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Sample records for antithrombin iii human

  1. Evidence for a hyperglycaemia-dependent decrease of antithrombin III-thrombin complex formation in humans.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Lefèbvre, P

    1990-03-01

    In the presence of increased levels of fibrinopeptide A, decreased antithrombin III biological activity, and thrombin-antithrombin III complex levels are seen in diabetic patients. Induced-hyperglycaemia in diabetic and normal subjects decreased antithrombin III activity and thrombin-antithrombin III levels, and increased fibrinopeptide A plasma levels, while antithrombin III concentration did not change; heparin was shown to reduced these phenomena. In diabetic patients, euglycaemia induced by insulin infusion restored antithrombin III activity, thrombin-antithrombin III complex and fibrinopeptide A concentrations; heparin administration had the same effects. These data stress the role of a hyperglycaemia-dependent decrease of antithrombin III activity in precipitating thrombin hyperactivity in diabetes mellitus.

  2. Antithrombin III blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AT III) is a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of ... may mean you have an increased risk of blood clotting. This can occur when there is not enough ...

  3. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin III...

  4. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin III...

  5. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin III...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin III...

  7. Antimicrobial effects of helix D-derived peptides of human antithrombin III.

    PubMed

    Papareddy, Praveen; Kalle, Martina; Bhongir, Ravi K V; Mörgelin, Matthias; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2014-10-24

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is a key antiproteinase involved in blood coagulation. Previous investigations have shown that ATIII is degraded by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, leading to release of heparin binding fragments derived from its D helix. As heparin binding and antimicrobial activity of peptides frequently overlap, we here set out to explore possible antibacterial effects of intact and degraded ATIII. In contrast to intact ATIII, the results showed that extensive degradation of the molecule yielded fragments with antimicrobial activity. Correspondingly, the heparin-binding, helix D-derived, peptide FFFAKLNCRLYRKANKSSKLV (FFF21) of human ATIII, was found to be antimicrobial against particularly the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy studies demonstrated that FFF21 binds to and permeabilizes bacterial membranes. Analogously, FFF21 was found to induce membrane leakage of model anionic liposomes. In vivo, FFF21 significantly reduced P. aeruginosa infection in mice. Additionally, FFF21 displayed anti-endotoxic effects in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest novel roles for ATIII-derived peptide fragments in host defense.

  8. [Role of antithrombin iii in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Muedra, V; Barettino, D; D'Ocón, P

    2013-11-01

    Coagulation of blood is of multidisciplinary interest. Cardiac surgery produces major changes in the delicate balance between pro-and anti-coagulant serum factors. The role of antithrombin iii has been analysed after finding evidence that associated decreased levels of protein activity to postoperative morbidity and mortality. Supplementing exogenous antithrombin is considered with the aim of optimising outcomes. Its intrinsic anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties have stimulated a growing interest, and suggests new lines of research.

  9. Antithrombin III: biodistribution in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Knot, E A; de Jong, E; ten Cate, J W; Gie, L K; van Royen, E A

    1987-12-18

    Five healthy volunteers were injected intravenously with 73-90 uCi purified human 131I-Antithrombin III (AT III), specific biological activity 5.6 U/mg. The tracer data were analysed using a three compartment model. The plasma radioactivity half life was 66.2 +/- 1.2 (sem) h, the fractional catabolic rate constant of the plasma pool was 0.025 +/- 0.002 (sem) h-1. These data were comparable with those described in the literature. Because of the difficulty in translating the mathematical analysis of various compartments into the biological model, biodistribution was monitored by a gamma camera linked to a DEC PDP 11/34 computer system. Dynamic and static images were obtained at fixed time intervals following the injection of 131I-AT III. Whole body scanning at intervals between the time of injection (t = 0) and t = 24.5 h showed 131I-AT III distribution over the heart, lungs, liver, spleen and great vessels. Dynamic scanning was performed over the heart, spleen and liver. Overlayed frames in the first ten minutes after the 131I-AT III injection showed the following radioactivity expressed as percentage of the injected dose; 5.9% +/- 0.3 (sem) over the heart, 10.6% +/- 0.9 (sem) over the liver and 1.1% +/- 0.1 (sem) over the spleen. A slower decline of the radioactivity between t = 0 and t = 24 h; (19%) was measured over the liver compared with the radioactivity disappearance over the heart region. This shows, in combination with the fact that the radioactivity disappearance over the heart was identical with the radioactivity decline measured in the plasma samples that retention of 131I-AT III occurred in the liver.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... level of antithrombin III (a substance which acts with the anticoagulant heparin to prevent coagulation). This determination is used to monitor the administration of heparin in the treatment of thrombosis. The...

  11. Technology evaluation: transgenic antithrombin III (rhAT-III), Genzyme Transgenics.

    PubMed

    Yeung, P K

    2000-06-01

    AT-III LLC, a joint venture between Genzyme Transgenics (GTC) and Genzyme General, is developing transgenic recombinant human antithrombin III (rhAT-III) as a potential treatment for sepsis and other disorders involving thrombosis. It is in phase III clinical trials in the US and Europe as an anticoagulant in patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery such as cardiopulmonary bypass.

  12. Recombinant human antithrombin III improves survival and attenuates inflammatory responses in baboons lethally challenged with Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Minnema, M C; Chang, A C; Jansen, P M; Lubbers, Y T; Pratt, B M; Whittaker, B G; Taylor, F B; Hack, C E; Friedman, B

    2000-02-15

    Plasma-derived antithrombin III (ATIII) prevents the lethal effects of Escherichia coli infusion in baboons, but the mechanisms behind this effect are not clear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of recombinant human ATIII (rhATIII) on the clinical course and the inflammatory cytokine and coagulation responses in baboons challenged with lethal dose of E coli. Animals in the treatment group (n = 5) received high doses of rhATIII starting 1 hour before an E coli challenge. Those in the control group were administered saline. Survival was significantly improved in the treatment group (P =.002). Both groups had similar hemodynamic responses to E coli challenge but different coagulation and inflammatory responses. The rhATIII group had an accelerated increase of thrombin-ATIII complexes and significantly less fibrinogen consumption compared to controls. In addition, the rhATIII group had much less severe thrombotic pathology on autopsy and virtually no fibrinolytic response to E coli challenge. Furthermore, the rhATIII group had a significantly attenuated inflammatory response as evidenced by marked reduction of the release of various cytokines. We conclude that the early administration of high doses of rhATIII improves the outcome in baboons lethally challenged with E coli, probably due to the combined anticoagulation and anti-inflammatory effects of this therapy. (Blood. 2000;95:1117-1123)

  13. The efficacy of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) vs antithrombin III (at III) vs heparin, in the healing process of partial-thickness burns: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Kritikos, O.; Tsagarakis, M.; Tsoutsos, D.; Kittas, C.; Gorgoulis, V.; Papalois, A.; Giannopoulos, A.; Kakiopoulos, G.; Papadopoulos, O.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This is an experimental study regarding the positive effect of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) in the healing process of partial-thickness burns, in comparison to antithrombin III and heparin. On a porcine model we induced superficial partial-thickness and deep partial-thickness burns and performed intravenous administration of the elements of study during the first 48 h. The progress of the condition of the injured tissues was evaluated by histopathological examination at specific time intervals. The results showed an improved healing response of the specimens treated with rhAPC compared to those treated with antithrombin III, heparin, and placebo. PMID:23233823

  14. [Plasma antithrombin III activity in patients with pulmonary thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Vertun, B; Filipecki, S; Szczepański, M; Wawrzyńska, L; Rózycka, J

    A decreased plasma antithrombin III activity has been noted in 12 out of 20 patients. In 2 patients it was most probably congenital defect, whereas in the remaining 10 patients--acquired. The observed disorders in the activity of antithrombin III with particular reference to anticoagulant therapy have been discussed.

  15. Antithrombin III, but not C1 esterase inhibitor reduces inflammatory response in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocytes in an ex-vivo whole blood setting.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Patrick; Nestler, Frank; Leimert, Anja; Bucher, Michael; Czeslick, Elke; Sablotzki, Armin; Raspè, Christoph

    2014-12-01

    In order to examine the immunomodulatory effects of antithrombin III (AT-III) and C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) in human monocytes, we investigated the intracellular expression of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in an ex-vivo laboratory study in a whole blood setting. Heparinized whole blood samples from 23 healthy male and female volunteers (mean age: 27±7years) were pre-incubated with clinically relevant concentrations of AT-III (n=11) and C1-INH (n=12), then stimulated with 0.2 ng/mL lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 3h. After phenotyping CD14⁺ monocytes, intracellular expression of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α was assessed using flow cytometry. In addition, 12 whole blood samples (AT-III and C1-INH, n=6 each) were examined using hirudin for anticoagulation; all samples were processed in the same way. To exclude cytotoxicity effects, 7-amino-actinomycin D and Nonidet P40 staining were used to investigate probes. This study is the first to demonstrate the influence of C1-INH and AT-III on the monocytic inflammatory response in a whole blood setting, which mimics the optimal physiological setting. Cells treated with AT-III exhibited significant downregulation of the proportion of gated CD14⁺ monocytes for IL-6 and IL-8, in a dose-dependent manner; downregulation for TNF-α did not reach statistical significance. There were no significant effects on mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). In contrast, C1-INH did not significantly reduce the proportion of gated CD14⁺ monocytes or the MFI regarding IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-8. When using hirudin for anticoagulation, no difference in the anti-inflammatory properties of AT-III and C1-INH in monocytes occurs. Taken together, in contrast to TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly downregulated in monocytes in an ex-vivo setting of human whole blood when treated with AT-III. This finding implicates monocytes as an important point of action regarding the anti-inflammatory properties of AT-III in sepsis. C1

  16. Domain structure of antithrombin III. Tentative localization of the heparin binding region using /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gettins, P.; Wooten, E.W.

    1987-07-14

    The denaturation of human and bovine antithrombin III by guanidine hydrochloride has been followed by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. The same unfolding transition seen previously from circular dichroism studies at low denaturant concentration was detected here by discontinuous changes in the chemical shifts of the C(2) protons of two of the five histidines in human antithrombin III and of three of the six histidines in bovine antithrombin III. These two histidines in human antithrombin III are assigned to residue 1 and, more tentatively, to residue 65. Two of the three histidines similarly affected in the bovine protein appear to be homologous to residues in the human protein. This supports the proposal of similar structures for the two proteins. In the presence of heparin, the discontinuous titration behavior of these histidine resonances is shifted to higher denaturant concentration, reflecting the stabilization of the easily unfolded first domain of the protein by bound heparin. From the tentative assignment of one of these resonances to histidine-1, it is proposed that the heparin binding site of antithrombin III is located in the N-terminal region and that this region forms a separate domain from the rest of the protein. The pattern of disulfide linkages is such that this domain may well extend from residue 1 to at least residue 128. Thermal denaturation also leads to major perturbation of these two histidine resonances in human antithrombin III, though stable intermediates in the unfolding were not detected.

  17. Antithrombin III in animal models of sepsis and organ failure.

    PubMed

    Dickneite, G

    1998-01-01

    Antithrombin III (AT III) is the physiological inhibitor of thrombin and other serine proteases of the clotting cascade. In the development of sepsis, septic shock and organ failure, the plasma levels of AT III decrease considerably, suggesting the concept of a substitution therapy with the inhibitor. A decrease of AT III plasma levels might also be associated with other pathological disorders like trauma, burns, pancreatitis or preclampsia. Activation of coagulation and consumption of AT III is the consequence of a generalized inflammation called SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome). The clotting cascade is also frequently activated after organ transplantation, especially if organs are grafted between different species (xenotransplantation). During the past years AT III has been investigated in numerous corresponding disease models in different animal species which will be reviewed here. The bulk of evidence suggests, that AT III substitution reduces morbidity and mortality in the diseased animals. While gaining more experience with AT III, the concept of substitution therapy to maximal baseline plasma levels (100%) appears to become insufficient. Evidence from clinical and preclinical studies now suggests to adjust the AT III plasma levels to about 200%, i.e., doubling the normal value. During the last few years several authors proposed that AT III might not only be an anti-thrombotic agent, but to have in addition an anti-inflammatory effect.

  18. Anti-HSV activity of serpin antithrombin III

    PubMed Central

    Quenelle, Debra C.; Hartman, Tracy L.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Prichard, Mark N.; Lynn, Ralf Geiben

    2014-01-01

    Natural serine protease inhibitors (serpins) elicit sensing of a microbial cell intruder and activate an intrinsic cellular immune response in HIV and HCV infected cells. Here, we demonstrate in vitro inhibition of HSV with serpin antithrombin III (ATIII) early during infection pointing towards inhibition of an entry event. We also found reduction of mortality from 90% to 40% in an abrasion mice model demonstrating a strong reduction of infection in vivo. Our data also indicated that this treatment might be suitable for drug-resistant viruses since high inhibition of an acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 strain was found. Thus, an ATIII tropical treatment might be used for immunocompromised patients where prolonged treatment leads to drug resistant HSV-1 strains. Understanding how ATIII regulates HSV-1 infections may reveal new avenues for therapeutic interventions. PMID:25215309

  19. Anti-HSV activity of serpin antithrombin III.

    PubMed

    Quenelle, Debra C; Hartman, Tracy L; Buckheit, Robert W; Prichard, Mark N; Lynn, Ralf Geiben

    2014-04-01

    Natural serine protease inhibitors (serpins) elicit sensing of a microbial cell intruder and activate an intrinsic cellular immune response in HIV and HCV infected cells. Here, we demonstrate in vitro inhibition of HSV with serpin antithrombin III (ATIII) early during infection pointing towards inhibition of an entry event. We also found reduction of mortality from 90% to 40% in an abrasion mice model demonstrating a strong reduction of infection in vivo. Our data also indicated that this treatment might be suitable for drug-resistant viruses since high inhibition of an acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 strain was found. Thus, an ATIII tropical treatment might be used for immunocompromised patients where prolonged treatment leads to drug resistant HSV-1 strains. Understanding how ATIII regulates HSV-1 infections may reveal new avenues for therapeutic interventions.

  20. Oral contraceptives, antithrombin- III activity, and postoperative deep-vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Sagar, S; Stamatakis, J D; Thomas, D P; Kakkar, V V

    1976-03-06

    Deep-vein thrombosis (D.V.T.) was detected by the fibrinogen-uptake test in six out of a total of thirty-one young women undergoing emergency abdominal surgery who gave a history of recent oral contraceptive intake. In contrast, no D.V.T. developed in nineteen similar patients who were not on oral contraceptives (P less than 0-01). Plasma-antithrombin-III activity was significantly lower preoperatively in patients taking oral contraceptives; postoperative D.V.T. subsequently developed in three out of five patients with preoperative antithrombin-III activity below 50%. In seventy-eight dental patients undergoing molar extraction, antithrombin-III activity was measured before, during, and after operation. Activity fell in all patients during operation, but the fall was significantly greater in women taking oral contraceptives (P less than 0-01). The intra-operative fall in antithrombin-III activity was prevented by a small preoperative dose of subcutaneous heparin.

  1. [Changes in antithrombin III, prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 and thrombin-antithrombin III complex following implantation of a coronary Palmaz-Schatz stent].

    PubMed

    Dittel, M; Haushofer, A; Spiel, R; Halbmayer, W M; Prachar, H; Fischer, M; Mlczoch, J

    1995-01-01

    To detect changes in the clotting parameters antithrombin III (AT III), prothrombin-fragment 1 + 2 (F 1 + 2) and thrombin-antithrombin-III-complex (TAT) after implantation of Palmaz Schatz stents, coagulation was monitored at standardized time points in 35 patients for 10 days. All patients were anticoagulated using a combination of heparin, phenprocoumon, and acetyl salicylic acid. Heparin therapy was guided by APTT levels (normal range 25-35 s), which were still within the therapeutic range (median 49.6 s (25%/75% percentiles 41.6/54.4) on day 10. Simultaneous oral anticoagulation was found to be effective on day 8 on average (INR median 2.24 (1.93/2.50)). The AT III activity dropped significantly (p < 0.0001) after a heparin loading dose of 15,000 IU during stenting. As the heparin dose was reduced on the following days, AT III levels increased significantly (p < 0.0001) during the observation time. There was a highly significant (p < 0.001) negative correlation between AT III and heparin levels. On days 4 and 5 F 1 + 2 values were significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05) higher than on the day of stenting (median 1.07 (0.90/1.31) 1.13 nmol/l and 1.06 (0.85/1.23) nmol/l vs. 0.97 (0.69/1.15) nmol/l) and dropped during anticoagulation. F 1 + 2 levels showed a significant negative correlation (p < 0.0005) with APTT values. TAT values showed no significant changes during the observation period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Purified radiolabeled antithrombin III metabolism in three families with hereditary AT III deficiency: application of a three-compartment model

    SciTech Connect

    Knot, E.A.; de Jong, E.; ten Cate, J.W.; Iburg, A.H.; Henny, C.P.; Bruin, T.; Stibbe, J.

    1986-01-01

    Purified human radioiodinated antithrombin III (125I-AT III) was used to study its metabolism in six members from three different families with a known hereditary AT III deficiency. Six healthy volunteers served as a control group. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) showed the purified AT III to be homogeneous. Amino acid analysis of the protein revealed a composition identical to a highly purified internal standard. The specific activity was 5.6 U/mg. Analysis of plasma radioactivity data was performed, using a three-compartment model. Neither plasma disappearance half-times nor fractional catabolic rate constants differed significantly between patients and control subjects. The mean absolute catabolic rate in the patient group was significantly lower than that of the control group at 2.57 +/- 0.44 and 4.46 +/- 0.80 mg/kg/day, respectively. In addition, the mean patient alpha 1-phase, flux ratio (k1,2 and k2,1) of the second compartment alpha 2-phase and influx (k3,1) of the third compartment were significantly reduced as compared with control values. It has been tentatively concluded that the observed reduction in the second compartment may be caused by a decrease in endothelial cell surface binding.

  3. [Comparative measurement of antithrombin III by latex agglutination and radial immunodiffusion in patients with peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Miagkova, M A; Aleshkin, A V; Abramenko, T V; Savitskaia, Iu A; Aleshkin, V A

    1997-01-01

    A highly sensitive and rapid method, based on latex agglutination, has been developed for measuring antithrombin III (AT III) in the blood serum of patients and donors. The sensitivity of analysis is 0.6 microgram/ml, time 2 to 3 min. The method is simple, requires no sophisticated equipment, and may be used under field conditions. The results are assessed visually. Immunochemical reagents have been synthesized for the method: latex conjugates and specific antibodies to AT III. The method was tried in patients with peritonitis. An additional criterion for diagnosing the respiratory distress syndrome of adults in this patient population has been developed.

  4. Targeted mutagenesis of zebrafish antithrombin III triggers disseminated intravascular coagulation and thrombosis, revealing insight into function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Kretz, Colin A.; Maeder, Morgan L.; Richter, Catherine E.; Tsao, Philip; Vo, Andy H.; Huarng, Michael C.; Rode, Thomas; Hu, Zhilian; Mehra, Rohit; Olson, Steven T.; Joung, J. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Pathologic blood clotting is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, underlying deep vein thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Genetic predisposition to thrombosis is still poorly understood, and we hypothesize that there are many additional risk alleles and modifying factors remaining to be discovered. Mammalian models have contributed to our understanding of thrombosis, but are low throughput and costly. We have turned to the zebrafish, a tool for high-throughput genetic analysis. Using zinc finger nucleases, we show that disruption of the zebrafish antithrombin III (at3) locus results in spontaneous venous thrombosis in larvae. Although homozygous mutants survive into early adulthood, they eventually succumb to massive intracardiac thrombosis. Characterization of null fish revealed disseminated intravascular coagulation in larvae secondary to unopposed thrombin activity and fibrinogen consumption, which could be rescued by both human and zebrafish at3 complementary DNAs. Mutation of the human AT3-reactive center loop abolished the ability to rescue, but the heparin-binding site was dispensable. These results demonstrate overall conservation of AT3 function in zebrafish, but reveal developmental variances in the ability to tolerate excessive clot formation. The accessibility of early zebrafish development will provide unique methods for dissection of the underlying mechanisms of thrombosis. PMID:24782510

  5. Heparin binding domain of antithrombin III: Characterization using a synthetic peptide directed polyclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.W.; Dey, B.; Knauer, D.J. )

    1990-09-25

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is a plasma-borne serine protease inhibitor that apparently forms covalent complexes with thrombin. The interaction between ATIII and thrombin is enhanced several thousandfold by the glycosaminoglycan, heparin. The authors have previously proposed that the heparin binding site of ATIII residues within a region extending from amino acid residues 114-156. Computer-assisted analysis of this region revealed the presence of a 22 amino acid domain (residues 124-145), part of which shows a strong potential for the formation of an amphipathic helix: hydrophobic on one face and highly positively charged on the other. In the presence studies, polyclonal antisera were generated against a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 124-145 in native human ATIII. Affinity-purified IgG from these antisera, as well as monovalent Fab's derived from them, specifically blocked the binding of heparin to ATIII. Additionally, occupancy of the heparin binding site by these same monovalent and bivalent IgG's at least partially substituted for heparin, accelerating linkage formation between ATIII and thrombin. These results provide the first immunological evidence that region 124-145 is directly involved in the binding of heparin to ATIII and that an antibody-induced conformational change within this region can mediate ATIII activation.

  6. Familial antithrombin III deficiency in a Malay patient with massive thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wan Ab Rahman, W S; Abdullah, W Z; Hassan, M N; Hussin, A; Zulkafli, Z; Haron, J

    2017-08-01

    Patients with low antithrombin III (AT III) has increased risk for arteriovenous thromboembolic (TE) disease. We report a 28-year-old Malay lady who presented with spontaneous right calf pain and swelling of one week duration. She was on oral contraceptive pills and had a history of travelling for a long distance prior to the presentation. Her brother who was diagnosed with AT III deficiency had arterial thrombosis at a young age. She was diagnosed as having right popliteal vein thrombosis by ultrasound and treated with subcutaneous fondaparinux. While on treatment, she developed massive bilateral pulmonary embolism (PE). Thrombophilia study showed reduced AT III activity (38μl/dl) and normal results for protein C, protein S, activated protein C resistance and lupus anticoagulant assays. This patient has heterozygous AT III deficiency added with significant acquired factors responsible for the TE events. Those with AT III deficiency may have resistance to heparin therapy and require higher doses of heparin.

  7. Antithrombin III/SerpinC1 insufficiency exacerbates renal ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Zhang, Guangyuan; Lu, Zeyuan; Geurts, Aron M; Usa, Kristie; Jacob, Howard J; Cowley, Allen W; Wang, Niansong; Liang, Mingyu

    2015-01-01

    Antithrombin III, encoded by SerpinC1, is a major anti-coagulation molecule in vivo and has anti-inflammatory effects. We found that patients with low antithrombin III activities presented a higher risk of developing acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery. To study this further, we generated SerpinC1 heterozygous knockout rats and followed the development of acute kidney injury in a model of modest renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Renal injury, assessed by serum creatinine and renal tubular injury scores after 24 h of reperfusion, was significantly exacerbated in SerpinC1+/− rats compared to wild-type littermates. Concomitantly, renal oxidative stress, tubular apoptosis, and macrophage infiltration following this injury were significantly aggravated in SerpinC1+/− rats. However, significant thrombosis was not found in the kidneys of any group of rats. Antithrombin III is reported to stimulate the production of prostaglandin I2, a known regulator of renal cortical blood flow, in addition to having anti-inflammatory effects and to protect against renal failure. Prostaglandin F1α, an assayable metabolite of prostaglandin I2, was increased in the kidneys of the wild-type rats at 3 h after reperfusion. The increase of prostaglandin F1α was significantly blunted in SerpinC1+/− rats, which preceded increased tubular injury and oxidative stress. Thus, our study found a novel role of SerpinC1 insufficiency in increasing the severity of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:26108065

  8. Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III: effect of single amino acid substitutions and relationship with functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, V; Leone, G; Mastrangelo, S; Lane, D A; Girolami, A; de Moerloose, P; Sas, G; Abildgaard, U; Blajchman, M; Rodeghiero, F

    1994-02-01

    Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III (AT-III) was investigated by crossed immunoelectrofocusing (CIEF) on eleven molecular variants. A normal pattern was found in five variants while two different abnormal CIEF patterns were found in the other four and two variants, respectively. Point mutations causing a major pI change (exceeding 4.0) of the amino acid substituted lead to alterations in the overall microheterogeneity. The variants thus substituted share a first type of abnormal CIEF pattern with alterations throughout the pH range, regardless of the location of the mutation (reactive site and adjacent regions or heparin binding region). Minor amino acid pI changes in these regions do not alter the AT-III overall microheterogeneity, whatever the resulting functional defect. However, if the mutation is placed in the region around positions 404 or 429, then even minor changes of the amino acid pI seem able to alter the overall charge, leading to a second type of abnormal CIEF pattern with the main alteration at pH 4.8-4.6. Neuraminidase treatment leads to disappearance of microheterogeneity except for the variants with the Arg393 to Cys substitution. Addition of thrombin induces CIEF modifications specifically related to the functional defect. A normal formation of thrombin-antithrombin complexes induces a shift towards the more acid pH range, whereas in the variants substituted at the reactive site the CIEF pattern is substantially unaffected by thrombin; variants substituted at positions 382-384 show a maximal thrombin-induced increase of the isoforms at pI 4.8-4.6. Therefore mutant antithrombins with different functional abnormalities but sharing a common CIEF pattern were well distinguished.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Production of recombinant human antithrombin by Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Kuwae, Shinobu; Ohyama, Masao; Ohya, Tomoshi; Ohi, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Kaoru

    2005-03-01

    This paper deals with the production of recombinant human antithrombin (rAT) by the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. In preliminary methanol-limited fed-batch fermentation, the rAT concentration reached 324 mg/l at 192 h of cultivation, but the specific heparin cofactor (HC) activity of rAT in the culture supernatant was 10% of that of plasma-derived antithrombin (pAT). To improve the specific HC activity of rAT, effort was first focused on the optimization of culture pH and media composition, resulting in protection of rAT against pH-dependent instability and proteolytic degradation. However, even in the optimized methanol-limited fed-batch fermentation, the specific HC activity of rAT in the culture supernatant was still 20% that of pAT. To investigate the unknown mechanisms involved in the decreased specific HC activity of rAT, the culture supernatant of mock-transfected cells was prepared by methanol-limited fed-batch fermentation. When pAT was added to this supernatant, a rapid decrease in HC activity was observed; the residual HC activity was 26% after 24 h of incubation at 25 degrees C. The loss of pAT activity was prevented by addition of a formaldehyde scavenger, amino urea, to the supernatant. In addition, alcohol oxidase activity was observed in the supernatant, resulting in the accumulation of formaldehyde in the culture broth. These results suggest that the formaldehyde produced by methanol oxidation in the culture broth of P. pastoris might decrease the HC activity of rAT during fermentation. Replacing the methanol with glycerol as the carbon source improved the specific HC activity of rAT from 20% to above 40% of that of pAT. In the glycerol-limited fed-batch fermentation, rAT is expressed at 100 mg/l under the control of the truncated mutated AOX2 promoter.

  10. [Prophylaxis of consumption coagulopathy in shock. Dependence of the effect of heparin on the activity of antithrombin III (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, H; Blauhut, B; Necek, S; Kramar, H; Vinazzer, H

    1980-11-01

    In 16 patients admitted in shock, heparin prophylaxis for DIC was carried out. The effect of heparin was monitored by a series of coagulation tests. A distinct relation was found between the effect of heparin on the aPTT and on the thrombin clotting time and the activity of antithrombin III. Even a comparatively slight diminution of this activity resulted in a considerable decrease of the heparin effect on coagulation. Since this effect is of primary importance for the efficacy of prophylaxis of DIC, regular assays of antithrombin III are proposed in shock patients receiving heparin.

  11. Antithrombin III Doses Rounded to Available Vial Sizes in Critically Ill Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stockton, Winifred M.; Padilla-Tolentino, Eimeira

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Children have decreased levels of antithrombin III (AT III) compared to adults. These levels may be further decreased during acute illness. Administration of exogenous AT III can increase anticoagulant efficacy. The objective of this study was to evaluate AT III doses rounded to available vial sizes compared to partial vial doses in critically ill pediatric patients, including patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). METHOD This retrospective review evaluated pediatric patients 0–18 years of age admitted to a 24-bed medical/surgical pediatric intensive care unit between June 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014, who received plasma-derived AT III. Patients received unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, or no anticoagulation. This review included patients who received ECMO and CRRT. RESULTS Eighty doses of AT III were administered to 24 patients (38 full vial size doses and 42 partial vial size doses). The AT III level following dose administration was ≥80% for 26 full vial doses (70%) and 16 partial vial doses (41%; p = 0.010). For patients who received multiple doses of AT III, the median time between doses was 45 hours following full vial doses, and 23 hours following partial vial doses (p = 0.011). Seven patients (29%) had documentation of new or increased bleeding. The median waste prevented from rounding doses to full vial sizes was 363 units. CONCLUSIONS After receiving AT III doses rounded to full vial sizes, patients were more likely to have a therapeutic AT III level and a longer interval between administrations. Rounding AT III doses to full vial sizes reduces waste and can result in cost savings.

  12. Acquired deficiency and urinary excretion of antithrombin III in nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, N D; Paule, P; Toohey, J; Hung, E; Alikhani, S; Darwish, R; Pahl, M V

    1984-09-01

    The published data concerning changes of antithrombin III (ATIII) in nephrotic syndrome (NS) are contradictory. While increased ATIII activity has been reported by some investigators, decreased concentration has been shown by others and normal values by yet another group of authors. We determined plasma and urine concentrations of ATIII in a group of 20 patients with NS using an immunologic assay. In addition, plasma ATIII activity was determined. The results were compared with those obtained in a group of normal volunteers. Plasma concentration and activity of ATIII were both greatly reduced in the patients with NS. In addition, substantial quantities of ATIII were recovered in the urine of all tested patients. The present study, therefore, substantiates the low plasma concentrations of ATIII and its urinary losses in NS. In addition, a parallel reduction in plasma ATIII activity is demonstrated providing functional evidence of acquired ATIII deficiency in this condition.

  13. Interaction of a trypsin-like enzyme of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 with antithrombin III.

    PubMed

    Curtis, M A; Slaney, J M; Carman, R J; Pemberton, P A

    1993-04-01

    We have previously observed that trypsin-like activity in Porphyromonas gingivalis culture supernatants is inhibitable by the plasma arg-serpin antithrombin III (ATIII). This report demonstrates that a partially purified P. gingivalis trypsin-like enzyme (M(r) 47,000) is inhibited by ATIII with an association rate constant (k(ass)) of 5.65 x 10(4) M-1 s-1 but does not form SDS-stable complexes. Heparin enhances the k(ass) and stabilizes the complexes but in either case such inhibition is temporary and results in ATIII inactivation by reactive centre proteolysis between R393-S394. In the absence of heparin this is accompanied by N-terminal cleavage between K39-I40.

  14. Low molecular weight heparin restores antithrombin III activity from hyperglycemia induced alterations.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Marchi, E; Palazzni, E; Quatraro, A; Giugliano, D

    1990-01-01

    Alteration of antithrombin III (ATIII) activity, glycemia level dependent, exists in diabetes mellitus. In this study the ability of a low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) (Fluxum, Alfa-Wassermann S.p.A., Bologna, Italy), as well as unfractioned héparin, to preserve ATIII activity from glucose-induced alterations, both in vitro and in vivo, is reported. The subcutaneous and intravenous LMWH and heparin administration increases basal depressed ATIII activity in diabetic patients. Heparin shows an equivalent effect on both anti-IIa and anti-Xa activity of ATIII, while LMWH is more effective in preserving the anti-Xa activity. Similarity, heparin preserves ATIII activity from hyperglycemia-induced alterations, during hyperglycemic clamp, and LMWH infusion is able to preserve a significant amount of anti-Xa activity from glucose-induced alterations. Since diabetic patients show a high incidence of thrombotic accidents, LMWH appears to be a promising innovation for the prevention of diabetic thrombophylia.

  15. Intravenous nitroglycerin-induced heparin resistance: a qualitative antithrombin III abnormality.

    PubMed

    Becker, R C; Corrao, J M; Bovill, E G; Gore, J M; Baker, S P; Miller, M L; Lucas, F V; Alpert, J A

    1990-06-01

    An ability of intravenous nitroglycerin to interfere with the anticoagulant properties of intravenous heparin would have profound clinical implications. To investigation nitroglycerin-heparin interactions, the following pilot study was performed. Patients (N = 18) admitted to the coronary care unit with a diagnosis of either acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina were divided into four treatment groups: (1) intravenous nitroglycerin and intravenous heparin; (2) intravenous nitroglycerin alone; (3) intravenous heparin alone; or (4) neither intravenous nitroglycerin nor intravenous heparin. Serial determinations of activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), serum heparin concentration, antithrombin III (ATIII) antigen (ATA), and ATIII activity (ATC) were obtained over a 72-hour period. Overall, patients receiving intravenous nitroglycerin did not differ significantly from other patients in APTT, heparin dose, heparin concentration, ATA, ATC, or ATA/ATC ratio (ATR). However, patients receiving intravenous nitroglycerin at a rate exceeding 350 micrograms per minute had a lower APTT (p less than 0.05), lower ATC (p = 0.02), higher ATR (p = 0.004), and a larger heparin dose requirement than patients receiving lower infusion rates. ATR correlated directly (r = 0.91; p less than 0.05) and ATC inversely (r = -0.78; p less than 0.05) with the intravenous nitroglycerin dose. Serum heparin concentration did not correlate with the intravenous nitroglycerin dose. Intravenous nitroglycerin-induced heparin resistance occurs at a critical nitroglycerin dose. A nitroglycerin-induced qualitative ATIII abnormality may be the underlying mechanism.

  16. Amide-HILIC LC/MS for the characterization of Antithrombin III heparin binders

    PubMed Central

    Naimy, Hicham; Leymarie, Nancy; Bowman, Michael J.; Costello, Catherine E.; Zaia, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a sulfated glycosaminoglycan attached to a core protein on the cell surface. Protein binding to cell surface Heparan sulfate (HS) is a key regulatory event for many cellular processes. The concept whereby protein binding to HS is not random but requires a limited number of sulfation patterns is becoming clear. Here we describe a hydrophobic trapping assay to screen a library of heparin hexasaccharides for binders to Antithrombin III (ATIII). Out of five initial hexasaccharide compositions present in the library (1:2:3:6:1), (1:2:3:7:1), (1:2:3:7:0), (1:2:3:8:0), (1:2:3:9:0) only two are shown to be able to bind ATIII, namely (1:2:3:8:0) and (1:2:3:9:0). The use of an amide hydrophilic interaction (HILIC) LC/MS permitted reproducible quantitative analysis of the composition of the initial library as well as that of the binding fraction. This type of LC/MS has never been applied to heparinoids. The specificity of the hexasaccharides binding ATIII was confirmed by assaying their ability to enhance ATIII mediated inhibition of Factor Xa in vitro. PMID:18260648

  17. Increased alpha 2-macroglobulin in diabetes: a hyperglycemia related phenomenon associated with reduced antithrombin III activity.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Stante, A; Dello Russo, P; Torella, R

    1989-01-01

    Increased alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) activity and concentration, and decreased antithrombin III (ATIII) plasma concentration are reported in diabetic subjects. In diabetes an inverse correlation between ATIII activity and blood glucose, HbA1, alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration, and a direct correlation between both alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration with blood glucose and HbA1 are found. Moreover, a direct correlation between alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration fails. In both diabetic and normal subjects induced hyperglycemia increases alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration reduces ATIII activity, while ATIII concentration is not affected. These data which show that hyperglycemia may increase alpha 2M molecule levels while altering only the biological function of ATIII, provide evidence that hyperglycemia may decrease, directly, the biological function of some proteins and may condition the levels of some risk factors for the development of diabetic complications such as alpha 2M.

  18. Early prediction of postoperative liver dysfunction and clinical outcome using antithrombin III-activity

    PubMed Central

    Pereyra, David; Offensperger, Florian; Klinglmueller, Florian; Haegele, Stefanie; Oehlberger, Lukas; Gruenberger, Thomas; Brostjan, Christine; Starlinger, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Antithrombin III (ATIII) has been reported to be associated with liver pathologies and was shown to predict outcome in patients undergoing liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma. We now aimed to assess whether perioperative ATIII-activity could predict postoperative outcome in patients without underlying liver disease, as well as in a routine clinical setting of patients undergoing hepatic resection. Methods ATIII-activity was evaluated preoperatively and on the first (POD1) and fifth day after liver resection in a retrospective evaluation cohort of 228 colorectal cancer patients with liver metastasis (mCRC). We further aimed to prospectively validate our results in a set of 177 consecutive patients undergoing hepatic resection. Results Patients developing postoperative liver dysfunction (LD) had a more pronounced postoperative decrease in ATIII-activity (P<0.001). ATIII-activity on POD1 significantly predicted postoperative LD (P<0.001, AUC = 84.4%) and remained independent upon multivariable analysis. A cut-off value of 61.5% ATIII-activity was determined using ROC analysis. This cut-off was vital to identify high-risk patients for postoperative LD, morbidity, severe morbidity and mortality (P<0.001, respectively) with a highly accurate negative predictive value of 97%, which could be confirmed for LD (P<0.001) and mortality (P = 0.014) in our independent validation cohort. Further, mCRC patients below our cut-off suffered from a significantly decreased overall survival (OS) at 1 and 3 years after surgery (P = 0.011, P = 0.025). Conclusions The routine laboratory parameter ATIII-activity on POD1 independently predicted postoperative LD and was associated with clinical outcome. Patients with a postoperative ATIII-activity <61.5% might benefit from close monitoring and timely initiation of supportive therapy. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01700231 PMID:28406940

  19. Polyguluronate sulfate, polymannuronate sulfate, and their oligosaccharides have antithrombin III- and heparin cofactor II-independent anticoagulant activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xuan; Lan, Ying; Zeng, Pengjiao; Guo, Zhihua; Hao, Cui; Zhang, Lijuan

    2017-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading causes of death. However, the complications can be treated with heparin and heparinoids, such as heparin pentasaccharide Fondaparinux, dermatan sulfate, and PSS made from alginate extracted from brown seaweeds by chemical sulfation. Alginate is composed of a linear backbone of polymannuronate (PM), polyguluronate (PG), and alternate residues of mannuronic acid and guluronic acid. It is unknown if heparin and sulfated PG (PGS)/PM (PMS) have the same or different anticoagulant molecular targets. In the current study, the anticoagulant activities of PGS, PMS, and their oligosaccharides were directly compared to that of heparin, Fondaparinux, and dermatan sulfate by the activated partial thrombinplastin time (aPTT) assay using normal, antithrombin III (ATIII)-deficient, heparin co-factor II (HCII)-deficient, and ATIII- and HCII-double deficient human plasmas. Our results showed that PGS, PMS, and their oligosaccharides had better anticoagulant activity than that of Fondaparinux in all four human plasmas tested. As expected, heparin was the best anticoagulant in normal plasma. Moreover, PGS, PGS6, PGS12, PGS25, PMS6, PMS12, and PMS25 were better anticoagulants than dermatan sulfate in HCII-deficient plasma. Most strikingly, PGS, PGS12, PGS25, PMS6, PMS12, and PMS25 were better anticoagulants than that of heparin in ATIII- and HCII-double deficient human plasma. The results revealed for the first time that sulfated alginate had ATIII- and HCII-independent anticoagulant activities. Therefore, developing PGS and PMS-based anticoagulants might require to discover their major molecular targets and to develop target-specific anticoagulant assays.

  20. Hyperglycemia-conditioned increase in alpha-2-macroglobulin in healthy normal subjects: a phenomenon correlated with deficient antithrombin III activity.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Quatraro, A; Dello Russo, P; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Giugliano, D

    1989-01-01

    Induced hyperglycemia in normal subjects increases alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) activity and alpha 2M concentration and reduces antithrombin III (ATIII) activity, while it does not affect ATIII plasma concentration. Hyperglycemia-determined variations in ATIII activity and alpha 2M molecules are correlated in an inverse and parallel fashion. A compensatory role for the increase in alpha 2M in the regulation of the coagulation system may be hypothesized. Moreover, these data provide evidence that hyperglycemia may decrease, directly, the biological function of some proteins and may influence the levels of some risk factors for the development of complications in diabetes.

  1. The role of hyperglycaemia-induced alterations of antithrombin III and factor X activation in the thrombin hyperactivity of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Quatraro, A; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Dello Russo, P; Lefebvre, P; Giugliano, D

    1990-05-01

    Factor X concentration and factor X activation, antithrombin III anti-Xa activity and plasma concentration, and fibrinopeptide A were measured in 20 diabetic patients and 20 normal subjects. Although factor X activation (81.3 +/- 2.2 vs 97.3 +/- 2.1%, p less than 0.01; mean +/- SE) and antithrombin III activity (76.5 +/- 2.2 vs 96.3 +/- 1.8%, p less than 0.01) were reduced in the diabetic patients, fibrinopeptide A concentration was increased (3.7 +/- 0.4 vs 1.7 +/- 0.2 ng ml-1, p less than 0.01). The ratio of factor X activation to antithrombin III anti-factor Xa activity was increased in the diabetic patients (1.10 +/- 0.01 vs 1.01 +/- 0.02, p less than 0.01). Induced hyperglycaemia was able to mimic all these abnormalities, without changing factor X or antithrombin III concentration. The results suggest that in vivo hyperglycaemia produces a decrease of factor X activation, but at the same time increases fibrinopeptide A formation due to a greater decrease of antithrombin III anti-Xa activity.

  2. Interaction of antithrombin III with bovine aortic segments. Role of heparin in binding and enhanced anticoagulant activity

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, D.; Nawroth, P.; Marcum, J.; Handley, D.; Kisiel, W.; Rosenberg, R.; Stern, K.

    1985-01-01

    Bovine antithrombin III (AT III) interaction with the luminal surface of bovine aortic segments with a continuous layer of endothelium was examined. Incubation of /sup 125/I-AT III with vessel segments, previously washed free of endogenous AT III, demonstrated specific, time-dependent binding to the protease inhibitor to the endothelium. Half-maximal binding was observed at an added AT III concentration of 14 nM. Binding of /sup 125/I-AT III to the vessel wall was reversible (50% dissociated in 4 min), and addition of either heparin or Factor Xa accelerated displacement of /sup 125/I-AT III from the vessel segment. Dissociation of /sup 125/I-AT III from the vessel segment in the presence of factor Xa coincided with the formation of a Factor Xa-/sup 125/I-AT III complex. Inactivation of Factor IXa and Factor Xa by AT III was facilitated in the presence of vessel segments. Pretreatment of vessel segments with highly purified Flavobacterium heparinase precluded the vessel-dependent augmentation of AT III anticoagulant activity as well as specific binding of /sup 125/I-AT III to the vessel endothelium. In contrast, pretreatment of the vessel segments with chrondroitinases (ABC or AC) had no detectable effect on /sup 125/I-AT III binding or on AT III anticoagulant activity. AT III binding to vessel segments was competitively inhibited by increasing concentration of platelet factor 4. Binding of the protease inhibitor to vessel segments was inhibited by chemical modification of AT III lysyl or tryptophan residues. These AT III derivatives retained progressive inhibitory activity. These data suggest that heparin-like molecules are present on the aortic vessel wall and mediate binding of AT III to the vessel surface, as well as enhancing the anticoagulant activity of AT III at these sites.

  3. Antithrombin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency. (For more about excessive clotting (such as deep vein thrombosis, DVT) and antithrombin deficiency, see the " ... affected person may bleed and/or clot. DVT (deep vein thrombosis – a blood clot usually in a ...

  4. Relationship between angiotensinogen, alpha 1-protease inhibitor elastase complex, antithrombin III and C-reactive protein in septic ARDS.

    PubMed

    Hilgenfeldt, U; Kellermann, W; Kienapfel, G; Jochum, M

    1990-01-01

    The time-course of plasma angiotensinogen (Ao), elastase-alpha 1-protease inhibitor complex (EL alpha 1PI), antithrombin III (AT III) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been investigated of six patients suffering from adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The total plasma Ao level (active and inactive Ao) varied in individuals but was increased up to five-fold. An increasing amount of inactive Ao is found. From the beginning of their stay in the intensive care unit up to five days half of the patients displayed a positive correlation between the plasma CRP and Ao level. The CRP and Ao values were either not or were negatively correlated with the AT III values. In contrast plasma Ao and AT III levels in all patients were positively correlated during a particular period in the subsequent phase of the disease, where there was no or a negative correlation with CRP. The two acute phase reactants CRP and EL alpha 1PI were only correlated in two patients at the beginning of the disease. The markedly increased plasma level at the beginning of the inflammatory disease indicates that Ao is an acute phase reactant, and this is supported by the parallel changes in plasma CRP and Ao levels during the early days of ARDS. The relationship between the plasma levels of Ao and AT III for more than fourteen days suggests similar regulation of these members of the serpin family after termination of the acute-phase.

  5. Sex hormone-binding globulin and antithrombin III activity in women with oral ultra-low-dose estradiol.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Sumika; Yasui, Toshiyuki; Kasai, Kana; Keyama, Kaoru; Yoshida, Kanako; Kato, Takeshi; Uemura, Hirokazu; Kuwahara, Akira; Matsuzaki, Toshiya; Irahara, Minoru

    2017-03-20

    Oral oestrogen increases the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and increases production of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in a dose-dependent manner. SHBG has been suggested to be involved in venous thromboembolism. We examined the effects of oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol on circulating levels of SHBG and coagulation parameters, and we compared the effects to those of transdermal oestradiol. Twenty women received oral oestradiol (500 μg) every day (oral ultra-low-dose group) and 20 women received a transdermal patch (50 μg) as a transdermal group. In addition, the women received dydrogesterone continuously (5 mg) except for women who underwent hysterectomy. Circulating SHBG, antithrombin III (ATIII) activity, d-dimer, thrombin-antithrombin complex and plasmin-α2 plasmin inhibitor complex were measured before and 3 months after the start of treatment. SHBG was significantly increased at 3 months in the oral ultra-low-dose group, but not in the transdermal group. However, percent changes in SHBG were not significantly different between the two groups. In both groups, ATIII was significantly decreased at 3 months. In conclusion, even ultra-low-dose oestradiol orally increases circulating SHBG level. However, the magnitude of change in SHBG caused by oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol is small and is comparable to that caused by transdermal oestradiol. Impact statement Oral oestrogen replacement therapy increases production of SHBG which may be related to increase in VTE risk. However, the effect of oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol on SHBG has not been clarified. Even ultra-low-dose oestradiol orally increases circulating SHBG levels, but the magnitude of change in SHBG caused by oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol is small and is comparable to that caused by transdermal oestradiol. VTE risk in women receiving oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol may be comparable to that in women receiving transdermal oestradiol.

  6. Novel mutation (E113X) of antithrombin III gene (AT3) in a woman with gestational recurrent thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Hoshi, N; Kato, E H; Ebina, Y; Kishida, T; Sagawa, T; Matsuno, K; Fujimoto, S

    2000-04-24

    A 35-year-old Japanese woman with a low level (42-54%) of blood antithrombin (AT) III, experienced two induced abortions due to deep venous thrombosis at 8 weeks of gestation (GW) and cerebral thrombosis at 10 GW. The present pregnancy was successfully managed with intravenous administration of AT III (6,000-8,000 U/wk). Analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) for exons 3A and 4 of the AT III gene (AT3) using her DNA revealed extra expansion bands with altered migration. The DNA sequencing demonstrated novel mutations in exon 3A of AT3: a G to T substitution at nucleotide position 5333 in codon GAG for Glu 113, causing a stop codon (E113X), and an A to T substitution at position 5338 in codon AAA for Lys 114, forming Asn (K114N). These novel mutations, especially E113X, in AT3 may be related to recurrent thrombosis in the pregnancy. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Blood macrophage colony-stimulating factor and thrombin-antithrombin III complex concentrations in pregnancy and preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M; Numaguchi, M; Ohkubo, N; Yaoi, Y

    1998-04-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is a characteristic cytokine that plays an essential role in placenta maintenance, and thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT) is a hemostatic marker that is remarkably altered both in normal pregnancy and in preeclampsia. The present study was designed in order to show various levels of M-CSF and TAT in pregnancies. Peripheral blood was collected from 49 subjects, of whom 31 were normal pregnant women consisting of the four groups (namely 10th, 20th, 30th, and 38th weeks of gestation), 13 were preeclamptic pregnant women (37th week of gestation; mean blood pressure, 158/99 mm Hg), and 5 were nonpregnant controls. We compared blood M-CSF and TAT levels among them. Results showed that blood M-CSF and TAT levels increased significantly with gestational age. Furthermore, the ratio of increase in M-CSF was significantly lower than that in TAT in normal pregnant women compared with controls. In contrast, the ratio of increase in M-CSF was significantly higher than that in TAT in preeclamptic women compared with normal pregnant women. These results concerning the ratio of increase in M-CSF and TAT have not been reported. These findings show that M-CSF level increases significantly in preeclampsia even in its earlier stage, exhibiting a systolic blood pressure of less than 160 mm Hg.

  8. In Vivo Anti-HIV Activity of the Heparin-Activated Serine Protease Inhibitor Antithrombin III Encapsulated in Lymph-Targeting Immunoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Asmal, Mohammed; Whitney, James B.; Luedemann, Corinne; Carville, Angela; Steen, Robert; Letvin, Norman L.; Geiben-Lynn, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are anti-inflammatory mediators with multiple biologic functions. Several serpins have been reported to modulate HIV pathogenesis, or exhibit potent anti-HIV activity in vitro, but the efficacy of serpins as therapeutic agents for HIV in vivo has not yet been demonstrated. In the present study, we show that heparin-activated antithrombin III (hep-ATIII), a member of the serpin family, significantly inhibits lentiviral replication in a non-human primate model. We further demonstrate greater than one log10 reduction in plasma viremia in the nonhuman primate system by loading of hep-ATIII into anti-HLA-DR immunoliposomes, which target tissue reservoirs of viral replication. We also demonstrate the utility of hep-ATIIII as a potential salvage agent for HIV strains resistant to standard anti-retroviral treatment. Finally, we applied gene-expression arrays to analyze hep-ATIII-induced host cell interactomes and found that downstream of hep-ATIII, two independent gene networks were modulated by host factors prostaglandin synthetase-2, ERK1/2 and NFκB. Ultimately, understanding how serpins, such as hep-ATIII, regulate host responses during HIV infection may reveal new avenues for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23133620

  9. Antithrombin III in patients with acute deep vein thrombosis during heparin treatment (subcutaneous and intravenous) and during and after treatment with oral coumarins.

    PubMed

    Andersson, G; Fagrell, B; Holmgren, K; Johnsson, H; Ljungberg, B; Wilhelmsson, S

    1984-05-15

    The antithrombin III (AT-III) concentration was studied in 98 patients with symptomatic acute deep-vein thrombosis. All patients were initially treated with heparin randomly by subcutaneous injections or by continuous infusions. Then the patients were treated with coumarins during one or six months. The AT-III concentration was estimated daily during heparin treatment and repeatedly during the first year. The mean AT-III concentration decreased progressively 25% during 5 days of heparin treatment regardless of whether heparin was given intravenously or subcutaneously. The mean AT-III concentration during coumarin treatment was higher than after coumarin treatment. Eleven patients developed recurrent thromboembolic episodes during the follow-up period. The mean AT-III concentration in these patients was not lower than in the patients without recurrences.

  10. Polymorphisms in factor V and antithrombin III gene in recurrent pregnancy loss: a case-control study in Indian population.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amit; Bhakuni, Teena; Ranjan, Ravi; Kumar, Ravi; Kishor, Kamal; Kamal, Vineet Kumar; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Jairajpuri, Mohamad Aman; Saxena, Renu

    2015-05-01

    Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) can be caused due to diverse factors with thrombophilia being one of them. The association of various thrombophilic risk factors with RPL is inconsistent in different studies and the frequency of these risk factors in Indian population is obscure. Five hundred and eighty patients with either recurrent early miscarriage or a history of at least one late miscarriage were screened for deficiency of protein C (PC), protein S (PS), antithrombin III (AT), APC resistance and prothrombin 20210G > A mutation. APC resistance positive patients were typed for the factor V Leiden, factor V Hong Kong/Cambridge mutations, and HR2 haplotype. PstI and rs2227589 AT mutations were detected by direct sequencing. APC resistance (13.4 %) was detected to be most common in Indian RPL patients followed by PS (10.6 %), PC (9.8 %) and AT deficiency (4.31 %.). FV Leiden was shown to be associated with APC resistance while HR2 haplotype was not associated with APC resistance (p values: 0.0001 and 0.327 respectively) and the increased risk of RPL. PstI and rs2227589 polymorphisms were similar in patients and controls and not associated with AT deficiency in RPL. Our study emphasizes the presence of other contributory factors towards APC resistance rather than FV Leiden alone. This is the first Indian study where HR2 haplotype and rs2227589 are observed to be present in RPL population. Although not significant, occurrence of rs2227589 and FV HR2 in homozygous condition necessitates the study of these polymorphisms in a larger sample size.

  11. Effect of thrombin and endotoxin on the in vivo metabolism of antithrombin III (AT III) in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, H.; Kobayashi, N.; Maekawa, T.

    1985-11-01

    Effect of thrombin and endotoxin on the metabolism of I-125-labelled canine AT III was studied in mongrel dogs. Under control condition, mean total amount of intravascular AT III with standard deviation was 23.4 +/- 2.4 mg/kg, plasma half life of i.v. injected I-125-AT III was 1.7 +/- 0.2 days, and the fractional catabolic flux (j3x) was 16.3 +/- 1.6 mg/kg/day. The total amount of intra- and extra-vascular AT III was 36.0 +/- 0.34 mg/kg. Neither a 3 hour infusion of a small dose (30 units/kg/hr) of thrombin nor i.v. injection of a large amount of thrombin (5,000-15,000 units/day) with heparin significantly affected AT III metabolism except for a transient decrease in AT III concentration in the latter case, although decrease in plasma fibrinogen concentration and platelet count was observed in both cases. Two injections with 200 micrograms/kg of endotoxin resulted in an evident acceleration of AT III metabolism with significant decrease in the plasma AT III, fibrinogen concentrations and platelet count. More marked changes in AT III metabolism were induced by a single infusion with 1 mg/kg of endotoxin. Changes in hemostatic system coincided with those observed in DIC.

  12. Interaction of heparin with internally quenched fluorogenic peptides derived from heparin-binding consensus sequences, kallistatin and anti-thrombin III.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Daniel C; Nantes, Iseli L; de Souza, Eduardo S; Le Bonniec, Bernard; Ito, Amando S; Tersariol, Ivarne L S; Oliveira, Vitor; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz

    2002-09-01

    Internally quenched fluorogenic (IQF) peptides bearing the fluorescence donor/acceptor pair o-aminobenzoic acid (Abz)/N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)ethylenediamine (EDDnp) at N- and C-terminal ends were synthesized containing heparin-binding sites from the human serpins kallistatin and antithrombin, as well as consensus heparin-binding sequences (Cardin clusters). The dissociation constant (K(d)), as well as the stoichiometry for the heparin-peptide complexes, was determined directly by measuring the decrease in fluorescence of the peptide solution. Experimental procedures were as sensitive as those used to follow the fluorescence change of tryptophan in heparin-binding proteins. The conformation of the peptides and the heparin-peptide complexes were obtained from measurements of time-resolved fluorescence decay and CD spectra. Kallistatin (Arg(300)-Pro(319))-derived peptide (HC2) and one derived from antithrombin III helix D [(AT3D), corresponding to Ser(112)-Lys(139)], which are the heparin-binding sites in these serpins, showed significant affinity for 4500 Da heparin, for which K(d) values were 17 nM and 100 nM respectively. The CD spectra of the heparin-HC2 peptide complex did not show any significant alpha-helix content, different from the situation with peptide AT3D, for which complex-formation with heparin resulted in 24% alpha-helix content. The end-to-end distance distribution and the time-resolved fluorescence-decay measurements agree with the CD spectra and K(d) values. The synthetic alpha-methyl glycoside pentasaccharide AGA*IA(M) (where A represents N,6-O-sulphated alpha-d-glucosamine; G, beta-d-glucuronic acid; A*, N,3,6-O-sulphated alpha-d-glucosamine; I, 2-O-sulphated alpha-l-iduronic acid; and A(M), alpha-methyl glycoside of A) also binds to AT3D and other consensus heparin-binding sequences, although with lower affinity. The interaction of IQF peptides with 4500 Da heparin was displaced by protamine. In conclusion, IQF peptides containing Abz/EDDnp as the

  13. Interaction of heparin with internally quenched fluorogenic peptides derived from heparin-binding consensus sequences, kallistatin and anti-thrombin III.

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, Daniel C; Nantes, Iseli L; de Souza, Eduardo S; Le Bonniec, Bernard; Ito, Amando S; Tersariol, Ivarne L S; Oliveira, Vitor; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz

    2002-01-01

    Internally quenched fluorogenic (IQF) peptides bearing the fluorescence donor/acceptor pair o-aminobenzoic acid (Abz)/N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)ethylenediamine (EDDnp) at N- and C-terminal ends were synthesized containing heparin-binding sites from the human serpins kallistatin and antithrombin, as well as consensus heparin-binding sequences (Cardin clusters). The dissociation constant (K(d)), as well as the stoichiometry for the heparin-peptide complexes, was determined directly by measuring the decrease in fluorescence of the peptide solution. Experimental procedures were as sensitive as those used to follow the fluorescence change of tryptophan in heparin-binding proteins. The conformation of the peptides and the heparin-peptide complexes were obtained from measurements of time-resolved fluorescence decay and CD spectra. Kallistatin (Arg(300)-Pro(319))-derived peptide (HC2) and one derived from antithrombin III helix D [(AT3D), corresponding to Ser(112)-Lys(139)], which are the heparin-binding sites in these serpins, showed significant affinity for 4500 Da heparin, for which K(d) values were 17 nM and 100 nM respectively. The CD spectra of the heparin-HC2 peptide complex did not show any significant alpha-helix content, different from the situation with peptide AT3D, for which complex-formation with heparin resulted in 24% alpha-helix content. The end-to-end distance distribution and the time-resolved fluorescence-decay measurements agree with the CD spectra and K(d) values. The synthetic alpha-methyl glycoside pentasaccharide AGA*IA(M) (where A represents N,6-O-sulphated alpha-d-glucosamine; G, beta-d-glucuronic acid; A*, N,3,6-O-sulphated alpha-d-glucosamine; I, 2-O-sulphated alpha-l-iduronic acid; and A(M), alpha-methyl glycoside of A) also binds to AT3D and other consensus heparin-binding sequences, although with lower affinity. The interaction of IQF peptides with 4500 Da heparin was displaced by protamine. In conclusion, IQF peptides containing Abz/EDDnp as the

  14. Magnetic particles as affinity matrix for purification of antithrombin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercês, A. A. D.; Maciel, J. C.; Carvalho Júnior, L. B.

    2015-11-01

    Immobilization of biomolecules onto insoluble supports is an important tool for the fabrication of a diverse range of functional materials. It provides advantages: enhanced stability and easy separation. In this work two different magnetic composites were synthesized (MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS) to human antithrombin purification. The magnetic particles (MAG) were obtained by co-precipitation method of iron salts II and III and subsequently coated with polyaniline (MAG-PANI particles). Dacron (polyethylene terephthalate) suffered a hydrazinolysis reaction to obtain a powder (Dacron hydrazide) which was subsequently magnetized (mDAC particles) also by co-precipitation method. Heparan sulfate (HS) was immobilized to MAG-PANI and mDAC retained respectively 35μg and 38.6μg per of support. The magnetic composite containing HS immobilized (MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS) was incubated with human blood plasma (1mL) and then washed with NaCl gradients. Electrophoresis of proteins present in eluates showed bands of antithrombin (58kDa). A reduction in the antithrombin activity was detected in plasma that were incubated in the composites magnetic with HS immobilized, suggesting that the antithrombin was removed of the human blood plasma and then purified. Therefore, the above results suggest that both preparations: MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS are able to affinity purify antithrombin, an important component of blood coagulation.

  15. Congenital antithrombin III deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Nanda, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Section of Hematology/Oncology, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, IL. Review ...

  16. [Prothrombin fragment 1+2 (F1+2), thrombin-antithrombin III complex(TAT) and thrombophilia parameters in orally anticoagulated patients with inferior vena cava filters].

    PubMed

    Halbmayer, W M; Haushofer, A; Toth, E

    1993-01-01

    Prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2) and thrombin-antithrombin-III-complex (TAT) levels were compared in 31 orally anticoagulated patients with inferior vena caval filters and a control group of 31 orally anticoagulated patients without caval filters and the incidence of markers of thrombophilia (deficiency of antithrombin-III, protein C, protein S and factor XII, presence of lupus anticoagulants) was determined. 8 of 31 patients (26%) from the group of caval filter carriers showed markers of thrombophilia (3 protein S deficiencies, 1 protein C deficiency, 2 factor XII deficiencies and 2 patients with lupus anticoagulants). In all orally anticoagulated patients a significant interdependence (p < 0.05) between F1 + 2- and TAT-levels and intensity (INR) of the oral anticoagulation could be observed. Comparison of F1 + 2- and TAT-levels of caval filter carriers and controls revealed no significant difference which leads to the conclusion that inferior vena caval filters do not induce detectable systemic activation of prothrombin under adequate oral anticoagulation therapy.

  17. Antithrombin and heparin.

    PubMed

    Carrell, R; Skinner, R; Warden, M; Whisstock, J

    1995-08-01

    Antithrombin, the main inhibitor of thrombosis in blood, is bound and activated by the heparin-like side-chains that line the small vasculature. We now have good depictions of the heparin-binding site on antithrombin, and of the way in which mutations at this site cause thrombotic disease. The interaction of heparin with antithrombin is, however, a kinetic one, with binding being followed by formation of a complex with thrombin and then release from the heparin. Our understanding of the processes involved is currently based on crystallographic models but, for a mobile mechanism, these merely provide snapshots - what is needed is a movie.

  18. Investigating changes in the gas-phase conformation of Antithrombin III upon binding of Arixtra using traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuejie; Singh, Arunima; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J.; Xu, Yongmei; Liu, Jian; Woods, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    We validate the utility of ion mobility to measure protein conformational changes induced by the binding of glycosaminoglycan ligands, using the well characterized system of Antithrombin III (ATIII) and Arixtra, a pharmaceutical agent with heparin (Hp) activity. Heparin has been used as a therapeutic anticoagulant drug for several decades through its interaction with ATIII, a serine protease inhibitor that plays a central role in the blood coagulation cascade. This interaction induces conformational changes within ATIII that dramatically enhance the ATIII-mediated inhibition rate. Arixtra is the smallest synthetic Hp containing the specific pentasaccharide sequence required to bind with ATIII. Here we report the first travelling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS) investigation of the conformational changes in ATIII induced by its interaction with Arixtra. Native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allowed the gentle transfer of the native topology of ATIII and ATIII–Arixtra complex. IM measurements of ATIII and ATIII–Arixtra complex showed a single structure, with well-defined collisional cross section (CCS) values. An average 3.6% increase in CCS of ATIII occurred as a result of its interaction with Arixtra, which agrees closely with the theoretical estimation of the change in CCS based on protein crystal structures. A comparison of the binding behavior of ATIII under both denaturing and non-denaturing conditions confirmed the significance of a folded tertiary structure of ATIII for its biological activity. A Hp oligosaccharide whose structure is similar to Arixtra but missing the 3-O sulfo group on the central glucosamine residue showed a dramatic decrease in binding affinity towards ATIII, but no change in the mobility behavior of the complex, consistent with prior studies that suggested that 3-O sulfation affects the equilibrium constant for binding to ATIII, but not the mode of interaction. In contrast, nonspecific binding by a Hp

  19. Antithrombin alfa in hereditary antithrombin deficient patients: A phase 3 study of prophylactic intravenous administration in high risk situations.

    PubMed

    Tiede, Andreas; Tait, R Campbell; Shaffer, Don W; Baudo, Francesco; Boneu, Bernard; Dempfle, Carl Erik; Horellou, Marie Helene; Klamroth, Robert; Lazarchick, John; Mumford, Andrew D; Schulman, Sam; Shiach, Caroline; Bonfiglio, Laura J; Frieling, Johan T M; Conard, Jacqueline; von Depka, Mario

    2008-03-01

    During surgery and childbirth, patients with hereditary antithrombin (AT) deficiency are at high risk for thrombosis, and heparin prophylaxis may not be sufficiently efficacious. In these patients, exogenous AT may be used in association with heparin. A recombinant human AT (generic name: antithrombin alfa) has been developed. This multi-center study assessed the efficacy and safety of prophylactic intravenous administration of antithrombin alfa to hereditary AT deficient patients in high risk situations, including elective surgery, childbirth, or cesarean section. Antithrombin alfa was administered prior to and during the high risk period for restoration and maintenance of AT activity at 100% of normal. Heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, and/or vitamin K antagonists were used according to standard of care. The primary efficacy endpoint was the incidence of acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) from baseline up to day 30 post dosing as assessed by independent central review of duplex ultrasonograms and/or venograms. Safety was assessed based on adverse events (AEs) and laboratory evaluations. Five surgical and nine obstetrical hereditary AT deficiency patients received antithrombin alfa for a mean period of seven days. No clinically overt DVT occurred. Central review of ultrasonograms identified signs of acute DVT in two out of 13 evaluable patients. No antithrombin alfa-related AEs were reported. No patient developed anti-antithrombin alfa antibodies. In conclusion, this study suggests that antithrombin alfa is a safe and effective alternative to human plasma-derived AT for treating hereditary AT deficiency patients at high risk for thromboembolic events.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary antithrombin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Merck Manual Home Edition for Patients and Caregivers: Thrombophilia National Blood Clot Alliance: Antithrombin Deficiency Orphanet: Hereditary thrombophilia due to congenital antithrombin deficiency Patient Support and ...

  1. Manufacturing process of anti-thrombin III concentrate: viral safety validation studies and effect of column re-use on viral clearance.

    PubMed

    Morrica, Antonietta; Nardini, Claudia; Falbo, Anna; Bailey, Andrew C; Bucci, E

    2003-09-01

    A manufacturing process for the production of Anti-thrombin IIII concentrate is described, which is based primarily on Heparin Sepharose affinity chromatography. The process includes two sequential viral inactivation/removal procedures, applied to the fraction eluted from the column, the first by heating in aqueous solution at 60 degrees C for 10 h and the second by nanofiltration. Using viral validation on a scaled-down process both treatments proved to be effective steps; able to inactivate or remove more than 4 logs of virus, and their combined effect (>8 logs) assured the safety of the final product. Viral validation studies of the Heparin Sepharose chromatographic step demonstrated a consistency of the affinity of the resin for viruses over repeated use (16 runs), thus providing evidence of absence of cross-contamination from one batch to the next. It was concluded that the process of ATIII manufacturing provides a high level of confidence that the product will not transmit viruses.

  2. Antithrombin activities in childhood malnutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, R A; Jiménez, E; Ingram, G I; Mora, L A; Atmetlla, F; Carrillo, J M; Vargas, W

    1979-01-01

    Antithrombin activities in 30 severely malnourished children and 40 normal children were estimated in clotting tests by thrombin neutralisation as anti-Xa and by a heparin antithrombin assay; and by immunodiffusion as alpha 2-globulin and alpha 1-antitrypsin. The patients' mean alpha 2-globulin was severely depressed, and there were less marked depletions in mean values for thrombin neutralisation, anti-Xa, and in the heparin antithrombin assay (which showed the flat curve thought to reflect a thrombotic tendency). The alpha 1-antitrypsin values were normal. The findings support the concept of antithrombin as the summation of alpha 2-globulin and alpha 1-antitrypsin (with alpha 2-macroglobulin); and the low values may be related to the high incidence of thrombosis reported in childhood malnutrition, although it was not seen in these patients. PMID:118190

  3. Antithrombin Activity of Erythrocyte Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Levin, G Ya; Sukhareva, E G

    2017-04-01

    Coagulation and optical (based on chromogenic substrate) methods were employed to examine antithrombin activity of erythrocytes and erythrocyte-derived microvesicles isolated days 7, 14, 21, and 28 on erythrocyte storage. The erythrocyte-derived microvesicles decelerated fibrin clot formation from fibrinogen in the presence of exogenous thrombin both with and without heparin. Microvesicles reduced optical density of chromogenic substrate. These data suggest that erythrocyte-derived microvesicles display a prominent antithrombin activity, which significantly increases during erythrocyte storage.

  4. Plasma-derived human antithrombin attenuates ventilator-induced coagulopathy but not inflammation in a Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia model in rats.

    PubMed

    Aslami, H; Haitsma, J J; Hofstra, J J; Florquin, S; Dos Santos, C; Streutker, C; Zhang, H; Levi, M; Slutsky, A S; Schultz, M J

    2012-03-01

    Mechanical ventilation exaggerates pneumonia-associated pulmonary coagulopathy and inflammation. We hypothesized that the administration of plasma-derived human antithrombin (AT), one of the natural inhibitors of coagulation, prevents ventilator-induced pulmonary coagulopathy, inflammation and bacterial outgrowth in a Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia model in rats. Forty-eight hours after induction of S. pneumoniae pneumonia rats were subjected to mechanical ventilation (tidal volume 12 mL kg(-1), positive end-expiratory pressure 0 cmH(2)O and inspired oxygen fraction 40%). Rats were randomized to systemic treatment with AT (250 IU administered intravenously (i.v.) before the start of mechanical ventilation) or placebo (saline). Non-ventilated, non-infected rats and non-ventilated rats with pneumonia served as controls. The primary endpoints were pulmonary coagulation and inflammation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Pneumonia was characterized by local activation of coagulation and inhibition of fibrinolysis, resulting in increased levels of fibrin degradation products and fibrin deposition in the lung. Mechanical ventilation exaggerated pulmonary coagulopathy and inflammation. Systemic administration of AT led to supra-normal BALF levels of AT and decreased ventilator-associated activation of coagulation. AT neither affected pulmonary inflammation nor bacterial outgrowth from the lungs or blood. Plasma-derived human AT attenuates ventilator-induced coagulopathy, but not inflammation and bacterial outgrowth in a S. pneumoniae pneumonia model in rats. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  5. Interstitial deletion of chromosome 1q [del(1)(q24q25.3)] identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene dosage analysis of apolipoprotein A-II, coagulation factor V, and antithrombin III

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, Takako; Yamanouchi, Yasuko; Mori, Yosuke

    1997-01-20

    We report on a 12-month-old Japanese boy with an interstitial deletion of the long-arm of chromosome 1 and meningomyelocele, hydrocephalus, anal atresia, atrial septal defect, left renal agenesis, bilateral cryptorchidism, talipes equinovarus, low birth weight, growth/developmental retardation, and many minor anomalies. By conventional GTG-banding, his karyotype was first interpreted as 46,XY,de1(1)(q23q24), but it was corrected as 46,XY.ish del(1)(q24q25.3) by fluorescence in situ hybridization using 11 known cosmid clones as probes. His serum levels of apolipoprotein A-II (gene symbol: APOA2, previously assigned to 1q21-q23) and coagulation factor V (F5, 1q21-q25) were normal, while serum concentration and activity of antithrombin III (AT3, 1q23-q25.1) was low. The results indicated that localization of APOA2 and F5 are proximal to the deleted region and AT3 is located within the deletion extent in the patient. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Alpha(2)-macroglobulin levels are high in adult patients with congenital antithrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, A; Chantarangkul, V; De Stefano, V; Mannucci, P

    2000-04-15

    Antithrombin is responsible for about 80% of the progressive inhibitory activity of thrombin in human plasma. The role of other protease inhibitors known to inhibit thrombin is not completely clarified. However, their contribution may become relevant when antithrombin is low. We elected to investigate adult patients with congenital antithrombin deficiency to assess the concentration of other naturally occurring thrombin inhibitors such as alpha(2)-macroglobulin, alpha(1)-antitrypsin, heparin cofactor II, and C(1)-inhibitor. The study included 59 patients with congenital antithrombin deficiency with and without a previous history of thrombosis, together with an equal number of control subjects matched for age and sex. Statistically significant differences (patients vs. controls) were observed only for alpha(2)-macroglobulin (i.e., 120 vs. 102%, p<0.01). Further analysis of antithrombin-deficient carriers with and without a past history of thrombosis showed that alpha(2)-macroglobulin levels were higher than the 90th percentile of control distribution more often in asymptomatic than symptomatic men (odds ratio=0.04; confidence interval=0.003-0.60), but not in women (odds ratio=2.14; confidence interval=0.35-13.1). In conclusion, results from this cross sectional study showed that alpha(2)-macroglobulin levels were high in patients with congenital antithrombin deficiency. Furthermore, the high levels were found more often in asymptomatic than symptomatic men. Whether this increase provides protection against thrombosis should be evaluated in a prospective study.

  7. Synthesis and characterisation of magnetised Dacron-heparin composite employed for antithrombin affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Mercês, Aurenice Arruda Dutra das; Silva, Ricardo de Souza; Silva, Karciano José Santos; Maciel, Jackeline da Costa; Oliveira, Givanildo Bezerra; Buitrago, Davian Martinez; de Aguiar, José Albino Oliveira; de Carvalho-Júnior, Luiz Bezerra

    2016-12-01

    Human antithrombin is a blood derivative widely used in the treatment of coagulation dysfunction. Affinity chromatography using heparin (HEP) derivatives is usually used for antithrombin purification. In this study, an affinity procedure based on a magnetic Dacron-HEP composite is proposed. Dacron was firstly converted to Dacron-hydrazide and magnetised by co-precipitation with of Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) (mDAC). HEP was activated by carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide and covalently linked to mDAC (mDAC-HEP). EDX and infrared spectra analyses confirmed each synthesis step of mDAC-HEP. This composite exhibited superparamagnetism behaviour. Human plasma was incubated with mDAC-HEP (fresh and stored over a long period) and washed with phosphate buffer containing increasing concentrations of NaCl. Human plasma antithrombin activity was reduced by approximately 20% in the presence of the 1.0M NaCl fraction, and this eluate was able to prolong coagulation time (aPTT) using both preparations. Electrophoresis of the eluates revealed bands corresponding to the expected size of antithrombin (58kDa). The mDAC-HEP particles are reusable. This method presents the following advantages: easy, low-cost synthesis of the composite, magnet-based affinity purification steps, and reusability.

