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Sample records for anton arhipov peeter

  1. Anton's Syndrome and Eugenics

    PubMed Central

    Frahm-Falkenberg, Siska

    2011-01-01

    Anton's syndrome is arguably the most striking form of anosognosia. Patients with this syndrome behave as if they can see despite their obvious blindness. Although best known for his description of asomatognosia and visual anosognosia, Gabriel Anton (1858-1933) made other significant contributions to the clinical neurosciences, including pioneering work in neurosurgery, neuropsychology, and child psychiatry. However, it has not been recognized in the English literature that Anton was also a dedicated advocate of eugenics and racial hygiene. This paper provides a case of Anton's syndrome and puts the works of Gabriel Anton into their historic context. PMID:21779298

  2. Anton Grdina Primary Achievement Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Anton project presents a partnership between NASA Lewis, CMHA, and the Cleveland Public Schools. The intent of this project is to empower parents to work with their children in science and math activities.

  3. Anton Chekhov: Yalta Years, 1899-1904.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkle, Lydle

    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov spent 6 of the last 7 years of his life at Yalta (located on the Crimean Peninsula) where he had a house constructed in order that he might live in a climate favorable to his failing health. During these years Chekhov married the actress Olga Knipper and met Leo Tolstoy, who was near the end of his life. Chekhov also…

  4. Anton Chekhov: Yalta Years, 1899-1904.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkle, Lydle

    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov spent 6 of the last 7 years of his life at Yalta (located on the Crimean Peninsula) where he had a house constructed in order that he might live in a climate favorable to his failing health. During these years Chekhov married the actress Olga Knipper and met Leo Tolstoy, who was near the end of his life. Chekhov also…

  5. Anton Makarenko: Contribution to Soviet Educational Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zilberman, Victor

    1988-01-01

    Examines the relationship of Anton Makarenko's educational theories to Russian history, tradition, and culture. Analyzes the influence of Russian and foreign prerevolutionary thinking on Makarenko's major theories. Discusses his major educational concepts (i.e., discipline, education through work, collectives, and the teacher's role) and views of…

  6. [Anton Chekhov--a self-deceiver?].

    PubMed

    Lund, P J

    2000-04-10

    The Russian author and doctor Anton Chekhov (1860-1904) died from tuberculosis in 1904. He had his first haemoptysis in 1884. In spite of continuing symptoms he did not let himself be examined by colleagues until he had a severe haemorrhage in 1897. He was then hospitalized, and extensive bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed. Even after that, he did not take his disease seriously. His attitude has been taken as an example of a doctor's self-deception. Almost 4,500 of Chekhov's letters has been published. In this article, the letters and contemporary memorial literature are used to illustrate the development of his disease and his ambivalence towards it. His self-deception was not that massive; there is a strain of uneasiness in his reports of his symptoms.

  7. Introduction [to Special Section on Anton Hales Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, R. W.; Mitterer, R. M.

    1983-04-01

    This volume of the Journal of Geophysical Research is devoted to Anton L. Hales. It contains many of the papers presented at the Anton L. Hales Symposium on `Some Recent Advances in Geophysics' held at The University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) on October 5-6, 1981, to honor Professor Hales on his retirement from UTD at the age of 70. Many former students, colleagues, and friends attended the symposium to honor Anton and to share their experiences with a man who had touched their lives and left his mark on the field of geophysics. Professor Hales' career in geophysics spans 50 years beginning with his first course in geophysics in 1932 at Cambridge University.

  8. The Distribution of Accommodation Rates in St. Anton, Austria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eysberg, Cees D.

    1984-01-01

    For use in college geography courses which teach spatial analysis, this case study investigated whether hotel rates in the ski resort of St. Anton, Austria, are affected by the hotel's proximity to ski lifts and apres ski establishments. Results showed that tourists are sensitive to distance; spatial behavior is predictable. (RM)

  9. The Distribution of Accommodation Rates in St. Anton, Austria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eysberg, Cees D.

    1984-01-01

    For use in college geography courses which teach spatial analysis, this case study investigated whether hotel rates in the ski resort of St. Anton, Austria, are affected by the hotel's proximity to ski lifts and apres ski establishments. Results showed that tourists are sensitive to distance; spatial behavior is predictable. (RM)

  10. IN MEMORIAM: Hermann Anton Haus, 1925 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-08-01

    Photograph Hermann Anton Haus, an Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), was to have been a Keynote Speaker at the Fluctuations and Noise in Photonics and Quantum Optics Conference, from which the papers in this special issue derive. Sadly, on May 21, 2003 - less than two weeks before the conference - Professor Haus succumbed to a heart attack after arriving home in Lexington, Massachusetts, from his regular, 15-mile commute by bicycle from MIT. He was 77. Throughout his lengthy and illustrious career, Professor Haus had repeatedly and very successfully addressed problems of fluctuations and noise, with special focus on the fundamental issues that arise in quantum optics. To honour Professor Haus' legacy to our technical community, this special issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics is dedicated to his memory. Professor Haus was born in Ljubljana, Slovenia, in the former Yugoslavia, on 8 August 1925. After attending the Technische Hochschule, Graz, and the Technische Hochschule, Wien, in Austria, he received his Bachelor of Science degree from Union College in Schenectady, New York in 1949. In 1951, he graduated from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute with a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering, and came to MIT, where he earned his Doctorate of Science and joined the faculty in 1954. He was promoted to Associate Professor in 1958, to Professor in 1962, and to Elihu Thomson Professor in 1973. In 1986, he was conferred the honour of Institute Professor. Professor Haus had a lifelong fascination with noise. While still an undergraduate at Union College, he became aware of Norbert Wiener's theories of statistical phenomena - the new mathematics needed to understand and quantify the random fluctuations we refer to as noise. So it was that noise theory formed the core of Professor Haus' research during the 1950s: noise in electron beams, noise in microwave amplifiers, and noise in amplifier cascades. Two of

  11. Anton Chekhov (1860-1904)--a 19th century physician.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ben

    2007-08-01

    This account of Anton Chekhov's life as a doctor is distinct from the short story writer and playwright on which his fame rests. It describes his school days, the years as a medical student and the period in general practice. In later years he became active in social medicine on a voluntary basis and earned his living purely from his literary work. He died from pulmonary tuberculosis at the age of 44 years.

  12. [Anton Chekhov--physician and writer. Physicians in his novels].

    PubMed

    Lund, P J

    1997-12-10

    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904) was a doctor and a writer. He practised medicine in a rather sporadic manner throughout his life, and his main occupation was his authorship. His collected works comprise 581 items of a narrative type, 17 plays, a narrative and a treatise of his voyage to Sakhalin, a number of articles and about 4,000 letters. This paper describes the doctors who appear in 83 of his short stories and associated material, and shows how Chekhov's medical background influenced his writing.

  13. Anton Makarenko: The "John Dewey of the U.S.S.R."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, Thom; Bowers, Fredalene B.; Wright, Randall

    2005-01-01

    There are a few correctional educators whose work is historically so influential that it is difficult to summarize in an article. Anton Makarenko was among this very select group; this is merely an attempt to outline his work. One way to introduce Makarenko to correctional educators is to focus on some of the seemingly incongruous elements of his…

  14. An appreciation of Christiane Groehen: the correspondence between Charles Darwin and Anton Dohrn.

    PubMed

    Browne, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Anton Dohrn was introduced to Darwinism by Ernst Haeckel during his student years at Jena, and became an eager disciple of Charles Darwin's work. He founded the Stazione Zoologica in 1872. Darwin became a patron of Dohrn's Stazione, and the two naturalists corresponded regularly. This article discusses their relationship and the contributions of Christiane Groeben to its elucidation.

  15. Paint and Pedagogy: Anton Ehrenzweig and the Aesthetics of Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Beth

    2009-01-01

    Anton Ehrenzweig's work training art teachers at Goldsmiths College in London was groundbreaking in its field. The work of the studio fed back into Ehrenzweig's writings through his reflections on teaching and the work produced in end of year shows. In "The Hidden Order of Art" (1967), he theorised the creative process in psychoanalytic…

  16. Anton Makarenko: The "John Dewey of the U.S.S.R."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, Thom; Bowers, Fredalene B.; Wright, Randall

    2005-01-01

    There are a few correctional educators whose work is historically so influential that it is difficult to summarize in an article. Anton Makarenko was among this very select group; this is merely an attempt to outline his work. One way to introduce Makarenko to correctional educators is to focus on some of the seemingly incongruous elements of his…

  17. A literary approach to tuberculosis: lessons learned from Anton Chekhov, Franz Kafka, and Katherine Mansfield.

    PubMed

    Vilaplana, Cristina

    2017-03-01

    Letters by notable writers from the past century can provide valuable information on the times in which they lived. In this article, attention is drawn to the lessons learned from three famous writers who died of tuberculosis: Anton Chekhov, Franz Kafka, and Katherine Mansfield. The characteristics of the course of the disease in the pre-antibiotic era and the importance of addressing mental health in the management of tuberculosis are discussed. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Seismology at the Australian National University; an interview with Anton L. Hales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1980-01-01

    Dr. Anton L. Hales is a leading seismologist who has just retired as Director of the Research School of Earth Sciences at the Australian National University (ANU), Canberra. Prior to that, he headed the Geosciences Division at the University of Texas at Dallas, and, before that, he was Director of the Bernard Price Institute of Geophysical Research at the University of the Witwatersrand Johannesburg, South Africa. he is about to step down as President of the International Geodynamics Commission. Dr. Hales' research has involved marine geophysics, the travel times of seismic waves, and the structure of the Earth's crust and upper mantle. 

  19. Anton P. Chekhov, MD (1860-1904): dual medical and literary careers.

    PubMed

    Carter, R

    1996-05-01

    This is a story of a physician who was one of the world's greatest short story writers. Anton Pavlovich Chekhov successfully performed dual careers of writing and practicing medicine during a short but productive life. Many biographers overlook Dr Chekhov's role, although his medical training and practice flowed over into his writing, influencing both his subject matter and his style. His stories and plays reveal the insights that Dr Chekhov discovered about the human psyche at work, thus delving into psychosomatic medicine nearly 50 years before its time. Despite orders to stop practicing medicine because of his own deteriorating health, Chekhov devoted himself further to the study of medicine, publishing a landmark study in social medicine that advocated reform of the Russian penal system. Meanwhile, his fictional works earned him the coveted Pushkin prize for the best literary work of the year in 1888. Shortly after celebrating his third wedding anniversary to actress Olga Knipper, Anton Chekhov died at age 44, victim of a nearly lifelong battle with tuberculosis.

  20. Antone Tarazi: the first Palestinian neurosurgeon and the first neurosurgeon in Jordan: a neurosurgeon of two countries.

    PubMed

    Awad, Ahmed J; Jane, John A

    2014-12-01

    Antone (Tony) Tarazi (1927-1999) was the first Palestinian neurosurgeon and the first neurosurgeon in Jordan. In 1952, Tarazi received his medical degree from the American University of Beirut in Lebanon. After completing neurosurgery training at the Montreal Neurological Institute in 1960, he returned to Palestine to practice neurosurgery in both Palestine and Jordan. For almost 10 years, he alone carried the load of neurosurgery for a population of >3 million people. His skills and knowledge enabled him to achieve admirable results with limited available resources. Tarazi was the president of the Palestinian Neurosurgical Society, a member of Jordan medical societies, and a member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. His continuous efforts to improve medical services extended beyond neurosurgery to many other fields. This article recounts Antone Tarazi's achievements and contributions to neurosurgery in Palestine and Jordan.

  1. Anton Raederscheidt's distorted self-portraits and their significance for understanding balance in art.

    PubMed

    Butter, Charles M

    2004-03-01

    Following a right cerebral stroke, the German artist Anton Raederscheidt produced a remarkable series of self-portraits that depicted his severe visual neglect and gradual recovery. These distorted images, like those drawn by others with this disorder, inform us about lateral balance in art and why it is common in the art of cultures separated in time and space. After describing how artists in various cultures have employed lateral balance, I present Arnheim's view that this aspect of art is the result of visual forces generated by the brain. Following a brief history of visual neglect, I present evidence that this disorder provides us with clues to the origin of the visual forces responsible for lateral balance in art. The relevant brain mechanisms control exploration of visual space by integrating orienting movements with visual spatial information. The prevalence of lateral balance in art becomes understandable when we consider that these brain mechanisms evolved to promote survival in our vertebrate ancestors. I end with a speculative neurological account of the aesthetics of lateral balance--why it is pleasing and its absence is displeasing.

  2. Association football and the representation of homosexuality by the print media: a case study of Anton Hysén.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    In March 2011, Anton Hysén (a semiprofessional footballer currently playing in the Swedish fourth division) became only the second association football (soccer) player of any professional disposition to publicly declare his homosexuality while still playing the game. This article provides a textual analysis of the print media's reaction to Hysén coming out and examines whether, in 2011, they portray more inclusive notions toward homosexuality than they did in 1990 when British footballer Justin Fashanu came out. The results advance inclusive masculinity theory as a number of print media sources (mostly British) interview Hysén in the weeks immediately after he came out and publish articles that challenge homophobia. Highlighting a change since 1990, a significant number of articles stress the need for the key stakeholders in football (players, fans, clubs, agents, the authorities, and the media) to accept gay players.

  3. Spontaneous generation and disease causation: Anton de Bary's experiments with Phytophthora infestans and late blight of potato.

    PubMed

    Matta, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Anton de Bary is best known for his elucidation of the life cycle of Phytopthora infestans, the causal organism of late blight of potato and the crop losses that caused famine in nineteenth-century Europe. But while practitioner histories often claim this accomplishment as a founding moment of modern plant pathology, closer examination of de Bary's experiments and his published work suggest that his primary motiviation for pursing this research was based in developmental biology, not agriculture. De Bary shied away from making any recommendations for agricultural practice, and instead focused nearly exclusively on spontaneous generation and fungal development - both concepts promoted through prize questions posted by the Académie des Sciences in the 1850s and 1860s. De Bary's submission to the Académie's 1859 Alhumbert prize question illustrates his own contributions to debates about spontaneous generation and demonstrates the practical applications of seemingly philosophical questions - such as the origin of life.

  4. In the shadow of Darwin: Anton de Bary's origin of myxomycetology and a molecular phylogeny of the plasmodial slime molds.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, T; Kutschera, U

    2010-06-01

    In his Origin of Species (John Murray, London, 1859), Charles Darwin described the theory of descent with modification by means of natural selection and postulated that all life may have evolved from one or a few simple kinds of organisms. However, Darwin's concept of evolutionary change is entirely based on observations of populations of animals and plants. He briefly mentioned 'lower algae', but ignored amoebae, bacteria and other micro-organisms. In 1859, Anton de Bary, the founder of mycology and plant pathology, published a seminal paper on the biology and taxonomy of the plasmodial slime molds (myxomycetes). These heterotrophic protists are known primarily as a large composite mass, the plasmodium, in which single nuclei are suspended in a common 'naked' cytoplasm that is surrounded by a plasma membrane. Here we summarize the contents of de Bary's 1859 publication and highlight the significance of this scientific classic with respect to the establishment of the kingdom Protoctista (protists such as amoebae), the development of the protoplasmic theory of the cell, the introduction of the concept of symbiosis and the rejection of the dogma of spontaneous generation. We describe the life cycle of the myxomycetes, present new observations on the myxamoebae and propose a higher-order phylogeny based on elongation factor-1 alpha gene sequences. Our results document the congruence between the morphology-based taxonomy of the myxomycetes and molecular data. In addition, we show that free-living amoebae, common protists in the soil, are among the closest living relatives of the myxomycetes and conclude that de Bary's 'Amoeba-hypothesis' on the evolutionary origin of the plasmodial slime molds may have been correct.

  5. Anton permselective membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, S. S.; Hodgdon, R. B.; Waite, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental composite membranes were synthesized on a lab scale consisting of a thin layer of anion permselective resin supported by and bonded to a porous physically strong and conductive substrate film. These showed good selectivity and also substantially lower electrical resistivities than the homogenous candidate membranes optimized in the previous contract. A wide range of resin porosities were examined for three candidate membrane systems, CDIL, CP4L, and A3L to identify the formulation giving the best overall redox cell performance. Candidate anion membranes showed large increases in resistivity after a short time of immersion in concentrated FeCl/HCl solution. Largely on the basis of resistance stability the CDIL formulation was selected as prime candidate and about thirty-five membranes (one foot square) were produced for experimental static and dynamic evaluation.

  6. Benthic Assemblages of the Anton Dohrn Seamount (NE Atlantic): Defining Deep-Sea Biotopes to Support Habitat Mapping and Management Efforts with a Focus on Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jaime S; Stewart, Heather A; Narayanaswamy, Bhavani E; Jacobs, Colin; Spicer, John; Golding, Neil; Howell, Kerry L

    2015-01-01

    In 2009 the NW and SE flanks of Anton Dohrn Seamount were surveyed using multibeam echosounder and video ground-truthing to characterise megabenthic biological assemblages (biotopes) and assess those which clearly adhere to the definition of Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems, for use in habitat mapping. A combination of multivariate analysis of still imagery and video ground-truthing defined 13 comprehensive descriptions of biotopes that function as mapping units in an applied context. The data reveals that the NW and SE sides of Anton Dohrn Seamount (ADS) are topographically complex and harbour diverse biological assemblages, some of which agree with current definitions of 'listed' habitats of conservation concern. Ten of these biotopes could easily be considered Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems; three coral gardens, four cold-water coral reefs, two xenophyophore communities and one sponge dominated community, with remaining biotopes requiring more detailed assessment. Coral gardens were only found on positive geomorphic features, namely parasitic cones and radial ridges, found both sides of the seamount over a depth of 1311-1740 m. Two cold-water coral reefs (equivalent to summit reef) were mapped on the NW side of the seamount; Lophelia pertusa reef associated with the cliff top mounds at a depth of 747-791 m and Solenosmilia variabilis reef on a radial ridge at a depth of 1318-1351 m. Xenophyophore communities were mapped from both sides of the seamount at a depth of 1099-1770 m and were either associated with geomorphic features or were in close proximity (< 100 m) to them. The sponge dominated community was found on the steep escarpment either side of the seamount over at a depth of 854-1345 m. Multivariate diversity revealed the xenophyophore biotopes to be the least diverse, and a hard substratum biotope characterised by serpulids and the sessile holothurian, Psolus squamatus, as the most diverse.

  7. Benthic Assemblages of the Anton Dohrn Seamount (NE Atlantic): Defining Deep-Sea Biotopes to Support Habitat Mapping and Management Efforts with a Focus on Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Jaime S.; Stewart, Heather A.; Narayanaswamy, Bhavani E.; Jacobs, Colin; Spicer, John; Golding, Neil; Howell, Kerry L.

    2015-01-01

    In 2009 the NW and SE flanks of Anton Dohrn Seamount were surveyed using multibeam echosounder and video ground-truthing to characterise megabenthic biological assemblages (biotopes) and assess those which clearly adhere to the definition of Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems, for use in habitat mapping. A combination of multivariate analysis of still imagery and video ground-truthing defined 13 comprehensive descriptions of biotopes that function as mapping units in an applied context. The data reveals that the NW and SE sides of Anton Dohrn Seamount (ADS) are topographically complex and harbour diverse biological assemblages, some of which agree with current definitions of ‘listed’ habitats of conservation concern. Ten of these biotopes could easily be considered Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems; three coral gardens, four cold-water coral reefs, two xenophyophore communities and one sponge dominated community, with remaining biotopes requiring more detailed assessment. Coral gardens were only found on positive geomorphic features, namely parasitic cones and radial ridges, found both sides of the seamount over a depth of 1311–1740 m. Two cold-water coral reefs (equivalent to summit reef) were mapped on the NW side of the seamount; Lophelia pertusa reef associated with the cliff top mounds at a depth of 747–791 m and Solenosmilia variabilis reef on a radial ridge at a depth of 1318-1351 m. Xenophyophore communities were mapped from both sides of the seamount at a depth of 1099–1770 m and were either associated with geomorphic features or were in close proximity (< 100 m) to them. The sponge dominated community was found on the steep escarpment either side of the seamount over at a depth of 854-1345 m. Multivariate diversity revealed the xenophyophore biotopes to be the least diverse, and a hard substratum biotope characterised by serpulids and the sessile holothurian, Psolus squamatus, as the most diverse. PMID:25992572

  8. [The Essen-based steel producer Alfred Krupp (1812-1887) as a reader of the flora and fauna of the Gulf of Naples. A look at the relationship of Anton Dohrn (1840-1909) to the house Krupp].

    PubMed

    Müller, Irmgard

    2015-01-01

    A unfavourable notice written by industrial magnate Alfred Krupp (1812-1887) has been discovered on the posterior cover sheet of the first volume of the monumental series Fauna und Flora des Golfes von Neapel, edited by the Zoological Station at Naples (1880) Krupp's handwritten statement affords the opportunity to discuss in more detail the intricate relationship between the founder of the first marine biology station, Anton Dohrn (1840-1909), and the owner of the greatest steel factory in Europe, the Krupp-family at Essen. Although Anton Dohrn did not know about Krupp's disapproving comment he had a fine unerring instinct for the mentality of his negotiating partner, whose way of thinking rather aimed at the practical success and completion of armament factory, preventing thus a the serious rapprochement between the two personalities. Even when the Krupp-heir, Friedrich Alfred Krupp, later devoted to questions about marine biology in his new built house at Capri, and was willing to support the Zoological Station with high sponsoring, Anton Dohrn maintained a reserved attitude towards the Krupp's offer to support the marine research financially. Likewise, he remained unimpressed, when the steel magnate was shook by the smear campaign in Capri that ultimately led to Krupp's death in November 1902.

  9. The influence of desiccation and predation on vertical size gradients in populations of the gastropod Oxystele variegata (Anton) on an exposed rocky shore.

    PubMed

    McQuaid, C D

    1982-04-01

    Oxystele variegata (Anton.) exhibits a vertical size gradient contrary to the model proposed by Vermeij (1972) for low/mid intertidal species, as shell size increases in an upshore direction. Settlement occurs in the lowest zones and juveniles are restricted to the lower shore by conditions of desiccation higher up the beach. Juveniles suffer rapid water loss due to a relatively large opercular surface area and circumference and have a much lower resistance to water loss than adults. This leads to high mortality under conditions of low humidities, and juveniles caged at the top of the balanoid zone, where adults normally occur, die within a few days. As animals increase in size their resistance to desiccation rises allowing them to migrate upshore. This is a response to high rates of predation by the whelk Burnupena delalandii in the lower balanoid zone. Predation is so intense as to override the advantages of higher food availability which lead to a greater body weight for adults protected by cages on the lower shore.

  10. Use of OSL dating to establish the stratigraphic framework of Quaternary eolian sediments, Anton scarp upper trench, Northeastern Colorado High Plains, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahan, S.A.; Noe, D.C.; McCalpin, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper contains the results of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating used to establish stratigraphic ages and relationships of eolian sediments in a trench in northeastern Colorado, USA. This trench was located in the upper face of the Anton scarp, a major topographic lineament trending NW-SE for a distance of 135 km, in anticipation of intersecting near-surface faulting. The trench was 180 m long, 4.5-6.0 m deep, and exposed 22 m of stratigraphic section, most of which dipped gently west and was truncated by gulley channeling at the face of the scarp. No direct evidence of faulting was found in the upper trench. The stratigraphy from the trench was described, mapped and dated using OSL on quartz and potassium feldspar, and 14C obtained from woody material. OSL dating identified two upper loess units as Peoria Loess and Gilman Canyon Loess, deposited between 16 and 30 ka ago. The bottom layers of the trench were substantially older, giving OSL ages in excess of 100 ka. These older ages are interpreted as underestimates, owing to saturation of the fast component of OSL. Using OSL and 14C dating, we can constrain the erosion and down cutting of the scarp face as occurring between 16 and 5.7 ka. As the trenching investigation continues in other parts of the scarp face, the results of this preliminary study will be of importance in relating the ages of the strata that underlie different parts of the scarp, and in determining whether Quaternary faulting was a mechanism that contributed to the formation of this regional geomorphic feature.

  11. [Anton Nyström: the first practitioner in dermatology in Sweden and the controversy about his book on skin disorders].

    PubMed

    Thyresson, N

    1994-01-01

    Anton Nyström (1842-1931), practitioner and author, was at the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth century a well-known but also controversial personage in Swedish cultural and intellectual life. The posterity remembers him mainly for having introduced the philosophical system of Auguste Comte and founded a Society for Positivism in Sweden as well as having founded an institution ("Arbetarinstitutet") in Stockholm with the purpose to give an all-round education to the working classes through lectures by leading personalities in the world of culture and science. In numerous publications he treated besides medical topics also religious, cultural, social, political and historical themes. Immediately after his medical graduation in May 1868, he went abroad to study dermatology and stayed for this purpose for nearly one and a half years in Vienna, Paris and London. Back in Sweden in the autumn of 1869, he began writing a book with the title "Theoretical and practical essays on skin disorders." This book is for us today interesting because it illustrates the different views of that time on skin diseases held by Hebra in Vienna, Bazin and Hardy in Paris and Wilson and Tilbury Fox in London. In Paris Nyström had been fascinated by Bazin's and Hardy's theories on constitutional diseases and diathetic states and had, as he says, "embraced the doctrines of Bazin". In Vienna, however, he had disapproved of Hebra's way to reject speculations on internal etiology for skin diseases and to look upon them as having mainly an external cause and of his method to treat skin diseases preferably with local remedies. In London he was on very friendly terms with Tilbury Fox, who to his satisfaction also sympathized with the opinions held by Bazin. ...

  12. [The tribute of the pioneer of hypnotherapy--Franz Anton Mesmer, MD, PhD in the history of psychotherapy and medicine].

    PubMed

    Radovancević, Ljubomir

    2009-01-01

    Modern hypnosis started with the Austrian physician Franz Anton Mesmer (1734-1815), who believed that the phenomenon known as mesmerism, or animal magnetism, or fluidum was related to an invisible substance--a fluid that runs within the subject or between the subject and the therapist, that is, the hypnotist, or the "magnetizer". The term hypnosis was introduced in the 1840s by a Scottish surgeon James Braid (1795-1860), who believed the subject to be in a particular state of sleep--a trance. In the late 19th century, a French neurologist Jean Martin Charcot (1825-1893) thought hypnotism to be a special physiological state, and his contemporary Hyppotite-Marie Bernheim (1840-1919) believed it to be a psychological state of heightened suggestibility. Sigmund Freud, who studied with Charcot, used hypnosis early in his career to help patients recover repressed memories. He noted that patients would relive traumatic events while under hypnosis, a process know as abreaction. Freud later replaced hypnosis with the technique of free associations. Today, hypnosis is used as a form of therapy (hypnotherapy), a method of investigation to recover lost memories, and research tool. According to Caplan & Sadock, F.A. Mesmer is generally thought of as the fons et origo of modern psychotherapy; and from the early techniques of mesmerism, it is said, have evolved the more elaborate and sophisticated therapeutic measures of the analyst and his colleagues. Although Mesmer was certainly dealing with individuals suffering from a variety of neurotic disorders, and though the clinical successes he achieved were the result of psychological processes that his procedures induced in his patients, Mesmer's theoretical formulations, his understanding of the nature of the treatment he developed, and his specific procedures were all totally different from those of the 20th century analyst. He was one of the corne stones in the development of psychoanalysis through hypnosis mainly of hysterical

  13. Anton Chekhov (1860-1904). Writer, physician and tuberculosis patient.

    PubMed

    Dubovsky, H

    1979-04-21

    Chekhov chose writing as a career after a childhood of hardship and poverty. Tuberculosis manifested soon after medical graduation and caused his death at the age of 44. Essentially a short story writer, he used simplicity and impressionism to portray sympathetically the psychology of the common man. Similarly his plays, popular today, written in a light and ethereal style, while static, have an inner psychological evolution. The best example is The Cherry Orchard.

  14. Nobel laureates at the Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn: phenomenology and paths to discovery in neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Groeben, Christiane; de Sio, Fabio

    2006-12-01

    The practice of science usually involves more than a solitary genius in a solitary room, coping with the problem of her/his life. From the second half of the 19th century onwards, scientific research, especially in the field of the Natural Sciences, has grown into a more and more complex practice, which often entangles very special needs, in terms of research objects, techniques, sources, and perspectives. A few special places, such as the Stazione Zoologica di Napoli, have represented in this period the focal points of an ever growing international scientific network, promoting independent research, exchange and diffusion of novel practices and techniques and unrestricted confrontation. The so-called "Naples experience" has been cited by a large number of renowned scientists of the last two centuries as a key moment in their scientific life. Here we have tried to test it against the experience of three great scientists par excellence, i.e. three Nobel laureates (T. H. Morgan, Otto Warburg, J. D. Watson). The different experiences they have had at Naples represent, in our view, three different moments of the professional life of almost every scientist. Therefore, we have chosen to present them as a phenomenology. The final section is dedicated to a survey of the Zoological Station's contribution to neurosciences, especially to the Naples experience of the Nobel Prize winner Sir Bernard Katz and his assistant Ricardo Miledi, between 1965 and 1970. Their work on the squid at Naples allowed probing and quantitative refinement of results already obtained on different animals and contributed to reinforce the long lasting neurophysiological tradition of the institute.

  15. Fantastic Antone Succeeds! Experiences in Educating Children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinfeld, Judith, Ed.; Wescott, Siobhan, Ed.

    Three themes run through the accounts of parents and teachers as they relate their experiences rearing and teaching children with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS): (1) Children with FAS can achieve far more than current negative stereotypes suggest; (2) Early intervention and excellent family care make an enormous difference to the success and…

  16. Pioneering Studies on Cephalopod's Eye and Vision at the Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn (1883-1977)

    PubMed Central

    Dröscher, Ariane

    2016-01-01

    From the late nineteenth century onwards, the phenomena of vision and the anatomy and physiology of the eye of marine animals induced many zoologists, ethologists, physiologists, anatomists, biochemists, and ophthalmologists to travel to the Zoological Station in Naples. Initially, their preferred research objects were fish, but it soon became evident that cephalopods have features which make them particularly suited to research. After the first studies, which outlined the anatomical structure of cephalopods' eyes and optic nerves, the research rapidly shifted to the electrophysiology and biochemistry of vision. In the twentieth century these results were integrated with behavioral tests and training techniques. Between 1909 and 1913 also the well-known debate on color vision between ophthalmologist Carl von Hess and zoologist Karl von Frisch took place in Naples. Largely unknown is that the debate also concerned cephalopods. A comparative historical analysis of these studies shows how different experimental devices, theoretical frameworks, and personal factors gave rise to two diametrically opposing views. PMID:28066256

  17. Pioneering Studies on Cephalopod's Eye and Vision at the Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn (1883-1977).

    PubMed

    Dröscher, Ariane

    2016-01-01

    From the late nineteenth century onwards, the phenomena of vision and the anatomy and physiology of the eye of marine animals induced many zoologists, ethologists, physiologists, anatomists, biochemists, and ophthalmologists to travel to the Zoological Station in Naples. Initially, their preferred research objects were fish, but it soon became evident that cephalopods have features which make them particularly suited to research. After the first studies, which outlined the anatomical structure of cephalopods' eyes and optic nerves, the research rapidly shifted to the electrophysiology and biochemistry of vision. In the twentieth century these results were integrated with behavioral tests and training techniques. Between 1909 and 1913 also the well-known debate on color vision between ophthalmologist Carl von Hess and zoologist Karl von Frisch took place in Naples. Largely unknown is that the debate also concerned cephalopods. A comparative historical analysis of these studies shows how different experimental devices, theoretical frameworks, and personal factors gave rise to two diametrically opposing views.

  18. [Did the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Primary Care center Anton de Borja correctly utilize inhalers?].

    PubMed

    Represas-Carrera, Francisco Jesús

    2015-01-01

    To determine the percentage of patients with Pulmonary Obstructive Chronic Disease who doing of incorrect form the inhaler technique. Descriptive transversal study made in the Primary Care Center "Antón de Borja" of Rubi (in Barcelona) during the period between May and December 2013, where it was studied a representative sample of 200 patients. To assess the inhaler technique was performed a personal interview with the patient in which it was requested him to carry out a demonstration of how he was using his inhaler regularly evaluating his inhaler technique by means of the regulations established by Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery. 43% of the patients carry out inhaler technique incorrectly. The percentage of inadequate use of inhalers of dry powder was 26%, of the pressurized cartridge 38% and the inhaler chamber 10%. 82% of patients ≥ 65 years who have prescribed a pressurized inhaler cartridge do not perform accompanied by an inhaler chamber. A high percentage of patients do not correctly carry out inhaler technique, pointing the rare use made of the inhaler chamber despite its proven efficacy and the high number of patients with pressurized inhaler cartridge. These results reflect the need for the implementation of an educational program in our Primary Care Center to teach patients to use inhaler devices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Science, evolution and natural selection: in praise of Darwin at the Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn of Naples.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Copernicus, Galileo, Newton and other physical scientists ushered in a conception of the universe as matter in motion governed by natural laws. Their discoveries brought about a fundamental revolution, namely a commitment to the postulate that the universe obeys immanent laws that can account for natural phenomena. The workings of the universe were brought into the realm of science: explanation through natural laws. Darwin completed the Copernican revolution by extending it to the living world. Darwin demonstrated the evolution of organisms. More important yet is that he discovered natural selection, the process that explains the 'design' of organisms. The adaptations and diversity of organisms, the origin of novel and complex species, even the origin of mankind, could now be explained by an orderly process of change governed by natural laws. The origin of species and the exquisite features of organisms had previously been explained as special creations of an omniscient God. Darwin brought them into the domain of science.

  20. Book review: Peeters, H. 2007. Field guide to owls of California and the West

    Treesearch

    Eric D. Forsman

    2010-01-01

    Field Guide to Owls of California and the West. Written primarily for nonprofessionals,this little field guide is a treasure trove of published and unpublished information on the natural history and distribution of owls in the western United States. It covers just about everything you could want to know about owls, from why they take dust baths, to facultative...

  1. [IPA secretary and patron--Freud's patient, financial administrator and friend. Anton von Freund's letters to Sigmund Freud (1916-1919)].

    PubMed

    Huppke, Andrea; Schröter, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Although the letters, of which numerous and lengthy excerpts are presented in this paper, have repeatedly been used by scholars, they have so far remained unpublished. There are 45 items, written between 4. 1. 1916 and 13. 7. 1919. They indicate a passionate transference to Freud, unfolding against the background of two Hungarian revolutions. After suffering a relapse of his cancer, v. Freund had several stretches of analysis with Freud. While he was better, he established two major funds: one of them allowing the foundation of the psychoanalytic publishing house, the other destined to sponsor a psychoanalytic clinic in Budapest. V. Freund helped organize the Budapest IPA congress, became a member of the "secret committee" and started to actively conduct analyses. Freud was very attached to him and felt deeply shaken by the inexorable progression of v. Freund's disease and then death in January 1920.

  2. The Hybrid Expert in the "Bergstaat": Anton Von Ruprecht as a Professor of Chemistry and Mining and as a Mining Official, 1779-1814

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konecny, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In the course of the 18th century a new type of scientifically educated functional elites developed, who were trained to administer mines. The educational project that led to the formation of a corps of mining engineers was part of a programme of administrative and economic reforms that led to a new configuration of bonds between state, economy…

  3. The Hybrid Expert in the "Bergstaat": Anton Von Ruprecht as a Professor of Chemistry and Mining and as a Mining Official, 1779-1814

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konecny, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In the course of the 18th century a new type of scientifically educated functional elites developed, who were trained to administer mines. The educational project that led to the formation of a corps of mining engineers was part of a programme of administrative and economic reforms that led to a new configuration of bonds between state, economy…

  4. Fractals and Chaos

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Mathematical Society, 1989. Anton , Howard , and Chris Rorres, Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications, John Wiley & Sons, 1987. Arnold, V. L...Additionally, the references used for general information throughout the thesis are Ross (1980) for advanced calculus, Anton (1987) for linear algebra ...our understanding of the physical world. The mathematics required to understand this thesis includes basic courses in calculus and linear algebra

  5. The Military Inventory Routing Problem with Direct Delivery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS). General Dynamics Information Technology. [13] Kleywegt, Anton J, Nori , Vijay S, & Savelsbergh, Martin WP. 2002. The...stochas- tic inventory routing problem with direct deliveries. Transportation Science, 36(1), 94–118. 55 [14] Kleywegt, Anton J, Nori , Vijay S

  6. Assessing Soldier Individual Differences to Enable Tailored Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Army Research Institute John Lipinski, U.S. Army Research Institute NOTICES DISTRIBUTION: Primary distribution of this Research...way to measure individual differences with strong criterion and face validity (Lievens, Peeters , & Schollaert, 2007). Attention to detail...Lievens, F., Peeters , G., & Schollaert, E. (2008). Situational judgment tests: a review of recent research. Personnel Review 37 (4), 426-441

  7. Selective Gene Regulation by Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    androgen receptor pathway in prostate cancer. Curr Opin Pharmacol, 2008. 8(4): p. 440-8. 6. Claessens, F., P. Alen , A. Devos, B. Peeters, G...Chem, 1996. 271(32): p. 19013-6. 7. Schoenmakers, E., P. Alen , G. Verrijdt, B. Peeters, G. Verhoeven, W. Rombauts, and F. Claessens, Differential DNA

  8. North Korea and Iran’s Nuclear Programs as Instability Factors in the New System of International Relations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    Aleksandr. “V mire letiat ‘iadernye utki’.” (Nuclear Hoax in the World.) Izvestiia, October 19, 2004. 113 Andreenko, Anton. “Iran i uran .” (Iran and...149 Andreenko, Anton. “Iran i uran .” (Iran and Uranium). 7 dnei. August 26, 2004. 150 Shumilin, Aleksandr. “V mire letiat ‘iadernye utki...152 IAEA materials. http://www.iaea.org. 153 Andreenko, Anton. “Iran i uran .” (Iran and Uranium). 7 dnei. August 26, 2004. - 38 - of its missile

  9. Navy Enterprise Resource Planning Program: Governance Challenges in Deploying an Enterprise-Wide Information Technology System in the Department of the Navy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    Jos Peeters , “Early MRP Systems at Royal Philips Electronics in the 1960s and 1970s,” IEEE Annals of the History of Computing 31, no. 2 (April-June...ERP) - A brief history,” Journal of Operations Management 25, no. 207 (December 2006): 358. 8 Peeters , Early MRP Systems, 58. 9 Massachusetts...history,” Journal of Operations Management 25, no. 207 (December 2006): 358. 11 Jos Peeters , “Early MRP Systems at Royal Philips Electronics in the

  10. 78 FR 1210 - Notice of Membership of Performance Review Board for Senior Executives (PRB)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... will remove the following member: Charles H. Schneider The Commission's PRB will add the following member: Anton C. Porter, PRB Chairman Dated: January 2, 2013. Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary. BILLING CODE...

  11. Black Scholars in Europe during the Renaissance and the Enlightenment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fikes, Robert, Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the accomplishments of Juan Latino (1516-1599), Jacobus Eliza Johannes Capitein (1717-1747), and Anton Wilhelm Amo (1703-1753), Blacks who were educated in Europe and became important intellectual and literary figures. (GC)

  12. Too Little too Soon: The Literature of Deaf Education in 17th-Century Britain (Part II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoolihan, Christopher

    1985-01-01

    The article describes the growth in literature on deaf education in 17th century Britain. Noted is the work of John Wallis, William Holder, George Dalgarno, Anton Deusing, and Johann Conrad Amman. (CL)

  13. Shkaplerov uses a Video Display Unit in the SM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-05

    ISS030-E-021039 (5 Jan. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, wears a communication system headset while working with a video display unit in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  14. Shkaplerov uses a Video Display Unit in the SM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-05

    ISS030-E-021042 (5 Jan. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, wears a communication system headset while working with a video display unit in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  15. Shkaplerov uses a Video Display Unit in the SM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-05

    ISS030-E-021041 (5 Jan. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, wears a communication system headset while working with a video display unit in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  16. Expedition 29 Crew Profile

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The six members of Expedition 29 are profiled and interviewed. NASA astronauts Mike Fossum and Dan Burbank; JAXA astronaut Satoshi Furukawa; and cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov and Anatoly Ivanishin di...

  17. Hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anton B, Ladenson PW. Prevalence and incidence of endocrine and metabolic disorders in the United States: a comprehensive review. Journal ... thyroid gland. Hashimoto’s disease is also an ... and Metabolic Diseases Information Service (NEMDIS) fact sheet ...

  18. ISS Expedition 42 Crew Profiles - Version 01

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-14

    Narrated program with biographical information about ISS Expedition 42 crewmembers Terry Virts, Samantha Cristoforetti and Anton Shjaplerov. The program covers the crewmember's career including childhood photographs; footage from previous missions; and interview sound bites.

  19. Shkaplerov makes a selection from food container

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-03

    ISS030-E-117514 (3 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, makes a selection from a food storage container in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  20. Shkaplerov exercises on the aRED

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-05

    ISS030-E-235507 (5 Jan. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, exercises using the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  1. Forced Labor and ’Foreign Workers’ in the Third Reich

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-18

    Wanderarbeiter, Gastarbeiter, ed. Klaus J. Bade (Ostfildern: Scripta Mercaturae Verlag, 1984), 581-583. 6 Anton Grossmann, “ Polen und Sowjetrussen...Herbert, “Fremdarbeiter,” 285-288. 23 Grossmann, “ Polen und Sowjetrussen,” 395. 24 Anton Grossmann, Fremd und Zwangsarbeiter: Providing several examples...Grossmann, “ Polen und Sowjetrussen,” 391 40 Grossmann, “ Polen und Sowjetrussen,” 390. 41 Herbert, “Fremdarbeiter,” 231. 42 Grossmann, “ Polen und

  2. Adaptability in Crisis Management: The Role of Organizational Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Peeters , van Tuijl, Rutte, & Reymen, 2006). Applying the same logic as the analyses performed on mean scores, ANOVAs were run first on standard... Peeters , M.A.G., van Tuijl, H.F.J.M., Rutte, C.G., & Reymen, I.M.M.J. (2006). Personality and team performance: A meta-analysis. European Journal of...Industrial and Organizational Psychology. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons Ltd. van Bezooijen, B. J. A., Essens, P. J. M. D., & Vogelaar, A. L. W. (2006

  3. Exploitation of Unintentional Information Leakage from Integrated Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    identity, the database is updated to reflect the pairing (e.g., device A1 belongs to John Smith). • Classification / feature matching module. For...Anderson. Security Engineering: A Guide to Building Depend- able Distributed Systems. Wiley, January 2001. APSQ06. Cédric Archambeau, Eric Peeters ...Security, IEEE Transactions on, PP(99):1, 2011. To appear. CNPQ03. M. Ciet, M. Neve, E. Peeters , and J.-J. Quisquater. Parallel FPGA implementation of

  4. Analysis of Social Network Measures with Respect to Structural Properties of Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    stress on a node, is calculated, as shown in Equation (11) (Koschützki, Lehmann, Peeters , & Richter, 2005, pp. 28-29). 18 ( ) ( )S k ij k i j j C p...communication will increase if the corresponding element x is removed from the graph” (Koschützki, Lehmann, Peeters , & Richter, 2005, pp. 36-38). This...Correlation. In Practical Nonparametric Statistics. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Erdos, P., & Renyi, A. (1960). On the Evolution of Random Graphs. Publ

  5. Computing Reaction Pathways of Rare Biomolecular Transitions using Atomistic Force-Fields.

    PubMed

    Faccioli, P; a Beccara, S

    2016-01-01

    The Dominant Reaction Pathway (DRP) method is an approximate variational scheme which can be used to compute reaction pathways in conformational transitions undergone by large biomolecules (up to ~10(3) amino-acids) using realistic all-atom force fields. We first review the status of development of this method. Next, we discuss its validation against the results of plain MD protein folding simulations performed by the DE-Shaw group using the Anton supercomputer. Finally, we review a few representative applications of the DRP approach to study reactions which are far too complex and rare to be investigated by plain MD, even on the Anton machine.

  6. Premalignant Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations in Tubal Epithelium from Women with BRCA1 Mutations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-14

    Premalignant Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations in Tubal Epithelium from Women with BRCA1 Mutations PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Anton Krumm, Ph.D...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 Sept 2009 – 14 Sept 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Premalignant Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations in Tubal 5a...Appendices…………………………………………………………………………… 8-33 10/14/2010 Anton Krumm 1 Premalignant Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations in Tubal Epithelium from Women

  7. Workshop on the Mechanics of Ice and Its Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    41st Street 206/363-3394 P.O. Box 3383 206/363-3394 (FAX) Tulsa, OK 74102 918/660-3339 Anton Prodanovic 918/660-3274 (FAX) Mobil Research & Development...5846 4502 East 41st Street 206/363-3394 P.O. Box 3383 206/363-3394 (FAX) Tulsa, OK 74102 918/660-3339 Anton Prodanovic 918/660-3274 (FAX) Mobil Research...um Aademy of Scimmoes, Moscow.. US= P. Varstas Helsinki University of Technlogy # Be’sInki, Finland A IN AN ICE (OVM UNDE RO~RSIQI Results and

  8. Birthday party

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-26

    ISS043E142528 (04/26/2015) ---From the International Space Station NASA astronaut Terry Virts (right) tweeted this image of he and his crewmate Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov celebrating the birthday of ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti (middle). His tweet commented: "Happy Birthday @AstroSamantha! We had a great time celebrating as a crew."

  9. Adaptive Identification by Systolic Arrays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    BIBLIOGRIAPHY Anton , Howard , Elementary Linear Algebra , John Wiley & Sons, 19S4. Cristi, Roberto, A Parallel Structure Jor Adaptive Pole Placement...10 11. SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION M*YETHODS ....................... 12 A. LINEAR SYSTEM MODELING ......................... 12 B. SOLUTION OF SYSTEMS OF... LINEAR EQUATIONS ......... 13 C. QR DECOMPOSITION ................................ 14 D. RECURSIVE LEAST SQUARES ......................... 16 E. BLOCK

  10. ISS Expedition 42 Crew Profile, Version 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-26

    Narrated production with biographical information about ISS Expedition 42 crewmembers Barry "Butch" Wilmore, Alexander Samokutyaev, Elena Serova, Terry Virts, Anton Shkaplerov and Samantha Cristoforetti. The program covers the crewmember's career including childhood photographs, previous space missions and interview sound bites with the crewmembers.

  11. Ice cream

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-20

    ISS043E125774 (04/20/2015) --- NASA astronaut Scott Kelly gives the "high sign" on the quality of his snack while taking a break from his work schedule aboard the International Space Station on Apr. 20, 2015. Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov (ROSCOSMOS) seems to agree on the tasty factor of the specially prepared space food.

  12. State of the Modern Information Professional, 1992-1993. An International View of the State of the Information Professional and the Information Profession in 1992-1993. FID Occasional Paper 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation for Information and Documentation, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The following 14 papers are provided: (1) "Perfil del profesional de la informacion en Venezuela" with a synopsis in English: "Profile of the Information Professional in Venezuela" (A. D. Anton and M. S. de Arenas); (2) "The Modern Information Professional in the Caribbean Setting" (D. Douglas); (3) "Development…

  13. Robotics Competitions and Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benke, Gertraud

    2012-01-01

    This paper looks at the distinctions between science classrooms and the robotics competition described in the article "Examining the mediation of power in a collaborative community: engaging in informal science as authentic practice" written by Anton Puvirajah, Geeta Verma and Horace Webb. Using the framework of "productive disciplinary…

  14. Movements and Spatial Use of Satellite-Tagged Odontocetes in the Western Main Hawaiian Islands: Results of Field Work Undertaken off O’ahu in October 2010 and Kaua’i in February 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Off O‘ahu we thank Bud Antonelis, Brenda Asuncion, Chuck Babbitt, Chris Boggs, Colleen Bryan, Vicki Davis, Pete Donaldson, Melissa Evans, Scott...Postgraduate School Monterey, CA Chris Miller Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA John Joseph Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA... Eckman Office of Naval Research Arlington, VA Ari Friedlaender Duke University Beaufort, NC CAPT Robin Brake U.S. Navy Washington

  15. The Quality of Gymnasium Education in the Banal Croatia in the Era of Neoabsolutism (1854-1860)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bošnjak, Arijana Kolak

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present an attempt to increase the quality of education in the Banal Croatia by analysing the reports sent to the Ministry of Religion and Education in Vienna by secondary school supervisor for the Banal Croatia Anton Jarc as well as the existing scholarly literature. The mentioned attempt was based on a reform of the…

  16. Shkaplerov trims Burbank's hair in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-18

    ISS030-E-012655 (18 Dec. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, trims the hair of NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, commander, in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Shkaplerov used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  17. Burbank trims Shkaplero's hair in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-18

    ISS030-E-012660 (18 Dec. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, trims the hair of Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, flight engineer, in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Burbank used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  18. Burbank trims Shkaplerov's hair in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-18

    ISS030-E-161707 (18 March 2012) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, trims the hair of Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, flight engineer, in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Burbank used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  19. Shkaplerov conducts an active session for the Russian Experiment KPT-10 Kulonvkiy Kristill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-14

    ISS030-E-010546 (14 Dec. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, conducts an active session for the Russian experiment KPT-10 ?Kulonovskiy Kristall? (Coulomb Crystal) in the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2) of the International Space Station.

  20. Shkaplerov conducts an active session for the Russian Experiment KPT-10 Kulonvkiy Kristill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-14

    ISS030-E-010540 (14 Dec. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, conducts an active session for the Russian experiment KPT-10 ?Kulonovskiy Kristall? (Coulomb Crystal) in the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2) of the International Space Station.

  1. Shkaplerov conducts an active session for the Russian Experiment KPT-10 Kulonvkiy Kristill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-14

    ISS030-E-010539 (14 Dec. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, conducts an active session for the Russian experiment KPT-10 “Kulonovskiy Kristall” (Coulomb Crystal) in the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2) of the International Space Station.

  2. Shkaplerov conducts an active session for the Russian Experiment KPT-10 Kulonvkiy Kristill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-14

    ISS030-E-010536 (14 Dec. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, conducts an active session for the Russian experiment KPT-10 “Kulonovskiy Kristall” (Coulomb Crystal) in the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2) of the International Space Station.

  3. Shkaplerov conducts an active session for the Russian Experiment KPT-10 Kulonvkiy Kristill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-14

    ISS030-E-010538 (14 Dec. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, conducts an active session for the Russian experiment KPT-10 ?Kulonovskiy Kristall? (Coulomb Crystal) in the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2) of the International Space Station.

  4. Remembering Johann Gregor Mendel: a human, a Catholic priest, an Augustinian monk, and abbot.

    PubMed

    Richter, Father Clemens

    2015-11-01

    Johann Mendel (Gregor was the name given to him only later by his Augustinian order, Fig. 1) was born on July 20, 1822 to an ethnic German family, Anton and Rosina Mendel (Fig. 2), in Heinzendorf in the Austrian Empire at the Moravian-Silesian border (now Hynčice, Czech Republic).

  5. Integrative Education: Teaching Psychology with the Use of Literature and Informational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toom, Anna

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a new method of teaching psychology based on the union of scientific, artistic, and information-technological knowledge is presented. The author teaches Cognitive Development in Early Childhood analyzing Anton Chekhov's short story "Grisha" and uses both traditional and computerized instructional methodology. In the authors' two…

  6. JPRS Report, Soviet Union, Kommunist.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    cides in quantities and varieties which would fully satisfy population demand. The decree suggests to the councils of ministers of autonomous...excerpt from the memoirs of one of Anton Semenovich’s students: "We were required to display impeccable cour- tesy in addressing one another

  7. A Request for the Conference and Symposia Grant from COMP Division of American Chemical Society

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-02

    Elucidating electrode and solid electrolyte kinetics from first principles Anton Van der Ven 11:05 am 169 Quantum chemistry of lithium-ion battery cathodes Bo...CA Abstracts2View™: http://abstracts.acs.org/chem/248nm/program/divisionindex.php?act=pre... 3 of 5 8/26/2014 8:19 PM 11:10 am 420 DME decomposition

  8. York Papers in Linguistics 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, S. J., Ed.; Warner, A. R., Ed.

    Papers on a variety of linguistic topics include six papers from a Festschrift and nine others, as follows: "Attitudes Towards English as a Possible Lingua Franca in Switzerland" (Urs Durmuller); "Functional Stability and Structural Levelling of Dialects: The Case of Maastricht" (Anton M. Hagen, Henk Munstermann); "On the…

  9. Effectiveness of Graduate Training in School Psychology: Perspectives of Graduate Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satchwell, Mary Susan

    2013-01-01

    While trends in graduate training in school psychology indicate a movement towards an increasing emphasis on consultation and decreasing emphasis on assessment (Anton-LaHart & Rosenfield, 2004), there remains a gap between training and practice for professional school psychologists (Harrison, et al., 2004). The present study provided an…

  10. jsc2011e203732

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-24

    At the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, outside Moscow, Expedition 30 Commander Dan Burbank of NASA (left), Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov (center), and Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin listen to questions from reporters during their news conference October 24, 2011 as they prepare for their launch November 14 on the Soyuz TMA-22 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Credit: NASA

  11. 17. 'BIRDSEYEVIEW, PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, CAL., JAN. 1938.' No signature, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. 'BIRDSEYEVIEW, PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, CAL., JAN. 1938.' No signature, photographer probably Anton C. Heidrick. This panoramic view looks west over Soldier Field from the upper floor or roof of the gymnasium. Original cool toned silver gelatin print measures 85.1 cm by 22.4 cm, flush mounted on mat board. - Presidio of Monterey, Soldier Field, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  12. Teaching Translation and Interpreting in Slovakia: Is There Anything Other than Levý and Popovic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biloveský, Vladimír; Djovcoš, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Institutional translation and interpreting training has a long lasting tradition in Slovakia mainly thanks to such significant translation scholars as Anton Popovic, František Miko, Ján Vilikovský and many others. However the situation has changed after the Velvet Revolution in 1989 and the education needed to start adapting to the new market…

  13. Classification of a second group of ordinary chondrites from Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlmann, A. J.; Keil, K.

    1987-03-01

    Based on optical microscopy and electron microprobe analyses of mafic minerals, six previously undescribed or poorly known ordinary chondrites from Texas were classified into compositional groups, petrologic types, and shock facies. These meteorites are Junction, L5d; Anton, H5b; Venus, H4d; Dalhart, H5a; Rosebud, H5c; and Cranfills Gap, H6c.

  14. Classification of a second group of ordinary chondrites from Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlmann, Arthur J.; Keil, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    Based on optical microscopy and electron microprobe analyses of mafic minerals, six previously undescribed or poorly known ordinary chondrites from Texas were classified into compositional groups, petrologic types, and shock facies. These meteorites are Junction, L5d; Anton, H5b; Venus, H4d; Dalhart, H5a; Rosebud, H5c; and Cranfills Gap, H6c.

  15. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov answers a reporter’s question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. The mission is set to launch November 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  16. Expedition 29 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov speaks during the State Commission meeting to approve the Soyuz launch of Expedition 29 to the International Space Station, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch November 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  17. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 NASA Flight Engineer Dan Burbank answers a reporter’s question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Expedition 29 NASA Flight Engineer Dan Burbank, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov and Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin is scheduled for November 14. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  18. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 Russian Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin answers a reporter’s question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Ivanishin, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov and NASA Flight Engineer Dan Burbank is scheduled for November 14. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  19. BTKh-35 MEMBRANA experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-17

    ISS029-E-042539 (17 Nov. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov is pictured onboard the International Space Station working with the biological BTKh-35 MEMBRANE experiment. Shkaplerov is one of three Expedition 29 crew members who recently joined three original Expedition 29 crew members aboard the orbiting complex. In a few days he will become a flight engineer on the Expedition 30 crew.

  20. Ivanishin participates in a CHeCS Medical Contingency Drill in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-16

    ISS030-E-012604 (16 Dec. 2011) --- Russian cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin (foreground) and Anton Shkaplerov, both Expedition 30 flight engineers, participate in a Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) medical contingency drill in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. This drill gives crew members the opportunity to work as a team in resolving a simulated medical emergency onboard the space station.

  1. Shkaplerov participates in a CHeCS Medical Contingency Drill in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-16

    ISS030-E-012600 (16 Dec. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, participates in a Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) medical contingency drill in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. This drill gives crew members the opportunity to work as a team in resolving a simulated medical emergency onboard the space station.

  2. A Teaching Tool for Linear Programming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    U I Bibliography U Anton, Howard. Elementary Linear Algebra . 5th ed. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1973.I...Richard 0. Jr. Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications. 2nd ed. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1991.I I Hillier, Frederick S. Pnd Gerald

  3. Requirements for IV&V of NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) Common Ada Programming Support Environment (APSE) Interface Set (CAIS) implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    kernel calls ( Pesch et al. 1985), In the original specification of the kernel calls, the syntax of each system function was formally defined. However, the...26-27 August 1985. Pesch . Ilerbvi-t. Schnupp, Perter, Schaller, Hans, and Spirk, Anton Paul, "Test Case Generation U.ing Prolog." in Proceedings of the

  4. Franklin, Lavoisier, and Mesmer: origin of the controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Herr, Harry W

    2005-01-01

    In 1784, a Royal Commission headed by Benjamin Franklin and Antoine Lavoisier designed a series of ingenious experiments to debunk France's greatest medical rogue, Anton Mesmer, and his bizarre healing of illnesses based on his bogus theory of animal magnetism. Using intentional subject ignorance and sham interventions to investigate mesmerism, Franklin's commission provided a model for the controlled clinical trial.

