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Sample records for anxiety treatments canmat

  1. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) 2016 Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Benicio N.; Ismail, Zahinoor; Jaworska, Natalia; Steiner, Meir; Lieshout, Ryan J. Van; Kennedy, Sidney H.; Lam, Raymond W.; Milev, Roumen V.; Parikh, Sagar V.; Ravindran, Arun V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) conducted a revision of the 2009 guidelines by updating the evidence and recommendations. The scope of the 2016 guidelines remains the management of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults, with a target audience of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. Methods: Using the question-answer format, we conducted a systematic literature search focusing on systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Evidence was graded using CANMAT-defined criteria for level of evidence. Recommendations for lines of treatment were based on the quality of evidence and clinical expert consensus. This section on “Special Populations” is the sixth of six guidelines articles. Results: Recent studies inform the treatment of MDD in children and adolescents, pregnant and breastfeeding women, women in perimenopause or menopause, and the elderly. Evidence for efficacy of treatments in these populations is more limited than for the general adult population, however, and risks of treatment in these groups are often poorly studied and reported. Conclusions: Despite the limited evidence base, extant data and clinical experience suggest that each of these special populations can benefit from the systematic application of treatment guidelines for treatment of MDD. PMID:27486149

  2. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) 2016 Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Quilty, Lena C.; Ravitz, Paula; Rosenbluth, Michael; Pavlova, Barbara; Grigoriadis, Sophie; Velyvis, Vytas; Kennedy, Sidney H.; Lam, Raymond W.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Milev, Roumen V.; Ravindran, Arun V.; Uher, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) has revised its 2009 guidelines for the management of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults by updating the evidence and recommendations. The target audiences for these 2016 guidelines are psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. Methods: Using the question-answer format, we conducted a systematic literature search focusing on systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Evidence was graded using CANMAT-defined criteria for level of evidence. Recommendations for lines of treatment were based on the quality of evidence and clinical expert consensus. “Psychological Treatments” is the second of six sections of the 2016 guidelines. Results: Evidence-informed responses were developed for 25 questions under 5 broad categories: 1) patient characteristics relevant to using psychological interventions; 2) therapist and health system characteristics associated with optimizing outcomes; 3) descriptions of major psychotherapies and their efficacy; 4) additional psychological interventions, such as peer interventions and computer- and technology-delivered interventions; and 5) combining and/or sequencing psychological and pharmacological interventions. Conclusions: First-line psychological treatment recommendations for acute MDD include cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), interpersonal therapy (IPT), and behavioural activation (BA). Second-line recommendations include computer-based and telephone-delivered psychotherapy. Where feasible, combining psychological treatment (CBT or IPT) with antidepressant treatment is recommended because combined treatment is superior to either treatment alone. First-line psychological treatments for maintenance include CBT and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT). Patient preference, in combination with evidence-based treatments and clinician/system capacity, will yield the optimal treatment strategies for improving individual outcomes in MDD. PMID

  3. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) 2016 Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbe, Peter; Kennedy, Sidney H.; Blumberger, Daniel M.; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.; Downar, Jonathan; Modirrousta, Mandana; Patry, Simon; Vila-Rodriguez, Fidel; Lam, Raymond W.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Parikh, Sagar V.; Ravindran, Arun V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) conducted a revision of the 2009 guidelines by updating the evidence and recommendations. The scope of the 2016 guidelines remains the management of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults, with a target audience of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. Methods: Using the question-answer format, we conducted a systematic literature search focusing on systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Evidence was graded using CANMAT-defined criteria for level of evidence. Recommendations for lines of treatment were based on the quality of evidence and clinical expert consensus. “Neurostimulation Treatments” is the fourth of six sections of the 2016 guidelines. Results: Evidence-informed responses were developed for 31 questions for 6 neurostimulation modalities: 1) transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), 2) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), 3) electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), 4) magnetic seizure therapy (MST), 5) vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), and 6) deep brain stimulation (DBS). Most of the neurostimulation treatments have been investigated in patients with varying degrees of treatment resistance. Conclusions: There is increasing evidence for efficacy, tolerability, and safety of neurostimulation treatments. rTMS is now a first-line recommendation for patients with MDD who have failed at least 1 antidepressant. ECT remains a second-line treatment for patients with treatment-resistant depression, although in some situations, it may be considered first line. Third-line recommendations include tDCS and VNS. MST and DBS are still considered investigational treatments. PMID:27486154

  4. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) 2016 Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Raymond W.; McIntyre, Roger S.; Tourjman, S. Valérie; Bhat, Venkat; Blier, Pierre; Hasnain, Mehrul; Jollant, Fabrice; Levitt, Anthony J.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; McInerney, Shane J.; McIntosh, Diane; Milev, Roumen V.; Müller, Daniel J.; Parikh, Sagar V.; Pearson, Norma L.; Ravindran, Arun V.; Uher, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) conducted a revision of the 2009 guidelines by updating the evidence and recommendations. The scope of the 2016 guidelines remains the management of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults, with a target audience of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. Methods: Using the question-answer format, we conducted a systematic literature search focusing on systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Evidence was graded using CANMAT-defined criteria for level of evidence. Recommendations for lines of treatment were based on the quality of evidence and clinical expert consensus. “Pharmacological Treatments” is the third of six sections of the 2016 guidelines. With little new information on older medications, treatment recommendations focus on second-generation antidepressants. Results: Evidence-informed responses are given for 21 questions under 4 broad categories: 1) principles of pharmacological management, including individualized assessment of patient and medication factors for antidepressant selection, regular and frequent monitoring, and assessing clinical and functional outcomes with measurement-based care; 2) comparative aspects of antidepressant medications based on efficacy, tolerability, and safety, including summaries of newly approved drugs since 2009; 3) practical approaches to pharmacological management, including drug-drug interactions and maintenance recommendations; and 4) managing inadequate response and treatment resistance, with a focus on switching antidepressants, applying adjunctive treatments, and new and emerging agents. Conclusions: Evidence-based pharmacological treatments are available for first-line treatment of MDD and for management of inadequate response. However, given the limitations of the evidence base, pharmacological management of MDD still depends on tailoring treatments to the patient. PMID:27486148

  5. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) 2016 Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Balneaves, Lynda G.; Faulkner, Guy; Ortiz, Abigail; McIntosh, Diane; Morehouse, Rachel L.; Ravindran, Lakshmi; Yatham, Lakshmi N.; Kennedy, Sidney H.; Lam, Raymond W.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Milev, Roumen V.; Parikh, Sagar V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) conducted a revision of the 2009 guidelines by updating the evidence and recommendations. The scope of the 2016 guidelines remains the management of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults, with a target audience of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. Methods: Using the question-answer format, we conducted a systematic literature search focusing on systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Evidence was graded using CANMAT-defined criteria for level of evidence. Recommendations for lines of treatment were based on the quality of evidence and clinical expert consensus. “Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatments” is the fifth of six sections of the 2016 guidelines. Results: Evidence-informed responses were developed for 12 questions for 2 broad categories of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) interventions: 1) physical and meditative treatments (light therapy, sleep deprivation, exercise, yoga, and acupuncture) and 2) natural health products (St. John’s wort, omega-3 fatty acids; S-adenosyl-L-methionine [SAM-e], dehydroepiandrosterone, folate, Crocus sativus, and others). Recommendations were based on available data on efficacy, tolerability, and safety. Conclusions: For MDD of mild to moderate severity, exercise, light therapy, St. John’s wort, omega-3 fatty acids, SAM-e, and yoga are recommended as first- or second-line treatments. Adjunctive exercise and adjunctive St. John’s wort are second-line recommendations for moderate to severe MDD. Other physical treatments and natural health products have less evidence but may be considered as third-line treatments. CAM treatments are generally well tolerated. Caveats include methodological limitations of studies and paucity of data on long-term outcomes and drug interactions. PMID:27486153

  6. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) 2016 Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Diane; Wang, JianLi; Enns, Murray W.; Kolivakis, Theo; Michalak, Erin E.; Sareen, Jitender; Song, Wei-Yi; Kennedy, Sidney H.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Milev, Roumen V.; Parikh, Sagar V.; Ravindran, Arun V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) conducted a revision of the 2009 guidelines by updating the evidence and recommendations. The scope of the 2016 guidelines remains the management of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults, with a target audience of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. Methods: Using the question-answer format, we conducted a systematic literature search focusing on systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Evidence was graded using CANMAT-defined criteria for level of evidence. Recommendations for lines of treatment were based on the quality of evidence and clinical expert consensus. This section is the first of six guidelines articles. Results: In Canada, the annual and lifetime prevalence of MDD was 4.7% and 11.3%, respectively. MDD represents the second leading cause of global disability, with high occupational and economic impact mainly attributable to indirect costs. DSM-5 criteria for depressive disorders remain relatively unchanged, but other clinical dimensions (sleep, cognition, physical symptoms) may have implications for depression management. e-Mental health is increasingly used to support clinical and self-management of MDD. In the 2-phase (acute and maintenance) treatment model, specific goals address symptom remission, functional recovery, improved quality of life, and prevention of recurrence. Conclusions: The burden attributed to MDD remains high, whether from individual distress, functional and relationship impairment, reduced quality of life, or societal economic cost. Applying core principles of care, including comprehensive assessment, therapeutic alliance, support of self-management, evidence-informed treatment, and measurement-based care, will optimize clinical, quality of life, and functional outcomes in MDD. PMID:27486151

  7. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) 2016 Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Major Depressive Disorder: Section 4. Neurostimulation Treatments.

    PubMed

    Milev, Roumen V; Giacobbe, Peter; Kennedy, Sidney H; Blumberger, Daniel M; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Downar, Jonathan; Modirrousta, Mandana; Patry, Simon; Vila-Rodriguez, Fidel; Lam, Raymond W; MacQueen, Glenda M; Parikh, Sagar V; Ravindran, Arun V

    2016-09-01

    The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) conducted a revision of the 2009 guidelines by updating the evidence and recommendations. The scope of the 2016 guidelines remains the management of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults, with a target audience of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. Using the question-answer format, we conducted a systematic literature search focusing on systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Evidence was graded using CANMAT-defined criteria for level of evidence. Recommendations for lines of treatment were based on the quality of evidence and clinical expert consensus. "Neurostimulation Treatments" is the fourth of six sections of the 2016 guidelines. Evidence-informed responses were developed for 31 questions for 6 neurostimulation modalities: 1) transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), 2) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), 3) electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), 4) magnetic seizure therapy (MST), 5) vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), and 6) deep brain stimulation (DBS). Most of the neurostimulation treatments have been investigated in patients with varying degrees of treatment resistance. There is increasing evidence for efficacy, tolerability, and safety of neurostimulation treatments. rTMS is now a first-line recommendation for patients with MDD who have failed at least 1 antidepressant. ECT remains a second-line treatment for patients with treatment-resistant depression, although in some situations, it may be considered first line. Third-line recommendations include tDCS and VNS. MST and DBS are still considered investigational treatments. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) clinical guidelines for the management of major depressive disorder in adults. III. Pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lam, Raymond W; Kennedy, Sidney H; Grigoriadis, Sophie; McIntyre, Roger S; Milev, Roumen; Ramasubbu, Rajamannar; Parikh, Sagar V; Patten, Scott B; Ravindran, Arun V

    2009-10-01

    In 2001, the Canadian Psychiatric Association and the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) partnered to produce evidence-based clinical guidelines for the treatment of depressive disorders. A revision of these guidelines was undertaken by CANMAT in 2008-2009 to reflect advances in the field. The CANMAT guidelines are based on a question-answer format to enhance accessibility to clinicians. An evidence-based format was used with updated systematic reviews of the literature and recommendations were graded according to Level of Evidence using pre-defined criteria. Lines of Treatment were identified based on criteria that included Levels of Evidence and expert clinical support. This section on "Pharmacotherapy" is one of 5 guideline articles. Despite emerging data on efficacy and tolerability differences amongst newer antidepressants, variability in patient response precludes identification of specific first choice medications for all patients. All second-generation antidepressants have Level 1 evidence to support efficacy and tolerability and most are considered first-line treatments for MDD. First-generation tricyclic and monoamine oxidase inhibitor antidepressants are not the focus of these guidelines but generally are considered second- or third-line treatments. For inadequate or incomplete response, there is Level 1 evidence for switching strategies and for add-on strategies including lithium and atypical antipsychotics. Most of the evidence is based on trials for registration and may not reflect real-world effectiveness. Second-generation antidepressants are safe, effective and well tolerated treatments for MDD in adults. Evidence-based switching and add-on strategies can be used to optimize response in MDD that is inadequately responsive to monotherapy.

  9. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) clinical guidelines for the management of major depressive disorder in adults. II. Psychotherapy alone or in combination with antidepressant medication.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Sagar V; Segal, Zindel V; Grigoriadis, Sophie; Ravindran, Arun V; Kennedy, Sidney H; Lam, Raymond W; Patten, Scott B

    2009-10-01

    In 2001, the Canadian Psychiatric Association and the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) partnered to produce evidence-based clinical guidelines for the treatment of depressive disorders. A revision of these guidelines was undertaken by CANMAT in 2008-2009 to reflect advances in the field. This article, one of five in the series, reviews new studies of psychotherapy in the acute and maintenance phase of MDD, including computer-based and telephone-delivered psychotherapy. The CANMAT guidelines are based on a question-answer format to enhance accessibility to clinicians. Evidence-based responses are based on updated systematic reviews of the literature and recommendations are graded according to the Level of Evidence, using pre-defined criteria. Lines of Treatment are identified based on criteria that included evidence and expert clinical support. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and Interpersonal Therapy (IPT) continue to have the most evidence for efficacy, both in acute and maintenance phases of MDD, and have been studied in combination with antidepressants. CBT is well studied in conjunction with computer-delivered methods and bibliotherapy. Behavioural Activation and Cognitive-Behavioural Analysis System of Psychotherapy have significant evidence, but need replication. Newer psychotherapies including Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Motivational Interviewing, and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy do not yet have significant evidence as acute treatments; nor does psychodynamic therapy. Although many forms of psychotherapy have been studied, relatively few types have been evaluated for MDD in randomized controlled trials. Evidence about the combination of different types of psychotherapy and antidepressant medication is also limited despite widespread use of these therapies concomitantly. CBT and IPT are the only first-line treatment recommendations for acute MDD and remain highly recommended for maintenance. Both computer-based and

  10. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) 2016 Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Major Depressive Disorder: Section 2. Psychological Treatments.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Sagar V; Quilty, Lena C; Ravitz, Paula; Rosenbluth, Michael; Pavlova, Barbara; Grigoriadis, Sophie; Velyvis, Vytas; Kennedy, Sidney H; Lam, Raymond W; MacQueen, Glenda M; Milev, Roumen V; Ravindran, Arun V; Uher, Rudolf

    2016-09-01

    The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) has revised its 2009 guidelines for the management of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults by updating the evidence and recommendations. The target audiences for these 2016 guidelines are psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. Using the question-answer format, we conducted a systematic literature search focusing on systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Evidence was graded using CANMAT-defined criteria for level of evidence. Recommendations for lines of treatment were based on the quality of evidence and clinical expert consensus. "Psychological Treatments" is the second of six sections of the 2016 guidelines. Evidence-informed responses were developed for 25 questions under 5 broad categories: 1) patient characteristics relevant to using psychological interventions; 2) therapist and health system characteristics associated with optimizing outcomes; 3) descriptions of major psychotherapies and their efficacy; 4) additional psychological interventions, such as peer interventions and computer- and technology-delivered interventions; and 5) combining and/or sequencing psychological and pharmacological interventions. First-line psychological treatment recommendations for acute MDD include cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), interpersonal therapy (IPT), and behavioural activation (BA). Second-line recommendations include computer-based and telephone-delivered psychotherapy. Where feasible, combining psychological treatment (CBT or IPT) with antidepressant treatment is recommended because combined treatment is superior to either treatment alone. First-line psychological treatments for maintenance include CBT and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT). Patient preference, in combination with evidence-based treatments and clinician/system capacity, will yield the optimal treatment strategies for improving individual outcomes in MDD. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) 2016 Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Major Depressive Disorder: Section 5. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatments.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Arun V; Balneaves, Lynda G; Faulkner, Guy; Ortiz, Abigail; McIntosh, Diane; Morehouse, Rachel L; Ravindran, Lakshmi; Yatham, Lakshmi N; Kennedy, Sidney H; Lam, Raymond W; MacQueen, Glenda M; Milev, Roumen V; Parikh, Sagar V

    2016-09-01

    The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) conducted a revision of the 2009 guidelines by updating the evidence and recommendations. The scope of the 2016 guidelines remains the management of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults, with a target audience of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. Using the question-answer format, we conducted a systematic literature search focusing on systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Evidence was graded using CANMAT-defined criteria for level of evidence. Recommendations for lines of treatment were based on the quality of evidence and clinical expert consensus. "Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatments" is the fifth of six sections of the 2016 guidelines. Evidence-informed responses were developed for 12 questions for 2 broad categories of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) interventions: 1) physical and meditative treatments (light therapy, sleep deprivation, exercise, yoga, and acupuncture) and 2) natural health products (St. John's wort, omega-3 fatty acids; S-adenosyl-L-methionine [SAM-e], dehydroepiandrosterone, folate, Crocus sativus, and others). Recommendations were based on available data on efficacy, tolerability, and safety. For MDD of mild to moderate severity, exercise, light therapy, St. John's wort, omega-3 fatty acids, SAM-e, and yoga are recommended as first- or second-line treatments. Adjunctive exercise and adjunctive St. John's wort are second-line recommendations for moderate to severe MDD. Other physical treatments and natural health products have less evidence but may be considered as third-line treatments. CAM treatments are generally well tolerated. Caveats include methodological limitations of studies and paucity of data on long-term outcomes and drug interactions. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) and International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) collaborative update of CANMAT guidelines for the management of patients with bipolar disorder: update 2009.

    PubMed

    Yatham, Lakshmi N; Kennedy, Sidney H; Schaffer, Ayal; Parikh, Sagar V; Beaulieu, Serge; O'Donovan, Claire; MacQueen, Glenda; McIntyre, Roger S; Sharma, Verinder; Ravindran, Arun; Young, L Trevor; Young, Allan H; Alda, Martin; Milev, Roumen; Vieta, Eduard; Calabrese, Joseph R; Berk, Michael; Ha, Kyooseob; Kapczinski, Flávio

    2009-05-01

    The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) published guidelines for the management of bipolar disorder in 2005, with a 2007 update. This second update, in conjunction with the International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD), reviews new evidence and is designed to be used in conjunction with the previous publications. The recommendations for the management of acute mania remain mostly unchanged. Lithium, valproate, and several atypical antipsychotics continue to be first-line treatments for acute mania. Tamoxifen is now suggested as a third-line augmentation option. The combination of olanzapine and carbamazepine is not recommended. For the management of bipolar depression, lithium, lamotrigine, and quetiapine monotherapy, olanzapine plus selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), and lithium or divalproex plus SSRI/bupropion remain first-line options. New data support the use of adjunctive modafinil as a second-line option, but also indicate that aripiprazole should not be used as monotherapy for bipolar depression. Lithium, lamotrigine, valproate, and olanzapine continue to be first-line options for maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder. New data support the use of quetiapine monotherapy and adjunctive therapy for the prevention of manic and depressive events, aripiprazole monotherapy for the prevention of manic events, and risperidone long-acting injection monotherapy and adjunctive therapy, and adjunctive ziprasidone for the prevention of mood events. Bipolar II disorder is frequently overlooked in treatment guidelines, but has an important clinical impact on patients' lives. This update provides an expanded look at bipolar II disorder.

  13. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) 2016 Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Major Depressive Disorder: Section 1. Disease Burden and Principles of Care.

    PubMed

    Lam, Raymond W; McIntosh, Diane; Wang, JianLi; Enns, Murray W; Kolivakis, Theo; Michalak, Erin E; Sareen, Jitender; Song, Wei-Yi; Kennedy, Sidney H; MacQueen, Glenda M; Milev, Roumen V; Parikh, Sagar V; Ravindran, Arun V

    2016-09-01

    The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) conducted a revision of the 2009 guidelines by updating the evidence and recommendations. The scope of the 2016 guidelines remains the management of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults, with a target audience of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. Using the question-answer format, we conducted a systematic literature search focusing on systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Evidence was graded using CANMAT-defined criteria for level of evidence. Recommendations for lines of treatment were based on the quality of evidence and clinical expert consensus. This section is the first of six guidelines articles. In Canada, the annual and lifetime prevalence of MDD was 4.7% and 11.3%, respectively. MDD represents the second leading cause of global disability, with high occupational and economic impact mainly attributable to indirect costs. DSM-5 criteria for depressive disorders remain relatively unchanged, but other clinical dimensions (sleep, cognition, physical symptoms) may have implications for depression management. e-Mental health is increasingly used to support clinical and self-management of MDD. In the 2-phase (acute and maintenance) treatment model, specific goals address symptom remission, functional recovery, improved quality of life, and prevention of recurrence. The burden attributed to MDD remains high, whether from individual distress, functional and relationship impairment, reduced quality of life, or societal economic cost. Applying core principles of care, including comprehensive assessment, therapeutic alliance, support of self-management, evidence-informed treatment, and measurement-based care, will optimize clinical, quality of life, and functional outcomes in MDD. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) 2016 Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Major Depressive Disorder: Section 6. Special Populations: Youth, Women, and the Elderly.

    PubMed

    MacQueen, Glenda M; Frey, Benicio N; Ismail, Zahinoor; Jaworska, Natalia; Steiner, Meir; Lieshout, Ryan J Van; Kennedy, Sidney H; Lam, Raymond W; Milev, Roumen V; Parikh, Sagar V; Ravindran, Arun V

    2016-09-01

    The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) conducted a revision of the 2009 guidelines by updating the evidence and recommendations. The scope of the 2016 guidelines remains the management of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults, with a target audience of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. Using the question-answer format, we conducted a systematic literature search focusing on systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Evidence was graded using CANMAT-defined criteria for level of evidence. Recommendations for lines of treatment were based on the quality of evidence and clinical expert consensus. This section on "Special Populations" is the sixth of six guidelines articles. Recent studies inform the treatment of MDD in children and adolescents, pregnant and breastfeeding women, women in perimenopause or menopause, and the elderly. Evidence for efficacy of treatments in these populations is more limited than for the general adult population, however, and risks of treatment in these groups are often poorly studied and reported. Despite the limited evidence base, extant data and clinical experience suggest that each of these special populations can benefit from the systematic application of treatment guidelines for treatment of MDD. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) and International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) collaborative update of CANMAT guidelines for the management of patients with bipolar disorder: update 2013.

    PubMed

    Yatham, Lakshmi N; Kennedy, Sidney H; Parikh, Sagar V; Schaffer, Ayal; Beaulieu, Serge; Alda, Martin; O'Donovan, Claire; Macqueen, Glenda; McIntyre, Roger S; Sharma, Verinder; Ravindran, Arun; Young, L Trevor; Milev, Roumen; Bond, David J; Frey, Benicio N; Goldstein, Benjamin I; Lafer, Beny; Birmaher, Boris; Ha, Kyooseob; Nolen, Willem A; Berk, Michael

    2013-02-01

    The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments published guidelines for the management of bipolar disorder in 2005, with updates in 2007 and 2009. This third update, in conjunction with the International Society for Bipolar Disorders, reviews new evidence and is designed to be used in conjunction with the previous publications.The recommendations for the management of acute mania remain largely unchanged. Lithium, valproate, and several atypical antipsychotic agents continue to be first-line treatments for acute mania. Monotherapy with asenapine, paliperidone extended release (ER), and divalproex ER, as well as adjunctive asenapine, have been added as first-line options.For the management of bipolar depression, lithium, lamotrigine, and quetiapine monotherapy, as well as olanzapine plus selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), and lithium or divalproex plus SSRI/bupropion remain first-line options. Lurasidone monotherapy and the combination of lurasidone or lamotrigine plus lithium or divalproex have been added as a second-line options. Ziprasidone alone or as adjunctive therapy, and adjunctive levetiracetam have been added as not-recommended options for the treatment of bipolar depression. Lithium, lamotrigine, valproate, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, risperidone long-acting injection, and adjunctive ziprasidone continue to be first-line options for maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder. Asenapine alone or as adjunctive therapy have been added as third-line options.

  16. The CANMAT task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Ayal; McIntosh, Diane; Goldstein, Benjamin I; Rector, Neil A; McIntyre, Roger S; Beaulieu, Serge; Swinson, Richard; Yatham, Lakshmi N

    2012-02-01

    Comorbid mood and anxiety disorders are commonly seen in clinical practice. The goal of this article is to review the available literature on the epidemiologic, etiologic, clinical, and management aspects of this comorbidity and formulate a set of evidence- and consensus-based recommendations. This article is part of a set of Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) Comorbidity Task Force papers. We conducted a PubMed search of all English-language articles published between January 1966 and November 2010. The search terms were bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, cross-referenced with anxiety disorders/symptoms, panic disorder, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Levels of evidence for specific interventions were assigned based on a priori determined criteria, and recommendations were developed by integrating the level of evidence and clinical opinion of the authors. Comorbid anxiety symptoms and disorders have a significant impact on the clinical presentation and treatment approach for patients with mood disorders. A set of recommendations are provided for the management of bipolar disorder (BD) with comorbid anxiety and major depressive disorder (MDD) with comorbid anxiety with a focus on comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder, use of cognitive-behavioral therapy across mood and anxiety disorders, and youth with mood and anxiety disorders. Careful attention should be given to correctly identifying anxiety comorbidities in patients with BD or MDD. Consideration of evidence- or consensus-based treatment recommendations for the management of both mood and anxiety symptoms is warranted.

  17. The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Serge; Saury, Sybille; Sareen, Jitender; Tremblay, Jacques; Schütz, Christian G; McIntyre, Roger S; Schaffer, Ayal

    2012-02-01

    Mood disorders, especially bipolar disorder (BD), frequently are associated with substance use disorders (SUDs). There are well-designed trials for the treatment of SUDs in the absence of a comorbid condition. However, one cannot generalize these study results to individuals with comorbid mood disorders, because therapeutic efficacy and/or safety and tolerability profiles may differ with the presence of the comorbid disorder. Therefore, a review of the available evidence is needed to provide guidance to clinicians facing the challenges of treating patients with comorbid mood disorders and SUDs. We reviewed the literature published between January 1966 and November 2010 by using the following search strategies on PubMed. Search terms were bipolar disorder or depressive disorder, major (to exclude depression, postpartum; dysthymic disorder; cyclothymic disorder; and seasonal affective disorder) cross-referenced with alcohol or drug or substance and abuse or dependence or disorder. When possible, a level of evidence was determined for each treatment using the framework of previous Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments recommendations. The lack of evidence-based literature limited the authors' ability to generate treatment recommendations that were strictly evidence based, and as such, recommendations were often based on the authors' opinion. Even though a large number of treatments were investigated for alcohol use disorder (AUD), none have been sufficiently studied to justify the attribution of level 1 evidence in comorbid AUD with major depressive disorder (MDD) or BD. The available data allows us to generate first-choice recommendations for AUD comorbid with MDD and only third-choice recommendations for cocaine, heroin, and opiate SUD comorbid with MDD. No recommendations were possible for cannabis, amphetamines, methamphetamines, or polysubstance SUD comorbid with MDD. First-choice recommendations were possible for alcohol, cannabis, and cocaine SUD

  18. A randomized controlled trial of psychoeducation or cognitive-behavioral therapy in bipolar disorder: a Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety treatments (CANMAT) study [CME].

    PubMed

    Parikh, Sagar V; Zaretsky, Ari; Beaulieu, Serge; Yatham, Lakshmi N; Young, L Trevor; Patelis-Siotis, Irene; Macqueen, Glenda M; Levitt, Anthony; Arenovich, Tamara; Cervantes, Pablo; Velyvis, Vytas; Kennedy, Sidney H; Streiner, David L

    2012-06-01

    Bipolar disorder is insufficiently controlled by medication, so several adjunctive psychosocial interventions have been tested. Few studies have compared these psychosocial treatments, all of which are lengthy, expensive, and difficult to disseminate. We compared the relative effectiveness of a brief psychoeducation group intervention to a more comprehensive and longer individual cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention, measuring longitudinal outcome in mood burden in bipolar disorder. This single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted between June 2002 and September 2006. A total of 204 participants (ages 18-64 years) with DSM-IV bipolar disorder type I or II participated from 4 Canadian academic centers. Subjects were recruited via advertisements or physician referral when well or minimally symptomatic, with few exclusionary criteria to enhance generalizability. Participants were assigned to receive either 20 individual sessions of cognitive-behavioral therapy or 6 sessions of group psychoeducation. The primary outcome of symptom course and morbidity was assessed prospectively over 72 weeks using the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation, which yields depression and mania symptom burden scores for each week. Both treatments had similar outcomes with respect to reduction of symptom burden and the likelihood of relapse. Eight percent of subjects dropped out prior to receiving psychoeducation, while 64% were treatment completers; rates were similar for cognitive-behavioral therapy (6% and 66%, respectively). Psychoeducation cost $180 per subject compared to cognitive-behavioral therapy at $1,200 per subject. Despite longer treatment duration and individualized treatment, cognitive-behavioral therapy did not show a significantly greater clinical benefit compared to group psychoeducation. Psychoeducation is less expensive to provide and requires less clinician training to deliver, suggesting its comparative attractiveness. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier

  19. Treatment of anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bandelow, Borwin; Michaelis, Sophie; Wedekind, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder/agoraphobia, social anxiety disorder, and others) are the most prevalent psychiatric disorders, and are associated with a high burden of illness. Anxiety disorders are often underrecognized and undertreated in primary care. Treatment is indicated when a patient shows marked distress or suffers from complications resulting from the disorder. The treatment recommendations given in this article are based on guidelines, meta-analyses, and systematic reviews of randomized controlled studies. Anxiety disorders should be treated with psychological therapy, pharmacotherapy, or a combination of both. Cognitive behavioral therapy can be regarded as the psychotherapy with the highest level of evidence. First-line drugs are the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. Benzodiazepines are not recommended for routine use. Other treatment options include pregabalin, tricyclic antidepressants, buspirone, moclobemide, and others. After remission, medications should be continued for 6 to 12 months. When developing a treatment plan, efficacy, adverse effects, interactions, costs, and the preference of the patient should be considered. PMID:28867934

  20. The CANMAT task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid medical conditions: diagnostic, assessment, and treatment principles.

    PubMed

    Ramasubbu, Rajamannar; Beaulieu, Serge; Taylor, Valerie H; Schaffer, Ayal; McIntyre, Roger S

    2012-02-01

    Medical comorbidity is commonly encountered in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). The presence of medical comorbidity has diagnostic, prognostic, treatment, and etiologic implications underscoring the importance of timely detection and treatment. A selective review of relevant articles and reviews published in English-language databases (1968 to April 2011) was conducted. Studies describing epidemiology, temporality of onset, treatment implications, and prognosis were selected for review. A growing body of evidence from epidemiologic, clinical, and biologic studies suggests that the relationship between medical illness and mood disorder is bidirectional in nature. It provides support for the multiplay of shared and specific etiologic factors interlinking these conditions. This article describes the complex interactions between medical illness and mood disorders and provides a meaningful approach to their comorbid clinical diagnosis and management.

  1. Treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Amy; Dodds, Alice; Walkup, John T; Rynn, Moira

    2013-11-01

    This article provides a brief review of the current available data concerning present treatment and potential new treatment advances for pediatric anxiety disorders, such as generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Disorder-specific treatment methods and innovations, particularly computer-assisted methods of delivery for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) will be reviewed. Additionally, the paper will discuss novel psychopharmacological compounds (e.g., D-cycloserine, riluzole, memantine, and anticonvulsant medications). Available evidence for the efficacy of novel medication strategies in adult studies and implications for their use in pediatrics will be discussed.

  2. Treatments for generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Struzik, Lukasz; Vermani, Monica; Coonerty-Femiano, Aimee; Katzman, Martin A

    2004-03-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder is characterized by excessive chronic anxiety in association with many somatic symptoms. The disorder has pervasive effects on quality of life, including work, social and educational aspects and requires long-term therapy. Available studies in patients are the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, third edition-revised and fourth edition, which have defined generalized anxiety disorder and demonstrate the efficacy of benzodiazepines, azapirones, some antidepressants and psychotherapy. Benzodiazepines are effective anxiolytics for short-term use but are accompanied by many adverse events. The antidepressants, paroxetine and venlafaxine (Efexor), have demonstrated efficacy in patients with generalized anxiety disorder with mild side-effect profiles. They have the additional benefit of efficacy in depression, which frequently occurs comorbidly in these patients. Long-term efficacy has been shown with venlafaxine in the treatment of this chronic condition, confirming that as in depression, the goal must not just be remission beyond simple symptom resolution but also on to improved functioning and quality of life. Psychotherapy with applied relaxation, cognitive therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy show the most promise in resolving and maintaining treatment gains in the long-term. These approaches may be useful alone or in combination with adjunctive pharmacotherapy to achieve remission. Based on current evidence, the recommended approach to achieving long-term benefits for patients with generalized anxiety disorder is antidepressant therapy with paroxetine or venlafaxine in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy.

  3. Treatment for Anxiety Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Past Conferences 2017 Conference 2017 Continuing Education Credits Mobile App Program Professional Education Continuing Education Credits Webinars for Mental Health Treatment Providers Continuing Education ...

  4. Treatment for Anxiety Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Day Workshop With Reid Wilson Conference Continuing Education Credits Sponsors & Exhibitors 2018 Conference Sponsors 2018 Conference Exhibitors ... Webinars for Mental Health Treatment Providers Continuing Education Credits Webinar Sponsorship Opportunities ADAA Publications/Special Offerings Podcasts ...

  5. Nonpharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Cottraux, Jean

    2002-09-01

    An evidence-based review of nonpharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders is presented. The vast majority of the controlled research is devoted to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and shows its efficiency and effectiveness in all the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) anxiety disorders in meta-analyses. Relaxation, psychoanalytic therapies, Rogerian nondirective therapy, hypnotherapy and supportive therapy were examined in a few controlled studies, which preclude any definite conclusion about their effectiveness in specific phobias, agoraphobia, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), CBT was clearly better than psychoanalytic therapy in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and performance anxiety Psychological debriefing for PTSD appeared detrimental to the patients in one high-quality meta-analysis. Uncontrolled studies of psychosurgery techniques for intractable OCD demonstrated a limited success and detrimental side effects. The same was true for sympathectomy in ereutophobia. Transcranial neurostimulation for OCD is under preliminary study. The theoretical and practical problems of CBT dissemination are discussed.

  6. Nonpharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cottraux, Jean

    2002-01-01

    An evidence-based review of nonpharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders is presented. The vast majority of the controlled research is devoted to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and shows its efficiency and effectiveness in all the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) anxiety disorders in meta-analyses. Relaxation, psychoanalytic therapies, Rogerian nondirective therapy, hypnotherapy and supportive therapy were examined in a few controlled studies, which preclude any definite conclusion about their effectiveness in specific phobias, agoraphobia, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), CBT was clearly better than psychoanalytic therapy in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and performance anxiety Psychological debriefing for PTSD appeared detrimental to the patients in one high-quality meta-analysis. Uncontrolled studies of psychosurgery techniques for intractable OCD demonstrated a limited success and detrimental side effects. The same was true for sympathectomy in ereutophobia. Transcranial neurostimulation for OCD is under preliminary study. The theoretical and practical problems of CBT dissemination are discussed. PMID:22034140

  7. Barriers to the treatment of social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Olfson, M; Guardino, M; Struening, E; Schneier, F R; Hellman, F; Klein, D F

    2000-04-01

    This article evaluates barriers to treatment reported by adults with social anxiety who participated in the 1996 National Anxiety Disorders Screening Day. The background characteristics of screening day participants with symptoms of social anxiety (N=6,130) were compared with those of participants without social anxiety (N=4,507). Barriers to previous mental health treatment reported by participants with and without symptoms of social anxiety were compared. Social anxiety was strongly associated with functional impairment, feelings of social isolation, and suicidal ideation. Compared to participants without social anxiety, those with social anxiety were significantly more likely to report that financial barriers, uncertainty over where to go for help, and fear of what others might think or say prevented them from seeking treatment. However, they were significantly less likely to report they avoided treatment because they did not believe they had an anxiety disorder. Roughly one-third (N=1,400 of 3,682, 38.0%) of the participants with symptoms of social anxiety who were referred for further evaluation were specifically referred for an evaluation for social phobia. Social anxiety is associated with a distinct pattern of treatment barriers. Treatment access may be improved by building public awareness of locally available services, easing the psychological and financial burden of entering treatment, and increasing health care professionals' awareness of its clinical significance.

  8. Treatment of Test Anxiety: A Computerized Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pless, Anica

    2010-01-01

    Test anxiety creates problems for many students, and can have a negative impact on the academic performance of many who suffer from it (Jones & Petruzzi, 1995). Typical treatment components for test anxiety involve psychoeducation, relaxation training, gradual exposure, cognitive restructuring, study skills training, and relapse prevention.…

  9. Treatment of Test Anxiety: A Computerized Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pless, Anica

    2010-01-01

    Test anxiety creates problems for many students, and can have a negative impact on the academic performance of many who suffer from it (Jones & Petruzzi, 1995). Typical treatment components for test anxiety involve psychoeducation, relaxation training, gradual exposure, cognitive restructuring, study skills training, and relapse prevention.…

  10. Emerging Drugs for the Treatment of Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Murrough, James W.; Yaqubi, Sahab; Sayed, Sehrish; Charney, Dennis S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent and disabling psychiatric disorders in the United States and worldwide. Basic research has provided critical insights into the mechanism regulating fear behavior in animals and a host of animal models have been developed in order to screen compounds for anxiolytic properties. Despite this progress, no mechanistically novel agents for the treatment of anxiety have come to market in more than two decades. Areas covered The current review will provide a critical summary of current pharmacological approaches to the treatment of anxiety and will examine the pharmacotherapeutic pipeline for treatments in development. Anxiety and related disorders considered herein include panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. The glutamate, neuropeptide and endocannabinoid systems show particular promise as future targets for novel drug development. Expert opinion In the face of an ever-growing understanding of fear related behavior, the field awaits the translation of this research into mechanistically novel treatments. Obstacles will be overcome through close collaboration between basic and clinical researchers with the goal of aligning valid endophenotypes of human anxiety disorders with improved animal models. Novel approaches are needed to move basic discoveries into new, more effective treatments for our patients. PMID:26012843

  11. Treatment of Dental Anxiety by Cue-Controlled Relaxation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Frank M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Women, self-referred for dental anxiety, were given four weeks of cue-controlled relaxation treatment. Nonorthogonal planned comparisons indicated significant decreases on dental anxiety, anxiety differential, and state anxiety scales, and systolic blood pressure. Participants reported that treatment was helpful in controlling anxiety when…

  12. Treatment of Dental Anxiety by Cue-Controlled Relaxation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Frank M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Women, self-referred for dental anxiety, were given four weeks of cue-controlled relaxation treatment. Nonorthogonal planned comparisons indicated significant decreases on dental anxiety, anxiety differential, and state anxiety scales, and systolic blood pressure. Participants reported that treatment was helpful in controlling anxiety when…

  13. Anxiety

    MedlinePlus

    ... be afraid to leave home. These people have anxiety disorders. Types include Panic disorder Obsessive-compulsive disorder Post-traumatic stress disorder Phobias Generalized anxiety disorder Treatment can involve medicines, therapy or both. NIH: ...

  14. Current Diagnosis and Treatment of Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bystritsky, Alexander; Khalsa, Sahib S.; Cameron, Michael E.; Schiffman, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health conditions. Although they are less visible than schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder, they can be just as disabling. The diagnoses of anxiety disorders are being continuously revised. Both dimensional and structural diagnoses have been used in clinical treatment and research, and both methods have been proposed for the new classification in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-5). However, each of these approaches has limitations. More recently, the emphasis in diagnosis has focused on neuroimaging and genetic research. This approach is based partly on the need for a more comprehensive understanding of how biology, stress, and genetics interact to shape the symptoms of anxiety. Anxiety disorders can be effectively treated with psychopharmacological and cognitive–behavioral interventions. These inter ventions have different symptom targets; thus, logical combinations of these strategies need to be further studied in order to improve future outcomes. New developments are forthcoming in the field of alternative strategies for managing anxiety and for treatment-resistant cases. Additional treatment enhancements should include the development of algorithms that can be easily used in primary care and with greater focus on managing functional impairment in patients with anxiety. PMID:23599668

  15. The Nature and Treatment of Mathematics Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Lisa

    This paper sought to identify some of the dimensions, correlates, and effective treatments of mathematics anxiety. The introductory section provides a statement of the problem, defines the purpose, organization, and limitation of the study, and includes a glossary of terms. In the second section, an annotated bibliography is presented, organized…

  16. The role of parental anxiety sensitivity in parent reports of child anxiety in treatment seeking families.

    PubMed

    Francis, Sarah E

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has examined the contribution of parental anxiety sensitivity to child anxiety, suggesting only a modest relationship between these two variables. No study to date, however, has examined the role of parental anxiety sensitivity in parent reports of the child's anxiety. It was hypothesized that anxiety sensitivity, a cognitive risk factor for the development of anxiety, would be significantly correlated with parents' reports of their child's anxiety, specifically with respect to panic and separation anxiety. The present study employed a sample of 56 treatment-seeking children and their parents. Parent and child reports of the child's anxiety were obtained, and self-reports of anxiety sensitivity were obtained from parent and child. Parent reports of their child's panic and separation anxiety symptoms were significantly related to not only parental anxiety sensitivity (r = .39 and r = .29, respectively) but also the child's self-reported level of anxiety sensitivity (r = .35 and r = .37, respectively). These findings suggest that anxiety sensitivity, a significant predictor of panic symptomatology amongst both adults and children, might be related to parents' perceptions of their child's symptoms of panic and separation anxiety. These findings further suggest taking into consideration parental levels of anxiety sensitivity when interpreting parent reports of child anxiety in clinical settings.

  17. Anxiety May Lead to Unneeded Prostate Cancer Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_163295.html Anxiety May Lead to Unneeded Prostate Cancer Treatments Researchers suggest that dealing with a patient's ... Jan. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Anxiety may prompt prostate cancer patients to opt for potentially unnecessary treatments, a ...

  18. Pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders: Current treatments and future directions✩

    PubMed Central

    Farach, Frank J.; Pruitt, Larry D.; Jun, Janie J.; Jerud, Alissa B.; Zoellner, Lori A.; Roy-Byrne, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Modern pharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders are safer and more tolerable than they were 30 years ago. Unfortunately, treatment efficacy and duration have not improved in most cases despite a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of anxiety. Moreover, innovative treatments have not reached the market despite billions of research dollars invested in drug development. In reviewing the literature on current treatments, we argue that evidence-based practice would benefit from better research on the causes of incomplete treatment response as well as the comparative efficacy of drug combinations and sequencing. We also survey two broad approaches to the development of innovative anxiety treatments: the continued development of drugs based on specific neuroreceptors and the pharmacological manipulation of fear-related memory. We highlight directions for future research, as neither of these approaches is ready for routine clinical use. PMID:23023162

  19. Treatment of child anxiety: an exploratory study of the role of maternal anxiety and behaviours in treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Creswell, Cathy; Willetts, Lucy; Murray, Lynne; Singhal, Meghna; Cooper, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common among parents of anxious children and have been found to impede child treatment outcomes, yet it is unclear whether it is parental anxiety that needs to be targeted in therapy or associated parental behaviours. Twenty-two children (6-12 years) with a current anxiety disorder and their mothers received cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) for child anxiety. In addition, of the 12 mothers who met criteria for a current anxiety disorder, 6 received CBT for their own disorder. Assessments were made of the mother-child interaction. The main findings were: (1) children did less well from treatment where their mothers had a current anxiety disorder; (2) treatment of maternal anxiety disorder did not improve child treatment outcome; and (3) maternal overinvolvement and expression of fear was associated with child treatment outcome. The results suggest that in the context of maternal anxiety disorder, child treatment outcome may be improved by specifically targeting parenting behaviours.

  20. Treatment-refractory anxiety; definition, risk factors, and treatment challenges.

    PubMed

    Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2015-06-01

    A sizable proportion of psychiatric patients will seek clinical evaluation and treatment for anxiety symptoms reportedly refractory to treatment. This apparent lack of response is either due to "pseudo-resistance" (a failure to have received and adhered to a recognized and effective treatment or treatments for their condition) or to true "treatment resistance." Pseudo-resistance can be due to clinician errors in selecting and delivering an appropriate treatment effectively, or to patient nonadherence to a course of treatment. True treatment resistance can be due to unrecognized exogenous anxiogenic factors (eg, caffeine overuse, sleep deprivation, use of alcohol or marijuana) or an incorrect diagnosis (eg, atypical bipolar illness, occult substance abuse, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder). Once the above factors are eliminated, treatment should focus on combining effective medications and cognitive behavioral therapy, combining several medications (augmentation), or employing novel medications or psychotherapies not typically indicated as first-line evidence-based anxiety treatments.

  1. Treatment-refractory anxiety; definition, risk factors, and treatment challenges

    PubMed Central

    Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A sizable proportion of psychiatric patients will seek clinical evaluation and treatment for anxiety symptoms reportedly refractory to treatment. This apparent lack of response is either due to “pseudo-resistance” (a failure to have received and adhered to a recognized and effective treatment or treatments for their condition) or to true “treatment resistance.” Pseudo-resistance can be due to clinician errors in selecting and delivering an appropriate treatment effectively, or to patient nonadherence to a course of treatment. True treatment resistance can be due to unrecognized exogenous anxiogenic factors (eg, caffeine overuse, sleep deprivation, use of alcohol or marijuana) or an incorrect diagnosis (eg, atypical bipolar illness, occult substance abuse, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder). Once the above factors are eliminated, treatment should focus on combining effective medications and cognitive behavioral therapy, combining several medications (augmentation), or employing novel medications or psychotherapies not typically indicated as first-line evidence-based anxiety treatments. PMID:26246793

  2. Neuro-Linguistic Programming Treatment for Anxiety: Magic or Myth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krugman, Martin; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compared neuro-linguistic programing treatment for anxiety with self-control desensitization of equal duration and a waiting-list control group in treating public speaking anxiety. Results indicated that neither treatment was more effective in reducing anxiety than merely waiting for one hour. (Author/MCF)

  3. Neuro-Linguistic Programming Treatment for Anxiety: Magic or Myth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krugman, Martin; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compared neuro-linguistic programing treatment for anxiety with self-control desensitization of equal duration and a waiting-list control group in treating public speaking anxiety. Results indicated that neither treatment was more effective in reducing anxiety than merely waiting for one hour. (Author/MCF)

  4. The Use of Three Variations of Anxiety Management Training in the Treatment of Generalized Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edie, Cecil A.

    Anxiety management training (AMT), developed by Suinn and Richardson, is a short-term treatment procedure for alleviating a variety of manifestations of anxiety. It is based on the theory that anxiety or fear responses themselves can become discriminative stimuli and that clients can be conditioned to respond to those stimuli with antagonistic…

  5. Parental anxiety in the treatment of childhood anxiety: a different story three years later.

    PubMed

    Cobham, Vanessa E; Dadds, Mark R; Spence, Susan H; McDermott, Brett

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on the results of a long-term follow-up of 60 (29 girls and 31 boys, all of Caucasian ethnicity) children and adolescents diagnosed with an anxiety disorder and treated 3 years earlier with child-focused cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) or child-focused CBT plus parental anxiety management (PAM). Sixty-seven children aged 7 to --14 years were assigned to either the "child anxiety only" or the "child + parental anxiety" condition based on parents' trait anxiety scores. Within conditions, participants were randomly assigned to one of the two treatment conditions. Results indicated that at follow-up, parental anxiety did not represent a risk factor for children's treatment outcome. In addition at follow-up, children who received the combined CBT + PAM intervention (regardless of parental anxiety status) were significantly more likely to be anxiety diagnosis free compared with children who received the child-focused CBT intervention only.

  6. Treatment Concerns and Functional Impairment in Pediatric Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Wu, Monica S; Salloum, Alison; Lewin, Adam B; Selles, Robert R; McBride, Nicole M; Crawford, Erika A; Storch, Eric A

    2016-08-01

    Although there are efficacious, evidence-based treatments for anxiety disorders, youth often experience delays in seeking therapy. Myriad reasons may contribute to this lag in treatment initiation, with some youth possessing concerns about therapy. Treatment concerns are broadly characterized by worries/ambivalence about seeking treatment, including concerns about the negative reactions, consequences, and inconvenience of treatment. As no studies exist for youth with anxiety disorders, this study examined the phenomenology of treatment concerns in 119 treatment-seeking, anxious youth and utilized a structural equation model to examine the relationship between child anxiety, depressive symptoms, treatment concerns, and anxiety-related functional impairment. Over 90 % of the children positively endorsed some type of treatment-related fear, with the most frequently expressed concern being that therapy would take too much time (50.4 %). Based on the model, both child anxiety and depressive symptoms predicted functional impairment, and treatment concerns mediated the relationship between child anxiety and functional impairment.

  7. The Impact of Brief Parental Anxiety Management on Child Anxiety Treatment Outcomes: A Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Jennifer L.; Newall, Carol; Rapee, Ronald M.; Lyneham, Heidi J.; Schniering, Carolyn C.; Wuthrich, Viviana M.; Schneider, Sophie; Seeley-Wait, Elizabeth; Edwards, Susan; Gar, Natalie S.

    2013-01-01

    Parental anxiety is a risk to optimal treatment outcomes for childhood anxiety disorders. The current trial examined whether the addition of a brief parental anxiety management (BPAM) program to family cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) was more efficacious than family CBT-only in treating childhood anxiety disorders. Two hundred nine children (aged 6–13 years, 104 female, 90% Caucasian) with a principal anxiety disorder were randomly allocated to family CBT with a five-session program of BPAM (n = 109) or family CBT-only (n = 100). Family CBT comprised the Cool Kids program, a structured 12-week program that included both mothers and fathers. Overall, results revealed that the addition of BPAM did not significantly improve outcomes for the child or the parent compared to the CBT-only group at posttreatment or 6-month follow-up. Overall, however, children with nonanxious parents were more likely to be diagnosis free for any anxiety disorder compared to children with anxious parents at posttreatment and 6-month follow-up. BPAM did not produce greater reductions in parental anxiety. The results support previous findings that parent anxiety confers poorer treatment outcomes for childhood anxiety disorders. Nevertheless the addition of BPAM anxiety management for parents in its current format did not lead to additional improvements when used as an adjunct to family CBT in the treatment of the child's anxiety disorder. Future benefits may come from more powerful methods of reducing parents’ anxiety. PMID:23845064

  8. The impact of brief parental anxiety management on child anxiety treatment outcomes: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Jennifer L; Newall, Carol; Rapee, Ronald M; Lyneham, Heidi J; Schniering, Carolyn C; Wuthrich, Viviana M; Schneider, Sophie; Seeley-Wait, Elizabeth; Edwards, Susan; Gar, Natalie S

    2014-01-01

    Parental anxiety is a risk to optimal treatment outcomes for childhood anxiety disorders. The current trial examined whether the addition of a brief parental anxiety management (BPAM) program to family cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) was more efficacious than family CBT-only in treating childhood anxiety disorders. Two hundred nine children (aged 6-13 years, 104 female, 90% Caucasian) with a principal anxiety disorder were randomly allocated to family CBT with a five-session program of BPAM (n = 109) or family CBT-only (n = 100). Family CBT comprised the Cool Kids program, a structured 12-week program that included both mothers and fathers. Overall, results revealed that the addition of BPAM did not significantly improve outcomes for the child or the parent compared to the CBT-only group at posttreatment or 6-month follow-up. Overall, however, children with nonanxious parents were more likely to be diagnosis free for any anxiety disorder compared to children with anxious parents at posttreatment and 6-month follow-up. BPAM did not produce greater reductions in parental anxiety. The results support previous findings that parent anxiety confers poorer treatment outcomes for childhood anxiety disorders. Nevertheless the addition of BPAM anxiety management for parents in its current format did not lead to additional improvements when used as an adjunct to family CBT in the treatment of the child's anxiety disorder. Future benefits may come from more powerful methods of reducing parents' anxiety.

  9. Treatment of separation, generalized, and social anxiety disorders in youths.

    PubMed

    Mohatt, Justin; Bennett, Shannon M; Walkup, John T

    2014-07-01

    Separation, generalized, and social anxiety disorders are common and impairing for children and adolescents. Childhood-onset anxiety disorders frequently persist into adulthood and place youths at risk for future psychiatric disorders, including mood and substance use disorders. Comorbidity is common in childhood anxiety disorders, and studies increasingly take this into account when assessing potential treatments. Existing studies support a number of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatments for childhood anxiety disorders. The strongest evidence supports use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Combination treatment with SSRIs and CBT has been found to be more effective than either treatment alone. Early detection and treatment of childhood anxiety disorders can prevent substantial impairment over the course of a child's development and accumulation of functional disability. Early treatment also may prevent later development of adult psychiatric illness. The authors review the treatment literature and present the case of an adolescent who is brought in for evaluation after years of untreated anxiety.

  10. Perinatal Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Assessment and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abizadeh, Jasmin; Sanders, Shawn; Swift, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Perinatal generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has a high prevalence of 8.5%–10.5% during pregnancy and 4.4%–10.8% postpartum. Despite its attendant dysfunction in the patient, this potentially debilitating mental health condition is often underdiagnosed. This overview will provide guidance for clinicians in making timely diagnosis and managing symptoms appropriately. A significant barrier to the diagnosis of GAD in the perinatal population is difficulty in distinguishing normal versus pathological worry. Because a perinatal-specific screening tool for GAD is nonexistent, early identification, diagnosis and treatment is often compromised. The resultant maternal dysfunction can potentially impact mother–infant bonding and influence neurodevelopmental outcomes in the children. Comorbid occurrence of GAD and major depressive disorder changes the illness course and its treatment outcome. Psychoeducation is a key component in overcoming denial/stigma and facilitating successful intervention. Treatment strategies are contingent upon illness severity. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), relaxation, and mindfulness therapy are indicated for mild GAD. Moderate/severe illness requires pharmacotherapy and CBT, individually or in combination. No psychotropic medications are approved by the FDA or Health Canada in pregnancy or the postpartum; off-label pharmacological treatment is instituted only if the benefit of therapy outweighs its risk. SSRIs/SNRIs are the first-line treatment for anxiety disorders due to data supporting their efficacy and overall favorable side effect profile. Benzodiazepines are an option for short-term treatment. While research on atypical antipsychotics is evolving, some can be considered for severe manifestations where the response to antidepressants or benzodiazepines has been insufficient. A case example will illustrate the onset, clinical course, and treatment strategies of GAD through pregnancy and the postpartum. PMID:26125602

  11. Perinatal Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Assessment and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Misri, Shaila; Abizadeh, Jasmin; Sanders, Shawn; Swift, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Perinatal generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has a high prevalence of 8.5%-10.5% during pregnancy and 4.4%-10.8% postpartum. Despite its attendant dysfunction in the patient, this potentially debilitating mental health condition is often underdiagnosed. This overview will provide guidance for clinicians in making timely diagnosis and managing symptoms appropriately. A significant barrier to the diagnosis of GAD in the perinatal population is difficulty in distinguishing normal versus pathological worry. Because a perinatal-specific screening tool for GAD is nonexistent, early identification, diagnosis and treatment is often compromised. The resultant maternal dysfunction can potentially impact mother-infant bonding and influence neurodevelopmental outcomes in the children. Comorbid occurrence of GAD and major depressive disorder changes the illness course and its treatment outcome. Psychoeducation is a key component in overcoming denial/stigma and facilitating successful intervention. Treatment strategies are contingent upon illness severity. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), relaxation, and mindfulness therapy are indicated for mild GAD. Moderate/severe illness requires pharmacotherapy and CBT, individually or in combination. No psychotropic medications are approved by the FDA or Health Canada in pregnancy or the postpartum; off-label pharmacological treatment is instituted only if the benefit of therapy outweighs its risk. SSRIs/SNRIs are the first-line treatment for anxiety disorders due to data supporting their efficacy and overall favorable side effect profile. Benzodiazepines are an option for short-term treatment. While research on atypical antipsychotics is evolving, some can be considered for severe manifestations where the response to antidepressants or benzodiazepines has been insufficient. A case example will illustrate the onset, clinical course, and treatment strategies of GAD through pregnancy and the postpartum.

  12. Designing new treatments for depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengming; Yang, Ji; Tobak, Anne

    2008-03-01

    Depression and anxiety are disabling disorders that affect many individuals. Drugs that interfere with the reuptake and/or metabolism of biogenic amines have been used to treat depression for more than four decades. An important development in the treatment of depression has been the emergence of triple reuptake inhibitors (SNDRIs), which inhibit the reuptake of serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine. Preclinical and clinical research indicates that drugs inhibiting the reuptake of all of these neurotransmitters can produce a more rapid onset of action and greater efficacy than traditional antidepressants. Allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors can produce anxiolytic, sedative/hypnotic and anesthetic effects, presumably from enhancing the inhibitory neurotransmission of GABAA through a facilitation of receptor function. Benzodiazepines have been used with great success as anxiolytics, but the use of these drugs is limited because of their addictive potential and sedative side effects. This feature review discusses the design and synthesis of antidepressants based on the monoamine hypothesis of depression, and presents the current status of research on GABAA receptor modulators as a potential treatment for anxiety disorders.

  13. Changes in affect during treatment for depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kring, Ann M; Persons, Jacqueline B; Thomas, Cannon

    2007-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the tripartite model [Clark, L. A., & Watson, D. (1991). Tripartite model of anxiety and depression: Psychometric evidence and psychometric implications. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 100, 316-336] can be extended to account for change during treatment for anxiety and depression. Forty-one patients treated naturalistically in private practice with cognitive behavior therapy completed weekly measures of depression, anxiety, negative affect (NA), positive affect (PA), and anxious arousal (AA). Consistent with the model, NA was associated with anxiety and depression during treatment, PA was more strongly related to depression than to anxiety, and AA was more strongly related to anxiety than to depression. As predicted, symptoms of depression and anxiety and NA all decreased during treatment. As predicted, AA also decreased, particularly for patients with panic disorder. PA increased during treatment, but only for patients who showed a significant decline in depression and only over an extended period of treatment. Nearly two-thirds of the variance in anxiety change was accounted for by changes in depression and NA, and just over three-fourths of the variance in depression change was accounted for by changes in anxiety and NA, indicating that much of the change in anxiety and depression across the course of treatment is shared in common.

  14. Matching Stress Inoculation's Treatment Components to Clients' Anxiety Mode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmaier, Elizabeth M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Speech-anxious students (N=69) classified as experiencing primarily cognitive or somatic symptoms of anxiety received cognitive restructuring, coping relaxation, a combined cognitive-somatic treatment (stress inoculation) or no treatment. Cognitive indices of anxiety indicated that matched treatments resulted in more facilitative patterns of…

  15. Matching Stress Inoculation's Treatment Components to Clients' Anxiety Mode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmaier, Elizabeth M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Speech-anxious students (N=69) classified as experiencing primarily cognitive or somatic symptoms of anxiety received cognitive restructuring, coping relaxation, a combined cognitive-somatic treatment (stress inoculation) or no treatment. Cognitive indices of anxiety indicated that matched treatments resulted in more facilitative patterns of…

  16. Spectrum of anxiety disorders: diagnosis and pharmacologic treatment.

    PubMed

    Karsnitz, Deborah Brandt; Ward, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 30% of women experience an anxiety disorder at some time during their lives, and there is increasing evidence that anxiety disorders are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Despite increased media coverage regarding anxiety disorders, women are reluctant to discuss signs and symptoms of anxiety with family or health care providers. Additionally, despite ongoing research and improved educational curricula, primary care and women's health care providers find diagnosis and treatment of mental health disorders challenging. This article reviews the diagnostic features and pharmacologic treatment options for the most common anxiety disorders including generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. The impact of anxiety disorders on pregnancy and guidelines for management are presented. © 2011 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  17. Pharmacological treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, David S; Ajel, Khalil I; Garner, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is common in community and clinical settings. The individual and societal burden associated with GAD is substantial, but many of those who could benefit from treatment are not recognized or treated. Recent evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of patients with GAD have recommended initial treatment with either a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), on the basis of their proven efficacy and reasonable tolerability in randomized placebo-controlled trials. However, there is much room for improvement in both the efficacy and the tolerability of treatment. Response rates to first-line treatment can be disappointing and it is hard to predict reliably which patients will respond well and which will have only a limited treatment response. Many patients worry about becoming dependent on medication, a substantial proportion experience troublesome adverse effects, and these problems limit the effectiveness of pharmacological treatments in clinical practice. The relative lack of longitudinal studies of clinical outcomes in GAD, and the small number of placebo-controlled relapse prevention studies lead to uncertainty about the optimal duration of treatment after a satisfactory initial response. There have been few investigations of the further management of patients who have not responded to first-line treatment and there is a pressing need for further augmentation studies in patients who have not responded to an SSRI or SNRI, or to other initial pharmacological approaches. Future treatment guidelines for GAD will be influenced by emerging data for established and novel pharmacological approaches, and possibly through the more accurate identification of certain patient subgroups who are likely to respond preferentially to particular interventions.