  8. Proposed heparin binding site in antithrombin based on arginine 47. A new variant Rouen-II, 47 Arg to Ser.

    PubMed Central

    Borg, J Y; Owen, M C; Soria, C; Soria, J; Caen, J; Carrell, R W

    1988-01-01

    Antithrombin Rouen-II, a new inherited variant of antithrombin-III, was found in two members of a family with no definite history of thrombosis. The subjects had normal antigenic concentrations of antithrombin and normal progressive inhibitory activity. However, the variant had defective heparin and heparan sulfate cofactor activities, and was not activated by a synthetic pentasaccharide representing the minimum heparin sequence. The abnormal antithrombin was isolated using heparin-Sepharose chromatography, and on electrophoresis at pH 8.6 migrated more anodally than normal. Two-dimensional peptide mapping of tryptic and Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digests was performed and the abnormal peptide was located by tryptophan staining. Amino acid sequence studies demonstrated a substitution of arginine at residue 47 by a serine. Evidence strongly suggests that arginine 47 is a prime heparin binding site in antithrombin and that it forms part of a proposed positively charged linear site (to which heparin binds) that stretches across the surface of the molecule from the A to the D helix. PMID:3350974

  9. [Biotransformation of mogroside III by human intestinal bacteria].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiu Wei; Zhang, Jian Ye; Xu, Wei

    2007-12-18

    To investigate the biotransformation of mogroside III, one of the main chemical constituent in the fruits of Momordica grosvenori Swingle, by the crude enzymes of human intestinal bacteria, and determine the structure of biotransformation products and provide scientific basis for absorption evaluation of primary mogroside III in human intestine. The mogroside III was incubated with crude enzymes of human intestinal bacteria under the anaerobic environment and 37 degrees C condition to transform mogroside III. The biotransformation products were isolated and purified by silica gel column chromatography, and structurally determined by infra-red (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry and mass spectroscopy (MS) techniques. Mogroside III was converted to mogroside II(A1) and mogrol by successive deglycosylation at C-3 of the glucosyl group and C-24 of the gentiobiosyl group. The human intestinal bacteria showed potent ability to transform mogroside III to release secondary glycoside mogroside II(A1) and aglycone mogrol.

  10. Complete antithrombin deficiency in mice results in embryonic lethality

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, Kazuhiro; Kojima, Tetsuhito; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Nakayama, Yukiko; Takagi, Akira; Suzuki, Misao; Takeda, Naoki; Ito, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Koji; Matsushita, Tadashi; Kusugami, Kazuo; Muramatsu, Takashi; Saito, Hidehiko

    2000-01-01

    Antithrombin is a plasma protease inhibitor that inhibits thrombin and contributes to the maintenance of blood fluidity. Using targeted gene disruption, we investigated the role of antithrombin in embryogenesis. Mating mice heterozygous for antithrombin gene (ATIII) disruption, ATIII+/–, yielded the expected Mendelian distribution of genotypes until 14.5 gestational days (gd). However, approximately 70% of the ATIII–/– embryos at 15.5 gd and 100% at 16.5 gd had died and showed extensive subcutaneous hemorrhage. Histological examination of those embryos revealed extensive fibrin(ogen) deposition in the myocardium and liver, but not in the brain or lung. Furthermore, no apparent fibrin(ogen) deposition was detected in the extensive hemorrhagic region, suggesting that fibrinogen might be decreased due to consumptive coagulopathy and/or liver dysfunction. These findings suggest that antithrombin is essential for embryonic survival and that it plays an important role in regulation of blood coagulation in the myocardium and liver. PMID:11018075

  11. Treatment of accidental perianal injection of topical thrombin with intravenous antithrombin.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G; Paidy, Samata R; McLeod, Whitney; Fox, Alexandra; Nfonsam, Valentine N

    2017-04-01

    While topical thrombin application can markedly improve surgical hemostasis, rapid absorption of thrombin can result in pulmonary embolism and death. We report a case of accidental interstitial infiltration of topical thrombin after hemorrhoidectomy that was treated with administration of human antithrombin and heparin anticoagulation. Except for a marked decrease in antithrombin activity from super normal to normal values, the patient exhibited no laboratory or clinical signs of pulmonary embolism, thrombin mediated consumptive loss of procoagulants, or regional thrombosis. The patient had an uncomplicated recovery without sign of thrombotic morbidity. While it is hoped that such a medical misadventure should not occur, our case may serve as a reference to guide anticoagulant therapy if such a clinical scenario arises.

  12. Canine Antithrombin-III: Some Biochemical and Biologic Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-02

    8217 •, 3. Immunodiffusion Immunodiffusion tests were performed by the method of Ouchterlony (70) using a 196 agarose matrix. Volumes of samples tested...cross (specie) reactivities - an anticipated finding in view of the apparent antigen similarities. Results obtained with Ouchterlony double diffusion...York, Academic Press: 1953, pp. 393-460. 70. Ouchterlony , D.: Diffusion in gel methods for immunological analysis. Prog. Allergy 5:1 (1958). 71

  13. Early Changes in the Antithrombin and Thrombin-Antithrombin Complex in Patients With Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Negreva, Mariya; Georgiev, Svetoslav; Prodanova, Krasimira; Nikolova, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Background Data on coagulation changes in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) are scarce. The aim of this study was to examine plasma antithrombin (AT) levels and activity as well as thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complex levels in the early hours of the clinical manifestation of PAF. Methods Fifty-one patients (26 men and 25 women; mean age 59.84 ± 1.60 years) were consecutively selected with PAF duration < 24 hours, and 52 controls (26 men and 26 women; mean age 59.50 ± 1.46 years) matched the patients in terms of gender, age and comorbidities. Plasma levels and activity of AT and levels of the covalent TAT complex were studied once in each study participant. Results AT plasma levels in PAF patients were statistically significantly lower compared to controls (164.69 ± 10.51 vs. 276.21 ± 8.29 μg/mL, P < 0.001). Plasma activity of the anticoagulant was also significantly lower in PAF (71.33±4.87 vs. 110.72±3.09%, P < 0.001). TAT complex concentration in plasma was higher in the patient group (5.32 ± 0.23 vs. 3.20 ± 0.14 μg/L, P < 0.001). Conclusion We can say that PAF is associated with significantly reduced AT levels and activity and increased levels of TAT complex during the first 24 hours after its manifestation. These changes indicate a reduced activity of AT anticoagulant system, which is a probable prerequisite for the established enhanced coagulation (high TAT complex levels). PMID:28197274

  14. Human Development Program: Level III Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bessell, Harold

    The curriculum guide presents the activities component of the Human Development Program for the third grade. The Human Development Program (HDP) is an affective curricular approach developed by psychologists to help teachers instill responsibility and self-confidence in children. Following a brief overview of the HDP and explanation of the Magic…

  15. Characterization of the conformational alterations, reduced anticoagulant activity, and enhanced antiangiogenic activity of prelatent antithrombin.

    PubMed

    Richard, Benjamin; Swanson, Richard; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Ramirez, Ben; Izaguirre, Gonzalo; Gettins, Peter G W; Olson, Steven T

    2008-05-23

    A conformationally altered prelatent form of antithrombin that possesses both anticoagulant and antiangiogenic activities is produced during the conversion of native to latent antithrombin (Larsson, H., Akerud, P., Nordling, K., Raub-Segall, E., Claesson-Welsh, L., and Björk, I. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 11996-12002). Here, we show that the previously characterized prelatent antithrombin is a mixture of native antithrombin and a modified, true prelatent antithrombin that are resolvable by heparin-agarose chromatography. Kinetic analyses revealed that prelatent antithrombin is an intermediate in the conversion of native to latent antithrombin whose formation is favored by stabilizing anions of the Hofmeister series. Purified prelatent antithrombin had reduced anticoagulant function compared with native antithrombin, due to a reduced heparin affinity and consequent impaired ability of heparin to either bridge prelatent antithrombin and coagulation proteases in a ternary complex or to induce full conformational activation of the serpin. Significantly, prelatent antithrombin possessed an antiangiogenic activity more potent than that of latent antithrombin, based on the relative abilities of the two forms to inhibit endothelial cell growth. The prelatent form was conformationally altered from native antithrombin as judged from an attenuation of tryptophan fluorescence changes following heparin activation and a reduced thermal stability. The alterations are consistent with the limited structural changes involving strand 1C observed in a prelatent form of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (Dupont, D. M., Blouse, G. E., Hansen, M., Mathiasen, L., Kjelgaard, S., Jensen, J. K., Christensen, A., Gils, A., Declerck, P. J., Andreasen, P. A., and Wind, T. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 36071-36081), since the (1)H NMR spectrum, electrophoretic mobility, and proteolytic susceptibility of prelatent antithrombin most resemble those of native rather than those of latent antithrombin

  16. Antithrombin reduces monocyte and neutrophil CD11b up regulation in addition to blocking platelet activation during extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Rinder, Christine S; Rinder, Henry M; Smith, Michael J; Fitch, Jane C K; Tracey, Jayne B; Chandler, Wayne L; Rollins, Scott A; Smith, Brian R

    2006-07-01

    Patients undergoing cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass develop a systemic inflammatory reaction. Antithrombin III (AT) has anticoagulant effects but also shows evidence of anti-inflammatory activity. The aim of this study was to examine whether exogenous AT could reduce white blood cell activation (CD11b up regulation or elastase release), in addition to inhibiting platelet (PLT) activation and fibrin generation, during simulated cardiopulmonary bypass (sCPB), undertaken in the absence of endothelium. sCPB was carried out with minimally heparinized (2 U/mL) human blood for 90 minutes in controls and with supplementation by low-dose (1 U/mL) and high-dose (5 U/mL) AT. High-dose AT blunted thrombin generation during sCPB (prothrombin fragment 1.2); both doses significantly inhibited thrombin activity (fibrinopeptide A). Complement activation (C3a and C5b-9) was unaffected by AT. High-dose AT inhibited PLT activation (P-selectin expression and P-selectin-dependent monocyte-PLT conjugate formation). AT supplementation at the higher dose significantly abrogated monocyte and neutrophil CD11b up regulation and neutrophil elastase release. In addition to anticoagulant and anti-PLT effects, pharmacologic AT doses significantly blunted monocyte and neutrophil CD11b up regulation and neutrophil elastase release during sCPB, independent of endothelial effects. These data provide evidence for the direct anti-inflammatory activity of AT that has clinical relevance for CPB complications.

  17. A Pilot Study of Antithrombin Replacement Prior to Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Niebler, Robert A; Woods, Katherine J; Murkowski, Kathleen; Ghanayem, Nancy S; Hoffman, George; Mitchell, Michael E; Punzalan, Rowena C; Scott, J Paul; Simpson, Pippa; Tweddell, James S

    2016-01-01

    Neonates have low levels of antithrombin. Inadequate anticoagulation during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) due to low antithrombin activity may result in a poor preservation of the coagulation system during bypass. We hypothesize that antithrombin replacement to neonates prior to CPB will preserve the hemostatic system and result in less postoperative bleeding. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled pilot study of antithrombin replacement to neonates prior to CPB was conducted. Preoperative antithrombin levels determined the dose of recombinant antithrombin or placebo to be given. Antithrombin levels were measured following the dosing of the antithrombin/placebo, after initiation of bypass, near the completion of bypass, and upon intensive care unit admission. Eight subjects were enrolled. No subject had safety concerns. Mediastinal exploration occurred in two antithrombin subjects and one placebo subject. Antithrombin activity levels were significantly higher in the treated group following drug administration; levels continued to be higher than preoperatively but not different from the placebo group at all other time points. Total heparin administration was less in the antithrombin group; measurements of blood loss were similar in both groups. A single dose of recombinant antithrombin did not maintain 100% activity levels throughout the entire operation. Although no safety concerns were identified in this pilot study, a larger trial is necessary to determine clinical efficacy.

  18. Issues in the Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Antithrombin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Kenneth A; Nguyen-Cao, Tam M; Spears, Jeffrey B

    2016-09-01

    To review insights gained in the past several years about hereditary antithrombin (AT) deficiency and to outline approaches to the management of patients with AT deficiency in the acute and chronic settings. An extensive literature search of Scopus (January 2008-April 2016) was performed for the terms congenital antithrombin deficiency, inherited antithrombin deficiency, or hereditary antithrombin deficiency Additional references were identified by reviewing literature citations. All relevant English-language case reports, reviews, clinical studies, meeting abstracts, and book chapters assessing hereditary AT deficiency were included. AT deficiency significantly increases the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The risk of VTE is particularly high during pregnancy, the postpartum period, and following major surgery. Effective clinical management includes determination of the appropriate type and duration of antithrombotic therapy (ie, AT replacement for acute situations) while minimizing the risk of bleeding. For persons newly diagnosed with AT deficiency, age, lifestyle, concurrent medical conditions, family history, and personal treatment preferences can be used to individualize patient management. Patients should be informed of the risks associated with hormonal therapy, pregnancy, surgical procedures, and immobility, which further increase the risk of VTE in patients with AT deficiency. AT deficiency poses the highest risk for VTE among the hereditary thrombophilias, often requiring long-term anticoagulation. Undertaking an evaluation for hereditary thrombophilia is controversial; however, a diagnosis of VTE in association with AT deficiency can have management implications. An important treatment option for patients with this disorder in high-risk situations is AT concentrate. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. [Antithrombin resistance: a new mechanism of inherited thrombophilia].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Tetsuhito; Takagi, Akira; Murata, Moe; Takagi, Yuki

    2015-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a multifactorial disease resulting from complex interactions among genetic and environmental factors. To date, numerous genetic defects have been found in families with hereditary thrombophilia, but there may still be many undiscovered causative gene mutations. We investigated a possible causative gene defect in a large Japanese family with inherited thrombophilia, and found a novel missense mutation in the prothrombin gene (p.Arg596Leu) resulting in a variant prothrombin (prothrombin Yukuhashi). The mutant prothrombin had moderately lower activity than wild type prothrombin in clotting assays, but formation of the thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complex was substantially impaired resulting in prolonged thrombin activity. A thrombin generation assay revealed that the peak activity of the mutant prothrombin was fairly low, but its inactivation was extremely slow in reconstituted plasma. The Leu596 substitution caused a gain-of-function mutation in the prothrombin gene, resulting in resistance to antithrombin and susceptibility to thrombosis. We also showed the effects of the prothrombin Yukuhashi mutation on the thrombomodulin-protein C anticoagulation system, recent development of a laboratory test detecting antithrombin resistance in plasma, and another antithrombin resistant mutation found in other thrombophilia families.

  20. Human Requirements of Flight. Aviation and Spaceflight. Aerospace Education III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coard, E. A.

    This book, one in the series on Aerospace Education III, deals with the general nature of human physiology during space flights. Chapter 1 begins with a brief discussion of the nature of the atmosphere. Other topics examined in this chapter include respiration and circulation, principles and problems of vision, noise and vibration, and…

  1. Human Requirements of Flight. Aerospace Education III. Instructional Unit IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Arthur D.

    This curriculum guide is prepared for the Aerospace Education III series publication entitled "Human Requirements of Flight." It provides specific guidelines for teachers using the textbook. The guidelines for each chapter are organized according to objectives (traditional and behavioral), suggested outline, orientation, suggested key…

  2. Characterization of human carbonic anhydrase III from skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Carter, N; Jeffery, S; Shiels, A; Edwards, Y; Tipler, T; Hopkinson, D A

    1979-10-01

    A third form of human carbonic anhydrase (CA III), found at high concentrations in skeletal muscle, has been purified and characterized. This isozyme shows relatively poor hydratase and esterase activities compared to the red cell isozymes, CA I and CA II, but is similar to these isozymes in subunit structure (monomer) and molecular size (28,000). CA III is liable to posttranslational modification by thiol group interaction. Monomeric secondary isozymes, sensitive to beta-mercaptoethanol, are found in both crude and purified material and can be generated in vitro by the addition of thiol reagents. Active dimeric isozymes, generated apparently by the formation of intermolecular disulfide bridges, also occur but account for only a small proportion of the total protein and appear only when the concentration of CA III is particularly high.

  3. Antithrombin controls tumor migration, invasion and angiogenesis by inhibition of enteropeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Luengo-Gil, Ginés; Calvo, María Inmaculada; Martín-Villar, Ester; Águila, Sonia; Bohdan, Nataliya; Antón, Ana I.; Espín, Salvador; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Quintanilla, Miguel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombin is a key inhibitor of the coagulation cascade, but it may also function as an anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-viral and anti-apoptotic protein. Here, we report a novel function of antithrombin as a modulator of tumor cell migration and invasion. Antithrombin inhibited enteropeptidase on the membrane surface of HT-29, A549 and U-87 MG cells. The inhibitory process required the activation of antithrombin by heparin, and the reactive center loop and the heparin binding domain were essential. Surprisingly, antithrombin non-covalently inhibited enteropeptidase, revealing a novel mechanism of inhibition for this serpin. Moreover, as a consequence of this inhibition, antithrombin was cleaved, resulting in a molecule with anti-angiogenic properties that reduced vessel-like formation of endothelial cells. The addition of antithrombin and heparin to U-87 MG and A549 cells reduced motility in wound healing assays, inhibited the invasion in transwell assays and the degradation of a gelatin matrix mediated by invadopodia. These processes were controlled by enteropeptidase, as demonstrated by RNA interference experiments. Carcinoma cell xenografts in nude mice showed in vivo co-localization of enteropeptidase and antithrombin. Finally, treatment with heparin reduced experimental metastasis induced by HT29 cells in vivo. In conclusion, the inhibition of enteropeptidase by antithrombin may have a double anti-tumor effect through inhibiting a protease involved in metastasis and generating an anti-angiogenic molecule. PMID:27270881

  4. Antithrombin controls tumor migration, invasion and angiogenesis by inhibition of enteropeptidase.

    PubMed

    Luengo-Gil, Ginés; Calvo, María Inmaculada; Martín-Villar, Ester; Águila, Sonia; Bohdan, Nataliya; Antón, Ana I; Espín, Salvador; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Quintanilla, Miguel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-06-08

    Antithrombin is a key inhibitor of the coagulation cascade, but it may also function as an anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-viral and anti-apoptotic protein. Here, we report a novel function of antithrombin as a modulator of tumor cell migration and invasion. Antithrombin inhibited enteropeptidase on the membrane surface of HT-29, A549 and U-87 MG cells. The inhibitory process required the activation of antithrombin by heparin, and the reactive center loop and the heparin binding domain were essential. Surprisingly, antithrombin non-covalently inhibited enteropeptidase, revealing a novel mechanism of inhibition for this serpin. Moreover, as a consequence of this inhibition, antithrombin was cleaved, resulting in a molecule with anti-angiogenic properties that reduced vessel-like formation of endothelial cells. The addition of antithrombin and heparin to U-87 MG and A549 cells reduced motility in wound healing assays, inhibited the invasion in transwell assays and the degradation of a gelatin matrix mediated by invadopodia. These processes were controlled by enteropeptidase, as demonstrated by RNA interference experiments. Carcinoma cell xenografts in nude mice showed in vivo co-localization of enteropeptidase and antithrombin. Finally, treatment with heparin reduced experimental metastasis induced by HT29 cells in vivo. In conclusion, the inhibition of enteropeptidase by antithrombin may have a double anti-tumor effect through inhibiting a protease involved in metastasis and generating an anti-angiogenic molecule.

  5. Insight into residues critical for antithrombin function from analysis of an expanded database of sequences that includes frog, turtle, and ostrich antithrombins.

    PubMed

    Backovic, Marija; Gettins, Peter G W

    2002-01-01

    Complete sequences were determined for frog, turtle, and ostrich antithrombins. Protein sequence comparisons with the other 10 known antithrombin sequences and with sequences of other serpins have provided striking evidence for the conservation of the heparin activation mechanism and new insight into those residues important for heparin binding, for heparin activation, and for reactive center loop function, as well as an indication of which glycosylation sites might be needed for function. Importantly, an understanding of, as yet, poorly understood antithrombin-protein interactions will be greatly aided by this expanded database and comparative analysis.

  6. The usefulness of antithrombin activity monitoring during antithrombin supplementation in patients with sepsis-associated disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Iba, Toshiaki; Saitoh, Daizoh; Gando, Satoshi; Thachil, Jecko

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have repeatedly reported the effectiveness of antithrombin (AT) supplementation for sepsis-associated disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). In this study, we intended to elucidate the usefulness of monitoring antithrombin activity during antithrombin supplementation. Data of 926 patients with sepsis-associated DIC who had been undergone AT substitution were retrospectively analyzed. All the patients had received 1500IU/day of AT concentrate for three consecutive days. The patients' demographic characteristics, including the age, body weight, baseline DIC score and baseline AT activity, and treatment-related markers such as the change in DIC score and the change in the AT activity with treatment were analyzed in relation to the 28-day mortality. Logistic regression analysis revealed a significant association of the patients' age, baseline AT activity, Δ AT activity, baseline DIC score and Δ DIC score to the patients' outcomes. The cutoff values of the AT activities for death calculated by the ROC curve analysis were 41.3% for the baseline AT activity, 72.9% for the post-treatment AT activity and 37.0% for Δ AT activity. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) showed discriminative powers for the baseline AT activity, post-treatment AT activity and Δ AT activity of 0.58, 0.69 and 0.66, respectively. Monitoring of the AT activity is useful to predict the patients' outcome. Furthermore, the measurement of baseline AT activity may help in determining the appropriate dose for AT supplementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cleavage and activation of human factor IX by serine proteases

    SciTech Connect

    Enfield, D.L.; Thompson, A.R.

    1984-10-01

    Human factor IX circulates as a single-chain glycoprotein. Upon activation in vitro, it is cleaved into disulfide-linked light and heavy chains and an activation peptide. After reduction of activated /sup 125/I-factor IX, the heavy and light chains are readily identified by gel electrophoresis. A direct, immunoradiometric assay for factor IXa was developed to assess activation of factor IX for proteases that cleaved it. The assay utilized radiolabeled antithrombin III with heparin to identify the active site and antibodies to distinguish factor IX. After cleavage of factor IX by factor XIa, factor VIIa-tissue thromboplastin complex, or the factor X-activating enzyme from Russell's viper venom, antithrombin III bound readily to factor IXa. Cleavage of /sup 125/I-factor IX by trypsin, chymotrypsin, and granulocyte elastase in the presence of calcium yielded major polypeptide fragments of the sizes of the factor XIa-generated light and heavy chains. When the immunoradiometric assay was used to assess trypsin-cleaved factor IX, the product bound antithrombin III, but not maximally. After digesting with insolubilized trypsin, clotting activity confirmed activation. In evaluating activation of factor IX, physical evidence of activation cleavages does not necessarily correlate with generation of an active site.

  8. Denaturation of Human Serum Albumin by Cerium (iii) Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behbahani, G. Rezaei; Shalbafan, M.; Gheibi, N.; Barzegar, L.; Behbahani, H. Rezaei; Yaghdavaei, N.; Behbahani, Z. Rezaei

    2013-08-01

    Cerium (III) Chloride-induced conformational changes of human serum albumin, HSA, in phosphate buffer, 10 mM at pH 7.4 was investigated, using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), UV and fluorescence emission spectroscopic methods. The results indicate that CeCl3, Ce3+, induces irreversible denaturation of the HSA structure. The UV absorption intensity of HSA + Ce3+ shows a slight blueshift in the absorbance wavelength with increasing Ce3+ concentration. The fluorescence intensity was increased regularly and a slight redshift was observed in the emission wavelength. The HSA + Ce3+ complex quenches the fluorescence of HSA and changes the microenvironment of tryptophan residue. The emission intensity increases suggesting the loss of the tertiary structure of HSA. The results obtained from the ITC data are in agreement with the spectroscopic methods. The strong negative cooperativity of Ce3+ binding with HSA (Table 1) recovered from the extended solvation model, indicates that HSA has been denatured as a result of its interaction with Ce3+ ions.

  9. Iron(III)-salen damages DNA and induces apoptosis in human cell via mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Woldemariam, Getachew A; Mandal, Subhrangsu S

    2008-04-01

    We synthesized a water soluble Fe(III)-salen complex and investigated its biochemical effects on DNA in vitro and on cultured human cells. We showed that Fe(III)-salen produces free radicals in the presence of reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) and induces DNA damage in vitro. Interestingly, upon treatment with Fe(III)-salen at concentration as low as 10microM, HEK293 human cells showed morphological changes, nuclear fragmentation, and nuclear condensation that are typical features of apoptotic cell death. The cytotoxicity measurement showed that IC(50) of Fe(III)-salen is 2.0microM for HEK293 cells. Furthermore, treatment with Fe(III)-salen resulted in translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol affecting mitochondrial membrane permeability. Our results demonstrated that Fe(III)-salen not only damages DNA in vitro, but also induces apoptosis in human cells via mitochondrial pathway.

  10. Thromboembolic disease due to thermolabile conformational changes of antithrombin Rouen-VI (187 Asn-->Asp)

    PubMed

    Bruce, D; Perry, D J; Borg, J Y; Carrell, R W; Wardell, M R

    1994-12-01

    A new variant of antithrombin (Rouen-VI, 187 Asn-->Asp) with increased heparin affinity was shown to have normal inhibitory activity which decreased slowly at 4 degrees C and rapidly at 41 degrees C. On electrophoresis the freshly isolated variant had an anodal shift relative to native antithrombin due to the mutation. A further anodal transition occurred after either prolonged storage at 4 degrees C or incubation at 41 degrees C due to the formation of a new inactive uncleaved component with properties characteristic of L-form (latent) antithrombin. At the same time, polymerization also occurred with a predominance of di-, tri-, and tetra-mers. These findings fit with the observed mutation of the conserved asparagine (187) in the F-helix destabilizing the underlying A-sheet of the molecule. Evidence of A-sheet perturbation is provided by the increased rate of peptide insertion into the A-sheet and by the decreased vulnerability of the reactive loop to proteolysis. The spontaneous formation of both L-antithrombin and polymers is consistent with our crystal structure of intact antithrombin where L-form and active antithrombin are linked together as dimers. The nature of this linkage favors a mechanism of polymerization whereby the opening of the A-sheet, to give incorporation of the reactive center loop, is accompanied by the bonding of the loop of one molecule to the C-sheet of the next. The accelerated lability of antithrombin Rouen-VI at 41 versus 37 degrees C provides an explanation for the clinical observation that episodes of thrombosis were preceded by unrelated pyrexias.

  11. Postoperative costs associated with outcomes after cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation: role of antithrombin levels.

    PubMed

    Muedra, Vicente; Llau, Juan V; Llagunes, José; Paniagua, Pilar; Veiras, Sonia; Fernández-López, Antonio R; Diago, Carmen; Hidalgo, Francisco; Gil, Jesús; Valiño, Cristina; Moret, Enric; Gómez, Laura; Pajares, Azucena; de Prada, Blanca

    2013-04-01

    To study the impact on postoperative costs of a patient's antithrombin levels associated with outcomes after cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation. An analytic decision model was designed to estimate costs and clinical outcomes after cardiac surgery in a typical patient with low antithrombin levels (<63.7%) compared with a patient with normal antithrombin levels (≥63.7%). The data used in the model were obtained from a literature review and subsequently validated by a panel of experts in cardiothoracic anesthesiology. Multi-institutional (14 Spanish hospitals). Consultant anesthesiologists. A sensitivity analysis of extreme scenarios was carried out to assess the impact of the major variables in the model results. The average cost per patient was €18,772 for a typical patient with low antithrombin levels and €13,881 for a typical patient with normal antithrombin levels. The difference in cost was due mainly to the longer hospital stay of a patient with low antithrombin levels compared with a patient with normal levels (13 v 10 days, respectively, representing a €4,596 higher cost) rather than to costs related to the management of postoperative complications (€215, mostly owing to transfusions). Sensitivity analysis showed a high variability range of approximately ±55% of the base case cost between the minimum and maximum scenarios, with the hospital stay contributing more significantly to the variation. Based on this analytic decision model, there could be a marked increase in the postoperative costs of patients with low antithrombin activity levels at the end of cardiac surgery, mainly ascribed to a longer hospitalization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Heparanase Activates Antithrombin through the Binding to Its Heparin Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Águila, Sonia; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that participates in morphogenesis, tissue repair, heparan sulphates turnover and immune response processes. It is over-expressed in tumor cells favoring the metastasis as it penetrates the endothelial layer that lines blood vessels and facilitates the metastasis by degradation of heparan sulphate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix. Heparanase may also affect the hemostatic system in a non-enzymatic manner, up-regulating the expression of tissue factor, which is the initiator of blood coagulation, and dissociating tissue factor pathway inhibitor on the cell surface membrane of endothelial and tumor cells, thus resulting in a procoagulant state. Trying to check the effect of heparanase on heparin, a highly sulphated glycosaminoglycan, when it activates antithrombin, our results demonstrated that heparanase, but not proheparanase, interacted directly with antithrombin in a non-covalent manner. This interaction resulted in the activation of antithrombin, which is the most important endogenous anticoagulant. This activation mainly accelerated FXa inhibition, supporting an allosteric activation effect. Heparanase bound to the heparin binding site of antithrombin as the activation of Pro41Leu, Arg47Cys, Lys114Ala and Lys125Alaantithrombin mutants was impaired when it was compared to wild type antithrombin. Intrinsic fluorescence analysis showed that heparanase induced an activating conformational change in antithrombin similar to that induced by heparin and with a KD of 18.81 pM. In conclusion, under physiological pH and low levels of tissue factor, heparanase may exert a non-enzymatic function interacting and activating the inhibitory function of antithrombin. PMID:27322195

  13. [Class III alcohol dehydrogenase and its role in the human body].

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Sani, Tufik Alizade; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    Class III alcohol dehydrogenase is composed of two chi subunits, encoded by the ADH5 gene and existing in all tissues examined. It possesses a great ability to metabolize long-chain alcohols, while its capacity to oxidize ethanol is very limited. The amino-acid sequence homology and identical structural and kinetic properties indicate that class III alcohol dehydrogenase and formaldehyde dehydrogenase are identical enzymes. ADH III plays a significant role in the metabolism of formaldehyde in the human body.

  14. Effect of praseodymium(III) on zinc(II) species in human interstitial fluid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Wang, Jinping; Lu, Xin; Yang, Kuiyue; Niu, Chunji

    2005-11-01

    A multiphase model of metal ion species in human interstitial fluid was constructed under physiological conditions. The effect of Pr(III) on Zn(II) species was studied. At the normal conditions, Zn(II) species mainly distribute in [Zn(HSA)], [Zn(IgG)], and [Zn(Cys)(2)H](+). With the Pr(III) level increased, the apparent competition of Pr(III) for ligands lead to the redistribution of Zn(II) species.

  15. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription

    PubMed Central

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription. PMID:25764111

  16. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription.

  17. Two isoforms of human RNA polymerase III with specific functions in cell growth and transformation

    PubMed Central

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Da Silva, Daniel; Rey, Christophe; Prochazkova, Martina; Roeder, Robert G.; Besser, Daniel; Teichmann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Transcription in eukaryotic nuclei is carried out by DNA-dependent RNA polymerases I, II, and III. Human RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcribes small untranslated RNAs that include tRNAs, 5S RNA, U6 RNA, and some microRNAs. Increased Pol III transcription has been reported to accompany or cause cell transformation. Here we describe a Pol III subunit (RPC32β) that led to the demonstration of two human Pol III isoforms (Pol IIIα and Pol IIIβ). RPC32β-containing Pol IIIβ is ubiquitously expressed and essential for growth of human cells. RPC32α-containing Pol IIIα is dispensable for cell survival, with expression being restricted to undifferentiated ES cells and to tumor cells. In this regard, and most importantly, suppression of RPC32α expression impedes anchorage-independent growth of HeLa cells, whereas ectopic expression of RPC32α in IMR90 fibroblasts enhances cell transformation and dramatically changes the expression of several tumor-related mRNAs and that of a subset of Pol III RNAs. These results identify a human Pol III isoform and isoform-specific functions in the regulation of cell growth and transformation. PMID:20154270

  18. A capillary zone electrophoresis method to detect conformers and dimers of antithrombin in therapeutic preparations.

    PubMed

    Marie, Anne-Lise; Tran, Nguyet Thuy; Saller, François; Abdou, Youmna Mohamed; Zeau, Pascal; Plantier, Jean-Luc; Urbain, Rémi; Borgel, Delphine; Taverna, Myriam

    2016-07-01

    Antithrombin (AT) is a human plasma glycoprotein that possesses anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the native (active) form of AT is unstable and undergoes conformational changes, leading to latent, cleaved, and heterodimeric forms. The presence of these alternative forms mostly inactive can highly impact the quality and therapeutic activity of pharmaceutical AT preparations. We developed a capillary zone electrophoresis method, based on a neutral polyethylene oxide-coated capillary and a buffer close to physiological conditions, enabling the separation of more than eight forms of AT. Several peaks were identified as native, latent, and heterodimeric forms. The CZE method was reproducible with intraday relative standard deviations less than 0.5 and 2% for migration times and peak areas, respectively. The method was applied to the comparison of AT preparations produced by five competitive pharmaceutical companies, and statistical tests were performed. Important differences in the proportion of each form were highlighted. In particular, one AT preparation was shown to contain a high quantity of heterodimer, and two preparations contained high quantities of latent form. In addition, one AT preparation exhibited additional forms, not yet identified. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Different duplex/quadruplex junctions determine the properties of anti-thrombin aptamers with mixed folding.

    PubMed

    Russo Krauss, Irene; Spiridonova, Vera; Pica, Andrea; Napolitano, Valeria; Sica, Filomena

    2016-01-29

    Mixed duplex/quadruplex oligonucleotides have attracted great interest as therapeutic targets as well as effective biomedical aptamers. In the case of thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA), the addition of a duplex motif to the G-quadruplex module improves the aptamer resistance to biodegradation and the affinity for thrombin. In particular, the mixed oligonucleotide RE31 is significantly more effective than TBA in anticoagulation experiments and shows a slower disappearance rate in human plasma and blood. In the crystal structure of the complex with thrombin, RE31 adopts an elongated structure in which the duplex and quadruplex regions are perfectly stacked on top of each other, firmly connected by a well-structured junction. The lock-and-key shape complementarity between the TT loops of the G-quadruplex and the protein exosite I gives rise to the basic interaction that stabilizes the complex. However, our data suggest that the duplex motif may have an active role in determining the greater anti-thrombin activity in biological fluids with respect to TBA. This work gives new information on mixed oligonucleotides and highlights the importance of structural data on duplex/quadruplex junctions, which appear to be varied, unpredictable, and fundamental in determining the aptamer functional properties.

  20. LuIII parvovirus selectively and efficiently targets, replicates in, and kills human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Paglino, Justin C; Ozduman, Koray; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2012-07-01

    Because productive infection by parvoviruses requires cell division and is enhanced by oncogenic transformation, some parvoviruses may have potential utility in killing cancer cells. To identify the parvovirus(es) with the optimal oncolytic effect against human glioblastomas, we screened 12 parvoviruses at a high multiplicity of infection (MOI). MVMi, MVMc, MVM-G17, tumor virus X (TVX), canine parvovirus (CPV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), rat parvovirus 1A (RPV1A), and H-3 were relatively ineffective. The four viruses with the greatest oncolytic activity, LuIII, H-1, MVMp, and MVM-G52, were tested for the ability, at a low MOI, to progressively infect the culture over time, causing cell death at a rate higher than that of cell proliferation. LuIII alone was effective in all five human glioblastomas tested. H-1 progressively infected only two of five; MVMp and MVM-G52 were ineffective in all five. To investigate the underlying mechanism of LuIII's phenotype, we used recombinant parvoviruses with the LuIII capsid replacing the MVMp capsid or with molecular alteration of the P4 promoter. The LuIII capsid enhanced efficient replication and oncolysis in MO59J gliomas cells; other gliomas tested required the entire LuIII genome to exhibit enhanced infection. LuIII selectively infected glioma cells over normal glial cells in vitro. In mouse models, human glioblastoma xenografts were selectively infected by LuIII when administered intratumorally; LuIII reduced tumor growth by 75%. LuIII also had the capacity to selectively infect subcutaneous or intracranial gliomas after intravenous inoculation. Intravenous or intracranial LuIII caused no adverse effects. Intracranial LuIII caused no infection of mature mouse neurons or glia in vivo but showed a modest infection of developing neurons.

  1. LuIII Parvovirus Selectively and Efficiently Targets, Replicates in, and Kills Human Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paglino, Justin C.; Ozduman, Koray

    2012-01-01

    Because productive infection by parvoviruses requires cell division and is enhanced by oncogenic transformation, some parvoviruses may have potential utility in killing cancer cells. To identify the parvovirus(es) with the optimal oncolytic effect against human glioblastomas, we screened 12 parvoviruses at a high multiplicity of infection (MOI). MVMi, MVMc, MVM-G17, tumor virus X (TVX), canine parvovirus (CPV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), rat parvovirus 1A (RPV1A), and H-3 were relatively ineffective. The four viruses with the greatest oncolytic activity, LuIII, H-1, MVMp, and MVM-G52, were tested for the ability, at a low MOI, to progressively infect the culture over time, causing cell death at a rate higher than that of cell proliferation. LuIII alone was effective in all five human glioblastomas tested. H-1 progressively infected only two of five; MVMp and MVM-G52 were ineffective in all five. To investigate the underlying mechanism of LuIII's phenotype, we used recombinant parvoviruses with the LuIII capsid replacing the MVMp capsid or with molecular alteration of the P4 promoter. The LuIII capsid enhanced efficient replication and oncolysis in MO59J gliomas cells; other gliomas tested required the entire LuIII genome to exhibit enhanced infection. LuIII selectively infected glioma cells over normal glial cells in vitro. In mouse models, human glioblastoma xenografts were selectively infected by LuIII when administered intratumorally; LuIII reduced tumor growth by 75%. LuIII also had the capacity to selectively infect subcutaneous or intracranial gliomas after intravenous inoculation. Intravenous or intracranial LuIII caused no adverse effects. Intracranial LuIII caused no infection of mature mouse neurons or glia in vivo but showed a modest infection of developing neurons. PMID:22553327

  2. Hydration structure of antithrombin conformers and water transfer during reactive loop insertion.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, J; McGee, M P

    1998-01-01

    The serine protease inhibitor antithrombin undergoes extensive conformational changes during functional interaction with its target proteases. Changes include insertion of the reactive loop region into a beta-sheet structure in the protein core. We explore the possibility that these changes are linked to water transfer. Volumes of water transferred during inhibition of coagulation factor Xa are compared to water-permeable volumes in the x-ray structure of two different antithrombin conformers. In one conformer, the reactive loop is largely exposed to solvent, and in the other, the loop is inserted. Hydration fingerprints of antithrombin (that is, water-permeable pockets) are analyzed to determine their location, volume, and size of access pores, using alpha shape-based methods from computational geometry. Water transfer during reactions is calculated from changes in rate with osmotic pressure. Hydration fingerprints prove markedly different in the two conformers. There is an excess of 61-76 water molecules in loop-exposed as compared to loop-inserted conformers. Quantitatively, rate increases with osmotic pressure are consistent with the transfer of 73 +/- 7 water molecules. This study demonstrates that conformational changes of antithrombin, including loop insertion, are linked to water transfer from antithrombin to bulk solution. It also illustrates the combined use of osmotic stress and analytical geometry as a new and effective tool for structure/function studies. PMID:9675160

  3. Antithrombin deficiency in three Japanese families: one novel and two reported point mutations in the antithrombin gene.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Keiko; Morishita, Eriko; Karato, Megumi; Kadono, Tadaaki; Sekiya, Akiko; Goto, Yukie; Sato, Tomomi; Nomoto, Haruka; Omi, Wataru; Tsuzura, Sachie; Imai, Hidenori; Asakura, Hidesaku; Ohtake, Shigeki; Nakao, Shinji

    2013-08-01

    Inherited antithrombin (AT) deficiency is associated with a predisposition to familial venous thromboembolic disease. We analyzed the AT gene in three unrelated patients with an AT deficiency who developed thrombosis. We analyzed the SERPINC1 gene in three patients. Additionally, we expressed the three mutants in the COS-1 cells and compared their secretion rates and levels of AT activity with those of the wild-type (WT). We identified three distinct heterozygous mutations of c.2534C>T: p.56Arginine → Cysteine (R56C), c.13398C>A: p.459Alanine → Aspartic acid (A459D) and c.2703C>G: p.112 Proline → Arginine (P112R). In the in vitro expression experiments, the AT antigen levels in the conditioned media (CM) of the R56C mutant were nearly equal to those of WT. In contrast, the AT antigen levels in the CM of the A459D and P112R mutants were significantly decreased. The AT activity of R56C was decreased in association with a shorter incubation time in a FXa inhibition assay and a thrombin inhibition-based activity test. However, the AT activity of R56C was comparable to that of WT when the incubation time was increased. We concluded that the R56C mutant is responsible for type II HBS deficiency. We considered that the A459D and P112R mutants can be classified as belonging to the type I AT deficiency. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation frequency and antithrombin activity levels in 120 of deep venous thrombosis and 150 of cerebral infarction patients in a single center in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-sen; Tang, Yang-ming; Tang, Mei-qing; Qing, Zi-Ju; Shu, Chang; Tang, Xiang-qi; Deng, Ming-yang; Tan, Li-ming

    2010-09-01

    Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation shows a relatively high frequency in western population. Some studies suggest that the mutation is an independent genetic risk factor both for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and for arterial thrombosis, but whether the mutation has racial difference or has a general significance for thrombophilia remains unclear. In this study we performed an analysis of the prevalence of the mutation in Chinese southern population; Also, the antithrombin activity levels were evaluated in each investigated individual. The studies included 120 patients with DVT, 150 patients with cerebral infarction, and 110 controls. The mutation was detected using polymerase chain reaction/PvuII restrictive fragment length polymorphism procedures. Antithrombin activity assay was done using chromogenic substrate method. The results showed that no antithrombin Cambridge II mutation was detected in all three groups (DVT, cerebral infarction and controls), the incidence was 0/380. Plasma antithrombin activity was 91.37% +/- 16.15% in the DVT patients and 102.68% +/- 13.10% in the controls; the antithrombin activity was significantly reduced in the DVT group (P < 0.0001). In DVT patients, eight cases were identified as primary antithrombin deficiency, accounting for an incidence of 6.7%. No significant difference was found for antithrombin activity between cerebral infarction group and controls. These results suggest that antithrombin Cambridge II mutation has a racial difference, and may not be a valuable risk factor of thrombophilia in Asian population, and antithrombin deficiency remains a major genetic risk factor for DVT patients in China.

  5. Interaction of the hemolytic lectin, CEL-III, with cultured human leukemic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sallay, I; Moriwaki, S; Nakamura, O; Yasuda, S; Kimura, M; Yamasaki, N; Itoh, K; Ohba, H

    2000-12-01

    We studied interaction of CEL-III with cultured human leukemic cell lines and lymphocytes from normal adults by evaluating the extent of cytotoxicity and cytoagglutination. Among acute T lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines, CEL-III displayed increased toxicity against different acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell lines as a function of increasing differentiation stage. In the case of acute B lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) cell lines, CEL-III showed strong cytotoxicity against relatively immature cell lines. We found that CEL-III was more toxic for ALL cell lines than leukocytes obtained from peripheral blood of healthy adults. Strong influence of the additional amount of calcium ion on the extent of cytotoxicity was observed. In addition, we describe a new way to evaluate the extent of cytoagglutination in "% of agglutinated cells". These findings make CEL-III a promising candidate in research for lectins which bind to and destroy only the targeted leukemic cells.

  6. Hunting the human DPP III active conformation: combined thermodynamic and QM/MM calculations.

    PubMed

    Tomić, Antonija; Tomić, Sanja

    2014-11-07

    Multiple choices of the protein active conformations in flexible metalloenzymes complicate study of their catalytic mechanism. We used three different conformations of human dipeptidyl-peptidase III (DPP III) to investigate the influence of the protein environment on ligand binding and the Zn(2+) coordination. MD simulations followed by calculations of binding free energy components accomplished for a series of DPP III substrates, both synthetic and natural, revealed that binding of the β-strand shaped substrate to the five-stranded β-core of the compact DPP III form (in antiparallel fashion) is the preferred binding mode, in agreement with the experimentally determined structure of the DPP III inactive mutant-tynorphin complex (Bezerra et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2012, 109, 6525). Previously it was proposed that the catalytic mechanism of DPP III is similar to that of thermolysin, which assumes exchange of five and four coordinated Zn(2+), and activation of Zn-bound water by a nearby Glu. Our QM/MM calculations, performed for a total of 18 protein structures with different zinc ion environments, revealed that the 5-coordinated metal ion is more favourable than the 6-coordinated one in only the most compact DPP III form. Besides, in this structure E451 is H-bonded to the metal ion coordinating water. Also, our study revealed two constraints for the broad substrate specificity of DPP III. One is the possibility of the substrate adopting the β-strand shape and the other is its charged N-terminus. Altogether, we assume that the human DPP III active conformation would be the most compact form, similar to the "closed X-ray" DPP III structure.

  7. Characterization of polymorphic forms of Fc receptor III on human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Ory, P A; Goldstein, I M; Kwoh, E E; Clarkson, S B

    1989-01-01

    We characterized Fc receptor III (FcR III) on human neutrophils and found it to be heavily glycosylated and polymorphic. In some individuals, FcR III that had been digested with N-glycanase appeared after SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions as two bands with apparent molecular masses of 33 and 29 kD. In other individuals, N-glycanase-treated FcR III appeared as a single band with an Mr of either 33 or 29 kD. After SDS-PAGE of N-glycanase-treated FcR III under nonreducing conditions, the apparent Mr of each structural type was decreased, suggesting the presence of intramolecular disulfide bonds. Digestion of the 33-kD band and the 29-kD band with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease yielded similar, but not identical, peptide maps. Thus, at least two polymorphic forms of FcR III are expressed on human neutrophils. The structural polymorphism of neutrophil FcR III correlated with previously described antigenic polymorphisms detected by monoclonal antibody Gran 11 and by alloantisera which recognize epitopes of the biallelic, neutrophil antigen (NA) system. Individuals whose neutrophils expressed the two-band structural type of FcR III were NA1NA2 heterozygotes. Individuals whose neutrophils expressed the single 33-kD band structural type were NA2NA2 homozygotes, and individuals whose neutrophils expressed the single 29-kD band structural type were NA1NA1 homozygotes. These findings indicate that antigenic and structural polymorphisms of human neutrophil FcR III are related and can be accounted for by differences at the level of primary protein structure. Images PMID:2523415

  8. Human dipeptidyl peptidase III acts as a post-proline-cleaving enzyme on endomorphins.

    PubMed

    Barsun, Marina; Jajcanin, Nina; Vukelić, Bojana; Spoljarić, Jasminka; Abramić, Marija

    2007-03-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase III (DPP III) is a zinc exopeptidase with an implied role in the mammalian pain-modulatory system owing to its high affinity for enkephalins and localisation in the superficial laminae of the spinal cord dorsal horn. Our study revealed that this human enzyme hydrolyses opioid peptides belonging to three new groups, endomorphins, hemorphins and exorphins. The enzymatic hydrolysis products of endomorphin-1 were separated and quantified by capillary electrophoresis and the kinetic parameters were determined for human DPP III and rat DPP IV. Both peptidases cleave endomorphin-1 at comparable rates, with liberation of the N-terminal Tyr-Pro. This is the first evidence of DPP III acting as an endomorphin-cleaving enzyme.

  9. Fine Arts and Humanities: Grade 7. Cluster III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Olivia H.

    A curriculum guide for Grade 7, the document is devoted to the occupational cluster "Fine Arts and Humanities." It is divided into five units: drama and literature, music, dance, art, and crafts. Each unit is introduced by a statement of the topic, the unit's purpose, main ideas, quests, and a list of career opportunities…

  10. Molecular genetics of human immune responsiveness to Lolium perenne (rye) allergen, Lol p III.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Freidhoff, L R; Marsh, D G

    1989-01-01

    Lol p II and III are each about 11-kD protein allergens from the pollen of Lolium perenne (rye grass). We have found that human immune responses (IgE and IgG antibodies) to both proteins are significantly associated with HLA-DR3. In addition, the two proteins are cross-reactive with the antibodies in many human sera (about 84% human sera showed the cross-reactivity). We have determined greater than 90% of the amino acid sequences of the two proteins and found that they are at least 54% homologous. Berzofsky found that 75% of the 23 known T cell sites in various proteins had an amphipathic structure. Our analysis by the same method showed that both Lol p II and III have a major region of amphipathicity (at residues 61-67, Lol p III numbering) which might contain sites for binding to an Ia molecule and a T cell receptor. This region is identical between Lol p II and III, except for an Arg-Lys substitution, and could account, in part, for the DR3 association with responsiveness to both molecules. An interesting difference between the two proteins is that immune response to Lol p III is associated with DR5 (in addition to DR3), whereas no DR5 association is found in the case of Lol p II. One possibility is that Lol p III has an additional site which binds to the DR5 Ia molecule. Lol p III indeed has a second highly amphiphathic peptide, 24-30 (Lol p III 24 R P G D T L A 30), which is different and not amphipathic in Lol p II.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Human erythrocytes and neuroblastoma cells are affected in vitro by Au(III) ions

    SciTech Connect

    Suwalsky, Mario; Gonzalez, Raquel; Villena, Fernando; Aguilar, Luis F.; Sotomayor, Carlos P.; Bolognin, Silvia; Zatta, Paolo

    2010-06-25

    Gold compounds are well known for their neurological and nephrotoxic implications. However, haematological toxicity is one of the most serious toxic and less studied effects. The lack of information on these aspects of Au(III) prompted us to study the structural effects induced on cell membranes, particularly that of human erythrocytes. AuCl{sub 3} was incubated with intact erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM) and molecular models of the erythrocyte membrane. The latter consisted of multibilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine, phospholipids classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. This report presents evidence that Au(III) interacts with red cell membranes as follows: (a) in scanning electron microscopy studies on human erythrocytes it was observed that Au(III) induced shape changes at a concentration as low as 0.01 {mu}M; (b) in isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes Au(III) induced a decrease in the molecular dynamics and/or water content at the glycerol backbone level of the lipid bilayer polar groups in a 5-50 {mu}M concentration range, and (c) X-ray diffraction studies showed that Au(III) in the 10 {mu}m-1 mM range induced increasing structural perturbation only to dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers. Additional experiments were performed in human neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y. A statistically significant decrease of cell viability was observed with Au(III) ranging from 0.1 {mu}M to 100 {mu}M.

  12. Comparison of Hybrid-III and postmortem human surrogate response to simulated underbody blast loading.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Ann Marie; Christopher, John J; Salzar, Robert S; Brozoski, Frederick

    2015-05-01

    Response of the human body to high-rate vertical loading, such as military vehicle underbody blast (UBB), is not well understood because of the chaotic nature of such events. The purpose of this research was to compare the response of postmortem human surrogates (PMHS) and the Hybrid-III anthropomorphic test device (ATD) to simulated UBB loading ranging from 100 to 860 g seat and floor acceleration. Data from 13 whole body PMHS tests were used to create response corridors for vertical loading conditions for the pelvis, T1, head, femur, and tibia; these responses were compared to Hybrid-III responses under matched loading conditions.

  13. [Separation and purification of human apolipoproteins A-I and C-III by chromatofocusing].

    PubMed

    Cheng, B

    1993-08-01

    Human very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) were isolated and purified by a process of combined dextran sulfate precipitation and density gradient ultracentrifugation. Chromatofocusing, which separates protein based on differences in isoelectric point, was used to separate apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and apolipoprotein C-III from human HDL and VLDL, respectively. Discontinuous SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and analytical isoelectric focusing (IEF) were used to study the purity of different fractions. Both purified apoA-I and apoC-III showed single bands on SDS-PAGE at molecular weights of 28183 and 9400 Daltons, respectively. As determined by IEF in the presence of 8 mol/L urea, apoA-I had eight isoforms with pI of 5.66-5.87. The pI's of the three isoproteins of apoC-III (C-III0, C-III1 and C-III2) were 5.06, 4.88 and 4.72, respectively. Chromatofocusing, a new simple technique combining the high resolving power of IEF with the high capacity of ion-exchange column chromatography, is extremely valuable for large-scale purification of the major apolipoproteins of VLDL and HDL.

  14. Inactivation of human T-cell lymphotropic virus, type III by heat, chemicals, and irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinnan, G.V. Jr.; Wells, M.A.; Wittek, A.E.; Phelan, M.A.; Mayner, R.E.; Feinstone, S.; Purcell, R.H.; Epstein, J.S.

    1986-09-01

    Infectivity of human T-cell lymphotropic virus, Type III (HTLV-III) was inactivated by heat more rapidly if in liquid medium than if lyophilized and more rapidly at 60 than 56/sup 0/C. When HTLV-III was added to factor VIII suspension, then lyophilized and heated at 60/sup 0/C for 2 hours or longer there was elimination of 1 X 10(6) in vitro infectious units (IVIU) of virus. Much of the viral inactivation appeared to result from lyophilization. The application of water-saturated chloroform to the lyophilized material containing virus also resulted in elimination of infectivity. HTLV-III was efficiently inactivated by formalin, beta-propiolactone, ethyl ether, detergent, and ultraviolet light plus psoralen. The results are reassuring regarding the potential safety of various biological products.

  15. humMR1, a highly specific humanized single chain antibody for targeting EGFRvIII.

    PubMed

    Safdari, Yaghoub; Farajnia, Safar; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Omidfar, Kobra; Khalili, Masoumeh

    2014-02-01

    Production of an efficient humanized single chain antibody is reported here to specifically target EGFRvIII, a truncated receptor expressed in a wide variety of human cancers. CDR loops of MR1, a phage display-derived murine single chain antibody developed against this mutant receptor, were grafted on human frameworks that had been selected based on similarity to MR1 in terms of two distinct parameters, variable domain protein sequence and CDR canonical structures. Moreover, two point mutations were introduced in CDR-H2 and CDR-H3 loops of the humanized antibody to destroy its cross-reactivity to wild-type EGFR. The resultant antibody, referred to as humMR1, was found by MTT assay, ELISA and western blot techniques to be highly specific for EGFRvIII. The affinity of this antibody for EGFRvIII-specific 14-amino acid synthetic peptide and HC2 cells were measured to be 1.87 × 10(10) and 2.17 × 10(10)/M respectively. This humanized antibody leads to 78.5% inhibition in proliferation of EGFRvIII-overexpressing cells.

  16. Cobalt(II)-substituted class III alcohol and sorbitol dehydrogenases from human liver.

    PubMed

    Maret, W

    1989-12-26

    The catalytic zinc atoms in class III (chi) alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) from human liver have been specifically removed and replaced by cobalt(II) with a new ultrafiltration technique. The electronic absorption spectrum of class III cobalt ADH (epsiolon 638 = 870 M-1 cm-1) is nearly identical with those of active site substituted horse EE and human class I (beta 1 beta 1) cobalt ADH. Thus, the coordination environment of the catalytic metal is strictly conserved in these enzymes. However, significant differences are noted when the spectra of class III ADH-coenzyme complexes are compared to the corresponding spectra of the horse enzyme. The spectrum of class III ADH.NADH is split into three bands, centered at 680, 638, and 562 nm. The class III ADH.NAD+ species resembles the alkaline form of the corresponding horse enzyme complex but without exhibiting the pH dependence of the latter. These spectral changes underscore the role of the coenzymes in differentially fine tuning the catalytic metal for its particular function in each ADH. The noncatalytic zinc of class III ADH exchanges with cobalt at pH 7.0. While 9 residues out of 15 in the loop surrounding the noncatalytic zinc of class III ADH differ from those of the class I ADH, the electronic absorption spectra of cobalt in the noncatalytic metal site of class III ADH establish that the coordination environment of this site is conserved as well. The spectrum of cobalt SDH differs significantly from those of cobalt ADHs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Intracerebral delivery of a third generation EGFRvIII-specific chimeric antigen receptor is efficacious against human glioma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bryan D; Suryadevara, Carter M; Gedeon, Patrick C; Herndon, James E; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Bigner, Darell D; Sampson, John H

    2014-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CAR)-transduced T cells hold great promise in the treatment of malignant disease. Here, we demonstrate that intracerebral injection with a human, epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII)-specific, third generation CAR successfully treats glioma in mice. Importantly, these results endorse clinical translation of this CAR in patients with EGFRvIII-expressing brain tumors.

  18. Chromium III histidinate exposure modulates antioxidant gene expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While the toxicity of hexavalent chromium is well established, trivalent Cr (Cr(III)) is an essential nutrient involved in insulin and glucose homeostasis. Recently, antioxidant effects of chromium (III) histidinate (Cr(III)His) were reported in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress...

  19. The ontogenesis of human fetal hormones. III. Prolactin.

    PubMed Central

    Aubert, M J; Grumbach, M M; Kaplan, S L

    1975-01-01

    The synthesis and release of human prolactin (hPRL) in the human fetus was assessed by radioimmunoassay analysis of the content and concentration of hPRL in 82 pituitary glands and the concentration of serum hPRL in 47 fetuses of gestational age 68 days to term. Fetal hPRL exhibited parallelism with the reference standard (Lewis 203-1). hPRL was detected by 68 days of gestation (10 wk), the earliest fetal pituitary gland studied; 8 out of 33 pituitaries had a prolactin (PRL) content above 2.0 ng between 10-15 wk gestation. The mean ocntent of PRL in the pituitary gland increased sharply from 14.8 plus or minus 4.6 ng at 15-19 wk to 405 plus or minus 142 ng at 20-24 wk and 542 plus or minus ng at 25-29 wk gestation. By term, the mean content was 2,039 plus or minus 459 (range 493-3,689) and the mean concentration 15.9 plus or minus 2.4 ng/mg (range 7-20). There was a significant positive correlation (P less than 0.001) between the hPRL and human growth hormone (hGH) content of fetal pituitary glands; at term the hPRL/hGH ratio was 1/290. The concentration of serum hPRL between 12 and 24 wk ranged from 2.9 to 67 ng/ml, mean 19.5 plus or minus 2.5 ng/ml )n = 21); by 26 wk fetal serum hPRL increased sharply and attained levels of 300-500 ng/ml in late gestation. At delivery, the mean plasma concentration of hPRL was 167 plus or minus 14.2 ng/ml in 36 umbilical venous specimens and 111.8 plus or minus 12.3 ng/ml in the matched maternal venous specimens. No correlation between serum hPRL and the pituitary content or concentration of hPRL was demonstrable in 12 matched fetal specimens. In five anencephalic infants, umbilical venous hPRL levels were between 65 and 283 ng/ml. In two anencephalic infants, thyrotropin releasing factor (TRF) (200 mug IV) evoked a rise in serum hPRL in one patient from 43 to 156 ng/ml at 30 min, and in the other from 65 to 404 ng/ml at 120 min. In both patients, plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) rose from undetectable base-line levels to

  20. Molecular and biochemical evidence for the presence of type III adenylyl cyclase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Katsel, Pavel L; Tagliente, Thomas M; Schwarz, Todd E; Craddock-Royal, Barbara D; Patel, Nayana D; Maayani, Saul

    2003-02-01

    The isoform(s) of adenylyl cyclase (AC) present in human platelets has not been identified, and evidence supporting a role for AC in platelet aggregation is equivocal. We recently characterized deaggregation as an active component of the platelet aggregation response that may be an important determinant of the extent and duration of aggregation. G(i)-coupled receptors are linked to the inhibition of AC and are targets of antiplatelet drugs. They also affect platelet aggregation by modulating deaggregation, suggesting a role for AC in modulating this response. The purpose of this study was to identify the AC isoform(s) present in human platelets and to identify its physiological modulators. RT-PCR screening of platelet, buffy coat layer cell and bone marrow megakaryocyte cDNA, and Western blot analysis with AC type III (AC-III) antibodies identified AC-III in platelets and in megakaryocytes. Human platelet AC-III was cloned and expressed in HEK293 cells and its characteristics compared to native platelet AC. Both platelet AC and cloned AC-III required Mg(2+) for activity, were insensitive to Ca(2+) and were G(s)- and G(i)-coupled. Zn(2+) and SQ22536 inhibited platelet AC activity. The affinity of SQ22536 was increased with Mg(2+)-related stimulation of AC, while that of Zn(2+) was unchanged, which is consistent with a non-competitive interaction between the two metal ions on AC. The Zn(2+) chelator TPEN reversed the inhibitory effects of Zn(2+). This study identified AC-III as the predominant AC isoform in human platelets, the activity of which may affect the extent and duration of the net aggregation response by modulating deaggregation.

  1. Human DNA ligase III recognizes DNA ends by dynamic switching between two DNA-bound states.

    PubMed

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A; Tomkinson, Alan E; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-07-27

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a "jackknife model" in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers.

  2. Human DNA Ligase III Recognizes DNA Ends by Dynamic Switching between Two DNA-Bound States

    SciTech Connect

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-09-13

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a 'jackknife model' in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers.

  3. Hypoglycosylation is a common finding in antithrombin deficiency in the absence of a SERPINC1 gene defect.

    PubMed

    de la Morena-Barrio, M E; Martínez-Martínez, I; de Cos, C; Wypasek, E; Roldán, V; Undas, A; van Scherpenzeel, M; Lefeber, D J; Toderici, M; Sevivas, T; España, F; Jaeken, J; Corral, J; Vicente, V

    2016-08-01

    Essentials We investigated the molecular base of antithrombin deficiency in cases without SERPINC1 defects. 27% of cases presented hypoglycosylation, transient in 62% and not restricted to antithrombin. Variations in genes involved in N-glycosylation underline this phenotype. These results support a new form of thrombophilia. Click here to listen to Dr Huntington's perspective on thrombin inhibition by the serpins Background Since the discovery of antithrombin deficiency, 50 years ago, few new thrombophilic defects have been identified, all with weaker risk of thrombosis than antithrombin deficiency. Objective To identify new thrombophilic mechanisms. Patients/methods We studied 30 patients with antithrombin deficiency but no defects in the gene encoding this key anticoagulant (SERPINC1). Results A high proportion of these patients (8/30: 27%) had increased hypoglycosylated forms of antithrombin. All N-glycoproteins tested in these patients (α1-antitrypsin, FXI and transferrin) had electrophoretic, HPLC and Q-TOF patterns indistinguishable from those of the congenital disorders of glycosylation (rare recessive multisystem disorders). However, all except one had no mental disability. Moreover, intermittent antithrombin deficiency and hypoglycosylation was recorded in five out of these eight patients, all associated with moderate alcohol intake. Genetic analysis, including whole exome sequencing, revealed mutations in different genes involved in the N-glycosylation pathway. Conclusions Our study provides substantial and novel mechanistic insights into two disease processes, with potential implications for diagnosis and clinical care. An aberrant N-glycosylation causing a recessive or transient antithrombin deficiency is a new form of thrombophilia. Our data suggest that congenital disorders of glycosylation are probably underestimated, especially in cases with thrombosis as the main or only clinical manifestation. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and

  4. Antithrombotic and thrombolytic effects of antithrombin: comparison with either heparin or defibrase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaru, Takanobu; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Miwa, Atsuko; Fujimori, Yoshiharu; Uchida, Yasumi

    1993-05-01

    Anti-thrombotic and thrombolytic effects of anti-thrombin agent (Argatroban;Arg 0.5 mg/kg) was evaluated by angioscopy and compared with heparin (250 U/kg). Occlusive thrombus was produced in canine iliac artery by balloon injury. At another side, balloon denudation was attempted at 20 minutes after the administration of the agent. One hour thrombus was control. Angioscopic percent luminal obstruction with thrombus reduced by Arg (from 69 to 32%, P < 0.0001), but not by heparin (from 53% to 59%). Both agents had antithrombotic effects and prevented thrombus formation. The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) prolonged to 190% with argatroban and 1253% with heparin (P < 0.0001). Thus, antithrombin agent has both preventive effect of thrombosis and thrombolytic effect without marked prolongation of the APTT.

  5. Non-enzymatic glycation reduces heparin cofactor II anti-thrombin activity.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Milani, M R; Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Lefebvre, P

    1990-04-01

    The effects of non-enzymatic glycation on heparin cofactor II activity, at glucose concentrations which might be expected in physiological or diabetic conditions have been evaluated in this study. Radiolabelled glucose incorporation was associated with a loss of heparin cofactor anti-thrombin activity. The heparin cofactor heparin and dermatan sulfate-dependent inhibition of thrombin was significantly reduced, showing a remarkable decrease of the maximum second order rate constant. This study shows that heparin cofactor can be glycated at glucose concentrations found in the blood, and that this phenomenon produces a loss of heparin cofactor-antithrombin activity. These data suggest, furthermore, a possible link between heparin cofactor glycation and the pathogenesis of thrombosis in diabetes mellitus.

  6. Cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of Cr(VI), Cr(III)-nitrate and Cr(III)-EDTA complex in human hepatoma (HepG2) cells.

    PubMed

    Novotnik, Breda; Ščančar, Janez; Milačič, Radmila; Filipič, Metka; Žegura, Bojana

    2016-07-01

    Chromium (Cr) and ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) are common environmental pollutants and can be present in high concentrations in surface waters at the same time. Therefore, chelation of Cr with EDTA can occur and thereby stable Cr(III)-EDTA complex is formed. Since there are no literature data on Cr(III)-EDTA toxicity, the aim of our work was to evaluate and compare Cr(III)-EDTA cytotoxic and genotoxic activity with those of Cr(VI) and Cr(III)-nitrate in human hepatoma (HepG2) cell line. First the effect of Cr(VI), Cr(III)-nitrate and Cr(III)-EDTA on cell viability was studied in the concentration range from 0.04 μg mL(-1) to 25 μg mL(-1) after 24 h exposure. Further the influence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of Cr(VI), Cr(III)-nitrate and Cr(III)-EDTA on DNA damage and genomic stability was determined with the comet assay and cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome assay, respectively. Cell viability was decreased only by Cr(VI) at concentrations above 1.0 μg mL(-1). Cr(VI) at ≥0.2 μg mL(-1) and Cr(III) at ≥1.0 μg mL(-1) induced DNA damage, while after Cr(III)-EDTA exposure no formation DNA strand breaks was determined. Statistically significant formation of micronuclei was induced only by Cr(VI) at ≥0.2 μg mL(-1), while no influence on the frequency of nuclear buds nor nucleoplasmic bridges was observed at any exposure. This study provides the first evidence that Cr(III)-EDTA did not induce DNA damage and had no influence on the genomic stability of HepG2 cells.

  7. Specific cleavage of human type III and IV collagens by Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Heck, L W; Morihara, K; McRae, W B; Miller, E J

    1986-01-01

    Purified Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase cleaved human type III and IV collagens with the formation of specific cleavage products. Furthermore, type I collagen appeared to be slowly cleaved by both P. aeruginosa elastase and alkaline protease. These cleavage fragments from type III and IV collagens were separated from the intact collagen chains by SDS polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis run under reducing conditions, and they were detected by their characteristic Coomassie blue staining pattern. The results of these studies suggest that the pathogenesis of tissue invasion and hemorrhagic tissue necrosis observed in P. aeruginosa infections may be related to the degradation of these collagen types by bacterial extracellular proteases. Images PMID:3079727

  8. Binding of Cerebratulus cytolysin A-III to human erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, K M

    1985-01-10

    Binding of Cerebratulus lacteus cytolysin A-III to intact human erythrocytes and erythrocyte membranes has been investigated. Binding to ghosts is essentially complete within 2.5 min of mixing which is slightly faster than the rate of hemolysis measured with intact cells. Approximately 4 X 10(4) binding sites per cell, exhibiting a K 0.5 of 0.7 microM exist; this compares with 50% hematocrit of about 0.3 microM for A-III. Binding is absent in ghosts extracted with Nonidet P-40, but is unaffected by pretreatment of ghosts with either trypsin or elastase.

  9. Mechanism of poly(acrylic acid) acceleration of antithrombin inhibition of thrombin: implications for the design of novel heparin mimics.

    PubMed

    Monien, Bernhard H; Cheang, Kai I; Desai, Umesh R

    2005-08-11

    The bridging mechanism of antithrombin inhibition of thrombin is a dominant mechanism contributing a massive approximately 2500-fold acceleration in the reaction rate and is also a key reason for the clinical usage of heparin. Our recent study of the antithrombin-activating properties of a carboxylic acid-based polymer, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), demonstrated a surprisingly high acceleration in thrombin inhibition (Monien, B. H.; Desai, U. R. J. Med. Chem. 2005, 48, 1269). To better understand this interesting phenomenon, we have studied the mechanism of PAA-dependent acceleration in antithrombin inhibition of thrombin. Competitive binding studies with low-affinity heparin and a heparin tetrasaccharide suggest that PAA binds antithrombin in both the pentasaccharide- and the extended heparin-binding sites, and these results are corroborated by molecular modeling. The salt-dependence of the K(D) of the PAA-antithrombin interaction shows the formation of five ionic interactions. In contrast, the contribution of nonionic forces is miniscule, resulting in an interaction that is significantly weaker than that observed for heparins. A bell-shaped profile of the observed rate constant for antithrombin inhibition of thrombin as a function of PAA concentration was observed, suggesting that inhibition proceeds through the "bridging" mechanism. The knowledge gained in this mechanistic study highlights important rules for the rational design of orally available heparin mimics.

  10. Identification of Antithrombin-Modulating Genes. Role of LARGE, a Gene Encoding a Bifunctional Glycosyltransferase, in the Secretion of Proteins?

    PubMed Central

    de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Buil, Alfonso; Antón, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Miñano, Antonia; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo; Navarro-Fernández, José; Aguila, Sonia; Souto, Juan Carlos; Vicente, Vicente; Soria, José Manuel; Corral, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The haemostatic relevance of antithrombin together with the low genetic variability of SERPINC1, and the high heritability of plasma levels encourage the search for modulating genes. We used a hypothesis-free approach to identify these genes, evaluating associations between plasma antithrombin and 307,984 polymorphisms in the GAIT study (352 individuals from 21 Spanish families). Despite no SNP reaching the genome wide significance threshold, we verified milder positive associations in 307 blood donors from a different cohort. This validation study suggested LARGE, a gene encoding a protein with xylosyltransferase and glucuronyltransferase activities that forms heparin-like linear polysaccharides, as a potential modulator of antithrombin based on the significant association of one SNPs, rs762057, with anti-FXa activity, particularly after adjustment for age, sex and SERPINC1 rs2227589 genotype, all factors influencing antithrombin levels (p = 0.02). Additional results sustained this association. LARGE silencing inHepG2 and HEK-EBNA cells did not affect SERPINC1 mRNA levels but significantly reduced the secretion of antithrombin with moderate intracellular retention. Milder effects were observed on α1-antitrypsin, prothrombin and transferrin. Our study suggests LARGE as the first known modifier of plasma antithrombin, and proposes a new role for LARGE in modulating extracellular secretion of certain glycoproteins. PMID:23705025

  11. Targeting of Antithrombin in Hemophilia A or B with RNAi Therapy.

    PubMed

    Pasi, K John; Rangarajan, Savita; Georgiev, Pencho; Mant, Tim; Creagh, Michael D; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Bevan, David; Austin, Steve; Hay, Charles R; Hegemann, Inga; Kazmi, Rashid; Chowdary, Pratima; Gercheva-Kyuchukova, Liana; Mamonov, Vasily; Timofeeva, Margarita; Soh, Chang-Heok; Garg, Pushkal; Vaishnaw, Akshay; Akinc, Akin; Sørensen, Benny; Ragni, Margaret V

    2017-08-31

    Current hemophilia treatment involves frequent intravenous infusions of clotting factors, which is associated with variable hemostatic protection, a high treatment burden, and a risk of the development of inhibitory alloantibodies. Fitusiran, an investigational RNA interference (RNAi) therapy that targets antithrombin (encoded by SERPINC1), is in development to address these and other limitations. In this phase 1 dose-escalation study, we enrolled 4 healthy volunteers and 25 participants with moderate or severe hemophilia A or B who did not have inhibitory alloantibodies. Healthy volunteers received a single subcutaneous injection of fitusiran (at a dose of 0.03 mg per kilogram of body weight) or placebo. The participants with hemophilia received three injections of fitusiran administered either once weekly (at a dose of 0.015, 0.045, or 0.075 mg per kilogram) or once monthly (at a dose of 0.225, 0.45, 0.9, or 1.8 mg per kilogram or a fixed dose of 80 mg). The study objectives were to assess the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics and safety of fitusiran. No thromboembolic events were observed during the study. The most common adverse events were mild injection-site reactions. Plasma levels of fitusiran increased in a dose-dependent manner and showed no accumulation with repeated administration. The monthly regimen induced a dose-dependent mean maximum antithrombin reduction of 70 to 89% from baseline. A reduction in the antithrombin level of more than 75% from baseline resulted in median peak thrombin values at the lower end of the range observed in healthy participants. Once-monthly subcutaneous administration of fitusiran resulted in dose-dependent lowering of the antithrombin level and increased thrombin generation in participants with hemophilia A or B who did not have inhibitory alloantibodies. (Funded by Alnylam Pharmaceuticals; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02035605 .).

  12. Wear behavior of human enamel against lithium disilicate glass ceramic and type III gold.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ahreum; Swain, Michael; He, Lihong; Lyons, Karl

    2014-12-01

    The wear behavior of human enamel that opposes different prosthetic materials is still not clear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate and compare the friction and wear behavior of human tooth enamel that opposes 2 indirect restorative materials: lithium disilicate glass ceramic and Type III gold. Friction-wear tests on human enamel (n=5) that opposes lithium disilicate glass ceramic (n=5) and Type III gold (n=5) were conducted in a ball-on-flat configuration with a reciprocating wear testing apparatus. The wear pairs were subjected to a normal load of 9.8 N, a reciprocating amplitude of approximately 200 μm, and a reciprocating frequency of approximately 1.6 Hz for up to 1100 cycles per test under distilled water lubrication. The frictional force of each cycle was recorded, and the corresponding friction coefficient for different wear pairs was calculated. After wear testing, the wear scars on the enamel specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Type III gold had a significantly lower steady-state friction coefficient (P=.009) and caused less wear damage on enamel than lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Enamel that opposed lithium disilicate glass ceramic exhibited cracks, plow furrows, and surface loss, which indicated abrasive wear as the prominent wear mechanism. In comparison, the enamel wear scar that opposed Type III gold had small patches of gold smear adhered to the surface, which indicated a predominantly adhesive wear mechanism. A lower friction coefficient and better wear resistance were observed when human enamel was opposed by Type III gold than by lithium disilicate glass ceramic in vitro. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibition of thrombin generation in plasma by fibrin formation (Antithrombin I).

