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  1. Cryo-EM Imaging of DNA-PK DNA Damage Repair Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Phoebe L. Stewart

    2005-06-27

    Exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation causes DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that must be repaired for cell survival. Higher eukaryotes respond to DSBs by arresting the cell cycle, presumably to repair the DNA lesions before cell division. In mammalian cells, the nonhomologous end-joining DSB repair pathway is mediated by the 470 kDa DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) together with the DNA-binding factors Ku70 and Ku80. Mouse knock-out models of these three proteins are all exquisitely sensitive to low doses of ionizing radiation. In the presence of DNA ends, Ku binds to the DNA and then recruits DNA-PKcs. After formation of the complex, the kinase activity associated with DNA-PKcs becomes activated. This kinase activity has been shown to be essential for repairing DNA DSBs in vivo since expression of a kinase-dead form of DNA-PKcs in a mammalian cell line that lacks DNA-PKcs fails to complement the radiosensitive phenotype. The immense size of DNA-PKcs suggests that it may also serve as a docking site for other DNA repair proteins. Since the assembly of the DNA-PK complex onto DNA is a prerequisite for DSB repair, it is critical to obtain structural information on the complex. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single particle reconstruction methods provide a powerful way to image large macromolecular assemblies at near atomic (10-15 ?) resolution. We have already used cryo-EM methods to examine the structure of the isolated DNA-PKcs protein. This structure reveals numerous cavities throughout the protein that may allow passage of single or double-stranded DNA. Pseudo two-fold symmetry was found for the monomeric protein, suggesting that DNA-PKcs may interact with two DNA ends or two Ku heterodimers simultaneously. Here we propose to study the structure of the cross-linked DNA-PKcs/Ku/DNA complex. Difference imaging with our published DNA-PKcs structure will enable us to elucidate the architecture of the complex. A second

  2. Cryo-EM structure of human DNA-PK holoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaotong; Liu, Mengjie; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Jiawei; Xu, Yanhui

    2017-08-25

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase complex composed of a catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and KU70/80 heterodimer bound to DNA. DNA-PK holoenzyme plays a critical role in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major DNA repair pathway. Here, we determined cryo-electron microscopy structure of human DNA-PK holoenzyme at 6.6 Å resolution. In the complex structure, DNA-PKcs, KU70, KU80 and DNA duplex form a 650-kDa heterotetramer with 1:1:1:1 stoichiometry. The N-terminal α-solenoid (∼2 800 residues) of DNA-PKcs adopts a double-ring fold and connects the catalytic core domain of DNA-PKcs and KU70/80-DNA. DNA-PKcs and KU70/80 together form a DNA-binding tunnel, which cradles ∼30-bp DNA and prevents sliding inward of DNA-PKcs along with DNA duplex, suggesting a mechanism by which the broken DNA end is protected from unnecessary processing. Structural and biochemical analyses indicate that KU70/80 and DNA coordinately induce conformational changes of DNA-PKcs and allosterically stimulate its kinase activity. We propose a model for activation of DNA-PKcs in which allosteric signals are generated upon DNA-PK holoenzyme formation and transmitted to the kinase domain through N-terminal HEAT repeats and FAT domain of DNA-PKcs. Our studies suggest a mechanism for recognition and protection of broken DNA ends and provide a structural basis for understanding the activation of DNA-PKcs and DNA-PK-mediated NHEJ pathway.Cell Research advance online publication 25 August 2017; doi:10.1038/cr.2017.110.