  18. The role of parental anxiety in the treatment of childhood anxiety.

    PubMed

    Cobham, V E; Dadds, M R; Spence, S H

    1998-12-01

    Sixty-seven children aged 7 to 14 who met diagnostic criteria for an anxiety disorder were assigned to conditions according to parental anxiety level. Within these conditions, children were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments: child-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or child-focused CBT plus parental anxiety management (CBT + PAM). At posttreatment, results indicated that within the child-anxiety-only condition, 82% of the children in the CBT condition no longer met criteria for an anxiety disorder compared with 80% in the CBT + PAM condition. Within the child + parental anxiety condition, 39% in the CBT condition no longer met criteria compared with 77% in the CBT + PAM condition. At follow-up, these differences were maintained, with some weakening over time. Results were not consistent across outcome measures. The interpretation and potential clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  19. Exercise as Treatment for Anxiety: Systematic Review and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stonerock, Gregory L.; Hoffman, Benson M.; Smith, Patrick J.; Blumenthal, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise has been shown to reduce symptoms of anxiety, but few studies have studied exercise in individuals pre-selected because of their high anxiety. Purpose To review and critically evaluate studies of exercise training in adults with either high levels of anxiety or an anxiety disorder. Methods We conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in which anxious adults were randomized to an exercise or non-exercise control condition. Data were extracted concerning anxiety outcomes and study design. Existing meta-analyses were also reviewed. Results Evidence from 12 RCTs suggested benefits of exercise, for select groups, similar to established treatments and greater than placebo. However, most studies had significant methodological limitations, including small sample sizes, concurrent therapies, and inadequate assessment of adherence and fitness levels. Conclusions Exercise may be a useful treatment for anxiety, but lack of data from rigorous, methodologically sound RCTs precludes any definitive conclusions about its effectiveness. PMID:25697132

  20. Treatment of anxiety in children and adolescents: using child and adolescent anxiety psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Silver, Gabrielle; Shapiro, Theodore; Milrod, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    This article presents information on child and adolescent psychodynamic psychotherapy (CAPP). Following a definition of anxiety, the authors present study outcomes of nonpsychodynamic treatment approaches, alone and in combination with psychopharmacologic treatment, then explore psychodynamic approaches. A detailed overview of psychodynamic psychotherapy is presented, along with 2 cases illustrating the use of CAPP in young patients with anxiety. Also presented are tables and boxes summarizing CAPP therapeutic processes and strategies as intervention for anxious youth.

  1. Anxiety in youth with autism spectrum disorders: implications for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Johnco, Carly; Storch, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Anxiety disorders are one of the most common psychiatric comorbidities among children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). There has been a recent proliferation of research examining the prevalence, phenomenology, assessment and treatment of anxiety disorders among youth with ASD. While there is currently very limited support for the use of pharmacological agents to treat anxiety among youth with ASD and comorbid anxiety, there has been overwhelming support across numerous modestly sized controlled studies for the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy. This review discusses advances in the treatment literature for anxiety in youth with ASD, and discusses the current evidence base for whether standard treatment needs to be adapted for this population. PMID:26548429

  2. Sequential Treatment of Comorbid Insomnia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Belleville, Geneviève; Ivers, Hans; Bélanger, Lynda; Blais, France C; Morin, Charles M

    2016-09-01

    To explore the efficacy of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for patients with comorbid generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and insomnia using 2 sequential treatments. Using a single-case methodology, 10 women (mean age = 45) with chronic insomnia and GAD were randomly assigned to CBT for GAD followed by CBT for insomnia, or to CBT for insomnia followed by CBT for GAD. Sleep and anxiety were measured via diagnostic interviews, daily diaries, and self-report questionnaires. Time series analyses, group effect sizes, and indications of clinically significant change revealed improvements on anxiety, worry, and sleep after CBT for GAD. Following CBT for insomnia, positive changes were observed on sleep and, to a lesser extent, anxiety and worry. In the presence of comorbid GAD and insomnia, initiating treatment for GAD first produced superior clinical benefits in anxiety and sleep. The addition of insomnia-specific treatment led to additional improvements in worry and sleep quality. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Developments in treatment of anxiety disorders: psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, and psychosurgery.

    PubMed

    Balon, Richard

    2004-01-01

    A selection of articles that focus on psychosocial treatments, pharmacotherapy, and psychosurgery of anxiety disorders are reviewed. While some medications look clearly beneficial or potentially effective in the treatment of anxiety disorders, other compounds seem less promising or not effective. A combination of proven pharmacotherapies and psychotherapies may be the most clinically prudent approach to the treatment of anxiety disorders. Thermocapsulotomy may be an "extreme" option in selected cases of severe nonobsessive anxiety but may carry a significant risk of adverse effects indicative of frontal lobe functioning impairment. In spite of all the research and progress in studying relatively well-defined therapies, many patients suffering from anxiety and depression still use complementary and alternative therapies. The use of alternative and complementary is likely to increase as insurance coverage expands. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Escitalopram in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, David S; Nair, Rajesh V

    2005-07-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram is the active enantiomer of citalopram and has proven efficacy in the treatment of major depression, panic disorder and social phobia. Accumulating data indicate that it is also efficacious in the treatment of patients with generalized anxiety disorder. This drug profile summarizes the current evidence-base for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder, describes the findings of a series of randomized placebo-controlled and comparator-controlled trials of escitalopram, examines the strengths and weaknesses of current treatment approaches and considers potential new therapies for the treatment of this common, chronic and impairing anxiety disorder. In summary, escitalopram is effective and well tolerated in both the short- and long-term treatment of generalized anxiety disorder, and has advantages over benzodiazepines and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine.

  5. Preliminary Investigation of Intolerance of Uncertainty Treatment for Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Sarah N.; Egan, Sarah; Rees, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is the tendency to react negatively to uncertain situations or events, and it has been found to be an important maintaining factor in a number of different anxiety disorders. It is often included as a part of cognitive behavioural interventions for anxiety disorders but its specific contribution to treatment outcome…

  6. Correlates, Causes, Effects, and Treatment of Test Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hembree, Ray

    1988-01-01

    A meta-analysis of the results of 562 studies illustrates the nature, effect, and treatment of academic test anxiety (TA). TA correlated inversely to students' self-esteem and directly to their fears of negative evaluation, defensiveness, and other forms of anxiety. Ability, gender, and school grade level also affect TA. (TJH)

  7. Adapting Manualized Treatments: Treating Anxiety Disorders among Native Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Coteau, Tami; Anderson, Jessiline; Hope, Debra

    2006-01-01

    Although there is a small but growing body of literature examining the psychopathology of anxiety among Native Americans, no data are available regarding the efficacy of empirically supported treatments for anxiety disorders among Native Americans. Moreover, exceptional challenges arise in adapting mainstream approaches to Native Americans, such…

  8. Preliminary Investigation of Intolerance of Uncertainty Treatment for Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Sarah N.; Egan, Sarah; Rees, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is the tendency to react negatively to uncertain situations or events, and it has been found to be an important maintaining factor in a number of different anxiety disorders. It is often included as a part of cognitive behavioural interventions for anxiety disorders but its specific contribution to treatment outcome…

  9. Informant Agreement in Treatment Gains for Child Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Courtney L.; Puleo, Connor M.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined multiple informant agreement in reports of treatment gains in a sample of children (M age = 10.27) treated for social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, and separation anxiety disorder. Mothers and fathers agreed on their child's improvement, and parents and children also generally agreed on the child's improvement.…

  10. Informant Agreement in Treatment Gains for Child Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Courtney L.; Puleo, Connor M.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined multiple informant agreement in reports of treatment gains in a sample of children (M age = 10.27) treated for social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, and separation anxiety disorder. Mothers and fathers agreed on their child's improvement, and parents and children also generally agreed on the child's improvement.…

  11. Epilepsy and anxiety: epidemiology, classification, aetiology, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kimiskidis, Vasilios K; Valeta, Thalia

    2012-09-01

    Anxiety in epilepsy has recently become a focus of interest for a number of reasons. Epidemiological studies have established that anxiety disorders are twice as common in patients with epilepsy compared to the general population, while in referral centres their prevalence is even higher. In addition, it has been recently appreciated that anxiety exerts a significant negative impact on the quality of life of patients with epilepsy of any age. With regard to the pathogenesis of anxiety in epilepsy, a number of theories have been put forward including those based on psychodynamics, learning-cognition, and neurobiology. From a clinical point of view, anxiety may occur as a comorbid disorder with epilepsy or be directly linked with epilepsy as a preictal, ictal, postictal or interictal phenomenon. The treatment of anxiety in patients with epilepsy requires a comprehensive, multidisciplinary, clinical assessment. Regarding pharmacological therapies, it should be recognised that some drugs prescribed for anxiety disorders are associated with a high risk of seizures, whereas some antiepileptic drugs possess anxiolytic properties that could be of use in the management of epileptic patients with anxiety. The correct diagnosis and successful treatment of anxiety is expected to have significant benefits for the quality of life of epileptic patients.

  12. Anxiety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Anxiety Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  13. Treatment and prevention of music performance anxiety.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Music performance anxiety (MPA) regularly occurs when musicians present themselves before an audience in performance situations, and thus, it plays an important role in the careers of professional musicians. MPA is expressed on the emotional and physical level, as well as on the levels of thinking and behavior, and extends along a continuum of varying severity. Its performance-impairing, afflicting form is considered to be a specific type of social phobia, which requires therapy. There are different psychological theories, which contribute to the understanding of the phenomenon of MPA and provide basic principles for the various treatment approaches. Current "best practice," in our clinical experience, is a personal- and problem-oriented approach within a multimodal therapy model, including the range of psychoanalytic and cognitive behavioral therapies, body-oriented methods, and mental techniques. In order to avoid severe MPA, prevention in the field of music pedagogic is very important. Thus, the concepts of dealing positively with MPA should be implemented very early into the instrumental and vocal education of musicians. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment of Anxiety and Depression in the Preschool Period

    PubMed Central

    Luby, Joan L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Empirical studies have now established that clinical anxiety and depressive disorders may arise in preschool children as early as age 3.0. As empirical studies validating and characterizing these disorders in preschoolers are relatively recent, less work has been done on the development and testing of age-appropriate treatments. Method A comprehensive literature search revealed several small randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of psychotherapeutic treatments for preschool anxiety and depression. The literature also contains case series of behavioral and psychopharmacologic interventions for specific anxiety disorders. However, to date, no large-scale RCTs of treatment for any anxiety or depressive disorder specifically targeting preschool populations have been published. Results Several age-adapted forms of cognitive behavioral therapy have been developed and preliminarily tested in small RCTs, and appear promising for a variety of forms of preschool anxiety disorders. Notably, these adaptations centrally involve primary caregivers and utilize age-adjusted methodology such as cartoon-based materials and co-constructed drawing or narratives. Modified forms of Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) have been tested and appear promising for both anxiety and depression. While preventive interventions that target parenting have shown significant promise in anxiety, these methods have not been explored in area of early childhood depression. Studies of the impact of parental treatment on infants suggest that direct treatment of the youngest children may be necessary to affect long-term change. Conclusions Recommendations are made for clinical treatment of these disorders where psychotherapy is the first line of intervention. PMID:23582866

  15. Parental involvement: contribution to childhood anxiety and its treatment.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chiaying; Kendall, Philip C

    2014-12-01

    Anxiety disorders are prevalent in youth. Despite demonstrated efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), approximately 40% of anxiety-disordered youth remain unresponsive to treatment. Because developmental and etiological models suggest that parental factors are relevant to the onset and maintenance of childhood anxiety, researchers have proposed and investigated family-based interventions with increased parent work in treatment, aiming to improve the efficacy of treatment for childhood anxiety. However, contrary to what theoretical models suggest, data to date did not indicate additive benefit of family-based CBT in comparison with child-centered modality. Is parent/family involvement unnecessary when treating childhood anxiety disorders? Or could there be the need for specificity (tailored family-based treatment) that is guided by a revised conceptualization that improves the implementation of a family-based intervention? The current review examines (1) relevant parental factors that have been found to be associated with the development and maintenance of childhood anxiety and (2) interventions that incorporate parental involvement. Relevant findings are integrated to formulate a "targeted" treatment approach for parental involvement in CBT for youth anxiety. Specifically, there is potential in the assessment of parent/family factors prior to treatment (for appropriateness) followed by a target-oriented implementation of parent training.

  16. Parents' state and trait anxiety: relationships with anxiety severity and treatment response in adolescents with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Conner, Caitlin M; Maddox, Brenna B; White, Susan W

    2013-08-01

    Comorbid anxiety is common among children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and parents of children with ASD are more likely to have anxiety disorders. This study investigated the relationship between parents' state and trait anxiety and parent-reported internalizing and externalizing symptoms among adolescents (n = 30) with ASD, as well as the relationship of parents' anxiety symptoms and adolescent treatment response in the context of a randomized controlled trial. Parental state anxiety correlated with severity of adolescent anxiety, and trait anxiety in parents correlated with parent-reported adolescent internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Also, parents of adolescent treatment responders experienced a decrease in their own trait anxiety. Findings highlight the importance of considering parental anxiety when targeting anxiety among youth with ASD.

  17. Herbal Treatment for Anxiety: Is It Effective?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and supplements and can cause low blood pressure. Lemon balm. Preliminary research shows lemon balm can reduce some symptoms of anxiety, such as nervousness and excitability. Lemon balm is generally well-tolerated and considered safe for ...

  18. Using Advances From Cognitive Behavioral Models of Anxiety to Guide Treatment for Social Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Narr, Rachel K; Teachman, Bethany A

    2017-05-01

    This case features an adult male with moderate social anxiety disorder and mild depressive symptoms who showed an initial positive response to an earlier experience of cognitive behavior therapy, but then relapsed when he started avoiding social situations again because of continuing beliefs that experiencing anxiety was unacceptable. His treatment at our clinic focused on shifting unhelpful thinking about the likelihood and consequences of becoming anxious and reengaging in avoided social situations so he could learn to tolerate negative affect and uncertainty. The treatment approach draws from cognitive behavioral models of social anxiety and highlights advances in clinical science, especially recent work on the causal role of interpretation biases (the tendency to assign negative or threatening meaning to ambiguous situations) in the maintenance and reduction of anxiety. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Cannabidiol as a Potential Treatment for Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Blessing, Esther M; Steenkamp, Maria M; Manzanares, Jorge; Marmar, Charles R

    2015-10-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), a Cannabis sativa constituent, is a pharmacologically broad-spectrum drug that in recent years has drawn increasing interest as a treatment for a range of neuropsychiatric disorders. The purpose of the current review is to determine CBD's potential as a treatment for anxiety-related disorders, by assessing evidence from preclinical, human experimental, clinical, and epidemiological studies. We found that existing preclinical evidence strongly supports CBD as a treatment for generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder when administered acutely; however, few studies have investigated chronic CBD dosing. Likewise, evidence from human studies supports an anxiolytic role of CBD, but is currently limited to acute dosing, also with few studies in clinical populations. Overall, current evidence indicates CBD has considerable potential as a treatment for multiple anxiety disorders, with need for further study of chronic and therapeutic effects in relevant clinical populations.

  20. Evidence-based psychological treatments for late-life anxiety.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Catherine R; Sorrell, John T; Thorp, Steven R; Wetherell, Julie Loebach

    2007-03-01

    This project identified evidence-based psychotherapy treatments for anxiety disorders in older adults. The authors conducted a review of the geriatric anxiety treatment outcome literature by using specific coding criteria and identified 17 studies that met criteria for evidence-based treatments (EBTs). These studies reflected samples of adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) or samples with mixed anxiety disorders or symptoms. Evidence was found for efficacy for 4 types of EBTs. Relaxation training, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), and, to a lesser extent, supportive therapy and cognitive therapy have support for treating subjective anxiety symptoms and disorders. CBT for late-life GAD has garnered the most consistent support, and relaxation training represents an efficacious, relatively low-cost intervention. The authors provide a review of the strengths and limitations of this research literature, including a discussion of common assessment instruments. Continued investigation of EBTs is needed in clinical geriatric anxiety samples, given the small number of available studies. Future research should examine other therapy models and investigate the effects of psychotherapy on other anxiety disorders, such as phobias and posttraumatic stress disorder in older adults. ((c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Treatment of comorbid anxiety and autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Joshua; Sulkowski, Michael L; Ung, Danielle; Wood, Jeffrey J; Lewin, Adam B; Murphy, Tanya K; May, Jill Ehrenreich; Storch, Eric A

    2011-01-01

    Summary Clinically significant anxiety occurs frequently among individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and is linked to increased psychosocial, familial, behavioral and academic impairment beyond the core autism symptoms when present. Although efforts are underway to establish empirically supported treatments for anxiety among individuals with ASDs, this remains an emerging research area. This literature review summarizes available information on the efficacy of pharmacological and psychosocial approaches for treating anxiety and repetitive behaviors in children, adolescents and adults with ASDs. Specifically, we evaluate evidence for the use of cognitive–behavioral therapy and selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. Evidence is growing in support of using cognitive–behavioral therapy to treat anxiety in youths with ASDs; however, mixed evidence exists for its application in treating repetitive behaviors, as well as the use of selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors for anxiety in youths with ASDs. We conclude the article with a discussion of the strength of current information and next steps in research. PMID:24174992

  2. Treatment of comorbid anxiety and autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Joshua; Sulkowski, Michael L; Ung, Danielle; Wood, Jeffrey J; Lewin, Adam B; Murphy, Tanya K; May, Jill Ehrenreich; Storch, Eric A

    2011-12-01

    Clinically significant anxiety occurs frequently among individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and is linked to increased psychosocial, familial, behavioral and academic impairment beyond the core autism symptoms when present. Although efforts are underway to establish empirically supported treatments for anxiety among individuals with ASDs, this remains an emerging research area. This literature review summarizes available information on the efficacy of pharmacological and psychosocial approaches for treating anxiety and repetitive behaviors in children, adolescents and adults with ASDs. Specifically, we evaluate evidence for the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy and selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. Evidence is growing in support of using cognitive-behavioral therapy to treat anxiety in youths with ASDs; however, mixed evidence exists for its application in treating repetitive behaviors, as well as the use of selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors for anxiety in youths with ASDs. We conclude the article with a discussion of the strength of current information and next steps in research.

  3. Long-term pharmacological treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Mahe, V; Balogh, A

    2000-03-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is one of the most common anxiety disorders and has a poor prognosis, although it is often thought to be a minor complaint. This disorder has a chronic course of 5-15 years and longer. Long-term treatment with the commonly used benzodiazepines is controversial because of concerns over tolerance and dependence. We performed a thorough search of the literature for clinical trials of a duration of over 2 months conducted in patients with generalized anxiety disorder in order to identify any successful long-term treatment of this disorder. Only eight long-term reports of studies conducted in well-defined homogeneous groups of patients diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder were found with the methodology of these studies presenting a number of limiting factors. The results are inconclusive and no reference drug could be identified. In addition, an adequate evaluation of the long-term treatment of GAD has not yet been performed.

  4. Social anxiety disorder: designing a pharmacologic treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Pollack, M H

    1999-01-01

    Growing appreciation of the prevalence of and morbid sequelae associated with social anxiety disorder has focused increasing interest on the development of effective treatment strategies. A number of pharmacologic interventions, including the monoamine oxidase inhibitors, reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase A, beta-blockers, benzodiazepines, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, have demonstrated efficacy for the treatment of social anxiety disorder. The choice of initial treatment depends on a variety of factors including comorbidity, prior treatment history, patient preference, and adverse effect profile. This article will examine the effectiveness of various pharmacologic agents for the treatment of social anxiety disorder, discuss considerations for long-term management, and review strategies for optimizing treatment in patients who are partially responsive or unresponsive to initial therapy.

  5. Effect of anxiety on treatment presentation and outcome: results from the Marijuana Treatment Project.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Julia D; Carroll, Kathleen M

    2010-08-15

    Despite emerging evidence of the efficacy of psychotherapies for marijuana dependence, variability in outcome exists. This study examined the role of anxiety on treatment involvement and outcome. Four questions were examined: (1) Is greater anxiety associated with greater impairment at baseline? (2) Is baseline anxiety related to greater marijuana use and problems following treatment? (3) Does adding cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to motivation enhancement therapy (MET) reduce anxiety relative to MET alone; (4) Are reductions in anxiety associated with better outcomes? The sample comprised 450 marijuana-dependent patients in the Marijuana Treatment Project. Marijuana use and anxiety were measured at pretreatment and 4- and 9-month follow-ups. At baseline, anxiety was linked to more marijuana-related problems. CBT was associated with less anxiety at follow-up compared to MET alone. Reductions in anxiety were related to less marijuana use. In fact, reduction in anxiety from baseline to 4-month follow-up was associated with less marijuana use at 9 months, but reduction in marijuana use did not predict subsequent anxiety. Data suggest that anxiety is an important variable that deserves further attention in marijuana-dependence treatment.

  6. Testing Public Anxiety Treatments against a Credible Placebo Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duff, Desiree C.; Levine, Timothy R.; Beatty, Michael J.; Woolbright, Jessica; Park, Hee Sun

    2007-01-01

    Research investigating public speaking anxiety treatments is subject to demand effects. This study tests the relative effectiveness of systematic desensitization (SD) and multiple treatment method (MT) containing visualization therapy against no-treatment and credible placebo controls. Data (N = 238) were collected at six points in a public…

  7. Testing Public Anxiety Treatments against a Credible Placebo Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duff, Desiree C.; Levine, Timothy R.; Beatty, Michael J.; Woolbright, Jessica; Park, Hee Sun

    2007-01-01

    Research investigating public speaking anxiety treatments is subject to demand effects. This study tests the relative effectiveness of systematic desensitization (SD) and multiple treatment method (MT) containing visualization therapy against no-treatment and credible placebo controls. Data (N = 238) were collected at six points in a public…

  8. Assessment and treatment of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wehry, Anna M; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Hennelly, Meghann M; Connolly, Sucheta D; Strawn, Jeffrey R

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in the developmental epidemiology, neurobiology, and treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders have increased our understanding of these conditions and herald improved outcomes for affected children and adolescents. This article reviews the current epidemiology, longitudinal trajectory, and neurobiology of anxiety disorders in youth. Additionally, we summarize the current evidence for both psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatments of fear-based anxiety disorders (e.g., generalized, social, and separation anxiety disorders) in children and adolescents. Current data suggest that these disorders begin in childhood and adolescence, exhibit homotypic continuity, and increase the risk of secondary anxiety and mood disorders. Psychopharmacologic trials involving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSNRIs) are effective in pediatric patients with anxiety disorders and have generally demonstrated moderate effect sizes. Additionally, current data support cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of these conditions in youth and suggest that the combination of psychotherapy + an SSRI may be associated with greater improvement than would be expected with either treatment as monotherapy.

  9. Assessment and Treatment of Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Wehry, Anna M.; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Hennelly, Meghann M.; Connolly, Sucheta D.; Strawn, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the developmental epidemiology, neurobiology and treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders have increased our understanding of these conditions and herald improved outcomes for affected children and adolescents. This article reviews the current epidemiology, longitudinal trajectory, and neurobiology of anxiety disorders in youth. Additionally, we summarize the current evidence for both psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatments of fear-based anxiety disorders (e.g., generalized, social and separation anxiety disorders) in children and adolescents. Current data suggest that these disorders begin in childhood and adolescence, exhibit homotypic continuity and increase the risk of secondary anxiety and mood disorders. Psychopharmacologic trials involving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSNRIs) are effective in pediatric patients with anxiety disorders and have generally demonstrated moderate effect sizes. Additionally, current data support cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) are efficacious in the treatment of these conditions in youth and that combination of CBT + an SSRI may be associated with greater improvement than would be expected with either treatment as monotherapy. PMID:25980507

  10. Examining the Relationship between Parental Anxiety and Treatment Response in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Reaven, Judy; Washington, Lindsay; Moody, Eric J.; Stern, Jessica A.; Hepburn, Susan L.; Blakeley-Smith, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    In response to the high co-occurrence of anxiety symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), several interventions have been developed for this population. In spite of promising findings, some youth with ASD respond only minimally to anxiety interventions. The current study explores the role of parental anxiety in youth treatment outcome. Thirty-one youth with ASD, ages 7–18, and their parents participated in the study. Parents completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory pre- and post-treatment. Contrary to previous research, there was no correlation between parental anxiety and youth anxiety at baseline or post-treatment. However, parental trait anxiety significantly decreased from pre- to post-treatment for parents of treatment responders. The findings are consistent with previous research and suggest youth-to-parent influence. PMID:25778837

  11. [Disease burden of extreme treatment anxiety; quality of life for patients with and without extreme dental treatment anxiety].

    PubMed

    Vermaire, J H; van Houtem, C M H H; Ross, J N; Schuller, A A

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a comparison was made between disease-specific (oral health-related) quality of life (OHQoL), measured with the OHIP-14 questionnaire, and generic (general health-related) quality of life (GHQoL), measured with the EQ5D-5L questionnaire, in patients with and without extreme dental treatment anxiety. A total of 76 patients who could not be treated due to extreme dental treatment anxiety were referred to a centre for special dentistry. These patients were matched, according to age, gender and socioeconomic status, with participants in an epidemiological study on oral health (n = 1125). Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used on both groups to compare GHQoL and OHQoL. The total OHIP score was higher (representing a lower quality of life) in the patient group than in the control group. Anxiety patients scored higher on all 7 domains of the OHIP-14. With respect to general quality of life, patients with extreme treatment anxiety were found to report lower utility scores than the matched control group. With these results, a total disease burden of 74,000 disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) was calculated for extreme treatment anxiety in the Netherlands. The findings of this study reveal that having extreme dental treatment anxiety results in a significant disease burden in the Netherlands.

  12. Defining Treatment Response and Remission in Child Anxiety: Signal Detection Analysis Using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caporino, Nicole E.; Brodman, Douglas M.; Kendall, Philip C.; Albano, Anne Marie; Sherrill, Joel; Piacentini, John; Sakolsky, Dara; Birmaher, Boris; Compton, Scott N.; Ginsburg, Golda; Rynn, Moira; McCracken, James; Gosch, Elizabeth; Keeton, Courtney; March, John; Walkup, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine optimal Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS) percent reduction and raw score cut-offs for predicting treatment response and remission among children and adolescents with anxiety disorders. Method: Data were from a subset of youth (N = 438; 7-17 years of age) who participated in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study…

  13. Defining Treatment Response and Symptom Remission for Anxiety Disorders in Pediatric Autism Spectrum Disorders Using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnco, Carly J.; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; Lewin, Adam B.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Wood, Jeffrey J.; Storch, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined optimal guidelines to assess treatment response and remission for anxiety in youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS). Data was collected for 108 children aged 7-16 years with comorbid anxiety and ASD before and after receiving cognitive behavior therapy. Optimal cut-offs on the…

  14. Defining Treatment Response and Remission in Child Anxiety: Signal Detection Analysis Using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caporino, Nicole E.; Brodman, Douglas M.; Kendall, Philip C.; Albano, Anne Marie; Sherrill, Joel; Piacentini, John; Sakolsky, Dara; Birmaher, Boris; Compton, Scott N.; Ginsburg, Golda; Rynn, Moira; McCracken, James; Gosch, Elizabeth; Keeton, Courtney; March, John; Walkup, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine optimal Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS) percent reduction and raw score cut-offs for predicting treatment response and remission among children and adolescents with anxiety disorders. Method: Data were from a subset of youth (N = 438; 7-17 years of age) who participated in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study…

  15. Defining Treatment Response and Symptom Remission for Anxiety Disorders in Pediatric Autism Spectrum Disorders Using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnco, Carly J.; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; Lewin, Adam B.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Wood, Jeffrey J.; Storch, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined optimal guidelines to assess treatment response and remission for anxiety in youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS). Data was collected for 108 children aged 7-16 years with comorbid anxiety and ASD before and after receiving cognitive behavior therapy. Optimal cut-offs on the…

  16. [Separation anxiety family therapy (SAFT): a cognitive behavioral treatment program for children suffering from separation anxiety].

    PubMed

    Blatter-Meunier, Judith; Schneider, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Separation Anxiety Disorder is one oft the most frequent mental disorders in children. The SAFT treatment manual is an evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy program for children with separation anxiety. Its first part consists of four weekly sessions with the child and four weekly sessions with the parents. Children and parents receive psychoeducation about anxiety, learn to recognize and reframe irrational beliefs about separation situations, expand their repertoire of coping strategies, and are introduced to the rationale for exposure. The second part of treatment consists of eight weekly family sessions followed by a short parent-only session. During the family sessions, exposure in vivo is planned and practiced. The parent-only portions of the family sessions involve reframing parental irrational beliefs about separation, parenting strategies and practicing parental behavior during exposure. Evaluation data shows that disorder-specific family-based therapy (SAFT) results in improvement compared with waiting list controls.

  17. Depression and Anxiety in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Etiology and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Laura G; Dokras, Anuja

    2017-09-20

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in reproductive age women and is associated with an increased prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms. This review presents potential mechanisms for this increased risk and outlines treatment options. Women with PCOS have increased odds of depressive symptoms (OR 3.78; 95% CI 3.03-4.72) and anxiety symptoms (OR 5.62; 95% CI 3.22-9.80). Obesity, insulin resistance, and elevated androgens may partly contribute to this association. Therefore, in addition to established treatment options, treatment of PCOS-related symptoms with lifestyle modification and/or oral contraceptive pills may be of benefit. Screening for anxiety and depression is recommended in women with PCOS at the time of diagnosis. The exact etiology for the increased risk in PCOS is still unclear. Moreover, there is a paucity of published data on the most effective behavioral, pharmacological, or physiological treatment options specifically in women with PCOS.

  18. Innovations in research for treatment of late-life anxiety.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Srijana; Robertson, Suzanne; Stanley, Melinda A

    2011-09-01

    While psychosocial interventions for late-life anxiety show positive outcomes, treatment effects are not as robust as in younger adults. To date, the reach of research has been limited to academic and primary care settings, with homogeneous samples. This review examines recently funded and ongoing late-life anxiety research that uses innovative approaches to reach unique patient populations and tailor treatment content and delivery options to meet the unique needs of older adults. A systematic search was conducted using electronic databases of funded clinical trials to identify ongoing psychosocial intervention studies targeting older adults with anxiety. The principal investigators (PIs) of the studies were contacted for study details and preliminary data, if available. In some cases, the PIs of identified studies acted as referral sources in identifying additional studies. Eleven studies met inclusion criteria and represented three areas of innovation: new patient groups, novel treatment procedures, and new treatment-delivery options. Studies and their associated theoretical bases are discussed, along with preliminary results reported in published papers or conference presentations. Psychosocial intervention trials currently in progress represent promising new strategies to facilitate engagement and improve outcomes among unique subsets of older adults with anxiety. Continued investigation of evidence-based treatments for geriatric anxiety will allow greater understanding of how best to tailor the interventions to fit the needs of older adults.

  19. Innovations in research for treatment of late-life anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Srijana; Robertson, Suzanne; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives While psychosocial interventions for late-life anxiety show positive outcomes, treatment effects are not as robust as in younger adults. To date, the reach of research has been limited to academic and primary care settings, with homogeneous samples. The current review examines recently funded and ongoing late-life anxiety research that uses innovative approaches to reach unique patient populations and tailor treatment content and delivery options to meet the unique needs of older adults. Method A systematic search was conducted using electronic databases of funded clinical trials to identify ongoing psychosocial intervention studies targeting older adults with anxiety. The principal investigators of the studies were contacted for study details and preliminary data, if available. In some cases, the principal investigators of identified studies acted as referral sources in identifying additional studies. Results Eleven studies met inclusion criteria and represented three areas of innovation: new patient groups, novel treatment procedures, and new treatment delivery options. Studies and their associated theoretical bases are discussed, along with preliminary results reported in published papers or conference presentations. Conclusion Psychosocial intervention trials currently in progress represent promising new strategies to facilitate engagement and improve outcomes among unique subsets of older adults with anxiety. Continued investigation of evidence-based treatments for geriatric anxiety will allow greater understanding of how best to tailor the interventions to fit the needs of older adults. PMID:21702723

  20. Treatment adequacy of anxiety disorders among young adults in Finland.

    PubMed

    Kasteenpohja, Teija; Marttunen, Mauri; Aalto-Setälä, Terhi; Perälä, Jonna; Saarni, Samuli I; Suvisaari, Jaana

    2016-03-15

    Anxiety disorders are common in early adulthood, but general population studies concerning the treatment adequacy of anxiety disorders taking into account appropriate pharmacological and psychological treatment are scarce. The aims of this study were to examine treatments received for anxiety disorders in a Finnish general population sample of young adults, and to define factors associated with receiving minimally adequate treatment and with dropping out from treatment. A questionnaire containing several mental health screens was sent to a nationally representative two-stage cluster sample of 1894 Finns aged 19 to 34 years. All screen positives and a random sample of screen negatives were invited to a mental health assessment including a SCID interview. For the final diagnostic assessment, case records from mental health treatments for the same sample were obtained. This article investigates treatment received, treatment adequacy and dropouts from treatment of 79 participants with a lifetime anxiety disorder (excluding those with a single specific phobia). Based on all available information, receiving antidepressant or buspirone medication for at least 2 months with at least four visits with any type of physician or at least eight sessions of psychotherapy within 12 months or at least 4 days of hospitalization were regarded as minimally adequate treatment for anxiety disorders. Treatment dropout was rated if the patient discontinued the visits by his own decision despite having an adequate treatment strategy according to the case records. Of participants with anxiety disorders (excluding those with a single specific phobia), 41.8 % had received minimally adequate treatment. In the multivariate analysis, comorbid substance use disorder was associated with antidepressant or buspirone medication lasting at least 2 months. Those who were currently married or cohabiting had lower odds of having at least four visits with a physician a year. None of these factors were

  1. Association between Anxiety and Pain in Dental Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-S; Wu, S-Y; Yi, C-A

    2017-02-01

    Accumulating evidence has revealed that dental anxiety (DA), as a dispositional factor toward the dental situation, is associated with the state anxiety (SA) and pain related to dental procedures. However, conclusions from individual studies may be limited by the treatment procedures that patients received, the tools used to assess DA, or the treatment stages when anxiety or pain was assessed. It is unclear whether DA, at the study level, accounts for the variance in pretreatment SA. The impact of DA and SA on pain at different treatment stages has not been systematically investigated. To address these questions, we present novel meta-analytical evidence from 35 articles (encompassing 47 clinical groups) that investigated DA in a clinical group. Subgroup analyses revealed that the studies of surgical and nonsurgical procedures did not significantly differ in either DA or pretreatment SA. Furthermore, metaregressions revealed DA as a significant predictor that explained the variance in SA assessed before and during treatment but not after treatment. The findings suggest that patient DA has a significant impact on patient SA. Metaregressions revealed DA as a significant predictor that explained the variance in expected pain, pain during treatment and posttreatment pain. In contrast, pretreatment SA was a significant predictor that explained the variance in expected pain. The findings reveal that DA has a consistent impact on pain through the entire period of dental treatment. Altogether, the findings highlight the role of DA as an overall indicator for anxiety and pain, across different types of dental procedures or treatment stages. We conclude that anxiety should be assessed as a critical step not only in anxiety management for high-DA patients, but also in pain control for all dental patients.

  2. Examining the Relationship Between Parental Anxiety and Treatment Response in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Reaven, Judy; Washington, Lindsay; Moody, Eric J; Stern, Jessica A; Hepburn, Susan L; Blakeley-Smith, Audrey

    2015-08-01

    In response to the high co-occurrence of anxiety symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), several interventions have been developed for this population. In spite of promising findings, some youth with ASD respond only minimally to such interventions. To understand potential factors that may impact treatment response, the current study explores the role of parental anxiety in youth treatment outcome. Thirty-one youth with ASD, ages 7-18, and their parents participated in the study. Parents completed the State/Trait Anxiety Inventory pre- and post-treatment. Contrary to previous research, there was no correlation between parental anxiety and youth anxiety at baseline or post-treatment. However, parental trait anxiety significantly decreased from pre- to post-treatment for parents of treatment responders. The findings are consistent with previous research and suggest a youth-to-parent influence.

  3. Transdiagnostic Internet treatment for anxiety disorders: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Titov, Nickolai; Andrews, Gavin; Johnston, Luke; Robinson, Emma; Spence, Jay

    2010-09-01

    Clinician-guided Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) programs are clinically effective at treating specific anxiety disorders. The present study examined the efficacy of a transdiagnostic Internet-based cognitive behavioural treatment (iCBT) program to treat more than one anxiety disorder within the same program (the Anxiety Program). Eighty six individuals meeting diagnostic criteria for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, and/or social phobia were randomly assigned to a treatment group, or to a waitlist control group. Treatment consisted of CBT based online educational lessons and homework assignments, weekly email or telephone contact from a clinical psychologist, access to a moderated online discussion forum, and automated emails. An intention-to-treat model using the baseline-observation-carried-forward principle was employed for data analyses. Seventy-five percent of treatment group participants completed all 6 lessons within the 8 week program. Post-treatment data was collected from 38/40 treatment group and 38/38 control group participants, and 3-month follow-up data was collected from 32/40 treatment group participants. Relative to controls, treatment group participants reported significantly reduced symptoms of anxiety as measured by the Generalized Anxiety Disorder - 7 Item, Social Phobia Screening Questionnaire, and the Panic Disorder Severity Rating Scale - Self Report Scale, but not on the Penn State Worry Questionnaire, with corresponding between-groups effect sizes (Cohen's d) at post-treatment of 0.78, 0.43, 0.43, and 0.20, respectively. The clinician spent a total mean time of 46min per person over the program, participants rated the procedure as moderately acceptable, and gains were sustained at follow-up. Modifications to the Anxiety program, based on post-treatment feedback from treatment group participants, were associated with improved outcomes in the control group. These results indicate that transdiagnostic

  4. [Atraumatic restorative treatment in relation to pain, discomfort and dental treatment anxiety].

    PubMed

    Frencken, J E F M; Flohil, K A; de Baat, C

    2014-01-01

    Dental treatment anxiety usually develops during childhood due to a bad experience and the dental drill as well as the injection needle are the most common causes. The Atraumatic Restorative Treatment provides the opportunity to provoke little or no dental treatment anxiety because only hand instruments are used and local anaesthesia is seldom required. Several scientific studies have indicated that the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment causes less pain, discomfort and anxiety by comparison with conventional treatments. Therefore, the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment is considered to be promising for the treatment of carious lesions in anxious children and adults, and potentially also for patients suffering from dental treatment phobia. Furthermore, the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment may be indicated as the primary treatment method in children to prevent dental treatment anxiety and treatment under general anaesthesia. These conclusions must still be confirmed with responsible scientific research.

  5. Exercise for the treatment of depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Carek, Peter J; Laibstain, Sarah E; Carek, Stephen M

    2011-01-01

    Depression and anxiety are the most common psychiatric conditions seen in the general medical setting, affecting millions of individuals in the United States. The treatments for depression and anxiety are multiple and have varying degrees of effectiveness. Physical activity has been shown to be associated with decreased symptoms of depression and anxiety. Physical activity has been consistently shown to be associated with improved physical health, life satisfaction, cognitive functioning, and psychological well-being. Conversely, physical inactivity appears to be associated with the development of psychological disorders. Specific studies support the use of exercise as a treatment for depression. Exercise compares favorably to antidepressant medications as a first-line treatment for mild to moderate depression and has also been shown to improve depressive symptoms when used as an adjunct to medications. While not as extensively studied, exercise has been shown to be an effective and cost-efficient treatment alternative for a variety of anxiety disorders. While effective, exercise has not been shown to reduce anxiety to the level achieved by psychopharmaceuticals.

  6. Incremental Benefits and Cost of Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management for Anxiety Treatment in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Joesch, Jutta M.; Sherbourne, Cathy D.; Sullivan, Greer; Stein, Murray B.; Craske, Michelle G.; Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Improving the quality of mental health care requires integrating successful research interventions into “real-world” practice settings. Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) is a treatment-delivery model for anxiety disorders encountered in primary care. CALM offers cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), medication, or both; non-expert care managers assisting primary care clinicians with adherence promotion and medication optimization; computer-assisted CBT delivery; and outcome monitoring. This study describes incremental benefits, costs, and net benefits of CALM versus usual care. Methods The CALM randomized, controlled effectiveness trial was conducted in 17 primary care clinics in 4 US cities from 2006 to 2009. Of 1,062 eligible patients, 1,004 English- or Spanish-speaking patients age 18–75 years with panic, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, and/or posttraumatic stress disorder with or without major depression were randomized. Anxiety-free days, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and expenditures for outpatient visits, emergency room visits, inpatient stays, and psychiatric medications were estimated based on blinded telephone assessments at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. Results Over 18 months, CALM participants, on average, experienced 57.1 more anxiety-free days [95% confidence interval (CI) 31–83] and $245 additional medical expenses (95% CI $ −733 to $1,223). The mean incremental net benefit of CALM versus usual care was positive when an anxiety-free day was valued ≥ $4. For QALYs based on the Short-Form Health Survey-12 and the EQ-5D the mean incremental net benefit was positive at ≥ $5,000. Conclusions Compared with usual care, CALM provides significant benefits with modest increases in health care expenditures. PMID:22152230

  7. Scalp Acupuncture Treatment Protocol for Anxiety Disorders: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia; Pan, Zimei; Ying, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric illnesses, and acupuncture treatment is widely accepted in the clinic without the side effects seen from various medications. We designed a scalp acupuncture treatment protocol by locating two new stimulation areas. The area one is between Yintang (M-HN-3) and Shangxing (DU-23) and Shenting (DU-24), and the area two is between Taiyang (M-HN-9) and Tianchong (GB-9) and Shuaigu (GB-8). By stimulating these two areas with high-frequency continuous electric waves, remarkable immediate and long-term effects for anxiety disorders have been observed in our practice. The first case was a 70-year-old male with general anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic attacks at night. The scalp acupuncture treatment protocol was applied with electric stimulation for 45 minutes once every week. After four sessions of acupuncture treatments, the patient reported that he did not have panic attacks at night and he had no feelings of anxiety during the day. Follow-up 4 weeks later confirmed that he did not have any episodes of panic attacks and he had no anxiety during the day since his last acupuncture treatment. The second case was a 35-year-old male who was diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with a history of providing frontline trauma care as a Combat Medics from the Iraq combat field. He also had 21 broken bones and multiple concussions from his time in the battlefield. He had symptoms of severe anxiety, insomnia, nightmares with flashbacks, irritability, and bad temper. He also had chest pain, back pain, and joint pain due to injuries. The above treatment protocol was performed with 30 minutes of electric stimulation each time in combination with body acupuncture for pain management. After weekly acupuncture treatment for the first two visits, the patient reported that he felt less anxious and that his sleep was getting better with fewer nightmares. After six sessions of acupuncture treatments, the patient completely

  8. Scalp acupuncture treatment protocol for anxiety disorders: a case report.

    PubMed

    He, Yuxin; Chen, Jia; Pan, Zimei; Ying, Zhou

    2014-07-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric illnesses, and acupuncture treatment is widely accepted in the clinic without the side effects seen from various medications. We designed a scalp acupuncture treatment protocol by locating two new stimulation areas. The area one is between Yintang (M-HN-3) and Shangxing (DU-23) and Shenting (DU-24), and the area two is between Taiyang (M-HN-9) and Tianchong (GB-9) and Shuaigu (GB-8). By stimulating these two areas with high-frequency continuous electric waves, remarkable immediate and long-term effects for anxiety disorders have been observed in our practice. The first case was a 70-year-old male with general anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic attacks at night. The scalp acupuncture treatment protocol was applied with electric stimulation for 45 minutes once every week. After four sessions of acupuncture treatments, the patient reported that he did not have panic attacks at night and he had no feelings of anxiety during the day. Follow-up 4 weeks later confirmed that he did not have any episodes of panic attacks and he had no anxiety during the day since his last acupuncture treatment. The second case was a 35-year-old male who was diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with a history of providing frontline trauma care as a Combat Medics from the Iraq combat field. He also had 21 broken bones and multiple concussions from his time in the battlefield. He had symptoms of severe anxiety, insomnia, nightmares with flashbacks, irritability, and bad temper. He also had chest pain, back pain, and joint pain due to injuries. The above treatment protocol was performed with 30 minutes of electric stimulation each time in combination with body acupuncture for pain management. After weekly acupuncture treatment for the first two visits, the patient reported that he felt less anxious and that his sleep was getting better with fewer nightmares. After six sessions of acupuncture treatments, the patient completely

  9. The psychosocial treatments interview for anxiety disorders. A method for assessing psychotherapeutic procedures in anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Steketee, G; Perry, JC; Goisman, RM; Warshaw, MG; Massion, AO; Peterson, LG; Langford, L; Weinshenker, N; Farreras , IG; Keller , MB

    1997-01-01

    The authors report on development, reliability, and findings of the Psychosocial Treatments Interview (PTI) to assess treatments reported by patients in a naturalistic study of the longitudinal course of anxiety disorders. The PTI ascertains frequency of different types of psychosocial treatments, based on patients' reports. The PTI showed good internal consistency and very good interrater reliability. At first 6-month follow-up, the most common modalities were supportive, medication discussion, and dynamic intervention. Combinations were common. Delivery of treatments differed by site. Overall, the PTI fills a methodological need for the assessment of the treatments reported by patients in naturalistic follow-up studies. PMID:9185065

  10. The psychosocial treatments interview for anxiety disorders. A method for assessing psychotherapeutic procedures in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Steketee, G; Perry, J C; Goisman, R M; Warshaw, M G; Massion, A O; Peterson, L G; Langford, L; Weinshenker, N; Farreras, I G; Keller, M B

    1997-01-01

    The authors report on development, reliability, and findings of the Psychosocial Treatments Interview (PTI) to assess treatments reported by patients in a naturalistic study of the longitudinal course of anxiety disorders. The PTI ascertains frequency of different types of psychosocial treatments, based on patients' reports. The PTI showed good internal consistency and very good interrater reliability. At first 6-month follow-up, the most common modalities were supportive, medication discussion, and dynamic intervention. Combinations were common. Delivery of treatments differed by site. Overall, the PTI fills a methodological need for the assessment of the treatments reported by patients in naturalistic follow-up studies.

  11. Computer-supported cognitive behavioral treatment of anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Page; Jacobs, Carli; Rothbaum, Barbara O

    2004-03-01

    This article reviews the empirical literature pertaining to the use of computer-supported cognitive-behavioral treatment of anxiety disorders, including palmtop computers, virtual reality exposure therapy, and personal computer software programs. The advantages and disadvantages unique to each type of technology are described. The review concludes with a discussion of ethical issues, barriers to the use of technology by clinicians, and suggestions for a process by which scientists and practitioners can conceptualize how technology can advance our understanding of anxiety and our dissemination of effective treatments.

  12. Non-Antidepressant Treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Zahreddine, Nada; Richa, Sami

    2013-02-04

    Introduction: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a prevalent and very disabling anxiety disorder. First-line medications are antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and selective serotonin and noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). However, a substantial number of patients do not reach remission while on antidepressants and they may develop troublesome side effects, which highlights the necessity of new therapeutic options for GAD.  Methods: The purpose of this review is to discuss all non-antidepressant treatments studied in GAD. We searched MedLine for English articles published between 1980 and 2012, containing the following keywords: "generalized (or generalised) anxiety disorder" OR "anxiety disorder", AND "drug therapy" OR "herbal medicine". 76 articles were finally selected. Results: Pregabalin is the anticonvulsant with the most robust level of evidence in GAD. It rapidly reduces anxiety, have a safe side effect profile and presents a low potential for abuse. Among antipsychotics, quetiapine is the one of choice in GAD, with similar efficacy to SSRIs in low dosages, yet with lower overall tolerability. Benzodiazepines, buspirone and hydroxyzine are Food and Drugs administration (FDA) approved for GAD and have relatively good evidence of efficacy. Other drugs (betablockers, zolpidem, riluzole, etc…) and natural remedies (e.g. Piper methysticum) could be potential treatment options, yet additional research is warranted. Conclusion:  Pregabalin and quetiapine are the two most promising non-antidepressant treatments for GAD.

  13. Evaluation of anxiety level changes during the first three months of orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Ersin; Karacay, Seniz

    2012-08-01

    To determine the changes in dental anxiety, state anxiety, and trait anxiety levels of patients and their parents after 3 months of active orthodontic treatment. We evaluated 120 patients and one parent of each patient. State Anxiety (STAI-S), Trait Anxiety (STAI-T), and Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) were administered before orthodontic treatment (T1) and after 3 months of treatment (T2). Differences in scores between T1 and T2 were compared using paired-sample t-tests and the relationship between the scores of the DAS and the STAI were analyzed using a bivariate two-tailed Pearson correlation test. Dental anxiety and state anxiety levels decreased among the patients after adjustment to orthodontic treatment (p < 0.001). However, 3 months of treatment was not sufficient to decrease the anxiety levels of parents (p > 0.05). Patient trait anxiety affected patient state anxiety and dental anxiety (p < 0.01). Additionally, a significant correlation was found between patient dental anxiety and parent dental anxiety (p < 0.05). Dental anxiety and state anxiety levels decrease after patients become familiar with their orthodontist and they became accustomed to orthodontic treatment. However, 3 months is not a sufficient length of time to decrease parental anxiety levels.

  14. Course of symptom change during anxiety treatment: Reductions in anxiety and depression in patients completing the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Bomyea, Jessica; Lang, Ariel; Craske, Michelle G.; Chavira, Denise A.; Sherbourne, Cathy D.; Rose, Raphael D.; Golinelli, Daniela; Campbell-Sills, Laura; Welch, Stacy S.; Sullivan, Greer; Bystritsky, Alexander; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Stein, Murray B.

    2015-01-01

    When treating anxious patients with co-occurring depression, research demonstrates that both types of symptoms independently improve. The current analyses examined how reductions in anxiety and depression may be interrelated both during treatment, as well as over time following treatment. Participants were 503 individuals with one or more DSM-IV anxiety disorders who completed a collaborative care anxiety management program. Anxiety and depression were assessed at each treatment session (i.e., session by session data) and also at 6, 12, and 18-month post-baseline assessments (i.e., long-term outcomes data). Mediation analysis examined changes in symptoms in session by session data and long-term outcomes data. Anxiety and depression changed reciprocally in session by session data; change in anxiety mediated change in depression to a greater extent than vice versa. In the long-term outcomes data, change in anxiety mediated change in depression. However, the reverse mediation model of the long-term outcomes period revealed that accounting for changes in depression altered the effect of time on anxiety. Thus, temporal change during active treatment may share similarities with those related to maintaining gains after treatment, although differences arose in the reverse mediation models. Limitations of the methodology and implications of anxiety treatment for depression outcomes are discussed. PMID:26228164

  15. Course of symptom change during anxiety treatment: Reductions in anxiety and depression in patients completing the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management program.

    PubMed

    Bomyea, Jessica; Lang, Ariel; Craske, Michelle G; Chavira, Denise A; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Rose, Raphael D; Golinelli, Daniela; Campbell-Sills, Laura; Welch, Stacy S; Sullivan, Greer; Bystritsky, Alexander; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Stein, Murray B

    2015-09-30

    When treating anxious patients with co-occurring depression, research demonstrates that both types of symptoms independently improve. The current analyses examined how reductions in anxiety and depression may be interrelated both during treatment, as well as over time following treatment. Participants were 503 individuals with one or more DSM-IV anxiety disorders who completed a collaborative care anxiety management program. Anxiety and depression were assessed at each treatment session (i.e., session by session data) and also at 6, 12, and 18-month post-baseline assessments (i.e., long-term outcomes data). Mediation analyses examined changes in symptoms in session by session data and long-term outcomes data. Anxiety and depression changed reciprocally in session by session data; change in anxiety mediated change in depression to a greater extent than vice versa. In the long-term outcomes data, change in anxiety mediated change in depression. However, the reverse mediation model of the long-term outcomes period revealed that accounting for changes in depression altered the effect of time on anxiety. Thus, temporal change during active treatment may share similarities with those related to maintaining gains after treatment, although differences arose in the reverse mediation models. Limitations of the methodology and implications of anxiety treatment for depression outcomes are discussed.

  16. Anxiety Disorder-Specific Predictors of Treatment Outcome in the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) Trial.

    PubMed

    Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Bloch, Michael H

    2016-09-01

    Identifying baseline characteristics associated with treatment outcome in generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder (SAD) or post-traumatic stress disorder. We performed two secondary analyses of the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management trial. Baseline characteristics and their interactions with treatment assignment were analyzed via stepwise logistic regression models and receiver-operating criterion analyses by disorder predicting remission and response for each disorder. Predictors for poor outcome across diagnoses were comorbid depression and low socioeconomic status. Good outcome was associated with positive treatment expectancy and high self-efficacy expectancy. SAD had the lowest rate of remission and response compared to the other anxiety disorders, and differed in respect to its predictors of treatment outcome. Perceived social support predicted treatment outcome in SAD. The special role of SAD among the other anxiety disorders requires further study both because of its worse prognosis and its more specific treatment needs.

  17. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for the treatment of anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Otto, Michael W; Smits, Jasper A J; Reese, Hannah E

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we consider the evidence supporting the range of applications of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders, and we examine some of the complex issues encountered for the combination of pharmacologic and cognitive-behavioral treatment strategies. The available evidence supports CBT as an effective first-line treatment for anxiety disorders offering longer-term maintenance of treatment gains. There is also evidence that CBT is an effective strategy for pharmacotherapy nonresponders, a replacement strategy for patients who wish to discontinue their medications, and a standard strategy for pharmacotherapy patients who need to boost their treatment response. Relative to combination therapy, we review some of the conditions that may influence the longevity of treatment gains from CBT.

  18. Social Anxiety and Peer Helping in Adolescent Addiction Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagano, Maria E.; Wang, Alexandra R.; Rowles, Brieana M.; Lee, Matthew T.; Johnson, Byron R.

    2015-01-01

    The developmental need to fit in may lead to higher alcohol and other drug use among socially anxious youths which exacerbates the drink/trouble cycle. In treatment, youths with social anxiety disorder (SAD) may avoid participating in therapeutic activities with risk of negative peer appraisal. Peer-helping is a low-intensity, social activity in…

  19. Treatment of Anxiety and Depression in the Preschool Period

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luby, Joan L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Empirical studies have established that clinical anxiety and depressive disorders may arise in preschool children as young as 3.0 years. Because empirical studies validating and characterizing these disorders in preschoolers are relatively recent, less work has been done on the development and testing of age-appropriate treatments.…

  20. Duloxetine in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Norman, Trevor R; Olver, James S

    2008-12-01

    Duloxetine, a medication with effects on both serotonin and noradrenaline transporter molecules, has recently been approved for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. The evidence for its efficacy lies in a limited number of double blind, placebo controlled comparisons. Statistically significant improvements in the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale from baseline were demonstrated in all studies at doses of 60 to 120 mg per day. The significance of such changes in terms of clinical improvements compared to placebo is less certain, particularly when the effect size of the change is calculated. In comparative trials with venlafaxine, duloxetine was as effective in providing relief of anxiety symptoms. In addition to improvements in clinical symptoms duloxetine has also been associated with restitution of role function as measured by disability scales. Duloxetine use is associated with nausea, dizziness, dry mouth, constipation, insomnia, somnolence, hyperhidrosis, decreased libido and vomiting. These treatment emergent side effects were generally of mild to moderate severity and were tolerated over time. Using a tapered withdrawal schedule over two weeks in the clinical trials, duloxetine was associated with only a mild withdrawal syndrome in up to about 30% of patients compared to about 17% in placebo treated patients. Duloxetine in doses of up to 200 mg twice daily did not prolong the QTc interval in healthy volunteers. Like other agents with dual neurotransmitter actions duloxetine reduces the symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder in short term treatments. Further evidence for its efficacy and safety in long term treatment is required.

  1. Hypnotherapeutic Restructuring and Systematic Desensitization as Treatment for Mathematics Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trent, Richard M.

    The present demand for quantitative proficiency makes low mathematics achievement not only a formidable obstacle in occupational aspirations but also in the academic arena. To modify the current understanding of the problem of mathematics anxiety and to develop an effective treatment program, college students (12 subjects per group; 8 females, 4…

  2. Hypnosis Versus Systematic Desensitization in the Treatment of Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melnick, Joseph; Russell, Ronald W.

    1976-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of systematic desensitization and the directed experience hypnotic technique in reducing self-reported test anxiety and increasing the academic performance of test-anxious undergraduates (N=36). The results are discussed as evidence for systematic desensitization as the more effective treatment in reducing…

  3. Treatment of Anxiety and Depression in the Preschool Period

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luby, Joan L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Empirical studies have established that clinical anxiety and depressive disorders may arise in preschool children as young as 3.0 years. Because empirical studies validating and characterizing these disorders in preschoolers are relatively recent, less work has been done on the development and testing of age-appropriate treatments.…

  4. Hypnosis Versus Systematic Desensitization in the Treatment of Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melnick, Joseph; Russell, Ronald W.

    1976-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of systematic desensitization and the directed experience hypnotic technique in reducing self-reported test anxiety and increasing the academic performance of test-anxious undergraduates (N=36). The results are discussed as evidence for systematic desensitization as the more effective treatment in reducing…

  5. Improving homework compliance in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Robert L

    2002-05-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder is a chronic condition characterized by beliefs that worry prepares and protects, but that excessive worry is out of control. In this article, I review the cognitive-behavioral model of generalized anxiety, focusing specifically on problems related to excessive worrying. Noncompliance in self-help homework is reflected in the patient's excessive focus on negative feelings, difficulty identifying automatic thoughts, demand for immediate results, and the belief that worries are realistic. Interventions for these problems are illustrated in the case of the treatment of a patient characterized by persistent worries, low self-confidence, procrastination, and avoidance. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Dean, Erin

    2016-07-13

    Essential facts Anxiety is the feeling of fear that occurs when faced with threatening or stressful situations. It is a normal response when confronted with danger, but, if it is overwhelming or the feeling persists, it could be regarded as an anxiety disorder. The Royal College of Psychiatrists says anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and social anxiety disorder, affect about one in ten.

  7. Defining Treatment Response and Remission in Child Anxiety: Signal Detection Analysis Using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale

    PubMed Central

    Caporino, Nicole E.; Brodman, Douglas M.; Kendall, Philip C.; Albano, Anne Marie; Sherrill, Joel; Piacentini, John; Sakolsky, Dara; Birmaher, Boris; Compton, Scott N.; Ginsburg, Golda; Rynn, Moira; McCracken, James; Gosch, Elizabeth; Keeton, Courtney; March, John; Walkup, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine optimal Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS) percent reduction and raw score cut-offs for predicting treatment response and remission among children and adolescents with anxiety disorders. Method Data were from a subset of youth (N =438; 7–17 years of age) who participated in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS), a multi-site, randomized controlled trial that examined the relative efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT; Coping Cat), medication (sertraline [SRT]), their combination, and pill placebo for the treatment of separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and social phobia. The clinician-rated PARS was administered pre- and posttreatment (delivered over 12 weeks). Quality receiver operating characteristic methods assessed the performance of various PARS percent reductions and absolute cut-off scores in predicting treatment response and remission, as determined by posttreatment ratings on the Clinical Global Impression scales and the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV. Corresponding change in impairment was evaluated using the Child Anxiety Impact Scale. Results Reductions of 35% and 50% on the six-item PARS optimally predicted treatment response and remission, respectively. Post-treatment PARS raw scores of 8 to 10 optimally predicted remission. Anxiety improved as a function of PARS-defined treatment response and remission. Conclusions Results serve as guidelines for operationalizing treatment response and remission in future research and in making cross-study comparisons. These guidelines can facilitate translation of research findings into clinical practice. PMID:23265634

  8. Virtual reality in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Gorini, Alessandra; Pallavicini, Federica; Algeri, Davide; Repetto, Claudia; Gaggioli, Andrea; Riva, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a common anxiety disorder characterized by 6 months of "excessive anxiety and worry" about a variety of events and situations. Anxiety and worry are often accompanied by additional symptoms like restlessness, being easily fatigued, difficulty concentrating, irritability, muscle tension and disturbed sleep. GAD is usually treated with medications and/or psychotherapy. In particular, the two most promising treatments seem to be cognitive therapy and applied relaxation. In this study we integrated these approaches through the use of a biofeedback enhanced virtual reality (VR) system used both for relaxation and controlled exposure. Moreover, this experience is strengthened by the use of a mobile phone that allows patients to perform the virtual experience even in an outpatient setting. This paper describe the results of a controlled trial (NCT00602212) involving 20 GAD patients randomly assigned to the following groups: (1) the VR and Mobile group (VRMB) including biofeedback; (2) the VR and Mobile group (VRM) without biofeedback; (3) the waiting list (WL) group. The clinical data underlined that (a) VR can be used also in the treatment of GAD; (b) in a VR treatment, patients take advantage of a mobile device that delivers in an outpatient setting guided experiences, similar to the one experienced in VR.