    PubMed

    de Bosch, N B; Mosesson, M W; Ruiz-Sáez, A; Echenagucia, M; Rodriguez-Lemoin, A

    2002-08-01

    The adsorption of thrombin to fibrin during clotting defines "Antithrombin I" activity. We confirmed that thrombin generation in afibrinogenemic or in Reptilase defibrinated normal plasma was higher than in normal plasma. Repletion of these fibrinogen-deficient plasmas with fibrinogen 1 (gamma A/gamma A), whose fibrin has two "low affinity" non-substrate thrombin binding sites, resulted in moderately reduced thrombin generation by 29-37%. Repletion with fibrinogen 2 (gamma'/gamma A), which in addition to low affinity thrombin-binding sites in fibrin, has a "high affinity" non-substrate thrombin binding site in the carboxy-terminal region of its gamma' chain, was even more effective and reduced thrombin generation by 57-67%. Adding peptides that compete for thrombin binding to fibrin [S-Hir53-64 (hirugen) or gamma'414-427] caused a transient delay in the onset of otherwise robust thrombin generation, indicating that fibrin formation is necessary for full expression of Antithrombin I activity. Considered together, 1) the increased thrombin generation in afibrinogenemic or fibrinogen-depleted normal plasma that is mitigated by fibrinogen replacement; 2) evidence that prothrombin activation is increased in afibrinogenemia and normalized by fibrinogen replacement; 3) the severe thrombophilia that is associated with defective thrombin-binding in dysfibrinogenemias Naples I and New York I, and 4) the association of afibrinogenemia or hypofibrinogenemia with venous or arterial thromboembolism, indicate that Antithrombin I (fibrin) modulates thromboembolic potential by inhibiting thrombin generation in blood.

  14. Substrate complexes of human dipeptidyl peptidase III reveal the mechanism of enzyme inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prashant; Reithofer, Viktoria; Reisinger, Manuel; Wallner, Silvia; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Human dipeptidyl-peptidase III (hDPP III) is a zinc-dependent hydrolase cleaving dipeptides off the N-termini of various bioactive peptides. Thus, the enzyme is likely involved in a number of physiological processes such as nociception and is also implicated in several forms of cancer. We present high-resolution crystal structures of hDPP III in complex with opioid peptides (Met-and Leu-enkephalin, endomorphin-2) as well as with angiotensin-II and the peptide inhibitor IVYPW. These structures confirm the previously reported large conformational change of the enzyme upon ligand binding and show that the structure of the closed conformation is independent of the nature of the bound peptide. The overall peptide-binding mode is also conserved ensuring the correct positioning of the scissile peptide bond with respect to the catalytic zinc ion. The structure of the angiotensin-II complex shows, how longer peptides are accommodated in the binding cleft of hDPP III. Differences in the binding modes allow a distinction between real substrates and inhibitory peptides or “slow” substrates. The latter displace a zinc bound water molecule necessitating the energetically much less favoured anhydride mechanism as opposed to the favoured promoted-water mechanism. The structural data also form the necessary framework for the design of specific hDPP III inhibitors. PMID:27025154

  15. Human immune responsiveness to Lolium perenne pollen allergen Lol p III (rye III) is associated with HLA-DR3 and DR5.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Freidhoff, L R; Meyers, D A; Bias, W B; Marsh, D G

    1989-05-01

    A well-characterized allergen of Lolium perenne (perennial rye grass) pollen, Lol p III, has been used as a model antigen to study the genetic control of the human immune response. Associations between HLA type and IgE or IgG antibody (Ab) responsiveness to Lol p III were studied in two groups of skin-test-positive Caucasoid adults (N = 135 and 67). We found by nonparametric and parametric analyses that immune responsiveness to Lol p III was significantly associated with HLA-DR3 and DR5. No association was found between any DQ type and immune responsiveness to Lol p III. Geometric mean IgE or IgG Ab levels to Lol p III were not different between B8+, DR3+ subjects and B8-, DR3+ subjects, showing that HLA-B8 had no influence on the association. Lol p III IgG Ab data obtained on subjects after grass antigen immunotherapy showed that 100% of DR3 subjects and 100% of DR5 subjects were Ab+. A comparison of all the available protein sequences of DRB gene products showed that the first hypervariable region of DR3 and DR5 (and DRw6), and no other region, contains the sequence Glu9-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Ser13. Our observations are consistent with the possibility that immune responsiveness to the allergen Lol p III is associated with this amino acid sequence in the first hypervariable region of the DR beta 1 polypeptide chain.

  16. Human TOP3: a single-copy gene encoding DNA topoisomerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Hanai, R; Caron, P R; Wang, J C

    1996-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding a protein homologous to the Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I subfamily of enzymes has been identified through cloning and sequencing. Expressing the cloned human cDNA in yeast (delta)top1 cells lacking endogenous DNA topoisomerase I yielded an activity in cell extracts that specifically reduces the number of supercoils in a highly negatively supercoiled DNA. On the basis of these results, the human gene containing the cDNA sequence has been denoted TOP3, and the protein it encodes has been denoted DNA topoisomerase III. Screening of a panel of human-rodent somatic hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization of cloned TOP3 genomic DNA to metaphase chromosomes indicate that human TOP3 is a single-copy gene located at chromosome 17p11.2-12. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8622991

  17. Improving Hybrid III injury assessment in steering wheel rim to chest impacts using responses from finite element Hybrid III and human body model.

    PubMed

    Holmqvist, Kristian; Davidsson, Johan; Mendoza-Vazquez, Manuel; Rundberget, Peter; Svensson, Mats Y; Thorn, Stefan; Törnvall, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to improve the quality of injury risk assessments in steering wheel rim to chest impacts when using the Hybrid III crash test dummy in frontal heavy goods vehicle (HGV) collision tests. Correction factors for chest injury criteria were calculated as the model chest injury parameter ratios between finite element (FE) Hybrid III, evaluated in relevant load cases, and the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS). This is proposed to be used to compensate Hybrid III measurements in crash tests where steering wheel rim to chest impacts occur. The study was conducted in an FE environment using an FE-Hybrid III model and the THUMS. Two impactor shapes were used, a circular hub and a long, thin horizontal bar. Chest impacts at velocities ranging from 3.0 to 6.0 m/s were simulated at 3 impact height levels. A ratio between FE-Hybrid III and THUMS chest injury parameters, maximum chest compression C max, and maximum viscous criterion VC max, were calculated for the different chest impact conditions to form a set of correction factors. The definition of the correction factor is based on the assumption that the response from a circular hub impact to the middle of the chest is well characterized and that injury risk measures are independent of impact height. The current limits for these chest injury criteria were used as a basis to develop correction factors that compensate for the limitations in biofidelity of the Hybrid III in steering wheel rim to chest impacts. The hub and bar impactors produced considerably higher C max and VC max responses in the THUMS compared to the FE-Hybrid III. The correction factor for the responses of the FE-Hybrid III showed that the criteria responses for the bar impactor were consistently overestimated. Ratios based on Hybrid III and THUMS responses provided correction factors for the Hybrid III responses ranging from 0.84 to 0.93. These factors can be used to estimate C max and VC max values when the Hybrid III is

  18. Comparative genomics of Pseudomonas fluorescens subclade III strains from human lungs.

    PubMed

    Scales, Brittan S; Erb-Downward, John R; Huffnagle, Ian M; LiPuma, John J; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2015-12-07

    While the taxonomy and genomics of environmental strains from the P. fluorescens species-complex has been reported, little is known about P. fluorescens strains from clinical samples. In this report, we provide the first genomic analysis of P. fluorescens strains in which human vs. environmental isolates are compared. Seven P. fluorescens strains were isolated from respiratory samples from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The clinical strains could grow at a higher temperature (>34 °C) than has been reported for environmental strains. Draft genomes were generated for all of the clinical strains, and multi-locus sequence analysis placed them within subclade III of the P. fluorescens species-complex. All strains encoded type- II, -III, -IV, and -VI secretion systems, as well as the widespread colonization island (WCI). This is the first description of a WCI in P. fluorescens strains. All strains also encoded a complete I2/PfiT locus and showed evidence of horizontal gene transfer. The clinical strains were found to differ from the environmental strains in the number of genes involved in metal resistance, which may be a possible adaptation to chronic antibiotic exposure in the CF lung. This is the largest comparative genomics analysis of P. fluorescens subclade III strains to date and includes the first clinical isolates. At a global level, the clinical P. fluorescens subclade III strains were largely indistinguishable from environmental P. fluorescens subclade III strains, supporting the idea that identifying strains as 'environmental' vs 'clinical' is not a phenotypic trait. Rather, strains within P. fluorescens subclade III will colonize and persist in any niche that provides the requirements necessary for growth.

  19. Cloning and characterization of a functional human homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease III

    PubMed Central

    Aspinwall, Richard; Rothwell, Dominic G.; Roldan-Arjona, Teresa; Anselmino, Catherine; Ward, Christopher J.; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Sampson, Julian R.; Lindahl, Tomas; Harris, Peter C.; Hickson, Ian D.

    1997-01-01

    Repair of oxidative damage to DNA bases is essential to prevent mutations and cell death. Endonuclease III is the major DNA glycosylase activity in Escherichia coli that catalyzes the excision of pyrimidines damaged by ring opening or ring saturation, and it also possesses an associated lyase activity that incises the DNA backbone adjacent to apurinic/apyrimidinic sites. During analysis of the area adjacent to the human tuberous sclerosis gene (TSC2) in chromosome region 16p13.3, we identified a gene, OCTS3, that encodes a 1-kb transcript. Analysis of OCTS3 cDNA clones revealed an open reading frame encoding a predicted protein of 34.3 kDa that shares extensive sequence similarity with E. coli endonuclease III and a related enzyme from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, including a conserved active site region and an iron/sulfur domain. The product of the OCTS3 gene was therefore designated hNTH1 (human endonuclease III homolog 1). The hNTH1 protein was overexpressed in E. coli and purified to apparent homogeneity. The recombinant protein had spectral properties indicative of the presence of an iron/sulfur cluster, and exhibited DNA glycosylase activity on double-stranded polydeoxyribonucleotides containing urea and thymine glycol residues, as well as an apurinic/apyrimidinic lyase activity. Our data indicate that hNTH1 is a structural and functional homolog of E. coli endonuclease III, and that this class of enzymes, for repair of oxidatively damaged pyrimidines in DNA, is highly conserved in evolution from microorganisms to human cells. PMID:8990169

  20. Transcription of Satellite III non-coding RNAs is a general stress response in human cells.

    PubMed

    Valgardsdottir, Rut; Chiodi, Ilaria; Giordano, Manuela; Rossi, Antonio; Bazzini, Silvia; Ghigna, Claudia; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2008-02-01

    In heat-shocked human cells, heat shock factor 1 activates transcription of tandem arrays of repetitive Satellite III (SatIII) DNA in pericentromeric heterochromatin. Satellite III RNAs remain associated with sites of transcription in nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). Here we use real-time RT-PCR to study the expression of these genomic regions. Transcription is highly asymmetrical and most of the transcripts contain the G-rich strand of the repeat. A low level of G-rich RNAs is detectable in unstressed cells and a 10(4)-fold induction occurs after heat shock. G-rich RNAs are induced by a wide range of stress treatments including heavy metals, UV-C, oxidative and hyper-osmotic stress. Differences exist among stressing agents both for the kinetics and the extent of induction (>100- to 80.000-fold). In all cases, G-rich transcripts are associated with nSBs. On the contrary, C-rich transcripts are almost undetectable in unstressed cells and modestly increase after stress. Production of SatIII RNAs after hyper-osmotic stress depends on the Tonicity Element Binding Protein indicating that activation of the arrays is triggered by different transcription factors. This is the first example of a non-coding RNA whose transcription is controlled by different transcription factors under different growth conditions.

  1. Transcription of Satellite III non-coding RNAs is a general stress response in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Valgardsdottir, Rut; Chiodi, Ilaria; Giordano, Manuela; Rossi, Antonio; Bazzini, Silvia; Ghigna, Claudia; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    In heat-shocked human cells, heat shock factor 1 activates transcription of tandem arrays of repetitive Satellite III (SatIII) DNA in pericentromeric heterochromatin. Satellite III RNAs remain associated with sites of transcription in nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). Here we use real-time RT-PCR to study the expression of these genomic regions. Transcription is highly asymmetrical and most of the transcripts contain the G-rich strand of the repeat. A low level of G-rich RNAs is detectable in unstressed cells and a 104-fold induction occurs after heat shock. G-rich RNAs are induced by a wide range of stress treatments including heavy metals, UV-C, oxidative and hyper-osmotic stress. Differences exist among stressing agents both for the kinetics and the extent of induction (>100- to 80.000-fold). In all cases, G-rich transcripts are associated with nSBs. On the contrary, C-rich transcripts are almost undetectable in unstressed cells and modestly increase after stress. Production of SatIII RNAs after hyper-osmotic stress depends on the Tonicity Element Binding Protein indicating that activation of the arrays is triggered by different transcription factors. This is the first example of a non-coding RNA whose transcription is controlled by different transcription factors under different growth conditions. PMID:18039709

  2. Effects of long-term ingestion of difructose anhydride III (DFA III) on intestinal bacteria and bile acid metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Minamida, Kimiko; Asakawa, Chikako; Sujaya, I Nengah; Kaneko, Maki; Abe, Ayumi; Sone, Teruo; Hara, Hiroshi; Asano, Kozo; Tomita, Fusao

    2006-02-01

    Changes in the intestinal microbiota of 10 human subjects with long-term ingestion of 3 g/d difructose anhydride III (DFA III; 4 persons, 2 months; 3 persons, 6 months; and 3 persons, 12 months) were examined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). According to the answers to questionnaires, the subjects were divided into two groups (constipated and normal). The DGGE profile was different for every individual and each subject had unique profiles of intestinal microbiota. In the DGGE profiles of constipated subjects, the intensities of bands related to Bacteroides spp. increased. Moreover, the DFA III-assimilating bacteria, Ruminococcus sp. were isolated from subjects who ingested DFA III for 12 months. These strains showed 95% similarity of their 16S rDNA sequences with that of Ruminococcus obeum ATCC 29174(T) (X85101) and produced large amounts of acetic acid. DFA III ingestion for 2 months tended to increase total organic acids in feces, and tended to decrease fecal pH and the secondary bile acid (SBA) ratio in total bile acids. The SBA ratio in total bile acids corresponded to fecal pH. The production of SBA was decreased by low pH in vitro. These results indicated that DFA III ingestion in humans tended to lower intestinal pH, inhibited bile acid 7alpha-dehydroxylation activities and also tended to decrease the SBA ratios in total bile acids. Moreover, as another cause for the decrease in the SBA ratio in total bile acids, it was suggested that the number of bile acid 7alpha-dehydroxylating bacteria were decreased by DFA III ingestion.

  3. Management of Venous Thromboembolism in Patients with Hereditary Antithrombin Deficiency and Pregnancy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lydia; Lim, Wendy; Crowther, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Background. Hereditary antithrombin deficiency is a thrombogenic disorder associated with a 50–90% lifetime risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), which is increased during pregnancy and the puerperium in these patients. We present a case of a woman with antithrombin (AT) deficiency who presented with a VTE despite therapeutic low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). Though the pregnancy was deemed unviable, further maternal complications were mitigated through the combined use of therapeutic anticoagulation and plasma-derived antithrombin concentrate infusions to normalize her functional antithrombin levels. Methods. A review of the literature was conducted for studies on prophylaxis and management of VTE in pregnant patients with hereditary AT deficiency. The search involved a number of electronic databases, using combinations of keywords as described in the text. Only English language studies between 1946 and 2015 were included. Conclusion. Antithrombin concentrate is indicated in pregnant women with hereditary AT deficiency who develop VTE despite being on therapeutic dose anticoagulation. Expert opinion suggests AT concentrate should be used concomitantly with therapeutic dose anticoagulation. However, further high-quality studies on the dose and duration of treatment in the postpartum period are required. Use of AT concentrate for prophylaxis is controversial and should be based on individual VTE risk stratification. PMID:28168066

  4. Antithrombin Administration During Intravenous Heparin Anticoagulation in the Intensive Care Unit: A Single-Center Matched Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Jacob T; Schoeppler, Kelly E; Zanotti, Giorgio; Weiss, Gregory M; Mueller, Scott W; MacLaren, Robert; Fish, Douglas N; Kiser, Tyree H

    2016-09-13

    Unfractionated heparin (UFH) is a frequently utilized indirect anticoagulant that induces therapeutic effect by enhancing antithrombin (AT)-mediated procoagulant enzyme inhibition. In suspected heparin resistance (HR) during cardiopulmonary bypass, AT activity may be decreased and AT supplementation helps restore UFH responsiveness. The benefit of AT supplementation in HR over longer durations of UFH therapy is unclear. The objective of this study was to describe and evaluate the use of AT III concentrate in the intensive care units (ICUs) at our institution for improving UFH therapy response over 72 hours. A total of 44 critically ill patients were included in the analysis-22 patients received at least 1 dose of AT and 22 patients received no AT. Thirty (68.2%) of the 44 patients were receiving mechanical circulatory support. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. The average AT activity prior to AT supplementation was 57.9% in the treatment group, and the median cumulative dose of AT was 786.5 U (9.26 U/kg) per patient. There were no significant differences observed in proportion of time spent in therapeutic range (31.9% vs 35.2%, P = .65), time to therapeutic goal (16.5 vs 15.5 hours, P = .97), or patients who experienced a bleeding event (5 vs 5, P = .99) between groups. In conclusion, AT supplementation had minimal impact on anticoagulant response in this cohort of ICU patients with mild to moderate HR receiving a prolonged UFH infusion. Additional research is needed to define AT activity targets and to standardize AT supplementation practices in patients receiving prolonged heparin infusion.

  5. A quantitative infection assay for human type I, II, and III interferon antiviral activities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Upon virus infection, cells secrete a diverse group of antiviral molecules that signal proximal cells to enter into an antiviral state, slowing or preventing viral spread. These paracrine signaling molecules can work synergistically, so measurement of any one antiviral molecule does not reflect the total antiviral activity of the system. Results We have developed an antiviral assay based on replication inhibition of an engineered fluorescent vesicular stomatitis virus reporter strain on A549 human lung epithelial cells. Our assay provides a quantitative functional readout of human type I, II, and III interferon activities, and it provides better sensitivity, intra-, and inter-assay reproducibility than the traditional crystal violet based assay. Further, it eliminates cell fixation, rinsing, and staining steps, and is inexpensive to implement. Conclusions A dsRed2-strain of vesicular stomatitis virus that is sensitive to type I, II, and III interferons was used to develop a convenient and sensitive assay for interferon antiviral activity. We demonstrate use of the assay to quantify the kinetics of paracrine antiviral signaling from human prostate cancer (PC3) cells in response to viral infection. The assay is applicable to high-throughput screening for anti-viral compounds as well as basic studies of cellular antiviral signaling. PMID:23829314

  6. Human Immune Responses to HTLV-III Virus Infections in the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-10

    in western blots in the antibodies to HIV-1 structural antigens between this serum and the other sera which neutralize HIV at low dilutions but enhance...n3est AvailabCe AD N T== HUMAN IMMUNE RESPONSE TO HTLV -III VIRUS INFECTION IN ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME N ANNUAL REPORT FRANCIS A. ENNIS D...Stimulation of HIV-1 specific T cells. We have stimulated the PBL of 20 HIV antibody-positive donors with live HIV-1 ( HTLV -IIIB) virus, and only 30% respond

  7. The effect of plasma antithrombin concentration on thrombin generation and fibrin gel structure.

    PubMed

    Elgue, G; Sanchez, J; Fatah, K; Olsson, P; Blombäck, B

    1994-07-15

    Congenital deficiency of antithrombin (AT) is associated with thrombotic events and AT consumption occurs in some severe disorders and after treatment with heparin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether variations in the level of plasma AT modify thrombin generation and the fibrin formation process after the intrinsic coagulation mechanism is triggered. Normal plasma was depleted of AT by immunoadsorption on CNBr-Sepharose coupled with the anti-AT-IgG fraction of antiserum. The AT-depleted plasma was reconstituted with AT (between 0.3 and 1.5 AT units per ml). Thrombin generation was measured as the development of thrombin-antithrombin complexes (TAT). The lag phase preceding fibrin formation depended on the concentration of AT. The short lag phase was seen in completely AT-depleted plasma and the long in plasma with 1.5 AT units per ml. TAT generation, determined in parallel consecutive samples, showed that the rate at which thrombin was generated was inverse to the AT concentration in plasma. The network structure of hydrated fibrin gels in the clotted plasma was studied by measuring the wavelength dependence of gel turbidity. The mass/length ratio value, -i.e. the thickness of fiber strands and porosity of the gel increased with increasing AT concentrations. It is concluded that plasma AT regulates the rate of prothrombin-thrombin conversion, the clotting time and the consequently network structure of the fibrin gel.

  8. Heparin chain-length dependence of factor Xa inhibition by antithrombin in plasma.

    PubMed

    Rezaie, Alireza R

    2007-01-01

    Heparin anticoagulants function by enhancing the inhibition of coagulation proteases by the serpin antithrombin (AT). A direct evaluation of the specific anti-factor Xa (fXa) activity of therapeutic heparins in the physiologically relevant plasma-based clotting assays has not been feasible since thrombin, the final protease of the cascade, is the primary target for inhibition by AT in the presence of heparin. To circumvent this problem, we developed an assay in which the native AT in plasma was replaced with an AT mutant which exhibits identical affinity for heparin and near normal reactivity for fXa, but does not react with thrombin and other coagulation proteases in either the absence or presence of heparin. This assay was used to distinguish the anti-fXa activity of different molecular weight heparins from their anti-thrombin activity in clotting assays which were initiated by the triggers of either the extrinsic or intrinsic coagulation pathway. The results suggest that the acceleration of fXa inhibition by AT exhibits a marked heparin chain-length dependence, with fondaparinux (a pentasaccharide) having the lowest and unfractionated heparin having the highest effect. Interestingly, comparative studies revealed that the fondaparinux-catalyzed acceleration of thrombin inhibition by AT also contributes to the prolongation of the clotting time, possibly suggesting that the anticoagulant function of the therapeutic pentasaccharide is mediated though the inhibition of both fXa and thrombin.

  9. Surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane with a covalent antithrombin-heparin complex to prevent thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Leung, Jennifer M; Berry, Leslie R; Chan, Anthony K C; Brash, John L

    2014-01-01

    To prevent coagulation in contact with blood, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was modified with an antithrombin-heparin (ATH) covalent complex using polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a linker/spacer. Using NHS chemistry, ATH was attached covalently to the distal chain end of the immobilized PEG linker. Surfaces were characterized by contact angle and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; attachment was confirmed by decrease in contact angles and an increase in nitrogen content as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Protein interactions in plasma were investigated using radiolabeled proteins added to plasma as tracers, and by immunoblotting of eluted proteins. Modification of PDMS with PEG alone was effective in reducing non-specific protein adsorption; attachment of ATH at the distal end of the PEG chains did not significantly affect protein resistance. It was shown that surfaces modified with ATH bound antithrombin selectively from plasma through the pentasaccharide sequence on the heparin moiety of ATH, indicating the ability of the ATH-modified surfaces to inhibit coagulation. Using thromboelastography, the effect of ATH modification on plasma coagulation was evaluated directly. It was found that initiation of coagulation was delayed and the time to clot was prolonged on PDMS modified with ATH/PEG compared to controls. For comparison, surfaces modified in a similar way with heparin were prepared and investigated using the same methods. The data suggest that the ATH-modified surfaces have superior anticoagulant properties compared to those modified with heparin.

  10. Human uroporphyrinogen III synthase: NMR-based mapping of the active site.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Luis; Kuti, Miklos; Bishop, David F; Mezei, Mihaly; Zeng, Lei; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Desnick, Robert J

    2008-05-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase (URO-synthase) catalyzes the cyclization and D-ring isomerization of hydroxymethylbilane (HMB) to uroporphyrinogen (URO'gen) III, the cyclic tetrapyrrole and physiologic precursor of heme, chlorophyl, and corrin. The deficient activity of human URO-synthase results in the autosomal recessive cutaneous disorder, congenital erythropoietic porphyria. Mapping of the structural determinants that specify catalysis and, potentially, protein-protein interactions is lacking. To map the active site and assess the enzyme's possible interaction in a complex with hydroxymethylbilane-synthase (HMB-synthase) and/or uroporphyrinogen-decarboxylase (URO-decarboxylase) by NMR, an efficient expression and purification procedure was developed for these cytosolic enzymes of heme biosynthesis that enabled preparation of special isotopically-labeled protein samples for NMR characterization. Using an 800 MHz instrument, assignment of the URO-synthase backbone (13)C(alpha) (100%), (1)H(alpha) (99.6%), and nonproline (1)H(N) and (15)N resonances (94%) was achieved as well as 85% of the side-chain (13)C and (1)H resonances. NMR analyses of URO-synthase titrated with competitive inhibitors N(D)-methyl-1-formylbilane (NMF-bilane) or URO'gen III, revealed resonance perturbations of specific residues lining the cleft between the two major domains of URO synthase that mapped the enzyme's active site. In silico docking of the URO-synthase crystal structure with NMF-bilane and URO'gen III was consistent with the perturbation results and provided a 3D model of the enzyme-inhibitor complex. The absence of chemical shift changes in the (15)N spectrum of URO-synthase mixed with the homogeneous HMB-synthase holoenzyme or URO-decarboxylase precluded occurrence of a stable cytosolic enzyme complex.

  11. Comparative cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of cobalt (II, III) oxide, iron (III) oxide, silicon dioxide, and aluminum oxide nanoparticles on human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rajiv, S; Jerobin, J; Saranya, V; Nainawat, M; Sharma, A; Makwana, P; Gayathri, C; Bharath, L; Singh, M; Kumar, M; Mukherjee, A; Chandrasekaran, N

    2016-02-01

    Despite the extensive use of nanoparticles (NPs) in various fields, adequate knowledge of human health risk and potential toxicity is still lacking. The human lymphocytes play a major role in the immune system, and it can alter the antioxidant level when exposed to NPs. Identification of the hazardous NPs was done using in vitro toxicity tests and this study mainly focuses on the comparative in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of four different NPs including cobalt (II, III) oxide (Co3O4), iron (III) oxide (Fe2O3), silicon dioxide (SiO2), and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) on human lymphocytes. The Co3O4 NPs showed decrease in cellular viability and increase in cell membrane damage followed by Fe2O3, SiO2, and Al2O3 NPs in a dose-dependent manner after 24 h of exposure to human lymphocytes. The oxidative stress was evidenced in human lymphocytes by the induction of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and depletion of catalase, reduced glutathione, and superoxide dismutase. The Al2O3 NPs showed the least DNA damage when compared with all the other NPs. Chromosomal aberration was observed at 100 µg/ml when exposed to Co3O4 NPs and Fe2O3 NPs. The alteration in the level of antioxidant caused DNA damage and chromosomal aberration in human lymphocytes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Laser-induced europium(III) luminescence as a probe of the metal ion mediated association of human prothrombin with phospholipid.

    PubMed

    Rhee, M J; Horrocks, W D; Kosow, D P

    1982-09-14

    7F0 leads to 5D0 excitation spectroscopy of Eu(III) has been used to investigate the Eu(III) and phospholipid binding properties of human prothrombin. The results indicate that human prothrombin contains four high-affinity Eu(III) binding sites which are distributed into two classes of binding sites. When 4 equiv of Eu(III) is bound to prothrombin, the prothrombin is capable of binding to phospholipid vesicles. The deuterium isotope effect on the lifetime of the Eu(III)-prothrombin complex and the Eu(III)-prothrombin-phospholipid complex was used to determine the number of water molecules coordinated to the Eu(III). In both complexes, each of the Eu(III)'s coordinated to 2.5 +/- 0.5 water molecules. These results indicate that the binding of the Eu(III)-prothrombin complex to the phospholipid does not require the formation of a prothrombin-Eu(III)-phospholipid bridge.

  13. Immunofluorescent studies on human spermatozoa. III. Immunoglobulin classes of human spermatozoal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, K. Brogaard

    1972-01-01

    Antibodies in human sera against four different antigens of human spermatozoa discovered by means of an indirect two-layer immunofluorescence technique (IFT) were characterized by determination of the class of immunoglobulins to which they belonged. A three-layer IFT using monospecific antisera against human IgG, IgA or IgM as the second layer was employed together with fractionation of sera on Sephadex G-200 or DEAE-cellulose followed by testing of the concentrated pools in a two-layer IFT. The study revealed that antibodies against the antigen in the front part of the acrosome were primarily IgM and those against the antigen in the tail primarily IgG. Antibodies against antigens in the equatorial segment and the postnuclear cap showed a varying predominance of these two immunoglobulins. Spermatozoal antibody as IgA was found only in small amounts. PMID:4558409

  14. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III infection of the central nervous system: a preliminary in situ analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stoler, M.H.; Eskin, T.A.; Benn, S.; Angerer, R.C.; Angerer, L.M.

    1986-11-07

    Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are subject to a spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Recent evidence implicates the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) in the pathogenesis of some of these illnesses, although the cells infected by the virus have yet to be identified. Using in situ hybridization, the authors examined brain tissue from two patients with AIDS encephalopathy for the presence of HTLV-III RNA. In both cases, viral RNA was detected and concentrated in, though not limited to, the white matter. The CNS cells most frequently infected included macrophages, pleomorphic microglia, and multinucleated giant cells. Less frequently, cells morphologically consistent with astrocytes, oligodendroglia, and rarely neurons were also infected. The findings strengthen the association of HTLV-III with the pathogenesis of AIDS encephalopathy. In situ hybridization can be applied to routinely prepared biopsy tissue in the diagnosis of HTLV-III infection of the CNS.

  15. Clinical investigations of lymphadenopathy, including lymph node biopsies, in 24 homosexual men with antibodies to the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III).

    PubMed

    Farthing, C F; Henry, K; Shanson, D C; Taube, M; Lawrence, A G; Harcourt-Webster, J N; Gazzard, B

    1986-03-01

    The findings of 27 lymph node biopsies performed on 24 homosexual patients with lymphadenopathy are presented. Six had acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and 18 lymphadenopathy only, of whom one subsequently developed AIDS. All these patients had antibodies to the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) suggesting that HTLV-III is currently the commonest cause of lymphadenopathy in homosexual men. The histopathological findings of six of seven nodes from AIDS patients showed either follicular depletion alone or follicular and paracortical lymphocyte depletion. Nodes from four patients showed Kaposi's sarcoma, three of which also showed follicular hyperplasia. In two of these patients there were no cutaneous manifestations of this condition. One lymph node from a patient with persistent generalized lymphadenopathy (PGL) showed Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Six nodes from six other patients have had features of toxoplasmosis although there was no serological or clinical evidence of recent toxoplasma infection. The remaining 11 lymph nodes from patients with PGL and one node from a patient with transient lymphadenopathy, showed reactive follicular hyperplasia only. We conclude that homosexuals with lymphadenopathy who are HTLV-III antibody positive do not need a routine node biopsy unless an alternative diagnosis is strongly suspected.

  16. Transient desialylation in combination with a novel antithrombin deficiency causing a severe and recurrent thrombosis despite anticoagulation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Revilla, Nuria; de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Miñano, Antonia; López-Gálvez, Raquel; Toderici, Mara; Padilla, José; García-Avello, Ángel; Lozano, María Luisa; Lefeber, Dirk J.; Corral, Javier; Vicente, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    An in-depth focused study of specific cases of patients with recurrent thrombosis may help to identify novel circumstances, genetic and acquired factors contributing to the development of this disorder. The aim of this study was to carry out a detailed and sequential analysis of samples from a patient suffering from early and recurrent venous and arterial thrombosis. We performed thrombophilic tests, biochemical, functional, genetic and glycomic analysis of antithrombin and other plasma proteins. The patient carried a new type I antithrombin mutation (p.Ile218del), whose structural relevance was verified in a recombinant model. Experiments with N-glycosidase F and neuraminidase suggested a nearly full desialylation of plasma proteins, which was confirmed by mass spectrometry analysis of transferrin glycoforms. However, partial desialylation and normal patterns were detected in samples collected at other time-points. Desialylation was noticeable after arterial events and was associated with low antithrombin activity, reduced platelet count and glomerular filtration rate. This is the first description of a global and transient desialylation of plasma proteins associated with thrombosis. The decrease in the strong electronegative charge of terminal glycans may modulate hemostatic protein-protein interactions, which in combination with a strong prothrombotic situation, such as antithrombin deficiency, could increase the risk of thrombosis. PMID:28303970

  17. Transient desialylation in combination with a novel antithrombin deficiency causing a severe and recurrent thrombosis despite anticoagulation therapy.

    PubMed

    Revilla, Nuria; de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Miñano, Antonia; López-Gálvez, Raquel; Toderici, Mara; Padilla, José; García-Avello, Ángel; Lozano, María Luisa; Lefeber, Dirk J; Corral, Javier; Vicente, Vicente

    2017-03-17

    An in-depth focused study of specific cases of patients with recurrent thrombosis may help to identify novel circumstances, genetic and acquired factors contributing to the development of this disorder. The aim of this study was to carry out a detailed and sequential analysis of samples from a patient suffering from early and recurrent venous and arterial thrombosis. We performed thrombophilic tests, biochemical, functional, genetic and glycomic analysis of antithrombin and other plasma proteins. The patient carried a new type I antithrombin mutation (p.Ile218del), whose structural relevance was verified in a recombinant model. Experiments with N-glycosidase F and neuraminidase suggested a nearly full desialylation of plasma proteins, which was confirmed by mass spectrometry analysis of transferrin glycoforms. However, partial desialylation and normal patterns were detected in samples collected at other time-points. Desialylation was noticeable after arterial events and was associated with low antithrombin activity, reduced platelet count and glomerular filtration rate. This is the first description of a global and transient desialylation of plasma proteins associated with thrombosis. The decrease in the strong electronegative charge of terminal glycans may modulate hemostatic protein-protein interactions, which in combination with a strong prothrombotic situation, such as antithrombin deficiency, could increase the risk of thrombosis.

  18. An unusual antithrombin-binding heparin octasaccharide with an additional 3-O-sulfated glucosamine in the active pentasaccharide sequence.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Marco; Elli, Stefano; Mourier, Pierre; Rudd, Timothy R; Gaudesi, Davide; Casu, Benito; Boudier, Christian; Torri, Giangiacomo; Viskov, Christian

    2013-01-15

    The 3-O-sulfation of N-sulfated glucosamine is the last event in the biosynthesis of heparin/heparan sulfate, giving rise to the antithrombin-binding pentasaccharide sequence AGA*IA, which is largely associated with the antithrombotic activity of these molecules. The aim of the present study was the structural and biochemical characterization of a previously unreported AGA*IA*-containing octasaccharide isolated from the very-low-molecular-mass heparin semuloparin, in which both glucosamine residues of the pentasaccharide moiety located at the non-reducing end bear 3-O-sulfate groups. Two-dimensional and STD (saturation transfer difference) NMR experiments clearly confirmed its structure and identified its ligand epitope binding to antithrombin. The molecular conformation of the octasaccharide-antithrombin complex has been determined by NMR experiments and docking/energy minimization. The presence of the second 3-O-sulfated glucosamine in the octasaccharide induced more than one order of magnitude increase in affinity to antithrombin compared to the pentasaccharide AGA*IA.

  19. Comparison of antithrombin activity of the polysulphate chitosan derivatives in in vivo and in vitro system.

    PubMed

    Drozd, N N; Sher, A I; Makarov, V A; Galbraikh, L S; Vikhoreva, G A; Gorbachiova, I N

    2001-06-01

    In order to choose the proper method for evaluating the antithrombin activity in samples of chitosan polysulphate (CP) with different polymerization degrees and sulphation degrees, we estimated the ability of direct anticoagulants to depress the coagulability of recalcified sheep blood using the third international heparin standard (A1 - in vitro system) and determined such activity on pharmacodynamic curve (A2 - in vivo system). The curve admits the kinetics of CP elimination to be nonlinear in case of intravenous injection to rabbits, as it is observed in heparin: Ct = C(o)exp(-K(e)lt), where Ct is the CP concentration at the time moment t; C(o) is the CP concentration at the injection moment; Kel is the elimination constant. Besides, it is assumed that there is a linear approximation of the anticoagulant effect on the dose, which finally makes it possible to calculate the specific activity A2: T = KTCt+T(in), where T is the time of clot formation at different time intervals after CP injection; T(in) is the time of clot formation prior to CP injection. T value was assessed in two tests: blood coagulation time (BCT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). No correlation was observed between A1 and A2. At the same time, the values of Kel and the period of semi-elimination, with the use of the biospecific cetylpyridinium chloride electrophores for the quantitative determination of CP in rabbit's blood taken at different time intervals after injection, showed a close correlation (r = .94, P < .05) between the same parameters, obtained with the help of the rectilinear pharmacodynamic plot in BCT test. Thus, experimentally, it was proven that the assumption of the CP nonlinear elimination and the CP effect-dose dependence was true, which is necessary for A2 calculation. Relatively low molecular weights (MW 61-82 kDa, polymerization degree 188-252 ) and high sulphation patterns (sulphur amounts 15.6-16.9%, sulphation degree 1.58-1.86) were slowly cleared and

  20. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to a pilus colonization factor (colonization factor antigen III) of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Honda, T; Wetprasit, N; Arita, M; Miwatani, T

    1989-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to a pilus colonization factor (colonization factor antigen III [CFA/III]) of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) were developed and characterized. All of the MAbs isolated belonged to the immunoglobulin G2a subclass. The specificity of these MAbs for CFA/III pili was demonstrated by the immunogold-labeling technique. The presence of more than one epitope in CFA/III pili was suggested. One of the three MAbs appears to recognize a polymeric conformational epitope(s) of CFA/III. CFA/III antigenicity distinct from that of other pilus colonization factors of ETEC was demonstrated by both a bacterial agglutination test and a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using the MAbs. Of the 100 strains of ETEC isolated from persons with traveler's diarrhea, 8% were found to carry CFA/III pili. Two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay systems which could detect as little as several or 50 ng of CFA/III per ml were developed. Images PMID:2572553

  1. Human recombinant interleukin-1 beta- and tumor necrosis factor alpha-mediated suppression of heparin-like compounds on cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, M.; Shimada, K.; Ozawa, T. )

    1990-09-01

    Cytokines are known to tip the balance of the coagulant-anticoagulant molecules on the endothelial cell surface toward intravascular coagulation. Their effects on endothelial cell surface-associated heparin-like compounds have not been examined yet. Incorporation of (35S)sulfate into heparan sulfate on cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells was suppressed by human recombinant interleukin-1 beta (rIL-1 beta) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (rTNF alpha) in a dose- and time-dependent manner with little effect on cell number, protein content, and (3H)leucine incorporation of cells. Maximal inhibition was achieved by incubation of cells with 100 ng/ml of rIL-1 beta or 5 ng/ml of rTNF alpha for 12-24 hours, resulting in a reduction of the synthesis of heparan sulfate on the cell surface by approximately 50%. The dose dependency was consistent with that seen in the stimulation of endothelial cell procoagulant activity by each cytokine. The suppression of heparan sulfate synthesis was sustained for at least 48 hours after pretreatment of cells with cytokines and was unchanged after the addition of indomethacin or polymyxin B. The rate of degradation of prelabeled 35S-heparan sulfate on the cell surface was not altered by cytokine treatments. Neither the size, the net negative charge, nor the proportion of the molecule with high affinity for antithrombin III of endothelial cell heparan sulfate was changed by cytokines. Furthermore, specific binding of 125I-labeled antithrombin III to the endothelial cell surface was reduced to 40-60% of control by cytokines. In parallel with reduction in binding, antithrombin III cofactor activity was partially diminished in cytokine-treated endothelial cells. Thus, cytokine-mediated suppression of heparin-like substance on endothelial cells appears to be another cytokine-inducible endothelial effects affecting coagulation.

  2. Decreased type III collagen expression in human uterine cervix of prolapse uteri

    PubMed Central

    IWAHASHI, MASAAKI; MURAGAKI, YASUTERU

    2011-01-01

    The precise mechanism of prolapse uteri is not fully understood. There is evidence to suggest that abnormalities of collagen, the main component of extracellular matrix, or its repair mechanism, may predispose women to prolapse. To investigate the characteristic structure of human uterine cervix of patients with prolapse uteri, various types of collagen expression in the uterine cervix tissues of the prolapse uteri were compared to those of normal uterine cervix. After informed consent, 36 specimens of uterine cervical tissues were obtained at the time of surgery from 16 postmenopausal women with prolapse uteri (stage III–IV by the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification examination) and 20 postmenopausal women without prolapse uteri (control group). Collagens were extracted from the uterine cervix tissues by salt precipitation methods. The relative levels of various collagens were evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The uterine cervix was longer in the patients with prolapse uteri than those of postmenopausal controls without prolapse uteri. The ratios of type III to type I collagen in the uterine cervical tissues were significantly decreased in the prolapse uteri, as compared to those of the postmenopausal uterine cervix without prolapse. These results suggest that decreased type III collagen expression may play an important role in determing the physiology and structure of the uterine cervix tissues of prolapse uteri. PMID:22977496

  3. Changes in Plasma Levels of Natural Anticoagulants in Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation: High Prognostic Value of Antithrombin and Protein C in Patients with Underlying Sepsis or Severe Infection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Qute; Hong, Ki Ho; Kim, Ji-Eun

    2014-01-01

    Background Dysfunctional natural anticoagulant systems enhance intravascular fibrin for mation in disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and plasma levels of natural anti coagulants can be used in the diagnosis and prognosis of DIC. Herein, the diagnostic value of 4 natural anticoagulants was assessed, and the prognostic value of antithrombin and protein C were validated in a large population. Methods Part 1 study included 126 patients with clinically suspected DIC and estimated plasma levels of 4 candidate anticoagulant proteins: antithrombin, protein C, protein S, and protein Z. Part 2 comprised 1,846 patients, in whom plasma antithrombin and protein C levels were compared with other well-known DIC markers according to the underlying dis eases. The 28-day mortality rate was used to assess prognostic outcome. Results Antithrombin and protein C showed higher areas under the ROC curve than pro tein S and protein Z. In part 2 of the study, antithrombin and protein C levels significantly correlated with DIC score, suggesting that these factors are good indicators of DIC severity. Antithrombin and protein C showed significant prognostic power in Kaplan-Meier analyses. In patients with sepsis/severe infection, antithrombin and protein C showed higher hazard ratios than D-dimer. Platelet count showed the highest hazard ratio in patients with hemato logic malignancy. In patients with liver disease, the hazard ratio for antithrombin levels was significantly high. Conclusions Decreased plasma anticoagulant levels reflect florid consumption of the phys iologic defense system against DIC-induced hypercoagulation. Plasma antithrombin and protein C levels are powerful prognostic markers of DIC, especially in patients with sepsis/severe infection. PMID:24624342

  4. The structural and optical properties of type III human collagen biosynthetic corneal substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sally; Lewis, Phillip; Islam, M. Mirazul; Doutch, James; Sorensen, Thomas; White, Tomas; Griffith, May; Meek, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    The structural and optical properties of clinically biocompatible, cell-free hydrogels comprised of synthetically cross-linked and moulded recombinant human collagen type III (RHCIII) with and without the incorporation of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) were assessed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray scattering, spectroscopy and refractometry. These findings were examined alongside similarly obtained data from 21 human donor corneas. TEM demonstrated the presence of loosely bundled aggregates of fine collagen filaments within both RHCIII and RHCIII-MPC implants, which X-ray scattering showed to lack D-banding and be preferentially aligned in a uniaxial orientation throughout. This arrangement differs from the predominantly biaxial alignment of collagen fibrils that exists in the human cornea. By virtue of their high water content (90%), very fine collagen filaments (2–9 nm) and lack of cells, the collagen hydrogels were found to transmit almost all incident light in the visible spectrum. They also transmitted a large proportion of UV light compared to the cornea which acts as an effective UV filter. Patients implanted with these hydrogels should be cautious about UV exposure prior to regrowth of the epithelium and in-growth of corneal cells into the implants. PMID:26159106

  5. Human NAIP and mouse NAIP1 recognize bacterial type III secretion needle protein for inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jieling; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Jianjin; Shao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Inflammasome mediated by central nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) protein is critical for defense against bacterial infection. Here we show that type III secretion system (T3SS) needle proteins from several bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella typhimurium, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Burkholderia spp., can induce robust inflammasome activation in both human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow macrophages. Needle protein activation of human NRL family CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasome requires the sole human neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (hNAIP). Among the seven mouse NAIPs, NAIP1 functions as the mouse counterpart of hNAIP. We found that NAIP1 recognition of T3SS needle proteins was more robust in mouse dendritic cells than in bone marrow macrophages. Needle proteins, as well as flagellin and rod proteins from five different bacteria, exhibited differential and cell type-dependent inflammasome-stimulating activity. Comprehensive profiling of the three types of NAIP ligands revealed that NAIP1 sensing of the needle protein dominated S. flexneri-induced inflammasome activation, particularly in dendritic cells. hNAIP/NAIP1 and NAIP2/5 formed a large oligomeric complex with NLRC4 in the presence of corresponding bacterial ligands, and could support reconstitution of the NLRC4 inflammasome in a ligand-specific manner. PMID:23940371

  6. Finite element comparison of human and Hybrid III responses in a frontal impact.

    PubMed

    Danelson, Kerry A; Golman, Adam J; Kemper, Andrew R; Gayzik, F Scott; Clay Gabler, H; Duma, Stefan M; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-12-01

    The improvement of finite element (FE) Human Body Models (HBMs) has made them valuable tools for investigating restraint interactions compared to anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of various combinations of safety restraint systems on the sensitivity of thoracic injury criteria using matched ATD and Human Body Model (HBM) simulations at two crash severities. A total of seven (7) variables were investigated: 3-point belt with two (2) load limits, frontal airbag, knee bolster airbag, a buckle pretensioner, and two (2) delta-v's - 40kph and 50kph. Twenty four (24) simulations were conducted for the Hybrid III ATD FE model and repeated with a validated HBM for 48 total simulations. Metrics tested in these conditions included sternum deflection, chest acceleration, chest excursion, Viscous Criteria (V*C) criteria, pelvis acceleration, pelvis excursion, and femur forces. Additionally, chest band deflection and rib strain distribution were measured in the HBM for additional restraint condition discrimination. The addition of a frontal airbag had the largest effect on the occupant chest metrics with an increase in chest compression and acceleration but a decrease in excursion. While the THUMS and Hybrid III occupants demonstrated the same trend in the chest compression measurements, there were conflicting results in the V*C, acceleration, and displacement metrics. Similarly, the knee bolster airbag had the largest effect on the pelvis with a decrease in acceleration and excursion. With a knee bolster airbag the simulated occupants gave conflicting results, the THUMS had a decrease in femur force and the ATD had an increase. Preferential use of dummies or HBM's is not debated; however, this study highlights the ability of HBM metrics to capture additional chest response metrics.

  7. Human Retroviruses and AIDS. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences: I--II; III--V

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Korber, B.; Wain-Hobson, S.; Smith, R.F.; Pavlakis, G.N.

    1993-12-31

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (I) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  8. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III infection in a cohort of homosexual men in New York City

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, C.E.; Taylor, P.E.; Zang, E.A.; Morrison, J.M.; Harley, E.J.; de Cordoba, S.R.; Bacino, C.; Ting, R.C.; Bodner, A.J.; Sarngadharan, M.G.; Gallo, R.C.

    1986-04-25

    Using blood samples collected since 1978, the authors investigated the epidemiology of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III), the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, in a group of 378 homosexually active men who have resided in New York City since the acquire immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic began. The anti-HTLV-III prevalence was 6.6% in sera from 1978 or 1979, and the subsequent annual incidence of seroconversion among susceptible men ranged between 5.5% and 10.6%. The highest incidences were in recent years, even though these men reported a decrease in their sexual activity during this time. These data demonstrate the continuing risk of HTLV-III infections in the homosexual population studied and emphasize the need for more effective prevention of transmission. The year during which antibody was first present was the only factor identified that was associated with altered cell-mediated immunity in antibody-positive men.

  9. Entropy-driven binding of opioid peptides induces a large domain motion in human dipeptidyl peptidase III

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Gustavo A.; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Viertlmayr, Roland; Dong, Aiping; Binter, Alexandra; Abramić, Marija; Macheroux, Peter; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Gruber, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Opioid peptides are involved in various essential physiological processes, most notably nociception. Dipeptidyl peptidase III (DPP III) is one of the most important enkephalin-degrading enzymes associated with the mammalian pain modulatory system. Here we describe the X-ray structures of human DPP III and its complex with the opioid peptide tynorphin, which rationalize the enzyme's substrate specificity and reveal an exceptionally large domain motion upon ligand binding. Microcalorimetric analyses point at an entropy-dominated process, with the release of water molecules from the binding cleft (“entropy reservoir”) as the major thermodynamic driving force. Our results provide the basis for the design of specific inhibitors that enable the elucidation of the exact role of DPP III and the exploration of its potential as a target of pain intervention strategies. PMID:22493238

  10. Entropy-driven binding of opioid peptides induces a large domain motion in human dipeptidyl peptidase III.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Gustavo A; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Viertlmayr, Roland; Dong, Aiping; Binter, Alexandra; Abramic, Marija; Macheroux, Peter; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Gruber, Karl

    2012-04-24

    Opioid peptides are involved in various essential physiological processes, most notably nociception. Dipeptidyl peptidase III (DPP III) is one of the most important enkephalin-degrading enzymes associated with the mammalian pain modulatory system. Here we describe the X-ray structures of human DPP III and its complex with the opioid peptide tynorphin, which rationalize the enzyme's substrate specificity and reveal an exceptionally large domain motion upon ligand binding. Microcalorimetric analyses point at an entropy-dominated process, with the release of water molecules from the binding cleft ("entropy reservoir") as the major thermodynamic driving force. Our results provide the basis for the design of specific inhibitors that enable the elucidation of the exact role of DPP III and the exploration of its potential as a target of pain intervention strategies.

  11. Human uroporphyrinogen-III synthase: genomic organization, alternative promoters, and erythroid-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Aizencang, G; Solis, C; Bishop, D F; Warner, C; Desnick, R J

    2000-12-01

    Uroporphyrinogen-III (URO) synthase is the heme biosynthetic enzyme defective in congenital erythropoietic porphyria. The approximately 34-kb human URO-synthase gene (UROS) was isolated, and its organization and tissue-specific expression were determined. The gene had two promoters that generated housekeeping and erythroid-specific transcripts with unique 5'-untranslated sequences (exons 1 and 2A) followed by nine common coding exons (2B to 10). Expression arrays revealed that the housekeeping transcript was present in all tissues, while the erythroid transcript was only in erythropoietic tissues. The housekeeping promoter lacked TATA and SP1 sites, consistent with the observed low level expression in most cells, whereas the erythroid promoter contained GATA1 and NF-E2 sites for erythroid specificity. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that the housekeeping promoter was active in both erythroid K562 and HeLa cells, while the erythroid promoter was active only in erythroid cells and its activity was increased during hemin-induced erythroid differentiation. Thus, human URO-synthase expression is regulated during erythropoiesis by an erythroid-specific alternative promoter.

  12. Type III Interferons Produced by Human Placental Trophoblasts Confer Protection against Zika Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Avraham; Lennemann, Nicholas J; Ouyang, Yingshi; Bramley, John C; Morosky, Stefanie; Marques, Ernesto Torres De Azeved; Cherry, Sara; Sadovsky, Yoel; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2016-05-11

    During mammalian pregnancy, the placenta acts as a barrier between the maternal and fetal compartments. The recently observed association between Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during human pregnancy and fetal microcephaly and other anomalies suggests that ZIKV may bypass the placenta to reach the fetus. This led us to investigate ZIKV infection of primary human trophoblasts (PHTs), which are the barrier cells of the placenta. We discovered that PHT cells from full-term placentas are refractory to ZIKV infection. In addition, medium from uninfected PHT cells protects non-placental cells from ZIKV infection. PHT cells constitutively release the type III interferon (IFN) IFNλ1, which functions in both a paracrine and autocrine manner to protect trophoblast and non-trophoblast cells from ZIKV infection. Our data suggest that for ZIKV to access the fetal compartment, it must evade restriction by trophoblast-derived IFNλ1 and other trophoblast-specific antiviral factors and/or use alternative strategies to cross the placental barrier. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. As(III) inhibits ultraviolet radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers repair via generation of nitric oxide in human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wei; Hudson, Laurie G.; Sun, Xi; Feng, Changjian; Liu, Ke Jian

    2008-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic enhances skin tumor formation when combined with other carcinogens including ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The inhibition of DNA damage repair by arsenic has been hypothesized to contribute to the co-carcinogenic activities of arsenic observed in vivo. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are an important mutagenic UVR photoproduct and implicated in the genesis of non-melanoma skin cancer. The current study demonstrates that low concentrations of arsenite (As(III)) inhibit UVR-induced CPDs repair in a human keratinocyte cell line via nitric oxide (NO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Following As(III) treatment, NO production and iNOS expression are elevated. Little is known about regulation of iNOS by As(III) and further investigations indicated that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and NF-κB are required for As(III) induction of iNOS expression. This As(III)-stimulated signaling cascade was involved in inhibition of UVR-induced CPDs repair as disruption of p38 MAPK activity and NF-κB nuclear translocation counteracted the effects of As(III) on CPD repair. Selective inhibition of iNOS ameliorated As(III) inhibition of CPDs repair thereby suggesting that iNOS is a downstream mediator of As(III) activity. These findings provide evidence that an As(III) stimulated signal transduction cascade culminating in elevated iNOS expression and NO generation is an underlying mechanism for inhibition of UVR-induced DNA damage repair by arsenic. PMID:18621123

  14. Recombinant human collagen III gel for transplantation of autologous skin cells in porcine full-thickness wounds.

    PubMed

    Nuutila, Kristo; Peura, Matti; Suomela, Sari; Hukkanen, Mika; Siltanen, Antti; Harjula, Ari; Vuola, Jyrki; Kankuri, Esko

    2015-12-01

    Complex skin wounds, such as chronic ulcers and deep burns, require lengthy treatments and cause extensive burdens on healthcare and the economy. Use of biomaterials and cell transplantation may improve traditional treatments and promote the healing of difficult-to-treat wounds. In this study, we investigated the use of recombinant human collagen III (rhCol-III) gel as a delivery vehicle for cultured autologous skin cells (keratinocytes only or keratinocyte-fibroblast mixtures). We examined its effect on the healing of full-thickness wounds in a porcine wound-healing model. Two Landrace pigs were used for the study. Fourteen deep dermal wounds were created on the back of each pig with an 8 mm biopsy punch. Syringes containing acellular rhCol-III gel (n = 8) or rhCol-III gel with autologous keratinocytes (n = 8) or rhCol-III gel with autologous keratinocytes and fibroblasts (n = 8) were applied into wounds. Untreated wounds were used as controls for the treatment groups (n = 4). We used rhCol-III gel to manufacture a cell-delivery syringe containing autologous skin cells. In a full-thickness wound-healing model, we observed that rhCol-III gel enhances early granulation tissue formation. Interestingly, we found cell type-dependent differences in the stability of rhCol-III in vivo. Fibroblast-containing gel was effectively removed from the wound, whereas gels without cells or with keratinocytes only remained intact. Our results demonstrate that the properties of rhCol-III gel for skin cell transplantation can be significantly altered in a cell type-dependent manner.

  15. As(III) inhibits ultraviolet radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer repair via generation of nitric oxide in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Hudson, Laurie G; Sun, Xi; Feng, Changjian; Liu, Ke Jian

    2008-10-15

    Inorganic arsenic enhances skin tumor formation when combined with other carcinogens including ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The inhibition of DNA damage repair by arsenic has been hypothesized to contribute to the cocarcinogenic activities of arsenic observed in vivo. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are an important mutagenic UVR photoproduct and implicated in the genesis of nonmelanoma skin cancer. The current study demonstrates that low concentrations of arsenite (As(III)) inhibit UVR-induced CPD repair in a human keratinocyte cell line via nitric oxide (NO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Following As(III) treatment, NO production and iNOS expression are elevated. Little is known about regulation of iNOS by As(III) and further investigations indicated that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and NF-kappaB are required for As(III) induction of iNOS expression. This As(III)-stimulated signaling cascade was involved in inhibition of UVR-induced CPD repair as disruption of p38 MAPK activity and NF-kappaB nuclear translocation counteracted the effects of As(III) on CPD repair. Selective inhibition of iNOS ameliorated As(III) inhibition of CPD repair, thereby suggesting that iNOS is a downstream mediator of As(III) activity. These findings provide evidence that an As(III)-stimulated signal transduction cascade culminating in elevated iNOS expression and NO generation is an underlying mechanism for inhibition of UVR-induced DNA damage repair by arsenic.

  16. Immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen antibodies in the temporomandibular joint disc of human foetuses

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, L.O.C.; Lodi, F.R.; Gomes, T.S.; Marques, S.R.; Oshima, C.T.F.; Lancellotti, C.L.P.; Rodríguez-Vázquez, J.F.; Mérida-Velasco, J.R.; Alonso, L.G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to study the morphology of the articular disc and analyse the immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen markers in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc of human foetuses of different gestational ages. Twenty TMJ from human foetuses supplied by Universidade Federal de Uberaba with gestational ages from 17 to 24 weeks were studied. The gestational age of the foetuses was determined by measuring the crown-rump (CR) length. Macroscopically, the foetuses were fixed in 10% formalin solution and dissected by removing the skin and subcutaneous tissue and exposing the deep structures. Immunohistochemical markers of type I and III were used to characterize the existence of collagen fibres. Analysis of the immunohistochemical markers of types I and III collagen revealed the presence of heterotypical fibril networks. PMID:22073371

  17. Mixed-mode I+II fracture characterization of human cortical bone using the Single Leg Bending test.

    PubMed

    Silva, F G A; de Moura, M F S F; Dourado, N; Xavier, J; Pereira, F A M; Morais, J J L; Dias, M I R

    2016-02-01

    Mixed-mode I+II fracture characterization of human cortical bone was analyzed in this work. A miniaturized version of the Single Leg Bending test (SLB) was used owing to its simplicity. A power law criterion was verified to accurately describe the material fracture envelop under mixed-mode I+II loading. The crack tip opening displacements measured by digital image correlation were used in a direct method to determine the cohesive law mimicking fracture behavior of cortical bone. Cohesive zone modeling was used for the sake of validation. Several fracture quantities were compared with the experimental results and the good agreement observed proves the appropriateness of the proposed procedure for fracture characterization of human bone under mixed-mode I+II loading.

  18. Rational development and characterization of humanized anti-EGFR variant III chimeric antigen receptor T cells for glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laura A; Scholler, John; Ohkuri, Takayuki; Kosaka, Akemi; Patel, Prachi R; McGettigan, Shannon E; Nace, Arben K; Dentchev, Tzvete; Thekkat, Pramod; Loew, Andreas; Boesteanu, Alina C; Cogdill, Alexandria P; Chen, Taylor; Fraietta, Joseph A; Kloss, Christopher C; Posey, Avery D; Engels, Boris; Singh, Reshma; Ezell, Tucker; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Ramones, Melissa H; Li, Na; Zhou, Li; Plesa, Gabriela; Seykora, John T; Okada, Hideho; June, Carl H; Brogdon, Jennifer L; Maus, Marcela V

    2015-02-18

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are synthetic molecules designed to redirect T cells to specific antigens. CAR-modified T cells can mediate long-term durable remissions in B cell malignancies, but expanding this platform to solid tumors requires the discovery of surface targets with limited expression in normal tissues. The variant III mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) results from an in-frame deletion of a portion of the extracellular domain, creating a neoepitope. We chose a vector backbone encoding a second-generation CAR based on efficacy of a murine scFv-based CAR in a xenograft model of glioblastoma. Next, we generated a panel of humanized scFvs and tested their specificity and function as soluble proteins and in the form of CAR-transduced T cells; a low-affinity scFv was selected on the basis of its specificity for EGFRvIII over wild-type EGFR. The lead candidate scFv was tested in vitro for its ability to direct CAR-transduced T cells to specifically lyse, proliferate, and secrete cytokines in response to antigen-bearing targets. We further evaluated the specificity of the lead CAR candidate in vitro against EGFR-expressing keratinocytes and in vivo in a model of mice grafted with normal human skin. EGFRvIII-directed CAR T cells were also able to control tumor growth in xenogeneic subcutaneous and orthotopic models of human EGFRvIII(+) glioblastoma. On the basis of these results, we have designed a phase 1 clinical study of CAR T cells transduced with humanized scFv directed to EGFRvIII in patients with either residual or recurrent glioblastoma (NCT02209376).

  19. Separation and isolation of human apolipoproteins C-II, C-III0, C-III1, and C-III2 by chromatofocusing on the Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography system.

    PubMed

    Huff, M W; Strong, W L

    1987-09-01

    Chromatofocusing, which separates proteins based on differences in isoelectric point, has been used on the Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography (FPLC) system (Pharmacia) to separate the C apolipoproteins from human very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). Using a Mono P column (Pharmacia), a pH gradient between pH 6.2 and pH 4.0 was generated using buffers containing 6 M urea, at a flow rate of 0.5 ml/min. Typically, runs took approximately 45 min. Chromatofocusing of delipidated whole VLDL produced sharp, well-resolved peaks for the C apolipoproteins. However, as determined by analytical isoelectric focusing (IEF), the apolipoprotein E isoforms were not separated from apoC-II, and they contaminated the other apoC species to a variable extent. In addition, apoC-II was not resolved from apoC-III0. Preliminary precipitation of VLDL with acetone prior to delipidation removed both apolipoproteins E and B. Using a start buffer of 25 mM histidine, pH 6.2, and a 1:30 dilution of the polybuffer exchanger (eluting buffer), apoC-II, C-III0, C-III1, and C-III2 were well resolved in run-times of approximately 60 min. The C apoproteins proved to be pure by analytical IEF and immunoassay with monospecific antisera against apoC-II and C-III. Recovery was over 90% of the protein chromatographed. In addition, a variant of apoC-II present in VLDL of a hypertriglyceridemic subject was clearly resolved from the other C apolipoproteins. This technique is superior to conventional methodology in terms of its time saving and high resolution. The application of this technique to the study of C apolipoprotein variants and C apolipoprotein specific radioactivity determinations is possible.

  20. An Atypical Clostridium Strain Related to the Clostridium botulinum Group III Strain Isolated from a Human Blood Culture

    PubMed Central

    Ruimy, Raymond; Bouchier, Christiane; Faucher, Nathalie; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R.

    2014-01-01

    A nontoxigenic strain isolated from a fatal human case of bacterial sepsis was identified as a Clostridium strain from Clostridium botulinum group III, based on the phenotypic characters and 16S rRNA gene sequence, and was found to be related to the mosaic C. botulinum D/C strain according to a multilocus sequence analysis of 5 housekeeping genes. PMID:24088855

  1. An atypical Clostridium strain related to the Clostridium botulinum group III strain isolated from a human blood culture.

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Philippe; Ruimy, Raymond; Bouchier, Christiane; Faucher, Nathalie; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R

    2014-01-01

    A nontoxigenic strain isolated from a fatal human case of bacterial sepsis was identified as a Clostridium strain from Clostridium botulinum group III, based on the phenotypic characters and 16S rRNA gene sequence, and was found to be related to the mosaic C. botulinum D/C strain according to a multilocus sequence analysis of 5 housekeeping genes.

  2. Streptococcus agalactiae isolates of serotypes Ia, III and V from human and cow are able to infect tilapia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Rui; Luo, Fu-Guang; Huang, Yan; Liang, Wan-Wen; Huang, Ting; Lei, Ai-Ying; Gan, Xi; Li, Li-Ping

    2015-10-22

    Recent studies have shown that group B streptococcus (GBS) may be infectious across hosts. The purpose of this study is to investigate the pathogenicity of clinical GBS isolates with serotypes Ia, III and V from human and cow to tilapia and the evolutionary relationship among these GBS strains of different sources. A total of 27 clinical GBS isolates from human (n=10), cow (n=2) and tilapia (n=15) were analyzed using serotyping, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among them, 15 isolates were tested for their pathogenicity to tilapia. The results showed that five human GBS strains (2 serotype III, 2 serotype Ia and 1 serotype V) infected tilapia with mortality rate ranging from 56.67% to 100%, while the other five human GBS strains tested were unable to infect tilapia. In addition, two cow GBS strains C001 and C003 of serotype III infected tilapia. However, they had significantly lower pathogenicity than the five human strains. Furthermore, human GBS strains H005 and H008, which had very strong ability to infect tilapia, had the same PFGE pattern. MLST analysis showed that the five human and the two cow GBS strains that were able to infect tilapia belonged to clonal complexes CC19, CC23 and CC103. The study for the first time confirmed that human or cow GBS clonal complexes CC19, CC23 and CC103 containing strains with serotypes Ia, III and V could infect tilapia and induce clinical signs under experimental conditions.

  3. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    PubMed Central

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  4. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining.

    PubMed

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L; Tomkinson, Alan E; Tainer, John A; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-08-18

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation.

  5. Nanoparticulate iron(III) oxo-hydroxide delivers safe iron that is well absorbed and utilised in humans.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Dora I A; Bruggraber, Sylvaine F A; Faria, Nuno; Poots, Lynsey K; Tagmount, Mani A; Aslam, Mohamad F; Frazer, David M; Vulpe, Chris D; Anderson, Gregory J; Powell, Jonathan J

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder worldwide with substantial impact on health and economy. Current treatments predominantly rely on soluble iron which adversely affects the gastrointestinal tract. We have developed organic acid-modified Fe(III) oxo-hydroxide nanomaterials, here termed nano Fe(III), as alternative safe iron delivery agents. Nano Fe(III) absorption in humans correlated with serum iron increase (P < 0.0001) and direct in vitro cellular uptake (P = 0.001), but not with gastric solubility. The most promising preparation (iron hydroxide adipate tartrate: IHAT) showed ~80% relative bioavailability to Fe(II) sulfate in humans and, in a rodent model, IHAT was equivalent to Fe(II) sulfate at repleting haemoglobin. Furthermore, IHAT did not accumulate in the intestinal mucosa and, unlike Fe(II) sulfate, promoted a beneficial microbiota. In cellular models, IHAT was 14-fold less toxic than Fe(II) sulfate/ascorbate. Nano Fe(III) manifests minimal acute intestinal toxicity in cellular and murine models and shows efficacy at treating iron deficiency anaemia. This paper reports the development of novel nano-Fe(III) formulations, with the goal of achieving a magnitude less intestinal toxicity and excellent bioavailability in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia. Out of the tested preparations, iron hydroxide adipate tartrate met the above criteria, and may become an important tool in addressing this common condition. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nanoparticulate iron(III) oxo-hydroxide delivers safe iron that is well absorbed and utilised in humans

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Dora I.A.; Bruggraber, Sylvaine F.A.; Faria, Nuno; Poots, Lynsey K.; Tagmount, Mani A.; Aslam, Mohamad F.; Frazer, David M.; Vulpe, Chris D.; Anderson, Gregory J.; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder worldwide with substantial impact on health and economy. Current treatments predominantly rely on soluble iron which adversely affects the gastrointestinal tract. We have developed organic acid-modified Fe(III) oxo-hydroxide nanomaterials, here termed nano Fe(III), as alternative safe iron delivery agents. Nano Fe(III) absorption in humans correlated with serum iron increase (P < 0.0001) and direct in vitro cellular uptake (P = 0.001), but not with gastric solubility. The most promising preparation (iron hydroxide adipate tartrate: IHAT) showed ~80% relative bioavailability to Fe(II) sulfate in humans and, in a rodent model, IHAT was equivalent to Fe(II) sulfate at repleting haemoglobin. Furthermore, IHAT did not accumulate in the intestinal mucosa and, unlike Fe(II) sulfate, promoted a beneficial microbiota. In cellular models, IHAT was 14-fold less toxic than Fe(II) sulfate/ascorbate. Nano Fe(III) manifests minimal acute intestinal toxicity in cellular and murine models and shows efficacy at treating iron deficiency anaemia. From the Clinical Editor This paper reports the development of novel nano-Fe(III) formulations, with the goal of achieving a magnitude less intestinal toxicity and excellent bioavailability in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia. Out of the tested preparations, iron hydroxide adipate tartrate met the above criteria, and may become an important tool in addressing this common condition. PMID:24983890

  7. Antithrombin nanoparticles inhibit stent thrombosis in ex vivo static and flow models.

    PubMed

    Palekar, Rohun U; Vemuri, Chandu; Marsh, Jon N; Arif, Batool; Wickline, Samuel A

    2016-11-01

    antithrombin perfluorocarbon NPs exert marked focal antithrombin activity to prevent intravascular stent thrombosis and occlusion. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Premature chromatid separation and altered proliferation of human leukocytes treated with vanadium (III) oxide.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Nava, Rodrigo Anibal; Rodríguez-Mercado, Juan José; Altamirano-Lozano, Mario Agustín

    2016-12-12

    Vanadium is a widely distributed metal in the Earth's surface and is released into the environment by either natural or anthropogenic causes. Vanadium (III) oxide (V2O3) is present in the environment, and many organisms are exposed to this compound; however, its effects at the cellular and genetic levels are still unknown. Therefore, in this study, the ability of V2O3 to induce chromosomal damage and impair cell proliferation was tested on human leukocytes in vitro. The cultures cells were treated for 48 h with different concentrations 2, 4, 8 or 16 μg/mL of V2O3, and we use the sister chromatid exchange's (SCE) test and the viability assay to evaluate the effects. In the results, no change was observed in either the viability or the frequency of SCE; however, a significant increase was observed in the incidence of premature chromatid separation (PCS), and a decrease was observed in both the mitotic index (MI) and the replication index (RI). Therefore, it can be suggested that V2O3 induces a genotoxic effect at the centromere level, indicating that it is a cause of aneuploidy that is capable of altering cell cycle progression.

  9. HindIII polymorphism in the human c-sis proto-oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Fourney, R.M.; Dietrich, K.D.; Aubin, R.A.; Paterson, M.C. )

    1988-08-25

    The 2.0 kb BamH1 restriction fragment corresponding to a cDNA insert encoding the human c-sis PDGF A chain and nucleotide sequences homologous to the v-sis gene was isolated from plasmid pSM-1. An identical polymorphism was noted using the 1.2 kb PstI fragment or the 1.0 kb PstI/XbaI fragment isolated from the v-sis sequence subcloned in the plasmid pV-sis. HindIII identifies a single bi-allelic polymorphism with bands at 22.6 kb and 19.4 kb. Co-dominant segregation was demonstrated in 1 family. This polymorphism is not easily detected unless the restricted DNA is separated on 0.6-0.8% agarose gels. Resolution was optimal if gels were run until the bromophenol blue tracking dye had migrated 14 cm from the origin and Southern blotting was performed under alkaline conditions.

  10. Phenotyping of human complement component C4, a class-III HLA antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Sim, E; Cross, S J

    1986-01-01

    The plasma complement protein C4 is encoded at two highly polymorphic loci, A and B, within the class-III region of the major histocompatibility complex. At least 34 different polymorphic variants of human C4 have been identified, including non-expressed or 'null' alleles. The main method of identification of C4 polymorphic allotypes is separation on the basis of charge by agarose-gel electrophoresis of plasma. On staining by immunofixation with anti-C4 antibodies, each C4 type gives three major bands, but, since individuals can have up to five allotypes, the overlapping banding pattern is difficult to interpret. We show that digestion of plasma samples with carboxypeptidase B, which removes C-terminal basic amino acids, before electrophoresis, produces a single, sharp, distinct band for each allotype and allows identification of the biochemical basis of the multiple banding pattern previously observed in C4 phenotype determination. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3103606

  11. Basement-membrane heparan sulphate with high affinity for antithrombin synthesized by normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pejler, G; David, G

    1987-01-01

    Basement-membrane proteoglycans, biosynthetically labelled with [35S]sulphate, were isolated from normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells. Proteoglycans synthesized by normal cells contained mainly heparan sulphate and, in addition, small amounts of chondroitin sulphate chains, whereas transformed cells synthesized a relatively higher proportion of chondroitin sulphate. Polysaccharide chains from transformed cells were of lower average Mr and of lower anionic charge density compared with chains isolated from the untransformed counterparts, confirming results reported previously [David & Van den Berghe (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 7338-7344]. A large proportion of the chains isolated from normal cells bound with high affinity to immobilized antithrombin, and the presence of 3-O-sulphated glucosamine residues, previously identified as unique markers for the antithrombin-binding region of heparin [Lindahl, Bäckström, Thunberg & Leder (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 6551-6555], could be demonstrated. A significantly lower proportion of the chains derived from transformed cells bound with high affinity to antithrombin, and a corresponding decrease in the amount of incorporated 3-O-sulphate was observed. PMID:2963617

  12. Occupant kinematics in low-speed frontal sled tests: Human volunteers, Hybrid III ATD, and PMHS.

    PubMed

    Beeman, Stephanie M; Kemper, Andrew R; Madigan, Michael L; Franck, Christopher T; Loftus, Stephen C

    2012-07-01

    A total of 34 dynamic matched frontal sled tests were performed, 17 low (2.5g, Δv=4.8kph) and 17 medium (5.0g, Δv=9.7kph), with five male human volunteers of approximately 50th percentile height and weight, a Hybrid III 50th percentile male ATD, and three male PMHS. Each volunteer was exposed to two impulses at each severity, one relaxed and one braced prior to the impulse. A total of four tests were performed at each severity with the ATD and one trial was performed at each severity with each PMHS. A Vicon motion analysis system, 12 MX-T20 2 megapixel cameras, was used to quantify subject 3D kinematics (±1mm) (1kHz). Excursions of select anatomical regions were normalized to their respective initial positions and compared by test condition and between subject types. The forward excursions of the select anatomical regions generally increased with increasing severity. The forward excursions of relaxed human volunteers were significantly larger than those of the ATD for nearly every region at both severities. The forward excursions of the upper body regions of the braced volunteers were generally significantly smaller than those of the ATD at both severities. Forward excursions of the relaxed human volunteers and PMHSs were fairly similar except the head CG response at both severities and the right knee and C7 at the medium severity. The forward excursions of the upper body of the PMHS were generally significantly larger than those of the braced volunteers at both severities. Forward excursions of the PMHSs exceeded those of the ATD for all regions at both severities with significant differences within the upper body regions. Overall human volunteers, ATD, and PMHSs do not have identical biomechanical responses in low-speed frontal sled tests but all contribute valuable data that can be used to refine and validate computational models and ATDs used to assess injury risk in automotive collisions.

