a challenge. Here, we describe “specific ribonucleoprotein (RNP) capture,” a versatile method for the determination of the proteins bound to specific transcripts in vitro and in cellular systems. Specific RNP capture uses UV irradiation to covalently stabilize protein–RNA interactions taking place at “zero distance.” Proteins bound to the target RNA are captured by hybridization with antisense locked nucleic acid (LNA)/DNA oligonucleotides covalently coupled to a magnetic resin. After stringent washing, interacting proteins are identified by quantitative mass spectrometry. Applied to in vitro extracts, specific RNP capture identifies the RBPs bound to a reporter mRNA containing the Sex-lethal (Sxl) binding motifs, revealing that the Sxl homolog sister of Sex lethal (Ssx) displays similar binding preferences. This method also revealed the repertoire of RBPs binding to 18S or 28S rRNAs in HeLa cells, including previously unknown rRNA-binding proteins. PMID:28476952

  6. Medial prefrontal cortical injections of c-fos antisense oligonucleotides transiently lower c-Fos protein and mimic amphetamine withdrawal behaviours.

    PubMed

    Persico, A M; Schindler, C W; Davis, S C; Ambrosio, E; Uhl, G R

    1998-02-01

    Prefrontal cerebral cortical areas display decreased expression of several transcription factor/immediate-early genes, including c-fos, during amphetamine withdrawal. Antisense strategies can help to test possible roles for this prefrontal c-fos down-regulation in the behavioural correlates of amphetamine withdrawal. Medial prefrontal cortical injections delivering 1.7 nmoles of anti c-fos oligonucleotides revealed an approximately 3 h half-life for phosphothioate and a 15 min half-life for phosphodiester oligonucleotides. Antisense phosphothioates complementary to the c-fos translational start site reduced levels of c-Fos protein, while exerting modest and variable effects on c-fos messenger RNA levels. Neither missense phosphorothioate nor antisense phosphodiester oligonucleotides significantly reduced levels of either c-fos messenger RNA or protein. Animals injected with anti c-fos phosphothioate oligonucleotides into the medial prefrontal cortex displayed marked reductions in linear locomotor activity and repetitive movements measured in a novel environment, effects not seen when missense oligonucleotides were used or when animals were accustomed to the activity monitor prior to antisense oligonucleotide injection. Behavioural changes produced by prefrontal cortical injections of c-fos antisense oligonucleotides closely mimic alterations recorded during amphetamine withdrawal. Prefrontal c-fos could thus conceivably play roles in the neurobiological underpinnings of psychostimulant withdrawal and of responses to stressors such as exposure to novel environments.

  7. MicroRNA 33 Regulates Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Cristina M.; Goedeke, Leigh; Rotllan, Noemi; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Cirera-Salinas, Daniel; Mattison, Julie A.; Suárez, Yajaira; de Cabo, Rafael; Gorospe, Myriam

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases are characterized by the failure of regulatory genes or proteins to effectively orchestrate specific pathways involved in the control of many biological processes. In addition to the classical regulators, recent discoveries have shown the remarkable role of small noncoding RNAs (microRNAs [miRNAs]) in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. In this regard, we have recently demonstrated that miR-33a and miR33b, intronic miRNAs located within the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) genes, regulate lipid metabolism in concert with their host genes. Here, we show that miR-33b also cooperates with SREBP1 in regulating glucose metabolism by targeting phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC), key regulatory enzymes of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Overexpression of miR-33b in human hepatic cells inhibits PCK1 and G6PC expression, leading to a significant reduction of glucose production. Importantly, hepatic SREBP1c/miR-33b levels correlate inversely with the expression of PCK1 and G6PC upon glucose infusion in rhesus monkeys. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-33b works in concert with its host gene to ensure a fine-tuned regulation of lipid and glucose homeostasis, highlighting the clinical potential of miR-33a/b as novel therapeutic targets for a range of metabolic diseases. PMID:23716591

  8. Selective Androgen Receptor Down-Regulators (SARDs): A New Prostate Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    PCa (9). Thus far, the techniques that have been used to down-regulate the AR include antisense oligonucleotides (10, 11), ribozyme treatments (12...Our findings suggest that ICI may present a useful treatment option for patients with AR-dependent PCa. Unlike the ribozyme , antisense, siRNA, or...Catalytic cleavage of the androgen receptor messenger RNA and functional inhibition of androgen receptor activity by a hammerhead ribozyme . Mol Endocrinol

  9. Gene regulation of mammalian long non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Heeyoun

    2017-09-11

    RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcribes two classes of RNAs, protein-coding and non-protein-coding (ncRNA) genes. ncRNAs are also synthesized by RNA polymerases I and III (Pol I and III). In humans, the number of ncRNA genes exceeds more than twice that of protein-coding genes. However, the history of studying Pol II-synthesized ncRNA is relatively short. Since early 2000s, important biological and pathological functions of these ncRNA genes have begun to be discovered and intensively studied. And transcription mechanisms of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) have been recently reported. Transcription of lncRNAs utilizes some transcription factors and mechanisms shared in that of protein-coding genes. In addition, tissue specificity in lncRNA gene expression has been shown. LncRNAs play essential roles in regulating the expression of neighboring or distal genes through different mechanisms. This leads to the implication of lncRNAs in a wide variety of biological pathways and pathological development. In this review, the newly discovered transcription mechanisms, characteristics, and functions of lncRNA are discussed.