  9. Family Factors in the Development, Treatment, and Prevention of Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Kelly L.; Ginsburg, Golda S.

    2012-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that anxiety disorders run in families, and current etiological models have proposed both genetic and environmental pathways to anxiety development. In this paper, the familial role in the development, treatment, and prevention of anxiety disorders in children is reviewed. We focus on three anxiety disorders in youth,…

  10. Family Factors in the Development, Treatment, and Prevention of Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Kelly L.; Ginsburg, Golda S.

    2012-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that anxiety disorders run in families, and current etiological models have proposed both genetic and environmental pathways to anxiety development. In this paper, the familial role in the development, treatment, and prevention of anxiety disorders in children is reviewed. We focus on three anxiety disorders in youth,…

  11. Comparison of Relaxation as Self-control and Systematic Desensitization in the Treatment of Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Arden L.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.

    1977-01-01

    Relaxation as self-control and desensitization were compared to a wait-list control in reduction of rest and other anxieties. Active treatments differed significantly from the control treatment. Subjects in both treatments reported less debilitating test anxiety, whereas desensitization subjects showed greater facilitating test anxiety. (Author)

  12. Family treatment of child anxiety: outcomes, limitations and future directions.

    PubMed

    Creswell, Cathy; Cartwright-Hatton, Sam

    2007-09-01

    Anxiety of childhood is a common and serious condition. The past decade has seen an increase in treatment-focussed research, with recent trials tending to give greater attention to parents in the treatment process. This review examines the efficacy of family-based cognitive behaviour therapy and attempts to delineate some of the factors that might have an impact on its efficacy. The choice and timing of outcome measure, age and gender of the child, level of parental anxiety, severity and type of child anxiety and treatment format and content are scrutinised. The main conclusions are necessarily tentative, but it seems likely that Family Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (FCBT) is superior to no treatment, and, for some outcome measures, also superior to Child Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CCBT). Where FCBT is successful, the results are consistently maintained at follow-up. It appears that where a parent is anxious, and this is not addressed, outcomes are less good. However, for children of anxious parents, FCBT is probably more effective than CCBT. What is most clear is that large, well-designed studies, examining these factors alone and in combination, are now needed.

  13. The role of duloxetine in the treatment of anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    De Berardis, Domenico; Serroni, Nicola; Carano, Alessandro; Scali, Marco; Valchera, Alessandro; Campanella, Daniela; D’Albenzio, Alessandro; Di Giuseppe, Berardo; Moschetta, Francesco Saverio; Salerno, Rosa Maria; Ferro, Filippo Maria

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety disorders (ADs) are the most common type of psychiatric disorders, with a mean incidence of 18.1% and a lifetime prevalence of 28.8%. Pharmacologic options studied for treating ADs may include benzodiazepines, tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), noradrenergic and specific serotonergic drug (NaSSA) and dual-reuptake inhibitors of serotonin and norepinephrine (SNRIs). In this context, the development of SNRIs (venlafaxine and duloxetine) has been particularly useful. As a dual-acting intervention that targets two neurotransmitter systems, these medications would appePar promising for the treatment of ADs. The purpose of this review was to elucidate current facts and views about the role of duloxetine in the treatment of ADs. In February 2007, duloxetine was approved by FDA for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The results of trials evaluating the use duloxetine in the treatment of GAD are supportive on its efficacy even if further studies on long-term use are needed. Apart from some interesting case reports, no large studies are, to date, present in literature about duloxetine and other ADs such as panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. Therefore, the clinical efficacy and the relative good tolerability of duloxetine may be further investigated to widen the therapeutic spectrum of ADs. PMID:19183783

  14. Treatment of anxiety and depression: medicinal plants in retrospect.

    PubMed

    Fajemiroye, James O; da Silva, Dayane M; de Oliveira, Danillo R; Costa, Elson A

    2016-06-01

    Anxiety and depression are complex heterogeneous psychiatric disorders and leading causes of disability worldwide. This review summarizes reports on the fundamentals, prevalence, diagnosis, neurobiology, advancement in treatment of these diseases and preclinical assessment of botanicals. This review was conducted through bibliographic investigation of scientific journals, books, electronic sources, unpublished theses and electronic medium such as ScienceDirect and PubMed. A number of the first-line drugs (benzodiazepine, azapirone, antidepressant tricyclics, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors, noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, etc.) for the treatment of these psychiatric disorders are products of serendipitous discoveries. Inspite of the numerous classes of drugs that are available for the treatment of anxiety and depression, full remission has remained elusive. The emerging clinical cases have shown increasing interests among health practitioners and patients in phytomedicine. The development of anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs of plant origin takes advantage of multidisciplinary approach including but not limited to ethnopharmacological survey (careful investigation of folkloric application of medicinal plant), phytochemical and pharmacological studies. The selection of a suitable plant for a pharmacological study is a basic and very important step. Relevant clues to achieving this step include traditional use, chemical composition, toxicity, randomized selection or a combination of several criteria. Medicinal plants have been and continue to be a rich source of biomolecule with therapeutic values for the treatment of anxiety and depression. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  15. The role of duloxetine in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    De Berardis, Domenico; Serroni, Nicola; Carano, Alessandro; Scali, Marco; Valchera, Alessandro; Campanella, Daniela; D'Albenzio, Alessandro; Di Giuseppe, Berardo; Moschetta, Francesco Saverio; Salerno, Rosa Maria; Ferro, Filippo Maria

    2008-10-01

    Anxiety disorders (ADs) are the most common type of psychiatric disorders, with a mean incidence of 18.1% and a lifetime prevalence of 28.8%. Pharmacologic options studied for treating ADs may include benzodiazepines, tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), noradrenergic and specific serotonergic drug (NaSSA) and dual-reuptake inhibitors of serotonin and norepinephrine (SNRIs). In this context, the development of SNRIs (venlafaxine and duloxetine) has been particularly useful. As a dual-acting intervention that targets two neurotransmitter systems, these medications would appePar promising for the treatment of ADs. The purpose of this review was to elucidate current facts and views about the role of duloxetine in the treatment of ADs. In February 2007, duloxetine was approved by FDA for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The results of trials evaluating the use duloxetine in the treatment of GAD are supportive on its efficacy even if further studies on long-term use are needed. Apart from some interesting case reports, no large studies are, to date, present in literature about duloxetine and other ADs such as panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. Therefore, the clinical efficacy and the relative good tolerability of duloxetine may be further investigated to widen the therapeutic spectrum of ADs.

  16. Factors associated with prolonging psychological treatment for anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Bernaldo-de-Quirós, Mónica; Labrador, Francisco J; García-Fernández, Gloria; Fernández-Arias, Ignacio; Estupiñá, Francisco; Labrador-Méndez, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are one of the disorders most frequently requested for psychological attention. The purpose of this study is to identify the factors that can explain a longer duration of psychological treatment for anxiety disorders. 202 patients from the University Psychology Clinic of the Complutense University of Madrid were analyzed. Multivariate regression analysis showed that the presence of obsessive-compulsive disorder and the application of arousal control techniques followed by modeling and other specific techniques were the best predictors of treatment duration. Reducing as much as possible the number of techniques applied without reducing intervention efficacy is suggested. In some disorders that produce a greater life disorganization, it may be useful to try to organize the patient´s life either as a first goal or at the same time as the intervention program, so as to increase its effectiveness and reduce the number of sessions.

  17. Treatment fears in anxiety disorders: development and validation of the treatment ambivalence questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Rowa, Karen; Gifford, Shannon; McCabe, Randi; Milosevic, Irena; Antony, Martin M; Purdon, Christine

    2014-10-01

    There are a number of effective psychological interventions for anxiety disorders. Anecdotal and empirical evidence indicates that clients are often highly apprehensive about commencing therapy. However, to date, there have been no empirical studies of the content of individuals' fears about beginning a psychological treatment for anxiety problems. Here we describe the development and initial validation of the Treatment Ambivalence Questionnaire (TAQ), a 30-item self-report measure of concerns about commencing psychological treatment for anxiety. Participants were a large group of individuals with a principal diagnosis of an anxiety disorder who were referred to a specialty anxiety disorders clinic. Participants completed the TAQ as well as several general self-report instruments before commencing treatment. The TAQ exhibited good internal consistency and, based on exploratory factor analyses, the items yielded three subscales: (a) fears of the personal consequences of engaging in treatment (e.g., personality change), (b) fears of negative or adverse reactions to treatment (e.g., not getting better), and (c) concerns about the inconvenience of engaging in treatment (e.g., treatment will be time-consuming). Confirmatory factor analysis supported this factor structure. Scores on the TAQ did not simply represent general symptom severity or distress. Preliminary data on the relation of TAQ scores to treatment outcome suggested either no relationship or a small relationship. The TAQ may be a useful means of normalizing treatment fears, identifying and addressing specific fears, and identifying people who may benefit from treatment readiness interventions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Pharmacotherapy augmentation strategies in treatment-resistant anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Ipser, J C; Carey, P; Dhansay, Y; Fakier, N; Seedat, S; Stein, D J

    2006-10-18

    A large proportion of patients with anxiety disorders fail to respond to first-line medication interventions, despite evidence of the effectiveness of these agents. To assess the effects of medication versus placebo augmentation in the treatment of patients with anxiety disorders who have failed to respond adequately to first-line drug therapies. The Cochrane Depression, Anxiety & Neurosis Group (CCDAN) specialised registers (CCDANCTR-Studies and CCDANCTR-References) were searched on 3/8/2005, MEDLINE (January 1966 to July 2005) and PsycINFO (1966 to 2005, Part A). Unpublished trials were identified through the Controlled Trials database and the National Institute of Health's Computer Retrieval of Information on Scientific Projects (CRISP) service (1972 to 2005). Additional studies in any language were sought in reference lists of retrieved articles. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of the medication augmentation of pharmacotherapy for treatment resistant anxiety disorders. Two raters independently assessed RCTs for inclusion in the review, collated trial data, and assessed trial quality. Investigators were contacted to obtain missing data. Summary statistics were stratified by class of augmentation agent and anxiety disorder. Overall effect estimates were calculated using a random-effects model, heterogeneity was assessed and subgroup/sensitivity analyses were undertaken. Twenty eight short-term (average of seven weeks) randomised controlled trials (740 participants) were included in the review, 20 of which investigated augmentation of medication for treatment-resistant obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Summary statistics for responder status from nine trials demonstrate overall superiority of a variety of medication agents to placebo (relative risk of non-response (RR) 3.16, 95% CI 1.08 to 9.23). Similarly, symptom severity was significantly reduced in the medication groups, relative to placebo (number of trials (N) = 14, standardised mean difference

  19. Treatment for Anxiety Disorders: Efficacy to Effectiveness to Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Craske, Michelle G.; Roy-Byrne, Peter P.; Stein, Murray B.; Sullivan, Greer; Sherbourne, Cathy; Bystritsky, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common, costly and debilitating, and yet often unrecognized or inadequately treated in real world, primary care settings. Our group has been researching ways of delivering evidence-based treatment for anxiety in primary care settings, with special interest to preserving the fidelity of the treatment while at the same time promoting its sustainability once the research is over. In this paper, we describe the programs we have developed and our directions for future research. Our first study evaluated the efficacy of CBT and expert pharmacotherapy recommendations for panic disorder in primary care, using a collaborative care model of service delivery (CCAP). Symptom, disability and mental health functioning measures were superior for the intervention group compared to treatment as usual both in the short term and the long term, although also more costly. In our ongoing CALM study, we have extended our population to include panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic disorder, while at the same time utilizing clinicians with limited mental health care experience. In addition to pharmacotherapy management, we developed a computer-assisted CBT that guides both novice clinician and patient, thereby contributing to sustainability once the research is over. We have also incorporated a measurement based approach to treatment planning, using a web-based tracking system of patient status. To date, the computer-assisted CBT program has been shown to be acceptable to clinicians and patients. Clinicians rated the program highly, and patients engaged in the program. Future directions for our research include dissemination and implementation of the CALM program, testing potential alternations to the CALM program, and distance delivery of CALM. PMID:19632667

  20. Differential impact of anxiety symptoms and anxiety disorders on treatment outcome for psychotic depression in the STOP-PD study.

    PubMed

    Davies, Simon J C; Mulsant, Benoit H; Flint, Alastair J; Rothschild, Anthony J; Whyte, Ellen M; Meyers, Barnett S

    2014-07-01

    There are conflicting results on the impact of anxiety on depression outcomes. The impact of anxiety has not been studied in major depression with psychotic features ("psychotic depression"). We assessed the impact of specific anxiety symptoms and disorders on the outcomes of psychotic depression. We analyzed data from the Study of Pharmacotherapy for Psychotic Depression that randomized 259 younger and older participants to either olanzapine plus placebo or olanzapine plus sertraline. We assessed the impact of specific anxiety symptoms from the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale ("tension", "anxiety" and "somatic concerns" and a composite anxiety score) and diagnoses (panic disorder and GAD) on psychotic depression outcomes using linear or logistic regression. Age, gender, education and benzodiazepine use (at baseline and end) were included as covariates. Anxiety symptoms at baseline and anxiety disorder diagnoses differentially impacted outcomes. On adjusted linear regression there was an association between improvement in depressive symptoms and both baseline "tension" (coefficient=0.784; 95% CI: 0.169-1.400; p=0.013) and the composite anxiety score (regression coefficient = 0.348; 95% CI: 0.064-0.632; p=0.017). There was an interaction between "tension" and treatment group, with better responses in those randomized to combination treatment if they had high baseline anxiety scores (coefficient=1.309; 95% CI: 0.105-2.514; p=0.033). In contrast, panic disorder was associated with worse clinical outcomes (coefficient=-3.858; 95% CI: -7.281 to -0.434; p=0.027) regardless of treatment. Our results suggest that analysis of the impact of anxiety on depression outcome needs to differentiate psychic and somatic symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Current considerations in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Katzman, Martin A

    2009-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a chronic disorder that frequently co-occurs with a variety of co-morbidities in patients with somatic conditions and other mental disorders. GAD is highly prevalent and is one of the most common anxiety disorders seen by primary care physicians. The individual and societal cost associated with GAD is high and the marked level of impairment experienced by patients with this disorder is equivalent in magnitude to that reported in patients with major depressive disorder. Furthermore, patients with GAD are at risk of suicide or suicide attempts, and are frequent users of healthcare services. Thus, GAD is a serious and chronic condition that requires appropriate long-term treatment. The focus of acute treatment for patients with GAD is the improvement of symptoms, while the primary goal of long-term clinical management is remission, i.e. the complete resolution of both symptoms and functional impairment. The consensus across current treatment guidelines is that first-line treatment for patients with GAD should consist of an antidepressant, either a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) such as sertraline, paroxetine or escitalopram, or a selective serotonin noradrenaline (norepinephrine) reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) such as venlafaxine or duloxetine. However, the SSRIs and SNRIs have efficacy limitations, such as lack of response in many patients, a 2- to 4-week delay before the onset of symptom relief, lack of full remission, and risk of relapse. In addition, there are troublesome adverse effects associated with both the SSRIs and SNRIs. Evidence from early clinical studies of the atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of anxiety and GAD indicate that they may have a potential role in the treatment of GAD, either as monotherapy or as augmentation to standard treatment.

  2. A Preliminary Investigation of Continuous and Intermittent Exposures in the Treatment of Public Speaking Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seim, Richard W.; Waller, Stacey A.; Spates, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    It is often argued that exposure-based treatments for anxiety disorders are only effective if the exposures are presented continuously until a marked decrement in anxiety is achieved (e.g. Foa & Kozak, 1986). However, the data supporting this conclusion is limited. This study compared two treatments for public speaking anxiety: one requiring…

  3. Neurosteroids as Neuromodulators in the Treatment of Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Longone, Patrizia; di Michele, Flavia; D’Agati, Elisa; Romeo, Elena; Pasini, Augusto; Rupprecht, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric disorders. They are frequently treated with benzodiazepines, which are fast acting highly effective anxiolytic agents. However, their long-term use is impaired by tolerance development and abuse liability. In contrast, antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are considered as first-line treatment but have a slow onset of action. Neurosteroids are powerful allosteric modulators of GABAA and glutamate receptors. However, they also modulate sigma receptors and they are modulated themselves by SSRIs. Both pre-clinical and clinical studies have shown that neurosteroid homeostasis is altered in depression and anxiety disorders and antidepressants may act in part through restoring neurosteroid disbalance. Moreover, novel drugs interfering with neurosteroidogenesis such as ligands of the translocator protein (18 kDa) may represent an attractive pharmacological option for novel anxiolytics which lack the unwarranted side effects of benzodiazepines. Thus, neurosteroids are important endogenous neuromodulators for the physiology and pathophysiology of anxiety and they may constitute a novel therapeutic approach in the treatment of these disorders. PMID:22654814

  4. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation for treatment of anxiety, depression, and insomnia.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Daniel L; Nichols, Francine

    2013-03-01

    Cranial electrotherapy stimulation is a prescriptive medical device that delivers a mild form of electrical stimulation to the brain for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and insomnia. It is supported by more than 40 years of research demonstrating its effectiveness in several mechanistic studies and greater than 100 clinical studies. Adverse effects are rare (<1%), mild, and self-limiting, consisting mainly of skin irritation under the electrodes and headaches. Often used as a stand-alone therapy, because results are usually seen from the first treatment, cranial electrotherapy stimulation may also be used as an adjunctive therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Escitalopram for the treatment of major depression and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Höschl, Cyril; Svestka, Jaromír

    2008-04-01

    Escitalopram is the S-enantiomer of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram, which contains equal amounts of the S- and R-forms in a racemic mixture. Escitalopram is the most selective SSRI, with almost no significant affinity to other tested receptors. It has been demonstrated that it is escitalopram that carries the therapeutic potential of citalopram, and has statistically superior and clinically relevant properties compared with citalopram. Escitalopram is at least as effective in the treatment of depression and anxiety as other SSRIs, as well as venlafaxine, bupropion and duloxetine. Owing to multiple metabolic degrading pathways, the clinically relevant interactions of escitalopram with other drugs are minimal. Compared with other antidepressants, escitalopram is generally better tolerated, its onset of action is relatively fast, and its use may have cost-effectiveness and cost-utility advantages. Escitalopram is an effective first-line option in the management of patients with major depression, including severe forms, and various anxiety disorders.

  6. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Long-Term Effects on Anxiety and Secondary Disorders in Young Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saavedra, Lissette M.; Silverman, Wendy K.; Morgan-Lopez, Antonio A.; Kurtines, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The present study's aim was to examine the long-term effects (8 to 13 years post-treatment; M = 9.83 years; SD = 1.71) of the most widely used treatment approaches of exposure-based cognitive behavioral treatment for phobic and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents (i.e., group treatment and two variants of individual…

  7. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Long-Term Effects on Anxiety and Secondary Disorders in Young Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saavedra, Lissette M.; Silverman, Wendy K.; Morgan-Lopez, Antonio A.; Kurtines, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The present study's aim was to examine the long-term effects (8 to 13 years post-treatment; M = 9.83 years; SD = 1.71) of the most widely used treatment approaches of exposure-based cognitive behavioral treatment for phobic and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents (i.e., group treatment and two variants of individual…

  8. Anxiety and Related Outcomes in Young Adults 7 to 19 Years after Receiving Treatment for Child Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Courtney L.; Harrison, Julie P.; Settipani, Cara A.; Brodman, Douglas M.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated follow-up outcomes associated with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for childhood anxiety by comparing successfully and unsuccessfully treated participants 6.72 to 19.17 years after treatment. Method Participants were a sample of 66 youth (ages 7 to 14 at time of treatment, ages 18 to 32 at present follow-up) who had been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder and randomized to treatment in a randomized clinical trial on average 16.24 (SD = 3.56, Range = 6.72–19.17) years prior. The present follow-up included self-report measures and a diagnostic interview to assess anxiety, depression, and substance misuse. Results Compared to those who responded successfully to CBT for an anxiety disorder in childhood, those who were less responsive had higher rates of Panic Disorder, Alcohol Dependence, and Drug Abuse in adulthood. Relative to a normative comparison group, those who were less responsive to CBT in childhood had higher rates of several anxiety disorders and substance misuse problems in adulthood. Participants remained at particularly increased risk, relative to the normative group, for Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Nicotine Dependence regardless of initial treatment outcome. Conclusions The present study is the first to assess the long-term follow-up effects of CBT treatment for an anxiety disorder in youth on anxiety, depression, and substance abuse through the period of young adulthood when these disorders are often seen. Results support the presence of important long-term benefits of successful early CBT for anxiety. PMID:23688146

  9. Pregabalin for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder: an update

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, David S; Ajel, Khalil; Masdrakis, Vasilios G; Nowak, Magda; Rafiq, Rizwan

    2013-01-01

    A previous review summarized what was then known about the potential role of pregabalin in the treatment of patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD): this review provides an update on its pharmacological properties and presumed mechanism of action, the liability for abuse, and efficacy and tolerability in patients with GAD. Pregabalin has a similar molecular structure to the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) but its mechanism of action does not appear to be mediated through effects on GABA. Instead, its anxiolytic effects may arise through high-affinity binding to the alpha-2-delta sub-unit of the P/Q type voltage-gated calcium channel in “over-excited” presynaptic neurons, thereby reducing the release of excitatory neurotransmitters such as glutamate. The findings of randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses together indicate that pregabalin is efficacious in both acute treatment and relapse prevention in GAD, with some evidence of an early onset of effect, and broad efficacy in reducing the severity of psychological and physical symptoms of anxiety. It also has efficacy as an augmenting agent after non-response to antidepressant treatment in GAD. Continuing vigilance is needed in assessing its potential abuse liability but the tolerability profile of pregabalin may confer some advantages over other pharmacological treatments in the short term for treatment in patients with GAD. PMID:23836974

  10. Likelihood of Attending Treatment for Anxiety Among Veteran Primary Care Patients: Patient Preferences for Treatment Attributes.

    PubMed

    Shepardson, Robyn L; Funderburk, Jennifer S

    2016-09-01

    Anxiety is common, but under-treated, in primary care. Behavioral health providers embedded in primary care can help address this treatment gap. Guidance on anxiety treatment preferences would help inform tailoring of clinical practice and new interventions to be more patient-centered and increase treatment engagement. We surveyed 144 non-treatment seeking Veteran primary care patients (82.6 % male, 85.4 % White, age M = 59.8 years, SD = 13.9) reporting current anxiety symptoms (M = 13.87, SD = 3.66, on the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 Questionnaire) on their likelihood of attending anxiety treatment featuring various levels of 11 attributes (modality, type, location, format, provider, visit frequency, visit length, treatment duration, type of psychotherapy, symptom focus, and topic/skill). Participants indicated clear preferences for individual, face-to-face treatment in primary care, occurring once a month for at least 30 min and lasting at least three sessions. They also tended to prefer a stress management approach focused on trouble sleeping or fatigue, but all topics/skills were rated equivalently. For most attributes, the highest rated options were consistent with characteristics of integrated care. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  11. One session treatment for specific phobias in children: Comorbid anxiety disorders and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sarah M; Strege, Marlene V; Oar, Ella L; Ollendick, Thomas H

    2017-03-01

    One-Session Treatment (OST) for specific phobias has been shown to be effective in reducing phobia severity; however, the effect of different types of co-occurring anxiety disorders on OST outcomes is unknown. The present study examined (1) the effects of co-occurring generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), or another non-targeted specific phobia (OSP) on the efficacy of OST for specific phobias, and (2) the effects of OST on these co-occurring disorders following treatment. Three groups of 18 youth (7-15 years) with a specific phobia and comorbid GAD, SAD, or OSP were matched on age, gender, and phobia type. Outcome measures included diagnostic status and severity, and clinician rated improvement. All groups demonstrated an improvement in their specific phobia following treatment. Treatment was equally effective regardless of co-occurring anxiety disorder. In addition, comorbid anxiety disorders improved following OST; however, this effect was not equal across groups. The SAD group showed poorer improvement in their comorbid disorder than the GAD group post-treatment. However, the SAD group continued to improve and this differential effect was not evident six-months following treatment. The current study sample was small, with insufficient power to detect small and medium effect sizes. Further, the sample only included a portion of individuals with primary GAD or SAD, which may have attenuated the findings. The current study demonstrated that co-occurring anxiety disorders did not interfere with phobia treatment. OST, despite targeting a single specific phobia type, significantly reduced comorbid symptomatology across multiple anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Anxiety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mind and Body Approaches for Health Problems Facing Military Personnel and Veterans 7 Things To Know About Complementary ... Mind and Body Approaches for Health Problems in Military Personnel and Veterans Clinical Digest: Anxiety and Complementary Health ...

  13. The Treatment of Anxiety in Autism Spectrum Disorder (TAASD) Study: Rationale, Design and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, Connor M.; Wood, Jeffrey J.; Kendall, Philip C.; Renno, Patricia; Crawford, Erika A.; Mercado, Rogelio J.; Fujii, Cori; Collier, Amanda; Hoff, Alexandra; Kagan, Elana R.; Small, Brent J.; Lewin, Adam B.; Storch, Eric A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the rationale, design, and methods of the Treatment for Anxiety in Autism Spectrum Disorders study, a three-site randomized controlled trial investigating the relative efficacy of a modular CBT protocol for anxiety in ASD (Behavioral Interventions for Anxiety in Children with Autism) versus standard CBT for pediatric anxiety (the Coping Cat program) and a treatment-as-usual control. The trial is distinct in its scope, its direct comparison of active treatments for anxiety in ASD, and its comprehensive approach to assessing anxiety difficulties in youth with ASD. The trial will evaluate the relative benefits of CBT for children with ASD and investigate potential moderators (ASD severity, anxiety presentation, comorbidity) and mediators of treatment response, essential steps for future dissemination and implementation. PMID:28747814

  14. Treatment Effectiveness of Anxiety Management Training in Small and Large Group Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Paul C.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Compared relative efficiency of anxiety management training (AMT) in large group to AMT in small groups and to a wait-list control. Immediately after treatment, small group AMT participants reported significantly less general anxiety than controls. Seven-week follow-up revealed maintenance of this reduction of general anxiety.

  15. Effects of Two Short-Term Desensitization Methods in the Treatment of Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Frank C.; Suinn, Richard M.

    1974-01-01

    Accelerated massed desensitization and anxiety management training were compared with standard systematic desensitization in terms of reducing self-reported test anxiety in high test-anxious college students. All three treatments significantly reduced test anxiety as compared with a waiting list control group. (Author)

  16. Mediation of Changes in Anxiety and Depression During Treatment of Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovitch, David A.; Stefan G. Hofmann, Michael K.; Suvak, Michael K.; In-Albon, Tina

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the interactive process of changes in social anxiety and depression during treatment, the authors assessed weekly symptoms in 66 adult outpatients with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) who participated in cognitive- behavioral group therapy. Multilevel mediational analyses revealed that improvements in social anxiety mediated…

  17. Mediation of Changes in Anxiety and Depression During Treatment of Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovitch, David A.; Stefan G. Hofmann, Michael K.; Suvak, Michael K.; In-Albon, Tina

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the interactive process of changes in social anxiety and depression during treatment, the authors assessed weekly symptoms in 66 adult outpatients with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) who participated in cognitive- behavioral group therapy. Multilevel mediational analyses revealed that improvements in social anxiety mediated…

  18. The Relative Efficacy of Negative Practice and Anxiety Management Training in the Treatment of Mathematics Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streim, Leonard; O'Brien, Richard M.

    Mathematics anxiety involves feelings of tension and stress that interfere with the solving of mathematical problems in academic and daily life situations. To investigate the relative effectiveness of group negative practice and group anxiety management training in reducing mathematics anxiety, 72 math-anxious high school students were divided…

  19. Current treatments and advances in pain and anxiety management.

    PubMed

    Huang, David; Wun, Edmund; Stern, Avichai

    2011-07-01

    In light of preoperative and postoperative mortality and morbidity, continued advancement in pain and anxiety management would benefit millions. Although significant strides have been made in the past few decades, it is imperative that research and development continue. This article discusses types of pain and anxiety, the relationship between pain and anxiety, the physiology of pain and anxiety, and current trends in pain and anxiety management.

  20. Bad dream frequency in older adults with generalized anxiety disorder: prevalence, correlates, and effect of cognitive behavioral treatment for anxiety.

    PubMed

    Nadorff, Michael R; Porter, Ben; Rhoades, Howard M; Greisinger, Anthony J; Kunik, Mark E; Stanley, Melinda A

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and frequency of bad dreams in older adults. A secondary analysis from a randomized clinical trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety to enhanced usual care (EUC) assessed bad dream frequency at baseline, post treatment (3 months), and at 6, 9, 12, and 15 months. Of 227 participants (mean age = 67.4), 134 met GAD diagnostic criteria (CBT = 70, EUC = 64), with the remaining 93 serving as a comparison group. Patients with GAD had significantly more bad dreams than those without, and bad dream frequency was significantly associated with depression, anxiety, worry, and poor quality of life. CBT for anxiety significantly reduced bad dream frequency at post treatment and throughout follow up compared to EUC.

  1. Bad Dream Frequency in Older Adults with Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Prevalence, Correlates, and Effect of Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Nadorff, Michael R.; Porter, Ben; Rhoades, Howard M.; Greisinger, Anthony J.; Kunik, Mark E.; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and frequency of bad dreams in older adults. A secondary analysis from a randomized clinical trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety (CBT) to enhanced usual care (EUC), it assessed bad dream frequency at baseline, post-treatment (3 months), and 6, 9, 12 and 15 months. Of 227 participants (mean age = 67.4), 134 met GAD diagnostic criteria (CBT = 70, EUC = 64), with the remaining 93 serving as a comparison group. Patients with GAD had significantly more bad dreams than those without, and bad dream frequency was significantly associated with depression, anxiety, worry, and poor quality of life. CBT for anxiety significantly reduced bad dream frequency at post-treatment and throughout follow-up compared to EUC. PMID:23470116

  2. Relationship factors and outcome in child anxiety treatment studies.

    PubMed

    Fjermestad, Krister W; Mowatt Haugland, Bente Storm; Heiervang, Einar; Ost, Lars-Göran

    2009-04-01

    This study reviews 19 randomized controlled trials examining the association between three relationship factors - participation, treatment involvement, and therapeutic relationship - and outcome of cognitive-behavioral anxiety treatments for children and adolescents. In 12 studies, parent participation was considered as an independent variable compared to child-only participation. In three studies, parental involvement was measured. Child involvement was measured in one study. The child's perception of the therapeutic relationship was considered in three studies. Six studies found a significant positive effect of parent participation on diagnostic status, symptom level, or global functioning outcome measures. One study found a significant effect of parental involvement on global outcome measures. Another study found a significant positive association between child involvement and symptom measures and global functioning measures. No association was found between the quality of the child's perception of the therapeutic relationship and treatment outcome. Clinical implications are discussed.

  3. Childhood separation anxiety and the pathogenesis and treatment of adult anxiety.

    PubMed

    Milrod, Barbara; Markowitz, John C; Gerber, Andrew J; Cyranowski, Jill; Altemus, Margaret; Shapiro, Theodore; Hofer, Myron; Glatt, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Clinically significant separation anxiety disorder in childhood leads to adult panic disorder and other anxiety disorders. The prevailing pathophysiological model of anxiety disorders, which emphasizes extinction deficits of fear-conditioned responses, does not fully consider the role of separation anxiety. Pathological early childhood attachments have far-reaching consequences for the later adult ability to experience and internalize positive relationships in order to develop mental capacities for self-soothing, anxiety tolerance, affect modulation, and individuation. Initially identified in attachment research, the phenomenon of separation anxiety is supported by animal model, neuroimaging, and genetic studies. A role of oxytocin is postulated. Adults, inured to their anxiety, often do not identify separation anxiety as problematic, but those who develop anxiety and mood disorders respond more poorly to both pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions. This poorer response may reflect patients' difficulty in forming and maintaining attachments, including therapeutic relationships. Psychotherapies that focus on relationships and separation anxiety may benefit patients with separation anxiety by using the dyadic therapist-patient relationship to recapture and better understand important elements of earlier pathological parent-child relationships.

  4. Memory modification as an outcome variable in anxiety disorder treatment.

    PubMed

    Tryon, Warren W; McKay, Dean

    2009-05-01

    Learning and memory are interdependent processes. Memories are learned, and cumulative learning requires memory. It is generally accepted that learning contributes to psychopathology and consequently to pertinent memory formation. Neuroscience and psychological research have established that memory is an active reconstructive process that is influenced by thoughts, feelings, and behaviors including post-event information. Recent research on the treatment of anxiety disorders using medications (i.e., d-cyclcloserine) to alter neurological systems associated with memory used in conjunction with behavior therapy suggests that memory is part of a central mechanism in the etiology and maintenance of these conditions. The main thesis of this article is that learning-based interventions create new memories that may modify existing ones. This raises the possibility of using such memory modifications to measure intervention outcome. A connectionist context for understanding this phenomenon and informing intervention is provided, with specific reference to post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. Recommendations for future research examining the role of memory change in treatment outcome are suggested.

  5. A meta-analytic review of adult cognitive-behavioral treatment outcome across the anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Norton, Peter J; Price, Esther C

    2007-06-01

    The efficacy of cognitive behavioral treatments (CBT) for anxiety in adults has been supported by multiple meta-analyses. However, most have focused on only 1 diagnosis, thereby disallowing diagnostic comparisons. This study examined the efficacy of CBT across the anxiety disorders. One hundred eight trials of CBT for an anxiety disorder met study criteria. Cognitive therapy and exposure therapy alone, in combination, or combined with relaxation training, were efficacious across the anxiety disorders, with no differential efficacy for any treatment components for any specific diagnoses. However, when comparing across diagnoses, outcomes for generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder were superior to those for social anxiety disorder, but no other differences emerged. CBT effects were superior to those for no-treatment and expectancy control treatments, although tentative evidence suggested equal effects of CBT when compared with relaxation-only treatments.

  6. The Role of Emotion Regulation in the Treatment of Child Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannesdottir, Dagmar Kristin; Ollendick, Thomas H.

    2007-01-01

    In this review, we examine the role of emotion regulation in the treatment of children with anxiety disorders. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has been shown to "work" for children with anxiety disorders and it has been categorized as an evidence-based treatment. However, most studies have shown that the treatment is effective for about 60-70%…

  7. Fluoxetine for the Treatment of Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Open-Label, Long-Term Extension to a Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Duncan B.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Monk, Kelly; Kalas, Catherine; Ehmann, Mary; Bridge, Jeffrey; Wood, D. Scott; Muthen, Bengt; Brent, David

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of fluoxetine for the long-term treatment of children and adolescents with anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, and/or social phobia. Method: Children and adolescents (7-17 years old) with anxiety disorders were studied in open treatment for 1 year after they…

  8. Fluoxetine for the Treatment of Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Open-Label, Long-Term Extension to a Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Duncan B.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Monk, Kelly; Kalas, Catherine; Ehmann, Mary; Bridge, Jeffrey; Wood, D. Scott; Muthen, Bengt; Brent, David

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of fluoxetine for the long-term treatment of children and adolescents with anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, and/or social phobia. Method: Children and adolescents (7-17 years old) with anxiety disorders were studied in open treatment for 1 year after they…

  9. [Treatment strategies in anxiety disorders--an update].

    PubMed

    Delini-Stula, Alexandra; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith

    2009-06-01

    Anxiety disorders are persistent impairing diseases, with often chronic course and suffering from symptoms throughout a life-span. The medication with the most evidence of efficacy is the benzodiazepines having a low incidence of side effects but may cause physical dependence, withdrawal and sedation. The use of these drugs should be limited to the acute treatments during the first several weeks in combination with an SSRI or and SNRI for the treatment of the acute phase. After three to four weeks, when antidepressants become effective, benzodiazepine dose should be tapered over a one week period. Among the antidepressants, the SSRI and the SNRI are considered a first-line therapy because of their favourable side effect spectrum compared to tricyclic antidepressants. However, the association with side effects such as nausea, sweating, sexual dysfunction and gastrointestinal problems and insomnia may be intolerable for a number of patients. Combining antidepressants and benzodiazepine therapy or medication treatment and psychotherapy may lead to an increase in improvement in patients not responding to one treatment approach alone. The most effective treatment for managing the recurrent symptoms of this chronic disorder are still unknown and other studies and approaches are in need as remission rates are still only about 40%.

  10. Research review: Attention bias modification (ABM): a novel treatment for anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Bar-Haim, Yair

    2010-08-01

    Attention bias modification (ABM) is a newly emerging therapy for anxiety disorders that is rooted in current cognitive models of anxiety and in established experimental data on threat-related attentional biases in anxiety. This review describes the evidence indicating that ABM has the potential to become an enhancing tool for current psychological and pharmacological treatments for anxiety or even a novel standalone treatment. The review also outlines the gaps in need of bridging before ABM techniques could be routinely applied and incorporated into standard treatment protocols.

  11. Biopsychosocial determinants of treatment outcome for mood and anxiety disorders up to 8 months postpartum.

    PubMed

    Misri, Shaila; Albert, Gillian; Abizadeh, Jasmin; Kendrick, Kristin; Carter, Diana; Ryan, Deirdre; Oberlander, Tim F

    2012-08-01

    Little is known about the biopsychosocial determinants that predict postpartum treatment outcome for mood and anxiety disorders. Postpartum mood and anxiety symptoms and psychosocial/biological variables were recorded for 8 months of 22 women treated with antidepressants during pregnancy. Depression scores decreased by 58%, whereas anxiety scores decreased by 35%. Family history of psychiatric illness and prior psychiatric illness unrelated to pregnancy predicted depressive treatment outcome, and sexual abuse history and prior psychiatric illness unrelated to pregnancy predicted anxiety outcome. Biological and psychosocial variables predicted pharmacological treatment outcome in postpartum-depressed and anxious women.

  12. Parental Anxiety in the Treatment of Childhood Anxiety: A Different Story Three Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobham, Vanessa E.; Dadds, Mark R.; Spence, Susan H.; McDermott, Brett

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on the results of a long-term follow-up of 60 (29 girls and 31 boys, all of Caucasian ethnicity) children and adolescents diagnosed with an anxiety disorder and treated 3 years earlier with child-focused cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) or child-focused CBT plus parental anxiety management (PAM). Sixty-seven children aged 7 to…

  13. Parental Anxiety in the Treatment of Childhood Anxiety: A Different Story Three Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobham, Vanessa E.; Dadds, Mark R.; Spence, Susan H.; McDermott, Brett

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on the results of a long-term follow-up of 60 (29 girls and 31 boys, all of Caucasian ethnicity) children and adolescents diagnosed with an anxiety disorder and treated 3 years earlier with child-focused cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) or child-focused CBT plus parental anxiety management (PAM). Sixty-seven children aged 7 to…

  14. Sleep-Related Problems and the Effects of Anxiety Treatment in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Caporino, Nicole E; Read, Kendra L; Shiffrin, Nina; Settipani, Cara; Kendall, Philip C; Compton, Scott N; Sherrill, Joel; Piacentini, John; Walkup, John; Ginsburg, Golda; Keeton, Courtney; Birmaher, Boris; Sakolsky, Dara; Gosch, Elizabeth; Albano, Anne M

    2015-10-14

    This study examined (a) demographic and clinical characteristics associated with sleep-related problems (SRPs) among youth with anxiety disorders, and (b) the impact of anxiety treatment: cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT; Coping Cat), medication (sertraline), their combination, and pill placebo on SRPs. Youth (N = 488, ages 7-17, 50% female, 79% White) with a principal diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, or social phobia participated. SRPs were reported by parents and youth. Findings differed by informant and by type of SRP, with evidence that SRPs are associated with age, anxiety severity, externalizing problems, functional impairment, and family burden at pretreatment. Anxiety treatment reduced SRPs; effect sizes were small to medium. Reductions in parent-reported separation-related sleep difficulties were significantly greater in active treatment than in the placebo condition, with the greatest reductions reported by parents of youth whose active treatment was multimodal or included sertraline. Youth whose anxiety treatment involved CBT reported significantly greater decreases in dysregulated sleep (e.g., sleeplessness). Both CBT for anxiety and sertraline appear to be somewhat effective in reducing SRPs, and multimodal treatment may be preferable depending on the symptom presentation. To inform practice, future research should examine a broad range of SRPs, incorporate objective measures of sleep, and evaluate the impact of behavioral strategies that directly target SRPs in youth with anxiety disorders.

  15. Sleep-Related Problems and the Effects of Anxiety Treatment in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Caporino, Nicole E.; Read, Kendra L.; Shiffrin, Nina D.; Settipani, Cara A.; Compton, Scott N.; Sherrill, Joel; Piacentini, John; Walkup, John; Ginsburg, Golda; Birmaher, Boris; Sakolsky, Dara; Gosch, Elizabeth; Keeton, Courtney; Albano, Anne Marie; Kendall, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examined (a) demographic and clinical characteristics associated with sleep-related problems (SRPs) among youth with anxiety disorders, and (b) the impact of anxiety treatment: cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT; Coping Cat), medication (sertraline), their combination, and pill placebo on SRPs. Method Youth (N = 488, ages 7-17, 50% female, 79% White) with a principal diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, or social phobia participated. SRPs were reported by parents and youth. Results Findings differed by informant and by type of SRP, with evidence that SRPs are associated with age, anxiety severity, externalizing problems, functional impairment, and family burden at pretreatment. Anxiety treatment reduced SRPs; effect sizes were small to medium. Reductions in parent-reported separation-related sleep difficulties were significantly greater in active treatment than in the placebo condition, with the greatest reductions reported by parents of youth whose active treatment was multimodal or included sertraline. Youth whose anxiety treatment involved CBT reported significantly greater decreases in dysregulated sleep (e.g., sleeplessness). Conclusions Both CBT for anxiety and sertraline appear to be somewhat effective in reducing SRPs, and multimodal treatment may be preferable depending on the symptom presentation. To inform practice, future research should examine a broad range of SRPs, incorporate objective measures of sleep, and evaluate the impact of behavioral strategies that directly target SRPs in youth with anxiety disorders. PMID:26467211

  16. Predicting Social Anxiety Treatment Outcome Based on Therapeutic Email Conversations.

    PubMed

    Hoogendoorn, Mark; Berger, Thomas; Schulz, Ava; Stolz, Timo; Szolovits, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Predicting therapeutic outcome in the mental health domain is of utmost importance to enable therapists to provide the most effective treatment to a patient. Using information from the writings of a patient can potentially be a valuable source of information, especially now that more and more treatments involve computer-based exercises or electronic conversations between patient and therapist. In this paper, we study predictive modeling using writings of patients under treatment for a social anxiety disorder. We extract a wealth of information from the text written by patients including their usage of words, the topics they talk about, the sentiment of the messages, and the style of writing. In addition, we study trends over time with respect to those measures. We then apply machine learning algorithms to generate the predictive models. Based on a dataset of 69 patients, we are able to show that we can predict therapy outcome with an area under the curve of 0.83 halfway through the therapy and with a precision of 0.78 when using the full data (i.e., the entire treatment period). Due to the limited number of participants, it is hard to generalize the results, but they do show great potential in this type of information.

  17. Fathers' role in the etiology, prevention and treatment of child anxiety: a review and new model.

    PubMed

    Bögels, Susan; Phares, Vicky

    2008-04-01

    Fathers have been neglected in investigations of the development, prevention, and treatment of anxiety and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. This review provides a historical background of what is known about fathers' roles in the etiology of anxiety problems and provides evidence from bottom-up, top-down, and cross-sectional correlation studies of the connections between fathers' and their children's anxiety. Treatment and prevention programs are discussed in terms of the limited findings regarding fathers' involvement in treatment for children's and adolescents' anxiety problems. Finally, a model is presented to show the unique ways in which mothers and fathers are involved in the development of anxiety disorders in their children. Future directions for research in this area are highlighted.

  18. Defining Treatment Response and Symptom Remission for Anxiety Disorders in Pediatric Autism Spectrum Disorders using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale

    PubMed Central

    Johnco, Carly; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; Lewin, Adam B.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Wood, Jeffrey J.; Storch, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined optimal guidelines to assess treatment response and remission for anxiety in youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS). Data was collected for 108 children aged 7–16 years with comorbid anxiety and ASD before and after receiving cognitive behavior therapy. Optimal cut-offs on the PARS were assessed using signal detection analyses using receiver operating characteristic methods. Maximum agreement with response criteria was achieved at 15% reduction in symptoms on the PARS. Maximum agreement with remission criteria was achieved at 40% reduction in symptoms, or at a score of 10 or below at post-treatment. Results have implications for standardizing criteria used in research trials and clinical practice. PMID:26031924

  19. SPECIAL SERIES: Intensive Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments for Child and Adolescent Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albano, Anne Marie

    2009-01-01

    This special series on intensive treatments for anxiety disorders in youth reminds us that these are challenging conditions and there is much more work to be done to address some of the limitations to and challenges of treating anxiety disorders in children using CBT. The treatments described in this series are intensive in their delivery and…

  20. A Retrospective Examination of the Similarity between Clinical Practice and Manualized Treatment for Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vande Voort, Jennifer L.; Svecova, Jana; Jacobson, Amy Brown; Whiteside, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to facilitate the bidirectional communication between researchers and clinicians about the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder. Forty-four children were assessed before and after cognitive behavioral treatment with the parent versions of the Spence Child Anxiety Scale…

  1. Predicting Response of ADHD Symptoms to Methylphenidate Treatment Based on Comorbid Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blouin, Brittany; Maddeaux, Cindy; Stanley Firestone, Jill; van Stralen, Judy

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In this small pilot study, the association of comorbid anxiety with the treatment of ADHD is studied. Methods: Eighteen volunteers from a pediatric clinic are tested for ADHD and anxiety and assessed for behavioral and cognitive ADHD symptomology. Response to methylphenidate as treatment for ADHD symptoms is measured 2 to 3 weeks, and…

  2. Test Anxiety: Theory, Assessment, and Treatment. The Series in Clinical and Community Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Charles D., Ed.; Vagg, Peter R., Ed.

    It is not surprising that a broad array of treatment programs have been developed to reduce test anxiety, since the consequences can be serious. The contributions in this volume review and evaluate the theory of test anxiety, its measurement, its manifestations, and possible treatments and their outcomes. The following chapters are included: (1)…

  3. Predicting Response of ADHD Symptoms to Methylphenidate Treatment Based on Comorbid Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blouin, Brittany; Maddeaux, Cindy; Stanley Firestone, Jill; van Stralen, Judy

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In this small pilot study, the association of comorbid anxiety with the treatment of ADHD is studied. Methods: Eighteen volunteers from a pediatric clinic are tested for ADHD and anxiety and assessed for behavioral and cognitive ADHD symptomology. Response to methylphenidate as treatment for ADHD symptoms is measured 2 to 3 weeks, and…

  4. Test Anxiety: Theory, Assessment, and Treatment. The Series in Clinical and Community Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Charles D., Ed.; Vagg, Peter R., Ed.

    It is not surprising that a broad array of treatment programs have been developed to reduce test anxiety, since the consequences can be serious. The contributions in this volume review and evaluate the theory of test anxiety, its measurement, its manifestations, and possible treatments and their outcomes. The following chapters are included: (1)…

  5. Anxiety symptoms prior to a prostate cancer diagnosis: Associations with knowledge and openness to treatment.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Amanda J; Scherer, Laura D; Ubel, Peter A; Alexander, Stewart; Fagerlin, Angela

    2017-02-01

    Research suggests that anxiety may be a common response to a cancer diagnosis, but research is needed to examine anxiety before diagnosis. Anxiety before diagnosis may relate to the comprehension of relevant health information or openness to potential treatments. This study examined anxiety and these outcomes in men who were waiting to learn of a prostate cancer diagnosis. One goal of this study was to determine whether anxiety would increase as men came closer to learning the results of their prostate cancer biopsy. Another goal was to test whether anxiety was associated with knowledge about prostate cancer or openness to different treatments. Men (N = 265) who were facing a prostate cancer diagnosis were surveyed at two time points. Time 1 occurred at the time of biopsy, and Time 2 occurred immediately before men received their biopsy result. At each time point, men reported their anxiety about prostate cancer and their biopsy result. At Time 2, they completed a knowledge test of information about prostate cancer and reported their openness to different potential treatments. Anxiety symptoms increased as men came closer to learning their diagnosis. Also, higher anxiety was associated with lower knowledge and greater openness to particular treatments like surgery. Interactions showed that when anxiety increased from Time 1 to Time 2, having high or low knowledge mattered less to treatment openness. Waiting for a cancer diagnosis is an important time period in which anxiety may increase and relate to information processing and openness to treatments. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Men undergoing prostate cancer screening have been found to experience high and low levels of anxiety. Research has shown that negative emotions like anxiety are common following a cancer diagnosis, but little research has examined emotions right before diagnosis. Anxiety has been associated with information processing and motivation to engage in

  6. Anxiety in adolescents: Update on its diagnosis and treatment for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Rebecca S; Dickstein, Daniel P

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health concern facing adolescents today, yet they are largely undertreated. This is especially concerning given that there are fairly good data to support an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety, and also that untreated, these problems can continue into adulthood, growing in severity. Thus, knowing how to recognize and respond to anxiety in adolescents is of the utmost importance in primary care settings. To that end, this article provides an up-to-date review of the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety disorders geared towards professionals in primary care settings. Topics covered include subtypes, clinical presentation, the etiology and biology, effective screening instruments, evidence-based treatments (both medication and therapy), and the long-term prognosis for adolescents with anxiety. Importantly, we focus on the most common types of anxiety disorders, often known as phobias, which include generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety/social phobia, separation anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and specific phobias. In summary, anxiety is a common psychiatric problem for adolescents, but armed with the right tools, primary care providers can make a major impact. PMID:24600282

  7. Hypnosis in the treatment of anxiety- and stress-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Hammond, D Corydon

    2010-02-01

    Self-hypnosis training represents a rapid, cost-effective, nonaddictive and safe alternative to medication for the treatment of anxiety-related conditions. Here we provide a review of the experimental literature on the use of self-hypnosis in the treatment of anxiety and stress-related disorders, including anxiety associated with cancer, surgery, burns and medical/dental procedures. An overview of research is also provided with regard to self-hypnotic treatment of anxiety-related disorders, such as tension headaches, migraines and irritable bowel syndrome. The tremendous volume of research provides compelling evidence that hypnosis is an efficacious treatment for state anxiety (e.g., prior to tests, surgery and medical procedures) and anxiety-related disorders, such as headaches and irritable bowel syndrome. Although six studies demonstrate changes in trait anxiety, this review recommends that further randomized controlled outcome studies are needed on the hypnotic treatment of generalized anxiety disorder and in documenting changes in trait anxiety. Recommendations are made for selecting clinical referral sources.

  8. Evaluation of dental anxiety in patients undergoing dentoalveolar surgery with laser treatment.

    PubMed

    Ugurlu, Faysal; Cavus, Onur; Kaya, Alper; Sener, Cem B

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dental anxiety in patients undergoing apicectomy procedures performed with conventional instruments or an erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Twenty-eight patients undergoing apicectomy were divided into two groups; roots were removed with an Er:YAG laser in group A (n=14) and with conventional instruments in group B (n=14). All patients completed preoperative State-Trait Anxiety Inventories (STAI) and postoperative questionnaires. Although state anxiety, trait anxiety, and postoperative questionnaire scores were lower in patients undergoing Er:YAG laser treatment than in those treated with conventional instruments, the differences were not statistically significant. Surgical instruments affect the anxiety levels of dental patients. Even with the STAI scores being lower for patients treated with Er:YAG, use of the Er:YAG laser alone cannot contribute to the resolution of dental anxiety. A patient's individual condition is the major factor influencing that patient's anxiety level.

  9. A standalone Internet cognitive behavior therapy treatment for social anxiety in adults who stutter: CBTpsych.

    PubMed

    Helgadóttir, Fjóla Dögg; Menzies, Ross G; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; O'Brian, Sue

    2014-09-01

    Social anxiety is common for those who stutter and efficacious cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for them appears viable. However, there are difficulties with provision of CBT services for anxiety among those who stutter. Standalone Internet CBT treatment is a potential solution to those problems. CBTpsych is a fully automated, online social anxiety intervention for those who stutter. This report is a Phase I trial of CBTpsych. Fourteen participants were allowed 5 months to complete seven sections of CBTpsych. Pre-treatment and post-treatment assessments tested for social anxiety, common unhelpful thoughts related to stuttering, quality of life and stuttering frequency. Significant post-treatment improvements in social anxiety, unhelpful thoughts, and quality of life were reported. Five of seven participants diagnosed with social anxiety lost those diagnoses at post-treatment. The two participants who did not lose social anxiety diagnoses did not complete all the CBTpsych modules. CBTpsych did not improve stuttering frequency. Eleven of the fourteen participants who began treatment completed Section 4 or more of the CBTpsych intervention. CBTpsych provides a potential means to provide CBT treatment for social anxiety associated with stuttering, to any client without cost, regardless of location. Further clinical trials are warranted. At the end of this activity the reader will be able to: (a) describe that social anxiety is common in those who stutter; (b) discuss the origin of social anxiety and the associated link with bullying; (c) summarize the problems in provision of effective evidence based cognitive behavior therapy for adults who stutter; (d) describe a scalable computerized treatment designed to tackle the service provision gap; (e) describe the unhelpful thoughts associated with stuttering that this fully automated computer program was able to tackle; (f) list the positive outcomes for individuals who stuttered that participated in this trial such as the

  10. A meta-analysis of the influence of comorbidity on treatment outcome in the anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Cisler, Josh M; Tolin, David F

    2010-08-01

    Although psychiatric comorbidity is common among patients with anxiety disorders, its impact on treatment outcome remains unclear. The present study used meta-analytic techniques to examine the relationship between diagnostic comorbidity and treatment outcome for patients with anxiety disorders. One hundred forty-eight anxiety-disordered treatment samples (combined N=3534) were examined for post-treatment effects from the PsychINFO database. Samples consisted of those exposed to both active (CBT, dynamic therapy, drug treatment, CBT+drug treatment, mindfulness) and inactive treatments (placebo/attention control, wait-list). All treatments were associated with significant improvement at post-treatment, and active treatments were associated with greater effects than were inactive treatments. However, overall comorbidity was generally unrelated to effect size at post-treatment or at follow-up. A significant negative relationship between overall comorbidity and treatment outcome was found for mixed or "neurotic" anxiety samples when examining associations between comorbidity and specific diagnoses. Conversely, there was a significant positive relationship between overall comorbidity and treatment outcome for panic disorder and/or agoraphobia and PTSD or sexual abuse survivors. These findings suggest that while diagnostic comorbidity may not impact the effects of specific anxiety disorder treatments, it appears to differentially impact outcome for specific anxiety disorder diagnoses.

  11. Predictors of Treatment Effectiveness for Youth with ASD and Comorbid Anxiety Disorders: It All Depends on the Family?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Steensel, F. J.; Zegers, V. M.; Bögels, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to explore predictors of treatment effectiveness in a sample of 79 children with ASD who received cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for their anxiety disorders. Severity of anxiety disorders and anxiety symptoms were used to measure treatment effectiveness and was assessed pre-treatment, post-treatment, 3 months-, 1 and 2 years…

  12. Auricular acupuncture effectively reduces state anxiety before dental treatment--a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Michalek-Sauberer, Andrea; Gusenleitner, Erich; Gleiss, Andreas; Tepper, Gabor; Deusch, Engelbert

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse whether auricular acupuncture, acupuncture at the outer ear, could reduce state anxiety before dental treatment. This prospective, randomised patient-blinded study with 182 patients compared anxiety before dental treatment following auricular acupuncture at the relaxation-, tranquillizer- and master cerebral points (auricular acupuncture group) versus acupuncture at sham points (finger-, shoulder- and tonsil points; sham group) and a non-intervention control group. Anxiety was assessed using the Spielberger State Trait Anxiety Inventory (German version) before auricular acupuncture and 20 min thereafter, immediately before dental treatment. Auricular acupuncture reduced state anxiety score more effectively from 54.7 ± 10.8 to 46.9 ± 10.4 (mean ± SD) than sham acupuncture from 51.9 ± 10.2 to 48.4 ± 10.0. In contrast, state anxiety in the control group increased from 51.0 ± 11.7 to 54.0 ± 11.6 (mean increase +3.0; CI +4.7 to +1.2). The decrease in state anxiety in both intervention groups was statistically significant (p < 0.001) when compared to the non-intervention control group. After correcting for group differences in baseline state anxiety, the reduction in anxiety was -7.3 score points (CI -9.0 to -5.6) in the auricular acupuncture group and -3.7 score points (CI -5.4 to -1.9) in the sham group (p = 0.008). Auricular acupuncture, a minimally invasive method, effectively reduces state anxiety before dental treatment. Auricular acupuncture could be an option for patients scheduled for dental treatment, who experience an uncomfortable degree of anxiety and request an acute intervention for their anxiety.