  13. Rationalization of paclitaxel insensitivity of yeast β-tubulin and human βIII-tubulin isotype using principal component analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel arrests cell division by binding to the hetero-dimeric protein tubulin. Subtle differences in tubulin sequences, across eukaryotes and among β-tubulin isotypes, can have profound impact on paclitaxel-tubulin binding. To capture the experimentally observed paclitaxel-resistance of human βIII tubulin isotype and yeast β-tubulin, within a common theoretical framework, we have performed structural principal component analyses of β-tubulin sequences across eukaryotes. Results The paclitaxel-resistance of human βIII tubulin isotype and yeast β-tubulin uniquely mapped on to the lowest two principal components, defining the paclitaxel-binding site residues of β-tubulin. The molecular mechanisms behind paclitaxel-resistance, mediated through key residues, were identified from structural consequences of characteristic mutations that confer paclitaxel-resistance. Specifically, Ala277 in βIII isotype was shown to be crucial for paclitaxel-resistance. Conclusions The present analysis captures the origin of two apparently unrelated events, paclitaxel-insensitivity of yeast tubulin and human βIII tubulin isotype, through two common collective sequence vectors. PMID:22849332

  14. Effects of Caramel Colour III on the number of blood lymphocytes: a human study on Caramel Colour III immunotoxicity and a comparison of the results with data from rat studies.

    PubMed

    Houben, G F; van Dokkum, W; van Loveren, H; Penninks, A H; Seinen, W; Spanhaak, S; Ockhuizen, T

    1992-05-01

    Administration of the colour additive Ammonia Caramel Colour (Caramel Colour III) to rats has been associated with decreased lymphocyte counts, specifically in rats fed a diet low in vitamin B6. This effect is rapidly reversible and is caused by an imidazole derivative (THI) in Caramel Colour III. In the present paper, the conduct of a human study with Caramel Colour III is outlined and the results of blood lymphocyte counts are presented. No decrease in the number of blood lymphocytes occurred in marginally vitamin B6-deficient humans who consumed Caramel Colour III at the acceptable daily intake level (200 mg/kg body weight/day) for 7 days. These data are discussed in relation to the effects of Caramel Colour III and THI on blood lymphocyte numbers in rats.

  15. Development of a recombinant antithrombin variant as a potent antidote to fondaparinux and other heparin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Elsa P; Fazavana, Judicael; Picard, Veronique; Borgel, Delphine

    2011-02-10

    Heparin derivative-based therapy has evolved from unfractionated heparin (UFH) to low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) and now fondaparinux, a synthetic pentasaccharide. Contrary to UFH or LMWHs, fondaparinux is not neutralized by protamine sulfate, and no antidote is available to counteract bleeding disorders associated with overdosing. To make the use of fondaparinux safer, we developed an antithrombin (AT) variant as a potent antidote to heparin derivatives. This variant (AT-N135Q-Pro394) combines 2 mutations: substitution of Asn135 by a Gln to remove a glycosylation site and increase affinity for heparins, and the insertion of a Pro between Arg393 and Ser394 to abolish its anticoagulant activity. As expected, AT-N135Q-Pro394 anticoagulant activity was almost abolished, and it exhibited a 3-fold increase in fondaparinux affinity. AT-N135Q-Pro394 was shown to reverse fondaparinux overdosing in vitro in a dose-dependent manner through a competitive process with plasma AT for fondaparinux binding. This antidote effect was also observed in vivo: administration of AT-N135Q-Pro394 in 2.5-fold molar excess versus plasma AT neutralized 86% of the anti-Xa activity within 5 minutes in mice treated with fondaparinux. These results clearly demonstrate that AT-N135Q-Pro394 can reverse the anticoagulant activity of fondaparinux and thus could be used as an antidote for this drug.

  16. A small deletion in SERPINC1 causes type I antithrombin deficiency by promoting endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lei; Zhang, Xin; Zhai, Yu; Liu, Jianren

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombin (AT) deficiency is an autosomal dominant disorder, and identification of mutation AT variants would improve our understanding of the anticoagulant function of this serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN) and the molecular pathways underlying this disorder. In the present study, we performed whole-exome sequencing of a Chinese family with deep vein thrombosis, and identified a new small deletion that eliminates four amino acids (INEL) from exon 4 of SERPINC1 gene. This causes type I AT deficiency by enhancing the intracellular retention of this protein. AT retention leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which further inhibits AT release. In addition, ER stress activates ER-associated degradation, which promotes AT degradation. Suppression of ER stress enhanced the secretion of AT, while inhibition of ER-associated degradation suppressed AT release. Thus, our study identified a new mutation (INEL deletion) causing type I AT deficiency, and uncovered a novel mechanism for AT retention through enhanced ER stress, which may provide an innovative approach for treating AT deficiency. PMID:27708219

  17. Isolated pregnancy-induced anti-thrombin deficiency in a woman with twin pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Kosuke; Morikawa, Mamoru; Yamada, Takahiro; Minakami, Hisanori

    2016-06-01

    A woman with twin pregnancy had a gradual decline in anti-thrombin (AT) activity from 72% at gestational week (GW) 29(-3/7) , to 53% at GW31(-2/7) , and to 41% at GW32(-2/7) , at which time hypertension (148/90 mmHg) and proteinuria (protein-to-creatinine ratio [P/Cr], 0.79 mg/mg) developed in the presence of normal platelet count (159 × 10(9) /L) and serum aspartate aminotransferase/lactate dehydrogenase (22/164 IU/L). AT product was given three times to maintain AT activity >50% and blood pressure was maintained below 155/95 mmHg with no treatment, but generalized edema with a weekly weight gain of 4.9 kg and increased proteinuria (to P/Cr, 7.6 mg/mg) required cesarean section at GW33(-3/7) . This case highlights the occurrence of pregnancy-induced AT deficiency alone in the absence of any other abnormality, including hypertension, proteinuria, or thrombocytopenia. Measurement of AT activity was considered helpful for determination of the appropriate time for delivery in this patient.

  18. Prevention, management and extent of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with hereditary antithrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rogenhofer, Nina; Bohlmann, Michael K; Beuter-Winkler, Petra; Würfel, Wolfgang; Rank, Andreas; Thaler, Christian J; Toth, Bettina

    2014-03-01

    Antithrombin (AT) deficiency is a rare hereditary thrombophilia with a mean prevalence of 0.02 % in the general population, associated with a more than ten-fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Within this multicenter retrospective clinical analysis, female patients with inherited AT deficiency were evaluated concerning the type of inheritance and extent of AT deficiency, medical treatment during pregnancy and postpartally, VTE risk as well as maternal and neonatal outcome. Statistical analysis was performed with SPPS for Windows (19.0). A total of 18 pregnancies in 7 patients were evaluated, including 11 healthy newborns ≥37th gestational weeks (gw), one small for gestational age premature infant (25th gw), two late-pregnancy losses (21st and 28th gw) and four early miscarriages. Despite low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) administration, three VTE occurred during pregnancy and one postpartally. Several adverse pregnancy outcomes occurred including fetal and neonatal death, as well as severe maternal neurologic disorders occurred. Patients with substitution of AT during pregnancy in addition to LMWH showed the best maternal and neonatal outcome. Close monitoring with appropriate anticoagulant treatment including surveillance of AT levels might help to optimize maternal and fetal outcome in patients with hereditary AT deficiency.

  19. Oxidized antithrombin is a dual inhibitor of coagulation and angiogenesis: Importance of low heparin affinity.

    PubMed

    Azhar, Asim; Khan, Mohammad Sazzad; Swaminathan, Akila; Naseem, Asma; Chatterjee, Suvro; Jairajpuri, Mohamad Aman

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous proteins that promote vascular endothelial cell based inhibition of angiogenesis are an attractive option for antitumor therapy. Inactive cleaved and latent conformations of antithrombin (AT) are antiangiogenic, but not its native form which is an inhibitor of proteases involved in blood coagulation. Unlike native, the cleaved and latent conformations are reactive center loop inserted conformations which binds heparin with very low affinity. We use a sulfoxy modified AT to assess the role of reactive center loop insertion and heparin affinity in antiangiogenic function. Chorioallantoic membrane assay (CAM) shows that antiangiogenic activity of latent and oxidized AT are better than thalidomide, a potent antiangiogenic drug. Wound healing experiments suggest that latent and oxidized conformations can influence endothelial cell migration. Latent and cleaved conformations of AT shows an increase in α-helical content in the presence of unfractionated heparin, but not the oxidized AT. Unlike the loop inserted polymer, cleaved and latent conformations, oxidized AT has factor Xa inhibitory activity indicating that loop insertion is not necessary for antiangiogenic role. The results of our study establish that active conformation of AT can become antiangiogenic while maintaining its anticoagulant activity possibly through chelation of low affinity heparin in the vicinity of endothelial cell. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Comprehensive Docking and MM/GBSA Rescoring Study of Ligand Recognition upon Binding Antithrombin

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Perez-Sanchez, Horacio; C. Lightstone, Felice

    2017-04-06

    A high-throughput virtual screening pipeline has been extended from single energetically minimized structure Molecular Mechanics/Generalized Born Surface Area (MM/GBSA) rescoring to ensemble-average MM/GBSA rescoring. The correlation coefficient (R2) of calculated and experimental binding free energies for a series of antithrombin ligands has been improved from 0.36 to 0.69 when switching from the single-structure MM/GBSA rescoring to ensemble-average one. The electrostatic interactions in both solute and solvent are identified to play an important role in determining the binding free energy after the decomposition of the calculated binding free energy. Furthermore, the increasing negative charge of the compounds provides a more favorablemore » electrostatic energy change but creates a higher penalty for the solvation free energy. Such a penalty is compensated by the electrostatic energy change, which results in a better binding affinity. A highly hydrophobic ligand is determined by the docking program to be a non-specific binder. Finally, these results have demonstrated that it is very important to keep a few top poses for rescoring, if the binding is non-specific or the binding mode is not well determined by the docking calculation.« less

  1. A small deletion in SERPINC1 causes type I antithrombin deficiency by promoting endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Su, Jingjing; Shu, Liang; Zhang, Zhou; Cai, Lei; Zhang, Xin; Zhai, Yu; Liu, Jianren

    2016-11-22

    Antithrombin (AT) deficiency is an autosomal dominant disorder, and identification of mutation AT variants would improve our understanding of the anticoagulant function of this serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN) and the molecular pathways underlying this disorder. In the present study, we performed whole-exome sequencing of a Chinese family with deep vein thrombosis, and identified a new small deletion that eliminates four amino acids (INEL) from exon 4 of SERPINC1 gene. This causes type I AT deficiency by enhancing the intracellular retention of this protein. AT retention leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which further inhibits AT release. In addition, ER stress activates ER-associated degradation, which promotes AT degradation. Suppression of ER stress enhanced the secretion of AT, while inhibition of ER-associated degradation suppressed AT release. Thus, our study identified a new mutation (INEL deletion) causing type I AT deficiency, and uncovered a novel mechanism for AT retention through enhanced ER stress, which may provide an innovative approach for treating AT deficiency.

  2. [Antithrombin III dosage using the chromogenic substrate Tos-Gly-Pro-Arg-NAN, in several pathological situations].

    PubMed

    Lourenço, D M; Noguti, M A; Juliano, L

    1995-01-01

    Functional methods for ATIII determination are essential for the diagnosis of deficiencies of this important thrombin inhibitor. The aim of this work was standardize the method for ATIII level determination in plasma, in microplates. ATIII levels were measured, using the chromogenic substrate Tos-Gly-Pro-Arg-NAN, which is specific for thrombin, and which has been sinthesized at the Biophysical Department of the Escola Paulista de Medicina of the Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil. Among 21 patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT), 20 had ATIII levels above 70% (113 +/- 22%). A 22 year-old female patient, who had recurrent DVT and a familiar DVT antecedent, had a congenital ATIII deficiency (56%). ATIII levels were normal in 6 patients with von Willebrand disease (109 +/- 28%), as expected. In 20 patients with severe hepatic failure, it has been found reduced ATIII levels (42 +/- 19%), since this inhibitor is produced by the liver. In 3 patients with sepsis and DIC, ATIII levels have also been reduced (45 +/- 5%) owing to consumption during blood coagulation activation. There was a significant correlation between ATIII levels and the prothrombin time, as well as the factor V levels, and both are good parameters to assess hepatic function and to monitor DIC. There was a significant correlation between ATIII levels measured using the chromogenic substrate Tos-Gly-Pro-Arg-NAN and those measured using S-2238, produced by Kabi Laboratories. This method for ATIII determination in plasma is easy to perform and it can detect ATIII deficiency in patients with hepatic failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation and thrombophilia.

  3. Distribution of a length polymorphism 5{prime} to exon 1 of the antithrombin III (ATIII) gene in the Chinese

    SciTech Connect

    Low, P.S.; Liu, Y.; Saha, N.

    1994-09-01

    A length polymorphism at the 5{prime} untranslated region of the ATIII gene has been described as having been detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a frequency of 0.75 for the short allele (S) in the Caucasian population. This length polymorphism of the ATIII gene has been studied in 251 Chinese healthy subjects. Genomic DNA was amplified by PCR with primers of published sequences. Fragments of the amplified DNA were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis (3% NuSieve and 1% Seakem GTG) and photographed on a UV transilluminator. The frequency of the short allele (S) was found to be significantly lower (0.37) than that in the Caucasians (0.75). The distribution of genotypes of this polymorphism of the ATIII gene was at Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The large difference of allelic frequencies in the Mongoloid and Caucasian populations makes it a useful marker for population studies.

  4. Focal adhesion kinase is involved in type III group B streptococcal invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sooan; Paul-Satyaseela, Maneesh; Maneesh, Paul-Satyaseela; Lee, Jong-Seok; Romer, Lewis H; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2006-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS), the leading cause of neonatal meningitis, has been shown to invade human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), which constitute the blood-brain barrier. GBS invasion of HBMEC has been shown to require the host cell actin cytoskeleton rearrangements. The present study examined the mechanisms underlying actin cytoskeleton rearrangements that are involved in type III GBS invasion of HBMEC. We showed that type III GBS invasion was inhibited by genistein, a general tyrosine kinase inhibitor (mean 54% invasion decrease at 100 microM), and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3) kinase inhibitor (mean 70% invasion decrease at 50 microM), but not by PP2, an inhibitor of the Src family tyrosine kinases. We subsequently showed that the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was the one of the host proteins tyrosine phosphorylated by type III GBS. Over-expression of a dominant negative form of the FAK C-terminal domain significantly decreased type III GBS invasion of HBMEC (mean 51% invasion decrease). In addition, we showed that FAK phosphorylation correlated with its association of paxillin, an adapter protein of actin filament, and PI3-kinase subunit p85. This is the first demonstration that FAK phosphorylation and its association with paxillin and PI3 kinase play a key role in type III GBS invasion of HBMEC.

  5. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 dependent overexpression of sulfiredoxin and peroxiredoxin III in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Sun; Lee, Hye Lim; Lee, Ki Bum; Park, Joo Hun; Chung, Wou Young; Lee, Keu Sung; Sheen, Seung Soo; Park, Kwang Joo; Hwang, Sung Chul

    2011-09-01

    Oxidative stress results in protein oxidation and is implicated in carcinogenesis. Sulfiredoxin (Srx) is responsible for the enzymatic reversal of inactivated peroxiredoxin (Prx). Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) binds to antioxidant responsive elements and upregulates the expression of Srx and Prx during oxidative stress. We aimed to elucidate the biological functions and potential roles of Srx in lung cancer. To study the roles of Srx and Prx III in lung cancer, we compared the protein levels of Nrf2, Prxs, thioredoxin, and Srx in 40 surgically resected human lung cancer tissues using immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses. Transforming growth factor-β(1), tumor necrosis factor-α, and camptothecin treatment were used to examine Prx III inactivation in Mv1Lu mink lung epithelial cells and A549 lung cancer cells. Prx I and Prx III proteins were markedly overexpressed in lung cancer tissues. A significant increase in the oxidized form of a cysteine sulfhydryl at the catalytic site of Prxs was found in carcinogenic lung tissue compared to normal lung tissue. Densitometric analyses of immunoblot data revealed significant Srx expression, which was higher in squamous cell carcinoma tissue (60%, 12/20) than in adenocarcinoma (20%, 4/20). Also, Nrf2 was present in the nuclear compartment of cancer cells. Srx and Prx III proteins were markedly overexpressed in human squamous cell carcinoma, suggesting that these proteins may play a protective role against oxidative injury and compensate for the high rate of mitochondrial metabolism in lung cancer.

  6. Dependence of the Ce(iii)/Ce(iv) ratio on intracellular localization in ceria nanoparticles internalized by human cells.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Daniela; Tredici, Ilenia G; Ghigna, Paolo; Castillio-Michel, Hiram; Falqui, Andrea; Di Benedetto, Cristiano; Alberti, Giancarla; Ricci, Vittorio; Anselmi-Tamburini, Umberto; Sommi, Patrizia

    2017-01-26

    CeO2 nanoparticles (CNPs) have been investigated as promising antioxidant agents with significant activity in the therapy of diseases involving free radicals or oxidative stress. However, the exact mechanism responsible for CNP activity has not been completely elucidated. In particular, in situ evidence of modification of the oxidative state of CNPs in human cells and their evolution during cell internalization and subsequent intracellular distribution has never been presented. In this study we investigated modification of the Ce(iii)/Ce(iv) ratio following internalization in human cells by X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). From this analysis on cell pellets, we observed that CNPs incubated for 24 h showed a significant increase in Ce(iii). By coupling on individual cells synchrotron micro-X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) with micro-XANES (μXANES) we demonstrated that the Ce(iii)/Ce(iv) ratio is also dependent on CNP intracellular localization. The regions with the highest CNP concentrations, suggested to be endolysosomes by transmission electron microscopy, were characterized by Ce atoms in the Ce(iv) oxidation state, while a higher Ce(iii) content was observed in regions surrounding these areas. These observations suggest that the interaction of CNPs with cells involves a complex mechanism in which different cellular areas play different roles.

  7. Tuning the serum persistence of human serum albumin domain III:diabody fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kenanova, Vania E.; Olafsen, Tove; Salazar, Felix B.; Williams, Lawrence E.; Knowles, Scott; Wu, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    The long circulation persistence of human serum albumin (HSA) is enabled by its domain III (DIII) interaction with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). A protein scaffold based on HSA DIII was designed. To modify the serum half life of the scaffold, residues H535, H510, and H464 were individually mutated to alanine. HSA DIII wild type (WT) and variants were fused to the anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) T84.66 diabody (Db), radiolabeled with 124I and injected into xenografted athymic mice for serial PET/CT imaging. All proteins targeted the CEA-positive tumor. The mean residence times (MRT) of the proteins, calculated by quantifying blood activity from the PET images, were: Db-DIII WT (56.7 h), H535A (25 h), H510A (20 h), H464A (17 h), compared with Db (2.9 h). Biodistribution confirmed the order of blood clearance from slow to fast: Db-DIII WT > H535A > H510A > H464A > Db with 4.0, 2.0, 1.8, 1.6 and 0.08 %ID/g of remaining blood activity at 51 h, respectively. This study demonstrates that attenuating the DIII–FcRn interaction provides a way of controlling the pharmacokinetics of the entire Db-DIII fusion protein without compromising tumor targeting. H464 appears to be most crucial for FcRn binding (greatest reduction in MRT), followed by H510 and H535. By mutating the DIII scaffold, we can dial serum kinetics for imaging or therapy applications. PMID:20802234

  8. Human malaria diagnosis using a single-step direct-PCR based on the Plasmodium cytochrome oxidase III gene.

    PubMed

    Echeverry, Diego F; Deason, Nicholas A; Davidson, Jenna; Makuru, Victoria; Xiao, Honglin; Niedbalski, Julie; Kern, Marcia; Russell, Tanya L; Burkot, Thomas R; Collins, Frank H; Lobo, Neil F

    2016-02-29

    Nested PCRs based on the Plasmodium 18s-rRNA gene have been extensively used for human malaria diagnosis. However, they are not practical when large quantities of samples need to be processed, further there have been challenges in the performance and when interpreting results, especially when submicroscopic infections are analysed. Here the use of "direct PCR" was investigated with the aim of improving diagnosis in the malaria elimination era. The performance of the Plasmodium cytochrome oxidase III gene (COX-III) based novel malaria detection strategies (direct nested PCR and direct single PCR) were compared using a 18s-rRNA direct nested PCR as a reference tool. Evaluations were based on sensitivity, specificity and the ability to detect mixed infections using control blood spot samples and field collected blood samples with final species diagnosis confirmation by sequencing. The COX-III direct PCR (limit of detection: 0.6-2 parasites/μL) was more sensitive than the 18s-rRNA direct nested PCR (limit of detection: 2-10 parasites/μL). The COX-III direct PCR identified all 21 positive controls (no mixed infections detected) while the 18s-rRNA direct nested PCR identified 18/21 (including four mixed infections). Different concentrations of simulated mixed infections (Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum) suggest that the COX-III direct PCR detects only the predominant species. When the 18s-rRNA direct nested PCR was used to detect Plasmodium in field collected bloods spots (n = 3833), there was discrepancy in the results from the genus PCR (16 % positive) and the species-specific PCR (5 % positive). Further, a large portion of a subset of these positive samples (93 % for genus and 60 % for P. vivax), did not align with Plasmodium sequences. In contrast, the COX-III direct PCR clearly identified (single bands confirmed with sequencing) 2 % positive Plasmodium samples including P. vivax, P. falciparum, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium ovale wallikeri. The COX-III

  9. Inactivation of human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus by formaldehyde-based reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, L.S.; Loskoski, S.L.; McDougal, J.S.

    1987-04-01

    Neutral buffered Formalin, a fixative used in most pathology laboratories, was found to inactivate human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus. Preparations containing this virus with infectivity titers of > 10/sup 5/ were treated with 1% or greater neutral buffered Formalin; after treatment, virus was undetectable (titer, <10/sup 1/). In addition, when infected phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes were treated with paraformaldehyde, transmission of the virus to other such lymphocytes was eliminated. 4 references, 2 tables.

  10. Sham feeding disrupts phase III of the duodenal migrating motor complex in humans.

    PubMed

    Pouderoux, P; Veyrac, M; Michel, H

    1995-09-01

    The role of the vagus nerve in the control of the intestinal migrating motor complex (MMC) is unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of physiological vagal stimulation with sham feeding on phase III of the MMC. Antroduodenal motility was recorded in six healthy volunteers. The first phase III was used as a control, and sham feeding was performed during the second phase III. The MMC was disrupted within 1.5 +/- 0.4 min of sham feeding and its duration was shorter than the control phase III. Phase III propagation was inhibited in all subjects, most of them exhibiting no propagation beyond the third duodenal recording site. During sham feeding, the antrum exhibited transient phasic contractions in five out of six subjects. The duodenal motility index recorded for up to 30 min after the onset of the sham feeding was unchanged in five out of six subjects. We conclude that sham feeding consistently interrupted phase III of the duodenal MMC and induced antral contractions, but failed to provoke significant motor events in the duodenum.

  11. Cloud point extraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for speciation of Cr(III) in human serum samples.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei; Wu, Qianghua

    2012-02-23

    A cloud point extraction (CPE) method for the preconcentration of ultra-trace chromium speciation in human serum samples prior to determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) had been developed in this paper. In this method, Cr(III) reacts with 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) yielding a hydrophobic complex, which is then entrapped in the surfactant-rich phase, whereas Cr(VI) remained in aqueous phase. Thus, separation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) could be realized. Total chromium was determined after the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by using ascorbic acid as reducing reagent. PAN was used not only as chelating reagent in CPE, but also as chemical modifier in GFAAS. Triton X-114 non-ionic surfactant had been used as an extraction medium. The main factors affecting CPE efficiency, such as pH of solution, concentration and kind of complexing agent, concentration of non-ionic surfactant, equilibration temperature and time, were investigated in detail. An enrichment factor of 83.5 was obtained for the preconcentration of Cr(III) with 10 mL solution. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limit of Cr(III) was 0.02 μg L⁻¹. The relative standard deviation was 2.6% for intra-day assay precision (n=7, c=10 ng mL⁻¹), values of recovery for chromium were from 92.0% to 94.7% for three samples. This method is simple, accurate, and sensitive and can be applied to determine ultra-trace chromium speciation in human serum. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Polymorphisms in antithrombin and in tissue factor pathway inhibitor genes are associated with recurrent pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Shinohara, Elvira M; Bertinato, Juliano Felix; Tosin Bueno, Carolina; Cordeiro da Silva, Kelma; Burlacchini de Carvalho, Mário Henrique; Pulcineli Vieira Francisco, Rossana; Zugaib, Marcelo; Cerda, Alvaro; Morelli, Vânia Maris

    2012-10-01

    Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) is a multifactorial condition. The effect of antithrombin (SERPINC1), protein C (PROC), thrombomodulin (THBD) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the risk of RPL is thus far unknown. Our objective was to determine the association of SNPs in the above mentioned genes with RPL. We included 117 non-pregnant women with three or more consecutive losses prior to 20 weeks of pregnancy without a previous history of carrying a fetus to viability, and 264 healthy fertile non-pregnant women who had at least two term deliveries and no known pregnancy losses. The PROC (rs1799809 and rs1799808), SERPINC1 (rs2227589), THBD (rs1042579) and TFPI (rs10931292, rs8176592 and rs10153820) SNPs were analysed by Real Time PCR. Genotype frequencies for PROC 2418A>G, PROC 2405C>T, THBD 1418C>T, TFPI (T-33C and TFPI C-399T) SNPs were similar in cases and controls. The carriers of SERPINC1 786A allele (GA + AA genotypes) had an increased risk for RPL (odds ratio [OR]: 1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.00, p= 0.034) while women carrying the TFPI -287C allele (TC + CC genotypes) had a protection effect on having RPL (OR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.26-0.83, p= 0.009). The TCC haplotype for TFPI T-33C/ TFPI T-287C/ TFPI C-399T SNPs was less frequent in cases (5.7%) than in controls (11.6%) (OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.23-0.90, p= 0.025). In conclusion, our data indicate that SERPINC1 786G>A variant increases the risk for RPL, while TFPI T-287C variant is protective; however, further studies are required to confirm our findings.

  13. Inhibition of antithrombin and bovine serum albumin native state aggregation by heparin.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Burcu Baykal; Zheng, Bingqian; Dubin, Paul L

    2014-01-14

    Protein native state aggregation, a major problem in pharmaceutical and biological processes, has been addressed pharmacologically by the addition of protein-binding excipients. Heparin (Hp), a highly sulfated polysaccharide, interacts with numerous proteins with moderate to high affinity, but reports about its effect on protein aggregation are contradictory. We studied the pH dependence of the aggregation of antithrombin (AT) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the presence and absence of heparin. High-precision turbidimetry showed strong aggregation for both AT and BSA in I = 10 mM NaCl, conditions at which electrostatically driven Hp binding and aggregation both occur, with more obvious aggregation of heparin-free AT appearing as larger aggregate size. Aggregation of AT was dramatically inhibited at Hp: protein 6:1 (mole ratio); however, the effect at 0.5:1 Hp:protein was greater for BSA. Frontal analysis capillary electrophoresis showed a much larger equilibrium association constant Kobs between Hp and AT, in accord with the onset of Hp binding at a higher pH; both effects are explained by the higher charge density of the positive domain for AT as revealed by modeling with DelPhi. The corresponding modeling images showed that these domains persist at high salt only for AT, consistent with the 160-fold drop in Kobs at 100 mM salt for BSA-Hp binding. The smaller inhibition effect for AT arises from the tendency of its uncomplexed monomer to form larger aggregates more rapidly, but the stronger binding of Hp to AT does not facilitate Hp-induced aggregate dissolution which occurs more readily for BSA. This can be attributed to the higher density of AT aggregates evidenced by higher fractal dimensions. Differences between inhibition and reversal by Hp arise because the former may depend on the stage at which Hp enters the aggregation process and the latter on aggregate size and morphology.

  14. The Function of Vascular Smooth Muscle Phosphodiesterase III is Preserved in Healthy Human Aging

    PubMed Central

    Elvebak, Rachel L.; Eisenach, John H.; Joyner, Michael J.; Nicholson, Wayne T.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Phosphodiesterase (PDE) III is an enzyme in vascular smooth muscle that metabolizes cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Milrinone inhibits PDE III, increasing the availability of cAMP. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), which is regulated by nitric oxide (NO), also inhibits PDE III. The endothelial NO component of prostacyclin (PGI2)‐mediated vasodilation is reduced in aging. This study investigated if PGI2‐mediated vasodilation during concomitant inhibition of endothelial NO and smooth muscle PDE III is affected by healthy aging. PDE III was inhibited with milrinone in 10 older subjects and 10 young matched controls while simultaneously infusing NG‐monomethyl‐l‐arginine acetate (l‐NMMA) to remove the confounding inhibitory effects of cGMP on PDE III. Incremental doses of PGI2 and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were administered to the brachial artery during separate trials. l‐NMMA decreased baseline blood flow similarly, and the addition of milrinone increased baseline blood flow similarly in both groups. The forearm blood flow responses to PGI2 were similar between groups (younger: 7.62 ± 0.72; older: 6.88 ± 0.81 mL•dL−1 FAV•min−1 at the highest dose of PGI2). SNP responses were also similar. This study suggests that the vasodilator pathway associated with PDE III function, the bioavailability of cAMP, and the interaction with cGMP may be preserved in healthy aging. Clin Trans Sci 2010; Volume 3: 239–242. PMID:21500398

  15. Interdigestive gastroduodenal manometry in humans. Indication of duodenal phase III as a retroperistaltic pump.

    PubMed

    Björnsson, E S; Abrahamsson, H

    1995-03-01

    To elucidate the specific function of the three phases (I-III) of the migrating motor complex (MMC) by manometry, detailed analysis of individual pressure waves in the proximal duodenum was performed. Twenty healthy subjects (10 men and 10 women of whom 11 were tube-naive) underwent computerized manometry for 5 h during fasting followed by 45 min after a meal using an 8-channel water perfused catheter. Three recording points were in the antrum, three in the proximal duodenum (2 cm apart), one in the distal duodenum and one in the proximal jejunum. In all subjects at least one phase III (median 2) was observed during the 5-h fasting recording. In the proximal duodenum the mean proportion of retrograde pressure waves, out of all propagating waves, was significantly increased in the last part of phase III (85 +/- 9%, mean, SE), compared with early phase III (6 +/- 5%), late phase II (5 +/- 4%) and the feeding phase (10 +/- 5%), irrespective of gender or previous tube-experience. The median length of the MMCs was 108.5 min. There was no statistically significant difference between men and women or between tube-naive and tube-experienced subjects for the duodeno-jejunal motility indices of phase II and phase III, nor for duration or migration of phase III. The postprandial motility index of the small intestine was increased compared with the interdigestive late phase II, particularly in the jejunum (P < 0.02). The last part of the duodenal interdigestive phase III in healthy subjects shows the feature of a retrosperistaltic pump. This cyclic sequence of retropropagation coincides with the reported rapid alkalinization of the duodenal bulb and the gastric antrum occurring in early antral phase I.

  16. Zinc protects human peripheral blood lymphocytes from Cr(III)(phenanthroline){sub 3}-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaramanivel, Sundararaj; Rajaram, Anantanarayanan; Rajaram, Rama

    2010-03-15

    We have studied the effect of Cr(III)(phen){sub 3} [(tris(1,10-phenanthroline) chromium(III) chloride)] on lymphocytes in order to find out if metallothioneins (MTs) are produced in the process. We also investigated whether zinc pretreatment is able to protect cells from apoptosis reported to occur for this compound. Our results indicate that MT synthesis is induced by Cr(III)(phen){sub 3}, and it has been identified as the MT-3 isoform through RT-PCR which has not been reported earlier. By zinc pretreatment, this apoptosis is reversed as inferred from cytotoxicity studies, Annexin-V/PI staining, ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining and DNA fragmentation pattern and ultrastructural investigations using TEM and SEM. The zinc pretreatment reduces the amount of ROS produced by Cr(III)(phen){sub 3} . The MT-1a and 1b synthesized by zinc (also evidenced through RT-PCR experiments) is possibly able to scavenge ROS which is one of the early signaling molecules that lead to apoptosis. Zinc pretreatment also reverses the changes in downstream signaling events such as mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP levels and the activation of caspase-3. This is the first report on the induction of MT-3 in lymphocytes due to a metal stress or any other stimuli. Even though MT-3 is synthesized here, apoptosis still occurs due to ROS production on Cr(III)(phen){sub 3} exposure when the cells have not been primed with zinc.

  17. Aquaporin Positron Emission Tomography Differentiates Between Grade III and IV Human Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuji; Nakamura, Yukihiro; Yamada, Kenichi; Kurabe, Satoshi; Okamoto, Kouichirou; Aoki, Hiroshi; Kitaura, Hiroki; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Fujii, Yukihiko; Huber, Vincent J; Igarashi, Hironaka; Kwee, Ingrid L; Nakada, Tsutomu

    2017-06-21

    Aquaporin (AQP) water channels play a significant role in mesenchymal microvascular proliferation and infiltrative growth. AQPs are highly expressed in malignant astrocytomas, and a positive correlation is observed between their expression levels and histological tumor grade. To examine the utility of aquaporin positron emission tomography (PET) for differentiating between astrocytoma grade III and grade IV using the AQP radioligand [ 11 C]TGN-020. Fifteen astrocytoma patients, grade III (n = 7) and grade IV (n = 8), and 10 healthy volunteers underwent [ 11 C]TGN-020 aquaporin PET imaging. Surgical tissues of astrocytoma patients were examined for histopathological grading using the WHO classification standard and expression of AQP1 and AQP4 immunohistochemically. Mean standardized uptake values of astrocytoma grade III and IV (0.51 ± 0.11 vs 1.50 ± 0.44, respectively) were higher than normal white matter (0.17 ± 0.02, P < .001) for both tumor grades. Importantly, mean standardized uptake values of astrocytoma grade IV were significantly higher than grade III ( P < .01). Our study demonstrated that [ 11 C]TGN-020 aquaporin PET imaging differentiated between astrocytoma grades III and IV. We suggest its clinical application as a noninvasive diagnostic tool would lead to advancements in the management of these malignant brain tumors.

  18. Design, expression, and stability of a diverse protein library based on the human fibronectin type III domain.

    PubMed

    Olson, C Anders; Roberts, Richard W

    2007-03-01

    Protein libraries based on natural scaffolds enable the generation of novel molecular tools and potential therapeutics by directed evolution. Here, we report the design and construction of a high complexity library (30 x 10(13) sequences) based on the 10th fibronectin type III domain of human fibronectin (10FnIII). We examined the bacterial expression characteristics and stability of this library using a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-reporter screen, SDS-PAGE analysis, and chemical denaturation, respectively. The high throughput GFP reporter screen demonstrates that a large fraction of our library expresses significant levels of soluble protein in bacteria. However, SDS-PAGE analysis of expression cultures indicates the ratio of soluble to insoluble protein expressed varies greatly for randomly chosen library members. We also tested the stabilities of several representative variants by guanidinium chloride denaturation. All variants tested displayed cooperative unfolding transitions similar to wild-type, and two exhibited free energies of unfolding equal to wild-type 10FnIII. This work demonstrates the utility of GFP-based screening as a tool for analysis of high-complexity protein libraries. Our results indicate that a vast amount of protein sequence space surrounding the 10FnIII scaffold is accessible for the generation of novel functions by directed as well as natural evolution.

  19. Design, expression, and stability of a diverse protein library based on the human fibronectin type III domain

    PubMed Central

    Olson, C. Anders; Roberts, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    Protein libraries based on natural scaffolds enable the generation of novel molecular tools and potential therapeutics by directed evolution. Here, we report the design and construction of a high complexity library (30 × 1013 sequences) based on the 10th fibronectin type III domain of human fibronectin (10FnIII). We examined the bacterial expression characteristics and stability of this library using a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-reporter screen, SDS-PAGE analysis, and chemical denaturation, respectively. The high throughput GFP reporter screen demonstrates that a large fraction of our library expresses significant levels of soluble protein in bacteria. However, SDS-PAGE analysis of expression cultures indicates the ratio of soluble to insoluble protein expressed varies greatly for randomly chosen library members. We also tested the stabilities of several representative variants by guanidinium chloride denaturation. All variants tested displayed cooperative unfolding transitions similar to wild-type, and two exhibited free energies of unfolding equal to wild-type 10FnIII. This work demonstrates the utility of GFP-based screening as a tool for analysis of high-complexity protein libraries. Our results indicate that a vast amount of protein sequence space surrounding the 10FnIII scaffold is accessible for the generation of novel functions by directed as well as natural evolution. PMID:17322532

  20. Effects of the colour additive caramel colour III on the immune system: a study with human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Houben, G F; Abma, P M; van den Berg, H; van Dokkum, W; van Loveren, H; Penninks, A H; Seinen, W; Spanhaak, S; Vos, J G; Ockhuizen, T

    1992-09-01

    Administration of the colour additive Caramel Colour III to rats has been associated with decreased numbers of lymphocytes and several other changes in the immune system, as well as in immune function parameters, specifically in animals fed a diet with a relatively low vitamin B6 content. The effects are caused by the imidazole derivative 2-acetyl-4(5)-tetrahydroxybutylimidazole (THI). Caramel Colour III is commonly used in food products such as bakery products, soya-bean sauces, brown sauces, gravies, soup aromas, brown (dehydrated) soups, brown malt caramel blend for various applications, vinegars and beers, and effects in humans on dietary intake cannot be excluded. Elderly male volunteers with a marginal deficit in vitamin B6 were considered a relevant and potentially sensitive group to study possible effects of Caramel Colour III on blood lymphocyte numbers (total and within subsets) or on proliferative responses of lymphocytes to mitogenic stimulation. In addition, several other haematological parameters, as well as serum immunoglobulin levels and immunoglobulin production in vitro by pokeweed mitogen-stimulated mononuclear blood cells were studied. The results of this double-blind intervention study demonstrated that in a selected test group of apparently healthy elderly male volunteers with a biochemically marginally deficient vitamin B6 status, Caramel Colour III containing 23 (commercial sample) or 143 (research sample) ppm THI and administered at the level of the current acceptable daily intake of 200 mg/kg body weight/day for 7 days did not affect any of the factors investigated.

  1. Glycosaminoglycans as naturally occurring combinatorial libraries: developing a mass spectrometry-based strategy for characterization of anti-thrombin interaction with low molecular weight heparin and heparin oligomers.

    PubMed

    Abzalimov, Rinat R; Dubin, Paul L; Kaltashov, Igor A

    2007-08-15

    Heparin is a densely charged polysaccharide, which is best known for its anticoagulant activity, although it also modulates a plethora of other biological processes. Unlike biopolymers whose synthesis is strictly controlled by a unique genetic template, heparin molecules exhibit a remarkable degree of structural heterogeneity, which poses a serious challenge for studies of heparin-protein interactions. This analytical challenge is often dealt with by reducing the enormous structural repertoire of heparin to a model small molecule. In this paper, we describe a different approach inspired by the experimental methodologies from the arsenal of combinatorial chemistry. Interaction of anti-thrombin III (AT) with heparinoids is studied using a mixture of oligoheparin molecules of fixed degree of polymerization, but varying chemical composition (heparin hexasaccharides obtained by size exclusion chromatography of an enzymatic digest of porcine intestinal heparin with bacterial heparinase), as well as a heparin-derived pharmaceutical preparation Tinzaparin (heparin oligosaccharides up to a 22-mer). AT binders are identified based on the results of ESI MS measurements of complexes formed by protein-oligoheparin association. Additionally, differential depletion of free heparin oligomers in solution in the presence of AT is used to verify the binding preferences. ESI MS characterization of oligoheparin-AT interaction under partially denaturing conditions allowed the conformer specificity of the protein-polyanion binding to be monitored. A model emerging from these studies invokes the notion of a well-defined binding site on AT, to which a flexible partner (heparin) adapts to maximize favorable intermolecular electrostatic interactions. This study demonstrates the enormous potential of ESI MS as an analytical tool to study the interactions of highly heterogeneous glycosaminoglycans with their cognate proteins outside of the commonly accepted reductionist paradigm, which reduces

  2. Human MAF1 targets and represses active RNA polymerase III genes by preventing recruitment rather than inducing long-term transcriptional arrest

    PubMed Central

    Orioli, Andrea; Praz, Viviane; Lhôte, Philippe; Hernandez, Nouria

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) is tightly controlled in response to environmental cues, yet a genomic-scale picture of Pol III regulation and the role played by its repressor MAF1 is lacking. Here, we describe genome-wide studies in human fibroblasts that reveal a dynamic and gene-specific adaptation of Pol III recruitment to extracellular signals in an mTORC1-dependent manner. Repression of Pol III recruitment and transcription are tightly linked to MAF1, which selectively localizes at Pol III loci, even under serum-replete conditions, and increasingly targets transcribing Pol III in response to serum starvation. Combining Pol III binding profiles with EU-labeling and high-throughput sequencing of newly synthesized small RNAs, we show that Pol III occupancy closely reflects ongoing transcription. Our results exclude the long-term, unproductive arrest of Pol III on the DNA as a major regulatory mechanism and identify previously uncharacterized, differential coordination in Pol III binding and transcription under different growth conditions. PMID:26941251

  3. Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Human As(III) S-Adenosylmethionine Methyltransferase (AS3MT)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is the most ubiquitous environmental toxin and carcinogen. Long-term exposure to arsenic is associated with human diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Human As(III) S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) methyltransferases (hAS3MT) methylates As(III) to trivalent mono- and dimethyl species that are more toxic and potentially more carcinogenic than inorganic arsenic. Modulators of hAS3MT activity may be useful for the prevention or treatment of arsenic-related diseases. Using a newly developed high-throughput assay for hAS3MT activity, we identified 10 novel noncompetitive small molecule inhibitors. In silico docking analysis with the crystal structure of an AS3MT orthologue suggests that the inhibitors bind in a cleft between domains that is distant from either the As(III) or SAM binding sites. This suggests the presence of a possible allosteric and regulatory site in the enzyme. These inhibitors may be useful tools for future research in arsenic metabolism and are the starting-point for the development of drugs against hAS3MT. PMID:26577531

  4. Involvement of DNA ligase III and ribonuclease H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Ruhanen, Heini; Ushakov, Kathy; Yasukawa, Takehiro

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis operates in mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, but the factors involved in lagging strand synthesis are largely uncharacterised. We investigated the effect of knockdown of the candidate proteins in cultured human cells under conditions where mtDNA appears to replicate chiefly via coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis to restore the copy number of mtDNA to normal levels after transient mtDNA depletion. DNA ligase III knockdown attenuated the recovery of mtDNA copy number and appeared to cause single strand nicks in replicating mtDNA molecules, suggesting the involvement of DNA ligase III in Okazaki fragment ligation in human mitochondria. Knockdown of ribonuclease (RNase) H1 completely prevented the mtDNA copy number restoration, and replication intermediates with increased single strand nicks were readily observed. On the other hand, knockdown of neither flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) nor DNA2 affected mtDNA replication. These findings imply that RNase H1 is indispensable for the progression of mtDNA synthesis through removing RNA primers from Okazaki fragments. In the nucleus, Okazaki fragments are ligated by DNA ligase I, and the RNase H2 is involved in Okazaki fragment processing. This study thus proposes that the mitochondrial replication system utilises distinct proteins, DNA ligase III and RNase H1, for Okazaki fragment maturation.

  5. Human uroporphyrinogen III synthase: Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of a full-length cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Shihfeng; Bishop, D.F.; Desnick, R.J. )

    1988-10-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase, the fourth enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, is responsible for conversion of the linear tetrapyrrole, hydroxymethylbilane, to the cyclic tetrapyrrole, uroporphyrinogen III. The deficient activity of URO-synthase is the enzymatic defect in the autosomal recessive disorder congenital erythropoietic porphyria. To facilitate the isolation of a full-length cDNA for human URO-synthase, the human erythrocyte enzyme was purified to homogeneity and 81 nonoverlapping amino acids were determined by microsequencing the N terminus and four tryptic peptides. Two synthetic oligonucleotide mixtures were used to screen 1.2 {times} 10{sup 6} recombinants from a human adult liver cDNA library. Eight clones were positive with both oligonucleotide mixtures. Of these, dideoxy sequencing of the 1.3 kilobase insert from clone pUROS-2 revealed 5' and 3' untranslated sequences of 196 and 284 base pairs, respectively, and an open reading frame of 798 base pairs encoding a protein of 265 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 28,607 Da. The isolation and expression of this full-length cDNA for human URO-synthase should facilitate studies of the structure, organization, and chromosomal localization of this heme biosynthetic gene as well as the characterization of the molecular lesions causing congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

  6. Arginine 485 of human serum albumin interacts with the benzophenone moiety of ketoprofen in the binding pocket of subdomain III A and III B.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, K; Chuang, V T G; Ito, T; Suenaga, A; Watanabe, H; Maruyama, T; Otagiri, M

    2012-05-01

    Arylpropionic acid nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drusg (NSAIDs) primarily bind to subdomain III A (site II) of human serum albumin (HSA). Ketoprofen (KP), an arylpropionic acid that contains a photoreactive benzophenone moiety, was used to photolabel the binding region of site II. LC/Q-TOF mass spectrometry determination revealed that R485 was the amino acid residue that formed covalent adduct with the benzophenone moiety of KP. Point mutation of arginine 485 to alanine showed a slight decrease in the overall binding percentage of KP when compared to that of native HSA. The induced circular dichroism spectral data of KP with both R485A and native albumin confirmed the photolabeling findings. Interestingly, an increase in the extent of [14C]KP covalent adduct formation with the 11.6 kDa peptide derived from subdomain IIB-IIIA was observed for R485A. In contrast, mutation of arginine 410 caused a significant reduction of binding percentage, confirming the importance of this residue in high affinity binding of arylpropionic acid derivatives. This may indicate that while KP's carboxylate interacts electrostatically with arginine 410, the benzophenone moiety may have swung away from helix 6 in the absence of arginine 485. In this study, photolabeling of native and mutants albumins, R485A and R410C with [14C]KP confirmed that R485 involved in the non-electrostatic interaction with the benzophenone moiety of KP, but not vital to hold KP in the binding pocket of subdomain IIIA.

  7. Hydroxylation of Human Type III Collagen Alpha Chain by Recombinant Coexpression with a Viral Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jingjing; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Gao, Yuan; Fan, Daidi; Zhu, Chenhui; Mi, Yu; Xue, Wenjiao

    2017-08-01

    High-level expression of recombinant collagen by genetic engineering is urgently required. Recombinant collagen is different from natural collagen in its hydroxyproline (Hyp) content and thermal stability. To obtain hydroxylated collagen for applications in biomedicine and biomaterials, the human collagen α1(III) chain was co-expressed with the viral prolyl 4-hydroxylase A085R in Escherichia coli. Unlike previous reports using human prolyl 4-hydroxylase, this study examined the hydroxylation of full-length human collagen α1(III) chain (COL3A1) by viral prolyl 4-hydroxylase. The genes encoding these two proteins were controlled by different promoters, Ptac and PRPL, on a recombinant pKK223-3 plasmid. The sequencing results verified that the target genes were successfully inserted into the recombinant vector. Based on quantitative PCR, SDS-PAGE, and western blotting, successful expression by E. coli BL21(DE3) was detected at the mRNA and protein levels for both loci. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) results suggested that the highest Hyp yield was obtained when the two proteins were induced with 0.5 mM IPTG and heat-shock treatment at 50 °C, corresponding to high enzyme expression and low human collagen α1(III) chain expression levels. A biological activity analysis indicated that the recombinant collagen with the highest hydroxylation level supported the growth of baby hamster kidney cells, similar to observations for native collagen. The production of hydroxylated collagen in this study establishes a new method for collagen hydroxylation and provides a basis for the application of recombinant collagen expressed in E. coli.

  8. Mutations in the UQCC1-Interacting Protein, UQCC2, Cause Human Complex III Deficiency Associated with Perturbed Cytochrome b Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wijeyeratne, Xiaonan W.; van den Brand, Mariël A. M.; Leenders, Anne M.; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Reljić, Boris; Compton, Alison G.; Frazier, Ann E.; Bruno, Damien L.; Christodoulou, John; Endo, Hitoshi; Ryan, Michael T.; Nijtmans, Leo G.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Thorburn, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is responsible for generating the majority of cellular ATP. Complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase) is the third of five OXPHOS complexes. Complex III assembly relies on the coordinated expression of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, with 10 subunits encoded by nuclear DNA and one by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Complex III deficiency is a debilitating and often fatal disorder that can arise from mutations in complex III subunit genes or one of three known complex III assembly factors. The molecular cause for complex III deficiency in about half of cases, however, is unknown and there are likely many complex III assembly factors yet to be identified. Here, we used Massively Parallel Sequencing to identify a homozygous splicing mutation in the gene encoding Ubiquinol-Cytochrome c Reductase Complex Assembly Factor 2 (UQCC2) in a consanguineous Lebanese patient displaying complex III deficiency, severe intrauterine growth retardation, neonatal lactic acidosis and renal tubular dysfunction. We prove causality of the mutation via lentiviral correction studies in patient fibroblasts. Sequence-profile based orthology prediction shows UQCC2 is an ortholog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex III assembly factor, Cbp6p, although its sequence has diverged substantially. Co-purification studies show that UQCC2 interacts with UQCC1, the predicted ortholog of the Cbp6p binding partner, Cbp3p. Fibroblasts from the patient with UQCC2 mutations have deficiency of UQCC1, while UQCC1-depleted cells have reduced levels of UQCC2 and complex III. We show that UQCC1 binds the newly synthesized mtDNA-encoded cytochrome b subunit of complex III and that UQCC2 patient fibroblasts have specific defects in the synthesis or stability of cytochrome b. This work reveals a new cause for complex III deficiency that can assist future patient diagnosis, and provides insight into human complex III assembly by establishing that UQCC1

  9. Inactivation of Factor VIIa by Antithrombin In Vitro, Ex Vivo and In Vivo: Role of Tissue Factor and Endothelial Cell Protein C Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Vatsyayan, Rit; Kothari, Hema; Mackman, Nigel; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that antithrombin (AT) could act as a significant physiologic regulator of FVIIa. However, in vitro studies showed that AT could inhibit FVIIa effectively only when it was bound to tissue factor (TF). Circulating blood is known to contain only traces of TF, at best. FVIIa also binds endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR), but the role of EPCR on FVIIa inactivation by AT is unknown. The present study was designed to investigate the role of TF and EPCR in inactivation of FVIIa by AT in vivo. Low human TF mice (low TF, ∼1% expression of the mouse TF level) and high human TF mice (HTF, ∼100% of the mouse TF level) were injected with human rFVIIa (120 µg kg−1 body weight) via the tail vein. At varying time intervals following rFVIIa administration, blood was collected to measure FVIIa-AT complex and rFVIIa antigen levels in the plasma. Despite the large difference in TF expression in the mice, HTF mice generated only 40–50% more of FVIIa-AT complex as compared to low TF mice. Increasing the concentration of TF in vivo in HTF mice by LPS injection increased the levels of FVIIa-AT complexes by about 25%. No significant differences were found in FVIIa-AT levels among wild-type, EPCR-deficient, and EPCR-overexpressing mice. The levels of FVIIa-AT complex formed in vitro and ex vivo were much lower than that was found in vivo. In summary, our results suggest that traces of TF that may be present in circulating blood or extravascular TF that is transiently exposed during normal vessel damage contributes to inactivation of FVIIa by AT in circulation. However, TF’s role in AT inactivation of FVIIa appears to be minor and other factor(s) present in plasma, on blood cells or vascular endothelium may play a predominant role in this process. PMID:25102166

  10. Saliva versus plasma bioequivalence of rusovastatin in humans: validation of class III drugs of the salivary excretion classification system.

    PubMed

    Idkaidek, Nasir; Arafat, Tawfiq

    2015-03-01

    Bioequivalence of rusovastatin in healthy human volunteers was done using saliva and plasma matrices in order to investigate the robustness of using saliva instead of plasma as a surrogate for bioequivalence of class III drugs according to the salivary excretion classification system (SECS). Saliva and plasma samples were collected for 72 h after oral administration of rusovastatin 40 mg to 12 healthy humans. Saliva and plasma pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non-compartmental analysis. Analysis of variance, 90 % confidence intervals, and intra-subject and inter-subject variability values of pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using Kinetica program V5. Human effective intestinal permeability was also calculated by SimCYP program V13. Rusovastatin falls into class III (high permeability/low fraction unbound to plasma proteins) and hence was subjected to salivary excretion. A correlation coefficient of 0.99 between saliva and plasma concentrations, and a saliva/plasma concentration ratio of 0.175 were observed. The 90 % confidence limits of area under the curve (AUClast) and maximum concentration (C max) showed similar trends in both saliva and plasma. On the other hand, inter- and intra-subject variability values in saliva were higher than in plasma, leading to the need for a slightly higher number of subjects to be used in saliva studies. Non-invasive saliva sampling instead of the invasive plasma sampling method can be used as a surrogate for bioequivalence of SECS class III drugs when an adequate sample size is used.

  11. Promoter analysis of the human alpha1,3/4-fucosyltransferase gene (FUT III).

    PubMed

    Dabrowska, Anna; Baczyńska, Dagmara; Widerak, Katarzyna; Laskowska, Anna; Ugorski, Maciej

    2005-10-15

    alpha1,3/4-Fucosyltransferase (FUT3) is involved in the synthesis of sialyl Le(a) tetrasaccharide, a tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen. Fucosyltransferases are thought to be important regulatory enzymes in the synthesis of fucosylated structures. However, there are conflicting data on the role of FUT3 in the synthesis of this carbohydrate structure and more studies on the regulation of FUT III gene expression are needed. Therefore, as first step, the promoter of FUT III gene was cloned and characterized. Sequencing data showed the absence of TATA, CAAT, and GC boxes, but many binding sites for transcription factors, previously described in colon cancer cells, were identified. Analysis of enhancer and silencing elements of deletion mutants revealed the presence of basal promoter elements of the FUT III gene in the region -636 to -674 bp from the translation initiation site, and positive and negative regulatory elements within the -674 bp to -854 bp and -854 to -1220 regions, respectively. 5'-RACE analysis showed the presence of two transcripts with 5'-ends localized within the exon A. The 5'-end of the longer transcript extended -229 nucleotides from the translation start codon and contained a sequence corresponding to an Inr element, localizing the putative transcription initiation site within this sequence. The strong correlation between the promoter activity of the FUT III gene and the high expression of sialyl Le(a) observed in different colon carcinoma cell lines seem to confirm the important regulatory role of FUT3 in the synthesis of sialyl Le(a).

  12. A Widespread Silent Polymorphism of Human Carbonic Anhydrase III (31 Ile ↔ Val): Implications for Evolutionary Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Hewett-Emmett, David; Welty, Rosalind J.; Tashian, Richard E.

    1983-01-01

    During amino acid sequence studies of carbonic anhydrase (CA) III, purified from a pool of human skeletal muscles, an electrophoretically undetectable (silent) variation was found at residue 31 which was either valine and/or isoleucine. To distinguish a simple allelic polymorphism from more complex models involving gene duplication, 11 separate CA III samples were purified from individuals of different age and racial backgrounds. Peptide mapping by high performance liquid chromatography and sequencing indicated that four were homozygous for 31-Val, three homozygous for 31-Ile and four were apparent heterozygotes. Since the ratio of Val/Ile at residue 31 was approximately 1.0 in the heterozygotes, the present observations are consistent with a simple allelic polymorphism model. Despite the small sample size, there are preliminary indications that the gene frequencies may differ among racial groups. The finding of this silent allelic polymorphism together with the finding of an electrophoretically detectable polymorphism of CA II permits us to test the linkage of the CA II and CA III genes which appear to have been formed by gene dupliction more than 300 million years ago. The possibility that the Val/Ile variation may represent a neutral mutation is discussed. PMID:6414885

  13. Procollagen-III in serum, plasminogen activation and fibronectin in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid during and following irradiation of human lung

    SciTech Connect

    Maasilta, P.; Salonen, E.M.; Vaheri, A.; Kivisaari, L.; Holsti, L.R.; Mattson, K. )

    1991-05-01

    In the search for predictors of late radiation-induced lung injury we studied procollagen type III peptide concentration (P-III-P) in serum as well as fibronectin and plasminogen activation in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid during and following irradiation of human lung. The patients received either high-dose hemithorax irradiation for pleural mesothelioma (11 patients) or high-dose irradiation with individually shaped fields for non-small cell lung cancer (12 patients). The severity of radiation fibrosis was assessed clinically from CT scans 6 months and 12 months after treatment. Four scores were used: severe, moderate, mild, or normal. Radiological lung injury varied from 'severe' (9 patients) to near absence of injury-'normal' (6 patients). Serum levels of P-III-P, when measured weekly during the 5-week period of radiotherapy or at several time-points after treatment, did not show consistent changes, nor did the levels correlate with the score for radiation fibrosis as assessed by CT scanning. Changes in fibronectin levels or in markers of plasminogen activation in BAL fluid did not correlate with the development of late lung injury. The levels of BAL fluid plasmin and plasminogen activator as assessed zymographically, but not the free net enzyme values, showed a tendency to be elevated in patients with severe radiation-induced lung injury, suggesting a possible role for inhibitors of the plasminogen activation cascade in the process of radiation-induced lung injury.

  14. Are type III-IV muscle afferents required for a normal steady-state exercise hyperpnoea in humans?

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Jerome A; Blain, Grégory M; Amann, Markus

    2014-02-01

    When tested in isolation, stimuli associated with respiratory CO2 exchange, feedforward central command and type III-IV muscle afferent feedback have each been shown to be capable of eliciting exercise-like cardio-ventilatory responses, but their relative contributions in a setting of physiological exercise remains controversial. We reasoned that in order to determine whether any of these regulators are obligatory to the exercise hyperpnoea each needs to be removed or significantly diminished in a setting of physiological steady-state exercise, during which all recognized stimuli (and other potential modulators) are normally operative. In the past few years we and others have used intrathecal fentanyl, a μ-opiate receptor agonist, in humans to reduce the input from type III-IV opiate-sensitive muscle afferents. During various types of intensities and durations of exercise a sustained hypoventilation, as well as reduced systemic pressure and cardioacceleration, were consistently observed with this blockade. These data provide the basis for the hypothesis that type III-IV muscle afferents are obligatory to the hyperpnoea of mild to moderate intensity rhythmic, large muscle, steady-state exercise. We discuss the limitations of these studies, the reasons for their disagreement with previous negative findings, the nature of the muscle afferent feedback stimulus and the need for future investigations.

  15. Human papillomavirus prevalence among women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia III and invasive cervical cancer from Goiânia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rabelo-Santos, S H; Zeferino, L; Villa, L L; Sobrinho, J P; Amaral, R G; Magalhães, A V

    2003-03-01

    This study estimated the prevalence and distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) types among women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade III and invasive cervical cancer from Goi s (Brazil Central Region). Seventy-four cases were analyzed and consisted of 18 CIN III, 48 squamous cell carcinomas, 4 adenocarcinomas, 1 adenosquamous carcinoma and 3 undifferentiated carcinomas. HPV-DNA sequences were examined in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues using primers from L1 region GP5+/GP6+. Polymerase chain reaction products were typed with dot blot hybridization using probes for HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 54, 6/11, 42/43/44, 51/52, 56/58. The prevalence of HPV was estimated to be 76% (56/74). HPV 16 was the most frequently found type, followed by HPV 33, 18 and 31. The prevalence of untyped HPV was 6%; 79% percent of the squamous cell carcinoma cases and 61% percent of the CIN III were positive for HPV and the prevalence rate of HPV types was the same for the total number of cases. According to other studies, HPV type 16 is the most prevalent virus in all Brazilian regions, but there is variation regarding to other types. Type 18 is the second most prevalent HPV in North, Southeast and South Brazil regions and types 31 and 33 are the second most prevalent HPV in Northeast and Central Brazil, respectively.

  16. Peptide array-based screening of human mesenchymal stem cell-adhesive peptides derived from fibronectin type III domain

    SciTech Connect

    Okochi, Mina; Nomura, Shigeyuki; Kaga, Chiaki; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2008-06-20

    Human mesenchymal stem cell-adhesive peptides were screened based on the amino acid sequence of fibronectin type III domain 8-11 (FN-III{sub 8-11}) using a peptide array synthesized by the Fmoc-chemistry. Using hexameric peptide library of FN-III{sub 8-11} scan, we identified the ALNGR (Ala-Leu-Asn-Gly-Arg) peptide that induced cell adhesion as well as RGDS (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) peptide. After incubation for 2 h, approximately 68% of inoculated cells adhere to the ALNGR peptide disk. Adhesion inhibition assay with integrin antibodies showed that the ALNGR peptide interacts with integrin {beta}1 but not with {alpha}v{beta}3, indicating that the receptors for ALNGR are different from RGDS. Additionally, the ALNGR peptide expressed cell specificities for adhesion: cell adhesion was promoted for fibroblasts but not for keratinocytes or endotherial cells. The ALNGR peptide induced cell adhesion and promoted cell proliferation without changing its property. It is therefore useful for the construction of functional biomaterials.

  17. MMP-12 catalytic domain recognizes and cleaves at multiple sites in human skin collagen type I and type III.

    PubMed

    Taddese, Samuel; Jung, Michael C; Ihling, Christian; Heinz, Andrea; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Schmelzer, Christian E H

    2010-04-01

    Collagens of either soft connective or mineralized tissues are subject to continuous remodeling and turnover. Undesired cleavage can be the result of an imbalance between proteases and their inhibitors. Owing to their superhelical structure, collagens are resistant to many proteases and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are required to initiate further degradation by other enzymes. Several MMPs are known to degrade collagens, but the action of MMP-12 has not yet been studied in detail. In this work, the potential of MMP-12 in recognizing sites in human skin collagen types I and III has been investigated. The catalytic domain of MMP-12 binds to the triple helix and cleaves the typical sites -Gly(775)-Leu(776)- in alpha-2 type I collagen and -Gly(775)-Ile(776)- in alpha-1 type I and type III collagens and at multiple other sites in both collagen types. Moreover, it was observed that the region around these typical sites contains comparatively less prolines, of which some have been proven to be only partially hydroxylated. This is of relevance since partial hydroxylation in the vicinity of a potential scissile bond may have a local effect on the conformational thermodynamics with probable consequences on the collagenolysis process. Taken together, the results of the present work confirm that the catalytic domain of MMP-12 alone binds and degrades collagens I and III. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Temporal uncertainty analysis of human errors based on interrelationships among multiple factors: a case of Minuteman III missile accident.

    PubMed

    Rong, Hao; Tian, Jin; Zhao, Tingdi

    2016-01-01

    In traditional approaches of human reliability assessment (HRA), the definition of the error producing conditions (EPCs) and the supporting guidance are such that some of the conditions (especially organizational or managerial conditions) can hardly be included, and thus the analysis is burdened with incomprehensiveness without reflecting the temporal trend of human reliability. A method based on system dynamics (SD), which highlights interrelationships among technical and organizational aspects that may contribute to human errors, is presented to facilitate quantitatively estimating the human error probability (HEP) and its related variables changing over time in a long period. Taking the Minuteman III missile accident in 2008 as a case, the proposed HRA method is applied to assess HEP during missile operations over 50 years by analyzing the interactions among the variables involved in human-related risks; also the critical factors are determined in terms of impact that the variables have on risks in different time periods. It is indicated that both technical and organizational aspects should be focused on to minimize human errors in a long run.

  19. III-10, a newly synthesized flavonoid, induces cell apoptosis with the involvement of reactive oxygen species-mitochondria pathway in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qinsheng; Yin, Qian; Zhao, Yikai; Guo, Ruichen; Li, Zhiyu; Ma, Shiping; Lu, Na

    2015-10-05

    Study of the mechanisms of apoptosis in tumor cells is an important field of tumor therapy and cancer molecular biology. We recently established that III-10, a new flavonoid with a pyrrolidinyl and a benzyl group substitution, exerted its anti-tumor effect via inducing differentiation of human U937 leukemia cells. In this study, we demonstrated that III-10 induced cell apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The activation of caspase-3, caspase-9, and the increased expression ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 were detected in III-10-induced apoptosis. Z-VAD-FMK, a pan-caspase inhibitor, partly attenuated the apoptotic induction of III-10 on both HepG2 and BEL-7402 cells. Furthermore, the increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and the reduction of mitochondria ΔΨm were also observed in BEL-7402 and HepG2 cells after the treatment of III-10. Pretreatment with NAC, a reactive oxygen species production inhibitor, partly attenuated the apoptosis induced by III-10 via blocking the reactive oxygen species generation. Our data also showed that III-10 induced the release of cytochrome c and AIF to cytosol followed after the reactive oxygen species accumulation. Moreover, the GSH levels and ATP generation were both inhibited after III-10 treatment. Besides, the MAPK, the downstream effect of reactive oxygen species accumulation including JNK could be activated by III-10, as well as the inactivation of ERK. Collectively, the generation of reactive oxygen species might play an crucial role in III-10-induced mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, provided more stubborn evidence for III-10 as a potent anticancer therapeutic candidate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Pathobiology of HTLV-III/LAV In Human Monocyte-Macrophage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-14

    tnecessary and idmntify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP RA 1 ; AIDS; HTLV -III; Virology; Macrophage 06 03 06 13 19. t8STRACT (Continue on reverse it...prepamuosm (10%. vohivol; lane 3). HIV- 1 0 INS shakm prepmraa (10%. VOL𔃺oi 1 .. 4). at LPS (04 agftklaws A) Apprmawaatly 10 o(0 total RNA was loaded per...7 circles riere•e.n 2y) Iand 4- 1 , respectively. c, 80 Inhibition of infection of U937 cells by HBIV.) _3" ( HTLV -IIIB isate) was carned o as

  1. Characterization of African Human Retroviruses Related to HTLV-III/LAV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-15

    DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 21. ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION rOUNCLASSIFIED/JNLIMITED M SAME AS RPT. r3 DTiC ’,:;S Unclassified 22a. NAME OF...16 H1V-2-78/4.0 HIV-1 + + + + 19 REFERENCES (1) Kanki PJ, McLane ME, King NW Jr, Letvin NL, Hunt RD, Sehgal P, Daniel MD, Desrosiers RC, Essex M ...Kanki, P. J., Kurth, R. Becher, W., Dreesman, G., Mclane, M . F. Essex, M . Antibodies to simian T-lymnphotropic virus type III in African green monkeys

  2. Characterization of a constitutive type III nitric oxide synthase in human U937 monocytic cells: stimulation by soluble CD23.

    PubMed Central

    Roman, V; Dugas, N; Abadie, A; Amirand, C; Zhao, H; Dugas, B; Kolb, J P

    1997-01-01

    The soluble cleavage fragment of the low-affinity immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor/CD23 (sCD23 25000 MW) and antibodies directed against their receptors on monocytes, CD11b and CD11c, stimulate the production of nitric oxide (NO) by these cells and we have suggested that the enzyme involved could be related to the endothelial constitutive type III nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS). In the present work, we have analysed the characteristic properties of this NOS isoform in the model of the human promonocytic cells U937 By reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the presence of an mRNA coding for type III NOS was found in U937 cells and the corresponding protein was detected by immunofluorescence in permeabilized cells with a specific anti-ecNOS monoclonal antibody (mAb). Membrane extracts displayed a NOS activity dependent on the presence of calcium and calmodulin in the reaction medium and that was abrogated in the presence of EGTA. Recombinant soluble CD23 (25000 MW) was found to trigger an NO-dependent cGMP accumulation in these cells, which was abrogated by calcium chelators and inhibitors of the calcium/calmodulin complex. Moreover, sCD23 elicited a transient augmentation of intracytoplasmic free calcium concentration [Ca2+]i that was dependent on the presence of calcium in the external buffer and was prevented in the presence of EGTA, indicating that it was due to a calcium influx. In conclusion, human promonocytic cells such as U937 exhibit a functional type III NOS that can be stimulated by calcium-raising agents, such as sCD23. Images Figure 1 PMID:9378507

  3. A histone arginine methylation localizes to nucleosomes in satellite II and III DNA sequences in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Capurso, Daniel; Xiong, Hao; Segal, Mark R

    2012-11-15

    Applying supervised learning/classification techniques to epigenomic data may reveal properties that differentiate histone modifications. Previous analyses sought to classify nucleosomes containing histone H2A/H4 arginine 3 symmetric dimethylation (H2A/H4R3me2s) or H2A.Z using human CD4+ T-cell chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) data. However, these efforts only achieved modest accuracy with limited biological interpretation. Here, we investigate the impact of using appropriate data pre-processing -deduplication, normalization, and position- (peak-) finding to identify stable nucleosome positions - in conjunction with advanced classification algorithms, notably discriminatory motif feature selection and random forests. Performance assessments are based on accuracy and interpretative yield. We achieved dramatically improved accuracy using histone modification features (99.0%; previous attempts, 68.3%) and DNA sequence features (94.1%; previous attempts, <60%). Furthermore, the algorithms elicited interpretable features that withstand permutation testing, including: the histone modifications H4K20me3 and H3K9me3, which are components of heterochromatin; and the motif TCCATT, which is part of the consensus sequence of satellite II and III DNA. Downstream analysis demonstrates that satellite II and III DNA in the human genome is occupied by stable nucleosomes containing H2A/H4R3me2s, H4K20me3, and/or H3K9me3, but not 18 other histone methylations. These results are consistent with the recent biochemical finding that H4R3me2s provides a binding site for the DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt3a) that methylates satellite II and III DNA. Classification algorithms applied to appropriately pre-processed ChIP-Seq data can accurately discriminate between histone modifications. Algorithms that facilitate interpretation, such as discriminatory motif feature selection, have the added potential to impart information about underlying biological mechanism.

  4. Comparative effect of repeated ingestion of difructose anhydride III and palatinose on the induction of gastrointestinal symptoms in humans.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Akiko; Shiomi, Takuya; Tamaki, Noriko; Shigematsu, Norihiro; Tomita, Fusao; Hara, Hiroshi

    2004-09-01

    We evaluated the safety and change in fermentability from repeated ingestion of difructose anhydride III (DFAIII) in humans. A randomized controlled single-blind crossover study with thirteen subjects was conducted. Each subject ingested 5 g of DFAIII or palatinose daily for 12 days, before and after which the subject was loaded with 10 g of DFAIII and had breath hydrogen measured from 0 to 9 h (DL test) to evaluate the fermentability of DFAIII. The defecation frequency and abdominal symptom score were the same between each ingestion period. Moreover, DFAIII ingestion had no influence on blood test results. Only the breath hydrogen excretion in post-DFAIII ingestion was slightly higher at h 8 than the pre-ingestion. Consequently, repeated ingestion of DFAIII for 12 days was as safe as palatinose ingestion, especially with respect to abdominal symptoms and blood test results, and its high resistance to enterobacterial fermentation in humans was not impaired.

  5. Human Immune Response to HTLV-III Virus Infection in Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-28

    the study of T cell responses to HIV-1. 2. We generated human CD4+ and CD8 + CTL clones to novel epitopes on the HIV-1 gag protein. 3. We generated a...of T cell responses to HIV-I. 2. We generated human CD4+ and CD8 + CTL clones to novel epitopes on the HIV-I gag protein. 3. We generated a human CD8 ...3 2. Generation of CD8 + human T cell clones to HIV-l gag .................. . . . . . . . 6 3. HIV-specific CD4+ CTL clones to gag protein. . .. 6 4

  6. Comprehensive safety assessment of a human inactivated diploid enterovirus 71 vaccine based on a phase III clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Kong, Yujia; Jiang, Zhiwei; Li, Chanjuan; Wang, Ling; Xia, Jielai

    2016-01-01

    abstract Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). In a previous phase III trial in children, a human diploid cell-based inactivated EV71 vaccine elicited EV71 specific immune responses and protection against EV71 associated HFMD. This study aimed to assess the factors influencing the severity of adverse events observed in this previous trial. This was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase III clinical trial of a human diploid vaccine carried out in 12,000 children in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01569581). Solicited events were recorded for 7 days and unsolicited events were reported for 28 days after each injection. Age trend analysis of adverse reaction was conducted in each treatment group. Multiple logistic regression models were built to identify factors influencing the severity of adverse reactions. Fewer solicited adverse reactions were observed in older participants within the first 7 days after vaccination (P < 0.0001), except local pain and pruritus. More severe adverse reactions were observed after the initial injection than after the booster injection. Serious cold or respiratory tract infections (RTI) were observed more often in children aged 6–36 months than in older children. Only the severity of local swelling was associated with body mass index. Children with throat discomfort before injection had a higher risk of serious cold or RTI. These results indicated that the human diploid cell-based vaccine achieved a satisfactory safety profile. PMID:26837471

  7. Growth suppression of human hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts by a monoclonal antibody CH12 directed to epidermal growth factor receptor variant III.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Huamao; Tan, Zhonghua; Hu, Suwen; Wang, Hai; Shi, Bizhi; Yang, Lin; Li, Peiyong; Gu, Jianren; Wang, Hongyang; Li, Zonghai

    2011-02-18

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered difficult to cure because it is resistant to radio- and chemotherapy and has a high recurrence rate after curative liver resection. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been reported to express in HCC tissues and cell lines. This article describes the efficacy of an anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (mAb CH12) in the treatment of HCC xenografts with EGFRvIII expression and the underlying mechanism of EGFRvIII as an oncogene in HCC. The results demonstrated that CH12 bound preferentially to EGFRvIII with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 1.346 nm/liter. In addition, CH12 induces strong antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity in Huh7-EGFRvIII (with exogenous expression of EGFRvIII) and SMMC-7721 (with endogenous expression of EGFRvIII) cells. Notably, CH12 significantly inhibited the growth of Huh7-EGFRvIII and SMMC-7721 xenografts in vivo with a growth inhibition ratio much higher than C225, a U. S. Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-EGFR antibody. Treatment of the two HCC xenografts with CH12 significantly suppressed tumor proliferation and angiogenesis. Mechanistically, in vivo treatment with CH12 reduced the phosphorylation of constitutively active EGFRvIII, Akt, and ERK. Down-regulation of the apoptotic protectors Bcl-x(L), Bcl-2, and the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, as well as up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27, were also observed after in vivo CH12 treatment. Collectively, these results indicate that the monoclonal antibody CH12 is a promising therapeutic agent for HCC with EGFRvIII expression.