  5. ISS Expedition 42 / 43 Soyuz Spacecraft and Crew Preparations for Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-26

    NASA TV (NTV) video file of crewmembers Terry Virts, Anton Shkaplerov (Roskosmos) and Samantha Cristoforetti (ESA) during final fit check of the Soyuz TMA 15M spacedraft at the Integration Facility, Baikonurk, Kazakhstan. Includes footage of the crew climbing into the Soyuz spacecraft, interviews, visit to museum where the crew sign posters and a flag; flag raising ceremony; and visit to mating facility.

  6. The Democratic School and the Pedagogy of Janusz Korczak: A Model of Early Twentieth Century Reform in Modern Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Liba H.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the history and pedagogy of Janusz Korczak within the context of his contemporary early Twentieth-Century European Innovative Educators which include Maria Montessori, Homer Lane, A.S. Neill, and Anton Semyonovitch Makarenko. The pedagogies of the aforementioned are compared and contrasted within the literature.

  7. The Way of the Drum: When Earth Becomes Heart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antone, Grafton; Turchetti, Lois Provost

    Two Native people describe their respective journeys to healing, journeys that involved the rediscovery of language and culture. In Part I, "Healing the Tears of Yesterday by the Drum Today: The Oneida Language Is a Healing Medicine" (Grafton Antone), the first narrator taught the Oneida language to adult students at a community center.…

  8. Effectiveness of Graduate Training in School Psychology: Perspectives of Graduate Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satchwell, Mary Susan

    2013-01-01

    While trends in graduate training in school psychology indicate a movement towards an increasing emphasis on consultation and decreasing emphasis on assessment (Anton-LaHart & Rosenfield, 2004), there remains a gap between training and practice for professional school psychologists (Harrison, et al., 2004). The present study provided an…

  9. The Democratic School and the Pedagogy of Janusz Korczak: A Model of Early Twentieth Century Reform in Modern Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Liba H.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the history and pedagogy of Janusz Korczak within the context of his contemporary early Twentieth-Century European Innovative Educators which include Maria Montessori, Homer Lane, A.S. Neill, and Anton Semyonovitch Makarenko. The pedagogies of the aforementioned are compared and contrasted within the literature.

  10. Burbank and Shkaplerov playing musical instruments

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-21

    ISS030-E-267651 (21 April 2012) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, plays a guitar, while Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, flight engineer, plays a musical keyboard during off-time in the Unity node of the International Space Station.

  11. Burbank and Shkaplerov with musical instruments

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-21

    ISS030-E-267652 (21 April 2012) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank (with guitar), Expedition 30 commander, and Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, flight engineer, are pictured at a musical keyboard during off-time in the Unity node of the International Space Station.

  12. Burbank and Shkaplerov playing musical instruments

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-21

    ISS030-E-267658 (21 April 2012) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, plays a guitar, while Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, flight engineer, plays a musical keyboard during off-time in the Unity node of the International Space Station.

  13. A Communicative Analysis of Chekhovian Drama as Portrayed in "The Sea Gull."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellweg, John D.; Hellweg, Susan A.

    The precision and poetic logic of the language used by Anton Chekhov in his plays, particularly "The Sea Gull," can be explored through an analysis of his use of dialogue, characterization, and imagery. Measuring the nature of a relationship, rather than providing a direct literal interchange, the dialogue is both social, when individual…

  14. Shkaplerov makes a selection from food container

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-03

    ISS030-E-117515 (3 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, makes a selection from a food storage container in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, commander, is visible in the background.

  15. The Miami Linguistic Reading Program, 1965-1968. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digneo, Ellen Hartnett, Ed.; Shaya, Tila, Ed.

    Information related to the implementation of the Miami Linguistic Reading Program for Spanish-speaking and American Indian children in 6 New Mexico school systems is presented. School systems utilizing and reporting on the program are: (1) the West Las Vegas School System; (2) Anton Chico Elementary School in Santa Rosa; (3) Pojoaque Valley…

  16. Shkaplerov works with EVA Hardware in the SM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-03

    ISS030-E-061157 (3 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, works with extravehicular activity (EVA) hardware in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station in preparation for an EVA scheduled for Feb. 16, 2012.

  17. Analysis of Air Force Secondary Power Logistics Solution Contract

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-21

    Der~~ Office orlm- peeter General 400 AnnyNa.vy Drivc Arlingtoll, VA � FROM: 448 SCMWIDV SUBJEcr· Audit. Analysis or .~r Force ~..toooruy...LOG I STICS AGENCV HEA DQUARTERS 8725 JOHN J . KINGMAN FlOAD FORT BELVO I R, VIRGI NI A 2:򒯤-622 1 MEMURANDUM f.’OR DA SUBJEct: Analysis

  18. Static and Dynamic Component Obfuscation on Reconfigurable Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    ed.): protocols, algorithms, and source code in C. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, NY, USA, 1995. ISBN 0-471-11709-9. [18] Sedcole, P., B. Blodget...University of Cambridge, Computer Laboratory, Technical Report UCAM-CL-TR-630, 2005. [21] Standaert, O.-X., E. Peeters , G. Rouvroy, and J.-J. Quisquater

  19. Novel Burkholderia mallei Virulence Factors Linked to Specific Host-Pathogen Protein Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-23

    systems. Combinatorial Chem. High Throughput Screening 9, 365–380 73. Brass, A. L., Huang, I. C., Benita, Y., John , S. P., Krishnan, M. N., Feeley, E. M...tion by bacterial effectors: A ubiquitous theme. PLOS Pathogens 8, e1002823 89. Angot, A., Vergunst, A., Genin, S., and Peeters , N. (2007) Exploitation

  20. Army National Guard: Enhancing Public and Employer Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-24

    rundowns/rundown.php?prgId=2&prgDate=4-18- 2009 (accessed 9 October 2010). 20 John Stimac, “Four Governors visit Gaud Troops in Iraq.” National Guard...The National Guard, A Great Value for America, 6. 33 LTC Michael Peeters , businessman, entrepreneur and member of the USAR, interviewed by author, 22

  1. The Cartographic Representation of Linguistic Data. Discussion Papers in Geolinguistics Nos. 19-21. Selected Papers from a Geolinguistic Seminar (Le Pailly, France, September 10-13, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peeters, Yvo J. D., Ed.; Williams, Colin H., Ed.

    Papers from a conference on cartography in geolinguistics include: "The Political Importance of Visualisation of Language Contact" (Yvo J. D. Peeters); "Some Considerations on People and Boundaries" (Guy Heraud); "Geolinguistic Developments and Cartographic Problems" (Colin H. Williams, John E. Ambrose); "A…

  2. Feasibility of Prostate Cancer Diagnosis by Transrectal Photoacoustic Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    and Imaging, John Wiley & Sons (2007). 7. S. Telenkov, A. Mandelis, B. Lashkari, and M. Forcht, “Frequency-domain photothermoacoustics...2009). 31. R. Nachabé, D. J. Evers, B. H. Hendriks, G. W. Lucassen, M. van der Voort, E. J. Rutgers, M. J. Peeters , J. A. Van der Hage, H. S

  3. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Early Childhood, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Reviews "La Educacion Preescolar: Desafio y Aventura" (Lavanchy Bobsien); "Working towards Better Childcare" (Peeters and Vandenbroeck, editors); "Children's Savings: A Study in the Development of Economic Behavior" (Sonuga-Barke and Webley); "Curvas de Crecimiento Estaturo-ponderal en Escolares" (Saez Crespo and others); and "Helping Bereaved…

  4. Agent-based Approaches to Dynamic Team Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    behavior. The second section reviews agent-based models of teamwork describing work involving both teamwork approaches to design of multiagent systems...there is less direct evidence for teams. Hough (1992), for example, found that ratings on conscientiousness, emotional stability, and agreeableness...Peeters, Rutte, Tuijl, and Reymen (2006) who found agreeableness and emotional stability positively related to satisfaction with the team make

  5. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Early Childhood, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Reviews "La Educacion Preescolar: Desafio y Aventura" (Lavanchy Bobsien); "Working towards Better Childcare" (Peeters and Vandenbroeck, editors); "Children's Savings: A Study in the Development of Economic Behavior" (Sonuga-Barke and Webley); "Curvas de Crecimiento Estaturo-ponderal en Escolares" (Saez Crespo and others); and "Helping Bereaved…

  6. "Build Me a Male Role Model!" A Critical Exploration of the Perceived Qualities/Characteristics of Men in the Early Years (0-8) in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownhill, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Young boys' "underachievement" and their disaffection with learning continue to dominate education agendas [Francis, B. 2006. "Stop That Sex Drive." "Times Educational Supplement" 30; Peeters, J. 2007. "Including Men in Early Childhood Education: Insights from the European Experience." "NZ Research in…

  7. "Build Me a Male Role Model!" A Critical Exploration of the Perceived Qualities/Characteristics of Men in the Early Years (0-8) in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownhill, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Young boys' "underachievement" and their disaffection with learning continue to dominate education agendas [Francis, B. 2006. "Stop That Sex Drive." "Times Educational Supplement" 30; Peeters, J. 2007. "Including Men in Early Childhood Education: Insights from the European Experience." "NZ Research in…

  8. 2015 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Presents the 2015 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association. In his introduction, President Barry Anton describes how 2015 was among APA's most challenging. Although 2015 ushered in an era of greater transparency within the association and enhanced communications to members and the public, it also required painful self-reflection stemming from the revelations of an independent review by an outside law firm. The review examined the question of whether APA played any role related to the Bush administration's use of abusive interrogation techniques during the war on terror. Anton's introduction also discusses (1) the APA convention, (2) representing APA at a White House meeting with health care providers and insurance companies, (3) APA's effort to increase the number of APA-accredited internships, (4) international activities, and (5) the global summit on psychology and integrated care. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. A Model for and Method of Predicting High Quality Army Enlistment Contracts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Practice of Econometrics, John Wiley and Sons, 1982. 11. Anton , Howard , Elementary Linear Algebra , John Wiley & Sons, 1984. 12. Barr, Donald R. and...the decision maker. " 4 The thesis develops the framework for a parsimonious linear statistical model of quality enlistment contracts for the U.S. Army...develops the framework for a parsimonious linear statistical model of quality enlistment contracts for the U.S. Army. There is a need for such a model that

  10. An Automated Immittance Measuring System for Electroacoustic Transducers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    Howard Anton , Elementary Linear Algebra , (John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1973) pp. 80-82. 3. "IEEE Standand on Piezoelectricity," IEEE Std. 176...immittance. Figure 1 compares an immittance circle defined by a linear sequence of frequencies with one in which the frequencies are generated from the...circular approximation method. There are two hundred points in the linear frequency sweep of Pig. la and only fifty points in Pig. lb. This

  11. Matrix Algebra.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    on courses being taught at NPS. LIST OF REFERENCES [1] Anton , Howard , Elementary Linear Algebra , John Wiley and Sons, New York, New York, 1994...and computational techniques for solving systems of linear equations. The goal is to enhance current matrix algebra textbooks and help the beginning... algebra is the study of algebraic operations on matrices and of their applications, primarily for solving systems of linear equations. Systems of

  12. Analysis and Evaluation of Project EVERGREEN Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Anton , Howard and Rorres, Chris, Elementary Linear Algebra with AyDlications, John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1987. 2. Binnall, Eugene P., EVERGREEN...2. Transmitter used was a Febetron. 3. Elevation angle ( Source ) = 45 degrees. 4. Polarization transmitted - Linear "Horizontal". 5. Polarization...2. Transmitter used was a Febetron. 3. Elevation angle ( Source ) = 45 degrees. 4. Polarization transmitted - Linear "Horizontal". 5. Polarization

  13. An Extended Microcomputer-Based Network Optimization Package.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    Analysis, Laxenberq, Austria, 1981, pp. 781-808. 9. Anton , H., Elementary Linear Algebra , John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1977. 10. Koopmans, T. C...fCaRUlue do leVee. aide It 001100"M OW eedea9f’ OF Nooke~e Network, generalized network, microcomputer, optimization, network with gains, linear ...Oboe &111111041 network problem, in turn, can be viewed as a specialization of a linear programuing problem having at most two non-zero entries in each

  14. Human Factors Aspects of Aircraft Accidents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    AIRCRAFT ACCIDENTS/’ --.. by S.A.Anderson _ --’ ^LIFE SUPPORT, RESTRAINT AND EJECTION SYSTEMS INVESTIGATION by D.J. Anton C^> AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT...and includes lectures on engineering, life support systems / restraint/ejection^ and the flight surgeon’s investigation. The flight surgeon’s lecture...will include the on-scene investigation and documentation, the removal of the aircraft and follow-on analyses, the selection of systems and subsystems

  15. E-Pals: Examining a Cross-Cultural Writing/Literature Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClanahan, Lauren G.

    This paper reports on a case study of a U.S. high school literature class during an e-mail exchange with a high school literature class in Moscow (Russia). During this project, the students in both classrooms read short stories by Anton Chekhov and O'Henry. By using the stories as a catalyst, the students' goal was to help their distant partner to…

  16. jsc2011e203164

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-23

    At the Kremlin Wall in Moscow, Expedition 30 Commander Dan Burbank of NASA laid flowers October 24, 2011 in a traditional ceremony during the tour of Red Square he and his crewmates conducted prior to their launch to the International Space Station November 14 on the Soyuz TMA-22 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Burbank, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov and Anatoly Ivanishin will arrive in Baikonur October 31 for final pre-launch preparations. Credit: NASA

  17. jsc2011e203165

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-23

    At the Kremlin Wall in Moscow, Expedition 30 Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin laid flowers October 24, 2011 in a traditional ceremony during the tour of Red Square he and his crewmates conducted prior to their launch to the International Space Station November 14 on the Soyuz TMA-22 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Ivanishin, Expedition Commander Dan Burbank of NASA and Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov will arrive in Baikonur October 31 for final pre-launch preparations. Credit: NASA

  18. jsc2011e203163

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-23

    At the Kremlin Wall in Moscow, Expedition 30 Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov laid flowers October 24, 2011 in a traditional ceremony during the tour of Red Square he and his crewmates conducted prior to their launch to the International Space Station November 14 on the Soyuz TMA-22 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Shkaplerov, Expedition Commander Dan Burbank of NASA and Anatoly Ivanishin will arrive in Baikonur October 31 for final pre-launch preparations. Credit: NASA

  19. Next Generation Proton Beam Writing: A Platform Technology for Nanowire Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    silsesquioxane (HSQ) nanostructures for Nickel electroplating, S. Gorelick, F. Zhang, P.G. Shao, J.A. van Kan, Harry J . Whitlow, F. Watt, Nuclear...Yaping Ren, Jeroen Anton van Kan, Sher-Yi Chiam, Linke Jian, Herbert O. Moser, Thomas Osipowicz, Frank Watt, Nuclear Instruments & Methods in Physics...Research Section B Volume 267 (2009) 2376-2380 2 Proton beam writing: a platform technology for nanowire production, J . A. van Kan F. Zhang S. Y

  20. The Next Generation Focusing Lenses for Proton Beam Writing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-28

    nanostructures for Nickel electroplating, S. Gorelick, F. Zhang, P.G. Shao, J.A. van Kan, Harry J . Whitlow, F. Watt, Nuclear Instruments & Methods in Physics...Anton van Kan, Sher-Yi Chiam, Linke Jian, Herbert O. Moser, Thomas Osipowicz, Frank Watt, Nuclear Instruments & Methods in Physics Research Section B...Volume 267 (2009) 2376-2380 2 Proton beam writing: a platform technology for nanowire production, J . A. van Kan F. Zhang S. Y. Chiam T. Osipowicz A

  1. JPRS Report, East Europe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-21

    asked for their collabora- tion (Ion Mihalache , Gr. Iunian, N. Titulescu, T. Teodorescu-Braniste, Mihai Ralea, Petre Pandrea, Con- stants Visoianu...came out of hospital, Gr. Iunian (who had spoken about the incident in the Assembly of Deputies) advised me to appeal to Ion Mihalache , who at the...shrugged his shoul- ders helplessly and quoted a saying from Anton Pann: "If you can’t do anything, why seek trouble." Ion Mihalache knew only too

  2. Cooperation and Integration: Keeping Austria’s Forces Relevant for 21st Century

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    December, 12, 2012). 59 Johann Frank Johann Pucher, “Strategie Und Sicherheit 2012” (Anton Pelinka: Die Oesterreichische Aussen- und...Sicherheitspolitik), Boehlau Verlag, 2012, 637. 60 Johann Frank Johann Pucher, “Strategie Und Sicherheit 2012” (Thomas Mayer, Sicherheitspolitik nach dem Psst...Proposal, Friedrich Ebert Stiftung, Berlinn 2010, http://library.fes.de/pdf-files/id/ipa/07075.pdf, (accessed September 20, 2012), 55. 65 European

  3. Varied Human Tolerance to the Combined Conditions of Low Contrast and Diminished Luminance: A Quasi-Meta Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-30

    no scotopic CA data available for larger population comparisons until February 2016 (Bartholomew, Lad, Cao, Bach , & Cirulli, 2016) in which data...Böhringer, Bach , Reinhard, and Birnbaum (2014). A prospective data analysis followed ten patients who received bifocal intraocular lenses, and ten...Progress in Retinal and Eye Research, 19(6), 711–777. Anton, A., Böhringer, D., Bach , M., Reinhard, T., & Birnbaum, F. (2014). Contrast sensitivity

  4. 16. 'EXCELLENT NEW PARADE GROUND BEST SINCE POST ESTABLISHED. STARTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. 'EXCELLENT NEW PARADE GROUND BEST SINCE POST ESTABLISHED. STARTED BY COL. RALPH PARKER, FINISHED BY COL. TROUPE MILLER, PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY CALIFORNIA.' No date, probably ca. 1936. No signature, photographer probably Anton C. Heidrick. This panoramic view looks east over Soldier Field to the Bay, from the cannons at the west end. Original hand tinted silver gelatin print measures 90.4 cm by 20.2 cm, flush mounted on mat board. - Presidio of Monterey, Soldier Field, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  5. 14. 'TROOP A, OREGON CAVALRY IN CAMP AT PRESIDIO OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. 'TROOP A, OREGON CAVALRY IN CAMP AT PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA, 1915.' Anton C. Heidrick, photographer. This panoramic view looks west from the lower end of Soldier Field, before construction of walls and roads. Original warm toned silver gelatin print measures 94.9 cm by 19.7 cm, flush mounted on mat board. - Presidio of Monterey, Soldier Field, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  6. Burbank participates in a CHeCS Medical Contingency Drill in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-16

    ISS030-E-012609 (16 Dec. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank (foreground), Expedition 30 commander, and Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, flight engineer, participate in a Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) medical contingency drill in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. This drill gives crew members the opportunity to work as a team in resolving a simulated medical emergency onboard the space station.

  7. Burbank participates in a CHeCS Medical Contingency Drill in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-16

    ISS030-E-012613 (16 Dec. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank (foreground), Expedition 30 commander, and Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, flight engineer, participate in a Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) medical contingency drill in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. This drill gives crew members the opportunity to work as a team in resolving a simulated medical emergency onboard the space station.

  8. The Economy of Romania: How it Compares to Other Centrally-Planned Economies in Eastern Europe.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Adminis- tration) assistance was all but terminated. The 6 8 Anton Logoreci, "Albania’s Future," New York Times... motor buses and trucks, high capacity tractors, farming machinery, Diesel and electric locomotives, aircraft and helicopters as well as installations...34 Yoga by Commissars." Economist. Volume 283, Number 7238, May 22, 1982, p. 80. "Yugoslav/Romanian Aircraft." Aviation Week and Space Tech- nology

  9. Russian Political Warfare: Origin, Evolution, and Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    WARFARE: ORIGIN , EVOLUTION, AND APPLICATION by Jeffrey V. Dickey Thomas B. Everett Zane M. Galvach Matthew J. Mesko Anton V. Soltis June...blank) 2. REPORT DATE June 2015 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RUSSIAN POLITICAL WARFARE: ORIGIN ...political warfare (PW) campaign. Analysis of the origin , history, and evolution of Soviet/Russian PW from 1917 through today reveals that Russia is

  10. Introduction to Real Orthogonal Polynomials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    7 A. ELEMENTARY LINEAR ALGEBRA ....................... 7 1. Vector Spaces ............. ......... .... .... ...... 7 2. Inner...fundamental ideas in the next chapter. IH. BACKGROUND A. ELEMENTARY LINEAR ALGEBRA 1. Vector Spaces Let R" denote the collection of all vectors (n-tuples), u...Handbook of Mathematical Sciences, 6th ed., CRC Press, Inc., 1987. 2. Anton, H., and Rorres, C., Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications, John Wiley

  11. jsc2011e204589

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-30

    At the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Expedition 29/30 Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin (foreground, left), NASA’s Dan Burbank (center) and Russian Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov (right) lead a delegation as they walk to their bus October 31, 2011, preparing to depart for their launch site in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The trio will launch November 14 from Baikonur on their Soyuz TMA-22 spacecraft for the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

  12. Analysis of the Causes of Military Coups d’Etat in Sub-Saharan Africa, 1960-1982.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    of Defense S TMAR 2 6 1985• . A collaborative research project by The Orkand Corporation and Arizona State University. The views and conclusions...issues proved invaluable. Dr. Donald S . Orkand, President of The Orkand Corporation, and Dr. Anton S . Morton, Director of its National Security...Appendix D should be processed as one document per Dr. Slater, Defense Intelligence College 1 j . S EXECUTIVE SUMMARY INTRODUCTION The Washington Post

  13. Nocturnal Oxygen Variability in Home Dwelling Heart Failure Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-16

    MEMORANDUM FOR ST DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 59TH MEDICAL WING (AETC) JOINT BASE SAN ANTON IO - LACKLAND TEXAS ATTN: MAJ CUBBY L. GARDNER FROM...forward your request fo r funds lo the designated wing POC. 4. Congratulations, and thank you for your efforts and time. Your contributions arc vital to...RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT (CRADA), MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT (MTA), INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS AGREEMENT ETC.? O YES 1:8:] NO NOTE: If the

  14. Expedition 30 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-28

    Expedition 30 Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin is welcomed home by colleagues and family in Star City, Russia on Saturday, April 28, 2012. Russian Cosmonaut Ivanishin, Expedition 30 Commander Daniel Burbank, and Russian Cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov landed outside of Arkalyk, Kazakhstan earlier in the day from over five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedtion 29 and 30 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  15. Expedition 30 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-28

    Expedition 30 Flight Engineers Anatoly Ivanishin, far left, and Anton Shkaplerov are welcomed home by colleagues and family in Star City, Russia on Saturday, April 28, 2012. Russian Cosmonauts Ivanishin, Shkaplerov and Expedition 30 Commander Daniel Burbank landed outside of Arkalyk, Kazakhstan earlier in the day from over five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedtion 29 and 30 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  16. [Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592): report of a case of not perceiving own blindness].

    PubMed

    Bernoulli, R

    1990-01-01

    In the second book of the Essais towards the end of the twelfth chapter Montaigne mentions a nobleman who does not take note of his blindness. This case of not noticing his own blindness is presumably the first ever described. It belongs to the complex of anosognosia symptoms among which must be emphasized the Anton syndrome. The invalidity described by Montaigne means for him a crucial point of his critique of senses and thus of his doctrine of natural cognition.

  17. ISS Expedition 42 / 43 Departs for Kazakhstan Launch Site

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-26

    NASA TV (NTV) video file of ISS Expedition 42 / 43 crewmembers Anton Shkaplerov (Roskosmos), Terry Virts and Samantha Cristoforetti (ESA) during traditional ceremonies at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) in Star City, Russia.. Includes footage of crew and backup crew speaking with friends, family and officials outside of GCTC; crew and backup crew walking to Gararian monument where they pose for pictures; media interviews; and crew driving away in a bus.

  18. ISS Expedition 42 Crew Final Training Outside Moscow

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-26

    NASA TV (NTV) video file on ISS Expedition 42 / 43 final qualification training at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Star City, Russia. Includes footage of ISS Expedition 42 / 43 crewmembers Anton Shkaplerov (Roscosmos), Terry Virts, Samantha Cristoforetti (ESA) during signing in for Soyuz inspection; interviews; Soyuz inspection; interview with Astronaut Dan Burbank, Director of Russian Operations, NASA; crew signing in for final examinations and interviews.

  19. ISS Expedition 42 / 43 Crew Training Resource Reel (JSC-2641)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-14

    Media resource reel of ISS Expedition 42 / 43 Crew training activities. Includes footage of crew photo shots with Samantha Cristoforetti, Anton Shkaplerov and Terry Virts; Routine shots with Virts, ISS Expedition 43 crewmember Scott Kelly, Cristoforetti, ISS Expedition 41 / 42 crewmember Barry Wilmore; and Shklaplerov; T-38 Operations with Virts; Routine operations with Cristoforetti, Shkaplerov and Virts; Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) with Cristoforetti and Kelly; and Emergency Scenatios with Virts, Cristoforetti and Shkaplerov.

  20. Expedition 30 crewmembers use TORU Docking System Controls

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-22

    ISS030-E-241414 (22 April 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov (right) and Oleg Kononenko, both Expedition 30 flight engineers, monitor data at the manual TORU docking system controls in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station during approach and docking operations of the unpiloted ISS Progress 47 resupply vehicle. Progress 47 docked automatically to the Pirs Docking Compartment via the Kurs automated rendezvous system at 10:39 a.m. (EDT) on April 22, 2012.

  1. Progress Resupply Vehicle approach

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-28

    ISS030-E-050932 (27 Jan. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov (left), Expedition 30 flight engineer, monitors data at the manual TORU docking system controls in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station during approach and docking operations of the unpiloted ISS Progress 46 resupply vehicle. Progress 46 docked automatically to the Pirs Docking Compartment via the Kurs automated rendezvous system at 7:00 p.m. (EST) on Jan. 27, 2012. NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, commander, looks on.

  2. Expedition 30 Crewmembers Monitor Data in the SM during Approach

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-22

    ISS030-E-267689 (22 April 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov (left), Oleg Kononenko (right) and Anatoly Ivanishin, all Expedition 30 flight engineers, monitor data at the manual TORU docking system controls in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station during approach and docking operations of the unpiloted ISS Progress 47 resupply vehicle. Progress 47 docked automatically to the Pirs Docking Compartment via the Kurs automated rendezvous system at 10:39 a.m. (EDT) on April 22, 2012.

  3. Shkaplerov and Kononenko monitor data at the manual TORU Docking System Controls

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-27

    ISS030-E-156562 (27 Jan. 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov (left) and Oleg Kononenko, both Expedition 30 flight engineers, monitor data at the manual TORU docking system controls in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station during approach and docking operations of the unpiloted ISS Progress 46 resupply vehicle. Progress 46 docked automatically to the Pirs Docking Compartment via the Kurs automated rendezvous system at 7:00 p.m. (EST) on Jan. 27, 2012.

  4. Expedition 30 crewmembers use TORU Docking System Controls

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-22

    ISS030-E-241387 (22 April 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov (left), Oleg Kononenko (right) and Anatoly Ivanishin, all Expedition 30 flight engineers, monitor data at the manual TORU docking system controls in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station during approach and docking operations of the unpiloted ISS Progress 47 resupply vehicle. Progress 47 docked automatically to the Pirs Docking Compartment via the Kurs automated rendezvous system at 10:39 a.m. (EDT) on April 22, 2012.

  5. Expedition 42 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-22

    Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA (left), Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) (center), and Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (right), pose for a photo at the conclusion of the press conference, Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch Nov. 24 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  6. Decay, Transfer, and the Reacquisition of a Complex Skill: An Investigation of Practice Schedules, Observational Rehearsal, and Individual Differences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    separate matter to consider. Issues pertaining to motivation are salient, and applying reinforcement (Skinner, 1969) and value- expectancy ( Vroom , 1964...6. AUTHOR( S ) Winfred Arthur, Eric Anthony Day, Anton J. V lado, Paul R. Boatman, Vanessa Kowollik, Winston Bennett, Jr., Alok Bhupatkar ROJECT...NUMBER il 5d. P 1400 5e. TASK NUMBER AS 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 01 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDR . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION

  7. Expedition 42 Crew Wave

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-24

    Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti, of the European Space Agency (ESA), top, Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA, center, and Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), bottom, wave farewell prior to boarding the Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft for launch, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Cristoforetti, Virts, and Shkaplerov will spend the next five and a half months aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  8. jsc2011e205781

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-08

    In Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 30 Commander Dan Burbank of NASA (left), Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov (center) and Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin review docking procedures on a laptop computer during training at their Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters November 8, 2011. The trio will launch in the Soyuz TMA-22 spacecraft from Baikonur on November 14 bound for the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  9. Transient cortical blindness after intradiscal oxygen–ozone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vaiano, Agostino Salvatore; Valente, Cristiana; De Benedetti, Giacomo; Caramello, Guido

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old caucasian male developed bilateral blindness during an oxygen–ozone injection for disc herniation. The visual loss (VL) was immediately followed by severe frontal headache, vomiting, and nausea. The patient underestimated the VL showing Anton's syndrome, with a complete visual recovery after 2-month follow-up. Magnetic resonance data were consistent with recent ischemic lesions in bilateral vascular territories of posterior cerebral arteries. PMID:28112142

  10. Expedition 30 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-27

    Expedition 30 Commander Dan Burbank is seen as he is extracted from the Soyuz TMA-22 spacecraft shortly after the capsule landed with Russian flight engineers Anton Shkaplerov and Anatoly Ivanishin in a remote area outside of the town of Arkalyk, Kazakhstan on Friday, April 27, 2012. Burbank, Ivanishin, and Shkaplerov are returning from more than five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 29 and 30 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  11. Effects of High Altitude on Neurological and Pulmonary Function: The Effect of High Altitude on Visual Evoked Potentials in Humans on Mt. Everest.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-25

    on Mount 1. Larson EB, Roach RC, Schoene RB, et al: Acetazolamide and Rainier , which may allow more meaningful comparisons, acute mountain sickness...CDM Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234-6100 1.9 -J., 19 ’ % Phenytoin and Acute Mountain Sickness on Mount Everest RICHARD N. W. WOHNS, M.D. Twenty-one...M.S. clinical trial of phenytoin prophylaxis for acute mountain sickness ANTON KARUZA, D.P.M. during the approach to the northeast ridge of Mount

  12. Falkland’s War: Strategic, Intelligence and Diplomatic Failures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    Spain, bearing L the name San Anton Islands and dated 1526. Sixty-five years later, the British navigator John Davis sighted the islands, and eight...34..........-.-...........° perspective and to underestimate the importance of South America and the determination of its people. 2 At least one British official, Sir James...senior ministers most closely involved, Mr. Humphry Athus and Mr. Richard Luce. Mrs. Thatcher tried to persuade Lord Carrington not to resign, but he felt

  13. A Decentralized Variable Ordering Method for Distributed Constraint Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Either aproach can be used depending on how densely the nodes are connected inside blocks. If inside-block connec- tivity is sparse, the latter method ...A Decentralized Variable Ordering Method for Distributed Constraint Optimization Anton Chechetka Katia Sycara CMU-RI-TR-05-18 May 2005 Robotics...00-00-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Decentralized Variable Ordering Method for Distributed Constraint Optimization 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  14. 3-D Soviet Style: A Presentation on Lessons Learned from the Soviet Experience in Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    veut une analyse des efforts soviétiques en matière de défense, de développement et de diplomatie au cours du conflit russo-afghan (1979 à 1989). Les...publiée en russe et en anglais . Les données statistiques sur le conflit ont également été prises en compte. Les auteurs, MM. Anton Minkov et

  15. JPRS Report East Europe.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    34 37 There ought to be a even arrested in the GDR (Max Fechner , Max Fank, special research program for this chapter as well as for Willy Jesse, Paul...Anton Ackermann, Franz SED Central Committee or of the Central Party Control Dahlem, Max Fechner , Erich Gniffke, August Karsten, Commission (ZPKK...organized in the fall of 1948, Paul Merker, and Elli Schmidt-of them Fechner and respectively. The Central Committee passed another Merker were arrested and

  16. Equality judgments cannot distinguish between attention effects on appearance and criterion: a reply to Schneider (2011).

    PubMed

    Anton-Erxleben, Katharina; Abrams, Jared; Carrasco, Marisa

    2011-01-01

    Whether attention modulates the appearance of stimulus features is debated. Whereas many previous studies using a comparative judgment have found evidence for such an effect, two recent studies using an equality judgment have not. Critically, these studies have relied on the assumption that the equality paradigm yields bias-free PSE estimates and is as sensitive as the comparative judgment, without testing these assumptions. Anton-Erxleben, Abrams, and Carrasco (2010) compared comparative judgments and equality judgments with and without the manipulation of attention. They demonstrated that the equality paradigm is less sensitive than the comparative judgment and also bias-prone. Furthermore, they reported an effect of attention on the PSE using both paradigms. Schneider (2011) questions the validity of the latter finding, stating that the data in the equality experiment are corrupted because of skew in the response distributions. Notably, this argument supports the original conclusion by Anton-Erxleben et al.: that the equality paradigm is bias-prone. Additionally, the necessary analyses to show that the attention effect observed in Anton-Erxleben et al. was due to skew in the data were not conducted. Here, we provide these analyses and show that although the equality judgment is bias-prone, the effects we observe are consistent with an increase of apparent contrast by attention.

  17. Bobcat (Felis rufus) ecology and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, Judd A.

    1997-01-01

    The bobcat (Felis rufus) is a medium sized predator in the family Felidae found exclusively in North America. Extensive natural history information is available and is summarized in several bibliographies and reviews (Sweeny and Poelker 1977, McCord and Cardoza 1982, Boddicker 1983, Anderson 1987, Rolley 1987). The bobcat is a spotted cat with a short white-tipped tail, small dark ear tufts and is about twice the size of the house cat (Felis domesticus) because of the bobcat’s longer bone structure (McCord and Cardoza 1982, Jameson and Peeters 1988). The bobcat weights between 5- 15 kg with males larger than females. TL 700- 1000, T 95-150, E (from crown) 60-75 (Jameson and Peeters 1988).

  18. Extension of Flutter Boundaries Using In-Flight Receptance Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    G., Random Data: Analysis & Measurement Procedures, Third Edition, John Wiley and Sons, New York, 2000. 18. Peeters , B., Lowet, G., Van der...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2012-0057 Extension of Flutter Boundaries Using In-Flight Receptance Data Professor John E Mottershead...6. AUTHOR(S) Professor John E Mottershead 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5d. TASK NUMBER 5e. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S

  19. Finite-Time Performance of Local Search Algorithms: Theory and Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-10

    proven to be .VP-complete using a polynomial 21 transformation from the NF-complete Maximum Edge Biclique Problem ( Peeters 2003). Kao and Jacobson...Goldsman, (1995) Design and Analysis of Experiments for Statistical Selection, Screening, and Multiple Comparisons. John Wiley and Sons, New York. A...34Safe at Home? An Experiment in Domestic Airline Security." Operations Research, 49, 181-195. P. Billingsley (1979). Probability and Measure, John

  20. A Tale of Two Studies: Equal Opportunity Climate and Mission Readiness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-24

    Bowler, 2007; LeBlanc, Hox, Schaufeli, Wilmar, Peeters , & Taris, 2007), and the requirement for self-reports of these constructs from a conceptual...1981; Fiske, 1949; Goldberg, 1992; John & A Tale of Two Studies, 32 Srivastava, 1999; McCrae & Costa, 1999; Norman, 1963; Wiggins & Trapnell, 1997...planning, prioritizing, thinking before acting, and following rules and norms) that yields effective task performance ( John & Srivastava, 1999). These

  1. Falconry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    Peregrine falcon populations 98. California Hawking Club, Davis Calif. A beginners manual of falconry. Davis, Calif: Pub. by The California Hawking Club...1965]. (SK 321 .H55) Cover has title: A beginners manual of falconry by Steven G. Herman, E.W. Jameson, jr., Hans J. Peeters. "Designed and printed...Introduction written by Rev. Alex. Gillies. cf. Lowndes’ Bibliographer’s manual . E;Ibliotheca Accipitraria #49. Oelgart #6 A 104. Carcano, Francesco

  2. Uncovering the Role of BMP Signaling in Melanocyte Development and Melanoma Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    validated zebrafish-specific array CGH platform. Genes Chromosomes Cancer, 48, 155-70. 10. North, T.E., Goessling, W., Peeters, M., Li, P., Ceol, C.J...number variation (CNV) in the melanoma genome. A major challenge in the field of cancer genomics has been to distinguish, from a chromosomal segment...tagged gdf6b, GST-gdf6b, into two guinea pigs. Antibodies were validated by comparing reactivity of 8 pre- and post-immune sera to bacterially

  3. Convergence and reproducibility in molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA duplex d(GCACGAACGAACGAACGC).

    PubMed

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Roe, Daniel R; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2015-05-01

    The structure and dynamics of DNA are critically related to its function. Molecular dynamics simulations augment experiment by providing detailed information about the atomic motions. However, to date the simulations have not been long enough for convergence of the dynamics and structural properties of DNA. Molecular dynamics simulations performed with AMBER using the ff99SB force field with the parmbsc0 modifications, including ensembles of independent simulations, were compared to long timescale molecular dynamics performed with the specialized Anton MD engine on the B-DNA structure d(GCACGAACGAACGAACGC). To assess convergence, the decay of the average RMSD values over longer and longer time intervals was evaluated in addition to assessing convergence of the dynamics via the Kullback-Leibler divergence of principal component projection histograms. These molecular dynamics simulations-including one of the longest simulations of DNA published to date at ~44μs-surprisingly suggest that the structure and dynamics of the DNA helix, neglecting the terminal base pairs, are essentially fully converged on the ~1-5μs timescale. We can now reproducibly converge the structure and dynamics of B-DNA helices, omitting the terminal base pairs, on the μs time scale with both the AMBER and CHARMM C36 nucleic acid force fields. Results from independent ensembles of simulations starting from different initial conditions, when aggregated, match the results from long timescale simulations on the specialized Anton MD engine. With access to large-scale GPU resources or the specialized MD engine "Anton" it is possible for a variety of molecular systems to reproducibly and reliably converge the conformational ensemble of sampled structures. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent developments of molecular dynamics. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. The 11th INTEGRAL Conference: Gamma-Ray Astrophysics in Multi-Wavelength Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research and the Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy of the University of Amsterdam have organised the 11th INTEGRAL Conference. The meeting focused on the astrophysics of highly energetic phenomena that are observed with INTEGRAL, taking into account advanced modelling and observational constraints from all wavelengths (and other cosmic messengers). The programme provided a broad perspective of the findings of INTEGRAL in synergy with other space observatories (XMM-Newton, Chandra, NuStar, Swift, ASTROSAT, Hitomi, Fermi, etc.) and ground-based facilities (LOFAR, H.E.S.S., Veritas, MAGIC, etc.). It addressed key open questions in the field and novel ideas to resolve them.

  5. Nonlinear Optimization Involving Polynomial Matrices and Their Generalized Inverses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    Since k is an arbitrary number of equations, this holds true for all k. This completes the proof. 103 B bi i oar aDhv 1. Anton . Howard . Elementary Linear ...interface it has with the Fundamental Theorem of Linear Algebra previously 47 A [A I]Initial A( Canonical I For mn Elementary Transformations 0 0 A1.22...as well as the strong interface between the ST method and the Fundamental Theorem of Linear Algebra . Finally selected application problems are solved

  6. Apathy, empathy, physicians, and Chekhov.

    PubMed

    Gianakos, D

    1997-01-01

    Healing depends on a caring, involved physician. In his story "Ward Number Six," Anton Chekhov illustrated how patients suffer when physicians become apathetic. Reading this story may inspire physicians to resist apathy and assume greater responsibility for the social conditions that impact on their patients' well-being. It may also stimulate physicians' imagination in such a way as to improve their ability to empathize with their patients. Finally, the act of reading itself--particularly reading great literature such as "Ward Number Six," can help rejuvenate those physicians who struggle with their own apathy.

  7. Creativity and mood disorders: The enigmatic case of Isaak Il'ich Levitan (1860-1900).

    PubMed

    Lerner, Vladimir; Margolin, Jacob; Witztum, Eliezer

    2015-08-25

    Isaak Levitan (1860-1900) was one of Russia's most influential landscape artists. He lived a very short life, only 40 years, but left more than 1000 paintings. He suffered from mood fluctuations, and died as a result of serious heart disease. After an introduction related to the issue of creativity and mental disorders, a short biography of Levitan's life is outlined, followed by some examples of his mood and behavior. A section on the mood's reflection in Levitan's professional work is followed by a description of his romantic loves and disappointments and his relationship with his contemporary Russian, the writer Anton Chekhov.

  8. Pigment characterization of important golden age panel paintings of the 17th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pięta, Ewa; Proniewicz, Edyta; Szmelter-Fausek, Bożena; Olszewska-Świetlik, Justyna; Proniewicz, Leonard M.

    2015-02-01

    Samples were obtained from two world-famous 17th century panel paintings of the Gdańsk school of panting: 'Seven Acts of Charity' (1607, in St. Mary's Church in Gdańsk, Poland) by Anton Möller and 'Angelic Concert' (1611, in Diocesan Museum in Pelplin, Poland) by Hermann Han. Micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS), optical microscopy (OM), and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy studies of the samples were performed to characterize the pigments present in the individual painting layers (a rich palette of white, black, blue, red, and yellow pigments) and the pictorial techniques used by the artists.

  9. jsc2017e114488

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-01

    jsc2017e114488 (Sept. 1, 2017) --- Expedition 53-54 prime crewmember Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos (foreground) and his backup and fellow cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov lay flowers at the Kremlin Wall in Red Square in Moscow Sept. 1 as part of traditional pre-launch ceremonies. Misurkin and Joe Acaba and Mark Vande Hei of NASA will launch Sept. 13 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan Sept. 13 on the Soyuz MS-06 spacecraft for a five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Elizabeth Weissinger

  10. jsc2014e092329

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-06

    4108: At the Kremlin Wall in Red Square in Moscow, Expedition 42/43 crewmember Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency lays flowers Nov. 6 at the site where Russian space icons are interred. Cristoforetti, Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Terry Virts of NASA will launch Nov. 24, Kazakh time from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on their Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  11. Earth observation taken by the Expedition 43 crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-01

    ISS043E080914 (04/01/2015) --- This Earth view from the International Space Station Apr. 1, 2015 (bottom left corner) is Soyuz TMA-15M which carried NASA astronaut Terry Virts, ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti and Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov to the ISS back in No. 2014 and will remain until May 2015. The further one (top left corner) is Progress 57 a Russian supply spaceship which launched and docked in October last year and will undock at the end of April to return to Earth.

  12. Expedition 30 Crew Members celebrate Christmas in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-25

    ISS030-E-015666 (25 Dec. 2011) --- The six Expedition 30 crew members assemble in the U.S. Lab (Destiny) aboard the International Space Station for a brief celebration of the Christmas holiday on Dec. 25. In front are Expedition 30 Commander Dan Burbank (right) and Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko. On the back row, left to right, are Flight Engineers Don Pettit, Anatoly Ivanishin, Andre Kuipers and Anton Shkaplerov (suspended with his feet anchored above the group). Burbank and Pettit are NASA astronauts; Kononenko, Shkaplerov and Ivanishin are Russian cosmonauts; and Kuipers represents the European Space Agency.

  13. Expedition 30 Crew Members celebrate Christmas in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-25

    ISS030-E-015660 (25 Dec. 2011) --- The six Expedition 30 crew members assemble in the U.S. Lab (Destiny) aboard the International Space Station for a brief celebration of the Christmas holiday on Dec. 25. In front are Expedition 30 Commander Dan Burbank (right) and Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko. On the back row, left to right, are Flight Engineers Don Pettit, Anatoly Ivanishin, Andre Kuipers and Anton Shkaplerov (suspended with his feet anchored above the group). Burbank and Pettit are NASA astronauts; Kononenko, Shkaplerov and Ivanishin are Russian cosmonauts; and Kuipers represents the European Space Agency.

  14. Expedition 30 Crew Members celebrate Christmas in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-25

    ISS030-E-015674 (25 Dec. 2011 --- The six Expedition 30 crew members assemble in the U.S. Lab (Destiny)aboard the International Space Station for a brief celebration of the Christmas holiday on Dec. 25. In front are Expedition 30 Commander Dan Burbank (right) and Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko. On the back row, left to right, are Flight Engineers Don Pettit, Anatoly Ivanishin, Andre Kuipers and Anton Shkaplerov (suspended with his feet anchored above the group). Burbank and Pettit are NASA astronauts; Kononenko, Shkaplerov and Ivanishin are Russian cosmonauts; and Kuipers represents the European Space Agency.

  15. Very Large Scale Integration of Nano-Patterned YBa2Cu3O7-delta Josephson Junctions in a Two-Dimensional Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-26

    Array Shane A. Cybart,∗,†,‡ Steven M. Anton,†,‡ Stephen M. Wu,†,‡ John Clarke,†,‡ and Robert C. Dynes†,‡ Department of Physics, University of California...bias currents in the opposite direction, the asymmetry had the opposite sign, consistent with our interpretation. We analyzed our data using the Bardeen ...B 2000, 63, 024511. (42) Bardeen , J.; Stephen, M. J. Phys. Rev 1965, 140, A1197. (43) Welty, R. P.; Martinis, J. M. IEEE Trans. Magn. 1991, 27, 2924

  16. Expedition 42 Door Signing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-23

    Expedition 42 Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) performs the traditional door signing at the Cosmonaut Hotel prior to departing the hotel for launch in a Soyuz rocket with fellow crewmates, Flight Engineers Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (ESA) and Terry Virts of NASA, Sunday, Nov. 23, 2014 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for the early hours of Nov. 24 Kazakhstan time and will carry Shkaplerov, Cristoforetti, and Virts into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  17. Expedition 42 Door Signing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-23

    Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA performs the traditional door signing at the Cosmonaut Hotel prior to departing the hotel for launch in a Soyuz rocket with fellow crewmates, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (ESA), Sunday, Nov. 23, 2014 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for the early hours of Nov. 24 Kazakhstan time and will carry Virts, Shkaplerov, and Cristoforetti into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  18. Expedition 42 Door Signing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-23

    Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (ESA), performs the traditional door signing at the Cosmonaut Hotel prior to departing the hotel for launch in a Soyuz rocket with fellow crewmates, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA, Sunday, Nov. 23, 2014 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for the early hours of Nov. 24 Kazakhstan time and will carry Cristoforetti, Virts, and Shkaplerov into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  19. Music and biology at the Naples Zoological Station.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Bernardino

    2015-01-01

    Anton Dohrn projected the Stazione Zoologica as composed of two complementary halves: nature and culture. This attitude was not only expression of the general cultural background of the nineteenth century cultural elite, for Dohrn both formed a coherent and organized whole. In my essay I will analyse the different levels of the relationship between music and biology. In particular, I will demonstrate that both share similar "styles of thought". In the last part I will show that Dohrn's most important scientific contribution, the concept or "principle" of Functionswechsel, provides evidence for the link he had established between music and biology.

  20. Soyuz TMA-22/28S departs the ISS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-27

    ISS031-E-005056 (27 April 2012) --- The Soyuz TMA-22 spacecraft departs from the International Space Station and heads toward a landing on April 27, 2012. Inside the Soyuz, NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander; along with Russian cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov, Soyuz commander, and Anatoly Ivanishin, flight engineer, were looking forward to putting their feet on terra firma for the first time in more than five months onboard the station, where they served as members of the Expedition 29 and 30 crews. At the time of this photo the two spacecraft were over the northwestern Pacific Ocean. With the aid of sun glint, ice floes can be seen clearly.

  1. Expedition 42 Pressure Check

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-23

    Expedition 42 crew members, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), left, Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (ESA), center, and Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA, right, prepare for pressure checks of their Sokol suits in Building 254 following their suit up for launch, Sunday, Nov. 23, 2014, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for the early hours of Nov. 24 and will carry Virts, Shkaplerov, and Cristoforetti into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  2. Expedition 42 Pressure Check

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-23

    Expedition 42 crew members, Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA, left, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), center, and Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (ESA), right, prepare for pressure checks of their Sokol suits in Building 254 following their suit up for launch, Sunday, Nov. 23, 2014, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for the early hours of Nov. 24 and will carry Virts, Shkaplerov, and Cristoforetti into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  3. Expedition 42 Pressure Check

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-23

    Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (ESA) waits for a pressure check of her Sokol suit in Building 254 following her suit up for launch, Sunday, Nov. 23, 2014, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for the early hours of Nov. 24 and will carry Cristoforetti and fellow crewmates, Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA and Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  4. Expedition 42 Pressure Check

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-23

    Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA waits for a pressure check of his Sokol suit in Building 254 following his suit up for launch, Sunday, Nov. 23, 2014, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for the early hours of Nov. 24 and will carry Virts and fellow crewmates, Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (ESA) and Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  5. Expedition 42 Pressure Check

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-23

    Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA gives a thumbs up while waiting for a pressure check of his Sokol suit in Building 254 following his suit up for launch, Sunday, Nov. 23, 2014, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for the early hours of Nov. 24 and will carry Virts and fellow crewmates, Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (ESA) and Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  6. A case of vertebrobasilar stroke during oxygen-ozone therapy.

    PubMed

    Corea, Francesco; Amici, Serena; Murgia, Nicola; Tambasco, Nicola

    2004-01-01

    Despite only sporadic observations, the use of medical oxygen-ozone therapy is a largely diffused treatment for lumbar disk herniation that has failed to respond to conservative management. Combined intradiscal and periganglionic injection of medical ozone and periganglionic injection of steroids are presumed to have a cumulative effect enhancing the overall outcome of treatment for pain caused by disk herniation. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of stroke during such medical application. The patient had Anton's syndrome as a result of top of the basilar hypoperfusion.

  7. Strategic and Operational Relevance of Heavy Lift in the United States Marine Corps: CH-53E Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    capabilities of the CH-53E: - Operation EASTERN EXIT - The recovery of Basher 52 (Captain Scott O’Grady Rescue) - Operation ENDURING FREEDOM (covered in the...significant payload. Recovery of Basher 52 Captain Scott O’Grady’s F-16 was shot down while flying over Bosnia on the 2nd of June 1995. The 24th MEU(SOC...Eric Damm USMC, Dr Tom Bowditch , Mr. Anton Jareb, Mr. Robert Bendow Marine Aviation Requirements Study: Summary Report, August 2001(Center for Naval

  8. Pure Dephasing in Flux Qubits due to Flux Noise with Spectral Density Scaling as 1/f(alpha)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-05

    Anton, C. Müller, J. Birenbaum, S. O’Kelley, A. Fefferman, D. Golubev, G. Hilton , H.-M. Cho, K. Irwin, F. Wellstood, Gerd Schön, A. Shnirman, John...1 C. Müller,2,3 J. S. Birenbaum,1 S. R. O’Kelley,1 A. D. Fefferman,1,* D. S. Golubev,4 G. C. Hilton ,5 H.-M. Cho,5 K. D. Irwin,5 F. C. Wellstood,6...de Physique Statistique de l’Ecole Normale Supérieure, associé au CNRS et aux Universités Denis Diderot et P.M. Curie, 24 rue Lhomond 75231 Paris

  9. jsc2011e027535

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-21

    At the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 27 Flight Engineer Ron Garan of NASA (left), Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev (center) and Flight Engineer Andrey Borisenko (right) are greeted upon their arrival March 21, 2011 by RSC-Energia Vice-President Nikolai Zelenchikov after their flight to the launch site from Star City, Russia. The trio, and their backups, Anatoly Ivanishin, Anton Shkaplerov and Dan Burbank are in the final weeks of training for their launch April 5 (April 4, U.S. time) on the Soyuz TMA-21 spacecraft to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  10. jsc2011e204586

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-30

    At the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Expedition 29/30 Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov (left) shares a moment with legendary Russian cosmonaut Alexei Leonov (right), the first human to walk in space, during the departure ceremony October 31, 2011 for Shkaplerov, NASA’s Dan Burbank and Russian Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin as they left for their launch site in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The trio will launch November 14 from Baikonur on their Soyuz TMA-22 spacecraft for the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

  11. Expedition 30 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-27

    NASA and GCTC (Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center) crew support personnel enter the inflatable medical tent in which Expedition 30 Commander Dan Burbank, and flight engineers Anton Shkaplerov and Anatoly Ivanishin are being checked out shortly after their Soyuz TMA-22 capsule landed out side the town of Arkalyk, Kazakhstan, Friday, April 27, 2012. Burbank, and Russian Cosmonauts Shkaplerov and Ivanishin are returning from more than five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 29 and 30 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  12. Expedition 22 Suitup

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-21

    Expedition 22 crew members, seated from left, NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia, and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan and their backup crew members, standing from left, NASA’s Doug Wheelock, Russian Anton Shkaplerov and Japan’s Satoshi Furakawa, pose for a group photo shortly after donning their flight suits a few hours before the scheduled launch of the Soyuz TMA-17 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Sunday Dec. 20, 2009. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Expedition 22 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-19

    Expedition 22 backup crew members, from left, NASA’s Doug Wheelock, Russian Anton Shkaplerov and Japan’s Satoshi Furakawa are seen during during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Saturday, Dec., 19, 2009. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Expedition 22 NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan, is scheduled for Monday, Dec., 21, 2009 at 3:52a.m. Kazakhstan time. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. The Perseids Aug 11-12, 1996 in Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojurova, E.; Trukchev, I.

    As every year Astroclub "Canopus" organized an extended Perseid observing campaign. Members of the club took part in expedition to Avren village near Varna, at the National Astronomical Observatory (Rojen) and at the National Yought Astronomical Camp in Belite Brezi (South Bulgaria). Here we present some results derived on the basis of data obtained by Biliana Ognianova, Diana Tisheva, Diliana Antonova, Eva Bojurova, Elena Surbinska, Irena Stavreva, Katia Koleva, Lilia Porojanova, Anton Antonov, Denis Mechmedov, Doichin Docinski, Galin Genchev, Ivan Trukhchev, Valentin Velkov. More than 2000 Perseids were recorded. Some other showers were also observed.

  15. Evolution of the gamma/gamma’ Interface Width in a Commercial Nickel Base Superalloy Studied by 3D Atom Probe (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    6 Reference 1. D . D . Krueger, R. D . Kissinger, R. D . Menzies, and, C. S. Wukusick, U. S. Patent 4,957,567. 2. S. T. Wlodek, M. Kelly, and, D . A...Alden, Superalloys 1996, Ed. R. D . Kissinger, D . J. Deye, D . L. Anton, A. D . Cetel, M. V. Nathal, T. M. Pollock, and, D . A. Woodford, TMS, Warrendale...H.L. Fraser, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008. 6. D . Blavette, E. Cadel, and, B. Deconihout, Mater. Char. 2000, vol. 44, pp.133-57. 7. P. M

  16. New crew launches to ISS on This Week @NASA - November 28, 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-28

    NASA’s Terry Virts and Expedition 42/43 crewmates, Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency and the European Space Agency’s Samantha Cristoforetti, launched Nov. 23 at 4:01 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, from Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Almost six hours later, their Soyuz spacecraft docked to the International Space Station – where they joined Expedition 42 Commander Barry Wilmore of NASA, and Flight Engineers Alexander Samokutyaev and Elena Serova of Roscosmos – returning the station crew to its full complement of six people. Also, First 3-D printed object in space, Orion flight test update, New airborne Earth Science missions and Happy Thanksgiving from space!

  17. Excess volumes of binary mixtures of 1,3-dichloropropane with isomeric butanols at 298. 15 and 313. 15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Lafuente, C.; Pardo, J.; Rodriguez, V.; Royo, F.M.; Urieta, J.S. . Dept. de Quimica Organica-Quimica Fisica)

    1993-10-01

    Excess molar volumes, V[sub m][sup E], for binary mixtures of 1,3-dichloropropane with 1-butanol, 2-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, and 2-methyl-2-propanol have been determined from density measurements at 298.15 and 313.15 K by means of an Anton Paar DMA-58 vibrating tube densimeter. V[sub m][sup E] is positive over the whole composition range except for mixtures containing 1-butanol and 2-methyl-1-propanol at 298.15 K in which V[sub m][sup E] shows negative values at low mole fractions of dichloroalkane.

  18. Progress Resupply Vehicle approach

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-27

    ISS030-E-050883 (27 Jan. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov (bottom), Expedition 30 flight engineer, monitors data at the manual TORU docking system controls in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station during approach and docking operations of the unpiloted ISS Progress 46 resupply vehicle. Progress 46 docked automatically to the Pirs Docking Compartment via the Kurs automated rendezvous system at 7:00 p.m. (EST) on Jan. 27, 2012. NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, commander, looks on. Russian cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin (bottom background), flight engineer, photographs the approach of the Progress from a Zvezda window.

  19. Progress Resupply Vehicle approach

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-27

    ISS030-E-050885 (27 Jan. 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov (bottom) and Oleg Kononenko (center), both Expedition 30 flight engineers, monitor data at the manual TORU docking system controls in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station during approach and docking operations of the unpiloted ISS Progress 46 resupply vehicle. Progress 46 docked automatically to the Pirs Docking Compartment via the Kurs automated rendezvous system at 7:00 p.m. (EST) on Jan. 27, 2012. NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, commander, looks on. Russian cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin (bottom background), flight engineer, photographs the approach of the Progress from a Zvezda window.