  10. Depletion of human micro-RNA miR-125b reveals that it is critical for the proliferation of differentiated cells but not for the down-regulation of putative targets during differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Sun; Kim, Hak Kyun; Chung, Sangmi; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Dutta, Anindya

    2005-04-29

    Micro-RNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate target gene expression post-transcriptionally through base pairing with the target messenger RNA. Functional characterization of micro-RNAs awaits robust experimental methods to knock-down a micro-RNA as well as to assay its function in vivo. In addition to the recently developed method to sequester micro-RNA with 2'-O-methyl antisense oligonucleotide, we report that small interfering RNA against the loop region of a micro-RNA precursor can be used to deplete the micro-RNA. The depletion of miR-125b by this method had a profound effect on the proliferation of adult differentiated cancer cells, and this proliferation defect was rescued by co-transfected mature micro-RNA. This technique has unique advantages over the 2'-O-methyl antisense oligonucleotide and can be used to determine micro-RNA function, assay micro-RNAs in vivo, and identify the contribution of a predicted micro-RNA precursor to the pool of mature micro-RNA in a given cell. miR-125b and let-7 micro-RNAs are induced, whereas their putative targets, lin-28 and lin-41, are decreased during in vitro differentiation of Tera-2 or embryonic stem cells. Experimental increase or decrease of micro-RNA concentrations did not, however, affect the levels of the targets, a finding that is explained by the fact that the down-regulation of the targets appears to be mostly at the transcriptional level in these in vitro differentiation systems. Collectively these results reveal the importance of micro-RNA depletion strategies for directly determining micro-RNA function in vivo.

  11. An mRNA-Derived Noncoding RNA Targets and Regulates the Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Pircher, Andreas; Bakowska-Zywicka, Kamilla; Schneider, Lukas; Zywicki, Marek; Polacek, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Summary The structural and functional repertoire of small non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) is central for establishing gene regulation networks in cells and organisms. Here, we show that an mRNA-derived 18-nucleotide-long ncRNA is capable of downregulating translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by targeting the ribosome. This 18-mer ncRNA binds to polysomes upon salt stress and is crucial for efficient growth under hyperosmotic conditions. Although the 18-mer RNA originates from the TRM10 locus, which encodes a tRNA methyltransferase, genetic analyses revealed the 18-mer RNA nucleotide sequence, rather than the mRNA-encoded enzyme, as the translation regulator. Our data reveal the ribosome as a target for a small regulatory ncRNA and demonstrate the existence of a yet unkown mechanism of translation regulation. Ribosome-targeted small ncRNAs are found in all domains of life and represent a prevalent but so far largely unexplored class of regulatory molecules. PMID:24685157

  12. Regulation of miRNA-mediated gene silencing by miRNA precursors

    PubMed Central

    Roy-Chaudhuri, Biswajoy; Valdmanis, Paul N.; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Qing; Luo, Qingjun; Kay, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Processing of miRNAs from their precursors to the biologically active mature form is regulated during development and cancer. We show that mouse precursor-miR-151 can bind to and compete with mature miR-151-5p and miR-151-3p for binding sites contained within the complementary regions of the E2f6 mRNA 3′UTR. In agreement, E2f6 mRNA levels were regulated by precursor-miR-151. Conversely, the miR-151-mediated repression of ARHGDIA mRNA was only dependent on the mature miR-151 level as only the mature miRNA was able to bind to the 3′UTR. This suggests that processing of miR-151 can have different effects on separate mRNA targets within a cell. A bioinformatics pipeline revealed additional candidate regions where pre-miRNAs can compete with their mature miRNA counterparts. This was experimentally validated for miR-124 and the SNAI2 3′UTR. Hence, miRNA precursors can serve as post-transcriptional regulators of miRNA activity and are not mere biogenesis intermediates. PMID:25086740