  8. Growth Suppression of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Xenografts by a Monoclonal Antibody CH12 Directed to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Variant III*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Huamao; Tan, Zhonghua; Hu, Suwen; Wang, Hai; Shi, Bizhi; Yang, Lin; Li, Peiyong; Gu, Jianren; Wang, Hongyang; Li, Zonghai

    2011-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered difficult to cure because it is resistant to radio- and chemotherapy and has a high recurrence rate after curative liver resection. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been reported to express in HCC tissues and cell lines. This article describes the efficacy of an anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (mAb CH12) in the treatment of HCC xenografts with EGFRvIII expression and the underlying mechanism of EGFRvIII as an oncogene in HCC. The results demonstrated that CH12 bound preferentially to EGFRvIII with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.346 nm/liter. In addition, CH12 induces strong antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity in Huh7-EGFRvIII (with exogenous expression of EGFRvIII) and SMMC-7721 (with endogenous expression of EGFRvIII) cells. Notably, CH12 significantly inhibited the growth of Huh7-EGFRvIII and SMMC-7721 xenografts in vivo with a growth inhibition ratio much higher than C225, a U. S. Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-EGFR antibody. Treatment of the two HCC xenografts with CH12 significantly suppressed tumor proliferation and angiogenesis. Mechanistically, in vivo treatment with CH12 reduced the phosphorylation of constitutively active EGFRvIII, Akt, and ERK. Down-regulation of the apoptotic protectors Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, and the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, as well as up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27, were also observed after in vivo CH12 treatment. Collectively, these results indicate that the monoclonal antibody CH12 is a promising therapeutic agent for HCC with EGFRvIII expression. PMID:21163950

  9. Inhibition of Human Class I vs Class III Phosphatidylinositol 3'-Kinases.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Matthew R; Sternberg, Anna R; Roepe, Paul D

    2017-08-22

    Most investigations of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K) drug inhibition have been via assays based on ADP appearance or ATP consumption (e.g., Liu, Q., et al. ( 2011 ) J. Med. Chem. 54 , 1473 - 1480 ). However, at least some PI3K isoforms show basal ATPase activity in the absence of PI lipid substrate(s), which may complicate quantification of drug potency, isoform specificity of some drugs, and synergy for drug combinations. In this study, we probe the class I vs class III isoform specificity of a selected set of PI3K inhibitors using a simple, inexpensive, semi high-throughput assay that quantifies production of phosphatidylinositol 3'-phosphate (PI3P) from phosphatidylinositol. Results are compared to previous data largely generated using ATPase activity assays. Good agreement between EC50 values computed via ATPase assays vs the reported PI3P formation assay is found for most drugs, but with a few exceptions. Furthermore, for the first time, drug inhibition of class I vs class III enzymes is compared side-by-side with the same assay for the important class I-specific inhibitors GSK2126458 ("Omipalisib") and NVP-BGT226 ("BGT226") currently in clinical development for advanced solid tumors.

  10. Clinical and biochemical characterization of the prothrombin Belgrade mutation in a large Serbian pedigree: new insights into the antithrombin resistance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miljic, P; Gvozdenov, M; Takagi, Y; Takagi, A; Pruner, I; Dragojevic, M; Tomic, B; Bodrozic, J; Kojima, T; Radojkovic, D; Djordjevic, V

    2017-01-11

    Essentials Prothrombin Belgrade mutation leads to antithrombin resistance. Clinical and biochemical phenotypes in a large family with this mutation were investigated. In carriers, we detected decreased factor II activity and increased endogenous thrombin potential. Prothrombin Belgrade mutation represents a strong prothrombotic risk factor.

  11. Activity and regulation by growth factors of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III (elongation factor 2-kinase) in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parmer, T G; Ward, M D; Yurkow, E J; Vyas, V H; Kearney, T J; Hait, W N

    1999-01-01

    Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III (CaM kinase III, elongation factor-2 kinase) is a unique member of the Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase family. Activation of CaM kinase III leads to the selective phosphorylation of elongation factor 2 (eEF-2) and transient inhibition of protein synthesis. Recent cloning and sequencing of CaM kinase III revealed that this enzyme represents a new superfamily of protein kinases. The activity of CaM kinase III is selectively activated in proliferating cells; inhibition of the kinase blocked cells in G0/G1-S and decreased viability. To determine the significance of CaM kinase III in breast cancer, we measured the activity of the kinase in human breast cancer cell lines as well as in fresh surgical specimens. The specific activity of CaM kinase III in human breast cancer cell lines was equal to or greater than that seen in a variety of cell lines with similar rates of proliferation. The specific activity of CaM kinase III was markedly increased in human breast tumour specimens compared with that of normal adjacent breast tissue. The activity of this enzyme was regulated by breast cancer mitogens. In serum-deprived MDA-MB-231 cells, the combination of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulated cell proliferation and activated CaM kinase III to activities observed in the presence of 10% serum. Inhibition of enzyme activity blocked cell proliferation induced by growth factors. In MCF-7 cells separated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, CaM kinase III was increased in S-phase over that of other phases of the cell cycle. In summary, the activity of Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase III is controlled by breast cancer mitogens and appears to be constitutively activated in human breast cancer. These results suggest that CaM kinase III may contribute an important link between growth factor/receptor interactions, protein synthesis and the induction of cellular proliferation in human breast

  12. Effects of the new phosphodiesterase-III inhibitor R80122 on contractility and calcium current in human cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Himmel, H M; Ravens, U

    1994-07-01

    The selective phosphodiesterase III (PDE-III) inhibitor R80122 ((E)-N-cyclohexal-N-methyl-2-[[[phenyl-(1,2,3,5- tetrahydro-2-oxoimidazo-[2,1b]-quinazolin-7-yl)-methylene]-a mino]-oxy]-acetamide) has been reported to possess greater cardiotonic potency and less side effects than the standard compounds milrinone or enoximone. To characterize this new compound further, we investigated the effects of R80122 on force of contraction (Fc) and calcium current (ICa) in human right atrium (HRA) and human left ventricle (HLV) with reference to the nonselective PDE-inhibitor IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine). With "late" exposure (300- to 330-min equilibration) of human atrial trabeculae, R80122 (3 microM) increased Fc by 60 +/- 11%; log EC50 was -6.2 +/- 0.1. R80122 (3 microM) induced a relative leftward shift of forskolin concentration-response curves by 0.34 log units; the respective value for IBMX (20 microM) was 0.46. A positive inotropic effect of R80122 was also shown in guinea pig papillary muscles. ICa was measured in voltage-clamped isolated myocytes of human right atrial and left ventricular (LV) tissue, and, for comparison, guinea pig ventricle. With clamp steps from -40 to +5 mV, R80122 (3 microM) increased peak ICa from 3.1 +/- 0.2 to 5.4 +/- 0.3 pA/pF in HRA cells, from 2.9 +/- 0.4 to 5.1 +/- 0.6 pA/pF in HLV cells, and from 4.4 +/- 0.3 to 6.6 +/- 0.5 pA/pF in guinea pig myocytes. IBMX 20 microM increased ICa to a greater extent. Washout or addition of carbachol 10 microM partially reversed the effect of R80122. Voltage dependence, inactivation time course, and steady-state inactivation of ICa were little changed by either compound. Stimulation of Ca2+ influx by L-type Ca2+ channels contributes to the positive inotropic effect of the selective PDE-III inhibitor R80122.

  13. Inhibition of the in vitro infectivity and cytopathic effect of human T-lymphotrophic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV) by 2',3'-dideoxynucleosides.

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuya, H; Broder, S

    1986-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III)/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (LAV) is a a newly discovered lymphotropic retrovirus that is cytopathic for helper/inducer T cells in vitro. This virus is the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and related diseases. In the current study, we tested the capacity of purine and pyrimidine nucleoside derivatives to inhibit the infectivity and cytopathic effect of human T-lymphotropic virus type III in vitro. With the ribose moiety of the molecule in a 2',3'-dideoxy configuration, every purine (adenosine, guanosine, and inosine) and pyrimidine (cytidine and thymidine) nucleoside tested suppressed the virus, although the thymidine derivative seemed to have substantially less activity in our system than the others. In general, we observed essentially complete suppression of the virus at doses that were lower by a factor of 10 to 20 than those needed to inhibit the proliferation of the target T cells and the immune reactivity of normal T cells in vitro. An analysis of five adenosine congeners, which differed only in the sugar moiety, revealed that reduction (an absence of hydroxyl determinants) at both the 2' and 3' carbons of the ribose was necessary for an anti-viral effect, and an additional reduction at the 5' carbon nullified the anti-viral activity. These observations may be of value in developing a new class of experimental drugs for the therapy of human T-lymphotropic virus type III infections. PMID:3006077

  14. Compendium of Human Responses to the Aerospace Environment. Volume III, Sections 10 - 16

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-11-01

    followed by data for zero gravity and subgravity environments. The second part covers the effects of the oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressure environments on human physiology and performance in space operations.

  15. Investigation of the genotype III to genotype I shift in Japanese encephalitis virus and the impact on human cases.

    PubMed

    Han, Na; Adams, James; Fang, Wei; Liu, Si-Qing; Rayner, Simon

    2015-08-01

    Japanese encephalitis is a mosquito borne disease and is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in the Asia-Pacific area. The causative agent, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) can be phylogenetically classified into five genotypes based on nucleotide sequence. In recent years, genotype I (GI) has displaced genotype III (GIII) as the dominant lineage, but the mechanisms behind this displacement event requires elucidation. In an earlier study, we compared host variation over time between the two genotypes and observed that GI appears to have evolved to achieve more efficient infection in hosts in the replication cycle, with the tradeoff of reduced infectivity in secondary hosts such as humans. To further investigate this phenomenon, we collected JEV surveillance data on human cases and, together with sequence data, and generated genotype/case profiles from seven Asia-Pacific countries and regions to characterize the GI/GIII displacement event. We found that, when comprehensive and consistent vaccination and surveillance data was available, and the GIII to GI shift occurred within a well-defined time period, there was a statistically significant drop in JEV human cases. Our findings provide further support for the argument that GI is less effective in infecting humans, who represent a dead end host. However, experimental investigation is necessary to confirm this hypothesis. The study highlights the value of alternative approaches to investigation of epidemics, as well as the importance of effective data collection for disease surveillance and control.

  16. DNA ligase III and DNA ligase IV carry out genetically distinct forms of end joining in human somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sehyun; Harvey, Adam; Zimbric, Jacob; Wang, Yongbao; Nguyen, Thanh; Jackson, Pauline J; Hendrickson, Eric A

    2014-09-01

    Ku-dependent C-NHEJ (classic non-homologous end joining) is the primary DNA EJing (end joining) repair pathway in mammals. Recently, an additional EJing repair pathway (A-NHEJ; alternative-NHEJ) has been described. Currently, the mechanism of A-NHEJ is obscure although a dependency on LIGIII (DNA ligase III) is often implicated. To test the requirement for LIGIII in A-NHEJ we constructed a LIGIII conditionally-null human cell line using gene targeting. Nuclear EJing activity appeared unaffected by a deficiency in LIGIII as, surprisingly, so were random gene targeting integration events. In contrast, LIGIII was required for mitochondrial function and this defined the gene's essential activity. Human Ku:LIGIII and Ku:LIGIV (DNA ligase IV) double knockout cell lines, however, demonstrated that LIGIII is required for the enhanced A-NHEJ activity that is observed in Ku-deficient cells. Most unexpectedly, however, the majority of EJing events remained LIGIV-dependent. In conclusion, although human LIGIII has an essential function in mitochondrial maintenance, it is dispensable for most types of nuclear DSB repair, except for the A-NHEJ events that are normally suppressed by Ku. Moreover, we describe that a robust Ku-independent, LIGIV-dependent repair pathway exists in human somatic cells.

  17. Virulence of human and bovine isolates of group B streptococci (types Ia and III) in experimental pregnant mouse models.

    PubMed Central

    Poutrel, B; Dore, J

    1985-01-01

    Two experimental mouse models were tested for their suitability in measuring virulence of two human and two bovine isolates (types Ia and III) of group B streptococci. In the first model, the kinetics of the number of bacteria in the spleen, liver, and placenta of mice inoculated intravenously on day 16 of pregnancy were monitored for 48 h after infection. In the second model, lethality and abortion were recorded for mice inoculated on day 13 of pregnancy. Levels of colonization in spleens or livers and lethality were significantly greater (P less than 0.001) for human isolates than for bovine isolates. In contrast, no statistically significant differences in the ability to colonize placentas and to induce abortions were noted between human and bovine isolates. The results showed that pregnant mice were more sensitive than nonpregnant mice to a challenge with group B streptococci. The results also suggest that placental colonization and abortion could be a suitable mouse model in evaluating the virulence of human and bovine isolates of group B streptococci. PMID:3880731

  18. The Influences of Arm Resist Motion on a CAR Crash Test Using Hybrid III Dummy with Human-Like Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongchul; Youm, Youngil; Bae, Hanil; Choi, Hyeonki

    Safety of the occupant during the crash is very essential design element. Many researches have been investigated in reducing the fatal injury of occupant. They are focusing on the development of a dummy in order to obtain the real human-like motion. However, they have not considered the arm resist motion during the car accident. In this study, we would like to suggest the importance of the reactive force of the arm in a car crash. The influences of reactive force acting on the human upper extremity were investigated using the impedance experimental method with lumped mass model of hand system and a Hybrid III dummy with human-like arm. Impedance parameters (e.g. inertia, spring constant and damping coefficient) of the elbow joint in maximum activation level were measured by free oscillation test using single axis robot. The results showed that without seat belt, the reactive force of human arm reduced the head, chest, and femur injury, and the flexion moment of the neck is higher than that of the conventional dummy.

  19. Evolution of human cytogenetics: an encyclopedic essay. III. The second decade after 1956: banding techiques.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, P K; Lucas, F V

    1976-12-01

    Unequivocal establishment of the correct diploid chromosome number in 1956 started the modern era of human cytogenetics. The next impetus came when the peripheral blood leukocyte culture technique for the chromosome preparation was described in 1960. Discovery of special staining procedures - banding techniques - in early seventies not only saved it from early senescence but played decisive roles in broadening the horizons of modern human cytogenetics.

  20. Head excursion of restrained human volunteers and hybrid III dummies in steady state rollover tests.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, Edward; Hare, Barry; Hughes, Raymond; Lewis, Lance; Iiyama, Hiroshi; Curzon, Anne; Cooper, Eddie

    2003-01-01

    Seatbelts provide substantial benefits in rollover crashes, yet occupants still receive head and neck injuries from contacting the vehicle roof interior when the roof exterior strikes the ground. Prior research has evaluated rollover restraint performance utilizing anthropomorphic test devices (dummies), but little dynamic testing has been done with human volunteers to learn how they move during rollovers. In this study, the vertical excursion of the head of restrained dummies and human subjects was measured in a vehicle being rotated about its longitudinal roll axis at roll rates from 180-to-360 deg/sec and under static inversion conditions. The vehicle's restraint design was the commonly used 3-point seatbelt with continuous loop webbing and a sliding latch plate. This paper presents an analysis of the observed occupant motion and provides a comparison of dummy and human motion under similar test conditions. Thirty-five tests (eighteen static and seventeen dynamic) were completed using two different sizes of dummies and human subjects in both near and far-side roll directions. The research indicates that far-side rollovers cause the restrained test subjects to have greater head excursion than near-side rollovers, and that static inversion testing underestimates head excursion for far-side occupants. Human vertical head excursion of up to 200 mm was found at a roll rate of 220 deg/sec. Humans exhibit greater variability in head excursion in comparison to dummies. Transfer of seatbelt webbing through the latch plate did not correlate directly with differences in head excursion.

  1. [Preparation and antithrombogenicity of oxidated low molecular weight heparin-antithrombin complex coated-polyvinyl chloride tubing].

    PubMed

    Luo, Peng; Liu, Weiyong; Yang, Chun; Zhou, Hua; Cao, Ruijun; Yang, Jian

    2011-02-01

    Based on non-enzymatic protein glycated reaction, the sodium periodate-oxidated low molecular weight heparin-antithrombin covalent complex (SPLMWATH) was produced. By using polyethyleneimine-glutaraldehyde bonding technique, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubings were coated with SPLMWATH, heparin and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). Spectrophotometry and dynamic clotting time experiment were used to determine the synthetic ratio of SPLMWATH, graft density, coating leaching ratio and to evaluate the antithrombogenicity of different coating on the PVC tubings. The results showed that the synthetic ratio of SPLMWATH was approximately 55%, and compared with heparin coating and LMWH coating, the graft density of SPLMWATH coating on the PVC tubing was smaller, but its coating stability and antithrombogenicity were significantly better than that of heparin coating and LMWH coating on the PVC tubings.

  2. Case Report of Severe Antithrombin Deficiency During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation and Therapeutic Plasma Exchange for Double Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brittney; Mazzeffi, Michael A; Sanchez, Pablo G; Pham, Si M; Kon, Zachary; Tanaka, Kenichi A

    2017-01-01

    Acquired antithrombin (AT) deficiency is not uncommon in cardiothoracic surgery because of heparin exposure and dilutional or consumptive losses. We report a case of acquired AT deficiency and resultant multiple deep vein thrombosis in a patient with pulmonary fibrosis on veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation who underwent double lung transplantation with intraoperative therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) as a part of an immunomodulation regimen for allosensitization. Preoperative heparin anticoagulation resulted in AT deficiency, which was further exacerbated by TPE using albumin. The recovery of AT activity after TPE with plasma was incomplete, and postoperative deficiencies of AT and other anticoagulants might have contributed to deep vein thromboses. The limitation of thromboelastometry in detecting AT deficiency was evident.

  3. Metalloprobes: Synthesis, Characterization, and Potency of a Novel Gallium(III) Complex in Human Epidermal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harpstrite, Scott E.; Prior, Julie; Rath, Nigam P.; Sharma, Vijay

    2009-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by overexpression of the MDR1 gene product, P-glycoprotein (Pgp), represents one of the best characterized barriers to chemotherapeutic treatment in cancer and may be a pivotal factor in progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Thus, agents capable of probing Pgp-mediated transport could be beneficial in biomedical imaging. Herein, we synthesized and structurally characterized a gallium(III) complex of the naphthol-Schiff base ligand (5). The crystal structure revealed octahedral geometry for the metallodrug. Cytotoxicity profiles of 5 were evaluated in KB-3-1 (Pgp−) and KB-8-5 (Pgp+) human epidermal carcinoma cell lines. Compared with an LC50 (the half-maximal cytotoxic concentration) value of 1.93 μM in drug-sensitive (Pgp−) cells, the gallium(III) complex 5 demonstrated an LC50 value > 100 μM in drug-resistant (Pgp+) cells, thus indicating that 5 was recognized by the Pgp as its substrate, thereby extruded from the cells and sequestered away from their cytotoxic targets. Radiolabeled analogues of 5 could be beneficial in noninvasive imaging of Pgp-mediated transport in vivo. PMID:17617464

  4. Lentivirus-mediated gene transfer of uroporphyrinogen III synthase fully corrects the porphyric phenotype in human cells.

    PubMed

    Géronimi, F; Richard, E; Lamrissi-Garcia, I; Lalanne, M; Ged, C; Redonnet-Vernhet, I; Moreau-Gaudry, F; de Verneuil, H

    2003-05-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is an inherited disease due to a deficiency in the uroporphyrinogen III synthase, the fourth enzyme of the heme biosynthesis pathway. It is characterized by accumulation of uroporphyrin I in the bone marrow, peripheral blood and other organs. The prognosis of CEP is poor, with death often occurring early in adult life. For severe transfusion-dependent cases, when allogeneic cell transplantation cannot be performed, the autografting of genetically modified primitive/stem cells may be the only alternative. In vitro gene transfer experiments have documented the feasibility of gene therapy via hematopoietic cells to treat this disease. In the present study lentiviral transduction of porphyric cell lines and primary CD34(+) cells with the therapeutic human uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) cDNA resulted in both enzymatic and metabolic correction, as demonstrated by the increase in UROS activity and the suppression of porphyrin accumulation in transduced cells. Very high gene transfer efficiency (up to 90%) was achieved in both cell lines and CD34(+) cells without any selection. Expression of the transgene remained stable over long-term liquid culture. Furthermore, gene expression was maintained during in vitro erythroid differentiation of CD34(+) cells. Therefore the use of lentiviral vectors is promising for the future treatment of CEP patients by gene therapy.

  5. Head Excursion of Restrained Human Volunteers and Hybrid III Dummies in Steady State Rollover Tests

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt, Edward; Hare, Barry; Hughes, Raymond; Lewis, Lance; Iiyama, Hiroshi; Curzon, Anne; Cooper, Eddie

    2003-01-01

    Seatbelts provide substantial benefits in rollover crashes, yet occupants still receive head and neck injuries from contacting the vehicle roof interior when the roof exterior strikes the ground. Prior research has evaluated rollover restraint performance utilizing anthropomorphic test devices (dummies), but little dynamic testing has been done with human volunteers to learn how they move during rollovers. In this study, the vertical excursion of the head of restrained dummies and human subjects was measured in a vehicle being rotated about its longitudinal roll axis at roll rates from 180-to-360 deg/sec and under static inversion conditions. The vehicle’s restraint design was the commonly used 3-point seatbelt with continuous loop webbing and a sliding latch plate. This paper presents an analysis of the observed occupant motion and provides a comparison of dummy and human motion under similar test conditions. Thirty-five tests (eighteen static and seventeen dynamic) were completed using two different sizes of dummies and human subjects in both near and far-side roll directions. The research indicates that far-side rollovers cause the restrained test subjects to have greater head excursion than near-side rollovers, and that static inversion testing underestimates head excursion for far-side occupants. Human vertical head excursion of up to 200 mm was found at a roll rate of 220 deg/sec. Humans exhibit greater variability in head excursion in comparison to dummies. Transfer of seatbelt webbing through the latch plate did not correlate directly with differences in head excursion. PMID:12941241

  6. Introduction to Human Services, Chapter III. Video Script Package, Text, and Audio Script Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Community Coll., FL.

    Video, textual, and audio components of the third module of a multi-media, introductory course on Human Services are presented. The module packages, developed at Miami-Dade Community College, deal with technology, social change, and problem dependencies. A video cassette script is first provided that explores the "traditional,""inner," and "other…

  7. Human Development, Early Childhood Care and Education and Family Welfare. Compendium of Researches, Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saraswathi, T. S., Ed.; And Others

    This volume encompasses 44 research studies that were conducted mainly by graduate students in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies, M.S. University of Baroda, India. The studies are organized in six broad categories: (1) child care in tribal, rural and urban poor, and institutional settings; (2) early childhood care and…

  8. Case Studies: Persecution/Genocide. The Human Rights Series. Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litynsky, Walter; And Others

    A continuation of the study of those factors that lead to persecutions and acts of genocide is presented. As students read the materials included in the case studies, they should be referred to the organizing concepts discussed in "Teaching about the Holocaust and Genocide: Introduction. The Human Rights Series, Volume I." Unit 1 in that…

  9. Case Studies: Persecution/Genocide. The Human Rights Series. Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litynsky, Walter; And Others

    A continuation of the study of those factors that lead to persecutions and acts of genocide is presented. As students read the materials included in the case studies, they should be referred to the organizing concepts discussed in "Teaching about the Holocaust and Genocide: Introduction. The Human Rights Series, Volume I." Unit 1 in that…

  10. Activation of human factor IX (Christmas factor).

    PubMed Central

    Di Scipio, R G; Kurachi, K; Davie, E W

    1978-01-01

    Human Factor IX (Christmas factor) is a single-chain plasma glycoprotein (mol wt 57,000) that participates in the middle phase of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. It is present in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease, Factor IXabeta, by Factor XIa (activated plasma thromboplastin antecedent) in the presence of calcium ions. In the activation reaction, two internal peptide bonds are hydrolyzed in Factor IX. These cleavages occur at a specific arginyl-alanine peptide bond and a specific arginyl-valine peptide bond. This results in the release of an activation peptide (mol wt approximately equal to 11,000) from the internal region of the precursor molecule and the generation of Factor IXabeta (mol wt approximately equal to 46,000). Factor IXabeta is composed of a light chain (mol wt approximately equal to 18,000) and a heavy chain (mol wt approximately equal to 28,000), and these chains are held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain originates from the amino terminal portion of the precursor molecule and has an amino terminal sequence of Tyr-Asn-Ser-Gly-Lys. The heavy chain originates from the carboxyl terminal region of the precursor molecule and contains an amino terminal sequence of Val-Val-Gly-Gly-Glu. The heavy chain of Factor IXabeta also contains the active site sequence of Phe-Cys-Ala-Gly-Phe-His-Glu-Gly-Arg-Asp-Ser-Cys-Gln-Gly-Asp-SER-Gly-Gly-Pro. The active site serine residue is shown in capital letters. Factor IX is also converted to Factor IXaalpha by a protease from Russell's viper venom. This activation reaction, however, occurs in a single step and involves only the cleavage of the internal arginyl-valine peptide bond. Human Factor IXabeta was inhibited by human antithrombin III by the formation of a one-to-one complex of enzyme and inhibitor. In this reaction, the inhibitor was tightly bound to the heavy chain of the enzyme. These data indicate that the mechanism of activation of human Factor IX and its

  11. Saliva versus Plasma Relative Bioavailability of Tolterodine in Humans: Validation of Class III Drugs of the Salivary Excretion Classification System.

    PubMed

    Idkaidek, N; Najib, N; Salem, I I; Najib, O

    2016-06-01

    Relative bioavailability study of tolterodine in healthy human volunteers was done using saliva and plasma matrices in order to investigate the robustness of using saliva instead of plasma as a surrogate for bioavailability and bioequivalence of class III drugs according to the salivary excretion classification system (SECS). Saliva and plasma samples were collected up to 16 h after 2 mg oral dose. Saliva and plasma pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non compartmental analysis using Kinetica program V5. Human effective intestinal permeability was optimized by SimCYP program V13. Tolterodine falls into class III (High permeability/Low fraction unbound to plasma proteins) and hence was subjected to salivary excretion. A high pearsons correlation coefficient of 0.97 between mean saliva and plasma concentrations, and saliva/plasma concentrations ratio of 0.33 were observed. In addition, correlation coefficients and saliva/plasma ratios of area under curve and maximum concentration were 0.98, 0.95 and 0.42, 0.34 respectively. On the other hand, time to reach maximum concentration was higher in saliva by 2.37 fold. In addition, inter subject variability values in saliva were slightly higher than plasma leading to need for slightly higher number of subjects to be used in saliva studies (55 vs. 48 subjects). Non-invasive saliva sampling instead of invasive plasma sampling method can be used as a surrogate for bioavailability and bioequivalence of SECS class I drugs when adequate sample size is used. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Cytotoxicity of Manganese (III) Complex in Human Breast Adenocarcinoma Cell Line Is Mediated by the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Followed by Mitochondrial Damage.

    PubMed

    Al-Anbaky, Qudes; Al-Karakooly, Zeiyad; Kilaparty, Surya P; Agrawal, Megha; Albkuri, Yahya M; RanguMagar, Ambar B; Ghosh, Anindya; Ali, Nawab

    2016-11-01

    Manganese (Mn) complexes are widely studied because of their important catalytic properties in synthetic and biochemical reactions. A Mn (III) complex of an amidoamine ligand was synthesized using a tetradentate amidoamine ligand. In this study, the Mn (III) complex was evaluated for its biological activity by measuring its cytotoxicity in human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7). Cytotoxic effects of the Mn (III) complex were determined using established biomarkers in an attempt to delineate the mechanism of action and the utility of the complex as a potential anticancer drug. The Mn (III) complex induces cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner as shown by microculture tetrazolium assay, a measure of cytotoxic cell death. Our results demonstrated that cytotoxic effects were significantly increased at higher concentrations of Mn (III) complex and with longer time of treatment. The IC50 (Inhibitor concentration that results in 50% cell death) value of Mn (III) complex in MCF-7 cells was determined to be 2.5 mmol/L for 24 hours of treatment. In additional experiments, we determined the Mn (III) complex-mediated cell death was due to both apoptotic and nonspecific necrotic cell death mechanisms. This was assessed by ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining and flow cytometry techniques. The Mn (III) complex produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggering the expression of manganese superoxide dismutase 1 and ultimately damaging the mitochondrial function as is evident by a decline in mitochondrial membrane potential. Treatment of the cells with free radical scavenger, N, N-dimethylthiourea decreased Mn (III) complex-mediated generation of ROS and attenuated apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that the Mn (III) complex-mediated MCF-7 cell death utilizes combined mechanism involving apoptosis and necrosis perhaps due to the generation of ROS.

  13. Responsible conduct of radiology research. Part III. Exemptions from regulatory requirements for human research.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jeffrey A

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this series of articles is to explain the ethical and legal basis for responsible conduct of radiology research and the rules that an investigator needs to follow. In this article (part three of the series), the situations in which human research in radiology is exempt from regulatory requirements are explained. There are several situations in which an activity falls under the regulatory definition of research but is exempt from the research regulations. Investigators who conduct exempt research should know the regulatory criteria for the exemptions. In the case of research that is potentially exempt from the Department of Health and Human Services regulations, the institutional review board or an authority other than the investigator should make the determination of whether a proposed research activity is exempt from the regulations. For research exempt from Food and Drug Administration regulations, investigators should follow institutional guidance and seek input from the institutional review board or Food and Drug Administration for questionable cases.

  14. Cryopreservation of human spermatozoa. III. The effect of cryoprotectants on motility.

    PubMed

    Critser, J K; Huse-Benda, A R; Aaker, D V; Arneson, B W; Ball, G D

    1988-08-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to examine potential toxic effects of cryoprotectants on motility of human spermatozoa. The data indicated that exposure of spermatozoa to cryoprotectant medium for as little as 15 minutes at room temperature caused a reduction in motility. This reduction in motility was caused by glycerol. Lowering glycerol concentrations from 7.5% to 5.0% improved sperm motility at 24 hours post-thaw. Sperm motility was not affected by either slow or abrupt cooling rates above -5 degrees C. Motility was greater in cryopreserved sperm at 24 hours post-thaw when glycerol was added at -5 degrees C rather than at room temperature. These data suggest that avoiding glycerol toxicity either by reducing the concentration used or by adding glycerol at a lower temperature, or both, may improve human sperm cryosurvival rates.

  15. Isolation of follicular dendritic cells from human tonsils and adenoids. III. Analysis of their Fc receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Heinen, E; Radoux, D; Kinet-Denoel, C; Moeremans, M; De Mey, J; Simar, L J

    1985-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDC), isolated from human tonsils or adenoids, were tested for their capacity to retain monomeric, aggregated or antigen-bound human antibodies in the absence of serum. FDC retain fluorescein-labelled heat-aggregated human immunoglobulins, but not monomeric ones nor fluorescein-labelled F(ab')2 in monomeric or aggregated form. Ultrastructural observations showed that colloidal gold-labelled monomeric, or antigen-bound, antibodies directed against tetanus toxoid are retained by dendrites and membrane infoldings of FDC but are never located in cytoplasmic vesicles. This retention was inhibited by incubating FDC with unlabelled aggregated or antigen-bound antibodies. When gold-labelled anti-tetanus toxoid antibodies were incubated in the presence of protein-A before the contact with FDC, a strong reduction of their retention occurred. This further suggested the presence of Fc receptors on isolated tonsillar FDC. Endocytosis was not observed in isolated FDC, even after prolonged incubation in presence of labelled immune complexes: their Fc receptors are, thus, not related to a phagocytic activity as they are in macrophages. Simultaneous ultrastructural labelling of Fc and C3b receptors with colloidal gold particles of different sizes did not reveal any clear relations between these two receptors on the surface of FDC. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3156811

  16. Lunar precursor missions for human exploration of Mars--III: studies of system reliability and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Mendell, W W; Heydorn, R P

    2004-01-01

    Discussions of future human expeditions into the solar system generally focus on whether the next explorers ought to go to the Moon or to Mars. The only mission scenario developed in any detail within NASA is an expedition to Mars with a 500-day stay at the surface. The technological capabilities and the operational experience base required for such a mission do not now exist nor has any self-consistent program plan been proposed to acquire them. In particular, the lack of an Abort-to-Earth capability implies that critical mission systems must perform reliably for 3 years or must be maintainable and repairable by the crew. As has been previously argued, a well-planned program of human exploration of the Moon would provide a context within which to develop the appropriate technologies because a lunar expedition incorporates many of the operational elements of a Mars expedition. Initial lunar expeditions can be carried out at scales consistent with the current experience base but can be expanded in any or all operational phases to produce an experience base necessary to successfully and safely conduct human exploration of Mars. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Lunar precursor missions for human exploration of Mars--III: studies of system reliability and maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendell, W. W.; Heydorn, R. P.

    2004-01-01

    Discussions of future human expeditions into the solar system generally focus on whether the next explorers ought to go to the Moon or to Mars. The only mission scenario developed in any detail within NASA is an expedition to Mars with a 500-day stay at the surface. The technological capabilities and the operational experience base required for such a mission do not now exist nor has any self-consistent program plan been proposed to acquire them. In particular, the lack of an Abort-to-Earth capability implies that critical mission systems must perform reliably for 3 years or must be maintainable and repairable by the crew. As has been previously argued, a well-planned program of human exploration of the Moon would provide a context within which to develop the appropriate technologies because a lunar expedition incorporates many of the operational elements of a Mars expedition. Initial lunar expeditions can be carried out at scales consistent with the current experience base but can be expanded in any or all operational phases to produce an experience base necessary to successfully and safely conduct human exploration of Mars. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Lunar precursor missions for human exploration of Mars--III: studies of system reliability and maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendell, W. W.; Heydorn, R. P.

    2004-01-01

    Discussions of future human expeditions into the solar system generally focus on whether the next explorers ought to go to the Moon or to Mars. The only mission scenario developed in any detail within NASA is an expedition to Mars with a 500-day stay at the surface. The technological capabilities and the operational experience base required for such a mission do not now exist nor has any self-consistent program plan been proposed to acquire them. In particular, the lack of an Abort-to-Earth capability implies that critical mission systems must perform reliably for 3 years or must be maintainable and repairable by the crew. As has been previously argued, a well-planned program of human exploration of the Moon would provide a context within which to develop the appropriate technologies because a lunar expedition incorporates many of the operational elements of a Mars expedition. Initial lunar expeditions can be carried out at scales consistent with the current experience base but can be expanded in any or all operational phases to produce an experience base necessary to successfully and safely conduct human exploration of Mars. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Induction of apoptosis by rhapontin having stilbene moiety, a component of rhubarb (Rheum officinale Baillon) in human stomach cancer KATO III cells.

    PubMed

    Hibasami, Hiroshige; Takagi, Keiji; Ishii, Toshiaki; Tsujikawa, Mayumi; Imai, Nami; Honda, Ikumi

    2007-08-01

    We have investigated the effects of rhapontin on proliferation and DNA of human stomach cancer KATO III cells. Growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis by rhapontin were observed in the KATO III cells. Morphological change showing apoptotic bodies was observed in the KATO III cells treated with rhapontin. The fragmentation of DNA by rhapontin to oligonucleosomal-sized fragments that is a characteristic of apoptosis was observed to be concentration- and time-dependent in the KATO III cells. N-acetyl-L-cysteine, an antioxidant, suppressed the DNA fragmentation caused by rhapontin. On the other hand, it was found that resveratrol having stilbene moiety as well as rhapontin induced apoptosis in the KATO III cells. So, it is considered that stilbene moiety in the molecule is essential for the induction of apoptosis. The data of the present study show that the suppression of KATO III cell-growth by rhapontin results from the induction of apoptosis by the compound, and that active oxygen is involved in the inductions of apoptosis caused by rhapontin in the KATO III cells.

  20. ESCRT-III subunits Snf7-1 and Snf7-2 differentially regulate transmembrane cargos in hESC-derived human neurons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Backgrounds Endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) is involved in several fundamental cellular processes and human diseases. Many mammalian ESCRT proteins have multiple isoforms but their precise functions remain largely unknown, especially in human neurons. Results In this study, we differentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into postmitotic neurons and characterized the functional properties of these neurons. Moreover, we found that among the three human paralogs of the yeast ESCRT-III subunit Snf7, hSnf7-1 and hSnf7-2 are most abundantly expressed in human neurons. Both hSnf7-1 and hSnf7-2 are required for the survival of human neurons, indicating a non-redundant essential function. Indeed, hSnf7-1 and hSnf7-2 are preferentially associated with CHMP2A and CHMP2B, respectively, and regulate the turnover of distinct transmembrane cargos such as neurotransmitter receptors in human neurons. Conclusion These findings indicate that different mammalian paralogs of the yeast ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 have non-redundant functions in human neurons, suggesting that ESCRT-III with distinct subunit compositions may preferentially regulate different cargo proteins. PMID:21975012

  1. Human RNase P ribonucleoprotein is required for formation of initiation complexes of RNA polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Serruya, Raphael; Orlovetskie, Natalie; Reiner, Robert; Dehtiar-Zilber, Yana; Wesolowski, Donna; Altman, Sidney; Jarrous, Nayef

    2015-01-01

    Human RNase P is implicated in transcription of small non-coding RNA genes by RNA polymerase III (Pol III), but the precise role of this ribonucleoprotein therein remains unknown. We here show that targeted destruction of HeLa nuclear RNase P inhibits transcription of 5S rRNA genes in whole cell extracts, if this precedes the stage of initiation complex formation. Biochemical purification analyses further reveal that this ribonucleoprotein is recruited to 5S rRNA genes as a part of proficient initiation complexes and the activity persists at reinitiation. Knockdown of RNase P abolishes the assembly of initiation complexes by preventing the formation of the initiation sub-complex of Pol III. Our results demonstrate that the structural intactness, but not the endoribonucleolytic activity per se, of RNase P is critical for the function of Pol III in cells and in extracts. PMID:25953854

  2. Contaminated soils (III): in vitro dermal absorption of ethylene glycol and nonylphenol in human skin.

    PubMed

    Moody, Richard P; Joncas, Julie; Richardson, Mark; Petrovic, Sanya; Chu, Ih

    2010-01-01

    Dermal absorption of contaminants from soils at federal contaminated sites in Canada was investigated using one hydrophile, (14)C-ethylene glycol (EG), and one lipophile, (14)C-nonylphenol (NP). In vitro dermal absorption of EG and NP was examined in dermatomed (0.4-0.5 mm) human skin using Bronaugh Teflon flow-through cells with Hanks HEPES buffered (pH 7.4) receiver solution with 4% bovine serum albumin (BSA). Tests were conducted under occlusive conditions with and without a commercial gardening soil spiked with EG or NP applied to skin at a soil load of 5 mg/cm(2). With percent absorption in skin depot included, a total of 9.9 + or - 6.28% (n = 6) and 34.8 + or - 8.47% (n = 6) absorption of EG with and without soil, respectively, and 20.6 + or - 5.56% (n = 7) and 41.1 + or - 6.46% (n = 7) of NP, with and without soil, respectively, were obtained. For tests without soil a reverse pattern was observed with significantly lower percent absorption into the receiver than depot with the lipophile NP, but significantly higher percent absorption in receiver versus depot for the hydrophile EG. This pattern was different in tests with soil, and caution needs to be exercised when extrapolating data from in vitro tests conducted without soil in human health risk assessments at contaminated sites.

  3. Human atherosclerosis. III. Immunocytochemical analysis of the cell composition of lesions of young adults.

    PubMed Central

    Katsuda, S.; Boyd, H. C.; Fligner, C.; Ross, R.; Gown, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    There have been only limited immunocytochemical studies of the cell composition of the early lesions of human atherosclerosis, and none that incorporate a comprehensive panel of antibodies to various cell types and subsets. The authors thus performed a prospective study of 27 lesions from 16 different individuals ranging in age from 15 to 34 years. These were all lesions that appeared grossly as slightly raised, yellow fatty streaks in the posterior ascending aorta, but on histologic examination had varying degrees of round-cell, spindle-cell, and foam-cell accumulation. Using a panel of antibodies, including monoclonal antibodies specific for smooth muscle cells [HHF35], human macrophages [HAM56], endothelial cells [monoclonal antibodies to F. VIII related antigen], lymphocytes [anti-CD45, anti-CD20, anti-CD45RO, anti-T-cell receptor], it was revealed that the predominant cell type in these early lesions was the smooth muscle cell, including the vast majority of the foam cells, which tended to appear in the deeper regions of the lesions. There were variable numbers of smooth muscle cells and lymphocytes; the latter were exclusively T cells. It is concluded that in atherosclerotic lesions of young adults, which may represent various stages of fatty streak formation and advanced fatty streaks, smooth muscle cell accumulation may be an early event. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1562051

  4. Regional assignment of the human uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) gene to chromosome 10q25.2----q26.3.

    PubMed

    Astrin, K H; Warner, C A; Yoo, H W; Goodfellow, P J; Tsai, S F; Desnick, R J

    1991-05-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase [UROS; hydroxymethylbilane hydro-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.2.1.75] is the fourth enzyme in the human heme biosynthetic pathway. The recent isolation of the cDNA encoding human UROS facilitated its chromosomal localization. Human UROS sequences were specifically amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from genomic DNA of two independent panels of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. There was 100% concordance for the presence of the human UROS PCR product and human chromosome 10. For each of the other chromosomes, there was 19%-53% discordance with human UROS. The chromosomal assignment was confirmed by Southern hybridization analysis of DNA from somatic cell hybrids with the full-length UROS cDNA. Using human-rodent hybrids containing different portions of human chromosome 10, we assigned the UROS gene to the region 10q25.2----q26.3.

  5. Frequency variations of discrete cranial traits in major human populations. III. Hyperostotic variations

    PubMed Central

    HANIHARA, TSUNEHIKO; ISHIDA, HAJIME

    2001-01-01

    Seven discrete cranial traits usually categorised as hyperostotic characters, the medial palatine canal, hypoglossal canal bridging, precondylar tubercle, condylus tertius, jugular foramen bridging, auditory exostosis, and mylohyoid bridging were investigated in 81 major human population samples from around the world. Significant asymmetric occurrences of the bilateral traits were detected in the medial palatine canal and jugular foramen bridging in several samples. Significant intertrait associations were found between some pairs of the traits, but not consistently across the large geographical samples. The auditory exostosis showed a predominant occurrence in males. With the exception of the auditory exostosis and mylohyoid bridging in a few samples, significant sex differences were slight. The frequency distributions of the traits (except for the auditory exostosis) showed some interregional clinality and intraregional discontinuity, suggesting that genetic drift could have contributed to the observed pattern of variation. PMID:11554504

  6. Microimaging FT-IR of oral cavity tumours. Part III: Cells, inoculated tissues and human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, C.; Ferraris, P.; Giorgini, E.; Pieramici, T.; Possati, L.; Rocchetti, R.; Rubini, C.; Sabbatini, S.; Tosi, G.; Mariggiò, M. A.; Lo Muzio, L.

    2007-05-01

    The biochemistry of healthy and tumour cell cultures, inoculated tissues and oral cavity tissues have been studied by FT-IR Microscopy with the aim to relate spectral patterns with microbiological and histopathological findings. 'Supervised' and 'unsupervised' procedures of data handling afforded a satisfactory degree of accordance between spectroscopic and the other two techniques. In particular, changes in frequency and intensity of proteins, connective and nucleic acids vibrational modes as well as the visualization of biochemical single wave number or band ratio images, allowed an evaluation of the pathological changes. The spectroscopic patterns of inoculated tissues resulted quite similar to human tissues; differences of both types of sections with cellular lines could be explained by the influence of the environment.

  7. Structure of the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase from human parainfluenza virus type III.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Michael C; Borg, Natalie A; Streltsov, Victor A; Pilling, Patricia A; Epa, V Chandana; Varghese, Joseph N; McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L; Colman, Peter M

    2004-01-30

    The three-dimensional structure of the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) from a human parainfluenza virus is described at ca 2.0 A resolution, both in native form and in complex with three substrate analogues. In support of earlier work on the structure of the homologous protein from the avian pathogen Newcastle disease virus (NDV), we observe a dimer of beta-propellers and find no evidence for spatially separated sites performing the receptor-binding and neuraminidase functions of the protein. As with the NDV HN, the active site of the HN of parainfluenza viruses is structurally flexible, suggesting that it may be able to switch between a receptor-binding state and a catalytic state. However, in contrast to the NDV structures, we observe no ligand-induced structural changes that extend beyond the active site and modify the dimer interface.

  8. Localization of types I, II, and III collagen mRNAs in developing human skeletal tissues by in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Paraffin sections of human skeletal tissues were studied in order to identify cells responsible for production of types I, II, and III collagens by in situ hybridization. Northern hybridization and sequence information were used to select restriction fragments of cDNA clones for the corresponding mRNAs to obtain probes with a minimum of cross- hybridization. The specificity of the probes was proven in hybridizations to sections of developing fingers: osteoblasts and chondrocytes, known to produce only one type of fibrillar collagen each (I and II, respectively) were only recognized by the corresponding cDNA probes. Smooth connective tissues exhibited variable hybridization intensities with types I and III collagen cDNA probes. The technique was used to localize the activity of type II collagen production in the different zones of cartilage during the growth of long bones. Visual inspection and grain counting revealed the highest levels of pro alpha 1(II) collagen mRNAs in chondrocytes of the lower proliferative and upper hypertrophic zones of the growth plate cartilage. This finding was confirmed by Northern blotting of RNAs isolated from epiphyseal (resting) cartilage and from growth zone cartilage. Analysis of the osseochondral junction revealed virtually no overlap between hybridization patterns obtained with probes specific for type I and type II collagen mRNAs. Only a fraction of the chondrocytes in the degenerative zone were recognized by the pro alpha 1(II) collagen cDNA probe, and none by the type I collagen cDNA probe. In the mineralizing zone virtually all cells were recognized by the type I collagen cDNA probe, but only very few scattered cells appeared to contain type II collagen mRNA. These data indicate that in situ hybridization is a valuable tool for identification of connective tissue cells which are actively producing different types of collagens at the various stages of development, differentiation, and growth. PMID:3558480

  9. Functional interaction between type III-secreted protein IncA of Chlamydophila psittaci and human G3BP1.

    PubMed

    Borth, Nicole; Litsche, Katrin; Franke, Claudia; Sachse, Konrad; Saluz, Hans Peter; Hänel, Frank

    2011-01-31

    Chlamydophila (Cp.) psittaci, the causative agent of psittacosis in birds and humans, is the most important zoonotic pathogen of the family Chlamydiaceae. These obligate intracellular bacteria are distinguished by a unique biphasic developmental cycle, which includes proliferation in a membrane-bound compartment termed inclusion. All Chlamydiaceae spp. possess a coding capacity for core components of a Type III secretion apparatus, which mediates specific delivery of anti-host effector proteins either into the chlamydial inclusion membrane or into the cytoplasm of target eukaryotic cells. Here we describe the interaction between Type III-secreted protein IncA of Cp. psittaci and host protein G3BP1 in a yeast two-hybrid system. In GST-pull down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments both in vitro and in vivo interaction between full-length IncA and G3BP1 were shown. Using fluorescence microscopy, the localization of G3BP1 near the inclusion membrane of Cp. psittaci-infected Hep-2 cells was demonstrated. Notably, infection of Hep-2 cells with Cp. psittaci and overexpression of IncA in HEK293 cells led to a decrease in c-Myc protein concentration. This effect could be ascribed to the interaction between IncA and G3BP1 since overexpression of an IncA mutant construct disabled to interact with G3BP1 failed to reduce c-Myc concentration. We hypothesize that lowering the host cell c-Myc protein concentration may be part of a strategy employed by Cp. psittaci to avoid apoptosis and scale down host cell proliferation.

  10. The Functions of Crucial Cysteine Residues in the Arsenite Methylation Catalyzed by Recombinant Human Arsenic (III) Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuping; Geng, Zhirong; Shi, Nan; Li, Xiangli; Wang, Zhilin

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic (III) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is a cysteine (Cys)-rich enzyme that catalyzes the biomethylation of arsenic. To investigate how these crucial Cys residues promote catalysis, we used matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) to analyze Cys residues in recombinant human arsenic (III) methyltransferase (hAS3MT). We detected two disulfide bonds, Cys250-Cys32 and Cys368-Cys369, in hAS3MT. The Cys250-Cys32 disulfide bond was reduced by glutathione (GSH) or other disulfide bond reductants before the enzymatic methylation of arsenite (iAs3+). In addition to exposing residues around the active sites, cleavage of the Cys250-Cys32 pair modulated the conformation of hAS3MT. This adjustment may stabilize the binding of S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) and favor iAs3+ binding to hAS3MT. Additionally, we observed the intermediate of Cys250-S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy), suggesting that Cys250 is involved in the transmethylation. In recovery experiments, we confirmed that trivalent arsenicals were substrates for hAS3MT, methylation of arsenic occurred on the enzyme, and an intramolecular disulfide bond might be formed after iAs3+ was methylated to dimethylarsinous acid (DMA3+). In this work, we clarified both the functional roles of GSH and the crucial Cys residues in iAs3+ methylation catalyzed by hAS3MT. PMID:25349987

  11. A Mechanistic Role for Type III IFN-λ1 in Asthma Exacerbations Mediated by Human Rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Miller, E. Kathryn; Hernandez, Johanna Zea; Wimmenauer, Vera; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Hijano, Diego; Libster, Romina; Serra, M. Elina; Bhat, Niranjan; Batalle, Juan P.; Mohamed, Yassir; Reynaldi, Andrea; Rodriguez, Andrea; Otello, Monica; Pisapia, Nestor; Bugna, Jimena; Bellabarba, Miguel; Kraft, David; Coviello, Silvina; Ferolla, F. Martin; Chen, Aaron; London, Stephanie J.; Siberry, George K.; Williams, John V.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Human rhinoviruses (HRV) are the leading cause of upper respiratory infections and have been postulated to trigger asthma exacerbations. However, whether HRV are detected during crises because upper respiratory infections often accompany asthma attacks, or because they specifically elicit exacerbations, is unclear. Moreover, although several hypotheses have been advanced to explain virus-induced exacerbations, their mechanism remains unclear. Objectives: To determine the role of HRV in pediatric asthma exacerbations and the mechanisms mediating wheezing. Methods: We prospectively studied 409 children with asthma presenting with upper respiratory infection in the presence or absence of wheezing. Candidate viral and immune mediators of illness were compared among children with asthma with different degrees of severity of acute asthma. Measurements and Main Results: HRV infections specifically associated with asthma exacerbations, even after adjusting for relevant demographic and clinical variables defined a priori (odds ratio, 1.90; 95% confidence interval, 1.21–2.99; P = 0.005). No difference in virus titers, HRV species, and inflammatory or allergic molecules was observed between wheezing and nonwheezing children infected with HRV. Type III IFN-λ1 levels were higher in wheezing children infected with HRV compared with nonwheezing (P < 0.001) and increased with worsening symptoms (P < 0.001). Moreover, after adjusting for IFN-λ1, children with asthma infected with HRV were no longer more likely to wheeze than those who were HRV-negative (odds ratio, 1.18; 95% confidence interval, 0.57–2.46; P = 0.66). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that HRV infections in children with asthma are specifically associated with acute wheezing, and that type III IFN-λ1 responses mediate exacerbations caused by HRV. Modulation of IFN- λ1 should be studied as a therapeutic target for exacerbations caused by HRV. PMID:22135341

  12. Functional Interaction between Type III-Secreted Protein IncA of Chlamydophila psittaci and Human G3BP1

    PubMed Central

    Borth, Nicole; Litsche, Katrin; Franke, Claudia; Sachse, Konrad; Saluz, Hans Peter; Hänel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydophila (Cp.) psittaci, the causative agent of psittacosis in birds and humans, is the most important zoonotic pathogen of the family Chlamydiaceae. These obligate intracellular bacteria are distinguished by a unique biphasic developmental cycle, which includes proliferation in a membrane-bound compartment termed inclusion. All Chlamydiaceae spp. possess a coding capacity for core components of a Type III secretion apparatus, which mediates specific delivery of anti-host effector proteins either into the chlamydial inclusion membrane or into the cytoplasm of target eukaryotic cells. Here we describe the interaction between Type III-secreted protein IncA of Cp. psittaci and host protein G3BP1 in a yeast two-hybrid system. In GST-pull down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments both in vitro and in vivo interaction between full-length IncA and G3BP1 were shown. Using fluorescence microscopy, the localization of G3BP1 near the inclusion membrane of Cp. psittaci-infected Hep-2 cells was demonstrated. Notably, infection of Hep-2 cells with Cp. psittaci and overexpression of IncA in HEK293 cells led to a decrease in c-Myc protein concentration. This effect could be ascribed to the interaction between IncA and G3BP1 since overexpression of an IncA mutant construct disabled to interact with G3BP1 failed to reduce c-Myc concentration. We hypothesize that lowering the host cell c-Myc protein concentration may be part of a strategy employed by Cp. psittaci to avoid apoptosis and scale down host cell proliferation. PMID:21304914

  13. Degradation of plasma proteins by the trypsin-like enzyme of Porphyromonas gingivalis and inhibition of protease activity by a serine protease inhibitor of human plasma.

    PubMed

    Fishburn, C S; Slaney, J M; Carman, R J; Curtis, M A

    1991-08-01

    The interaction between Porphyromonas gingivalis culture supernatant and human serum was examined. Hydrolysis of the major serum proteins was thiol-dependent and correlated with the trypsin-like activity of the sample. Transferrin and IgG light chains were less susceptible to degradation than albumin and IgG heavy chains and partially degraded IgG retained antigen-binding capability. Serum inhibited the trypsin-like activity in a fluorimetric assay. The inhibition was shown to be independent of the level of IgG antibody reactive with whole cells of P. gingivalis. Purified preparations of antithrombin III, a serine protease inhibitor, but not alpha 1-antitrypsin nor alpha 2-macroglobulin inhibited the trypsin-like activity in the fluorometric assay.

  14. Modulation of endogenous β-tubulin isotype expression as a result of human βIII cDNA transfection into prostate carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, S; McCauley, R A; Dexter, D W; Hudes, G R

    2001-01-01

    Increases of individual β tubulin isotypes in antimicrotubule drug resistant cell lines have been reported by several laboratories. We have previously described elevations in βIII and βIVa isotypes in estramustine and paclitaxel resistant human prostate carcinoma cells. To investigate further the function of β tubulin isotypes in antimicrotubule drug response, human prostate carcinoma cells that normally have very low to undetectable levels of βIII were stably transfected with βIII cDNA in pZeoSV system. An 18 bp haemagglutinin (HA) epitope tag was added at the 3′ end prior to cloning into the vector. Cells were transfected with pZeoSV or pZeoSV-βIII plasmids and selected in the presence of Zeocin. Immunofluorescent staining of the transfectant cells have shown significant expression and incorporation of HA-tagged βIII tubulin into cellular microtubules. Quantitation of Western blots revealed the HA-tagged βIII levels to be approximately 7-fold higher than the vector control cells. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the increase at the transcript level and also revealed a collateral increase of βII and βIVb transcripts. Cell viability assays indicated that sensitivity of βIII transfected cells to various antimicrotubule agents was similar to vector transfected cells: IC50 values for estramustine, paclitaxel, colchicine and vinblastine were 4 μM, 4 nM, 22 nM and 2 nM, respectively for both cell lines. Thus, overexpression of βIII isotype in human prostate carcinoma cells by stable transfection failed to confer antimicrotubule drug resistance to these cells. Counterregulatory increases of endogenous βII and βIVb tubulin isotypes in these βIII transfected cells may be a compensatory mechanism used by the cells to overcome the effects of elevated βIII levels on the cellular microtubules. These results highlight the difficulty in isolating the contribution of single tubulin isotypes in drug response studies. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http

  15. Fc gamma receptor III on human neutrophils. Allelic variants have functionally distinct capacities.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, J E; Edberg, J C; Kimberly, R P

    1990-01-01

    As a model system to explore the functional consequences of structural variants of human Fc gamma receptors (Fc gamma R), we have investigated Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis in relation to the NA1-NA2 polymorphism of Fc gamma RIII (CD16) on neutrophils (Fc gamma RIIIPMN). The neutrophil-specific NA antigen system is a biallelic polymorphism with codominant expression demonstrating a gene dose effect with the anti-NA1 MAb CLB-gran 11 in a large donor population. To explore the impact of this allelic variation of Fc gamma RIIIPMN on phagocytosis, we used two Fc gamma RIII-dependent probes, IgG-sensitized erythrocytes (EA) and concanavalin. A-treated erythrocytes (E-ConA). Comparison of Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis by PMN from NA1 subjects and from NA2 subjects showed lower levels of phagocytosis of both probes by the NA2 individuals. The difference was most pronounced with lightly opsonized EA: at the lowest level of sensitization the phagocytic index was 72% lower for NA2 donors, whereas at the highest level of sensitization it was 21% lower (P less than 0.003). Blockade of Fc gamma RII with MAb IV.3 Fab amplified by threefold the difference between NA1 and NA2 donors. NA1 and NA2 individuals had identical phagocytic capacities for the non-Fc gamma RIII probes, serum-treated and heat-treated zymosan. These individuals did not show differential quantitative cell surface expression of Fc gamma RIIIPMN measured by a panel of anti-CD16 MAb (3G8, CLB FcR-gran 1, VEP13, BW209/2) and by Scatchard analysis of 125I-IgG dimer binding. The difference in Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis was not explicable on the basis of differential collaboration of Fc gamma RIIIPMN alleles with Fc gamma RII, since (a) the difference in phagocytic capacity between NA1 and NA2 individuals was readily apparent with the E-ConA probe (which is independent of Fc gamma RII) and (b) the difference in phagocytosis of EA was magnified by Fc gamma RII blockade. The demonstration that allelic

  16. Categorial Compositionality III: F-(co)algebras and the Systematicity of Recursive Capacities in Human Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Steven; Wilson, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Human cognitive capacity includes recursively definable concepts, which are prevalent in domains involving lists, numbers, and languages. Cognitive science currently lacks a satisfactory explanation for the systematic nature of such capacities (i.e., why the capacity for some recursive cognitive abilities–e.g., finding the smallest number in a list–implies the capacity for certain others–finding the largest number, given knowledge of number order). The category-theoretic constructs of initial F-algebra, catamorphism, and their duals, final coalgebra and anamorphism provide a formal, systematic treatment of recursion in computer science. Here, we use this formalism to explain the systematicity of recursive cognitive capacities without ad hoc assumptions (i.e., to the same explanatory standard used in our account of systematicity for non-recursive capacities). The presence of an initial algebra/final coalgebra explains systematicity because all recursive cognitive capacities, in the domain of interest, factor through (are composed of) the same component process. Moreover, this factorization is unique, hence no further (ad hoc) assumptions are required to establish the intrinsic connection between members of a group of systematically-related capacities. This formulation also provides a new perspective on the relationship between recursive cognitive capacities. In particular, the link between number and language does not depend on recursion, as such, but on the underlying functor on which the group of recursive capacities is based. Thus, many species (and infants) can employ recursive processes without having a full-blown capacity for number and language. PMID:22514704

  17. Gold(III) Macrocycles: Nucleotide-Specific Unconventional Catalytic Inhibitors of Human Topoisomerase I

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Topoisomerase IB (Top1) is a key eukaryotic nuclear enzyme that regulates the topology of DNA during replication and gene transcription. Anticancer drugs that block Top1 are either well-characterized interfacial poisons or lesser-known catalytic inhibitor compounds. Here we describe a new class of cytotoxic redox-stable cationic Au3+ macrocycles which, through hierarchical cluster analysis of cytotoxicity data for the lead compound, 3, were identified as either poisons or inhibitors of Top1. Two pivotal enzyme inhibition assays prove that the compounds are true catalytic inhibitors of Top1. Inhibition of human topoisomerase IIα (Top2α) by 3 was 2 orders of magnitude weaker than its inhibition of Top1, confirming that 3 is a type I-specific catalytic inhibitor. Importantly, Au3+ is essential for both DNA intercalation and enzyme inhibition. Macromolecular simulations show that 3 intercalates directly at the 5′-TA-3′ dinucleotide sequence targeted by Top1 via crucial electrostatic interactions, which include π–π stacking and an Au···O contact involving a thymine carbonyl group, resolving the ambiguity of conventional (drug binds protein) vs unconventional (drug binds substrate) catalytic inhibition of the enzyme. Surface plasmon resonance studies confirm the molecular mechanism of action elucidated by the simulations. PMID:24694294

  18. REINFORCEMENT IN CLASSROOM LEARNING. PART II, STUDIES OF REINFORCEMENT IN SIMULATED CLASSROOM SITUATIONS. PART III, IDENTIFICATION OF REINFORCERS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TRAVERS, ROBERT M.W.; AND OTHERS

    REINFORCEMENT CONCEPTS DERIVED LARGELY FROM RESEARCH OF SUBHUMAN SUBJECTS WERE TESTED FOR APPLICABILITY TO HUMAN-LEARNING SITUATIONS SIMILAR TO THOSE THAT OCCUR IN SCHOOLS. A SERIES OF EXPLORATORY STUDIES CONDUCTED IS DESCRIBED IN PART II OF THIS REPORT. IN PART III, TWO EXPERIMENTS CONDUCTED TO DETERMINE THE REINFORCING VALUE OF DIFFERENT STIMULI…

  19. Heavy metals and human spermatozoa. III. The toxicity of copper ions for spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Holland, M K; White, I G

    1988-12-01

    The dissolution of copper ions from copper metal into a saline medium in vitro was quantified using a colourimetric assay. The presence of spermatozoa enhanced this dissolution and increasing the protein content of the medium further increased the rate of dissolution. Approximately 17% of the copper released was either tightly bound to the spermatozoa or was within the cell and could not be removed by repeated washing. Once spermatozoa were immobilized, they could not be revived by washing and repeated changes of medium, by addition of copper specific-chelating agent or by extensive dialysis. When the toxicity to spermatozoa of cuprous and cupric ions was compared with copper metal, it could be shown that the quantity of cupric ions required (0.2-0.4 mg/ml) was in excess of the total quantity of copper released into solution. The quantity of cuprous ion required (0.08-0.16 mg/ml) to exert similar toxic effects to copper, was within the range of copper released from the metal. Under the conditions of this study, it is possible that cuprous ion would be oxidised to the cupric form generating free radicals in the process. It is not known whether the toxic effect is due to the cuprous ion, per se, or to radicals generated in its oxidation. Increasing the protein content of the medium to levels similar to low (8 mg/ml) and high (64 mg/ml) values reported in human uterine fluid increased the dissolution rate of copper but also offered some protection against the toxic effects of copper metal and cuprous and cupric ions.

  20. [Influence of intravenous injection of fucoidan from brown seaweed Fucus evanescens by plasma rabbits anticoagulant activity and neutralisation by sulphate protamin of fucoidans antithrombin activity in vitro].

    PubMed

    Lapikova, E S; Drozd, N N; Makarov, V A; Zviagintseva, T N; Shevchenko, N M; Kuznetsova, T A; Besednova, N N

    2012-01-01

    With fucoidan from Fucus evanescens dose increase from 1 to 5 mg/kg plasma coagulation time in test A(see symbol)TB increases. Sulphate protamin in final concentration 0.67-1.35 mkg/ml will neutralise antithrombin activity of fucoidans from brown seaweed Fucus evanescens and Laminaria cichorioides. The gravimetrichesky relation for the investigated samples makes an antidot/anticoagulant 1.

  1. Inhibition of replication and expression of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III in cultured cells by exogenous synthetic oligonucleotides complementary to viral RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Zamecnik, P C; Goodchild, J; Taguchi, Y; Sarin, P S

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of using oligodeoxynucleotides complementary to viral RNA or proviral DNA to inhibit the replication of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) [the etiological agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)] in cultured human cells was addressed by studying the association of 32P-labeled oligodeoxynucleotides with mammalian cellular components. The results indicated that exogenous oligodeoxynucleotides at 20 microM became associated with the membrane/cytosol fractions of the cell in amounts approximating 1.5 microM. Oligodeoxynucleotides complementary to a region close to the tRNALys primer binding site on HTLV-III RNA and others complementary to HTLV-III mRNA donor or acceptor splice sites inhibited viral replication (assayed as reverse transcriptase) and gene expression (assayed as virus-encoded proteins p15 and p24) by as much as 95%. Use of control (random) oligodeoxynucleotides suggests that the antiviral effects were specific. Although these results pertain to HTLV-III-infected cells in tissue culture, rather than to AIDS patients, they nevertheless point to a therapeutic potential of the complementary oligodeoxynucleotide ("hybridization competition" or "hybridon") approach in the treatment of patients with AIDS and AIDS-related complex. PMID:3012555

  2. Sb(V) and Sb(III) distribution in human erythrocytes: speciation methodology and the influence of temperature, time and anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Waldo; Aguilar, Luis; Barría, Macarena; Veneciano, Jocelyn; Martínez, Daniel; Bravo, Manuel; Lobos, María Gabriela; Mercado, Luis

    2013-10-15

    In this research a new method was developed and optimized for the determination of Sb(V) and Sb(III) in human erythrocytes fractions (plasma and cytoplasm) by high performance liquid chromatography with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The method considers the first step of samples cleaning by protein precipitation by salting out followed by C18 solid phase extraction, EDTA elution, and finally a chromatographic separation by using anion exchange PRPX-100 (100 mm × 4.1mm) and EDTA 20 mmol L(-1) as mobile phase. The method was optimized by experimental design with a recovery of 90% for Sb(V) and 55-75% for Sb(III) approximately. The analytical method was applied to study the distribution of Sb(V) and Sb(III) in human erythrocytes considering temperature and time of incubations and with special attention about the influence of the anticoagulant. Results showed that both Sb(V) and Sb(III) are capable to enter the red blood cell in a proportion of approximately 40-60%. On the other hand, both species are then excreted from the interior of the cell, where the percentage considerably decreased from approximately 60 to less than 30% within the cell. An increase in the culture temperature increases the capacity of Sb(V) and Sb(III) to penetrate the membrane barrier and reach the cytoplasm. In order to preserve the original distribution of Sb in blood, heparin seems to be the best anticoagulant for sample preservation.

  3. Present and future of anticoagulant therapy using antithrombin and thrombomodulin for sepsis-associated disseminated intravascular coagulation: a perspective from Japan.

    PubMed

    Iba, Toshiaki; Thachil, Jecko

    2016-03-01

    In sepsis, the coagulation system is often systemically activated in combination with the simultaneous impairment of fibrinolysis and anticoagulant systems. Since this hypercoagulable state often leads to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), an independent predictor of mortality in critically ill patients, the appropriate management of DIC itself is a crucial part of treatment strategies for severe sepsis. In this context, the Japanese Association of Acute Medicine (JAAM) scoring system for DIC has been proposed as a valid test for diagnosing DIC; this system is also expected to aid in devising specifically tailored management strategies. Anticoagulant therapy is commonly given to septic patients with DIC as part of the standard care in Japan. More recently, antithrombin concentrate and recombinant thrombomodulin have become the two major anticoagulant agents of choice. In relation to the use of antithrombin, recent studies have indicated that the recovery of antithrombin activity to within the normal range (>70%) is necessary if supplementation therapy is to provide a favorable outcome. Recombinant thrombomodulin is slightly more controversial, with favorable results being greater among severe cases of DIC. In the present review, we summarize recent clinical advances in anticoagulant therapy for sepsis-associated DIC.

  4. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, electrochemical behavior and computational analysis of mixed diamine ligand gold(III) complexes: antiproliferative and in vitro cytotoxic evaluations against human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Al-Jaroudi, Said S; Monim-ul-Mehboob, M; Altaf, Muhammad; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A; Wazeer, Mohammed I M; Altuwaijri, Saleh; Isab, Anvarhusein A

    2014-12-01

    The gold(III) complexes of the type [(DACH)Au(en)]Cl3, 1,2-Diaminocyclohexane ethylenediamine gold(III) chloride [where 1,2-DACH = cis-, trans-1,2- and S,S-1,2diaminocyclohexane and en = ethylenediamine] have been synthesized and characterized using various analytical and spectroscopic techniques including elemental analysis, UV-Vis and FTIR spectra; and solution as well as solid-state NMR measurements. The solid-state (13)C NMR shows that 1,2-diaminocyclohexane (1,2-DACH) and ethylenediamine (en) are strongly bound to the gold(III) center via N donor atoms. The stability of the mixed diamine ligand gold(III) was determined by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra. Their electrochemical behavior was studied by cyclic voltammetry. The structural details and relative stabilities of the four possible isomers of the complexes were also reported at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level of theory. The coordination sphere of these complexes around gold(III) center adopts distorted square planar geometry. The computational study also demonstrates that trans- conformations is slightly more stable than the cis-conformations. The antiproliferative effects and cytotoxic properties of the mixed diamine ligand gold(III) complexes were evaluated in vitro on human gastric SGC7901 and prostate PC3 cancer cells using MTT assay. The antiproliferative study of the gold(III) complexes on PC3 and SGC7901 cells indicate that complex 1 is the most effective antiproliferative agent among mixed ligand based gold(III) complexes 1-3. The IC50 data reveal that the in vitro cytotoxicity of complexes 1 and 3 against SGC7901 cancer cells are fairly better than that of cisplatin.

  5. Further characterization of the metabolic properties of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from human and mouse apoC-III transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Aalto-Setälä, K; Weinstock, P H; Bisgaier, C L; Wu, L; Smith, J D; Breslow, J L

    1996-08-01

    We previously showed that human apoC-III expression in transgenic mice causes hypertriglyceridemia due to the accumulation of enlarged very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-like particles, with increased triglycerides and apoC-III and decreased apoE. In vivo turnover studies indicated the metabolic basis was decreased particle fractional catabolic rate. The presence of enlarged triglyceride-rich particles with prolonged residence time in plasma implied defective lipolysis, but in vitro these particles were good substrates for purified lipoprotein lipase (LPL). In the current study we further characterize the metabolic properties of these particles. We show that expression of a mouse apoC-III transgene can also cause hypertriglyceridemia with a similar accumulation of a VLDL-like particle with increased apoC-III and decreased apoE. A vitamin A fat tolerance test was used to show that MoCIIITg and HuCIIITg mice had similarly delayed clearance of triglyceride-rich postprandial particles. Thus, the previously observed hypertriglyceridemia caused by human apoC-III transgene expression was not due interspecies incompatibility but a property of apoC-III. In further experiments we showed VLDL from apoC-III transgenic mice interacted poorly with fibroblast lipoprotein receptors and this could be corrected by adding exogenous apoE. In addition, control VLDL interaction could be decreased by exogenous apoC-III. Moreover, the hypertriglyceridemia of HuCIIITg mice could be normalized by crossbreeding with HuETg mice. Thus, a functionally significant reciprocal relationship of apoC-III and apoE exists, presumably due to competition for space on the surface of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Finally, VLDL from HuCIITg and MoCIIITg mice showed decreased binding to heparin-Sepharose. This suggests and additional locus of the defect in these mice could potentially be in the binding of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins to heparan sulfate proteoglycan matrix on the surface of endothelial

  6. Predictability in orbital reconstruction. A human cadaver study, part III: Implant-oriented navigation for optimized reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Leander; Essig, Harald; Schreurs, Ruud; Jansen, Jesper; Maal, Thomas J J; Gooris, Peter J J; Becking, Alfred G

    2015-12-01

    Navigation-assisted orbital reconstruction remains a challenge, because the surgeon focuses on a two-dimensional multiplanar view in relation to the preoperative planning. This study explored the addition of navigation markers in the implant design for three-dimensional (3D) orientation of the actual implant position relative to the preoperative planning for more fail-safe and consistent results. Pre-injury computed tomography (CT) was performed for 10 orbits in human cadavers, and complex orbital fractures (Class III/IV) were created. The orbits were reconstructed using preformed orbital mesh through a transconjunctival approach under image-guided navigation and navigation by referencing orientating markers in the implant design. Ideal implant positions were planned using preoperative CT scans. Implant placement accuracy was evaluated by comparing the planned and realized implant positions. Significantly better translation (3.53 mm vs. 1.44 mm, p = 0.001) and rotation (pitch: -1.7° vs. -2.2°, P = 0.52; yaw: 10.9° vs. 5.9°, P = 0.02; roll: -2.2° vs. -0.5°, P = 0.16) of the placed implant relative to the planned position were obtained by implant-oriented navigation. Navigation-assisted surgery can be improved by using navigational markers on the orbital implant for orientation, resulting in fail-safe reconstruction of complex orbital defects and consistent implant positioning.

  7. Complexation of Cm(III) with the recombinant N-lobe of human serum transferrin studied by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS).