  3. DNA-ligase activities appear normal in the CHO mutant EM9.

    PubMed

    Chan, J Y; Thompson, L H; Becker, F F

    1984-01-01

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant strain EM9 was previously shown to be hypersensitive to killing by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), to have a 12-fold increased baseline incidence of sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE), and to be defective in rejoining DNA strand breaks after treatment with EMS, MMS, or X-rays. A study was performed to determine if the primary biochemical defect might be a DNA ligase. DNA-ligase activities were assayed and compared after separation of the multiple forms of ligase by AcA 34 gel-filtration chromatography of total cellular extracts. In EM9 cells the levels of the presumptive replicative forms, DNA ligase Ia (480 kd) and ligase Ib (240 kd) were about 50% and 60%, respectively, of those in the parental AA8 cells, whereas DNA ligase II (80 kd) was unaltered in EM9 . In a phenotypic revertant line ( 9R1 ) ligases Ia, Ib and II levels were 35%, 37% and 100%, respectively, of those in AA8 . The reduced levels of ligases Ia and Ib in EM9 and 9R1 cells are apparently not related directly to the mutant phenotype and may be attributable to the somewhat slower growth rates of these strains compared with those of AA8 . To determine if the repair defect in EM9 might reside in the ability to induce DNA-ligase activity after treatment with a DNA-damaging agent, AA8 and EM9 cells were treated with MMS at 30 micrograms/ml for 60 min before preparing fractions for ligase assays. Under these conditions the activities of ligases Ia and Ib decreases 70-80% in both cell lines, but ligase II increased 2.0- and 2.6-fold, respectively, in AA8 and EM9 . As a further test of defective ligase activities in EM9 , assays were performed in the presence of 0.1 M NaCl or after heating the fractions for 10 min at 50 degrees C. Although all 3 forms of ligase showed altered activity under both of these conditions, there were no significant differences between EM9 and AA8 cells. These data combined with the above results provide strong

  4. Telescópio de pequeno porte como suporte ao ensino em cidades com intensa poluição luminosa II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, P. C. R.; Santos-Júnior, J. M.; Cruz, W. S.

    2003-08-01

    Para a maioria dos estudantes, sua passagem pelo ensino formal fundamental envolve a transmissão de fatos que devem ser guardados para um exame, a habilidade para lembrar fórmulas e, eventualmente, a repetição de experimentos que devem produzir resultados exigidos pelo professor. O resultado deste modelo de ensino, ao longo dos anos, é conhecido por todos: desconhecimento e descontentamento, por parte dos estudantes, de temas relativos ao papel e aos processos da ciência. Acreditamos que a Astronomia, pelo seu caráter observacional, é uma das áreas do conhecimento que pode contribuir neste cenário. A Fundação Planetário da Cidade do Rio de Janeiro possui um telescópio Meade LX-200 (25cm) que, juntamente com as câmeras CCD ST-7E e ST8E, tem sido utilizado em projetos voltados aos estudantes do ensino médio desde o ano 2000. Tais projetos envolvem a condução de um projeto de pesquisa observacional num nível apropriado, e possibilitam o contato com técnicas e novas tecnologias: computador, software para manipulação de dados e gráficos, programas de tratamento e redução de dados, uso de equipamentos óptico-eletrônicos (telescópio e CCD), bem como o processo de aquisição de conhecimento. Dentro da proposta dos anos anteriores, priorizamos projetos de uma noite, ou seja, procuramos trabalhar com fenômenos que apresentem variabilidade com intervalo de recorrência relativamente curto. Em todos os casos, optamos pela fotometria diferencial, que tem se mostrado bastante eficiente para o céu luminoso como o da cidade do Rio de Janeiro. Neste painel, apresentamos alguns dos projetos desenvolvidos no último ano, com 25 estudantes. Apresentamos os resultados da observação da variável pulsante AI Vel (V = 6,6) e da variável cataclísmica FO Aqr (V = 13,5), e do monitoramento do trânsito da lua de Júpiter, Europa, ocorrido em 30 de abril de 2003. As curvas de luz produzidas para as primeiras estão concordantes com as da literatura, assim

  5. Cryo-EM structure of a 3D DNA-origami object

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-chen; Martin, Thomas G.; Scheres, Sjors H. W.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    A key goal for nanotechnology is to design synthetic objects that may ultimately achieve functionalities known today only from natural macromolecular complexes. Molecular self-assembly with DNA has shown potential for creating user-defined 3D scaffolds, but the level of attainable positional accuracy has been unclear. Here we report the cryo-EM structure and a full pseudoatomic model of a discrete DNA object that is almost twice the size of a prokaryotic ribosome. The structure provides a variety of stable, previously undescribed DNA topologies for future use in nanotechnology and experimental evidence that discrete 3D DNA scaffolds allow the positioning of user-defined structural motifs with an accuracy that is similar to that observed in natural macromolecules. Thereby, our results indicate an attractive route to fabricate nanoscale devices that achieve complex functionalities by DNA-templated design steered by structural feedback. PMID:23169645

  6. Cryo-EM of dynamic protein complexes in eukaryotic DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingchuan; Yuan, Zuanning; Bai, Lin; Li, Huilin