  13. Differential regulation of plastid mRNA stability. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, D.B.

    1993-09-01

    Our goal is to identify cis-acting sequences and transacting factors that function in plastid mRNA maturation, stabilization, and/or decay through an in vitro and in vivo analysis of mRNA:protein interactions. Our previous results emphasized the study of 3{prime}end inverted repeat sequences (IRs) that serve both as mRNA processing elements and stability determinants, and associate with plastid proteins that potentially play enzymatic, structural and/or regulatory roles. We seek to define, by single base and internal deletion mutagenesis, the sequence and structural requirements for protein binding to the 3{prime} IRs of petD and psbA mRNAs; to purify RNA-binding proteins that demonstrate gene- or sequence-specific binding, or that are implicated in RNA stabilization or decay; and to investigate the native form of mRNA in the plastid, by attempting to purify ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles from organelles. Our view of mRNA decay is that it is regulated by three interactive components: RNA structure, ribonucleases and RNA-binding proteins. We have used mutagenesis to study the role of RNA structure in regulating RNA decay rates, and to identify protein binding and endonuclease recognition sites. We have identified at least three endonuclease activities; one that cleaves psbA RNA; and two whose cleavage patterns with petD 3{prime} IR-RNA has been studied (endoC1 and endoC2). Additionally, we have continued to analyze the properties of the major RNA processing exoribonuclease. We have concentrated our efforts on three RNA-binding proteins. A 100 kd protein with properties suggestive of a mammalian RNP component has been purified. A protein of 55 kd that may also be an endonuclease has been partially purified. We have studied the interaction of a 29 kd protein with the petD stem/loop, and its role in RNA processing. Recently, we have used a novel gel shift/SDS-PAGE technique to identify new RNA-binding proteins.

  14. MicroRNA-mediated regulation of flower development in grasses.

    PubMed

    Smoczynska, Aleksandra; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Flower structure in grasses is very unique. There are no petals or sepals like in eudicots but instead flowers develop bract-like structures - palea and lemma. Reproductive organs are enclosed by round lodicule that not only protects reproductive organs but also plays an important role during flower opening. The first genetic model for floral organ development was proposed 25 years ago and it was based on the research on model eudicots. Since then, studies have been carried out to answer the question whether this model could be applicable in the case of monocots. Genes from all classes found in eudicots have been also identified in genomes of such monocots like rice, maize or barley. What's more, it seems that miRNA-mediated regulation of floral organ genes that was observed in the case of Arabidopsis thaliana also takes place in monocots. MiRNA172, miRNA159, miRNA171 and miRNA396 regulate expression of floral organ identity genes in barley, rice and maize, affecting various features of the flower structure, ranging from formation of lemma and palea to the development of reproductive organs. A model of floral development in grasses and its genetic regulation is not yet fully characterized. Further studies on both, the model eudicots and grasses, are needed to unravel this topic. This review provides general overview of genetic model of flower organ identity specification in monocots and it's miRNA-mediated regulation.

  15. Strategies to identify natural antisense transcripts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yulong; Li, Dijie; Zhang, Ru; Peng, Shang; Zhang, Ge; Yang, Tuanmin; Qian, Airong

    2017-01-01

    Natural antisense transcripts, originally considered as transcriptional noises arising from so-called "junk DNA″, are recently recognized as important modulators for gene regulation. They are prevalent in nearly all realms of life and have been found to modulate gene expression positively or negatively. By affecting almost all stages of gene expression range from pre-transcriptional, transcriptional and post-transcriptional to translation, NATs are fundamentally involved in various biological processes. However, compared to increasing huge data from transcriptional analysis especially high-throughput sequencing technologies (such as RNA-seq), limited functional NATs (around 70) are so far reported, which hinder our advanced comprehensive understanding for this field. Hence, efficient strategies for identifying NATs are urgently desired. In this review, we discussed the current strategies for identifying NATs, with a focus on the advantages, disadvantages, and applications of methods isolating functional NATs. Moreover, publicly available databases for NATs were also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  16. Principles of microRNA Regulation Revealed Through Modeling microRNA Expression Quantitative Trait Loci.