    PubMed

    Bauer, N; Smith, V C; MacGillivray, R T A; Panak, P J

    2015-01-28

    The complexation of Cm(III) with the recombinant N-lobe of human serum transferrin (hTf/2N) is investigated in the pH range from 4.0 to 11.0 using TRLFS. At pH ≥ 7.4 a Cm(III) hTf/2N species is formed with Cm(III) bound at the Fe(III) binding site. The results are compared with Cm(III) transferrin interaction at the C-lobe and indicate the similarity of the coordination environment of the C- and N-terminal binding sites with four amino acid residues of the protein, two H2O molecules and three additional ligands (e.g. synergistic anions such as carbonate) in the first coordination sphere. Measurements at c(carbonate)tot = 0.23 mM (ambient carbonate concentration) and c(carbonate)tot = 25 mM (physiological carbonate concentration) show that an increase of the total carbonate concentration suppresses the formation of the Cm(III) hTf/2N species significantly. Additionally, the three Cm(III) carbonate species Cm(CO3)(+), Cm(CO3)2(-) and Cm(CO3)3(3-) are formed successively with increasing pH. In general, carbonate complexation is a competing reaction for both Cm(III) complexation with transferrin and hTf/2N but the effect is significantly higher for the half molecule. At c(carbonate)tot = 0.23 mM the complexation of Cm(III) with transferrin and hTf/2N starts at pH ≥ 7.4. At physiological carbonate concentration the Cm(III) transferrin species II forms at pH ≥ 7.0 whereas the Cm(III) hTf/2N species is not formed until pH > 10.0. Hence, our results reveal significant differences in the complexation behavior of the C-terminal site of transferrin and the recombinant N-lobe (hTf/2N) towards trivalent actinides.

  8. Synthesis and anticoagulant activity of bioisosteric sulfonic-Acid analogues of the antithrombin-binding pentasaccharide domain of heparin.

    PubMed

    Herczeg, Mihály; Lázár, László; Bereczky, Zsuzsanna; Kövér, Katalin E; Timári, István; Kappelmayer, János; Lipták, András; Antus, Sándor; Borbás, Anikó

    2012-08-20

    Two pentasaccharide sulfonic acids that were related to the antithrombin-binding domain of heparin were prepared, in which two or three primary sulfate esters were replaced by sodium-sulfonatomethyl moieties. The sulfonic-acid groups were formed on a monosaccharide level and the obtained carbohydrate sulfonic-acid esters were found to be excellent donors and acceptors in the glycosylation reactions. Throughout the synthesis, the hydroxy groups to be methylated were masked in the form of acetates and the hydroxy groups to be sulfated were masked with benzyl groups. The disulfonic-acid analogue was prepared in a [2+3] block synthesis by using a trisaccharide disulfonic acid as an acceptor and a glucuronide disaccharide as a donor. For the synthesis of the pentasaccharide trisulfonic acid, a more-efficient approach, which involved elongation of the trisaccharide acceptor with a non-oxidized precursor of the glucuronic acid followed by post-glycosidation oxidation at the tetrasaccharide level and a subsequent [1+4] coupling reaction, was elaborated. In vitro evaluation of the anticoagulant activity of these new sulfonic-acid derivatives revealed that the disulfonate analogue inhibited the blood-coagulation-proteinase factor Xa with outstanding efficacy; however, the introduction of the third sulfonic-acid moiety resulted in a notable decrease in the anti-Xa activity. The difference in the biological activity of the disulfonic- and trisulfonic-acid counterparts could be explained by the different conformation of their L-iduronic-acid residues.

  9. Factor VIIa-antithrombin complexes in patients with non-neoplastic portal vein thrombosis with and without cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, V; Spiezia, L; Senzolo, M; Rodriguez, K; Gavasso, S; Woodhams, B; Simioni, P

    2013-02-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is caused by local and systemic prothrombotic risk factors. In this case-control study, we evaluated the use of the Factor VIIa-antithrombin complex (FVIIa-AT) complex assay as a hypercoagulability marker in patients with PVT. Two different groups of cases were considered: (i) n = 12 noncirrhotic PVT patients, (ii) n = 33 cirrhotic patients with PVT. Controls were sex and age-matched healthy volunteers and cirrhotic subjects without PVT, respectively. Levels of the FVIIa-AT complex were significantly higher in noncirrhotic PVT subjects (132 ± 32 pM) than in healthy volunteers (108 ± 18 pM, P = 0.04). No significant difference in FVIIa-AT complexes was seen between cirrhotic patients with (64 ± 20 pM) or without (61 ± 24 pM) PVT. A linear correlation was seen between FVIIa-AT and FVIIa in noncirrhotic PVT subjects. In cirrhotic patients, FVIIa-AT complexes depended on both FVIIa and AT. These results confirm the utility of the FVIIa-AT assay in identifying the hypercoagulable state of noncirrhotic patients because of a previous thrombotic event. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. [Study on antiplatelet and antithrombin activitives and effective components variation of Puhuang-Wulingzhi before and after compatibility].

    PubMed

    Su, Shu-lan; Xue, Ping; Ouyang, Zhen; Zhou, Wei; Duan, Jin-ao

    2015-08-01

    The changes of bioactive constituents were analyzed for Puhuang-Wulingzhi before and after compatibility and the antiplatelet and antithrombin activitives were evaluated in order to elucidate the scientific and reasonable of Puhuang-Wulingzhi compatibility. UPLC-QTOF-MA-Markerlynx, principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis were used for data analysis and tracking changes of chemical composition during the decocting process. In vitro platelet aggregation induced by ADP, thrombin time(TT) and prothrombin time (PT) were investigated for Puhuang-Wulingzhi before and after compatibility. The results showed that significant differences were found between the mixed decoction and codecoction of Wulingzhi and Puhuang. Five compounds changed obviously were identified as typhaneoside, naringenin, isorhamnetin-3-O-ruinoside, quercetin-3-O-neohesperidoside, kaempferol-3-O-neohesperidoside. The codecoction, comparing with the single decoction, was more significant in antiplatelet aggregation and could prolong thrombin time. In the same crude drug dose, the thrombin time (TT) elongation were greater. These data could provide references for elucidation of bioactive components for this herb pair.

  11. Kinematic Comparison of Pediatric Human Volunteers and the Hybrid III 6-Year-Old Anthropomorphic Test Device

    PubMed Central

    Seacrist, Thomas; Balasubramanian, Sriram; García-España, J. Felipe; Maltese, Matthew R.; Arbogast, Kristy B.; Lopez-Valdes, Francisco J.; Kent, Richard W.; Tanji, Hiromasa; Higuchi, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    The Hybrid III 6-year-old ATD has been benchmarked against adult-scaled component level tests but the lack of biomechanical data hinders the effectiveness of the procedures used to scale the adult data to the child. Whole body kinematic validation of the pediatric ATD through limited comparison to post mortem human subjects (PMHS) of similar age and size has revealed key differences attributed to the rigidity of the thoracic spine. As restraint systems continue to advance, they may become more effective at limiting peak loads applied to occupants, leading to lower impact environments for which the biofidelity of the ATD is not well established. Consequently, there is a growing need to further enhance the assessment of the pediatric ATD by evaluating its biofidelity at lower crash speeds. To this end, this study compared the kinematic response of the Hybrid III 6 year old ATD against size-matched male pediatric volunteers (PVs) (6–9 yrs) in low-speed frontal sled tests. A 3-D near-infrared target tracking system quantified the position of markers at seven locations on the ATD and PVs (head top, opisthocranion, nasion, external auditory meatus, C4, T1, and pelvis). Angular velocity of the head, seat belt forces, and reaction forces on the seat pan and foot rest were also measured. The ATD exhibited significantly greater shoulder and lap belt, foot rest, and seat pan normal reaction loads compared to the PVs. Contrarily, PVs exhibited significantly greater seat pan shear. The ATD experienced significantly greater head angular velocity (11.4 ± 1.7 rad/s vs. 8.1 ± 1.4 rad/s), resulting in a quicker time to maximum head rotation (280.4 ± 2.5 ms vs 334.2 ± 21.7 ms). The ATD exhibited significantly less forward excursions of the nasion (171.7 ± 7.8 mm vs. 199.5 ± 12.3 mm), external auditory meatus (194.5 ± 11.8 mm vs. 205.7 ± 10.3 mm), C4 (127.0 ± 5.2 mm vs. 183.3 ± 12.8 mm) and T1 (111.1 ± 6.5 mm vs. 153.8 ± 10.5 mm) compared to the PVs. These analyses

  12. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoprotein-Associated Apolipoprotein C-III Production Is Stimulated by Plasma Free Fatty Acids in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pavlic, Mirjana; Valéro, René; Duez, Hélène; Xiao, Changting; Szeto, Linda; Patterson, Bruce W.; Lewis, Gary F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Insulin resistant states are associated with increased fatty acid flux to liver and intestine, which stimulates the production of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL). ApoC-III production and plasma and TRL concentrations are increased in insulin resistance and may contribute to the hypertriglyceridemia of these conditions. The mechanism underlying that increase is not known, but because apoC-III and VLDL production are closely linked we hypothesized that FFAs may stimulate TRL apoC-III production. Methods and Results We used Intralipid/heparin (IH) to raise plasma FFA in 12 healthy men in the fed state, and stable isotopes to examine apoC-III metabolism. TRL apoC-III concentration was significantly higher in the IH study, and this increase was associated with higher production (PR) and fractional catabolic rate (FCR). The increase in production was greater than in FCR (90% versus 30%, respectively), accounting for the elevated concentration. Glycerol infusion had no effect on apoC-III concentration, PR, or FCR compared to saline, indicating that the effect was not attributable to glycerol released from intralipid. Conclusion These findings confirm that TRL apoC-III production is stimulated by an acute elevation of plasma FFAs, suggesting a novel regulatory pathway that may play a role in the overproduction of TRL apoC-III in insulin resistant states. PMID:18556566

  13. Evaluation of the Biorid P3 and the Hybrid III in Pendulum Impacts to the Back - A Comparison to Human Subject Test Data

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Astrid; Bergman, Ulf; Svensson, Mats; Viano, David

    2000-01-01

    The BioRID P3 (Biofidelic Rear Impact Dummy) and the Hybrid III were evaluated in pendulum impacts to the back and compared to data from previous cadaver tests. The test setup impacting seated cadavers was reproduced with a pendulum impacting seated dummies at the level of T6 (6th thoracic vertebra). The pendulum mass was 23 kg and the impact velocity 4.6 m/s. The results showed that the BioRID P3 was more biofidelic than the Hybrid III in terms of the peak responses and the temporal window of the head and head relative to T1 horizontal, vertical, and angular displacement. This study is an evaluation of both the BioRID P3 and the Hybrid III against a recently available set of human subject data. The study meets the need for validation of the BioRID P3 at a higher impact severity than has been previously accomplished. PMID:11558088

  14. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part III. Deleterious effects: infections of humans, animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Kinga Lemieszek, Marta; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-06-02

    Pantoea agglomerans, a bacterium associated with plants, is not an obligate infectious agent in humans. However, it could be a cause of opportunistic human infections, mostly by wound infection with plant material, or as a hospital-acquired infection, mostly in immunocompromised individuals. Wound infection with P. agglomerans usually follow piercing or laceration of skin with a plant thorn, wooden splinter or other plant material and subsequent inoculation of the plant-residing bacteria, mostly during performing of agricultural occupations and gardening, or children playing. Septic arthritis or synovitis appears as a common clinical outcome of exogenous infection with P. agglomerans, others include endophthalmitis, periostitis, endocarditis and osteomyelitis. Another major reason for clinical infection with P. agglomerans is exposure of hospitalized, often immunodeficient individuals to medical equipment or fluids contaminated with this bacterium. Epidemics of nosocomial septicemia with fatal cases have been described in several countries, both in adult and paediatric patients. In most cases, however, the clinical course of the hospital-acquired disease was mild and application of the proper antibiotic treatment led to full recovery. Compared to humans, there are only few reports on infectious diseases caused by Pantoea agglomerans in vertebrate animals. This species has been identified as a possible cause of equine abortion and placentitis and a haemorrhagic disease in dolphin fish (Coryphaena hippurus). P. agglomerans strains occur commonly, usually as symbionts, in insects and other arthropods. Pantoea agglomerans usually occurs in plants as an epi- or endophytic symbiont, often as mutualist. Nevertheless, this species has also also been identified as a cause of diseases in a range of cultivable plants, such as cotton, sweet onion, rice, maize, sorghum, bamboo, walnut, an ornamental plant called Chinese taro (Alocasia cucullata), and a grass called onion couch

  15. Computer simulation of Zn(II) speciation and effect of Gd(III) on Zn(II) speciation in human blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinping; Zhang, Haiyuan; Yang, Kuiyue; Niu, Chunji; Ni, Jiazuan

    2003-01-01

    The speciation and distribution of Zn(II) and the effect of Gd(III) on Zn(II) speciation in human blood plasma were studied by computer simulation. The results show that, in normal blood plasma, the most predominant species of Zn(II) are [Zn(HSA)] (58.2%), [Zn(IgG)](20.1%), [Zn(Tf)] (10.4%), ternary complexes of [Zn(Cit)(Cys)] (6.6%) and of [Zn(Cys)(His)H] (1.6%), and the binary complex of [Zn(Cys)2H] (1.2%). When zinc is deficient, the distribution of Zn(II) species is similar to that in normal blood plasma. Then, the distribution changes with increasing zinc(II) total concentration. Overloading Zn(II) is initially mainly bound to human serum albumin (HSA). As the available amount of HSA is exceeded, phosphate metal and carbonate metal species are established. Gd(III) entering human blood plasma predominantly competes for phosphate and carbonate to form precipitate species. However, Zn(II) complexes with phosphate and carbonate are negligible in normal blood plasma, so Gd(III) only have a little effect on zinc(II) species in human blood plasma at a concentration above 1.0 x 10(-4) M.

  16. Vasoconstrictor effects of iso-prostaglandin F2alpha type-III (8-iso-prostaglandin F2alpha) on human saphenous veins.

    PubMed

    Gardan, B; Cracowski, J L; Sessa, C; Hunt, M; Stanke-Labesque, F; Devillier, P; Bessard, G

    2000-05-01

    Free radical generation can initiate the peroxidation of arachidonic acid, resulting in a non-cyclooxygenase-dependent production of bioactive prostaglandin F2-like compounds. We have investigated the effects of iso-prostaglandin F2alpha type III, (iPF2alpha-III, formerly named 8-iso prostaglandin F2alpha) on human saphenous veins, and characterized the underlying mechanisms. In organ baths, the contractile effects of iPF2alpha-III were tested on saphenous vein rings coming from 22 patients. iPF2alpha-III induced concentration-dependent contractions of isolated human saphenous veins. The maximal contraction did not differ significantly from that of prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha). The pD2 values for iPF2alpha-III, PGF2alpha, endothelin-1 (ET-1), and U46619 (a stable thromboxane A2 mimetic) were 6.31+/-0.12, 5.66+/-0.13, 7.37+/-0.08, and 7.99+/-0.31, respectively (p < 0.001 for U46619 vs. iPF2alpha-III and PGF2alpha; and ET-1 vs. PGF2alpha). Emax values of iPF2alpha-III, PGF2alpha, ET-1, and U46619 were 137.7+/-24.3%, 145.9+/-7.5%, 92.9+/-16.8%, and 238.7+/-23.7%, respectively (p < 0.001 for U46619 vs. iPF2alpha-III, PGF2alpha and ET-1; and for PGF2alpha vs. ET-1). The responses to iPF2alpha-III were inhibited by GR 32191 10(-7) M, a TP-receptor antagonist, without affecting the maximal response (pD2 values were 5.98+/-0.06 in the absence, and 5.22+/-0.05 in the presence of GR32191; p < 0.001). Concentration-effect curves to iPF2alpha-III were not affected by phosphoramidon 10(-5) M (an endothelin converting enzyme inhibitor), BQ123 10(-6) M (a selective ET(A)-receptor antagonist), BQ788 10(-6) M (a selective ET(B)-receptor antagonist), and indomethacin 10(-5) M (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor). Finally, the contractile response of iPF2alpha-III did not involve the release of thromboxane B2 and ET-1, measured using enzyme immunoassays. This study demonstrates that iPF2alpha-III is a vasoconstrictor of human saphenous veins, with a potency fourfold greater than that of

  17. [Expressiona of c-Jun and collagens I and III in cultured human skin fibroblasts are affected by infrared ray radiation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Yang, Rong-Li; Su, Hui; Li, Lin-Li; Song, Jian-Wen; Lu, Ning; Liu, Yu-Ze

    2016-02-01

    To observe the effect of solar infrared ray (IR) radiation on the expressions of c-Jun and collagens I and III in cultured human skin fibroblasts (HSFs) and explore the molecular mechanism by which IR radiation causes aging of the skin. Primarily cultured HSFs exposed to IR radiation were examined for changes of the cell viability with MTT assay. The mRNA and protein expressions of c-Jun and collagens I and III was detected with real-time quantitative PCR and immunocytochemistry. MTT assay showed that IR irradiation caused inhibition of cell proliferation compared with the control cells. The mRNA and protein expression of collagen I was decreased significantly by IR irradiation with the increase of the irradiation dose (P<0.01). HSFs irradiated by IR for 12 h showed a dose-dependent reduction of the expression of collagen type III mRNA and protein (P<0.05, P<0.01), but the expression increased dose-dependently in response to IR exposure for 24 h (P<0.05 or 0.01). IR irradiation enhanced the mRNA and protein expression of c-Jun in a dose-dependence manner (P<0.05 or 0.01). IR irradiation can increase the expression of c-Jun, inhibit the expression of collagen I, and cause disturbance in collagen III expression in human skin fibroblasts, which may be one of the mechanism of IR radiation to initiate and promote skin photoaging.

  18. Human DNA ligases I and III, but not ligase IV, are required for microhomology-mediated end joining of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Liang, Li; Deng, Li; Nguyen, Son C; Zhao, Xin; Maulion, Christopher D; Shao, Changshun; Tischfield, Jay A

    2008-06-01

    DNA nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination are two distinct pathways of DNA double-strand break repair in mammalian cells. Biochemical and genetic studies showed that DNA ends can also be joined via microhomology-mediated end joining (MHEJ), especially when proteins responsible for NHEJ, such as Ku, are reduced or absent. While it has been known that Ku-dependent NHEJ requires DNA ligase IV, it is unclear which DNA ligase(s) is required for Ku-independent MHEJ. In this study, we used a cell-free assay to determine the roles of DNA ligases I, III and IV in MHEJ and NHEJ. We found that siRNA mediated down-regulation of DNA ligase I or ligase III in human HTD114 cells led to impaired end joining that was mediated by 2-, 3- or 10-bp microhomology. In addition, nuclear extract from human fibroblasts harboring a mutation in DNA ligase I displayed reduced MHEJ activity. Furthermore, treatment of HTD114 nuclear extracts with an antibody against DNA ligase I or III also significantly reduced MHEJ. These data indicate that DNA ligases I and III are required in MHEJ. DNA ligase IV, on the contrary, is not required in MHEJ but facilitates Ku-dependent NHEJ. Therefore, MHEJ and NHEJ require different DNA ligases.

  19. A YAC contig spanning a cluster of human type III receptor protein tyrosine kinase genes (PDGFRA-KIT-KDR) in chromosome segment 4q12

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.A.; Strunk, K.M.; Lee, S.T.

    1994-07-15

    The authors have mapped five genes encoding protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) to the pericentromeric region of human chromosome 4. PTK4 and TYRO4, which encode nonreceptor intracellular PTKs, are located at 4p12 and 4q13, respectively. The other three genes, PDGFRA, KIT, and KDR, encode type III transmembrane receptor PTKs for known ligands. The authors have developed a contig of 29 yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) spanning approximately 2 Mb of DNA at 4q12 that includes PDGFRA, KIT, and KDR, and have used this YAC contig to map 12 different sequence-tagged sites in this region. PDGFRA, KIT, and KDR thus constitute a cluster of genes at 4q12 encoding closely related type III receptor PTKs. Mutations of the human KIT gene result in piebaldism, an autosomal dominant disorder of melanocyte development. 42 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. The Critical Role of Hinge Region Expulsion in the Induced-fit Heparin Binding Mechanism of Antithrombin

    PubMed Central

    Langdown, Jonathan; Belzar, Klara J.; Savory, Wendy J.; Baglin, Trevor P.; Huntington, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Antithrombin (AT) is the most important inhibitor of the coagulation proteases. Its activity is stimulated by glycosaminoglycans such as heparin, through allosteric and template mechanisms. AT utilises an induced-fit mechanism to bind with high affinity to a pentasaccharide sequence found in about one-third of heparin chains. The conformational changes behind this mechanism have been characterised by several crystal structures of AT in the absence and presence of the pentasaccharide. Pentasaccharide binding ultimately results in a conformational change that improves affinity by about 1000-fold. Crystal structures show several differences, including the expulsion of the hinge region of the reactive centre loop from β-sheet A, known to be critical for the allosteric activation of AT. Here we present data that reveals an energetically distinct intermediate on the path to full activation, where the majority of conformational changes have already occurred. A crystal structure of this intermediate shows that the hinge region is in a native like state, in spite of having the pentasaccharide bound in the normal fashion. We engineered a disulphide bond to lock the hinge in its native position to determine the energetic contributions of the initial and final conformational events. Approximately 60% of the free energy contribution of conformational change is provided by the final step of hinge region expulsion and subsequent closure of the main β-sheet A. A new analysis of the individual structural changes provides a plausible mechanism for propagation of conformational change from the heparin binding site to the remote hinge region in β-sheet A. PMID:19452598

  1. Molecular basis of inherited antithrombin deficiency in Portuguese families: identification of genetic alterations and screening for additional thrombotic risk factors.

    PubMed

    David, Dezsö; Ribeiro, Sofia; Ferrão, Lénia; Gago, Teresa; Crespo, Francisco

    2004-06-01

    Antithrombin (AT), the most important coagulation serine proteases inhibitor, plays an important role in maintaining the hemostatic balance. Inherited AT deficiency, mainly characterized by predisposition to recurrent venous thromboembolism, is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. In this study, we analyzed the underlying genetic alterations in 12 unrelated Portuguese thrombophilic families with AT deficiency. At the same time, the modulating effect of the FV Leiden mutation, PT 20210A, PAI-1 4G, and MTHFR 677T allelic variants, on the thrombotic risk of AT deficient patients was also evaluated. Three novel frameshift alterations, a 4-bp deletion in exon 4 and two 1-bp insertions in exon 6, were identified in six unrelated type I AT deficient families. A novel missense mutation in exon 3a, which changes the highly conserved F147 residue, and a novel splice site mutation in the invariant acceptor AG dinucleotide of intron 2 were also identified in unrelated type I AT deficient families. In addition to these, two previously reported missense mutations changing the AT reactive site bond (R393-S394) and leading to type II-RS deficiency, and a previously reported cryptic splice site mutation (IVS4-14G-->A), were also identified. In these families, increased thrombotic risk associated with co-inheritance of the FV Leiden mutation and of the PAI-1 4G variant was also observed. In conclusion, we present the first data regarding the underlying genetic alterations in Portuguese thrombophilic families with AT deficiency, and confirm that the FV Leiden mutation and probably the PAI-1 4G variant represent additional thrombotic risk factors in these families.

  2. Missense mutations in the gene encoding prothrombin corresponding to Arg596 cause antithrombin resistance and thrombomodulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yuki; Murata, Moe; Kozuka, Toshihiro; Nakata, Yukiko; Hasebe, Ryo; Tamura, Shogo; Takagi, Akira; Matsushita, Tadashi; Saito, Hidehiko; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2016-11-30

    Antithrombin (AT) and thrombomodulin (TM) play important roles in the process of natural anticoagulation in vivo. Recently, we reported that the prothrombin Yukuhashi mutation (p.Arg596Leu) was associated with AT and TM resistance-related thrombophilia. To assess the AT and TM resistances associated with other missense mutations by single base substitution in the Arg596 codon, we generated recombinant variants (596Gln, 596Trp, 596Gly, and 596Pro) and investigated the effects on AT and TM anticoagulant functions. All variants except 596Pro were secreted in amounts comparable to that of the wild-type but exhibited variable procoagulant activities. After a 30-minute inactivation by AT, the relative residual activity of wild-type thrombin decreased to 15 ± 4.0 %, in contrast to values of all variants were maintained at above 80 %. The thrombin-AT complex formation, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, was reduced with all tested variants in the presence and absence of heparin. In the presence of soluble TM (sTM), the relative fibrinogen clotting activity of wild-type thrombin decreased to 16 ± 0.12 %, whereas that of tested variants was 37 %-56 %. In a surface plasmon resonance assay, missense Arg596 mutations reduced thrombin-TM affinity to an extent similar to the reduction of fibrinogen clotting inhibition. In the presence of sTM or cultured endothelial-like cells, APC generation was enhanced differently by variant thrombins in a thrombin-TM affinity-dependent manner. These data indicate that prothrombin Arg596 missense mutations lead to AT and TM resistance in the variant thrombins and suggest that prothrombin Arg596 is important for AT- and TM-mediated anticoagulation.

  3. Exposure to monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) leads to altered selenoprotein synthesis in a primary human lung cell model

    SciTech Connect

    Meno, Sarah R.; Nelson, Rebecca; Hintze, Korry J.; Self, William T.

    2009-09-01

    Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), a trivalent metabolite of arsenic, is highly cytotoxic and recent cell culture studies suggest that it might act as a carcinogen. The general consensus of studies indicates that the cytotoxicity of MMA{sup III} is a result of increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A longstanding relationship between arsenic and selenium metabolism has led to the use of selenium as a supplement in arsenic exposed populations, however the impact of organic arsenicals (methylated metabolites) on selenium metabolism is still poorly understood. In this study we determined the impact of exposure to MMA{sup III} on the regulation of expression of TrxR1 and its activity using a primary lung fibroblast line, WI-38. The promoter region of the gene encoding the selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) contains an antioxidant responsive element (ARE) that has been shown to be activated in the presence of electrophilic compounds. Results from radiolabeled selenoproteins indicate that exposure to low concentrations of MMA{sup III} resulted in increased synthesis of TrxR1 in WI-38 cells, and lower incorporation of selenium into other selenoproteins. MMA{sup III} treatment led to increased mRNA encoding TrxR1 in WI-38 cells, while lower levels of mRNA coding for cellular glutathione peroxidase (cGpx) were detected in exposed cells. Luciferase activity of TrxR1 promoter fusions increased with addition of MMA{sup III}, as did expression of a rat quinone reductase (QR) promoter fusion construct. However, MMA{sup III} induction of the TRX1 promoter fusion was abrogated when the ARE was mutated, suggesting that this regulation is mediated via the ARE. These results indicate that MMA{sup III} alters the expression of selenoproteins based on a selective induction of TrxR1, and this response to exposure to organic arsenicals that requires the ARE element.

  4. Exposure to monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) leads to altered selenoprotein synthesis in a primary human lung cell model.

    PubMed

    Meno, Sarah R; Nelson, Rebecca; Hintze, Korry J; Self, William T

    2009-09-01

    Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), a trivalent metabolite of arsenic, is highly cytotoxic and recent cell culture studies suggest that it might act as a carcinogen. The general consensus of studies indicates that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) is a result of increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A longstanding relationship between arsenic and selenium metabolism has led to the use of selenium as a supplement in arsenic exposed populations, however the impact of organic arsenicals (methylated metabolites) on selenium metabolism is still poorly understood. In this study we determined the impact of exposure to MMA(III) on the regulation of expression of TrxR1 and its activity using a primary lung fibroblast line, WI-38. The promoter region of the gene encoding the selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) contains an antioxidant responsive element (ARE) that has been shown to be activated in the presence of electrophilic compounds. Results from radiolabeled selenoproteins indicate that exposure to low concentrations of MMA(III) resulted in increased synthesis of TrxR1 in WI-38 cells, and lower incorporation of selenium into other selenoproteins. MMA(III) treatment led to increased mRNA encoding TrxR1 in WI-38 cells, while lower levels of mRNA coding for cellular glutathione peroxidase (cGpx) were detected in exposed cells. Luciferase activity of TrxR1 promoter fusions increased with addition of MMA(III), as did expression of a rat quinone reductase (QR) promoter fusion construct. However, MMA(III) induction of the TRX1 promoter fusion was abrogated when the ARE was mutated, suggesting that this regulation is mediated via the ARE. These results indicate that MMA(III) alters the expression of selenoproteins based on a selective induction of TrxR1, and this response to exposure to organic arsenicals that requires the ARE element.

  5. Role of CD14 and TLR4 in type I, type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion in LPS-induced normal human skin fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongming; Li, Juncong; Wang, Yihe; Hu, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to investigate the role of CD14 and TLR4 in type I, type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion in LPS-induced normal human skin fibroblasts. The secondary aim was to provide theoretical basis for the molecular mechanisms of scar formation induced by LPS. Methods: The normal skin fibroblasts cultured in vitro were randomly divided into four groups: 0.1 μg/mL LPS reference group, CD14 pretreatment + LPS, TLR4 pretreatment + LPS, CD14 and TLR4 pretreatment + LPS. The collagen DNA synthesis was assessed by 3H-proline incorporation method. Real-time Quantitative PCR was used to detect type I, type III collagen mRNA expression. Results: Similar results were revealed for mRNA expression levels. The immunofluorescence staining suggested that type I and type III collagen were expressed in all investigated groups and that the expression was differentially downregulated in groups B, C, D. ELISA demonstrated markedly decreased levels in secreting type I, type III collagens and hydroxyproline in groups B, C, D (P<0.05), and the lowest level was detected in group D (P<0.01). Conclusion: Pretreatment with CD14 or TLR4 alone or their combination can significantly reduce the levels of type I and type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion, with the most notable reduction detected in case of CD14 and TLR4 combined. We could thus conclude that both CD14 and TLR4 are involved in type I and type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion in LPS-induced skin fibroblasts. PMID:25932184

  6. Mutation of Arg-115 of human class III alcohol dehydrogenase: a binding site required for formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity and fatty acid activation.

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, K; Höög, J O; Holmquist, B; Estonius, M; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B L

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the fatty acid activation and formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that distinguishes human class III alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) from all other alcohol dehydrogenases has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis of its Arg-115 residue. The Ala- and Asp-115 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The activities of the recombinant native and mutant enzymes toward ethanol are essentially identical, but mutagenesis greatly decreases the kcat/Km values for glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation. The catalytic efficiency for the Asp variant is < 0.1% that of the unmutated enzyme, due to both a higher Km and a lower kcat value. As with the native enzyme, neither mutant can oxidize methanol, be saturated by ethanol, or be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole; i.e., they retain these class III characteristics. In contrast, however, their activation by fatty acids, another characteristic unique to class III alcohol dehydrogenase, is markedly attenuated. The Ala mutant is activated only slightly, but the Asp mutant is not activated at all. The results strongly indicate that Arg-115 in class III alcohol dehydrogenase is a component of the binding site for activating fatty acids and is critical for the binding of S-hydroxymethylglutathione in glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. PMID:8460164

  7. Linkage mapping in Papio baboons: Conservation of a syntenic group of six markers on human chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.; Witte, S.M.; Kammerer, C.M.; Hixson, J.E.; MacCluer, J.W.

    1995-07-20

    We have established multipoint genetic linkage among six loci in baboons (Papio hamadryas). Published PCR primers designed to amplify five human microsatellite loci were used to amplify homologous loci in 229 pedigreed baboons. Southern blotting was used to type two RFLPs in a functional gene (anti-thrombin III) in a subset of those animals. All six loci are known to map to human chromosome 1q, a region of the genome predicted by karyotype studies to be conserved in baboons. Pairwise recombination frequencies and lod scores indicate that the six loci are also linked in baboons. Recombination distances among the loci are similar to those reported for humans. Like humans, the baboons exhibit higher rates of recombination in females than in males. This study demonstrates that (1) microsatellite loci first described and characterized in the human genome can be effectively used for genetic linkage mapping in nonhuman primates, (2) a group of genetic loci known to be linked on human chromosome 1q are also linked in the baboon genome, and (3) sex differences in recombination frequencies among loci on human chromosome 1q are also observe din the genome of this Old World monkey. This constitutes the first reported multipoint linkage map in any nonhuman primate. 26 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  8. Comparison of the Antiproliferative Activity of Two Antitumour Ruthenium(III) Complexes With Their Apotransferrin and Transferrin-Bound Forms in a Human Colon Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Keppler, B. K.; Hartmann, M.; Messori, L.; Berger, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    Two ruthenium(III) complexes, namely trans-indazolium[tetrachlorobis(indazole)- ruthenate(III)], HInd[RuInd2Cl4] and trans-imidazolium[tetrachlorobis(imidazole)- ruthenate(III)], HIm[RuIm2Cl4] exhibit high anticancer activity in an autochthonous colorectal carcinoma model in rats. Recently, it has been shown that both complexes bind specifically to human serum apotransferrin and the resulting adducts have been studied through spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques with the ultimate goal of preparing adducts with good selectivity for cancer cells due to the fact that tumour cells express high amounts of transferrin receptors on their cell surface. In order to investigate whether the cellular uptake of the complexes was mediated by apotransferrin or transferrin, we compared the antiproliferative efficacy of HInd[RuInd2Cl4] and HIm[RuIm2Cl4] with its apotransferrin- and transferrin-bound form in the human colon cancer cell line SW707 using the microculture tetrazolium test (MTT). Our results show that especially the transferrin-bound forms exhibit high antiproliferative activity, which exceeds that of the free complex, indicating that this protein can act as a carrier of the ruthenium complexes into the tumor cell. PMID:18472789

  9. Linkage disequilibrium between polymorphisms at the 5{prime} untranslated region and intron 5 (Dde I) of the antithrombin III (ATIII) gene in the Chinese

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, J.S.H.; Liu, Y.; Low, P.S.

    1994-09-01

    A length polymorphism at the 5{prime} untranslated region of exon 1 and an RFLP (Dde I) in intron 5 (nt 160) of the ATIII gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction with primers of published sequences. DNA fragments were size-fractionated by agarose gel electrophoresis (3% NuSieve and 1% Seakem GTG) and photographed over a UV transilluminator. A strong linkage disequilibrium was observed between these two polymorphisms of the ATIII gene in the Chinese ({chi}{sup 2} = 63.7; {triangle} 0.42, P < 0.001). The estimated frequencies of the three haplotypes were found to be 0.37 for SD+, 0.40 for LD+ and 0.23 for LD-.

  10. N-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen as a biomarker of anabolic response to recombinant human GH and testosterone

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Context: Biomarkers that predict musculoskeletal response to anabolic therapies should expedite drug development. During collagen synthesis in soft lean tissue, N-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (P3NP) is released into circulation. We investigated P3NP as a biomarker of lean body mass (L...

  11. SAGE III

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-01-13

    SAGE III Data and Information The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas ... on the spacecraft. SAGE III produced L1 and L2 scientific data from 5/07/2002 until 12/31/2005. The flight of the second instrument is as ... Additional Info:  Data Format: HDF-EOS or Big Endian/IEEE Binary SCAR-B Block:  ...

  12. Transcriptional activation of RNA polymerase III-dependent genes by the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 tax protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gottesfeld, J M; Johnson, D L; Nyborg, J K

    1996-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus-encoded tax protein is a potent activator of many viral and cellular genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. We find that both chromatin and cell extracts derived from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-infected human T lymphocytes support higher levels of 5S rRNA and tRNA gene transcription than chromatin or extracts from uninfected T lymphocytes. The viral protein Tax was likely responsible for this higher level of class II gene transcription, as purified Tax was found to stimulate both genes when added to the uninfected cell extract or in reconstituted systems. Both limiting-component transcription assays and DNA binding assays identified the class III gene transcription factor TFIIIB as the principle target of Tax activity. Surprisingly, we find that Tax increases the effective concentration of active TFIIIB molecules. These data suggest that Tax stimulates RNA polymerase III-dependent gene expression by accelerating the rate and/or extent of transcription initiation complex assembly. PMID:8657153

  13. Adsorption and transformation of selected human-used macrolide antibacterial agents with iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxides.

    PubMed

    Feitosa-Felizzola, Juliana; Hanna, Khalil; Chiron, Serge

    2009-04-01

    The adsorption/transformation of two members (clarithromycin and roxithromycin) of the macrolide (ML) antibacterial agents on the surface of three environmental subsurface sorbents (clay, iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxy-hydroxides) was investigated. The adsorption fitted well to the Freundlich model with a high sorption capacity. Adsorption probably occurred through a surface complexation mechanism and was accompanied by slow degradation of the selected MLs. Transformation proceeded through two parallel pathways: a major pathway was the hydrolysis of the cladinose sugar, and to a lesser extent the hydrolysis of the lactone ring. A minor pathway was the N-dealkylation of the amino sugar. This study indicates that Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxy-hydroxides in aquatic sediments may play an important role in the natural attenuation of MLs. Such an attenuation route yields a range of intermediates that might retain some of their biological activity.

  14. Interleukin 1 suppresses expression of cartilage-specific types II and IX collagens and increases types I and III collagens in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Goldring, M B; Birkhead, J; Sandell, L J; Kimura, T; Krane, S M

    1988-01-01

    In inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, functions of chondrocytes including synthesis of matrix proteins and proteinases are altered through interactions with cells of the infiltrating pannus. One of the major secreted products of mononuclear inflammatory cells is IL-1. In this study we found that recombinant human IL-1 beta suppressed synthesis of cartilage-specific type II collagen by cultured human costal chondrocytes associated with decreased steady state levels of alpha 1 (II) and alpha 1(IX) procollagen mRNAs. In contrast, IL-1 increased synthesis of types I and III collagens and levels of alpha 1(I), alpha 2(I), and alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNAs, as we described previously using human articular chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts. This stimulatory effect of IL-1 was observed only when IL-1-stimulated PGE2 synthesis was blocked by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The suppression of type II collagen mRNA levels by IL-1 alone was not due to IL-1-stimulated PGE2, since addition of indomethacin did not reverse, but actually potentiated, this inhibition. Continuous exposure of freshly isolated chondrocytes from day 2 of culture to approximately half-maximal concentrations of IL-1 (2.5 pM) completely suppressed levels of type II collagen mRNA and increased levels of types I and III collagen mRNAs, thereby reversing the ratio of alpha 1(II)/alpha 1(I) procollagen mRNAs from greater than 6.0 to less than 1.0 by day 7. IL-1, therefore, can modify, at a pretranslational level, the relative amounts of the different types of collagen synthesized in cartilage and thereby could be responsible for the inappropriate repair of cartilage matrix in inflammatory conditions. Images PMID:3264290

  15. Sensitive Electrochemical Detection of Human Methyltransferase Based on a Dual Signal Amplification Strategy Coupling Gold Nanoparticle-DNA Complexes with Ru(III) Redox Recycling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Dong, Huilei; Yang, Guoqing; Chen, Hongfei; Cai, Chenxin

    2016-11-15

    Effective detection of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity is significant for cancer research. Herein, we developed a sensitive electroanalytical method to detect human DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) from crude lysates of cancer cells. In this assay, capture DNA having a preferred DNMT1 methylation site was immobilized on a gold electrode and then hybridized with gold nanoparticle (Au NP)-DNA complexes. The modified electrodes were equilibrated with the lysate and then incubated with methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme. If the lysate was negative for DNMT1 activity, the Au NP-DNA complexes would be cut by the restriction enzyme and released from the electrode. Conversely, restriction enzyme cleavage would be blocked by the fully methylated duplexes, and the Au NP-DNA complexes would remain on the electrode. Electroactive Ru(NH3)6(3+) was used as the signal reporter, because of its electrostatic attraction to DNA, resulting in an electrochemical signal. Since the electrochemical signal reflects the amount of Ru(III) redox and the amount of Ru(III) redox is correlated with the activity of DNMT1, the activity of DNMT1 is proportional to the electrochemical signal. The signal could be amplified by the numerous DNAs on the Au NPs and further amplified by Ru(III) redox recycling. With this method, a detection limit down to 0.3 U/mL for pure DNMT1 and 8 MCF-7 cells was achieved. DNMT1 activities of different cell lines were also successfully evaluated.

  16. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of CofB, the minor pilin subunit of CFA/III from human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Kazuki; Oki, Hiroya; Fukakusa, Shunsuke; Maruno, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yuji; Motooka, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Tooru; Honda, Takeshi; Iida, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Shota; Ohkubo, Tadayasu

    2015-06-01

    Colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III) is one of the virulence factors of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) that forms the long, thin, proteinaceous fibres of type IV pili through assembly of its major and minor subunits CofA and CofB, respectively. The crystal structure of CofA has recently been reported; however, the lack of structural information for CofB, the largest among the known type IV pilin subunits, hampers a comprehensive understanding of CFA/III pili. In this study, constructs of wild-type CofB with an N-terminal truncation and the corresponding SeMet derivative were cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belonged to the rhombohedral space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.97, c = 364.57 Å for the wild-type construct and a = b = 103.47, c = 362.08 Å for the SeMet-derivatized form. Although the diffraction quality of these crystals was initially very poor, dehydration of the crystals substantially improved the resolution limit from ∼ 4.0 to ∼ 2.0 Å. The initial phase was solved by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) method using a dehydrated SeMet CofB crystal, which resulted in an interpretable electron-density map.

  17. Characterization of the third generation enzyme immunoassay IEA-HIV1/2-III for the detection of anti-HIV specific antibodies in human sera.

    PubMed

    Rayevskaya, G; Pilipenko, V G; Tkáciková, L; Spivak, N Y; Mikula, I; Chumak, R M

    2000-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of the developed anti-HIV1/2 third generation enzyme immunoassay, the IEA-HIV1/2-III, was examined. The test system for the detection of anti-HIV antibodies included peroxidase-conjugated HIV-specific recombinant Gag protein fragments (epitopes of p24 and p17 proteins), Env-1 (epitopes of p41 and p120 proteins), and Env-2 (p36 epitopes). Sensitivity was evaluated with 346 sera from HIV1-seropositive subjects, Anti-HIV1 Low Titer panels no. 10 and PRB-106 and seropositive panel PRB-931 in comparison with other third- and second-generation assays. The IEA-HIV1/2-III assays are characterized with high sensitivity comparable to the other third generation assays and the better sensitivity with respect to the second generation test-kit to determine HIV-specific antibodies in human sera. The specificity was determined using three hundred sixty-seven potentially cross-reactive samples (but negative for anti-HIV1/2). Only one specimen among them was reactive by IEA-HIV1/2-III.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and theoretical calculations of (1,2-diaminocyclohexane)(1,3-diaminopropane)gold(III) chloride complexes: in vitro cytotoxic evaluations against human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Al-Jaroudi, Said S; Altaf, Muhammad; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A; Kawde, Abdel-Nasser; Altuwaijri, Saleh; Ahmad, Saeed; Isab, Anvarhusein A

    2015-10-01

    The gold(III) complexes of the type (1,2-diaminocyclohexane)(1,3-diaminopropane)gold(III) chloride, [(DACH)Au(pn)]Cl3, [where DACH = cis-, trans-1,2- and S,S-1,2-diaminocyclohexane and pn = 1,3-diaminopropane] have been synthesized and characterized using various spectroscopic and analytical techniques including elemental analysis, UV-Vis and FTIR spectroscopy; solution as well as solid-state NMR measurements. The solid-state (13)C NMR shows that 1,2-diaminocyclohexane (1,2-DACH) and 1,3-diaminopropane (pn) are strongly bound to the gold(III) center via N donor atoms. The stability of the mixed diamine ligand gold(III) was checked by UV-Vis spectroscopy and NMR measurements. The molecular structure of compound 1 (containing cis-1,2-DACH) was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The structure of 1 consists of [(cis-DACH)Au(pn)](3+) complex ion and chloride counter ions. Each gold atom in the complex ion adopts a distorted square-planar geometry. The structural details and relative stabilities of the four possible isomers of the complexes were also estimated at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level of theoretical calculations. The computational study demonstrates that trans- conformations are slightly more stable than the cis- conformations. The antiproliferative effects and cytotoxic properties of the mixed ligand gold(III) complexes were evaluated in vitro on human gastric SGC7901 and prostate PC3 cancer cells using MTT assay. The antiproliferative study of the gold(III) complexes on PC3 and SGC7901 cells indicate that complex 3 (containing 1S,2S-(+)-1,2-(DACH)) is the most effective antiproliferative agent. The IC50 data reveal that the in vitro cytotoxicity of complex 3 against SGC7901 cancer cells manifested similar and very pronounced cytotoxic effects with respect to cisplatin. Moreover, the electrochemical behavior, and the interaction of complex 3 with two well-known model proteins, namely, hen egg white lysozyme and bovine serum albumin is also reported.

  19. Differential Induction of Type I and Type III Interferons by Swine and Human Origin H1N1 Influenza A Viruses in Porcine Airway Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Venkatramana D; Roach, Erin; Zaidman, Nathan A; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Rotschafer, Jessica H; O'Grady, Scott M; Cheeran, Maxim C-J

    2015-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) have been shown to inhibit influenza A virus (IAV) replication and play an essential role in controlling viral infection. Here we studied the kinetics and magnitude of induction of type I and type III IFN transcripts by primary porcine airway epithelial cells (pAECs) in response to swine and human origin IAV. We observed that swine influenza viruses (SIV) replicate more efficiently than the human pandemic influenza A/California/2009 (pH1N1 CA/09) in pAECs. Interestingly, we also found significant difference in kinetics of IFN-β, IFN-λ1 and IFN-λ3 gene expression by these viruses. While there was delay of up to 12 hours post infection (h p.i.) in induction of IFN genes in pAECs infected with swine IAV A/Sw/Illinois/2008 (H1N1 IL/08), human pH1N1 CA/09 rapidly induced IFN-β, IFN-λ1 and IFN-λ3 gene expression as early as 4 h p.i. However, the magnitude of IFN-β and IFN-λ3 induction at 24 h p.i. was not significantly different between the viral strains tested. Additionally, we found that swine H1N1 IL/08 was less sensitive to dsRNA induced antiviral response compared to human pH1N1 CA/09. Our data suggest that the human and swine IAVs differ in their ability to induce and respond to type I and type III interferons in swine cells. Swine origin IAV may have adapted to the pig host by subverting innate antiviral responses to viral infection.

  20. Human CHMP6, a myristoylated ESCRT-III protein, interacts directly with an ESCRT-II component EAP20 and regulates endosomal cargo sorting

    PubMed Central

    Yorikawa, Chiharu; Shibata, Hideki; Waguri, Satoshi; Hatta, Kazumi; Horii, Mio; Katoh, Keiichi; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Maki, Masatoshi

    2004-01-01

    CHMP6 (charged multivesicular body protein 6) is a human orthologue of yeast Vps (vacuolar protein sorting) 20, a component of ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport)-III. Various CHMP6 orthologues in organisms ranging from yeast to humans contain the N-myristoylation consensus sequence at each N-terminus. Metabolic labelling of HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney) cells showed the incorporation of [3H]myristate into CHMP6 fused C-terminally to GFP (green fluorescent protein) (CHMP6–GFP). Interactions of CHMP6 with another ESCRT-III component CHMP4b/Shax [Snf7 (sucrose non-fermenting 7) homologue associated with Alix] 1, one of three paralogues of human Vps32/Snf7, and with EAP20 (ELL-associated protein 20), a human counterpart of yeast Vps25 and component of ESCRT-II, were observed by co-immunoprecipitation of epitope-tagged proteins expressed in HEK-293 cells. The in vitro pull-down assays using their recombinant proteins purified from Escherichia coli demonstrated direct physical interactions which were mediated by the N-terminal basic half of CHMP6. Overexpressed CHMP6-GFP in HeLa cells exhibited a punctate distribution throughout the cytoplasm especially in the perinuclear area, as revealed by fluorescence microscopic analysis. Accumulation of LBPA (lysobisphosphatidic acid), a major phospholipid in internal vesicles of an MVB (multivesicular body), was observed in the CHMP6–GFP-localizing area. FLAG-tagged EAP20 distributed diffusely, but exhibited a punctate distribution on co-expression with CHMP6–GFP. Overexpression of CHMP6–GFP caused reduction of transferrin receptors on the plasma membrane surface, but caused their accumulation in the cytoplasm. Ubiquitinated proteins and endocytosed EGF continuously accumulated in CHMP6–GFP-expressing cells. These results suggest that CHMP6 acts as an acceptor for ESCRT-II on endosomal membranes and regulates cargo sorting. PMID:15511219

  1. BIOPLUME III

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BIOPLUME III is a two-dimensional finite difference model for simulating the natural attenuation of organic contaminants in groundwater due to the processes of advection, dispersion, sorption, and biodegradation.

  2. Inhibition of HER3 activation and tumor growth with a human antibody binding to a conserved epitope formed by domain III and IV.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Lisa C; Rau, Alexander; Seifert, Oliver; Honer, Jonas; Hutt, Meike; Schmid, Simone; Zantow, Jonas; Hust, Michael; Dübel, Stefan; Olayioye, Monilola A; Kontermann, Roland E

    2017-07-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3, also known as ErbB3) has emerged as relevant target for antibody-mediated tumor therapy. Here, we describe a novel human antibody, IgG 3-43, recognizing a unique epitope formed by domain III and parts of domain IV of the extracellular region of HER3, conserved between HER3 and mouse ErbB3. An affinity of 11 nM was determined for the monovalent interaction. In the IgG format, the antibody bound recombinant bivalent HER3 with subnanomolar affinity (KD = 220 pM) and HER3-expressing tumor cells with EC50 values in the low picomolar range (27 - 83 pM). The antibody competed with binding of heregulin to HER3-expressing cells, efficiently inhibited phosphorylation of HER3 as well as downstream signaling, and induced receptor internalization and degradation. Furthermore, IgG 3-43 inhibited heregulin-dependent proliferation of several HER3-positive cancer cell lines and heregulin-independent colony formation of HER2-overexpressing tumor cell lines. Importantly, inhibition of tumor growth and prolonged survival was demonstrated in a FaDu xenograft tumor model in SCID mice. These findings demonstrate that by binding to the membrane-proximal domains III and IV involved in ligand binding and receptor dimerization, IgG 3-43 efficiently inhibits activation of HER3, thereby blocking tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Class III alcohol dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: structural and enzymatic features differ toward the human/mammalian forms in a manner consistent with functional needs in formaldehyde detoxication.

    PubMed

    Fernández, M R; Biosca, J A; Norin, A; Jörnvall, H; Parés, X

    1995-08-14

    Alcohol dehydrogenase class III (glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was purified and analyzed structurally and enzymatically. The corresponding gene was also analyzed after cloning from a yeast genome library by screening with a probe prepared through PCR amplification. As with class III alcohol dehydrogenase from other sources, the yeast protein was obtained in two active forms, deduced to reflect different adducts/modifications. Protein analysis established N-terminal and C-terminal positions, showing different and specific patterns in protein start positions between the human/mammalian, yeast, and prokaryotic forms. Km values with formaldehyde differ consistently, being about 10-fold higher in the yeast than the human/mammalian enzymes, but compensated for by similar changes in kcat values. This is compatible with the different functional needs, emphasizing low formaldehyde concentration in the animal cells but efficient formaldehyde elimination in the microorganisms. This supports a general role of the enzyme in formaldehyde detoxication rather than in long-chain alcohol turnover.

  4. Group III/IV muscle afferents limit the intramuscular metabolic perturbation during whole body exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mangum, Tyler S.; Sidhu, Simranjit K.; Weavil, Joshua C.; Hureau, Thomas J.; Jessop, Jacob E.; Bledsoe, Amber D.; Richardson, Russell S.; Amann, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Key points The purpose of this study was to determine the role of group III/IV muscle afferents in limiting the endurance exercise‐induced metabolic perturbation assayed in muscle biopsy samples taken from locomotor muscle.Lumbar intrathecal fentanyl was used to attenuate the central projection of μ‐opioid receptor‐sensitive locomotor muscle afferents during a 5 km cycling time trial.The findings suggest that the central projection of group III/IV muscle afferent feedback constrains voluntary neural ‘drive’ to working locomotor muscle and limits the exercise‐induced intramuscular metabolic perturbation.Therefore, the CNS might regulate the degree of metabolic perturbation within locomotor muscle and thereby limit peripheral fatigue. It appears that the group III/IV muscle afferents are an important neural link in this regulatory mechanism, which probably serves to protect locomotor muscle from the potentially severe functional impairment as a consequence of severe intramuscular metabolic disturbance. Abstract To investigate the role of metabo‐ and mechanosensitive group III/IV muscle afferents in limiting the intramuscular metabolic perturbation during whole body endurance exercise, eight subjects performed 5 km cycling time trials under control conditions (CTRL) and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl impairing lower limb muscle afferent feedback (FENT). Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained before and immediately after exercise. Motoneuronal output was estimated through vastus lateralis surface electromyography (EMG). Exercise‐induced changes in intramuscular metabolites were determined using liquid and gas chromatography‐mass spectrometry. Quadriceps fatigue was quantified by pre‐ to post‐exercise changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch torque (ΔQTsingle) evoked by electrical femoral nerve stimulation. Although motoneuronal output was 21 ± 12% higher during FENT compared to CTRL (P < 0.05), time to complete the time trial

  5. Analysis of the N-glycans of recombinant human Factor IX purified from transgenic pig milk

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Geun-Cheol; Velander, William H; Van Cott, Kevin E

    2008-01-01

    Glycosylation of recombinant proteins is of particular importance because it can play significant roles in the clinical properties of the glycoprotein. In this work, the N-glycan structures of recombinant human Factor IX (tg-FIX) produced in the transgenic pig mammary gland were determined. The majority of the N-glycans of transgenic pig-derived Factor IX (tg-FIX) are complex, bi-antennary with one or two terminal N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) moieties. We also found that the N-glycan structures of tg-FIX produced in the porcine mammary epithelial cells differed with respect to N-glycans from glycoproteins produced in other porcine tissues. tg-FIX contains no detectable Neu5Gc, the sialic acid commonly found in porcine glycoproteins produced in other tissues. Additionally, we were unable to detect glycans in tg-FIX that have a terminal Galα(1,3)Gal disaccharide sequence, which is strongly antigenic in humans. The N-glycan structures of tg-FIX are also compared to the published N-glycan structures of recombinant human glycoproteins produced in other transgenic animal species. While tg-FIX contains only complex structures, antithrombin III (goat), C1 inhibitor (rabbit), and lactoferrin (cow) have both high mannose and complex structures. Collectively, these data represent a beginning point for the future investigation of species-specific and tissue/cell-specific differences in N-glycan structures among animals used for transgenic animal bioreactors. PMID:18456721

  6. Analysis of the N-glycans of recombinant human Factor IX purified from transgenic pig milk.

    PubMed

    Gil, Geun-Cheol; Velander, William H; Van Cott, Kevin E

    2008-07-01

    Glycosylation of recombinant proteins is of particular importance because it can play significant roles in the clinical properties of the glycoprotein. In this work, the N-glycan structures of recombinant human Factor IX (tg-FIX) produced in the transgenic pig mammary gland were determined. The majority of the N-glycans of transgenic pig-derived Factor IX (tg-FIX) are complex, bi-antennary with one or two terminal N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) moieties. We also found that the N-glycan structures of tg-FIX produced in the porcine mammary epithelial cells differed with respect to N-glycans from glycoproteins produced in other porcine tissues. tg-FIX contains no detectable Neu5Gc, the sialic acid commonly found in porcine glycoproteins produced in other tissues. Additionally, we were unable to detect glycans in tg-FIX that have a terminal Galalpha(1,3)Gal disaccharide sequence, which is strongly antigenic in humans. The N-glycan structures of tg-FIX are also compared to the published N-glycan structures of recombinant human glycoproteins produced in other transgenic animal species. While tg-FIX contains only complex structures, antithrombin III (goat), C1 inhibitor (rabbit), and lactoferrin (cow) have both high mannose and complex structures. Collectively, these data represent a beginning point for the future investigation of species-specific and tissue/cell-specific differences in N-glycan structures among animals used for transgenic animal bioreactors.

  7. Rat heparan sulphates. A study of the antithrombin-binding properties of heparan sulphate chains from rat adipose tissue, brain, carcase, heart, intestine, kidneys, liver, lungs, skin and spleen.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, A A

    1990-01-01

    Adult male rats were given [35S]sulphate intraperitoneally. Heparan [35S]sulphate (HS) chains were recovered from adipose tissue, brain, carcase, heart, intestine, kidneys, liver, lungs, skin and spleen by digestion with Pronase, precipitation with cetylpyridinium chloride, digestion with chondroitin ABC lyase and DNAase and gradient elution from DEAE-Sephacel. Purity was confirmed by agarose-gel electrophoresis and degradation with HNO2. Fractionation by gradient elution from antithrombin-agarose indicated that the proportion of HS with high binding affinity for antithrombin (HA-HS) ranged from 4.7% (kidneys) to 21.5% (brain). On a mass basis the major sources of HA-HS were carcase, skin and intestine. HA-HS from intestine was arbitrarily divided into subfractions I-VI, with anticoagulant activities ranging from 1 to 60 units/mg [by amidolytic anti-(Factor IIa) assay] and from 4 to 98 units/mg [by amidolytic anti-(Factor Xa) assay], indicating that the antithrombin-binding-site densities of HA-HS chains covered a wide range, as shown previously for rat HA-heparin chains [Horner, Kusche, Lindahl & Peterson (1988) Biochem. J. 251, 141-145]. HA-HS subfractions II, IV and VI were mixed with samples of HA-[3H]heparin chains and rechromatographed on antithrombin-agarose. Affinity for matrix-bound antithrombin did not correlate with anticoagulant activity, e.g. HA-HS subfraction IV [38 anti-(Factor Xa) units/mg] was co-eluted with HA-heparin chains [127 anti-(Factor Xa) units/mg]. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2138457

  8. Deficiencies of Proteins C, S and Antithrombin and Activated Protein C Resistance–Their Involvement in the Occurrence of Arterial Thromboses

    PubMed Central

    Popa, C

    2010-01-01

    Deficiencies of natural anticoagulants protein C, protein S, antithrombin and activated protein C resistance are components of inherited thrombophilia. Inherited thrombophilia was defined as a genetically determined tendency towards venous thromboembolism which characteristically occurs in young age (before 40 to 45 years) without apparent causes and tend to recur. In the recent years, there has been a lot of debate about the implication of these defects in arterial thromboses (peripheral artery disease, myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction). The screening for thrombophilia is recommended for young patients with spontaneous thromboses, arterial infarctions, family history of thromboses, personal history of recurrent abortions, with thrombosis of venous dural sinuses or strokes or myocardial infarctions, in patients with venous thrombosis at unusual sites, because the diagnosis of such a disease leads to a treatment that is lifesaving [1,2]. PMID:21254740

  9. [The effect of treatment of chrysotile with chloride iron (III) on the effect of genomic instability in cultured human lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Ingel, F I; Pylev, L N; Yurtseva, N A; Krivtsova, E K; Snirnova, O V; Golubeva, N M

    2014-01-01

    All forms of asbestos are carcinogenic to humans, that caused the prohibition of its use in Europe, America, etc. However, the unique physical and chemical properties of asbestos and many opportunities for its applications in various industries and human activities require the creation of new technologies to. Analysis of genomic instability in human lymphocytes in a large range of doses (micronucleus test with cytochalasin B showed a decline of core indicators of genome instability (frequency of dividing cells with cytogenetic damage, asymmetry in the distribution of the genetic material in mitosis, proliferative activity) incubation of cells with asbestos modified chloride iron, as compared to the initial sample. These data are consistent with the results of analysis of the intensity of neutrophil chemiluminescence of luminol by exposure of human blood samples studied. Based on the findings made some practical recommendations to the protocol cytogenetic analysis of genomic instability of people exposed to asbestos.

  10. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) As of FY 2015 President’s Budget...00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Responsible Office References Program Name Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) DoD Component Air Force

  11. Near infrared spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis for monitoring the ethanol precipitation process of fraction I + II + III supernatant in human albumin separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Can; Wang, Fei; Zang, Lixuan; Zang, Hengchang; Alcalà, Manel; Nie, Lei; Wang, Mingyu; Li, Lian

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, as a powerful process analytical tool, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been widely applied in process monitoring. In present work, NIRS combined with multivariate analysis was used to monitor the ethanol precipitation process of fraction I + II + III (FI + II + III) supernatant in human albumin (HA) separation to achieve qualitative and quantitative monitoring at the same time and assure the product's quality. First, a qualitative model was established by using principal component analysis (PCA) with 6 of 8 normal batches samples, and evaluated by the remaining 2 normal batches and 3 abnormal batches. The results showed that the first principal component (PC1) score chart could be successfully used for fault detection and diagnosis. Then, two quantitative models were built with 6 of 8 normal batches to determine the content of the total protein (TP) and HA separately by using partial least squares regression (PLS-R) strategy, and the models were validated by 2 remaining normal batches. The determination coefficient of validation (Rp2), root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV), root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and ratio of performance deviation (RPD) were 0.975, 0.501 g/L, 0.465 g/L and 5.57 for TP, and 0.969, 0.530 g/L, 0.341 g/L and 5.47 for HA, respectively. The results showed that the established models could give a rapid and accurate measurement of the content of TP and HA. The results of this study indicated that NIRS is an effective tool and could be successfully used for qualitative and quantitative monitoring the ethanol precipitation process of FI + II + III supernatant simultaneously. This research has significant reference value for assuring the quality and improving the recovery ratio of HA in industrialization scale by using NIRS.

  12. Near infrared spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis for monitoring the ethanol precipitation process of fraction I+II+III supernatant in human albumin separation.

    PubMed

    Li, Can; Wang, Fei; Zang, Lixuan; Zang, Hengchang; Alcalà, Manel; Nie, Lei; Wang, Mingyu; Li, Lian

    2017-03-15

    Nowadays, as a powerful process analytical tool, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been widely applied in process monitoring. In present work, NIRS combined with multivariate analysis was used to monitor the ethanol precipitation process of fraction I+II+III (FI+II+III) supernatant in human albumin (HA) separation to achieve qualitative and quantitative monitoring at the same time and assure the product's quality. First, a qualitative model was established by using principal component analysis (PCA) with 6 of 8 normal batches samples, and evaluated by the remaining 2 normal batches and 3 abnormal batches. The results showed that the first principal component (PC1) score chart could be successfully used for fault detection and diagnosis. Then, two quantitative models were built with 6 of 8 normal batches to determine the content of the total protein (TP) and HA separately by using partial least squares regression (PLS-R) strategy, and the models were validated by 2 remaining normal batches. The determination coefficient of validation (Rp(2)), root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV), root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and ratio of performance deviation (RPD) were 0.975, 0.501g/L, 0.465g/L and 5.57 for TP, and 0.969, 0.530g/L, 0.341g/L and 5.47 for HA, respectively. The results showed that the established models could give a rapid and accurate measurement of the content of TP and HA. The results of this study indicated that NIRS is an effective tool and could be successfully used for qualitative and quantitative monitoring the ethanol precipitation process of FI+II+III supernatant simultaneously. This research has significant reference value for assuring the quality and improving the recovery ratio of HA in industrialization scale by using NIRS.

  13. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  14. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  15. Disposable terbium (III) salicylate complex imprinted membrane using solid phase surface fluorescence method for fast separation and detection of salicylic acid in pharmaceuticals and human urine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianxiang; Hu, Yufei; Hu, Yuling; Li, Gongke

    2013-03-30

    In this work, a simple, low cost, selective and sensitive complex imprinted membrane (CIM) for solid-phase fluorescent detection was developed with terbium (III) salicylate as complex template. Terbium-sensitized luminescence was employed for monitoring salicylic acid (SA) based on the fluorescence enhancement effect of benzoic acid derivatives on lanthanide ion Tb (III). The resulting CIM showed good fluorescent response and high selectivity towards SA with Tb as pivot in protic solvents, while demonstrating better analytical performance than the controlled membranes. The optimized adsorption time was 10 min, indicating rapid kinetics of the imprinted membrane. The linear response of CIM to SA was from 0.20 to 10mg/L with limit of detection (LOD) of 0.040 mg/L. The prepared CIM was successfully applied to the analysis of salicylic acid in pharmaceuticals and spiked human urine with recoveries of 80.6%-88.1%. The analytical results of the proposed method were in good agreement with those obtained by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method, indicating that the developed membrane has acceptable practicability for fast determination of SA in real samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mathematical model of uptake and metabolism of arsenic(III) in human hepatocytes - Incorporation of cellular antioxidant response and threshold-dependent behavior

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Arsenic is an environmental pollutant, potent human toxicant, and oxidative stress agent with a multiplicity of health effects associated with both acute and chronic exposures. A semi-mechanistic cellular-level toxicokinetic (TK) model was developed in order to describe the uptake, biotransformation and clearance of arsenical species in human hepatocytes. Notable features of this model are the incorporation of arsenic-glutathione complex formation and a "switch-like" formulation to describe the antioxidant response of hepatocytes to arsenic exposure. Results The cellular-level TK model applies mass action kinetics in order to predict the concentrations of trivalent and pentavalent arsenicals in hepatocytes. The model simulates uptake of arsenite (iAsIII) via aquaporin isozymes 9 (AQP9s), glutathione (GSH) conjugation, methylation by arsenic methyltransferase (AS3MT), efflux through multidrug resistant proteins (MRPs) and the induced antioxidant response via thioredoxin reductase (TR) activity. The model was parameterized by optimization of model estimates for arsenite (iAsIII), monomethylated (MMA) and dimethylated (DMA) arsenicals concentrations with time-course experimental data in human hepatocytes for a time span of 48 hours, and dose-response data at 24 hours for a range of arsenite concentrations from 0.1 to 10 μM. Global sensitivity analysis of the model showed that at low doses the transport parameters had a dominant role, whereas at higher doses the biotransformation parameters were the most significant. A parametric comparison of the TK model with an analogous model developed for rat hepatocytes from the literature demonstrated that the biotransformation of arsenite (e.g. GSH conjugation) has a large role in explaining the variation in methylation between rats and humans. Conclusions The cellular-level TK model captures the temporal modes of arsenical accumulation in human hepatocytes. It highlighted the key biological processes that influence

  17. Effects of chromium(III) picolinate on cortisol and DHEAs secretion in H295R human adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beob G; Adams, Julye M; Jackson, Brian A; Lindemann, Merlin D

    2010-02-01

    Dietary chromium(III) picolinate (CrPic) effects on circulating steroid hormones have been reported in various experimental animals. However, direct effects of CrPic on adrenocortical steroidogenesis are uncertain. Therefore, the objective was to determine the effects of CrPic on cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAs) secretion from H295R cells. In experiment 1, a 24-h exposure to CrPic (0 to 200 microM) had both linear (p < 0.001) and quadratic (p < 0.001) effects on cortisol secretion from forskolin-stimulated cells with the highest cortisol secretion at 0.1 microM of CrPic and the lowest at 200 microM of CrPic. In experiment 2, a 48-h exposure to CrPic (200 microM) decreased cortisol (p < 0.07) release from forskolin-stimulated cells during a 24-h collection period. In experiment 3, a 48-h exposure to CrPic (100 microM) decreased cortisol (p < 0.05) and DHEAs (p < 0.01) from forskolin-stimulated cells during a 24-h sampling period. In experiment 4, a 24-h exposure to forskolin followed by a 24-h exposure to both forskolin and CrPic (100 and 200 microM) decreased both cortisol and DHEAs secretion (p < 0.01). This study suggests that at high concentrations, CrPic inhibits aspects of steroidogenesis in agonist-stimulated adrenocortical cells.

  18. Tuning intracellular homeostasis of human uroporphyrinogen III synthase by enzyme engineering at a single hotspot of congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

    PubMed

    ben Bdira, Fredj; González, Esperanza; Pluta, Paula; Laín, Ana; Sanz-Parra, Arantza; Falcon-Perez, Juan Manuel; Millet, Oscar

    2014-11-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) results from a deficiency in uroporphyrinogen III synthase enzyme (UROIIIS) activity that ultimately stems from deleterious mutations in the uroS gene. C73 is a hotspot for these mutations and a C73R substitution, which drastically reduces the enzyme activity and stability, is found in almost one-third of all reported CEP cases. Here, we have studied the structural basis, by which mutations in this hotspot lead to UROIIIS destabilization. First, a strong interdependency is observed between the volume of the side chain at position 73 and the folded protein. Moreover, there is a correlation between the in vitro half-life of the mutated proteins and their expression levels in eukaryotic cell lines. Molecular modelling was used to rationalize the results, showing that the mutation site is coupled to the hinge region separating the two domains. Namely, mutations at position 73 modulate the inter-domain closure and ultimately affect protein stability. By incorporating residues capable of interacting with R73 to stabilize the hinge region, catalytic activity was fully restored and a moderate increase in the kinetic stability of the enzyme was observed. These results provide an unprecedented rationale for a destabilizing missense mutation and pave the way for the effective design of molecular chaperones as a therapy against CEP.

  19. Human development III: bridging brain-mind and body-mind. introduction to "deep" (fractal, poly-ray) cosmology.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Hermansen, Tyge Dahl; Rald, Erik; Flensborg-Madsen, Trine; Nielsen, Maj Lyck; Clausen, Birgitte; Merrick, Joav

    2006-07-06

    Reality can be interpreted in many ways, but two distinctly different ways are the mental and the emotional interpretation. The traditional way of thinking in science today is the first: an often simple and mechanical interpretation of reality that empowers us to handle the outer physical world with great, often brutal efficiency. The development of a mind that enables us to handle the outer physical world and survive makes a lot of sense from an evolutionary perspective; the problem is that the mental reason and linear logic reduces all phenomena to well-defined interacting objects, which might not exist from a deeper perspective of reality. A more intuitive way to interpret the world makes much more sense, when it comes to our human relations. So to function as a human being, we need both these two ways of seeing the world, and two different modi operandi. In many patients, we find an internalized conflict between logical and mental reasoning on one hand, and emotional and sexual approach to reality and human needs on the other. We speculate that this conflict causes the deep emotional problems that really are the basis of most human diseases. Only by merging brain-mind and body-mind will we be whole and free and truly ourselves. We need to develop our mental understanding, deepen our cosmology, and develop our sexuality and body-mind in order to make them meet and merge. To facilitate this existential healing, we propose a third integrative way of looking at our human nature, which we call "the energetic-informational interpretation of reality". What it does is allows us to look at both brain-mind and body-mind as a highly structured field of "energy and information". Energy and information are actually the same from a scientific point of view; when the world is seen through the body-mind, it looks more like energy; when seen though the brain-mind, it looks more like information.

  20. Fast and sensitive chemiluminescence assay of aminophylline in human serum using luminol-diperiodatoargentate(III) system catalyzed by coated iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, B.; Ensafi, Ali A.; Zarei, L.

    2012-05-01

    The CL intensity of luminol-diperiodatoargentate(III) (DPA) system is strongly enhanced by addition of iron nanoparticles (FeNPs) covered with C12E4. On injection of aminophylline into luminol-DPA-FeNPs system, the CL intensity is significantly increased. On this basis, a sensitive CL assay was developed for determination of AmP in human serum. FeNPs could catalyze the oxidation rate of luminol in the present of oxygen. Also, the CL intensity of luminol-DPA-FeNPs system is significantly increased in the presence of aminophylline (AmP). Based on this ruling, a sensitive CL assay was developed for determination of AmP in human serum. The influences of analytical variables on the CL signal were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions in the present of FeNPs, the CL intensity is linearly increased with AmP concentration in the range of 1.0 × 10-8-2.0 × 10-6 mol L-1. The detection limit was 9.8 × 10-9 mol L-1 AmP and the relative standard deviation for ten parallel measurements of 8.0 × 10-7 mol L-1 AmP was also 4.8%. The proposed system was successfully applied to determine AmP in human serum samples.

  1. Fast and sensitive chemiluminescence assay of aminophylline in human serum using luminol-diperiodatoargentate(III) system catalyzed by coated iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, B; Ensafi, Ali A; Zarei, L

    2012-05-01

    The CL intensity of luminol-diperiodatoargentate(III) (DPA) system is strongly enhanced by addition of iron nanoparticles (FeNPs) covered with C12E4. On injection of aminophylline into luminol-DPA-FeNPs system, the CL intensity is significantly increased. On this basis, a sensitive CL assay was developed for determination of AmP in human serum. FeNPs could catalyze the oxidation rate of luminol in the present of oxygen. Also, the CL intensity of luminol-DPA-FeNPs system is significantly increased in the presence of aminophylline (AmP). Based on this ruling, a sensitive CL assay was developed for determination of AmP in human serum. The influences of analytical variables on the CL signal were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions in the present of FeNPs, the CL intensity is linearly increased with AmP concentration in the range of 1.0×10(-8)-2.0×10(-6) mol L(-1). The detection limit was 9.8×10(-9) mol L(-1) AmP and the relative standard deviation for ten parallel measurements of 8.0×10(-7)mol L(-1) AmP was also 4.8%. The proposed system was successfully applied to determine AmP in human serum samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Highly selective and sensitive determination of several antioxidants in human breast milk using high-performance liquid chromatography based on Ag(III) complex chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Shi, Hongmei; Lian, Kaoqi; Diao, Yingfei; Chen, Yang; Ma, Chunling; Kang, Weijun

    2017-03-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA) and glutathione (GSH) are the most important water-soluble antioxidants. The concentrations of GSH and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) and their molar ratio are the indicators of oxidative stress. Little is known about the contents of UA, GSH and GSSG in human milk; a reliable and sensitive method to monitor the concentrations of the four compounds simultaneously in human milk is of critical importance. A new method for separation and quantification of these water-soluble antioxidants by HPLC coupled with Ag(III) chemiluminescence detector has been developed in this work with better recoveries. The antioxidants contents were determined in different times of lactation utilizing this method. The results show that the levels of AA, UA, GSH and GSH/GSSG of human colostrum are significantly higher than those of mature milk (P<0.05). It is concluded that colostrum contains more water-soluble antioxidants than mature milk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Human gastric signet ring carcinoma (KATO-III) cell apoptosis induced by Vitex agnus-castus fruit extract through intracellular oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Kunio; Akaike, Takenori; Imai, Masahiko; Toyoda, Hiroo; Hirobe, Chieko; Bessho, Toshio

    2005-07-01

    We have previously reported that an ethanol extract of the dried ripe fruit of Vitex agnus-castus (Vitex) displays cytotoxic activity against certain kinds of human cancer cell line resulting in the induction of apoptosis. In this paper, we investigate the molecular mechanism of apoptosis induced by Vitex using a human gastric signet ring carcinoma cell line, KATO-III. DNA fragmentation was observed in Vitex-treated KATO-III cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. DNA fragmentation was accompanied by the following phenomena: elevation in the level of hemeoxygenase-1 protein and thioredoxin reductase mRNA; repression of Mn-superoxide dismutase and catalase mRNAs; release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol; activation of caspases-8, -9 and -3; decrease in the level of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Bid protein; increase in the level of Bad protein. The intracellular oxidized state, measured using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate, increased after Vitex treatment. While the amount of intracellular GSH decreased significantly after treatment with Vitex, the level of GSSG was unaffected. Furthermore, no significant perturbation in the amount of proteins/mRNAs related to glutathione metabolism could be detected. These apoptotic alterations induced by exposure to Vitex were blocked by the presence of an anti-oxidative reagent, N-acetyl-l-cysteine, or the addition of exogenous GSH. Our results demonstrate that intracellular oxidative stress and mitochondrial membrane damage is responsible for Vitex-induced apoptosis, which may be mediated by a diminution of reduced type glutathione within the cell.