  13. Examining the Relationship between Parental Anxiety and Treatment Response in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reaven, Judy; Washington, Lindsay; Moody, Eric J.; Stern, Jessica A.; Hepburn, Susan L.; Blakeley-Smith, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    In response to the high co-occurrence of anxiety symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), several interventions have been developed for this population. In spite of promising findings, some youth with ASD respond only minimally to such interventions. To understand potential factors that may impact treatment response, the current…

  14. Examining the Relationship between Parental Anxiety and Treatment Response in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reaven, Judy; Washington, Lindsay; Moody, Eric J.; Stern, Jessica A.; Hepburn, Susan L.; Blakeley-Smith, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    In response to the high co-occurrence of anxiety symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), several interventions have been developed for this population. In spite of promising findings, some youth with ASD respond only minimally to such interventions. To understand potential factors that may impact treatment response, the current…

  15. The anxiety of Taiwanese women with or without continuity treatment after previous in vitro fertilisation failure.

    PubMed

    Su, Tsann-Juu; Tzeng, Ya-Ling; Kuo, Pi-Chao

    2011-08-01

    To compare the anxiety levels of Taiwanese women who continued with in vitro fertilisation treatment and those who discontinued treatment post-in vitro fertilisation failure. In vitro fertilisation is perceived as the last resort of infertility treatment. The impact of unsuccessful in vitro fertilisation treatment on psychological function has been documented; however, research comparing the levels of anxiety of women who cease and those who continue in vitro fertilisation post-failure is scant. A cross-sectional comparative study design was used. Fifty-eight women in whom in vitro fertilisation had failed within the previous year were recruited to this study from a medical centre in northern Taiwan; 34 women continued treatment and 24 discontinued treatment. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was used to assess their levels of anxiety. Women in the group who continued treatment exhibited higher state and trait anxiety (TA) than women in the group who discontinued treatment (p < 0·005). The number and frequency of in vitro fertilisation cycles were significantly higher in the group who continued treatment than in those who did not. A strong positive correlation between state and TA (r = 0·8, p < 0·01) existed in both groups. Both groups exhibited considerable levels of anxiety; however, the women who continued in vitro fertilisation treatment had higher levels of anxiety than those who discontinued treatment. The level of anxiety of women who decide to continue in vitro fertilisation treatment should be assessed as early as possible and counselling services provided to women who experience in vitro fertilisation failure should concentrate more on relieving psychological distress. One year after discontinuing treatment, some women still experience considerable anxiety; therefore, the care and assistance provided to these women need to be continually evaluated. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Social anxiety and peer helping in adolescent addiction treatment.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Maria E; Wang, Alexandra R; Rowles, Brieana M; Lee, Matthew T; Johnson, Byron R

    2015-05-01

    The developmental need to fit in may lead to higher alcohol and other drug use among socially anxious youths which exacerbates the drink/trouble cycle. In treatment, youths with social anxiety disorder (SAD) may avoid participating in therapeutic activities with risk of negative peer appraisal. Peer-helping is a low-intensity, social activity in the 12-step program associated with greater abstinence among treatment-seeking adults. This study examined the influence of SAD on clinical severity at intake, peer-helping during treatment, and outcomes in a large sample of adolescents court-referred to residential treatment. Adolescents (N = 195; 52% female, 30% Black) aged 14 to 18 were prospectively assessed at treatment admission, treatment discharge, and 6 months after treatment discharge. Data were collected using rater-administered assessments, youth reports, clinician reports, medical charts, and electronic court records. The influence of SAD on peer-helping and outcomes was examined using hierarchical linear regression and event history methods. Forty-two percent of youths reported a persistent fear of being humiliated or scrutinized in social situations, and 15% met current diagnostic criteria for SAD. SAD onset preceded initial use for two-thirds of youths with SAD and substance dependency. SAD youths presented for treatment with greater clinical severity in terms of earlier age of first use (p < 0.01), greater lifetime use of heroin and polysubstance use (p < 0.05), incarceration history (p < 0.01), and lifetime trauma (p < 0.001). Twelve-step participation patterns during treatment did not differ between youths with and without SAD except for peer-helping, which was associated with reduced risk of relapse (p < 0.01) and incarceration (p < 0.05) in the 6 months posttreatment. This study found evidence of an association between SAD and earlier age of first use, greater lifetime use of heroin, incarceration history, and lifetime trauma. SAD was

  17. The reciprocal relationship between alliance and symptom improvement across treatment of childhood anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Marker, Craig D.; Comer, Jonathan S.; Abramova, Viktoriya; Kendall, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study examined changes in the therapeutic alliance and in self-reported anxiety over the course of 16 weeks of manual-based family treatment for child anxiety disorders. Method 86 children (51.3% female; aged 7.15 to 14.44; 86.2% Caucasian, 14.8% minority) with a principal diagnosis of separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and/or social phobia, and their parents, received family treatment for anxiety disorders in youth. Child, therapist, and parent ratings of therapeutic alliance and child ratings of state anxiety were measured each session. Latent difference score growth modeling investigated the interacting relationship. Results Therapeutic alliance change, as rated by the mother and by the therapist, was a significant predictor (medium effect) of latter change in child anxiety (with greater therapeutic alliance leading to later reduction in anxiety). However, changes in child-reported anxiety also predicted latter change in father- and therapist-reported alliance (small-to-medium effect). Prospective relationships between child-reported therapeutic alliance and child-reported symptom improvement were not significant. Conclusions Results provide partial support for a reciprocal model in which therapeutic alliance improves outcome, and anxiety reduction improves therapeutic alliance. PMID:23009693

  18. The reciprocal relationship between alliance and symptom improvement across the treatment of childhood anxiety.

    PubMed

    Marker, Craig D; Comer, Jonathan S; Abramova, Viktoriya; Kendall, Philip C

    2013-01-01

    This study examined changes in the therapeutic alliance and in self-reported anxiety over the course of 16 weeks of manual-based family treatment for child anxiety disorders. Eighty-six children (51.3% female; aged 7.15-14.44; 86.2% Caucasian, 14.8% minority) with a principal diagnosis of separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and/or social phobia, and their parents, received family treatment for anxiety disorders in youth. Child, therapist, and parent ratings of therapeutic alliance and child ratings of state anxiety were measured each session. Latent difference score growth modeling investigated the interacting relationship. Therapeutic alliance change, as rated by the mother and by the therapist, was a significant predictor (medium effect) of latter change in child anxiety (with greater therapeutic alliance leading to later reduction in anxiety). However, changes in child-reported anxiety also predicted latter change in father- and therapist-reported alliance (small-to-medium effect). Prospective relationships between child-reported therapeutic alliance and child-reported symptom improvement were not significant. Results provide partial support for a reciprocal model in which therapeutic alliance improves outcome, and anxiety reduction improves therapeutic alliance.

  19. Efficacy of a manualized and workbook-driven individual treatment for social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Ledley, Deborah Roth; Heimberg, Richard G; Hope, Debra A; Hayes, Sarah A; Zaider, Talia I; Dyke, Melanie Van; Turk, Cynthia L; Kraus, Cynthia; Fresco, David M

    2009-12-01

    Social anxiety disorder is a prevalent and impairing disorder for which viable cognitive-behavioral therapies exist. However, these treatments have not been easily packaged for dissemination and may be underutilized as a result. The current study reports on the findings of a randomized controlled trial of a manualized and workbook-driven individual cognitive-behavioral treatment for social anxiety disorder (Hope, Heimberg, Juster, & Turk, 2000; Hope, Heimberg, & Turk, 2006). This treatment package was derived from an empirically supported group treatment for social anxiety disorder and intended for broad dissemination, but it has not previously been subjected to empirical examination on its own. As a first step in that examination, 38 clients seeking treatment for social anxiety disorder at either the Adult Anxiety Clinic of Temple University or the Anxiety Disorders Clinic of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln were randomly assigned to receive either immediate treatment with this cognitive-behavioral treatment package or treatment delayed for 20 weeks. Evaluation at the posttreatment/postdelay period revealed substantially greater improvements among immediate treatment clients on interviewer-rated and self-report measures of social anxiety and impairment. Three-month follow-up assessment revealed maintenance of gains. Clinical implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  20. Self-talk in youth with anxiety disorders: states of mind, content specificity, and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Treadwell, K R; Kendall, P C

    1996-10-01

    This study investigated the relationship between childhood anxiety disorders, the valence and content of self-statements, and the impact of treatment on the internal dialogue. Participants (151 8- to 13-year-olds) included 71 youth with anxiety disorders and 80 control participants. Positive and negative self-statements and a states-of-mind (SOM) ratio were examined. Results indicated that the negative self-statements and SOM ratio (but not positive self-statements) of children with anxiety disorders significantly predicted anxiety. Results also indicated that negative (but not positive cognition) and SOM ratio predicted improvement in anxiety after treatment and mediated treatment gains. Results of analyses to explore the content specificity hypothesis were mixed. The impact of negative self-talk on children's anxious symptomatology and favorable treatment outcome is discussed.

  1. Avoidant decision-making in social anxiety disorder: A laboratory task linked to in vivo anxiety and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Pittig, Andre; Alpers, Georg W; Niles, Andrea N; Craske, Michelle G

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies on reward-based decision-making in the presence of anxiety-related stimuli demonstrated that approach-avoidance conflicts can be assessed under controlled laboratory conditions. However, the clinical relevance of these decision conflicts has not been demonstrated. To this end, the present study investigated avoidant decisions in treatment-seeking individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD). In a gambling task, advantageous choices to maximize gains were associated with task-irrelevant angry faces and disadvantageous choices with happy faces. The clinical relevance of avoidant decisions for in vivo anxiety in a social stress situation (public speaking) were examined (n = 44). In a subsample (n = 20), the predictive value for a reduction of avoidance following behavioral therapy was also evaluated. Results indicated a close link between more frequent avoidant decisions and elevated in vivo anxiety. Moreover, individuals who showed a deficit in the goal-directed adjustment of their decisions also showed higher and sustained distress during the social stressor and reported less decrease of avoidance following treatment. The findings highlight the importance of an avoidant decision-making style for the experience of acute distress and the maintenance of avoidance in SAD. Assessing avoidant decision-making may help to predict the response to behavioral treatments.

  2. Children and adolescents referred for treatment of anxiety disorders: differences in clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Waite, Polly; Creswell, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Reports of the clinical characteristics of children and adolescents with anxiety disorders are typically based on community populations or from clinical samples with exclusion criterion applied. Little is known about the clinical characteristics of children and adolescents routinely referred for treatment for anxiety disorders. Furthermore, children and adolescents are typically treated as one homogeneous group although they may differ in ways that are clinically meaningful. A consecutive series of children (n=100, aged 6-12 years) and adolescents (n=100, aged 13-18 years), referred to a routine clinical service, were assessed for anxiety and comorbid disorders, school refusal and parental symptoms of psychopathology. Children with a primary anxiety disorder were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with separation anxiety disorder than adolescents. Adolescents with a primary anxiety disorder had significantly higher self and clinician rated anxiety symptoms and had more frequent primary diagnoses of social anxiety disorder, diagnoses and symptoms of mood disorders, and irregular school attendance. Childhood and adolescence were considered categorically as distinct, developmental periods; in reality changes would be unlikely to occur in such a discrete manner. The finding that children and adolescents with anxiety disorders have distinct clinical characteristics has clear implications for treatment. Simply adapting treatments designed for children to make the materials more 'adolescent-friendly' is unlikely to sufficiently meet the needs of adolescents. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Children and adolescents referred for treatment of anxiety disorders: Differences in clinical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Polly; Creswell, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Background Reports of the clinical characteristics of children and adolescents with anxiety disorders are typically based on community populations or from clinical samples with exclusion criterion applied. Little is known about the clinical characteristics of children and adolescents routinely referred for treatment for anxiety disorders. Furthermore, children and adolescents are typically treated as one homogeneous group although they may differ in ways that are clinically meaningful. Methods A consecutive series of children (n=100, aged 6–12 years) and adolescents (n=100, aged 13–18 years), referred to a routine clinical service, were assessed for anxiety and comorbid disorders, school refusal and parental symptoms of psychopathology. Results Children with a primary anxiety disorder were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with separation anxiety disorder than adolescents. Adolescents with a primary anxiety disorder had significantly higher self and clinician rated anxiety symptoms and had more frequent primary diagnoses of social anxiety disorder, diagnoses and symptoms of mood disorders, and irregular school attendance. Limitations Childhood and adolescence were considered categorically as distinct, developmental periods; in reality changes would be unlikely to occur in such a discrete manner. Conclusions The finding that children and adolescents with anxiety disorders have distinct clinical characteristics has clear implications for treatment. Simply adapting treatments designed for children to make the materials more ‘adolescent-friendly’ is unlikely to sufficiently meet the needs of adolescents. PMID:25016489

  4. Comorbid Anxiety Disorders and Treatment of Depression in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Michelle Nicole; Siddique, Juned; Fokuo, J. Konadu; Mohr, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Anxiety is highly comorbid with depression, but little is known about the impact of anxiety disorders on the effectiveness of empirically supported psychotherapies for depression. We examined such outcomes for people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and depression, with versus without comorbid anxiety disorders. Design Participants with MS (N = 102) received 16 weeks of telephone-administered psychotherapy for depression and were followed for one year post-treatment. Results Participants with comorbid anxiety disorders improved to a similar degree during treatment as those without anxiety disorders. Outcomes during follow-up were mixed, and thus we divided the anxiety diagnoses into distress and fear disorders. The distress disorder (GAD) was associated with elevated anxiety symptoms during and after treatment. In contrast, fear disorders (i.e., panic disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, specific phobia) were linked to depression, specifically during follow-up, across 3 different measures. Conclusions People with GAD receiving treatment for depression may benefit from additional services targeting anxiety more specifically, while those with comorbid fear disorders may benefit from services targeting maintenance of gains after treatment. PMID:20804269

  5. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Late-Life Anxiety Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorenstein, Ethan E.; Papp, Lazlo A.

    In the absence of data, pharmacotherapy with benzodiazepines has become the mainstay of anxiety management in the elderly population. However, the use of benzodiazepines in the elderly has many problems. Elderly persons are more sensitive to anti-anxiety medications and are subject to a variety of increased risks, including cognitive impairment,…

  6. Cognitive-behavioral group treatment for perinatal anxiety: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Green, Sheryl M; Haber, Erika; Frey, Benicio N; McCabe, Randi E

    2015-08-01

    Along with physical and biological changes, a tremendous amount of upheaval and adjustment accompany the pregnancy and postpartum period of a woman's life that together can often result in what is commonly known as postpartum depression. However, anxiety disorders have been found to be more frequent than depression during pregnancy and at least as common, if not more so, during the postpartum period, e.g., Brockington et al., (Archieves Women's Ment Health 9:253-263, 2006; Wenzel et al. (J Anxiety Disord, 19:295-311, 2005). Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a well-established psychological treatment of choice for anxiety; however, few studies have specifically examined a cognitive-behavioral intervention targeting perinatal anxiety. This pilot study examined the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral group treatment (CBGT) program specifically tailored to address perinatal anxiety in 10 women who were either pregnant or within 12 months postpartum. Participants were recruited from a women's clinic at an academic hospital setting, with anxiety identified as their principal focus of distress. Following a diagnostic interview confirming a primary anxiety disorder and completion of assessment measures, participants completed a 6-week CBGT program. There was a statistically significant reduction in anxiety and depressive symptoms following the CBGT program (all p < 0.05). Participants also reported high acceptability and satisfaction with this treatment for addressing their perinatal anxiety. These findings suggest that CBGT for perinatal anxiety is a promising treatment for both anxiety and depressive symptoms experienced during the perinatal period. Further studies are needed to evaluate the treatment efficacy through larger controlled trials.

  7. The Efficacy of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Therapy Technique in the Treatment of Test Anxiety of College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enright, Matthew; Baldo, Tracy D.; Wykes, Scott D.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the efficacy of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) in the treatment of test anxiety. Thirty-five college students with test anxiety were assigned to either a treatment or delayed treatment control group. EMDR was shown to be effective in reducing overall test anxiety as well as "emotionality" and…

  8. The Efficacy of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Therapy Technique in the Treatment of Test Anxiety of College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enright, Matthew; Baldo, Tracy D.; Wykes, Scott D.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the efficacy of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) in the treatment of test anxiety. Thirty-five college students with test anxiety were assigned to either a treatment or delayed treatment control group. EMDR was shown to be effective in reducing overall test anxiety as well as "emotionality" and…

  9. The trajectories of adolescent anxiety and depressive symptoms over the course of a transdiagnostic treatment.

    PubMed

    Queen, Alexander H; Barlow, David H; Ehrenreich-May, Jill

    2014-08-01

    Anxiety and depressive disorders commonly co-occur during adolescence, share multiple vulnerability factors, and respond to similar psychosocial and pharmacological interventions. However, anxiety and depression may also be considered distinct constructs and differ on some underlying properties. Prior research efforts on evidence-based treatments for youth have been unable to examine the concurrent trajectories of primary anxiety and depressive concerns across the course of treatment. The advent of transdiagnostic approaches for these emotional disorders in youth allows for such examination. The present study examined the separate trajectories of adolescent anxiety and depressive symptoms over the course of a transdiagnostic intervention, the Unified Protocol for the Treatment of Emotional Disorders in Adolescence (UP-A; Ehrenreich et al., 2008), as well as up to six months following treatment. The sample included 59 adolescents ages 12-17 years old (M=15.42, SD=1.71) who completed at least eight sessions of the UP-A as part of an open trial or randomized, controlled trial across two treatment sites. Piecewise latent growth curve analyses found adolescent self-rated anxiety and depressive symptoms showed similar rates of improvement during treatment, but while anxiety symptoms continued to improve during follow-up, depressive symptoms showed non-significant improvement after treatment. Parent-rated symptoms also showed similar rates of improvement for anxiety and depression during the UP-A to those observed for adolescent self-report, but little improvement after treatment across either anxiety or depressive symptoms. To a certain degree, the results mirror those observed among other evidence-based treatments for youth with anxiety and depression, though results hold implications for future iterations of transdiagnostic treatments regarding optimization of outcomes for adolescents with depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Psychopharmacology of anxiety and depression: Historical aspects, current treatments and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Javelot, H

    2016-03-01

    Pharmacological treatment of acute anxiety still relies on benzodiazepines, while chronic anxiety disorders and depression are treated with different antidepressants, according to specific indications. The monoaminergic axis is represented by two families which are being developed: (i) serotonin-norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitors (SNDRI), also called triple reuptake inhibitors (TRI), for the treatment of depression (amitifadine), (ii) multimodal antidepressants for depression and anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder mainly) (tedatioxetine, vortioxetine and vilazodone). Third-generation antipsychotics (aripiprazole, lurasidone, brexpiprazole, cariprazine) appear relevant in the treatment of resistant depression and some anxiety disorders. Among the modulators of the glutamatergic axis, promising compounds include: (i) ionotropic regulators of NMDA receptors: esketamine, AVP-923 and AVP-786, CERC-301, rapastinel (Glyx-13), NRX-1074 developed for depression, rapastinel and bitopertine developed for obsessive compulsive disorder, (ii) metabotropic glutamate receptors modulators: decoglurant and basimglurant developed for depression and mavoglurant developed for obsessive compulsive disorder.

  11. The reappraisal of benzodiazepines in the treatment of anxiety and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Starcevic, Vladan

    2014-11-01

    Benzodiazepines (BDZs) continue to be shrouded in controversy, mainly because of dependence associated with their long-term use and some of their side effects. Despite treatment recommendations favoring newer antidepressants, BDZs are still commonly prescribed for anxiety and related disorders. Recent studies have demonstrated that long-term use of BDZs for these conditions can be effective and safe and that BDZs can be combined with psychological therapy and antidepressants to produce optimal outcomes. Such findings, along with a failure to convincingly demonstrate the overall superiority of alternative pharmacotherapy for anxiety and related disorders, have given an impetus to a reconsideration of the role of BDZs. This article reviews BDZs and other pharmacotherapy options for anxiety and related disorders and suggests that treatment guidelines should acknowledge that BDZs can be used as first-line, long-term pharmacological treatment for panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and social anxiety disorder.

  12. Anxiety, Gambling Activity, and Neurocognition: A Dimensional Approach to a Non-Treatment-Seeking Sample

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Gustavo C.; Sampaio, Daniela G.; Leppink, Eric W.; Chamberlain, Samuel R.; Grant, Jon E.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Previous analyses have highlighted significant associations between gambling disorder (GD)/subsyndromal GD and increased rates of anxiety symptoms and anxiety disorders relative to the general population. However, less is known about how anxiety symptoms influence the clinical presentation of gambling problems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between anxiety symptoms, gambling activity, and neurocognition across the spectrum of gambling behavior. Methods The sample consisted of 143 non-treatment-seeking young adults (aged 18–29 years), in which 63 individuals (44.1%) were classified as recreational gamblers, 47 (32.9%) as having subsyndromal GD, and 33 (23.1%) met criteria for GD. Results The main findings were: (a) there was a positive correlation between anxiety severity and gambling severity measured by the number of DSM-5 GD criteria met; (b) there was a positive correlation between anxiety severity and attentional impulsiveness; (c) subjects with suicidality presented higher levels of anxiety; and (d) the severity of anxiety symptoms was negatively correlated with the quality of life. Discussion and conclusions This study suggests that anxiety may be associated with relevant clinical variables in the broad spectrum of gambling activity. Therefore, proper management of anxiety symptoms might improve the clinical presentation of gamblers in different areas. PMID:27363461

  13. Anxiety, Gambling Activity, and Neurocognition: A Dimensional Approach to a Non-Treatment-Seeking Sample.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Gustavo C; Sampaio, Daniela G; Leppink, Eric W; Chamberlain, Samuel R; Grant, Jon E

    2016-06-01

    Background and aims Previous analyses have highlighted significant associations between gambling disorder (GD)/subsyndromal GD and increased rates of anxiety symptoms and anxiety disorders relative to the general population. However, less is known about how anxiety symptoms influence the clinical presentation of gambling problems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between anxiety symptoms, gambling activity, and neurocognition across the spectrum of gambling behavior. Methods The sample consisted of 143 non-treatment-seeking young adults (aged 18-29 years), in which 63 individuals (44.1%) were classified as recreational gamblers, 47 (32.9%) as having subsyndromal GD, and 33 (23.1%) met criteria for GD. Results The main findings were: (a) there was a positive correlation between anxiety severity and gambling severity measured by the number of DSM-5 GD criteria met; (b) there was a positive correlation between anxiety severity and attentional impulsiveness; (c) subjects with suicidality presented higher levels of anxiety; and (d) the severity of anxiety symptoms was negatively correlated with the quality of life. Discussion and conclusions This study suggests that anxiety may be associated with relevant clinical variables in the broad spectrum of gambling activity. Therefore, proper management of anxiety symptoms might improve the clinical presentation of gamblers in different areas.

  14. Complex Psychiatric Comorbidity of Treatment-Seeking Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Anxiety Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepburn, Susan L.; Stern, Jessica A.; Blakeley-Smith, Audrey; Kimel, Lila K.; Reaven, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive study examines the complexity of psychiatric comorbidity in treatment-seeking youth with ASD and anxiety symptoms. Forty-two parents of youth with ASD and anxiety (ages 8-14) completed a structured diagnostic interview (Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version). Youth…

  15. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments for Anxiety and Phobic Disorders in Children and Adolescents: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Neville J.; Heyne, David; Ollendick, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an overview of cognitive-behavioural strategies used in the treatment of child-anxiety problems, emphasizing the need for exposure and caregiver involvement. Most of the paper focuses on developments in empirically supported cognitive-behavioral intervention protocols for generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety…

  16. Do Anxiety-Disordered Children Need to Come into the Clinic for Efficacious Treatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobham, Vanessa E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study compared 3 experimental conditions: wait-list, therapist-supported bibliotherapy, and individual therapy, in the treatment of child anxiety. Method: Participants were 55 children (25 girls and 30 boys), aged 7 to 14 years diagnosed with an anxiety disorder, and their parents. Families were assigned using a modified random…

  17. Complex Psychiatric Comorbidity of Treatment-Seeking Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Anxiety Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepburn, Susan L.; Stern, Jessica A.; Blakeley-Smith, Audrey; Kimel, Lila K.; Reaven, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive study examines the complexity of psychiatric comorbidity in treatment-seeking youth with ASD and anxiety symptoms. Forty-two parents of youth with ASD and anxiety (ages 8-14) completed a structured diagnostic interview (Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version). Youth…

  18. Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study Using Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeney, Farah; Egan, Sarah; Gasson, Natalie

    2005-01-01

    Depression and anxiety affect up to 50% of people with Parkinson's Disease (PD) (Marsh, 2000; Murray, 1996), however, few studies have examined the effectiveness of psychological treatment. This study examined the effectiveness of group cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in treating depression and anxiety in PD. Four participants, aged between 56…

  19. The Role of Self-Statements as a Mediator in Treatment for Youth with Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Philip C.; Treadwell, Kimberli R. H.

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated features of self-statements as predictors of anxiety in children with and without anxiety disorder (AD) and as a mediator of treatment of ADs in children. Children (N = 145) between the ages of 9 and 13 years participated (71 AD youth, 84 controls). Self-statements were classified by valence and content. Results indicated…

  20. Use of Electromyographic Biofeedback and Cue-Controlled Relaxation in the Treatment of Test Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Counts, D. Kenneth; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Studied use of electromyographic (CMG) biofeedback to increase efficacy of cue-controlled relaxation training in treatment of test anxiety. Results indicated cue-controlled relaxation was effective in increasing test performance for test-anxious subjects. EMG biofeedback did not contribute to effectiveness. Self-report measures of anxiety are…

  1. Remission after Acute Treatment in Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorders: Findings from the CAMS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsburg, Golda S.; Kendall, Philip C.; Sakolsky, Dara; Compton, Scott N.; Piacentini, John; Albano, Anne Marie; Walkup, John T.; Sherrill, Joel; Coffey, Kimberly A.; Rynn, Moira A.; Keeton, Courtney P.; McCracken, James T.; Bergman, Lindsey; Iyengar, Satish; Birmaher, Boris; March, John

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To report on remission rates in anxious youth who participated in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS). The CAMS, a multisite clinical trial, randomized 488 children and adolescents (ages 7-17 years; 79% Caucasian; 50% female) with separation, social, and/or generalized anxiety disorder to a 12-week treatment of…

  2. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments for Anxiety and Phobic Disorders in Children and Adolescents: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Neville J.; Heyne, David; Ollendick, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an overview of cognitive-behavioural strategies used in the treatment of child-anxiety problems, emphasizing the need for exposure and caregiver involvement. Most of the paper focuses on developments in empirically supported cognitive-behavioral intervention protocols for generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety…

  3. Do Anxiety-Disordered Children Need to Come into the Clinic for Efficacious Treatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobham, Vanessa E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study compared 3 experimental conditions: wait-list, therapist-supported bibliotherapy, and individual therapy, in the treatment of child anxiety. Method: Participants were 55 children (25 girls and 30 boys), aged 7 to 14 years diagnosed with an anxiety disorder, and their parents. Families were assigned using a modified random…

  4. Use of Electromyographic Biofeedback and Cue-Controlled Relaxation in the Treatment of Test Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Counts, D. Kenneth; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Studied use of electromyographic (CMG) biofeedback to increase efficacy of cue-controlled relaxation training in treatment of test anxiety. Results indicated cue-controlled relaxation was effective in increasing test performance for test-anxious subjects. EMG biofeedback did not contribute to effectiveness. Self-report measures of anxiety are…

  5. An Innovative Treatment Approach for Children with Anxiety Disorders and Medically Unexplained Somatic Complaints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reigada, Laura C.; Fisher, Paige H.; Cutler, Cynthia; Warner, Carrie Masia

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety disorders in children and adolescents are largely undetected and the majority of youth do not receive services. Given the deleterious consequences of anxiety disorders, early identification and intervention have public health implications. In order to increase identification and treatment of anxious youth, expansion to nonpsychiatric…

  6. Threat Related Selective Attention Predicts Treatment Success in Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legerstee, Jeroen S.; Tulen, Joke H. M.; Kallen, Victor L.; Dieleman, Gwen C.; Treffers, Philip D. A.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.

    2009-01-01

    Threat-related selective attention was found to predict the success of the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders through administering a pictorial dot-probe task to 131 children with anxiety disorders prior to cognitive behavioral therapy. The diagnostic status of the subjects was evaluated with a semistructured clinical interview at both pre-…

  7. Brief Measures of Anxiety in Non-Treatment-Seeking Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Maddox, Brenna B.; Kendall, Philip C.; Rump, Keiran; Berry, Leandra; Schultz, Robert T.; Souders, Margaret C.; Bennett, Amanda; Herrington, John; Miller, Judith

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the accuracy of brief anxiety scales for non-treatment-seeking youth with autism spectrum disorder. In all, 54 youth (7-17?years; IQ: 67-158) with autism spectrum disorder and their parents completed (a) an expanded version of the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule--Child/Parent designed to capture typical and atypical…

  8. Threat Related Selective Attention Predicts Treatment Success in Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legerstee, Jeroen S.; Tulen, Joke H. M.; Kallen, Victor L.; Dieleman, Gwen C.; Treffers, Philip D. A.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.

    2009-01-01

    Threat-related selective attention was found to predict the success of the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders through administering a pictorial dot-probe task to 131 children with anxiety disorders prior to cognitive behavioral therapy. The diagnostic status of the subjects was evaluated with a semistructured clinical interview at both pre-…

  9. Remission after Acute Treatment in Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorders: Findings from the CAMS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsburg, Golda S.; Kendall, Philip C.; Sakolsky, Dara; Compton, Scott N.; Piacentini, John; Albano, Anne Marie; Walkup, John T.; Sherrill, Joel; Coffey, Kimberly A.; Rynn, Moira A.; Keeton, Courtney P.; McCracken, James T.; Bergman, Lindsey; Iyengar, Satish; Birmaher, Boris; March, John

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To report on remission rates in anxious youth who participated in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS). The CAMS, a multisite clinical trial, randomized 488 children and adolescents (ages 7-17 years; 79% Caucasian; 50% female) with separation, social, and/or generalized anxiety disorder to a 12-week treatment of…

  10. Brief Measures of Anxiety in Non-Treatment-Seeking Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Maddox, Brenna B.; Kendall, Philip C.; Rump, Keiran; Berry, Leandra; Schultz, Robert T.; Souders, Margaret C.; Bennett, Amanda; Herrington, John; Miller, Judith

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the accuracy of brief anxiety scales for non-treatment-seeking youth with autism spectrum disorder. In all, 54 youth (7-17?years; IQ: 67-158) with autism spectrum disorder and their parents completed (a) an expanded version of the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule--Child/Parent designed to capture typical and atypical…

  11. A review of the epidemiology and approaches to the treatment of social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Sareen, L; Stein, M

    2000-03-01

    This review presents current literature on the epidemiology and treatment of social anxiety disorder (social phobia). This illness has been demonstrated to be the most common anxiety disorder with a 1-year prevalence of 7 to 8% and a lifetime prevalence of 13 to 14% in patients aged between 15 and 54 years. Social anxiety disorder can be classified into 2 subtypes, discrete and generalised. Morbidity is high with this disorder, and 70 to 80% of patients have co-morbid mental disorders. Although effective treatments are available, social anxiety disorder is under-recognised and under-treated. Treatments that have been systemically studied and have shown efficacy in patients with social anxiety disorder include pharmacotherapy (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, reversible inhibitors of monoamine-A and benzodiazepines) and short term psychotherapies (cognitive behaviour therapy, social skills training and exposure in vivo therapy). Beta-blockers are useful in treating performance-related anxiety. Few published data are available on the treatment of social anxiety disorder with a combination of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. We conclude this review by discussing proposed algorithms for treating both subtypes of social anxiety disorder.

  12. Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study Using Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeney, Farah; Egan, Sarah; Gasson, Natalie

    2005-01-01

    Depression and anxiety affect up to 50% of people with Parkinson's Disease (PD) (Marsh, 2000; Murray, 1996), however, few studies have examined the effectiveness of psychological treatment. This study examined the effectiveness of group cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in treating depression and anxiety in PD. Four participants, aged between 56…

  13. An Innovative Treatment Approach for Children with Anxiety Disorders and Medically Unexplained Somatic Complaints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reigada, Laura C.; Fisher, Paige H.; Cutler, Cynthia; Warner, Carrie Masia

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety disorders in children and adolescents are largely undetected and the majority of youth do not receive services. Given the deleterious consequences of anxiety disorders, early identification and intervention have public health implications. In order to increase identification and treatment of anxious youth, expansion to nonpsychiatric…

  14. Brief Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Anxiety and Depression: Piloting an Integrated Treatment Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weersing, V. Robin; Gonzalez, Araceli; Campo, John V.; Lucas, Amanda N.

    2008-01-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders in youth are disabling, distressing, and prevalent. Furthermore, depression and anxiety frequently co-exist, may share several etiological factors, and respond to similar interventions. In this paper, we report preliminary results from a treatment adaptation project designed to condense existing cognitive behavioral…

  15. An Open Trial Investigation of a Transdiagnostic Group Treatment for Children with Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilek, Emily L.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The current study investigates the feasibility and preliminary outcomes associated with a transdiagnostic emotion-focused group protocol for the treatment of anxiety disorders and depressive symptoms in youth. Twenty-two children (ages 7 to 12; M = 9.79) with a principal anxiety disorder and varying levels of comorbid depressive symptoms were…

  16. An Open Trial Investigation of a Transdiagnostic Group Treatment for Children with Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilek, Emily L.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The current study investigates the feasibility and preliminary outcomes associated with a transdiagnostic emotion-focused group protocol for the treatment of anxiety disorders and depressive symptoms in youth. Twenty-two children (ages 7 to 12; M = 9.79) with a principal anxiety disorder and varying levels of comorbid depressive symptoms were…

  17. Measuring Anxiety as a Treatment Endpoint in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lecavalier, Luc; Wood, Jeffrey J.; Halladay, Alycia K.; Jones, Nancy E.; Aman, Michael G.; Cook, Edwin H.; Handen, Benjamin L.; King, Bryan H.; Pearson, Deborah A.; Hallett, Victoria; Sullivan, Katherine Anne; Grondhuis, Sabrina; Bishop, Somer L.; Horrigan, Joseph P.; Dawson, Geraldine; Scahill, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high rate of anxiety in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), measuring anxiety in ASD is fraught with uncertainty. This is due, in part, to incomplete consensus on the manifestations of anxiety in this population. Autism Speaks assembled a panel of experts to conduct a systematic review of available measures for anxiety in youth with ASD. To complete the review, the panel held monthly conference calls and two face-to-face meetings over a fourteen-month period. Thirty eight published studies were reviewed and ten assessment measures were examined: four were deemed appropriate for use in clinical trials, although with conditions; three were judged to be potentially appropriate, while three were considered not useful for clinical trials assessing anxiety. Despite recent advances, additional relevant, reliable and valid outcome measures are needed to evaluate treatments for anxiety in ASD. PMID:24158679

  18. Relaxation-induced anxiety: Effects of peak and trajectories of change on treatment outcome for generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Newman, Michelle G; Lafreniere, Lucas S; Jacobson, Nicholas C

    2016-11-18

    Evidence is mixed regarding whether relaxation-induced anxiety (RIA) impedes relaxation training (RT) efficacy. Unlike past studies that averaged RIA across sessions, we examined peak RIA, change in RIA level across sessions, and timing of peak RIA with outcome. This was a secondary analysis of Borkovec, Newman, Pincus, and Lytle [2002. A component analysis of cognitive-behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety disorder and the role of interpersonal problems. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 70, 288-298. doi: 10.1037/0022-006X.70.2.288 ]. Forty-one GAD participants were assigned randomly to CBT (n = 22) or BT (n = 19). Both treatments contained RT and RIA ratings within 13/14 sessions. Analyses used generalized additive mixed models (GAMMs), which accounted for longitudinal nonindependence and examined nonlinear trajectories of change. All participants improved significantly regardless of RIA. "Change trajectory of RIA level did not predict outcome". Instead, lower peak RIA predicted fewer GAD symptoms at post-treatment and greater likelihood to continue to improve during follow-up. Also, timing of peak was important. Whereas lower peak early in therapy did not predict outcome, lower peak during the last third of treatment did. Peak RIA's effect was neither accounted for by baseline symptom severity, treatment condition, comorbidity, nor by preceding or concurrent anxiety symptom change. People with consistently low peak RIA and/or who fully habituate to RIA by the end of therapy respond optimally to relaxation-based treatments.

  19. Pilot study of psilocybin treatment for anxiety in patients with advanced-stage cancer.

    PubMed

    Grob, Charles S; Danforth, Alicia L; Chopra, Gurpreet S; Hagerty, Marycie; McKay, Charles R; Halberstadt, Adam L; Greer, George R

    2011-01-01

    Researchers conducted extensive investigations of hallucinogens in the 1950s and 1960s. By the early 1970s, however, political and cultural pressures forced the cessation of all projects. This investigation reexamines a potentially promising clinical application of hallucinogens in the treatment of anxiety reactive to advanced-stage cancer. To explore the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in patients with advanced-stage cancer and reactive anxiety. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of patients with advanced-stage cancer and anxiety, with subjects acting as their own control, using a moderate dose (0.2 mg/kg) of psilocybin. A clinical research unit within a large public sector academic medical center. Twelve adults with advanced-stage cancer and anxiety. In addition to monitoring safety and subjective experience before and during experimental treatment sessions, follow-up data including results from the Beck Depression Inventory, Profile of Mood States, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory were collected unblinded for 6 months after treatment. Safe physiological and psychological responses were documented during treatment sessions. There were no clinically significant adverse events with psilocybin. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory trait anxiety subscale demonstrated a significant reduction in anxiety at 1 and 3 months after treatment. The Beck Depression Inventory revealed an improvement of mood that reached significance at 6 months; the Profile of Mood States identified mood improvement after treatment with psilocybin that approached but did not reach significance. This study established the feasibility and safety of administering moderate doses of psilocybin to patients with advanced-stage cancer and anxiety. Some of the data revealed a positive trend toward improved mood and anxiety. These results support the need for more research in this long-neglected field. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00302744.

  20. Polysubstance use, social anxiety, and length of treatment for alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Oakland, Andrew; McChargue, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the interactive effects of social anxiety and psychosocial factors (i.e., group attendance, polysubstance use) on substance use treatment for men with a primary diagnosis of alcohol use disorder. Social anxiety and alcohol use disorders often co-occur, but it is currently unclear how having high social anxiety might affect aspects of substance use treatment, such as group participation and length of stay. This study compared men with alcohol use disorder only versus those with alcohol plus other drug disorders in a residential treatment facility. Measures included demographics, self-reported social anxiety, self-reported drug history, attendance at treatment groups, and total number of days in treatment. Of 128 participants, 39 (30.5%) used only alcohol, while 89 (69.5%) used alcohol and other substances. Hierarchical linear regression showed only one significant interaction with social anxiety and length of treatment: people who used alcohol only or alcohol in addition to other substances (p < .05). Simple effects analyses revealed a positive relationship between social anxiety and length of stay among men who used only alcohol, but not among men who used more than one substance. Currently, the distinction between those who use only alcohol and those who use other substances as well is not often examined in the literature. However, the present study shows that this assumption of homogeneity may be inaccurate, given the differential relationships that these groups may have with factors such as social anxiety.

  1. Assessment and Treatment of Anxiety in Youth With Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Vasa, Roma A; Mazurek, Micah O; Mahajan, Rajneesh; Bennett, Amanda E; Bernal, Maria Pilar; Nozzolillo, Alixandra A; Arnold, L Eugene; Coury, Daniel L

    2016-02-01

    Anxiety is one of the most prevalent co-occurring symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The assessment and treatment recommendations proposed here are intended to help primary care providers with the assessment and treatment of anxiety in ASD. The Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network/Autism Intervention Research on Physical Health Anxiety Workgroup, a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and researchers with expertise in ASD, developed the clinical recommendations. The recommendations were based on available scientific evidence regarding anxiety treatments, both in youth with ASD and typically developing youth, and clinical consensus of the workgroup where data were lacking. Assessment of anxiety requires a systematic approach to evaluating symptoms and potential contributing factors across various developmental levels. Treatment recommendations include psychoeducation, coordination of care, and modified cognitive-behavioral therapy, particularly for children and adolescents with high-functioning ASD. Due to the limited evidence base in ASD, medications for anxiety should be prescribed cautiously with close monitoring of potential benefits and side effects. Assessment and treatment of clinical anxiety in youth with ASD require a standardized approach to improve outcomes for youth with ASD. Although this approach provides a framework for clinicians, clinical judgment is recommended when making decisions about individual patients. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. [Treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in terms of cognitive behavioral].

    PubMed

    Kamrowska, Anna; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    Risk of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) within life is estimated at 2.6-5.1%. Amongst etiological factors that affect the development of the disorder are: biological and psychological problems, including cognitive models. There are known several cognitive models: metacognitive, Borkovec'c model and the model developed in Quebec. Key cognitive contents that occur with generalized anxiety disorder are focused on two aspects: metacognitive beliefs and intolerance of uncertainty. A primary purpose of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is the modification of dysfunctional beliefs about worry. Cognitive behavioural therapy is effective in reducing anxiety, makes it easier to operate in the professional sphere and improves the quality of life.

  3. Efficacy of treatments for anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bandelow, Borwin; Reitt, Markus; Röver, Christian; Michaelis, Sophie; Görlich, Yvonne; Wedekind, Dirk

    2015-07-01

    To our knowledge, no previous meta-analysis has attempted to compare the efficacy of pharmacological, psychological and combined treatments for the three main anxiety disorders (panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and social phobia). Pre-post and treated versus control effect sizes (ES) were calculated for all evaluable randomized-controlled studies (n = 234), involving 37,333 patients. Medications were associated with a significantly higher average pre-post ES [Cohen's d = 2.02 (1.90-2.15); 28,051 patients] than psychotherapies [1.22 (1.14-1.30); 6992 patients; P < 0.0001]. ES were 2.25 for serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (n = 23 study arms), 2.15 for benzodiazepines (n = 42), 2.09 for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (n = 62) and 1.83 for tricyclic antidepressants (n = 15). ES for psychotherapies were mindfulness therapies, 1.56 (n = 4); relaxation, 1.36 (n = 17); individual cognitive behavioural/exposure therapy (CBT), 1.30 (n = 93); group CBT, 1.22 (n = 18); psychodynamic therapy 1.17 (n = 5); therapies without face-to-face contact (e.g. Internet therapies), 1.11 (n = 34); eye movement desensitization reprocessing, 1.03 (n = 3); and interpersonal therapy 0.78 (n = 4). The ES was 2.12 (n = 16) for CBT/drug combinations. Exercise had an ES of 1.23 (n = 3). For control groups, ES were 1.29 for placebo pills (n = 111), 0.83 for psychological placebos (n = 16) and 0.20 for waitlists (n = 50). In direct comparisons with control groups, all investigated drugs, except for citalopram, opipramol and moclobemide, were significantly more effective than placebo. Individual CBT was more effective than waiting list, psychological placebo and pill placebo. When looking at the average pre-post ES, medications were more effective than psychotherapies. Pre-post ES for psychotherapies did not differ from pill placebos; this finding cannot be explained by heterogeneity, publication bias or allegiance effects. However, the decision on whether to choose

  4. Clinical issues in the treatment of anxiety and depression in older adults with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pachana, Nancy A; Egan, Sarah J; Laidlaw, Ken; Dissanayaka, Nadeeka; Byrne, Gerard J; Brockman, Simone; Marsh, Rodney; Starkstein, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    A significant proportion of persons affected by Parkinson's disease (PD) are over age 65 years. Mental health issues are often less a focus of treatment in this population than physical manifestations of the illness. Anxiety or depression alone, as well as comorbid depression and anxiety, are underrecognized in patients with PD and are associated with deleterious effects on physical and interpersonal functioning, negatively impacting quality of life and well-being. We offer a brief overview of salient clinical points with respect to assessment and treatment approaches to enhance efficacy of the treatment of mental health symptoms in older adults with PD. Cognitive behavior therapy involves the patient learning to overcome behavioral avoidance associated with anxiety and challenge unhelpful negative cognitions. It is suggested that cognitive behavior therapy is an effective approach to treatment of anxiety and depression in PD and should be offered as a treatment to patients.

  5. Effects of a transdiagnostic group treatment for anxiety on secondary depression.

    PubMed

    Norton, Peter J; Hayes, Sarah A; Hope, Debra A

    2004-01-01

    Researchers have recently explored transdiagnostic anxiety treatments based on models of anxiety emphasizing a single common pathway across diagnostic categories. Results from a previous study [Norton and Hope, in press] indicated that a transdiagnostic approach was effective for both targeted and untargeted anxiety disorders. Consistent with the tripartite model, the transdiagnostic treatment should also influence symptoms of a broader pathology such as negative affectivity. This follow-up to Norton and Hope found significant decreases in depressed mood for clients undergoing transdiagnostic treatment for anxiety when compared to wait-list control participants. Although not statistically established, severity of depressive diagnoses seemed to generally decrease across treatment, whereas no change in severity occurred for those not receiving treatment.

  6. Evidence Base Update: 50 Years of Research on Treatment for Child and Adolescent Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Higa-McMillan, Charmaine K; Francis, Sarah E; Rith-Najarian, Leslie; Chorpita, Bruce F

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health disorder among children and adolescents. We examined 111 treatment outcome studies testing 204 treatment conditions for child and adolescent anxiety published between 1967 and mid-2013. Studies were selected for inclusion in this review using the PracticeWise Evidence-Based Services database. Using guidelines identified by this journal (Southam-Gerow & Prinstein, 2014), studies were included if they were conducted with children and/or adolescents (ages 1-19) with anxiety and/or avoidance problems. In addition to reviewing the strength of the evidence, the review also examined indicators of effectiveness, common practices across treatment families, and mediators and moderators of treatment outcome. Six treatments reached well-established status for child and adolescent anxiety, 8 were identified as probably efficacious, 2 were identified as possibly efficacious, 6 treatments were deemed experimental, and 8 treatments of questionable efficacy emerged. Findings from this review suggest substantial support for cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) as an effective and appropriate first-line treatment for youth with anxiety disorders. Several other treatment approaches emerged as probably efficacious that are not primarily CBT based, suggesting that there are alternative evidence-based treatments that practitioners can turn to for children and adolescents who do not respond well to CBT. The review concludes with a discussion of treatments that improve functioning in addition to reducing symptoms, common practices derived from evidence-based treatments, mediators and moderators of treatment outcomes, recommendations for best practice, and suggestions for future research.

  7. Exploring exercise as an avenue for the treatment of anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    DeBoer, Lindsey B; Powers, Mark B; Utschig, Angela C; Otto, Michael W; Smits, Jasper AJ

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety disorders constitute a significant public health problem. Current gold standard treatments are limited in their effectiveness, prompting the consideration of alternative approaches. In this review, we examine the evidence for exercise as an intervention for anxiety disorders. This evidence comes from population studies, studies of nonclinical anxiety reduction, as well as a limited number of studies of clinically anxious individuals. All of these studies provide converging evidence for consistent beneficial effects of exercise on anxiety, and are consistent with a variety of accounts of the mechanism of anxiety reduction with exercise. Further study of clinical populations is encouraged, as are studies of the mechanism of change of exercise interventions, which have the potential to help refine exercise intervention strategies. Likewise, studies that identify moderators of treatment efficacy will assist clinicians in deciding how and for whom to prescribe exercise. PMID:23002943

  8. Transdiagnostic Treatment of Bipolar Disorder and Comorbid Anxiety with the Unified Protocol: A Clinical Replication Series

    PubMed Central

    Ellard, Kristen K.; Deckersbach, Thilo; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Barlow, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic, debilitating disorder with recurrent manic and depressive episodes. Over 75% of bipolar patients have a current or lifetime diagnosis of a comorbid anxiety disorder. Comorbid anxiety in BD is associated with greater illness severity, greater functional impairment, and poorer illness-related outcomes. Effectively treating comorbid anxiety in individuals with BD has been recognized as one of the biggest unmet needs in the field of bipolar disorder. Recently, the Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders (UP) was developed to be applicable to the full range of anxiety and mood disorders, based upon converging evidence from genetics, cognitive and affective neuroscience, and behavioral research suggesting common, core emotion-related pathology. Here, we present a preliminary evaluation of the efficacy of the UP for the treatment of BD with comorbid anxiety, in a clinical replication series consisting of three cases. PMID:22822175

  9. Feasibility of Two Modes of Treatment Delivery for Child Anxiety in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Chavira, Denise A.; Drahota, Amy; Garland, Ann; Roesch, Scott; Garcia, Maritza; Stein, Murray B.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examine the feasibility of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for children with anxiety in primary care, using two modes of treatment delivery. A total of 48 parents and youth (8–13) with anxiety disorders were randomly assigned to receive 10-sessions of CBT either delivered by a child anxiety specialist in the primary care clinic or implemented by the parent with therapist support by telephone (i.e., face-to-face or therapist-supported bibliotherapy). Feasibility outcomes including satisfaction, barriers to treatment participation, safety, and dropout were assessed. Independent evaluators, blind to treatment condition, administered the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children (ADIS) and the Clinical Global Impression of Improvement (CGI-I) at baseline, post-treatment and 3-month follow-up; clinical self-report questionnaires were also administered. Findings revealed high satisfaction, low endorsement of barriers, low drop out rates, and no adverse events across the two modalities. According to the CGI-I, 58.3%–75% of participants were considered responders (i.e., much or very much improved) at the various time points. Similar patterns were found for remission from “primary anxiety disorder” and “all anxiety disorders” as defined by the ADIS. Clinically significant improvement was seen on the various parent and child self-report measures of anxiety. Findings suggest that both therapy modalities are feasible and associated with significant treatment gains in the primary care setting. PMID:25075802

  10. Feasibility of two modes of treatment delivery for child anxiety in primary care.

    PubMed

    Chavira, Denise A; Drahota, Amy; Garland, Ann F; Roesch, Scott; Garcia, Maritza; Stein, Murray B

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we examine the feasibility of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for children with anxiety in primary care, using two modes of treatment delivery. A total of 48 parents and youth (8-13) with anxiety disorders were randomly assigned to receive 10-sessions of CBT either delivered by a child anxiety specialist in the primary care clinic or implemented by the parent with therapist support by telephone (i.e., face-to-face or therapist-supported bibliotherapy). Feasibility outcomes including satisfaction, barriers to treatment participation, safety, and dropout were assessed. Independent evaluators, blind to treatment condition, administered the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children (ADIS) and the Clinical Global Impression of Improvement (CGI-I) at baseline, post-treatment and 3-month follow-up; clinical self-report questionnaires were also administered. Findings revealed high satisfaction, low endorsement of barriers, low drop out rates, and no adverse events across the two modalities. According to the CGI-I, 58.3%-75% of participants were considered responders (i.e., much or very much improved) at the various time points. Similar patterns were found for remission from "primary anxiety disorder" and "all anxiety disorders" as defined by the ADIS. Clinically significant improvement was seen on the various parent and child self-report measures of anxiety. Findings suggest that both therapy modalities are feasible and associated with significant treatment gains in the primary care setting. (clinicaltrials.gov unique identifier: NCT00769925). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Adult separation anxiety in treatment nonresponders with anxiety disorders: delineation of the syndrome and exploration of attachment-based psychotherapy and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Milrod, Barbara; Altemus, Margaret; Gross, Charles; Busch, Fredric; Silver, Gabrielle; Christos, Paul; Stieber, Joshua; Schneier, Franklin

    2016-04-01

    Clinically significant separation anxiety [SA] has been identified as being common among patients who do not respond to psychiatric interventions, regardless of intervention type (pharmacological or psychotherapeutic), across anxiety and mood disorders. An attachment formation and maintenance domain has been proposed as contributing to anxiety disorders. We therefore directly determined prevalence of SA in a population of adult treatment non-responders suffering from primary anxiety. In these separation anxious nonresponders, we pilot-tested an SA-focused, attachment-based psychotherapy for anxiety, Panic-Focused Psychodynamic Psychotherapy-eXtended Range [PFPP-XR], and assessed whether hypothesized biomarkers of attachment were engaged. We studied separation anxiety [SA] in 46 adults (ages 23-70 [mean 43.9 (14.9)]) with clinically significant anxiety symptoms (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale [HARS]≥15), and reporting a history of past non-response to psychotherapy and/or medication treatments. Thirty-seven (80%) had clinically significant symptoms of separation anxiety (Structured Clinical Interview for Separation Anxiety Symptoms [SCI-SAS] score≥8). Five of these subjects completed an open clinical trial of Panic Focused Psychodynamic Psychotherapy eXtended Range [PFPP-XR], a 21-24 session, 12-week manualized attachment-focused anxiolytic psychodynamic psychotherapy for anxiety. Patients improved on "adult threshold" SCI-SAS (current separation anxiety) (p=.016), HARS (p=0.002), and global severity, assessed by the Clinical Global Impression Scale (p=.0006), at treatment termination. Salivary oxytocin levels decreased 67% after treatment (p=.12). There was no significant change in high or low frequency HRV after treatment, but change in high frequency HRV inversely correlated with treatment change in oxytocin (p<.02), and change in low frequency HRV was positively associated with change in oxytocin (p<.02). SA is surprisingly prevalent among non-responders to

  12. Exercise heart rate monitors for anxiety treatment in a rural primary care setting: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Houser, Melissa Marotta; Rosen, Lee; Seagrave, Martha P; Grabowski, Don; Matthew, John D; Craig, William A P

    2013-10-01

    Rural patients with anxiety often lack access to traditional biofeedback modalities. Exercise heart rate monitors (HRMs) are tools used in the fitness industry to provide athletes with feedback on heart rate and regulatory breathing strategies. HRMs are inexpensive, discrete, and publicly accessible. This randomized controlled pilot study explored whether use of HRMs for biofeedback during guided mindfulness, diaphragmatic breathing, and progressive muscle relaxation techniques could facilitate anxiety reduction as compared to these techniques alone. Fifty-three rural anxiety patients were randomized to HRM or control groups for four weekly 20-minute, scripted sessions with a non-behaviorist wherein they practiced these techniques; the HRM group received feedback on their heart rate response. The HRM group had significantly greater improvement in state anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) and self-efficacy (General Self Efficacy Scale), and a greater percentage of the group indicated that they "felt in control of their anxiety." This pilot study demonstrates that this novel, inexpensive, and accessible tool may be a useful clinical intervention for anxiety and can be easily incorporated by both behaviorists and non-behaviorist primary care clinicians into individual or group biofeedback treatment for patients with anxiety. This tool has additional potential for patients to use for anxiety self-management. Further study with a larger sample and blinded design is warranted.

  13. Cognitive-behavioral Treatment of Persistent Functional Somatic Complaints and Pediatric Anxiety: An Initial Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Masia Warner, Carrie; Colognori, Daniela; Kim, Rachel E.; Reigada, Laura C.; Klein, Rachel G.; Browner-Elhanan, Karen J.; Saborsky, Amy; Petkova, Eva; Reiss, Philip; Chhabra, Manoj; McFarlane-Ferreira, Yvonne B.; Phoon, Colin K.; Pittman, Nanci; Benkov, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Background Children and adolescents who seek medical treatment for persistent physical distress often suffer from co-occurring anxiety disorders. Treatment options for this impaired population are limited. This study tests the feasibility and potential efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention targeting pain and anxiety for youth with impairing functional physical symptoms and anxiety disorders presenting to pediatricians for medical care. Methods Children and adolescents (aged 8–16) experiencing somatic complaints, without an explanatory medical disorder (i.e., functional), were recruited from primary care and specialty (gastroenterologists and cardiologists) pediatricians. Forty children, primarily with gastrointestinal symptoms, who met criteria for a co-occurring anxiety disorder, were randomly assigned to a cognitive-behavioral treatment addressing pain and anxiety, Treatment of Anxiety and Physical Symptoms (TAPS), or to a waiting-list control. Results TAPS was found to be an acceptable treatment for this population and was superior to the waiting-list condition. Eighty percent of children in TAPS were rated as treatment responders by independent evaluators compared with none of the controls. Overall, self- and parent ratings indicated reductions in children’s somatic discomfort and anxiety following intervention. TAPS participants maintained clinical gains three months following treatment. Conclusions The study supports the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention targeting co-occurring physical distress and anxiety in youth presenting for medical treatment. Such an approach has the potential to exert broad impact on children’s dysfunction and to minimize exposure to invasive, ineffective, and costly medical procedures and treatments. PMID:21681863

  14. A review on predictors of treatment outcome in social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Mululo, Sara Costa Cabral; Menezes, Gabriela Bezerra de; Vigne, Paula; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

    2012-03-01

    This article aims to review the clinical features and therapeutic characteristics that may predict treatment response in patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD). A systematic review of trials identified through databases of ISI, Medline, PsycInfo, Cochrane, LILACS, Current Controlled Trials, and in references of previously selected articles published in English up to December 2010. In our literature search, we used the words prediction/predictors and social anxiety disorder or social phobia. Early onset, greater disease severity, comorbidity with other anxiety disorders (including generalized anxiety disorder and simple phobia), and high expectations about the role of the therapist emerged as potential predictors of less effective treatment in SAD. Knowledge of various clinical and treatment features may help professionals to predict possible responses to therapeutic interventions in patients with SAD. However, given the diversity of measures used to assess response, further studies should be performed with standardized methods to investigate the aspects related to treatment resistance in SAD.

  15. Directionality of change in youth anxiety treatment involving parents: an initial examination.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Wendy K; Kurtines, William M; Jaccard, James; Pina, Armando A

    2009-06-01

    This randomized clinical trial compared cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with minimal parent involvement to CBT with active parent involvement in a sample of 119 youths (7-16 years old; 33.6% Caucasian, 61.3% Latino) with anxiety disorders. The dynamics of change between youth anxiety and parent variables (positive-negative behaviors toward the child, conflict in the parent-youth relationship, and parental anxiety) in both treatment conditions over pretreatment, posttreatment, and 12-month follow-up were also examined. Results indicated that youth anxiety was significantly reduced with both treatments and that the dynamics of change may not solely flow from parent to youth but also from youth to parent. Findings highlight the need for research on directionality and mechanisms of change to move from evidence-based treatments toward evidence-based explanations of treatment outcome. Copyright 2009 APA

  16. Interpersonal Subtypes of Anxiety Disorder Patients: Relationship to Assessment and Treatment Variables.

    PubMed

    Pitman, Seth R; Hilsenroth, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    We attempted to replicate earlier findings of interpersonal subtypes in patients with anxiety disorder (Psychotherapy. 2011;48:304-310) and examine whether these subtypes are characterized by different types of pathology and respond differently to treatment. Interpersonal problems were measured by the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (Inventory of Interpersonal Problems Manual. San Antonio, TX: Psychological Cooperation; 2000) in a sample of 31 patients with anxiety disorder. Results demonstrated the existence of 4 interpersonal subtypes. The subtypes did not differ in severity of anxiety and global levels of symptoms at pretreatment or in Reliable Change Index of anxiety symptoms over the course of treatment. However, they were significantly different in terms of overall interpersonal problems (p = 0.004). Regarding treatment variables, half of the patients in the nonassertive cluster discontinued treatment prematurely. The number of psychotherapy sessions attended was significantly different across the 4 clusters (p = 0.04), with socially avoidant patients attending significantly greater number of sessions.

  17. Systematic Desensitization Of Test Anxiety: A Comparison Of Group And Individual Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scissons, Edward H.; Njaa, Lloyd J.

    1973-01-01

    The results indicate the effectiveness of both individual desensitization and group desensitization in the treatment of high test anxiety. More research is needed in comparing the effectiveness of group desensitization and individual desensitization with intratreatment variables. (Author)

  18. Internet treatment for social anxiety disorder in Romania: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tulbure, Bogdan Tudor; Månsson, Kristoffer N T; Andersson, Gerhard

    2012-10-30

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most common anxiety disorders and is associated with marked impairments. However, a small proportion of individuals with SAD seek and receive treatment. Internet-administrated cognitive behavior therapy (iCBT) has been found to be an effective treatment for SAD. This trial will be the first Internet-delivered guided self-help intervention for SAD in Romania. Participants with social anxiety disorder (N = 96) will be recruited via newspapers, online banners and Facebook. Participants will be randomized to either: a) an active treatment, or b) a waiting list control group.The treatment will have a guided iCBT format and will last for nine weeks. Self-report questionnaires on social phobia, anxiety, depression, treatment credibility and irrational thinking will be used. All assessments will be collected pre, post and at follow-up (six months after intervention). Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale - Self-Report version (LSAS-SR) will be the primary outcome measure and will be administrated on a weekly basis in both conditions. The present randomized controlled trial investigates the efficacy of an Internet-administered intervention in reducing social anxiety symptoms in a culture where this form of treatment has not been tested. This trial will add to the body of knowledge on the efficacy of iCBT, and the results might lead to an increase of the accessibility of evidence-based psychological treatment in Romania. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01557894.

  19. Social anxiety disorder in the Chinese military: prevalence, comorbidities, impairment, and treatment-seeking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaning; Zhang, Ruiguo; Chen, Yunchun; Wang, Huaihai; Zhang, Yahong; Gan, Jingli; Zhang, Liyi; Tan, Qingrong

    2014-12-30

    The objective of this work is To investigate the prevalence, comorbidities, impairment, and treatment-seeking of social anxiety disorder in the Chinese military personnel. Military personnel (n=11,527) were surveyed from May to August 2007 using a multistage whole cohort probability sampling method. A Chinese version of the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was used for assessment, and a military-related socio-demographic questionnaire was used to describe the prevalence distribution. A unified survey was performed to investigate 11 different social situations. The short-form health survey was used to assess role impairment. The 12-month and lifetime prevalence rates of social anxiety disorder were 3.34% (95% CI: 3.25-3.42%) and 6.22% (95% CI: 6.11-6.32%), respectively. Social anxiety disorder was associated with increased odds of depression, substance abuse, panic attacks/disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. Childhood foster, female, stressful life events, younger age, and being divorced/widowed increase the incidence of social anxiety disorder. Treatment-seeking was relatively rare. Social anxiety disorder is a common disorder in military personnel in China, and it is a risk factor for subsequent depressive illness, substance abuse and other mental disorder. Early detection and treatment of social anxiety disorder are important because of the low rate of treatment-seeking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Is there a specific pharmacological treatment for anxiety disorders? Summary of a controversy].

    PubMed

    Todorov, Christo

    2004-01-01

    The acute pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders is barely specific with the exception of the obsessive-compulsive disorder: it responds preferentially to potent serotoninergic antidepressants only. For all other anxiety disorders all antidepressants regardless of their mechanism of action could be equally efficient thanks to their common class effect and are considered to be the pharmacological treatment of first choice. Benzodiazepines that also share a common class effect are recommended as possible and temporary adjuvants. Augmentation strategies for the cases of refractory anxiety disorders are also non-specific: lithium, antipsychotics, anticonvulsants.

  1. Treatment hurts: Lay theories of graded exposure in the treatment of four anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Furnham, Adrian; Wilson, Emma; Chapman, Amy; Persuad, Raj

    2013-01-01

    Objective This paper concerned the perceived suffering/side effects caused by various well-known treatments for personal problems. It looked at whether people understood whether potentially painful treatments that confront negative aversive affect were effective or not. Method In total, 106 participants completed a long questionnaire assessing the ‘psychological pain’ ratings of 30 psychotherapy treatments, varying in fear exposure, for four relatively common anxiety disorders: social phobia, agoraphobia, post-traumatic stress disorder, and obsessive compulsive disorder. Results Factor analytic results revealed four clear factors underlying lay efficacy beliefs of psychotherapy interventions, varying in fear exposure: talking therapies, fear confrontation, fear avoidance, and alternative therapies. Talking therapies were rated the most effective across all disorders, but also the most painful. Fear avoidance therapies were rated the least effective and, along with alternative medicine, the least painful. Treatments involving fear exposure were rated the most painful. Regression analysis revealed talking therapies to be rated more efficacious by younger subjects than older subjects. Conclusion Most people seem able to differentiate between the efficacies of interventions for different anxiety disorders and hold consensually held optimistic conceptions about the usefulness of psychotherapy treatments and counseling that involve fear exposure, despite knowledge of the psychophysical side effects that these therapies often entail. They favored talking cures over others, but that may have been due to misleading items in the questionnaire. PMID:26405431

  2. [Stress, anxiety and audio-analgesia in dental treatment measured with the aid of biosignals].