    PubMed

    Budach, Stefan; Heinig, Matthias; Marsico, Annalisa

    2016-08-01

    Extensive work has been dedicated to study mechanisms of microRNA-mediated gene regulation. However, the transcriptional regulation of microRNAs themselves is far less well understood, due to difficulties determining the transcription start sites of transient primary transcripts. This challenge can be addressed using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) whose regulatory effects represent a natural source of perturbation of cis-regulatory elements. Here we used previously published cis-microRNA-eQTL data for the human GM12878 cell line, promoter predictions, and other functional annotations to determine the relationship between functional elements and microRNA regulation. We built a logistic regression model that classifies microRNA/SNP pairs into eQTLs or non-eQTLs with 85% accuracy; shows microRNA-eQTL enrichment for microRNA precursors, promoters, enhancers, and transcription factor binding sites; and depletion for repressed chromatin. Interestingly, although there is a large overlap between microRNA eQTLs and messenger RNA eQTLs of host genes, 74% of these shared eQTLs affect microRNA and host expression independently. Considering microRNA-only eQTLs we find a significant enrichment for intronic promoters, validating the existence of alternative promoters for intragenic microRNAs. Finally, in line with the GM12878 cell line derived from B cells, we find genome-wide association (GWA) variants associated to blood-related traits more likely to be microRNA eQTLs than random GWA and non-GWA variants, aiding the interpretation of GWA results. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. Principles of microRNA Regulation Revealed Through Modeling microRNA Expression Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Budach, Stefan; Heinig, Matthias; Marsico, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Extensive work has been dedicated to study mechanisms of microRNA-mediated gene regulation. However, the transcriptional regulation of microRNAs themselves is far less well understood, due to difficulties determining the transcription start sites of transient primary transcripts. This challenge can be addressed using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) whose regulatory effects represent a natural source of perturbation of cis-regulatory elements. Here we used previously published cis-microRNA-eQTL data for the human GM12878 cell line, promoter predictions, and other functional annotations to determine the relationship between functional elements and microRNA regulation. We built a logistic regression model that classifies microRNA/SNP pairs into eQTLs or non-eQTLs with 85% accuracy; shows microRNA-eQTL enrichment for microRNA precursors, promoters, enhancers, and transcription factor binding sites; and depletion for repressed chromatin. Interestingly, although there is a large overlap between microRNA eQTLs and messenger RNA eQTLs of host genes, 74% of these shared eQTLs affect microRNA and host expression independently. Considering microRNA-only eQTLs we find a significant enrichment for intronic promoters, validating the existence of alternative promoters for intragenic microRNAs. Finally, in line with the GM12878 cell line derived from B cells, we find genome-wide association (GWA) variants associated to blood-related traits more likely to be microRNA eQTLs than random GWA and non-GWA variants, aiding the interpretation of GWA results. PMID:27260304

  18. Optimal Down Regulation of mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Zarai, Yoram; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2017-01-01

    Down regulation of mRNA translation is an important problem in various bio-medical domains ranging from developing effective medicines for tumors and for viral diseases to developing attenuated virus strains that can be used for vaccination. Here, we study the problem of down regulation of mRNA translation using a mathematical model called the ribosome flow model (RFM). In the RFM, the mRNA molecule is modeled as a chain of n sites. The flow of ribosomes between consecutive sites is regulated by n + 1 transition rates. Given a set of feasible transition rates, that models the outcome of all possible mutations, we consider the problem of maximally down regulating protein production by altering the rates within this set of feasible rates. Under certain conditions on the feasible set, we show that an optimal solution can be determined efficiently. We also rigorously analyze two special cases of the down regulation optimization problem. Our results suggest that one must focus on the position along the mRNA molecule where the transition rate has the strongest effect on the protein production rate. However, this rate is not necessarily the slowest transition rate along the mRNA molecule. We discuss some of the biological implications of these results. PMID:28120903

  19. Optimal Down Regulation of mRNA Translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarai, Yoram; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2017-01-01

    Down regulation of mRNA translation is an important problem in various bio-medical domains ranging from developing effective medicines for tumors and for viral diseases to developing attenuated virus strains that can be used for vaccination. Here, we study the problem of down regulation of mRNA translation using a mathematical model called the ribosome flow model (RFM). In the RFM, the mRNA molecule is modeled as a chain of n sites. The flow of ribosomes between consecutive sites is regulated by n + 1 transition rates. Given a set of feasible transition rates, that models the outcome of all possible mutations, we consider the problem of maximally down regulating protein production by altering the rates within this set of feasible rates. Under certain conditions on the feasible set, we show that an optimal solution can be determined efficiently. We also rigorously analyze two special cases of the down regulation optimization problem. Our results suggest that one must focus on the position along the mRNA molecule where the transition rate has the strongest effect on the protein production rate. However, this rate is not necessarily the slowest transition rate along the mRNA molecule. We discuss some of the biological implications of these results.

  20. Colony-stimulating factor-1 antisense treatment suppresses growth of human tumor xenografts in mice.

    PubMed

    Aharinejad, Seyedhossein; Abraham, Dietmar; Paulus, Patrick; Abri, Hojatollah; Hofmann, Michael; Grossschmidt, Karl; Schäfer, Romana; Stanley, E Richard; Hofbauer, Reinhold