  20. Progress Resupply Vehicle approach

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-28

    ISS030-E-050933 (27 Jan. 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov (left) and Oleg Kononenko (partially obscured), both Expedition 30 flight engineers, monitor data at the manual TORU docking system controls in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station during approach and docking operations of the unpiloted ISS Progress 46 resupply vehicle. Progress 46 docked automatically to the Pirs Docking Compartment via the Kurs automated rendezvous system at 7:00 p.m. (EST) on Jan. 27, 2012. NASA astronaut Dan Burbank (partially out of frame at right), commander, looks on.

  1. Expedition 30 Crewmembers use manual TORU docking system

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-22

    ISS030-E-241403 (22 April 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov (center) and Oleg Kononenko (left foreground); along with NASA astronaut Don Pettit, all Expedition 30 flight engineers, monitor data at the manual TORU docking system controls in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station during approach and docking operations of the unpiloted ISS Progress 47 resupply vehicle. Progress 47 docked automatically to the Pirs Docking Compartment via the Kurs automated rendezvous system at 10:39 a.m. (EDT) on April 22, 2012.

  2. After Progress Resupply Vehicle Docking

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-28

    ISS030-E-050949 (27 Jan. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank (right), Expedition 30 commander; Russian cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov (bottom), Oleg Kononenko (center) and Anatoly Ivanishin (left background); and European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers, all flight engineers, take a moment for a photo in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station following the successful docking of the unpiloted ISS Progress 46 resupply vehicle. Progress 46 docked automatically to the Pirs Docking Compartment via the Kurs automated rendezvous system at 7:00 p.m. (EST) on Jan. 27, 2012.

  3. AFT view of the Transfer Compartment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-22

    ISS030-E-241385 (22 April 2012) --- Photographed from the transfer compartment between the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB) and the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station, Russian cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov (left), Oleg Kononenko (right) and Anatoly Ivanishin, all Expedition 30 flight engineers, monitor data at the manual TORU docking system controls in Zvezda during approach and docking operations of the unpiloted ISS Progress 47 resupply vehicle. Progress 47 docked automatically to the Pirs Docking Compartment via the Kurs automated rendezvous system at 10:39 a.m. (EDT) on April 22, 2012.

  4. After Progress Resupply Vehicle Docking

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-28

    ISS030-E-050946 (27 Jan. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank (right), Expedition 30 commander; Russian cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov (bottom), Oleg Kononenko (center) and Anatoly Ivanishin (left background); and European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers, all flight engineers, take a moment for a photo in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station following the successful docking of the unpiloted ISS Progress 46 resupply vehicle. Progress 46 docked automatically to the Pirs Docking Compartment via the Kurs automated rendezvous system at 7:00 p.m. (EST) on Jan. 27, 2012.

  5. AFT view of the Transfer Compartment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-22

    ISS030-E-241386 (22 April 2012) --- Photographed from the transfer compartment between the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB) and the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station, Russian cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov (left), Oleg Kononenko (right) and Anatoly Ivanishin, all Expedition 30 flight engineers, monitor data at the manual TORU docking system controls in Zvezda during approach and docking operations of the unpiloted ISS Progress 47 resupply vehicle. Progress 47 docked automatically to the Pirs Docking Compartment via the Kurs automated rendezvous system at 10:39 a.m. (EDT) on April 22, 2012.

  6. Progress Resupply Vehicle approach

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-27

    ISS030-E-050884 (27 Jan. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov (bottom), Expedition 30 flight engineer, monitors data at the manual TORU docking system controls in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station during approach and docking operations of the unpiloted ISS Progress 46 resupply vehicle. Progress 46 docked automatically to the Pirs Docking Compartment via the Kurs automated rendezvous system at 7:00 p.m. (EST) on Jan. 27, 2012. NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, commander, looks on. Russian cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin (bottom background), flight engineer, photographs the approach of the Progress from a Zvezda window.

  7. Expedition 40 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-27

    Expedition 40 prime crew members Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, ESA, far left, Soyuz Commander Maxim Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, second left, and Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman of NASA, center, pose for a picture with Expedition 40 backup crew members Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA, third right, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of Roscosmos, and Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of ESA at the conclusion a press conference, Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch May 29 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  8. Expedition 42 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-22

    Family visits with Expedition 42 Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) through glass at the conclusion of the press conference, Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for Nov. 24 and will carry Shkaplerov, Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA , and Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  9. Expedition 42 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-22

    Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (ESA) speaks with friends and family through glass at the conclusion of the press conference, Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for Nov. 24 and will carry Cristoforetti, Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA , and Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  10. jsc2011e203161

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-23

    With famed St. Basil’s Cathedral in the background, the prime crew for the upcoming Expedition 30 launch to the International Space Station toured Red Square in Moscow October 24, 2011 as part of their ceremonial pre-launch activities. From left to right are Expedition 30 Commander Dan Burbank of NASA, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov and Anatoly Ivanishin. Burbank, Shkaplerov and Ivanishin will launch on November 14 to the International Space Station in the Soyuz TMA-22 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Credit: NASA

  11. Expedition 30 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-27

    Expedition 30 flight engineer and Russian cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin is seen as he is extracted from the Soyuz TMA-22 spacecraft shortly after the capsule landed with Expedition 30 Commander Dan Burbank and flight engineer Anton Shkaplerov in a remote area outside of the town of Arkalyk, Kazakhstan on Friday, April 27, 2012. Ivanishin, Burbank and Shkaplerov are returning from more than five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 29 and 30 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  12. Abrasion-Erosion Evaluation of Concrete Mixtures for Stilling Basin Repairs, Kinzua Dam, Pennsylvania.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Federal Building Pittsburgh, PA 15222 Attention: Mr. Anton Krysa Re: Mix Compositions of Microsilica Concrete for the Neville Island Test Dear Mr. Krysa...and look forward to further r associations. Please do not hesitate to contact us regarding further information on the microsilica concrete as needed...wt. 159.2 156.7 156.6 (Ibs/cu. fz-.) Air content. , 1.2 2.5 2.6 S) ump. i n. 10 __;____________ I The surrv contains 50, solid microsilica by we irht

  13. Darwin: German mystic or French rationalist?

    PubMed

    Ghiselin, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    The notion that Charles Darwin embraced the German Romantic tradition seems plausible, given the early influence of Alexander von Humboldt. But this view fails to do justice to other scientific traditions. Darwin was a protégé of the Englishman John Stevens Henslow and was a follower of the Scott Charles Lyell. He had important debts to French scientists, notably Henri Milne-Edwards, Etienne and Isidore Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, and Alphonse de Candolle. Many Germans were quite supportive of Darwin, but not all of these were encumbered by idealistic metaphysical baggage. Both Darwin and Anton Dohrn treated science as very much a cosmopolitan enterprise.

  14. jsc2014e092317

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-06

    3851: At the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Expedition 42/43 crewmember Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (right) signs a ceremonial book Nov. 6 as her crewmates, Terry Virts of NASA (left) and Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) look on. Virts, Cristoforetti and Shkaplerov will launch Nov. 24, Kazakh time from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on their Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  15. Optimizing Assignment of Tomahawk Cruise Missile Missions to Firing Units

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Brown,2* Wilson Price,2 Anton Rowe,2 Charles F. Fennemore,3 Robert L. Taft3 1 Division of Economics and Business , Colorado School of Mines, Golden...simultaneously optimizes each zk (x), then the multiobjective problem would be clear and simple, but such an ideal solution cannot be guaranteed, and is rare in...objective problems (Hk), for k = 1, . . . , |K|: (Hk) : z ∗ k = min zk (x) s.t. x ∈ θ zk ′(x) = z∗k′ , ∀k′ < k One weakness of this hierarchical

  16. The FUor Candidate V582 Aurigae: First Photometric and Spectroscopic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkov, Evgeni H.; Peneva, Stoyanka P.; Dennefeld, Michel

    One of the most attractive events in the pre-main sequence evolution is the FU Orionis (FUor) outburst. Because only a small number of FUor stars have been detected to date, photometric and spectral studies of every new object are of great interest. Recently, a new FUor candidate was discovered by Anton Khruslov - V582 Aur. To confirm the FUors nature of this object we started regular photometric observations with the telescopes of the National Astronomical Observatory Rozhen (Bulgaria). A high-resolution spectrum of V582 Aur was obtained with the 1.93 m telescope in Haute-Provence Observatory (France).

  17. Cyber Deterrence: Tougher in Theory than in Practice?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    and systematic attack to date” on Pentagon networks, according to then–deputy secretary of defense John Hamre, observers jumped to the conclusion of...RAND, 2002), http://www.rand .org/pubs/monograph_reports/MR1619/MR1619.pdf. 7. In Mark Landler and John Markoff, “Digital Fears Emerge after Data Siege...on Estonia targeted its banks. In Peeter Lorents, Rain Ottis, and Raul Rikk, “Cyber Society and Cooperative Cyber Defence,” a paper presented at the

  18. Early modern experimentation on live animals.

    PubMed

    Bertoloni Meli, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the works by Aselli (De lactibus sive lacteis venis, 1627) on the milky veins and Harvey (1628, translated in 1993) on the motion of the heart and the circulation of the blood, the practice of vivisection witnessed a resurgence in the early modern period. I discuss some of the most notable cases in the century spanning from Aselli's work to the investigations of fluid pressure in plants and animals by Stephen Hales (Vegetable Staticks, 1727). Key figures in my study include Johannes Walaeus, Jean Pecquet, Marcello Malpighi, Reinier de Graaf, Richard Lower, Anton Nuck, and Anton de Heide. Although vivisection dates from antiquity, early modern experimenters expanded the range of practices and epistemic motivations associated with it, displaying considerable technical skills and methodological awareness about the problems associated with the animals being alive and the issue of generalizing results to humans. Many practitioners expressed great discomfort at the suffering of the animals; however, many remained convinced that their investigations were not only indispensable from an epistemic standpoint but also had potential medical applications. Early modern vivisection experiments were both extensive and sophisticated and cannot be ignored in the literature of early modern experimentation or of experimentation on living organisms across time.

  19. Absorbed dose determination in kilovoltage X-ray synchrotron radiation using alanine dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Butler, D J; Lye, J E; Wright, T E; Crossley, D; Sharpe, P H G; Stevenson, A W; Livingstone, J; Crosbie, J C

    2016-12-01

    Alanine dosimeters from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK were irradiated using kilovoltage synchrotron radiation at the imaging and medical beam line (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron. A 20 × 20 mm(2) area was irradiated by scanning the phantom containing the alanine through the 1 mm × 20 mm beam at a constant velocity. The polychromatic beam had an average energy of 95 keV and nominal absorbed dose to water rate of 250 Gy/s. The absorbed dose to water in the solid water phantom was first determined using a PTW Model 31014 PinPoint ionization chamber traceable to a graphite calorimeter. The alanine was read out at NPL using correction factors determined for (60)Co, traceable to NPL standards, and a published energy correction was applied to correct for the effect of the synchrotron beam quality. The ratio of the doses determined by alanine at NPL and those determined at the synchrotron was 0.975 (standard uncertainty 0.042) when alanine energy correction factors published by Waldeland et al. (Waldeland E, Hole E O, Sagstuen E and Malinen E, Med. Phys. 2010, 37, 3569) were used, and 0.996 (standard uncertainty 0.031) when factors by Anton et al. (Anton M, Büermann L., Phys Med Biol. 2015 60 6113-29) were used. The results provide additional verification of the IMBL dosimetry.

  20. Hydrographic conditions in the Veracruz Reef System (Western Gulf of Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas Perez, J. D.; Arenas Fuentes, V.

    2007-05-01

    The hydrographic conditions over the Veracruz reef system (Western continental shelf of the Gulf of Mexico) are investigated by means of CTD profiles. These were measured during two periods: The first one was doing, between 28-30 January of 2005 in the Arrecifal system of Anton Lizardo, just before a Norte event occurs, and the second one was doing between 6-8 of February of 2005, in front of the Jamapa River region and the Arrecifal system of Veracruz, just after a moderate Norte event take place. The most remarkable result was the notable difference of temperature and salinity values of ~ 2ºC and ~ 2 psu between the southern region (Arrecifal system of Anton Lizardo) and the middle (Jamapa River region) and northern (Arrecifal system of Veracruz) regions, induced by convective mixing after a moderate Norte event pass. Moreover, the temperature values during this period were 3ºC under the optimal range of temperature (25ºC-29ºC) to allow healthy coral reef growth.

  1. Embryos in evolution: evo-devo at the Naples Zoological Station in 1874.

    PubMed

    Hall, Brian K

    2009-03-01

    Eighteen seventy-four was a high point in evolutionary embryology. Thanks to Charles Darwin, the theory of evolution by natural selection provided a revolutionary new way of viewing the relationships and origins of organisms on Earth. Thanks to Ernst Haeckel, embryos were the way to study evolution (Haeckel in Generelle morphologie der organismen, vols 1, 2. Verlag Georg Reimer, Berlin, 1866)-it really was embryos in evolution-and recapitulation was in the air. Thanks to Anton Dohrn, a new research facility was on the ground, designed, located and structured to facilitate the study of embryos in evolution. Anton Dohrn devised, designed, financed, supervised the construction and then administered the Naples Zoological Station specifically so that researchers from all nations would have a facility where Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection could be tested. The zoologists who took advantage of the brand new facility within weeks of its opening late in 1873 established lines of research into evolutionary embryology, the field we now know as evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo), the study of embryos in evolution. I examine the approach taken by Ambrosius Hubrecht, the first Dutch embryologist to undertake research at the station, and then evaluate the research of three British zoologists-E. Ray Lankester, Albert Dew-Smith, and Francis Maitland (Frank) Balfour. All four sought insights into origins, especially vertebrate origins that rested on comparative embryology, homology, germ layers, and a Darwinian approach to origins.

  2. Volumetric Properties, Viscosities, and Refractive Indices of the Binary Systems 1-Butanol + PEG 200, + PEG 400, and + TEGDME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Živković, N.; Šerbanović, S.; Kijevčanin, M.; Živković, E.

    2013-06-01

    Densities, viscosities, and refractive indices of three binary systems consisting of 1-butanol with polyethylene glycols of different molecular weights (PEG 200 and PEG 400) or tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (TEGDME) were measured at ten temperatures (288.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, 313.15, 318.15, 323.15, 328.15, and 333.15) K and atmospheric pressure. Densities of the selected binary mixtures were measured with an Anton Paar DMA 5000 digital vibrating U-tube densimeter, refractive indices were measured with an automatic Anton Paar RXA-156 refractometer, while for viscosity measurements, a digital Stabinger SVM 3000/G2 viscometer was used. From these data, excess molar volumes were calculated and fitted to the Redlich-Kister equation. The obtained results have been analyzed in terms of specific molecular interactions and mixing behavior between mixture components, as well as the influence of temperature on them. Viscosity data were also correlated by Grunberg-Nissan, Eyring-UNIQUAC, three-body McAlister, and Eyring-NRTL models.

  3. Heredity, evolution and development in their (epistemic) environment at the turn of the nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    Colonna, Federica Turriziani

    2016-03-01

    During the early 1870s a young zoologist who worked as a Privatdozent delivering lectures at different Prussian universities invested much of his family wealth and solicited his fellows' contributions to establish a research facility by the sea. The young zoologist happened to be called Anton Dohrn. From the time it opened its doors, the Anton Dohrn Zoological Station - or Naples Zoological Station, as it was originally called - played a crucial role in shaping life sciences as it facilitated research aimed at explaining the mechanics of inheritance. During the last quarter of the nineteenth century and the first decades of the twentieth, zoologists attempted to explain how evolutionary changes occur within a population and become stabilized. In so doing, they looked at developmental processes as well as environmental pressure, coming up with different hypotheses to explain inheritance. In some cases, their research was highly speculative, whereas in other cases they conducted cytological observations to identify the material basis of heredity. Research on evolution and development has been carried out in different places, and zoological stations like the one in Naples have played a major role in this story. However, numerous biological institutions active at the turn of the twentieth century have not received much attention from historians.

  4. Alcohol consumption and the risk of renal cancers in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Wozniak MB, Brennan P, Brenner DR, Overvad K, Olsen A, Tjønneland A, Boutron-Ruault MC, Clavel-Chapelon F, Fagherazzi G, Katzke V, Kühn T, Boeing H, Bergmann MM, Steffen A, Naska A, Trichopoulou A, Trichopoulos D, Saieva C, Grioni S, Panico S, Tumino R, Vineis P, Bueno-de-Mesquita HB, Peeters PH, Hjartåker A, Weiderpass E, Arriola L, Molina-Montes E, Duell EJ, Santiuste C, Alonso de la Torre R, Barricarte Gurrea A, Stocks T, Johansson M, Ljungberg B, Wareham N, Khaw KT, Travis RC, Cross AJ, Murphy N, Riboli E, Scelo G.Int J Cancer. 2015 Oct 15;137(8):1953-66. [Epub 2015 Apr 28]. doi: 10.1002/ijc.29559.

    PubMed

    Jay, Raman; Brennan, P; Brenner; Overvad, K; Olsen, A; Tjønneland, A; Boutron-Ruault, M C; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Fagherazzi; Katzke, V; Kühn, T; Boeing, H; Bergmann, M M; Steffen, A; Naska, A; Trichopoulou, A; Trichopoulos, D; Saieva, C; Grioni, S; Panico, S; Tumino, R; Vineis, P; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Peeters, P H; Hjartåker, A; Weiderpass, E; Arriola, L; Molina-Montes, E; Duell, E J; Santiuste, C; Alonso de la Torre, R; Barricarte Gurrea, A; Stocks, T; Johansson, M; Ljungberg, B; Wareham, N; Khaw, K T; Travis, R C; Cross, A J; Murphy, N; Riboli, E; Scelo, G

    2017-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies have reported that moderate alcohol consumption is inversely associated with the risk of renal cancer. However, there is no information available on the associations in renal cancer subsites. From 1992 to 2010, 477,325 men and women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort were followed for incident renal cancers (n = 931). Baseline and lifetime alcohol consumption was assessed by country-specific, validated dietary questionnaires. Information on past alcohol consumption was collected by lifestyle questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated from Cox proportional hazard models. In multivariate analysis, total alcohol consumption at baseline was inversely associated with renal cancer; the HR and 95% CI for the increasing categories of total alcohol consumption at recruitment vs. the light drinkers category were 0.78 (0.62-0.99), 0.82 (0.64-1.04), 0.70 (0.55-0.90), and 0.91 (0.63-1.30), respectively, (ptrend = 0.001). A similar relationship was observed for average lifetime alcohol consumption and for all renal cancer subsites combined or for renal parenchyma subsite. The trend was not observed in hypertensive individuals and not significant in smokers. In conclusion, moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a decreased risk of renal cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Commentary on "Plasma carotenoids and vitamin C concentrations and risk of urothelial cell carcinoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition." Ros MM, Bueno de Mesquita HB, Kampman E, Aben KK, Büchner FL, Jansen EH, van Gils CH, Egevad L, Overvad K, Tjønneland A, Roswall N, Boutron Ruault MC, Kvaskoff M, Perquier F, Kaaks R, Chang Claude J, Weikert S, Boeing H, Trichopoulou A, Lagiou P, Dilis V, Palli D, Pala V, Sacerdote C, Tumino R, Panico S, Peeters PH, Gram IT, Skeie G, Huerta JM, Barricarte A, Quirós JR, Sánchez MJ, Buckland G, Larrañaga N, Ehrnström R, Wallström P, Ljungberg B, Hallmans G, Key TJ, Allen NE, Khaw KT, Wareham N, Brennan P, Riboli E, Kiemeney LA, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands: Am J Clin Nutr 2012;96(4):902-10 [Epub 2012 Sep 5].

    PubMed

    See, William A

    2013-07-01

    Published associations between dietary carotenoids and vitamin C and bladder cancer risk are inconsistent. Biomarkers may provide more accurate measures of nutrient status. We investigated the association between plasma carotenoids and vitamin C and risk of urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. A total of 856 patients with newly diagnosed UCC were matched with 856 cohort members by sex, age at baseline, study center, date and time of blood collection, and fasting status. Plasma carotenoids (α- and β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein, and zeaxanthin) were measured by using reverse-phase HPLC, and plasma vitamin C was measured by using a colorimetric assay. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated by using conditional logistic regression with adjustment for smoking status, duration, and intensity. UCC risk decreased with higher concentrations of the sum of plasma carotenoids (IRR for the highest compared with the lowest quartile: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.93; P-trend = 0.04). Plasma β-carotene was inversely associated with aggressive UCC (IRR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.30, 0.88; P-trend = 0.02). Plasma lutein was inversely associated with risk of nonaggressive UCC (IRR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.32, 0.98; P-trend = 0.05). No association was observed between plasma vitamin C and risk of UCC. Although residual confounding by smoking or other factors cannot be excluded, higher concentrations of plasma carotenoids may reduce risk of UCC, in particular aggressive UCC. Plasma lutein may reduce risk of nonaggressive UCC. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Research on data from the ATLAS experiment at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Purohit, Milind V.

    2015-07-31

    In this report senior investigator Prof. Milind V. Purohit describes research done with data from the ATLAS experiment at CERN. This includes preparing papers on the performance of the CSC detector, searches for SUSY using a new modern ''big data'' technique, and a search for supersymmetry (SUSY) using the "zero leptons razor" (0LRaz) technique. The prediction of the W=Z+jets background processes by the ATLAS simulation prior to the fit is found to be overestimated in the phase space of interest. In all new signal regions presented in this analysis the number of events observed is consistent with the post-fit SM expectations. Assuming R-parity conservation, the limit on the gluino mass exceeds 1150 GeV at 95% confidence level, for an LSP mass smaller than 100 GeV. Other USC personnel who participated in this project during the period of this grant were a graduate student, Anton Kravchenko.

  7. Chekhov and Rossolimo: careers in medicine and neurology in Russia 100 years ago.

    PubMed

    Satran, Richard

    2005-01-11

    Neurology as a specialty was established at the close of the 19th century, especially in England, France, Germany, and the United States. It was not uncommon for US physicians to seek postgraduate training in those three Western European countries. However, Russian clinical investigators and scientists, who contributed to neurology and the neurosciences, rarely had their papers cited in Western medical publications. The medical careers of the well-known writer-physician Anton P. Chekhov and his contemporary G.I. Rossolimo, an academic neurologist at the University of Moscow, illustrate their contributions within the constraints of their autocratic society. Their work led to a better understanding of the complexities of human behavior, Chekhov through his enduring writings, and Rossolimo as a founder of neuropsychology and child neurology.

  8. [Street social education: historical, political and pedagogical bases].

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Walter Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    This work is about street social education as a pedagogical system that started in Latin America in the late 1970s, as the street population formed mostly by children and adolescents called for attention. The first street social educators were 'pastoral' agents working at the praça da Sé a place with large numbers of street children in São Paulo. Based on the Liberation Theology and on the pedagogies developed by Paulo Freire, Celestine Freinet, Anton Makarenko, and Emília Ferreiro, the street educators developed a conceptual field and participated in the promulgation of the 1988 Federal Constitution, particularly by writing and introducing the 'Estatuto da Criança e do Adolescente' (the 'Child and Adolescent Statute'). Street social education is currently latent and suffering the consequences of program discontinuity caused by successive changes of government. It is, therefore important to know the conceptual proposals.

  9. iss042e101429

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-01-05

    ISS042E101429 (01/05/2014) --- This image, photographed by one of the Expedition 42 crew members aboard the International Space Station, shows the the Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft on the left attached to the Rassvet module on the Earth-facing port of the Russian segment of the station that delivered Expedition 42 crewmembers Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), Terry Virts of NASA and Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency on Nov. 24, 2014 , and to the right, the unpiloted ISS Progress 57 cargo craft that is docked to the Pirs Docking Compartment and which arrived at the station a month earlier on Oct. 29, 2014.

  10. Between the laboratory and the deep blue sea: space issues in the marine stations of Naples and Wimereux.

    PubMed

    de Bont, Raf

    2009-04-01

    In the 1870s, the life sciences witnessed the rise of a new site for scientific research: the marine station. This new workplace brought the laboratory of the biologist closer to the natural surroundings of the marine organisms that he/she was studying. It was therefore a site where the lab could be 'renaturalized'. In this paper, the extent of this 'renaturalization' is studied with regard to two stations. The first, Anton Dohrn's Stazione zoologica in Naples, was to become an international centre for laboratory research, while the second, Alfred Giard's marine station in Wimereux (France), turned out to be an important hub for field studies. Field-oriented animal life studies could be developed in Wimereux, whereas these were largely outshone by physiological and morphological research in Naples. I argue that differences in the physical and social organization of the two stations - or their 'ecologies' - accounted for the varying practices and types of knowledge found in Naples and Wimereux.

  11. The New Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    2009-08-01

    Introduction Gordon Fraser; Part I. Matter and the Universe: 1. Cosmology Wendy Freedman and Rocky Kolb; 2. Gravity Ronald Adler; 3. Astrophysics Arnon Dar; 4. Particles and the standard model Chris Quigg; 5. Superstrings Michael Green; Part II. Quantum Matter: 6. Atoms and photons Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and Jean Dalibard; 7. The quantum world of ultra-cold atoms Christopher Foot and William Phillips; 8. Superfluidity Henry Hall; 9. Quantum phase transitions Subir Sachdev; Part III. Quanta in Action: 10. Quantum entanglement Anton Zeilinger; 11. Quanta, ciphers and computers Artur Ekert; 12. Small-scale structure and nanoscience Yoseph Imry; Part IV. Calculation and Computation: 13. Nonlinearity Henry Abarbanel; 14. Complexity Antonio Politi; 15. Collaborative physics, e-science and the grid Tony Hey and Anne Trefethen; Part V. Science in Action: 16. Biophysics Cyrus Safinya; 17. Medical physics Nicolaj Pavel; 18. Physics and materials Robert Cahn; 19. Physics and society Ugo Amaldi.

  12. jsc2014e089253

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-30

    #3234a - (30 October 2014) --- At the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Expedition 42/43 backup Flight Engineer Kjell Lindgren of NASA answers questions from reporters in front of a Soyuz simulator October 30 as part of his final qualification exams for flight. He along with Oleg Kononenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Kimiya Yui of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (not pictured) are the backups to the prime crew --- Terry Virts of NASA, Anton Shkaplerov of Roscosmos and Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency --- who are in the final stages of training for launch November 24, Kazakh time, in the Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft to begin a five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  13. jsc2014e089254

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-30

    #3241 - (30 October 2014) --- At the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Expedition 42/43 backup crewmembers Kjell Lindgren of NASA (left), Soyuz Commander Oleg Kononenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) and Kimiya Yui of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (right) answer questions from reporters in front of a Soyuz simulator October 30 as part of their final qualification exams for flight. They are the backups to the prime crew --- Terry Virts of NASA, Anton Shkaplerov of Roscosmos and Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency --- who are in the final stages of training for launch November 24, Kazakh time, in the Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft to begin a five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  14. CiSE and Computational Physics: Undergraduate Physics Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Denis

    2008-04-01

    The role of Computing in Science and Engineering (CiSE) in support of computational physics is discussed with emphasis on CiSE's computational physics challenge. Winners awards are 1500, 1000, and 500. Each winner also receives a copy of Mathematica plus modest travel support. The challenge was for undergraduates at any accredited educational institution. Applicants were to select a physically and computationally interesting problem of their own choosing. Awards are presented at this session. Student winners discuss their work in papers that follow. First prize winner is Yevgeny Binder, of Loyola University in Chicago -``PartonKit: A C Program for Fast Parton Evolution with the Rossi Method.'' Second prize winner is John Barrett, of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst - ``Analysis of Photon Transport in 3 Polarized Scintillating Target Proto-types.'' Third prize winner is Steven Anton, of the University of Delaware - ``Electron Wave Packet Propagation in Graphene Nanoribbons.''

  15. jsc2014e042133

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-08

    1183A: At Red Square in Moscow, the Expedition 40/41 backup and prime crewmembers pose for pictures on a stage May 8 that is set up for a concert May 9 to celebrate the Russian holiday of Victory Day May 9. From left to right are backup crewmembers Terry Virts of NASA, Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency, and prime crewmembers Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, Max Suraev of Roscosmos and Reid Wiseman of NASA. Gerst, Suraev and Wiseman are preparing for launch May 29, Kazakh time, in the Soyuz TMA-13M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  16. Self-consistent calculation of protein folding pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orioli, S.; a Beccara, S.; Faccioli, P.

    2017-08-01

    We introduce an iterative algorithm to efficiently simulate protein folding and other conformational transitions, using state-of-the-art all-atom force fields. Starting from the Langevin equation, we obtain a self-consistent stochastic equation of motion, which directly yields the reaction pathways. From the solution of this set of equations we derive a stochastic estimate of the reaction coordinate. We validate this approach against the results of plain MD simulations of the folding of a small protein, which were performed on the Anton supercomputer. In order to explore the computational efficiency of this algorithm, we apply it to generate a folding pathway of a protein that consists of 130 amino acids and has a folding rate of the order of s-1.

  17. [Blood analysis 200 years ago--the theory and practice of hematoscopy in veterinary medicine].

    PubMed

    Schäffer, J

    1991-12-01

    Since antiquity the macroscopic judgement of blood obtained through phlebotomy was an important constituent of the medical diagnostic procedures. In the progress of blood sedimentation, the "eucrasia" or the "dyscrasia" of the humours became visible. This paper summarizes the historical and theoretical basis of the haematoscopy, and offers insight into the haemodiagnostic practices of a veterinarian at the end of the 18th century. The authority is the professor of veterinary art and medical advisor Anton Joseph Will (1752-1821), mental father and founder of the veterinary school in Munich, which opened its doors on the 1st of November 1790. Between 1786 and 1790, A. J. Will developed a research program to control animal diseases in Bavaria and examined several thousands of blood samples from healthy and sick animals. The different components of coagulated blood, infected with anthrax, were given to dogs. In this way, he could demonstrate experimentally the high infectiousness of anthrax.

  18. Rheological properties of carbon nanotubes-reinforced magnetorheological elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, S. A. A.; Mazlan, SA; Nik Ismail, N. I.; Ubaidillah; Khairi, MHA; Yunus, NA

    2017-01-01

    Magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) based on the natural rubber with different types of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) as additives were synthesized. MRE with pristine MWCNTs was prepared as a control and the carboxylated (MWCNT-COOH), as well as hydroxylated (MWCNT-OH) were introduced as new additives in MRE. Their rheological properties under different magnetic field were evaluated by using the rheometer (MCR 302, AntonPaar, Austria) equipped with the electromagnetic device. The dependency of MREs towards excitation frequencies under different magnetic field was investigated. It is shown that the storage modulus and loss factor of MRE with functionalized MWCNTs exhibited noticeable increment in MR performance compared to control parallel with the frequencies increment.

  19. Corporeal elements and principles in the learned German chymical tradition.

    PubMed

    Klein, Joel A

    2014-11-01

    This paper explores diverse conceptions of the physicality and tangibility of elements and principles in early modern chymistry. By tracing the development of natural philosophical and corpuscular ideas about material elements and principles among several physicans and chymists, including Thomas Erastus, Andreas Libavius, Daniel Sennert, and Anton Günther Billich, this article locates a learned tradition that developed predominantly in Germany, and which directly challenged a common understanding of matter held by major Paracelsians as well as authors from the French textbook tradition. Likewise, conceptions of incorporeal elements or principles are shown to have developed from the ideas of Paracelsus and Petrus Severinus, whereas authors in the learned tradition emphasised a particular interpretation of Aristotle. The article concludes by suggesting that chymical interpretations of material composition had an important influence throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and that this provides further evidence that the so-called "compositional revolution" in chemistry was well underway prior to the eighteenth century.

  20. Effectively explore metastable states of proteins by adaptive nonequilibrium driving simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin

    2017-03-01

    Nonequilibrium drivings applied in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can efficiently extend the visiting range of protein conformations, but might compel systems to go far away from equilibrium and thus mainly explore irrelevant conformations. Here we propose a general method, called adaptive nonequilibrium simulation (ANES), to automatically adjust the external driving on the fly, based on the feedback of the short-time average response of system. Thus, the ANES approximately keeps the local equilibrium but efficiently accelerates the global motion. We illustrate the capability of the ANES in highly efficiently exploring metastable conformations in the deca-alanine peptide and find that the 0.2 -μ s ANES approximately captures the important states and folding and unfolding pathways in the HP35 solution by comparing with the result of the recent 398 -μ s equilibrium MD simulation on Anton [S. Piana et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 17845 (2012), 10.1073/pnas.1201811109].

  1. Radiometric Measurements of Tropospheric Water Properties in the Tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küllmann, H.; Tan, B.; Warneke, T.; Notholt, J.; Mätzler, C.; Kämpfer, N.

    2009-04-01

    To understand the processes leading to climate change observations of tropical water vapour are of primal importance due to its dominant abundance as a greenhouse gas and its high variability. This applies particularly to the tropospheric region near the equator where only few measurements exist. The portable TRARA radiometer (on loan from the IAP Bern) is operated at the Anton de Kom University of Suriname in Paramaribo and measures continuously since mid of December 2006. The sensor consists of two channels at frequencies of 21 and 35 GHz to observe the integrated water vapour content of the troposphere. The tropospheric opacity is derived from hot/cold and tipping curve calibrations. The results of two years of microwave data using new statistical retrieval algorithms based on local sonde profiles (SHADOZ) which are available every other week at Paramaribo will be presented. In addition, the two-channel radiometer allows for studying the integrated liquid water path.

  2. The power of a musical instrument: Franklin, the Mozarts, Mesmer, and the glass armonica.

    PubMed

    Gallo, D A; Finger, S

    2000-11-01

    In 1761 Benjamin Franklin invented the armonica (often referred to as the glass harmonica), an instrument designed to simplify the playing of the musical glasses. The instrument immediately became popular and inspired compositions by Wolfgang Mozart, who had the opportunity to hear and play one at the house of Franz Anton Mesmer. Armonica music was used by Mesmer in his séances, because he felt it could promote healing by propagating a mystical fluid that he called animal magnetism through the body. After Mesmer's theories were debunked by a highly respected panel of scientists, the armonica fell out of vogue. Because Franklin was on the panel that examined the discredited mesmerism, he indirectly contributed to his own invention's demise.

  3. "Franklin: Science, Politics and France"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, James E., III

    2003-04-01

    This presentation traces Benjamin Franklin's career as a "civic scientist" in Old-Regime France. It outlines the initial - and not always positive - reception of Franklin's work on electricity by the community of French scientists in the 1750s. It sketches Franklin's subsequent elevation into the pantheon of French Enlightenment heros, and it details his work as a "civic scientist" while American envoy to France in the 1770s and 1780s, notably his service on the government-sponsored commissions that repudiated the scientific and medical claims of Franz Anton Mesmer. This presentation concludes by examining a few features of Franklin's career that are not completely congruent with our notion of what a "civic scientist" might be, a contrast that is intended to illuminate both Franklin and the concept of "civic scientist."

  4. The New Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    2006-04-01

    Introduction Gordon Fraser; Part I. Matter and the Universe: 1. Cosmology Wendy Freedman and Rocky Kolb; 2. Gravity Ronald Adler; 3. Astrophysics Arnon Dar; 4. Particles and the standard model Chris Quigg; 5. Superstrings Michael Green; Part II. Quantum Matter: 6. Atoms and photons Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and Jean Dalibard; 7. The quantum world of ultra-cold atoms Christopher Foot and William Phillips; 8. Superfluidity Henry Hall; 9. Quantum phase transitions Subir Sachdev; Part III. Quanta in Action: 10. Quantum entanglement Anton Zeilinger; 11. Quanta, ciphers and computers Artur Ekert; 12. Small-scale structure and nanoscience Yoseph Imry; Part IV. Calculation and Computation: 13. Nonlinearity Henry Abarbanel; 14. Complexity Antonio Politi; 15. Collaborative physics, e-science and the grid Tony Hey and Anne Trefethen; Part V. Science in Action: 16. Biophysics Cyrus Safinya; 17. Medical physics Nicolaj Pavel; 18. Physics and materials Robert Cahn; 19. Physics and society Ugo Amaldi.

  5. [A nosology for supernatural phenomena and the construction of the 'possessed' brain in the nineteenth century].

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Valeria Portugal; Ortega, Francisco

    2013-06-01

    At the end of the twentieth century, supernatural phenomena such as so called trances and possession by spirits received a scientific classification, which includes the numerous diagnoses of the dominant psychiatry. At the end of the nineteenth century we can observe a process of scientific categorization of phenomena considered to have originated in superstition or popular imagination. In this work we show how trances and spiritual possession were studied by Franz Anton Mesmer and his followers when developing the concept of magnetism; by James Braid during the creation of his theory of hypnosis; and by Jean Martin Charcot, which marked the entry of hysteria into nosological classification. Despite the differences between these schools, we identify the use of the brain and cerebral metaphors as the foundation of theories of the mind.

  6. Paul A. Cibis, MD: a pioneer of modern vitreoretinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Feibel, Robert M; Blodi, Christopher F

    2013-08-01

    Paul Anton Cibis (1911-1965) was one of the pioneers of modern vitreoretinal surgery. He reasoned that the pathology of complex retinal detachments was intravitreal fibrosis and concluded that the optimum surgery was the injection of liquid silicone oil into the vitreous cavity to dissect fibrous membranes from the retinal surface and use the silicone for retinal tamponade. Prior to the invention of pars plana vitrectomy, such surgery was innovative, even daring. These surgical techniques were an important advance in directly operating on the vitreous in retinal detachment surgery. However, Cibis' contributions to vitreoretinal surgery only occupied the last 10 years of his tragically short life. Prior to his practice in retinal surgery, he made contributions to basic research in physiologic optics, local retinal adaptation, and the effect of ionizing radiation and atomic energy on the globe.

  7. jsc2014e049405

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-17

    12-29-49: At the statue of the Russian Great Designer, Sergei Korolev, in the town of Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 40/41 backup crewmembers Terry Virts of NASA (left), Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) and Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (right) pose for pictures May 17. The trio is backing up the prime crew, Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, Soyuz Commander Max Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and NASA Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman, who will launch from Baikonur on May 29, Kazakh time, for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  8. jsc2017e115217

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-08

    jsc2017e115217 (Sept.. 8, 2017) --- In the town of Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 53-54 backup crewmembers Shannon Walker of NASA, Anton Shkaplerov of Roscosmos and Scott Tingle of NASA pay tribute after laying flowers at the statue of Russia’s great space designer Sergey Korolev in a traditional ceremony Sept. 8. They are serving as backups to the prime crewmembers, Joe Acaba of NASA, Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos and Mark Vande Hei of NASA, who will launch on Sept. 13 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on the Soyuz MS-06 spacecraft for a five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  9. Hidden images of holography: wavefront reconstruction of abnormalities within pulsed holographic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Unplanned images recorded within holographic space are of candid interest that can reshape audience definition crossing intellectual boundaries. This paper details three examples of off-axis Pulsed Laser transmission holograms that involve holographic portraits. These are movie director Martin Scorsese, former Royal Photographic Society President Mike Austin and a unique recently discovered early pulsed recording of Nick Phillips together with Anton Furst recorded in 1977. Each example was made when operating conditions for the pulsed ruby lasers were optimum, offering a coherence of several meters time-compressed into 25 ns. This gave rise to not only the portrait capture but also others present during the recording session inside the room. This optimum condition captured more than was intended resulting in images that, until now, have remained un-documented.

  10. jsc2011e025924

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-11

    At the headquarters of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) in Moscow March 11, 2011, Roscosmos Head Anatoly Perminov (center right), Alexei Krasnov, Roscosmos’ Head of Piloted Space Programs, and Joel Montalbano, NASA Director of Human Spaceflight Programs, Russia, discuss the upcoming launch of the Soyuz TMA-21 spacecraft with Expedition 27 prime crew members: Russian cosmonaut Alexander Samokutyaev (far right), cosmonaut Andrey Borisenko, and NASA astronaut Ron Garan, along with backup crewmembers Anton Shklaperov, Anatoly Ivanishin and Daniel Burbank. Samokutyaev, Borisenko and Garan are scheduled to launch to the International Space Station on March 30 (Kazakhstan time). The occasion was a traditional “tea” with Perminov prior to the crew’s departure for the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan March 17. Photo credit: NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  11. jsc2014e042134

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-08

    1227: At Red Square in Moscow, the Expedition 40/41 backup crewmembers pose for pictures with St. Basil’s Cathedral as their backdrop May 8, part of traditional pre-launch ceremonies. Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (left), Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) and Terry Virts of NASA (right), are the backups to prime crewmembers Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, Max Suraev of Roscosmos and Reid Wiseman of NASA who are preparing for launch May 29, Kazakh time, in the Soyuz TMA-13M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  12. jsc2011e203160

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-23

    With famed St. Basil’s Cathedral in the background, the prime and backup crews for the upcoming Expedition 30 launch to the International Space Station toured Red Square in Moscow October 24, 2011 as part of their ceremonial pre-launch activities. From right to left are prime crewmembers Anatoly Ivanishin, NASA’s Dan Burbank and Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov. Along with backup crewmembers Sergei Revin and NASA’s Joe Acaba. Backup crewmember Gennady Padalka is not seen. At the far left with the crewmembers is NASA’s Joel Montalbano, the Director of Human Spaceflight Programs in Russia. Burbank, Shkaplerov and Ivanishin will launch on November 14 in the Soyuz TMA-22 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Credit: NASA

  13. jsc2014e092327

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-07

    4064a: In Red Square in Moscow, Expedition 42/43 crewmembers Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (foreground, left) and Terry Virts of NASA (foreground, right) walk by the famed St. Basil’s Cathedral Nov. 6 as they prepare to lay flowers at the Kremlin Wall where Russian space icons are interred. In the background are backup crewmembers Kimiya Yui of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Oleg Kononenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Kjell Lindgren of NASA. Cristoforetti, Virts and Anton Shkaplerov of Roscosmos will launch Nov. 24, Kazakh time from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on their Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  14. jsc2014e042136

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-08

    1262: With St. Basil’s Cathedral in Moscow’s Red Square in the background, the Expedition 40/41 prime and backup crewmembers pose for pictures at the Kremlin Wall May 8 after laying flowers at the spot where Russian space icons are interred. From left to right are prime crewmembers Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, Max Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Reid Wiseman of NASA and backup crewmembers Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency, Terry Virts of NASA and Anton Shkaplerov of Roscosmos. Gerst, Suraev and Wiseman are preparing for launch May 29, Kazakh time, in the Soyuz TMA-13M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  15. jsc2014e091112

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-31

    3608a: At the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Expedition 42/43 Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) flashes a thumbs up as he enters a Soyuz simulator October 31 for the second day of qualification exams. Overlooking Shkaplerov is a wall mural depicting the image of Yuri Gagarin, the first human to fly in space. Shkaplerov, NASA Flight Engineer Terry Virts and European Space Agency Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti are preparing for launch in the Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan Nov. 24, Kazakh time, for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  16. [The attempts of Bishop Ivan Sintić (1792-1837) to treat snake and other animal bites: from intuition to scientific dispute].

    PubMed

    Velcic, Franjo

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript describes an attempt to treat snake and other animal bites using an ointment made of a plant Aster atticus (sternkraut, of the family Aster). The recipe for this ointment had passed from an Istrian Bernardo Alessandri to bishop Ivan Anton Sintić at the end of the 18th century. At the request by the Austrian administration of the Province of Zadar, Sintić published a booklet on how to prepare the plant and use it, and the administration distributed the booklet to local practitioners. Encouraged by the new therapy, physician Srećko Randić of Bakar, took it for the subject of his doctoral dissertation, an published it in Vienna in 1840. However, the efficiency of this therapy was disputed by the new island of Krk physician Ivan Krstitelj Kubić after years of follow up and investigation.

  17. Bless me reader for I have sinned: physicians and confessional writing.

    PubMed

    Wear, Delese; Jones, Therese

    2010-01-01

    From the poetry of William Carlos Williams, the novels of Walker Percy, and the short stories of Anton Chekov to the contemporary essays of Atul Gawande, physicians' contributions to literary genres have been significant. This article explores the specific form of confessional writing offered by physicians during the past half century, writing that often exposes medical error or negative feelings towards patients. A history of confessional practices as a legal tool, as religious practice, and as literary genre is offered, followed by analyses of selected confessional writings by physicians, many of them found in clinical journals such as Journal of the American Medical Association, Annals of Internal Medicine, and the Lancet. The authors of the narratives described here are engaged in several or all elements of the confessional sequence, which may offer them some resolution through the exposure and acknowledgment of their shared humanity with their patients and their expression of regret for any harm done.

  18. A review of the Magnus effect in aeronautics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Jost

    2012-11-01

    The Magnus effect is well-known for its influence on the flight path of a spinning ball. Besides ball games, the method of producing a lift force by spinning a body of revolution in cross-flow was not used in any kind of commercial application until the year 1924, when Anton Flettner invented and built the first rotor ship Buckau. This sailboat extracted its propulsive force from the airflow around two large rotating cylinders. It attracted attention wherever it was presented to the public and inspired scientists and engineers to use a rotating cylinder as a lifting device for aircraft. This article reviews the application of Magnus effect devices and concepts in aeronautics that have been investigated by various researchers and concludes with discussions on future challenges in their application.

  19. Convergence and reproducibility in molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA duplex d(GCACGAACGAACGAACGC)

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Roe, Daniel R.; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Background The structure and dynamics of DNA are critically related to its function. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations augment experiment by providing detailed information about the atomic motions. However, to date the simulations have not been long enough for convergence of the dynamics and structural properties of DNA. Methods MD simulations performed with AMBER using the ff99SB force field with the parmbsc0 modifications, including ensembles of independent simulations, were compared to long timescale MD performed with the specialized Anton MD engine on the B-DNA structure d(GCACGAACGAACGAACGC). To assess convergence, the decay of the average RMSD values over longer and longer time intervals was evaluated in addition to assessing convergence of the dynamics via the Kullback-Leibler divergence of principal component projection histograms. Results These MD simulations —including one of the longest simulations of DNA published to date at ~44 μs—surprisingly suggest that the structure and dynamics of the DNA helix, neglecting the terminal base pairs, are essentially fully converged on the ~1–5 μs timescale. Conclusions We can now reproducibly converge the structure and dynamics of B-DNA helices, omitting the terminal base pairs, on the μs time scale with both the AMBER and CHARMM C36 nucleic acid force fields. Results from independent ensembles of simulations starting from different initial conditions, when aggregated, match the results from long timescale simulations on the specialized Anton MD engine. General Significance With access to large-scale GPU resources or the specialized MD engine “Anton” it is possibly for a variety of molecular systems to reproducibly and reliably converge the conformational ensemble of sampled structures. PMID:25219455

  20. Gray Fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) ecology and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, Judd A.

    1997-01-01

    The gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) is a petite member of the family Canidae in the order Carnivora with a long muzzle and pointed ears (Samuel and Nelson 1982). The coat of the gray fox is silver gray across the back with significant amounts of rufus along the sides. This characteristic is often confused by people who see the flash of red and assume that the fox is a red fox (Vulpes vulpes). The gray fox has a black tipped tail with a dorsal black stripe that differentiates this species from the kit fox (Vulpes macrotis). The red fox has a white tipped tail. The gray fox weighs between 3-5 kg, occasionally to 7 kg. TL 800-1125, T 275-443, HF 100-150. (Jameson and Peeters 1988).

  1. A triclinic polymorph of (-)-(S)-N-benzyl-2-[(R)-6-fluoro-chroman-2-yl]-2-hy-droxy-ethanaminium bromide.

    PubMed

    Rousselin, Yoann; Laureano, Hugo; Clavel, Alexandre

    2013-12-01

    The title salt, C18H21FNO2 (+)·Br(-), determined at 115 K, crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1. The previously reported polymorph occurs in the monoclinic space group P21 and has two independent mol-ecules in the asymmetric unit [Peeters et al. (1993 ▶). Acta Cryst. C49, 2157-2160]. In the title molecule, the pyran rings adopt half-chair conformations. The absolute configuration is S for the hy-droxy-bearing C atom and R for the asymmetric C atom in the di-hydro-pyran unit. In the crystal, the components are linked by N-H⋯Br and O-H⋯Br hydrogen bonds, forming chains along the c-axis direction. The crystal studied was refined as an inversion twin.

  2. Normal Modes of Magnetized Finite Two-Dimensional Yukawa Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marleau, Gabriel-Dominique; Kaehlert, Hanno; Bonitz, Michael

    2009-11-01

    The normal modes of a finite two-dimensional dusty plasma in an isotropic parabolic confinement, including the simultaneous effects of friction and an external magnetic field, are studied. The ground states are found from molecular dynamics simulations with simulated annealing, and the influence of screening, friction, and magnetic field on the mode frequencies is investigated in detail. The two-particle problem is solved analytically and the limiting cases of weak and strong magnetic fields are discussed.[4pt] [1] C. Henning, H. K"ahlert, P. Ludwig, A. Melzer, and M.Bonitz. J. Phys. A 42, 214023 (2009)[2] B. Farokhi, M. Shahmansouri, and P. K. Shukla. Phys.Plasmas 16, 063703 (2009)[3] L. Cândido, J.-P. Rino, N. Studart, and F. M. Peeters. J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 10, 11627--11644 (1998)

  3. On the nature of fermion-monopole supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyushchay, M. S.

    2000-07-01

    It is shown that the generator of the nonstandard fermion-monopole supersymmetry uncovered by De Jonghe, Macfarlane, Peeters and van Holten, and the generator of its standard /N=1/2 supersymmetry have to be supplemented by their product operator to be treated as independent supercharge. As a result, the fermion-monopole system possesses the nonlinear /N=3/2 supersymmetry having the nature of the 3D spin-1/2 free particle's supersymmetry generated by the supercharges represented in a scalar form. Analyzing the supercharges' structure, we trace how under reduction of the fermion-monopole system to the spherical geometry the nonlinear /N=3/2 superalgebra comprising the Hamiltonian and the total angular momentum as even generators is transformed into the standard linear /N=1 superalgebra with the Hamiltonian to be the unique even generator.

  4. A triclinic polymorph of (−)-(S)-N-benzyl-2-[(R)-6-fluoro­chroman-2-yl]-2-hy­droxy­ethanaminium bromide

    PubMed Central

    Rousselin, Yoann; Laureano, Hugo; Clavel, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    The title salt, C18H21FNO2 +·Br−, determined at 115 K, crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1. The previously reported polymorph occurs in the monoclinic space group P21 and has two independent mol­ecules in the asymmetric unit [Peeters et al. (1993 ▶). Acta Cryst. C49, 2157–2160]. In the title molecule, the pyran rings adopt half-chair conformations. The absolute configuration is S for the hy­droxy-bearing C atom and R for the asymmetric C atom in the di­hydro­pyran unit. In the crystal, the components are linked by N—H⋯Br and O—H⋯Br hydrogen bonds, forming chains along the c-axis direction. The crystal studied was refined as an inversion twin. PMID:24860291

  5. Mapping the isotopic signature of methane in South-Eastern Spain: complementing biogeochemical long-term research with short term observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Àgueda, Alba; Morguí, Josep Anton; Vazquez Garcia, Eusebi; Curcoll, Roger; Lowry, David; Fisher, Rebecca E.; Nisbet, Euan G.

    2016-04-01

    will be helpful in the validation of transport models. *Corresponding author: Josep Anton Morguí - josep-anton.morgui@ic3.cat "The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) in the InGOS project under grant agreement n° 284274''

  6. The Zach family in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargha, Magda

    The Zach Family moved to Hungary. In the first decades of the 18th century the population was so low in Hungary that thousands of people moved into an almost empty country. In 1740 the physician Joseph Zach (1714-1792) came from Moravia to Esztergom which at that time had only 10 000 inhabitants. Soon he became the city doctor. It is very probable, that this was the place where he met Klara Sonntag, who became his wife. In any case, Zach moved to Pest, where he became the city doctor in 1746. The Invalide-Hospital built by Martinelli in 1726 was the biggest and most elegant house in Pest at that time - and it was giving shelter to 4000 invalids, whilst the city itself had only 11 000 inhabitants. There Zach became the ``protomedicus''. In 1751 Austrian Empress Maria Theresia visited this military hospital. She was so impressed by Zach's work that she honoured him with Hungarian nobility in 1765. From the corresponding official paper we know that he had three sons and three daughters. In 1791 he received citizenship in Pest. The Hungarian Magnates favoured the talented physician. The Lord Chief Justice Count György Fekete was also among his patients. His thirteen year-old son Count János Fekete became the godfather of Zach's son Franz Xaver Zach in 1754. It is very likely that Voltairian Count János Fekete influenced the personality of Franz Xaver von Zach. Galicia became Austrian Territory in 1772. Pater Liesganig was nominated to lead the Land-Survey Office of Galicia. Anton von Zach and Franz Xaver Zach were his co-workers in this very important task. At the same time Franz Zach became a professor of mechanics at Lemberg University and in its observatory he began his life-long astronomical observations. It is very probable that he joined the Freemasons here together with his godfather, now General, Jänos Fekete. Later they stayed in the same cities very often. The military and scientific works of the two Zach brothers Anton and Franz were so highly

  7. [Toxicologic risk assessment and prevention: rational and irrational approaches].

    PubMed

    Forth, W

    1996-12-01

    infectious diseases or diseases caused by parasites are far more serious than the exposure to any man made chemical product including the Seveso poison, i.e. 2,3,7,8-TCDD, and related compounds. Vice-versa, the assumption that naturally occurring poisons could be neglected may lead to fatal experiences as for instances the outbreak of St-Anton's fire, i.e. the gangraeneous type of ergot alacaloide intoxication after having swallowed claviceps purpurea poisoned "Müsli" produced by rye collected in the fields and ground in a hand mill. In Middle-Europe, since 1880, when the threshold of 0.1% claviceps purpurea in rye was established, no poisonous epidemia of St. Anton's fire was observed.

  8. Observation and modelling of OH and HO2 concentrations in the Pearl River Delta 2006: a missing OH source in a VOC rich atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, K. D.; Rohrer, F.; Holland, F.; Fuchs, H.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Chang, C. C.; Häseler, R.; Hu, M.; Kita, K.; Kondo, Y.; Li, X.; Lou, S. R.; Nehr, S.; Shao, M.; Zeng, L. M.; Wahner, A.; Zhang, Y. H.; Hofzumahaus, A.

    2011-04-01

    Ambient OH and HO2 concentrations were measured by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) during the PRIDE-PRD2006 (Program of Regional Integrated Experiments of Air Quality over the Pearl River Delta, 2006) campaign at a rural site downwind of the megacity of Guangzhou in Southern China. The observed OH concentrations reached daily peak values of (15-26) × 106 cm-3 which are among the highest values so far reported for urban and suburban areas. The observed OH shows a consistent high correlation with j(O1D) over a broad range of NOx conditions. The correlation cannot be reproduced by model simulations, indicating that OH stabilizing processes are missing in current models. The observed OH exhibited a weak dependence on NOx in contrast to model predictions. While modelled and measured OH agree well at NO mixing ratios above 1 ppb, a continuously increasing underprediction of the observed OH is found towards lower NO concentrations, reaching a factor of 8 at 0.02 ppb NO. A dependence of the modelled-to-measured OH ratio on isoprene cannot be concluded from the PRD data. However, the magnitude of the ratio fits into the isoprene dependent trend that was reported from other campaigns in forested regions. Hofzumahaus et al. (2009) proposed an unknown OH recycling process without NO, in order to explain the high OH levels at PRD in the presence of high VOC reactivity and low NO. Taking a recently discovered interference in the LIF measurement of HO2 into account, the need for an additional HO2 → OH recycling process persists, but the required source strength may be up to 20% larger than previously determined. Recently postulated isoprene mechanisms by Lelieveld et al. (2008) and Peeters and Müller (2010) lead to significant enhancements of OH expected for PRD, but an underprediction of the observed OH by a factor of two remains at low NO (0.1-0.2 ppb). If the photolysis of hydroperoxy aldehydes from isoprene is as efficient as proposed by Peeters and Müller (2010), the

  9. Observation and modelling of OH and HO2 concentrations in the Pearl River Delta 2006: a missing OH source in a VOC rich atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, K. D.; Rohrer, F.; Holland, F.; Fuchs, H.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Chang, C. C.; Häseler, R.; Hu, M.; Kita, K.; Kondo, Y.; Li, X.; Lou, S. R.; Nehr, S.; Shao, M.; Zeng, L. M.; Wahner, A.; Zhang, Y. H.; Hofzumahaus, A.

    2012-02-01

    Ambient OH and HO2 concentrations were measured by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) during the PRIDE-PRD2006 (Program of Regional Integrated Experiments of Air Quality over the Pearl River Delta, 2006) campaign at a rural site downwind of the megacity of Guangzhou in Southern China. The observed OH concentrations reached daily peak values of (15-26) × 106 cm-3 which are among the highest values so far reported for urban and suburban areas. The observed OH shows a consistent high correlation with j(O1D) over a broad range of NOx conditions. The correlation cannot be reproduced by model simulations, indicating that OH stabilizing processes are missing in current models. The observed OH exhibited a weak dependence on NOx in contrast to model predictions. While modelled and measured OH agree well at NO mixing ratios above 1 ppb, a continuously increasing underprediction of the observed OH is found towards lower NO concentrations, reaching a factor of 8 at 0.02 ppb NO. A dependence of the modelled-to-measured OH ratio on isoprene cannot be concluded from the PRD data. However, the magnitude of the ratio fits into the isoprene dependent trend that was reported from other campaigns in forested regions. Hofzumahaus et al. (2009) proposed an unknown OH recycling process without NO, in order to explain the high OH levels at PRD in the presence of high VOC reactivity and low NO. Taking a recently discovered interference in the LIF measurement of HO2 into account, the need for an additional HO2 → OH recycling process persists, but the required source strength may be up to 20% larger than previously determined. Recently postulated isoprene mechanisms by Lelieveld et al. (2008) and Peeters and Müller (2010) lead to significant enhancements of OH expected for PRD, but an underprediction of the observed OH by a factor of two remains at low NO (0.1-0.2 ppb). If the photolysis of hydroperoxy aldehydes from isoprene is as efficient as proposed by Peeters and Müller (2010), the

  10. Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy and Kinetics of HO_2+HCHO: Detection of the ν_1 and {A}- {X} Bands of HOCH_2OOCAVITY Ringdown Spectroscopy and Kinetics of HO_2+HCHO: Detection of the ν_1 and {A}- {X} Bands of HOCH_2OO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, Matthew K.; Okumura, Mitchio; Sander, Stanley P.