    PubMed

    Mayer, R

    1989-09-01

    Fear of dental treatment is undoubtedly widespread. In the present study this fear, the "stress phenomenon", has been investigated. So-called biosignals were used to demonstrate the factual presence of these "anxiety conditions"; it has been found that they are increasing at the beginning of treatment and reach peak levels during certain much feared procedures. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that audio-analgesia may reduce anxiety and stress.

  3. Benefits of Child-Focused Anxiety Treatments for Parents and Family Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Keeton, Courtney P.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Drake, Kelly L.; Sakolsky, Dara; Kendall, Philip C.; Birmaher, Boris; Albano, Anne Marie; March, John S.; Rynn, Moira; Piacentini, John; Walkup, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Background To examine (1) changes in parent (global psychological distress, trait anxiety) and family (dysfunction, burden) functioning following 12 weeks of child-focused anxiety treatment, and (2) whether changes in these parent and family factors were associated with child's treatment condition and response. Methods Participants were 488 youth ages 7–17 years (50% female; mean age 10.7 years) who met DSM-IV-TR criteria for social phobia, separation anxiety, and/or generalized anxiety disorder, and their parents. Youth were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of “Coping Cat” individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), medication management with sertraline (SRT), their combination (COMB), or medication management with pill placebo (PBO) within the multisite Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS). At pre- and posttreatment, parents completed measures of trait anxiety, psychological distress, family functioning, and burden of child illness; children completed a measure of family functioning. Blinded independent evaluators rated child's response to treatment using the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale at posttreatment. Results Analyses of covariance revealed that parental psychological distress and trait anxiety, and parent-reported family dysfunction improved only for parents of children who were rated as treatment responders, and these changes were unrelated to treatment condition. Family burden and child-reported family dysfunction improved significantly from pre- to posttreatment regardless of treatment condition or response. Conclusions Findings suggest that child-focused anxiety treatments, regardless of intervention condition, can result in improvements in nontargeted parent symptoms and family functioning particularly when children respond successfully to the treatment. PMID:23390005

  4. Benefits of child-focused anxiety treatments for parents and family functioning.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Courtney P; Ginsburg, Golda S; Drake, Kelly L; Sakolsky, Dara; Kendall, Philip C; Birmaher, Boris; Albano, Anne Marie; March, John S; Rynn, Moira; Piacentini, John; Walkup, John T

    2013-09-01

    To examine (1) changes in parent (global psychological distress, trait anxiety) and family (dysfunction, burden) functioning following 12 weeks of child-focused anxiety treatment, and (2) whether changes in these parent and family factors were associated with child's treatment condition and response. Participants were 488 youth ages 7-17 years (50% female; mean age 10.7 years) who met DSM-IV-TR criteria for social phobia, separation anxiety, and/or generalized anxiety disorder, and their parents. Youth were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of "Coping Cat" individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), medication management with sertraline (SRT), their combination (COMB), or medication management with pill placebo (PBO) within the multisite Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS). At pre- and posttreatment, parents completed measures of trait anxiety, psychological distress, family functioning, and burden of child illness; children completed a measure of family functioning. Blinded independent evaluators rated child's response to treatment using the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale at posttreatment. Analyses of covariance revealed that parental psychological distress and trait anxiety, and parent-reported family dysfunction improved only for parents of children who were rated as treatment responders, and these changes were unrelated to treatment condition. Family burden and child-reported family dysfunction improved significantly from pre- to posttreatment regardless of treatment condition or response. Findings suggest that child-focused anxiety treatments, regardless of intervention condition, can result in improvements in nontargeted parent symptoms and family functioning particularly when children respond successfully to the treatment. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Adequacy of treatment received by primary care patients with anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Risa B; Beard, Courtney; Moitra, Ethan; Dyck, Ingrid; Keller, Martin B

    2014-05-01

    We examined the adequacy of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy received by primary care patients with anxiety disorders over up to 5 years of follow-up. Five hundred thirty-four primary care patients at 15 US sites, who screened positive for anxiety symptoms, were assessed for anxiety disorders. Those meeting anxiety disorder criteria were offered participation and interviewed again at six and 12 months postintake, and yearly thereafter for up to 5 years. We utilized existing definitions of appropriate pharmacotherapy and created definitions of potentially adequate psychotherapy/cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). At intake, of 534 primary care participants with anxiety disorders, 19% reported receiving appropriate pharmacotherapy and 14% potentially adequate CBT. Overall, 28% of participants reported receiving potentially adequate anxiety treatment, whether pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, or both. Over up to five years of follow-up, appropriate pharmacotherapy was received by 60% and potentially adequate CBT by 36% of the sample. Examined together, 69% of participants received any potentially adequate treatment during the follow-up period. Over the course of follow-up, primary care patients with MDD, panic disorder with agoraphobia, and with medicaid/medicare were more likely to receive appropriate anxiety treatment. Ethnic minority members were less likely to receive potentially adequate care. Potentially adequate anxiety treatment was rarely received by primary care patients with anxiety disorders at intake. Encouragingly, rates improved over the course of the study. However, potentially adequate CBT remained much less utilized than pharmacotherapy and racial-ethnic minority members were less likely to received care, suggesting much room for improved dissemination of quality treatment. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. ADEQUACY OF TREATMENT RECEIVED BY PRIMARY CARE PATIENTS WITH ANXIETY DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, Risa B.; Beard, Courtney; Moitra, Ethan; Dyck, Ingrid; Keller, Martin B.

    2014-01-01

    Background We examined the adequacy of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy received by primary care patients with anxiety disorders over up to 5 years of follow-up. Method Five hundred thirty-four primary care patients at 15 US sites, who screened positive for anxiety symptoms, were assessed for anxiety disorders. Those meeting anxiety disorder criteria were offered participation and interviewed again at six and 12 months postintake, and yearly thereafter for up to 5 years. We utilized existing definitions of appropriate pharmacotherapy and created definitions of potentially adequate psychotherapy/cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Results At intake, of 534 primary care participants with anxiety disorders, 19% reported receiving appropriate pharmacotherapy and 14% potentially adequate CBT. Overall, 28% of participants reported receiving potentially adequate anxiety treatment, whether pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, or both. Over up to five years of follow-up, appropriate pharmacotherapy was received by 60% and potentially adequate CBT by 36% of the sample. Examined together, 69% of participants received any potentially adequate treatment during the follow-up period. Over the course of follow-up, primary care patients with MDD, panic disorder with agoraphobia, and with medicaid/medicare were more likely to receive appropriate anxiety treatment. Ethnic minority members were less likely to receive potentially adequate care. Conclusions Potentially adequate anxiety treatment was rarely received by primary care patients with anxiety disorders at intake. Encouragingly, rates improved over the course of the study. However, potentially adequate CBT remained much less utilized than pharmacotherapy and racial-ethnic minority members were less likely to received care, suggesting much room for improved dissemination of quality treatment. PMID:24190762

  7. Reductions in the diurnal rigidity of anxiety predict treatment outcome in cognitive behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Aaron J; Newman, Michelle G

    2016-04-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a chronic and disabling disorder which is characterized by worrisome mentation about future outcomes. Because the evocative stimuli in GAD are largely internally derived, the feared outcomes contained in worry episodes can be invoked--and responded to--regardless of external context. We hypothesized that individuals with GAD would be entrained to internally-regulated, fixed patterns of anxiety on a day-to-day basis and that successful therapeutic intervention would serve to mitigate this entrainment. Thus, the present study examined the constructs of flexibility and rigidity as they apply to the daily fluctuation of anxious symptoms in individuals with GAD. We aimed to demonstrate that an apparently variable system can be conceptualized as rigid when the variability maps onto stable and predictable periodic oscillations. Sixty-nine individuals completed cognitive-behavioral treatment for GAD. Average age was 36.62 years (SD = 11.56), and participants were mostly Caucasian (89.5%) and female (68.4%). Daily-diary data indicating level of anxiety on a 0 to 100-point scale and collected four times per day were subjected to spectral analysis in order to determine the spectral power attributable to daily oscillations--which was related to the degree of rigidity in daily anxiety. Diurnal rigidity decreased throughout therapy and the degree to which rigidity was reduced significantly predicted reliable change at post-treatment. Thus, symptom rigidity can be conceptualized as stable periodic fluctuation and is discernible from other metrics of volatility in repeated measures data. Moreover, diurnal rigidity is significantly reduced during treatment, facilitating flexible responding to environmental demands.

  8. Development of a video-delivered relaxation treatment of late-life anxiety for veterans.

    PubMed

    Gould, Christine E; Zapata, Aimee Marie L; Bruce, Janine; Bereknyei Merrell, Sylvia; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; O'Hara, Ruth; Kuhn, Eric; Goldstein, Mary K; Beaudreau, Sherry A

    2017-10-01

    Behavioral treatments reduce anxiety, yet many older adults may not have access to these efficacious treatments. To address this need, we developed and evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of a video-delivered anxiety treatment for older Veterans. This treatment program, BREATHE (Breathing, Relaxation, and Education for Anxiety Treatment in the Home Environment), combines psychoeducation, diaphragmatic breathing, and progressive muscle relaxation training with engagement in activities. A mixed methods concurrent study design was used to examine the clarity of the treatment videos. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 20 Veterans (M age = 69.5, SD = 7.3 years; 55% White, Non-Hispanic) and collected ratings of video clarity. Quantitative ratings revealed that 100% of participants generally or definitely could follow breathing and relaxation video instructions. Qualitative findings, however, demonstrated more variability in the extent to which each video segment was clear. Participants identified both immediate benefits and motivation challenges associated with a video-delivered treatment. Participants suggested that some patients may need encouragement, whereas others need face-to-face therapy. Quantitative ratings of video clarity and qualitative findings highlight the feasibility of a video-delivered treatment for older Veterans with anxiety. Our findings demonstrate the importance of ensuring patients can follow instructions provided in self-directed treatments and the role that an iterative testing process has in addressing these issues. Next steps include testing the treatment videos with older Veterans with anxiety disorders.

  9. Mediators of Change in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Treatment Study

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Philip C.; Cummings, Colleen M.; Villabø, Marianne A.; Narayanan, Martina K.; Treadwell, Kimberli; Birmaher, Boris; Compton, Scott; Piacentini, John; Sherrill, Joel; Walkup, John; Gosch, Elizabeth; Keeton, Courtney; Ginsburg, Golda; Suveg, Cindy; Albano, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Objective Test changes in (a) coping efficacy and (b) anxious self-talk as potential mediators of treatment gains at 3-month follow-up in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Treatment Study (CAMS). Method Participants were 488 youth (ages 7-17; 50.4% male) randomized to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT; Coping cat program), pharmacotherapy (sertraline), their combination, or pill placebo. Participants met DSM-IV criteria for generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, and/or separation anxiety disorder. Coping efficacy (reported ability to manage anxiety provoking situations) was measured by youth and parent reports on the Coping Questionnaire, and anxious self-talk was measured by youth report on the Negative Affectivity Self-Statement Questionnaire. Outcome was measured using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (completed by Independent Evaluators blind to condition). For temporal precedence, residualized treatment gains were assessed at 3-month follow-up. Results Residualized gains in coping efficacy mediated gains in the CBT, sertraline, and combination conditions. In the combination condition, some unique effect of treatment remained. Treatment assignment was not associated with a reduction in anxious self-talk, nor did anxious self-talk predict changes in anxiety symptoms. Conclusions The findings suggest that improvements in coping efficacy are a mediator of treatment gains. Anxious self-talk did not emerge as a mediator. PMID:26460572

  10. Mediators of change in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Treatment Study.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Philip C; Cummings, Colleen M; Villabø, Marianne A; Narayanan, Martina K; Treadwell, Kimberli; Birmaher, Boris; Compton, Scott; Piacentini, John; Sherrill, Joel; Walkup, John; Gosch, Elizabeth; Keeton, Courtney; Ginsburg, Golda; Suveg, Cindy; Albano, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Test changes in (a) coping efficacy and (b) anxious self-talk as potential mediators of treatment gains at 3-month follow-up in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Treatment Study (CAMS). Participants were 488 youth (ages 7-17; 50.4% male) randomized to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT; Coping cat program), pharmacotherapy (sertraline), their combination, or pill placebo. Participants met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, and/or separation anxiety disorder. Coping efficacy (reported ability to manage anxiety provoking situations) was measured by youth and parent reports on the Coping Questionnaire, and anxious self-talk was measured by youth report on the Negative Affectivity Self-Statement Questionnaire. Outcome was measured using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (completed by Independent Evaluators blind to condition). For temporal precedence, residualized treatment gains were assessed at 3-month follow-up. Residualized gains in coping efficacy mediated gains in the CBT, sertraline, and combination conditions. In the combination condition, some unique effect of treatment remained. Treatment assignment was not associated with a reduction in anxious self-talk, nor did anxious self-talk predict changes in anxiety symptoms. The findings suggest that improvements in coping efficacy are a mediator of treatment gains. Anxious self-talk did not emerge as a mediator. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Fluoxetine treatment reverses the intergenerational impact of maternal separation on fear and anxiety behaviors.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Gui-Jing; Yang, Yuan; Cao, Jun; Mao, Rong-Rong; Xu, Lin

    2015-05-01

    Early life stress increases risks of fear and anxiety related disorders in adulthood, which may be alleviated by fluoxetine treatment. However, the intergenerational impacts of maternal separation (MS) on fear and anxiety behaviors from father to their offspring are little known. And the potential effects of fluoxetine treatment on the intergenerational transmission have not been well tested. Here, we investigated whether fluoxetine can reverse the intergenerational effects of MS on fear and anxiety behaviors. The first generation (F1) male rats were exposed to MS 3 h daily from postnatal day 2-14 and then treated with fluoxetine for four weeks during adulthood before fear conditioning. We found that maternal separation significantly impaired contextual fear extinction in F1 adult male rats but not in their second generation (F2). Although no obvious effects of MS on anxiety were observed in F1 male rats, the F2 offspring displayed a phenotype of low anxiety-like behaviors despite they were reared in normal condition. Fluoxetine treatment in F1 males not only reversed the impairment of fear extinction in F1 males but also the low anxiety-like behaviors in their F2 offspring. These findings highlight the intergenerational impacts of early life stress on fear and anxiety behaviors, and provide a new sight of the intergenerational effect of fluoxetine therapy for early life stress related mental problems.

  12. Anxiety in Children with Mood Disorders: A Treatment Help or Hindrance?

    PubMed Central

    Fristad, Mary A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of comorbid anxiety in treatment outcome for children with mood disorders (N= 165; age 8–11) participating in Multi-Family Psychoeducational Psychotherapy (MF-PEP). Assessments occurred at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months for two randomly assigned groups: immediate treatment and 1-year wait-list. Most children (69%) had comorbid anxiety disorders. Baseline comorbid anxiety, as reported on the Children’s Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS), was associated with higher Children’s Depression Rating Scale- Revised (CDRS-R) scores but not Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) scores. Higher levels of anxiety symptoms were associated with lower Children’s Global Assessment Scale (C-GAS) scores. Participation in MF-PEP did not significantly reduce anxiety symptoms (p=0.62). However, presence of comorbid anxiety did not impede reduction in depressive (CDRS-R, p=0.74) or manic (YMRS scores, p=0.94) symptoms following MF-PEP. More baseline anxiety symptoms were associated with greater improvement in C-GAS scores post-treatment (p= 0.02). Implications are discussed. PMID:21912843

  13. The role of anxiety in the development, maintenance, and treatment of childhood aggression.

    PubMed

    Granic, Isabela

    2014-11-01

    The majority of aggressive children exhibit symptoms of anxiety, yet none of our developmental models of aggression incorporate the role of anxiety, and our treatments ignore this comorbidity. This article outlines a novel theoretical model that specifies three hypotheses about comorbid anxious and aggressive children: (a) unpredictable parenting induces anxiety in children that in turn triggers aggressive behavior; (b) prolonged periods of anxiety deplete children's capacity to inhibit impulses and trigger bouts of aggression, and aggression in turn functions to regulate levels of anxiety; and (c) minor daily stressors give rise to anxiety while cognitive perseveration maintains anxious moods, increasingly disposing children to aggress. Little or no research has directly tested these hypotheses. Extant research and theory consistent with these claims are herein reviewed, and future research designs that can test them specifically are suggested. The clinical implications most relevant to the hypotheses are discussed, and to improve the efficacy of treatments for childhood aggression, it is proposed that anxiety may need to be the primary target of treatment.

  14. Cognitive-behavioral treatment for anxiety in patients with dementia: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Cynthia A; Seignourel, Paul; Balasubramanyam, Valli; Snow, A Lynn; Wilson, Nancy L; Kunik, Mark E; Schulz, Paul E; Stanley, Melinda A

    2008-05-01

    Anxiety is common in dementia and is associated with decreased independence and increased risk of nursing home placement. However, little is known about the treatment of anxiety in dementia. This article reports results from two patients who were treated with a modified version of cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety in dementia (CBT-AD). Modifications were made in the content, structure, and learning strategies of CBT to adapt skills to the cognitive limitations of these patients and include collaterals (i.e., family members, friends, or other caregivers) in the treatment process. The patients received education and awareness training and were taught the skills of diaphragmatic breathing, coping self-statements, exposure, and behavioral activation. The Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) Scale was used to characterize dementia severity and determine eligibility for treatment (a CDR score of 0.5 to 2.0 was required for participation). Other measures included the Rating Anxiety in Dementia scale, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Anxiety subscale, and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Outcome data showed improvement in anxiety as measured by standardized rating scales. We conclude that CBT-AD is potentially useful in treating anxiety in dementia patients and that this technique merits further study.

  15. Predictors of treatment satisfaction among older adults with anxiety in a primary care psychology program.

    PubMed

    Hundt, Natalie E; Armento, Maria E A; Porter, Bennett; Cully, Jeffrey A; Kunik, Mark E; Stanley, Melinda

    2013-04-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are treated in integrated primary care mental health programs. The current study examined predictors of satisfaction with treatment in patients from a randomized clinical trial of late-life generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in primary care. Higher treatment satisfaction was associated with receiving CBT rather than enhanced usual care. Treatment credibility, treatment expectancies, social support, and improvements in depression and anxiety symptoms predicted higher treatment satisfaction in the total sample. In the CBT group, only credibility and adherence with treatment predicted satisfaction. This suggests that older patients receiving CBT who believe more strongly in the treatment rationale and follow the therapist's recommendations more closely are likely to report satisfaction at the end of treatment. In addition, this study found that adherence mediated the relationship between treatment credibility and treatment satisfaction. In other words, patients' perceptions that the treatment made sense for them led to greater treatment adherence which then increased their satisfaction with treatment.

  16. Brief measures of anxiety in non-treatment-seeking youth with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Maddox, Brenna B; Kendall, Philip C; Rump, Keiran; Berry, Leandra; Schultz, Robert T; Souders, Margaret C; Bennett, Amanda; Herrington, John; Miller, Judith

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the accuracy of brief anxiety scales for non-treatment-seeking youth with autism spectrum disorder. In all, 54 youth (7-17 years; IQ: 67-158) with autism spectrum disorder and their parents completed (a) an expanded version of the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Child/Parent designed to capture typical and atypical fears and (b) brief scales of anxiety symptoms (Behavior Assessment Schedule for Children, Second Edition; Screen for Child Anxiety and Related Emotional Disorders; Negative Affective Self-Statement Questionnaire; Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale). The results indicate that measures lacked adequate sensitivity and specificity, and the detection of atypical fears was particularly poor. Revised cut scores are offered, but refined and/or revised instruments are likely needed for research on youth with autism spectrum disorder.

  17. The relationship between depression and generalized anxiety during intensive psychological and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Aderka, Idan M; Beard, Courtney; Lee, Josephine; Weiss, Rachel B; Björgvinsson, Thröstur

    2015-09-15

    In the present study we examined the relationship between depressive symptoms and generalized anxiety symptoms during intensive cognitive-behavioral and pharmacological treatment. Individuals (n = 157) with major depressive disorder (MDD; n = 83), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n = 29) and their combination (n = 45) who attended an intensive partial hospital treatment program, completed daily self-report measures of depression and generalized anxiety. Treatment included empirically-based cognitive-behavioral interventions in both individual and group format, as well as pharmacotherapy. Multilevel linear modeling indicated that for all diagnostic groups, changes in depressive symptoms led to changes in generalized anxiety symptoms to a greater extent than vice versa during treatment. Moreover, changes in depressive symptoms fully mediated changes in generalized anxiety symptoms, whereas changes in generalized anxiety symptoms only partially mediated the changes in depressive symptoms. Partial hospital setting. Our results suggest that depressive symptoms may play a prominent role in the process of change in both MDD and GAD. This has implications for the classification of GAD as well as for choosing early treatment targets for individuals with comorbid MDD and GAD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment of Co-occurring Anxiety Disorders and Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, R. Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders co-occur with substance use disorders at a high rate in both the general population and in treatment-seeking samples. The co-occurrence of these disorders is associated with greater symptom severity, higher levels of disability, and poorer course of illness relative to either disorder alone. However, relatively little research focus has been afforded to the treatment of co-occurring anxiety and substance use disorders. This notable gap in the research literature may not only leave anxiety untreated or under-treated, but may also increase the risk for relapse and poor substance use outcomes. The aim of this manuscript is to provide a review of the current state of the literature on the treatment of co-occurring anxiety and substance use disorders. This review includes brief overview of the epidemiology of this co-occurrence, challenges in assessing anxiety in the context of a substance use disorder, evidence for treatment approaches, and new advancements and future directions in this understudied area. The importance of future research to identify optimal behavioral and pharmacologic treatments for co-occurring anxiety and substance use disorders is highlighted. PMID:25747923

  19. Transdiagnostic internet treatment for anxiety and depression: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Titov, Nickolai; Dear, Blake F; Schwencke, Genevieve; Andrews, Gavin; Johnston, Luke; Craske, Michelle G; McEvoy, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Disorder-specific cognitive behavioural therapy programs delivered over the internet (iCBT) with clinician guidance are effective at treating specific anxiety disorders and depression. The present study examined the efficacy of a transdiagnostic iCBT protocol to treat three anxiety disorders and/or depression within the same program (the Wellbeing Program). Seventy-seven individuals with a principal diagnosis of major depression, generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and/or social phobia were randomly assigned to a Treatment or Waitlist Control group. Treatment consisted of CBT-based online educational lessons and homework assignments, weekly email or telephone contact from a clinical psychologist, access to a moderated online discussion forum, and automated emails. Eighty one percent of Treatment group participants completed all 8 lessons within the 10 week program. Post-treatment data were collected from 34/37 Treatment group and 35/37 Control group participants, and 3-month follow-up data were collected from 32/37 Treatment group participants. Relative to Controls, Treatment group participants reported significantly reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression as measured by the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales-21 item, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 item, and Generalised Anxiety Disorder-7 item scales, with corresponding between-groups effect sizes (Cohen's d) at post treatment of.56,.58, and.52, respectively. The clinician spent a mean time of 84.76 min (SD=50.37) per person over the program. Participants rated the procedure as highly acceptable, and gains were sustained at follow-up. These results provide preliminary support for the efficacy of transdiagnostic iCBT in the treatment of anxiety and depressive disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Guided parent-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety: Predictors of treatment response.

    PubMed

    Thirlwall, Kerstin; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    Guided Parent-delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (GPD-CBT) is a brief, effective treatment for childhood anxiety disorders, however not all children respond favourably. To examine predictors of response to GPD-CBT. Parents of 125 children (7-12 years) with an anxiety disorder received GPD-CBT over 2.6 or 5.3h. Recovery was measured post treatment and six months later. Younger children and those with primary Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD) improved more post treatment, but older children and those without primary GAD had better outcomes at six month follow up. Fewer children allocated to 2.6h had recovered post treatment compared to those allocated to the 5.2h intervention, but did not differ significantly six months later. The identification of predictors of short and longer-term treatment outcomes can guide treatment decisions following this low-intensity approach. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Routine treatment duration for clients attending a community based anxiety disorders clinic.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Anthony; Berle, David; Milicevic, Denise; Dale, Erin; Starcevic, Vladan; Brakoulias, Vlasios; Viswasam, Kirupamani

    2016-09-02

    To determine the average duration of treatment at a community-based anxiety disorders clinic. Data were collected on primary disorder, the presence of co-occurring disorders and treatment length (both in terms of number of sessions and weeks of therapy) for 248 consecutive clients. The mean number of sessions was 13, and average treatment length was 29 weeks. There was substantial variation in treatment duration (range for number of sessions = 1-128, range for treatment duration = 0-186 weeks). Clients with anxiety disorders were often treated in relatively few sessions, in line with randomised controlled trials (RCTs). However, a number of clients required many more sessions and were treated for a longer period of time than clients in RCTs. Health services should be cautious in mandating limits to therapy duration for anxiety disorders given the wide range in the duration of treatment for clients in our sample. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  2. Muscle biofeedback and transcendental meditation. A controlled evaluation of efficacy in the treatment of chronic anxiety.

    PubMed

    Raskin, M; Bali, L R; Peeke, H V

    1980-01-01

    Recent articles have suggested that muscle biofeedback and transcendental meditation may be useful in treating chronic anxiety. To assess this, we conducted a controlled study comparing muscle biofeedback, transcendental mediation, and relaxation therapy. The study consisted of a six-week baseline period, six weeks of treatment, a six-week posttreatment observation period, and later follow-up. Thirty-one subjects completed the first part of the study and have been followed up for three to 18 months. Forty percent of the subjects had a clinically significant decrease in their anxiety. There were no differences between treatments with respect to treatment efficacy, onset of symptom amelioration, or maintenance of therapeutic gains. We found no evidence suggesting that the degree of muscle relaxation induced by any of the treatments is related to the therapeutic outcome. Relaxation therapies as a sole treatment appear to have a limited place in the treatment of chronic anxiety.

  3. Decreasing Methadone Dose Via Anxiety Reduction: A Treatment Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushner, Marlene; And Others

    This manual describes a Relaxation-Information Presentation program based on the clinical observation that anxiety is a serious barrier to detoxification for many methadone clients, and on experimental evidence indicating that expectations may play a greater role in the discomfort experienced during detoxification than the actual methadone dose.…

  4. Decreasing Methadone Dose Via Anxiety Reduction: A Treatment Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushner, Marlene; And Others

    This manual describes a Relaxation-Information Presentation program based on the clinical observation that anxiety is a serious barrier to detoxification for many methadone clients, and on experimental evidence indicating that expectations may play a greater role in the discomfort experienced during detoxification than the actual methadone dose.…

  5. Stress Inoculation Bibliotherapy in the Treatment of Test Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Register, Angela C.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Assigned 121 test-anxious college students to 1 of 4 conditions: telephone-contact; no-contact, stress-inoculation bibliotherapy; telephone-contact, wait-list control; and no-contact, wait-list control. Two experimental conditions were superior to control conditions in reducing subjective anxiety; telephone-contact and no-contact conditions were…

  6. Anxiety and Art Therapy: Treatment in the Public Eye

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambala, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the most common mental health problems in the United States today. It is the number one mental health problem among American women and ranks as a close second to substance abuse among men. In fact, alcoholism is the only other disorder that affects a greater number of people throughout the county. Fifteen percent of the American…

  7. Recent Research on the Treatment of Speech Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Bill

    Apprehension on the part of students who must engage in public speaking figures high on the list of student fears. Speech anxiety has been viewed as a trait--the overall propensity to fear giving speeches--and as a state--the condition of fearfulness on a particular occasion of speech making. Methodology in therapy research should abide by the…

  8. Recent Advances in the Treatment of Anxiety in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karoly, Paul

    Traditional perspectives on children's fears and anxiety neither provide satisfying answers to fundamental and important questions nor provide paths to effective clinical intervention. Recently, investigators assessing and treating phobic children by means of active, multi-layered, coping-oriented, temporally extended, and child-centered methods…

  9. Predictors of Change Following Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Children with Anxiety Problems: A Preliminary Investigation on Negative Automatic Thoughts and Anxiety Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muris, Peter; Mayer, Birgit; den Adel, Madelon; Roos, Tamara; van Wamelen, Julie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate negative automatic thoughts and anxiety control as predictors of change produced by cognitive-behavioral treatment of youths with anxiety disorders. Forty-five high-anxious children aged between 9 and 12 years who were selected from the primary school population, received a standardized CBT…

  10. Predictors of Change Following Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Children with Anxiety Problems: A Preliminary Investigation on Negative Automatic Thoughts and Anxiety Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muris, Peter; Mayer, Birgit; den Adel, Madelon; Roos, Tamara; van Wamelen, Julie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate negative automatic thoughts and anxiety control as predictors of change produced by cognitive-behavioral treatment of youths with anxiety disorders. Forty-five high-anxious children aged between 9 and 12 years who were selected from the primary school population, received a standardized CBT…

  11. The Timing of Exposure in Clinic-Based Treatment for Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gryczkowski, Michelle R.; Tiede, Michael S.; Dammann, Julie E.; Jacobsen, Amy Brown; Hale, Lisa R.; Whiteside, Stephen P. H.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examines treatment length and timing of exposure from two child anxiety disorders clinics. Data regarding symptoms and treatment characteristics for 28 youth were prospectively obtained through self, parent, and therapist report at each session. Information regarding length of treatment, timing of exposure initiation, and…

  12. The Timing of Exposure in Clinic-Based Treatment for Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gryczkowski, Michelle R.; Tiede, Michael S.; Dammann, Julie E.; Jacobsen, Amy Brown; Hale, Lisa R.; Whiteside, Stephen P. H.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examines treatment length and timing of exposure from two child anxiety disorders clinics. Data regarding symptoms and treatment characteristics for 28 youth were prospectively obtained through self, parent, and therapist report at each session. Information regarding length of treatment, timing of exposure initiation, and…

  13. A Case of Premature Termination in a Treatment for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boswell, James F.; Llera, Sandra J.; Newman, Michelle G.; Castonguay, Louis G.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a case of failure in an integrative treatment for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) combining cognitive-behavioral therapy, an empirically supported treatment for GAD, and interpersonal-emotional processing therapy. The client of focus dropped out of treatment after the 8th session. Based on our analysis of this case, we…

  14. Integrating Religion and Spirituality into Treatment for Late-Life Anxiety: Three Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera, Terri L.; Zeno, Darrell; Bush, Amber L.; Barber, Catherine R.; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2012-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is common in older adults and, although cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious treatment for late-life GAD, effect sizes are only moderate and attrition rates are high. One way to increase treatment acceptability and enhance current cognitive behavioral treatments for GAD in older adults might be to…

  15. Integrating Religion and Spirituality into Treatment for Late-Life Anxiety: Three Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera, Terri L.; Zeno, Darrell; Bush, Amber L.; Barber, Catherine R.; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2012-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is common in older adults and, although cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious treatment for late-life GAD, effect sizes are only moderate and attrition rates are high. One way to increase treatment acceptability and enhance current cognitive behavioral treatments for GAD in older adults might be to…

  16. A Case of Premature Termination in a Treatment for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boswell, James F.; Llera, Sandra J.; Newman, Michelle G.; Castonguay, Louis G.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a case of failure in an integrative treatment for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) combining cognitive-behavioral therapy, an empirically supported treatment for GAD, and interpersonal-emotional processing therapy. The client of focus dropped out of treatment after the 8th session. Based on our analysis of this case, we…

  17. Anxiety and attention to threat: Cognitive mechanisms and treatment with attention bias modification.

    PubMed

    Mogg, Karin; Bradley, Brendan P

    2016-12-01

    Anxiety disorders are common and difficult to treat. Some cognitive models of anxiety propose that attention bias to threat causes and maintains anxiety. This view led to the development of a computer-delivered treatment: attention bias modification (ABM) which predominantly trains attention avoidance of threat. However, meta-analyses indicate disappointing effectiveness of ABM-threat-avoidance training in reducing anxiety. This article considers how ABM may be improved, based on a review of key ideas from models of anxiety, attention and cognitive control. These are combined into an integrative framework of cognitive functions which support automatic threat evaluation/detection and goal-directed thought and action, which reciprocally influence each other. It considers roles of bottom-up and top-down processes involved in threat-evaluation, orienting and inhibitory control in different manifestations of attention bias (initial orienting, attention maintenance, threat avoidance, threat-distractor interference) and different ABM methods (e.g., ABM-threat-avoidance, ABM-positive-search). The framework has implications for computer-delivered treatments for anxiety. ABM methods which encourage active goal-focused attention-search for positive/nonthreat information and flexible cognitive control across multiple processes (particularly inhibitory control, which supports a positive goal-engagement mode over processing of minor threat cues) may prove more effective in reducing anxiety than ABM-threat-avoidance training which targets a specific bias in spatial orienting to threat.

  18. Treatment of borderline personality disorder and co-occurring anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Valenstein, Helen R.

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among individuals with borderline personality disorder, with comorbidity rates of up to 90%. Anxiety disorders have been found to reduce the likelihood of achieving remission from borderline personality disorder over time and to increase the risk of suicide and self-injury in this population. Evidence-based treatments for borderline personality disorder have not sufficiently focused on targeting anxiety disorders, and their effects on these disorders are either limited or unknown. Conversely, evidence-based treatments for anxiety disorders typically exclude suicidal, self-injuring, and seriously comorbid patients, thereby limiting their generalizability to individuals with borderline personality disorder. To address these limitations, recent research has begun to emerge focused on developing and evaluating treatments for individuals with co-occurring borderline personality disorder and anxiety disorders, specifically posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with promising initial results. However, there is a need for additional research in this area, particularly studies evaluating the treatment of anxiety disorders among high-risk and complex borderline personality disorder patients. PMID:23710329

  19. Direct-to-consumer marketing of psychological treatments for anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Kaitlin P; Comer, Jonathan S; Barlow, David H

    2013-12-01

    Progress disseminating and implementing evidence-based psychological treatments (EBPTs) for the anxiety disorders has been gradual. To date, the dominant approach for promoting the uptake of EBPTs in clinical settings has been to target the education and training of mental health providers, with many consumers remaining unaware of the potential benefits of EBPTs for anxiety disorders. Direct-to-consumer (DTC) marketing may be a promising vehicle for increasing EBPT utilization rates in the treatment of anxiety disorders. This paper provides an overview of the rationale and important considerations for applying DTC efforts to promote evidence-based care in the treatment of anxiety disorders, and reviews current DTC efforts in this area, including resources on the Internet and other media and in-person events. We conclude with recommendations for future efforts in the DTC marketing of EBPTs for the anxiety disorders, including the need for increased funding and grassroots efforts to inform consumers about anxiety disorders and their most effective treatments.

  20. Homework Adherence and Cognitive Behaviour Treatment Outcome for Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Kristian; Thastum, Mikael; Hougaard, Esben

    2016-03-01

    Homework assignments are considered an essential component for a successful outcome of cognitive behavioural therapy for youths with anxiety disorders. However, only two studies have examined the association between homework adherence and outcome of cognitive behavioural therapy for youths with anxiety disorders. The study examined the association between homework adherence and treatment outcome following a generic group cognitive behaviour treatment program (Cool Kids) for anxiety disordered youths and their parents. The treatment program was completed by 98 children and adolescents (ages 7-16). Homework adherence was measured as time spent doing homework assignments between each session, reported by youths as well as parents. Outcome criteria consisted of youth-reported anxiety symptoms and clinician rated severity of primary anxiety diagnosis at posttreatment and 3-month follow-up. Results did not support an association between homework adherence and treatment outcome when controlling for pretreatment severity. The study found no convincing evidence that homework adherence predicted outcome of cognitive behavioural therapy for youths with anxiety disorders. Reasons for divergent findings on homework adherence in cognitive behavioural therapy for youths compared to adults are discussed.

  1. Looking beyond Fear and Extinction Learning: Considering Novel Treatment Targets for Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Jennifer C.; Evans, Travis C.; Hernandez, Michael V.

    2014-01-01

    Fear conditioning studies provide valuable insight into how fears are learned and extinguished. Previous work focuses on fear and extinction learning to understand and treat anxiety disorders. However, a cascade of cognitive processes that extend beyond learning may also yield therapeutic targets for anxiety disorders. Throughout this review, we will discuss recent findings of fear generalization, memory consolidation, and reconsolidation. Factors related to effectiveness, efficiency and durability of extinction-based treatments will be addressed. Moreover, adolescence may be a key developmental stage when threat-related perturbations emerge; therefore, targeting interventions during adolescence when these nascent processes are more malleable may alter the trajectory of anxiety disorders. PMID:25705579

  2. [The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Medication, or Combined Treatment For Child Hood Anxiety Disorders].

    PubMed

    Sevi Tok, Emine Sevinç; Arkar, Haluk; Bildik, Tezan

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of the Fear Hunter cognitive behavioral therapy program, which was developed for the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders, and to compare its effectiveness with standard medication treatment. A total of 46 participants (aged 8 to 12) that applied to the Ege University, Faculty of Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry clinic and had a diagnosis of anxiety disorder were recruited for the study. The participants were randomly assigned to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), standard drug treatment (ST), or combined treatment (CBT+ ST) groups according to the order of application. Subjects were evaluated using pretest, posttest and 3 months follow-up measurements. The participants were assessed by the researcher using The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED), The Children's Negative Cognitive Errors Questionnaire (CNCEQ), Health Related Quality of Life in Children (Kid-KINDL), and Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). The results of repeated measures ANOVA showed that, although general anxiety scores of all treatment conditions significantly decreased at posttest and follow up, a combination of two therapies (CBT+ST) had a significantly superior response rate. Moreover, all treatment conditions including CBT (CBT+ST and CBT) were superior to ST in terms of negative cognitive errors, quality of life, and depression. It is thought that The Fear Hunter Therapy Program is an effective treatment technique because; it provides significant improvement in the primary and secondary symptoms (e.g. quality of life, depression, negative automatic thoughts) of childhood anxiety disorders.

  3. Parental involvement in youth anxiety treatment: conceptual bases, controversies, and recommendations for intervention.

    PubMed

    Taboas, William R; McKay, Dean; Whiteside, Stephen P H; Storch, Eric A

    2015-03-01

    Parents are often perceived as a contributing or maintaining source of youth anxiety disorders, making them natural targets for either intervention or involvement in treatment protocols. Efforts to increase the efficacy and durability of standard treatments by incorporating parents have been successful, yet they often do not outperform child-focused treatment. Breinholst et al. (2012) review and discuss several overlooked parental research variables (anxiety, overcontrol, beliefs and assumptions, global family dysfunction) found to promote and maintain child anxiety. However, it remains unclear how these proposed variables interfere with active therapeutic ingredients (e.g., exposure) or how the identified problems might be addressed. We propose that insufficient attention to exposure-based treatment and family behavioral responses explain the comparatively low added value for parental involvement in child anxiety treatment and outline directions for research to address them. With meaningful attention being given to exposure and its accompanying variables in the treatment of childhood anxiety, we believe that treatment outcomes and intervention acceptability can be improved.

  4. Evidence to practice: treatment of anxiety in individuals with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Russell; Mahoney, Richard; El Zein, Farah; Delaune, Elizabeth; Amidon, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question What treatment improves social interactions and reduces reports of anxiety symptoms in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and a co-occurring anxiety disorder? Results Systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials suggest that cognitive behavior therapy in tandem with direct instruction of social skills using applied behavior analysis intervention components may be effective for treating anxiety in individuals with high functioning ASD. For individuals with ASD, an anxiety disorder, and an intellectual disability, systematic desensitization may be effective. Implementation Intervention should emphasize teaching social skills. Reinforcers (ie, rewards based upon the client’s interests) should be used to encourage participation in therapy. Treatment should incorporate visual aides and family involvement. Intervention components involving abstract concepts, visualization, and discussions of emotions are less useful given difficulties in abstract reasoning and communication inherent to ASD. PMID:21326652

  5. The role of self-statements as a mediator in treatment for youth with anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Philip C; Treadwell, Kimberli R H

    2007-06-01

    The authors investigated features of self-statements as predictors of anxiety in children with and without anxiety disorder (AD) and as a mediator of treatment of ADs in children. Children (N = 145) between the ages of 9 and 13 years participated (71 AD youth, 84 controls). Self-statements were classified by valence and content. Results indicated that children's anxious, but not positive or depressed, self-statements significantly predicted anxiety in children with and without AD. For children with AD, changes in anxious self-statements mediated treatment gains, replicating a previously reported finding. A states of mind ratio mediated only 1 outcome measure, and positive and depressive cognitions served no mediating role. The impact of anxious self-talk on children's adjustment and implications for cognitive theory of anxiety in children are discussed.

  6. Treatment of addiction and anxiety using extinction approaches: neural mechanisms and their treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Gary B; Heinrichs, Stephen C; Carey, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Clinical interventions which produce cue and contextual extinction learning can reduce craving and relapse in substance abuse and inhibit conditioned fear responses in anxiety disorders. In both types of disorders, classical conditioning links unconditioned drug or fear responses to associated contextual cues and result in enduring pathological responses to multiple stimuli. Extinction therapy countermeasures seek to reduce conditioned responses using a set of techniques in which patients are repeatedly exposed to conditioned appetitive or aversive stimuli using imaginal imagery, in vivo exposure, or written scripts. Such interventions allow patients to rehearse more adaptive responses to conditioned stimuli. The ultimate goal of these interventions, extinction of the original conditioned response, is a new learning process that results in a decrease in frequency or intensity of conditioned responses to drug or fear cues. This review explores extinction approaches in conditioned drug reward and fear responses. The behavioral, neuroanatomical and neurochemical mechanisms of conditioned reward and fear responses and their extinction are derived from our understanding of the animal literature. Extensive neuroscience research shows that even though many mechanisms differ in conditioned fear and reward, converging prefrontal cortical glutamatergic pathways underlie extinction learning. Efficacy of pharmacological and behavioral treatment approaches in addiction and anxiety disorders may be optimized by enhancing extinction and weakening the bond between the original conditioned stimuli and conditioned responses. Adjunctive pharmacotherapy approaches using agents which alter glutamate or γ-aminobutyric acid signaling or epigenetic mechanisms in prefrontal cortical pathways can enhance extinction learning. A comparative study of extinction processes and its neural mechanisms can be translated into more effective behavioral and pharmacological treatment approaches in

  7. Anxiety Diagnoses in Smokers Seeking Cessation Treatment: Relations with Tobacco Dependence, Withdrawal, Outcome, and Response to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Megan E.; Cook, Jessica W.; Schlam, Tanya R.; Jorenby, Douglas E.; Baker, Timothy B.

    2010-01-01

    Aims To understand the relations amongst anxiety disorders and tobacco dependence, withdrawal symptoms, response to smoking cessation pharmacotherapy, and ability to quit smoking. Design Randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial. Participants received six 10-minute individual counseling sessions and either: placebo, bupropion SR, nicotine patch, nicotine lozenge, bupropion SR+nicotine lozenge, or nicotine patch+nicotine lozenge. Setting Two urban research sites. Participants Data were collected from 1504 daily smokers (>9 cigarettes per day) who were motivated to quit smoking and did not report current diagnoses of schizophrenia or psychosis or bupropion use. Measurements Participants completed baseline assessments, the Composite International Diagnostic Interview and ecological momentary assessments for two weeks. Findings A structured clinical interview identified participants who ever met criteria for a panic attack (n=455), social anxiety (n=199), or generalized anxiety disorder (n=99), and those who qualified for no anxiety diagnosis (n=891). Smokers with anxiety disorders reported higher levels of nicotine dependence and pre-quit withdrawal symptoms. Those ever meeting criteria for panic attacks or social anxiety disorder showed greater quit-day negative affect. Smokers ever meeting criteria for anxiety disorders were less likely to be abstinent at 8-weeks and 6-months postquit and showed no benefit from single-agent or combination-agent pharmacotherapies. Conclusions Anxiety diagnoses were common amongst treatment-seeking smokers and were related to increased motivation to smoke, elevated withdrawal, lack of response to pharmacotherapy, and impaired ability to quit smoking. These findings could guide treatment assignment algorithms and treatment development for smokers with anxiety diagnoses. PMID:20973856

  8. Therapist competence and therapeutic alliance are important in the treatment of health anxiety (hypochondriasis).

    PubMed

    Weck, Florian; Richtberg, Samantha; Jakob, Marion; Neng, Julia M B; Höfling, Volkmar

    2015-07-30

    The role of treatment delivery factors (i.e., therapist adherence, therapist competence, and therapeutic alliance) is rarely investigated in psychotherapeutic treatment for health anxiety. This study aimed to investigate the role of the assessment perspective for the evaluation of treatment delivery factors and their relevance for treatment outcome. Therapist adherence, therapist competence, and therapeutic alliance were evaluated by independent raters, therapists, patients, and supervisors in 68 treatments. Patients with severe health anxiety (hypochondriasis) were treated with cognitive therapy or exposure therapy. Treatment outcome was assessed with a standardized interview by independent diagnosticians. A multitrait-multimethod analysis revealed a large effect for the assessment perspective of therapist adherence, therapist competence, and therapeutic alliance. The rater perspective was the most important for the prediction of treatment outcome. Therapeutic alliance and therapist competence accounted for 6% of the variance of treatment outcome while therapist adherence was not associated with treatment outcome. Therapist competence was only indirectly associated with treatment outcome, mediated by therapeutic alliance. Both therapeutic alliance and therapist competence demonstrated to be important treatment delivery factors in psychotherapy for health anxiety. A stronger consideration of those processes during psychotherapy for health anxiety might be able to improve psychotherapy outcome.

  9. Internet-based mindfulness treatment for anxiety disorders: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, Johanna; Aström, Viktor; Påhlsson, Daniel; Schenström, Ola; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per

    2014-03-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions have proven effective for the transdiagnostic treatment of heterogeneous anxiety disorders. So far, no study has investigated the potential of mindfulness-based treatments when delivered remotely via the Internet. The current trial aims at evaluating the efficacy of a stand-alone, unguided, Internet-based mindfulness treatment program for anxiety. Ninety-one participants diagnosed with social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, or anxiety disorder not otherwise specified were randomly assigned to a mindfulness treatment group (MTG) or to an online discussion forum control group (CG). Mindfulness treatment consisted of 96 audio files with instructions for various mindfulness meditation exercises. Primary and secondary outcome measures were assessed at pre-, posttreatment, and at 6-months follow-up. Participants of the MTG showed a larger decrease of symptoms of anxiety, depression, and insomnia from pre- to postassessment than participants of the CG (Cohen's d(between)=0.36-0.99). Within effect sizes were large in the MTG (d=0.82-1.58) and small to moderate in the CG (d=0.45-0.76). In contrast to participants of the CG, participants of the MTG also achieved a moderate improvement in their quality of life. The study provided encouraging results for an Internet-based mindfulness protocol in the treatment of primary anxiety disorders. Future replications of these results will show whether Web-based mindfulness meditation can constitute a valid alternative to existing, evidence-based cognitive-behavioural Internet treatments. The trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01577290).

  10. Parenting and parental anxiety and depression as predictors of treatment outcome for childhood anxiety disorders: has the role of fathers been underestimated?

    PubMed

    Liber, Juliette M; van Widenfelt, Brigit M; Goedhart, Arnold W; Utens, Elisabeth M W J; van der Leeden, Adelinde J M; Markus, Monica T; Treffers, Philip D A

    2008-10-01

    A substantial percentage of children with anxiety disorders do not respond adequately to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). Examination of parental factors related to treatment outcome could contribute to a further understanding of treatment outcome responses. This study investigated the predictive value of paternal and maternal emotional warmth, rejection, overprotection, anxiety, and depression for CBT outcome in clinic-referred anxious children (ages 8-12). Levels of maternal emotional warmth, paternal rejection and anxiety, and depressive symptoms predicted treatment success and failure. A higher level of maternal emotional warmth was associated with a less favorable treatment outcome. Higher levels of paternal rejection, anxiety, and depressive symptoms were consistently associated with a less favorable treatment outcome.

  11. Attention Bias Modification Treatment for children with anxiety disorders who do not respond to cognitive behavioral therapy: a case series.

    PubMed

    Bechor, Michele; Pettit, Jeremy W; Silverman, Wendy K; Bar-Haim, Yair; Abend, Rany; Pine, Daniel S; Vasey, Michael W; Jaccard, James

    2014-03-01

    Evidence is emerging to support the promise of Attention Bias Modification Treatment (ABMT), a computer-based attention training program, in reducing anxiety in children. ABMT has not been tested as an adjuvant for children with anxiety disorders who do not respond to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT). This case series presents findings from an open trial of ABMT among six children (four girls; M age = 11.2 years) who completed a CBT protocol and continued to meet diagnostic criteria for an anxiety disorder. All children completed the ABMT protocol with no canceled or missed sessions. Child self-ratings on anxiety symptoms and depressive symptoms significantly decreased from pretreatment to posttreatment, as did parent ratings on child anxiety-related impairment. Parent ratings on child anxiety and internalizing symptoms displayed non-significant decreases from pretreatment to posttreatment. These findings support the potential promise of ABMT as a feasible adjuvant treatment that reduces anxiety and impairment among child anxiety CBT nonresponders.

  12. Efficacy and Tolerability of Duloxetine Treatment in Elderly Patients with Major Depressive Disorder and Concurrent Anxiety Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Raskin, Joel; Wiltse, Curtis; Walker, Daniel; Brawman-Mintzer, Olga

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy and tolerability of duloxetine 60mg/day versus placebo in treating elderly patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and concurrent anxiety symptoms. Methods: Patients (≥65) were randomized to eight weeks of treatment with duloxetine 60mg/day (n=207) or placebo (n=104). Anxiety measures were analyzed for all patients, by age (<75 and ≥75), and in patients having concurrent high anxiety (HAMD17, item 10; Psychic Anxiety baseline score of 2, 3, or 4). Psychic Anxiety, Somatic Anxiety item 11, and the Anxiety/Somatization subscale were analyzed for all patients and subgroups by mean change from baseline to endpoint and repeated measures. Tolerability was assessed via treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs), and adverse events were reported as the reason for discontinuation. The analyses presented are primarily post hoc in nature. Results: Duloxetine produced significantly greater reductions than placebo in Psychic Anxiety (least-squares mean change: -0.62 vs. -0.18, p<0.001) and the Anxiety/Somatization subscale (-1.88 vs. -0.99, p=0.002). Repeated measures analyses showed separation between the treatment groups beginning at Week 1 for Psychic Anxiety and Week 4 for the Anxiety/Somatization subscale. Significant improvement occurred in the <75 and ≥75 age groups for Psychic Anxiety, but only the <75 group for the Anxiety/Somatization subscale. Duloxetine-treated patients with high anxiety showed significant improvement compared with placebo-treated patients on Psychic Anxiety, Anxiety/Somatization subscale, the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD17) total score, and several other measures. Duloxetine and placebo had similar TEAE rates and discontinuation rates due to adverse events. Conclusion: Duloxetine (60mg/day) was efficacious and tolerable in elderly patients with MDD and concurrent anxiety symptoms. PMID:20711334

  13. Experimental Evaluation of Behavioral Activation Treatment of Anxiety (BATA) in Three Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Jarrod S.; Leach, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes three single-case experimental evaluations of Behavioral Activation Treatment of Anxiety (BATA) applied with a 51-year-old male, a 62-year-old female, and a 53-year-old female, each of whom met DSM-IV criteria for anxiety. Each case was a clinical replication of an initial trial of BATA reported in Turner and Leach (2009).…

  14. Meta-analysis Comparing Different Behavioral Treatments for Late-Life Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Thorp, Steven R.; Ayers, Catherine R.; Nuevo, Roberto; Stoddard, Jill A.; Sorrell, John T.; Wetherell, Julie Loebach

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of different types of behavioral treatments for geriatric anxiety [cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) alone, CBT with relaxation training (RT), and RT alone]. Method We compared effect sizes from 19 trials. Analyses were based on uncontrolled outcomes (comparing post-treatment and pre-treatment scores) and effects relative to control conditions on both anxiety and depressive symptoms. Results Treatments for older adults with anxiety symptoms were, on average, more effective than active control conditions. Effect sizes were comparable to those reported elsewhere for CBT for anxiety in the general population or for pharmacotherapy in anxious older adults. CBT (alone or augmented with RT) does not appear to add anything beyond RT alone, although a direct comparison is challenging given differences in control conditions. Effects on depressive symptoms were smaller, with no differences among treatment types. Conclusion Results suggest that behavioral treatments are effective for older adults with anxiety disorders and symptoms. Results must be interpreted with caution given the limitations of the literature, including differing sample characteristics and control conditions across studies. PMID:19155744

  15. Attention bias modification (ABM) as a treatment for child and adolescent anxiety: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lowther, Helen; Newman, Emily

    2014-10-01

    Attention Bias Modification (ABM) is a novel computer based treatment for anxiety disorders. It has been proposed as an efficient, accessible psychological therapy and is based on cognitive theories of attention. The present review sought to investigate the efficacy of ABM as a potential treatment for child and adolescent anxiety. A systematic literature review was conducted, using three main databases, PsycINFO, Embase and Medline, to identify original research articles which measured the effect of ABM on anxiety levels in children and/or adolescents. Ten articles met the inclusion criteria and of these 10, three were randomised control trials. A lack of standardisation in relation to the treatment protocol was observed; nonetheless the identified studies generally provided evidence for the efficacy of ABM as an anxiety treatment. Due to the nature of the studies found, a statistical meta-analysis was not possible. ABM seems to be a promising, novel treatment for child and/or adolescent anxiety disorders with merits over lengthier, talking based therapies. However, more rigorous research trials are needed to clarify the mechanisms behind ABM and establish effective, standardised treatment protocols. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Neural Reactivity to Angry Faces Predicts Treatment Response in Pediatric Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Bunford, Nora; Kujawa, Autumn; Fitzgerald, Kate D; Swain, James E; Hanna, Gregory L; Koschmann, Elizabeth; Simpson, David; Connolly, Sucheta; Monk, Christopher S; Phan, K Luan

    2017-02-01

    Although cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy (CBT) and pharmacotherapy are evidence-based treatments for pediatric anxiety, many youth with anxiety disorders fail to respond to these treatments. Given limitations of clinical measures in predicting treatment response, identifying neural predictors is timely. In this study, 35 anxious youth (ages 7-19 years) completed an emotional face-matching task during which the late positive potential (LPP), an event-related potential (ERP) component that indexes sustained attention towards emotional stimuli, was measured. Following the ERP measurement, youth received CBT or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment, and the LPP was examined as a predictor of treatment response. Findings indicated that, accounting for pre-treatment anxiety severity, neural reactivity to emotional faces predicted anxiety severity post- CBT and SSRI treatment such that enhanced electrocortical response to angry faces was associated with better treatment response. An enhanced LPP to angry faces may predict treatment response insofar as it may reflect greater emotion dysregulation or less avoidance and/or enhanced engagement with environmental stimuli in general, including with treatment.

  17. [The effect of dental health instruction before treatment on anxiety of patients with acute pulpitis].

    PubMed

    Tang, Yu; Du, Rong

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of dental health instruction before treatment on dental anxiety of patients with acute pulpitis. One hundred and fifty-four patients with acute pulpitis treated in our department from July 2011 to June 2013, and aged from 19 years to 64 years, were selected. They were randomly divided into experimental group and control group. Seventy-eight patients of the experimental group accepted dental health instruction before treatment, while 76 cases in the control group received regular treatment. Two questionaires of dental anxiety were proceeded to both groups respectively before treatment. The data was analyzed for Student's t test and Chi-square test using SPSS12.0 software package. Dental anxiety (DA) points of the experimental group after dental health instruction were significantly lower than that before treatment (t=4.1346, P<0.01). DA points of the experimental group after dental health instruction were significantly lower than that of the control group (t=6.2784, P<0.01). The acceptability of the experimental group towards the first treatment was significantly higher than of the control group. The completion rate of the following treatment of the experimental group was also significantly higher than that of the control group. Dental health instruction to patients with acute pulpitis before treatment are helpful to reduce the pressure and relieve the anxiety during the treatment, so that the patients will complete the first and the following treatment successfully.

  18. Interpretation bias modification for youth and their parents: a novel treatment for early adolescent social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Reuland, Meg M; Teachman, Bethany A

    2014-12-01

    Social anxiety is the most prevalent anxiety disorder of late adolescence, yet current treatments reach only a minority of youth with the disorder. Effective and easy-to-disseminate treatments are needed. This study pilot tested the efficacy of a novel, online cognitive bias modification for interpretation (CBM-I) intervention for socially anxious youth and their parents. The CBM-I intervention targeted cognitive biases associated with early adolescents' maladaptive beliefs regarding social situations, and with parents' intrusive behavior, both of which have been theoretically linked with the maintenance of social anxiety in youth. To investigate the efficacy of intervening with parents and/or children, clinically diagnosed early adolescents (ages 10-15; N=18) and their mothers were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: the first targeted early adolescents' cognitive biases related to social anxiety (Child-only condition); the second targeted parents' biases associated with intrusive behavior (Parent-only condition); and the third targeted both youth and parents' biases in tandem (Combo condition). The use of a multiple baseline design allowed for the efficient assessment of causal links between the intervention and reduction in social anxiety symptoms in youth. Results provided converging evidence indicating modest support for the efficacy of CBM-I, with no reliable differences across conditions. Taken together, results suggest that online CBM-I with anxious youth and/or their parents holds promise as an effective and easily administered component of treatment for child social anxiety that deserves further evaluation in a larger trial.

  19. Reductions in anxiety and depression symptoms in youth receiving substance use treatment.

    PubMed

    Horigian, Viviana E; Weems, Carl F; Robbins, Michael S; Feaster, Daniel J; Ucha, Jessica; Miller, Michael; Werstlein, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that interventions for substance use disorders may be helpful in reducing internalizing disorders in adolescents. This paper examines the prevalence and reductions of anxiety and depression symptoms among youth receiving substance use treatment. Four hundred eighty adolescents ages 12-17 who received treatment for substance abuse as part of the Brief Strategic Family Therapy effectiveness trial were screened for anxiety and depression using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-Predictive Scales (DISC-PS). Twelve-month post-randomization assessments were completed by 327 parents and 315 youth. Sixty-five percent of the sample was found to have probability of at least one anxiety disorder or depression diagnosis. Significant reduction of anxiety and depressive symptoms and significant reductions in probable anxiety and depression diagnoses were observed at follow-up. Few differences by treatment type and by ethnic group were noticed. Findings indicate that substance use interventions might help reduce the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms and the probability of these disorders. Copyright © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  20. National trends in the antipsychotic treatment of psychiatric outpatients with anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Comer, Jonathan S; Mojtabai, Ramin; Olfson, Mark

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine patterns and recent trends in the antipsychotic medication treatment of anxiety disorders among visits to office-based psychiatrists in the United States. Annual data from the 1996-2007 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were analyzed to examine the patterns and trends in antipsychotic medication treatment within a nationally representative sample of 4,166 visits to office-based psychiatrists in which an anxiety disorder was diagnosed. Across the 12-year period, antipsychotic prescriptions in visits for anxiety disorders increased from 10.6% (1996-1999) to 21.3% (2004-2007). Over the study period, the largest increase in antipsychotic prescribing occurred among new patient visits. Antipsychotic prescribing also significantly increased among privately insured visits and visits in which neither antidepressants nor sedative/hypnotics were prescribed. Among the common anxiety disorder diagnoses, the largest increase in antipsychotic medication treatment was observed in visits for panic disorder. Antipsychotic prescribing rose from 6.9% (1996-1999) to 14.5% (2004-2007) among visits for anxiety disorders in which there were no co-occurring diagnoses with an indication approved by the Food and Drug Administration for antipsychotic medications. Although little is known about their effectiveness for anxiety disorders, antipsychotic medications are becoming increasingly prescribed to psychiatric outpatients with these disorders.

  1. Treatment of music performance anxiety via psychological approaches: a review of selected CBT and psychodynamic literature.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Julie J

    2010-12-01

    Performance anxiety, or stage fright, is anxiety aroused about potential mishaps in performance that expose feared inadequacies before an audience and which evoke feelings of embarrassment and humilation. For affected musicians, performance anxiety can be emotionally devastating, as their career choice in music may be terminated or severely compromised. This paper focuses on the cognitive and psychodynamic literature about music performance anxiety, with the emphasis that for treatment "one size does not fit all." It reviews the factors underlying performance anxiety and those factors which can exacerbate the condition in musicians. The two major clinical treatment modalities within contemporary psychology, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic treatments, are reviewed. While there are more empirical studies of CBT in various populations in the literature, until recently there was an indifference to empirical research by psychodynamic investigators. However, meta-analyses show strong efficacy for psychodynamic psychotherapy (in various disorders, not specifically music performance anxiety), but also that the benefits of psychodynamic psychotherapy may endure longer and increase with time.