    2002-09-15

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) foster cellular invasion by disrupting extracellular matrix barriers and thereby facilitate tumor development. MMPs are synthesized by both cancer cells and adjacent stromal cells, primarily macrophages. The production of macrophages is regulated by colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1). Tissue CSF-1 expression increased significantly in embryonic and colon cancer xenografts. We, therefore, hypothesized that blocking CSF-1 may suppress tumor growth by decelerating macrophage-mediated extracellular matrix breakdown. Cells expressing CSF-1 and mice xenografted with CSF-1 receptor (c-fms)- and CSF-1-negative malignant human embryonic or colon cancer cells were treated with mouse CSF-1 antisense oligonucleotides. Two weeks of CSF-1 antisense treatment selectively down-regulated CSF-1 mRNA and protein tissue expression in tumor lysates. CSF-1 blockade suppressed the growth of embryonic tumors to dormant levels and the growth of the colon carcinoma by 50%. In addition, tumor vascularity and the expression of MMP-2 and angiogenic factors were reduced. Six-month survival was observed in colon carcinoma mice only after CSF-1 blockade, whereas controls were all dead at day 65. These results suggest that human embryonic and colon cancer cells up-regulate host CSF-1 and MMP-2 expression. Because the cancer cells used were CSF-1 negative, CSF-1 antisense targeted tumor stromal cell CSF-1 production. CSF-1 blockade could be a novel strategy in treatment of solid tumors.

  1. Delineating bacteriostatic and bactericidal targets in mycobacteria using IPTG inducible antisense expression.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Parvinder; Agarwal, Saurabh; Datta, Santanu

    2009-06-15

    In order to identify novel high value antibacterial targets it is desirable to delineate whether the inactivation of the target enzyme will lead to bacterial death or stasis. This knowledge is particularly important in slow growing organisms, like mycobacteria, where most of the viable anti-tubercular agents are bactericidal. A bactericidal target can be identified through the conditional deletion or inactivation of the target gene at a relatively high cell number and subsequently following the time course of survival for the bacteria. A simple protocol to execute conditional inactivation of a gene is by antisense expression. We have developed a mycobacteria specific IPTG inducible vector system and monitored the effect of antisense inhibition of several known essential genes in mycobacteria by following their survival kinetics. By this method, we could differentiate between genes whose down regulation lead to bacteriostatic or bactericidal effect. Targets for standard anti-tubercular drugs like inhA for isoniazid, rpoB and C for rifampicin, and gyr A/B for flouroquinolones were shown to be bactericidal. In contrast targets like FtsZ behaved in a bacteriostatic manner. Induction of antisense expression in embB and ribosomal RNA genes, viz., rplJ and rpsL showed only a marginal growth inhibition. The specificity of the antisense inhibition was conclusively shown in the case of auxotrophic gene ilvB. The bactericidal activity following antisense expression of ilvB was completely reversed when the growth media was supplemented with the isoleucine, leucine, valine and pantothenate. Additionally, under these conditions the expression of several genes in branched chain amino acid pathway was severely suppressed indicating targeted gene inactivation.

  2. Delineating Bacteriostatic and Bactericidal Targets in Mycobacteria Using IPTG Inducible Antisense Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Parvinder; Agarwal, Saurabh; Datta, Santanu

    2009-01-01

    In order to identify novel high value antibacterial targets it is desirable to delineate whether the inactivation of the target enzyme will lead to bacterial death or stasis. This knowledge is particularly important in slow growing organisms, like mycobacteria, where most of the viable anti-tubercular agents are bactericidal. A bactericidal target can be identified through the conditional deletion or inactivation of the target gene at a relatively high cell number and subsequently following the time course of survival for the bacteria. A simple protocol to execute conditional inactivation of a gene is by antisense expression. We have developed a mycobacteria specific IPTG inducible vector system and monitored the effect of antisense inhibition of several known essential genes in mycobacteria by following their survival kinetics. By this method, we could differentiate between genes whose down regulation lead to bacteriostatic or bactericidal effect. Targets for standard anti-tubercular drugs like inhA for isoniazid, rpoB and C for rifampicin, and gyr A/B for flouroquinolones were shown to be bactericidal. In contrast targets like FtsZ behaved in a bacteriostatic manner. Induction of antisense expression in embB and ribosomal RNA genes, viz., rplJ and rpsL showed only a marginal growth inhibition. The specificity of the antisense inhibition was conclusively shown in the case of auxotrophic gene ilvB. The bactericidal activity following antisense expression of ilvB was completely reversed when the growth media was supplemented with the isoleucine, leucine, valine and pantothenate. Additionally, under these conditions the expression of several genes in branched chain amino acid pathway was severely suppressed indicating targeted gene inactivation. PMID:19526063

  3. MiR-101-3p Suppresses HOX Transcript Antisense RNA (HOTAIR)-induced Proliferation and Invasion Through Directly Targeting SRF in Gastric Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Jin; Wu, Zhenfeng; Chen, Che; Liu, Jiayun; Wu, Guannan; Zhai, Jing; Liu, Fukun; Li, Gang