    2017-01-01

    DNA replication in Eukaryotes is a highly dynamic process that involves several dozens of proteins. Some of these proteins form stable complexes that are amenable to high-resolution structure determination by cryo-EM, thanks to the recent advent of the direct electron detector and powerful image analysis algorithm. But many of these proteins associate only transiently and flexibly, precluding traditional biochemical purification. We found that direct mixing of the component proteins followed by 2D and 3D image sorting can capture some very weakly interacting complexes. Even at 2D average level and at low resolution, EM images of these flexible complexes can provide important biological insights. It is often necessary to positively identify the feature-of-interest in a low resolution EM structure. We found that systematically fusing or inserting maltose binding protein (MBP) to selected proteins is highly effective in these situations. In this chapter, we describe the EM studies of several protein complexes involved in the eukaryotic DNA replication over the past decade or so. We suggest that some of the approaches used in these studies may be applicable to structural analysis of other biological systems. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  7. Aquecimento alfvênico viscoso-resistivo em discos de acresção ao redor de estrelas T Tauri clássicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, W. M.; Vasconcelos, M. J.

    2003-08-01

    Com a crescente disponibilidade de dados observacionais sobre estrelas T Tauri, a busca por modelos mais precisos vem se tornando cada vez maior. Estes modelos devem explicar, entre outras coisas, o mecanismo dissipativo responsável pelo transporte de momento angular no disco de acresção que acredita-se, circunda estas estrelas. O mecanismo mais viável, do ponto de vista teórico, é uma instabilidade MHD conhecida como "instabilidade magnetorotacional ou Balbus-Hawley" (IBH). Esta instabilidade veio mostrar que o campo magnético desempenha um papel importante na evolução destes objetos mas requer, no entanto, um acoplamento mínimo entre o gás e o campo magnético no disco que não é atingido para os valores de temperatura obtidos do modelo padrão. Contudo, alguns mecanismos de aquecimento para o disco precisam ser examinados. Neste trabalho, propomos a dissipação de ondas Alfvén como uma fonte de aquecimento para o disco. Se o gás apresentar uma condutividade elétrica finita e viscosidade, teremos um tipo de amortecimento para as ondas denominado amortecimento viscoso-resistivo que será aqui considerado. Este mecanismo é aplicado ao modelo de disco em camadas. Calculam-se as taxas de aquecimento Alfvênico, a temperatura efetiva do disco bem como as taxas de ionização decorrentes deste aquecimento e do aquecimento gerado pela absorção de raios cósmicos. Comparações com os dados observacionais de Kitamura et. al. (2001) são efetuadas, ressaltando-se os pontos comuns entre suas observações e nossos dados teóricos.

  8. Single particle EM studies of the Drosophila melanogaster origin recognition complex and evidence for DNA wrapping.

    PubMed

    Clarey, Megan G; Botchan, Michael; Nogales, Eva

    2008-12-01

    Hyperphosphorylation of the Drosophila melanogaster origin recognition complex (DmORC) by cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) allows nucleotide binding but inhibits the ATPase activity of Orc1, and ablates the ATP-dependent interaction of ORC with DNA. Here we present single particle electron microscopy (EM) studies of ORC bound to nucleotide in both the dephosphorylated and hyper-phosphorylated states. 3D image reconstructions show that nucleotide binding gives rise to an analogous conformation independent of phosphorylation state. At the intermediate resolution achieved in our studies, ATP promotes changes along the toroidal core of the complex with negligible differences contributed by phosphorylation. Thus, hyperphosphorylation of DmORC does not induce meso-scale rearrangement of the ORC structure. To better understand ORC's role in origin remodeling, we performed atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies that show the contour length of a 688bp linear DNA fragment shortens by the equivalent of approximately 130bp upon ORC binding. This data, coupled with previous studies that showed a linking number change in circular DNA upon ORC binding, suggests that ORC may wrap the DNA in a manner akin to DnaA. Based on existing data and our structures, we propose a subunit arrangement for the AAA+ and winged helix domains, and in addition, speculate on a path of the 133bp of DNA around the ORC complex.

  9. Compilação de dados atômicos e moleculares do UV ao IV próximo para uso em síntese espectral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, P.; Barbuy, B.; Melendez, J.; Allen, D. M.; Castilho, B.