    2011-06-01

    The reactions of HO_2 with carbonyl compounds are believed to be a sink for carbonyl compounds in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. These reactions proceed through a hydrogen bound intermediate before isomerizing. The reaction of HO_2 + formaldehyde (HCHO) serves as a prototype for this class of reactions, forming the isomerization product hydroxymethylperoxy (HOCH_2OO, HMP). Previous studies measured the spectrum and kinetics of HMP using either FTIR detection of the end products or direct detection of HMP by the unstructured tilde{B}-tilde{X} transition. Despite these studies, considerable uncertainty exists in the rate constant of HMP formation (±80%, 2σ). In this talk, we report the first detection of the ν_1 (OH stretch) and tilde{A}-tilde{X} electronic spectra of the HMP radical. The OH stretch spectrum is broad and featureless, while the tilde{A}(0)-tilde{X}(0) origin and combination band with the OOCO torsion tilde{A}(NOOCO=1)-tilde{X}(0) are rotationally resolved. Quantum chemistry calculations have been performed on both the tilde{A} and tilde{X} states as a function of the OOCO and HOCO dihedral angles to estimate the tilde{A}-tilde{X} transition frequency and to assess the coupling between the two torsional modes. We also present kinetics data showing the rates of production and destruction of HMP. I. Hermans, J. F. Muller, T. L. Nguyen, P. A. Jacobs, and J. Peeters. J. Phys. Chem. A 2005, 109, 4303. F. Su, J. G. Calvert, and J. H. Shaw J. Phys. Chem. 1979, 83, 3185. B. Veyret, R. Lesclaux, M. T. Rayez, J. C. Rayez, R. A. Cox, and G. K. Moortgat J. Phys. Chem. 1989, 93, 2368. J. P. Burrows, G. K. Moortgat, G. S. Tyndall, R. A. Cox, M. E. Jenkin, G. D. Hayman, and B. Veyret J. Phys. Chem. 1989, 93, 2375 S. P. Sander, B. J. Finlayson-Pitts, D. M. Golden, R. E. Huie, C. E. Kolb, M. J. Kurylo, M. J. Molina, et al. Chemical Kinetics and Photochemical Data for Use in Atmospheric Studies, Evaluation Number 16, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 2009 I

  11. Infrared spectra of interstellar deuteronated PAHs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buragohain, Mridusmita; Pathak, Amit; Sarre, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules have emerged as a potential constituent of the ISM that emit strong features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.2 and 12.7 μm with weaker and blended features in the 3-20μm region. These features are proposed to arise from the vibrational relaxation of PAH molecules on absorption of background UV photons (Tielens 2008). These IR features have been observed towards almost all types of astronomical objects; say H II regions, photodissociation regions, reflection nebulae, planetary nebulae, young star forming regions, external galaxies, etc. A recent observation has proposed that interstellar PAHs are major reservoir for interstellar deuterium (D) (Peeters et al. 2004). According to the `deuterium depletion model' as suggested by Draine (2006), some of the Ds formed in the big bang are depleted in PAHs, which can account for the present value of D/H in the ISM. Hence, study of deuterated PAHs (PADs) is essential in order to measure D/H in the ISM.In this work, we consider another probable category of the large PAH family, i.e. Deuteronated PAHs (DPAH+). Onaka et al. have proposed a D/H ratio which is an order of magnitude smaller than the proposed value of D/H by Draine suggesting that if Ds are depleted in PAHs, they might be accommodated in large PAHs (Onaka et al. 2014). This work reports a `Density Functional Theory' calculation of large deuteronated PAHs (coronene, ovalene, circumcoronene and circumcircumcoronene) to determine the expected region of emission features and to find a D/H ratio that is comparable to the observational results. We present a detailed analysis of the IR spectra of these molecules and discuss the possible astrophysical implications.ReferencesDraine B. T. 2006, in ASP Conf. Ser. 348, Proc. Astrophysics in the Far Ultraviolet: Five Years of Discovery with FUSE, ed. G. Sonneborn, H. Moos, B-G Andersson (San Francisco, CA:ASP) 58Onaka T., Mori T. I., Sakon I., Ohsawa R., Kaneda H., Okada Y., Tanaka M

  12. Investigation of the β-pinene photooxidation by OH in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Martin; Fuchs, Hendrik; Acir, Ismail-Hakki; Bohn, Birger; Brauers, Theo; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Häseler, Rolf; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Li, Xin; Lutz, Anna; Nehr, Sascha; Rohrer, Franz; Tillmann, Ralf; Vereecken, Luc; Wegener, Robert; Wahner, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    Besides isoprene, monoterpenes are the non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with the highest global emission rates. Due to their high reactivity towards OH, monoterpenes can dominate the radical chemistry of the atmosphere in forested areas. In the present study the photochemical degradation mechanism of β-pinene was investigated in the Jülich atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber). One focus of this study is on the OH budget in the degradation process. Therefore, the SAPHIR chamber was equipped with instrumentation to measure radicals (OH, HO2, RO2), the total OH reactivity, important OH precursors (O3, HONO, HCHO), the parent VOC β-pinene, its main oxidation products, acetone and nopinone and photolysis frequencies. All experiments were carried out under low-NO conditions ( ≤ 300 ppt) and at atmospheric β-pinene concentrations ( ≤ 5 ppb) with and without addition of ozone. For the investigation of the OH budget, the OH production and destruction rates were calculated from measured quantities. Within the limits of accuracy of the instruments, the OH budget was balanced in all β-pinene oxidation experiments. However, even though the OH budget was closed, simulation results from the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) 3.2 showed that the OH production and destruction rates were underestimated by the model. The measured OH and HO2 concentrations were underestimated by up to a factor of 2, whereas the total OH reactivity was slightly overestimated because the model predicted a nopinone mixing ratio which was 3 times higher than measured. A new, theory-derived, first-generation product distribution by Vereecken and Peeters (2012) was able to reproduce the measured nopinone time series and the total OH reactivity. Nevertheless, the measured OH and HO2 concentrations remained underestimated by the numerical simulations. These observations together with the fact that the measured OH budget

  13. A new gas-phase condensed mechanism of isoprene-NO x photooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haofei; Rattanavaraha, Weruka; Zhou, Yang; Bapat, Jyoti; Rosen, Elias P.; Sexton, Kenneth G.; Kamens, Richard M.

    2011-08-01

    A new condensed gas-phase isoprene mechanism is developed and evaluated, using O 3, nitrogen oxides (NO x), and volatile organic compounds (VOC) data from over twenty isoprene experiments. Experiments were performed in two UNC dual outdoor smog chambers using natural sunlight, with different NO x levels, and with or without the presence of an urban hydrocarbon environment. The mechanism uses the Carbon Bond mechanism (CB05) to represent inorganic chemistry and hydrocarbons other than isoprene. It was designed so that the chemistry related to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation can be incorporated, and thus it can be further expanded into a gas-aerosol-phase mechanism. A box model framework of this new isoprene mechanism is able to reasonably simulate most experimental data at HC/NO x ratios that range from 0.3 to 18. An intercomparison was performed between the isoprene kinetics developed in this study and other isoprene chemistry that is included in other kinetic mechanisms, including MCM v3.1, SAPRC99, SAPRC07, MIM2, CB4 and CB05. The results indicate that most current mechanisms tend to under-predict ozone levels to different extents, while the new mechanism simulates the UNC smog chamber O 3 data better than the others in most cases, especially at higher HC/NO x ratios. Further, the new mechanism performs reasonably well in modeling outdoor smog chamber experiments with isoprene in an urban hydrocarbon mixture. In addition, a HO x (OH + HO 2) recycling scheme based upon Peeters et al. (2009) and Archibald et al. (2010b) was implemented in MCM v3.1 and the new UNC mechanism, since it has been recently been suggested to be very important under low-NO x conditions. Although our experimental data base is very limited for the low-NO x condition, the Peeters et al. (2009) isoprene chemistry tended to significantly over-predict observed chamber O 3. This suggests that more low-NO x experiments and further confirmation of current theoretical studies are needed.

  14. Coronene and Pyrene (5,7)-member Ring Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oettl, Silvia; Kimeswenger, Stefan; Huber, Stefan E.

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known to be one of the carriers of the omnipresent aromatic infrared bands that are frequently observed in different astrophysical environments (e.g., Peeters et al. 2004, Draine & Li 2007, Tielens 2008, Bauschlicher et al. 2009, Peeters 2011). Although PAH features are identified in a wide variety of environments, the characteristics of the individual molecules is not clear so far. Several emission features are observed, but cannot be explained. Therefore a sophisticated understanding of all possible types and subtypes is required. We present an investigation of the IR spectra of PAHs containing (5, 7)-member ring defects. Using density functional theory, the influence of those defects on the IR spectra of coronene (C24H12)and pyrene (C16H10) and their cations and anions were examined in detail. Additionally, the potential energy surface of the neutral species is explored and an alternative formation pathway is taken into account.The addition of the pentagons and heptagons instead of some of the hexagons usually constituting PAHs result in a change of the IR spectra: coronene and pyrene lose both their typical spectroscopic signature. We find different additional features and shifts in the positions of the band. Also the intensities differ. Both molecules are among the smallest PAHs that can exhibit such a ring defect. The minimum activation barriers for the transformation from ground to defected state can be found via investigating the minimum energy pathway. This leads to a result of 8.21 eV for pyrene and 8.41 eV for coronene. Pyrene retains some of its symmetry due to the symmetry exhibited by the Stone-Wales defect itself. However, coronene loses much more of its symmetry. The formation of these (5, 7)-member ring defects in PAHs may be well supported in asymptotic giant branch stars or planetary nebulae. These environments strongly enable the transition from the ground to the defected state. Therefore, the

  15. Past changes of landscape due to increased dynamics of erosion processes in the Bezděz-Doksy region (Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vysloužilová, Barbora; Dreslerová, Dagmar; Kozáková, Radka; Poništiak, Štefan; Chuman, Tomáš; Šefrna, Luděk

    2016-04-01

    This study broadens the archaeological research of the the Bezděz - Doksy region in Northern Bohemia, Czech Republic (Dreslerová et al., 2013). Extensive field works between 2008 and 2012 showed that the region has been settled since the La Tène period. Survey of the alluvial plain of the Robečský stream revealed a record of two intensive erosion episodes in the catchment. We suppose that the first episode may be connected to land use changes and the beginnings of agriculture at the site in the La Tène period. The second episode may be connected to the foundation of the medieval village of Okna, which came into existence in the vicinity of the La Tène settlement. The accelerated erosion of former albeluvisols (on loess) led to significant changes of landscape in the region. The aim of this contribution is to bring a reconstruction of soils, vegetation and relief at the site of Okna before the human occupancy and to detect landscape changes over the time. It focuses on the hypothesis that the accelerated soil erosion has been occurring at the site since the first anthropogenic influence like it is demonstrated by other studies in Europe (e.g. Leopold and Völkel, 2007; Boardman, 2013). An abrupt change of land use from forest to arable land is proved by palynological records. Simultaneously there are buried soil horizons and alluvial sediments which can be studied as geoarchives. The difficulties in reconstruction of relief and quantification of the historical erosion effects are faced by applying GIS and model approaches (Peeters et al., 2003). References Boardman, J., 2013. Soil Erosion in Britain: Updating the Record. Agriculture 3, 418-442. doi:10.3390/agriculture3030418 Dreslerová, D., Waldhauser, J., Abraham, V., Kočár, P., Křivánek, R., Meduna, P., Sádlo, J., 2013. The Bezděz - Doksy region (Northern Bohemia) in prehistory and the La Tène settlement at Okna (in Czech). Archeologické rozhledy LXV, 535-573. Leopold, M., Völkel, J., 2007

  16. ZOONET: perspectives on the evolution of animal form. Meeting report.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Antje H L; Arboleda, Enrique; Egger, Bernhard; Hilbrant, Maarten; McGregor, Alistair P; Cole, Alison G; Daley, Allison C

    2009-11-15

    What drives evolution? This was one of the main questions raised at the final ZOONET meeting in Budapest, Hungary, in November 2008. The meeting marked the conclusion of ZOONET, an EU-funded Marie-Curie Research Training Network comprising nine research groups from all over Europe (Max Telford, University College London; Michael Akam, University of Cambridge; Detlev Arendt, EMBL Heidelberg; Maria Ina Arnone, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn Napoli; Michalis Averof, IMBB Heraklion; Graham Budd, Uppsala University; Richard Copley, University of Oxford; Wim Damen, University of Cologne; Ernst Wimmer, University of Göttingen). ZOONET meetings and practical courses held during the past four years provided researchers from diverse backgrounds--bioinformatics, phylogenetics, embryology, palaeontology, and developmental and molecular biology--the opportunity to discuss their work under a common umbrella of evolutionary developmental biology (Evo Devo). The Budapest meeting emphasized in-depth discussions of the key concepts defining Evo Devo, and bringing together ZOONET researchers with external speakers who were invited to present their views on the evolution of animal form. The discussion sessions addressed four main topics: the driving forces of evolution, segmentation, fossils and phylogeny, and the future of Evo Devo.

  17. Investigating everyday measures through exploratory talk: whole class plenary intervention and landscape study at grade four

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gade, Sharada; Blomqvist, Charlotta

    2016-10-01

    We report an exploratory talk based, whole class plenary intervention, in relation to students' understanding of everyday measures and measurement, in a grade four classroom at a grade 4-6 school in Sweden. Extended, project related, teacher-researcher collaboration forms basis for such cultural historical activity theory or CHAT based efforts. As formative intervention, the conduct of the plenary is not pre-determined but embedded in ongoing curricular realities, with the agency of students and teacher promoted, pedagogical ideas reutilised and the role of researcher viewed as supporting design and growth of the intervention. Under Charlotta's guidance as teacher, the plenary is opportunity for her students to examine improbable scenarios such as, Can Eva and Anton measure the length of Sweden on foot, Can Lars and Iris measure their age in decimeters. A zone of proximal development is created, in which students make the transition from spontaneous to scientific concepts and learn how various units of measurement are objects-that-can-be-used-for-certain-purposes. With opportunity for critical and reflective inquiry, in a plenary designed to lead development, Charlotta's students look beyond the making of rote measurements and articulate a theory of measure in nascent terms. Such a landscape of teaching-learning is finally understood in terms of the nature of talk that was facilitated, the manner of pedagogy utilised, the style of teaching exercised and the kind of learning that was demanded of her students.

  18. Helgoland und die Erforschung der marinen Benthosalgen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollenhauer, D.; Lüning, K.

    1988-09-01

    Early phycological research on the island of Helgoland was performed by amateur phycologists from the adjacent coastal regions of Germany (Bremen, Hamburg, Lower Saxony and Schleswig-Holstein). These pioneers were followed by professionals, and by collectors from the mainland universities, particularly from Berlin. This second phase group includes the naturalist Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg, the zoologists Johannes Müller, Ernst Haeckel and Anton Dohrn, and the botanists Alexander Braun, Nathanael Pringsheim, and Ferdinand Cohn. The leading marine phycologist in Germany, towards the end of the 19th century, was Johannes Reinke, who finally worked at the University of Kiel. Paul Kuckuck's doctoral thesis had been supervised by Reinke who recommended him for the post of the first curator of botany at the Biological Station of Helgoland, which was founded in 1892. Kuckuck worked on the island from 1892 to 1914. After World War I, and after Kuckuck's untimely death, Wilhelm Nienburg became the second curator of botany on Helgoland, from 1921 to 1923. The next permanent phycologist on the island, from 1925 to 1936, was Ernst Schreiber. He was followed in 1936 by Peter Kornmann, who retired in 1972 but still continues as a research worker, together with Paul-Heinz Sahling, who started to work as a technical assistant under the guidance of Ernst Schreiber in 1927.

  19. Characterization of a Venom Peptide from a Crassispirid Gastropod

    PubMed Central

    Cabang, April B.; Imperial, Julita S.; Gajewiak, Joanna; Watkins, Maren; Corneli, Patrice Showers; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Concepcion, Gisela P.

    2011-01-01

    The crassispirids are a large branch of venomous marine gastropods whose venoms have not been investigated previously. We demonstrate that crassispirids comprise a major group of toxoglossate snails in a clade distinct from all turrids whose venoms have been analyzed. The isolation and biochemical definition of the first venom component from any crassispirid is described. Crassipeptide cce9a from Crassispira cerithina (Anton, 1838) was purified from crude venom by following biological activity elicited in young mice, lethargy and a lack of responsiveness to external stimuli. Using Edman sequencing and mass spectrometry, the purified peptide was shown to be 29 amino acid residues long, with the sequence: GSCGLPCHENRRCGWACYCDDGICKPLRV. The sequence assignment was verified through the analysis of a cDNA clone encoding the peptide. The peptide was chemically synthesized and folded; the synthetic peptide was biologically active and coelution with the native venom peptide was demonstrated. When injected into mice of various ages, the peptide elicited a striking shift in behavioral phenotype between 14 and 16 days, from lethargy to hyperactivity. PMID:21939682

  20. The astrological roots of mesmerism.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Simon

    2010-06-01

    Franz Anton Mesmer's 1766 thesis on the influence of the planets on the human body, in which he first publicly presented his account of the harmonic forces at work in the microcosm, was substantially copied from the London physician Richard Mead's early eighteenth century tract on solar and lunar effects on the body. The relation between the two texts poses intriguing problems for the historiography of medical astrology: Mesmer's use of Mead has been taken as a sign of the Vienna physician's enlightened modernity while Mead's use of astro-meteorology has been seen as evidence of the survival of antiquated astral medicine in the eighteenth century. Two aspects of this problem are discussed. First, French critics of mesmerism in the 1780s found precedents for animal magnetism in the work of Paracelsus, Fludd and other early modern writers; in so doing, they began to develop a sophisticated history for astrology and astro-meteorology. Second, the close relations between astro-meteorology and Mead's project illustrate how the environmental medical programmes emerged. The making of a history for astrology accompanied the construction of various models of the relation between occult knowledge and its contexts in the enlightenment.

  1. Meeting report: 26th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    PubMed

    Vere Hodge, R Anthony

    2013-10-01

    The 26th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held in San Francisco, California from May 11 to 15, 2013. This article summarizes the principal invited lectures at the meeting. The opening symposium on the legacy of the late Antonín Holý included presentations on his pioneering work with nucleotide analogs, which led to the development of several antiviral drugs including tenofovir. This drug has transformed the treatment of HIV infection and has recently become the first-line therapy for chronic hepatitis B. The Gertrude Elion Award lecturer described the anti-HIV activities of the CCR5 inhibitor cenicriviroc and the reverse transcriptase inhibitor festinavir®, and also reviewed the evaluation of biodegradable nanoparticles with adjuvant activity. The William Prusoff Award winner reported on the creation of NAOMI, a computer model with 21 enzymes to predict the activity of nucleoside analogs against hepatitis C virus (HCV). Other invited lecturers discussed the development of countermeasures against severe dengue and the potential of RNA virus capping and repair enzymes as drug targets. Topics in the clinical symposium included the current status of the anti-HCV compounds sovaprevir, ACH-3102, miravirsen and ALS-2200; the evaluation of single-tablet regimens for HIV infection; and the investigation of cytomegalovirus resistance to CMX001. Two chemistry minisymposia examined strategies and tactics in drug design and the use of in drug discovery. Copyright © 2013 The Author. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Chekhov as a doctor].

    PubMed

    Rooijmans, H G M

    2003-03-01

    Anton Chekhov (1860-1904) was not only a writer, but also a doctor. One might think that he was primarily concerned with writing, but he also dedicated himself fully to being a doctor. When he had to give up his practice in 1897 upon urgent medical advice, he experienced it as a great loss. As a medic he often felt unsure and believed that he failed in his duties. This did not change the fact that many patients called upon him for assistance. They were probably also fond of him because of his genuine interest in their living conditions and because of his compassion. In terms of his scientific activities, his attempt to have his visit in 1890 to the Russian penal colony Sakhalin recognised as a dissertation failed. In many ways, Chekhov was a hard-working idealist, but one without illusions. Doctors appear as the main character or one of the main characters in 25 of Chekhov's hundreds of stories as well as in various plays. Although Chekhov undoubtedly will have incorporated his own experiences into his works, he did not give a picture of his own medical activities in the doctors he portrayed. A large number of the doctors he describes are depressed, nervous or irritable. Others are naïve and clumsy, while others still are skeptic, cynical or disillusioned. In some of the descriptions the image of Chekhov as a doctor may be observed.

  3. Doctors in Court, Honour, and Professional Ethics: Two Scandals in Imperial Germany*

    PubMed Central

    Maehle, Andreas-Holger

    2013-01-01

    Summary Comparing two public medical affairs which involved disciplinary proceedings and libel actions, one from Bavaria and one from Prussia, this article analyzes the dynamics behind legal conflicts over doctors’ professional ethics in Imperial Germany. In both the case of Dr Maurice Hutzler, who committed suicide after conflicts with senior colleagues at the Gisela Children’s Hospital and a sentence of the court of honour of the Munich Medical District Society, and the Berlin ‘patient trade’ affair, in which the medical professors Ernst von Leyden, Hermann Senator, Karl Anton Ewald and Carl Posner were accused of having made payments to middlemen for bringing them lucrative private patients, notions of personal and professional honour played a central role. The Munich case highlighted shortcomings of the Bavarian medical court of honour system, which was less developed than its Prussian counterpart. The analysis of the two cases suggests that the ethics of medical practice in early twentieth-century Germany should be viewed as part of a culture of honour. PMID:22303773

  4. [The celebrity of Polish and French medicine--Józef Julian Franciszek Feliks Babiński (1857-1932)].

    PubMed

    Skalski, Janusz H; Gładki, Marcin; Pypłacz, Dariusz

    2007-07-01

    The paper presents a biography of Polish and French medical scientist, Józef Julian Franciszek Feliks Babiński (1857-1932), a son of Polish exiles to France after the unsuccessful insurrection against the Russian occupants. Born in Paris, Babiński considered Poland as his own home-country, being faithful and grateful citizen of France, his adopted country. He made his neurological department in Paris a world famous medical centre at the turn of the 20th century. Currently for every student of medicine or physician practitioner, the name of Babiński immediately associates with the "toe phenomenon" (phénomène des orteils). The discovery of this "sign" (1896) is the crowning point of Babiński's work in semiology. He was a co-author of discoveries known under eponym names of syndromes: Babinski-Nageotte, Babinski-Fröhlich, Anton-Babinski and many others. Babiński emphasized his Polish origins, expressing his feeling towards two home countries (1922): "I am proud to have two countries--to one, I owe the knowledge, to the other, the country of my ancestors, the elements of my Polish soul...".

  5. A new three-dimensional magneto-viscoelastic model for isotropic magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agirre-Olabide, I.; Lion, A.; Elejabarrieta, M. J.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, a four-parameter fractional derivative viscoelastic model was developed to describe the dynamic shear behaviour of magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) as a function of the matrix, particle content and magnetic field. The material parameters were obtained from experimental data measured with a Physica MCR 501 rheometer from the Anton Paar Company, equipped with a magnetorheological cell. The synthetised isotropic MRE samples were based on room-temperature vulcanising silicone rubber and spherical carbonyl iron powder micro particles as fillers, and seven volumetric particle contents were studied. The influence of particle contents was included in each parameter of the four-parameter fractional derivative model. The dependency of the storage modulus as a function of an external magnetic field (magnetorheological (MR) effect) was studied, and a dipole–dipole interaction model was used. A new three-dimensional magneto-viscoelastic model was developed to couple the viscoelastic model, the particle-matrix interaction and the magneto-induced modulus model, which predicts the influence of the magnetic field and the particle content in the MR effect of isotropic MREs.

  6. A Compendium of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Released By Human Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Filipiak, Wojciech; Mochalski, Pawel; Filipiak, Anna; Ager, Clemens; Cumeras, Raquel; Davis, Cristina E.; Agapiou, Agapios; Unterkofler, Karl; Troppmair, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) offer unique insights into ongoing biochemical processes in healthy and diseased humans. Yet, their diagnostic use is hampered by the limited understanding of their biochemical or cellular origin and their frequently unclear link to the underlying diseases. Major advancements are expected from the analyses of human primary cells, cell lines and cultures of microorganisms. In this review, a database of 125 reliably identified VOCs previously reported for human healthy and diseased cells was assembled and their potential origin is discussed. The majority of them have also been observed in studies with other human matrices (breath, urine, saliva, feces, blood, skin emanations). Moreover, continuing improvements of qualitative and quantitative analyses, based on the recommendations of the ISO-11843 guidelines, are suggested for the necessary standardization of analytical procedures and better comparability of results. The data provided contribute to arriving at a more complete human volatilome and suggest potential volatile biomarkers for future validation. Dedication: This review is dedicated to the memory of Prof. Dr. Anton Amann, who sadly passed away on January 6, 2015. He was motivator and motor for the field of breath research. PMID:27160536

  7. [Neurology and literature].

    PubMed

    Iniesta, I

    2010-10-01

    Literature complements medical literature in the academic and clinical development of neurologists. The present article explores the contributions of writers of fiction on neurology. Literary works of fiction with particular reference to neurology. A symbiosis between writers of fiction and doctors has been well recognised. From Shakespeare to Cervantes by way of Dickens and Cela to writer - physicians such as Anton Chekhov or António Lobo Antunes have contributed through their medically informed literature to the better understanding of neurology. Some writers like Dostoevsky, Machado de Assis and Margiad Evans have written about their own experiences with disease thus bringing new insights to medicine. Furthermore, some neurological disorders have been largely based on literary descriptions. For instance, Dostoevsky's epilepsy has been retrospectively analysed by famous neurologists including Freud, Alajouanine or Gastaut, whilst his writings and biography have prompted others like Waxman and Geschwind to describe typical behavioural changes in temporal lobe epilepsy, finding their source of inspiration in Dostoevsky. Likewise, Cirignotta et al have named an unusual type of seizure after the Russian novelist. Inspired by Lewis Carroll, Todd introduced the term Alice in Wonderland Syndrome to refer to visual distortions generally associated with migraine. Writers of fiction offer a humanised perception of disease by contributing new insights into the clinical history, informing about the subjective experience of the illness and helping to eradicate the stigma associated to neurological disorders.

  8. [Music therapy in the behavior therapeutic combined treatment concept. Comparison between alcoholics with neurotic personality structure and patients with behavior disturbances].

    PubMed

    Formann-Radl, I

    1980-01-01

    From times immemorial, music closely associating with magic, played a significant part in the art of healing and in religion itself. It is not an invention of modern technical age and today it is legitimately involved in the overall rehabilitation programms in psychiatry. We have therefore attempted to conduct a study on this subject. The present investigation compares the behaviour of 100 alcoholics and 100 patients with neurotic personality disturbances drawn from the catchment areas of the Psychiatric University Clinic Vienna/Austria and the Anton-Proksch-Institut in Vienna-Kalksburg with regard to their respone to this type of therapy. We found that music provides a substantial contribution in reinforcing the basic ethical concept of the person concerned. It also breaks the barriere of expressivity by enriching the pool fo potential vocabulary. It appears to be the ideal medium of free communication. Investigation has to be continued, but music therapy will never develop from an ancilliary treatment into a therapeutic method in its own right. However, the music therapist should be prepared if necessary to allow for useful deviations from the traditional lines of musical concepts in his efforts to reduce the state of anxiety in his patients and prevent further deterioration instinct and traditional values, thus strengthening the ethical concept.

  9. Re-Entrant Structure for Robust Superhydrophobicity and Drag Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Gad-El-Hak, Mohamed

    2014-11-01

    A re-entrant structure is required for superoleophobicity by effectively pinning low-surface-tension liquids from wetting the textures and forming a solid-liquid-air composite interface. In this work, we examine the contribution of a re-entrant structure to the robustness of superhydrophobicity and skin-friction reduction capabilities. Textured surfaces with wavy sidewall pillars provide re-entrant structures and are used as model surfaces. Gibbs energy analysis is conducted to study the pinning sites and wetting stability. The wetting robustness against pressure is characterized by breakthrough pressure, which is obtained by conservation of energy and force balance at the pinning sites. The slip length and slip velocity are evaluated through a shear stress and strain rate correlation, which is obtained using an Anton Paar rheometer. Gibbs energy analysis indicates that the breakthrough pressure provided by the wavy sidewall structure for water is about 18 times of that on the straight sidewall structure. This is mostly due to the energy barrier at the re-entrant structure. When a contact line advances onto and pins at the re-entrant structure, its slip performance degrades due to the increased no-slip fraction on the composite interface, but Cassie-Baxter state still remains.

  10. AIDS and Africa. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, Loretta M; van Niekerk, Anton A

    2002-04-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is the epicenter of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and in this issue of the Journal, seven authors discuss the moral, social and medical implications of having 70% of those stricken living in this area. Anton A. van Niekerk considers complexities of plague in this region (poverty, denial, poor leadership, illiteracy, women's vulnerability, and disenchantment of intimacy) and the importance of finding responses that empower its people. Solomon Benatar reinforces these issues, but also discusses the role of global politics in sub-Saharan Africa, especially discrimination, imperialism and its exploitation by first world countries. Given the public health crisis, Udo Schüklenk and Richard E. Ashcroft defend compulsory licensing of essential HIV/AIDS medications on consequentialist grounds. Keymanthri Moodley discusses the importance of conducting research and the need to understand a moderate form of communitarianism, also referred to as "ubuntu" or "communalism", to help some Africans understand research as an altruistic endeavour. Godfrey B. Tangwa also defends traditional African values of empathy and ubuntu, discussing how they should be enlisted to fight this pandemic. Loretta M. Kopelman criticizes the tendency among those outside Africa to dismiss the HIV/AIDS pandemic, attributing one source to the ubiquitous and misguided punishment theory of disease. The authors conclude that good solutions must be cooperative ventures among countries within and outside of sub-Saharan Africa with far more support from wealthy countries.

  11. Present at the creation: the clinical pastoral movement and the origins of the dialogue between religion and psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Hart, Curtis W; Div, M

    2010-12-01

    The contemporary dialogue between religion and psychiatry has its roots in what is called the clinical pastoral movement. The early leaders of the clinical pastoral movement (Anton Boisen, Elwood Worcester, Helen Flanders Dunbar, and Richard Cabot) were individuals of talent, even genius, whose lives and work intersected one another in the early decades of the twentieth century. Their legacy endures in the persons they inspired and continue to inspire and in the professional organizations and academic programs that profit from their pioneering work. To understand them and the era of their greatest productivity is to understand some of what psychiatry and religion have to say to each other. Appreciating their legacy requires attention to the context of historical movements and forces current in America at the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth century that shaped religious, psychiatric, and cultural discourse. This essay attempts to provide an introduction to this rich and fascinating material. This material was first presented as a Grand Rounds lecture at The New York Presbyterian Hospital, Payne Whitney Westchester in the Department of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College.

  12. Detection of biological threats. A challenge for directed molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Valery A; Sorokulova, Iryna B

    2004-08-01

    The probe technique originated from early attempts of Anton van Leeuwenhoek to contrast microorganisms under the microscope using plant juices, successful staining of tubercle bacilli with synthetic dyes by Paul Ehrlich and discovery of a stain for differentiation of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria by Hans Christian Gram. The technique relies on the principle that pathogens have unique structural features, which can be recognized by specifically labeled organic molecules. A hundred years of extensive screening efforts led to discovery of a limited assortment of organic probes that are used for identification and differentiation of bacteria. A new challenge--continuous monitoring of biological threats--requires long lasting molecular probes capable of tight specific binding of pathogens in unfavorable conditions. To respond to the challenge, probe technology is being revolutionized by utilizing methods of combinatorial chemistry, phage display and directed molecular evolution. This review describes how molecular evolution methods are applied for development of peptide, antibody and phage probes, and summarizes the author's own data on development of landscape phage probes against Salmonella typhimurium. The performance of the probes in detection of Salmonella is illustrated by a precipitation test, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescent, optical and electron microscopy.

  13. A brief historical survey of "Peyronie's disease".

    PubMed

    Musitelli, Sergio; Bossi, Maurizio; Jallous, Hussein

    2008-07-01

    Historians of medicine and urology, sexology, and andrology in particular maintain that many other physicians, surgeons, anatomists, and pathologists have already described "Peyronie's disease" some centuries before the author after whom it has been called, François Gigot de La Peyronie (1678-1747). To perform a brief historical survey of Peyronie's disease. Methods. A literature review was performed. The main surgeons and anatomists who previously observed and described penile curvature prior to François Gigot de La Peyronie are Theodoricus Borgognoni (1205-1298), Guilielmus of Saliceto (circa 1210-1276), Gabriele Falloppio (or Falloppia) (1523-1562), Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564), Giulio Cesare Aranzi (or Aranzio) (1530-1589), Claas Pieterzoon Tulp (Nicholaus Tulpius) (1593-1674), and Anton Frederik Ruysch (1638-1731), who was said to have left the first "postmortem" illustration of the disease in a copperplate engraving in 1691. The original texts could easily prove that none of the alleged "precursors" of La Peyronie did ever describe, treat, and cure real cases of Peyronie's disease, and that to award them this merit was somewhat far-fetched, with only Guilielmus of Saliceto and Falloppio possibly excepted.

  14. Preparation and properties of environmental-friendly coatings based on carboxymethyl cellulose nitrate ester & modified alkyd.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongtao; Shao, Ziqiang; Zhao, Ming; Zhou, Zhenwen

    2016-02-10

    Amphipathic coating basic film-forming material carboxymethyl cellulose nitrate ester (CMCN) was synthesized and characterizations of CMCN with different ratio of functional groups were studied. Ratios of functional groups on each repeating units of CMCN have great importance in the decision of CMCN properties using as an amphipathic coating basic film-forming material and ratios of functional groups were the most concerned of the study. Ratios of functional groups on each repeating units of CMCN were measured by elemental analyzer and calculated. Series of experiments were conducted using different ratios of functional groups of CMCN. Thermal properties of CMCN were measured by FT-IR and TG. Densities of CMCN powders were measured. Aqueous coatings based on CMCN/alkyd (after chemical modified by coconut oil) were prepared and morphology & rheology of CMCN hydrophilic dispersions were measured using an Anton-Paar-Strasse 20A-8054 Graz analyzer. Contact angles between films based on CMCN and deionized water were recorded. Other properties of films were measured. CMCN with the etherification of carboxymethyl groups at 0.35-0.40, nitrate ester groups at 1.96-2.19 and hydroxyl groups at 0.46-0.64 per d-glucose was considered as the best film forming material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. On the history of gout: paleopathological evidence from the Medici family of Florence.

    PubMed

    Giuffra, Valentina; Minozzi, Simona; Vitiello, Angelica; Fornaciari, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Throughout history, gout has been referred to as the "disease of the kings", and has been clearly associated with the lifestyle of the aristocratic social classes. According to the written sources, several members of the famous Medici family of Florence suffered from an arthritic disease that contemporary physicians called "gout". A paleopathological study carried out on the skeletal remains of some members of the family, exhumed from their tombs in the Church of San Lorenzo in Florence, offered a unique opportunity to directly investigate the evidence of the arthritic diseases affecting this elite group. The skeletal remains of several members of the family were examined macroscopically and submitted to x-ray investigation. The results of the study allowed us to ascertain that the so-called "gout of the Medici" should be considered the clinical manifestation of three different joint conditions: diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, rheumatoid arthritis and uratic gout. In particular, uric acid gout was diagnosed in the Grand Duke Ferdinand I (1549-1609). Recently, a new case of this disease was diagnosed in Anton Francesco Maria (1618-1659), a probable illegitimate member of the family. With this new case, uratic gout was observed in 2 out of 9 adult males, leading to suppose that the disease should have been a common health problem within the family. The aetiology of the disease has to be searched in environmental factors, since both historical and paleonutritional studies demonstrated that the diet of this aristocratic court was rich in meat and wine.

  16. History of Neurosurgery in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Darwazeh, Rami; Darwazeh, Mazhar; Sun, Xiaochuan

    2017-08-01

    Palestinian neurosurgery started with Dr. Antone Tarazi as the first Palestinian neurosurgeon. Before that, there was no organized neurosurgery specialty, and general surgeons performed neurosurgical procedures. Here we review the history of neurosurgery and neurosurgical applications in Palestine, evaluate some limitations of the current system, and discuss major challenges to improving this system. We collected information from various sources in either English or Arabic. The development of neurosurgery and neurosurgical training in Palestine began in 1960 with the first center established in Jerusalem, which provided much-needed neurosurgical services and training in the fields of neurosurgery and neurology. Palestine has produced a number of its own neurosurgeons and has promoted further progress by establishing the Palestinian Neurosurgical Society in 2014. Today, there are 34 neurosurgeons (including 1 female neurosurgeon) and 17 residents providing expert care in 17 centers across Palestine, along with 1 neurosurgical residency program. Neurosurgery in Palestine has faced many challenges, some of which have been overcome. However, there remain many challenges, which will require much time and effort to surmount. Political stabilization is a significant factor in the progress of neurosurgery in Palestine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sergei Winogradsky: a founder of modern microbiology and the first microbial ecologist.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Sergei Winogradsky, was born in Russia in 1856 and was to become a founder of modern microbiology. After his Master's degree work on the nutrition and growth physiology of the yeast Mycoderma vini at the University of St. Petersburg, he joined the laboratory of Anton DeBary in Strassburg. There he carried out his studies on the sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Beggiatoa which resulted in his formulation of the theory of chemolithotrophy. He then joined the Swiss Polytechnic Institute in Zurich where he did his monumental work on bacterial nitrification. He isolated the first pure cultures of the nitrifying bacteria and confirmed that they carried out the separate steps of the conversion of ammonia to nitrite and of nitrite to nitrate. This led directly to the concept of the cycles of sulfur and nitrogen in Nature. He returned to Russia and there was the first to isolate a free-living dinitrogen-fixing bacterium. In the flush of success, he retired from science and spent 15 years on his familial estate in the Ukraine. The Russian revolution forced him to flee Russia. He joined the Pasteur Institute in Paris where he spent his remaining 24 years initiating and developing the field of microbial ecology. He died in 1953.

  18. Rheological Characterization and Cluster Classification of Iranian Commercial Foods, Drinks and Desserts to Recommend for Esophageal Dysphagia Diets

    PubMed Central

    ZARGARAAN, Azizollaah; OMARAEE, Yasaman; RASTMANESH, Reza; TAHERI, Negin; FADAVI, Ghasem; FADAEI, Morteza; MOHAMMADIFAR, Mohammad Amin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background In the absence of dysphagia-oriented food products, rheological characterization of available food items is of importance for safe swallowing and adequate nutrient intake of dysphagic patients. In this way, introducing alternative items (with similar ease of swallow) is helpful to improve quality of life and nutritional intake of esophageal cancer dysphagia patients. The present study aimed at rheological characterization and cluster classification of potentially suitable foodstuffs marketed in Iran for their possible use in dysphagia diets. Methods In this descriptive study, rheological data were obtained during January and February 2012 in Rheology Lab of National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute Tehran, Iran. Steady state and oscillatory shear parameters of 39 commercial samples were obtained using a Physica MCR 301 rheometer (Anton-Paar, GmbH, Graz, Austria). Matlab Fuzzy Logic Toolbox (R2012 a) was utilized for cluster classification of the samples. Results Using an extended list of rheological parameters and fuzzy logic methods, 39 commercial samples (drinks, main courses and desserts) were divided to 5 clusters and degree of membership to each cluster was stated by a number between 0 and 0.99. Conclusion Considering apparent viscosity of foodstuffs as a single criterion for classification of dysphagia-oriented food products is shortcoming of current guidelines in dysphagia diets. Authors proposed to some revisions in classification of dysphagia-oriented food products and including more rheological parameters (especially, viscoelastic parameters) in the classification. PMID:26060647

  19. The second joint Kemali-IBRO Mediterranean school of neuroscience is the first for invertebrate neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, A; Chabaud, M A

    2011-12-01

    This meeting was held at the Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Naples, Italy, from 6th-13th July 2011. It was sponsored through a collaboration between IBRO (the International Brain Research Organisation) and the Kemali Foundation. Notably, it is the first IBRO sponsored School specifically in invertebrate neuroscience. The meeting was attended by early career researchers from countries around the Mediterranean basin and highlighted the research opportunities that this field can offer to neuroscientists at the start of their careers. Students participating in the School were introduced to a range of important invertebrate model systems. The utility of these models in addressing fundamental neurobiological problems, especially those relating to human neurological disorders, was extensively discussed. In this review, two of the participating students provide a summary of this meeting with a view to encouraging support for further activity in this arena in the future. One of the aims of the Kemali foundation is to foster enduring collaborations between scientists in the Mediterranean region. Given the enthusiastic networking both during and after the meeting, there is much promise that this goal will be realised.

  20. Microwave Irradiation on Halloysite-Polypropylene Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espino, Omar; Yust, Brian; Chipara, Dorina; Ajayan, Pullickel; Chipara, Alin; Chipara, Mircea; Utrgv Collaboration; Rice Collaboration

    Halloysite is an unique cyllindrical nanoclay characterized by poor electrical and thermal conductivity, which may become the filler of choice for the reinforcement of polymeric matrix, where electrical or thermal insulation are required. The main limits in the use of halloysite as replacement for carbon nanotube (CNT) are: 1. Smaller aspect ratio as halloysites are typically shorter than CNTs. 2. Smaller Young modulus of halloysites compared with CNTs. 3. Reduced thermal stability due to the loss of water upon heating. A research on halloysite dispersed within isotactic polypropylene is reported. To improve the interface between the halloysite and the polymeric matrix a microwave irradiation step has been considered. The local heating of the halloysite nanotubes is mediated by the absorbed/structural water content of the nanoclay. Nanocomposites loaded by various amounts of halloysite ranging from 0 % to 20 % wt. have been prepared by melt mixing by using a Haake RheoMixer. The as obtained nanocomposites have been subjected to microwave irradiation at 75 W in an Anton Paar Monowave 300 system and various irradiation times ranging from 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes. The effect of microwave irradiation has been studied by Raman and FTIR spectroscopy

  1. “Colossal” Breakthrough: The Callosal Puncture as a Precursor to Third Ventriculostomy

    PubMed Central

    Chesler, D. A.; Pendleton, C.; Jallo, G. I.; Quiñones-Hinojosa, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background In 1908, Anton and von Bramann proposed the Balkenstich method, a corpus callosum puncture which created a communication between the ventricle and subarachnoid space. This method offered the benefit of providing continuous CSF diversion without the implantation of cannula or other shunting devices, yet it received only slight reference in the literature of the time. It remained a novel and perhaps underutilized approach at the time Cushing began expanding his neurosurgical practice at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Materials and Methods Following IRB approval, and through the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, the surgical records of the Johns Hopkins Hospital for the period 1896–1912 were reviewed. Patients operated upon by Harvey Cushing were selected. Results 7 patients underwent puncture of the corpus callosum for treatment of hydrocephalus. 6 patients were treated for obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to presumed intracranial lesions. 1 patient was treated for congenital hydrocephalus. Conclusion The series reported here documents Cushing’s early use of the corpus callosum puncture to divert CSF in patients with obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to intracranial tumors, as well as an attempt to use the procedure in a pediatric patient with congenital hydrocephalus. Notably, 3 patients developed new onset left-sided weakness post-operatively, possibly due to retraction injury upon the supplementary motor intra-operative manipulations. PMID:22278787

  2. The effect of temperature on rheological properties of endodontic sealers.

    PubMed

    Rai, Roshni U; Singbal, Kiran P; Parekh, Vaishali

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate temperature-dependent rheological properties of three endodontic sealers MTA Fillapex (Angelus, Brazil), AH Plus (Dentsply, Germany), and EndoREZ (Ultradent, USA). Five samples of each group of endodontic sealers (n = 30) were freshly mixed and placed on the plate of a rheometer (MCR 301, AntonPaar, Physica) and examined at 25°C and 37°C temperature, respectively. Rheological properties of the sealers were calculated according to the loss modulus (G″), storage modulus (G'), loss factor (Tan δ), and complex viscosity (η*) using dynamic oscillatory shear tests. Statistical analysis (Wilcoxon signed-rank test) demonstrated that MTA Fillapex exhibited higher loss modulus (G″ > G') and a crossover region. AH Plus and EndoREZ had a higher storage modulus (G' > G″) at both temperatures. Loss factor (Tan δ) of MTA Fillapex was the highest compared to AH Plus, followed by EndoREZ. With a temperature change from 25°C to 37°C, MTA Fillapex exhibited a decrease while AH Plus exhibited an increase and, EndoREZ exhibited the least change, in complex viscosity (η*). EndoREZ exhibited better rheological properties compared to the other two test sealers.

  3. Rheological Characterization and Cluster Classification of Iranian Commercial Foods, Drinks and Desserts to Recommend for Esophageal Dysphagia Diets.

    PubMed

    Zargaraan, Azizollaah; Omaraee, Yasaman; Rastmanesh, Reza; Taheri, Negin; Fadavi, Ghasem; Fadaei, Morteza; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin

    2013-12-01

    In the absence of dysphagia-oriented food products, rheological characterization of available food items is of importance for safe swallowing and adequate nutrient intake of dysphagic patients. In this way, introducing alternative items (with similar ease of swallow) is helpful to improve quality of life and nutritional intake of esophageal cancer dysphagia patients. The present study aimed at rheological characterization and cluster classification of potentially suitable foodstuffs marketed in Iran for their possible use in dysphagia diets. In this descriptive study, rheological data were obtained during January and February 2012 in Rheology Lab of National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute Tehran, Iran. Steady state and oscillatory shear parameters of 39 commercial samples were obtained using a Physica MCR 301 rheometer (Anton-Paar, GmbH, Graz, Austria). Matlab Fuzzy Logic Toolbox (R2012 a) was utilized for cluster classification of the samples. Using an extended list of rheological parameters and fuzzy logic methods, 39 commercial samples (drinks, main courses and desserts) were divided to 5 clusters and degree of membership to each cluster was stated by a number between 0 and 0.99. Considering apparent viscosity of foodstuffs as a single criterion for classification of dysphagia-oriented food products is shortcoming of current guidelines in dysphagia diets. Authors proposed to some revisions in classification of dysphagia-oriented food products and including more rheological parameters (especially, viscoelastic parameters) in the classification.

  4. The effect of temperature on rheological properties of endodontic sealers

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Roshni U.; Singbal, Kiran P.; Parekh, Vaishali

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate temperature-dependent rheological properties of three endodontic sealers MTA Fillapex (Angelus, Brazil), AH Plus (Dentsply, Germany), and EndoREZ (Ultradent, USA). Materials and Methods: Five samples of each group of endodontic sealers (n = 30) were freshly mixed and placed on the plate of a rheometer (MCR 301, AntonPaar, Physica) and examined at 25°C and 37°C temperature, respectively. Rheological properties of the sealers were calculated according to the loss modulus (G″), storage modulus (G′), loss factor (Tan δ), and complex viscosity (η*) using dynamic oscillatory shear tests. Results: Statistical analysis (Wilcoxon signed-rank test) demonstrated that MTA Fillapex exhibited higher loss modulus (G″ > G′) and a crossover region. AH Plus and EndoREZ had a higher storage modulus (G′ > G″) at both temperatures. Loss factor (Tan δ) of MTA Fillapex was the highest compared to AH Plus, followed by EndoREZ. With a temperature change from 25°C to 37°C, MTA Fillapex exhibited a decrease while AH Plus exhibited an increase and, EndoREZ exhibited the least change, in complex viscosity (η*). Conclusions: EndoREZ exhibited better rheological properties compared to the other two test sealers. PMID:27099414

  5. Rheological properties of a reclaimed waste tire rubber through high-pressure high-temperature sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubaidillah, Yunus, N. A.; Aziz, S. A. A.; Wahab, N. A. A.; Mazlan, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    High-Pressure High-Temperature (HPHT) sintering method has successfully revulcanized waste tire rubber (WTR) without any additional virgin rubber. The crumb rubber cleaned from its fabric and metals was reclaimed by applying high pressure (25 MPa) and high temperature (200 °C) for an hour along with common vulcanization agents such as sulfur, zinc oxide, and stearic acid. Dynamic properties of reclaimed WTR were assessed through shear rheology test on MCR302 Rheometer, Anton Paar, Austria. The results indicated that under steady test, the yield stress occurred at 31 kPa at 5% linear viscoelastic limit. The storage modulus ranged from 0.6 to 0.7 MPa under excitation frequency of 0.1 to 100 Hz and 1% strain amplitude. Under ramp strain amplitude, the storage modulus showed Payne Effect phenomenon at 0.8 to 1 % strain amplitude and 1 Hz excitation frequency. In general, the resulted dynamic properties was comparable with non-reclaimed rubber based on a literature survey. The results confirmed that HPHT sintering method was capable of reclaiming 100% WTR without an additional virgin rubber and achieving acceptable dynamic properties.

  6. The design and analysis of new musical bells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLachlan, Neil M.

    2004-05-01

    The design and analysis of a series of new musical bells will be presented in this paper. Modal analysis of a wide range of bell-like geometries using FEA revealed the presence and significance of transverse axial modes in unconstrained bell models, leading to a new understanding of the relationships between bell geometry and modal behavior. This understanding was used to adjust simple parametric models of bell geometry to arrive at appropriate geometries to begin numerical shape optimization for the design of bells with a range of desired overtone tunings. Pitch salience is well known to depend on the degree of harmonic relationships between pure tones in complex stimuli. Bells intended to produce a single, highly salient pitch were designed and manufactured with up to the first 7 overtones tuned to the harmonic series. Other bells with overtones tuned to subsets of two or three harmonic series were also designed and manufactured. These bells were intended to produce multiple pitch perceptions of approximately equal strength. Spectral analysis and range of numerical psycho-acoustic models are used to evaluate the sounds of manufactured bells against these design objectives. [I would like to acknowledge the close collaboration of Dr. Anton Hasell of Australian Bell.

  7. An Equation of State for Hypersaline Water in Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, D.L.; Millero, F.J.; Jones, B.F.; Green, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    Great Salt Lake (GSL) is one of the largest and most saline lakes in the world. In order to accurately model limnological processes in GSL, hydrodynamic calculations require the precise estimation of water density (??) under a variety of environmental conditions. An equation of state was developed with water samples collected from GSL to estimate density as a function of salinity and water temperature. The ?? of water samples from the south arm of GSL was measured as a function of temperature ranging from 278 to 323 degrees Kelvin (oK) and conductivity salinities ranging from 23 to 182 g L-1 using an Anton Paar density meter. These results have been used to develop the following equation of state for GSL (?? = ?? 0.32 kg m-3): ?? - ??0 = 184.01062 + 1.04708 * S - 1.21061*T + 3.14721E - 4*S2 + 0.00199T2 where ??0 is the density of pure water in kg m-3, S is conductivity salinity g L-1, and T is water temperature in degrees Kelvin. ?? 2011 U.S. Government.

  8. Knock on brick. [use of masonry for energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, W. ); Arcidi, P.

    1993-03-01

    In 1978, the Netherlands International Bank (NMB) needed a new image and a new headquarters in Amsterdam. It was created by an interdisciplinary team: architects, construction engineers, landscape architects, energy experts, artists, and bank employees worked for three years on the design. The architect Anton Alberts describes the building as [open quotes]anthroposophical,[close quotes] bases on Rudolph Steiner's design philosophy, where the orthogonal gives way to organic volumes and forms to elicit humane spaces with a spiritual sensibility. The integration of building design, daylighting, and energy systems has yielded impressive results. NMB's former headquarters consumed 422,801 BTU of primary energy per square foot each year. The new building consumes only 35,246 BTU per square foot. By way of comparison, an adjacent bank, constructed at approximately the same time and cost, consumes five times the energy per square foot. Construction costs of $162 per square foot (in 1991 dollars) include land, structure, landscaping, art, furniture, and equipment. Costs attributed to the energy systems were approximately $700,000, but estimates for the annual energy savings are $2.6 million. Using early 1980s technologies the energy measures had a three-month payback.

  9. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of protein folding.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yinglong; Feixas, Ferran; Eun, Changsun; McCammon, J Andrew

    2015-07-30

    Folding of four fast-folding proteins, including chignolin, Trp-cage, villin headpiece and WW domain, was simulated via accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD). In comparison with hundred-of-microsecond timescale conventional molecular dynamics (cMD) simulations performed on the Anton supercomputer, aMD captured complete folding of the four proteins in significantly shorter simulation time. The folded protein conformations were found within 0.2-2.1 Å of the native NMR or X-ray crystal structures. Free energy profiles calculated through improved reweighting of the aMD simulations using cumulant expansion to the second-order are in good agreement with those obtained from cMD simulations. This allows us to identify distinct conformational states (e.g., unfolded and intermediate) other than the native structure and the protein folding energy barriers. Detailed analysis of protein secondary structures and local key residue interactions provided important insights into the protein folding pathways. Furthermore, the selections of force fields and aMD simulation parameters are discussed in detail. Our work shows usefulness and accuracy of aMD in studying protein folding, providing basic references in using aMD in future protein-folding studies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. "Colossal" breakthrough: the callosal puncture as a precursor to third ventriculostomy.

    PubMed

    Chesler, D A; Pendleton, C; Jallo, G I; Quiñones-Hinojosa, A

    2011-10-01

    In 1908, Anton and von Bramann proposed the Balkenstich method, a corpus callosum puncture which created a communication between the ventricle and subarachnoid space. This method offered the benefit of providing continuous CSF diversion without the implantation of cannula or other shunting devices, yet it received only slight reference in the literature of the time. It remained a novel and perhaps underutilized approach at the time Cushing began expanding his neurosurgical practice at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Following IRB approval, and through the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, the surgical records of the Johns Hopkins Hospital for the period 1896-1912 were reviewed. Patients operated upon by Harvey Cushing were selected. 7 patients underwent puncture of the corpus callosum for treatment of hydrocephalus. 6 patients were treated for obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to presumed intracranial lesions. 1 patient was treated for congenital hydrocephalus. The series reported here documents Cushing's early use of the corpus callosum puncture to divert CSF in patients with obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to intracranial tumors, as well as an attempt to use the procedure in a pediatric patient with congenital hydrocephalus. Notably, 3 patients developed new onset left-sided weakness post-operatively, possibly due to retraction injury upon the supplementary motor intra-operative manipulations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Coming of Age With Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    1. Letters to David Baker; 2. Letters to Howard Baker; 3. Letters to Howard Barnum; 4. Letters to Paul Benioff; 5. Letters to Charlie Bennett; 6. Letters to Herb Bernstein; 7. Letters to Doug Bilodeau; 8. Letters to Gilles Brassard; 9. Letters to Jeffrey Bub; 10. Letters to Carlton Caves; 11. Letters to Greg Comer; 12. Letters to Charles Enz; 13. Letters to Henry Folse; 14. Letters to Bob Griffiths; 15. Letters to Adrian Kent; 16. Letters to Rolf Landauer; 17. Letters to Hideo Mabuchi; 18. Letters to David Mermin; 19. Letters to David Meyer; 20. Letters to Jeff Nicholson; 21. Letters to Michael Nielsen; 22. Letters to Asher Peres; 23. Diary of a carefully worded paper: more letters to Asher Peres; 24. Letters to John Preskill; 25. Letters to Joseph Renes; 26. Letters to Mary Beth Ruskai; 27. Letters to Rüdiger Schack; 28. Letters to Robert Schumann; 29. Letters to Abner Shimony; 30. Letters to Jon Waskan; 31. Letters to Bill Wootters; 32. Letters to Anton Zeilinger; 33. Other letters; Index.

  12. Long-Timescale Molecular Dynamics Simulations Elucidate the Dynamics and Kinetics of Exposure of the Hydrophobic Patch in Troponin C

    PubMed Central

    Lindert, Steffen; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Troponin (Tn) is an important regulatory protein in the thin-filament complex of cardiomyocytes. Calcium binding to the troponin C (TnC) subunit causes a change in its dynamics that leads to the transient opening of a hydrophobic patch on TnC’s surface, to which a helix of another subunit, troponin I (TnI), binds. This process initiates contraction, making it an important target for studies investigating the detailed molecular processes that underlie contraction. Here we use microsecond-timescale Anton molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the dynamics and kinetics of the opening transition of the TnC hydrophobic patch. Free-energy differences for opening are calculated for wild-type Ca2+-bound TnC (∼8 kcal/mol), V44Q Ca2+-bound TnC (3.2 kcal/mol), E40A Ca2+-bound TnC (∼12 kcal/mol), and wild-type apo TnC (∼20 kcal/mol). These results suggest that the mutations have a profound impact on the frequency with which the hydrophobic patch presents to TnI. In addition, these simulations corroborate that cardiac wild-type TnC does not open on timescales relevant to contraction without calcium being bound. PMID:23083722

  13. Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the dynamics and kinetics of exposure of the hydrophobic patch in troponin C.