    2017-03-02

    MiR-101-3p was identified as a tumor suppressor in several cancers, but its exact role in gastric adenocarcinoma is still largely unknown. In this study, we found that, compared with the RGM-1 human normal gastric epithelial cells, miR-101-3p was significantly downregulated in all the 6 human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines, including BGC-823, MNK-45, MGC-803, SGC-7901, AGS and HGC-27. Overexpression miR-101-3p suppressed both the proliferation and invasion of AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of miR-101-3p displayed an opposite effect. In addition, miR-101-3p could directly target and suppress the expression SRF gene, which is a transcription factor of HOTAIR, a well-characterized tumor promoter lncRNA. MiR-101-3p negatively regulated SRF-mediated transcription of HOTAIR. Moreover, either silence of SRF or silence of HOTAIR could counteract the promotion of gastric adenocarcinoma cell proliferation and invasion by miR-101-3p inhibition. Our findings indicate that miR-101-3p suppresses HOTAIR-induced proliferation and invasion through directly targeting SRF in gastric carcinoma cells.

  4. Natural antisense transcripts of Alzheimer's disease associated genes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-Hu; Cheng, Hai-Peng; Yu, Long; Zhao, Shouyuan

    2006-04-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs), also named endogenous antisense transcripts, are a class of genes whose role in controlling gene expression is becoming more and more relevant. NATs might play important roles in gene expression and translation regulation. Present work investigated the presence of NATs of Alzheimer's disease associated genes including PRESENILIN1, PRESENILIN2, BACE1, BACE2, APP, APOE, TAU (MAPT), PRION, alpha-SYNUCLEIN (SNCA), NICASTRIN, PEN2, APH1A, APH1B as well as CD147 (BASIGIN), and the results revealed that APP, BACE2, APH1A, TAU, CD147 and alpha-SYNUCLEIN contain natural antisense transcripts. These NATs were characterized according to the sense-antisense overlapping information and potential functional mechanisms were proposed. Present findings provide preliminary but important information about transcription regulation of AD associated genes, which would further our understanding of the gene expression regulation of AD, and also suggest a novel potential strategy for the therapy of AD.

  5. Promoter RNA links transcriptional regulation of inflammatory pathway genes

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Masayuki; Chu, Yongjun; Zhang, Huiying; Gagnon, Keith T.; Shaikh, Sarfraz; Kuchimanchi, Satya; Manoharan, Muthiah; Corey, David R.; Janowski, Bethany A.

    2013-01-01

    Although many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered, their function and their association with RNAi factors in the nucleus have remained obscure. Here, we identify RNA transcripts that overlap the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) promoter and contain two adjacent binding sites for an endogenous miRNA, miR-589. We find that miR-589 binds the promoter RNA and activates COX-2 transcription. In addition to miR-589, fully complementary duplex RNAs that target the COX-2 promoter transcript activate COX-2 transcription. Activation by small RNA requires RNAi factors argonaute-2 (AGO2) and GW182, but does not require AGO2-mediated cleavage of the promoter RNA. Instead, the promoter RNA functions as a scaffold. Binding of AGO2 protein/small RNA complexes to the promoter RNA triggers gene activation. Gene looping allows interactions between the promoters of COX-2 and phospholipase A2 (PLA2G4A), an adjacent pro-inflammatory pathway gene that produces arachidonic acid, the substrate for COX-2 protein. miR-589 and fully complementary small RNAs regulate both COX-2 and PLA2G4A gene expression, revealing an unexpected connection between key steps of the eicosanoid signaling pathway. The work demonstrates the potential for RNA to coordinate locus-dependent assembly of related genes to form functional operons through cis-looping. PMID:23999091

  6. Long non-coding RNA ANRIL is up-regulated in bladder cancer and regulates bladder cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hongxue; Li, Xuechao; Song, Yarong; Zhang, Peng; Xiao, Yajun; Xing, Yifei

    2015-11-13

    Antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL) is a member of long non-coding RNAs and has been reported to be dysregulated in several human cancers. However, the role of ANRIL in bladder cancer remains unclear. This present study aimed to investigate whether and how ANRIL involved in bladder cancer. Our results showed up-regulation of ANRIL in bladder cancer tissues versus the corresponding adjacent non-tumor tissues. To explore the specific mechanisms, ANRIL was silenced by small interfering RNA or short hairpin RNA transfection in human bladder cancer T24 and EJ cells. Knockdown of ANRIL repressed cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis, along with decreased expression of Bcl-2 and increased expressions of Bax, cytoplasmic cytochrome c and Smac and cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP. However, no change of cleaved caspase-8 level was observed. Furthermore, in vivo experiment confirmed that knockdown of ANRIL inhibited tumorigenic ability of EJ cells in nude mice. Meanwhile, in accordance with in vitro study, knockdown of ANRIL inhibited expression of Bcl-2 and up-regulated expressions of Bax and cleaved caspase-9, but did not affect cleaved caspase-8 level. In conclusion, we first report that ANRIL possibly serves as an oncogene in bladder cancer and regulates bladder cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis through the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. - Highlights: • We first report the role of ANRIL in bladder cancer. • ANRIL is obviously up-regulated in bladder cancer tissues. • ANRIL regulates bladder cancer cell proliferation and cell apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway.