    2003-08-01

    Espectros sintéticos são utéis em uma grande variedade de aplicações, desde análise de abundâncias em espectros estelares de alta resolução ao estudo de populações estelares em espectros integrados. A confiabilidade de um espectro sintético depende do modelo de atmosfera adotado, do código de formação de linhas e da qualidade dos dados atômicos e moleculares que são determinantes no cálculo das opacidades da fotosfera. O nosso grupo no departamento de Astronomia no IAG tem utilizado espectros sintéticos há mais de 15 anos, em aplicações voltadas principalmente para a análise de abundâncias de estrelas G, K e M e populações estelares velhas. Ao longo desse tempo, as listas de linhas vieram sendo construídas e atualizadas continuamente, e alguns acréscimos recentes podem ser citados: Castilho (1999, átomos e moléculas no UV), Schiavon (1998, bandas moleculares de TiO) e Melendez (2001, átomos e moléculas no IV próximo). Com o intuito de calcular uma grade de espectros do UV ao IV próximo para uso no estudo de populações estelares velhas, se fazia necessário compilar e homogeneizar as diversas listas em apenas uma lista atômica e uma molecular. Nesse processo, a nova lista compilada foi correlacionada com outras bases de dados (NIST, Kurucz Database, O' Brian et al. 1991) para atualização dos parâmetros que caracterizam a transição atômica (comprimento de onda, log gf e potencial de excitação). Adicionalmente as constantes de interação C6 foram calculadas segundo a teoria de Anstee & O'Mara (1995) e artigos posteriores. As bandas moleculares de CH e CN foram recalculadas com o programa LIFBASE (Luque & Crosley 1999). Nesse poster estão detalhados os procedimentos citados acima, as comparações entre espectros calculados com as novas listas e espectros observados em alta resolução do Sol e de Arcturus, e uma análise do impacto decorrente da utilização de diferentes modelos de atmosfera no espectro sintético. Ao

  10. Cometas: Das Lendas aos Fatos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelzke, M. R.

    O descobrimento de cometas, devido ao seu aparecimento espetacular, tem registro nas mais antigas culturas humanas. A primeira referência situa-se no ano de 1095 antes de Cristo [a.C.; HO; HO, 1962]. A quantidade de registros de descobrimentos cometários, principalmente provenientes do território chinês em particular e do oriente em geral, aumentou gradualmente a partir do quarto século depois de Cristo (d.C.). É de origem chinesa a primeira referência ao cometa P/Halley no ano de 240 a.C. [VOELZKE, 1993]. Com o desenvolvimento da astronomia relativamente às técnicas observacionais os descobrimentos bem como as observações cometárias aumentaram sensivelmente a partir do século XVII, sendo que a partir do século XIX um novo incremento ocorreu devido ao emprego da fotografia e a resultante melhora de sensibilidade na observação.

  11. Cryo-EM Structures Reveal Mechanism and Inhibition of DNA Targeting by a CRISPR-Cas Surveillance Complex.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tai Wei; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Yang, Hui; Falconieri, Veronica; Rao, Prashant; Merk, Alan; Eng, Edward T; Raczkowski, Ashleigh M; Fox, Tara; Earl, Lesley A; Patel, Dinshaw J; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2017-10-05

    Prokaryotic cells possess CRISPR-mediated adaptive immune systems that protect them from foreign genetic elements, such as invading viruses. A central element of this immune system is an RNA-guided surveillance complex capable of targeting non-self DNA or RNA for degradation in a sequence- and site-specific manner analogous to RNA interference. Although the complexes display considerable diversity in their composition and architecture, many basic mechanisms underlying target recognition and cleavage are highly conserved. Using cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM), we show that the binding of target double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) to a type I-F CRISPR system yersinia (Csy) surveillance complex leads to large quaternary and tertiary structural changes in the complex that are likely necessary in the pathway leading to target dsDNA degradation by a trans-acting helicase-nuclease. Comparison of the structure of the surveillance complex before and after dsDNA binding, or in complex with three virally encoded anti-CRISPR suppressors that inhibit dsDNA binding, reveals mechanistic details underlying target recognition and inhibition. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Connectivity across the Caribbean Sea: DNA Barcoding and Morphology Unite an Enigmatic Fish Larva from the Florida Straits with a New Species of Sea Bass from Deep Reefs off Curaçao

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Carole C.; Johnson, G. David