    PubMed

    Lindert, Steffen; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M; McCammon, J Andrew

    2012-10-17

    Troponin (Tn) is an important regulatory protein in the thin-filament complex of cardiomyocytes. Calcium binding to the troponin C (TnC) subunit causes a change in its dynamics that leads to the transient opening of a hydrophobic patch on TnC's surface, to which a helix of another subunit, troponin I (TnI), binds. This process initiates contraction, making it an important target for studies investigating the detailed molecular processes that underlie contraction. Here we use microsecond-timescale Anton molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the dynamics and kinetics of the opening transition of the TnC hydrophobic patch. Free-energy differences for opening are calculated for wild-type Ca(2+)-bound TnC (∼8 kcal/mol), V44Q Ca(2+)-bound TnC (3.2 kcal/mol), E40A Ca(2+)-bound TnC (∼12 kcal/mol), and wild-type apo TnC (∼20 kcal/mol). These results suggest that the mutations have a profound impact on the frequency with which the hydrophobic patch presents to TnI. In addition, these simulations corroborate that cardiac wild-type TnC does not open on timescales relevant to contraction without calcium being bound. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nephrological excerpts from the Encyclopédie of Diderot and d'Alembert.

    PubMed

    De Santo, Natale Gaspare; Cirillo, Massimo; Bisaccia, Carmela; Richet, Gabriel; Eknoyan, Garabed

    2011-05-01

    The Encyclopédie of Denis Diderot (1713-1784) and Jean-Baptiste le Rond d'Alembert (1717-1783), a 35-volume work published between 1751 and 1780, is the most representative work of the Enlightenment in France. Written to explain truths based on experiment, detected by the senses, and analyzed by reason, it was meant to be an inclusive systematic dictionary of the sciences, arts, and crafts. Medicine, considered an experimental but practical science based on measurement, is not mentioned in the frontispiece, but is covered in the text based on the work of several illustrious scientists and clinicians of the period. The renal entries describe kidney structure and function, normal and pathologic urine, diabetes, anuria, polyuria, dysuria, stranguria, incontinence, kidney stones, edema, diuretics, and nephritis. The contributions of Marcello Malpighi (1628-1698), Herman Boerhaave (1668-1738), and Guichard-Joseph Duverney (1648-1730) are highlighted. Accompanying illustrations of unique perfection show the position of the kidneys according to Albrecht Haller (1708-1777); their innervation according to Raymond Vieussens (1641-1715); their structure according to Anton Nuck (1650-1692), Exupère Joseph Bertin (1712-1781), and Frederick Ruysch (1638-1731); and the genitourinary tract according to Duverney. Overall, the Encyclopédie provides a unique summary of what was known about kidney structure, function, and disease in the 18th century.

  15. Factor structure and concurrent validity of the obsessive compulsive drinking scale in a group of alcohol-dependent subjects of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Marta; Solís, Luís; Cordero, Roberto; Torruco, Mario; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos

    2009-07-01

    Obsessive thoughts and compulsive drinking behaviors have been proposed as key factors associated with the loss of control over alcohol consumption experienced by alcohol-dependent patients. The self-report 14-item Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS; Anton et al., 1995) was designed in order to rate these features. A Spanish-translated version of the OCDS was applied to a group of 159 alcohol-dependent subjects while in abstinence, and data were analyzed in order to evaluate the factor structure and concurrent validity of the scale. Several solutions were explored after applying the principal factor analysis to the data. The most plausible result was obtained after excluding the items on quantity and frequency of drinking. This model explaining 56.9% of the variance included 2 factors: obsessive thoughts related to drinking and interference/behaviors related to drinking. Additionally, OCDS scores were significantly correlated with measures for the Alcohol Dependence Scale, number of DSM-IV criteria met for alcohol dependence as well as the number of days in a week engaged in heavy drinking, indicating concurrent validity. Our results support the use of OCDS as a valid self-rated instrument that can be broadly applied in research and treatment settings. However, its current version includes questions that may not represent the core concept of craving. The abridged 12-item version of the scale (excluding the items on drinking habits) maintains good psychometrics features and seems to be adequate when different cognitive and behavioral dimensions are explored.

  16. Lab experiments on the innovative rapid thick strip casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Richard; Senk, Dieter

    2012-05-01

    Rapid thick strip casting (RTSC) by Anton Hulek, Inventmetall®, is an innovative concept for the production of hot strips with a final as-cast thickness of about 25 mm before rolling. The innovation of the mechanism consists in a vertical mould performing a caterpillar motion. This moving mould has an unconventional parallelogram-shaped cross-section. The conventional rectangular shape is formed in the shaping machine, which is placed straight below the mould. Further elements of the technology are state-of-the-art. For the investigation of this new casting system theoretical calculations were complemented with practical experiments. The investigation focused mainly on two key aspects: the characteristics of the mould and the shaping process. For the practical analysis a static mould with three pairs of elements in laboratory scale was developed and commissioned by the Dept. of Ferrous Metallurgy @ RWTH Aachen University. The shaping experiments were carried out in model scale with two different materials and in variable boundary conditions. The results of these experiments delivered important mechanical as well as thermal informations about the casting system.

  17. [Visual perception deficits of cortical origin].

    PubMed

    Stolarska, Urszula; Zajac, Anna; Skowronek-Bała, Barbara; Budziszewska, Bogusława

    2009-01-01

    This work comprises of a literature review on visual perception distortions that have their origin in structural or functional irregularities of the brain, resulting in the cortex malfunction. The main area that we pay attention to is the brain cortex, but we should not forget, that diseases destructive to the lower brain structures also inevitably lead to secondary dysfunction of the cortex, and thus they have also been included in this paper. Cerebral vision disorders are a small percentage of caseload in either neurology or ophthalmology practice, yet they certainly are interesting for the cognitive scientists, as they open a window into the complex mechanisms of the cerebral clockwork. We are presenting examples of disorders, many of which engage the creative cooperation between specialists from different fields of neuroscience. Three kinds of disorders are presented: vision loss, agnosias and hallucinations. Among others there is some information on cortical blindness, blindsight, Anton's syndrome, hysterical blindness, apperceptive and associative agnosia, prosopagnosia, pure alexia, achromatopsia, Bonnet syndrome, Alice in Wonderland syndrome, peduncular halucinosis etc.

  18. Highlights of the 30th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    PubMed

    Andrei, Graciela; Carter, Kara; Janeba, Zlatko; Sampath, Aruna; Schang, Luis M; Tarbet, E Bart; Vere Hodge, R Anthony; Bray, Mike; Esté, José A

    2017-09-01

    The 30th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held in Atlanta, GA, USA from May 18 to 21, 2017. This report provides an account of award lectures, invited keynote addresses and oral presentations during the meeting. The 2017 Gertrude Elion Memorial Lecture Award by Michael Sofia highlighted one of the most important accomplishments in recent drug discovery in antiviral research, the identification of the hepatitis C virus direct-acting antiviral sofosbuvir and new alternatives to combat hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The Antonín Holý Lecture Award by David Chu on medicinal chemistry provided an overview of early developments of nucleoside analogs for the treatment of HIV and varicella zoster virus infection and how this knowledge serves to develop new drugs targeting HBV. Priscilla Yang gave the first ISAR Women in Science lecture. She reported on pharmacological validation of new antiviral targets for dengue, Zika and other flaviviruses. The William Prusoff Young Investigator Lecture Award by Maaike Everts described the Alabama Drug Discovery Alliance and the Antiviral Drug Discovery and Development Consortium, and how they are helping to accelerate the development of new antivirals. The 30th ICAR was a success in promoting new discoveries in antiviral drug development and research. The 31st ICAR will be held in Porto, Portugal, June 11-15, 2018. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Next Space Station Crew Previews Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-10-11

    NASA astronaut Scott Tingle and crewmates Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian space agency Roscosmos and Norishege Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) discussed their upcoming mission to the International Space Station in a news conference on Oct. 11 at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. Tingle, Shkaplerov and Kanai will launch to the space station aboard the Soyuz MS-07 spacecraft on Dec. 17 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. They will join the station’s Expedition 54 crew, and return to Earth in April 2018 as members of Expedition 55. During a planned four-month mission, the station crew members will take part in about 250 research investigations and technology demonstrations not possible on Earth in order to advance scientific knowledge of Earth, space, physical and biological sciences. Science conducted on the space station continues to yield benefits for humanity and will enable future long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space, including missions past the Moon and Mars. This will be the first spaceflight for Tingle and Kanai, and the third for Shkaplerov.

  20. The oceanic state: a conceptual elucidation in terms of modal contact.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, Jussi Antti

    2012-08-01

    Despite its lengthy history in psychoanalysis, the psychological origins, essential features and value of the oceanic state remain open to dispute. This ambiguity has come at a cost to the clarity of theoretical discussions on the topic. In working towards a conceptual elucidation, the author maintains that there are three primary accounts of the oceanic state: the metaphysical one of Romain Rolland, the developmental one of Sigmund Freud, and the cognitive-perceptual one of Anton Ehrenzweig. Based on the notion of modal contact, he argues that the accounts share a general theoretical structure that establishes as the necessary criterion for all oceanic states the loosening of ego boundaries and sufficient contact between differentiated and undifferentiated modalities of the mind. However, within this common structure, the accounts employ dissimilar metapsychologies to promulgate oceanic states of appreciably distinct kinds. To support this view, the author carries out a comparative examination of the modal contacts involved in the primary accounts' oceanic states. To conclude, he reviews the main implications of the notion of modal contact vis-à-vis recent discussion on oceanic phenomena, and puts forward for consideration a pluralist account of the mind that can accommodate the existence of several kinds of oceanic states.

  1. History of the pharmacies in the town of Aleşd, Bihor county.

    PubMed

    Paşca, Manuela Bianca; Gîtea, Daniela; Moisa, Corina

    2013-01-01

    In 1848 pharmacist Horváth Mihály established the first pharmacy in Aleşd, called Speranţa (Remény). Following the brief history of this pharmacy we will notice that in 1874 the pharmacy comes into the possession of Kocsiss József. In 1906 the personal rights of the pharmacy are transcribed to Kocsiss Béla, and since 1938 the his son, Kocsiss Dezső, pharmacist, became the new owner. In 1949 the pharmacy was nationalized and became the property of the Pharmaceutical Office Oradea, the pharmacy got the name Farmacia nr. 22 of Aleşd, and continued its activity throughout the whole communist period. Starting with the year 1991 it entered into private system as Angefarm, as the property of Mermeze Gheorghe, pharmacist, and from 2003 until now works under the name Vitalogy 3, as the property of Ghitea Sorin. A second pharmacy, Sfântul Anton was founded in 1937 by pharmacist Herceg Dobreanu Atena, which however had no continuity during the communist period.

  2. [Conscious awareness of cognitive processes and their dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kyoko

    2009-11-01

    Conscious awareness is the state in which external and internal stimuli are perceived and can be intentionally acted on. Although various investigations have provided new insights into the neural mechanisms of conscious awareness, its whole network in human remains to be solved. Anosognosia for visual dysfunction and unconscious processing of visual stimuli are good examples of dissociation between cognitive processes and conscious awareness. Anton syndrome, anosognosia for blind or deaf, could be observed in blindness caused by cerebral as well as ophthalmological diseases, when general cognitive function or attention is impaired. Unawareness of hemianopia is not an exception but a common phenomenon, which seems to be related to a completion phenomenon and macular sparing. Patients with visual agnosia are not consciously aware of the nature of their visual dysfunction but have a vague feeling of visual impairment. Blindsight, unconscious visual processing in the blind field, might be partly related to the dorso-dorsal visual stream that takes roles in the control of actions "on line" without awareness of spatial perception. In patients with unilateral spatial neglect, unconscious processing of visual stimuli on the neglected space was also observed. Better understanding of neural mechanisms of conscious awareness would provide insights into various neurological disorders and therapeutic approaches.

  3. iss030e079919

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-079919 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Shkaplerov and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  4. iss030e079949

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-079949 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Shkaplerov and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  5. iss030e078377

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-078377 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Anton Shkaplerov, both Expedition 30 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Kononenko and Shkaplerov moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  6. iss030e078381

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-078381 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Anton Shkaplerov, both Expedition 30 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Kononenko and Shkaplerov moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  7. iss030e079991

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-079991 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko, Expedition 30 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Kononenko and Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  8. iss030e078488

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-078488 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Anton Shkaplerov, both Expedition 30 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Kononenko and Shkaplerov moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  9. iss030e079955

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-079955 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Shkaplerov and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  10. iss030e078393

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-078393 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Anton Shkaplerov, both Expedition 30 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Kononenko and Shkaplerov moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  11. iss030e079930

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-079930 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Shkaplerov and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  12. iss030e078388

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-078388 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Anton Shkaplerov, both Expedition 30 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Kononenko and Shkaplerov moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  13. iss030e078522

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-078522 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Anton Shkaplerov, both Expedition 30 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Kononenko and Shkaplerov moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  14. iss030e078511

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-078511 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Anton Shkaplerov, both Expedition 30 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Kononenko and Shkaplerov moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  15. iss030e078391

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-078391 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Anton Shkaplerov, both Expedition 30 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Kononenko and Shkaplerov moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  16. iss030e078532

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-078532 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Anton Shkaplerov, both Expedition 30 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Kononenko and Shkaplerov moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  17. iss030e079953

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-079953 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Shkaplerov and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  18. iss030e080048

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-080048 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko, Expedition 30 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Kononenko and Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  19. iss030e079939

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-079939 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Shkaplerov and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  20. iss030e078385

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-078385 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Anton Shkaplerov, both Expedition 30 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Kononenko and Shkaplerov moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  1. iss030e079943

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-079943 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Shkaplerov and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  2. iss030e078533

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-078533 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Anton Shkaplerov, both Expedition 30 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Kononenko and Shkaplerov moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  3. iss030e078537

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-078537 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Anton Shkaplerov, both Expedition 30 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Kononenko and Shkaplerov moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  4. iss030e080014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-080014 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko, Expedition 30 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Kononenko and Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  5. iss030e079937

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-079937 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Shkaplerov and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  6. iss030e078372

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-078372 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Anton Shkaplerov, both Expedition 30 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Kononenko and Shkaplerov moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  7. iss030e079956

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-079956 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Shkaplerov and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  8. iss030e080004

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-16

    ISS030-E-080004 (16 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko, Expedition 30 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, Kononenko and Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-1 crane from the Pirs Docking Compartment to begin preparing the Pirs for its replacement next year with a new laboratory and docking module. The duo used another boom, the Strela-2, to move the hand-operated crane to the Poisk module for future assembly and maintenance work. Both telescoping booms extend like fishing rods and are used to move massive components outside the station. On the exterior of the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2), they also installed the Vinoslivost Materials Sample Experiment, which will investigate the influence of space on the mechanical properties of the materials. The spacewalkers also collected a test sample from underneath the insulation on the Zvezda Service Module to search for any signs of living organisms. Both spacewalkers wore Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes and equipped with NASA helmet cameras.

  9. The new IAA Light Scattering Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Molina, A.; Guirado, D.; Ramos, J. L.; López, A.; Girela, F.; Costillo, L. P.

    2005-05-01

    We are building up a light scattering setup at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA), Granada, Spain. The design of this new setup is based on the well known apparatus currently located at the Astronomical Institute "Anton Pannekoek", University of Amsterdam, The Neteherlands [1],[2]. By using a polarization modulation technique, all scattering matrix elements as function of the scattering angle are obtained from 8 separate measurement runs. In this new setup we use an Argon-Kripton laser (483 nm, 488 nm, 514 nm, 568 nm, and 647 nm) as light source. The detectors are mounted on dove tails that allow their movement backward and forward. In addition, the detectors have been designed to minimize blockage of the laser beam at positions close to the forward and backward directions. In this way we intend to do measurements covering an angle range from 3 to 177 degrees. The alignment of the optics is automatically done and controlled from the computer reducing the measurement time.

  10. Prediction, Refinement and Persistency of Transmembrane Helix Dimers in Lipid Bilayers using Implicit and Explicit Solvent/Lipid Representations: Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations of ErbB1/B2 and EphA1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liqun; Sodt, Alexander J.; Venable, Richard M.; Pastor, Richard W.; Buck, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    All-atom simulations are carried out on ErbB1/B2 and EphA1 transmembrane helix dimers in lipid bilayers starting from their solution/DMPC bicelle NMR structures. Over the course of microsecond trajectories, the structures remain in close proximity to the initial configuration and satisfy the great majority of experimental tertiary contact restraints. These results further validate CHARMM protein/lipid force fields and simulation protocols on Anton. Separately, dimer conformations are generated using replica exchange in conjunction with an implicit solvent and lipid representation. The implicit model requires further improvement, and this study investigates whether lengthy all-atom molecular dynamics simulations can alleviate the shortcomings of the initial conditions. The simulations correct many of the deficiencies. For example excessive helix twisting is eliminated over a period of hundreds of nanoseconds. The helix tilt, crossing angles and dimer contacts approximate those of the NMR derived structure, although the detailed contact surface remains off-set for one of two helices in both systems. Hence, even microsecond simulations are not long enough for extensive helix rotations. The alternate structures can be rationalized with reference to interaction motifs and may represent still sought after receptor states that are important in ErbB1/B2 and EphA1 signaling. PMID:23042146

  11. [Room with a view for the "daughters of pain": 1828 was the beginning of new obstetrics in Erlangen].

    PubMed

    Frobenius, W

    1996-01-01

    The roots of clinical obstetrics at the University of Erlangen go back as far as the end of the 18th century. In 1796, Christian Friedrich Deutsch (1768-1843) was appointed as the first university teacher solely responsible for obstetrics. At the same time, he was also vehemently committed to the creation of a clinical institution for the purpose of training in obstetrics. For several reasons, the opening of a maternity home in a converted private house on the outskirts of town did not take place until 1828 under the leadership of Anton Bayer (1791-1832). In 1854/55, it was possible to move into a new building situated directly next to the university hospital; this new building was planned by Eugen Rosshirt (1798-1872). The increasing number of births and students as well as the introduction of gynecology finally led to the establishment, in 1878, of the first gynecological hospital in the sense understood by us today. The hospital was designed by Karl Schröder (1838-1887) who was the first Erlangen teacher of obstetrics to complete his habilitation in this field and probably has to be considered as the founder of the science of obstetrics at the University of Erlangen.

  12. The Impact of a Ligand Binding on Strand Migration in the SAM-I Riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Kim, Joohyun; Jha, Shantenu; Aboul-ela, Fareed

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitches sense cellular concentrations of small molecules and use this information to adjust synthesis rates of related metabolites. Riboswitches include an aptamer domain to detect the ligand and an expression platform to control gene expression. Previous structural studies of riboswitches largely focused on aptamers, truncating the expression domain to suppress conformational switching. To link ligand/aptamer binding to conformational switching, we constructed models of an S-adenosyl methionine (SAM)-I riboswitch RNA segment incorporating elements of the expression platform, allowing formation of an antiterminator (AT) helix. Using Anton, a computer specially developed for long timescale Molecular Dynamics (MD), we simulated an extended (three microseconds) MD trajectory with SAM bound to a modeled riboswitch RNA segment. Remarkably, we observed a strand migration, converting three base pairs from an antiterminator (AT) helix, characteristic of the transcription ON state, to a P1 helix, characteristic of the OFF state. This conformational switching towards the OFF state is observed only in the presence of SAM. Among seven extended trajectories with three starting structures, the presence of SAM enhances the trend towards the OFF state for two out of three starting structures tested. Our simulation provides a visual demonstration of how a small molecule (<500 MW) binding to a limited surface can trigger a large scale conformational rearrangement in a 40 kDa RNA by perturbing the Free Energy Landscape. Such a mechanism can explain minimal requirements for SAM binding and transcription termination for SAM-I riboswitches previously reported experimentally. PMID:23704854

  13. Capturing Invisible Motions in the Transition from Ground to Rare Excited States of T4 Lysozyme L99A.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Jamie M; Feher, Victoria A; Malmstrom, Robert D; Sida, Roxana; Amaro, Rommie E

    2016-10-18

    Proteins commonly sample a number of conformational states to carry out their biological function, often requiring transitions from the ground state to higher-energy states. Characterizing the mechanisms that guide these transitions at the atomic level promises to impact our understanding of functional protein dynamics and energy landscapes. The leucine-99-to-alanine (L99A) mutant of T4 lysozyme is a model system that has an experimentally well characterized excited sparsely populated state as well as a ground state. Despite the exhaustive study of L99A protein dynamics, the conformational changes that permit transitioning to the experimentally detected excited state (∼3%, ΔG ∼2 kcal/mol) remain unclear. Here, we describe the transitions from the ground state to this sparsely populated excited state of L99A as observed through a single molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory on the Anton supercomputer. Aside from detailing the ground-to-excited-state transition, the trajectory samples multiple metastates and an intermediate state en route to the excited state. Dynamic motions between these states enable cavity surface openings large enough to admit benzene on timescales congruent with known rates for benzene binding. Thus, these fluctuations between rare protein states provide an atomic description of the concerted motions that illuminate potential path(s) for ligand binding. These results reveal, to our knowledge, a new level of complexity in the dynamics of buried cavities and their role in creating mobile defects that affect protein dynamics and ligand binding.

  14. Slide-and-exchange mechanism for rapid and selective transport through the nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Raveh, Barak; Karp, Jerome M.; Sparks, Samuel; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej; Cowburn, David

    2016-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is mediated by the interaction of transport factors (TFs) with disordered phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats that fill the central channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). However, the mechanism by which TFs rapidly diffuse through multiple FG repeats without compromising NPC selectivity is not yet fully understood. In this study, we build on our recent NMR investigations showing that FG repeats are highly dynamic, flexible, and rapidly exchanging among TF interaction sites. We use unbiased long timescale all-atom simulations on the Anton supercomputer, combined with extensive enhanced sampling simulations and NMR experiments, to characterize the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of FG repeats and their interaction with a model transport factor. Both the simulations and experimental data indicate that FG repeats are highly dynamic random coils, lack intrachain interactions, and exhibit significant entropically driven resistance to spatial confinement. We show that the FG motifs reversibly slide in and out of multiple TF interaction sites, transitioning rapidly between a strongly interacting state and a weakly interacting state, rather than undergoing a much slower transition between strongly interacting and completely noninteracting (unbound) states. In the weakly interacting state, FG motifs can be more easily displaced by other competing FG motifs, providing a simple mechanism for rapid exchange of TF/FG motif contacts during transport. This slide-and-exchange mechanism highlights the direct role of the disorder within FG repeats in nucleocytoplasmic transport, and resolves the apparent conflict between the selectivity and speed of transport. PMID:27091992

  15. ["To suffer an ordeal": Some Swedish physicians' struggle during the nineteenth century against unhygienic female dress].

    PubMed

    Nordström, M

    1993-01-01

    Tight-lacing of the female body has been practised at various periods in the history of costume. During the romantic age of the nineteenth century the ideal women had to be pale, weak and often pathologically thin. She was supposed to be of a humble disposition and subservient to her husband (according to the doctrine of subordination). Women laced themselves so tightly that their bodies became deformed, with physical injuries and damage to the internal organs as a consequence. Competition for suitable husbands was keen, since marriage was the only honourable way for a woman to ensure that she would be provided for. It was also in the nineteenth century that doctors were beginning to fight against endemic disease and to argue for a more hygienic way of life. They maintained that women were slaves to fashion and that they dressed in an unhygienic way. Above all, they campaigned against the use of tight-laced corsets. Swedish doctors, such as Anton Nyström, Truls Johan Harterlius and Karolina Widerström headed the fight against the use of laced corsetes, on both medical and social grounds. An improved and "informed" costume was introduced which was meant to allow women greater freedom of movement, thus enabling them to live a more natural life. It was, however, not until 1910 that the tightly-laced corset was abandoned. The conclusion of this is that the history of costume is "the history of absurd follies".

  16. Breaking the apple embryo dormancy by nitric oxide involves the stimulation of ethylene production.

    PubMed

    Gniazdowska, Agnieszka; Dobrzyńska, Urszula; Babańczyk, Tomasz; Bogatek, Renata

    2007-03-01

    Mature seeds of apple (Mallus domestica Borb. cv. Antonówka) are dormant and do not germinate unless their dormancy is removed by several weeks of moist-cold treatment. We investigated the effect of short-term (3 h) nitric oxide (NO) pretreatment on breaking of apple embryonic dormancy expressed as inhibition of germination and morphological abnormalities of young seedlings. Imbibition of embryos isolated from dormant apple seeds with sodium nitroprusside (SNP) or S-nitroso,N-acetyl penicillamine (SNAP) as NO donors resulted in enhanced germination. Moreover, NO treatment removed morphological abnormalities of seedlings developing from dormant embryo. The NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-teramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3 oxide (cPTIO) removed the above effects. NO-mediated breaking of embryonic dormancy correlated well with enhanced ethylene production. Inhibitor of ethylene synthesis (AOA) reversed the stimulatory effect of NO donors on embryo germination. Additionally SNP reduced embryo sensitivity to exogenously applied ABA ensuing dormancy breakage. We can conclude that NO acts as a regulatory factor included in the control of apple embryonic dormancy breakage by stimulation of ethylene biosynthesis.

  17. How far are rheological parameters from amplitude sweep tests predictable using common physicochemical soil properties?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoppe, N.; Horn, R.

    2017-01-01

    A basic understanding of soil behavior on the mesoscale resp. macroscale (i.e. soil aggregates resp. bulk soil) requires knowledge of the processes at the microscale (i.e. particle scale), therefore rheological investigations of natural soils receive growing attention. In the present research homogenized and sieved (< 2 mm) samples from Marshland soils of the riparian zone of the River Elbe (North Germany) were analyzed with a modular compact rheometer MCR 300 (Anton Paar, Ostfildern, Germany) with a profiled parallel-plate measuring system. Amplitude sweep tests (AST) with controlled shear deformation were conducted to investigate the viscoelastic properties of the studied soils under oszillatory stress. The gradual depletion of microstructural stiffness during AST cannot only be characterized by the well-known rheological parameters G, G″ and tan δ but also by the dimensionless area parameter integral z, which quantifies the elasticity of microstructure. To discover the physicochemical parameters, which influences the microstructural stiffness, statistical tests were used taking the combined effects of these parameters into account. Although the influence of the individual factors varies depending on soil texture, the physicochemical features significantly affecting soil micro structure were identified. Based on the determined statistical relationships between rheological and physicochemical parameters, pedotransfer functions (PTF) have been developed, which allow a mathematical estimation of the rheological target value integral z. Thus, stabilizing factors are: soil organic matter, concentration of Ca2+, content of CaCO3 and pedogenic iron oxides; whereas the concentration of Na+ and water content represent structurally unfavorable factors.

  18. [Oswald Schwarz: a pioneer in psychosomatic urology and sexual medicine].

    PubMed

    Berberich, H J; Schultheiss, D; Kieser, B

    2015-01-01

    Oswald Schwarz, a urologist from Vienna, was a scholar of Anton Ritter von Frisch and Hans Rubritius. As a physician during World War I, he was confronted with numerous bullet wounds to the spinal cord. In 1919, he completed his professorial thesis"Bladder dysfunction as a result of bullet wounds to the spinal cord". Oswald Schwarz was known as a committed surgeon. As an urologist he also treated patients with sexual dysfunction. Besides his practical and scientific urology-related work, he was also interested in psychology and philosophy. He held lectures on both subjects earning himself the nickname, the Urosoph. In the 1920s, Oswald Schwarz belonged to the inner circle of Alfred Adler, the founder of Individual Psychology, and was editor of the first psychosomatic textbook published in German, "Psychological origin and psychotherapy of physical symptoms" (1925). In addition, Schwarz wrote numerous articles and several books on sexual medicine. He also made many valuable contributions to the development of medical anthropology. Altogether, his work includes over 130 publications. Faced with the rise of fascism and National Socialism in Europe, Oswald Schwarz, who was of Jewish origin, emigrated to England in 1934. There he died in 1949. Unfortunately his scientific work has largely been forgotten. The aim of the following article is to remind us of his important contributions to the field.

  19. Rheological Properties of Nanoparticle Silica-Surfactant Stabilized Crude Oil Emulsions: Influence of Temperature, Nanoparticle Concentration and Water Volume Fraction"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, Erin; Pales, Ashley; Li, Chunyan; Mu, Linlin; Bai, Lingyun; Clifford, Heather; Darnault, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Oil in water emulsions occur during oil extraction due to the presence of water, naturally-occurring surface-active agents and mechanical mixing in pipelines or from oil spillage. Emulsions present difficulties for use of oil in fuel and their rheological properties are important to treat environmental impacts of spills. The objective of this study is to assess the rheological characteristics of oil in water emulsions stabilized by 5% NaCl brine, Tween 20 surfactant and silica nanoparticles to gain knowledge about the behavior of oil flow in pipelines and characterize them for environmental applications. Rheological behaviors such as shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity of Prudhoe Bay crude oil emulsions were analyzed with varying percent of water volume fractions (12.5, 25 and 50%), varying weight percent of silica nanoparticles (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 weight %), with and without 2 CMC Tween 20 nonionic surfactant. Emulsions with varying water volume fractions were analyzed at 20, 40 and 60 degrees Celsius. Flow curve analysis of the emulsions was performed using an Anton-Paar rheometer. Preliminary findings indicate that increased temperature and increasing the concentration of nanoparticles both produced lower shear stress and that the addition of surfactant decreased the viscosity and shear stress of the emulsions.

  20. A paradigm shift in mechanical biofilm management? Subgingival air polishing: a new way to improve mechanical biofilm management in the dental practice.

    PubMed

    Sculean, Anton; Bastendorf, Klaus-Dieter; Becker, Christian; Bush, Bernita; Einwag, Johannes; Lanoway, Carmen; Platzer, Ursula; Schmage, Petra; Schoeneich, Brigitte; Walter, Clemens; Wennström, Jan L; Flemmig, Thomas F

    2013-07-01

    In the past few years indications for the use of the air polishing technology have been expanded from supragingival use (airflow) to subgingival air polishing (perioflow) by the development of new low-abrasive glycine-based powders and devices with a subgingival nozzle. Several studies on the subgingival use of air polishing have been completed. On 7 June 2012, during the Europerio 7 Congress in Vienna, a consensus conference on mechanical biofilm management took place aiming to review the current evidence from the literature on the clinical relevance of the subgingival use of air polishing and to make practical recommendations for the clinician. Bernita Bush (Bern), Prof Johannes Einwag (Stuttgart), Prof Thomas Flemmig (Seattle), Carmen Lanoway (Munich), Prof Ursula Platzer (Hamburg), Prof Petra Schmage (Hamburg), Brigitte Schoeneich (Zurich), Prof Anton Sculean (Bern), Dr Clemens Walter (Basel), and Prof Jan Wennström (Gothenburg) discussed under the moderation of Klaus-Dieter Bastendorf and Christian Becker (both ADIC Association for Dental Infection Control) the available clinical studies to reach a consensus on available clinical evidence. This paper summarizes the main conclusions of the consensus conference and points to the clinical relevance of the findings for the dental practitioner.

  1. Development of orthopaedics in Slovenia and the history of the Orthopaedic Department Ljubljana University Hospital--on the occasion of the WHO "Bone and Joint Decade" (2000-2010).

    PubMed

    Zupanic Slavec, Zvonka; Herman, Srecko; Slavec, Ksenija

    2011-01-01

    In Slovenia, orthopaedics started to develop at the end of WWI, when the number of the handicapped increased. Dr Anton Brecelj, who in 1919 laid the groundwork for the welfare of handicapped and sent a Czech doctor Franc Minař to specialise in orthopaedic surgery. When Minař returned to Ljubljana in 1923, he established an orthopaedic unit within surgery and in 1937 took over its management. Orthopaedics developed very quickly after 1945, when Ljubljana University set up a School of Medicine, a Department of Orthopaedics and Physical Medicine within the School, and Orthopaedic Clinic of the University Hospital. Orthopaedic surgeons from Ljubljana participated in the establishment of a hospital for osteoarticular tuberculosis in Valdoltra, (which later became the largest orthopaedic hospital in Slovenia), specialised clinics and orthopaedic hospital departments throughout Slovenia, schools for physiotherapists in Ljubljana, the Slovenian Rehabilitation Institute - Soča, the Home for Disabled Children in Kamnik, and the spa and rehabilitation centre in Laško. In 2011, orthopaedics in Slovenia holds 600 hospital beds and has about 75 orthopaedic surgeons who annually treat around 50,000 patients.

  2. Observations of CI Cam needed to support spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2016-10-01

    Kelly Gourdji and Marcella Wijngaarden (graduate students at the University of Amsterdam/Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy) have requested AAVSO observers' assistance in providing optical photometry of CI Cam in support of their high-resolution spectroscopy from now through January 2017. They write: "...We are currently observing the variable star CI Cam (the B[e] optical counterpart of a HMXB system) with the HERMES spectrograph at the Mercator Telescope in La Palma. Having observed the star for three nights now, the object appears to be in outburst. In particular, H alpha was measured to be 80 times the continuum flux, and increasing between Oct. 9 and 12. This is similar to the previous outburst in 2004/5. Photometric data obtained during the 2004/5 outburst suggested an outburst duration of about 3 months and a peak brightness of 11.2 in the V band." More information is available in ATel #9634 (Wijngaarden et al.). Multiple snapshot observations per night in BVRI are requested beginning immediately and continuing through January 2017. Time series are not necessary unless requested later via an AAVSO Special Notice. Observations made using other filters will be useful as well as long as there are multiple observations in these bands. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (https://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  3. Factors Affecting the Rheological Measurement of Hyaluronic Acid Gel Fillers.

    PubMed

    Lorenc, Z Paul; Öhrlund, Åke; Edsman, Katarina

    2017-09-01

    With the number of available dermal fillers increasing, so is the demand for scientifically based comparisons, often with rheological properties in focus. Since analytical results are always influenced by instrument settings, consensus on settings is essential to make comparison of results from different investigators more useful. Preferred measurement settings for rheological analysis of hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers are suggested, and the reasoning behind the choices is presented by demonstrating the effect of different measurement settings on select commercial HA fillers. Rheological properties of 8 HA fillers were measured in a frequency sweep from 10 to 0.01 Hz at 0.1% strain, using an Anton Paar MCR 301, a PP-25 measuring system with a gap of 1 mm at 25°C. A 30-min period was used for relaxation of the sample between loading and measuring. The data presented here, together with previously published data, demonstrate differences in G' from 1.6 to 7.4 times for the same product. A large part of the differences were concluded to be due to differences in rheometry measurement settings. The confusion from the many parameters involved in rheometry can be avoided by simply using the elastic modulus (G') to differentiate products.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(9):876-882.

    .

  4. Gyrokinetic theory and simulation of angular momentum transport

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Candy, J.; Hinton, F. L.

    2007-12-15

    A gyrokinetic theory of turbulent toroidal angular momentum transport as well as modifications to neoclassical poloidal rotation from turbulence is formulated starting from the fundamental six-dimensional kinetic equation. The gyro-Bohm scaled transport is evaluated from toroidal delta-f gyrokinetic simulations using the GYRO code [Candy and Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. The simulations recover two pinch mechanisms in the radial transport of toroidal angular momentum: The slab geometry ExB shear pinch [Dominguez and Staebler, Phys. Fluids B 5, 387 (1993)] and the toroidal geometry 'Coriolis' pinch [Peeters, Angioni, and Strintzi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265003 (2007)]. The pinches allow the steady state null stress (or angular momentum transport flow) condition required to understand intrinsic (or spontaneous) toroidal rotation in heated tokamak without an internal source of torque [Staebler, Kinsey, and Waltz, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 46, 221 (2001)]. A predicted turbulent shift in the neoclassical poloidal rotation [Staebler, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1064 (2004)] appears to be small at the finite relative gyroradius (rho-star) of current experiments.

  5. Frequency bands of strongly nonlinear homogeneous granular systems.

    PubMed

    Lydon, Joseph; Jayaprakash, K R; Ngo, Duc; Starosvetsky, Yuli; Vakakis, Alexander F; Daraio, Chiara

    2013-07-01

    Recent numerical studies on an infinite number of identical spherical beads in Hertzian contact showed the presence of frequency bands [Jayaprakash, Starosvetsky, Vakakis, Peeters, and Kerschen, Nonlinear Dyn. 63, 359 (2011)]. These bands, denoted here as propagation and attenuation bands (PBs and ABs), are typically present in linear or weakly nonlinear periodic media; however, their counterparts are not intuitive in essentially nonlinear periodic media where there is a complete lack of classical linear acoustics, i.e., in "sonic vacua." Here, we study the effects of PBs and ABs on the forced dynamics of ordered, uncompressed granular systems. Through numerical and experimental techniques, we find that the dynamics of these systems depends critically on the frequency and amplitude of the applied harmonic excitation. For fixed forcing amplitude, at lower frequencies, the oscillations are large in amplitude and governed by strongly nonlinear and nonsmooth dynamics, indicating PB behavior. At higher frequencies the dynamics is weakly nonlinear and smooth, in the form of compressed low-amplitude oscillations, indicating AB behavior. At the boundary between the PB and the AB large-amplitude oscillations due to resonance occur, giving rise to collisions between beads and chaotic dynamics; this renders the forced dynamics sensitive to initial and forcing conditions, and hence unpredictable. Finally, we study asymptotically the near field standing wave dynamics occurring for high frequencies, well inside the AB.

  6. Diphthongs in the repopulated vowel space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogacka, Anna

    2005-04-01

    The study examined 8 British English diphthongs produced by Polish learners of English, testing the diphthongs' quality, duration, nasalization, and occurrence of glottal stops before the diphthongs. There were twelve conditions in which the diphthongs were tested: word-initial, word-final, before a voiced obstruent, before a voiceless obstruent, before a nasal consonant, and before a nasal consonant followed by a fricative, and each of these conditions was tested in a stressed and unstressed position. The diphthongs were tested in real words, embedded in sentences, controlled for the stress position, rhythmic units, and length. The sentences were read by 8 female and 8 male Polish learners of English and control subjects. The aim of the phonetic analysis done with Praat, and employing the methodologies used by Flege (1995) for SLA and Peeters (1991) and Jacewicz, Fujimara, and Fox (2003) for diphthongs, is to examine the shape of the restructured vowel space (Liljencrants and Lindblom 1972; Stevens 1989). The approach taken here is termed Vowel Space Repopulation to emphasize that the vowel space of Polish speakers of English is re-structured by new categories in complex ways which are not adequately captured by traditional notions such as ``transfer,'' ``interference,'' or ``interlanguage.''

  7. Purification of rat liver particulate neutral ribonuclease and comparison of properties with pancreas and serum ribonucleases.

    PubMed Central

    Bartholeyns, J; Baudhuin, P

    1977-01-01

    Rat liver particulate neutral ribonuclease (EC 3.1.4.22) was extensively purified (up to 40000-fold). It is shown to be an endonuclease, specific for pyrimidine bases, hydrolysing 5'-phosphate ester bonds. The enzyme specificity, Km, pH optimum, stability in acid medium and thermal stability at high temperature are the same as those of rat pancreatic and serum ribonucleases. Like pancreatic and serum neutral ribonucleases, the hepatic enzyme is sensitive to the liver natural inhibitor. This inhibitor was purified 8000-fold; its association with ribonuclease follows zero-order kinetics. These identical properties for ribonuclease of rat liver, pancreas and serum support the hypothesis [Bartholeyns, Peeters-Joris & Baudhuin (1975) Eur. J. Biochem. 60, 385-393] of an extrahepatic origin for the liver enzyme, the plasma ribonuclease of pancreatic origin being taken up by endocytosis in the liver. Neutral ribonuclease activity was detected in all rat organs investigated; its distribution among tissues is different from the distribution of the natural ribonuclear inhibitor. PMID:19011

  8. Peer review statement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-08-01

    All papers published in this Volume 12 of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science have been peer reviewed through processes administered by the editors of the 25th IAHR Symposium on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems proceedings, Professor Romeo Susan-Resiga, Dr Sebastian Muntean and Dr Sandor Bernad. Reviews were conducted by expert referees from the Scientific Committee to the professional and scientific standards expected of a proceedings journal published by IOP Publishing. The members of the Scientific Committee who selected and reviewed the papers included in the Proceedings of the 25th IAHR Symposium on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems are: Anton ANTONTechnical University of Civil Engineering, BucharestRomania François AVELLANEcole Polytechnique Fédérale de LausanneSwitzerland Fidel ARZOLAEDELCAVenezuela Thomas ASCHENBRENNERVoith Hydro Gmb H & Co. KG, HeidenheimGermany Anton BERGANTLitostroj Power d.o.o., LjubljanaSlovenia Gerard BOISENSAM, LilleFrance Hermod BREKKENTNU, TrondheimNorway Stuart COULSON Voith Hydro Inc., YorkUSA Eduard EGUSQUIZAPolytechnical University Catalonia BarcelonaSpain Arpad FAYUniversity of MiskolczHungary Richard FISHERVoith Hydro Inc., York USA Regiane FORTES-PATELLAInstitut Polytechnique de GrenobleFrance Aleksandar GAJICUniversity of BelgradeSerbia Arno GEHRERAndritz Hydro GrazAustria José GONZÁLEZUniversidad de OviedoSpain François GUIBAULTEcole Polytechnique de MontrealCanada Chisachi KATOUniversity of TokyoJapan Kwang-Yong KIMInha University, IncheonKorea Jiri KOUTNIKVoith Hydro Gmb H & Co. KG, HeidenheimGermany Adrian LUNGUDunarea de Jos University of GalatiRomania Christophe NICOLETPower Vision Engineering Sàrl, LausanneSwitzerland Torbjøm K. NIELSENNTNU, TrodheimNorway Michihiro NISHIKyushu Institute of TechnologyJapan Maryse PAGEHydro Quebec IREQ, VarennesCanada Etienne PARKINSONAndritz Hydro LtdSwitzerland František POCHYLYBrno UniversityCzech Republic Stefan RIEDELBAUCHVoith Hydro Gmb H & Co. KG

  9. Experiences on Altimeter Calibration at Ibiza Island and Cape of Begur (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Benjamin, J. J.; Martinez Harcia, M.; Ortiz Castello, M. A.; Talaya, J.; Baron, A.; Rodriguez Velasco, G.; Martín Davila, J.; Garate, J.; Bonnefond, P.; Garcia, C.

    2006-07-01

    Three preliminary camp aigns for TOPEX /POSEIDON (T/P) wer e made in March 1999 and July 2000 and for JASON-1 in August 2002, in the NW Mediterran ean Sea at th e Begur Cape area. Dir ect abso lute altimeter calibration , and mapping of the sea surface, w ere made in these camp aigns from dir ect overflights using GPS buoys with a toroidal design performed at the I CC based in the orig inal design of the Univ ersity of Colorado at Boulder and a estimation of the TOPEX A lt- B bias w as made. A Spanish JASON-1 geoid gradien t campaign with Fench support has been made in June 2003 at the Ibiza island in the NW Mediterr anean Sea. Th e main objectiv e has b een to map w ith a new d esign ed, builded and calibrated GPS catamar an, the lo cal geoid gradien t in three ar eas around Ibiza island under the ascending (187) and descending (248) Jason-1ground tracks. The catamaran equ ipped with two GPS antennas to perform continuous sea lev el measur ements was towed by the Patro l Dev a from th e Span ish N avy. Five GPS reference stations were dep loyed on Ibiza island: one in Portinatx, two in San Anton io and two in Ibiza. The marin e geo id has been used to relate the coastal tide gauge data from Ibiza and San An tonio h arbours to off- shore altimetric data. In th e framework of the campaign, the levelling of the Ibiza and San Anton io tide gauges to the r espective GPS mark ers w as p erformed. We present synth esis of the resu lts obtained from Topex/Poseidon and th e first r esults on Jason-1 altimeter calibration using the direct measurements from GPS buoys and the derived marin e geoid. Th e Ibiza results agree relativ ely w ell with resu lts ob tained at Corsica, Harvest and Bass Strait calibration permanen t sites. Moreov er, the geod etic activities (e.g., GPS, levelling) has p ermitted to build a very accurate (few mm) local n etwork link ed to th e European one, w ith a reference frame compatible with th e satellite altimetry missions (ITRF2000). The GPS

  10. Microgravity can activate signals urging cells to S-phase entry during tissue and organ regeneration in Urodele amphibians exposed to real and simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, E.; Anton, H.-J.; Mitashov, V.

    Regenerative response following local injury or tissue removal in urodele amphibians is dependent on cell cycle entry of cells sources for regeneration in the remaining tissue. In a number of our experiments performed aboard biosatellites in orbital flights and fast rotated clinostat we found enhanced proliferative activity and, as a result, regeneration quicker than that in controls. In each investigated case an activity of cell proliferation evaluated by 3H-thymidine radioautography and BrdU assay at the early stages of lens, retina, forelimb and tail regeneration in newts was about 1,2-1,7 fold higher both under conditions of real and physiological weightlessness as compared with controls. Faster S-phase entry under conditions of micro- g was demonstrated by cycling multipotent cells as well as by differentiated postmitotic cells both participated in regeneration. Important, that cycling cells outside areas of regeneration were also found as displayed faster cellular growth. In our papers (1,2,3,4) we offered some hypothesis that could explain mechanisms of low g stimulating effect upon cell growth in regeneration in Urodela. In particular, changes in expression of some growth factors and their receptors, as well as the synthesis of specific range of generalized stress proteins (AGSPs) were proposed. However, in fact, molecular mechanisms of micro- g effect upon cell proliferation are mediated by changes on organismic level induced by micro- g environment. Some of them which are able to trigger off signaling changes on the cellular level that, in turn, evoke cells to grow faster would be represented in our report. 1. Mitashov V. et al. Adv. Space Res. 1996. 17 (6/7): 241-255 2. Anton H.-J. et al. Adv. Space Res. 1996. 17 (6/7): 55-65 3. Grigoryan E. et al. Adv. Space Res. 1998. 22 (2): 293-301 4. Grigoryan E. et al. Adv. Space Res. 2002. 30 (4): 757-764

  11. Feasibility study of entrance and exit dose measurements at the contra lateral breast with alanine/electron spin resonance dosimetry in volumetric modulated radiotherapy of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Daniela M.; Hüttenrauch, Petra; Anton, Mathias; von Voigts-Rhetz, Philip; Zink, Klemens; Wolff, Hendrik A.

    2017-07-01

    The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt has established a secondary standard measurement system for the dose to water, D W, based on alanine/ESR (Anton et al 2013 Phys. Med. Biol. 58 3259-82). The aim of this study was to test the established measurement system for the out-of-field measurements of inpatients with breast cancer. A set of five alanine pellets were affixed to the skin of each patient at the contra lateral breast beginning at the sternum and extending over the mammilla to the distal surface. During 28 fractions with 2.2 Gy per fraction, the accumulated dose was measured in four patients. A cone beam computer tomography (CBCT) scan was generated for setup purposes before every treatment. The reference CT dataset was registered rigidly and deformably to the CBCT dataset for 28 fractions. To take the actual alanine pellet position into account, the dose distribution was calculated for every fraction using the Acuros XB algorithm. The results of the ESR measurements were compared to the calculated doses. The maximum dose measured at the sternum was 19.9 Gy  ±  0.4 Gy, decreasing to 6.8 Gy  ±  0.2 Gy at the mammilla and 4.5 Gy  ±  0.1 Gy at the distal surface of the contra lateral breast. The absolute differences between the calculated and measured doses ranged from  -1.9 Gy to 0.9 Gy. No systematic error could be seen. It was possible to achieve a combined standard uncertainty of 1.63% for D W  =  5 Gy for the measured dose. The alanine/ESR method is feasible for in vivo measurements.

  12. Rheological analysis of an effect of different deflocculants on the fly-ash slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnecki, K.; Bartosik, A.

    2014-08-01

    During the combustion of coal in the combined heat and power plant (CHP), a very large amount of combustion waste, called further as a fly-ash, is produced. It is typical that fly-ash appears during the combustion process of the fine coal and is transported by a pipeline with support of water as a carrier liquid to a pond storage site, where it is disposed. The pond is localized usually a few kilometers from the CHP, which makes it possible that decrease of friction in such a pipeline can result in energy savings of electricity needed for the pump and water needed as a carrier liquid. In the study an efficient method using a few deflocculants for reducing shear stress, and as a consequence viscosity, is demonstrated. The objective of the paper is to improve the efficiency of the hydrotransport of the fly-ash slurry by adding own designed additives. During the experiments a solids concentration by weight was determined from procured raw material in order to compute the real value occurring in industrial conditions. In addition, the analysis of the particle size distribution was conducted. The Anton Paar MCR 302 electronic rheometer was used to measure the dependence of shear stress and viscosity vs shear rate in the fly-ash existing in the CHP. Another part of the analysis was focused on the additives (deflocculants), to examine their influence on the reduction of the shear stress. The paper proves positive deflocculants impact on the rheological properties of the fly-ash slurry. The results of measurements are presented as figures and conclusions.

  13. Doctor Chekhov's doctors.

    PubMed

    Crommelynck, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Anton Chekhov (1860-1904) was both a writer and a doctor, as well as a patient. In spite of his literary success, he did not turn away from medicine until 1897, at the age of 37, when his tuberculosis became too serious. During his medical studies in Moscow, he wrote short stories, at night, under various pseudonyms to provide money for his family; all his life, Chekhov was his parents' financial support. It was Alexei Suvorin (1834-1912), the powerful director of Novoye Vremya (New Times), and the well-known writer Dimitry Grigorovich (1822-1899) who persuaded him that he had exceptional literary talent and requested him to abandon pseudonyms and sign his articles. So, for all his life, he practiced medicine as a district doctor and wrote plays and short stories. In each of his plays, except The Cherry Orchard, Chekhov introduced characters of doctors, principally Yevgeny Konstantinovich Lvov in Ivanov and Mikhail Lvovich Astrov in Uncle Vanya, as well as Khrushchev in The Wood Demon, Dorn in The Seagull, Tcheboutykin in The Three Sisters, and Triletski in Platonov. In his countless short stories, there are numerous doctors, for instance Professor Stepanovich (A Dreary Story), Doctors Kirilov (Enemies), Sobol (My Wife), Outchinnikov (An Inconvenience), Dymov (The Grasshopper), Startsvev (Ionitch), and others. Chekhov's main interest in psychiatry was clearly visible in The Nervous Breakdown, The Black Monk, The Man in a Case, A Doctor's Visit, and WardNo. 6 with Dr. Ragin. In his short stories as in his plays, Chekhov relied on his knowledge of provincial life; his doctor's characters were not professors, academicians, or Moscow's great physicians, but instead exhausted hard workers, with no effective diagnostic and therapeutic means, and poorly paid. Unlike himself, none of Chekhov's doctors was a writer or breadwinner, and Chekhov did not like to lay emphasis on the disease. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Volumetric behavior of the {CO2 (1) + C2H6 (2)} system in the subcritical (T = 293.15 K), critical, and supercritical (T = 308.15 K) regions.

    PubMed

    Gil, Laura; Martínez-López, José F; Artal, Manuela; Blanco, Sofía T; Muñoz Embid, José; Fernández, Javier; Otín, Santos; Velasco, Inmaculada

    2010-04-29

    The volumetric behavior for the {CO2 (1) + C2H6 (2)} system has been studied. Density measurements of {CO2 (1) + C2H6 (2)} binary mixtures at 293.15 and 308.15 K, at several pressures and compositions, and density measurements for infinitely dilute solutions at 304.21 and 308.15 K were carried out using an Anton Paar DMA 512-P vibrating-tube densimeter calibrated with the forced path mechanical calibration model. The mean relative standard deviation of density, s(rho)(r), was estimated to be better than 0.1%, and the uncertainties in temperature and pressure were estimated as +/-0.01 K and +/-0.001 MPa, respectively. In the experimental setup, an uncertainty in the mole fraction of u(x(j)) = +/-0.0015 has been achieved. Other properties related to P-rho-T-x data such as the compressibility factor, Z, excess molar volumes, V(m)(E), and partial molar volumes, V(i) and V(i)(infinity) have been calculated. The volumetric behavior has been compared with literature data and with that obtained from the PC-SAFT EoS rescaled parameters; these parameters have been obtained from our previous experimental values for the critical temperature and pressure of pure compounds. The value for the Krichevskii parameter, A(Kr), was obtained from the experimental density data for infinitely dilute solutions measured in this work, and it has been compared with that obtained from critical properties. Structural properties such as direct and total correlation function integrals and cluster size were calculated using the Krichevskii function concept.

  15. High temperature steady shear and oscillatory rheometry of basaltic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petford, N.; English, R.; Williams, R.; Rogers, N.

    2012-04-01

    There is a paucity of linear viscoelastic data on low viscosity (basaltic) silicate melts. We report here the initial results of a rheometrical characterisation (steady rotation, small angle oscillation) study on a geochemically well constrained aphyric basalt from Ethiopia (SiO2 48.51 wt.%, Mg# 0.44), in the temperature range 1200-1400 Celsius. Experiments were done using a recently developed commercial instrument (Anton Paar FRS 1600) and a wide gap Couette geometry. To the best of our knowledge these are the first reported silicate melt viscosity data obtained using small amplitude oscillatory shear and a rheometer with a high performance electrically commutated actuator. Results show that in the temperature range the system was very fluid, with the measured shear viscosity falling to ~ 2.3 Pa s at T = 1400 C. The melt exhibited a linear (Newtonian) response, with the shear viscosity remaining constant across two decades of deformation rate. As expected for a Newtonian fluid, the phase angle was 90 degrees across the entire range of angular frequencies studied. Correspondingly, the storage modulus (G') was zero and the loss modulus finite exhibiting a linear increase with frequency. The complex viscosity (oscillation) and shear viscosity (steady rotation) were equal in magnitude ('Cox-Merz' equivalence). These data are best interpreted in terms of a system with relatively low 'connectivity'/polymeric character and rapid relaxation dynamics, consistent with the mafic composition of the melt. As detailed compositional data are available the experimentally determined shear viscosity values are compared with those predicted from multicomponent chemical models in the literature. Discrepancies between the experimental and theoretical values are discussed.

  16. Reevaluating glyphosate as a transition-state inhibitor of EPSP synthase: identification of an EPSP synthase.EPSP.glyphosate ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Sammons, R D; Gruys, K J; Anderson, K S; Johnson, K A; Sikorski, J A

    1995-05-16

    Numerous studies have confirmed that glyphosate forms a tight ternary complex with EPSP synthase and shikimate 3-phosphate. It has been proposed [Anton, D., Hedstrom, L., Fish, S., & Abeles, R. (1983) Biochemistry 22, 5903-5908; Steinrücken, H. C., & Amrhein, N. (1984) Eur. J. Biochem. 143, 351-357] that in this complex glyphosate functions as a transition-state analog of the putative phosphoenolpyruvoyl oxonium ion. For this to be true, glyphosate must occupy the space in the enzyme active site that is normally associated with PEP and, through turnover, the carboxyvinyl group of the product EPSP. According to this model, one would predict that, in the reverse EPSP synthase reaction with EPSP and phosphate as substrates, there should be little if any interaction of glyphosate with enzyme or enzyme.substrate complexes. In contrast to this expectation, rapid gel filtration experiments provided direct evidence that glyphosate could be trapped on the enzyme in the presence of EPSP to form a ternary complex of EPSPS.EPSP.glyphosate. The experimentally determined stoichiometry for this complex, 0.62 equiv of glyphosate/mole of EPSPS, is similar to that found for the EPSPS.S3P.glyphosate ternary complex (0.66). This direct binding result was corroborated and quantitated by fluorescence titration experiments which demonstrated that glyphosate forms a reasonably tight (Kd = 56 +/- 1 microM) ternary complex with enzyme and EPSP. This finding was further verified, and its impact on substrate turnover analyzed, by steady-state kinetics. Glyphosate was found to be an uncompetitive inhibitor versus EPSP with Kii(app) = 54 +/- 2 microM.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Relative response of the alanine dosimeter to medium energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Anton, M; Büermann, L

    2015-08-07

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to kilovoltage x-rays with respect to the dose to water was measured, relative to the response to Co-60 radiation.Two series of x-ray qualities were investigated, one ranging from 30 kV to 100 kV tube voltage (TW series), the other one ranging from 70 kV to 280 kV (TH series). Due to the use of the water calorimeter as a primary standard, the uncertainty of the delivered dose is significantly lower than for other published data. The alanine response was measured as described in a previous publication (Anton et al 2013 Phys. Med. Biol. 58 3259-82). The uncertainty component due to the alanine measurement and analysis is ⩽0.4%, the major part of the combined uncertainty of the relative response originates from the uncertainty of the delivered dose. The relative uncertainties of the relative response vary from ⩽2% for the TW series to ⩽1.1% for the TH series.Different from the behaviour of the alanine dosimeter for megavoltage x-rays or electrons, the relative response drops significantly from unity for Co-60 radiation to less than 64% for the TW quality with a tube voltage of 30 kV. In order to reproduce this behaviour through Monte Carlo simulations, not only the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water has to be known, but also the intrinsic efficiency, i.e. the dependence of the number of free radicals generated per unit of absorbed dose on the photon energy. This quantity is not yet accessible for the TW series.For a possible use of the alanine dosimeter for kilovoltage x-rays, for example in electronic brachytherapy, users should rely on the measured data for the relative response which have become available with this publication.