  7. An RNA conformational switch regulates pre-18S rRNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Lamanna, Allison C; Karbstein, Katrin

    2011-01-07

    To produce mature ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), polycistronic rRNA transcripts are cleaved in an ordered series of events. We have uncovered the molecular basis for the ordering of two essential cleavage steps at the 3'-end of 18S rRNA. Using in vitro and in vivo structure probing, RNA binding and cleavage experiments, and yeast genetics, we demonstrate that a conserved RNA sequence in the spacer region between the 18S and 5.8S rRNAs base-pairs with the decoding site of 18S rRNA in early assembly intermediates. Nucleolar cleavage at site A(2) excises this sequence element, leading to a conformational switch in pre-18S rRNA, by which the ribosomal decoding site is formed. This conformational switch positions the nuclease Nob1 for cytoplasmic cleavage at the 3'-end of 18S rRNA and is required for the final maturation step of 18S rRNA in vivo and in vitro. More generally, our data show that the intrinsic ability of RNA to form stable structural switches is exploited to order and regulate RNA-dependent biological processes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An RNA Conformational Switch Regulates Pre-18S rRNA Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Lamanna, Allison C.; Karbstein, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    To produce mature ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), polycistronic rRNA transcripts are cleaved in an ordered series of events. We have uncovered the molecular basis for the ordering of two essential cleavage steps at the 3′-end of 18S rRNA. Using in vitro and in vivo structure probing, RNA binding and cleavage experiments, and yeast genetics, we demonstrate that a conserved RNA sequence in the spacer region between the 18S and 5.8S rRNAs base pairs with the decoding site of 18S rRNA in early assembly intermediates. Nucleolar cleavage at site A2 excises this sequence element, leading to a conformational switch in pre-18S rRNA by which the ribosomal decoding site is formed. This conformational switch positions the nuclease Nob1 for cytoplasmic cleavage at the 3′-end of 18S rRNA and is required for the final maturation step of 18S rRNA in vivo and in vitro. More generally, our data show that the intrinsic ability of RNA to form stable structural switches is exploited to order and regulate RNA-dependent biological processes. PMID:20934433

  9. Trans-regulation of RNA-binding protein motifs by microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Francis; Tenenbaum, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    The wide array of vital functions that RNA performs is dependent on its ability to dynamically fold into different structures in response to intracellular and extracellular changes. RNA-binding proteins regulate much of this activity by targeting specific RNA structures or motifs. One of these structures, the 3-way RNA junction, is characteristically found in ribosomal RNA and results from the RNA folding in cis, to produce three separate helices that meet around a central unpaired region. Here we demonstrate that 3-way junctions can also form in trans as a result of the binding of microRNAs in an unconventional manner with mRNA by splinting two non-contiguous regions together. This may be used to reinforce the base of a stem-loop motif being targeted by an RNA-binding protein. Trans interactions between non-coding RNA and mRNA may be used to control the post-transcriptional regulatory code and suggests a possible role for some of the recently described transcripts of unknown function expressed from the human genome. PMID:24795744

  10. RNA regulation went wrong in neurodevelopmental disorders: The example of Msi/Elavl RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Yano, Masato; Hayakawa-Yano, Yoshika; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-12-01

    RNA regulation participates in many aspects of brain development. There is substantial evidence that RNA dysregulation is critical in the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders, neurological diseases, and cancer. Several gene families encode RNA-binding proteins (RNABPs) that bind directly to RNA and orchestrate the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, including pre-mRNA splicing, stability, and poly(A) site usage. Among neural RNABPs, the Elavl and Msi families are the focus of neuronal development research owing to their hierarchical expression pattern: Msi1 is expressed in neural progenitor/stem cells, Elavl2 is expressed in early neuronal progenitors to mature neurons, and Elavl3/4 expression begins slightly later, during cortical neuron development. Traditional biochemical analyses provide mechanistic insight into RNA regulation by these RNABPs, and Drosophila and mouse genetic studies support a relationship between these RNABPs and several neurodevelopmental disorders. In addition, a recent cohort analysis of the human genome shows that genetic mutations and SNPs in these RNABPs are associated with various neurological disorders. Newly emerged technologies assess transcriptome-wide RNA-protein interactions in vivo. These technologies, combined with classical genetics methods, provide new insight into Elavl and Msi, not only with respect to their neurodevelopmental functions, but also their roles in several diseases. We review recent discoveries related to the two RNABP families in brain development and disease.