  2. Disseminating treatment for anxiety disorders step 2: peer recommendations to seek help.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Jessica R; Coles, Meredith E; Heimberg, Richard G; Weiss, Barry D

    2014-10-01

    Despite the high prevalence of and significant psychological burden caused by anxiety disorders, as few as 25% of individuals with these disorders seek treatment, and treatment seeking by African-Americans is particularly uncommon. This purpose of the current study was to gather information regarding the public's recommendations regarding help-seeking for several anxiety disorders and to compare Caucasian and African-American participants on these variables. A community sample of 577 US adults completed a telephone survey that included vignettes portraying individuals with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social phobia/social anxiety disorder (SP/SAD), panic disorder (PD), and for comparison, depression. The sample was ½ Caucasian and ½ African American. Respondents were significantly less likely to recommend help-seeking for SP/SAD and GAD (78.8% and 84.3%, respectively) than for depression (90.9%). In contrast, recommendations to seek help for panic disorder were common (93.6%) and similar to rates found for depression. The most common recommendations were to seek help from a primary care physician (PCP). African Americans were more likely to recommend help-seeking for GAD than Caucasians. Findings suggested that respondents believed individuals with anxiety disorders should seek treatment. Given that respondents often recommended consulting a PCP, we recommend educating PCPs about anxiety disorders and empirically-supported interventions.

  3. Clinical effectiveness of interventions for treatment-resistant anxiety in older people: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Barton, Samantha; Karner, Charlotta; Salih, Fatima; Baldwin, David S; Edwards, Steven J

    2014-08-01

    Anxiety and related disorders include generalised anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and phobic disorders (intense fear of an object or situation). These disorders share the psychological and physical symptoms of anxiety, but each disorder has its own set of characteristic symptoms. Anxiety disorders can be difficult to recognise, particularly in older people (those aged over 65 years). Older people tend to be more reluctant to discuss mental health issues and there is the perception that older people are generally more worried than younger adults. It is estimated that between 3 and 14 out of every 100 older people have an anxiety disorder. Despite treatment, some people will continue to have symptoms of anxiety. People are generally considered to be 'resistant' or 'refractory' to treatment if they have an inadequate response or do not respond to their first treatment. Older adults with an anxiety disorder find it difficult to manage their day-to-day lives and are at an increased risk of comorbid depression, falls, physical and functional disability, and loneliness. To evaluate the effectiveness of pharmacological, psychological and alternative therapies in older adults with an anxiety disorder who have not responded, or have responded inadequately, to treatment. Electronic databases (MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed citations, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library databases, PsycINFO and Web of Science) were searched from inception to September 2013. Bibliographies of relevant systematic reviews were hand-searched to identify additional potentially relevant studies. ClinicalTrials.gov was searched for ongoing and planned studies. A systematic review of the clinical effectiveness of treatments for treatment-resistant anxiety in older adults was carried out. No randomised controlled trial or prospective comparative observational study was identified meeting the prespecified inclusion criteria

  4. Health literacy and the pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, M Carlotta; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Altamura, A Carlo; Stein, Dan J; Baldwin, David S

    2014-05-01

    Anxiety disorders are treatable conditions, but many affected individuals neither seek professional help nor adhere to recommended pharmacological treatments. Increasing the health literacy of people with (or at risk of) anxiety disorders may encourage treatment-seeking and adherence to recommended interventions. Aims of this study were to review the literature relating to health literacy in the treatment of anxiety disorders, focusing on results on public opinion on psychotropic medications and its effectiveness in improving access to psychiatric health care and the actual use of medications. A computerized literature search of the published literature on mental health literacy was undertaken, focusing on the question of whether increased mental health literacy led to increased treatment-seeking and pharmacotherapy adherence in individuals with anxiety disorders. Twelve relevant articles were identified. All reported that improving mental health literacy leads to raised awareness, and in 10 out of 12 studies, increased help-seeking. However, there is currently no unequivocal evidence to show that increasing health literacy leads to increased use of medication in any psychiatric disorder, including anxiety disorders. Two studies show that knowledge of presumed biological mechanisms can predict use of psychotropic medication, including antidepressants, in psychiatric disorders, however, not specifically in anxiety disorders. There have been few investigations of health literacy focused on psychotropic medications. Given the prevalence, burden and sub-optimal recognition, and treatment of anxiety disorders, further work is needed to determine whether increased mental health literacy is associated with treatment-seeking and medication adherence in patients with these disorders. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Exposure to virtual social interactions in the treatment of social anxiety disorder: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kampmann, Isabel L; Emmelkamp, Paul M G; Hartanto, Dwi; Brinkman, Willem-Paul; Zijlstra, Bonne J H; Morina, Nexhmedin

    2016-02-01

    This randomized controlled trial investigated the efficacy of a stand-alone virtual reality exposure intervention comprising verbal interaction with virtual humans to target heterogeneous social fears in participants with social anxiety disorder. Sixty participants (Mage = 36.9 years; 63.3% women) diagnosed with social anxiety disorder were randomly assigned to individual virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET), individual in vivo exposure therapy (iVET), or waiting-list. Multilevel regression analyses revealed that both treatment groups improved from pre-to postassessment on social anxiety symptoms, speech duration, perceived stress, and avoidant personality disorder related beliefs when compared to the waiting-list. Participants receiving iVET, but not VRET, improved on fear of negative evaluation, speech performance, general anxiety, depression, and quality of life relative to those on waiting-list. The iVET condition was further superior to the VRET condition regarding decreases in social anxiety symptoms at post- and follow-up assessments, and avoidant personality disorder related beliefs at follow-up. At follow-up, all improvements were significant for iVET. For VRET, only the effect for perceived stress was significant. VRET containing extensive verbal interaction without any cognitive components can effectively reduce complaints of generalized social anxiety disorder. Future technological and psychological improvements of virtual social interactions might further enhance the efficacy of VRET for social anxiety disorder.

  6. Addressing anxiety in vivo in physiotherapy treatment of women with severe vaginismus: a clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Talli

    2011-01-01

    Physiotherapy for the treatment of vaginismus is perceived as an intervention aimed to normalize muscle tone of the pelvic floor in order to allow vaginal penetration in accordance with the traditional view of vaginal spasm as its defining feature. Newer definitions recognize the experience of anxiety as well as pain, and effective treatment approaches should address these components as well. Physiotherapists often encounter women who, as a result of severe anxiety, are unable to undergo examination and treatment, despite their expressed desire to do so. This article describes a therapeutic intervention designed to help women with vaginismus prepare for examination and treatment by addressing the component of anxiety in real-life situations. This approach is also appropriate for nurse practitioners and physicians who work with this patient population and may be adapted for sex therapists to teach as a home exercise.

  7. Atraumatic restorative treatment and dental anxiety in outpatients attending public oral health clinics in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Frencken, Jo E; van't, Hof Martin A

    2007-01-01

    This study was undertaken to test the hypotheses that using the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) approach results in lower patient anxiety and that lower anxiety leads to higher restoration/extraction ratios. The test group of dental operators (n = 9) was trained in ART The control group (n = 11) was not, and did not apply ART The Short Form of the Dental Subscale of the Children's Fear Survey Schedule (CFSS-SF) and Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) were used to assess patient anxiety after ART (test group) and after traditional restorations (control group). The restoration/extraction ratio calculated for primary (children) and permanent dentitions (adults) per operator was based on 12-month treatment statistics. Dental anxiety assessments were analysed using ANOVA. Differences were compared using the t-test and corrected for confounding factors (ANCOVA). The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to measure the correlation between dental anxiety levels and restoration/extraction ratios. The mean CFSS-SF score for test-group children was statistically significantly lower than for the control-group children. The mean DAS score for test-group adults was statistically significant lower than the control. No significant correlation was observed between dental anxiety level and restoration/extraction ratio per operator for both dentitions in both groups. The first hypothesis was accepted; the second, rejected. Although dental anxiety scores were lower both in child and in adult patients treated by ART than in those who received traditional restorative treatments, this positive effect had not resulted in higher restoration/extraction ratios.

  8. Improving the retention rate for residential treatment of substance abuse by sequential intervention for social anxiety

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Residential drug rehabilitation is often seen as a treatment of last resort for people with severe substance abuse issues. These clients present with more severe symptoms, and frequent psychiatric comorbidities relative to outpatients. Given the complex nature of this client group, a high proportion of clients seeking treatment often do not enter treatment, and of those who do, many exit prematurely. Given the highly social nature of residential drug rehabilitation services, it has been argued that social anxieties might decrease the likelihood of an individual entering treatment, or increase the likelihood of them prematurely exiting treatment. The current paper reports on the protocol of a Randomised Control Trial which examined whether treatment of social anxiety prior to entry to treatment improves entry rates and retention in residential drug rehabilitation. Method/design A Randomised Control Trial comparing a social skills treatment with a treatment as usual control group was employed. The social skills training program was based on the principles of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, and was adapted from Ron Rapee’s social skills training program. A permutated block randomisation procedure was utilised. Participants are followed up at the completion of the program (or baseline plus six weeks for controls) and at three months following entry into residential rehabilitation (or six months post-baseline for participants who do not enter treatment). Discussion The current study could potentially have implications for addressing social anxiety within residential drug treatment services in order to improve entry and retention in treatment. The results might suggest that the use of additional screening tools in intake assessments, a focus on coping with social anxieties in support groups for clients waiting to enter treatment, and greater awareness of social anxiety issues is warranted. Australian New Zealand clinical trials registry Australian New Zealand

  9. Improving the retention rate for residential treatment of substance abuse by sequential intervention for social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Staiger, Petra K; Kyrios, Michael; Williams, James S; Kambouropoulos, Nicolas; Howard, Alexandra; Gruenert, Stefan

    2014-02-17

    Residential drug rehabilitation is often seen as a treatment of last resort for people with severe substance abuse issues. These clients present with more severe symptoms, and frequent psychiatric comorbidities relative to outpatients. Given the complex nature of this client group, a high proportion of clients seeking treatment often do not enter treatment, and of those who do, many exit prematurely. Given the highly social nature of residential drug rehabilitation services, it has been argued that social anxieties might decrease the likelihood of an individual entering treatment, or increase the likelihood of them prematurely exiting treatment. The current paper reports on the protocol of a Randomised Control Trial which examined whether treatment of social anxiety prior to entry to treatment improves entry rates and retention in residential drug rehabilitation. A Randomised Control Trial comparing a social skills treatment with a treatment as usual control group was employed. The social skills training program was based on the principles of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, and was adapted from Ron Rapee's social skills training program. A permutated block randomisation procedure was utilised. Participants are followed up at the completion of the program (or baseline plus six weeks for controls) and at three months following entry into residential rehabilitation (or six months post-baseline for participants who do not enter treatment). The current study could potentially have implications for addressing social anxiety within residential drug treatment services in order to improve entry and retention in treatment. The results might suggest that the use of additional screening tools in intake assessments, a focus on coping with social anxieties in support groups for clients waiting to enter treatment, and greater awareness of social anxiety issues is warranted. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN) registration number: ACTRN12611000579998.

  10. A meta-review of Internet computer-based psychological treatments for anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Peñate, Wenceslao; Fumero, Ascensión

    2016-01-01

    Internet computer-based psychological treatments have enjoyed rapid growth. Today, there are a number of them available for many mental disorders and psychological problems. Internet-based psychological treatments for anxiety disorders and phobias are amongst the most frequently observed. Treatment results with these resources are promising, but inconclusive. This paper reviews 11 systematic reviews and meta-analyses about the efficacy of Internet-based psychological treatments for anxiety disorders, including studies and clinical trials covering the majority of anxiety disorders and phobias, usually with adult patient samples. In general, these reviews agree on the efficacy of Internet-based psychological treatment as compared with non-treatment groups (with large effect sizes), finding similar efficacy compared with face-to-face therapies. Internet-based psychological treatments are further improved when combined with some type of therapist contact. On the negative side, some systematic reviews highlight high attrition rates of Internet-based psychological treatments. These findings remain inconclusive and more refined reviews (involving patient samples, therapy comparisons, type of therapist contact, etc.) are needed, in order to establish the scope and limits of Internet-based psychological treatments for anxiety disorders. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Bipolar disorder with comorbid anxiety disorders: impact of comorbidity on treatment outcome in cognitive-behavioral therapy and psychoeducation.

    PubMed

    Hawke, Lisa D; Velyvis, Vytas; Parikh, Sagar V

    2013-01-01

    Comorbid anxiety disorders are extremely prevalent in bipolar disorder (BD) and have substantial impact on the course of illness. Limited evidence regarding treatment factors has led to a renewal of research efforts examining both the impact of treatments on comorbid anxiety and the impact of comorbid anxiety on treatments. The current study examines the impact of comorbid anxiety disorders on response to two psychosocial interventions for BD. A sample of 204 patients with BD took part in the study. Of them, 41.7% had a comorbid anxiety disorder. All participants received either individual cognitive-behavioral therapy or group psychoeducation for BD. Evaluations included complete pretreatment and 18-month follow-up assessments of mood and anxiety symptoms, functioning, medication compliance, dysfunctional attitudes, and coping style. Outcome was compared based on the presence or absence of a comorbid anxiety disorder. The participants with comorbid anxiety disorders ranked more severe than those without on several measures. Despite more severe illness characteristics, the magnitude of their treatment gains was equivalent or superior to that of the participants without anxiety disorders on a variety of outcome measures. Although the treatments did not specifically target the anxiety disorder, the participants made significant improvements in anxiety symptoms. Despite greater illness severity, patients with comorbid anxiety disorders can make substantial gains from psychosocial interventions targeting BD. Even in the presence of an anxiety disorder, they are able to attend to the content of the psychosocial treatments and apply it to better manage their condition. The presence of a comorbid anxiety disorder should not be considered a deterrent to offering BD-focused psychosocial treatments.

  12. The feasibility and acceptability of virtual environments in the treatment of childhood social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Sarver, Nina Wong; Beidel, Deborah C; Spitalnick, Josh S

    2014-01-01

    Two significant challenges for the dissemination of social skills training programs are the need to assure generalizability and provide sufficient practice opportunities. In the case of social anxiety disorder, virtual environments may provide one strategy to address these issues. This study evaluated the utility of an interactive virtual school environment for the treatment of social anxiety disorder in preadolescent children. Eleven children with a primary diagnosis of social anxiety disorder between 8 to 12 years old participated in this initial feasibility trial. All children were treated with Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children, an empirically supported treatment for children with social anxiety disorder. However, the in vivo peer generalization sessions and standard parent-assisted homework assignments were substituted by practice in a virtual environment. Overall, the virtual environment programs were acceptable, feasible, and credible treatment components. Both children and clinicians were satisfied with using the virtual environment technology, and children believed it was a high-quality program overall. In addition, parents were satisfied with the virtual environment augmented treatment and indicated that they would recommend the program to family and friends. Findings indicate that the virtual environments are viewed as acceptable and credible by potential recipients. Furthermore, they are easy to implement by even novice users and appear to be useful adjunctive elements for the treatment of childhood social anxiety disorder.

  13. The feasibility and acceptability of virtual environments in the treatment of childhood social anxiety disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Nina; Beidel, Deborah C.; Spitalnick, Josh

    2013-01-01

    Objective Two significant challenges for the dissemination of social skills training programs are the need to assure generalizability and provide sufficient practice opportunities. In the case of social anxiety disorder, virtual environments may provide one strategy to address these issues. This study evaluated the utility of an interactive virtual school environment for the treatment of social anxiety disorder in preadolescent children. Method Eleven children with a primary diagnosis of social anxiety disorder between 8 to 12 years old participated in this initial feasibility trial. All children were treated with Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children, an empirically supported treatment for children with social anxiety disorder. However, the in vivo peer generalization sessions and standard parent-assisted homework assignments were substituted by practice in a virtual environment. Results Overall, the virtual environment programs were acceptable, feasible, and credible treatment components. Both children and clinicians were satisfied with using the virtual environment technology, and children believed it was a high quality program overall. Additionally, parents were satisfied with the virtual environment augmented treatment and indicated that they would recommend the program to family and friends. Conclusion Virtual environments are viewed as acceptable and credible by potential recipients. Furthermore, they are easy to implement by even novice users and appear to be useful adjunctive elements for the treatment of childhood social anxiety disorder. PMID:24144182

  14. Nonpharmacological Alternatives to Benzodiazepine Drugs for the Treatment of Anxiety in Outpatient Populations: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Platt, Lois M; Whitburn, Amy Irene; Platt-Koch, Alexander G; Koch, Ronald L

    2016-08-01

    Overuse of benzodiazepine drugs to treat anxiety, mood, and sleep disorders is a growing problem in clinical practice. GABAergic medications (benzodiazepine drugs in particular) have side effects, drug interactions, and the potential to create tolerance and dependence in users. GABA-enhancing dietary supplements have similar and unique risks. Natural, non-chemical, anxiolytic treatments exist and can be safely recommended to patients. Three such treatments have been the focus of study in the past 20 years: mindfulness, meditation, and yoga. Growing evidence exists that these treatments can be safely recommended to patients with anxiety. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(8), 35-42.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Feasibility and Acceptability of Bibliotherapy and Telephone Sessions for the Treatment of Late-life Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brenes, Gretchen A.; McCall, W. Vaughn; Williamson, Jeff D.; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the development of Biblio and Telephone Therapy or BTT, a cognitive-behavioral treatment program for late-life anxiety disorders. Although studies have examined bibliotherapy for the treatment of late-life depression, none have studied it as a format for treating late-life anxiety. The application of this treatment to 4 older adults with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and/or Panic Disorder (PD) is described and benefits, advantages and limitations are discussed. PMID:20661315

  16. Feasibility and Acceptability of Bibliotherapy and Telephone Sessions for the Treatment of Late-life Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Brenes, Gretchen A; McCall, W Vaughn; Williamson, Jeff D; Stanley, Melinda A

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the development of Biblio and Telephone Therapy or BTT, a cognitive-behavioral treatment program for late-life anxiety disorders. Although studies have examined bibliotherapy for the treatment of late-life depression, none have studied it as a format for treating late-life anxiety. The application of this treatment to 4 older adults with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and/or Panic Disorder (PD) is described and benefits, advantages and limitations are discussed.

  17. Treatment of Anxiety in Children and Adolescents: Using the Child and Adolescent Anxiety Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (CAPP) Therapy Gabrielle Silver, Theodore Shapiro, Barbara Milrod

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Gabrielle; Shapiro, Theodore; Milrod, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Information is presented here on CAPP – child and adolescent psychodynamic psychotherapy. Following a definition of anxiety, the authors present study outcomes of non-psychodynamic treatment approaches, alone and in combination with psychopharmacologic treatment, then explore psychodynamic approaches. A detailed overview of psychodynamic psychotherapy is presented, along with two cases illustrating the use of CAPP with young patients with anxiety. The authors also present tables and boxes summarizing CAPP therapeutic processes and strategies as intervention for anxious youth. PMID:23164129

  18. Sudden Gains during Psychological Treatments of Anxiety and Depression: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aderka, Idan M.; Nickerson, Angela; Boe, Hans Jakob; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The present study quantitatively reviewed the literature on sudden gains in psychological treatments for anxiety and depression. The authors examined the short- and long-term effects of sudden gains on treatment outcome as well as moderators of these effects. Method: The authors conducted a literature search using PubMed, PsycINFO, the…

  19. Anxiety in Children with Mood Disorders: A Treatment Help or Hindrance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Colleen M.; Fristad, Mary A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the role of comorbid anxiety in treatment outcome for children with mood disorders (N = 165; age 8-11) participating in Multi-Family Psychoeducational Psychotherapy (MF-PEP). Assessments occurred at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months for two randomly assigned groups: immediate treatment and 1-year wait-list. Most children (69%) had…

  20. Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Phobic and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Wendy K.; Pina, Armando A.; Viswesvaran, Chockalingam

    2008-01-01

    The article reviews psychosocial treatments for phobic and anxiety disorders in youth. Using criteria from Nathan and Gorman (2002), 32 studies are evaluated along a continuum of methodological rigor. In addition, the treatments evaluated in each of the 32 studies are classified according to Chambless et al.'s (1996) and Chambless and Hollon's…

  1. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Health-Related Anxiety in Youth: A Case Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahana, Shoshana Y.; Feeny, Norah C.

    2005-01-01

    Although illness phobias are fairly common disorders, their treatment has been scarcely addressed in the literature. The current article discusses the treatment of a 9-year-old female diagnosed with health-related anxiety--specifically, a phobia of vomiting. A variety of cognitive-behavioral techniques, such as relaxation training (e.g., deep…

  2. Treatment of Speech Anxiety by Cue-Controlled Relaxation and Desensitization with Professional and Paraprofessional Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Richard K.; Wise, Fred

    1976-01-01

    This investigation compared the relative effectiveness of group-administered cue-controlled relaxation and group systematic desensitization in the treatment of speech anxiety. Also examined was the role of professional versus paraprofessional counselors in implementing the treatment program. A description of the cue-controlled relaxation technique…

  3. Specificity of Treatment Effects: Cognitive Therapy and Relaxation for Generalized Anxiety and Panic Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siev, Jedidiah; Chambless, Dianne L.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to address claims that among bona fide treatments no one is more efficacious than another by comparing the relative efficacy of cognitive therapy (CT) and relaxation therapy (RT) in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder without agoraphobia (PD). Two fixed-effects meta-analyses were…

  4. Concordance between Measures of Anxiety and Physiological Arousal Following Treatment of Panic Disorder in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacow, Terri Landon; May, Jill Ehrenreich; Choate-Summers, Molly; Pincus, Donna B.; Mattis, Sara G.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the concordance (or synchrony/desynchrony) between adolescents' self-reports of anxiety and physiological measures of arousal (heart rate) both prior to and after treatment for panic disorder. Results indicated a decline in reported subjective units of distress (SUDS) for the treatment group only at the post-treatment…

  5. Sudden Gains during Psychological Treatments of Anxiety and Depression: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aderka, Idan M.; Nickerson, Angela; Boe, Hans Jakob; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The present study quantitatively reviewed the literature on sudden gains in psychological treatments for anxiety and depression. The authors examined the short- and long-term effects of sudden gains on treatment outcome as well as moderators of these effects. Method: The authors conducted a literature search using PubMed, PsycINFO, the…

  6. Anxiety in Children with Mood Disorders: A Treatment Help or Hindrance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Colleen M.; Fristad, Mary A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the role of comorbid anxiety in treatment outcome for children with mood disorders (N = 165; age 8-11) participating in Multi-Family Psychoeducational Psychotherapy (MF-PEP). Assessments occurred at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months for two randomly assigned groups: immediate treatment and 1-year wait-list. Most children (69%) had…

  7. Specificity of Treatment Effects: Cognitive Therapy and Relaxation for Generalized Anxiety and Panic Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siev, Jedidiah; Chambless, Dianne L.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to address claims that among bona fide treatments no one is more efficacious than another by comparing the relative efficacy of cognitive therapy (CT) and relaxation therapy (RT) in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder without agoraphobia (PD). Two fixed-effects meta-analyses were…

  8. Do anxiety-disordered children need to come into the clinic for efficacious treatment?

    PubMed

    Cobham, Vanessa E

    2012-06-01

    This study compared 3 experimental conditions: wait-list, therapist-supported bibliotherapy, and individual therapy, in the treatment of child anxiety. Participants were 55 children (25 girls and 30 boys), aged 7 to 14 years diagnosed with an anxiety disorder, and their parents. Families were assigned using a modified random assignment process to 1 of the 3 conditions. The intervention evaluated in the 2 active treatment conditions was a family-focused, cognitive-behavioral program. At posttreatment, participants in both treatment conditions had improved significantly on both diagnostic and questionnaire outcome measures compared with participants in the wait-list condition, with no differences demonstrated between the treatment conditions. Thus, at posttreatment, 0% of children in the wait-list condition were anxiety diagnosis free, compared with 95% in the therapist-supported bibliotherapy condition and 78.3% in the individual therapy condition. There was no significant difference between diagnostic status at posttreatment between the 2 treatment conditions. Participants assigned to a treatment condition were reassessed at 3-month and 6-month follow-up. Treatment gains were maintained in both conditions across the follow-up period. In light of the fact that more than 80% of anxiety-disordered children never receive treatment, these data suggest that therapist-supported bibliotherapy represents a cost-effective means of reaching a greater number of anxious children.

  9. A Systematic Review of Treatments for Anxiety in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasa, Roma A.; Carroll, Laura M.; Nozzolillo, Alixandra A.; Mahajan, Rajneesh; Mazurek, Micah O.; Bennett, Amanda E.; Wink, Logan K.; Bernal, Maria Pilar

    2014-01-01

    This study systematically examined the efficacy and safety of psychopharmacological and non-psychopharmacological treatments for anxiety in youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Four psychopharmacological, nine cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and two alternative treatment studies met inclusion criteria. Psychopharmacological studies were…

  10. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Health-Related Anxiety in Youth: A Case Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahana, Shoshana Y.; Feeny, Norah C.

    2005-01-01

    Although illness phobias are fairly common disorders, their treatment has been scarcely addressed in the literature. The current article discusses the treatment of a 9-year-old female diagnosed with health-related anxiety--specifically, a phobia of vomiting. A variety of cognitive-behavioral techniques, such as relaxation training (e.g., deep…

  11. The Evaluation of Treatment Procedures Aimed at the Reduction of Interpersonal Anxiety in the Dating Dyad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, James P.; Gilbert, Francis S.

    Three outcome studies were conducted in order to evaluate various treatment procedures for subjects experiencing dating anxiety. The treatment procedures of specific focus was a skills training package using modeling, behavioral rehearsal, feedback, and in vivo practice as major components. The data from two studies indicates the skills training…

  12. Treatment of Test Anxiety by Cue-Controlled Relaxation and Systematic Desensitization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Richard K.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Test-anxious subjects (N=19) participated in an outcome study comparing systematic desensitization, cue-controlled relaxation, and no treatment. The treatment groups demonstrated significant improvement on the self-report measures of test and state anxiety but not on the behavioral indices. The potential advantages of this technique over…

  13. A Systematic Review of Treatments for Anxiety in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasa, Roma A.; Carroll, Laura M.; Nozzolillo, Alixandra A.; Mahajan, Rajneesh; Mazurek, Micah O.; Bennett, Amanda E.; Wink, Logan K.; Bernal, Maria Pilar

    2014-01-01

    This study systematically examined the efficacy and safety of psychopharmacological and non-psychopharmacological treatments for anxiety in youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Four psychopharmacological, nine cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and two alternative treatment studies met inclusion criteria. Psychopharmacological studies were…

  14. Muscle relaxation for individuals having tattoos removed through laser treatment: possible effects regarding anxiety and pain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Faye; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Chen, Tien-Hsing; Chen, Ching; Hsieh, Yu-Lian; Chong, Mian-Yoon; Hung, Chi-Fa; Lin, Shu-Ching; Tsai, Hsiu-Huang; Wang, Liang-Jen

    2016-08-01

    Effectively managing pain is vital for the well-being and satisfaction of patients undergoing dermatologic treatments involving lasers. This study investigates the potential outcome of using muscle relaxation techniques to reduce pain among people having their tattoos removed with laser treatment. This study consists of 56 participants (mean age 18.1 ± 2.1 years) that had tattoos removed using the principle of selective photothermolysis. These participants underwent muscle relaxation before receiving the laser treatment. Their peripheral skin temperatures (PST) were measured both at the beginning and the end of the muscle relaxation period. Then, the Beck Anxiety Inventory was applied to evaluate anxiety levels. Once the laser treatment was completed, pain levels were measured using a visual analogue scale. A total of 125 person-sessions of laser treatment and psychometric assessments were performed in this study. The muscle relaxation method significantly increased the PST of the participants while reducing the levels of anxiety and pain throughout the course of the laser treatment procedure. The PST, anxiety scores, and pain scores all showed significant correlations with one another. According to the results obtained, this study proposes that muscle relaxation techniques be considered possibly auxiliary treatment options for individuals having tattoos removed through laser treatment. Additional studies with a comparison group and a larger sample size are required in the future to confirm the effectiveness of such intervention.

  15. Concordance between Measures of Anxiety and Physiological Arousal Following Treatment of Panic Disorder in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacow, Terri Landon; May, Jill Ehrenreich; Choate-Summers, Molly; Pincus, Donna B.; Mattis, Sara G.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the concordance (or synchrony/desynchrony) between adolescents' self-reports of anxiety and physiological measures of arousal (heart rate) both prior to and after treatment for panic disorder. Results indicated a decline in reported subjective units of distress (SUDS) for the treatment group only at the post-treatment…

  16. Impact of dissociation on treatment of depressive and anxiety spectrum disorders with and without personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Prasko, Jan; Grambal, Ales; Kasalova, Petra; Kamardova, Dana; Ociskova, Marie; Holubova, Michaela; Vrbova, Kristyna; Sigmundova, Zuzana; Latalova, Klara; Slepecky, Milos; Zatkova, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The central goal of the study was to analyze the impact of dissociation on the treatment effectiveness in patients with anxiety/neurotic spectrum and depressive disorders with or without comorbid personality disorders. The research sample consisted of inpatients who were hospitalized in the psychiatric department and met the ICD-10 criteria for diagnosis of depressive disorder, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, mixed anxiety-depressive disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, adjustment disorders, dissociative/conversion disorders, somatoform disorder, or other anxiety/neurotic spectrum disorder. The participants completed these measures at the start and end of the therapeutic program - Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, a subjective version of Clinical Global Impression-Severity, Sheehan Patient-Related Anxiety Scale, and Dissociative Experience Scale. A total of 840 patients with anxiety or depressive spectrum disorders, who were resistant to pharmacological treatment on an outpatient basis and were referred for hospitalization for the 6-week complex therapeutic program, were enrolled in this study. Of them, 606 were statistically analyzed. Data from the remaining 234 (27.86%) patients were not used because of various reasons (103 prematurely finished the program, 131 did not fill in most of the questionnaires). The patients' mean ratings on all measurements were significantly reduced during the treatment. Also, 67.5% reached at least minimal improvement (42.4% showed moderate and more improvement, 35.3% of the patients reached remission). The patients without comorbid personality disorder improved more significantly in the reduction of depressive symptoms than those with comorbid personality disorder. However, there were no significant differences in change in anxiety levels and severity of the mental issues between the patients with and without personality disorders. Higher

  17. Internet treatment for social anxiety disorder in Romania: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most common anxiety disorders and is associated with marked impairments. However, a small proportion of individuals with SAD seek and receive treatment. Internet-administrated cognitive behavior therapy (iCBT) has been found to be an effective treatment for SAD. This trial will be the first Internet-delivered guided self-help intervention for SAD in Romania. Methods Participants with social anxiety disorder (N = 96) will be recruited via newspapers, online banners and Facebook. Participants will be randomized to either: a) an active treatment, or b) a waiting list control group. The treatment will have a guided iCBT format and will last for nine weeks. Self-report questionnaires on social phobia, anxiety, depression, treatment credibility and irrational thinking will be used. All assessments will be collected pre, post and at follow-up (six months after intervention). Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale – Self-Report version (LSAS-SR) will be the primary outcome measure and will be administrated on a weekly basis in both conditions. Discussion The present randomized controlled trial investigates the efficacy of an Internet-administered intervention in reducing social anxiety symptoms in a culture where this form of treatment has not been tested. This trial will add to the body of knowledge on the efficacy of iCBT, and the results might lead to an increase of the accessibility of evidence-based psychological treatment in Romania. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01557894 PMID:23111108

  18. Identification of Anxiety Symptom Clusters in Patients with COPD: Implications for Assessment and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Breland, Jessica Y; Hundt, Natalie E; Barrera, Terri L; Mignogna, Joseph; Petersen, Nancy J; Stanley, Melinda A; Cully, Jeffery A

    2015-10-01

    Treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is palliative, and quality of life is important. Increased understanding of correlates of quality of life and its domains could help clinicians and researchers better tailor COPD treatments and better support patients engaging in those treatments or other important self-management behaviors. Anxiety is common in those with COPD; however, overlap of physical and emotional symptoms complicates its assessment. The current study aimed to identify anxiety symptom clusters and to assess the association of these symptom clusters with COPD-related quality of life. Participants (N = 162) with COPD completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and Medical Research Council dyspnea scale. Anxiety clusters were identified, using principal component analysis (PCA) on the BAI's 21 items. Anxiety clusters, along with factors previously associated with quality of life, were entered into a multiple regression designed to predict COPD-related quality of life. PCA identified four symptom clusters related to (1) general somatic distress, (2) fear, (3) nervousness, and (4) respiration-related distress. Multiple regression analyses indicated that greater fear was associated with less perceived mastery over COPD (β = -0.19, t(149) = -2.69, p < 0.01). Anxiety symptoms associated with fear appear to be an important indicator of anxiety in patients with COPD. In particular, fear was associated with perceptions of mastery, an important psychological construct linked to disease self-management. Assessing the BAI symptom cluster associated with fear (five items) may be a valuable rapid assessment tool to improve COPD treatment and physical health outcomes.

  19. Effectiveness of transdiagnostic Internet cognitive behavioural treatment for mixed anxiety and depression in primary care.

    PubMed

    Newby, Jill M; Mewton, Louise; Williams, Alishia D; Andrews, Gavin

    2014-08-01

    Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural treatment (iCBT) has been shown to be effective for the combined treatment of depression and anxiety in randomised controlled trials. The degree to which these findings generalise to patients in primary care awaits further investigation. Using an open-trial design, we investigated adherence to, and effectiveness of a 6-lesson therapist-assisted iCBT program for mixed anxiety and depression for patients (n = 707) who completed the program under the supervision of primary care clinicians (general practitioners, psychologists and other allied health professionals). Primary outcome measures were the PHQ-9 (depression), GAD-7 (generalised anxiety), K-10 (distress), WHODAS-II (disability), mini-SPIN (social anxiety) and panic disorder severity scale self-report version (PDSS). Adherence to the iCBT program was modest (47.3%), but within-subjects effect sizes ranged from medium (0.51 for PDSS) to large (1.20 for PHQ-9). The lack of control group, limited post-treatment data due to drop-out, and short follow-up period. iCBT is an effective treatment for mixed depression and anxiety when delivered in primary care settings. Methods to increase adherence are needed to optimise the benefits to patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of Auriculotherapy in the Treatment of Temporomandibular Disorders with Anxiety in University Students

    PubMed Central

    Iunes, Denise Hollanda; Chaves, Érika de Cássia Lopes; Moura, Caroline de Castro; Côrrea, Bruna; Carvalho, Leonardo César; Silva, Andreia Maria; de Carvalho, Emília Campos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of auriculotherapy with mustard seeds in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), anxiety, and electromyographic (EMG) activity in university students. Methodology. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) for TMDs (RDC/TMDs), and electromyography were used in this study of 44 college students with high levels of anxiety and TMDs. The subjects were divided into two groups: an auriculotherapy (AA) group (n = 31) and an AA sham group (n = 13). The mustard seeds were applied to the shenmen, rim, sympathetic, brain stem, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) points in the AA group and to sham points in the external ear and wrist in the AA sham group. The treatment protocol was 10 sessions (two treatments per week). Results. Anxiety (p < 0.01) was significantly reduced in the AA group. This group also showed a decrease in tender points in the mandibular posterior region (p = 0.04) and in the right side of the submandibular region (p = 0.02). Complaints of bilateral pain were reduced in the temporal tendon (p ≤ 0.01) and in the left side of the ATM (p < 0.01). In addition, electromyographic (EMG) activity was reduced during temporal muscle contraction (p = 0.03).  Conclusion. Auriculotherapy was effective in the treatment of students with anxiety and TMDs. PMID:26495012

  1. Treatment of co-occurring anxiety disorders and substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    McHugh, R Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders commonly co-occur with substance use disorders both in the general population and in treatment-seeking samples. This co-occurrence is associated with greater symptom severity, higher levels of disability, and poorer course of illness relative to either disorder alone. Little research has been conducted, however, on the treatment of these co-occurring disorders. This gap may not only leave anxiety untreated or undertreated but also increase the risk for relapse and poor substance use outcomes. The aim of this article is to review the current state of the literature on treating co-occurring anxiety and substance use disorders. In addition to presenting a brief overview of the epidemiology of this co-occurrence, the article discusses the challenges in assessing anxiety in the context of a substance use disorder, the evidence for various treatment approaches, and recent advances and future directions in this understudied area. Also highlighted is the need for future research to identify optimal behavioral and pharmacologic treatments for co-occurring anxiety and substance use disorders.

  2. Treatment inadequacy in primary and specialized care patients with depressive and/or anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Bet, Pierre M; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Balkom, Anton van; Nolen, Willem A; Hoogendijk, Witte J G

    2013-12-15

    All guidelines on major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders recommend pharmacotherapy and/or psychological treatment for moderate to severe disease. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate treatment inadequacy, both pharmacological and psychological, in a large naturalistic cohort of subjects with MDD and anxiety disorders from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. All subjects with a current 6-month diagnosis were included (n=1662). Demographic data, clinical features and actual medication use were assessed in face-to-face interviews. In moderate to severe MDD, 43% of the subjects were not treated sufficiently with antidepressants or psychological treatment. In primary health care patients, this undertreatment was 70%. In moderate to severe anxiety disorders, 44% of the subjects were not treated sufficiently with antidepressants, benzodiazepines or psychological treatment. Among antidepressant users with moderate to severe MDD, 21% of the pharmacotherapy was inadequate with respect to drug choice, dose and every day use. Undertreatment and pharmacotherapeutic inadequacy are common in moderate to severe MDD and anxiety disorders. Both are more pronounced in primary care than in specialized care. This may be partly due to differences in disease recognition and help seeking behaviour. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Augmentation Treatment of Psychotherapy for Anxiety Disorders with D-Cycloserine

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Stefan G.; Pollack, Mark H.; Otto, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common mental disorders. One of the most effective strategies to treat anxiety disorders is exposure therapy with or without cognitive intervention. Fear reduction in exposure therapy is similar to extinction learning. Preclinical studies suggest that extinction learning can be blocked by antagonists at the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, and facilitated with D-cycloserine (DCS), a partial agonist at the glycine recognition site of the NMDA receptor in the amygdala. DCS is an established antibiotic drug for the chronic treatment of tuberculosis in humans, but has only recently been investigated as an augmentation therapy for psychological treatment procedures. The review of the literature provides preliminary support for the use of acute dosing of DCS as an adjunctive intervention to exposure therapy for anxiety disorders, including specific phobia and social anxiety disorder. Negative results have recently been reported in the treatment of subclinical fears of animals. These studies suggest that DCS needs to be administered on an acute rather than a chronic dosing schedule, include sufficient time for memory consolidation, and be administered together with psychological treatment that leaves sufficient room for further improvement. It remains to be seen whether these highly promising findings represent reliable pharmacological strategies to enhance exposure therapy of anxiety disorders. PMID:17227287

  4. The effect of virtual reality during dental treatment on child anxiety and behavior.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, C; Schneider, P E; Musselman, R J; Dummett, C O; Gardiner, D

    2000-01-01

    Virtual reality, a three-dimensional computer generated world, has been shown to relax adults during dental treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of virtual reality on the behavior and anxiety of children during dental treatment. The behavior, anxiety and heart rate of twenty-six children, ages five to seven years were evaluated for the first five minutes of two restorative treatment visits. Thirteen children viewed virtual reality at their first restorative visit and not the second, and thirteen children viewed virtual reality at the second restorative visit and not the first. Before and immediately following the restorative visits, each child was instructed to draw a human figure. The restorative appointments were video recorded and heart rate monitored. The drawings and videotapes were rated independently by two examiners. The Koppitz method of evaluating drawings was used to measure anxiety. The Frankl behavior rating scale was used to evaluate behavior. Differences (ANOVA) in behavior (p < or = 0.50) and anxiety (p < or = 0.65) were not significant. The overall pulse rate was significantly lower (ANOVA p < or = 0.001) when the child was wearing glasses and viewing virtual reality. In conclusion, virtual reality during dental treatment had no significant effect on the behavior or anxiety but significantly reduced the pulse.

  5. Anxiety and depression after failure of assisted reproductive treatment among patients experiencing infertility.

    PubMed

    Maroufizadeh, Saman; Karimi, Elaheh; Vesali, Samira; Omani Samani, Reza

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the impact of the number of previous infertility treatment failures on anxiety and depression. In a cross-sectional study, individuals (men and women, but not couples) aged at least 18 years who had a history of infertility and could read and write in Persian were enrolled at the Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran, between November 1, 2013, and February 28, 2014. Participants provided demographic and infertility information and completed the Persian version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Overall, 330 patients (122 men, 208 women) were included. Mean scores on the HADS anxiety and depression subscales (HADS-A and HADS-D) were 8.40±4.51 and 5.95±3.54, respectively. In multiple regression analysis, mean HADS-A scores were significantly higher for patients with one treatment failure (9.57±4.58) than for those without a history of treatment (7.79±4.13; P=0.003). HADS-D scores were significantly higher for patients with two failures (6.92±3.69) than for those with no previous treatment (5.59±3.79; P=0.019). Patients with infertility have increased depression and anxiety after infertility treatment failure. Counseling or treatment for these potential psychological effects should be considered after infertility treatment failure. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral treatment for childhood anxiety in community clinics.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wai-yee; Chan, Charlotte Kwok-ying; Li, Johnson Ching-hong; Au, Terry Kit-fong

    2010-11-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral treatment for childhood anxiety in a community clinic setting in Hong Kong, China. Forty-five clinically-referred children (age 6-11 years) were randomly assigned to either a cognitive-behavioral treatment program or a waitlist-control condition. Children in the treatment condition showed significant reduction in anxiety symptoms-both statistically and clinically-whereas children in the waitlist condition did not. After the waitlist period was over, the control group also received the treatment program and showed a similar reduction in symptoms. For the full sample of 45 children, the effectiveness of the intervention was significant immediately after treatment and in 3- and 6-month follow-ups. In addition, children's anxiety cognition and their ability to cope with anxiety-provoking situations fully mediated the treatment gains. These results offer empirical support for cognitive-behavioral treatment programs in a non-Western cultural context and plausible mediators for how cognitive-behavioral therapy works. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Improving Treatment Response for Paediatric Anxiety Disorders: An Information-Processing Perspective.

    PubMed

    Ege, Sarah; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise

    2016-12-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is considered the treatment of choice for paediatric anxiety disorders, yet there remains substantial room for improvement in treatment outcomes. This paper examines whether theory and research into the role of information-processing in the underlying psychopathology of paediatric anxiety disorders indicate possibilities for improving treatment response. Using a critical review of recent theoretical, empirical and academic literature, the paper examines the role of information-processing biases in paediatric anxiety disorders, the extent to which CBT targets information-processing biases, and possibilities for improving treatment response. The literature reviewed indicates a role for attentional and interpretational biases in anxious psychopathology. While there is theoretical grounding and limited empirical evidence to indicate that CBT ameliorates interpretational biases, evidence regarding the effects of CBT on attentional biases is mixed. Novel treatment methods including attention bias modification training, attention feedback awareness and control training, and mindfulness-based therapy may hold potential in targeting attentional biases, and thereby in improving treatment response. The integration of novel interventions into an existing evidence-based protocol is a complex issue and faces important challenges with regard to determining the optimal treatment package. Novel interventions targeting information-processing biases may hold potential in improving response to CBT for paediatric anxiety disorders. Many important questions remain to be answered.

  8. Remission After Acute Treatment in Children and Adolescents With Anxiety Disorders: Findings From the CAMS

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Golda S.; Sakolsky, Dara; Piacentini, John; Walkup, John T.; Coffey, Kimberly A.; Keeton, Courtney P.; Iyengar, Satish; Kendall, Philip C.; Compton, Scott N.; Albano, Anne Marie; Sherrill, Joel; Rynn, Moira A.; McCracken, James T.; Bergman, Lindsey; Birmaher, Boris; March, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report on remission rates in anxious youth who participated in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS). The CAMS, a multisite clinical trial, randomized 488 children and adolescents (ages 7–17 years; 79% Caucasian; 50% female) with separation, social, and/or generalized anxiety disorder to a 12-week treatment of sertraline (SRT), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), their combination (COMB), or clinical management with pill placebo (PBO). Method The primary definition of remission was loss of all study-entry anxiety disorder diagnoses; additional definitions of remission were used. All outcomes were rated by independent evaluators blind to treatment assignment. Predictors of remission were also examined. Results Remission rates after 12 weeks of treatment ranged from 46% to 68% for COMB, 34% to 46% for SRT, 20% to 46% for CBT, and 15% to 27% for PBO. Rates of remission (i.e., achieving a nearly symptom-free state) were significantly lower than rates of response (i.e., achieving a clinically meaningful improvement relative to baseline) for the entire sample. Youth who received COMB had significantly higher rates of remission compared to all other treatment groups. Both monotherapies had higher remission rates compared to PBO, but rates were not different from each other. Predictors of remission were younger age, nonminority status, lower baseline anxiety severity, absence of other internalizing disorders (e.g., anxiety, depression), and absence of social phobia. Conclusions For the majority of children, some symptoms of anxiety persisted, even among those showing improvement after 12 weeks of treatment, suggesting a need to augment or extend current treatments for some children. PMID:22122292

  9. Grape powder treatment prevents anxiety-like behavior in a rat model of aging.

    PubMed

    Patki, Gaurav; Ali, Quaisar; Pokkunuri, Indira; Asghar, Mohammad; Salim, Samina

    2015-06-01

    Earlier, we have reported that grape powder (GP) treatment prevented pharmacologic and psychological stress-induced anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment in rats. Protective effects of GP were attributed to its antioxidant effects. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that age-associated behavioral and cognitive deficits such as anxiety and memory impairment will be ameliorated with GP treatment. Using a National Institute of Aging recommended rodent model of aging, we examined a potentially protective role of antioxidant-rich GP in age-associated anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment. Male Fischer 344 rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups: young rats (3 months old) provided with tap water or with 15 g/L GP dissolved in tap water for 3 weeks, aged rats (21 months old) provided with tap water or with GP-treated tap water for 3 weeks (AG-GP). Anxiety-like behavior was significantly greater in aged rats compared with young rats, GP-treated young rats, or aged control rats (P < .05). Also, GP treatment prevented age-induced anxiety-like behavior in AG-GP rats (P < .05). Neither short-term nor long-term age-associated memory deficits improved with GP treatment in AG-GP rats. Furthermore, aged rats showed increased level of physiological stress (corticosterone) and increased oxidative stress in the plasma (8-isoprostane) as well as in selected brain areas (protein carbonylation). Grape powder treatment prevented age-induced increase in corticosterone levels and plasma 8-isoprostane levels in aged rats (P < .05), whereas protein carbonylation was recovered in the amygdala region only (P < .05). Grape powder by regulating oxidative stress ameliorates age-induced anxiety-like behavior in rats, whereas age-associated memory deficits seem unaffected with GP treatment.

  10. New advances in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder: the multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine.

    PubMed

    Orsolini, Laura; Tomasetti, Carmine; Valchera, Alessandro; Iasevoli, Felice; Buonaguro, Elisabetta Filomena; Vellante, Federica; Fornaro, Michele; Fiengo, Annastasia; Mazza, Monica; Vecchiotti, Roberta; Perna, Giampaolo; de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Martinotti, Giovanni; Di Giannantonio, Massimo; De Berardis, Domenico

    2016-05-01

    Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is a persistent condition characterized by chronic anxiety, exaggerated worry and tension, mainly comorbid with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Currently, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are recommended as first-line treatment of GAD. However, some patients may not respond to the treatment or discontinue due to adverse effects. Vortioxetine (VRX) is a multimodal antidepressant with a unique mechanism of action, by acting as 5-HT3A, 5-HT1D and 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, partial agonist at the 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors and inhibitor at the 5-HT transporter. Preliminary clinical trials showed contrasting findings in terms of improvement of the anxiety symptomatology and/or cognitive impairment. Here, we aim to systematically review the evidence currently available on the efficacy, safety and tolerability of VRX in the treatment of GAD. The generalizability of results on the efficacy of VRX in patients with anxiety symptomatology and GAD is limited due to few and contrasting RCTs so far available. Only two studies, of which one prevention relapse trial, reported a significant improvement in anxiety symptomatology compared to three with negative findings.

  11. Acceptance and commitment therapy in the treatment of anxiety: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Swain, Jessica; Hancock, Karen; Hainsworth, Cassandra; Bowman, Jenny

    2013-12-01

    With a lifetime prevalence of approximately 17% among community-dwelling adults, anxiety disorders are among the most pervasive of contemporary psychiatric afflictions. Traditional Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) is currently the first line evidence-based psychosocial intervention for the treatment of anxiety. Previous research, however, has found that a significant proportion of patients do not respond to traditional CBT or exhibit residual symptomatology at treatment cessation. Additionally, there is a paucity of evidence among child populations and for the comparative effectiveness of alternative interventions. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) has a growing empirical base demonstrating its efficacy for an array of problems. A systematic review was conducted to examine the evidence for ACT in the treatment of anxiety. PsycInfo, PsycArticles, PsycExtra, Medline and Proquest databases were searched, reference lists examined and citation searches conducted. Two independent reviewers analysed results, determined study eligibility and assessed methodological quality. Thirty-eight studies met inclusion criteria (total n=323). The spectrum of DSM-IV anxiety disorders as well as test and public speaking anxiety were examined. Studies were predominantly between-group design and case studies, with few employing control comparisons. Several methodological issues limit conclusions; however results provide preliminary support for ACT. Larger scale, methodologically rigorous trials are needed to consolidate these findings.

  12. An integrative review of attention biases and their contribution to treatment for anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Tom J.; Vervliet, Bram; Hermans, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Models of exposure therapy, one of the key components of cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders, suggest that attention may play an important role in the extinction of fear and anxiety. Evidence from cognitive research suggests that individual differences may play a causal role in the onset and maintenance of anxiety disorders and so it is also likely to influence treatment. We review the evidence concerning attention and treatment outcomes in anxiety disorders. The evidence reviewed here suggests that that attention biases assessed at pre-treatment might actually predict improved response to treatment, and in particular that prolonged engagement with threat as measured in tasks such as the dot probe is associated with greater reductions in anxious symptoms following treatment. We examine this research within a fear learning framework, considering the possible role of individual differences in attention in the extinction of fear during exposure. Theoretical, experimental and clinical implications are discussed, particularly with reference to the potential for attention bias modification programs in augmenting treatment, and also with reference to how existing research in this area might inform best practice for clinicians. PMID:26217284

  13. New research on anxiety disorders in the elderly and an update on evidence-based treatments.

    PubMed

    Andreescu, Carmen; Varon, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety disorders are frequently encountered in the elderly, but they are largely undetected and untreated. Epidemiological studies indicate a prevalence ranging from 1.2 to 15 %. With the exception of generalized anxiety disorder and agoraphobia, which can often start in late life, most anxiety disorders in older patients are chronic and have their onset earlier in life. Anxiety disorders are an often unrecognized cause of distress, disability, and mortality risk in older adults, and they have been associated with cardiovascular disease, stroke, and cognitive decline. The mechanisms of anxiety in older adults differ from that in younger adults due to age-related neuropathology, as well as the loss and isolation so prominent in late life. Our review intends to provide a comprehensive summary of the most recent research done in the field of anxiety disorders in the elderly. Recent findings in clinical research, neuroimaging, neuroendocrinology, and neuropsychology are covered. An update on treatment options is discussed, including pharmacological and non-pharmacological alternatives.

  14. Cognitive bias modification in the treatment of social anxiety in early psychosis: a single case series.

    PubMed

    Turner, Ruth; Hoppitt, Laura; Hodgekins, Joanne; Wilkinson, Judith; Mackintosh, Bundy; Fowler, David

    2011-05-01

    Social anxiety is a common problem among people who are recovering from psychosis. At present there is no evidence based psychological treatment targeting social anxiety in this population. Cognitive Bias Modification for Interpretation (CBM-I) has been shown to be effective in reducing social anxiety in people who do not have a history of psychosis. To assess the feasibility and acceptability of the CBM-I methodology for use in a clinical setting with people who are experiencing social anxiety following an episode of psychosis. Eight participants with social anxiety were recruited from an early intervention service. A single session of computerized CBM-I was conducted, with mood and cognitive interpretation bias being assessed before and after the session. All participants reported an improvement in mood immediately following the CBM-I session (n=8). For those participants who had a negative interpretation bias, none became more negative following the CBM-I session, with three out of six participants showing a beneficial change. These results suggest that CBM-I is acceptable for use with people who are experiencing social anxiety following a psychotic episode. Further research looking at how CBM-I could be made more interactive and producing more applicable scenarios for use in a clinical setting is recommended. © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2011

  15. Open fluoxetine treatment of mixed anxiety disorders in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, J M; Pine, D S; Tancer, N K; Dummit, E S; Kentgen, L M; Martin, J; Asche, B K; Klein, R G

    1997-01-01

    An open-label pilot study examined fluoxetine treatment in 16 outpatients (9-18 years old) with mixed anxiety disorders. Following nonresponse to psychotherapy, fluoxetine monotherapy was started at 5 mg daily and was increased weekly by 5 or 10 mg daily for 6-9 weeks until improvement occurred or to a maximum of 40 mg (children under 12) or 80 mg (adolescents). Among patients on fluoxetine, severity of illness ratings were "much improved" (mean final Clinical Global Impression scale score 2.8 +/- 0.7). Clinical improvement occurred in 10 of 10 patients with current separation anxiety disorder, 8 of 10 with social phobia, 4 of 6 with specific phobia, 3 of 5 with panic disorder, and 1 of 7 with generalized anxiety disorder. Mean time to improvement was 5 weeks. Mean doses were 24 mg (0.7 mg/kg) for children and 40 mg (0.71 mg/kg) for adolescents. Side effects were transient and included drowsiness (31% of patients), sleep problems (19%), decreased appetite (13%), nausea (13%), abdominal pain (13%), and excitement (13%). No patient developed disinhibition, akathisia, or suicidality. These preliminary findings suggest fluoxetine effectiveness in separation anxiety disorder and social phobia. Youths with only one anxiety disorder appeared to respond to lower doses of fluoxetine than patients with multiple anxiety disorders (0.49 +/- 0.14 versus 0.80 +/- 0.28 mg/kg, p < 0.05).

  16. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of major depressive disorder with comorbid generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    White, Daniela; Tavakoli, Sason

    2015-08-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has shown promising results in treating individuals with behavioral disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD), posttraumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and social anxiety disorder. A number of applications of rTMS to different regions of the left and right prefrontal cortex have been used to treat these disorders, but no study of treatment for MDD with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has been conducted with application of rTMS to both the left and right prefrontal cortex. We hypothesized that applying low-frequency rTMS to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) before applying it to the left DLPFC for the treatment of depression would be anxiolytic in patients with MDD with GAD. Thirteen adult patients with comorbid MDD and GAD received treatment with rTMS in an outpatient setting. The number of treatments ranged from 24 to 36 over 5 to 6 weeks. Response was defined as a ≥ 50% reduction in symptoms from baseline, and remission was defined as a score of < 5 for anxiety symptoms on the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) scale and < 8 for depressive symptoms on the 21-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D-21). At the end of the treatment period, for the GAD-7 scale, 11 out of 13 (84.6%) patients' anxiety symptoms were in remission, achieving a score of < 5 on the GAD-7, and 10 out of 13 patients (76.9%) achieved a HAM-D-21 score of < 8 for depressive symptoms. In this small pilot study of 13 patients with comorbid MDD and GAD, significant improvement in anxiety symptoms along with depressive symptoms was achieved in a majority of patients after bilateral rTMS application.

  17. Impact of dissociation on treatment of depressive and anxiety spectrum disorders with and without personality disorders

    PubMed Central

    Prasko, Jan; Grambal, Ales; Kasalova, Petra; Kamardova, Dana; Ociskova, Marie; Holubova, Michaela; Vrbova, Kristyna; Sigmundova, Zuzana; Latalova, Klara; Slepecky, Milos; Zatkova, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Objective The central goal of the study was to analyze the impact of dissociation on the treatment effectiveness in patients with anxiety/neurotic spectrum and depressive disorders with or without comorbid personality disorders. Methods The research sample consisted of inpatients who were hospitalized in the psychiatric department and met the ICD-10 criteria for diagnosis of depressive disorder, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, mixed anxiety–depressive disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, adjustment disorders, dissociative/conversion disorders, somatoform disorder, or other anxiety/neurotic spectrum disorder. The participants completed these measures at the start and end of the therapeutic program – Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, a subjective version of Clinical Global Impression-Severity, Sheehan Patient-Related Anxiety Scale, and Dissociative Experience Scale. Results A total of 840 patients with anxiety or depressive spectrum disorders, who were resistant to pharmacological treatment on an outpatient basis and were referred for hospitalization for the 6-week complex therapeutic program, were enrolled in this study. Of them, 606 were statistically analyzed. Data from the remaining 234 (27.86%) patients were not used because of various reasons (103 prematurely finished the program, 131 did not fill in most of the questionnaires). The patients’ mean ratings on all measurements were significantly reduced during the treatment. Also, 67.5% reached at least minimal improvement (42.4% showed moderate and more improvement, 35.3% of the patients reached remission). The patients without comorbid personality disorder improved more significantly in the reduction of depressive symptoms than those with comorbid personality disorder. However, there were no significant differences in change in anxiety levels and severity of the mental issues between the patients with and without

  18. Parents' State and Trait Anxiety: Relationships with Anxiety Severity and Treatment Response in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Caitlin M.; Maddox, Brenna B.; White, Susan W.

    2013-01-01

    Comorbid anxiety is common among children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and parents of children with ASD are more likely to have anxiety disorders. This study investigated the relationship between parents' state and trait anxiety and parent-reported internalizing and externalizing symptoms among adolescents (n = 30) with ASD, as well…

  19. Parents' State and Trait Anxiety: Relationships with Anxiety Severity and Treatment Response in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Caitlin M.; Maddox, Brenna B.; White, Susan W.

    2013-01-01

    Comorbid anxiety is common among children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and parents of children with ASD are more likely to have anxiety disorders. This study investigated the relationship between parents' state and trait anxiety and parent-reported internalizing and externalizing symptoms among adolescents (n = 30) with ASD, as well…

  20. Deep brain stimulation: a new treatment in mood and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Velasques, Bruna; Diniz, Claudia; Teixeira, Silmar; Cartier, Consuelo; Peressutti, Caroline; Silva, Farmy; de Carvalho, Marcele; Novaes, Aline; Bittencourt, Juliana; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Cheniaux, Elie; Basile, Luis; Cagy, Mauricio; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    This article considered already existing studies about Deep Brain Stimulation in Mood and Anxiety Disorders. In particular, articles regarding Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Major Depression were mostly analyzed, due to the lack of researches about other types of Mood and Anxiety Disorders. We have concentrated on the target areas where Deep Brain Stimulation was most commonly applied, and on the effects this measure had on treatment-refractory patients. The obtained results showed that the stimulation of the: nucleus accumbens, subgenual cingulate cortex and ventral capsule/ventral striatum, has a positive influence on the development of the disorders investigated, sometimes showing the complete remission of the symptoms. Although Deep Brain Stimulation was overall found to be a promising and safe treatment for Mood and Anxiety Disorders, there are not enough studies proving its efficacy in wide samples and in the presence of more complex variables.

  1. Insomnia Symptoms Following Treatment for Comorbid Panic Disorder With Agoraphobia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cousineau, Héloïse; Marchand, André; Bouchard, Stéphane; Bélanger, Claude; Gosselin, Patrick; Langlois, Frédéric; Labrecque, Joane; Dugas, Michel J; Belleville, Geneviève

    2016-04-01

    Patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) frequently also suffer from insomnia. However, the impact of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders on insomnia has been understudied. Furthermore, comorbidity between anxiety disorders is common. Our main objective was to assess the impact of CBT for PDA or GAD on insomnia. In a quasi-experimental design, 86 participants with PDA and GAD received conventional CBT for their primary disorder or combined CBT for both disorders. Overall, CBTs had a significant impact on reducing insomnia symptoms (η = 0.58). However, among people with insomnia at pretest (67%), 33% still had an insomnia diagnosis, and the majority (63%) had clinically significant residual insomnia following treatment. In conclusion, the CBTs had a positive effect on the reduction of insomnia, but a significant proportion of participants still had insomnia problems following treatment. Clinicians should address insomnia during CBT for PDA and GAD.