  18. [Medical cybernetics in Czechoslovakia--the first steps].

    PubMed

    Wünsch, Z

    1998-09-01

    During fifties there were at most few tens of persons in this country who believed in the future of computers and cybernetics. One group of such enthusiasts, headed by Antonín Svoboda, was working at a construction of the first Czech computer SAPO. The other group tried to analyse, anticipate, and prepare in advance various applications for the new systemic conceptions and for the information processing machines. Members of both groups met for discussions which opened prospects to the future and influenced many of other activities for a long time. At the early sixties, the Czechoslovak Cybernetic Society was established at the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences and in 1962 the Main Problem Committee for the Medical Cybernetics was founded at the Department of Health. It coordinated majority of the research programmes in the medical cybernetics and informatics. In 1967-1969 the Committee prepared an extensive project of a medical information system (ZIS), but its accomplishment was finally blocked by the then authorities. However, interests for that topics kept growing and the new working places equipped with available computer technology were formed at the health and clinical centres. The first tentative lectures in medical cybernetics and biocybernetics at our faculty were introduced into the students curricula in the late sixties. Thematically, medical cybernetics subsequently differentiated into the medical informatics, simulations of biological and medical systems, and the biosignal analysis. The growing interest enabled to hold conferences since the middle of seventies, some of which were held periodically, sometimes with international participation. It is not possible in brevity to include the whole spectrum to those goal-directed activities nor to appraise adequately their future significance.

  19. PREFACE: 2nd International School and Conference Saint-Petersburg OPEN on Optoelectronics, Photonics, Engineering and Nanostructures (SPbOPEN2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-11-01

    The 2nd International School and Conference ''Saint Petersburg OPEN 2015'' on Optoelectronics, Photonics, Engineering and Nanostructures was held on April 6 - 8, 2015 at St. Petersburg Academic University. The School and Conference included a series of invited talks given by leading professors with the aim to introduce young scientists with actual problems and major advances in physics and technology. The keynote speakers were Mikhail V. Maximov (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, Russia) Vladimir G. Dubrovskii (St. Petersburg Academic University and St. Petersburg State University, Russia) Anton Yu. Egorov (JSC Connector Optics, Russia) Victor V. Luchinin (St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University, Russia) Vladislav E. Bugrov (St. Petersburg University of Internet Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Russia) Vitali A. Schukin (VI Systems, Germany) Yuri P. Svirko (University of Eastern Finland, Finland) During the poster session all undergraduate and graduate students attending the conference presented their works. A sufficiently large number of participants, with more than 170 student attendees from all over the world, allowed the Conference to provide a fertile ground for fruitful discussions between the young scientists as well as to become a perfect platform for valuable discussions between student authors and highly experienced scientists. The best student papers, which were selected by the Program Committee and by the invited speakers basing on the theses and their poster presentation, were awarded with diplomas of the conference - see the photos. This year ''Saint Petersburg OPEN 2015'' is organized by St. Petersburg Academic University in cooperation with Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University. The School and Conference is supported by Russian Science Foundation, SPIE (The International Society for Optics and Photonics), OSA (The Optical Society) and by Skolkovo Foundation. It is a continuation of the annual schools and seminars for

  20. The lost origin of chemical ecology in the late 19th century

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The origin of plant chemical ecology generally dates to the late 1950s, when evolutionary entomologists recognized the essential role of plant secondary metabolites in plant–insect interactions and suggested that plant chemical diversity evolved under the selection pressure of herbivory. However, similar ideas had already flourished for a short period during the second half of the 19th century but were largely forgotten by the turn of the century. This article presents the observations and studies of three protagonists of chemical ecology: Anton Kerner von Marilaun (1831–1898, Innsbruck, Austria, and Vienna, Austria), who mainly studied the impact of geological, climatic, and biotic factors on plant distribution and survival; Léo Errera (1858–1906, Brussels, Belgium), a plant physiologist who analyzed the localization of alkaloids in plant cells and tissues histochemically; and Ernst Stahl (1848–1919, Jena, Germany), likely the first experimental ecologist and who performed feeding studies with snails and slugs that demonstrated the essential role of secondary metabolites in plant protection against herbivores. All three, particularly Stahl, suggested that these “chemical defensive means” evolved in response to the relentless selection pressure of the heterotrophic community that surrounds plants. Although convincingly supported by observations and experiments, these ideas were forgotten until recently. Now, more than 100 years later, molecular analysis of the genes that control secondary metabolite production underscores just how correct Kerner von Marilaun, Errera, and, particularly, Stahl were in their view. Why their ideas were lost is likely a result of the adamant rejection of all things “teleological” by the physiologists who dominated biological research at the time. PMID:18218780

  1. Applications and Implications of Fractional Dynamics for Dielectric Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilfer, R.

    This article summarizes briefly the presentation given by the author at the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on "Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy and its Advanced Technological Applications", held in Perpignan, France, in September 2011. The purpose of the invited presentation at the workshop was to review and summarize the basic theory of fractional dynamics (Hilfer, Phys Rev E 48:2466, 1993; Hilfer and Anton, Phys Rev E Rapid Commun 51:R848, 1995; Hilfer, Fractals 3(1):211, 1995; Hilfer, Chaos Solitons Fractals 5:1475, 1995; Hilfer, Fractals 3:549, 1995; Hilfer, Physica A 221:89, 1995; Hilfer, On fractional diffusion and its relation with continuous time random walks. In: Pekalski et al. (eds) Anomalous diffusion: from basis to applications. Springer, Berlin, p 77, 1999; Hilfer, Fractional evolution equations and irreversibility. In: Helbing et al. (eds) Traffic and granular flow'99. Springer, Berlin, p 215, 2000; Hilfer, Fractional time evolution. In: Hilfer (ed) Applications of fractional calculus in physics. World Scientific, Singapore, p 87, 2000; Hilfer, Remarks on fractional time. In: Castell and Ischebeck (eds) Time, quantum and information. Springer, Berlin, p 235, 2003; Hilfer, Physica A 329:35, 2003; Hilfer, Threefold introduction to fractional derivatives. In: Klages et al. (eds) Anomalous transport: foundations and applications. Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, pp 17-74, 2008; Hilfer, Foundations of fractional dynamics: a short account. In: Klafter et al. (eds) Fractional dynamics: recent advances. World Scientific, Singapore, p 207, 2011) and demonstrate its relevance and application to broadband dielectric spectroscopy (Hilfer, J Phys Condens Matter 14:2297, 2002; Hilfer, Chem Phys 284:399, 2002; Hilfer, Fractals 11:251, 2003; Hilfer et al., Fractional Calc Appl Anal 12:299, 2009). It was argued, that broadband dielectric spectroscopy might be useful to test effective field theories based on fractional dynamics.

  2. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic investigation of cyclodextrin-mediated asenapine maleate in situ nasal gel for improved bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Juilee A; Avachat, Amelia M

    2017-02-01

    Asenapine maleate (AM) is used in the treatment of schizophrenia. Its oral and sublingual bioavailability is <2% and 35%, respectively, due to first pass metabolism and poor solubility. To avoid first pass metabolism and to enhance solubility at all nasal pH conditions, thermo-responsive in situ nasal gel containing asenapine maleate-hydroxyl propyl β cyclodextrin inclusion complex (AM-HPβCD) was prepared in the present study. Inclusion complex (1:1 molar ratio) was characterized using UV spectroscopy, FITR and XRD techniques. Selected formulation (F8b) contained a thermo-sensitive polymer poloxamer 407 which formed gel at 23%w/v concentration and a mucoadhesive polymer PVP K 30 (0.3%w/v) in temperature range of 29-34 °c. It was analyzed for pH, clarity, gelation temperature, mucoadhesive strength, gel strength and rheological parameters using Anton paar compact rheometer. This formulation was subjected to in vitro drug diffusion study using the Franz diffusion cell. Maximum % drug diffusion was obtained at the end of 120 min (99.1 ± 0.44%w/v). Dissolution in simulated nasal fluid was 92.33 ± 0.15%w/v at the end of 120 min. Locomotor activity was improved with nasal gel containing AM-HPβCD as compared to AM and AM-HPβCD oral solution in rats. Cmax for nasal gel was found to be more (9 ng/ml) as compared to AM-HPβCD (5.5 ng/mL) and oral standard solution (2 ng/ml). Tmax was found to be 1.5 h. AUC and thus bioavailability in rats by nasal route was increased by 2.5 fold.

  3. PREFACE: Eurotherm Seminar 102: Thermal Management of Electronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punch, J.; Walsh, E.

    2014-07-01

    About EUROTHERM The aim of the EUROTHERM Committee (www.eurothermcommittee.eu) is to promote and foster European cooperation in Thermal Sciences and Heat Transfer by gathering together scientists and engineers working in specialized areas. The Committee consists of members representing and appointed by national bodies in the EU countries. The current President of EUROTHERM is Professor Anton van Steenhoven from the University of Eindhoven (The Netherlands). The Committee organizes and coordinates European scientific events such as the EUROTHERM Seminars (about 4 per year) and the European Thermal Sciences Conference (every 4 years). About EUROTHERM Seminar 102 (www.eurothermseminar102.com) This seminar, part of the long-running series of European seminars on the thermal sciences, took place in June 2014 at the University of Limerick in Limerick, Ireland. The seminar addressed the topic of 'Thermal Management of Electronic Systems', a critical contemporary application area which represents a vibrant challenge for practitioners of the thermal sciences. We convey special thanks to the reviewers who have evaluated these papers. We also thank the scientific committee, consisting of internationally recognized experts. Their role has been to manage the evaluation of abstracts and the papers selection process as co-coordinators for specific topics. This seminar was hosted by the Stokes Institute at the University of Limerick. It could not have been organized without the efficient help of our administrators and technicians for IT support. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 27 articles presented at the seminar. Dr. Jeff Punch, Chair Stokes Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland Email: jeff.punch@ul.ie Prof. Edmond Walsh, Co-Chair Associate Professor, Osney Laboratories, Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, UK Email: edmond.walsh@bnc.ox.ac.uk

  4. Modeling and Assessing Insect Disturbance on Boreal Forests in the Krasnoyarsk region of Russia by Employing the FAREAST Gap Model and Local Forest Inventory and Disturbance Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erler, A. E.; Shuman, J. K.; Soukhavolosky, V.; Kovalev, A.; Stevens, T.; Shugart, H. H.

    2008-12-01

    FAREAST: an individual-based forest dynamics model was initially developed to simulate the forested region around Changbai Mountain in northern China. In recent years the model has been expanded across Siberia. The model output for biomass (tCha-1) has been verified against forest inventory data for a number of sites across Russia. With this success, an additional module for the model was written by Anton Kovalev to predict the impact of insect disturbance on the Boreal forests. This model predicts the probability of an insect outbreak occurring, and then, by assessing each individual tree in a modeled stand, predicts whether a tree will be killed as a result of insect predation. From this, a disturbance index is calculated that includes lost biomass as a result of insect disturbance and subsequent species composition. This disturbance "fingerprint" is being compared to forest inventory and insect disturbance data from the Usolsky forests in the Krasnoyarsk region of central Siberia. Silkworm disturbance is expressed in this geo- database as a percentage of trees damaged or killed in a stand. The forest inventory data allows us to calculate a biomass estimate that will be compared to the biomass outputs generated by the model post insect disturbance. The validation of simulated biomass with independent inventory data confirms that FAREAST is a robust model of Russian forest dynamics. Effective validation of the insect disturbance model will allow us to generate a more complete picture of the changing ecology of the Siberian Boreal landscape. The economic cost of lumber lost as a result of Silkworm damage has been enormous, if verified, FAREAST will afford us the opportunity to estimate the extent of that loss and predict the changing ecological dynamics of the Boreal forest system under the worlds evolving climate.

  5. Participation of D.O. Muhleman as a Co-Investigator on the Mars Observer Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, Duane O.

    2004-01-01

    The Co-I has been a principle member of the MOLA Team since the beginning of the Mars Observer Project and the MOLA Team formation. The basic area of research for the Co-I involved the interactions of the MOLA laser beam with the Mars atmosphere, ice fields and surface in general. The Co-I was assisted by one graduate student, and later a research assistant, Anton Ivanov, throughout the reporting period. Dr. Ivanov received a PhD from Caltech in 2000 from research involving the MOLA project. Dr. Ivanov continued with the MOLA project after receiving his degree as a research assistant to Professor Muhleman. Most of the funding from this grant was used to support Dr. Ivanov during the later years. The primary results of these investigations included the measurement of Mars atmospheric opacity at the 1 micron wavelength of the laser, the effects of dust within the craters and canyons of Mars, and a detailed study of the North Polar Ice Cap in terms of ice sublimation and the current structure of that ice cap. We were able to show that the sublimation of the ice on the polar cap would create the current average shape of the norther cap. Extensive data collection and study were made of the Mars surface 1 micron reflectivity until the laser mechanically failed during the reporting period. Reflectivity maps of Mars were produced although there were serious problems of the laser echo signal strength calibration. After that event the efforts were mainly to complete the older investigations. All of the work supported by this grant was theoretical in nature and did not lead to any patents.

  6. Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Lipid Mixing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of membranes are often hindered by the slow lateral diffusion of lipids and the limited time scale of MD. In order to study the dynamics of mixing and characterize the lateral distribution of lipids in converged mixtures, we report microsecond-long all-atom MD simulations performed on the special-purpose machine Anton. Two types of mixed bilayers, POPE:POPG (3:1) and POPC:cholesterol (2:1), as well as a pure POPC bilayer, were each simulated for up to 2 μs. These simulations show that POPE:POPG and POPC:cholesterol are each fully miscible at the simulated conditions, with the final states of the mixed bilayers similar to a random mixture. By simulating three POPE:POPG bilayers at different NaCl concentrations (0, 0.15, and 1 M), we also examined the effect of salt concentration on lipid mixing. While an increase in NaCl concentration is shown to affect the area per lipid, tail order, and lipid lateral diffusion, the final states of mixing remain unaltered, which is explained by the largely uniform increase in Na+ ions around POPE and POPG. Direct measurement of water permeation reveals that the POPE:POPG bilayer with 1 M NaCl has reduced water permeability compared with those at zero or low salt concentration. Our calculations provide a benchmark to estimate the convergence time scale of all-atom MD simulations of lipid mixing. Additionally, equilibrated structures of POPE:POPG and POPC:cholesterol, which are frequently used to mimic bacterial and mammalian membranes, respectively, can be used as starting points of simulations involving these membranes. PMID:25237736

  7. Predictors of Abstinence from Heavy Drinking During Treatment in COMBINE and External Validation in PREDICT

    PubMed Central

    Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Wu, Ran; O'Connor, Patrick G; Weisner, Constance; Fucito, Lisa M.; Hoffmann, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of the current study was to use tree-based methods (Zhang and Singer, 2010) to identify predictors of abstinence from heavy drinking in COMBINE (Anton et al., 2006), the largest study of pharmacotherapy for alcoholism in the United States to date, and to validate these results in PREDICT (Mann et al., 2012), a parallel study conducted in Germany. Methods We compared a classification tree constructed according to purely statistical criteria to a tree constructed according to a combination of statistical criteria and clinical considerations for prediction of no heavy drinking during treatment in COMBINE. We considered over one-hundred baseline predictors. The tree approach was compared to logistic regression. The trees and a deterministic forest identified the most important predictors of no heavy drinking for direct testing in PREDICT. Results The tree built using both clinical and statistical considerations consisted of four splits based on consecutive days of abstinence (CDA) prior to randomization, age, family history of alcoholism (FHAlc) and confidence to resist drinking in response to withdrawal and urges. The tree based on statistical considerations with four splits also split on CDA and age but also on GGT level and drinking goal. Deterministic forest identified CDA, age and drinking goal as the most important predictors. Backward elimination logistic regression among the top 18 predictors identified in the deterministic forest analyses identified only age and CDA as significant main effects. Longer CDA and goal of complete abstinence were associated with better outcomes in both data sets. Conclusions The most reliable predictors of abstinence from heavy drinking were CDA and drinking goal. Trees provide binary decision rules and straightforward graphical representations for identification of subgroups based on response and may be easier to implement in clinical settings. PMID:25346505

  8. Participation of D.O. Muhleman as a Co-Investigator on the Mars Observer Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, Duane O.

    2004-01-01

    The Co-I has been a principle member of the MOLA Team since the beginning of the Mars Observer Project and the MOLA Team formation. The basic area of research for the Co-I involved the interactions of the MOLA laser beam with the Mars atmosphere, ice fields and surface in general. The Co-I was assisted by one graduate student, and later a research assistant, Anton Ivanov, throughout the reporting period. Dr. Ivanov received a PhD from Caltech in 2000 from research involving the MOLA project. Dr. Ivanov continued with the MOLA project after receiving his degree as a research assistant to Professor Muhleman. Most of the funding from this grant was used to support Dr. Ivanov during the later years. The primary results of these investigations included the measurement of Mars atmospheric opacity at the 1 micron wavelength of the laser, the effects of dust within the craters and canyons of Mars, and a detailed study of the North Polar Ice Cap in terms of ice sublimation and the current structure of that ice cap. We were able to show that the sublimation of the ice on the polar cap would create the current average shape of the norther cap. Extensive data collection and study were made of the Mars surface 1 micron reflectivity until the laser mechanically failed during the reporting period. Reflectivity maps of Mars were produced although there were serious problems of the laser echo signal strength calibration. After that event the efforts were mainly to complete the older investigations. All of the work supported by this grant was theoretical in nature and did not lead to any patents.

  9. [Idiopathic facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Wolf, S R

    1998-09-01

    Although acute idiopathic facial paresis is often labelled "Bell's palsy", historical studies show that Nicolaus Anton Friedreich (1761-1836) from Würzburg was the first physician to describe the typical symptoms of the disorder in 1797, approximately 24 years prior to the paper published by Sir Charles Bell. Diagnostics has now improved to the extent that acute idiopathic facial palsy can more frequently be assigned to etiologies caused by inflammatory disorders. Herpes simplex virus type I and Borrelia burgdorferi are particularly relevant. Underestimation of the degree of paresis is, particularly in children, a drawback of the clinical examination. "Incomplete eyelid closure" is not a reliable indicator of remaining nerve function. For this reason complete electromyography (EMG) is recommended in all cases of severe facial paresis. Since electroneurography does not reliably reflect the degree of denervation present, needle EMG is preferred. The therapy of the facial palsy of unclear etiology is still not well defined. Nevertheless, we recommend that a combined treatment should be used early, at least in patients with disfiguring pareses. Combinations may consist of cortisone, virostatic agents and hemorrheologic substances and possibly antibiotics. Surgical decompression of the facial nerve remains controversial, since positive surgical results lack statistical support. Individual instructions for facial exercises, massage and muscle relaxation can support rehabilitation and possibly reduce the production of pathological synkinesia. Electrical stimulation should not be used. There are a number of possibilities available to reduce the effects of misdirected reinnervation, especially the use of botulinum-A-toxin. However, intensive diagnosis and therapy in the early phase of paresis are decisive in obtaining a favorable outcome. Further refinements in rehabilitation and comparative multicenter controlled studies are still required for future improvements in

  10. Neurological surgery at the University of Vienna.

    PubMed

    Koos, W T; Day, J D

    1996-09-01

    ANTON VON EISELSBERG was the first to resect a cerebral tumor at the First Surgical Clinic at the General Hospital in Vienna in 1904. He successfully removed a cerebral glioma, the first of no fewer than 15,000 tumors operated on at that hospital to date. von Eiselsberg and his successors, Egon Ranzi and Leopold Schönbauer, as heads of the First Surgical Clinic, devoted themselves intensively to brain surgery, and neurosurgery developed to be an integral part of Viennese surgery. During the first decades, a prominent neurologist, Otto Marburg, and a world-famous anatomist, Julius Tandler, were members of the neurosurgical operating team. This approach changed in the 1950s, when the brain surgeons aimed at becoming independent of the basic sciences. The founding of an independent neurosurgical department at the University of Vienna in 1964 under Herbert Kraus also marked the beginning of the formation of specialized sections for pediatric and stereotactic neurosurgery. After 1968, the operating microscope was greatly emphasized. As of 1970, cerebral tumors and cerebrovascular lesions were treated microneurosurgically. Many operations were performed by surgeons who were experienced in neurosurgery. This again changed in 1978 under the new head of the department, Wolfgang Koos, who regarded the neurosciences as the basis for neurosurgical training as well as neurosurgical activity. The reorganization of the neurosurgical institution coincided with the construction of a large modern building with state-of-the-art equipment for microneurosurgery, radiosurgery (gamma knife), neurodiagnostics, laboratories, etc. Many details of the construction plans, the equipment, and the organization of the department have their roots in the years that the present head of the department spent in the United States; this is also the reason for the close connection and cooperation of Vienna neurosurgery with many neurosurgeons in the United States.

  11. Quantitative comparisons of numerical models of brittle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, S.

    2009-04-01

    Numerical modelling of brittle deformation in the uppermost crust can be challenging owing to the requirement of an accurate pressure calculation, the ability to achieve post-yield deformation and localisation, and the choice of rheology (plasticity law). One way to approach these issues is to conduct model comparisons that can evaluate the effects of different implementations of brittle behaviour in crustal deformation models. We present a comparison of three brittle shortening experiments for fourteen different numerical codes, which use finite element, finite difference, boundary element and distinct element techniques. Our aim is to constrain and quantify the variability among models in order to improve our understanding of causes leading to differences between model results. Our first experiment of translation of a stable sand-like wedge serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions (e.g., taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work). The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge in a sandbox-like setup which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. All models accommodate shortening by in-sequence formation of forward shear zones. We analyse the location, dip angle and spacing of thrusts in detail as previous comparisons have shown that these can be highly variable in numerical and analogue models of crustal shortening and extension. We find that an accurate implementation of boundary friction is important for our models. Our results are encouraging in the overall agreement in their dynamic evolution, but show at the same time the effort that is needed to understand shear zone evolution. GeoMod2008 Team: Markus Albertz, Michele Cooke, Susan Ellis, Taras Gerya, Luke Hodkinson, Kristin Hughes, Katrin Huhn, Boris Kaus, Walter Landry, Bertrand Maillot, Christophe Pascal, Anton Popov, Guido Schreurs, Christopher Beaumont, Tony Crook, Mario Del Castello and Yves Leroy

  12. Energy landscape of LeuT from molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gur, Mert; Zomot, Elia; Cheng, Mary Hongying; Bahar, Ivet

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial sodium-coupled leucine transporter (LeuT) has been broadly used as a structural model for understanding the structure-dynamics-function of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters as well as other solute carriers that share the same fold (LeuT fold), as the first member of the family crystallographically resolved in multiple states: outward-facing open, outward-facing occluded, and inward-facing open. Yet, a complete picture of the energy landscape of (sub)states visited along the LeuT transport cycle has been elusive. In an attempt to visualize the conformational spectrum of LeuT, we performed extensive simulations of LeuT dimer dynamics in the presence of substrate (Ala or Leu) and co-transported Na+ ions, in explicit membrane and water. We used both conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (with Anton supercomputing machine) and a recently introduced method, collective MD, that takes advantage of collective modes of motions predicted by the anisotropic network model. Free energy landscapes constructed based on ˜40 μs trajectories reveal multiple substates occluded to the extracellular (EC) and/or intracellular (IC) media, varying in the levels of exposure of LeuT to EC or IC vestibules. The IC-facing transmembrane (TM) helical segment TM1a shows an opening, albeit to a smaller extent and in a slightly different direction than that observed in the inward-facing open crystal structure. The study provides insights into the spectrum of conformational substates and paths accessible to LeuT and highlights the differences between Ala- and Leu-bound substates.

  13. On behalf of tradition: An analysis of medical student and physician beliefs on how anatomy should be taught.

    PubMed

    Marom, Assaf; Tarrasch, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    ." -From "A Boring Story: From the Notebook of an Old Man" by Anton Chekhov. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. PREFACE: 6th European Thermal Sciences Conference (Eurotherm 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Daniel; Le Niliot, Christophe

    2012-11-01

    About EUROTHERM The aim of the EUROTHERM Committee (www.eurothermcommittee.eu) is to promote and foster European cooperation in Thermal Sciences and Heat Transfer by gathering together scientists and engineers working in specialized areas. The Committee consists of members representing and appointed by national bodies in the EU countries. The current President of EUROTHERM is Professor Anton van Steenhoven from the University of Eindhoven (The Netherlands). The Committee organizes and coordinates European scientific events such as the EUROTHERM Seminars (about 4 per year) and the European Thermal Sciences Conference (every 4 years). About the conference This sixth in the series of European Thermal Sciences Conferences (www.eurotherm2012.com) took place in France, in the Conference Centre of Poitiers, Futuroscope. We address special thanks to the 225 reviewers, coming from different European countries, who have evaluated these papers. We also thank the scientific committee, consisting of some EUROTHERM Committee members together with other internationally recognized experts. Their role has been to manage the evaluation of abstracts and the papers selection process as co-coordinators for specific topics. This conference is the joint effort of two laboratories: the PPRIME Institute in Poitiers and the IUSTI laboratory in Marseille. It could not be organized without the efficient help of our secretaries and our technician for the IT support. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 180 articles presented at the conference. Professor Daniel PETIT Chairman, PPRIME Poitiers, France Institut P'(UPR CNRS 3346) ENSMA 1 av. Clément Ader - BP40109 86961 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil France daniel.petit@ensma.fr Professor Christophe LE NILIOT Co-chairman, IUSTI Marseille, France Laboratoire IUSTI UMR CNRS 6595 Technopôle de Chateau-Gombert 5, rue Enrico Fermi 13 453 MARSEILLE CEDEX 13 France christophe.leniliot@polytech.univ-mrs.fr

  15. The lost origin of chemical ecology in the late 19th century.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Thomas

    2008-03-25

    The origin of plant chemical ecology generally dates to the late 1950s, when evolutionary entomologists recognized the essential role of plant secondary metabolites in plant-insect interactions and suggested that plant chemical diversity evolved under the selection pressure of herbivory. However, similar ideas had already flourished for a short period during the second half of the 19th century but were largely forgotten by the turn of the century. This article presents the observations and studies of three protagonists of chemical ecology: Anton Kerner von Marilaun (1831-1898, Innsbruck, Austria, and Vienna, Austria), who mainly studied the impact of geological, climatic, and biotic factors on plant distribution and survival; Léo Errera (1858-1906, Brussels, Belgium), a plant physiologist who analyzed the localization of alkaloids in plant cells and tissues histochemically; and Ernst Stahl (1848-1919, Jena, Germany), likely the first experimental ecologist and who performed feeding studies with snails and slugs that demonstrated the essential role of secondary metabolites in plant protection against herbivores. All three, particularly Stahl, suggested that these "chemical defensive means" evolved in response to the relentless selection pressure of the heterotrophic community that surrounds plants. Although convincingly supported by observations and experiments, these ideas were forgotten until recently. Now, more than 100 years later, molecular analysis of the genes that control secondary metabolite production underscores just how correct Kerner von Marilaun, Errera, and, particularly, Stahl were in their view. Why their ideas were lost is likely a result of the adamant rejection of all things "teleological" by the physiologists who dominated biological research at the time.

  16. Psychoanalytic listening II.

    PubMed

    Chessick, R D

    1985-01-01

    This paper employs a rhetorical form designed to clarify and sharpen the focus of the very special stance required--which must be painstakingly learned under careful supervision--in order to effectively tune in to communications coming from the unconscious of the patient. This is the hardest task that must be mastered to become truly empathic and sensitive in dyadic relationships, a unique expertise that marks the psychiatrist as a genuine specialist in medical practice. Regardless of theoretical orientation, neither the form or content of any therapeutic intervention can be appropriate unless it is empathically based. Clinical vignettes illustrate the lack of such empathy, and readings are suggested that enhance our approach to learning this skill, borrowing especially from Kohut and Bion. The great importance of the often ignored "background" of the patient's communication is emphasized, and is illustrated from the field of music in the work of John Cage and Anton Webern. The congruence between this clinical psychiatric problem and the main thrust of Continental philosophy, which attempts to put man back in touch with himself, is described. Suggestions are offered to supervisors how to develop these skills in the novice. Finally, a discussion is presented of the effect on the professional and personal life of the therapist who has not developed these skills, emphasizing the dangers of "burn-out" in therapists and the implicit philosophy of life in a money-oriented practice of psychotherapy. The dangers of not attending to such matters even during residency training are pointed out, in an attempt to raise the consciousness level of the therapist to the extreme importance of background practices both in the patient and the therapist.

  17. Changes in visual and sensory-motor resting-state functional connectivity support motor learning by observing

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Heather R.

    2015-01-01

    Motor learning occurs not only through direct first-hand experience but also through observation (Mattar AA, Gribble PL. Neuron 46: 153–160, 2005). When observing the actions of others, we activate many of the same brain regions involved in performing those actions ourselves (Malfait N, Valyear KF, Culham JC, Anton JL, Brown LE, Gribble PL. J Cogn Neurosci 22: 1493–1503, 2010). Links between neural systems for vision and action have been reported in neurophysiological (Strafella AP, Paus T. Neuroreport 11: 2289–2292, 2000; Watkins KE, Strafella AP, Paus T. Neuropsychologia 41: 989–994, 2003), brain imaging (Buccino G, Binkofski F, Fink GR, Fadiga L, Fogassi L, Gallese V, Seitz RJ, Zilles K, Rizzolatti G, Freund HJ. Eur J Neurosci 13: 400–404, 2001; Iacoboni M, Woods RP, Brass M, Bekkering H, Mazziotta JC, Rizzolatti G. Science 286: 2526–2528, 1999), and eye tracking (Flanagan JR, Johansson RS. Nature 424: 769–771, 2003) studies. Here we used a force field learning paradigm coupled with resting-state fMRI to investigate the brain areas involved in motor learning by observing. We examined changes in resting-state functional connectivity (FC) after an observational learning task and found a network consisting of V5/MT, cerebellum, and primary motor and somatosensory cortices in which changes in FC were correlated with the amount of motor learning achieved through observation, as assessed behaviorally after resting-state fMRI scans. The observed FC changes in this network are not due to visual attention to motion or observation of movement errors but rather are specifically linked to motor learning. These results support the idea that brain networks linking action observation and motor control also facilitate motor learning. PMID:25995349

  18. Changes in visual and sensory-motor resting-state functional connectivity support motor learning by observing.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Heather R; Gribble, Paul L

    2015-07-01

    Motor learning occurs not only through direct first-hand experience but also through observation (Mattar AA, Gribble PL. Neuron 46: 153-160, 2005). When observing the actions of others, we activate many of the same brain regions involved in performing those actions ourselves (Malfait N, Valyear KF, Culham JC, Anton JL, Brown LE, Gribble PL. J Cogn Neurosci 22: 1493-1503, 2010). Links between neural systems for vision and action have been reported in neurophysiological (Strafella AP, Paus T. Neuroreport 11: 2289-2292, 2000; Watkins KE, Strafella AP, Paus T. Neuropsychologia 41: 989-994, 2003), brain imaging (Buccino G, Binkofski F, Fink GR, Fadiga L, Fogassi L, Gallese V, Seitz RJ, Zilles K, Rizzolatti G, Freund HJ. Eur J Neurosci 13: 400-404, 2001; Iacoboni M, Woods RP, Brass M, Bekkering H, Mazziotta JC, Rizzolatti G. Science 286: 2526-2528, 1999), and eye tracking (Flanagan JR, Johansson RS. Nature 424: 769-771, 2003) studies. Here we used a force field learning paradigm coupled with resting-state fMRI to investigate the brain areas involved in motor learning by observing. We examined changes in resting-state functional connectivity (FC) after an observational learning task and found a network consisting of V5/MT, cerebellum, and primary motor and somatosensory cortices in which changes in FC were correlated with the amount of motor learning achieved through observation, as assessed behaviorally after resting-state fMRI scans. The observed FC changes in this network are not due to visual attention to motion or observation of movement errors but rather are specifically linked to motor learning. These results support the idea that brain networks linking action observation and motor control also facilitate motor learning. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. The Works of Henry Moseley, 1887-1915

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scerri, Eric

    2013-04-01

    In 1913 Henry Moseley, an unknown young English physicist published an article in the Philosophical Magazine under the title of ``The High Frequency Spectra of the Elements.'' The 10-page article was to have far reaching implications in both chemistry and physics and helped to resolve a major conundrum in the periodic table of the elements. The talk will briefly examine the life and work of Moseley who died tragically while fighting in the trenches of World War I in 1915. The build-up to the discovery of atomic number took several different avenues including contributions from Rutherford and Barkla. However the more direct motivation for Moseley's work, as he readily acknowledged, were the articles of an unknown Dutch econometrician Anton Van den Broek who attempted to improve on Mendeleev's periodic table. Moseley began as a student of Rutherford at Manchester and took a keen interest in the development of research using X-rays following the work of Roentgen, von Laue and Bragg. Although Rutherford was at first reluctant to enter this new field he soon yielded to young Moseley's request and sent him to Leeds for brief training with Bragg. On returning to Manchester, Moseley devised an ingenious apparatus in which a set of metal samples could be rotated so as to become the target for a beam of electrons in order to measure the frequencies of the emitted K X-rays. The first set of such experiments used nine successive elements in the periodic table, from titanium to zinc. Moseley's now immense fame rests with the results of this study as well as a subsequent one which extended the study into a further 30 elements, in addition to the use that his method was put to by himself as well as subsequent chemists and physicists.

  20. Energy landscape of LeuT from molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Gur, Mert; Zomot, Elia; Cheng, Mary Hongying; Bahar, Ivet

    2015-12-28

    The bacterial sodium-coupled leucine transporter (LeuT) has been broadly used as a structural model for understanding the structure-dynamics-function of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters as well as other solute carriers that share the same fold (LeuT fold), as the first member of the family crystallographically resolved in multiple states: outward-facing open, outward-facing occluded, and inward-facing open. Yet, a complete picture of the energy landscape of (sub)states visited along the LeuT transport cycle has been elusive. In an attempt to visualize the conformational spectrum of LeuT, we performed extensive simulations of LeuT dimer dynamics in the presence of substrate (Ala or Leu) and co-transported Na(+) ions, in explicit membrane and water. We used both conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (with Anton supercomputing machine) and a recently introduced method, collective MD, that takes advantage of collective modes of motions predicted by the anisotropic network model. Free energy landscapes constructed based on ∼40 μs trajectories reveal multiple substates occluded to the extracellular (EC) and/or intracellular (IC) media, varying in the levels of exposure of LeuT to EC or IC vestibules. The IC-facing transmembrane (TM) helical segment TM1a shows an opening, albeit to a smaller extent and in a slightly different direction than that observed in the inward-facing open crystal structure. The study provides insights into the spectrum of conformational substates and paths accessible to LeuT and highlights the differences between Ala- and Leu-bound substates.

  1. Energy landscape of LeuT from molecular simulations

    PubMed Central

    Gur, Mert; Zomot, Elia; Cheng, Mary Hongying; Bahar, Ivet

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial sodium-coupled leucine transporter (LeuT) has been broadly used as a structural model for understanding the structure-dynamics-function of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters as well as other solute carriers that share the same fold (LeuT fold), as the first member of the family crystallographically resolved in multiple states: outward-facing open, outward-facing occluded, and inward-facing open. Yet, a complete picture of the energy landscape of (sub)states visited along the LeuT transport cycle has been elusive. In an attempt to visualize the conformational spectrum of LeuT, we performed extensive simulations of LeuT dimer dynamics in the presence of substrate (Ala or Leu) and co-transported Na+ ions, in explicit membrane and water. We used both conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (with Anton supercomputing machine) and a recently introduced method, collective MD, that takes advantage of collective modes of motions predicted by the anisotropic network model. Free energy landscapes constructed based on ∼40 μs trajectories reveal multiple substates occluded to the extracellular (EC) and/or intracellular (IC) media, varying in the levels of exposure of LeuT to EC or IC vestibules. The IC-facing transmembrane (TM) helical segment TM1a shows an opening, albeit to a smaller extent and in a slightly different direction than that observed in the inward-facing open crystal structure. The study provides insights into the spectrum of conformational substates and paths accessible to LeuT and highlights the differences between Ala- and Leu-bound substates. PMID:26723619

  2. Observations of V420 Aur (HD 34921) needed to support spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2016-10-01

    Marcella Wijngaarden and Kelly Gourdji (graduate students at the University of Amsterdam/Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy) have requested AAVSO observers' assistance in providing optical photometry of V420 Aur in support of their high-resolution spectroscopy with the Mercator telescope + Hermes spectrograph in La Palma 2016 October 7 through 17. They write: "[V420 Aur (HD 34921) is] the optical Be star that is part of a peculiar High Mass X-ray Binary...[that exhibits highly] complex and variable spectra...it is difficult to construct a physical model of this HMXB system, though based on these observations, the system is thought to contain a B[e] star with a dense plasma region, an accretion disk around a neutron star, a shell and circumstellar regions of cold dust. It has been over a decade since the last spectra were taken, and, given the highly variable nature of this star, we expect new observations to yield new information that will contribute to a better understanding of this system." Observations in BVRI (preferred over other bands) are requested beginning immediately and continuing through October 24. In all cases, timeseries in a few bands (i.e. BVRI) are preferred over single/a few observations in the other bands as it is the variability on relatively short timescales that is most important. "The target is bright so exposures should be long enough to reach good signal to noise in order to see the small variability amplitude but without saturating the target/comparison stars. We will study the variability on several timescales, so observations starting from a few per night to high cadence timeseries are useful." Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (https://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  3. Hydroxyl Radical Regeneration in Isoprene Oxidation: the Upgraded Mechanism LIM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, J.; Nguyen, S.; Nguyen, T.; Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Measured hydroxyl radical concentrations in isoprene-rich areas are much higher than predicted by existing chemical models, to the extent that the global oxidizing capacity of our atmosphere should be significantly revised upwards. The OH regeneration that clearly occurs in isoprene oxidation at low/moderate NO is attributed in the Leuven Isoprene Mechanism to novel, theoretically characterized chemical pathways (LIM0: Peeters et al. 2009; Peeters and Muller 2010). The key new features of LIM0 are (i) thermal equilibration of the labile beta-OH- and delta-OH-isoprenylperoxy isomers; (ii) 1,6-H shift isomerisation of the Z-delta-OH-peroxy isomers to yield hydroperoxy-methyl-butenals (HPALDs); (iii) fast photolysis of the HPALDs resulting overall in several OH radicals per HPALD. The OH-regeneration through photolabile HPALDs has recently found experimental support, but the peroxy isomerisation rate, HPALD yield and the extent of OH recycling are still uncertain (Crounse et al. 2011; Wolfe et al. 2012). In this work, the upgraded LIM1 mechanism is presented. Based on better levels of theory, the crucial equilibrium ratio of the isomerising Z-delta-OH-peroxys over the majority beta-OH-isoprenylperoxys had to be reduced by a factor of about 5 compared to LIM0, while the isomerisation rate of the Z-delta-OH-peroxys adopted from Taraborrelli et al. (2012) is about 3 times lower than in LIM0. The chemistry following the 1,6-H shift of the Z-delta-OH-peroxys is much expanded and extended. Firstly, LIM1 introduces other pathways beside HPALD formation following the Z-delta-OH-peroxy isomerisation, resulting likewise in OH recycling. This, together with the revised Z-delta-OH- equilibrium and isomerisation data above, affords a close model-reproduction of the HPALD and other product yields observed by Crounse et al. (2011). Secondly, LIM1 proposes new fast reactions of HO2 with the alpha-oxoketene products from the peroxy isomerisation routes; these reactions are shown to

  4. Hydrophysical and hydrochemical features of Lake Issyk-Kul (Kyrgyzstan) as revealed by field survey of June, 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavialov, Peter; Makkaveev, Petr; Rimskiy-Korsakov, Nikolay; Alymkulov, Salmor; Izhitskiy, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    cycle. However, the vertical profiles of dissolved oxygen indicated that the most intense photosynthetic activity took place in the intermediate layers, while in the surface layer it was suppressed, hypothetically, by excessive insolation. The ionic salt content of the Issyk-Kul waters was essentially uniform throughout the water column, which points towards efficient mixing in the cold period. In summer season, temperature stratification was sufficiently strong to provide for significant reduction of dissolved oxygen and increase of nutrients in the bottom layer. Samples collected and analyzed for dissolved methane generally yielded low concentrations below 0.5 μl/l at the surface and 0.2 μl/l in the bottom layer, however, values as high as to 3.9 μl/l were documented in some samples corresponding to near-shore stations at depths of about 70 m. We also used a towed side-looking sonar to obtain detailed maps of bathymetric features, including the channels formed by ancient beds of the Tyup and the Dzhergalan Rivers. These channels are believed to represent important pathways for ventilated water and terrigenic substances penetrating into the deep central part of the lake following seasonal differential cooling on the eastern shelf (Peeters et al., 2003). Quantitative assessment of this plausible mechanism is subject to future work. References Oberhansli, H., and P. Molnar (2012) Climate evolution in Central Asia during the past few million years: A case study from Issyk-Kul. Scientific Drilling, 13, doi: 10.2204/iodp/sd.13.09.2011 Peeters F, Finger D, Hofer M, Brennwald M, Livingstone DM, Kipfer R (2003) Deep-water renewal in Lake Issyk-Kul driven by differential cooling. Limnol. and Oceanogr. 48: 1419- 1431.

  5. Investigating the impact of millennial scale Agulhas Current System variability on global ocean circulation and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, M.; Hall, I. R.; Barker, S.; Ziegler, M.

    2012-04-01

    silt mean grain sizes together with δ18O and δ13C data measured on the benthic foraminiferal species Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi are used to construct high-resolution records of near-bottom flow vigour and deep water ventilation at the core site (3300 m water depth), which is today influenced by the Agulhas Undercurrent. The results highlight source water change from North Atlantic Deep Waters (NADW) to Antarctic originated Bottom Waters at the core site that can be linked with colder surface temperatures and higher bottom water flow speed during Marine Isotope Stage 2 (MIS 2), at around 26,000 years ago. A comparison of our "upstream" SST variability with previously published records from the immediate Agulhas Corridor (Martínez Méndez et al, 2010; Cape Basin Record (CBR), Schneider et al., 1999, Peeters et al. 2004), shows that our SST record has a more pronounced temperature variability compared to reconstructions based on the biomarker UK'37 (Peeters et al. 2004), while the early warming trend observed prior to TI (based on Mg/Ca of Globigerinoides bulloides; Martínez Méndez et al. 2010) is not seen in our upstream record. All data have been generated within the EU Marie Curie GATEWAYS project.

  6. The sensitivity of laser induced fluorescence instruments at low pressure to RO2 radicals and the use of this detection method to determine the yield of HO2 during OH-initiated isoprene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, D. E.; Whalley, L. K.; Blitz, M. A.; Seakins, P. W.

    2011-12-01

    a dry air flow at variable positions along the flow-tube; Isoprene was added downstream of the lamp. Theoretical studies (Peeters et al., 2009) suggest an HO2 yield of 0.7 on a time-scale of a few seconds. Results from the recent laboratory studies will be discussed. Fuchs, H., Bohn, B., Hofzumahaus, A., Holland, F., Lu, K., Nehr, S., Rohrer, F., and Wahner, A.: Detection of HO2 by laser-induced fluorescence: Calibration and interferences from RO2 radicals, Atmos Meas Tech Discuss, 4, 1255-1302, 2011. Heard, D. E., and Pilling, M. J.: Measurement of OH and HO2 in the troposphere, Chem Rev, 103, 5163-5198, 2003. Peeters, J., Nguyen, T. L., and Vereecken, L.: HOx radical regeneration in the oxidation of isoprene, Phys Chem Chem Phys, 11, 5935-5939, 2009.

  7. PREFACE: 21st Latin American Symposium on Solid State Physics (SLAFES XXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, J. Albino

    2014-04-01

    Colombia e-mail: dalandinezt@unal.edu.co Professor Laura T Corredor Bohórquez Departamento de Física Universidade Federal de Pernambuco 50670-901 Recife PE Brazil e-mail: ltcorredorb@df.ufpe.br Professor Arkady Shanenko Departamento de Física Universidade Federal de Pernambuco 50670-901 Recife PE Brazil e-mail: arkadyshanenko@df.ufpe.br Professor Renato F Jardim Instituto de Física Universidade de S\\~ao Paulo CP 66318 S\\~ao Paulo SP Brazil e-mail: rjardim@if.usp.br Professor Francois Peeters Department Fysica Universiteit Antwerpen Groneneborgerlann 171 B-2020, Antwerpen Belgium e-mail: francois.peeters@uantwerpen.be Organizing committee ChairmanCarlos Arturo Parra Vargas Proceedings EditorJosé Albino Aguiar Program ChairJairo Roa-Rojas SecretaryAura Janeth Barón González TreasurerArmando Sarmiento Santos Speaker ChairRafael González Hernández Fernando Naranjo Mayorga David A Landínez Téllez Jesús Oswaldo Morán José Sierra Ortega

  8. Impacts of mechanistic changes on HOx formation and recycling in the oxidation of isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, A. T.; Cooke, M. C.; Utembe, S. R.; Shallcross, D. E.; Derwent, R. G.; Jenkin, M. E.

    2010-09-01

    Recently reported model-measurement discrepancies for the concentrations of the HOx radical species (OH and HO2) in locations characterized by high emission rates of isoprene have indicated possible deficiencies in the representation of OH recycling and formation in isoprene mechanisms currently employed in numerical models; particularly at low levels of NOx. Using version 3.1 of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.1) as a base mechanism, the sensitivity of the system to a number of detailed mechanistic changes is examined for a wide range of NOx levels, using a simple box model. The studies consider sensitivity tests in relation to three general areas for which experimental and/or theoretical evidence has been reported in the peer-reviewed literature, as follows: (1) implementation of propagating channels for the reactions of HO2 with acyl and β-oxo peroxy radicals with HO2, with support from a number of studies; (2) implementation of the OH-catalysed conversion of isoprene-derived hydroperoxides to isomeric epoxydiols, as characterised by Paulot et al.~(2009a); and (3) implementation of a mechanism involving respective 1,5 and 1,6 H atom shift isomerisation reactions of the β-hydroxyalkenyl and cis-δ-hydroxyalkenyl peroxy radical isomers, formed from the sequential addition of OH and O2 to isoprene, based on the theoretical study of Peeters et al. (2009). All the considered mechanistic changes lead to simulated increases in the concentrations of OH, with (1) and (2) resulting in respective increases of up to about 7% and 16%, depending on the level of NOx. (3) is found to have potentially much greater impacts, with enhancements in OH concentrations of up to a factor of about 3.3, depending on the level of NOx, provided the (crucial) rapid photolysis of the hydroperoxy-methyl-butenal products of the cis-δ-hydroxyalkenyl peroxy radical isomerisation reactions is represented, as also postulated by Peeters et al.~(2009). Additional tests suggest that the

  9. Decadal- to biennial scale variability of planktic foraminifera in the northeastern Arabian Sea during the last two millennia: evidence for winter monsoon forcing mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munz, Philipp; Lückge, Andreas; Siccha, Michael; Kucera, Michal; Schulz, Hartmut

    2015-04-01

    The Asian monsoon system is controlling the hydrologic cycle, and thus the agricultural and economic prosperity of the worlds most densely populated region. Strong and moisture-laden winds from the southwest induce upwelling and significant productivity in the western Arabian Sea during boreal summer. During boreal winter, weaker dry and cold surface winds from the northeast nourish ocean productivity mainly in the northeastern Arabian Sea. Instrumental records spanning the last century are too short to understand how the monsoon system reacts to external forcing mechanisms and to accurately determine its natural variability. Compared to the summer monsoon component, the dynamics of the winter monsoon are virtually unknown, due to the lack of adequate archives that are affected only by winter conditions. Here we present a decadal- to biennial-scale resolution record of past winter monsoon variability over the last two millennia, based on census counts of planktic foraminifera from two laminated sediment cores collected offshore Pakistan. One shorter box core (SO90-39KG) spans the last 250 years with an average ~2-year resolution, whereas the longer piston core (SO130-275KL) spans the last 2,100 years with a 10-year resolution. We use Globigerina falconensis as a faunal indicator for winter conditions, a species that is most abundant during winter in the NE Arabian Sea (Peeters and Brummer, 2002; Schulz et al., 2002). Our results show that during the past 2,100 years G. falconensis varied with significant periodicities centered on ˜ 60, ˜ 53, ˜ 40, ˜ 34 and ˜ 29 years per cycle. Some of these periods closely match cycles that are known from proxy records of solar irradiance, suggesting a solar forcing on winter monsoon variability. During the past 250 years G. falconensis varied in correlation with the (11-year) Schwabe and the (22-year) Hale solar cycles. Furthermore, a significant ˜ 7 year cyclicity could indicate a teleconnection to the El Niño Southern

  10. Hydroxyl radical regeneration in isoprene oxidation: upgraded mechanism LIM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, Jozef; Son Nguyen, Vinh; Nguyen, Thanh Lam; Stravrakou, Trissevgeni; Muller, Jean-Francois

    2013-04-01

    The OH regeneration known to occur in isoprene oxidation at low/moderate NO is attributed in the Leuven Isoprene Mechanism to novel, theoretically characterized chemical pathways (LIM0: Peeters et al. 2009; Peeters and Muller 2010). Its key new features are (i) quasi-equilibration of the thermally labile beta-OH- and delta-OH-isoprenylperoxy isomers; (ii) 1,6-H shift isomerisation of the Z-delta-OH-peroxy isomers to yield hydroperoxy-methyl-butenals (HPALDs); (iii) fast photolysis of the HPALDs resulting overall in several OH radicals per HPALD. The OH-regeneration through photolabile HPALDs has recently found experimental support, but the peroxy isomerisation rate, HPALD yield and extent of OH recycling are still uncertain (Crounse et al. 2011; Wolfe et al. 2012). In this work, the upgraded LIM1 mechanism is presented. Based on much higher levels of theory that fully account for dispersion effects, the crucial equilibrium ratio of the isomerising Z-delta-OH-peroxys over the majority beta-OH-isoprenylperoxys is reduced by a factor ≈5 and the isomerisation rate of the Z-delta-OH-peroxys by a factor ≈1.5 compared to LIM0. The chemistry following the 1,6-H shift of the Z-delta-OH-peroxys is also much expanded and extended. Firstly, LIM1 introduces other pathways beside HPALD formation following the Z-delta-OH-peroxy isomerisation, but resulting likewise in OH recycling. This, together with the revised Z-delta-OH- equilibrium and isomerisation data above, affords a fair model-reproduction of the HPALD and other product yields observed by Crounse et al. (2011). Secondly, LIM1 proposes new fast reactions of HO2 with the alpha-oxoketene products from the peroxy isomerisation routes; these reactions are shown to efficiently convert HO2 into OH and are prime candidates for the unknown X + HO2 → OH + ... hydroxyl-recycling routes invoked in recent studies (Hofzumahaus et al.2009; Whalley et al. 2011). Modeling results using the IMAGES global CTM will be presented on

  11. HOx regeneration in the oxidation of isoprene III: theoretical study of the key isomerisation of the Z-δ-hydroxy-peroxy isoprene radicals.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Lam; Vereecken, Luc; Peeters, Jozef

    2010-12-17

    As a sequel to our communication on a proposed new isoprene oxidation mechanism aiming to rationalize the unexpectedly high OH and HO(2) levels observed in isoprene-rich areas (J. Peeters, T. L. Nguyen, L. Vereecken, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2009, 11, 5935), we report herein the detailed quantum chemical and statistical kinetics characterization of the crucial 1,6-H shifts in the two Z-δ-hydroxy-peroxy radicals from isoprene. Geometries, energies and vibration frequencies of all conformers of the reactant radicals and transition states are computed at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory and the energies of the lowest-lying conformers are then refined at various higher levels of theory, including CBS-QB3, IRCMax(CBS-QB3//B3LYP) and CBS-APNO. The rate coefficients over a wide temperature range are calculated using multi-conformer transition state theory with WKB tunneling factors evaluated for the barrier shape found by CBS-QB3//B3LYP IRC analyses. The WKB tunneling factors for these allyl-stabilisation-assisted reactions are about 25 at ambient temperatures. The rate coefficients can be represented by Arrhenius expressions over the 250-350 K range: k(T)=1.4×10(9) exp(-6380/T) s(-1) for the Z-1-OH-4-OO(·)-isoprene radical, and k(T)=0.72×10(9) exp(-5520/T) s(-1) for Z-1-OH-4-OO(·)-isoprene. With the k(1,6-H) of order 1 s(-1) at ambient temperatures, these isomerisations can compete with and even outrun the traditional peroxy reactions at low and moderate NO levels. The importance of these reactions as key processes in the newly proposed, OH-regenerating isoprene oxidation scheme is discussed.

  12. Pedagogy with babies: perspectives of eight nursery managers.

    PubMed

    Elfer, Peter; Page, Jools

    2015-12-02

    The last 30 years have seen a significant increase in babies attending nursery, with corresponding questions about the aims and organisation of practice. Research broadly agrees on the importance of emotionally consistent, sensitive and responsive interactions between staff and babies. Policy objectives for nursery and expectations of parents and staff give rise to different and sometimes conflicting aims for such interactions; for example attachments to staff, peer interactions or early learning. Research shows marked variations of pedagogy aims and organisation with babies in nurseries in different national and cultural contexts. It also demonstrates variation between nurseries in similar contexts and between staff in their beliefs and values about work with babies. This paper reports on an exploratory study of the beliefs, aspirations and approaches of eight managers concerning pedagogy with babies in two similar English local authorities. These managers spoke of the importance of being responsive to the concerns and priorities of parents, whilst being sensitive to the demands of the work on their staff. The main finding was of the contradictions and confusions managers felt were inherent in the work, arising from both conflicting policy objectives and personal beliefs and aspirations; sometimes their own and sometimes those of individual staff and parents. Urban, Vandenbroeck, Van Laere, Lazzari, and Peeters' [(2012). Towards competent systems in early childhood education and care. Implications for policy and practice. European Journal of Education, 47(4), 508-526.] concept of the 'competent system' is used to recommend a grounded approach to the development of a more culturally, socially and individually responsive pedagogy with babies than appears to exist at present.

  13. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing papers presented at the 4th IAEA Technical Meeting on the Theory of Plasma Instabilities Special issue containing papers presented at the 4th IAEA Technical Meeting on the Theory of Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, K.; Wilson, H. R.

    2010-05-01

    The 4th IAEA technical meeting (TM) on the Theory of Plasma Instabilities was held in Kyoto, May 18th--20th 2009, following the first (Seeon), second (Trieste) and third (York) meetings in this series. This IAEA-TM was motivated by the recent advances in theoretical methodology, the rapid progress in observations of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas and the evolution of fusion research as we approach the ITER era. The international advisory committee (IAC) and local organizing committee (LOC), the members of which are listed below, collaborated to define the scope and the content of the scientific programme. Young scientists were actively encouraged to participate in this TM to help stimulate their future research careers and raise their international profiles. Through these young scientists, the IAEA-TM planned to identify the future directions of research. About 90 researchers, from 13 countries and the IAEA, participated in this IAEA-TM, with 72 scientific presentations. The talks and posters generated enthusiastic discussions, contributing to the vibrancy of the meeting. This special issue of Nuclear Fusion consists of a cluster of papers, reporting some of the main contributions to the IAEA-TM. The articles in this cluster are representative of the scientific width of presentations at the meeting, spanning topics from micro-turbulence to large-scale MHD dynamics and from transport to detailed analysis of diagnostics. They demonstrate the quality and depth of the research presented at the conference. List of IAC (alphabetical order): B. Breizman (USA), S. Guenter (Germany), T. S. Hahm (USA), K. Itoh (Japan, Chair of 2009), Ya. I. Kolesnichenko (Ukraine), A. G. Peeters (UK), H. Wilson (UK) List of LOC (alphabetical order): A. Fukuyama, R. Horiuchi, S.-I. Itoh, N. Kasuya, Y. Kishimoto (co-chair), K. Kusano, J. Li, K. Mima, S. Murakami, H. Naitou, N. Nakajima, Y. Nakamura, H. Ohtani, S. Okamura, T. Ozeki, S. Sudo (co-chair), H. Sugama, Y. Todo, S. Tokuda, S

  14. Large effect of irradiance on hydrogen isotope fractionation of alkenones in Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Benthien, Albert; French, Katherine L.; Epping, Eric; Zondervan, Ingrid; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Bijma, Jelle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogen isotopic (δD) composition of long-chain alkenones produced by certain haptophyte algae has been suggested as a potential proxy for reconstructing paleo sea surface salinity. However, environmental parameters other than salinity may also affect the δD of alkenones. We investigated the impact of the level of irradiance on hydrogen isotopic fractionation of alkenones versus growth water by cultivating two strains of the cosmopolitan haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi at different light intensities. The hydrogen isotope fractionation decreased by approximately 40‰ when irradiance was increased from 15 to 200 μmol photons m-2 s-1 above which it was relatively constant. The response is likely a direct effect of photosystem I and II activity as the relationship of the fractionation factor α versus light intensity can be described by an Eilers-Peeters photosynthesis model. This irradiance effect is in agreement with published δD data of alkenones derived from suspended particulate matter collected from different depths in the photic zone of the Gulf of California and the eastern tropical North Pacific. However, haptophyte algae tend to bloom at relatively high light intensities (>500 μmol photons m-2 s-1) occurring at the sea surface, at which hydrogen isotope fractionation is relatively constant and not affected by changes in light intensity. Alkenones accumulating in the sediment are likely mostly derived from these surface water haptophyte blooms, when the largest amount of biomass is produced. Therefore, the observed irradiance effect is unlikely to affect the applicability of the hydrogen isotopic composition of sedimentary long chain alkenones as a proxy for paleosalinity.