  4. MAP kinase p38α regulates type III interferon (IFN-λ1) gene expression in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells in response to RNA stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Miao; Österlund, Pamela; Fagerlund, Riku; Rios, Diana N; Hoffmann, Alexander; Poranen, Minna M; Bamford, Dennis H; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2015-02-01

    Recognition of viral nucleic acids leads to type I and type III IFN gene expression and activation of host antiviral responses. At present, type III IFN genes are the least well-characterized IFN types. Here, we demonstrate that the p38 MAPK signaling pathway is involved in regulating IFN-λ1 gene expression in response to various types of RNA molecules in human moDCs. Inhibition of p38 MAPK strongly reduced IFN gene expression, and overexpression of p38α MAPK enhanced IFN-λ1 gene expression in RNA-stimulated moDCs. The regulation of IFN gene expression by p38 MAPK signaling was independent of protein synthesis and thus, a direct result of RNA stimulation. Moreover, the RIG-I/MDA5-MAVS-IRF3 pathway was required for p38α MAPK to up-regulate IFN-λ1 promoter activation, whereas the MyD88-IRF7 pathway was not needed, and the regulation was not involved directly in IRF7-dependent IFN-α1 gene expression. The stimulatory effect of p38α MAPK on IFN-λ1 mRNA expression in human moDCs did not take place directly via the activating TBK1/IKKε complex, but rather, it occurred through some other parallel pathways. Furthermore, mutations in ISRE and NF-κB binding sites in the promoter region of the IFN-λ1 gene led to a significant reduction in p38α MAPK-mediated IFN responses after RNA stimulation. Altogether, our data suggest that the p38α MAPK pathway is linked with RLR signaling pathways and regulates the expression of early IFN genes after RNA stimulation cooperatively with IRF3 and NF-κB to induce antiviral responses further.

  5. All-trans-retinoic acid and retinol binding to the FA1 site of human serum albumin competitively inhibits heme-Fe(III) association.

    PubMed

    Di Muzio, Elena; Polticelli, Fabio; di Masi, Alessandra; Fanali, Gabriella; Fasano, Mauro; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2016-01-15

    Retinoids are a class of chemicals derived from vitamin A metabolism, playing important and diverse functions. Vitamin A, also named all-trans-retinol (all-trans-ROL), is coverted into two classes of biologically active retinoids, i.e. 11-cis-retinoids and acidic retinoids. Among acidic retinoids, all-trans-retinoic acid (all-trans-RA) and 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis-RA) represent the main metabolic products. Specific and aspecific proteins solubilize, protect, and detoxify retinoids in the extracellular environment. The retinoid binding protein 4 (RBP4), the epididymal retinoid-binding protein (ERBP), and the interphotoreceptor matrix retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) play a central role in ROL transport, whereas lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase (also named β-trace) and human serum albumin (HSA) transport preferentially all-trans-RA. Here, the modulatory effect of all-trans-RA and all-trans-ROL on ferric heme (heme-Fe(III)) binding to HSA is reported. All-trans-RA and all-trans-ROL binding to the FA1 site of HSA competitively inhibit heme-Fe(III) association. Docking simulations and local structural comparison of HSA with all-trans-RA- and all-trans-ROL-binding proteins support functional data indicating the preferential binding of all-trans-RA and all-trans-ROL to the FA1 site of HSA. Present results may be relevant in vivo, in fact HSA could act as a secondary carrier of retinoids in human diseases associated with reduced levels of RBP4 and IRBP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Topographic and radiographic profile assessment of dental erosion. Part III: Effect of green and black tea on human dentition.

    PubMed

    Bassiouny, Mohamed A; Kuroda, Shuntaro; Yang, Jie

    2008-01-01

    This study compared green and black tea to soda and orange juice in terms of their erosive effect on the human dentition. Vinegar and water were used as active and passive control fluids. An accelerated in vitro test was used to monitor how short- and long-term exposure to these fluids affected the topography and morphology of the coronal segments of the human dentition. This 20-week test was conducted under controlled conditions, independent of the influencing factors of the oral environment. The erosive effects of these fluids were categorized generally into three groups: highly erosive (vinegar), moderately erosive (soda and orange juice), and minimally erosive (black and green tea). The erosive effect of tea was similar to that of water, which has no erosion potential. Given the systemic and dental benefits of tea and the low potential for erosion, green and black tea should be highly encouraged for daily beverage consumption.

  7. Human inhibitor of the first component of complement, C1: characterization of cDNA clones and localization of the gene to chromosome 11.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A E; Whitehead, A S; Harrison, R A; Dauphinais, A; Bruns, G A; Cicardi, M; Rosen, F S

    1986-01-01

    C1 inhibitor is a heavily glycosylated plasma protein that regulates the activity of the first component of complement (C1) by inactivation of the serine protease subcomponents, C1r and C1s. C1 inhibitor cDNA clones have been isolated, and one of these (pC1INH1, 950 base pairs) has been partially sequenced. Sequence analysis demonstrates that the C1 inhibitor is a member of the serpin "superfamily" of protease inhibitors. In the region sequenced, C1 inhibitor has 22% identity with antithrombin III, 26% with alpha 1-antitrypsin and alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, and 18% with human angiotensinogen. C1 inhibitor has a larger amino-terminal extension than do the other plasma protease inhibitors. In addition, inspection of residues that are invariant among the other protease inhibitors shows that C1 inhibitor differs at 14 of 41 of these positions. Thus, it appears that C1 inhibitor diverged from the group relatively early in evolution, although probably after the divergence of angiotensinogen. Southern blot analysis of BamHI-digested DNA from normal individuals and from rodent-human somatic cell hybrid cell lines (that contain a limited but varied human chromosome complement) was used to localize the human C1 inhibitor gene to chromosome 11. Images PMID:3458172

  8. Interaction between the Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase and Fusion Glycoproteins of Human Parainfluenza Virus Type III Regulates Viral Growth In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Palmer, Samantha G.; Porotto, Matteo; Palermo, Laura M.; Niewiesk, Stefan; Wilson, Ian A.; Moscona, Anne

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxoviruses, enveloped RNA viruses that include human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3), cause the majority of childhood viral pneumonia. HPIV3 infection starts when the viral receptor-binding protein engages sialic acid receptors in the lung and the viral envelope fuses with the target cell membrane. Fusion/entry requires interaction between two viral surface glycoproteins: tetrameric hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion protein (F). In this report, we define structural correlates of the HN features that permit infection in vivo. We have shown that viruses with an HN-F that promotes growth in cultured immortalized cells are impaired in differentiated human airway epithelial cell cultures (HAE) and in vivo and evolve in HAE into viable viruses with less fusogenic HN-F. In this report, we identify specific structural features of the HN dimer interface that modulate HN-F interaction and fusion triggering and directly impact infection. Crystal structures of HN, which promotes viral growth in vivo, show a diminished interface in the HN dimer compared to the reference strain’s HN, consistent with biochemical and biological data indicating decreased dimerization and decreased interaction with F protein. The crystallographic data suggest a structural explanation for the HN’s altered ability to activate F and reveal properties that are critical for infection in vivo. IMPORTANCE Human parainfluenza viruses cause the majority of childhood cases of croup, bronchiolitis, and pneumonia worldwide. Enveloped viruses must fuse their membranes with the target cell membranes in order to initiate infection. Parainfluenza fusion proceeds via a multistep reaction orchestrated by the two glycoproteins that make up its fusion machine. In vivo, viruses adapt for survival by evolving to acquire a set of fusion machinery features that provide key clues about requirements for infection in human beings. Infection of the lung by parainfluenzavirus is determined by

  9. The role of D4 receptor gene exon III polymorphisms in shaping human altruism and prosocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yushi; Chew, Soo H; Ebstein, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    Human beings are an extraordinarily altruistic species often willing to help strangers at a considerable cost (sometimes life itself) to themselves. But as Darwin noted "… he who was ready to sacrifice his life, as many a savage has been, rather than betray his comrades, would often leave no offspring to inherit his noble nature." Hence, this is the paradox of altruism. Twin studies have shown that altruism and other prosocial behavior show considerable heritability and more recently a number of candidate genes have been identified with this phenotype. Among these first provisional findings are genes encoding elements of dopaminergic transmission. In this article we will review the evidence for the involvement of one of these, the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene, in shaping human prosocial behavior and consider the methodologies employed in measuring this trait, specific molecular genetic findings and finally, evidence from several Gene × Environment (G × E) studies that imply differential susceptibility of this gene to environmental influences.

  10. Splitting of human thyroglobulin. III. Comparison of fragments obtained during enzymatic digestion and by reduction and alkylation

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, P. D.; Rose, N. R.

    1974-01-01

    Purified thyroglobulin was digested with trypsin and papain and was also reduced with dithiothreitol and alkylated with iodoacetamide. The resulting fragments were separated and characterized by immunological techniques. Following enzymatic degradation a small fragment, termed fraction 2, was isolated. It had a sedimentation coefficient of approximately 3S and a mol. wt determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in presence of SDS was approximately 37,000 daltons. In the Ouchterlony test, it was antigenically deficient as compared with intact thyroglobulin, when rabbit antisera to human thyroglobulin were used. With human autoantisera, fraction 2 did not show any precipitin reaction in the Ouchterlony test. However, it produced weak inhibition in the tanned cell haemagglutination test. The fractions obtained from trypsin and papain digestion appeared to be immunologically identical. However, when these fractions were compared with the similar product obtained from reduced and alkylated thyroglobulin, the latter fraction showed a reaction of non-identity in the Ouchterlony test, and had a weaker inhibiting capacity in tanned cell haemagglutination test. The fraction produced by reduction and alkylation had a sedimentation coefficient of 8S and an approximate mol. wt of 38,500. It can be concluded that the small mol. wt fractions derived from enzymatic breakdown and by reduction and alkylation are different although both possess a number of antigenic determinants recognized by the rabbit antiserum and lack most of the autoantigenic determinants. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 8FIG. 9 PMID:4143116

  11. Quantitative analysis of basal dendritic tree of layer III pyramidal neurons in different areas of adult human frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Zeba, Martina; Jovanov-Milosević, Natasa; Petanjek, Zdravko

    2008-01-01

    Large long projecting (cortico-cortical) layer IIIc pyramidal neurons were recently disclosed to be in the basis of cognitive processing in primates. Therefore, we quantitatively examined the basal dendritic morphology of these neurons by using rapid Golgi and Golgi Cox impregnation methods among three distinct Brodmann areas (BA) of an adult human frontal cortex: the primary motor BA4 and the associative magnopyramidal BA9 from left hemisphere and the Broca's speech BA45 from both hemispheres. There was no statistically significant difference in basal dendritic length or complexity, as dendritic spine number or their density between analyzed BA's. In addition, we analyzed each of these BA's immunocytochemically for distribution of SMI-32, a marker of largest long distance projecting neurons. Within layer IIIc, the highest density of SMI-32 immunopositive pyramidal neurons was observed in associative BA9, while in primary BA4 they were sparse. Taken together, these data suggest that an increase in the complexity of cortico-cortical network within human frontal areas of different functional order may be principally based on the increase in density of large, SMI-32 immunopositive layer IIIc neurons, rather than by further increase in complexity of their dendritic tree and synaptic network.

  12. The role of D4 receptor gene exon III polymorphisms in shaping human altruism and prosocial behavior

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yushi; Chew, Soo H.; Ebstein, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Human beings are an extraordinarily altruistic species often willing to help strangers at a considerable cost (sometimes life itself) to themselves. But as Darwin noted “… he who was ready to sacrifice his life, as many a savage has been, rather than betray his comrades, would often leave no offspring to inherit his noble nature.” Hence, this is the paradox of altruism. Twin studies have shown that altruism and other prosocial behavior show considerable heritability and more recently a number of candidate genes have been identified with this phenotype. Among these first provisional findings are genes encoding elements of dopaminergic transmission. In this article we will review the evidence for the involvement of one of these, the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene, in shaping human prosocial behavior and consider the methodologies employed in measuring this trait, specific molecular genetic findings and finally, evidence from several Gene × Environment (G × E) studies that imply differential susceptibility of this gene to environmental influences. PMID:23717276

  13. [Determining the distribution of Mutans Streptococci in human dental plaque by monoclonal antibody against SA I/II and SPAa of Mutans Streptococci].

    PubMed

    Wen, L; Zhang, C; Yue, S

    2000-12-01

    To explore the possibility of detecting the distribution of Mutans Streptococci in human dental plaque by Monoclonal antibody (WC2E10c, WC3A6d) against SA I/II and SPAa of Mutans Streptococci, which was prepared in our lab. 60 subjects were divided into the experimental group and the control group. The distributions of Mutans Streptococci (serotype c and d) in dental plaques were detected in 60 subjects by the clonal blot technique. Positive colonies were examined by bacterial morphology, serology, biochemistry and SDS-PAGE. Bacterial colony was significantly different between the experimental group and the control group with eye observation. Colonies of the experimental group were deep brown and easily differentiated, but colonies of control group were white. Brown colonies were proved to be Mutans Streptococci (serotype c and d) by using assay of bacterial morphology, serology, biochemistry and SDS-PAGE, but white colonies were not. McAbs (WC2E10c, WC3A6d) were shown high specificity in Mutans Streptococci (Serotype c and d) of human dental plaques.

  14. Transcriptional activation of the human brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene promoter III by dopamine signaling in NT2/N neurons.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hung; Chartier, Joanne; Sodja, Caroline; Desbois, Angele; Ribecco-Lutkiewicz, Maria; Walker, P Roy; Sikorska, Marianna

    2003-07-18

    We have identified a functional cAMP-response element (CRE) in the human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene promoter III and established that it participated in the modulation of BDNF expression in NT2/N neurons via downstream signaling from the D1 class of dopamine (DA) receptors. The up-regulation of BDNF expression, in turn, produced neuroprotective signals through receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) and promoted cell survival under the conditions of oxygen and glucose deprivation. To our knowledge this is the first evidence showing the presence of a functional CRE in the human BDNF gene and the role of DA signaling in establishing transcriptional competence of CRE in post-mitotic NT2/N neurons. This ability of DA to regulate the expression of the BDNF survival factor has a profound significance for the nigrostriatal pathway, because it indicates the existence of a feedback loop between the neutrophin, which promotes both the maturation and survival of dopaminergic neurons, and the neurotransmitter, which the mature neurons ultimately produce and release.

  15. Type III Methyltransferase M.NgoAX from Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 Regulates Biofilm Formation and Interactions with Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatek, Agnieszka; Mrozek, Agnieszka; Bacal, Pawel; Piekarowicz, Andrzej; Adamczyk-Popławska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the etiological factor of the sexually transmitted gonorrhea disease that may lead, under specific conditions, to systemic infections. The gonococcal genome encodes many restriction modification (RM) systems, which main biological role is to defend the pathogen from potentially harmful foreign DNA. However, RM systems seem also to be involved in several other functions. In this study, we examined the effect of inactivation the N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 ngoAXmod gene encoding M.NgoAX methyltransferase on the global gene expression, biofilm formation, interactions with human epithelial host cells and overall bacterial growth. Expression microarrays showed at least a twofold deregulation of a total of 121 genes in the NgoAX knock-out mutant compared to the wild-type (wt) strain under standard grow conditions. Genes with changed expression levels encoded mostly proteins involved in cell metabolism, DNA replication and repair or regulating cellular processes and signaling (such as cell wall/envelop biogenesis). As determined by the assay with crystal violet, the NgoAX knock-out strain formed a slightly larger biofilm biomass per cell than the wt strain. Live biofilm observations showed that the biofilm formed by the gonococcal ngoAXmod gene mutant is more relaxed, dispersed and thicker than the one formed by the wt strain. This more relaxed feature of the biofilm, in respect to adhesion and bacterial interactions, can be involved in pathogenesis. Moreover, the overall adhesion of mutant bacterial cells to human cells was lower than adhesion of the wt gonococci [adhesion index = 0.672 (±0.2) and 2.15 (±1.53), respectively]; yet, a higher number of mutant than wt bacteria were found inside the Hec-1-B epithelial cells [invasion index = 3.38 (±0.93) × 105 for mutant and 4.67 (±3.09) × 104 for the wt strain]. These results indicate that NgoAX knock-out cells have lower ability to attach to human cells, but more easily penetrate inside the host

  16. On the contribution of group III and IV muscle afferents to the circulatory response to rhythmic exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Markus; Runnels, Sean; Morgan, David E; Trinity, Joel D; Fjeldstad, Anette S; Wray, D Walter; Reese, Van R; Richardson, Russell S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the role of skeletal muscle afferent feedback in circulatory control during rhythmic exercise in humans. Nine healthy males performed single leg knee-extensor exercise (15/30/45 watts, 3 min each) under both control conditions (Ctrl) and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl impairing μ-opioid receptor-sensitive muscle afferents. Cardiac output and femoral blood flow were determined, and femoral arterial/venous blood samples were collected during the final minute of each workload. To rule out cephalad migration of fentanyl to the brainstem, we documented unchanged resting ventilatory responses to different levels of hypercapnia. There were no haemodynamic differences between conditions at rest. However, during exercise cardiac output was ∼20% lower with fentanyl blockade compared to control (P < 0.05), secondary to a 6% and 13% reduction in heart rate and stroke volume, respectively. Throughout exercise mean arterial pressure (MAP) was reduced by 7% (P < 0.01) which is likely to have contributed to the 15% fall in femoral blood flow. However, MAP was not completely responsible for this peripheral haemodynamic change as vascular conductance was also attenuated (∼9%). Evidence of increasing noradrenaline spillover (P = 0.09) implicated an elevation in sympathetic outflow in this response. The attenuated femoral blood flow during exercise with fentanyl was associated with a 17% reduction in leg O2 delivery (P < 0.01) and a concomitant rise in the arteriovenous O2 difference (4–9%), but leg O2 consumption remained 7–13% lower than control (P < 0.05). Our findings reveal an essential contribution of continuous muscle afferent feedback to ensure the appropriate haemodynamic and ultimately metabolic response to rhythmic exercise in humans. PMID:21646407

  17. Human papillomavirus genotyping and p16 expression as prognostic factors for patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stages I to III carcinoma of the anal canal.

    PubMed

    Serup-Hansen, Eva; Linnemann, Dorte; Skovrider-Ruminski, Wojciech; Høgdall, Estrid; Geertsen, Poul Flemming; Havsteen, Hanne

    2014-06-10

    Carcinomas of the anal canal are strongly associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV). Expression of p16 is used as a surrogate marker of HPV infection. In a retrospective study, we evaluated HPV genotyping and p16 expression as prognostic markers of overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) in patients diagnosed with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages I to III carcinoma of the anal canal. HPV genotyping polymerase chain reaction (high-risk subtypes 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58) and immunohistochemical expression of p16 were analyzed by using paraffin-embedded tumor biopsies from 143 anal carcinomas. The patients were treated with combined chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. HPV16 was detected in 81.0% of the tumors, followed by HPV33 (5.1%), HPV18 (2.2%), and HPV58 (0.7%). p16 positivity was found in 92.9% of the tumors. In univariable survival analysis, HPV positivity was significantly correlated with improved OS (74% v 52%; P=.036) and DSS (84% v 52%; P=.002), and p16 positivity was significantly correlated with improved OS (76% v 30%; P<.001) and DSS (85% v 30%; P<.001). In multivariable COX analysis that included HPV status, p16 status, sex, T stage, N stage, and treatment, p16 positivity remained an independent prognostic factor for OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.07; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.61; P=.016) and DSS (HR, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.53; P=.011). p16 positivity is an independent prognostic factor for OS and DSS in patients with AJCC stages I to III carcinoma of the anal canal. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  18. Repeated administrations of human umbilical cord blood cells improve disease outcomes in a mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type III B.

    PubMed

    Willing, Alison E; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana N; Zayko, Olga; Derasari, Hiranya M; Rawls, Ashley E; James, Chris R; Mervis, Ron F; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type III B (MPS III B) is an inherited disorder characterized by a deficiency of α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Naglu) enzyme leading to accumulation of heparan sulfate in lysosomes and severe neurological deficits. We have previously shown that a single administration of human umbilical cord mononuclear cells (hUCB MNCs) into Naglu knockout mice decreased behavioral abnormalities and tissue pathology. In this study, we tested whether repeated doses of hUCB MNCs would be more beneficial than a single dose of cells. Naglu mice at 3 months of age were randomly assigned to either a Media-only group or one of three hUCB MNC treatment groups--single low dose (3 × 10(6) cells), single high dose (1.8 × 10(7) cells), or multiple doses (3 × 10(6) cells monthly for 6 months) delivered intravenously; cyclosporine was injected intraperitoneally to immune suppress the mice for the duration of the study. An additional control group of wild-type mice was also used. We measured anxiety in an open field test and cognition in an active avoidance test prior to treatment and then at monthly intervals for 6 months. hUCB MNCs restored normal anxiety-like behavior in these mice (p < 0.001). The repeated cell administrations also restored hippocampal cytoarchitecture, protected the dendritic tree, decreased GM3 ganglioside accumulation, and decreased microglial activation, particularly in the hippocampus and cortex. These data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of hUCB MNCs can be enhanced by repeated cell administrations.

  19. Repeated Administrations of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells Improve Disease Outcomes in a Mouse Model of Sanfilippo Syndrome Type III B.

    PubMed

    Willing, Alison E; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana N; Zayko, Olga; Derasari, Hiranya M; Rawls, Ashley E; James, Chris R; Mervis, Ron F; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Paul R

    2013-12-30

    Sanfilippo syndrome type III B (MPS III B) is an inherited disorder characterized by a deficiency of ?-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Naglu) enzyme leading to accumulation of heparan sulfate in lysosomes and severe neurological deficits. We have previously shown that a single administration of human umbilical cord mononuclear cells (hUCB MNC) into Nagluknockout mice decreased behavioral abnormalities and tissue pathology. In this study, we tested whether repeated doses of hUCB MNCs would be more beneficial than a single dose of cells. Naglumice at 3 months of age were randomly assigned to either a Media only group, or one of three hUCB MNC treatment groups - single low dose (3x10(6) cells), single high dose (1.8x10(7) cells) or multiple doses (3x10(6) cells monthly for 6 months) delivered intravenously (i.v.); cyclosporine was injected i.p. to immune suppress the mice for the duration of the study. An additional control group of wild type mice was also used. We measured anxiety in an open field test and cognition inactive avoidance test prior to treatment and then at monthly intervals for 6 months. hUCB MNCs restored normal anxiety-like behavior in these mice (p < 0.001). The repeated cell administrations also restored hippocampal cytoarchitecture, protected the dendritic tree, decreased GM3 ganglioside accumulation and decreased microglial activation, particularly in hippocampus and cortex. These data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of hUCB MNCs can be enhanced by repeated cell administrations.

  20. Homo-trimeric Structure of the Type IVb Minor Pilin CofB Suggests Mechanism of CFA/III Pilus Assembly in Human Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Kazuki; Oki, Hiroya; Fukakusa, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Takuya; Imai, Tomoya; Maruno, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yuji; Motooka, Daisuke; Iida, Tetsuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Nakamura, Shota

    2016-03-27

    In gram-negative bacteria, the assembly of type IV pilus (T4P) and the evolutionally related pseudopilus of type II secretion system involves specialized structural proteins called pilins and pseudopilins, respectively, and is dynamically regulated to promote bacterial pathogenesis. Previous studies have suggested that a structural "tip"-like hetero-complex formed through the interaction of at least three minor (pseudo) pilins plays an important role in this process, while some members of the pathogenic type IVb subfamily are known to have only one such minor pilin subunit whose function is still unknown. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the type IVb minor pilin CofB of colonization factor antigen/III from human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli at 1.88-Å resolution. The crystal structure, in conjunction with physicochemical analysis in solution, reveals a symmetrical homo-trimeric arrangement distinct from the hetero-complexes of minor (pseudo) pilins observed in other T4P and type II secretion systems. Each CofB monomer adopts a unique three-domain architecture, in which the C-terminal β-sheet-rich lectin domain can effectively initiate trimer association of its pilin-like N-terminal domain through extensive hydrophobic interactions followed by domain swapping at the central hinge-like domain. Deletion of cofB produces a phenotype with no detectable pili formation on the cell surface, while molecular modeling indicates that the characteristic homo-trimeric structure of CofB is well situated at the pilus tip of colonization factor antigen/III formed by the major pilin CofA, suggesting a role for the minor pilin in the efficient initiation of T4P assembly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Thyroid remnant ablation success and disease outcome in stage III or IV differentiated thyroid carcinoma: recombinant human thyrotropin versus thyroid hormone withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Vallejo Casas, Juan A; Mena Bares, Luisa M; Gálvez Moreno, Maria A; Moreno Ortega, Estefanía; Marlowe, Robert J; Maza Muret, Francisco R; Albalá González, María D

    2016-06-01

    Most publications to date compare outcomes after post-surgical thyroid remnant ablation stimulated by recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) versus thyroid hormone withholding/withdrawal (THW) in low-recurrence risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients. We sought to perform this comparison in high-risk patients. We retrospectively analyzed ~9-year single-center experience in 70 consecutive adults with initial UICC (Union for International Cancer Control) stage III/IV, M0 DTC undergoing rhTSH-aided (N.=54) or THW-aided (N.=16) high-activity ablation. Endpoints included ablation success and DTC outcome. Assessed ≥1 year post-ablation, ablation success comprised a) no visible scintigraphic thyroid bed uptake or pathological extra-thyroidal uptake; b) undetectable stimulated serum thyroglobulin (Tg) without interfering autoantibodies; c) both criteria. DTC outcome, determined at the latest visit, comprised either 1) "no evidence of disease" (NED): undetectable Tg, negative Tg autoantibodies, negative most recent whole-body scan, no suspicious findings clinically, on neck ultrasonography, or on other imaging; 2) persistent disease: failure to attain NED; or 3) recurrence: loss of NED. After the first ablative activity, ablation success by scintigraphic plus biochemical criteria was 64.8% in rhTSH patients, 56.3% in THW patients (P=NS). After 3.5-year versus 6.2-year median follow-up (P<0.05), DTC outcomes were NED, 85.2%, persistent disease, 13.0%, recurrence, 1.9%, in the rhTSH group and NED, 87.5%, persistent or recurrent disease, 6.3% each, in the THW group (P=NS). In patients with initial stage III/IV, M0 DTC, rhTSH-aided and THW-assisted ablation were associated with comparable remnant eradication or DTC cure rates.

  2. Linkage mapping of the gene for Type III collagen (COL3A1) to human chromosome 2q using a VNTR polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.; Summar, M.L. )

    1994-03-15

    The gene for the [alpha]1(III) chain of type III collagen, COL3A1, has been previously mapped to human chromosome 2q24.3-q31 by in situ hybridization. Physical mapping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has demonstrated that COL3A1 lies within 35 kb of COL5A2. The authors genotyped the CEPH families at the COL3A2 locus using a pentanucleotide repeat polymorphism within intron 25. They demonstrated significant linkage to 18 anonymous markers as well as the gene for carbamyl phosphate synthetase (CPSI), which had been previously mapped to this region. No recombination was seen between COL3A1 and COL5A2 (Z = 9.93 at [theta] = 0) or D2S24 (Z = 10.55 at [theta] = 0). The locus order is (D2S32-D2S138-D2S148)-(D2S24-COL5A2-COL3A1)-(D2S118-D2S161), with odds of 1:2300 for the next most likely order. These relationships are consistent with the physical mapping of COL3A1 to the distal portion of 2q and place it proximal to CPSI by means of multipoint analysis. These linkage relationships should prove useful in further studies of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV and carbamyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency and provide an additional framework for localizing other genes in this region. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Rat heparins. A study of the relative sizes and antithrombin-binding characteristics of heparin proteoglycans, chains and depolymerization products from rat adipose tissue, heart, lungs, peritoneal cavity and skin.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, A A

    1986-01-01

    35S-labelled heparins were recovered from adipose tissue, hearts, lungs, peritoneal cavities and skins of rats given H2(35)SO4. Their purification involved incubation with Pronase, precipitation with cetylpyridinium chloride in 1.0 M-NaCl, gradient elution from DEAE-Sephacel and incubation with chondroitinase ABC. Each product was divided into proteoglycan and "depolymerization products' fractions by gel filtration on Bio-Gel A-15m. Heparin chains were released from a portion of each proteoglycan fraction by beta-elimination with NaOH. Proteoglycans, chains and depolymerization products were separated by gradient elution from a column of antithrombin-agarose into fractions with no affinity, low affinity and high affinity for antithrombin. The relative sizes of the products were determined by gel filtration on columns of Bio-Gel A-50m, A-15m, A-1.5m and A-0.5m. Skin was the major source of heparin and contained the largest proteoglycans and the lowest proportion of depolymerization products. Lungs contained the smallest proteoglycans, the smallest depolymerization products and the highest proportion of depolymerization products. The highest proportions of proteoglycans, chains and depolymerization products with high affinity for antithrombin were found in adipose tissue. The lowest proportions of each of these fractions were found in the peritoneal cavity. The data suggest that there was relatively little biosynthesis of sites with high affinity for antithrombin in peritoneal-cavity mast cells and that heparin catabolism was most active in lungs. Each source of heparin was unique with respect to both biosynthesis and subsequent breakdown of its proteoglycans. PMID:3827837

  4. Adenosine diphosphate-induced aggregation of human platelets in flow through tubes: III. Shear and extrinsic fibrinogen-dependent effects.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, H L; Frojmovic, M M; Braovac, S; McIntosh, F; Wong, T

    1994-01-01

    The effect of shear rate and fibrinogen concentration on adenosine diphosphate-induced aggregation of suspensions of washed human platelets in Poiseuille flow at 23 degrees C was studied using a previously described double infusion technique and resistive particle counter size analysis. Using suspensions of multiple-centrifuged and -washed cells in Tyrodes-albumin [3 x 10(5) microliters-1; (17)] with [fibrinogen] from 0 to 1.2 microM, the rate and extent of aggregation with 0.7 microM ADP in Tyrodes-albumin were measured over a range of mean transit times from 0.2 to 43 s, and at mean tube shear rates, G, = 41.9, 335 and 1,335 s-1. As measured by the decrease in singlet concentration, aggregation at 1.2 microM fibrinogen increased with increasing G up to 1,335 s-1, in contrast to that previously reported in citrated plasma, in which aggregation reached a maximum at G = 335 s-1. Without added fibrinogen, there was no aggregation at G = 41.9 s-1; at G = 335 s-1, there was significant aggregation but with an initial lag time, aggregation increasing further at G = 1,335 s-1. Without added fibrinogen, aggregation was abolished at all G upon incubation with the hexapeptide GRGDSP, but was almost unaffected by addition of an F(ab')2 fragment of an antibody to human fibrinogen. Aggregation in the absence of added fibrinogen was also observed at 37 degrees C. The activation of the multiple-washed platelets was tested using flow cytometry with the fluorescently labelled monoclonal antibodies FITC-PAC1 and FITC-9F9. It was shown that 57% of single cells in unactivated PRT expressed maximal GPIIb-IIIa fibrinogen receptors (MoAb PAC1) and 54% expressed pre-bound fibrinogen (MoAb 9F9), with further increases on ADP activation. However, incubation with GRGDSP and the F(ab')2 fragment did not inhibit the prebound fibrinogen. Moreover, relatively unactivated cells (8% expressing receptor, 14% prebound fibrinogen), prepared from acidified cPRP by single centrifugation with 50 nM of

  5. Methods to identify and characterize developmental neurotoxicity for human health risk assessment. III: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Dorman, D C; Allen, S L; Byczkowski, J Z; Claudio, L; Fisher, J E; Fisher, J W; Harry, G J; Li, A A; Makris, S L; Padilla, S; Sultatos, L G; Mileson, B E

    2001-01-01

    We review pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors that should be considered in the design and interpretation of developmental neurotoxicity studies. Toxicologic effects on the developing nervous system depend on the delivered dose, exposure duration, and developmental stage at which exposure occurred. Several pharmacokinetic processes (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) govern chemical disposition within the dam and the nervous system of the offspring. In addition, unique physical features such as the presence or absence of a placental barrier and the gradual development of the blood--brain barrier influence chemical disposition and thus modulate developmental neurotoxicity. Neonatal exposure may depend on maternal pharmacokinetic processes and transfer of the xenobiotic through the milk, although direct exposure may occur through other routes (e.g., inhalation). Measurement of the xenobiotic in milk and evaluation of biomarkers of exposure or effect following exposure can confirm or characterize neonatal exposure. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models that incorporate these and other determinants can estimate tissue dose and biologic response following in utero or neonatal exposure. These models can characterize dose--response relationships and improve extrapolation of results from animal studies to humans. In addition, pharmacologic data allow an experimenter to determine whether exposure to the test chemical is adequate, whether exposure occurs during critical periods of nervous system development, whether route and duration of exposure are appropriate, and whether developmental neurotoxicity can be differentiated from direct actions of the xenobiotic. PMID:11250810

  6. Fractionation of human lymphocytes with plant lectins. III. Identification of cells regulating the in vitro response to L-phytohaemagglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    Boldt, D H; Lyons, R D

    1980-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were separated into two subclasses by differential adherence to wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). WGA-adherent PBL differed structurally (different WGA-binding properties) and functionally from WGA-non-adherent cells. As judged by [3H]-thymidine incorporation, WGA-adherent PBL responded less well to L-phytohaemagglutinin (L-PHA) than non-adherent cells. This difference was not due to different L-PHA dose requirements or different response kinetics. WGA-adherent and non-adherent PBL bound identical amounts of 125I-L-PHA and contained comparable percentages of T cells, B cells, and monocytes. Addition of mitomycin-C-pre-treated WGA-adherent cells to non-adherent cells caused suppression of the L-PHA response. Maximal suppression occurred at a ratio of 1 adherent:2 non-adherent cells and on days 5-7 of culture. Under these conditions the adherent cells themselves did not proliferate indicating that active proliferation was not required for inhibition. Suppression was selective for L-PHA as it did not occur in cultures stimulated with concanavalin A, pokeweed mitogen, Lens culinaris lectin, or in the mixed leucocyte reaction. Cell fractionation techniques indicated that plastic adherent cells (presumably monocytes) in the WGA-adherent subclass were critical for mediation of suppression; These data provide evidence for a specific human suppressor cell of the in vitro response to L-PHA. PMID:6445871

  7. Fractionation of human lymphocytes with plant lectins. III. Identification of cells regulating the in vitro response to L-phytohaemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Boldt, D H; Lyons, R D

    1980-04-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were separated into two subclasses by differential adherence to wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). WGA-adherent PBL differed structurally (different WGA-binding properties) and functionally from WGA-non-adherent cells. As judged by [3H]-thymidine incorporation, WGA-adherent PBL responded less well to L-phytohaemagglutinin (L-PHA) than non-adherent cells. This difference was not due to different L-PHA dose requirements or different response kinetics. WGA-adherent and non-adherent PBL bound identical amounts of 125I-L-PHA and contained comparable percentages of T cells, B cells, and monocytes. Addition of mitomycin-C-pre-treated WGA-adherent cells to non-adherent cells caused suppression of the L-PHA response. Maximal suppression occurred at a ratio of 1 adherent:2 non-adherent cells and on days 5-7 of culture. Under these conditions the adherent cells themselves did not proliferate indicating that active proliferation was not required for inhibition. Suppression was selective for L-PHA as it did not occur in cultures stimulated with concanavalin A, pokeweed mitogen, Lens culinaris lectin, or in the mixed leucocyte reaction. Cell fractionation techniques indicated that plastic adherent cells (presumably monocytes) in the WGA-adherent subclass were critical for mediation of suppression; These data provide evidence for a specific human suppressor cell of the in vitro response to L-PHA.

  8. Pharmacology of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus Stapf). III. Assessment of eventual toxic, hypnotic and anxiolytic effects on humans.

    PubMed

    Leite, J R; Seabra, M de L; Maluf, E; Assolant, K; Suchecki, D; Tufik, S; Klepacz, S; Calil, H M; Carlini, E A

    1986-07-01

    A herbal tea (called an abafado in Brazil) prepared from the dried leaves of lemongrass was administered to healthy volunteers. Following a single dose or 2 weeks of daily oral administration, the abafado produced no changes in serum glucose, urea, creatinine, cholesterol, triglycerides, lipids, total bilirubin, indirect bilirubin, GOT, GPT, alkaline phosphatase, total protein, albumin, LDH and CPK. Urine analysis (proteins, glucose, ketones, bilirubins, occult blood and urobilinogen) as well as EEG and EKG showed no abnormalities. There were slight elevations of direct bilirubin and of amylase in some of the volunteers, but without any clinical manifestation. These results taken together indicate that lemongrass as used in Brazilian folk medicine is not toxic for humans. The eventual hypnotic effect of lemongrass was investigated in 50 volunteers who ingested samples of lemongrass and a placebo under double-blind conditions. The parameters (i.e. sleep induction, sleep quality, dream recall and rewakening) did not show any effect of lemongrass as compared to the placebo. Eighteen subjects with high scores of trait-anxiety were submitted to an anxiety-inducing test following taking lemongrass or placebo under double-blind conditions. Their anxiety levels were similar, indicating that the abafado of the plant does not have anxiolytic properties. It is concluded that lemongrass, one of the most popular Brazilian herbal medicines, used for its alleged CNS-depressant effects, is atoxic but lacks hypnotic or anxiolytic properties.

  9. Three-channel Lissajous' trajectory of human auditory brain-stem evoked potentials. III. Effects of click rate.

    PubMed

    Pratt, H; Bleich, N; Martin, W H

    1986-05-01

    Three-channel Lissajous' trajectories (3-CLT) of the human auditory brain-stem evoked potentials (ABEPs) were recorded from 14 adult subjects using click rates of 10, 55 and 80/sec. The 3-CLTs were analysed and described in terms of their constituent planar segments and their trajectory amplitudes at each stimulus rate. Increasing stimulus rate resulted in an increase of planar segment duration which was more pronounced for segments 'a' and 'e', an increase in apex latency which was more pronounced the later the component and a decrease in planar segment size and peak trajectory amplitude which was more pronounced the earlier the component. These findings support the involvement of synaptic efficacy changes in the effects of stimulus rate on ABEP. The results are explained by overlapping convergence and divergence in the ascending auditory pathway. These results support the notion that the principal generator of each component is activated by the principal generator of the previous component, with some temporal overlap of their activities. Such temporal overlap may be minimized by using low intensity high rate stimuli.

  10. Expression and characterization of recombinant human alpha-3/4-fucosyltransferase III from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) and Trichoplusia ni (Tn) cells using the baculovirus expression system.

    PubMed Central

    Morais, V A; Serpa, J; Palma, A S; Costa, T; Maranga, L; Costa, J

    2001-01-01

    The human alpha-3/4-fucosyltransferase III (Fuc-TIII) participates in the synthesis of Lewis determinants. The enzyme from human sources is scarce and heterogeneous. In this paper we describe the expression of a secreted form of Fuc-TIII (SFT3) in two insect cell lines, Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) and Trichoplusia ni (Tn), using the baculovirus expression system. The Sf9 cells secreted approx. 0.4 unit/l (1 mg/l) of the enzyme. The Tn cells secreted approx. 3-fold this amount. A large proportion of active protein was accumulated in the two cell lines (50 and 75% respectively for Sf9 and Tn cells, on the fourth day after infection) indicating a possible limitation not only of the folding machinery, but also a saturation of the secretory pathway. SFT3 was purified by cation-exchange chromatography followed by affinity chromatography. The enzyme from the Tn cell line had a lower global charge, possibly due to post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation or sulphation. The two glycosylation sites from SFT3 were occupied. SFT3 secreted by Sf9 cells was completely deglycosylated by peptide-N-glycanase F, whereas 50% of SFT3 secreted by Tn cells was resistant to deglycosylation by this enzyme. The apparent kinetic parameters determined with the type I acceptor were k(cat)=0.4 s(-1) and K(m)=0.87 mM for the SFT3 secreted by Tn cells, and k(cat)=0.09 s(-1) and K(m)=0.76 mM for the SFT3 secreted by Sf9 cells, indicating that the enzymes had substrate affinities within the same order of magnitude as their mammalian counterpart. Furthermore, SFT3 secreted by either cell type showed a clear preference for type 1 carbohydrate acceptors, similarly to human Fuc-TIII. PMID:11171070

  11. The Fe(III)Zn(II) form of recombinant human purple acid phosphatase is not activated by proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Funhoff, Enrico G; Bollen, Mirko; Averill, Bruce A

    2005-02-01

    The kinetics and spectroscopic properties of the single polypeptide and proteolytically cleaved form of recombinant Fe(3+)Fe(2+) human purple acid phosphatase (recHPAP) exhibit significant differences, primarily due to a difference in pK(es,1) (the value of an acid dissociation constant of the ES complex). These differences are due to the presence or absence, respectively, of an interaction between an aspartate residue in an exposed loop of the protein and one or more active site residues. To further explore the origin of these differences, the ferrous ion of recHPAP has been replaced by zinc. Analysis of the reconstituted Fe(3+)Zn(2+)recHPAP reveals an unexpected catalytic activity versus pH profile, in that the optimal pH is 6.3, similar to that of the proteolytically cleaved form (6.5). Moreover, replacement of the ferrous ion by zinc increases the turnover number more than 10-fold; the pK(es) values are also shifted as expected for the change in the divalent metal ion. Although the EPR spectra of both single polypeptide and proteolytically cleaved Fe(3+)Zn(2+)-recHPAP are independent of pH over the range 4.5-6.2, the visible spectrum of Fe(3+)Zn(2+)-recHPAP is pH dependent. These results suggest that the properties and environment of the divalent metal are important in determining the catalytic properties of mammalian PAPs, and in particular that a solvent molecule coordinated to the divalent metal ion may play a critical role in the catalytic cycle of these enzymes.

  12. Screening of promising chemotherapeutic candidates from plants against human adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (III).

    PubMed

    Nakano, Daisuke; Ishitsuka, Kenji; Kamikawa, Mio; Matsuda, Michika; Tsuchihashi, Ryota; Okawa, Masafumi; Okabe, Hikaru; Tamura, Kazuo; Kinjo, Junei

    2013-10-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is a malignancy of mature peripheral T lymphocytes caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). In our previous paper, 214 extracts from 162 plants were screened to elucidate the anti-proliferative principles against HTLV-I-infected T-cell lines. In this study, 245 extracts from 182 plants belonging to 61 families were further tested against two HTLV-I-infected T-cell lines (MT-1 and MT-2). Potent anti-proliferative effects were exhibited against MT-1 and MT-2 cells by 52 and 60 of the 245 extracts tested, respectively. Of these, two extracts showed strong inhibitory activity (EC₅₀ values 0.1-1 μg/mL; +++) against both cells, 7 extracts showed moderate inhibitory activity (EC5₅₀ values 1-10 μg/mL; ++), and 43 extracts showed weak inhibitory activity (EC₅₀ values 10-100 μg/mL; +), whereas the remaining extracts did not show any activity (EC₅₀ values >100 μg/mL; -) against MT-1 cells. On the other hand, 10 extracts showed moderate inhibitory activit and, 48 extracts showed weak inhibitory activity, whereas the remaining extracts did not show any activity against MT-2 cells. Extracts from the aerial parts of Annona reticulata and A. squamosa showed the most potent inhibitory activity and three aporphine alkaloids were isolated from their extracts as the active principles by activity-guided fractionation.

  13. Human T cell activation. III. Induction of an early activation antigen, EA 1 by TPA, mitogens and antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, T.; Jung, L.K.L.; FU, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    With human T cells activated for 12 hours by 12-o-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as immunogen, an IgG/sub 2a/ monoclonal antibody, mAb Ea 1, has been generated to a 60KD phosphorylated protein with 32KD and 28KD subunits. The antigen, Ea 1, is readily detected on 60% of isolated thymocytes by indirect immunofluorescence. A low level of Ea 1 expression is detectable on 2-6% of blood lymphocytes. Isolated T cells have been induced to express Ea 1 by TPA, mitogens and anitgens. TPA activated T cells express Ea 1 as early as 1 hour after activation. By 4 hours, greater than 95% of the T cells stain with mAb Ea 1. About 50% of the PHA or Con A activated T cells express Ea 1 with a similar kinetics. Ea 1 expression proceeds that of IL-2 receptor in these activation processes. T cells activated by soluble antigens (tetanus toxoid and PPD) and alloantigens in MLR also express Ea 1 after a long incubation. About 20% of the T cells stain for Ea 1 at day 6. Ea 1 expression is not limited to activated T cells. B cells activated by TPA or anti-IgM Ab plus B cell growth factor express Ea 1. The kinetics of Ea 1 expression is slower and the staining is less intense. Repeated attempts to detect Ea 1 on resting and activated monocytes and granulocytes have not been successful. Ea 1 expression is due to de novo synthesis for its induction is blocked by cycloheximide and actinomycin D. Ea 1 is the earliest activation antigen detectable to-date.

  14. A Human-in-the-Loop Evaluation of Multi-Sector Planning in Mixed Equipage Airspace (MSP III)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Nancy; Prevot, Tom; Kessell, Angela; Homola, Jeff; Lee, Hwasoo; Mercer, Joey; Brasil, Connie; Mainini, Matt; Lee, Paul

    2011-01-01

    A human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulation was conducted in May 2010 to determine the feasibility and value 01 conducting multi-sector planning (MSP) operations in a mixed equipage environment. Aircraft were categorized as equipped or unequipped based on the presence or absence of an air-ground data communications (Data Comm) capability for receiving auto-loadable clearances and transfer of communication messages from the air navigation service provider (ANSP). The purpose of the study was to determine the feasibility and possible benefits of introducing multi-sector planning in a mixed equipage context, or whether Data Comm equipage was required for MSP operations. Each test scenario presented one of three different equipage levels to the controllers (10%, 50% or 90% equipped aircraft), so that the operational impact of different equipage levels could be observed. Operational feasibility assessment addressed two related questions: (1) are MSP operations feasible for unequipped aircraft, and (2) are they feasible in a mixed equipage context. Similarly, two categories of potential benefits were explored: (1) system performance improvements (e.g., throughput, workload) associated with MSP at different equipage levels, and (2) the possibility of providing differential service for equipage through MSP operations. Tool requirements (for both planning and controller stations), as well as planning and coordination procedures - within facility (traffic management unit/operational area) and within sector (R-Side/D-Side) - were two other topics addressed in the study. Overall, results suggested that MSP operations were feasible in a mixed equipage environment and that the tools were effective with both equipped and unequipped aircraft. Using the MSP tools, traffic management coordinators were able to manage controller task load, effectively balancing throughput with complexity and controller task load at each of the three equipage levels tested.

  15. Cytotoxic effects of bromelain in human gastrointestinal carcinoma cell lines (MKN45, KATO-III, HT29-5F12, and HT29-5M21)

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Afshin; Ehteda, Anahid; Masoumi Moghaddam, Samar; Akhter, Javed; Pillai, Krishna; Morris, David Lawson

    2013-01-01

    Background Bromelain is a pineapple stem extract with a variety of therapeutic benefits arising from interaction with a number of different biological processes. Several preclinical studies and anecdotal clinical observations have reported the anticancer properties of bromelain. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of bromelain in four human cancer cell lines of gastrointestinal origin and the mechanisms involved. Methods The gastric carcinoma cell lines (KATO-III and MKN45) and two chemoresistant subpopulations of the HT29 colon adenocarcinoma cell line (HT29-5M21 and HT29-5F12) were treated with a range of concentrations of bromelain, as well as with cisplatin as a positive control. The effect of bromelain on the growth and proliferation of cancer cells was determined using a sulforhodamine B assay after 72 hours of treatment. Expression of apoptosis-associated proteins in MKN45 cells treated with bromelain was analyzed by Western blotting. Results Data from our sulforhodamine B assay showed that bromelain inhibited proliferation of HT29-5F12, HT29-5M21, MKN45, and KATO-III cells, with respective half maximal inhibitory concentration values of 29, 34, 94, and 142 μg/mL. Analyzing the expression of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic proteins in bromelain-treated MKN45 cells, we observed activation of the caspase system, cleavage of PARP and p53, overexpression of cytochrome C, attenuation of phospho-Akt and Bcl2, and removal of MUC1. Apart from the caspase-dependent apoptosis observed, emergence of cleaved p53 supports a direct, extranuclear apoptotic function of p53. Moreover, interrupted Akt signaling and attenuation of Bcl2 and MUC1 oncoproteins suggest impaired survival of cancer cells. Conclusion Our findings collectively indicate that bromelain exerts cytotoxic effects in a panel of human gastric and colon carcinoma cells. Our study of MKN45 cells implicated different mechanisms in bromelain-induced cell death. While promoting apoptosis

  16. Serum PEDF levels are decreased in a spontaneous animal model for human autoimmune uveitis.

    PubMed

    Zipplies, Johanna K; Hauck, Stefanie M; Schoeffmann, Stephanie; Amann, Barbara; Stangassinger, Manfred; Ueffing, Marius; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2009-02-01

    Identification of biomarkers is of critical relevance toward improving diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune disorders. Serum markers are a desirable choice as sera are easily accessible and the development of assays for routine clinical detection prompts feasible. Autoimmune uveitis, a recurrent disease affecting the eye, is characterized by returning inflammatory attacks of the inner eye followed by variable periods of quiescent stages. Spontaneous equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is the equine equivalent and serves as a model for the human disease. To identify potential biomarker candidates, we first systematically compared the proteomes of individual ERU cases with healthy controls by proteomic profiling using 2-D difference-gel-electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) followed by tandem mass spectrometry. A total of seven differentially expressed proteins were identified. Besides the upregulation of IgG and the significant lower expression of albumin, Antithrombin III, and Vitamin D binding protein, we found complement components C1q and C4, to be downregulated in uveitic state. Interestingly, Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a marker already detected by 2DE differential proteome analysis in ERU target tissues, vitreous and retina, was found to be also significantly downregulated in sera. The lower expression of PEDF in sera of horses with uveitis could be verified in a cohort of 116 ERU cases and 115 healthy controls. Our findings of a significant lower PEDF expression in ERU cases also in the periphery of the eye proves PEDF as a promising uveitis biomarker.

  17. Conversion of antithrombin from an inhibitor of thrombin to a substrate with reduced heparin affinity and enhanced conformational stability by binding of a tetradecapeptide corresponding to the P1 to P14 region of the putative reactive bond loop of the inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Björk, I; Ylinenjärvi, K; Olson, S T; Bock, P E

    1992-01-25

    A synthetic tetradecapeptide having the sequence of the region of the antithrombin chain amino-terminal to the reactive bond, i.e. comprising residues P1 to P14, was shown to form a tight equimolar complex with antithrombin. A similar complex has previously been demonstrated between alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and the analogous peptide of this inhibitor (Schulze, A. J., Baumann, U., Knof, S., Jaeger, E., Huber, R. and Laurell, C.-B. (1990) Eur. J. Biochem. 194, 51-56). The antithrombin-peptide complex had a conformation similar to that of reactive bond-cleaved antithrombin and, like the cleaved inhibitor, also had a higher conformational stability and lower heparin affinity than intact antithrombin. These properties suggest that the peptide bound to intact antithrombin at the same site that the P1 to P14 segment of the inhibitor occupies in reactive-bond-cleaved antithrombin, i.e. was incorporated as a sixth strand in the middle of the major beta-sheet, the A sheet. The extent of complex formation was reduced in the presence of heparin with high affinity for antithrombin, which is consistent with heparin binding and peptide incorporation being linked. Antithrombin in the complex with the tetradecapeptide had lost its ability to inactivate thrombin, but the reactive bond of the inhibitor was cleaved as in a normal substrate. These observations suggest a model, analogous to that proposed for alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (Engh, R.A., Wright, H.T., and Huber, R. (1990) Protein Eng. 3, 469-477) for the structure of intact antithrombin, in which the A sheet contains only five strands and the P1 to P14 segment of the chain forms part of an exposed loop of the protein. The results further support a reaction model for serpins in which partial insertion of this loop into the A sheet is required for trapping of a proteinase in a stable complex, and complete insertion is responsible for the conformational change accompanying cleavage of the reactive bond of the inhibitor.

  18. Determination of the Distance between the Mo(V) and Fe(III) Heme Centers of Wild Type Human Sulfite Oxidase by Pulsed EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Astashkin, Andrei V.; Rajapakshe, Asha; Cornelison, Matthew; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Enemark, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer (IET) between the molybdenum and heme centers of vertebrate sulfite oxidase (SO) is proposed to be a key step in the catalytic cycle of the enzyme. However, the X-ray crystallographic distance between these centers, RMoFe = 32.3 Å, appears to be too long for the rapid IET rates observed in liquid solution. The Mo and heme domains are linked by a flexible tether, and it has been proposed that dynamic interdomain motion brings the two metal centers closer together and thereby facilitates rapid IET. To date there have been no direct distance measurements for SO in solution that would support or contradict this model. In this work, pulsed electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) and relaxation induced dipolar modulation enhancement (RIDME) techniques were used to obtain information about RMoFe in the Mo(V)Fe(III) state of wild type recombinant human SO in frozen glassy solution. Surprisingly, the data obtained suggest a fixed structure with RMoFe = 32 Å, similar to that determined by X-ray crystallography for chicken SO, although the orientation of the RMoFe radius-vector with respect to the heme center was found to be somewhat different. The implications of these findings for the flexible tether model are discussed. PMID:22229742

  19. Preparation of leptin antagonists by site-directed mutagenesis of human, ovine, rat, and mouse leptin's site III: implications on blocking undesired leptin action in vivo.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gili; Niv-Spector, Leonora; Gonen-Berger, Dana; Callebaut, Isabelle; Djiane, Jean; Gertler, Arieh

    2006-12-01

    Six muteins of human, ovine, rat, and mouse leptins mutated to Ala in amino acids 39-41 or 39-42 were prepared by site-directed mutagenesis of the putative site III, which does not affect binding but is necessary for receptor activation, then expressed, solubilized in 4.5 M urea, at pH 11.3 in presence of cysteine, refolded and purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose or combination of anion-exchange chromatography followed by gel filtration. The overall yields were 400-800 mg from 5 L of fermentation. All proteins were >98% pure as evidenced by SDS-PAGE and contained at least 95% monomers as documented by gel-filtration chromatography under nondenaturing conditions. Circular dichroism analysis revealed that all six muteins have identical secondary structure characteristic of nonmutated leptins, namely 52-63% of alpha helix content. All muteins formed a 1:1 complex with chicken leptin binding domain, (chLBD) and bound chLBD or membrane-embedded leptin receptor with affinity identical to WT leptins. Muteins were devoid of any biological activity in several bioassays but were potent competitive antagonists. Some muteins were pegylated using 40 kDa PEG. Although pegylation decreased the in vitro activity, increasing circulation half-life can recompensate this deficit, so pegylated antagonists are expected to be more potent in vivo.

  20. A chlamydial type III-secreted effector protein (Tarp) is predominantly recognized by antibodies from humans infected with Chlamydia trachomatis and induces protective immunity against upper genital tract pathologies in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Chen, Lili; Chen, Fan; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yingqian; Baseman, Joel; Perdue, Sondra; Yeh, I-Tien; Shain, Rochelle; Holland, Martin; Bailey, Robin; Mabey, David; Yu, Ping; Zhong, Guangming

    2009-05-14

    Chlamydia trachomatis genome is predicted to encode a type III secretion system consisting of more than 40 open reading frames (ORFs). To test whether these ORFs are expressed and immunogenic during chlamydial infection in humans, we expressed 55 chlamydial ORFs covering all putative type III secretion components plus control molecules as fusion proteins and measured the reactivity of these fusion proteins with antibodies from patients infected with C. trachomatis in the urogenital tract (24 antisera) or in the ocular tissue (8 antisera). Forty-five of the 55 proteins were recognized by at least 1 of the 32 human antisera, suggesting that these proteins are both expressed and immunogenic during chlamydial infection in humans. Tarp, a putative type III secretion effector protein, was identified as a novel immunodominant antigen due to its reactivity with the human antisera at high frequency and titer. The expression and immunogenicity of Tarp were confirmed in cell culture and mouse systems. Tarp was mainly associated with the infectious form of chlamydial organisms and became undetectable between 13 and 24 h during the infection cycle in cell culture. Mice intravaginally infected with C. muridarum developed Tarp-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. More importantly, immunization of mice with Tarp induced Th1-dominant immunity that significantly reduced the shedding of live organisms from the lower genital tract and attenuated inflammatory pathologies in the fallopian tube tissues. These observations have demonstrated that Tarp, an immunodominant antigen identified by human antisera, can induce protective immunity against chlamydial infection and pathology in mice.

  1. Autolytic activity of human calpain 7 is enhanced by ESCRT-III-related protein IST1 through MIT-MIM interaction.

    PubMed

    Osako, Yohei; Maemoto, Yuki; Tanaka, Ryohei; Suzuki, Hironori; Shibata, Hideki; Maki, Masatoshi

    2010-11-01

    Calpain 7, a mammalian ortholog of yeast Cpl1/Rim13 and fungal PalB, is an atypical calpain that lacks a penta-EF-hand domain. Previously, we reported that a region containing a tandem repeat of microtubule-interacting and transport (MIT) domains in calpain 7 interacts with a subset of endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III-related proteins, suggesting involvement of calpain 7 in the ESCRT system. Although yeast and fungal calpains are thought to be involved in alkaline adaptation via limited proteolysis of specific transcription factors, proteolytic activity of calpain 7 has not been demonstrated yet. In this study, we investigated the interaction between calpain 7 and a newly reported ESCRT-III family member, increased sodium tolerance-1 (IST1), which possesses two different types of MIT-interacting motifs (MIM1 and MIM2). We found that glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-fused tandem MIT domains of calpain 7 (calpain 7MIT) pulled down FLAG-tagged IST1 expressed in HEK293T cells. Coimmunoprecipitation assays with various deletion or point mutants of epitope-tagged calpain 7 and IST1 revealed that both repetitive MIT domains and MIMs are required for efficient interaction. Direct MIT-MIM binding was confirmed by a pulldown experiment with GST-fused IST1 MIM and purified recombinant calpain 7MIT. Furthermore, we found that the GST-MIM protein enhances the autolysis of purified Strep-tagged monomeric green fluorescent protein (mGFP)-fused calpain 7 (mGFP-calpain 7-Strep). The autolysis was almost completely abolished by 10 mmN-ethylmaleimide but only partially inhibited by 1 mm leupeptin or E-64. The putative catalytic Cys290-substituted mutant (mGFP-calpain 7(C290S)-Strep) showed no autolytic activity. These results demonstrate for the first time that human calpain 7 is proteolytically active, and imply that calpain 7 is activated in the ESCRT system. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 FEBS.

  2. Serologial screening of human T cell lymphotropic virus I and II (HTLV I/II) in blood banks by immunoblotting and enzyme-immuno assays: to demand or to defeat?

    PubMed

    Kawashti, Maha I Sh; Hindawi, S I; Damanhouri, G A; Rowehy, Nadia G; Bawazeer, Manal M; Alshawa, M

    2005-01-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus I and II (HTLV I/II) has been recommended to be screened for blood donors since 1988, and it become a mandatory test to get college of american Pathologists (CAP) accreditation. The present study aimed at investigating the prevalence rate of HTLV I/II among Arab blood donors, to revise whether is its screening mandatory? Thirty-thousand (30,000) Arab donors along two years attending two central hospital blood banks in Jeddah. Antibodies to HTLV I/II have been screened using enzyme immunoassay (E.I.A) and immunoblotting assay (Western blot). Results revealed zero prevalence rate. Based upon this finding, no potential risk of HTLV I/II transmission among blood donors population exist. As screening for HTLV I/II is still mandatory, it could be done on pools of sera rather than on individual serum samples, after standardization of a pooling protocol, to fulfill coast-effectiveness and reduce the coasts by 90-95%.

  3. X-ray Structure Analysis of Indazolium trans-[Tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (KP1019) Bound to Human Serum Albumin Reveals Two Ruthenium Binding Sites and Provides Insights into the Drug Binding Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bijelic, Aleksandar; Theiner, Sarah; Keppler, Bernhard K; Rompel, Annette

    2016-06-23

    Ruthenium(III) complexes are promising candidates for anticancer drugs, especially the clinically studied indazolium trans-[tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (KP1019) and its analogue sodium trans-[tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (NKP-1339). Several studies have emphasized the likely role of human serum proteins in the transportation and accumulation of ruthenium(III) complexes in tumors. Therefore, the interaction between KP1019 and human serum albumin was investigated by means of X-ray crystallography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The structural data unambiguously reveal the binding of two ruthenium atoms to histidine residues 146 and 242, which are both located within well-known hydrophobic binding pockets of albumin. The ruthenium centers are octahedrally coordinated by solvent molecules revealing the dissociation of both indazole ligands from the ruthenium-based drug. However, a binding mechanism is proposed indicating the importance of the indazole ligands for binding site recognition and thus their indispensable role for the binding of KP1019.

  4. X-ray Structure Analysis of Indazolium trans-[Tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (KP1019) Bound to Human Serum Albumin Reveals Two Ruthenium Binding Sites and Provides Insights into the Drug Binding Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ruthenium(III) complexes are promising candidates for anticancer drugs, especially the clinically studied indazolium trans-[tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (KP1019) and its analogue sodium trans-[tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (NKP-1339). Several studies have emphasized the likely role of human serum proteins in the transportation and accumulation of ruthenium(III) complexes in tumors. Therefore, the interaction between KP1019 and human serum albumin was investigated by means of X-ray crystallography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The structural data unambiguously reveal the binding of two ruthenium atoms to histidine residues 146 and 242, which are both located within well-known hydrophobic binding pockets of albumin. The ruthenium centers are octahedrally coordinated by solvent molecules revealing the dissociation of both indazole ligands from the ruthenium-based drug. However, a binding mechanism is proposed indicating the importance of the indazole ligands for binding site recognition and thus their indispensable role for the binding of KP1019. PMID:27196130

  5. Type III Secretion System and Virulence Markers Highlight Similarities and Differences between Human- and Plant-Associated Pseudomonads Related to Pseudomonas fluorescens and P. putida

    PubMed Central

    Mazurier, Sylvie; Merieau, Annabelle; Bergeau, Dorian; Decoin, Victorien; Sperandio, Daniel; Crépin, Alexandre; Barbey, Corinne; Jeannot, Katy; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Plésiat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is commonly considered a saprophytic rhizobacterium devoid of pathogenic potential. Nevertheless, the recurrent isolation of strains from clinical human cases could indicate the emergence of novel strains originating from the rhizosphere reservoir, which could be particularly resistant to the immune system and clinical treatment. The importance of type three secretion systems (T3SSs) in the related Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial species and the occurrence of this secretion system in plant-associated P. fluorescens raise the question of whether clinical isolates may also harbor T3SSs. In this study, isolates associated with clinical infections and identified in hospitals as belonging to P. fluorescens were compared with fluorescent pseudomonads harboring T3SSs isolated from plants. Bacterial isolates were tested for (i) their genetic relationships based on their 16S rRNA phylogeny, (ii) the presence of T3SS genes by PCR, and (iii) their infectious potential on animals and plants under environmental or physiological temperature conditions. Two groups of bacteria were delineated among the clinical isolates. The first group encompassed thermotolerant (41°C) isolates from patients suffering from blood infections; these isolates were finally found to not belong to P. fluorescens but were closely related and harbored highly conserved T3SS genes belonging to the Ysc-T3SS family, like the T3SSs from P. aeruginosa. The second group encompassed isolates from patients suffering from cystic fibrosis; these isolates belonged to P. fluorescens and harbored T3SS genes belonging to the Hrp1-T3SS family found commonly in plant-associated P. fluorescens. PMID:25636837

  6. Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III beta is essential for replication of human rhinovirus and its inhibition causes a lethal phenotype in vivo.

    PubMed

    Spickler, Catherine; Lippens, Julie; Laberge, Marie-Kristine; Desmeules, Sophie; Bellavance, Édith; Garneau, Michel; Guo, Tim; Hucke, Oliver; Leyssen, Pieter; Neyts, Johan; Vaillancourt, Fréderic H; Décor, Anne; O'Meara, Jeff; Franti, Michael; Gauthier, Annick

    2013-07-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) is the predominant cause of the common cold, but more importantly, infection may have serious repercussions in asthmatics and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) patients. A cell-based antiviral screen against HRV was performed with a subset of our proprietary compound collection, and an aminothiazole series with pan-HRV species and enteroviral activity was identified. The series was found to act at the level of replication in the HRV infectious cycle. In vitro selection and sequencing of aminothiazole series-resistant HRV variants revealed a single-nucleotide mutation leading to the amino acid change I42V in the essential HRV 3A protein. This same mutation has been previously implicated in resistance to enviroxime, a former clinical-stage antipicornavirus agent. Enviroxime-like compounds have recently been shown to target the lipid kinase phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III beta (PI4KIIIβ). A good correlation between PI4KIIIβ activity and HRV antiviral potency was found when analyzing the data over 80 compounds of the aminothiazole series, covering a 750-fold potency range. The mechanism of action through PI4KIIIβ inhibition was further demonstrated by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of PI4KB, which reduced HRV replication and also increased the potency of the PI4KIIIβ inhibitors. Inhibitors from two different structural classes with promising pharmacokinetic profiles and with very good selectivity for PI4KIIIβ were used to dissociate compound-related toxicity from target-related toxicity. Mortality was seen in all dosing groups of mice treated with either compound, therefore suggesting that short-term inhibition of PI4KIIIβ is deleterious.

  7. Comparative Study on the Antivirus Activity of Shuang–Huang–Lian Injectable Powder and Its Bioactive Compound Mixture against Human Adenovirus III In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qinhai; Liang, Dedong; Song, Shuai; Yu, Qintian; Shi, Chunyu; Xing, Xuefeng; Luo, Jia-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Shuang–Huang–Lian injectable powder (SHL)—a classical purified herbal preparation extracted from Scutellaria baicalensis, Lonicera japonica, and Forsythia suspense—has been used against human adenovirus III (HAdV3) for many years. The combination herb and its major bioactive compounds, including chlorogenic acid, baicalin, and forsythia glycosides A, are effective inhibitors of the virus. However, no comprehensive studies are available on the antiviral effects of SHL against HAdV3. Moreover, it remains unclear whether the mixture of chlorogenic acid, baicalin, and forsythia glycosides A (CBF) has enhanced antiviral activity compared with SHL. Therefore, a comparative study was performed to investigate the combination which is promising for further antiviral drug development. To evaluate their antivirus activity in parallel, the combination ratio and dose of CBF were controlled and consistent with SHL. First, the fingerprint and the ratio of CBF in SHL were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Then, a plaque reduction assay, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to explore its therapeutic effects on viral infection and replication, respectively. The results showed that SHL and CBF inhibited dose- and time-dependently HAdV3-induced plaque formation in A549 and HEp-2 cells. SHL was more effective than CBF when supplemented prior to and after viral inoculation. SHL prevented viral attachment, internalization, and replication at high concentration and decreased viral levels within and out of cells at non-toxic concentrations in both cell types. Moreover, the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1ß, and IL-6 was lower and the expression of interferon (IFN)-γ was higher in both cell types treated with SHL than with CBF. In conclusion, SHL is much more effective and slightly less toxic than CBF. PMID

  8. Comparative Study on the Antivirus Activity of Shuang-Huang-Lian Injectable Powder and Its Bioactive Compound Mixture against Human Adenovirus III In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qinhai; Liang, Dedong; Song, Shuai; Yu, Qintian; Shi, Chunyu; Xing, Xuefeng; Luo, Jia-Bo

    2017-04-12

    Shuang-Huang-Lian injectable powder (SHL)-a classical purified herbal preparation extracted from Scutellaria baicalensis, Lonicera japonica, and Forsythia suspense-has been used against human adenovirus III (HAdV₃) for many years. The combination herb and its major bioactive compounds, including chlorogenic acid, baicalin, and forsythia glycosides A, are effective inhibitors of the virus. However, no comprehensive studies are available on the antiviral effects of SHL against HAdV₃. Moreover, it remains unclear whether the mixture of chlorogenic acid, baicalin, and forsythia glycosides A (CBF) has enhanced antiviral activity compared with SHL. Therefore, a comparative study was performed to investigate the combination which is promising for further antiviral drug development. To evaluate their antivirus activity in parallel, the combination ratio and dose of CBF were controlled and consistent with SHL. First, the fingerprint and the ratio of CBF in SHL were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Then, a plaque reduction assay, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to explore its therapeutic effects on viral infection and replication, respectively. The results showed that SHL and CBF inhibited dose- and time-dependently HAdV₃-induced plaque formation in A549 and HEp-2 cells. SHL was more effective than CBF when supplemented prior to and after viral inoculation. SHL prevented viral attachment, internalization, and replication at high concentration and decreased viral levels within and out of cells at non-toxic concentrations in both cell types. Moreover, the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1ß, and IL-6 was lower and the expression of interferon (IFN)-γ was higher in both cell types treated with SHL than with CBF. In conclusion, SHL is much more effective and slightly less toxic than CBF.

  9. In silico prediction of the effects of mutations in the human UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase gene: towards a predictive framework for type III galactosemia.

    PubMed

    McCorvie, Thomas J; Timson, David J

    2013-07-25

    The enzyme UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE) catalyses the reversible epimerisation of both UDP-galactose and UDP-N-acetyl-galactosamine. Deficiency of the human enzyme (hGALE) is associated with type III galactosemia. The majority of known mutations in hGALE are missense and private thus making clinical guidance difficult. In this study a bioinformatics approach was employed to analyse the structural effects due to each mutation using both the UDP-glucose and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine bound structures of the wild-type protein. Changes to the enzyme's overall stability, substrate/cofactor binding and propensity to aggregate were also predicted. These predictions were found to be in good agreement with previous in vitro and in vivo studies when data was available and allowed for the differentiation of those mutants that severely impair the enzyme's activity against UDP-galactose. Next this combination of techniques were applied to another twenty-six reported variants from the NCBI dbSNP database that have yet to be studied to predict their effects. This identified p.I14T, p.R184H and p.G302R as likely severely impairing mutations. Although severely impaired mutants were predicted to decrease the protein's stability, overall predicted stability changes only weakly correlated with residual activity against UDP-galactose. This suggests other protein functions such as changes in cofactor and substrate binding may also contribute to the mechanism of impairment. Finally this investigation shows that this combination of different in silico approaches is useful in predicting the effects of mutations and that it could be the basis of an initial prediction of likely clinical severity when new hGALE mutants are discovered.

  10. Structural comparison of AP endonucleases from the exonuclease III family reveals new amino acid residues in human AP endonuclease 1 that are involved in incision of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Vigouroux, Armelle; Mursalimov, Aibek; Grin, Inga; Alili, Doria; Koshenov, Zhanat; Akishev, Zhiger; Maksimenko, Andrei; Bissenbaev, Amangeldy K; Matkarimov, Bakhyt T; Saparbaev, Murat; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Moréra, Solange

    2016-01-01

    Oxidatively damaged DNA bases are substrates for two overlapping repair pathways: DNA glycosylase-initiated base excision repair (BER) and apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease-initiated nucleotide incision repair (NIR). In the BER pathway, an AP endonuclease cleaves DNA at AP sites and 3'-blocking moieties generated by DNA glycosylases, whereas in the NIR pathway, the same AP endonuclease incises DNA 5' to an oxidized base. The majority of characterized AP endonucleases possess classic BER activities, and approximately a half of them can also have a NIR activity. At present, the molecular mechanism underlying DNA substrate specificity of AP endonucleases remains unclear mainly due to the absence of a published structure of the enzyme in complex with a damaged base. To identify critical residues involved in the NIR function, we performed biochemical and structural characterization of Bacillus subtilis AP endonuclease ExoA and compared its crystal structure with the structures of other AP endonucleases: Escherichia coli exonuclease III (Xth), human APE1, and archaeal Mth212. We found conserved amino acid residues in the NIR-specific enzymes APE1, Mth212, and ExoA. Four of these positions were studied by means of point mutations in APE1: we applied substitution with the corresponding residue found in NIR-deficient E. coli Xth (Y128H, N174Q, G231S, and T268D). The APE1-T268D mutant showed a drastically decreased NIR activity and an inverted Mg(2+) dependence of the AP site cleavage activity, which is in line with the presence of an aspartic residue at the equivalent position among other known NIR-deficient AP endonucleases. Taken together, these data show that NIR is an evolutionarily conserved function in the Xth family of AP endonucleases.

  11. Founder effect is responsible for the p.Leu131Phe heparin-binding-site antithrombin mutation common in Hungary: phenotype analysis in a large cohort.