  2. Treatment of anxiety disorders in epilepsy: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Mula, Marco

    2013-03-01

    During recent years growing attention has been paid to psychiatric comorbidities in epilepsy. However, anxiety disorders still remain underrecognized and undertreated. This is largely related to the lack of specific screening instruments and the frequent co-occurrence with mood disorders. Data on treatment are insufficient and clinical practice still relies heavily on individual experience. In this article we review evidence-based treatment strategies for primary major anxiety disorders and adapt them to the specific needs of patients with epilepsy. In panic disorder, a combined approach, namely serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is always indicated during the acute phase. Long-term maintenance treatment may include combined therapy or CBT alone depending on individual cases. For generalized anxiety disorders pregabalin has to be considered first choice for short-term and long-term treatment. In social anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder SSRIs, in particular sertraline and paroxetine, can be safely used. Obsessive-compulsive disorder represents a serious condition that needs to be approached in a psychiatric setting. CBT should be considered as the first choice in patients with epilepsy. If drug treatment is needed, epileptologists have to be aware that high-dose antidepressants are appropriate and that SSRIs, in particular sertraline, should be considered first choice. In these patients, careful clinical monitoring is indicated, in selected cases, for potential seizure precipitation and side effects due to pharmacodynamics interactions. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Effects of Music Listening on Pre-treatment Anxiety and Stress Levels in a Dental Hygiene Recall Population.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Myriam V; Zemp, Martina; Kreienbühl, Lea; Hofer, Deborah; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Attin, Thomas; Ehlert, Ulrike; Nater, Urs M

    2015-08-01

    Waiting for a medical procedure can exert significant feelings of state anxiety in patients. Music listening has been shown to be effective in decreasing anxiety levels. No study so far examined the potential anxiety and stress-reducing effect of a music intervention on pre-treatment anxiety and stress in patients waiting for dental hygiene treatment. Knowing whether the anxiety-reducing effect of music would also be detectible in the context of preventive routine medical procedures in healthy individuals would widen the area of application of music from the hospital or clinical environment to medical offices in general. Waiting for a medical treatment can induce anxiety and may lead to the experience of stress. We set out to examine the effect of music on pre-treatment anxiety in a healthy patient sample waiting for a dental treatment. In a randomized controlled clinical trial, 92 consecutive volunteer patients (mean age, 57 years) waiting for their scheduled dental hygiene treatment were randomly allocated to either an experimental (n = 46, listening to music for 10 min) or a control group (n = 46, waiting in silence). State and habitual anxiety, subjective stress, and mood measures were assessed before and after music listening or silence, respectively. State anxiety levels in the music group decreased significantly after intervention as compared to the control group (F(1/90) = 8.06; p = 0.006). Participants' trait anxiety and dental anxiety were not found to moderate this effect. Listening to music prior to dental hygiene treatment decreases anxiety levels to a greater extent than waiting in silence.

  4. Clown doctors as a treatment for preoperative anxiety in children: a randomized, prospective study.

    PubMed

    Vagnoli, Laura; Caprilli, Simona; Robiglio, Arianna; Messeri, Andrea

    2005-10-01

    . The clown group was significantly less anxious during the induction of anesthesia compared with the control group. In the control group there was an increased level of anxiety in the induction room in comparison to in the waiting room; in the clown group anxiety was not significantly different in the 2 locations. The questionnaire for health professionals indicated that the clowns were a benefit to the child, but the majority of the staff was opposed to continuing the program because of perceived interference with the procedures of the operating room. The correlation between the scores of the form to self-evaluate the effectiveness of the clowns and of the Modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale is significant for both the waiting room and induction room. This study shows that the presence of clowns during the induction of anesthesia, together with the child's parents, was an effective intervention for managing children's and parents' anxiety during the preoperative period. We would encourage the promotion of this form of distraction therapy in the treatment of children requiring surgery, but the resistance of medical personnel make it very difficult to insert this program in the activity of the operating room.

  5. Relationships among depression, anxiety, and insomnia symptoms in perinatal women seeking mental health treatment.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Leslie M; Pickett, Scott M; Flynn, Heather; Armitage, Roseanne

    2011-04-01

    Depression and anxiety symptoms are commonly experienced by women during the perinatal period. Changes in sleep and sleep quality are typical throughout pregnancy and early postpartum. However, little is known about relationships between insomnia symptoms and psychiatric symptoms in perinatal women. The objective of the present study is to characterize the burden of insomnia symptoms in perinatal women seeking outpatient psychiatric treatment and to examine relationships between insomnia and symptoms of depression and anxiety. Data from 257 pregnant or postpartum women who sought outpatient psychiatric treatment at a university hospital-affiliated clinic were extracted from an existing clinical management database. Data included validated self-report measures assessing insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]), mood (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale [EPDS]), and generalized anxiety (Penn State Worry Questionnaire [PSWQ]). Fifty-two percent of women reported symptoms of insomnia, 75% reported symptoms of depression, and 61% reported symptoms of generalized anxiety. After controlling for PSWQ, the partial correlation between EPDS and ISI was 0.15 and 0.37 for pregnant and postpartum women, respectively. After controlling for EPDS, the partial correlation between PSWQ and ISI was 0.20 and 0.12 for pregnant and postpartum women, respectively. Women with clinically significant ISI scores had significantly higher odds for reporting symptoms consistent with depression (odds ratio [OR] 7.7) and generalized anxiety (OR 2.55) compared to women with lower ISI scores. Insomnia symptoms affected a significant proportion of the perinatal women in this sample. These symptoms are linked to symptoms of depression and anxiety in treatment-seeking pregnant and postpartum women. Perinatal women seen in psychiatric treatment settings should be routinely screened for sleep problems.

  6. SLEEP QUALITY PREDICTS TREATMENT OUTCOME IN CBT FOR SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER

    PubMed Central

    Zalta, Alyson K.; Dowd, Sheila; Rosenfield, David; Smits, Jasper A. J.; Otto, Michael W.; Simon, Naomi M.; Meuret, Alicia E.; Marques, Luana; Hofmann, Stefan G.; Pollack, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sleep quality may be an important, yet relatively neglected, predictor of treatment outcome in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders. Specifically, poor sleep quality may impair memory consolidation of in-session extinction learning. We therefore examined sleep quality as a predictor of treatment outcome in CBT for social anxiety disorder and the impact of d-cycloserine (DCS) on this relationship. Methods One hundred sixty-nine participants with a primary diagnosis of DSM-IV generalized social anxiety disorder were recruited across three sites. Participants were enrolled in 12 weeks of group CBT. Participants randomly received 50 mg of DCS (n = 87) or pill placebo (n = 82) 1 hr prior to sessions 3–7. Participants completed a baseline measure of self-reported sleep quality and daily diaries recording subjective feelings of being rested upon wakening. Outcome measures including social anxiety symptoms and global severity scores were assessed at each session. Results Poorer baseline sleep quality was associated with slower improvement and higher posttreatment social anxiety symptom and severity scores. Moreover, patients who felt more “rested” after sleeping the night following a treatment session had lower levels of symptoms and global severity at the next session, controlling for their symptoms and severity scores the previous session. Neither of these effects were moderated by DCS condition. Conclusions Our findings suggest that poor sleep quality diminishes the effects of CBT for social anxiety disorder and this relation is not attenuated by DCS administration. Therapeutic attention to sleep quality prior to initiation of CBT and during the acute treatment phase may be clinically indicated. PMID:24038728

  7. Sleep quality predicts treatment outcome in CBT for social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Zalta, Alyson K; Dowd, Sheila; Rosenfield, David; Smits, Jasper A J; Otto, Michael W; Simon, Naomi M; Meuret, Alicia E; Marques, Luana; Hofmann, Stefan G; Pollack, Mark H

    2013-11-01

    Sleep quality may be an important, yet relatively neglected, predictor of treatment outcome in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders. Specifically, poor sleep quality may impair memory consolidation of in-session extinction learning. We therefore examined sleep quality as a predictor of treatment outcome in CBT for social anxiety disorder and the impact of d-cycloserine (DCS) on this relationship. One hundred sixty-nine participants with a primary diagnosis of DSM-IV generalized social anxiety disorder were recruited across three sites. Participants were enrolled in 12 weeks of group CBT. Participants randomly received 50 mg of DCS (n = 87) or pill placebo (n = 82) 1 hr prior to sessions 3-7. Participants completed a baseline measure of self-reported sleep quality and daily diaries recording subjective feelings of being rested upon wakening. Outcome measures including social anxiety symptoms and global severity scores were assessed at each session. Poorer baseline sleep quality was associated with slower improvement and higher posttreatment social anxiety symptom and severity scores. Moreover, patients who felt more "rested" after sleeping the night following a treatment session had lower levels of symptoms and global severity at the next session, controlling for their symptoms and severity scores the previous session. Neither of these effects were moderated by DCS condition. Our findings suggest that poor sleep quality diminishes the effects of CBT for social anxiety disorder and this relation is not attenuated by DCS administration. Therapeutic attention to sleep quality prior to initiation of CBT and during the acute treatment phase may be clinically indicated. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Is cannabis treatment for anxiety, mood, and related disorders ready for prime time?

    PubMed

    Turna, Jasmine; Patterson, Beth; Van Ameringen, Michael

    2017-06-21

    Anxiety and related disorders are the most common mental conditions affecting the North American population. Despite their established efficacy, first-line antidepressant treatments are associated with significant side effects, leading many afflicted individuals to seek alternative treatments. Cannabis is commonly viewed as a natural alternative for a variety of medical and mental health conditions. Currently, anxiety ranks among the top five medical symptoms for which North Americans report using medical marijuana. However, upon careful review of the extant treatment literature, the anxiolytic effects of cannabis in clinical populations are surprisingly not well-documented. The effects of cannabis on anxiety and mood symptoms have been examined in healthy populations and in several small studies of synthetic cannabinoid agents but there are currently no studies which have examined the effects of the cannabis plant on anxiety and related disorders. In light of the rapidly shifting landscape regarding the legalization of cannabis for medical and recreational purposes, it is important to highlight the significant disconnect between the scientific literature, public opinion, and related policies. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the current cannabis treatment literature, and to identify the potential for cannabis to be used as a therapeutic intervention for anxiety, mood, and related disorders. Searches of five electronic databases were conducted (PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, PsychINFO, and Google Scholar), with the most recent in February 2017. The effects of cannabis on healthy populations and clinical psychiatric samples will be discussed, focusing primarily on anxiety and mood disorders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. [Treatment-resistant anxiety disorders: A literature review of drug therapy strategies].

    PubMed

    Ammar, G; Naja, W J; Pelissolo, A

    2015-06-01

    Anxiety disorders are widespread psychiatric conditions with significant social and professional disability, poor quality of life, an increased risk of suicide, and frequent attendance of medical services. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRI) and serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) have demonstrated a rather robust efficacy for the treatment of most of anxiety disorders. Nevertheless a substantial number of patients are resistant or still suffer from residual symptoms despite this first line treatment. The objective of our paper is to review relevant studies for the pharmacologic management of anxiety disorders resistant to the first line treatment. For this purpose, we conducted a pubmed/medline search for double-blind placebo-controlled trials of treatment-resistant anxiety disorders. An adequate trial for a SRI in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) should continue for at least 12 weeks. Special considerations of the comorbidities and symptom profile could help in the choice of an appropriate pharmacotherapy. Several trials have highlighted the efficacy of antipsychotics as an add-on to SRI in treatment-resistant OCD such as haloperidol more so when comorbid with a tic disorder, or risperidone that can reduce OCD as well as depressive symptoms. Aripiprazole has been shown efficacious in two placebo-controlled double-blind trials, while the efficacy of quetiapine and olanzapine remains controversial. Other trials showed some efficacy of anticonvulsants (lamotrigine, topiramate), pindolol, memantin and N-acetylcystein as an adjunctive treatment to SRI for resistant OCD. Few trials have investigated selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) or SNRI resistant generalized anxiety disorder showing a failure of adjunctive therapy with olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone and risperidone. These studies were underpowered and very limited in number. Adjunctive risperidone for resistant post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) showed

  10. Pregabalin long-term treatment and assessment of discontinuation in patients with generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Siegfried; Iglesias-García, Celso; Schweizer, Edward; Wilson, Jacquelyn; DuBrava, Sarah; Prieto, Rita; Pitman, Verne W; Knapp, Lloyd

    2014-05-01

    Discontinuation effects following cessation of 12 and 24 wk of pregabalin treatment for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) were evaluated in a placebo- and lorazepam-controlled, randomized, double-blind, multicentre trial conducted in 16 countries. The study design consisted of two 12-wk treatment periods (periods 1 and 2), each followed by a 1-wk taper and two post-discontinuation assessments, one immediately following the taper and one 1-wk post-taper. Patients were assigned to receive an initially flexible dose of pregabalin 450-600 mg/d, pregabalin 150-300 mg/d, or lorazepam 3-4 mg/d for 6 wk; responders continued fixed-dose therapy for 6 additional weeks. Patients entering period 2 continued on the same fixed dose or switched to placebo. Discontinuation effects were evaluated with the Physician Withdrawal Checklist (PWC) and reported discontinuation-emergent signs and symptoms. Rebound anxiety was measured with the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale. GAD symptoms improved with all treatments and improvements were maintained over 12 and 24 wk. Low levels of discontinuation symptoms were evident in all treatment groups. For patients who received active treatment during both periods, mean (95% confidence interval) increases on the PWC from last visit on active treatment to the second post-discontinuation assessment were: pregabalin 450-600 mg/d: 2.8 (1.6-3.9), pregabalin 150-300 mg/d: 1.7 (0.7-2.8), lorazepam 3-4 mg/d: 2.2 (1.0-3.5). Rates of rebound anxiety were also low at both 12 and 24 wk (0-6%). This suggests that risk of discontinuation symptoms and rebound anxiety are low for pregabalin after 12 and 24 wk of treatment.

  11. Depression, anxiety, stress, and motivation over the course of smoking cessation treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pawlina, Maritza Muzzi Cardozo; Rondina, Regina de Cássia; Espinosa, Mariano Martinez; Botelho, Clóvis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate changes in the levels of patient anxiety, depression, motivation, and stress over the course of smoking cessation treatment. Methods: This cohort study involved patients enrolled in a smoking cessation program in Cuiabá, Brazil. We selected patients who completed the program in six months or less (n = 142). Patient evaluations were conducted at enrollment (evaluation 1 [E1]); after 45 days of treatment with medication and cognitive-behavioral therapy (E2); and at the end of the six-month study period (E3). Patients were evaluated with a standardized questionnaire (to collect sociodemographic data and determine smoking status), as well as with the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment scale, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, and Lipp Inventory of Stress Symptoms for Adults. The data were analyzed with the nonparametric Wilcoxon test for paired comparisons. To compare treatment success (smoking cessation) with treatment failure, the test for two proportions was used. Results: Among the 142 patients evaluated, there were improvements, in terms of the levels of anxiety, depression, motivation, and stress, between E1 and E2, as well as between E1 and E3. In addition, treatment success correlated significantly with the levels of motivation and anxiety throughout the study period, whereas it correlated significantly with the level of depression only at E2 and E3. Conclusions: We conclude that there are in fact changes in the levels of patient anxiety, depression, motivation, and stress over the course of smoking cessation treatment. Those changes appear to be more pronounced in patients in whom the treatment succeeded. PMID:26578135

  12. Clinical effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral group treatment program for anxiety disorders: a benchmarking study.

    PubMed

    Oei, Tian P S; Boschen, Mark J

    2009-10-01

    Previous research has established efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders, yet it has not been widely assessed in routine community clinic practices. Efficacy research sacrifices external validity to achieve maximum internal validity. Recently, effectiveness research has been advocated as more ecologically valid for assessing routine clinical work in community clinics. Furthermore, there is a lack of effectiveness research in group CBT. This study aims to extend existing research on the effectiveness of CBT from individual therapy into group therapy delivery. It aimed also to examine outcome using not only symptom measures, but also measures of related symptoms, cognitions, and life quality and satisfaction. Results from a cohort of patients with various anxiety disorders demonstrated that treatment was effective in reducing anxiety symptoms to an extent comparable with other effectiveness studies. Despite this, only 43% of individuals showed reliable change, and 17% were 'recovered' from their anxiety symptoms, and the post-treatment measures were still significantly different from the level of anxiety symptoms observed in the general population.

  13. Family Accommodation of Child and Adolescent Anxiety: Mechanisms, Assessment, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Kaila R.; Silverman, Wendy K.

    2016-01-01

    TOPIC Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health concern for youth. Unfortunately, a substantial number of children and adolescents do not respond positively to current evidence-based interventions and/or relapse. As pediatric anxiety disorders are fundamentally a systemic phenomenon, focusing on the ways in which parents become involved in their children’s anxiety symptoms may be a promising alternative approach to treatment. PURPOSE To inform psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners (PMHNPs) about the phenomenology, associated neurobiology, and assessment of family accommodation (FA) as well as clinical interventions targeting FA. FA refers to ways that parents adapt their own behaviors to reduce their children’s anxiety-related distress. SOURCES USED A literature search was performed using Psyc-INFO and PubMed. CONCLUSIONS Current findings indicate a high prevalence of FA associated with pediatric anxiety disorders. FA has a potentially deleterious impact on course of illness and treatment response and is associated with greater caregiver burden. Potential neurobiological underpinnings of FA include dysregulation of parent cortico-limbic circuitry and the oxytocinergic system. PMHNPs are in a unique position to identify families engaged in problematic FA, educate their clientele, provide psychotherapy services with the goal of reducing FA, and consult with multidisciplinary team members. PMID:26238937

  14. Severity of depression and anxiety are predictors of response to antidepressant treatment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Moonen, A J H; Wijers, A; Leentjens, A F G; Christine, C W; Factor, S A; Juncos, J; Lyness, J M; Marsh, L; Panisset, M; Pfeiffer, R; Rottenberg, D; Serrano Ramos, C; Shulman, L; Singer, C; Slevin, J; McDonald, W; Auinger, P; Richard, I H

    2014-06-01

    Antidepressants have appeared to be more effective than placebo treatment in treating depressive syndromes in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). To identify factors that predict improvement in depressive symptoms during antidepressant treatment in depressed PD patients. A secondary analysis was performed on the dataset of the Randomized Placebo-controlled Study of Antidepressants in PD (SAD-PD), in which 76 patients received active treatment with either paroxetine or venlafaxine extended release (XR), and 39 patients received placebo treatment. Backward stepwise regression analyses were conducted with change in 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-24) score between assessments at baseline and week 12 as the main outcome measure, and sex, age, baseline HAMD-24 score, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale section III (UPDRS-III) score, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and the Clinical Anxiety Scale (CAS) as independent variables. In both the active treatment and placebo groups, higher baseline HAMD-24 score and lower UPDRS-III score were associated with greater reduction in HAMD-24 score. Higher anxiety scores predicted less response in the active treatment group. Higher MMSE scores predicted greater response only in the placebo-treated group. Sex and age were no predictors of response. Higher pre-treatment depression scores and lower pre-treatment anxiety scores are the two most important predictors for improvement during antidepressant treatment in depressed PD patients, which is in line with those found in treatment studies of depressed non-PD patients. Furthermore, our results indicate the requirement for different or more intensive treatment for depressed PD patients with more severe anxiety symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Separate and Combined Effects of Cue-Controlled Relaxation and Cognitive Restructuring in the Treatment of Musical Performance Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Gladys Acevedo; Horan, John J.

    1982-01-01

    Music students with reactive and adaptive anxieties participated in a musical performance anxiety reduction program. Cue-controlled relaxation (CCR) and cognitive restructuring (CR) were examined separately and in combination in comparison with a standard treatment control condition. The CCR and CR treatments were each effective in reducing state…

  16. CBT for Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Differential Changes in Selective Attention between Treatment Responders and Non-Responders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legerstee, Jeroen S.; Tulen, Joke H. M.; Dierckx, Bram; Treffers, Philip D. A.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study examined whether treatment response to stepped-care cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) is associated with changes in threat-related selective attention and its specific components in a large clinical sample of anxiety-disordered children. Methods: Ninety-one children with an anxiety disorder were included in the present…

  17. Family-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Chronic Pediatric Headache and Anxiety Disorders: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Kelly L.; Ginsburg, Golda S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic pediatric headache disorders are pervasive, debilitating, and associated with high rates of comorbid anxiety disorders. The combination of headaches and anxiety presents unique challenges for clinicians. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a promising treatment for pediatric headache, however, available treatments fail to…

  18. Family-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Chronic Pediatric Headache and Anxiety Disorders: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Kelly L.; Ginsburg, Golda S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic pediatric headache disorders are pervasive, debilitating, and associated with high rates of comorbid anxiety disorders. The combination of headaches and anxiety presents unique challenges for clinicians. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a promising treatment for pediatric headache, however, available treatments fail to…

  19. CBT for Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Differential Changes in Selective Attention between Treatment Responders and Non-Responders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legerstee, Jeroen S.; Tulen, Joke H. M.; Dierckx, Bram; Treffers, Philip D. A.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study examined whether treatment response to stepped-care cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) is associated with changes in threat-related selective attention and its specific components in a large clinical sample of anxiety-disordered children. Methods: Ninety-one children with an anxiety disorder were included in the present…

  20. Opioid dependence during pregnancy: relationships of anxiety and depression symptoms to treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Benningfield, Margaret M; Dietrich, Mary S; Jones, Hendrée E; Kaltenbach, Karol; Heil, Sarah H; Stine, Susan M; Coyle, Mara G; Arria, Amelia M; O'Grady, Kevin E; Fischer, Gabriele; Martin, Peter R

    2012-11-01

    To examine the relationship of anxiety and depression symptoms with treatment outcomes (treatment discontinuation, rates of ongoing use of illicit drugs and likelihood of preterm delivery) in opioid-dependent pregnant women and describe their use of psychotropic medications. Secondary data analysis from a randomized clinical trial of treatment for opioid dependence during pregnancy. A total of 175 opioid-dependent pregnant women, of whom 131 completed treatment. Symptoms of anxiety and depression were captured with the 15-item Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) screen. Use of illicit drugs was measured by urine drug screening. Preterm delivery was defined as delivery prior to 37 weeks' gestation. Self-reported use of concomitant psychotropic medication at any point during the study was recorded. Women reporting only anxiety symptoms at study entry were more likely to discontinue treatment [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 4.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) : 1.91-13.26, P = 0.012], while those reporting only depression symptoms were less likely to discontinue treatment (adjusted OR = 0.14, 95% CI : 0.20-0.88, P = 0.036) compared to women who reported neither depression nor anxiety symptoms. No statistically significant between-group differences were observed for ongoing illicit drug use or preterm delivery. A majority (61.4%) of women reported use of concomitant psychotropic medication at some point during study participation. Opioid agonist-treated pregnant patients with co-occurring symptoms of anxiety require additional clinical resources to prevent premature discontinuation. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  1. Propranolol for the treatment of anxiety disorders: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Steenen, Serge A; van Wijk, Arjen J; van der Heijden, Geert J M G; van Westrhenen, Roos; de Lange, Jan; de Jongh, Ad

    2016-02-01

    The effects of propranolol in the treatment of anxiety disorders have not been systematically evaluated previously. The aim was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials, addressing the efficacy of oral propranolol versus placebo or other medication as a treatment for alleviating either state or trait anxiety in patients suffering from anxiety disorders. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria. These studies concerned panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (four studies, total n = 130), specific phobia (two studies, total n = 37), social phobia (one study, n = 16), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (one study, n = 19). Three out of four panic disorder trials qualified for pooled analyses. These meta-analyses found no statistically significant differences between the efficacy of propranolol and benzodiazepines regarding the short-term treatment of panic disorder with or without agoraphobia. Also, no evidence was found for effects of propranolol on PTSD symptom severity through inhibition of memory reconsolidation. In conclusion, the quality of evidence for the efficacy of propranolol at present is insufficient to support the routine use of propranolol in the treatment of any of the anxiety disorders.

  2. Reactive and Reciprocal Inhibition Therapies in the Group Treatment of Test Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Maureen

    This experiment compares the effects of group reactive inhibition therapy and group reciprocal inhibition therapy with no treatment on the anxiety level of test-anxious college students. Twenty undergraduate students volunteered for the study and were assigned to either the reactive inhibition group, the reciprocal inhibition group, or the…

  3. Pilot Study: Fluvoxamine Treatment for Depression and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents with Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Rubinstein, Maly; Shemesh, Eyal; Miller, Orit; Farbstein, Ilana; Klein, Anat; Weizman, Abraham; Apter, Alan; Yaniv, Isaac

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and benefit of fluvoxamine for the treatment of major depressive disorder or anxiety disorders in children and adolescents with cancer. Method: The study was conducted from 2001 to 2004 at a pediatric hematology-oncology center. Fifteen children and adolescents with cancer were treated with…

  4. Conjoint Behavioral Consultation: Application to the School-Based Treatment of Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auster, Elana R.; Feeney-Kettler, Kelly A.; Kratochwill, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    In the current paper we discuss the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders using a problem-solving consultation framework. The role of consultation as a service delivery model in a school setting is elaborated on, as well as the contribution that consultation has in the movement towards evidence-based practices in school psychology.…

  5. Social Mishap Exposures for Social Anxiety Disorder: An Important Treatment Ingredient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, Angela; Sawyer, Alice T.; Asnaani, Anu; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional cognitive-behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder, which is closely based on the treatment for depression, has been shown to be effective in numerous randomized placebo-controlled trials. Although this intervention is more effective than waitlist control group and placebo conditions, a considerable number of clients do not…

  6. A Unified, Transdiagnostic Treatment for Adolescents with Chronic Pain and Comorbid Anxiety and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Laura B.; Tsao, Jennie C. I.; Seidman, Laura C.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain disorders represent a significant public health concern, particularly for children and adolescents. High rates of comorbid anxiety and unipolar mood disorders often complicate psychological interventions for chronic pain. Unified treatment approaches, based on emotion regulation skills, are applicable to a broad range of emotional…

  7. Conjoint Behavioral Consultation: Application to the School-Based Treatment of Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auster, Elana R.; Feeney-Kettler, Kelly A.; Kratochwill, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    In the current paper we discuss the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders using a problem-solving consultation framework. The role of consultation as a service delivery model in a school setting is elaborated on, as well as the contribution that consultation has in the movement towards evidence-based practices in school psychology.…

  8. Prediction of success and failure of behavior modification as treatment for dental anxiety.

    PubMed

    Eli, I; Baht, R; Blacher, S

    2004-08-01

    Behavior modification techniques are effective in the treatment of extreme dental anxiety, but their success is by no means absolute. In the present article, the Corah Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS), the self-report symptom inventory SCL-90R and a questionnaire accessing subjects' daydreaming styles (the Short Imaginal Process Inventory) were used to develop possible predictive measures for success and failure of behavior modification as a treatment for dental fear. The patients' level of distractibility and mind wandering, initial dental anxiety and somatization significantly predicted the success of therapy. The odds ratio indicated that the risk of therapy failure increased about 11 times with an increase of one scale of the Poor Attention Control Scale, about three times with an increase of one level of the mean DAS score, and 0.17 times with an increase of one level of somatization. The predictive value of the chosen scales was 80%. Thus, the use of these scales as part of an initial admittance process for patients who suffer from dental anxiety can enhance our ability to better recognize patients who are prone to fail behavior therapy as treatment for their problem, and enable their referral for other possible modes of treatment.

  9. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Anxiety Disorders: Three Case Studies Exemplifying a Unified Treatment Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eifert, Georg H.; Forsyth, John P.; Arch, Joanna; Espejo, Emmanuel; Keller, Melody; Langer, David

    2009-01-01

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is an innovative acceptance-based behavior therapy that has been applied broadly and successfully to treat a variety of clinical problems, including the anxiety disorders. Throughout treatment ACT balances acceptance and mindfulness processes with commitment and behavior change processes. As applied to…

  10. Practice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This revised practice parameter reviews the evidence from research and clinical experience and highlights significant advancements in the assessment and treatment of anxiety disorders since the previous parameter was published. It highlights the importance of early assessment and intervention, gathering information from various sources, assessment…

  11. Incentives and disincentives for the treatment of depression and anxiety: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Ashcroft, Rachelle; Silveira, Jose; Rush, Brian; Mckenzie, Kwame

    2014-07-01

    There is widespread support for primary care to help address growing mental health care demands. Incentives and disincentives are widely used in the design of health care systems to help steer toward desired goals. The absence of a conceptual model to help understand the range of factors that influence the provision of primary mental health care inspired a scoping review of the literature. Understanding the incentives that promote and the disincentives that deter treatment for depression and anxiety in the primary care context will help to achieve goals of greater access to mental health care. A review of the literature was conducted to answer the question, how are incentives and disincentives conceptualized in studies investigating the treatment of common mental disorders in primary care? A comprehensive search of MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Google Scholar was undertaken using Arksey and O'Malley's 5-stage methodological framework for scoping reviews. We identified 27 studies. A range of incentives and disincentives influence the success of primary mental health care initiatives to treat depression and anxiety. Six types of incentives and disincentives can encourage or discourage treatment of depression and anxiety in primary care: attitudes and beliefs, training and core competencies, leadership, organizational, financial, and systemic. Understanding that there are 6 different types of incentives that influence treatment for anxiety and depression in primary care may help service planners who are trying to promote improved mental health care.

  12. Hemisphere-Specific Treatment of Dyslexia Subtypes: Better Reading with Anxiety-Laden Words?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strien, Jan W.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Forty children with dyslexia were treated with visual hemisphere-specific stimulation based on their subtype of dyslexia. Children with L-type dyslexia (hurried, inaccurate reading) who received treatment with anxiety-laden words made fewer substantive errors and more fragmentations on a text-reading task, compared to children who received…

  13. In-Session Exposure Tasks and Therapeutic Alliance across the Treatment of Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Philip C.; Comer, Jonathan S.; Marker, Craig D.; Creed, Torrey A.; Puliafico, Anthony C.; Hughes, Alicia A.; Martin, Erin D.; Suveg, Cynthia; Hudson, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The study examined the shape of therapeutic alliance using latent growth curve modeling and data from multiple informants (therapist, child, mother, father). Children (n = 86) with anxiety disorders were randomized to family-based cognitive-behavioral treatment (FCBT; N = 47) with exposure tasks or to family education, support, and attention…

  14. Effective Group Treatment for Diverse Sources of Anxiety on a College Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouse, Roy; Myszka, Michael

    This paper proposes guidelines based on student development theory and offers practical suggestions for developing a campus-wide anxiety treatment program. The proposed model is designed to allow staff to set priorities and implement plans compatible with available resources. Three major program components are discussed: assessing needs, assessing…

  15. Pilot Study: Fluvoxamine Treatment for Depression and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents with Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Rubinstein, Maly; Shemesh, Eyal; Miller, Orit; Farbstein, Ilana; Klein, Anat; Weizman, Abraham; Apter, Alan; Yaniv, Isaac

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and benefit of fluvoxamine for the treatment of major depressive disorder or anxiety disorders in children and adolescents with cancer. Method: The study was conducted from 2001 to 2004 at a pediatric hematology-oncology center. Fifteen children and adolescents with cancer were treated with…

  16. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Anxiety Disorders: Three Case Studies Exemplifying a Unified Treatment Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eifert, Georg H.; Forsyth, John P.; Arch, Joanna; Espejo, Emmanuel; Keller, Melody; Langer, David

    2009-01-01

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is an innovative acceptance-based behavior therapy that has been applied broadly and successfully to treat a variety of clinical problems, including the anxiety disorders. Throughout treatment ACT balances acceptance and mindfulness processes with commitment and behavior change processes. As applied to…

  17. A Unified, Transdiagnostic Treatment for Adolescents with Chronic Pain and Comorbid Anxiety and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Laura B.; Tsao, Jennie C. I.; Seidman, Laura C.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain disorders represent a significant public health concern, particularly for children and adolescents. High rates of comorbid anxiety and unipolar mood disorders often complicate psychological interventions for chronic pain. Unified treatment approaches, based on emotion regulation skills, are applicable to a broad range of emotional…

  18. Lu-AA21004, a multimodal serotonergic agent, for the potential treatment of depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Adell, Albert

    2010-12-01

    Lu-AA21004, an oral, multimodal serotonergic agent, is currently under development by H Lundbeck and Takeda Pharmaceutical, for the potential treatment of depression and anxiety. Lu-AA21004 belongs to a novel chemical class of antidepressant agents, the bisarylsulfanyl amines, and possesses a novel pharmacological profile, with activity at serotonergic receptors 5-HT3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A, and also at the 5-HT transporter. Acute administration of Lu-AA21004 in rats inhibited the firing activity of serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus through 5-HT3 receptor blockade, with rapid recovery of firing activity upon cessation of treatment compared with an antidepressant of the SSRI class. Results from phase II clinical trials have reported improvement in depression and anxiety symptoms after 6 weeks of treatment. Lu-AA21004 was generally well tolerated, with adverse events related to sexual dysfunction occurring in a lower number of patients receiving Lu-AA21004 compared with venlafaxine. Phase III clinical trials with Lu-AA21004 in patients with major depressive disorder are underway and phase III trials in patients with generalized anxiety disorder have been completed. If initial outcomes from these clinical trials prove positive, Lu-AA21004 may pave the way for new multimodal therapies for the treatment of depression and anxiety.

  19. Propranolol for the treatment of anxiety disorders: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Steenen, Serge A; van Wijk, Arjen J; van der Heijden, Geert JMG; van Westrhenen, Roos; de Lange, Jan; de Jongh, Ad

    2016-01-01

    The effects of propranolol in the treatment of anxiety disorders have not been systematically evaluated previously. The aim was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials, addressing the efficacy of oral propranolol versus placebo or other medication as a treatment for alleviating either state or trait anxiety in patients suffering from anxiety disorders. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria. These studies concerned panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (four studies, total n = 130), specific phobia (two studies, total n = 37), social phobia (one study, n = 16), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (one study, n = 19). Three out of four panic disorder trials qualified for pooled analyses. These meta-analyses found no statistically significant differences between the efficacy of propranolol and benzodiazepines regarding the short-term treatment of panic disorder with or without agoraphobia. Also, no evidence was found for effects of propranolol on PTSD symptom severity through inhibition of memory reconsolidation. In conclusion, the quality of evidence for the efficacy of propranolol at present is insufficient to support the routine use of propranolol in the treatment of any of the anxiety disorders. PMID:26487439

  20. Social Mishap Exposures for Social Anxiety Disorder: An Important Treatment Ingredient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, Angela; Sawyer, Alice T.; Asnaani, Anu; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional cognitive-behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder, which is closely based on the treatment for depression, has been shown to be effective in numerous randomized placebo-controlled trials. Although this intervention is more effective than waitlist control group and placebo conditions, a considerable number of clients do not…

  1. Effect of Behavioral Activation Treatment on Fibromyalgia-Related Pain Anxiety Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundervold, Duane A.; Talley, Chris; Buermann, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Effects of Behavioral Activation Treatment (BAT) on pain anxiety, depression, and pain interference on a 43-year-old female with an 11-year history of chronic fibromyalgia pain are described. Analgesic, anxyiolytic, and antidepressant medications were stabilized prior to participation. Dependent measures were the Behavioral Relaxation Scale, a…

  2. A probabilistic and individualized approach for predicting treatment gains: an extension and application to anxiety disordered youth.

    PubMed

    Beidas, Rinad S; Lindhiem, Oliver; Brodman, Douglas M; Swan, Anna; Carper, Matthew; Cummings, Colleen; Kendall, Philip C; Albano, Anne Marie; Rynn, Moira; Piacentini, John; McCracken, James; Compton, Scott N; March, John; Walkup, John; Ginsburg, Golda; Keeton, Courtney P; Birmaher, Boris; Sakolsky, Dara; Sherrill, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to extend the probability of treatment benefit method by adding treatment condition as a stratifying variable, and illustrate this extension of the methodology using the Child and Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study data. The probability of treatment benefit method produces a simple and practical way to predict individualized treatment benefit based on pretreatment patient characteristics. Two pretreatment patient characteristics were selected in the production of the probability of treatment benefit charts: baseline anxiety severity, measured by the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale, and treatment condition (cognitive-behavioral therapy, sertraline, their combination, and placebo). We produced two charts as exemplars which provide individualized and probabilistic information for treatment response and outcome to treatments for child anxiety. We discuss the implications of the use of the probability of treatment benefit method, particularly with regard to patient-centered outcomes and individualized decision-making in psychology and psychiatry.

  3. The Use of Virtual Reality Technology in the Treatment of Anxiety and Other Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Maples-Keller, Jessica L; Bunnell, Brian E; Kim, Sae-Jin; Rothbaum, Barbara O

    After participating in this activity, learners should be better able to:• Evaluate the literature regarding the effectiveness of incorporating virtual reality (VR) in the treatment of psychiatric disorders• Assess the use of exposure-based intervention for anxiety disorders ABSTRACT: Virtual reality (VR) allows users to experience a sense of presence in a computer-generated, three-dimensional environment. Sensory information is delivered through a head-mounted display and specialized interface devices. These devices track head movements so that the movements and images change in a natural way with head motion, allowing for a sense of immersion. VR, which allows for controlled delivery of sensory stimulation via the therapist, is a convenient and cost-effective treatment. This review focuses on the available literature regarding the effectiveness of incorporating VR within the treatment of various psychiatric disorders, with particular attention to exposure-based intervention for anxiety disorders. A systematic literature search was conducted in order to identify studies implementing VR-based treatment for anxiety or other psychiatric disorders. This article reviews the history of the development of VR-based technology and its use within psychiatric treatment, the empirical evidence for VR-based treatment, and the benefits for using VR for psychiatric research and treatment. It also presents recommendations for how to incorporate VR into psychiatric care and discusses future directions for VR-based treatment and clinical research.

  4. Psychological factors and treatment effectiveness in resistant anxiety disorders in highly comorbid inpatients.

    PubMed

    Ociskova, Marie; Prasko, Jan; Latalova, Klara; Kamaradova, Dana; Grambal, Ales

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are a group of various mental syndromes that have been related with generally poor treatment response. Several psychological factors may improve or hinder treatment effectiveness. Hope has a direct impact on the effectiveness of psychotherapy. Also, dissociation is a significant factor influencing treatment efficiency in this group of disorders. Development of self-stigma could decrease treatment effectiveness, as well as several temperamental and character traits. The aim of this study was to explore a relationship between selected psychological factors and treatment efficacy in anxiety disorders. A total of 109 inpatients suffering from anxiety disorders with high frequency of comorbidity with depression and/or personality disorder were evaluated at the start of the treatment by the following scales: the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness scale, the Adult Dispositional Hope Scale, and the Temperament and Character Inventory - revised. The participants, who sought treatment for anxiety disorders, completed the following scales at the beginning and end of an inpatient-therapy program: Clinical Global Impression (objective and subjective) the Beck Depression Inventory - second edition, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the Dissociative Experiences Scale. The treatment consisted of 25 group sessions and five individual sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy or psychodynamic therapy in combination with pharmacotherapy. There was no randomization to the type of group-therapy program. Greater improvement in psychopathology, assessed by relative change in objective Clinical Global Impression score, was connected with low initial dissociation level, harm avoidance, and self-stigma, and higher amounts of hope and self-directedness. Also, individuals without a comorbid personality disorder improved considerably more than comorbid patients. According to backward-stepwise multiple regression, the best

  5. Psychological factors and treatment effectiveness in resistant anxiety disorders in highly comorbid inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Ociskova, Marie; Prasko, Jan; Latalova, Klara; Kamaradova, Dana; Grambal, Ales

    2016-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are a group of various mental syndromes that have been related with generally poor treatment response. Several psychological factors may improve or hinder treatment effectiveness. Hope has a direct impact on the effectiveness of psychotherapy. Also, dissociation is a significant factor influencing treatment efficiency in this group of disorders. Development of self-stigma could decrease treatment effectiveness, as well as several temperamental and character traits. The aim of this study was to explore a relationship between selected psychological factors and treatment efficacy in anxiety disorders. Subjects and methods A total of 109 inpatients suffering from anxiety disorders with high frequency of comorbidity with depression and/or personality disorder were evaluated at the start of the treatment by the following scales: the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness scale, the Adult Dispositional Hope Scale, and the Temperament and Character Inventory – revised. The participants, who sought treatment for anxiety disorders, completed the following scales at the beginning and end of an inpatient-therapy program: Clinical Global Impression (objective and subjective) the Beck Depression Inventory – second edition, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the Dissociative Experiences Scale. The treatment consisted of 25 group sessions and five individual sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy or psychodynamic therapy in combination with pharmacotherapy. There was no randomization to the type of group-therapy program. Results Greater improvement in psychopathology, assessed by relative change in objective Clinical Global Impression score, was connected with low initial dissociation level, harm avoidance, and self-stigma, and higher amounts of hope and self-directedness. Also, individuals without a comorbid personality disorder improved considerably more than comorbid patients. According to

  6. Interpretation Bias Modification for Youth and their Parents: A Novel Treatment for Early Adolescent Social Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Reuland, Meg M.; Teachman, Bethany A.

    2014-01-01

    Social anxiety is the most prevalent anxiety disorder of late adolescence, yet current treatments reach only a minority of youth with the disorder. Effective and easy-to-disseminate treatments are needed. This study pilot tested the efficacy of a novel, online cognitive bias modification for interpretation (CBM-I) intervention for socially anxious youth and their parents. The CBM-I intervention targeted cognitive biases associated with early adolescents’ maladaptive beliefs regarding social situations, and with parents’ intrusive behavior, both of which have been theoretically linked with the maintenance of social anxiety in youth. To investigate the efficacy of intervening with parents and/or children, clinically diagnosed early adolescents (ages 10–15; N = 18) and their mothers were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: the first targeted early adolescents’ cognitive biases related to social anxiety (Child-only condition); the second targeted parents’ biases associated with intrusive behavior (Parent-only condition); and the third targeted both youth and parents’ biases in tandem (Combo condition). The use of a multiple baseline design allowed for the efficient assessment of causal links between the intervention and reduction in social anxiety symptoms in youth. Results provided converging evidence indicating modest support for the efficacy of CBM-I, with no reliable differences across conditions. Taken together, results suggest that online CBM-I with anxious youth and/or their parents holds promise as an effective and easily administered component of treatment for child social anxiety that deserves further evaluation in a larger trial. PMID:25445075

  7. Psychological treatment of generalized anxiety disorder: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cuijpers, Pim; Sijbrandij, Marit; Koole, Sander; Huibers, Marcus; Berking, Matthias; Andersson, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    Recent years have seen a near-doubling of the number of studies examining the effects of psychotherapies for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in adults. The present article integrates this new evidence with the older literature through a quantitative meta-analysis. A total of 41 studies (with 2132 patients meeting diagnostic criteria for GAD) were identified through systematic searches in bibliographical databases, and were included in the meta-analysis. Most studies examined the effects of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). The majority of studies used waiting lists as control condition. The pooled effect of the 38 comparisons (from 28 studies) of psychotherapy versus a control group was large (g=0.84; 95% CI: 0.71-0.97) with low to moderate heterogeneity. The effects based on self-report measures were somewhat lower than those based on clinician-rated instruments. The effects on depression were also large (g=0.71; 95% CI: 0.59-0.82). There were some indications for publication bias. The number of studies comparing CBT with other psychotherapies (e.g., applied relaxation) or pharmacotherapy was too small to draw conclusions about comparative effectiveness or the long-term effects. There were some indications that CBT was also effective at follow-up and that CBT was more effective than applied relaxation in the longer term.

  8. The role of symptom induction in the treatment of panic and anxiety. Identifiable domains, conditional properties, and treatment targets.

    PubMed

    Rudd, M D; Joiner, T

    1998-01-01

    Although the importance of affectively charged material in the treatment of panic and anxiety has been emphasized and implicitly viewed as essential for effective therapeutic change, a general framework for organizing, understanding, implementing, and evaluating symptom induction techniques has yet to be offered. This article offers a framework for organizing symptoms induction techniques, categorizing treatment targets, and, accordingly, assessing therapeutic change in the treatment of panic and anxiety. Symptom induction techniques are examined in three exposure domains: physiological, cognitive, and situational/circumstantial; treatment targets fall into five categories: (a) poor symptom tolerance and resultant hypersensitivity and hypervigilance, (b) avoidance of internal and external triggers, (c) the emergence of specific catastrophic thoughts and related misinterpretations, (d) diminished adaptive coping skills, and (e) a reduction in general self-efficacy. Additionally, a distinction is proposed between conditional and unconditional properties of symptom induction, with an emphasis on the potential deleterious role conditional properties play during the course of treatment.

  9. Potential Therapeutic Value of a Novel FAAH Inhibitor for the Treatment of Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Marco, Eva M.; Rapino, Cinzia; Caprioli, Antonio; Borsini, Franco; Laviola, Giovanni; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent psychiatric diseases with high personal costs and a remarkable socio-economic burden. However, current treatment of anxiety is far from satisfactory. Novel pharmacological targets have emerged in the recent years, and attention has focused on the endocannabinoid (eCB) system, given the increasing evidence that supports its central role in emotion, coping with stress and anxiety. In the management of anxiety disorders, drug development strategies have left apart the direct activation of type-1 cannabinoid receptors to indirectly enhance eCB signalling through the inhibition of eCB deactivation, that is, the inhibition of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) enzyme. In the present study, we provide evidence for the anxiolytic-like properties of a novel, potent and selective reversible inhibitor of FAAH, ST4070, orally administered to rodents. ST4070 (3 to 30 mg/kg per os) administered to CD1 male mice induced an increase of time spent in the exploration of the open arms of the elevated-plus maze. A partial reduction of anxiety-related behaviour by ST4070 was also obtained in Wistar male rats, which moderately intensified the time spent in the illuminated compartment of the light-dark box. ST4070 clearly inhibited FAAH activity and augmented the levels of two of its substrates, N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide) and N-palmitoylethanolamine, in anxiety-relevant brain regions. Altogether, ST4070 offers a promising anxiolytic-like profile in preclinical studies, although further studies are warranted to clearly demonstrate its efficacy in the clinic management of anxiety disorders. PMID:26360704

  10. Fluoxetine vs. placebo for the treatment of recurrent vasovagal syncope with anxiety sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Flevari, Panayota; Leftheriotis, Dionyssios; Repasos, Evangelos; Katsaras, Dimitrios; Katsimardos, Andreas; Lekakis, John

    2017-01-01

    The optimal medical therapy of patients with vasovagal syncope (VVS) remains controversial. Fluoxetine is effective against anxiety and panic disorders, while its use has shown promising results for VVS. Anxiety sensitivity is a personality trait observed in a considerable proportion of patients with VVS, associated with predisposition to anxiety and panic disorders. Our aim was to examine whether fluoxetine exerts beneficial effects regarding VVS prevention in the subset of patients with anxiety sensitivity. We assessed 106 patients with typical history of recurrent VVS, without other comorbidities, and a diagnostic, positive head-up tilt test. A psychiatric examination ruled out clinical psychiatric disease. Their psychological, stress-related profile was assessed by the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) questionnaire, a 16-item questionnaire, assessing fear of anxiety-related sensations, previously studied in VVS. Patients scoring positive for ASI (n = 60, 57% of the population) were randomized in a 2:1 fashion to receive either 10-40 mg fluoxetine daily (n = 40) or placebo (n = 20), and were followed-up for 1 year. A significant difference was observed between patients receiving fluoxetine and those with placebo, regarding the distribution of syncope-free time during the study (P < 0.05). A significant difference was also observed between the two groups regarding presyncopal events and the total number of patients who experienced syncope or presyncope during follow-up. Sensitivity to anxiety is a common personality trait in recurrent VVS. Fluoxetine is superior to placebo against syncope in these patients. This drug may be a first-line pharmacological treatment for this difficult-to-treat group. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Anxiety Disorders in Caucasian and African American Children: A Comparison of Clinical Characteristics, Treatment Process Variables, and Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gordon-Hollingsworth, Arlene T.; Becker, Emily M.; Keeton, Courtney; Compton, Scott N.; Birmaher, Boris B.; Sakolsky, Dara J.; Piacentini, John; Albano, Anne M.; Kendall, Philip C.; Suveg, Cynthia M.; March, John S.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined racial differences in anxious youth using data from the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS) [1]. Specifically, the study aims addressed whether African American (n = 44) versus Caucasian (n = 359) children varied on (1) baseline clinical characteristics, (2) treatment process variables, and (3) treatment outcomes. Participants were ages 7–17 and met DSM-IV-TR criteria for generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, and/or separation anxiety disorder. Baseline data, as well as outcome data at 12 and 24 weeks, were obtained by independent evaluators. Weekly treatment process variables were collected by therapists. Results indicated no racial differences on baseline clinical characteristics. However, African American participants attended fewer psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy sessions, and were rated by therapists as less involved and compliant, in addition to showing lower mastery of CBT. Once these and other demographic factors were accounted for, race was not a significant predictor of response, remission, or relapse. Implications of these findings suggest African American and Caucasian youth are more similar than different with respect to the manifestations of anxiety and differences in outcomes are likely due to treatment barriers to session attendance and therapist engagement. PMID:25293650

  12. Anxiety Disorders in Caucasian and African American Children: A Comparison of Clinical Characteristics, Treatment Process Variables, and Treatment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gordon-Hollingsworth, Arlene T; Becker, Emily M; Ginsburg, Golda S; Keeton, Courtney; Compton, Scott N; Birmaher, Boris B; Sakolsky, Dara J; Piacentini, John; Albano, Anne M; Kendall, Philip C; Suveg, Cynthia M; March, John S

    2015-10-01

    This study examined racial differences in anxious youth using data from the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS) [1]. Specifically, the study aims addressed whether African American (n = 44) versus Caucasian (n = 359) children varied on (1) baseline clinical characteristics, (2) treatment process variables, and (3) treatment outcomes. Participants were ages 7-17 and met DSM-IV-TR criteria for generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, and/or separation anxiety disorder. Baseline data, as well as outcome data at 12 and 24 weeks, were obtained by independent evaluators. Weekly treatment process variables were collected by therapists. Results indicated no racial differences on baseline clinical characteristics. However, African American participants attended fewer psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy sessions, and were rated by therapists as less involved and compliant, in addition to showing lower mastery of CBT. Once these and other demographic factors were accounted for, race was not a significant predictor of response, remission, or relapse. Implications of these findings suggest African American and Caucasian youth are more similar than different with respect to the manifestations of anxiety and differences in outcomes are likely due to treatment barriers to session attendance and therapist engagement.

  13. Role of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Hershenberg, Rachel; Gros, Daniel F; Brawman-Mintzer, Olga

    2014-06-01

    Evidence-based treatment approaches for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) comprise psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, or a combination of the two. First-line pharmacotherapy agents include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and, in certain European guidelines, pregabalin, which gained European Commission approval. Although short- and long-term efficacy have been established for these agents in controlled trials, response rates of 60-70 % are insufficient, remission rates are relatively modest, and relapse rates considerable. Moreover, questions increasingly arise regarding tolerability and side-effect profiles. As an alternative, antipsychotics have long been of interest for the treatment of anxiety disorders, but investigation had been tempered by their potential for irreversible side effects. With the improved side-effect profiles of atypical antipsychotics, these agents are increasingly being investigated across Axis I disorders. Atypical antipsychotics such as quetiapine, aripiprazole, olanzapine, and risperidone have been shown to be helpful in addressing a range of anxiety and depressive symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders, and have since been used in the treatment of a range of mood and anxiety disorders. In this article, we review the efficacy and tolerability of atypical antipsychotics as adjunctive therapy and/or monotherapy for individuals with GAD, a currently off-label indication. The most evidence has accumulated for quetiapine. Findings suggest that approximately 50 % of participants tolerate the side effects, most commonly sedation and fatigue. Among this subset, those who continue treatment demonstrate significant reductions in anxiety when used as adjunctive therapy or monotherapy. The appropriateness of the use of antipsychotics in the treatment of GAD is discussed.

  14. Treatment of comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and anxiety in children: a multiple baseline design analysis.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Matthew A; Ollendick, Thomas H

    2012-04-01

    The present study evaluated a 10-week psychosocial treatment designed specifically for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and a comorbid anxiety disorder. Using a nonconcurrent multiple baseline design, the authors treated 8 children ages 8-12 with ADHD, combined type, and at least 1 of 3 major anxiety disorders (separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia). The integrated treatment protocol involved parent management training for ADHD and family-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety. Pretreatment assessments included semistructured diagnostic interviews and other standardized measures to determine study eligibility. Children were randomized to 1 of 3 baseline control conditions (i.e., 2, 3, or 4 weeks) and subsequently treated in a university-based psychosocial treatment clinic. Weekly assessments of ADHD and anxiety disorder symptoms occurred throughout treatment and comprehensive assessments were obtained at pretreatment, 1-week posttreatment, and 6-months posttreatment. Single-case results supported greater success in the treatment phase relative to the baseline phase for both ADHD and anxiety symptoms, and ADHD and anxiety symptoms appeared to change concurrently. Pre-post group analyses revealed significant and clinically meaningful improvements in ADHD and anxiety symptoms at 1-week posttreatment, but only anxiety symptoms moved into the subclinical range. At 6-months follow-up, treatment effects were maintained with new movement into the subclinical range for ADHD. The present study provides initial data on an integrated treatment protocol for ADHD and anxiety. Further replication and evaluation are needed. Implications of the findings are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Predictors of treatment outcome in an effectiveness trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for children with anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Wergeland, Gro Janne H; Fjermestad, Krister W; Marin, Carla E; Bjelland, Ingvar; Haugland, Bente Storm Mowatt; Silverman, Wendy K; Öst, Lars-Göran; Bjaastad, Jon Fauskanger; Oeding, Kristin; Havik, Odd E; Heiervang, Einar R

    2016-01-01

    A substantial number of children with anxiety disorders do not improve following cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Recent effectiveness studies have found poorer outcome for CBT programs than what is typically found in efficacy studies. The present study examined predictors of treatment outcome among 181 children (aged 8-15 years), with separation anxiety, social phobia, or generalized anxiety disorder, who participated in a randomized, controlled effectiveness trial of a 10-session CBT program in community clinics. Potential predictors included baseline demographic, child, and parent factors. Outcomes were as follows: a) remission from all inclusion anxiety disorders; b) remission from the primary anxiety disorder; and c) child- and parent-rated reduction of anxiety symptoms at post-treatment and at 1-year follow-up. The most consistent findings across outcome measures and informants were that child-rated anxiety symptoms, functional impairment, a primary diagnosis of social phobia or separation anxiety disorder, and parent internalizing symptoms predicted poorer outcome at post-treatment. Child-rated anxiety symptoms, lower family social class, lower pretreatment child motivation, and parent internalizing symptoms predicted poorer outcome at 1-year follow-up. These results suggest that anxious children with more severe problems, and children of parents with elevated internalizing symptom levels, may be in need of modified, additional, or alternative interventions to achieve a positive treatment outcome.

  16. Is internet treatment for depressive and anxiety disorders ready for prime time?

    PubMed

    Andrews, Gavin; Titov, Nickolai

    2010-06-07

    Internet treatment programs for anxiety and depressive disorders are becoming available and offer cost-effective alternatives to face-to-face treatment with medication or cognitive behaviour therapy. The Clinical Research Unit for Anxiety and Depression at St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, offers internet treatment courses at the VirtualClinic (http://www.virtualclinic.org.au) for people who meet diagnostic criteria for major depression, social phobia, panic disorder and generalised anxiety disorder. These courses are free to people recruited for research. The results of VirtualClinic trials show a high level of patient adherence and strong reductions in symptoms, and that very little clinician time is required. The four treatment programs that have been successfully evaluated in the VirtualClinic have been made available on a not-for-profit basis ($5 service fee) at the CRUfADclinic (http://www.crufadclinic.org) for general practitioners and other clinicians to use with their patients. These programs could be the first level of treatment in a stepped-care environment, where patients who do not benefit sufficiently could then receive face-to-face treatment from their clinician or be referred for specialist treatment.

  17. Public speaking avoidance as a treatment moderator for social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Mesri, Bita; Niles, Andrea N; Pittig, Andre; LeBeau, Richard T; Haik, Ethan; Craske, Michelle G

    2017-06-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) have both garnered empirical support for the effective treatment of social anxiety disorder. However, not every patient benefits equally from either treatment. Identifying moderators of treatment outcome can help to better understand which treatment is best suited for a particular patient. Forty-nine individuals who met criteria for social anxiety disorder were assessed as part of a randomized controlled trial comparing 12 weeks of CBT and ACT. Pre-treatment avoidance of social situations (measured via a public speaking task and clinician rating) was investigated as a moderator of post-treatment, 6-month follow-up, and 12-month follow-up social anxiety symptoms, stress reactivity, and quality of life. Public speaking avoidance was found to be a robust moderator of outcome measures, with more avoidant individuals generally benefitting more from CBT than ACT by 12-month follow-up. In contrast, clinician-rated social avoidance was not found to be a significant moderator of any outcome measure. Results were found only at 12-month follow-up. More comprehensive measures of avoidance would be useful for the field moving forward. Findings inform personalized medicine, suggesting that social avoidance measured behaviorally via a public speaking task may be a more robust factor in treatment prescription compared to clinician-rated social avoidance. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Pilot study: fluvoxamine treatment for depression and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents with cancer.

    PubMed

    Gothelf, Doron; Rubinstein, Maly; Shemesh, Eyal; Miller, Orit; Farbstein, Ilana; Klein, Anat; Weizman, Abraham; Apter, Alan; Yaniv, Isaac

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and benefit of fluvoxamine for the treatment of major depressive disorder or anxiety disorders in children and adolescents with cancer. The study was conducted from 2001 to 2004 at a pediatric hematology-oncology center. Fifteen children and adolescents with cancer were treated with fluvoxamine 100 mg/day in an open prospective 8-week trial. Safety and tolerability were evaluated at baseline and at weeks 4 and 8 by blood tests and the Side Effects Checklist. Clinical benefit was assessed with the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement, the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised, and the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale. Fluvoxamine was well tolerated by all subjects. Psychiatric symptoms improved significantly. In this open trial, fluvoxamine appeared to be well tolerated and was associated with a promising reduction in the depression and anxiety symptoms of pediatric patients with cancer.

  19. Risk for anxiety and implications for treatment: developmental, environmental, and genetic factors governing fear regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Catherine A.; Casey, BJ

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common of the psychiatric disorders affecting as many as 10% of youth, with a peak during adolescence. A core component of these disorders is an unremitting fear in the absence of present threat. One of the most commonly used therapies to treat these disorders is exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy that identifies the source of the fear and anxiety and then desensitizes the individual to it. This treatment builds on basic principles of fear extinction learning. A number of patients improve with this therapy, but 40–50% do not. This paper provides an overview of recent empirical studies employing both human imaging and cross-species behavioral genetics to examine how fear regulation varies across individuals and across development, especially during adolescence. These studies have important implications for understanding who may be at risk for anxiety disorders and for whom and when during development exposure-based therapies may be most effective. PMID:24147742

  20. Health anxiety and hypochondriasis: Description and treatment issues highlighted through a case illustration.

    PubMed

    Hart, John; Björgvinsson, Thröstur

    2010-01-01

    Health anxiety and hypochondriasis are serious and debilitating conditions that are poorly understood by health care providers and general public. This is so partly because of the derogatory use of the term hypochondriasis by the general public. There has been a push by mental health professionals in recent years to use the term health anxiety and to use hypochondriasis only for its extreme form. The Internet has become a popular medium, through Web sites and chat rooms, for patients to seek information, reassurance, and exchange of medical information, sometimes of limited veracity. The term cyberchondria has even been coined to describe this phenomenon. The authors review the research literature related to health anxiety and discuss the beneficial treatments of CBT and pharmacology. The utilization of intensive cognitive-behavioral therapy is highlighted with a case illustration.