  15. Perturbative studies of toroidal momentum transport using neutral beam injection modulation in the Joint European Torus: Experimental results, analysis methodology, and first principles modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mantica, P.; Ferreira, J. S.; Salmi, A.; Strintzi, D.; Weiland, J.; Brix, M.; Giroud, C.; Corrigan, G.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Tardini, G.

    2010-09-15

    Perturbative experiments have been carried out in the Joint European Torus [Fusion Sci. Technol. 53(4) (2008)] in order to identify the diffusive and convective components of toroidal momentum transport. The torque source was modulated either by modulating tangential neutral beam power or by modulating in antiphase tangential and normal beams to produce a torque perturbation in the absence of a power perturbation. The resulting periodic perturbation in the toroidal rotation velocity was modeled using time-dependent transport simulations in order to extract empirical profiles of momentum diffusivity and pinch. Details of the experimental technique, data analysis, and modeling are provided. The momentum diffusivity in the core region (0.2<{rho}<0.8) was found to be close to the ion heat diffusivity ({chi}{sub {phi}/{chi}i{approx}}0.7-1.7) and a significant inward momentum convection term, up to 20 m/s, was found, leading to an effective momentum diffusivity significantly lower than the ion heat diffusivity ({chi}{sub {phi}}{sup eff}/{chi}{sub i}{sup eff{approx}}0.4). These results have significant implications on the prediction of toroidal rotation velocities in future tokamaks and are qualitatively consistent with recent developments in momentum transport theory. Detailed quantitative comparisons with the theoretical predictions of the linear gyrokinetic code GKW [A. G. Peeters et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 180, 2650 (2009)] and of the quasilinear fluid Weiland model [J. Weiland, Collective Modes in Inhomogeneous Plasmas (IOP, Bristol, 2000)] are presented for two analyzed discharges.

  16. Pedagogy with babies: perspectives of eight nursery managers

    PubMed Central

    Elfer, Peter; Page, Jools

    2015-01-01

    The last 30 years have seen a significant increase in babies attending nursery, with corresponding questions about the aims and organisation of practice. Research broadly agrees on the importance of emotionally consistent, sensitive and responsive interactions between staff and babies. Policy objectives for nursery and expectations of parents and staff give rise to different and sometimes conflicting aims for such interactions; for example attachments to staff, peer interactions or early learning. Research shows marked variations of pedagogy aims and organisation with babies in nurseries in different national and cultural contexts. It also demonstrates variation between nurseries in similar contexts and between staff in their beliefs and values about work with babies. This paper reports on an exploratory study of the beliefs, aspirations and approaches of eight managers concerning pedagogy with babies in two similar English local authorities. These managers spoke of the importance of being responsive to the concerns and priorities of parents, whilst being sensitive to the demands of the work on their staff. The main finding was of the contradictions and confusions managers felt were inherent in the work, arising from both conflicting policy objectives and personal beliefs and aspirations; sometimes their own and sometimes those of individual staff and parents. Urban, Vandenbroeck, Van Laere, Lazzari, and Peeters' [(2012). Towards competent systems in early childhood education and care. Implications for policy and practice. European Journal of Education, 47(4), 508–526.] concept of the ‘competent system’ is used to recommend a grounded approach to the development of a more culturally, socially and individually responsive pedagogy with babies than appears to exist at present. PMID:26692633

  17. HOx regeneration in isoprene oxidation: evidence for new unimolecular peroxy radical reactions with strong implications for tropospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, Jozef; Nguyen, Thanh Lam; Vereecken, Luc; Muller, Jean-Francois

    2010-05-01

    HOx re-generation in the oxidation of isoprene, with its global emissions of about 500 Tg/yr, has a large impact on the global oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. Recently, we proposed and theoretically quantified new pathways for the OH-initiated oxidation of isoprene that might explain the much higher than observed OH concentrations in isoprene-rich environments (Peeters et al., Phys.Chem.Chem.Phys., 11, 5935, 2009). The new reaction mechanisms put forward and characterized using high-level theoretical methods include (i) the very fast interconversion (by O2 elimination and addition) of the various conformers/isomers of the major isoprene peroxy radicals, (ii) the 1,5-H shift of the major β-OH-peroxys generating OH with coproducts MACR or MACR, and most importantly, (iii) the 1,6-H shift of specific conformers (Z-δ-OH-peroxys) followed by reaction with O2 generating HO2 and very photolabile hydroperoxy aldehydes (denoted HPALDs), and (iv) fast photolysis (with quantum yield approaching unity) as the main sink of the HPALDs, generating OH and a radical which will give rise to additional OH formation. In this communication we present evidence, from recent experimental observations, for the newly proposed chemistry. The yields of the main first-generation products (HOx, HPALD, MVK, MACR, but also the hydroxy-aldehydes HALD) will be examined as a function of NO. The implications regarding the role of isoprene in the atmosphere will be also briefly discussed. A global modelling study aiming at quantifying the impact of the new chemistry will be presented in a companion paper in this session.

  18. Müller cell gliotic response in the retina of the newts exposed to real and simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, Eleonora N.; Poplinskaya, Valentina; Domaratskaya; Aleinikova, Karina; Novikova, Julia; Anton, Hermann J.; Almeida, Eduardo

    The effects of real and simulated microgravity on the eye tissue regeneration of newts (Pl. waltli) after lens and/or retina removal were investigated. Changes in Müller glial cells in the retina of eyes regenerating after lens extirpation were detected in newts exposed to clinostat-ing. The cells were hypertrophied, and their processes thickened. Such changes were viewed as specific of reactive gliosis [1]. Later experiments onboard the Russian biosatellite Bion-11 showed similar changes in the retinas of newts regenerating after a two-week spaceflight. In the Bion-11 animals, GFAP, the major structural protein of macroglial cells was found to be up-regulated [2]. In more recent experiments onboard Foton-2 (2005) and Foton-M3 (2007), GFAP expression in retinas of space-flown, ground control (kept at 1 g), and basal control (sacrificed on launch day) newts was quantified, using microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and digital image analysis. It was found that Müller cell processes of non-operated animals dis-u played low GFAP immunolabeling. A low level of immunoreactivity was also observed in basal controls. In contrast, retinas of space-flown animals showed greater GFAP immunoreactivity associated with both an increased cell number and a higher density of intermediate filaments [3]. This, in turn, was accompanied by up-regulation of stress protein (HSP90) and growth factor (FGF2) expressions. It can be postulated that such a response of Müller cells was to mitigate the retinal stress in newts exposed to microgravity. Although the exact mechanisms remain unknown, it can be hypothesized that GFAP up-regulation is mediated by HSPs and growth factors, particularly by FGF2. Taken together, these data suggest that the retinal population of macroglial cells is sensitive to gravity changes and that in space it can react by enhancing its neuroprotective function. [1] Grigoryan E.N., Anton H.J., Mitashov V.I. Adv. Space Res. 1998. V. 22. N.2. P. 293-301. [2] Grigoryan E

  19. Post-translational Modification of Ribosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Arragain, Simon; Garcia-Serres, Ricardo; Blondin, Geneviève; Douki, Thierry; Clemancey, Martin; Latour, Jean-Marc; Forouhar, Farhad; Neely, Helen; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Hunt, John F.; Mulliez, Etienne; Fontecave, Marc; Atta, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of ribosomal proteins are important for the accuracy of the decoding machinery. A recent in vivo study has shown that the rimO gene is involved in generation of the 3-methylthio derivative of residue Asp-89 in ribosomal protein S12 (Anton, B. P., Saleh, L., Benner, J. S., Raleigh, E. A., Kasif, S., and Roberts, R. J. (2008) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 105, 1826–1831). This reaction is formally identical to that catalyzed by MiaB on the C2 of adenosine 37 near the anticodon of several tRNAs. We present spectroscopic evidence that Thermotoga maritima RimO, like MiaB, contains two [4Fe-4S] centers, one presumably bound to three invariant cysteines in the central radical S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) domain and the other to three invariant cysteines in the N-terminal UPF0004 domain. We demonstrate that holo-RimO can specifically methylthiolate the aspartate residue of a 20-mer peptide derived from S12, yielding a mixture of mono- and bismethylthio derivatives. Finally, we present the 2.0 Å crystal structure of the central radical AdoMet and the C-terminal TRAM (tRNA methyltransferase 2 and MiaB) domains in apo-RimO. Although the core of the open triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel of the radical AdoMet domain was conserved, RimO showed differences in domain organization compared with other radical AdoMet enzymes. The unusually acidic TRAM domain, likely to bind the basic S12 protein, is located at the distal edge of the radical AdoMet domain. The basic S12 protein substrate is likely to bind RimO through interactions with both the TRAM domain and the concave surface of the incomplete TIM barrel. These biophysical results provide a foundation for understanding the mechanism of methylthioation by radical AdoMet enzymes in the MiaB/RimO family. PMID:20007320

  20. A helper-dependent system for adenovirus vector production helps define a lower limit for efficient DNA packaging.

    PubMed Central

    Parks, R J; Graham, F L

    1997-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) are intermediate-sized mammalian DNA viruses with a double-stranded linear genome of 36 kb. The icosohedral virion has been shown to accommodate up to 105% of the wild-type genome length, and genomes larger than this size are either unpackageable or extremely unstable, frequently undergoing DNA rearrangement. Here we show that the Ad virion also has a lower packaging limit of approximately 75% of the wild-type genome length. We have constructed a series of vectors with sizes ranging from 15.1 to 33.6 kb and used these to show that in our Cre/loxP helper-dependent system (R. J. Parks, L. Chen, M. Anton, U. Sankar, M. A. Rudnicki, and F. L. Graham, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93:13565-13570, 1996), vectors with genomes greater than or equal to 27.7 kb are packaged with equal efficiencies, whereas vectors with smaller genomes are inefficiently packaged. A 15.1-kb vector, approximately half the size of the wild-type adenovirus genome, was packaged with an efficiency intermediate between that of the small (21.3- to 25.7-kb) and large (27.7- to 33.5-kb) vectors. Analysis of vector DNA after amplification in helper virus-infected cells showed that vectors below 75% of the Ad genome had undergone DNA rearrangements, whereas larger vectors were unaltered. The 15.1-kb vector was recovered primarily as a mix of head-to-tail and tail-to-tail covalent dimers, with a size of 30 kb. We conclude that the Ad virion can efficiently accommodate viral DNA of greater than 75% of the viral genome but that smaller viral genomes tend to undergo rearrangement, resulting in a final size of greater than approximately 27 kb before they can be efficiently packaged. Knowledge of the lower limit to Ad DNA packaging should allow for the design of better and more stable vectors. PMID:9060698

  1. Music and the Nature: Input of the Czech Composers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Vaclav; Nemcova, Lidmila

    2014-05-01

    Extraordinary occasions for art of any kind - music, creative graphic and plastic arts, literature (classic, modern incl. science fiction), theatre, cinema, etc. - exist to harmonise individual personal interests with those of the humanity well-being and of the Nature and also to cultivate individual spirituality and the appropriate values. Arts can be applied as irreplaceable means for making any human being better, for improving his sense for solidarity and for increasing his ethical sensibility. An interest for the art should be cultivated already since the childhood. - How much of inspiration for numerous composers all over the world has been given by the Nature, how much of inspiration for people who by listening to such a music are increasing nobility of their behaviour as well as their friendly approach to the Nature. - Many classical music works have been written with a strong inspiration by the Nature itself from the past until today. The actual Year of the Czech Music gives the possibility to present the most famous Czech composers inspired by the Nature (selected examples only): Bedřich Smetana (1824 - 1884): At the sea shore - a concert etude for piano inspired by his stay in Göteborg (Sweden); Vltava (Moldau) - a symphonic poem from the cycle "My country" inspired by the river crossing Bohemia from the South to Prague; From the Bohemian woods and meadows - another symphonic poem from the same cycle. Antonín Dvořák (1841 - 1904): V přírodě (In the Nature) - a work for orchestra Leoš Janáček (1854 - 1928): Příhody li\\vsky Bystrou\\vsky (The Cunning Little Vixen) - an opera situated mostly in a forest. Josef Bohuslav Foerster (1859-1951): Velké širé rodné lány (Big large native fields) - a choir for men singers inspired by the nature in the region where the composer as a boy from Prague was visiting his grand-father. Vítězslav Novák (1870 - 1949): In Tatra mountains - a symphonic poem expressing the author's passion for the famous

  2. Kinematics of an oblique deformation front using paleomagnetic data; the Altomira-Loranca structures (Iberian Chain, Central Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valcarcel, M.

    2013-05-01

    Manoel Valcárcel1, 5, Ruth Soto2, Elisabet Beamud3, Belén Oliva-Urcia4 and Josep Anton Muñoz5 1 IGME, Departamento de Investigación y Prospección Geocientífica. C/ La Calera, 1, 28760 Tres Cantos; m.valcarcel@igme.es 2 IGME, Unidad de Zaragoza, C/ Manuel Lasala 44, 9 B, 50006 Zaragoza, Spain 3 Lab. Paleomagnetisme (CCiT UB-CSIC). ICT "Jaume Almera", Solé i Sabarís, s/n, 08028 Barcelona, Spain. 4 IPE-CSIC, Avda. Montañana 1005, 50059 Zaragoza, Spain 5 Grup Geodinàmica i Anàlisi de Conques, Universitat de Barcelona, Zona Universitària Pedralbes, 08028 Barcelona, Spain The Altomira and Loranca structures consist of a fold-and-thrust system detached on Triassic evaporites. They are oriented N-S to NNE-SSW and NNW-SSE at its northern and southern end, respectively, forming a subtle arc, oblique with respect to the general NW-SE trend of the Iberian Chain. The aim of this work is to characterize with paleomagnetic data the kinematic evolution of the the Altomira Range, located at the southwestern deformation front of the Iberian Chain, and of the structures within its associated piggy-back basin, the Loranca basin. This approach will also give clues regarding the primary and/or secondary origin of these structures to better characterize them in further studies (3D reconstruction and restoration, fault pattern). A total of 180 samples were obtained from 19 sites in Eocene, Oligocene and Miocene rocks (including clays, fine sandstones and limestones). They were analyzed by means of stepwise thermal demagnetization and subsequent measurement of the natural remanent magnetization (NRM). Although fold tests are not statistically significant, a primary origin of the magnetization is deduced by samples showing either normal or reverse polarity after bedding correction of the calculated characteristic components. Declinations of the site mean directions appear scattered after bedding correction suggesting differential vertical-axis rotations. Sites located at the

  3. Characterization of RimO, a new member of the methylthiotransferase subclass of the radical SAM superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Saleh, Lana; Anton, Brian P; Madinger, Catherine L; Benner, Jack S; Iwig, David F; Roberts, Richard J; Krebs, Carsten; Booker, Squire J

    2009-10-27

    RimO, encoded by the yliG gene in Escherichia coli, has been recently identified in vivo as the enzyme responsible for the attachment of a methylthio group on the beta-carbon of Asp88 of the small ribosomal protein S12 [Anton, B. P., Saleh, L., Benner, J. S., Raleigh, E. A., Kasif, S., and Roberts, R. J. (2008) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 105, 1826-1831]. To date, it is the only enzyme known to catalyze methylthiolation of a protein substrate; the four other naturally occurring methylthio modifications have been observed on tRNA. All members of the methylthiotransferase (MTTase) family, to which RimO belongs, have been shown to contain the canonical CxxxCxxC motif in their primary structures that is typical of the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) family of proteins. MiaB, the only characterized MTTase, and the enzyme experimentally shown to be responsible for methylthiolation of N(6)-isopentenyladenosine of tRNA in E. coli and Thermotoga maritima, has been demonstrated to harbor two distinct [4Fe-4S] clusters. Herein, we report in vitro biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of RimO. We show by analytical and spectroscopic methods that RimO, overproduced in E. coli in the presence of iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis proteins from Azotobacter vinelandii, contains one [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster. Reconstitution of this form of RimO (RimO(rcn)) with (57)Fe and sodium sulfide results in a protein that contains two [4Fe-4S](2+) clusters, similar to MiaB. We also show by mass spectrometry that RimO(rcn) catalyzes the attachment of a methylthio group to a peptide substrate analogue that mimics the loop structure bearing aspartyl 88 of the S12 ribosomal protein from E. coli. Kinetic analysis of this reaction shows that the activity of RimO(rcn) in the presence of the substrate analogue does not support a complete turnover. We discuss the possible requirement for an assembled ribosome for fully active RimO in vitro. Our findings are consistent with those of other

  4. Perspective View with Color-Coded Shaded Relief, Central Panama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This perspective view shows central Panama, with the remnants of the extinct volcano El Valle in the foreground and the Caribbean Sea in the distance. El Valle underwent an explosive eruption about 3 million years ago, forming a crater 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) across, one of the largest in the Americas. The crater subsequently filled with water forming a huge lake, but about 12,000 years ago a breach at the present site of the waterfall Choro de las Mozas caused it to drain, forming the present valley. Within the crater is the town of El Valle de Anton, whose 600-meter (1,968-foot) elevation and resulting cooler climate make it a popular tourist and vacation site.

    The lake in the distance is Lake Gatun, at the west end of the Panama Canal. The canal itself extends to the southwest (to the right in this northeast facing view) but is hidden by the intervening terrain.

    This shaded relief perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. On flatter surfaces, the pattern of light and shadows can reveal subtle features in the terrain. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM, and range from green at the lowest elevations to white at the highest elevations.

    SRTM, launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the

  5. Network representation of conformational transitions between hidden intermediates of Rd-apocytochrome b562

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Mojie; Liu, Hanzhong; Li, Minghai; Huo, Shuanghong

    2015-10-01

    The folding kinetics of Rd-apocytochrome b562 is two-state, but native-state hydrogen exchange experiments show that there are discrete partially unfolded (PUF) structures in equilibrium with the native state. These PUF structures are called hidden intermediates because they are not detected in kinetic experiments and they exist after the rate-limiting step. Structures of the mimics of hidden intermediates of Rd-apocytochrome b562 are resolved by NMR. Based upon their relative stability and structural features, the folding mechanism was proposed to follow a specific pathway (unfolded → rate-limiting transition state → PUF1 → PUF2 → native). Investigating the roles of equilibrium PUF structures in folding kinetics and their interrelationship not only deepens our understanding of the details of folding mechanism but also provides guides in protein design and prevention of misfolding. We performed molecular dynamics simulations starting from a hidden intermediate and the native state of Rd-apocytochrome b562 in explicit solvent, for a total of 37.18 μs mainly with Anton. We validated our simulations by detailed comparison with experimental data and other computations. We have verified that we sampled the post rate-limiting transition state region only. Markov state model was used to analyze the simulation results. We replace the specific pathway model with a network model. Transition-path theory was employed to calculate the net effective flux from the most unfolded state towards the most folded state in the network. The proposed sequential folding pathway via PUF1 then more stable, more native-like PUF2 is one of the routes in our network, but it is not dominant. The dominant path visits PUF2 without going through PUF1. There is also a route from PUF1 directly to the most folded state in the network without visiting PUF2. Our results indicate that the PUF states are not necessarily sequential in the folding. The major routes predicted in our network are

  6. The Physicist and Astronomer Christoper Scheiner - Biography Letters, Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daxecker, Franz

    The Jesuit priest Christopher Scheiner was one of the most influential astronomers of the first half of the 17th century. He was a creative and down-to-earth natural scientist who worked in the fields of astronomy, physics, optics and ophthalmology, while following his vocations as university lecturer, church builder and pastor. In scientific matters he was Galilei's opponent. Their dispute centred on the priority of discovery in regard to the sunspots. Scheiner was not the first to discover the sunspots, but he gave the most detailed account thereofin his main work "Rosa Ursina sive Sol". He was, however, ceaseless in his defense of the geocentric system. In 1891, Anton v.Braunmühl published a biography of Father Scheiner. Ever since then, new documents have come to light, justifying the publication of a new biography. Among the documents now available is Scheiner's hitherto unknown dissertation. Notes taken during his lectures in Ingolstadt provide valuable information on astronomy using the telescope, an invention of his lifetime. His exchange of letters with personalities like Archduke Leopold V of Austria-Tyrol, with scientists like Magini, Galilei, Gassendi, Kepler and confriars Rader, Guldin, Alber, Minutuli, Cysat und Kircher is a source of precious insights. Letters to Scheiner from the Father Generals of his order display evidence of his superiors' zero tolerance for the helincentric system. They also disclose Scheiner's wish to become a missionary in China, the financial difficulties he faced while trying to find a publisher for his "Rosa Ursina sive Sol" and his personal shortcomings. A Scheiner obituary from 1650 was found in Cracow in 2001. It contains information on the troublesome last years of his life and has finally allowed us to determine the year of his birth. Scheiner's personality has been praised as well as criticized by many authors - sometimes depending on their ideological backgrounds. This holds true especially regarding the argument

  7. Dense nanometric microalloyed molybdenum disilicide synthesized through mechanical and field activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolman, Joseph Nelson

    There has been no theoretical improvements in the high temperature capability of materials used in the hot sections of turbines since 1941 [2]. Exploitation of the nickel based super-alloys to their fullest potential is a result of processing improvement, mainly in the form of vacuum arc melt furnaces [3]. Anton and Shah [4, 5] report based on ultimate tensile strength (UTS), creep strength and oxidation resistance that seven intermetallic compounds with melting points above 1600°C, have been selected as possible replacement materials for high temperature structural materials. These selected compounds are as Nb3Al, Cr3Si, Co2Nb, MoSi 2, Mo5Si3 and Nb2Al. In the terms of UTS and oxidation resistance, MoSi2 is the material with the most promise [5]. Before MoSi2 is set for industrial application, numerous problems have to be solved. High on the list is the brittle to ductile transition at approximately 1000°C. Waghmare et al., from first principles, list elements which introduced at the microalloying level offer the possibility for ductility improvement in MoSi2 without sacrificing its outstanding high temperature properties. Of the elements listed m their model, the one with the most promise as a softener of MoSi2 is magnesium. Until now, this compound had not been synthesized. Through a combination of mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering, we were able to successfully synthesize the compound Mo(Si 2-xMgx). Hardness results presented above confirm the predictions of Waghmare et al. in that a substantial reduction in hardness was realized. Material prepared identically, lacking magnesium, displayed a hardness of 2000 Vickers, while material with 5 at% magnesium displayed a hardness of 620 Vickers. The elements predicted by Waghmare et al. to have the greatest softening potential on alpha-MoSi2: Al and Mg substituting for Si and Nb and V substituting for Mg were explored. The results for Mg match the predictions, while the results for Al, Nb and V match the

  8. Characterization of RimO, a New Member of the Methylthiotransferase Subclass of the Radical SAM Superfamily†

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Saleh, Lana; Anton, Brian P.; Madinger, Catherine L.; Benner, Jack S.; Iwig, David F.; Roberts, Richard J.; Krebs, Carsten; Booker, Squire J.

    2009-01-01

    RimO, encoded by the yliG gene in Escherichia coli, has been recently identified in vivo as the enzyme responsible for the attachment of a methylthio group on the β-carbon of Asp88 of the small ribosomal protein S12 [Anton, B. P., Saleh, L., Benner, J. S., Raleigh, E. A., Kasif, S., and Roberts, R. J. (2008) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 105, 1826–1831]. To date, it is the only enzyme known to catalyze methylthiolation of a protein substrate; the four other naturally occurring methylthio modifications have been observed on tRNA. All members of the methylthiotransferase (MTTase) family, to which RimO belongs, have been shown to contain the canonical CxxxCxxC motif in their primary structures that is typical of the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) family of proteins. MiaB, the only characterized MTTase, and the enzyme experimentally shown to be responsible for methylthiolation of N6-isopentenyladenosine of tRNA in E. coli and Thermotoga maritima, has been demonstrated to harbor two distinct [4Fe–4S] clusters. Herein, we report in vitro biochemical, and spectroscopic characterization of RimO. We show by analytical and spectroscopic methods that RimO, heterologously overproduced in E. coli in the presence of iron–sulfur cluster biosynthesis proteins from Azotobacter vinelandii, contains one [4Fe–4S]2+ cluster. Reconstitution of this form of RimO (RimOrcn) with 57Fe and sodium sulfide results in a protein that contains two [4Fe–4S]2+ clusters, similar to MiaB. We also show by mass spectrometry that RimOrcn catalyzes the attachment of a methylthio group to a peptide substrate analog that mimics the loop structure bearing aspartyl 88 of the S12 ribosomal protein from E. coli. Kinetic analysis of this reaction shows that the activity of RimOrcn in the presence of the substrate analog does not support a complete turnover. We discuss the possible requirement for an assembled ribosome for fully active RimO in vitro. Our findings are consistent with those of other

  9. NVP melt/magma viscosity: insight on Mercury lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Stefano; Morgavi, Daniele; Namur, Olivier; Vetere, Francesco; Perugini, Diego; Mancinelli, Paolo; Pauselli, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    After more than four years of orbiting Mercury, NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft came to an end in late April 2015. MESSENGER has provided many new and surprising results. This session will again highlight the latest results on Mercury based on MESSENGER observations or updated modelling. The session will further address instrument calibration and science performance both retrospective on MESSENGER and on the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission. Papers covering additional themes related to Mercury are also welcomed. Please be aware that this session will be held as a PICO session. This will allow an intensive exchange of expertise and experience between the individual instruments and mission. NVP melt/magma viscosity: insight on Mercury lava flows S. Rossi1, D. Morgavi1, O. Namur2, D. Perugini1, F.Vetere1, P. Mancinelli1 and C. Pauselli1 1 Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, piazza Università 1, 06123 Perugia, Italy 2 Uni Hannover Institut für Mineralogie, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Callinstraβe 3, 30167 Hannover, Germany In this contribution we report new measurements of viscosity of synthetic komatitic melts, used the behaviour of silicate melts erupted at the surface of Mercury. Composition of Mercurian surface magmas was calculated using the most recent maps produced from MESSENGER XRS data (Weider et al., 2015). We focused on the northern hemisphere (Northern Volcanic Province, NVP, the largest lava flow on Mercury and possibly in the Solar System) for which the spatial resolution of MESSENGER measurements is high and individual maps of Mg/Si, Ca/Si, Al/Si and S/Si were combined. The experimental starting material contains high Na2O content (≈7 wt.%) that strongly influences viscosity. High temperature viscosity measurements were carried out at 1 atm using a concentric cylinder apparatus equipped with an Anton Paar RheolabQC viscometer head at the Department of Physics and Geology (PVRG_lab) at the University of Perugia (Perugia, Italy

  10. Negative thermal expansion in silicalite-1 and zirconium silicalite-1 having MFI structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bhange, D.S.; Ramaswamy, Veda . E-mail: v.ramaswamy@ncl.res.in

    2006-07-13

    In situ high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) studies on monoclinic silicalite-1 (S-1, silica polymorph of ZSM-5) and an orthorhombic metallosilicate molecular sieve, zirconium silicalite-1 (ZrS-1) with MFI structure (Si/Zr = 50) have been carried out using a laboratory X-ray diffractometer with an Anton Parr HTK 1600 attachment. While the structure of the S-1 collapsed at 1123 K forming {alpha}-cristobalite. S-1 and ZrS-1 showed a complex thermal expansion behavior in the temperature range 298-1023 K, ZrS-1 was stable. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) data taken in this region have shown strong negative lattice thermal expansion coefficient, {alpha} {sub V} = -6.75 x 10{sup -6} and -17.92 x 10{sup -6} K{sup -1} in the temperature range 298-1023 K{sup -1} for S-1 and ZrS-1 samples, respectively. The thermal expansion behavior of S-1 and ZrS-1 is anisotropic, with the relative strength of contraction along a axis is more than that along b and c axes. Three different thermal expansion regions could be identified in the overall temperature range (298-1023 K) studied, corroborating with the three steps of weight loss in the TG curve of ZrS-1 sample. While the region between 298 and 423 K, displays positive thermal expansion coefficient with {alpha} {sub V} = 2.647 x 10{sup -6} and 4.24 x 10{sup -6} K{sup -1}, the second region between 423 and 873 K shows strong negative thermal expansion (NTE) coefficient {alpha} {sub V} = -7.602 x 10{sup -6} and -15.04 x 10{sup -6} K{sup -1}, respectively, for S-1 and ZrS-1 samples. The region between 873 and 1023 K, shows a very strong NTE coefficient with {alpha} {sub V} = -12.08 x 10{sup -6} and -45.622 x 10{sup -6} K{sup -1} for S-1 and ZrS-1, respectively, which is the highest in the whole temperature range studied. NTE seen over a temperature range 298-1023 K could be associated with transverse vibrations of bridging oxygen atoms in the structure which results in an apparent shortening of the Si-O distances.

  11. Polymerase Chain Reaction: Basic Protocol Plus Troubleshooting and Optimization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Todd C.

    2012-01-01

    In the biological sciences there have been technological advances that catapult the discipline into golden ages of discovery. For example, the field of microbiology was transformed with the advent of Anton van Leeuwenhoek's microscope, which allowed scientists to visualize prokaryotes for the first time. The development of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is one of those innovations that changed the course of molecular science with its impact spanning countless subdisciplines in biology. The theoretical process was outlined by Keppe and coworkers in 1971; however, it was another 14 years until the complete PCR procedure was described and experimentally applied by Kary Mullis while at Cetus Corporation in 1985. Automation and refinement of this technique progressed with the introduction of a thermal stable DNA polymerase from the bacterium Thermus aquaticus, consequently the name Taq DNA polymerase. PCR is a powerful amplification technique that can generate an ample supply of a specific segment of DNA (i.e., an amplicon) from only a small amount of starting material (i.e., DNA template or target sequence). While straightforward and generally trouble-free, there are pitfalls that complicate the reaction producing spurious results. When PCR fails it can lead to many non-specific DNA products of varying sizes that appear as a ladder or smear of bands on agarose gels. Sometimes no products form at all. Another potential problem occurs when mutations are unintentionally introduced in the amplicons, resulting in a heterogeneous population of PCR products. PCR failures can become frustrating unless patience and careful troubleshooting are employed to sort out and solve the problem(s). This protocol outlines the basic principles of PCR, provides a methodology that will result in amplification of most target sequences, and presents strategies for optimizing a reaction. By following this PCR guide, students should be able to: ● Set up reactions and thermal cycling

  12. All-Manganite Tunnel Junctions with Interface-Induced Barrier Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefrioui, Zouhair

    2011-03-01

    The recent discovery of several unexpected phases at complex oxide interfaces is providing new insights into the physics of strongly correlated electron systems. The possibility of tailoring the electronic structure of such interfaces has triggered a great technological drive to functionalize them into devices. In this communication, we describe an alternative strategy to produce spin filtering by inducing a ferromagnetic insulating state in an ultrathin antiferromagnetic layer in contact with a ferromagnetic layer. This artificially induced spin filtering persists up to relatively high temperatures and operates at high applied bias voltages. The results suggest that after playing a key role in exchange-bias for spin-valves, uncompensated moments at engineered antiferromagnetic interfaces represent a novel route for generating highly spin-polarized currents with antiferromagnets. Work done in collaboration with M. Bibes, C. Carrétéro, A. Barthélémy (Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales, Campus de Polytechnique, 1, Avenue A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France) and Université Paris-Sud, 91045 Orsay (France)), F.A. Cuellar, C. Visani, A. Rivera-Calzada, , C. León, J. Santamaria (Grupo de Física de Materiales Complejos, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)), M.J. Calderón, L. Brey (Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)), K. March, M. Walls, D. Imhoff (Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)), R. Lopez Anton, T.R. Charlton (ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)), E. Iborra (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros de Telecomunicaciones, 28040 Madrid (Spain)), F. Ott (Léon Brillouin, CEA/CNRS, UMR 12, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)). This work was supported by the Spanish Ministry for Science and Education programs MAT2008 06517, and the Réseau Thématique de Recherche Avanc

  13. Temporal Variability of Methane Flares on the Cascadia Margin Imaged with Swath Bathymetric Data (Ancillary Data to Cascadia Initiative Cruise AT26-02)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trehu, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Livelybrooks (Un. of Oregon), undergraduates participating in summer research programs at (Elizabeth Davis, Indiana Un. and Oregon State Un. REU program in Oceanography; David Clemens-Sewall, Dartmouth College and IRIS intern), community college students and faculty (Haley Domer, Portland CC; Jonas Cervantes and Greg Mulder, Linn-Benton CC), and graduate students and scientists who had applied to sailed on a Cascadia Initiative cruise (Bridget Hass, Oregon State Un.; Katherine Kirk, Cornell Un. and WHOI; Anton Ypma, Western Washington Un.; Lexi Black, CA State Un. Northridge; Samantha Black, College of Charleston). WHOI marine technician Rob Hagg and MATE Intern Arianna Johns also contributed significantly to this effort.

  14. Polymerase chain reaction: basic protocol plus troubleshooting and optimization strategies.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Todd C

    2012-05-22

    In the biological sciences there have been technological advances that catapult the discipline into golden ages of discovery. For example, the field of microbiology was transformed with the advent of Anton van Leeuwenhoek's microscope, which allowed scientists to visualize prokaryotes for the first time. The development of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is one of those innovations that changed the course of molecular science with its impact spanning countless subdisciplines in biology. The theoretical process was outlined by Keppe and coworkers in 1971; however, it was another 14 years until the complete PCR procedure was described and experimentally applied by Kary Mullis while at Cetus Corporation in 1985. Automation and refinement of this technique progressed with the introduction of a thermal stable DNA polymerase from the bacterium Thermus aquaticus, consequently the name Taq DNA polymerase. PCR is a powerful amplification technique that can generate an ample supply of a specific segment of DNA (i.e., an amplicon) from only a small amount of starting material (i.e., DNA template or target sequence). While straightforward and generally trouble-free, there are pitfalls that complicate the reaction producing spurious results. When PCR fails it can lead to many non-specific DNA products of varying sizes that appear as a ladder or smear of bands on agarose gels. Sometimes no products form at all. Another potential problem occurs when mutations are unintentionally introduced in the amplicons, resulting in a heterogeneous population of PCR products. PCR failures can become frustrating unless patience and careful troubleshooting are employed to sort out and solve the problem(s). This protocol outlines the basic principles of PCR, provides a methodology that will result in amplification of most target sequences, and presents strategies for optimizing a reaction. By following this PCR guide, students should be able to: • Set up reactions and thermal cycling

  15. Interpretation of electrokinetic measurements with porous films: role of electric conductance and streaming current within porous structure.

    PubMed

    Yaroshchuk, Andriy; Luxbacher, Thomas

    2010-07-06

    It is shown that in tangential electrokinetic measurements with porous films the porous structure makes contribution not only to the cell electric conductance (as demonstrated previously) but also to the observed streaming current. Both of these contributions give rise to dependences of streaming-potential and streaming-current coefficients on the channel height. However, due to the combined contribution of two phenomena, the dependence of streaming-potential coefficient on the channel height may be rather complicated and not allow for simple extrapolation. At the same time, the dependences of streaming-current coefficient and cell electric conductance on the channel height turn out linear and can be easily extrapolated to zero channel heights. This enables one to determine separately the contributions of external surface of porous film and of its porous structure to the streaming current and of the channel and porous structure to the cell electric conductance. This procedure is illustrated by the measurements of tangential electrokinetic phenomena and electric conductance with Millipore mixed-cellulose membrane filters of various average pore sizes (from 0.025 to 5 mum) in the so-called adjustable-gap cell of SurPASS electrokinetic instrument (Anton Paar GmbH). The design of this cell allows for easy and quasi-continuous variation of channel height as well as accurate determination of cell electric conductance, streaming-current coefficient, and channel height (from the cell hydraulic permeability). The quality of linear fits of experimental data has been found to be very good, and thus, the extrapolation procedures were quite reliable and accurate. Zeta-potentials could be determined of both external film and internal pore surfaces. It is demonstrated that the porous structures make considerable contributions to both streaming-current coefficient and cell electric conductance especially in the case of filters with larger pores. It is also found that, rather

  16. Perspective View with Color-Coded Shaded Relief, Central Panama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This perspective view shows central Panama, with the remnants of the extinct volcano El Valle in the foreground and the Caribbean Sea in the distance. El Valle underwent an explosive eruption about 3 million years ago, forming a crater 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) across, one of the largest in the Americas. The crater subsequently filled with water forming a huge lake, but about 12,000 years ago a breach at the present site of the waterfall Choro de las Mozas caused it to drain, forming the present valley. Within the crater is the town of El Valle de Anton, whose 600-meter (1,968-foot) elevation and resulting cooler climate make it a popular tourist and vacation site.

    The lake in the distance is Lake Gatun, at the west end of the Panama Canal. The canal itself extends to the southwest (to the right in this northeast facing view) but is hidden by the intervening terrain.

    This shaded relief perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. On flatter surfaces, the pattern of light and shadows can reveal subtle features in the terrain. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM, and range from green at the lowest elevations to white at the highest elevations.

    SRTM, launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the

  17. Deriving Equations of State for Specific Lakes and Inland Seas from Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrulionis, Natalia; Zavialov, Ivan; Zavialov, Peter; Osadchiev, Alexander; Kolokolova, Alexandra; Alukaeva, Alevtina; Izhitskiy, Alexander; Izhitskaya, Elena

    2017-04-01

    The equation of state is the dependence of water density on temperature, salinity, and pressure. It is important in many respects, in particular, for numerical modeling of marine systems. The widely used UNESCO equation of state, as well as the more recent and general TEOS-10 equation, are intended for the ocean waters. Hence, they are confined to salinities below 40 ‰ and, even more restrictively, valid only for ionic salt composition characteristic for the ocean. Both conditions do not hold for many lakes. Moreover, significant deviations of the ionic composition from the oceanic one have been documented for coastal zones, especially those exposed to river discharges. Therefore, the objective of this study was to find equations of state for areas or water bodies with non-oceanic ionic salt composition. In order to obtain the required equations, we analyzed water samples obtained in expeditions of 2014-2016 from the Black Sea, the Aral Sea, Lake Issyk-Kul and Caspian Sea. The filtered samples were submitted to high accuracy (up to 0.00001 g/cm3) density measurements in laboratory using the Anton Paar DMA 5000M in the temperature range from 1 to 29°C. The absolute salinity values of the initial samples were obtained through the dry residue method. Further, we diluted the samples by purified deionized water to produce different salinities. To control the accuracy of the dilution process, we used a reference sample of standard IAPSO-certified seawater at 35‰. The density versus salinity and temperature data obtained thereby were then approximated by a best fitting 2-order polynomial surface using the least squares method. This procedure yielded the approximate empirical equations of state for the selected marine areas (the Russian Black Sea shelf) and inland water bodies (the Aral Sea, the Lake Issyk-Kul, the Caspian Sea). The newly derived equations - even the one for the Black Sea shelf - are different from the oceanic equation significantly within the

  18. Local Heroes Live!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-09-01

    Physics teacher Andrew Morrison from High Pavement College in Nottingham has recently been appointed as Schools' officer for particle physics by the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, as part of the Council's Public Understanding of Science programme. As well as his role as an experienced physics teacher, Andrew has acted as marketing manager for his college and chair of the Nottinghamshire section of the Association for Science Education. He will now be working two days each week in his new role with PPARC, acting as a link between the science education and research communities, helping researchers develop ideas for promoting particle physics and leading some specific new projects for the production of schools materials. Andrew can be contacted at High Pavement Sixth Form College, Gainsford Crescent, Nottingham NG5 5HT (tel: 0115 916 6165 or e-mail: morrison@innotts.co.uk). On the other side of the Atlantic, an 18 year-old student at Atlee High School in Mechanicsville, Virginia, USA was the recipient of the `1999 Young Scientist of the Year' award. Jakob Harmon submitted a project on magnetic levitation (maglev) in this extracurricular competition organized by PhysLINK.com, a leading Internet authority on physics and engineering education. The prize was a summer placement at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, where Jakob continued his education in one of the most active maglev research and development groups in the USA. He also received science books and software as part of the award. The PhysLINK.com award was established to recognize, encourage and foster talented high school students in physics and engineering, with the prize being designed to fit the specific needs and aspirations of each individual winner. Details of next year's competition, along with Jakob's project and more about magnetic levitation can be viewed at www.physlink.com or by contacting Anton Skorucak of PhysLINK.com at 11271 Ventura Blvd #299, Studio City, CA 91606

  19. Viscosity of carbonate-rich melts under different oxygen fugacity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Genova, Danilo; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-04-01

    Viscosity is a fundamental property of many materials and its changes affects the fluid dynamics of natural system as well as industrial processes. The mobility of carbonatitic melts, which are carbonate-rich and very fluid melts, has attracted renewed interest in both earth science and industry. In fact, these melts are considered the main transport agent of carbon from the mantle to the crust and may be intimately linked to the generation of kimberlites. At the same time lithium, potassium and sodium carbonate are used as electrolytes in molten carbonate fuel cells which operate at high temperatures (~650° C) for the production of electricity without CO2 emissions. Accurate measurement of the transport property (i.e. viscosity) of carbonatitic melts is a priority in order to understand the carbonatite mobility and reaction rates. Additionally, obtaining accurate viscosity measurements of such low viscosity melts is however an experimental challenge due to volatility, very low torques and chemical melt instability in the viscometer. To overcome these limitations we have customized a Modular Compact Rheometer (MCR 502 from Anton Paar) ad hoc equipped with 2 narrow gap concentric-cylinder geometries of steel and Pt-Au. The rheometer is characterized by an air-bearing-supported synchronous motor with torque ranging between 0.01 μNm and 230 mNm (resolution of 0.1 nNm), achieving very low viscosity measurements in the order of mPa s, temperatures up to 1000° C and shear rates ranging between 1 and 100 sec-1. These experimental conditions well match the temperature-viscosity-shear rate window relevant for carbonate melts. Here we present the calibration of the rheometer and the results of a rheological characterization study on a series of very low viscous synthetic and natural carbonatitic melts at different oxygen fugacity (air and CO2 saturated atmosphere). Viscosity measurements on carbonate melts have been performed in the temperature range between ~650 and 1000

  20. A novel method for trace tritium transport studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonheure, Georges; Mlynar, Jan; Murari, A.; Giroud, C.; Belo, P.; Bertalot, L.; Popovichev, S.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2009-08-01

    A new method combining a free-form solution for the neutron emissivity and the ratio method (Bonheure et al 2006 Nucl. Fusion 46 725-40) is applied to the investigation of tritium particle transport in JET plasmas. The 2D neutron emissivity is calculated using the minimum Fisher regularization method (MFR) (Anton et al 1996 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 38 1849, Mlynar et al 2003 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 45 169). This method is being developed and studied alongside other methods at JET. The 2D neutron emissivity was significantly improved compared with the first MFR results by constraining the emissivity along the magnetic flux surfaces. 1D profiles suitable for transport analysis are then obtained by subsequent poloidal integration. In methods on which previous JET publications are based (Stork et al 2005 Nucl. Fusion 45 S181, JET Team (prepared by Zastrow) 1999 Nucl. Fusion 39 1891, Zastrow et al 2004 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 46 B255, Adams et al 1993 Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 329 277, Jarvis et al 1997 Fusion Eng. Des. 34-35 59, Jarvis et al 1994 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 36 219), the 14.07 MeV D-T neutron line integrals measurements were simulated and the transport coefficients varied until good fits were obtained. In this novel approach, direct knowledge of tritium concentration or the fuel ratio nT/nD is obtained using all available neutron profile information, e.g both 2.45 MeV D-D neutron profiles and 14.07 MeV D-T neutron profiles (Bonheure et al 2006 Nucl.Fusion 46 725-40). Tritium particle transport coefficients are then determined using a linear regression from the dynamic response of the tritium concentration nT/nD profile. The temporal and spatial evolution of tritium particle concentration was studied for a set of JET discharges with tritium gas puffs from the JET trace tritium experiments. Local tritium transport coefficients were derived from the particle flux equation Γ = -D∇nT + VnT, where D is the particle diffusivity and V the

  1. Comparison of UV irradiances from Aura/Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) with Brewer measurements at El Arenosillo (Spain) - Part 1: Analysis of parameter influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, M.; Cachorro, V. E.; Vilaplana, J. M.; Toledano, C.; Krotkov, N. A.; Arola, A.; Serrano, A.; de La Morena, B.

    2010-03-01

    The main objective of this study is to compare the erythemal UV irradiance (UVER) and spectral UV irradiances (at 305, 310 and 324 nm) from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard NASA EOS/Aura polar sun-synchronous satellite (launched in July 2004, local equator crossing time 01:45 p.m.) with ground-based measurements from the Brewer spectroradiometer #150 located at El Arenosillo (South of Spain). The analyzed period comprises more than four years, from October 2004 to December 2008. The effects of several factors (clouds, aerosols, ozone and the solar elevation) on OMI-Brewer comparisons were analyzed. The proxies used for each factor were: OMI Lambertian Equivalent Reflectivity (LER) at 360 nm (clouds), the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at 440 nm measured from the ground-based Cimel sun-photometer (http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov), OMI total column ozone, and solar elevation at OMI overpass time. The comparison for all sky conditions reveals positive biases (OMI higher than Brewer) 12.3% for UVER, 14.2% for UV irradiance at 305 nm, 10.6% for 310 nm and 8.7% for 324 nm. The OMI-Brewer Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) is reduced when cloudy cases are removed from the analysis, (e.g., RMSE ~20% for all sky conditions and RMSE smaller than 10% for cloud-free conditions). However, the biases remain and even become more significant for the cloud-free cases with respect to all sky conditions. The mentioned overestimation is clearly documented as due to aerosol extinction influence. The differences OMI-Brewer typically decrease with increasing the Solar Zenith Angle (SZA). The seasonal dependence of the OMI-Brewer difference for cloud-free conditions is driven by aerosol climatology. To account for the aerosol effect, a first evaluation in order to compare with previous TOMS results (Anton et al., 2007) was performed. This comparison shows that the OMI bias is between +14% and +19% for UVER and spectral UV irradiances

  2. Relating rheological measurements to primary and secondary skin feeling when mineral-based and Fischer-Tropsch wax-based cosmetic emulsions and jellies are applied to the skin.

    PubMed

    Bekker, M; Webber, G V; Louw, N R

    2013-08-01

    Rheology measurements were correlated to skin sensations occurring when cream and petroleum jelly cosmetic products containing different amounts of synthetic Fischer-Tropsch wax were applied to the skin. A panel of 15 people with a background in cosmetic product development were asked to rate skin feelings when a range of petroleum jelly and cream samples are applied to the skin. Primary skin feel, or the spreadability of a cosmetic product, was correlated to the product's flow onset and maximum viscosity as measured by a Anton Paar rheometer, whereas secondary skin feel or the sensation occurring at the end of application when the product was completely rubbed into the skin was correlated to the product's viscosity measured at high shear rates. The cream samples prepared with a petroleum jelly containing 10% and 20% Fischer-Tropsch wax fell within the boundary of good primary skin feeling of cream products. Predominantly, synthetic petroleum jellies were given the best assessments in terms of primary skin feeling and were used with mineral-based petroleum jellies to determine the boundary of good primary skin feeling for petroleum jelly products. The further away a product falls from this rheological boundary the poorer the skin feeling assessment appears to be by the panel. Products containing Fischer-Tropsch waxes were given the best assessment by the panel for secondary skin feeling. Comments from the panel include that these products feel silky and light on the skin. The higher the Fischer-Tropsch wax content, the lower viscosity was at high shear rate (ϒ = 500 s(-1) ) and the higher the assessment by the panel. Rheological measurements can be used to objectively determine skin sensation when products are applied to the skin; this may shorten research and development times. A rheology boundary of certain product viscosity and shear stress applied is associated with good primary skin feeling for lotions, creams and petroleum jellies. Lower product viscosity

  3. [Mental disease in two classical music composers].

    PubMed

    Rempelakos, L; Poulakou-Rebelakou, E; Ploumpidis, D

    2012-01-01

    A study οn two neglected classical music composers suffering a not syphilitic mental disease, is attempted here, syphilis of the central nervous system being frequent in that time. A brief overview on the psychiatric ailments of many great composers reveals suicide attempts and more or less severe depression following external events. The issue of a possible relationship between mental disease and (musical) creativity can be discussed, as mood swings and a certain tendency to melancholia are frequent features of a talented brain (a fact that can also be detected in their works). The first case presented here is Hans Rott from Austria, the beloved student of Anton Bruckner, who was considered to be at least equal to his famous classmate Gustav Mahler. The great expectations of his teacher and his friends suddenly came to an end, when he suffered a crisis of schizophrenia and was hospitalized in an insane asylum in Lower Austria. The tragic psychiatric adventure of the young musician lasted almost four years. He was diagnosed as a case of "hallucinatory insanity" and "persecution mania" by the medical staff, before dying of tuberculosis, aged only 26, and having completed only one symphony and several smaller works. His name came again on surface only a century after his death, when in 1989 his Symphony in E Major was discovered and premiered with great success, permitting to its creator a posthumous recognition, among Bruckner and Mahler. The second case of mental illness is that of the Armenian Komitas Vardapet. He was an orphan who grew up in theological schools and became a monk and later a priest, though he spent some years in Berlin in order to develop his musical skills. He is considered to be an authority of Armenian ecclesiastic music, introducing polyphony in the Armenian Church's music and collecting numerous traditional songs from all parts of Armenia. In 1915, during the Armenian genocide he was deported, tortured but finally saved, due to interventions

  4. Land surface model over forest and lake surfaces in a boreal site - Evaluation of the tiling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique Suñén, A.; Nordbo, A.; Balsamo, G.; Beljaars, A.; Mammarella, I.

    2012-04-01

    Land surface model over forest and lake surfaces in a boreal site - Evaluation of the tiling method Andrea Manrique Suñén1, Annika Nordbo2, Gianpaolo Balsamo1, Anton Beljaars1 and Ivan Mammarella2 1 ECMWF, Reading, UK 2 University of Helsinki, Finland The tiling method is used by many models to represent the surface heterogeneity. Each grid-box is divided into fractions of different types of surface, and an area-weighted average of the energy fluxes is computed to couple with the atmosphere. This method provides a flexible characterisation of land complexity, and separate information of sub grid variables. However, not much assessment of its validity has been carried out. To evaluate results for two contrasting surfaces, the Hydrology Tiled ECMWF Scheme for Surface Exchanges has been run offline for the year 2006, forced by the ERA-Interim reanalysis data over a boreal site in southern Finland for two cases. The first one corresponds to a full coverage of the grid-box by high vegetation, and the second one to a full coverage by a lake. The lake model Flake was incorporated into the system to represent inland water processes. It uses a simple parameterisation which has proved to perform well for numerical weather prediction. The resulting fluxes for both cases have been compared to observational data from two stations situated near each other in a Scots pine forest (Hyytiälä) and in a small boreal lake (Valkea-Kotinen), in southern Finland. The turbulent fluxes at the sites were measured using the Eddy-covariance technique. Net radiation, change in heat storage, wind speed, air temperature, and specific humidity and surface pressure were also available for each site. The diurnal and seasonal cycles of the energy fluxes for these contrasting surfaces have been evaluated, and the different energy partitioning has been explained. In general, the effect of the lake's thermal inertia is well represented by the model. The only shortcoming of the lake model appears to

  5. Maribor General Hospital from its foundation until World War II.

    PubMed

    Pivec, Gregor

    2006-01-01

    The author describes the history of Maribor General Hospital from its foundation in 1799 until the beginning of World War II. In 1799 the magistrate of the town of Maribor issued a memorandum regarding the establishment of a town hospital in the renovated building of the town hospice, providing space for 24 patients. The work of the hospital was carried out in the former hospice building until 1855. In the period between its establishment and eventual relocation 26 beds were added. The last two decades of the hospital's operation at the original location were marked by the assiduous work of the town's physicist, Dr. Anton Kuker. In the first half of the 19th century, the population of Maribor grew rapidly as a consequence of the construction of the Southern Railway. The town authorities therefore purchased the Prosenjak family villa in the Magdalena suburbs and relocated the hospital to it in 1855, providing 28 rooms for 110 patients. For a whole century, the care of patients was taken over by the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul. The hospital was soon admitting over 1000 patients a year, the most common complaints being pulmonary catarrh, gastritis and fever. In 1872, when the Master of Surgery Feliks Ferk joined the hospital, the internal "medical" and the "external" surgical departments were formed. Although medical studies were not easily accessible, there were a number of Slovene physicians working in the hospital and the town in that period. In the last decades of the 19th century, the hospital was often renovated and enlarged. The infrastructure (telephone, water supply system, heating, lighting) had also been modernized before World War I. In 1914, the first X-ray apparatus was purchased. Between the wars, the hospital's development was boosted by recruitment of the Slovene physicians Ivan Matko, Mirko Cernic, Janko Dernovsek and Hugon Robic. The initial external and medical departments split into several departments: internal medicine, surgery

  6. Cell type complexity in the basal metazoan Hydra is maintained by both stem cell based mechanisms and transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Stefan; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Bosch, Thomas C G

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms controlling the stability of the differentiated cell state is a fundamental problem in biology. To characterize the critical regulatory events that control stem cell behavior and cell plasticity in vivo in an organism at the base of animal evolution, we have generated transgenic Hydra lines [Wittlieb, J., Khalturin, K., Lohmann, J., Anton-Erxleben, F., Bosch, T.C.G., 2006. Transgenic Hydra allow in vivo tracking of individual stem cells during morphogenesis. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 103, 6208-6211] which express eGFP in one of the differentiated cell types. Here we present a novel line which expresses eGFP specifically in zymogen gland cells. These cells are derivatives of the interstitial stem cell lineage and have previously been found to express two Dickkopf related genes [Augustin, R., Franke, A., Khalturin, K., Kiko, R., Siebert, S. Hemmrich, G., Bosch, T.C.G., 2006. Dickkopf related genes are components of the positional value gradient in Hydra. Dev. Biol. 296 (1), 62-70]. In the present study we have generated transgenic Hydra in which eGFP expression is under control of the promoter of one of them, HyDkk1/2/4 C. Transgenic Hydra recapitulate faithfully the previously described graded activation of HyDkk1/2/4 C expression along the body column, indicating that the promoter contains all elements essential for spatial and temporal control mechanisms. By in vivo monitoring of eGFP+ gland cells, we provide direct evidence for continuous transdifferentiation of zymogen cells into granular mucous cells in the head region. We also show that in this tissue a subpopulation of mucous gland cells directly derives from interstitial stem cells. These findings indicate that both stem cell-based mechanisms and transdifferentiation are involved in normal development and maintenance of cell type complexity in Hydra. The results demonstrate a remarkable plasticity in the differentiation capacity of cells in an organism which diverged before

  7. [Feliks Karol Koneczny - academic career path].

    PubMed

    Biliński, Piotr

    2005-01-01

    Feliks Koneczny's ideas in history and philosophy of history are well-known in today's world. Since the 1990s many researchers have devoted their interests and studies to that very matter. They have written a lot about the issue. Yet there hasn't been even one thorough biography of that outstanding scholar based on an in-depth archival query. It was the author's research conducted in national and foreign archives, that finally provided the answer to the hitherto unexplained, mysteries concerning Feliks Koneczny. Feliks Koneczny (1862-1949) graduated from the Faculty of Philosophy at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow and began work as an office senior lecturer at the Academy of Arts and Sciences; since 1897, he worked at the Jagiellonian Library. After Poland regained its independence, he became an assistant professor in 1919. In June 1920, after he had qualified received the degree of doctor habilitatus, he became a professor of the Stefan Batory University in Vilnius. After having retired in 1929, he came back to Cracow. His interests moved from purely historical research to the philosophy of history, religion and philosophy. During the Second World War his two sons were killed by the Nazis, and part of his house was occupied by German co-tenants. His pioneering works dealing with the history of Russia. As well as his theory the evolution of civilizations are among his greatest achievements. Foreign researchers and scholars, among them Anton Hilckman, Arnold Toynbee and Samuel Huntington widely draw upon Feliks Koneczny's works and achievements. In 1948, after sixty years of research work Koneczny calculated that his written scholarly output encompassed 26 volumes, each of them being 300 to 400 pages long, not to mention more than 300 articles, brochures and reprints. Although a lot of Polish scholars can boast of having completed more works than he had not many Polish historians can prode themselves on such an enormous scape of research, which included

  8. Volumetric Properties of Dilute Aqueous Solutions of 1- and 2-propanol to 50 MPa and 373.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, J.; Bahramian, J.; Blackwell, R.; Inaki, T.; York, D.; Schulte, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The need to accurately model and understand reactions among organic compounds and biomolecules in solution is necessary to develop realistic chemical models for the reactions leading to the emergence of life and metabolic processes of extremophiles under elevated temperature and pressure conditions. Unfortunately, the scarcity of experimentally determined volumetric (and other) properties for important compounds at high temperatures and pressures leads to uncertainty in the calculation of reaction properties. Experimentally determined volumetric properties of aqueous solutions at non-standard conditions provide direct tests of current estimation methods and aid in the refinement of these methods. The goal of our research is to provide a database of experimentally determined volumetric properties. In previous studies, we have examined important organic molecules and biomolecules such as adenosine, coenzyme M and D-ribose. In this study, we investigate the volumetric properties of the structural isomers 1- and 2-propanol. 1-propanol (n-propanol) is a primary alcohol (CH3CH2CH2OH) and 2-propanol (isopropanol) is the simplest example of a secondary alcohol (CH3CHOHCH3). These compounds differ slightly in structure depending on to which carbon atom the hydroxyl group is bonded and will provide a sensitive test of current estimation methods and lead to more accurate predictions of the properties of complex aqueous systems at elevated temperatures and pressures. We obtained the densities of aqueous solutions of the alchohols using an Anton Paar DMA HP vibrating tube densimeter. Pressure was measured (pressure transducer) to an accuracy of ±0.01% and temperature was measured (integrated platinum thermometer) with an accuracy of ±0.05 K. Experimental uncertainty of density measurements is less than ±0.0001 g·cm-3. The partial molar volumes at infinite dilution (V∞) for 1- and 2-propanol were calculated from the measured densities and are shown in the figure at 0

  9. Giovanni Verga (1879-1923), author of a pioneering treatise on pituitary surgery: the foundations of this new field in Europe in the early 1900s.