  11. Exaptive origins of regulated mRNA decay in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Fursham M.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is extensively controlled at the level of mRNA stability and the mechanisms underlying this regulation are markedly different from their archaeal and bacterial counterparts. We propose that two such mechanisms, nonsense‐mediated decay (NMD) and motif‐specific transcript destabilization by CCCH‐type zinc finger RNA‐binding proteins, originated as a part of cellular defense against RNA pathogens. These branches of the mRNA turnover pathway might have been used by primeval eukaryotes alongside RNA interference to distinguish their own messages from those of RNA viruses and retrotransposable elements. We further hypothesize that the subsequent advent of “professional” innate and adaptive immunity systems allowed NMD and the motif‐triggered mechanisms to be efficiently repurposed for regulation of endogenous cellular transcripts. This scenario explains the rapid emergence of archetypical mRNA destabilization pathways in eukaryotes and argues that other aspects of post‐transcriptional gene regulation in this lineage might have been derived through a similar exaptation route. PMID:27438915

  12. Hormone-dependent expression of a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein natural antisense transcript in MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol transport is essential for many physiological processes, including steroidogenesis. In steroidogenic cells hormone-induced cholesterol transport is controlled by a protein complex that includes steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Star is expressed as 3.5-, 2.8-, and 1.6-kb transcripts that differ only in their 3'-untranslated regions. Because these transcripts share the same promoter, mRNA stability may be involved in their differential regulation and expression. Recently, the identification of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has added another level of regulation to eukaryotic gene expression. Here we identified a new NAT that is complementary to the spliced Star mRNA sequence. Using 5' and 3' RACE, strand-specific RT-PCR, and ribonuclease protection assays, we demonstrated that Star NAT is expressed in MA-10 Leydig cells and steroidogenic murine tissues. Furthermore, we established that human chorionic gonadotropin stimulates Star NAT expression via cAMP. Our results show that sense-antisense Star RNAs may be coordinately regulated since they are co-expressed in MA-10 cells. Overexpression of Star NAT had a differential effect on the expression of the different Star sense transcripts following cAMP stimulation. Meanwhile, the levels of StAR protein and progesterone production were downregulated in the presence of Star NAT. Our data identify antisense transcription as an additional mechanism involved in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis.

  13. Linking gene regulation to mRNA production and export.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana; Hurt, Ed

    2011-06-01

    Regulation of gene expression can occur at many different levels. One important step in the gene expression process is the transport of mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. In recent years, studies have described how nuclear mRNA export depends on the steps preceding and following transport through nuclear pore complexes. These include gene activation, transcription, mRNA processing and mRNP assembly and disassembly. In this review, we summarise recent insights into the links between these steps in the gene expression cascade.

  14. PTBP1-dependent Regulation of USP5 Alternative RNA Splicing Plays a Role in Glioblastoma Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Izaguirre, Daisy I.; Zhu, Wen; Hai, Tao; Cheung, Hannah C.; Krahe, Ralf; Cote, Gilbert J.

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant RNA splicing is thought to play a key role in tumorigenesis. The assessment of its specific contributions is limited by the complexity of information derived from genome-wide array-based approaches. We describe how performing splicing factor-specific comparisons using both tumor and cell line datasets may more readily identify physiologically relevant tumor-specific splicing events. Affymetrix exon array data derived from glioblastoma (GBM) tumor samples with defined PTBP1 levels were compared with data from U251 GBM cells with and without PTBP1 knockdown. This comparison yielded overlapping gene sets that comprised only a minor fraction of each dataset. The identification of a novel GBM-specific splicing event involving the USP5 gene led us to further examine its role in tumorigenesis. In GBM, USP5 generates a shorter isoform 2 through recognition of a 5′ splice site within exon 15. Production of the USP5 isoform 2 was strongly correlated with PTBP1 expression in GBM tumor samples and cell lines. Splicing regulation was consistent with the presence of an intronic PTBP1 binding site and could be modulated through antisense targeting of the isoform 2 splice site to force expression of isoform 1 in GBM cells. The forced expression of USP5 isoform 1 in two GBM cell lines inhibited cell growth and migration, implying an important role for USP5 splicing in gliomagenesis. These results support a role for aberrant RNA splicing in tumorigenesis and suggest that changes in relatively few genes may be sufficient to drive the process. PMID:21976412

  15. Allogeneic T cell responses are regulated by a specific miRNA-mRNA network

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yaping; Tawara, Isao; Zhao, Meng; Qin, Zhaohui S.; Toubai, Tomomi; Mathewson, Nathan; Tamaki, Hiroya; Nieves, Evelyn; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Reddy, Pavan

    2013-01-01

    Donor T cells that respond to host alloantige