  1. Posttreatment Attrition and Its Predictors, Attrition Bias, and Treatment Efficacy of the Anxiety Online Programs

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Britt; Meyer, Denny

    2014-01-01

    Background Although relatively new, the field of e-mental health is becoming more popular with more attention given to researching its various aspects. However, there are many areas that still need further research, especially identifying attrition predictors at various phases of assessment and treatment delivery. Objective The present study identified the predictors of posttreatment assessment completers based on 24 pre- and posttreatment demographic and personal variables and 1 treatment variable, their impact on attrition bias, and the efficacy of the 5 fully automated self-help anxiety treatment programs for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PD/A), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Methods A complex algorithm was used to diagnose participants’ mental disorders based on the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition, Text Revision; DSM-IV-TR). Those who received a primary or secondary diagnosis of 1 of 5 anxiety disorders were offered an online 12-week disorder-specific treatment program. A total of 3199 individuals did not formally drop out of the 12-week treatment cycle, whereas 142 individuals formally dropped out. However, only 347 participants who completed their treatment cycle also completed the posttreatment assessment measures. Based on these measures, predictors of attrition were identified and attrition bias was examined. The efficacy of the 5 treatment programs was assessed based on anxiety-specific severity scores and 5 additional treatment outcome measures. Results On average, completers of posttreatment assessment measures were more likely to be seeking self-help online programs; have heard about the program from traditional media or from family and friends; were receiving mental health assistance; were more likely to learn best by reading, hearing and doing; had a lower pretreatment

  2. Stepped care treatment for depression and anxiety in primary care. a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Seekles, Wike; van Straten, Annemieke; Beekman, Aartjan; van Marwijk, Harm; Cuijpers, Pim

    2011-07-07

    Depressive and anxiety disorders are common in general practice but not always treated adequately. Introducing stepped care might improve this. In this randomized trial we examined the effectiveness of such a stepped care model. The study population consisted of primary care attendees aged 18-65 years with minor or major DSM-IV depressive and/or anxiety disorders, recruited through screening. We randomized 120 patients to either stepped care or care as usual. The stepped care program consisted of (1) watchful waiting, (2) guided self-help, (3) short face-to-face problem solving treatment and (4) pharmacotherapy and/or specialized mental health care. Patients were assessed at baseline and after 8, 16 and 24 weeks. Symptoms of depression and anxiety decreased significantly over time for both groups. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (IDS: P = 0.35 and HADS: P = 0.64). The largest, but not significant, effect (d = -0.21) was found for anxiety on T3. In both groups approximately 48% of the patients were recovered from their DSM-IV diagnosis at the final 6 months assessment. In summary we could not demonstrate that stepped care for depression and anxiety in general practice was more effective than care as usual. Possible reasons are discussed. Current Controlled Trails: ISRCTN17831610.

  3. Treatment of comorbid anxiety and depression with escitalopram: results of a post-marketing surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Laux, G; Friede, M; Müller, W E

    2013-01-01

    In this 16-week post-marketing surveillance (PMS) study, antidepressant effects and tolerability of escitalopram was examined in 2 911 patients with comorbid depression and anxiety. Antidepressant effects were assessed using a modified version of the Montgomery-Åsberg depression rating scale (svMADRS), the Hamilton anxiety scale (HAMA) and the hospital anxiety depression scale (HADS-D) and the clinical global impression scale (CGI-S, CGI-I). Treatment was completed by 2 718 patients, whose severity of depression decreased from a mean svMADRS total score of 33.0 to 8.9. At the end of the study, the remission rate (svMADRS≤12) was 72.9% and the response rate (≥50% decrease in svMADRS score) was 83.1% (LOCF). Similarly, the severity of anxiety symptoms decreased from a mean HAMA total score of 28.8-8.8; the remission rate (HAMA<10) was 63.9% and the response rate (decrease≥50%) was 80.2%. The most frequent adverse events were nausea (1.6%), agitation (1.1%) and fatigue (0.7%). Antidepressant effects and good tolerability of escitalopram were confirmed in everyday practice in patients with comorbid depression and anxiety. The high response and remission rates were within the range reported in previous RTC's of escitalopram vs. comparators or vs. placebo. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. The multidimensional evaluation and treatment of anxiety in children and adolescents: rationale, design, methods and preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Isolan, Luciano Rassier; Bosa, Vera Lúcia; Tocchetto, Andrea Goya; Teche, Stefania Pigatto; Schuch, Ilaine; Costa, Jandira Rahmeier; Costa, Marianna de Abreu; Jarros, Rafaela Behs; Mansur, Maria Augusta; Knijnik, Daniela; Silva, Estácio Amaro; Kieling, Christian; Oliveira, Maria Helena; Medeiros, Elza; Bortoluzzi, Andressa; Toazza, Rudineia; Blaya, Carolina; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Salles, Jerusa Fumagalli de; Silveira, Patrícia Pelufo; Goldani, Marcelo Zubaran; Heldt, Elizeth; Manfro, Gisele Gus

    2011-06-01

    This study aims to describe the design, methods and sample characteristics of the Multidimensional Evaluation and Treatment of Anxiety in Children and Adolescents - the PROTAIA Project. Students between 10 and 17 years old from all six schools belonging to the catchment area of the Primary Care Unit of Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre were included in the project. It comprises five phases: (1) a community screening phase; (2) a psychiatric diagnostic phase; (3) a multidimensional assessment phase evaluating environmental, neuropsychological, nutritional, and biological factors; (4) a treatment phase, and (5) a translational phase. A total of 2,457 subjects from the community were screened for anxiety disorders. From those who attended the diagnostic interview, we identified 138 individuals with at least one anxiety disorder (apart from specific phobia) and 102 individuals without any anxiety disorder. Among the anxiety cases, generalized anxiety disorder (n = 95; 68.8%), social anxiety disorder (n = 57; 41.3%) and separation anxiety disorder (n = 49; 35.5%) were the most frequent disorders. The PROTAIA Project is a promising research project that can contribute to the knowledge of the relationship between anxiety disorders and anxiety-related phenotypes with several genetic and environmental risk factors.

  5. Does atraumatic restorative treatment reduce dental anxiety in children? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Arun K.; Bhumika, T. V.; Nair, N. Sreekumaran

    2015-01-01

    Dental anxiety is one of the major problems affecting children, which impairs the rendering of dental care, leading to impaired quality of life. It often leads to occupational stress in dental personnel and conflict between parents/caregivers. The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials done in children, to synthesize evidence of the effectiveness of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) in reducing dental anxiety in children compared to conventional restorative treatments. The databases searched included PubMed, Google Scholar and The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register. Eligible studies reporting dental anxiety by a variety of psychometric scales were tabulated. The review was conducted and reported in accordance with the guidelines provided by the Cochrane Collaboration. Among 416 studies retrieved through literature search, six studies matched the inclusion criteria. Due to lack of data, only three studies were included for meta-analysis using RevMan software (Review Manager, Version 5.3;The Cochrane Collaboration, Copenhagen, 2014). The pooled meta-analysis data, (standardized mean difference − 2.12 [95% confidence interval: −4.52, 0.27]) failed to show any difference between ART group and the conventional treatment group. In conclusion, ART was not more beneficial in reducing dental anxiety among pediatric dental patients. The findings are relevant in the field of clinical practice in dentistry in the management of the anxious pediatric dental patient. PMID:26038668

  6. Integrative Therapies in Anxiety Treatment with Special Emphasis on the Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Schnorr, Stephanie L.; Bachner, Harriet A.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, research has shown that diet and gut health affects symptoms expressed in stress related disorders, depression, and anxiety through changes in the gut microbiota. Psycho-behavioral function and somatic health interaction have often been ignored in health care with resulting deficits in treatment quality and outcomes. While mental health care requires the professional training in counseling, psychotherapy and psychiatry, complimentary therapeutic strategies, such as attention to a nutritional and diverse diet and supplementation of probiotic foods, may be integrated alongside psychotherapy treatment models. Development of these alternative strategies is predicated on experimental evidence and diligent research on the biology of stress, fear, anxiety-related behaviors, and the gut-brain connection. This article provides a brief overview on biological markers of anxiety and the expanding nutritional literature relating to brain health and mental disorders. A case study demonstrates an example of a biopsychosocial approach integrating cognitive psychotherapy, dietary changes, and mindfulness activities, in treating symptoms of anxiety. This case study shows a possible treatment protocol to explore the efficacy of targeting the gut-brain-axis that may be used as an impetus for future controlled studies. PMID:27698624

  7. Integrative Therapies in Anxiety Treatment with Special Emphasis on the Gut Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Schnorr, Stephanie L; Bachner, Harriet A

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decade, research has shown that diet and gut health affects symptoms expressed in stress related disorders, depression, and anxiety through changes in the gut microbiota. Psycho-behavioral function and somatic health interaction have often been ignored in health care with resulting deficits in treatment quality and outcomes. While mental health care requires the professional training in counseling, psychotherapy and psychiatry, complimentary therapeutic strategies, such as attention to a nutritional and diverse diet and supplementation of probiotic foods, may be integrated alongside psychotherapy treatment models. Development of these alternative strategies is predicated on experimental evidence and diligent research on the biology of stress, fear, anxiety-related behaviors, and the gut-brain connection. This article provides a brief overview on biological markers of anxiety and the expanding nutritional literature relating to brain health and mental disorders. A case study demonstrates an example of a biopsychosocial approach integrating cognitive psychotherapy, dietary changes, and mindfulness activities, in treating symptoms of anxiety. This case study shows a possible treatment protocol to explore the efficacy of targeting the gut-brain-axis that may be used as an impetus for future controlled studies.

  8. Parenting and Parental Anxiety and Depression as Predictors of Treatment Outcome for Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Has the Role of Fathers Been Underestimated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liber, Juliette M.; van Widenfelt, Brigit M.; Goedhart, Arnold W.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.; van der Leeden, Adelinde J. M.; Markus, Monica T.; Treffers, Philip D. A.

    2008-01-01

    A substantial percentage of children with anxiety disorders do not respond adequately to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). Examination of parental factors related to treatment outcome could contribute to a further understanding of treatment outcome responses. This study investigated the predictive value of paternal and maternal emotional warmth,…

  9. Parenting and Parental Anxiety and Depression as Predictors of Treatment Outcome for Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Has the Role of Fathers Been Underestimated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liber, Juliette M.; van Widenfelt, Brigit M.; Goedhart, Arnold W.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.; van der Leeden, Adelinde J. M.; Markus, Monica T.; Treffers, Philip D. A.

    2008-01-01

    A substantial percentage of children with anxiety disorders do not respond adequately to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). Examination of parental factors related to treatment outcome could contribute to a further understanding of treatment outcome responses. This study investigated the predictive value of paternal and maternal emotional warmth,…

  10. Effect of Audiovisual Treatment Information on Relieving Anxiety in Patients Undergoing Impacted Mandibular Third Molar Removal.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung-Hwan; Won, Ji-Hoon; Cha, Jung-Yul; Hwang, Chung-Ju

    2015-11-01

    The authors hypothesized that an audiovisual slide presentation that provided treatment information regarding the removal of an impacted mandibular third molar could improve patient knowledge of postoperative complications and decrease anxiety in young adults before and after surgery. A group that received an audiovisual description was compared with a group that received the conventional written description of the procedure. This randomized clinical trial included young adult patients who required surgical removal of an impacted mandibular third molar and fulfilled the predetermined criteria. The predictor variable was the presentation of an audiovisual slideshow. The audiovisual informed group provided informed consent after viewing an audiovisual slideshow. The control group provided informed consent after reading a written description of the procedure. The outcome variables were the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Dental Anxiety Scale, a self-reported anxiety questionnaire, completed immediately before and 1 week after surgery, and a postoperative questionnaire about the level of understanding of potential postoperative complications. The data were analyzed with χ(2) tests, independent t tests, Mann-Whitney U  tests, and Spearman rank correlation coefficients. Fifty-one patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The audiovisual informed group was comprised of 20 men and 5 women; the written informed group was comprised of 21 men and 5 women. The audiovisual informed group remembered significantly more information than the control group about a potential allergic reaction to local anesthesia or medication and potential trismus (P < .05). The audiovisual informed group had lower self-reported anxiety scores than the control group 1 week after surgery (P < .05). These results suggested that informing patients of the treatment with an audiovisual slide presentation could improve patient knowledge about postoperative complications and aid in alleviating

  11. Outcomes for depression and anxiety in primary care and details of treatment: a naturalistic longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is little evidence as to whether or not guideline concordant care in general practice results in better clinical outcomes for people with anxiety and depression. This study aims to determine possible associations between guideline concordant care and clinical outcomes in general practice patients with depression and anxiety, and identify patient and treatment characteristics associated with clinical improvement. Methods This study forms part of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). Adult patients, recruited in general practice (67 GPs), were interviewed to assess DSM-IV diagnoses during baseline assessment of NESDA, and also completed questionnaires measuring symptom severity, received care, socio-demographic variables and social support both at baseline and 12 months later. The definition of guideline adherence was based on an algorithm on care received. Information on guideline adherence was obtained from GP medical records. Results 721 patients with a current (6-month recency) anxiety or depressive disorder participated. While patients who received guideline concordant care (N = 281) suffered from more severe symptoms than patients who received non-guideline concordant care (N = 440), both groups showed equal improvement in their depressive or anxiety symptoms after 12 months. Patients who (still) had moderate or severe symptoms at follow-up, were more often unemployed, had smaller personal networks and more severe depressive symptoms at baseline than patients with mild symptoms at follow-up. The particular type of treatment followed made no difference to clinical outcomes. Conclusion The added value of guideline concordant care could not be demonstrated in this study. Symptom severity, employment status, social support and comorbidity of anxiety and depression all play a role in poor clinical outcomes. PMID:22099636

  12. Treatments for anxiety and depression in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Cafarella, Paul A; Effing, Tanja W; Usmani, Zafar-Ahmad; Frith, Peter A

    2012-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a serious contemporary health issue. Psychological co-morbidities such as anxiety and depression are common in COPD. Current evidence for treatment options to reduce anxiety and depression in patients with COPD was examined. There is evidence available for the efficacy of pharmacological treatments, cognitive behavioural therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, relaxation therapy and palliative care in COPD. Therapeutic modalities that have not been proven effective in decreasing anxiety and depression in COPD, but which have theoretical potential among patients, include interpersonal psychotherapy, self-management programmes, more extensive disease management programmes, supportive therapy and self-help groups. Besides pulmonary rehabilitation that is only available for a small percentage of patients, management guidelines make scant reference to other options for the treatment of mental health problems. The quantity and quality of research on mental health treatments in COPD have historically been insufficient to support their inclusion in COPD treatment guidelines. In this review, recommendations regarding assessment, treatment and future research in this important field were made.

  13. A randomized controlled trial of an audio-based treatment program for child anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Infantino, Alyssa; Donovan, Caroline L; March, Sonja

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of an audio-based cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) program for child anxiety disorders. Twenty-four children aged 5-11 years were randomly allocated into either the audio-based CBT program condition (Audio, n = 12) or a waitlist control (WL; n = 12) group. Outcome measures included a clinical diagnostic interview, clinician-rated global assessment of functioning, and parent and child self-report ratings of anxiety and internalisation. Assessments were conducted prior to treatment, 12 weeks following treatment, and at 3-month follow-up. Results indicated that at post-assessment, 58.3% of children receiving treatment compared to 16.7% of waitlist children were free of their primary diagnosis, with this figure rising to 66.67% at the 3-month follow-up time point. Additionally, at post-assessment, 25.0% of children in the treatment condition compared to .0% of the waitlist condition were free of all anxiety diagnoses, with this figure rising to 41.67% for the treatment group at 3-month follow-up. Overall, the findings suggest that the audio program tested in this study has the potential to be an efficacious treatment alternative for anxious children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effects of anxiety and depression symptoms on treatment adherence in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Turan, Onur; Yemez, Beyazit; Itil, Oya

    2014-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may cause some psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety, similar to other chronic diseases. Treatment adherence may be affected by worsening of cognitive functions. We aimed to show whether the symptoms of anxiety and depression affect treatment adherence by patients. Seventy-eight COPD patients were analysed at the first visit. The use of bronchodilator therapy was revised for standardization before they attended a second visit after six months. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3 (ASI-3) and SF-36 Questionnaire were carried out at that visit. 'National Guide of Turkish Thoracic Society for Asthma' was used for scoring method of use of the bronchodilator and evaluating treatment adherence (including maintenance therapy). Sixty-two of 78 patients, 53 (85.5%) men and nine (14.5%) women with a mean age of 64.9 ± 9.9 joined the second visit. Thirty-three patients (53.2%) had a high-treatment adherence (HTA), whereas 29 (46.8%) had a low-treatment adherence (LTA). There were high scores of anxiety in 18 (29%) and depression in 11 (17.7%) patients. There was no statistical difference between the HTA and LTA groups in means of age, gender, educational level, presence of comorbidity, classification of COPD, high anxiety scores according to HADS and ASI-3 scores. Of the patients, 41.4% in the LTA group were still smoking, whereas it was only 12.1% in the HTA group (P = 0.009). The LTA group had higher depression scores (P = 0.004) than the HTA group. Dyspnea was found more frequent in LTA patients (P = 0.047); vitality score was also statistically low in this group (P = 0.01). As a result, continuing smoking and the presence of depression symptoms may decrease adherence to treatment. Therefore, to increase the adherence to treatment and reduce symptoms such as dyspnea, it is important to treat any depressive symptoms that are present and to help patients cease smoking.

  15. Prevalence and Prognostic Value of Depression and Anxiety in Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Possibilities of their Treatment.

    PubMed

    Udovichenko, Oleg V; Maximova, N V; Amosova, M V; Yunilaynen, O A; Berseneva, E A; Starostina, E G

    2017-01-01

    Depression and anxiety can potentially influence treatment results of diabetic complications. Of our study was to explore: (1) prevalence of these disorders in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFU); (2) possible risk factors of depression and anxiety; (3) possible links between ulcer treatment results and depression/anxiety status. 285 outpatients with diabetes and foot or leg ulcers were tested for depression and anxiety with self-report scales: CES-D and the anxiety subscale from HADS. Ulcer treatment results, incidence of new ulcers and number of hospital admissions were assessed after 1.5 years of follow-up. Depression was detected in 110 patients (39%), anxiety in 103 (36%). Females had depression and anxiety more often than males (48% and 46% vs. 27% and 25% respectively). A combined score based on diabetes duration, insulin treatment, history of myocardial infarction, history of foot ulcers and recent foot surgery was higher in patients with than without depression (3.0 vs. 2.0, p=0.02). Every of these or other potential risk factors alone was not associated with depression or anxiety. Patients with depression did not demonstrate poorer prognosis except higher mortality in subgroup of severely depressed patients without ulcer history. For anxiety we got similar results as its presence strongly correlated with depression. The overall prevalence of depression and anxiety in DFU patients is compatible with other diabetic populations. Various parameters of ulcer severity and duration did not influence the probability of depression and anxiety occurrence. Depression in general was not associated with poorer ulcer treatment results. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. The use of virtual reality exposure in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Rothbaum, B O; Hodges, L F

    1999-10-01

    One possible alternative to standard in vivo exposure may be virtual reality exposure. Virtual reality integrates real-time computer graphics, body tracking devices, visual displays, and other sensory input devices to immerse a participant in a computer-generated virtual environment. Virtual reality exposure (VRE) is potentially an efficient and cost-effective treatment of anxiety disorders. VRE therapy has been successful in reducing the fear of heights in the first known controlled study of virtual reality in the treatment of a psychological disorder. Outcome was assessed on measures of anxiety, avoidance, attitudes, and distress. Significant group differences were found on all measures such that the VRE group was significantly improved at posttreatment but the control group was unchanged. The efficacy of virtual reality exposure therapy was also supported for the fear of flying in a case study. The potential for virtual reality exposure treatment for these and other disorders is explored.

  17. Serotonin pathway polymorphisms and the treatment of major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Helton, Sarah G; Lohoff, Falk W

    2015-01-01

    While antidepressants are widely used to treat major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders, only half of the patients will respond to antidepressant treatment and only a third of patients will experience a remission of symptoms. Identification of genetic biomarkers that predict antidepressant treatment response could thus greatly improve current clinical practice by providing guidance on which drug to use for which patient. Most antidepressant drugs for the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders have effects on the serotonergic neurotransmitter system; thus, genetic polymorphisms in the genes involved in this pathway represent logical candidates for investigation. This article reviews recent findings on the pharmacogenetics of antidepressant drugs with a focus on serotonergic pathway polymorphisms and discusses future clinical applications.

  18. Dispositional optimism, trait anxiety, and coping: unique or shared effects on biological response to fertility treatment?

    PubMed

    Lancastle, Deborah; Boivin, Jacky

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the unique and shared predictive power of psychological variables on reproductive physical health. Three months before fertility treatment, 97 women completed measures of dispositional optimism, trait anxiety, and coping. Information about biological response to treatment (e.g., estradiol level) was collected from medical charts after treatment. Structural equation modeling showed that measured psychological variables were all significant indicators of a single latent construct and that this construct was a better predictor of biological response to treatment than was any individual predictor. This research contributes to evidence suggesting that the health benefits of dispositional optimism are due to its shared variance with neuroticism.

  19. Factors affecting the death anxiety levels of relatives of cancer patients undergoing treatment.

    PubMed

    Beydag, Kerime Derya

    2012-01-01

    This descriptive study was performed to determine levels of the death anxiety levels of relatives of patients who being treated in a public hospital located in the Asian side of Istanbul and influencing factors. The sample was 106 patient relatives of patients from oncology or chemotherapy units of the hospital. Data were collected between May-June 2011 with the 15-item Death Anxiety Scale developed by Templer (1970) and adapted to Turkish by Senol (1989) and evaluated by number-percentage calculations, the Kruskal Wallis, Anova and t tests. Some 36.8% of the included group were aged 45 years and over, 57.5% were female and 65.1% were married. A statistically significant difference was found between the age groups, genders of the patient relatives, the period of cancer treatment regarding the death anxiety levels (p<0.05). The death anxiety levels of the patient relatives who were in the 17-39 age group, female and had a patient who was under treatment for less than 6 months were found to high as compared to others.

  20. Evaluation of the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3 among treatment-seeking smokers.

    PubMed

    Farris, Samantha G; DiBello, Angelo M; Allan, Nicholas P; Hogan, Julianna; Schmidt, Norman B; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    The Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3 (ASI-3; Taylor et al., 2007) is a self-report assessment of anxiety sensitivity, reflecting an individual's tendency to misinterpret the meaning of anxiety-relevant sensations. Despite this construct being related to a wide array of clinically significant smoking maintenance and relapse processes, the psychometric properties of scores on the ASI-3 have not yet been investigated for use among smokers. Therefore, the current study aimed to test the psychometric properties of the scores on the ASI-3 in a sample of cigarette smokers. Participants were treatment-seeking daily smokers who completed the ASI-3 at a precessation visit (Time 1, N = 464) and 3 months postcessation attempt (Time 2, n = 137). Confirmatory factor analyses results of the scores on ASI-3 at Time 1 and Time 2 revealed the hypothesized 3-factor model, including physical, social, and cognitive concerns. In addition, the ASI-3 factor scores evidenced factor stability, test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and convergent, and discriminant, and predictive validity. The present study provides evidence in support of the validity and reliability of scores on the ASI-3 as a measure of anxiety sensitivity among treatment-seeking cigarette smokers.

  1. Herbs and nutrients in the treatment of depression, anxiety, insomnia, migraine, and obesity.

    PubMed

    Brown, R P; Gerbarg, P L

    2001-03-01

    Although a multitude of pharmaceutical agents are available for the treatment of mood disorders, anxiety and insomnia, many patients have difficulty tolerating the side effects, do not respond adequately, or eventually lose their response. Many therapeutic herbs and nutrients have far fewer side effects and may provide an alternative treatment or can be used to enhance the effect of prescription medications. In the article, the authors review the quality of the evidence supporting the clinical effects of a number of commonly used types of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) for mood disorders, anxiety, and insomnia. They review data on the use of St. John's Wort, S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM-e), B vitamins, inositol, omega-3 fatty acids, and choline for mood disorders; data on the use of kava and other herbal agents and fish extract for anxiety and insomnia; and data on valerian and melatonin for insomnia. The authors also discuss the use of CAM to treat migraines, which may be comorbid with mood and anxiety disorders, and obesity, which can occur as a side effect of psychotropic medications. They consider the data on feverfew and butterbur for migraines and on chromium picolinate and the combination of ephedrine and caffeine for obesity. The authors also review issues related to comorbid medical illness, side effects, drug interactions, dosage, and brand selection.

  2. Hoarding in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Anxiety: Incidence, Clinical Correlates, and Behavioral Treatment Response.

    PubMed

    Storch, Eric A; Nadeau, Joshua M; Johnco, Carly; Timpano, Kiara; McBride, Nicole; Jane Mutch, P; Lewin, Adam B; Murphy, Tanya K

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the nature and correlates of hoarding among youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Forty children with ASD and a comorbid anxiety disorder were administered a battery of clinician-administered measures assessing presence of psychiatric disorders and anxiety severity. Parents completed questionnaires related to child hoarding behaviors, social responsiveness, internalizing and externalizing behaviors, and functional impairment. We examined the impact of hoarding behaviors on treatment response in a subsample of twenty-six youth who completed a course of personalized cognitive-behavioral therapy targeting anxiety symptoms. Hoarding symptoms were common and occurred in a clinically significant manner in approximately 25 % of cases. Overall hoarding severity was associated with increased internalizing and anxiety/depressive symptoms, externalizing behavior, and attention problems. Discarding items was associated with internalizing and anxious/depressive symptoms, but acquisition was not. Hoarding decreased following cognitive-behavioral therapy but did not differ between treatment responders and non-responders. These data are among the first to examine hoarding among youth with ASD; implications of study findings and future directions are highlighted.

  3. A behavioural neuroscience perspective on the aetiology and treatment of anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Kindt, Merel

    2014-11-01

    Over the past decades, behaviour and cognitive psychology have produced fruitful and mutually converging theories from which hypotheses could be derived on the nature and origin of fear and anxiety disorders. Notwithstanding the emergence of effective treatments, there are still many questions that remain to be answered. Here, I will argue that the burgeoning field of behavioural neuroscience may advance our understanding of fear, anxiety disorders and its treatments. Decades of fear-conditioning research across species have begun to elucidate the neurobiological mechanisms underlying associative fear learning and memory. The fear-conditioning paradigm provides a well-controlled and fine-grained research platform to examine these processes. Although the traditional fear conditioning paradigm was originally designed to unveil general principles of fear (un)learning, it is well-suited to understand the transition from normal fear to pathological fear and the mechanisms of change. This paper presents 1) a selection of fear conditioning studies on the generalization and persistence of associative fear memory as intermediate phenotypes of fear and anxiety disorders, and 2) insights from neuroscience on the malleability of fear memory with the potential to provide a long-term cure for anxiety and related disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. How well do websites concerning children's anxiety answer parents' questions about treatment choices?

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Kristin A; Walker, John R; Walsh, Kate

    2015-10-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the quality of information concerning anxiety disorders in children that is available on the Internet and to evaluate changes in the quality of website information over time. The authors identified websites addressing child anxiety disorders (N = 26) using a Google search and recommendations from an expert in child anxiety. Each website was evaluated on the extent to which it addressed questions that parents consider important, the quality of information, and the reading level. All websites provided adequate information describing treatment options; however, fewer websites had information addressing many questions that are important to parents, including the duration of treatment, what happens when treatment stops, and the benefits and risks of various treatments. Many websites provided inadequate information on pharmacological treatment. Most websites were of moderate quality and had more difficult reading levels than is recommended. Five years after the initial assessment, authors re-analyzed the websites in order to investigate changes in content over time. The content of only six websites had been updated since the original analysis, the majority of which improved on the three aforementioned areas of evaluation. Websites could be strengthened by providing important information that would support parent decision-making.

  5. Anxiety and worry when coping with cancer treatment: agreement between patient and proxy responses.

    PubMed

    Hermont, Ana Paula; Scarpelli, Ana Carolina; Paiva, Saul M; Auad, Sheyla M; Pordeus, Isabela A

    2015-06-01

    Assess agreement between proxy respondents (caregivers) and children/adolescents related to the impact of cancer on children's/adolescents' health-related quality of life, with respect to anxiety and worry issues. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 83 Brazilian children/adolescents, of both genders, diagnosed with cancer, aged 5-18 years and their proxy respondents. Anxiety and worry were assessed through items of the instrument Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ Cancer Module Scale. Participants were recruited from the pediatric hematology/oncology centers at two public hospitals. All individuals were receiving medical care. Descriptive statistics were performed as well as a weighted kappa coefficient, Spearman's correlation coefficient, Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Bland-Altman plots. The magnitude of the difference between the mean scores obtained from children/adolescents and that of their proxy respondents was evaluated through effect size. The proxy respondents underestimated the feelings of worry among children (8-12 years) (p < 0.001; effect size 0.71) and overestimated adolescents' (13-18 years) treatment anxiety (p < 0.05; effect size 0.57). The comparison between the three age groups (5-7, 8-12, 13-18 years) showed a tendency for children/adolescents to report increasing feelings of worry as they got older. In the 'treatment anxiety' subscale, there was a tendency for proxy respondents to present higher mean scores, revealing that proxy respondents believed the children's/adolescents' treatment anxiety decreased as they aged. Discrepancies between the reports of children/adolescents and their proxy respondents were observed. Children's/adolescents' reports should not be ignored nor replaced by proxy reports; both reports should be analyzed together.

  6. An open trial of a brief transdiagnostic internet treatment for anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Dear, Blake F; Titov, Nickolai; Schwencke, Genevieve; Andrews, Gavin; Johnston, Luke; Craske, Michelle G; McEvoy, Peter

    2011-12-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy of a brief version of an internet-administered transdiagnostic CBT protocol, the Wellbeing Program (Titov et al., 2011), designed to treat three anxiety disorders and major depression within the same program. This brief version included the same core CBT skills as the original, but condensed the materials from 8 to 5 online lessons, reduced the duration of treatment from 10 to 8 weeks and did not include an online forum. Thirty-two individuals with a principal diagnosis of major depression, generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder or social phobia received CBT-based online educational lessons, homework assignments, weekly contact from a clinical psychologist and automated emails. Eighty-one percent of participants completed the lessons within the 8 week program. Post-treatment and 3-month follow-up data were collected from 28/32 and 31/32 participants respectively. Participants improved significantly on the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales - 21 Item, Patient Health Questionnaire - 9 Item, and Generalised Anxiety Disorder - 7 Item scales, with corresponding within-group effect sizes (Cohen's d) at follow-up of 1.05, .73, and .95, respectively. Participants rated the procedure as highly acceptable with gains of a similar magnitude as those found for the original program, but less time was spent per participant by the clinician in the present trial (mean=44.61 min, SD=34.45) compared to the original program (mean=84.76 min, SD=50.37). These results provide additional support for the efficacy of transdiagnostic iCBT in the treatment of anxiety and depressive disorders and indicate that a brief version may be of benefit. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of Comorbid Anxiety and Depressive Disorders on Treatment Response to Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, Lynda; Harvey, Allison G.; Fortier-Brochu, Émilie; Beaulieu-Bonneau, Simon; Eidelman, Polina; Talbot, Lisa; Ivers, Hans; Hein, Kerrie; Lamy, Manon; Soehner, Adriane M.; Mérette, Chantal; Morin, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of comorbid anxiety or depressive disorders on treatment response to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for insomnia, behavior therapy (BT), or cognitive therapy (CT). Method Participants were 188 adults (117 women; M age = 47.4 years) with chronic insomnia, including 45 also presenting a comorbid anxiety or mild to moderate depressive disorder. They were randomized to BT (n = 63), CT (n = 65), or CBT (n = 60). Outcome measures were the proportion of treatment responders (decrease of ≥ 8 points on the Insomnia Severity Index; ISI) and remissions (ISI score < 8) and depression and anxiety symptoms. Results Proportion of treatment responders and remitters in the CBT condition was not significantly different between the subgroups with and without comorbidity. However, the proportion of responders was lower in the comorbidity subgroup compared to those without comorbidity in both the BT (34.4% vs 81.6%; p=0.007) and CT (23.6% vs 57.6%; p=0.02) alone conditions, although remission rates and pre-post ISI change scores were not. Pre to post change scores on the depression (−10.6 vs −3.9; p<0.001) and anxiety measures (−9.2 vs −2.5; p=.01) were significantly greater in the comorbidity subgroup relative to the subgroup without comorbidity but only for those treated with the full CBT; no difference was found for those treated with either BT or CT alone. Conclusions The presence of a comorbid anxiety or mild to moderate depressive disorder did not reduce the efficacy of CBT for insomnia, but it did for its single BT and CT components when used alone. PMID:26963600

  8. Balance Treatment Ameliorates Anxiety and Increases Self-Esteem in Children with Comorbid Anxiety and Balance Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bart, Orit; Bar-Haim, Yair; Weizman, Einat; Levin, Moran; Sadeh, Avi; Mintz, Matti

    2009-01-01

    Comorbidity between balance and anxiety disorders in adult population is a well-studied clinical entity. Children might be particularly prone to develop balance-anxiety comorbidity, but surprisingly they are practically neglected in this field of research. The consequence is that children are treated for what seems to be the primary disorder…

  9. Anxiety Management Training and Relaxation as Self-Control in the Treatment of Generalized Anxiety in Medical Outpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cragan, Mary K.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.

    1984-01-01

    Compared Anxiety Management Training (AMT) and Relaxation as Self-Control (RSC) in reducing stress in 55 anxious medical outpatients. At posttreatment and follow-up assessments, both AMT and RSC groups reported significantly less anxiety, stress reactivity, general physiological arousal, depression, and anger than controls. (JAC)

  10. Balance Treatment Ameliorates Anxiety and Increases Self-Esteem in Children with Comorbid Anxiety and Balance Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bart, Orit; Bar-Haim, Yair; Weizman, Einat; Levin, Moran; Sadeh, Avi; Mintz, Matti

    2009-01-01

    Comorbidity between balance and anxiety disorders in adult population is a well-studied clinical entity. Children might be particularly prone to develop balance-anxiety comorbidity, but surprisingly they are practically neglected in this field of research. The consequence is that children are treated for what seems to be the primary disorder…

  11. Cultural influences on willingness to seek treatment for social anxiety in Chinese- and European-heritage students.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Lorena; Alden, Lynn E

    2008-07-01

    We examined culture-related influences on willingness to seek treatment for social anxiety in first- and second-generation students of Chinese heritage (Ns=65, 47, respectively), and their European-heritage counterparts (N=60). Participants completed measures that assessed their willingness to seek treatment for various levels of social anxiety. Results showed that participants were similar on willingness to seek treatment at low- and high-severity levels of social anxiety; however, at moderate levels, first-generation Chinese participants were significantly less willing to seek treatment compared to their European-heritage counterparts. The reluctance of first-generation Chinese participants to seek treatment was associated with greater Chinese-heritage acculturation, and was not related to perceiving symptoms of social anxiety as less impairing. The findings support the general contention that Asians in North America tend to delay treatment for mental health problems. Copyright (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Parental Factors that Detract from the Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Childhood Anxiety: Recommendations for Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jerry V., III

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the recent empirical literature on the various parental factors that detract from the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral treatment for children with anxiety. Interventions such as treating parental anxiety and increasing parental involvement in the therapeutic process may combat these factors. Newer strategies such as…

  13. The Relation of Severity and Comorbidity to Treatment Outcome with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liber, Juliette Margo; van Widenfelt, Brigit M.; van der Leeden, Adelinde J. M.; Goedhart, Arnold W.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.; Treffers, Philip D. A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the impact of comorbidity over and above the impact of symptom severity on treatment outcome of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for children with anxiety disorders. Children (aged 8-12, n = 124) diagnosed with an anxiety disorder were treated with a short-term CBT protocol. Severity was assessed with a composite measure…

  14. Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral, Reminiscence, and Activity Treatments on Life Satisfaction and Anxiety in the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scates, Sharon K. Harp; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined effects of a cognitive-behavioral group condition, a reminiscence treatment group condition, and an activity group condition on anxiety and life satisfaction for senior citizens. No significant differences on life satisfaction and trait anxiety were found. (Author/ABL)

  15. Parental Factors that Detract from the Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Childhood Anxiety: Recommendations for Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jerry V., III

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the recent empirical literature on the various parental factors that detract from the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral treatment for children with anxiety. Interventions such as treating parental anxiety and increasing parental involvement in the therapeutic process may combat these factors. Newer strategies such as…

  16. Major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder and response to treatment in hepatitis C patients in Egypt.

    PubMed

    MM, Bassiony; A, Yousef; U, Youssef; GM, Salah El-Deen; M, Abdelghani; H, Al-Gohari; E, Fouad; MM, El-Shafaey

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence and associated correlates of major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder in hepatitis C virus patients before and after treatment and to investigate the relationship between major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder and treatment response. A total of 116 consecutive hepatitis C virus patients from hepatitis C virus treatment center in Zagazig city, Egypt, were included in the study and divided into treated group (N = 58) and untreated group (N = 58). All hepatitis C virus patients were screened for major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder using hospital anxiety and depression scale, and those who screened positive were interviewed to confirm the diagnosis of major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder using DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria. These measures were done at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment or observation. At baseline, 3.5% and 12.1% of hepatitis C virus patients (treated group) had major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder, respectively. After 12 weeks of treatment 37.9% of hepatitis C virus patients (treated group) had major depressive disorder and 46.6% had generalized anxiety disorder. There was a significant statistical difference between hospital anxiety and depression scale scores for depression (3.3 ± 2.3 vs. 6.4 ± 3.2, t = 9.6, p = 0.001) and for anxiety (4.6 ± 2.4 vs. 7.3 ± 3.0, t = 10.2, p = 0.001) before and after treatment. There was also significant statistical difference between treated group and untreated group regarding hospital anxiety and depression scale scores after treatment and observation (depression, treated group 6.4 ± 3.2 vs. untreated group 4.0 ± 2.4, t = 3.7, p = 0.001; anxiety, treated group 7.3 ± 3.0 vs. untreated group 4.5 ± 2.3, t = 4.4, p = 0.001). There was no association between major depressive disorder

  17. The impact of alcohol use severity on anxiety treatment outcomes in a large effectiveness trial in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate; Brown, Lily A.; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Sherbourne, Cathy; Stein, Murray B.; Sullivan, Greer; Bystritsky, Alexander; Craske, Michelle G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The presence of anxiety disorders is associated with poorer alcohol use disorder treatment outcomes, but little is known about the impact of alcohol use problems on anxiety disorder treatment outcomes despite their high comorbidity. The current study examined the impact of alcohol use symptom severity on anxiety disorder treatment outcomes in a multi-site primary care effectiveness study of anxiety disorder treatment. Method Data came from the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) effectiveness trial. Participants (N = 1004) were randomized to an evidence-based anxiety intervention (including cognitive behavioral therapy and medications) or usual care in primary care. Participants completed measures of alcohol use, anxiety, and depression a baseline, 6-mo, 12-mo, and 18-mo follow-up periods. Patients with alcohol dependence were excluded. Results There were no significant moderating (Treatment Group x Alcohol Use Severity) interactions. The majority of analyses revealed no predictive effects of alcohol use severity on outcome; however, alcohol problems at baseline were associated with somewhat higher anxiety and depression symptoms at the 18-mo follow-up. Conclusions These data indicate that patients with alcohol problems in primary care can be effectively treated for anxiety disorders. Baseline alcohol problems were associated with some poorer long-term outcomes, but this was evident across CALM and usual care. These findings provide preliminary evidence that there may be no need to postpone treatment of anxiety disorders until alcohol problems are addressed, at least among those who have mild to moderate alcohol problems. Replication with more severe alcohol use disorders is needed. PMID:25615523

  18. The Role of Anxiety Control and Treatment Implications of Informant Agreement on Child PTSD Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, Kathryn L.; Weems, Carl F.; Scheeringa, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine parent and child agreement of child posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms pre- and posttreatment, as well as potential moderators of agreement including treatment responder status, child anxiety control, and parent self-reported PTSD symptoms. Method We examined child self-reported and parent-reported child PTSD symptoms from the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children. Of the 141 parent–child pairs, the mean age of children was 12.72 (SD = 3.40), 53 percent were female, and 54 percent were Black. A subsample of participants (n = 47) was assessed after completion of a cognitive behavioral therapy treatment for PTSD. Results Moderate levels of agreement were found at baseline, though Criterion D (increased arousal) symptoms had lower levels of agreement than the other symptom clusters. Symptom agreement was lower at posttreatment. Treatment responders had higher levels of baseline informant agreement than treatment non-responders. Child perceived anxiety control significantly moderated informant agreement, such that pairs with children who had high levels of perceived control of their anxiety had lower PTSD symptom agreement where children reported lower symptoms relative to their parents. Contrary to expectations, parent self-reported PTSD did not moderate parent–child symptom agreement. Conclusion Factors associated with higher parent–child agreement of child PTSD symptoms were being a PTSD treatment responder and children with lower perceived anxiety control. These findings have potential implications for determining those who may benefit from greater symptom monitoring over the course of intervention and potential alternative intervention approaches. PMID:26645622

  19. A Unified, Transdiagnostic Treatment for Adolescents With Chronic Pain and Comorbid Anxiety and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Laura B.; Tsao, Jennie C.I.; Seidman, Laura C.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pain disorders represent a significant public health concern, particularly for children and adolescents. High rates of comorbid anxiety and unipolar mood disorders often complicate psychological interventions for chronic pain. Unified treatment approaches, based on emotion regulation skills, are applicable to a broad range of emotional disorders and suggest the possibility of extending these interventions to chronic pain and pain-related dysfunction. This case report describes the use of a unified protocol for treatment of an adolescent boy with chronic daily headache and social anxiety and an adolescent girl with whole body pain and depression. Following weekly, 50-minute individual treatment sessions, the boy demonstrated notable improvement in emotional symptoms, emotion regulation skills, somatization, and functional disability. The girl showed some improvement on measures of anxiety and depression, although there appeared to be a worsening of pain symptoms and somatization. However, both patients demonstrated improvement over follow-up. This case study illustrates the potential utility of a unified treatment approach targeting pain and emotional symptoms from an emotion regulation perspective in an adolescent population. PMID:28824271

  20. The treatment of generalized anxiety disorder with pregabalin, an atypical anxiolytic.

    PubMed

    Strawn, Jeffrey R; Geracioti, Thomas D

    2007-04-01

    A constellation of pharmacologic treatments for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) have been developed over the past five decades, although each has a number of potential drawbacks in clinical practice. This review addresses one potentially new pharmacologic treatment for generalized anxiety disorder, the gamma-aminobutyric acid analogue pregabalin. We review the mechanism of action, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of pregabalin as well as the results of 5 double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of pregabalin in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Based entirely on data from these industry-sponsored (Pfizer), multi-site clinical trials in patients with GAD, pregabalin appears to be generally well tolerated and has rapid onset of action (approximately 1 week), comparable efficacy to benzodiazepines and lower discontinuation rates compared with other pharmacologic treatments. Thus in GAD, a disorder that is often suboptimally responsive to traditional psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic interventions - secondary to poor efficacy, tolerability, and/or side-effects - pregabalin may have a primary role in GAD patients, especially in those with certain psychiatric comorbidities or individuals who are on multi-drug regimens for medical comorbidities.

  1. Initial development of a treatment adherence measure for cognitive-behavioral therapy for child anxiety.

    PubMed

    Southam-Gerow, Michael A; McLeod, Bryce D; Arnold, Cassidy C; Rodríguez, Adriana; Cox, Julia R; Reise, Steven P; Bonifay, Wesley E; Weisz, John R; Kendall, Philip C

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of treatment adherence (a component of treatment integrity defined as the extent to which a treatment is delivered as intended) is a critical element in treatment evaluation research. This article presents initial psychometric data for scores on the Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Adherence Scale for Youth Anxiety (CBAY-A), an observational measure designed to be sensitive to common practice elements found in individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (ICBT) for youth anxiety. Therapy sessions (N = 954) from 1 efficacy and 1 effectiveness study of ICBT for youth anxiety were independently rated by 2 coders. Interrater reliability (as gauged by intraclass correlation coefficients) for the item scores averaged 0.77 (SD = 0.15; range .48 to .80). The CBAY-A item and scale (skills, model, total) scores demonstrated evidence of convergent and discriminant validity with an observational measure of therapeutic interventions and an observational measure of the alliance. The CBAY-A item and scale scores also discriminated between therapists delivering ICBT in research and practice settings and therapists delivering nonmanualized usual clinical care. We discuss the importance of replicating these psychometric findings in different samples and highlight possible application of an adherence measure in testing integrity-outcome relations. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Treatment of childhood anxiety disorders: what is the place for antidepressants?

    PubMed

    Muris, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety disorders represent one of the most prevalent forms of psychopathology among children and adolescents. As these problems tend to persist and have a negative impact on young people's development, there is a need for evidence-based interventions. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is at present the treatment of first choice, but pharmacotherapy and in particular antidepressant medication may be a viable alternative or adjunct to CBT. This paper provides a detailed overview of controlled treatment outcome studies on the efficacy of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) in children and adolescents with anxiety disorders. Further, a discussion is provided on how clinically anxious youths should be preferably treated, with special focus on the position of pharmacotherapy in the treatment process. The short-term efficacy of antidepressants in anxious youths is good, and this is particularly true for SSRIs. Therefore, this type of medication should be viewed as a viable treatment option, in particular for youths with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) or other severe and pervasive anxiety disorders. More research is needed on the long-term effects, the consequences of prolonged use of this type of medication for children's developing brains and the efficacy of an intervention in which CBT and SSRIs are combined.

  3. Current status of beta-blocking drugs in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Tyrer, P

    1988-12-01

    beta-Adrenoceptor blocking drugs have been used for the treatment of acute stress reactions, adjustment disorders, generalised anxiety, panic disorder and agoraphobia. In general they are effective in these disorders if somatic or autonomic symptoms are prominent but not extreme in degree. Thus, they are of more value for the relatively mild tremor of the anxious violinist in public performance than in the severe shaking noticed during a panic attack. It is most likely that beta-blockers act primarily by blocking peripheral adrenergic beta-receptors; symptoms that are mediated through beta-stimulation, such as tremor and palpitations, are helped most. Improvement is noted within 1 to 2 hours and with relatively low doses (e.g. propranolol 40 mg/day). Some recent studies, however, have suggested that when longer treatment using higher doses (e.g. propranolol 160 mg/day) is given, improvement in other forms of anxiety is noted after several weeks of treatment. beta-blocking drugs are useful adjuncts to existing treatments for anxiety and are likely to enjoy wider use now that benzodiazepines are being avoided due to their dependence risks.

  4. Low baseline pCO2 predicts poorer outcome from behavioral treatment: evidence from a mixed anxiety disorders sample.

    PubMed

    Davies, Carolyn D; Craske, Michelle G

    2014-10-30

    Low levels of end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2)-the amount of carbon dioxide measured from expired air-are commonly found in individuals with anxiety disorders but have not been examined as predictors of outcome from anxiety treatment. The current study examined pre-treatment baseline pCO2 as a predictor of outcome from cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for anxiety disorders. Sixty-one individuals with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) defined principal anxiety disorder diagnosis completed 12 sessions of either CBT or ACT. Baseline pCO2 was measured prior to entering treatment. Self-reported anxiety symptoms and quality of life were assessed at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 6- and 12-month follow-up from baseline. Low baseline pCO2 was associated with higher anxiety symptoms and lower quality of life across follow-up timepoints, above and beyond baseline symptom severity. These results suggest that low baseline pCO2 predicts poorer outcome from CBT and ACT for anxiety and may warrant treatment that directly addresses respiratory dysregulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effects of psychiatric treatment on depression, anxiety, quality of life, and sexual dysfunction in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Yanartas, O; Kani, H T; Bicakci, E; Kilic, I; Banzragch, M; Acikel, C; Atug, O; Kuscu, K; Imeryuz, N; Akin, H

    2016-01-01

    Depression and anxiety are common disorders in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our aim is to prospectively determine the effect of psychiatric treatment on scores for depression, anxiety, quality of life (QoL), and sexual dysfunction in an outpatient population diagnosed with IBD and also anxiety and/or depression disorder. Patients who scored higher than the cutoff point on the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale were referred for further structured psychiatric evaluation and determination of the need for psychiatric drug treatment. Patients who underwent drug therapy completed Short Form-36 (SF-36) and the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale at baseline and after 6 months of follow-up. Major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder were the most common diagnoses. After 6 months, 47 patients had completely adhered to drug treatment (group A), whereas 20 were nonadherent (group B). In group A, all domains of SF-36, Arizona Sexual Experience Scale, depression/anxiety scores, and Crohn's disease activity index were statistically improved after treatment when compared with the baseline. In group B, the three domains of SF-36, platelet count, and mean corpuscular volume were worse between baseline and at 6 months. In IBD patients having any psychiatric disorder, 6 months of antidepressant drug treatment is associated with an improvement in depression, anxiety, QoL, and sexual functioning scores, as well as an improvement in Crohn's disease activity index. On the other hand, insufficient psychiatric treatment seems to be related to a poor QoL.

  6. Self-esteem treatment in anxiety: A randomized controlled crossover trial of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) versus Competitive Memory Training (COMET) in patients with anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Staring, A B P; van den Berg, D P G; Cath, D C; Schoorl, M; Engelhard, I M; Korrelboom, C W

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about treating low self-esteem in anxiety disorders. This study evaluated two treatments targeting different mechanisms: (1) Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), which aims to desensitize negative memory representations that are proposed to maintain low self-esteem; and (2) Competitive Memory Training (COMET), which aims to activate positive representations for enhancing self-esteem. A Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) was used with a crossover design. Group 1 received six sessions EMDR first and then six sessions COMET; group 2 vice versa. Assessments were made at baseline (T0), end of first treatment (T1), and end of second treatment (T2). Main outcome was self-esteem. We included 47 patients and performed Linear Mixed Models. COMET showed more improvements in self-esteem than EMDR: effect-sizes 1.25 versus 0.46 post-treatment. Unexpectedly, when EMDR was given first, subsequent effects of COMET were significantly reduced in comparison to COMET as the first intervention. For EMDR, sequence made no difference. Reductions in anxiety and depression were mediated by better self-esteem. COMET was associated with significantly greater improvements in self-esteem than EMDR in patients with anxiety disorders. EMDR treatment reduced the effectiveness of subsequent COMET. Improved self-esteem mediated reductions in anxiety and depression symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Refining Clinical Judgment of Treatment Response and Symptom Remission Identification in Childhood Anxiety Using a Signal Detection Analysis on the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Alison; Lewin, Adam B.; Storch, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine guidelines for delineating treatment response and symptom remission for children with anxiety disorder based on the five item and Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS5), and replicate guidelines using the six item PARS (PARS6). Methods: Participants were 73 children 7–13 years of age with a primary anxiety disorder who received computer-assisted cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety. Signal detection analyses utilizing receiver operating curve procedures were used to determine optimal guidelines for defining treatment response and symptom remission for youth with anxiety disorders on the PARS5 and PARS6. The percent reduction in anxiety severity was used to predict treatment responder status. The percent reduction in symptoms and posttreatment raw score were used to predict remission status. Results: Optimal prediction of treatment response based on gold standard criteria was achieved at 15–20% reduction in symptoms on the PARS5 (with 20% reduction achieving marginally higher accuracy), and 20% reduction on the PARS6. A 25% reduction in symptoms on the PARS5 or a posttreatment raw score cutoff of 9 optimally predicted remission status. For the PARS6, a cutoff of 35% reduction or a posttreatment score of 11, was considered optimal for determining remission in clinical settings, whereas a 30% reduction or score of 12 was considered optimal for research settings. Conclusions: With different scoring options available for the PARS, these results provide guidelines for determining response and remission based on the PARS5 and PARS6 scores. Guidelines have implications for use in clinical trials, as well as for assessment of change in clinical practice. PMID:26579629

  8. Treatment of cocaine withdrawal anxiety with guanfacine: relationships to cocaine intake and reinstatement of cocaine seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Buffalari, Deanne M; Baldwin, Chelsey K; See, Ronald E

    2012-09-01

    Successful treatment of cocaine addiction is severely impeded by the propensity of users to relapse. Withdrawal severity may serve as a key predictor of susceptibility to relapse. Therefore, the identification and treatment of cocaine withdrawal symptoms such as anxiety may improve addiction treatment outcome. The current study examined the role of anxiety-like behavior during cocaine withdrawal and anxiolytic treatment in reinstatement of cocaine seeking in an animal model of relapse. Male rats experienced daily IV cocaine self-administration. One group of animals received the norepinephrine α-2 agonist, guanfacine, or vehicle prior to anxiety testing 48 h after the last self-administration session. In the second group of rats, relationships between cocaine intake, anxiety-like behavior after withdrawal of cocaine, and reinstatement responding were investigated. The third and fourth groups of animals received guanfacine, yohimbine (norepinephrine α-2 antagonist), or vehicle once per day for 3 days 48 h after cessation of cocaine self-administration, followed by extinction and subsequent reinstatement induced by cocaine injections, cocaine-paired cues, and yohimbine administration. Cocaine-withdrawn rats at 48 h demonstrated higher levels of anxiety-like behavior as measured on a defensive burying task when compared to yoked saline controls, an effect reversed by guanfacine treatment. Cocaine intake was positively correlated with measures of anxiety-like behavior during early withdrawal, and this anxiety-like behavior was significantly correlated with subsequent cocaine-primed reinstatement. Yohimbine treatment during early withdrawal increased reinstatement to conditioned cues, while guanfacine treatment reduced reinstatement to yohimbine. These studies suggest an important role for noradrenergic mediation of anxiety-like behavior that emerges after withdrawal of cocaine and potential risk of relapse as modeled by reinstatement, and suggest that treatment of

  9. The effect of drawing and writing technique on the anxiety level of children undergoing cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Altay, Naime; Kilicarslan-Toruner, Ebru; Sari, Çigdem

    2017-06-01

    To determine the effect of the drawing and writing technique on the anxiety level of children undergoing cancer treatment in hospital. Research was conducted in the haematology-oncology clinic of a university hospital, using a quasi-experimental design (pre-and-post intervention evaluations of a single group). The sample comprised 30 hospitalised children aged 9-16 years. Data were collected with Socio-demographic form, clinical data form, and the State Anxiety Inventory. The institution gave written approval for the study and parents provided written consent. Drawing, writing and mutual story-telling techniques were used as part of a five-day programme. Children were asked to draw a picture of a hospitalised child and write a story about this drawing. After drawing and writing, mutual storytelling were used to more constructive story with positive feelings. The drawing, writing techniques was implemented on the first and third days of the programme and mutual storytelling was implemented on the second and fourth days. Data were reported as percentages and frequencies and the intervention effect analysed with the Wilcoxon test. The average age of children was 12.56 years ± 2.67 and 76.7% were girls. The mean age diagnosis and mean treatment duration were 11.26 years ± 3.17 and 16.56 months ± 20.75 respectively. Most of the children (50%) had leukaemia and were receiving chemotherapy (66.7%). In most cases (76.7%) the mother was the primary caregiver. Scores on the State Anxiety Inventory were lower-indicating lower anxiety-after the intervention (36.86 ± 4.12 than before it (40.46 ± 4.51) (p < 0.05). The therapeutic intervention reduced children's state anxiety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Meta-Analysis: Reduced Risk of Anxiety with Psychostimulant Treatment in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Catherine G; Cohen, Stephanie C; Mulqueen, Jilian M; Ferracioli-Oda, Eduardo; Stuckelman, Zachary D; Bloch, Michael H

    2015-10-01

    Anxiety is a commonly reported side-effect of psychostimulant treatment. Our goal was to quantify the risk of anxiety as a side effect of psychostimulant treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We conducted a PubMed search to identify all double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials examining the efficacy of psychostimulant medications in the treatment of children with ADHD. We used a fixed-effects meta-analysis to examine the risk ratio of anxiety reported as a side effect in children treated with psychostimulants compared with those treated with placebo. We used stratified subgroup analysis and meta-regression to examine the effects of stimulant type, dosage, duration of use, and trial design on the measured risk of anxiety. We identified 23 studies involving 2959 children with ADHD for inclusion in our meta-analysis. The risk of anxiety associated with psychostimulant treatment was significantly lower than that experienced with placebo (relative risk [RR] = 0.86 [95% CI: 0.77, 0.95], z = -2.90, p < 0.05). Higher doses of psychostimulants were associated with a reduced measured risk of anxiety of psychostimulants when compared with placebo (β = -0.0039 [95% CI: -0.00718, -0.00064], z = -2.34, p = 0.019). Meta-analysis suggests that treatment with psychostimulants significantly reduced the risk of anxiety when compared with placebo. This finding does not rule out the possibility that some children experience increased anxiety when treated with psychostimulants, but suggests that those risks are outweighed by the number of children who experience improvement in anxiety symptoms (possibly as a secondary effect of improved control of ADHD symptoms). Clinicians should consider rechallenging children with ADHD who report new-onset or worsening anxiety with psychostimulants, as these symptoms are much more likely to be coincidental rather than caused by psychostimulants.

  11. Acupuncture treatment for women with concurrent substance use and anxiety/depression: an effective alternative therapy?

    PubMed

    Courbasson, Christine M A; de Sorkin, Alicia Araujo; Dullerud, Berit; Van Wyk, Lucy

    2007-01-01

    This exploratory study evaluated the benefits of adding auricular acupuncture to a 21-day outpatient structured psychoeducational treatment program for women with concurrent substance use problems, anxiety, and depression. Women receiving acupuncture (n = 185) reported having reduced physiological cravings for substances, felt significantly less depressed, less anxious, and were better able to reflect on and resolve difficulties than women in the control group (n = 101). It was found that auricular acupuncture, as an adjunct therapy to a comprehensive psychoeducational treatment program for women with addictions, shows promise in being an effective, more viable treatment alternative to anxiolytics.

  12. Depression, anxiety, hopelessness and quality of life in users of cocaine/crack in outpatient treatment.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Camila Bosse; Ferreira, Isadora Borne; Bosa, Vera Lúcia; Narvaez, Joana Corrêa de Magalhães

    2017-01-01

    To identify symptoms of anxiety, depression, and feelings of hopelessness in patients in outpatient treatment for substance dependency and to test for correlations with various aspects of their quality of life. A cross-sectional study of a sample of 25 men in recuperation from substance dependency, selected by convenience. We assessed symptoms of depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II), anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory), hopelessness (Beck Hopelessness Scale), and quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life instrument-Abbreviated version [WHOQOL-Bref]), and also analyzed sociodemographic profile, substance abuse, and family history. Categorical variables were expressed as frequencies and percentages and quantitative variables as means and standard deviations or as medians and interquartile ranges. We also analyzed Spearman correlations to a 5% significance level. The study revealed prevalence rates of 32% for depression, 24% for anxiety, and 12% for hopelessness, at a moderate/severe level. Correlations between Beck scales and WHOQOL-Bref were significant; but impacts differed in the four areas evaluated. Overall, we observe global negative impacts on subjects' lives, affecting their psychiatric symptoms and quality of life and their relationships and occupational factors to a similar degree. The results show that the lower the scores on these scales, the better the quality of life in some areas, indicating that there is a negative correlation between psychiatric symptoms and quality of life.

  13. A randomized trial of Internet-delivered treatment for social anxiety disorder in high school students.

    PubMed

    Tillfors, Maria; Andersson, Gerhard; Ekselius, Lisa; Furmark, Tomas; Lewenhaupt, Susanne; Karlsson, Anders; Carlbring, Per

    2011-01-01

    Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) has been shown effective for university students with social anxiety disorder (SAD) and public speaking fears. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the promising results can be transferred to high school students suffering from this condition. A total of 19 speech-anxious high school students with SAD were randomized either into 9 weeks of Internet-delivered CBT or to a wait-list control group. Significant improvements were found on measures of social anxiety, general anxiety, and depression. Effects were maintained at 1-year follow-up. The average within- and between-group effect sizes (Cohen's d) for the primary social anxiety scales at posttest were 0.98 and 1.38, respectively. However, the average number of completed modules in the CBT program was low. Although compliance can be improved, the results suggest that Internet-based guided self-help is effective in the treatment of high school students with SAD.

  14. [Interest of propranolol in the treatment of school refusal anxiety: about three clinical observations].

    PubMed

    Fourneret, P; Desombre, H; de Villard, R; Revol, O

    2001-01-01

    School refusal anxiety is a pathopsychological disorder which touches the young child, between 8 and 13 years. Even if the school refusal is studied for a long time, there is not still consensus as for the specific definition of this disorder or on the best way of treating it. Nevertheless, accountable of long-lasting difficulties in school integration, its short and medium term consequences are serious and well known: school desertion, mood disorder and behavioral problems. Speed and quality of the medico-psychological and educational interventions represent a important factor for evolution and prognosis. Although, psychological interventions remain essential, sometimes the interest of an associated psychotropic medication should be discussed. This one can indeed either improve their results or supporting their installations. Despite more than twenty controlled trials in the pediatric population, no definitive psychopharmacological treatment data exist for anxiety disorder in childhood and especially for school refusal disorder. The majority of the studies stress as well the interest of benzodiazepines as tricyclic antidepressants but without being able to specify the possible superiority of a chemical on the other. On the other hand, the side effects of each one are well-documented, in particular for the benzodiazepines (potential abuse, sedation, potential desinhibition, mnemonic disorder), limiting thus their uses in child. In this work, we would like to emphasize the interest of propranolol in the treatment of somatic symptoms usually met in school refusal anxiety. Although beta-blockers have been used in the treatment of neurovegetative symptoms associated with situational anxiety disorders, there is no controlled data and only some open data to guide pediatric use for anxiety disorders in children. Nevertheless, prescribed with low posology and in substitution of benzodiazepine, this medication enabled us in three severe clinical cases to shorter notably the