    PubMed

    Gindele, R; Oláh, Z; Ilonczai, P; Speker, M; Udvari, Á; Selmeczi, A; Pfliegler, G; Marján, E; Kovács, B; Boda, Z; Muszbek, L; Bereczky, Z

    2016-04-01

    Antithrombin (AT) is a key regulator of the coagulation. In type II deficiency, the heparin-binding-site defect (type II HBS) is considered to be relatively low thrombosis risk. Our aims were to search for SERPINC1 mutation(s) and to describe the clinical and laboratory phenotype of a large number of AT Budapest3 (ATBp3, p.Leu131Phe) carriers and confirm the presence of a founder effect. AT-deficient patients were recruited and carriers of ATBp3, n = 102 (63 families) were selected. To investigate the founder effect, eight intragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms, a 5'-length dimorphism, and five microsatellite markers were detected. Clinical and laboratory data of the patients were collected and analyzed. In AT deficiency, 16 different causative mutations were found, and the great majority of patients were of type II HBS subtype. Most of them (n = 102/118, 86.5%) carried the ATBp3 mutation. The ATBp3 mutant allele was associated with one single haplotype, while different haplotypes were detected in the case of normal allele. The anti-factor Xa-based AT activity assay that we used could detect all ATBp3 patients with high sensitivity in our cohort. ATBp3 homozygosity (n = 26) was associated with thrombosis at a young age and conferred a high thrombotic risk. Half of the heterozygotes (n = 41/76, 53.9%) also had venous and/or arterial thrombosis, and pregnancy complications were also recorded. In Hungary, the founder mutation, ATBp3, is the most common AT deficiency. Our study is the first in which the clinical characterization of ATBp3 mutation was executed in a large population. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  12. Influence of 8 and 24-h storage of whole blood at ambient temperature on prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, thrombin time, antithrombin and D-dimer.

    PubMed

    Kemkes-Matthes, Bettina; Fischer, Ronald; Peetz, Dirk

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluates the effect of whole blood storage on common coagulation parameters in order to confirm or revise acceptable storage limits as defined by current guidelines and diverse study reports. Aliquots were taken from the citrated whole blood of inpatients and outpatients (n = 147) within 4 h after blood withdrawal and after extended storage of whole blood for 8 and 24 h at ambient temperature. Aliquots were centrifuged and analyzed for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen (Fbg), antithrombin (AT), thrombin time (TT) and D-dimer. For each parameter, samples from 33-56 patients were investigated covering a wide range of normal and pathological values. Samples from patients receiving heparin were excluded from analyses of APTT and TT. All assays were performed using reagents and an analyzer from Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Products GmbH. The mean percentage change after 8 and 24-h storage was below 10% for all parameters. Considering the changes in individual samples, all parameters can be reliably tested after 8-h storage, since less than 15% of the samples demonstrated individual changes of above 10%. The acceptable storage time can be extended to 24 h for PT, TT and D-dimer. Clinically relevant changes were detected after 24-h storage for APTT: 41% of the investigated samples demonstrated changes of above 10%. After 24-h storage, changes for Fbg and AT values were more than 15% in five out of 49 and in three out of 45 samples, respectively. This sporadic increase of values is clinically acceptable except for borderline samples.

  13. Comparison of activated clotting times obtained using Hemochron and Medtronic analysers in patients receiving anti-thrombin therapy during cardiac catheterisation.

    PubMed

    Chia, Stanley; Van Cott, Elizabeth M; Raffel, O Christopher; Jang, Ik-Kyung

    2009-03-01

    Accurate monitoring of anti-thrombin therapy with activated clotting time (ACT) is important to prevent thrombotic and haemorrhagic complications during cardiac catheterisation. Significant variability in ACT tests exists when different analysers are used. Our objective was to compare ACT results obtained using Hemochron and Medtronic ACT PLUS devices and antiXa activity in patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation. Thirty-two patients who received unfractionated heparin or argatroban therapy during cardiac catheterisation were enrolled. Blood sampling was performed to determine ACT values using Hemochron and Medtronic (with high-range cartridges) devices in all patients (n = 130 pairs), and anti-Xa activity following heparin administration. In the heparin group, ACT tests (n = 95 pairs) showed very good correlation (r = 0.84, y = 1.31x-0.81; p<0.001). However, Hemochron values were consistently higher and the difference more pronounced with increasing ACT (for ACT>150 sec, mean difference 65 +/- 48 sec; p<0.001). Both Hemochron and Medtronic ACT tests correlated well with plasma anti-Xa levels (r = 0.85, r = 0.81, respectively; p<0.001); Hemochron ACT>300 sec corresponded to anti-Xa>1.48 IU/ml. With concomitant eptifibatide therapy, the divergence in ACT was greater compared to heparin alone. In the argatroban group, ACT tests (n = 35 pairs) demonstrated excellent correlation (r = 0.94, y = 0.61x+79.9; p<0.001). In contrast to the heparin group, ACT values were higher with Medtronic compared to Hemochron. Therefore, despite good correlation between Hemochron and Medtronic ACT results, and strong association with anti-Xa activity, Medtronic ACT values were consistently lower compared to Hemochron following heparin anticoagulation. Paradoxically, Medtronic ACT results were higher after argatroban therapy. Understanding this discrepancy is crucial when using ACT to guide invasive cardiac procedures.

  14. Analytical comparison of a US generic enoxaparin with the originator product: The focus on comparative assessment of antithrombin-binding components.

    PubMed

    Mourier, Pierre A J; Herman, Fréderic; Sizun, Philippe; Viskov, Christian

    2016-09-10

    Enoxaparin sodium, a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) prepared from porcine intestinal heparin, is widely used for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism. The antithrombotic activity of heparin is mediated mainly through its activation of antithrombin (AT) and subsequent inhibition of coagulation factors. Heparin is a complex heteropolymer and the sulfation pattern of its alternating uronic acid and glucosamine sugar units is a major factor influencing its biological activity. The manufacturing process itself is associated with the introduction of exogenous microheterogeneities that may further affect its biological efficacy. This is important since enoxaparin is prepared by depolymerizing the heparin with the aim of optimizing its biological activity and safety. Changes during its manufacture could thus affect its biological activity and safety. The current study was performed to assess potential differences between the originator enoxaparin and a new generic enoxaparin commercialized by Teva. Heparinase digestion, AT affinity chromatography, gel permeation chromatography, anion exchange chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance methodologies were used. The results indicated differences in oligosaccharides related to the cleavage selectivity around the heparin AT-binding sequences of the Teva Enoxaparin Sodium Injection, USP and the originator Sanofi enoxaparin. These differences influence the strength of the AT-binding affinity of the individual oligosaccharides, their ability to activate AT and, therefore, the inhibitory potency on the proteases of the coagulation cascade. This study, together with other published analytical reports, describes specific compositional differences between generics and originator LWMHs. However, it is yet to be established whether such variations might have any clinical relevance. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hemocompatibility evaluation of different silver nanoparticle concentrations employing a modified Chandler-loop in vitro assay on human blood.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Stefanie; Prucek, Robert; Panacek, Ales; Avci-Adali, Meltem; Nolte, Andrea; Straub, Andreas; Zboril, Radek; Wendel, Hans P; Kvitek, Libor

    2013-07-01

    Due to their antibacterial effects, the use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in a great variety of medical applications like coatings of medical devices has increased markedly in the last few years. However, blood in contact with AgNPs may induce adverse effects, thereby altering hemostatic functions. The objective of this study was to investigate the hemocompatibility of AgNPs in whole blood. Human whole blood (n=6) was treated with different AgNPs concentrations (1, 3 and 30mgl(-1)) or with saline/blank solutions as controls before being circulated in an in vitro Chandler-loop model for 60min at 37°C. Before and after circulation, various hematologic markers were investigated. Based on the hematologic parameters measured, no profound changes were observed in the groups treated with AgNP concentrations of 1 or 3mgl(-1). AgNP concentrations of 30mgl(-1) induced hemolysis of erythrocytes and α-granule secretion in platelets, increased CD11b expression on granulocytes, increased coagulation markers thrombin-antithrombin-III complex, kallikrein-like and FXIIa-like activities as well as complementing cascade activation. Overall, we provide for the first time a comprehensive evaluation including all hematologic parameters required to reliably assess the hemocompatibility of AgNPs. We strongly recommend integrating these hemocompatibility tests to preclinical test procedures prior to in vivo application of new AgNP-based therapies.

  16. Effect of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) on the hemostatic system in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Huraib, S; al-Momen, A K; Gader, A M; Mitwalli, A; Sulimani, F; Abu-Aisha, H

    1991-11-01

    Hemostatic measurements were undertaken in eight chronic hemodialysis uremic patients on recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo). Same measurements were repeated in another seven patients in whom anemia was corrected by the transfusion of red blood cells. The correction of the anemia by rHuEpo therapy was accompanied by 1. correction of the prolonged Simplate Bleeding Time (BT) to normal less than 10.0, minutes after 16 weeks of rHuEpo treatment; 2. significant increases in the levels of fibrinogen, clotting FVIII:C, vWF:antigen, vWF:ristocetin cofactor and platelet count; 3. enhanced aggregation responses to ADP, adrenaline, arachidonic acid, collagen and ristocetin. There was no significant fluctuation in other coagulation parameters PT, APTT, TT, reptilase time and antithrombin III and plasma fibrinogen. In patients who were treated with RBC transfusion and despite the correction of the anemia, the bleeding time shortened significantly but not corrected, mean BT before and after RBC transfusion was 17.1 +/- 1.4 and 11.6 +/- 1.9 minutes respectively. Besides there was significant elevation of vWF:Ricofactor levels but not FVIII:C, vWF:Ag or platelet count. Platelet aggregation responses to ADP remained unchanged. It is concluded that significant elevations of FVIII:related activities, plasma fibrinogen, improved platelet aggregability and correction of the BT are salient hemostatic changes that follow rHuEpo therapy in uremic patients.

  17. Live attenuated tetravalent (G1-G4) bovine-human reassortant rotavirus vaccine (BRV-TV): Randomized, controlled phase III study in Indian infants.

    PubMed

    Saluja, Tarun; Palkar, Sonali; Misra, Puneet; Gupta, Madhu; Venugopal, Potula; Sood, Ashwani Kumar; Dhati, Ravi Mandyam; Shetty, Avinash; Dhaded, Sangappa Malappa; Agarkhedkar, Sharad; Choudhury, Amlan; Kumar, Ramesh; Balasubramanian, Sundaram; Babji, Sudhir; Adhikary, Lopa; Dupuy, Martin; Chadha, Sangeet Mohan; Desai, Forum; Kukian, Darshna; Patnaik, Badri Narayan; Dhingra, Mandeep Singh

    2017-06-16

    Rotavirus remains the leading cause of diarrhoea among children <5years. We assessed immunogenic non-inferiority of a tetravalent bovine-human reassortant rotavirus vaccine (BRV-TV) over the licensed human-bovine pentavalent rotavirus vaccine RV5. Phase III single-blind study (parents blinded) in healthy infants randomized (1:1) to receive three doses of BRV-TV or RV5 at 6-8, 10-12, and 14-16weeks of age. All concomitantly received a licensed diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine (DTwP-HepB-Hib) and oral polio vaccine (OPV). Immunogenic non-inferiority was evaluated in terms of the inter-group difference in anti-rotavirus serum IgA seroresponse (primary endpoint), and seroprotection/seroresponse rates to DTwP-HepB-Hib and OPV vaccines. Seroresponse was defined as a ≥4-fold increase in titers from baseline to D28 post-dose 3. Non-inferiority was declared if the difference between groups (based on the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval [CI]) was above -10%. Each subject was evaluated for solicited adverse events 7days and unsolicited & serious adverse events 28days following each dose of vaccination. Of 1195 infants screened, 1182 were randomized (590 to BRV-TV; 592 to RV5). Non-inferiority for rotavirus serum IgA seroresponse was not established: BRV-TV, 47.1% (95%CI: 42.8; 51.5) versus RV5, 61.2% (95%CI: 56.8; 65.5); difference between groups, -14.08% (95%CI: -20.4; -7.98). Serum IgA geometric mean concentrations at D28 post-dose 3 were 28.4 and 50.1U/ml in BRV-TV and RV5 groups, respectively. For all DTwP-HepB-Hib and OPV antigens, seroprotection/seroresponse was elicited in both groups and the -10% non-inferiority criterion between groups was met. There were 16 serious adverse events, 10 in BRV-TV group and 6 in RV5 group; none were classified as vaccine related. Both groups had similar vaccine safety profiles. BRV-TV was immunogenic but did not meet immunogenic non-inferiority criteria to RV5 when

  18. Mutations in the paired domain of the human PAX3 gene cause Klein-Waardenburg syndrome (WS-III) as well as Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS-I)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoth, C.F.; Milunsky, A.; Lipsky, N.; Baldwin, C.T. ); Sheffer, R. ); Clarren, S.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS-I) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, dystopia canthorum, pigmentary disturbances, and other developmental defects. Klein-Waardenburg syndrome (WS-III) is a disorder with many of the same characteristics as WS-I and includes musculoskeletal abnormalities. The authors have recently reported the identification and characterization of one of the first gene defects, in the human PAX3 gene, which causes WS-I. PAX3 is a DNA-binding protein that contains a structural motif known as the paired domain and is believed to regulate the expression of other genes. In this report they describe two new mutations, in the human PAX3 gene, that are associated with WS. One mutation was found in a family with WS-I, while the other mutation was found in a family with WS-III. Both mutations were in the highly conserved paired domain of the human PAX3 gene and are similar to other mutations that cause WS. The results indicate that mutations in the PAX3 gene can cause both WS-I and WS-III. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Effect of FUT3 gene silencing with miRNA on proliferation, invasion and migration abilities of human KATO-III gastric cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Cai, Y-J; Zheng, X-F; Lu, C-H; Jiang, Q; Liu, Q; Xin, Y-H

    2016-06-30

    This study investigated the effects of FUT3 gene expression inhibition with miRNA on the proliferation, invasion and migration abilities of KATO-III cells. KATO-III cells were transfected with plasmid pcDNA™6.2-GW/EmGFP-FUT3-miR(FUT3-miRNA) and negative control plasmid in mediation of liposome, respectively, using untransfected cells as blank controls. Forty-eight hours after transfection, FUT3 mRNA levels were tested by RT-PCR. Levels of sLeA proteins were assayed by Western blot. The effects of FUT3-miRNA on the proliferation, invasion and migration of KATO-III cells were determined by CCK8 testing and Transwell assays, respectively. Results indicate that the transfection of FUT3-miRNA may down-regulate sLeA protein expression on the surface of KATO-III cells, and significantly inhibit cell proliferation (p<0.05). As compared to the negative and blank control groups, the number of invasion and migration cells in the FUT3-miRNA group decreased significantly (each p<0.05). Experimental results indicate that the miRNA expression vector which targets the FUT3 gene can effectively inhibit the proliferation, migration and invasion abilities of KATO-III cells.

  20. Exploring the Origin of Differential Binding Affinities of Human Tubulin Isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV for DAMA-Colchicine Using Homology Modelling, Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Dulal; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-01-01

    Tubulin isotypes are found to play an important role in regulating microtubule dynamics. The isotype composition is also thought to contribute in the development of drug resistance as tubulin isotypes show differential binding affinities for various anti-cancer agents. Tubulin isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV show differential binding affinity for colchicine. However, the origin of differential binding affinity is not well understood at the molecular level. Here, we investigate the origin of differential binding affinity of a colchicine analogue N-deacetyl-N-(2-mercaptoacetyl)-colchicine (DAMA-colchicine) for human αβII, αβIII and αβIV isotypes, employing sequence analysis, homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and MM-GBSA binding free energy calculations. The sequence analysis study shows that the residue compositions are different in the colchicine binding pocket of αβII and αβIII, whereas no such difference is present in αβIV tubulin isotypes. Further, the molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations results show that residue differences present at the colchicine binding pocket weaken the bonding interactions and the correct binding of DAMA-colchicine at the interface of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes. Post molecular dynamics simulation analysis suggests that these residue variations affect the structure and dynamics of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes, which in turn affect the binding of DAMA-colchicine. Further, the binding free-energy calculation shows that αβIV tubulin isotype has the highest binding free-energy and αβIII has the lowest binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine. The order of binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine is αβIV ≃ αβII >> αβIII. Thus, our computational approaches provide an insight into the effect of residue variations on differential binding of αβII, αβIII and αβIV tubulin isotypes with DAMA-colchicine and may help to design new analogues with higher

  1. Exploring the Origin of Differential Binding Affinities of Human Tubulin Isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV for DAMA-Colchicine Using Homology Modelling, Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kumbhar, Bajarang Vasant; Borogaon, Anubhaw; Panda, Dulal; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-01-01

    Tubulin isotypes are found to play an important role in regulating microtubule dynamics. The isotype composition is also thought to contribute in the development of drug resistance as tubulin isotypes show differential binding affinities for various anti-cancer agents. Tubulin isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV show differential binding affinity for colchicine. However, the origin of differential binding affinity is not well understood at the molecular level. Here, we investigate the origin of differential binding affinity of a colchicine analogue N-deacetyl-N-(2-mercaptoacetyl)-colchicine (DAMA-colchicine) for human αβII, αβIII and αβIV isotypes, employing sequence analysis, homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and MM-GBSA binding free energy calculations. The sequence analysis study shows that the residue compositions are different in the colchicine binding pocket of αβII and αβIII, whereas no such difference is present in αβIV tubulin isotypes. Further, the molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations results show that residue differences present at the colchicine binding pocket weaken the bonding interactions and the correct binding of DAMA-colchicine at the interface of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes. Post molecular dynamics simulation analysis suggests that these residue variations affect the structure and dynamics of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes, which in turn affect the binding of DAMA-colchicine. Further, the binding free-energy calculation shows that αβIV tubulin isotype has the highest binding free-energy and αβIII has the lowest binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine. The order of binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine is αβIV ≃ αβII > αβIII. Thus, our computational approaches provide an insight into the effect of residue variations on differential binding of αβII, αβIII and αβIV tubulin isotypes with DAMA-colchicine and may help to design new analogues with higher

  2. Neuroprotective effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor group II and III activators against MPP(+)-induced cell death in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells: the impact of cell differentiation state.

    PubMed

    Jantas, D; Greda, A; Golda, S; Korostynski, M; Grygier, B; Roman, A; Pilc, A; Lason, W

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies have documented that metabotropic glutamate receptors from group II and III (mGluR II/III) are a potential target in the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), however, the neuroprotective effects of particular mGluR II/III subtypes in relation to PD pathology are recognized only partially. In the present study, we investigated the effect of various mGluR II/III activators in the in vitro model of PD using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line and mitochondrial neurotoxin MPP(+). We demonstrated that all tested mGluR ligands: mGluR II agonist - LY354740, mGluR III agonist - ACPT-I, mGluR4 PAM - VU0361737, mGluR8 agonist - (S)-3,4-DCPG, mGluR8 PAM - AZ12216052 and mGluR7 allosteric agonist - AMN082 were protective against MPP(+)-evoked cell damage in undifferentiated (UN-) SH-SY5Y cells with the highest neuroprotection mediated by mGluR8-specific agents. However, in retinoic acid- differentiated (RA-) SH-SY5Y cells we found protection mediated only by mGluR8 activators. We also demonstrated the cell proliferation stimulating effect for mGluR4 and mGluR8 PAMs. Next, we showed that the protection mediated by mGluR II/III activators in UN-SH-SY5Y was not accompanied by the modulation of caspase-3 activity, however, a decrease in the number of apoptotic nuclei was found. Finally, we showed that the inhibitor of necroptosis, necrostatin-1 blocked the mGluR III-mediated protection. Altogether our comparative in vitro data add a further proof to neuroprotective effects of mGluR agonists or PAMs and point to mGluR8 as a promising target for neuroprotective interventions in PD. The results also suggest the participation of necroptosis-related molecular pathways in neuroprotective effects of mGluR III activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mutational analysis of residues in human arsenic (III) methyltransferase (hAS3MT) belonging to 5 Å around S-adenosylmethionine (SAM).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangli; Geng, Zhirong; Chang, Jiayin; Song, Xiaoli; Wang, Zhilin

    2014-12-01

    The functions of residues 57-RY-58, G60, L77, 80-GSGR-83, I101, T104, 134-GY-135, N155, V157 and 160-LV-161 in human arsenic (III) methyltransferase (hAS3MT) 5 Å around S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) have not been studied. Herein, sixteen mutants were designed by substituting these residues with Ala. Mutants G60A, G80A, I101A, N155A and L160A were completely inactive. Only MMA was detected when mutants R57A, Y58A, G82A and T104A were used as the enzymes, which suggested that their catalytic activities were seriously impaired compared with that of wild type (WT). The catalytic capacities of other mutants were also lower than that of WT-hAS3MT. The KM(SAM) values of mutants were 1.9–8.7 times that of WT, suggesting their affinities to SAM were weakened. As evidenced by the experimental data herein, earlier literature and the model of hAS3MT-SAM, 57-RYYG-60, G78, G80, G82 and 155-NCV-157 interacted with the methionine of SAM, and 101-IDMT-104 and 135-YIE-137 were associated with the nucleotide adenosine of SAM. Since C156 and L160 were the common residues between 5 Å around SAM and 5 Å around As, and C156S and L160A were inactive, we proposed that C156 and L160 functioned in the methyl transfer process. G78, G80 and G82 belonging to the consensus GxGxG were located in a loop connecting the first β-strand and α-helix in the Rossmann fold core. Y59, N155, C156 and L160 oriented S(+)-CH(3) during its approach to the arsenic lone pair, and further activated methyl transfer. G78, D102, M103, T104, I136 and N155 formed hydrogen bonds with SAM.

  4. Retargeted human avidin-CAR T cells for adoptive immunotherapy of EGFRvIII expressing gliomas and their evaluation via optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhiping; Sun, Haojie; Zhang, Mingzhi; Zhang, Jianning; Liu, Shuang; Hao, Limin; Lu, Guoqiu; Zheng, Kangcheng; Gong, Xikui; Wu, Di; Wang, Fan; Shen, Li

    2015-01-01

    There has been significant progress in the design of chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) for adoptive immunotherapy targeting tumor-associated antigens. However, the challenge of monitoring the therapy in real time has been continually ignored. To address this issue, we developed optical molecular imaging approaches to evaluate a recently reported novel CAR strategy for adoptive immunotherapy against glioma xenografts expressing EGFRvIII. We initially biotinylated a novel anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (biotin-4G1) to pre-target EGFRvIII+ gliomas and then redirect activated avidin-CAR expressing T cells against the pre-targeted biotin-4G1. By optical imaging study and bio-distribution analysis, we confirmed the specificity of pre-target and target and determined the optimal time for T cells adoptive transfer in vivo. The results showed this therapeutic strategy offered efficient therapy effect to EGFRvIII+ glioma-bearing mice and implied that optical imaging is a highly useful tool in aiding in the instruction of clinical CAR-T cells adoptive transfer in future. PMID:26124178

  5. The Development of a Professional Activities Handbook Governing Financial Assistance to Staff as Funded by the Title III Grant. Human Resources Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinnon, Norma M.

    In an effort to more effectively and efficiently administer Title III funds received for faculty, staff, and administrator development activities, the Northern Maine Technical College (NMTC) created a professional activities handbook for distribution to all college employees. This practicum report details the procedures undertaken in developing…

  6. Retargeted human avidin-CAR T cells for adoptive immunotherapy of EGFRvIII expressing gliomas and their evaluation via optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaiyu; Liu, Xujie; Peng, Zhiping; Sun, Haojie; Zhang, Mingzhi; Zhang, Jianning; Liu, Shuang; Hao, Limin; Lu, Guoqiu; Zheng, Kangcheng; Gong, Xikui; Wu, Di; Wang, Fan; Shen, Li

    2015-09-15

    There has been significant progress in the design of chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) for adoptive immunotherapy targeting tumor-associated antigens. However, the challenge of monitoring the therapy in real time has been continually ignored. To address this issue, we developed optical molecular imaging approaches to evaluate a recently reported novel CAR strategy for adoptive immunotherapy against glioma xenografts expressing EGFRvIII. We initially biotinylated a novel anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (biotin-4G1) to pre-target EGFRvIII+ gliomas and then redirect activated avidin-CAR expressing T cells against the pre-targeted biotin-4G1. By optical imaging study and bio-distribution analysis, we confirmed the specificity of pre-target and target and determined the optimal time for T cells adoptive transfer in vivo. The results showed this therapeutic strategy offered efficient therapy effect to EGFRvIII+ glioma-bearing mice and implied that optical imaging is a highly useful tool in aiding in the instruction of clinical CAR-T cells adoptive transfer in future.

  7. Proceedings of the EMU Conference on Foreign Languages for Business and the Professions (Dearborn, Michigan, April 5-7, 1984). Part III: Taking the Humanities to Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voght, Geoffrey M., Ed.

    Part III of the proceedings contains 12 presentations. They are: "The Role of Business Language in the Traditional Curriculum" (Michel Rocchi); "Foreign Languages for Business and the Professions Belong in the Liberal Arts" (Robert A. Kreiter); "How Much and How Far? Commercial French and the Student, Instructor, Administrator, and the Business…

  8. Inhibition of Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase 1 (ACC1) and 2 (ACC2) Reduces Proliferation and De Novo Lipogenesis of EGFRvIII Human Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jessica E. C.; Esler, William P.; Patel, Rushi; Lanba, Adhiraj; Vera, Nicholas B.; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A.; Vernochet, Cecile

    2017-01-01

    Tumor cell proliferation and migration processes are regulated by multiple metabolic pathways including glycolysis and de novo lipogenesis. Since acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is at the junction of lipids synthesis and oxidative metabolic pathways, we investigated whether use of a dual ACC inhibitor would provide a potential therapy against certain lipogenic cancers. The impact of dual ACC1/ACC2 inhibition was investigated using a dual ACC1/ACC2 inhibitor as well as dual siRNA knock down on the cellular viability and metabolism of two glioblastoma multiform cancer cell lines, U87 and a more aggressive form, U87 EGFRvIII. We first demonstrated that while ACCi inhibited DNL in both cell lines, ACCi preferentially blunted the U87 EGFRvIII cellular proliferation capacity. Metabolically, chronic treatment with ACCi significantly upregulated U87 EGFRvIII cellular respiration and extracellular acidification rate, a marker of glycolytic activity, but impaired mitochondrial health by reducing maximal respiration and decreasing mitochondrial ATP production efficiency. Moreover, ACCi treatment altered the cellular lipids content and increased apoptotic caspase activity in U87 EGFRvIII cells. Collectively these data indicate that ACC inhibition, by reducing DNL and increasing cellular metabolic rate, may have therapeutic utility for the suppression of lipogenic tumor growth and warrants further investigation. PMID:28081256

  9. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and antiretroviral activity of the potent, specific human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor nelfinavir: results of a phase I/II trial and extended follow-up in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Moyle, G J; Youle, M; Higgs, C; Monaghan, J; Prince, W; Chapman, S; Clendeninn, N; Nelson, M R

    1998-08-01

    The safety, antiretroviral activity, and pharmacokinetic profile of nelfinavir, a potent and specific inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease, were assessed in a small open-label phase I/II dose-ranging study in protease inhibitor-naive HIV-positive men. A total of 22 patients with baseline plasma HIV RNA > or = 20,000 copies/mL and CD4+ counts between 200 and 500 cells/mm3 were enrolled in the study. Of the 22 patients, 20 were evaluated for activity; 10 patients assigned to 771 mg/day base equivalent (300 mg three times daily) and 10 patients assigned to 1,026 mg/day base equivalent (600 mg twice daily) given monotherapy. A capsule formulation of nelfinavir was used. The initial study period was 28 days; patients showing a virologic response of 1 log10 reduction were eligible for enrollment in an extension phase and addition of nucleoside analogues. A maximally tolerated dose of nelfinavir was not established. A dose-response relationship was observed for four (40%) patients in the 771-mg group and six (60%) patients in the 1,026-mg group experiencing a reduction from baseline in plasma HIV RNA of at lest 1 log during the 28-day study. Of these patients, five sustained the reduction in plasma HIV RNA beyond day 28 (2 patients receiving 771 mg/day and 3 patients receiving 1,026 mg/day). Median increases from baseline in CD4+ counts at day 28 were 216 cell/mm3 and 86 cell/mm3 in the 771-mg and 1,026-mg groups, respectively. After oral administration, median nelfinavir plasma concentrations on day 28 reached a maximum at 1 hour (2,966 ng/mL) in the 771-mg group and at 3 hours (3,157 ng/mL) in the 1,026-mg group. Data for 22 patients were included in the safety analysis; 12 patients (55%) reported at least one grade 2 or worse (moderate, severe, or very severe) adverse event. The most common grade 2 or worse adverse event was diarrhea, reported by two patients (20%) receiving 771 mg/day and seven patients (70%) receiving 1,026 mg/day; followed by

  10. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    modernization of the constellation . GPS III complies with 10 United States Code (USC) § 2281, ensuring the continued sustainment and operation of GPS for... constellations , further increasing the accuracy and availability of user PNT solutions. GPS III December 2015 SAR March 23, 2016 16:15:29 UNCLASSIFIED

  11. Relation of Internal Elastic Lamellar Layer Disruption to Neointimal Cellular Proliferation and Type III Collagen Deposition in Human Peripheral Artery Restenosis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Prakash; Purushothaman, K-Raman; Purushothaman, Meerarani; Baber, Usman; Tarricone, Arthur; Vasquez, Miguel; Wiley, Jose; Kini, Annapoorna; Sharma, Samin K; O'Connor, William N; Moreno, Pedro R

    2016-04-01

    Smooth muscle cell proliferation and extracellular matrix formation are responsible for disease progression in de novo and restenotic atherosclerosis. Internal elastic lamella (IEL) layer maintains the structural integrity of intima, and disruption of IEL may be associated with alterations in neointima, type III collagen deposition, and lesion progression in restenosis. Nineteen restenotic plaques (12 patients) procured during peripheral interventions were compared with 13 control plaques (12 patients) without restenosis. Hematoxylin & Eosin and elastic trichrome stains were used to measure length and percentage of IEL disruption, cellularity, and inflammation score. Type I and III collagens, smooth muscle cell (smc), fibroblast density, and nuclear proliferation (Ki67) percentage were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. IEL disruption percentage (28 ± 3.6 vs 6.1 ± 2.4; p = 0.0006), type III collagen content (0.33 ± 0.06 vs 0.17 ± 0.07; p = 0.0001), smc density (2014 ± 120 vs 923 ± 150; p = 0.0001), fibroblast density (2,282 ± 297 vs 906 ± 138; p = 0.0001), and Ki67 percentage (21.6 ± 2 vs 8.2 ± 0.65; p = 0.0001) were significantly increased in restenotic plaques compared to de novo plaques. Logistic regression analysis identified significant correlation between IEL disruption and neointimal smc density (r = 0.45; p = 0.01) and with type III collagen deposition (r = 0.61; p = 0.02) in restenosis. Increased IEL disruption may trigger cellular proliferation, altering collagen production, and enhancing restenotic neointima. In conclusion, understanding the pathologic and molecular basis of restenosis and meticulous-guided interventions oriented to minimize IEL damage may aid to reduce neointimal proliferation and the occurrence of restenosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Normal prothrombinase activity, increased systemic thrombin activity, and lower antithrombin levels in patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation at an early phase of trauma: comparison with acute coagulopathy of trauma-shock.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Yuichiro; Gando, Satoshi; Sawamura, Atsushi; Hayakawa, Mineji; Uegaki, Shinji; Kubota, Nobuhiko; Homma, Taeko; Ono, Yuichi; Honma, Yoshinori; Wada, Takeshi; Jesmin, Subrina

    2013-07-01

    We tested the hypotheses that an increase in systemic thrombin activity occurs in both disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) with the fibrinolytic phenotype and in acute coagulopathy of trauma shock (ACoTS), and that the patients diagnosed as having ACoTS overlap or are identical with those diagnosed as having DIC. We made a prospective study of 57 trauma patients, including 30 patients with DIC and 27 patients without DIC. Patients with ACoTS, defined as a prothrombin time ratio >1.2, were also investigated. We included 12 healthy volunteers as controls. The levels of soluble fibrin, antithrombin, prothrombinase activity, soluble thrombomodulin, and markers of fibrin(ogen)olysis were measured on days 1 and 3 after the trauma. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment were scored to evaluate the extent of inflammation and organ dysfunction. Patients with DIC showed more systemic inflammation and greater Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores and were transfused with more blood products than the patients without DIC. On day 1, normal prothrombinase activity, increased soluble fibrin, lesser levels of antithrombin, and increased soluble thrombomodulin were observed in patients with DIC in comparison with controls and non-DIC patients. These changes were more prominent in patients with DIC who met the overt criteria for DIC established by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis. Multiple regression analysis showed that antithrombin is an independent predictor of high soluble fibrin in DIC patients. Greater levels of fibrin and fibrinogen degradation products, D-dimer, and the fibrin and fibrinogen degradation products/D-dimer ratio indicated increased fibrin(ogen)olysis in DIC patients. Almost all ACoTS patients overlapped with the DIC patients. The changes in the measured variables in ACoTS patients coincided with those in DIC patients. Normal prothrombinase activity and insufficient control of

  13. Increased carotid intima-media thickness and reduced distensibility in human class III obesity: independent and differential influences of adiposity and blood pressure on the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Moore, Xiao L; Michell, Danielle; Lee, Sabrina; Skilton, Michael R; Nair, Rajesh; Dixon, John B; Dart, Anthony M; Chin-Dusting, Jaye

    2013-01-01

    Carotid intima-media-thickness (cIMT) and carotid distensibility (distensibility), structural and functional properties of carotid arteries respectively, are early markers, as well as strong predictors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The characteristic of these two parameters in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2) (Class III obesity), however, are largely unknown. The present study was designed to document cIMT and distensibility in this population and to relate these to other factors with established association with CVD in obesity. The study included 96 subjects (65 with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2) and 31, age- and gender-matched, with BMI of 18.5 to 30.0 kg/m(2)). cIMT and distensibility were measured by non-invasive high resolution ultrasonography, circulatory CD133(+)/KDR(+) angiogenic cells and endothelial microparticles (EMP) by flow cytometry, and plasma levels of adipokines, growth factors and cytokines by Luminex immunoassay kits. The study results demonstrated increased cIMT (0.62±0.11 mm vs. 0.54±0.08 mm, P = 0.0002) and reduced distensibility (22.52±10.79 10(-3)kpa(-1)vs. 29.91±12.37 10(-3)kpa(-1), P<0.05) in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2). Both cIMT and distensibility were significantly associated with traditional CVD risk factors, adiposity/adipokines and inflammatory markers but had no association with circulating angiogenic cells. We also demonstrated, for the first time, elevated plasma EMP levels in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2). In conclusion, cIMT is increased and distensibility reduced in Class III obesity with the changes predominantly related to conventional CVD risk factors present in this condition, demonstrating that both cIMT and distensibility remain as CVD markers in Class III obesity.

  14. A long-lived ferrocene-conjugated iridium(III) complex for sensitive turn-on luminescence detection of traces of DMSO in water and human serum.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chung-Nga; Wu, Chun; Li, Guodong; Leung, Chung-Hang; Liu, Jin-Biao; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2017-09-01

    The development of an efficient sensor for the determination of the DMSO content in aqueous solution is highly desirable in a number of chemical industries. Presented herein is a ferrocene-conjugated iridium(III) complex, which exhibits remarkable capability to detect traces of DMSO (<1% v/v) in aqueous solution through a turn-on luminescence sensing mechanism. The extraordinary sensitivity and selectivity of this newly developed complex for DMSO renders it as one of the most powerful DMSO sensors known. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Glomerular Collagen V Codeposition and Hepatic Perisinusoidal Collagen III Accumulation in Canine Collagen Type III Glomerulopathy.

    PubMed

    Rørtveit, R; Reiten, M R; Lingaas, F; Sveri, S B; Brech, A; Espenes, A; Jansen, J H

    2015-11-01

    Collagen type III glomerulopathy, also known as collagenofibrotic glomerulopathy, is a rare renal disease of unknown pathogenesis. The disease occurs in humans and animals and is characterized by massive glomerular accumulations of collagen type III. In the present study, we describe a Drever dog litter affected by an early onset variant of this glomerular disease, where 4 of 9 puppies developed renal failure within 50 days of age. Necropsy specimens of kidney from the 4 affected cases were studied by light microscopy, electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry, and characteristic lesions compatible with a diagnosis of collagen type III glomerulopathy were found. In addition, 2 cases showed atypical epithelium in the collecting ducts of the medulla, so-called adenomatoid change. Immunohistochemistry of renal specimens from collagen type III glomerulopathy-affected dogs (n = 10) originating from two different dog strains, the Drever dogs and a mixed-breed strain, demonstrated that the deposited glomerular collagen is composed of a mixture of collagen III and collagen V. The distribution of the collagen V corresponded to the localization of collagen III; however, differences in staining intensity showed that collagen type III is the dominating component. Immunohistochemistry for collagen III (n = 9) and a transmission electron microscopic study (n = 1) showed hepatic perisinusoidal collagen type III deposition in affected cases from both dog strains. This is the first report documenting glomerular accumulations of collagen type V and perisinusoidal liver collagen III deposition in canine collagen type III glomerulopathy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Detection of abused drugs in human blood by using the on-site drug-screening device Oratect® III.

    PubMed

    Toubou, Hirokazu; Namera, Akira; Arima, Yousuke; Uchida, Yukie; Torikoshi, Aiko; Moriya, Fumio; Nagao, Masataka

    2014-09-01

    A simple and precise drug screening method was developed for the detection of abused drugs in whole blood by using the Oratect® III device that is usually employed for the detection of drugs in saliva. Whole blood was acidified with phosphoric acid, following which the hemolyzed solution was filtered through the ultrafiltration column Vivaspin 2 Hydrosart®. The filtrate was then tested for the presence of drugs using Oratect III. The detection limit of the device for methamphetamine, amphetamine, morphine, codeine, dihydrocodeine, diazepam, alprazolam, estazolam, and prazepam in whole blood was 125, 125, 50, 50, 50, 25, 60, 15, and 75ng/mL, respectively. The concentration range detected was between therapeutic and toxic drug levels; therefore, the proposed method can be applied for detecting the presence of abused drugs in blood. Our method is a novel, optimized technique for use in forensic laboratories to screen whole blood for drugs of abuse. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ec sub. gamma. receptor type III (CD16) is included in the. zeta. NK receptor complex expressed by human natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.; Caligiuri, M.; O'Brien, C.; Manley, T.; Ritz, J.; Schlossman, S.F. )

    1990-03-01

    The authors recently reported that CD3{sup {minus}} natural killer (NK) cells express the {zeta} chain of the T-cell receptor complex ({zeta} NK) in association with higher molecular weight structures whose expression differs between individual NK cell clones. Because NK cell cytolytic activity is known to be triggered by perturbation of the type III Fc{sub {gamma}} receptor (CD16), they sought to determine whether this activating molecule is included in the {zeta}NK molecular complex. Biochemical evidence for a physical association between CD16 and {zeta}NK was obtained by comparing immunoprecipitates formed using monoclonal antibodies reactive with each of these molecules by SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and peptide mapping. In both clonal and polyclonal populations of CD3{sup {minus}}NK cells, CD16 and {zeta}NK specifically associated with one another. Functional evidence for a specific association between CD16 and {zeta}NK in intact cells was obtained by demonstrating a coordinate down-modulation of both of these molecules induced by either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or monoclonal antibodies reactive with CD16. The results suggest that Fc{sub {gamma}} receptor type III (CD16) is included in the {zeta}NK complex and that this complex is likely to play an important role in NK cell activation.

  18. Fc gamma receptor type III (CD16) is included in the zeta NK receptor complex expressed by human natural killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, P; Caligiuri, M; O'Brien, C; Manley, T; Ritz, J; Schlossman, S F

    1990-01-01

    We recently reported that CD3- natural killer (NK) cells express the zeta chain of the T-cell receptor complex (zeta NK) in association with higher molecular weight structures whose expression differs between individual NK cell clones. Because NK cell cytolytic activity is known to be triggered by perturbation of the type III Fc gamma receptor (CD16), we sought to determine whether this activating molecule is included in the zeta NK molecular complex. Biochemical evidence for a physical association between CD16 and zeta NK was obtained by comparing immunoprecipitates formed using monoclonal antibodies reactive with each of these molecules by SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and peptide mapping. In both clonal and polyclonal populations of CD3- NK cells, CD16 and zeta NK specifically associated with one another. Functional evidence for a specific association between CD16 and zeta NK in intact cells was obtained by demonstrating a coordinate down-modulation of both of these molecules induced by either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or monoclonal antibodies reactive with CD16. Our results suggest that Fc gamma receptor type III (CD16) is included in the zeta NK complex and that this complex is likely to play an important role in NK cell activation. Images PMID:2138330

  19. Growth factors and corneal endothelial cells: III. Stimulation of adult human corneal endothelial cell mitosis in vitro by defined mitogenic agents.

    PubMed

    Schultz, G; Cipolla, L; Whitehouse, A; Eiferman, R; Woost, P; Jumblatt, M

    1992-01-01

    Human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC) do not mitose extensively in vivo after damage to the endothelial layer. However, HCEC will divide in vitro if cultured under appropriate conditions. We measured the ability of various sera, plasma, growth factors, and nutritional substances to stimulate mitosis of HCEC during 5 days of organ culture after a central freeze injury to the endothelium. Supplementation of a chemically defined medium (CDM) with 20% fetal human serum (FHS) induced significantly higher numbers of mitotic figures or labeled nuclei of human or cat corneas compared with paired corneas cultured in CDM alone. Furthermore, addition of 20% FHS produced more labeled nuclei than did addition of 20% fetal bovine serum or 20% adult human serum. Dialyzed fetal human serum failed to stimulate mitosis, indicating that one or more components of fetal human serum with molecular weight less than 12,000 are essential for mitosis. Human plasma also failed to stimulate mitosis, but an extract of human platelets significantly stimulated high levels of nuclear labeling, suggesting that growth factors contained in platelet granules were responsible for serum-stimulated mitosis of HCEC. Addition of 100 nM epidermal growth factor (EGF) or 10 microM insulin to CDM supplemented with low levels of adult human serum (0.5%) stimulated significantly higher numbers of labeled nuclei compared with paired corneas cultured with 0.5% adult human serum. Supplementation of corneal storage media (K-Sol and CSM) with a mixture of chemically defined agents consisting of EGF, insulin, transferrin, selenium, linoleic acid, and albumin stimulated significantly higher numbers of labeled nuclei compared with paired corneas cultured in the unsupplemented corneal storage media.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Human circulating ribosomal DNA content significantly increases while circulating satellite III (1q12) content decreases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma- neutron and tritium beta-radiation.

    PubMed

    Korzeneva, Inna B; Kostuyk, Svetlana V; Ershova, Elizaveta S; Skorodumova, Elena N; Zhuravleva, Veronika F; Pankratova, Galina V; Volkova, Irina V; Stepanova, Elena V; Porokhovnik, Lev N; Veiko, Natalia N

    A single exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) results in an elevated cell-free DNA (cfDNA) content in the blood plasma. In this case, the cfDNA concentration can be a marker of the cell death in the organism. However, a chronic exposure to a low-dose IR enhances both the endonuclease activity and titer of antibodies to DNA in blood plasma, resulting in a decrease of the total concentration of circulating cfDNA in exposed people. In this case, the total cfDNA concentration should not be considered as a marker of the cell death in an exposed body. We assumed that a pool of the cfDNA circulating in the exposed people contains DNA fragments, which are resistant to a double-strand break formation in the environment of the elevated plasma endonuclease activity, and can be accumulated in the blood plasma. In order to test this hypothesis, we studied the content of GC-rich sequences (69%GC) of the transcribed region of human ribosomal repeat (rDNA), as well as the content of AT-rich repeat (63%AT) of satellite III (1q12) in the cfDNA samples obtained from 285 individuals. We have found that a chronic exposure to gamma-neutron radiation (N=88) and tritium β-radiation (N=88) evokes an increase of the rDNA content (RrDNA index) and a decrease of the satellite III content (RsatIII index) in the circulating cfDNA as compared with the cfDNA of non-exposed people (N=109). Such index that simultaneously displays both the increase of rDNA content and decrease of satellite III content in the cfDNA (RrDNA/RsatIII) can be recommended as a marker of chronic processes in the body that involve the elevated cell death rate and/or increased blood plasma endonuclease activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of a high carbohydrate diet on the content of apolipoproteins C-II, C-III and E in human plasma high density lipoprotein subfractions.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, N; Holdsworth, G; Barnhart, R L; Srivastava, L S; Glueck, C J; Kashyap, M L; Jackson, R L

    1983-03-01

    The effect of isocaloric high and low carbohydrate (Carb) diets on the structure and apoprotein composition of plasma high density lipoproteins (HDL) was assessed in four healthy men. The high Carb diet contained 65% calories as Carb and 15% as fat; the low Carb was 15% and 65%, respectively, with protein fixed at 20% of calories in each case. Cholesterol was 400 mg/day and the P/S ratio of the fat was 0.4. Each diet was sequentially consumed for periods of 3 weeks. At the end of each 3-week study period, plasma HDL2 and HDL3 were isolated by zonal ultracentrifugation and their apoprotein and lipid compositions were determined. Compared to the low Carb diet, the high Carb diet was associated with an increase in the size of HDL2 (116.0 +/- 1.8 vs. 109.1 +/- 1.8 A) and in the content (mean weight % +/- SEM) of apoE (2.81 +/- 0.71 vs. 1.79 +/- 0.49, P less than 0.01) and of apoC-II (1.73 +/- 0.09 vs. 1.11 +/- 0.12, P less than 0.01). HDL2 apoC-III content was not significantly different on the two diets (6.49 +/- 0.50 vs. 7.42 +/- 1.21). On the two diets, HDL3 size and HDL3 apoE content were not significantly changed. HDL3 apoC-II and apoC-III, however, were higher on the high Carb diet, P less than 0.05. The ratio (by weight) of HDL2 apoE/HDL2 apoC-II + C-III increased on the high Carb diet compared to the low Carb diet (0.344 +/- 0.058 vs. 0.228 +/- 0.053, P less than 0.01). We suggest that the increased amount of apolipoprotein E in HDL2 may influence its rate of catabolic clearance and may account for the well-known decrease in plasma HDL-cholesterol in subjects on high Carb diets.

  2. Kinetic and kinematic responses of post mortem human surrogates and the Hybrid III ATD in high-speed frontal sled tests.

    PubMed

    Beeman, Stephanie M; Kemper, Andrew R; Madigan, Michael L; Duma, Stefan M

    2013-06-01

    Despite improvements in vehicle design and safety technologies, frontal automotive collisions continue to result in a substantial number of injuries and fatalities each year. Although a considerable amount of research has been performed on PMHSs and ATDs, matched dynamic whole-body frontal testing with PMHSs and the current ATD aimed at quantifying both kinetic and kinematic data in a single controlled study is lacking in the literature. Therefore, a total of 4 dynamic matched frontal sled tests were performed with three male PMHSs and a Hybrid III 50th percentile male ATD (28.6g, Δv=40 kph). Each subject was restrained using a 4 kN load limiting, driver-side, 3-point seatbelt. Belt force was measured for the lap belt and shoulder belt. Reaction forces were measured at the seat pan, seat back, independent foot plates, and steering column. Linear head acceleration, angular head acceleration, and pelvic acceleration were measured for all subjects. Acceleration of C7, T7, T12, both femurs, and both tibias were also measured for the PMHSs. A Vicon motion analysis system, consisting of 12 MX-T20 2 megapixel cameras, was used to quantify subject 3D motion (±1 mm) at a rate of 1 kHz. Excursions of select anatomical regions were normalized to their respective initial positions and compared by test condition and between subject types. Notable discrepancies were observed in the responses of the PMHSs and the ATD. The reaction forces and belt loading for the ATD, particularly foot plate, seat back, steering column, and lap belt forces, were not in agreement with those of the PMHSs. The forward excursions of the ATD were consistently within those of the PMHSs with the exception of the left upper extremity. This could potentially be due to the known limitations of the Hybrid III ATD shoulder and chest. The results presented herein demonstrate that there are some limitations to the current Hybrid III ATD under the loading conditions evaluated in the current study. Overall

  3. Synthesis, complexation and water exchange properties of Gd(III)-TTDA-mono and bis(amide) derivatives and their binding affinity to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Ou, Ming-Hung; Chen, Yi-Ming; Chang, Ya-Hui; Lu, Wen-Kuei; Liu, Gin-Chung; Wang, Yun-Ming

    2007-07-14

    With the objective of tuning the lipophilicity of ligands and maintaining the neutrality and stability of Gd(III) chelate, we designed and synthesized two bis(amide) derivatives of TTDA, TTDA-BMA and TTDA-BBA, and a mono(amide) derivative, TTDA-N-MOBA. The ligand protonation constants and complex stability constants for various metal ions were determined in this study. The identification of the microscopic sites of protonation of the amide ligand by 1H NMR titrations show that the first protonation site occurs on the central nitrogen atom. The values of the stability constant of TTDA-mono and bis(amide) complex are significantly lower than those of TTDA and DTPA, but the selectivity constants of these ligands for Gd(III) over Zn(II) and Cu(II) are slightly higher than those of TTDA and DTPA. On the basis of the water-exchange rate values available for [Gd(TTDA-BMA)(H2O)], [Gd(TTDA-BBA)(H2O)] and [Gd(TTDA-N-MOBA)(H2O)]-, we can state that, in general, the replacement of one carboxylate group by an amide group decreases the water-exchange rate of the gadolinium(III) complexes by a factor of about three to five. The decrease in the exchange rate is explained in terms of a decreased steric crowding and charge effect around the metal ion when carboxylates are replaced by an amide group. In addition, to support the HSA protein binding studies of lipophilic [Gd(TTDA-N-MOBA)(H2O)]- and [Gd(TTDA-BBA)(H2O)] complexes, further protein-complex binding was studied by ultrafiltration and relaxivity studies. The binding constants (KA) of [Gd(TTDA-N-MOBA)(H2O)]- and [Gd(TTDA-BBA)(H2O)] are 8.6 x 10(2) and 1.0 x 10(4) dm3 mol(-1), respectively. The bound relaxivities (r1(b)) are 51.8 and 52 dm3 mmol(-1) s(-1), respectively. The KA value of [Gd(TTDA-BBA)(H2O)] is similar to that of MS-325 and indicates a stronger interaction of [Gd(TTDA-BBA)(H2O)] with HSA.

  4. Identification of a new structural variant of human apolipoprotein E, E2(Lys146 leads to Gln), in a type III hyperlipoproteinemic subject with the E3/2 phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Rall, S C; Weisgraber, K H; Innerarity, T L; Bersot, T P; Mahley, R W; Blum, C B

    1983-01-01

    A type III hyperlipoproteinemic subject having the apolipoprotein E (apo E) phenotype E3/2 was identified. From isoelectric focusing experiments in conjunction with cysteamine treatment (a method that measures cysteine content in apo E), the E2 isoform of this subject was determined to have only one cysteine residue, in contrast to all previously studied E2 apoproteins, which had two cysteines. This single cysteine was shown to be at residue 112, the same site at which it occurs in apo E3. From amino acid and sequence analyses, it was determined that this apo E2 differed from apo E3 by the occurrence of glutamine rather than lysine at residue 146. When phospholipid X protein recombinants of the subject's isolated E3 and E2 isoforms were tested for their ability to bind to the human fibroblast apo-B,E receptor, it was found that the E3 bound normally (compared with an apo E3 control) but that the E2 had defective binding (approximately 40% of normal). Although they contained E3 as well as E2, the beta-very low density lipoproteins (beta-VLDL) from this subject were very similar in character to the beta-VLDL from an E2/2 type III hyperlipoproteinemic subject; similar subfractions could be obtained from each subject and were shown to have a similar ability to stimulate cholesteryl ester accumulation in mouse peritoneal macrophages. The new apo E2 variant has also been detected in a second type III hyperlipoproteinemic subject. Images PMID:6313758

  5. Grape seed extract targets mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III and induces oxidative and metabolic stress leading to cytoprotective autophagy and apoptotic death in human head and neck cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shrotriya, Sangeeta; Deep, Gagan; Lopert, Pamela; Patel, Manisha; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2015-12-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a major killer worldwide and innovative measures are urgently warranted to lower the morbidity and mortality caused by this malignancy. Aberrant redox and metabolic status in HNSCC cells offer a unique opportunity to specifically target cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of grape seed extract (GSE) to target the redox and bioenergetic alterations in HNSCC cells. GSE treatment decreased the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity, increased the mitochondrial superoxide levels and depleted the levels of cellular antioxidant (glutathione), thus resulting in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in human HNSCC Detroit 562 and FaDu cells. Polyethylene glycol-SOD addition reversed the GSE-mediated apoptosis without restoring complex III activity. Along with redox changes, GSE inhibited the extracellular acidification rate (representing glycolysis) and oxygen consumption rate (indicating oxidative phosphorylation) leading to metabolic stress in HNSCC cells. Molecular studies revealed that GSE activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and suppressed Akt/mTOR/4E-BP1/S6K signaling in both Detroit 562 and FaDu cells. Interestingly, GSE increased the autophagic load specifically in FaDu cells, and autophagy inhibition significantly augmented the apoptosis in these cells. Consistent with in vitro results, in vivo analyses also showed that GSE feeding in nude mice activated AMPK and induced-autophagy in FaDu xenograft tumor tissues. Overall, these findings are innovative as we for the first time showed that GSE targets ETC complex III and induces oxidative and metabolic stress, thereby, causing autophagy and apoptotic death in HNSCC cells. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Grape seed extract targets mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III and induces oxidative and metabolic stress leading to cytoprotective autophagy and apoptotic death in human head and neck cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shrotriya, Sangeeta; Deep, Gagan; Lopert, Pamela; Patel, Manisha; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a major killer worldwide and innovative measures are urgently warranted to lower the morbidity and mortality caused by this malignancy. Aberrant redox and metabolic status in HNSCC cells offer a unique opportunity to specifically target cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of grape seed extract (GSE) to target the redox and bioenergetic alterations in HNSCC cells. GSE treatment decreased the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity, increased the mitochondrial superoxide levels and depleted the levels of cellular antioxidant (glutathione), thus resulting in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in human HNSCC Detroit 562 and FaDu cells. Polyethylene glycol-SOD addition reversed the GSE-mediated apoptosis without restoring complex III activity. Along with redox changes, GSE inhibited the extracellular acidification rate (representing glycolysis) and oxygen consumption rate (indicating oxidative phosphorylation) leading to metabolic stress in HNSCC cells. Molecular studies revealed that GSE activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and suppressed Akt/mTOR/4E-BP1/S6K signaling in both Detroit 562 and FaDu cells. Interestingly, GSE increased the autophagic load specifically in FaDu cells, and autophagy inhibition significantly augmented the apoptosis in these cells. Consistent with in vitro results, in vivo analyses also showed that GSE feeding in nude mice activated AMPK and induced-autophagy in FaDu xenograft tumor tissues. Overall, these findings are innovative as we for the first time showed that GSE targets ETC complex III and induces oxidative and metabolic stress, thereby, causing autophagy and apoptotic death in HNSCC cells. PMID:25557495

  7. Development of a novel chemiluminescence method for the determination of cefazolin sodium in injectable powder and human urine based on a luminol-Cu(III) complex reaction in alkaline medium.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hanwen; Wang, Juan; Wang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    A novel chemiluminescence (CL) method was developed for the determination of cefazolin sodium based on the CL reaction between the [Cu(HIO6)2](5-) Cu(III) complex and luminol in alkaline solution. Results showed that CL emission of Cu(III) complex-luminol in alkaline medium was significantly different from that in acidic medium. A possible mechanism of the enhanced effect of cefazolin on CL emission of the [Cu(HIO6)2](5-)-luminol system was proposed. The effect of the reaction conditions on CL emissions was examined. Under optimized conditions, a good linear relationship was obtained between CL intensity and concentrations of cefazolin sodium in the range of 2.0 x 10(-8) to 2.0 x 10(-6) g/mL with a correlation coefficient of R(2) = 0.9978. The limit of detection was 4.58 x 10(-9) g/mL. The proposed method was applied for the determination of cefazolin sodium in real samples with recoveries of 82.0-109% with an RSD of 0.7-2.1%. The proposed method was successfully used for the determination of cefazolin sodium in injectable powder preparations and human urine with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The novel pterostilbene derivative ANK-199 induces autophagic cell death through regulating PI3 kinase class III/beclin 1/Atg‑related proteins in cisplatin‑resistant CAR human oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Min-Tsang; Chen, Hao-Ping; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Wu, Tian-Shung; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Huang, Li-Jiau; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2014-08-01

    Pterostilbene is an effective chemopreventive agent against multiple types of cancer cells. A novel pterostilbene derivative, ANK-199, was designed and synthesized by our group. Its antitumor activity and mechanism in cisplatin-resistant CAR human oral cancer cells were investigated in this study. Our results show that ANK-199 has an extremely low toxicity in normal oral cell lines. The formation of autophagic vacuoles and acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) was observed in the ANK-199-treated CAR cells by monodansylcadaverine (MDC) and acridine orange (AO) staining, suggesting that ANK-199 is able to induce autophagic cell death in CAR cells. Neither DNA fragmentation nor DNA condensation was observed, which means that ANK-199-induced cell death is not triggered by apoptosis. In accordance with morphological observation, 3-MA, a specific inhibitor of PI3K kinase class III, can inhibit the autophagic vesicle formation induced by ANK-199. In addition, ANK-199 is also able to enhance the protein levels of autophagic proteins, Atg complex, beclin 1, PI3K class III and LC3-II, and mRNA expression of autophagic genes Atg7, Atg12, beclin 1 and LC3-II in the ANK-199-treated CAR cells. A molecular signaling pathway induced by ANK-199 was therefore summarized. Results presented in this study show that ANK-199 may become a novel therapeutic reagent for the treatment of oral cancer in the near future (patent pending).

  9. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) causes a persistent increase in steady-state amounts of type I and type III collagen and fibronectin mRNAs in normal human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Varga, J; Rosenbloom, J; Jimenez, S A

    1987-01-01

    It has been previously shown that transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) is capable of stimulating fibroblast collagen and fibronectin biosynthesis. The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanisms involved in TGF beta stimulation of fibroblast biosynthetic activity. Our results indicate that TGF beta causes a marked enhancement of the production of types I and III collagens and fibronectin by cultured normal human dermal fibroblasts. The rate of collagen production by fibroblasts exposed to TGF beta was 2-3-fold greater than that of control cells. These effects were associated with a 2-3-fold increase in the steady-state amounts of types I and III collagen mRNAs and a 5-8-fold increase in the amounts of fibronectin mRNAs as determined by dot-blot hybridization with specific cloned cDNA probes. In addition, the increased production of collagen and fibronectin and the increased amounts of their corresponding mRNAs remained elevated for at least 72 h after removal of TGF beta. These findings suggest that TGF beta may play a major role in the normal regulation of extracellular matrix production in vivo and may contribute to the development of pathological states of fibrosis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:3501287

  10. Transplantation of human renal cell carcinoma into NMRI nu/nu mice. III. Effect of irradiation on tumor acceptance and tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, U.; Huland, H.; Baisch, H.; Kloeppel, G.

    1985-07-01

    Irradiation of human renal cell carcinoma before radical tumor nephrectomy resulted in a significantly lower acceptance rate (1 of 7) in nude mice than for nonirradiated tumors (all of 13). The tumor tissue was transplanted into NMRI nu/nu mice immediately after nephrectomy. In this experimental system the authors demonstrated the reduced vitality of human tumor cells after irradiation. In a second series of experiments, 3 morphologically different human renal cell carcinomas were irradiated at various doses after establishment in nude mice. The irradiated tumor tissue was transplanted to the next passage. The morphology, proliferation rate and growth of these tumors were compared with those of nonirradiated controls. Radiation effect was dose dependent in the responding tumor types. The characteristics correlated with radiosensitivity were high proliferation rate (measured by flow cytometry), low cytologic grading and fast growth rate in the nude mice.

  11. A mouse model of a human congenital disorder of glycosylation caused by loss of PMM2

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Barden; Clasquin, Michelle; Smolen, Gromoslaw A.; Histen, Gavin; Powe, Josh; Chen, Yue; Lin, Zhizhong; Lu, Chenming; Liu, Yan; Cang, Yong; Yan, Zhonghua; Xia, Yuanfeng; Thompson, Ryan; Singleton, Chris; Dorsch, Marion; Silverman, Lee; Su, Shin-San Michael; Freeze, Hudson H.; Jin, Shengfang

    2016-01-01

    The most common congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG), phosphomannomutase 2 (PMM2)-CDG, is caused by mutations in PMM2 that limit availability of mannose precursors required for protein N-glycosylation. The disorder has no therapy and there are no models to test new treatments. We generated compound heterozygous mice with the R137H and F115L mutations in Pmm2 that correspond to the most prevalent alleles found in patients with PMM2-CDG. Many Pmm2R137H/F115L mice died prenatally, while survivors had significantly stunted growth. These animals and cells derived from them showed protein glycosylation deficiencies similar to those found in patients with PMM2-CDG. Growth-related glycoproteins insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1, IGF binding protein-3 and acid-labile subunit, along with antithrombin III, were all deficient in Pmm2R137H/F115L mice, but their levels in heterozygous mice were comparable to wild-type (WT) littermates. These imbalances, resulting from defective glycosylation, are likely the cause of the stunted growth seen both in our model and in PMM2-CDG patients. Both Pmm2R137H/F115L mouse and PMM2-CDG patient-derived fibroblasts displayed reductions in PMM activity, guanosine diphosphate mannose, lipid-linked oligosaccharide precursor and total cellular protein glycosylation, along with hypoglycosylation of a new endogenous biomarker, glycoprotein 130 (gp130). Over-expression of WT-PMM2 in patient-derived fibroblasts rescued all these defects, showing that restoration of mutant PMM2 activity is a viable therapeutic strategy. This functional mouse model of PMM2-CDG, in vitro assays and identification of the novel gp130 biomarker all shed light on the human disease, and moreover, provide the essential tools to test potential therapeutics for this untreatable disease. PMID:27053713

  12. The metastability of human UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE) is increased by variants associated with type III galactosemia but decreased by substrate and cofactor binding.

    PubMed

    Pey, Angel L; Padín-Gonzalez, Esperanza; Mesa-Torres, Noel; Timson, David J

    2014-11-15

    Type III galactosemia is an inherited disease caused by mutations which affect the activity of UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE). We evaluated the impact of four disease-associated variants (p.N34S, p.G90E, p.V94M and p.K161N) on the conformational stability and dynamics of GALE. Thermal denaturation studies showed that wild-type GALE denatures at temperatures close to physiological, and disease-associated mutations often reduce GALE's thermal stability. This denaturation is under kinetic control and results partly from dimer dissociation. The natural ligands, NAD(+) and UDP-glucose, stabilize GALE. Proteolysis studies showed that the natural ligands and disease-associated variations affect local dynamics in the N-terminal region of GALE. Proteolysis kinetics followed a two-step irreversible model in which the intact protein is cleaved at Ala38 forming a long-lived intermediate in the first step. NAD(+) reduces the rate of the first step, increasing the amount of undigested protein whereas UDP-glucose reduces the rate of the second step, increasing accumulation of the intermediate. Disease-associated variants affect these rates and the amounts of protein in each state. Our results also suggest communication between domains in GALE. We hypothesize that, in vivo, concentrations of natural ligands modulate GALE stability and that it should be possible to discover compounds which mimic the stabilising effects of the natural ligands overcoming mutation-induced destabilization.

  13. SUPERSTARS III: K-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  14. RNA polymerase III under control: repression and de-repression.

    PubMed

    Boguta, Magdalena; Graczyk, Damian

    2011-09-01

    The synthesis of tRNA by yeast RNA polymerase III (Pol III) is regulated in response to changing environmental conditions. This control is mediated by Maf1, the global negative regulator of Pol III transcription conserved from yeast to humans. Details regarding the molecular basis of Pol III repression by Maf1 are now emerging from recently reported structural and biochemical data on Pol III and Maf1. Efficient Pol III transcription, following the shift of cells from a non-fermentable carbon source to glucose, requires phosphorylation of Maf1. One of the newly identified Maf1 kinases is the chromatin-bound casein kinase II (CK2). Current studies have allowed us to propose an innovative mechanism of Pol III regulation. We suggest that CK2-mediated phosphorylation of Maf1, occurring directly on tDNA chromatin, controls Pol III recycling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phase III, randomized controlled trial in girls 9-15 years old to evaluate lot consistency of a novel nine-valent human papillomavirus L1 virus-like particle vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Luxembourg, Alain; Moreira, Edson D; Samakoses, Rudiwilai; Kim, Kyung-Hyo; Sun, Xiao; Maansson, Roger; Moeller, Erin; Christiano, Susan; Chen, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    A 9-valent human papillomavirus (6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) VLP (9vHPV) vaccine has recently been proven highly efficacious in preventing disease associated with vaccine HPV types in a pivotal Phase III study. The demonstration of lot-to-lot consistency to confirm the reliability of the manufacturing process is a regulatory requirement for vaccine licensure in the United States. A randomized trial was conducted to demonstrate that three lots of 9vHPV vaccine elicit equivalent antibody response for all 9 vaccine types. The study required thorough planning because it required success on 27 separate statistical comparisons. An innovative statistical approach was used taking into account between-lot variance for more conservative power calculations. The study demonstrated equivalence of three lots of 9vHPV vaccine for all 9 vaccine types. PMID:26086587

  16. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Economically Depressed Areas Strand: Human Development. Module III-E-1: Characteristics of Economically Depressed Areas Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Fresno. Dept. of Home Economics.

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on characteristics of economically depressed area families is the first in a set of three modules on human development in economically depressed areas (EDA). (This set is part of a larger set of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and…

  17. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Economically Depressed Areas Strand: Human Development. Module III-E-2: The Child and the Economically Depressed Area Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boogaert, John

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on the child and the economically depressed area family is the second in a set of three modules on human development in economically depressed areas (EDA). (This set is part of a larger set of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking…

  18. Single chain fragment variable antibodies developed by using as target the 3rd fibronectin type III homologous repeat fragment of human neural cell adhesion molecule L1 promote cell migration and neuritogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dan-Yang; Yu, Yang; Zhao, Xuan-Jun; Schachner, Melitta; Zhao, Wei-Jiang

    2015-01-15

    L1CAM plays important roles during ontogeny, including promotion of neuronal cell migration and neuritogenesis, and stimulation of axonal outgrowth, fasciculation and myelination. These functions are at least partially exerted through a 16-mer amino acid sequence in the third fibronectin type III-like repeat of L1, which associates with several interaction partners, including integrins, other adhesion molecules and growth factor receptors. Here, using the Tomlinson I library for phage display, we obtained two single-chain variable fragment antibodies (scFvs) against this peptide sequence of human L1, hereafter called H3 peptide. Both scFvs recognize the H3 peptide and the extracellular domain of L1, as tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining of L1 expresssing cells. Furthermore, both scFvs reduce U-87 MG cell adhesion to fibronectin, while stimulating cell migration. Application of scFvs to human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells promote process outgrowth. Similar to triggering of endogenous L1 functions at the cell surface, both scFvs activate the signal transducers Erk and Src in these cells. Our results indicate that scFvs against a functionally pivotal domain in L1 trigger its regeneration-beneficial functions in vitro, encouraging thoughts on therapy of neurodegenerative diseases in the hope to ameliorate human nervous system diseases.

  19. Subcellular location of horseradish peroxidase in horseradish leaves treated with La(III), Ce(III) and Tb(III).

    PubMed

    Ye, Yaxin; Wang, Lihong; Huang, Xiaohua; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Zhou, Qing; Guo, Shaofen

    2008-11-01

    The agricultural application of rare-earth elements (REEs) would promote REEs inevitably to enter in the environment and then to threaten the environmental safety and human health. Therefore, the distribution of the REEs ion, (141)Ce(III) and effects of La(III), Ce(III) and Tb(III) on the distribution of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in horseradish mesophyll cells were investigated with electron microscopic radioautography and transmission electron microscopic cytochemistry. It was found for the first time that REEs ions can enter into the mesophyll cells, deposit in both extra and intra-cellular. Compared to the normal condition, after the horseradish leaves treated with La(III) or Tb(III), HRP located on the tonoplast is decreased and HRP is mainly located on the cell wall, while HRP is mainly located on the plasma membrane after the horseradish leaves were treated with Ce(III). This also indicated that REEs ions may regulate the plant growth through changing the distribution of enzymes.

  20. Altered cofactor binding affects stability and activity of human UDP-galactose 4′-epimerase: implications for type III galactosemia

    PubMed Central

    McCorvie, Thomas J.; Liu, Ying; Frazer, Andrew; Gleason, Tyler J.; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.; Timson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Deficiency of UDP-galactose 4′-epimerase is implicated in type III galactosemia. Two variants, p.K161N-hGALE and p.D175N-hGALE, have been previously found in combination with other alleles in patients with a mild form of the disease. Both variants were studied in vivo and in vitro and showed different levels of impairment. p.K161N-hGALE was severely impaired with substantially reduced enzymatic activity, increased thermal stability, reduced cofactor binding and inability to rescue the galactose-sensitivity of gal10-null yeast. Interestingly p.K161N-hGALE showed less impairment of activity with UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine in comparison to UDP-galactose. Differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that p.K161N-hGALE was more stable than the wild-type protein and only changed stability in the presence of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine and NAD+. p.D175N-hGALE essentially rescued the galactose-sensitivity of gal10-null yeast, was less stable than the wild-type protein but showed increased stability in the presence of substrates and cofactor. We postulate that p.K161N-hGALE causes its effects by abolishing an important interaction between the protein and the cofactor, whereas p.D175N-hGALE is predicted to remove a stabilizing salt bridge between the ends of two α-helices that contain residues that interact with NAD+. These results suggest that the cofactor binding is dynamic and that its loss results in significant structural changes that may be important in disease causation. PMID:22613355

  1. Effect of Human and Bovine Serum Albumin on kinetic Chemiluminescence of Mn (III)-Tetrakis (4-Sulfonatophenyl) Porphyrin-Luminol-Hydrogen Peroxide System

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Sayed Yahya; Abedirad, Seyed Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The present work deals with an attempt to study the effect of human and bovine serum albumin on kinetic parameters of chemiluminescence of luminol-hydrogen peroxide system catalyzed by manganese tetrasulfonatophenyl porphyrin (MnTSPP). The investigated parameters involved pseudo-first-order rise and fall rate constant for the chemiluminescence burst, maximum level intensity, time to reach maximum intensity, total light yield, and values of the intensity at maximum CL which were evaluated by nonlinear least square program KINFIT. Because of interaction of metalloporphyrin with proteins, the CL parameters are drastically affected. The systems resulted in Stern-Volmer plots with k Q values of 3.17 × 105 and 3.7 × 105 M−1 in the quencher concentration range of 1.5 × 10−6 to 1.5 × 10−5 M for human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), respectively. PMID:22645466

  2. Effect of human and bovine serum albumin on kinetic chemiluminescence of Mn (III)-Tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrin-luminol-hydrogen peroxide system.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Sayed Yahya; Abedirad, Seyed Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The present work deals with an attempt to study the effect of human and bovine serum albumin on kinetic parameters of chemiluminescence of luminol-hydrogen peroxide system catalyzed by manganese tetrasulfonatophenyl porphyrin (MnTSPP). The investigated parameters involved pseudo-first-order rise and fall rate constant for the chemiluminescence burst, maximum level intensity, time to reach maximum intensity, total light yield, and values of the intensity at maximum CL which were evaluated by nonlinear least square program KINFIT. Because of interaction of metalloporphyrin with proteins, the CL parameters are drastically affected. The systems resulted in Stern-Volmer plots with k(Q) values of 3.17 × 10(5) and 3.7 × 10(5) M(-1) in the quencher concentration range of 1.5 × 10(-6) to 1.5 × 10(-5) M for human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), respectively.

  3. IFPA Meeting 2013 Workshop Report III: maternal placental immunological interactions, novel determinants of trophoblast cell fate, dual ex vivo perfusion of the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Abumaree, M H; Brownbill, P; Burton, G; Castillo, C; Chamley, L; Croy, B A; Drewlo, S; Dunk, C; Girard, S; Hansson, S; Jones, S; Jurisicova, A; Lewis, R; Letarte, M; Parast, M; Pehrson, C; Rappolee, D; Schneider, H; Tannetta, D; Varmuza, S; Wadsack, C; Wallace, A E; Zenerino, C; Lash, G E

    2014-02-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialised topics. At IFPA meeting 2013 there were twelve themed workshops, three of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology but collectively covered areas of placental function, cell turnover and immunology: 1) immunology; 2) novel determinants of placental cell fate; 3) dual perfusion of human placental tissue.

  4. Reduction of misleading ("false") positive results in mammalian cell genotoxicity assays. III: sensitivity of human cell types to known genotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Paul; Smith, Robert; Smith, Katie; Young, Jamie; Jeffrey, Laura; Carmichael, Paul; Kirkland, David; Pfuhler, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    We have demonstrated previously that the seemingly high rate of "false" or "misleading" positive results from in vitro micronucleus assays (MNvit) was greater when rodent derived cell lines and certain toxicity measures, such as relative cell count or replication index, were used. These studies suggested that the use of a human cell type with functional p53 and a toxicity measure that included a function of cell proliferation could dramatically reduce the detection of misleading positive results. A reduced "false positive rate" should not be at the expense of a loss of sensitivity of the assay. Therefore, we have investigated the sensitivity of the MNvit assay to known genotoxic agents using three cell types shown previously to be less prone to misleading positives, namely human lymphocytes (HuLy), TK6 and HepG2 cells. The 17 chemicals are well characterised and are from a list of chemicals known to produce positive results in in vitro mammalian cell assays. These data demonstrated a high sensitivity of the assay in which TK6 and HuLy cells were employed, such that 15 out of the 17 chemicals were correctly identified. By contrast, the use of HepG2 cells resulted in far fewer than expected positive responses. In conclusion, using TK6 and HuLy cells in preference to long established rodent cell lines in order to improve specificity does not compromise the sensitivity of the MNvit to detect known genotoxic agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Human Lung Cancer Risks from Radon – Part III - Evidence of Influence of Combined Bystander and Adaptive Response Effects on Radon Case-Control Studies - A Microdose Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Bobby E.; Thompson, Richard E.; Beecher, Georgia C.

    2012-01-01

    Since the publication of the BEIR VI (1999) report on health risks from radon, a significant amount of