    PubMed

    Pascual, José M; Mongardi, Lorenzo; Prieto, Ruth; Castro-Dufourny, Inés; Rosdolsky, María; Strauss, Sewan; Carrasco, Rodrigo; Winter, Eduard; Mazzarello, Paolo

    2017-05-27

    The field of pituitary surgery was born in the first decade of the twentieth century in Europe, and it evolved rapidly with the development of numerous innovative surgical techniques by some of the founding fathers of neurosurgery. This study investigates the pioneering Italian treatise on pituitary surgery, La Patologia Chirurgica dell'Ipofisi (Surgical Pathology of the Hypophysis), published in 1911 by Giovanni Verga (1879-1923), a surgeon from Pavía and one of Golgi's disciples. This little-known monograph compiles the earliest experience on pituitary surgery through the analysis of the first 50 procedures performed between 1903 and 1911. We conducted a biographical survey of Giovanni Verga and the motivations for his work on pituitary surgery. In addition, a systematic analysis of all original reports and historical documents about these pituitary procedures referenced in Verga's treatise was carried out. Verga's treatise provides a summary of the techniques employed and surgical outcomes for the first 50 attempted procedures of pituitary tumor removal. This monograph is the only scientific source that includes a complete account of the series of 10 pituitary tumors operated on by Sir Victor Horsley in the 1900s. Three major types of surgery were employed: (i) palliative procedures of craniectomy (n = 6); (ii) transcranial approaches to the pituitary gland, either subfrontal or subtemporal (n = 13); and (iii) transphenoidal routes to expose the sella turcica, either using an upper transnasal-transethmoidal approach (n = 19) or a lower sublabial/endonasal-transeptal one (n = 12). An operative mortality rate of 36% (n = 17) was observed in these early series. The pathological nature of the tumors operated on was available in 42 cases. There were 28 adenomas and 15 craniopharyngiomas. Sir Victor Horsley (1857-1916) and the Viennese surgeons Anton von Eiselsberg (1860-1939) and Oskar Hirsch (1877-1965) were the leading European figures in the development

  10. Post-translational Modification of Ribosomal Proteins: Structural and Functional Characterization of RimO from Thermotoga maritima, a Radical S-adenosylmethionine methylthiotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Arragain, S.; Latour, J; Forouhar, F; Neely, H; Montelione, G; Hunt, J; Mulliez, E; Fontecave, M; Atta, M; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of ribosomal proteins are important for the accuracy of the decoding machinery. A recent in vivo study has shown that the rimO gene is involved in generation of the 3-methylthio derivative of residue Asp-89 in ribosomal protein S12 (Anton, B. P., Saleh, L., Benner, J. S., Raleigh, E. A., Kasif, S., and Roberts, R. J. (2008) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 105, 1826-1831). This reaction is formally identical to that catalyzed by MiaB on the C2 of adenosine 37 near the anticodon of several tRNAs. We present spectroscopic evidence that Thermotoga maritima RimO, like MiaB, contains two [4Fe-4S] centers, one presumably bound to three invariant cysteines in the central radical S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) domain and the other to three invariant cysteines in the N-terminal UPF0004 domain. We demonstrate that holo-RimO can specifically methylthiolate the aspartate residue of a 20-mer peptide derived from S12, yielding a mixture of mono- and bismethylthio derivatives. Finally, we present the 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the central radical AdoMet and the C-terminal TRAM (tRNA methyltransferase 2 and MiaB) domains in apo-RimO. Although the core of the open triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel of the radical AdoMet domain was conserved, RimO showed differences in domain organization compared with other radical AdoMet enzymes. The unusually acidic TRAM domain, likely to bind the basic S12 protein, is located at the distal edge of the radical AdoMet domain. The basic S12 protein substrate is likely to bind RimO through interactions with both the TRAM domain and the concave surface of the incomplete TIM barrel. These biophysical results provide a foundation for understanding the mechanism of methylthioation by radical AdoMet enzymes in the MiaB/RimO family.

  11. Post-translational Modification of Ribosomal Proteins - Structural and Functional Characterization of RimO from Thermotoga Maritima, A Radiacal S-Adenosylmethionine Methylthiotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Arragain, S.; Garcia-Serres, R; Blondin, G; Douki, T; Clemancey, M; Latour, J; Forouhar, F; Neely, H; Montelione, G; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of ribosomal proteins are important for the accuracy of the decoding machinery. A recent in vivo study has shown that the rimO gene is involved in generation of the 3-methylthio derivative of residue Asp-89 in ribosomal protein S12 (Anton, B. P., Saleh, L., Benner, J. S., Raleigh, E. A., Kasif, S., and Roberts, R. J. (2008) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 105, 1826-1831). This reaction is formally identical to that catalyzed by MiaB on the C2 of adenosine 37 near the anticodon of several tRNAs. We present spectroscopic evidence that Thermotoga maritima RimO, like MiaB, contains two [4Fe-4S] centers, one presumably bound to three invariant cysteines in the central radical S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) domain and the other to three invariant cysteines in the N-terminal UPF0004 domain. We demonstrate that holo-RimO can specifically methylthiolate the aspartate residue of a 20-mer peptide derived from S12, yielding a mixture of mono- and bismethylthio derivatives. Finally, we present the 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the central radical AdoMet and the C-terminal TRAM (tRNA methyltransferase 2 and MiaB) domains in apo-RimO. Although the core of the open triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel of the radical AdoMet domain was conserved, RimO showed differences in domain organization compared with other radical AdoMet enzymes. The unusually acidic TRAM domain, likely to bind the basic S12 protein, is located at the distal edge of the radical AdoMet domain. The basic S12 protein substrate is likely to bind RimO through interactions with both the TRAM domain and the concave surface of the incomplete TIM barrel. These biophysical results provide a foundation for understanding the mechanism of methylthioation by radical AdoMet enzymes in the MiaB/RimO family.

  12. Network representation of conformational transitions between hidden intermediates of Rd-apocytochrome b562

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Mojie; Liu, Hanzhong; Li, Minghai; Huo, Shuanghong

    2015-01-01

    The folding kinetics of Rd-apocytochrome b562 is two-state, but native-state hydrogen exchange experiments show that there are discrete partially unfolded (PUF) structures in equilibrium with the native state. These PUF structures are called hidden intermediates because they are not detected in kinetic experiments and they exist after the rate-limiting step. Structures of the mimics of hidden intermediates of Rd-apocytochrome b562 are resolved by NMR. Based upon their relative stability and structural features, the folding mechanism was proposed to follow a specific pathway (unfolded → rate-limiting transition state → PUF1 → PUF2 → native). Investigating the roles of equilibrium PUF structures in folding kinetics and their interrelationship not only deepens our understanding of the details of folding mechanism but also provides guides in protein design and prevention of misfolding. We performed molecular dynamics simulations starting from a hidden intermediate and the native state of Rd-apocytochrome b562 in explicit solvent, for a total of 37.18 μs mainly with Anton. We validated our simulations by detailed comparison with experimental data and other computations. We have verified that we sampled the post rate-limiting transition state region only. Markov state model was used to analyze the simulation results. We replace the specific pathway model with a network model. Transition-path theory was employed to calculate the net effective flux from the most unfolded state towards the most folded state in the network. The proposed sequential folding pathway via PUF1 then more stable, more native-like PUF2 is one of the routes in our network, but it is not dominant. The dominant path visits PUF2 without going through PUF1. There is also a route from PUF1 directly to the most folded state in the network without visiting PUF2. Our results indicate that the PUF states are not necessarily sequential in the folding. The major routes predicted in our network are

  13. [Electroconvulsive therapy and level of evidence: From causality to dose-effect relationship].

    PubMed

    Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Quilès, C; Cermolacce, M; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Fakra, E; Azorin, J-M

    2016-12-01

    The first objective of this article is to summarize the history of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in psychiatry in order to highlight the transition from clinical level of evidence based on phenomenological descriptions to controlled trial establishing causal relationship. The second objective is to apply the criteria of causation for ECT, to focus on the dose-effect relationship criteria, and thus to analyze the conditions of application of these criteria for ECT. A literature review exploring the use of electricity, ECT and electroencephalography (EEG) in psychiatry was conducted. The publications were identified from the Pubmed and GoogleScholar electronic databases. The scientific literature search of international articles was performed in July 2016. In 1784, a Royal commission established in France by King Louis XVI tested Mesmer's claims concerning animal magnetism. By doing that, the commission, including such prominent scientists as the chemist Anton Lavoisier and the scientist and researcher on electricity and therapeutics Benjamin Franklin, played a central role in establishing the criteria needed to assess the level of evidence of electrical therapeutics in psychiatry. Surprisingly, it is possible to identify the classical Bradford Hill criteria of causation in the report of the commission, except the dose-effect relationship criteria. Since then, it has been conducted blinded randomized controlled trials that confirmed the effectiveness of ECT against ECT placebos for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. At present, the dose-effect relationship criteria can be analyzed through an EEG quality assessment of ECT-induced seizures. EEG quality assessment includes several indices: TSLOW (time to onset of seizure activity ≤5Hz, seconds), peak mid-ictal amplitude (mm), regularity (intensity or morphology of the seizure (0-6)), stereotypy (global seizure patterning, 0-3) and post-ictal suppression (0-3). A manual rating sheet is needed to score theses

  14. Possible changes in ground-water flow to the Pecos River caused by Santa Rosa Lake, Guadalupe County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risser, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    In 1980 Santa Rosa Dam began impounding water on the Pecos River about 7 miles north of Santa Rosa, New Mexico, to provide flood control, sediment control, and storage for irrigation. Santa Rosa Lake has caused changes in the groundwater flow system, which may cause changes in the streamflow of the Pecos River that cannot be detected at the present streamflow gaging stations. Data collected at these stations are used to measure the amount of water available for downstream users. A three-dimensional groundwater flow model for a 950 sq mi area between Anton Chico and Puerto de Luna was used to simulate the effects of Santa Rosa Lake on groundwater flow to a gaining reach of the Pecos River for lake levels of 4,675, 4,715, 4,725, 4,750, 4,776, and 4,797 feet above sea level and durations of impoundment of 30, 90, 182, and 365 days for all levels except 4 ,797 feet. These simulations indicated that streamflow in the Pecos River could increase by as much as 2 cu ft/sec between the dam and Puerto de Luna if the lake level were maintained at 4 ,797 feet for 90 days or 4,776 feet for 1 year. About 90% of this increased streamflow would occur < 0.5 mi downstream from the dam, some of which would be measured at the streamflow gaging station located 0.2 mile downstream from the dam. Simulations also indicated that the lake will affect groundwater flow such that inflow to the study area may be decreased by as much as 1.9 cu ft/sec. This water may leave the Pecos River drainage basin or be diverted back to the Pecos River downstream from the gaging station near Puerto de Luna. In either case, this quantity represents a net loss of water upstream from Puerto de Luna. Most simulations indicated that the decrease in groundwater flow into the study area would be of about the same quantity as the simulated increase in streamflow downstream from the dam. Therefore, the net effect of the lake on the flow of the Pecos River in the study area appears to be negligible. Model simulations

  15. Effects of Long-Term Exercise on Age-Related Hearing Loss in Mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Chul; Ding, Dalian; Lopez, Maria-Cecilia; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Zhang, Yanping; Kim, Mi-Jung; Park, Hyo-Jin; White, Karessa; Kim, Yong Hwan; Linser, Paul; Tanokura, Masaru; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Baker, Henry V; Salvi, Richard J; Someya, Shinichi

    2016-11-02

    Regular physical exercise reduces the risk for obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and disability and is associated with longer lifespan expectancy (Taylor et al., 2004; Pahor et al., 2014; Anton et al., 2015; Arem et al., 2015). In contrast, decreased physical function is associated with hearing loss among older adults (Li et al., 2013; Chen et al., 2015). Here, we investigated the effects of long-term voluntary wheel running (WR) on age-related hearing loss (AHL) in CBA/CaJ mice, a well established model of AHL (Zheng et al., 1999). WR activity peaked at 6 months of age (12,280 m/d) and gradually decreased over time. At 24 months of age, the average WR distance was 3987 m/d. Twenty-four-month-old runners had less cochlear hair cell and spiral ganglion neuron loss and better auditory brainstem response thresholds at the low and middle frequencies compared with age-matched, non-WR controls. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis of inner ear tissues from 6-month-old controls and runners revealed that WR resulted in a marked enrichment for GO gene sets associated with immune response, inflammatory response, vascular function, and apoptosis. In agreement with these results, there was reduced stria vascularis (SV) atrophy and reduced loss of capillaries in the SV of old runners versus old controls. Given that SV holds numerous capillaries that are essential for transporting oxygen and nutrients into the cochlea, our findings suggest that long-term exercise delays the progression of AHL by reducing age-related loss of strial capillaries associated with inflammation. Nearly two-thirds of adults aged 70 years or older develop significant age-related hearing loss (AHL), a condition that can lead to social isolation and major communication difficulties. AHL is also associated with decreased physical function among older adults. In the current study, we show that regular exercise slowed AHL and cochlear degeneration significantly in a well established murine model. Our data

  16. Effects of Long-Term Exercise on Age-Related Hearing Loss in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chul; Ding, Dalian; Lopez, Maria-Cecilia; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Zhang, Yanping; Kim, Mi-Jung; Park, Hyo-Jin; White, Karessa; Kim, Yong Hwan; Linser, Paul; Tanokura, Masaru; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Baker, Henry V.; Salvi, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Regular physical exercise reduces the risk for obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and disability and is associated with longer lifespan expectancy (Taylor et al., 2004; Pahor et al., 2014; Anton et al., 2015; Arem et al., 2015). In contrast, decreased physical function is associated with hearing loss among older adults (Li et al., 2013; Chen et al., 2015). Here, we investigated the effects of long-term voluntary wheel running (WR) on age-related hearing loss (AHL) in CBA/CaJ mice, a well established model of AHL (Zheng et al., 1999). WR activity peaked at 6 months of age (12,280 m/d) and gradually decreased over time. At 24 months of age, the average WR distance was 3987 m/d. Twenty-four-month-old runners had less cochlear hair cell and spiral ganglion neuron loss and better auditory brainstem response thresholds at the low and middle frequencies compared with age-matched, non-WR controls. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis of inner ear tissues from 6-month-old controls and runners revealed that WR resulted in a marked enrichment for GO gene sets associated with immune response, inflammatory response, vascular function, and apoptosis. In agreement with these results, there was reduced stria vascularis (SV) atrophy and reduced loss of capillaries in the SV of old runners versus old controls. Given that SV holds numerous capillaries that are essential for transporting oxygen and nutrients into the cochlea, our findings suggest that long-term exercise delays the progression of AHL by reducing age-related loss of strial capillaries associated with inflammation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Nearly two-thirds of adults aged 70 years or older develop significant age-related hearing loss (AHL), a condition that can lead to social isolation and major communication difficulties. AHL is also associated with decreased physical function among older adults. In the current study, we show that regular exercise slowed AHL and cochlear degeneration significantly in a well established

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Initial Gaia Source List (IGSL) (Smart, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, R. L.; Nicastro, L.

    2013-11-01

    The IGSL is a compilation catalog produced for the Gaia mission. We have combined data from the following catalogs or datasets to produce a homogenous list of positons, proper motions, photometry in a blue and red band and estimates of the magnitudes in the Gaia G and G_RVS bands. Included Catalogs: Tycho2, LQRF, UCAC4, SDSS-DR9, PPMXL, GSC23, GEPC, OGLE, Sky2000, 2MASS. Note that in compiling the various entries we did not consider the individual flags. Overall, we think this catalog is reliable but there will be errors, mismatches and duplicates. The user should use this catalog with that in mind, it is fine for statistical studies that has some way to remove obviously incorrect entries but it should only be used with care for individual objects. The source catalogs used to produce the IGSL are: * The Gaia Ecliptic Pole Catalog, version 3.0 (GEPC) Altmann & Bastian 2009, "Ecliptic Poles Catalogue Version 1.1" ESA Document GAIA-C3-TN-ARI-MA-002 URL http://www.rssd.esa.int/llink/livelink/open/2885828 * GSC2.3: GSC2 version 2.3, Lasker et al. 2008AJ....136..735L (I/305) * an excerpt of the 4th version of the Gaia Initial QSO Catalog (GIQC) as compiled by the GWP-S-335-13000, formed by Alexandre H. Andrei, Christophe Barache, Dario N. da Silva Neto, Francois Taris, Geraldine Bourda, Jean-Francois Le Campion, Jean Souchay, J.J. Pereira Osorio, Julio I. Bueno de Camargo, Marcelo Assafin, Roberto Vieira Martins, Sebastien Bouquillon, Sebastien Lambert, Sonia Anton, Patrick Charlot * OGLE: Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment version III (Szymaski et al., 2011, Cat. J/AcA/61/83) * PPMXL: Positions and Proper Motions "Extra Large" Catalog, Roeser et al. (2010, Cat. I/317) * SDSS: Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 9, Cat. V/139 * UCAC4: Zacharias et al., 2012, Cat. I/322 * Tycho-2, Hoeg et al., 2000, Cat. I/259 (1 data file).

  18. Unusually fast 1,6-h shifts of enolic hydrogens in peroxy radicals: formation of the first-generation C2 and C3 carbonyls in the oxidation of isoprene.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Jozef; Nguyen, Thanh Lam

    2012-06-21

    In a theoretical investigation using the CBS-QB3//UB3LYP/6-31+G** method supported by higher-level computations such as CBS-QB3//UQCISD/6-31+G**, the 1,6-H shifts of the enolic hydrogen in peroxy radicals of the type Z-HO-CH═CH-CH(2)-OO(•) were found to face exceptionally low energy barriers of only about 11 kcal mol(-1)--i.e., 6-9 kcal mol(-1) lower than the barriers for similar shifts of alkane hydrogens--such that they can proceed at unequaled rates of order 10(5) to 10(6) s(-1) at ambient temperatures. The unusually low barriers for enolic 1,6-H shifts in peroxy radicals, characterized here for the first time to our knowledge, are rationalized. As cases in point, the secondary peroxy radicals Z-HO-CH═C(CH(3))-CH(OO(•))-CH(2)OH (case A) and Z-HO-CH═CH-C(CH(3))(OO(•))-CH(2)OH (case B) derived from the primary Z-δ-hydroxy-peroxy radicals in the oxidation of isoprene, are predicted to undergo 1,6-H shifts of their enolic hydrogens at TST-calculated rates in the range 270-320 K of k(T)(A) = 5.4 × 10(-4) × T(5.04) × exp(-1990/T) s(-1) and k(T)(B) = 109 × T(3.13) × exp(-3420/T) s(-1), respectively, i.e., 2.0 × 10(6) and 6.2 × 10(4) s(-1), respectively, at 298 K, far outrunning in all relevant atmospheric and laboratory conditions their reactions with NO proposed earlier as their dominant pathways (Dibble J. Phys. Chem. A 2004, 108, 2199). These fast enolic-H shifts are shown to provide the explanation for the first-generation formation of methylglyoxal + glycolaldehyde, and glyoxal + hydroxyacetone in the oxidation of isoprene under high-NO conditions, recently determined by several groups. However, under moderate- and low-NO atmospheric conditions, the fast interconversion and equilibration of the various thermally labile, initial peroxy conformers/isomers from isoprene and the isomerization of the initial Z-δ-hydroxy-peroxy radicals, both recently proposed by us (Peeters et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2009, 11, 5935), are expected to

  19. Combining Ambient Measurements of OH Radicals and OH Reactivity in a Tropical Rainforest during the OP-3 Project: Resolving the Magnitude of the Missing OH Sources and Sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, L. K.; Edwards, P.; Furneaux, K. L.; Goddard, A.; George, I. J.; Evans, M. J.; Heard, D. E.; Team Op-3

    2010-12-01

    effect of 0.74 ppbv of NO. The model is unable to account for all of the OH reactivity; to simulate the OH reactivity a range of unmeasured sinks must be invoked. In general we believe that the simultaneous measurement of OH reactivity and OH concentration enables the separation of OH sources and sinks, allowing a more comprehensive test of our understanding of the radical chemistry occurring in this chemically complex environment. [1] J. Lelieveld, T. M. Butler, J. N. Crowley et al.: Nature, 2008, 452, p.737 - 740 [2] J. Peeters, T. L. Nguyen & L. Vereecken, PCCP, 2009, 11, p.5935 - 5939

  20. Comparisons of observed and modeled OH and HO2 concentrations during the ambient measurement period of the HOxComp field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, Y.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Dorn, H.-P.; Brauers, T.; Fuchs, H.; Holland, F.; Rohrer, F.; Bohn, B.; Tillmann, R.; Wegener, R.; Wahner, A.; Kajii, Y.; Miyamoto, K.; Nishida, S.; Watanabe, K.; Yoshino, A.; Kubistin, D.; Martinez, M.; Rudolf, M.; Harder, H.; Berresheim, H.; Elste, T.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Stange, G.; Kleffmann, J.; Elshorbany, Y.; Schurath, U.

    2012-03-01

    A photochemical box model constrained by ancillary observations was used to simulate OH and HO2 concentrations for three days of ambient observations during the HOxComp field campaign held in Jülich, Germany in July 2005. Daytime OH levels observed by four instruments were fairly well reproduced to within 33% by a base model run (Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism with updated isoprene chemistry adapted from Master Chemical Mechanism ver. 3.1) with high R2 values (0.72-0.97) over a range of isoprene (0.3-2 ppb) and NO (0.1-10 ppb) mixing ratios. Daytime HO2(*) levels, reconstructed from the base model results taking into account the sensitivity toward speciated RO2 (organic peroxy) radicals, as recently reported from one of the participating instruments in the HO2 measurement mode, were 93% higher than the observations made by the single instrument. This also indicates an overprediction of the HO2 to OH recycling. Together with the good model-measurement agreement for OH, it implies a missing OH source in the model. Modeled OH and HO2(*) could only be matched to the observations by addition of a strong unknown loss process for HO2(*) that recycles OH at a high yield. Adding to the base model, instead, the recently proposed isomerization mechanism of isoprene peroxy radicals (Peeters and Müller, 2010) increased OH and HO2(*) by 28% and 13% on average. Although these were still only 4% higher than the OH observations made by one of the instruments, larger overestimations (42-70%) occurred with respect to the OH observations made by the other three instruments. The overestimation in OH could be diminished only when reactive alkanes (HC8) were solely introduced to the model to explain the missing fraction of observed OH reactivity. Moreover, the overprediction of HO2(*) became even larger than in the base case. These analyses imply that the rates of the isomerization are not readily supported by the ensemble of radical observations. One of the measurement days

  1. Evaluating the Effect of Labeled Benchmarks on Children's Number Line Estimation Performance and Strategy Use.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Dominique; Sekeris, Elke; Verschaffel, Lieven; Luwel, Koen

    2017-01-01

    Some authors argue that age-related improvements in number line estimation (NLE) performance result from changes in strategy use. More specifically, children's strategy use develops from only using the origin of the number line, to using the origin and the endpoint, to eventually also relying on the midpoint of the number line. Recently, Peeters et al. (unpublished) investigated whether the provision of additional unlabeled benchmarks at 25, 50, and 75% of the number line, positively affects third and fifth graders' NLE performance and benchmark-based strategy use. It was found that only the older children benefitted from the presence of these benchmarks at the quartiles of the number line (i.e., 25 and 75%), as they made more use of these benchmarks, leading to more accurate estimates. A possible explanation for this lack of improvement in third graders might be their inability to correctly link the presented benchmarks with their corresponding numerical values. In the present study, we investigated whether labeling these benchmarks with their corresponding numerical values, would have a positive effect on younger children's NLE performance and quartile-based strategy use as well. Third and sixth graders were assigned to one of three conditions: (a) a control condition with an empty number line bounded by 0 at the origin and 1,000 at the endpoint, (b) an unlabeled condition with three additional external benchmarks without numerical labels at 25, 50, and 75% of the number line, and (c) a labeled condition in which these benchmarks were labeled with 250, 500, and 750, respectively. Results indicated that labeling the benchmarks has a positive effect on third graders' NLE performance and quartile-based strategy use, whereas sixth graders already benefited from the mere provision of unlabeled benchmarks. These findings imply that children's benchmark-based strategy use can be stimulated by adding additional externally provided benchmarks on the number line, but that

  2. Modulation of the Substitution Pattern of 5-Aryl-2-Aminoimidazoles Allows Fine-Tuning of Their Antibiofilm Activity Spectrum and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Elien; Hooyberghs, Geert; Robijns, Stijn; Waldrant, Kai; De Weerdt, Ami; Delattin, Nicolas; Liebens, Veerle; Kucharíková, Soňa; Tournu, Hélène; Verstraeten, Natalie; Dovgan, Barbara; Girandon, Lenart; Fröhlich, Mirjam; De Brucker, Katrijn; Van Dijck, Patrick; Michiels, Jan; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin; Vanderleyden, Jozef; Van der Eycken, Erik; Steenackers, Hans P

    2016-11-01

    antibiofilm activity spectrum and toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Peeters et al.

  3. EVAPORISATION: a new vapor pressure model taking into account neighbour effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compernolle, Steven; Ceulemans, Karl; Muller, Jean-Francois

    2010-05-01

    pressure method can have a major impact on aerosol yield, considerably larger than the choice of activity coefficient model (Compernolle et al. 2009). M. Capouet and J.-F. Muller, Atm. Chem. Phys. 6, 1455-1467 (2006) M. Capouet, J.-F. Muller, K. Ceulemans, S. Compernolle, L. Vereecken and J. Peeters, J. Geophys. Res. 113, D02308 (2008) S. Compernolle, K. Ceulemans and J. Muller, Atm. Chem. Phys. 9, 1325-1388 (2009) S.H. Hilal, S.W. Karickhoff and L.A. Carreira , QSAR Comb. Sci. 22, 565-574 (2003) P.B. Myrdal and S.H. Yalkowsky, Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 36, 2494-2499 (1997) Y. Nannoolal, J. Rarey and D. Ramjugernath, Fluid Phase Eq. 269, 117-133 (2008) B. Moller, J. Rarey and D. Ramjugernath, J. Mol. Liq. 143, 52-63 (2008)

  4. Micro Flow Cytometry Miniaturisation - Towards in-situ Optical Phytoplankton Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmijan, R.; Abi Kaed Bey, S.; Mowlem, M. C.; Morgan, H.

    2012-04-01

    The use of flow cytometry for studies of temporal and spatial variability of phytoplankton populations is a valuable tool contributing to research relating carbon biogeochemistry and climate change. Early designs and marine deployments of such devices started over two decades ago [1-3]. Miniaturisation and cost reduction without sacrificing performance remains a major challenge but would enable mass production and deployment. Large numbers of measurement nodes (e.g. as part of a global ocean observation system) would be possible which would increase data available over both spatial and temporal scales. This research presents two different design approaches for miniaturisation and integration of optics into a microfluidic cytometer chip. The proposed solutions are suitable for micro cytometers with external components coupled with optical fibres and were simulated and optimised using ray tracing software (Zemax). The two designs address light delivery for excitation of particles within the measurement region of the cytometer. One uses an integrated micro lens (fabricated in the chip) and the other a ball shaped micro lens manufactured separately and then inserted into the chip. Both approaches collimate the excitation light beam (from an off chip diode laser coupled with an optical fibre) into the fluidic channel. The predicted (by ray tracing) excitation beam widths are 70 and 80 µm for the integrated and the ball lens respectively, and are in agreement with experimental data presented. The proposed cytometer chip design is compatible with low cost materials (acrylic glass, cyclo-olefines) and manufacturing methods (micro milling, hot embossing, injection moulding). 1. Dubelaar, G.B.J. and P.L. Gerritzen, CytoBuoy: a step forward towards using flow cytometry in operational oceanography. Scientia Marina, 2000. 64(2): p. 255-265. 2. Peeters, J.C.H., et al., Optical Plankton Analyzer - a Flow Cytometer for Plankton Analysis .1. Design Considerations. Cytometry, 1989

  5. Spectroscopy and photometric flux correlations for a sample of AGNs in the range of 4 ×10^3-25 ×10^4Å

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuera G., M. A.; Rodríguez-Ardila, A.; Tejeiro, J. M.

    2006-06-01

    The Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) unified theory says that the primary role of a dusty torus around a central AGN is to hide the central engine. Nowdays based on near-infrared spectroscopy L-band spectroscopy and data collected from ground and space-based observatories is possible to explore the occurrence of starbursts in the dusty torus (Imanishi et al. 2004). Because the torus is rich in dust and molecular gas, it is a natural place to the ocurrence of starburts activity. The detection of PAH emission from the inner tens of parsecs in several Seyfert sources (Imanishi 2003; Rodríguez-Ardila et al. 2004; Peeters et al. 2004), suggest that the PAH detected emission can be directly associated to star formation episodes in the torus structure. The main goal of this work is to test the above hypothesis by means of flux correlations between the PAHs emission lines and the optical-infrared continuum using the data available in the literature. For a subset of galaxies from the CfA sample we choose continuum flux measurements at the wavelengths 0.6μm, 1.6μm, 2.1μm, 3.5μm (Alonso-Herrero et al. 2003), and 12μm, 25μm (Imanishi 2003, 2004). For our analysis, we selected the ratios F1.6/F3.3, F2.1/F3.3, F12/F3.3 and F25/F3.3 as a function of FOpt/F3.3, and F3.5/F3.3. We found a good correlation between F1.6/F.3.3 vs. FOpt/F3.3 and F2.1/F3.3 vs F3.5/F3.3, however in the other cases the correlations are not so good. The values observed show the presence of dust emission and reddening. In order to refine our study, new relationships need to be established, for example, between the 3.3μm and the other PAH emission lines with: radio emission (1.49); emission from molecular hydrogen H_2 (2.121μm), Brγ (2.165μm) and emissions in the range of soft and hard X-rays.

  6. Ambient measurements of OH and OH reactivity during the OP3 project: Resolving the magnitude of the missing OH source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, L. K.; Furneaux, K.; Edwards, P.; Goddard, A.; Heard, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    and has wide implications, leading to much higher predicted OH over tropical forests, with a concomitant reduction in the methane lifetime and increase in the rate of VOC degradation [4]. [1] Bloss, W. J. et al., Faraday Discuss. 130, 425-436, 2005 [2] Lelieveld, J et al., Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 107, 4715, 2002 [3] Peeters, J. et al., Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 28, 5935-5939, 2009 [4] Whalley, L. K. et al., Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11, 7223-7233, 2011

  7. Effects of climate change on deep-water oxygen and winter mixing in a deep lake (Lake Geneva)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwefel, Robert; Alfred, Wüest; Damien, Bouffard

    2016-04-01

    Oxygen is the most important dissolved gas for lake ecosystems. Because low oxygen concentrations are an ongoing problem in many parts of the oceans and numerous lakes, oxygen depletion processes have been intensively studied over the last decades and were mainly attributed to high nutrient loads. Recently, climate-induced changes in stratification and mixing behavior were recognized as additional thread to hypolimnetic oxygen budgets in lakes and reservoirs [Matzinger et al., 2007; Zhang et al., 2015]. Observational data of Lake Geneva, a deep perialpine lake situated between France and Switzerland showed no decreasing trend in hypoxia over the last 43 years, despite an impressive reduction in nutrient input during this period. Instead, hypoxic conditions were predominantly controlled by deep mixing end of winter and in turn by winter temperatures. To test the sensitivity of Lake Geneva on future climate change and changes in water transparency, we simulated the hydrodynamics and temperature of Lake Geneva under varying conditions for atmospheric temperature and water clarity performed with the one-dimensional model SIMSTRAT [Goudsmit, 2002]. The results show, that the stratification in lakes is only weakly affected by changes in light absorption due to varying water quality. For conditions expected for the end of the century, a decrease in the annual mean deep convective mixing of up to 45 m is predicted. Also complete mixing events over the whole lake are less likely to occur. A change in the hypolimnetic oxygen concentration of up to 20% can thus be expected in the future. These results show, that changes in deep mixing have an equally strong impact as eutrophication on the deep-water oxygen development of oligomictic lakes and have to be considered in the prediction of the future development of lakes. References: Goudsmit, G. H., H. Burchard, F. Peeters, and A. Wüest (2002), Application of k-ɛ turbulence models to enclosed basins: The role of internal

  8. An annotated catalogue and bibliography of the taxonomy, synonymy and distribution of the Recent Vetigastropoda of South Africa (Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Herbert, David G

    2015-11-30

    A complete inventory of the known Recent vetigastropod fauna of South Africa is provided. Bibliographic citations to works discussing the taxonomy, synonymy and distribution of the species in a southern African or south-western Indian Ocean context are provided. Additional explanatory notes are given where pertinent. New genus records for South Africa: Acremodontina B.A. Marshall, 1995; Choristella Bush, 1879; Cocculinella Thiele, 1909; Conjectura Finlay, 1926; Crosseola Iredale, 1924; Falsimargarita Powell, 1951; Lepetella Verrill, 1880; Profundisepta McLean & Geiger, 1998; Stomatella Lamarck, 1816; Stomatia Helbling, 1779; Stomatolina Iredale, 1937; Synaptocochlea Pilsbry, 1890; Tibatrochus Nomura, 1940; Visayaseguenzia Poppe, Tagaro & Dekker, 2006; Zetela Finlay, 1926. New species records for South Africa: Acremodontina aff. carinata Powell, 1940; Anatoma finlayi (Powell, 1937); Anatoma munieri (P. Fischer, 1862); Calliotropis acherontis B.A. Marshall, 1979; Calliotropis bucina Vilvens, 2006; Cocculinella minutissima (E.A. Smith, 1904); Diodora ruppellii (G.B. Sowerby (I), 1835); Emarginula costulata Deshayes, 1863; Emarginula decorata Deshayes, 1863; Jujubinus hubrechti Poppe, Tagaro & Dekker, 2006; Lepetella sp.; Seguenzia orientalis Thiele, 1925; Stomatella auricula Lamarck, 1816; Stomatia phymotis Helbling, 1779; Stomatolina angulata (A. Adams, 1850); Stomatolina cf. calliostoma (A. Adams, 1850); Stomatolina aff. danblumi Singer & Mienis, 1999; Stomatolina cf. rubra (Lamarck, 1822); Stomatolina sp.; Synaptocochlea concinna (Gould, 1845); Tectus mauritianus (Gmelin, 1791); Tibatrochus cf. incertus (Schepman, 1908); Turbo imperialis Gmelin, 1791; Turbo tursicus Reeve, 1848; Visayaseguenzia compsa (Melvill, 1904).New species: Spectamen martensi, replacement name for Spectamen semisculptum sensu Herbert (1987) (non Martens, 1904). New name: Oxystele antoni is proposed as a new name for Trochus (Turbo) variegatus (non Gmelin, 1791 =Heliacus) Anton, 1838. Revised

  9. Magmatic Vapor Phase Transport of Copper in Reduced Porphyry Copper-Gold Deposits: Evidence From PIXE Microanalysis of Fluid Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowins, S. M.; Yeats, C. J.; Ryan, C. G.

    2002-05-01

    Nondestructive proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) studies of magmatic fluid inclusions in granite-related Sn-W deposits [1] reveal that copper transport out of reduced felsic magmas is favored by low-salinity vapor and not co-existing high-salinity liquid (halite-saturated brine). Copper transport by magmatic vapor also has been documented in oxidized porphyry Cu-Au deposits, but the magnitude of Cu partitioning into the vapor compared to the brine generally is less pronounced than in the reduced magmatic Sn-W systems [2]. Consideration of these microanalytical data leads to the hypothesis that Cu and, by inference, Au in the recently established "reduced porphyry copper-gold" (RPCG) subclass should partition preferentially into vapor and not high-salinity liquid exsolving directly from fluid-saturated magmas [3-4]. To test this hypothesis, PIXE microanalysis of primary fluid inclusions in quartz-sulfide (pyrite, pyrrhotite & chalcopyrite) veins from two RPCG deposits was undertaken using the CSIRO-GEMOC nuclear microprobe. PIXE microanalysis for the ~30 Ma San Anton deposit (Mexico) was done on halite-saturated aqueous brine (<10 vol.% vapor) and co-existing low-salinity aqueous vapor (<20 vol.% liquid) inclusions. Results indicate that vapor inclusions have higher concentrations of Cu (typically 1000's of ppm; max. 7277 ppm) compared to brine inclusions (typically 100's of ppm). Brine inclusions also are much higher in Cl (Na), K, Ca, Mn, Zn, and Fe. Only Pb concentrations approach those in the vapor. Metal ratios such as Cu/Fe and Cu/Zn are 2 to 167 times higher in the vapor compared with the brine inclusions. Cu/Pb ratios are 2 to 15 times higher in the vapor than in the brine. PIXE microanalysis for the ~617 Ma 17 Mile Hill deposit (W. Australia) was done on halite-saturated "aqueous" inclusions, which contain a small (<10 vol.%) bubble of carbonic fluid, and adjacent "carbonic" inclusions, which have a thin rim of aqueous liquid (<10 vol.%) wetting the

  10. The "DREAM" IODP project to drill the Mediterranean Salt Giant on the Balearic Promontory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lofi, Johanna; Camerlenghi, Angelo; Aloisi, Giovanni; Maillard, Agnès; Garcia-Castellanos, Daniel; Huebscher, Christian; Kuroda, Junichiro

    2017-04-01

    should allow testing 1) the contradictory emplacement models that explain its genesis and 2) the presence of halophilic micro-organisms it may host/feed. DREAM is a part of a bigger Multi-phase IODP Drilling Project entitled "Uncovering a Salt Giant" (857-MDP, coord. A. Camerlenghi) born out of a series of workshops and international initiatives carried out since 2014. The DREAM pre-proposal P857B has been accepted by the IODP Science Evaluation Panel in January 2016. The full-proposal will be submitted after the acquisition of complementary Site Survey Data in 2017. The DREAM project is performed in close link with various international initiatives including the COST Action CA15103 and ANR Project MEDSALT (Camerlenghi et al., this congress) and the IMMAGE ICDP-IODP amphibious proposal (Flecker et al., this congress). DREAM co-proponents: J. Anton, M.A. Bassetti, D. Birgel, R. Bourillot, A. Caruso, H. Daigle, G. DeLange, F. Dela Pierre, R. Flecker, V. Gaullier, D. Hodell, F. Jimenez-Espejo, W. Krijgsman, L. Lourens, S. Lugli, V. Manzi, T. McGenity, J. McKenzie, P. Meijer, H. Moreno, A. Moscariello, P. Munch, N. Ohkouchi, J. Peckmann, P. Pezard, J. Poort, M. Roveri, F. Sierro, K. Takai, T. Treude.

  11. Visions of Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiao, Raymond Y.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Leggett, Anthony J.; Phillips, William D.; Harper, Charles L., Jr.

    2010-10-01

    physics? Steven Chu; 20. Quantum information J. Ignacio Cirac; 21. Emergence in condensed matter physics Marvin L. Cohen; 22. Achieving the highest spectral resolution over the widest spectral bandwidth: precision measurement meets ultrafast science Jun Ye; 23. Wireless non-radiative energy transfer Marin Soljačić; Part V. Consciousness and Free Will: 24. The big picture: exploring questions on the boundaries of science - consciousness and free will George F. R. Ellis; 25. Quantum entanglement: from fundamental questions to quantum communication and quantum computation and back Anton Zeilinger; 26. Consciousness, body, and brain: the matter of the mind Gerald M. Edelman; 27. The relation between quantum mechanics and higher brain functions: lessons from quantum computation and neurobiology Christof Koch and Klaus Hepp; 28. Free will and the causal closure of physics Robert C. Bishop; 29. Natural laws and the closure of physics Nancy L. Cartwright; 30. Anti-Cartesianism and downward causation: reshaping the free-will debate Nancey Murphy; 31. Can we understand free will? Charles H. Townes; Part VI. Reflections on the Big Questions: Mind, Matter. Mathematics, and Ultimate Reality: 32. The big picture: exploring questions on the boundaries of science - mind, matter, mathematics George F. R. Ellis; 33. The mathematical universe Max Tegmark; 34. Where do the laws of physics come from? Paul C. W. Davies; 35. Science, energy, ethics, and civilization Vaclav Smil; 36. Life of science, life of faith William T. Newsome; 37. The science of light and the light of science: an appreciative theological reflection on the life and work of Charles Hard Townes Robert J. Russell; 38. Two quibbles about 'ultimate' Gerald Gabrielse; Index.

  12. Optical and Acoustical Techniques for Non-viral Gene Delivery to Mammalian Cells and In-situ Study of Cytoskeletal Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zili

    Since the first optical microscope invented by Anton van Leeuwenhoek in 1674, the great development of laser technique and its applications in biophotonics have helped us reveal the mechanisms underlying numerous biological activities gradually. The introduction of fs lasers to the studies of biology has emerged as a fast developing area calling for the efforts and skills both from optics and electric engineering and biology and medicine. Due to the fast update of laser source techniques, there has been an increasing number of commercialized fs lasers available for this growing market of biophotonics. To better utilize the potential offered by fs lasers, we studied the technique of optical gene delivery and tried to narrow the gap between laboratorial research and industrial/clinical applications, in that the strict experimental conditions of specific optical laboratorial studies are generally not appropriate for the practical biological applications. To carry out our experiments, we built a two-stage amplifier fs laser system to generate the desired pulse train. The laser pulse train was coupled into an invert fluorescence microscope for the imaging and manipulation of each cell. To overcome limitations brought by the tight focus of laser beam due to high NA objective, we introduced gold nanorods (GNRs), a metallic nanomaterial, with tunable optical property. With these additional membrane for membrane permeabilization, which could significantly improve the manipulation speed than that based on the tightly focused laser. We used GFP plasmid to demonstrate the applications of this technique in gene delivery, and successfully transfected and GFP-expressed cells were observed one day after the optical transfection. Additionally, as an important trend of biophotonics, the integration of optics with microfluidic chips has become the new frontier of both biology and engineering. Here we firstly demonstrated a technique of gene delivery by an on-chip device generating

  13. The blind protocol and its place in consciousness research.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stephan A

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes the development of the blind protocol, and its place in this history of consciousness research. It was first devised by Croesus, King of the Lydians (BCE 560-547) and reported by Herodotus ( approximately BCE 484 - approximately 424), and was created to protect against fraud in assessing an Anomalous Perception (AP) event; a Remote Viewing (RV) experiment little different from those conducted today. Its next use in the 17th century was to study a peasant farmer, Jacques Aymar, who solved crimes with Anomalous Perception, using dowsing. Not only was a blind protocol employed, but the rudiments of controls were introduced to assess Aymar. The next documented use of a blind protocol in consciousness research occurred in 1784, when it was explicitly employed in the interest of science, and its history as a research technique can be said to have formally begun. King Louis the XVIth created a commission to evaluate Franz Anton Mesmer's claims concerning healing through "animal magnetism," administered while people were in a trance, and asked Benjamin Franklin to be the commission's head. The paper proposes that Franklin be considered the first parapsychologist. He created the blind protocol to answer the king's question as to whether "animal magnetism" was real, and he not only introduced demographic variables and controls, but literally blindfolded people, which is why today we call it the blind protocol. Franklin's observations also present the first recorded Western description of psychosomatic illness. An unintended consequence of Franklin's Mesmer study was the loss of the idea of psychophysical self-regulation (PPSR) as a research vector, although the English surgeon John Eliotson (1791-1868) apparently saw through the failure of Mesmer's explanatory model to the deeper insight in the form of hypnosis that was Mesmer's real discovery. He seems to have avoided all attempts at explaining how it worked but conducted a considerable number of

  14. Platelet Rich Plasma and Hyaluronic Acid Blend for the Treatment of Osteoarthritis: Rheological and Biological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Fabrizio; D’Este, Matteo; Vadalà, Gianluca; Cattani, Caterina; Papalia, Rocco; Alini, Mauro; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common musculoskeletal disease. Current treatments for OA are mainly symptomatic and inadequate since none results in restoration of fully functional cartilage. Hyaluronic Acid (HA) intra-articular injections are widely accepted for the treatment of pain associated to OA. The goal of HA viscosupplementation is to reduce pain and improve viscoelasticity of synovial fluid. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been also employed to treat OA to possibly induce cartilage regeneration. The combination of HA and PRP could supply many advantages for tissue repair. Indeed, it conjugates HA viscosupplementation with PRP regenerative properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the rheological and biological properties of different HA compositions in combination with PRP in order to identify (i) the viscoelastic features of the HA-PRP blends, (ii) their biological effect on osteoarthritic chondrocytes and (iii) HA formulations suitable for use in combination with PRP. Materials and Methods HA/PRP blends have been obtained mixing human PRP and three different HA at different concentrations: 1) Sinovial, 0.8% (SN); 2) Sinovial Forte 1.6% (SF); 3) Sinovial HL 3.2% (HL); 4) Hyalubrix 1.5% (HX). Combinations of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and the four HA types were used as control. Rheological measurements were performed on an Anton PaarMCR-302 rheometer. Amplitude sweep, frequency sweep and rotational measurements were performed and viscoelastic properties were evaluated. The rheological data were validated performing the tests in presence of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) up to ultra-physiological concentration (7%). Primary osteoarthritic chondrocytes were cultured in vitro with the HA and PRP blends in the culture medium for one week. Cell viability, proliferation and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content were assessed. Results PRP addition to HA leads to a decrease of viscoelastic shear moduli and increase of the crossover point, due to a

  15. Crustal Structure in the Southern Rockall Trough from Satellite Gravity Data: Evidence for Sea-floor Spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappell, A.; Kusznir, N. J.

    2005-05-01

    The southern Rockall Trough south of 57 N has previously been interpreted as either an intra-continental rift floored with highly extended continental crust, or a failed oceanic rift formed by Cretaceous sea floor spreading. Satellite gravity, bathymetry data and seismic estimates of sediment thickness are used to derive crustal basement thickness for the southern Rockall Trough and adjacent regions using a gravity inversion method incorporating a correction for the large negative thermal gravity component present in oceanic and stretched continental lithosphere. The marine Bouguer anomaly, derived from satellite free air gravity (Sandwell & Smith 1997) and Gebco 2003 bathymetry data, is inverted using the method of Oldenberg (1974), incorporating an iteratively applied thermal anomaly correction, to give Moho depth. For oceanic crust the thermal anomaly correction is calculated using isochron ages (Muller et al. 1997) and for continental crust from the beta stretching factors resulting from gravity derived crustal basement thickness and an assumed rift age. When sediment thickness and volcanic addition are assumed to be zero, the resulting upper bound of crustal thickness from the gravity inversion is as little as 10 km in the southern Rockall Trough. A segmented axial thickening of the crust at the centre of the Rockall Trough is predicted, between the Barra volcanic ridge and the Anton Dohrn seamount and is interpreted as having a volcanic origin. Inclusion of a sediment thickness correction in the gravity inversion further reduces predicted crustal thickness. A pseudo-sediment-thickness map has been constructed from the available wide-angle data and incorporated in the gravity inversion. The addition of up to 5.5 km of sediment in the gravity inversion reduces the upper bound of crustal thickness to less than 3 km in some locations. The segmented axial thickening and thin crust shown by the gravity inversion, the lack of intra-basinal faulting, and the volcanic

  16. Evaluation of a Modified ADC-Based Thermometry Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgornik, T.; Batagelj, V.; Winkler, G.; Hartl, H.; Drnovsek, J.

    2011-12-01

    This article presents the modification and testing of an ADC-based thermometry bridge. The instrument under investigation is an Anton Paar MKT 50 Millikelvin Thermometer (developed at the IFE, TU-Graz) based on a precision analog-to-digital converter (ADC). During preliminary testing, it was found that the MKT 50 performs better than its declared uncertainty (1 mK equal to 1 ppm when using a 100 Ω PRT) and is comparable to thermometry resistance ratio bridges typically used in secondary thermometry laboratories (with typical uncertainties from 0.1 mK to 1 mK). The modifications to the original bridge were undertaken by the development team of the MKT 50 at the Graz University of Technology, Austria. Measurements and evaluation of the modified instruments were performed at the MIRS/UL-FE/LMK. For the MKT 50 to be used in thermometry laboratories as a reference unit, measuring parameters of the instrument had to be changed. During the first modification, the upper limit of the instrument range was decreased from 400 Ω to 133 Ω, this is a preferred range for standard platinum resistance thermometers (SPRTs). This also meant an increase in the measuring current from 0.5 mA to the more frequently used 1 mA. A modification of the programmable ADC control unit increased the resolution from 24 bit to 27 bit. By adding a switch, the use of an external standard resistor was enabled. After this stage of the modification, the first tests on the instrument were performed. The second stage was aimed at the removal of noise sources. The instrument was prepared in such a way that it only used two input channels, one connected to the SPRT and the other to the standard resistor. Also, the components of the ADC were upgraded to further reduce noise. The elimination of one input channel sped up measurements, making the PC software capable of taking several readings in a shorter time period. All tests were performed in laboratory conditions, where precision AC and DC resistance

  17. PREFACE: The Universe under the Microscope: Astrophysics at High Angular Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schödel, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Köln, Köln, Germany Eduardo Ros Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Bonn, Germany Scientific organizing committee Dennis Downes Institut de Radio Astronomie Millimétrique, France Wolfgang Duschl University of Kiel, Germany Andrea Ghez University of California, Los Angeles, USA Vladimir Karas Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic Andreas Eckart University of Cologne, Germany Sera Marko University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands Susanne Pfalzner University of Cologne, Germany Sebastian Rabien Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Germany Daniel Rouan Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, France Eduardo Ros Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy, Germany Rainer Schödel Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía -CSIC, Spain Zhiqiang Shen Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, China Anton Zensus Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy, Germany Local organizing committee Sebastian Fischer University of Cologne, Germany Devaky Kunneriath University of Cologne, Germany Leo Meyer University of Cologne, Germany Koraljka Muzic University of Cologne, Germany Rainer Schödel University of Cologne, Germany/IAA -CSIC, Spain Christian Straubmeier University of Cologne, Germany Mohammad Zamaninasab University of Cologne, Germany

  18. FOREWORD: The XXV IAHR Symposium on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems marks half a century tradition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susan-Resiga, Romeo

    2010-05-01

    'Politehnica' of Timisoara in 1923 'It is not the walls that make a school, but the spirit living inside'. A particular trademark of the 'Politehnica' of Timisoara was the continuous effort to answer industrial problems by training the students not only on theoretical aspects but also in design and manufacturing, as well as in laboratory works. Developing modern laboratories, where students can observe and understand first hand the engineering applications along the years a priority for Timisoara 'Politehnica' University. The School of Hydraulic Machinery within the 'Politehnica' University of Timisoara was established in early 1930 by Professor Aurel Barglazan (1905-1960), and further developed by Professor Ioan Anton (born 1924), both members of the Romanian Academy. The Laboratory of Hydraulic Machines from Timisoara (LMHT) started back in 1928 in a small hut, with a test rig for Francis and Kaplan turbines manufactured by J M Voith. LMHT was continuously developed and was officially recognized in 1959 as being one of the leading research and developing laboratories in Romania. It was the foundation of the Romanian efforts of designing and manufacturing hydraulic turbines starting in 1960 at the Resita Machine Building Factory. Under the leadership of Professor Ioan Anton, the Timisoara School in Hydraulic Machinery has focused the basic and development research activities on the following main topics: (i) Turbine Hydrodynamics, (ii) Hydrofoil Cascade Hydrodynamics, (iii) Cavitation in Hydraulic Machines and Equipments, (iv) Scale-up Effects in Hydraulic Machines. With the establishment in the year 2000 of the National Center for Engineering of Systems with Complex Fluids, within the 'Politehnica' University of Timisoara, the research in turbomachinery hydrodynamics and cavitation included high performance computing for flows in hydraulic machines, as well as the development of novel technologies to mitigate the self-induced flow instabilities in hydraulic turbines operated

  19. Using noble gases in the pore water of ocean sediments to characterize CH4 seepage off the coast of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S.; Kipfer, Rolf

    2013-04-01

    Newly developed analytical techniques to determine the abundances of noble gases in sediment pore water [1, 5] allow noble-gas concentrations and isotope ratios to be measured easily and routinely in unconsolidated lacustrine sediments [6, 7]. We applied these techniques for the first time to ocean sediments to investigate an active cold methane seepage system located in the South Pacific off the coast of New Zealand using 3He-4He ratios determined in the sediment pore water. Our results [8] show that more 3He-rich fluids are released in the vicinity of the Pacific-Australian subduction zone than at the forearc stations located closer to the New Zealand coast. However, the 3He-4He isotope signature in the sediment column indicates that only a minor part of the He emanating from deeper strata originates from a (depleted) mantle source. Hence, most He in the pore water is produced locally by the radioactive decay of U and Th in the sediment minerals or in the underlying crustal rocks. Such an occurrence of isotopically heavy crustal He also suggests that the source of the largest fraction of methane is a near-surface geochemical reservoir. This finding is in line with a previous δ13C study in the water column which concluded that the emanating methane is most likely of biological origin and is formed in the upper few meters of the sediment column [2]. The prevalence of isotopically heavy He agrees well with the outcome of other previous studies on island arc systems [3, 4] which indicate that the forearc regions are characterized by crustal He emission, whereas the volcanic arc region is characterized by the presence of mantle He associated with rising magma. References [1] Brennwald, M. S., Hofer, M., Peeters, F., Aeschbach-Hertig, W., Strassmann, K., Kipfer, R., and Imboden, D. M. (2003). Analysis of dissolved noble gases in the pore water of lacustrine sediments. Limnol. Oceanogr.: Methods 1, 51-62. [2] Faure, K., Greinert, J., Schneider von Deimling, J., Mc

  20. Natural-Cause Mortality and Long-Term Exposure to Particle Components: An Analysis of 19 European Cohorts within the Multi-Center ESCAPE Project

    PubMed Central

    Hoek, Gerard; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Stafoggia, Massimo; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Weinmayr, Gudrun; Hoffmann, Barbara; Wolf, Kathrin; Samoli, Evangelia; Fischer, Paul H.; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Xun, Wei W.; Katsouyanni, Klea; Dimakopoulou, Konstantina; Marcon, Alessandro; Vartiainen, Erkki; Lanki, Timo; Yli-Tuomi, Tarja; Oftedal, Bente; Schwarze, Per E.; Nafstad, Per; De Faire, Ulf; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Fratiglioni, Laura; Penell, Johanna; Korek, Michal; Pershagen, Göran; Eriksen, Kirsten Thorup; Overvad, Kim; Sørensen, Mette; Eeftens, Marloes; Peeters, Petra H.; Meliefste, Kees; Wang, Meng; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Sugiri, Dorothea; Krämer, Ursula; Heinrich, Joachim; de Hoogh, Kees; Key, Timothy; Peters, Annette; Hampel, Regina; Concin, Hans; Nagel, Gabriele; Jaensch, Andrea; Ineichen, Alex; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Schaffner, Emmanuel; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Schindler, Christian; Ragettli, Martina S.; Vilier, Alice; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Declercq, Christophe; Ricceri, Fulvio; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Galassi, Claudia; Migliore, Enrica; Ranzi, Andrea; Cesaroni, Giulia; Badaloni, Chiara; Forastiere, Francesco; Katsoulis, Michail; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Keuken, Menno; Jedynska, Aleksandra; Kooter, Ingeborg M.; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Sokhi, Ranjeet S.; Vineis, Paolo; Brunekreef, Bert

    2015-01-01

    , Pershagen G, Eriksen KT, Overvad K, Sørensen M, Eeftens M, Peeters PH, Meliefste K, Wang M, Bueno-de-Mesquita HB, Sugiri D, Krämer U, Heinrich J, de Hoogh K, Key T, Peters A, Hampel R, Concin H, Nagel G, Jaensch A, Ineichen A, Tsai MY, Schaffner E, Probst-Hensch NM, Schindler C, Ragettli MS, Vilier A, Clavel-Chapelon F, Declercq C, Ricceri F, Sacerdote C, Galassi C, Migliore E, Ranzi A, Cesaroni G, Badaloni C, Forastiere F, Katsoulis M, Trichopoulou A, Keuken M, Jedynska A, Kooter IM, Kukkonen J, Sokhi RS, Vineis P, Brunekreef B. 2015. Natural-cause mortality and long-term exposure to particle components: an analysis of 19 European cohorts within the Multi-Center ESCAPE Project. Environ Health Perspect 123:525–533; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408095 PMID:25712504