    2014-01-01

    Integrative taxonomy, in which multiple disciplines are combined to address questions related to biological species diversity, is a valuable tool for identifying pelagic marine fish larvae and recognizing the existence of new fish species. Here we combine data from DNA barcoding, comparative morphology, and analysis of color patterns to identify an unusual fish larva from the Florida Straits and demonstrate that it is the pelagic larval phase of a previously undescribed species of Liopropoma sea bass from deep reefs off Curaçao, southern Caribbean. The larva is unique among larvae of the teleost family Serranidae, Tribe Liopropomini, in having seven elongate dorsal-fin spines. Adults of the new species are similar to the golden bass, Liopropoma aberrans, with which they have been confused, but they are distinct genetically and morphologically. The new species differs from all other western Atlantic liopropomins in having IX, 11 dorsal-fin rays and in having a unique color pattern–most notably the predominance of yellow pigment on the dorsal portion of the trunk, a pale to white body ventrally, and yellow spots scattered across both the dorsal and ventral portions of the trunk. Exploration of deep reefs to 300 m using a manned submersible off Curaçao is resulting in the discovery of numerous new fish species, improving our genetic databases, and greatly enhancing our understanding of deep-reef fish diversity in the southern Caribbean. Oh the mother and child reunion is only a moment away. Paul Simon. PMID:24825118

  13. Connectivity across the Caribbean Sea: DNA barcoding and morphology unite an enigmatic fish larva from the Florida straits with a new species of sea bass from deep reefs off Curaçao.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Carole C; Johnson, G David

    2014-01-01

    Integrative taxonomy, in which multiple disciplines are combined to address questions related to biological species diversity, is a valuable tool for identifying pelagic marine fish larvae and recognizing the existence of new fish species. Here we combine data from DNA barcoding, comparative morphology, and analysis of color patterns to identify an unusual fish larva from the Florida Straits and demonstrate that it is the pelagic larval phase of a previously undescribed species of Liopropoma sea bass from deep reefs off Curaçao, southern Caribbean. The larva is unique among larvae of the teleost family Serranidae, Tribe Liopropomini, in having seven elongate dorsal-fin spines. Adults of the new species are similar to the golden bass, Liopropoma aberrans, with which they have been confused, but they are distinct genetically and morphologically. The new species differs from all other western Atlantic liopropomins in having IX, 11 dorsal-fin rays and in having a unique color pattern-most notably the predominance of yellow pigment on the dorsal portion of the trunk, a pale to white body ventrally, and yellow spots scattered across both the dorsal and ventral portions of the trunk. Exploration of deep reefs to 300 m using a manned submersible off Curaçao is resulting in the discovery of numerous new fish species, improving our genetic databases, and greatly enhancing our understanding of deep-reef fish diversity in the southern Caribbean. Oh the mother and child reunion is only a moment away. Paul Simon.

  14. Numerical Methods in Electromagnetics: Evanescent Nanometry for DNA Sequencing, and EM Induction for UXO Detection and Discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijamov, Alex

    The main goals of this work are to extend forward and apply inverse EM numerical methods to enhance the fundamental understanding of ultra-wideband frequency range EM fields in complex geometries. The particular emphases are made on medical device development for whole human genome sequencing using force spectroscopy; and underwater target detection, and live sites UXO discrimination. Force spectroscopy is a powerful technique used to manipulate single biomolecules and study their interactions. In these experiments one end of a macromolecule is immobilized on a substrate, while its free end is attached to an externally-manipulated microscopic bead. Crucial to the application of force spectroscopy to DNA sequencing is the ability to apply pulling forces reaching hundreds of pico-Newtons and image molecular extensions with sub-nanometer resolution. To achieve both goals the behavior of EM fields in the vicinity of the beads and the associated far fields need to be investigated using numerical simulations. In recent years our group has developed a numerical technique---the Method of Auxiliary Sources---which was modified here for these problems. In this work the physics of bead scattering and fluorescent responses is studied for a variety of bead and substrate compositions and geometries, including layered structures, to understand their potential in increasing imaging sensitivity. This thesis also studies the inversion problems related to the underwater UXO detection and live-site UXO discrimination. Rigorous analysis of underlying physics of low-frequency EM field scattering from conducting objects in underwater environments is performed. The effects of seawater surface roughness on transmitted EM signals and the associated noise levels are analyzed. A new, magnetic field-based geolocation system is studied numerically for GPS-denied underwater environments. Finally, the performances of statistical and machine learning methods are analyzed for automatic

  15. Retinal AO OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Miller, Donald T.

    The last two decades have witnessed extraordinary advances in optical technology to image noninvasively and at high resolution the posterior segment of the eye. Two of the most impactful technological advancements over this period have arguably been optical coherence tomography (OCT) and adaptive optics (AO). The strengths of these technologies complement each other and when combined have been shown to provide unprecedented, micron-scale resolution (<3 μm) in all three dimensions and sensitivity to image the cellular retina in the living eye. This powerful extension of OCT, that is AO-OCT, is the focus of this chapter. It presents key aspects of designing and implementing AO-OCT systems. Particular attention is devoted to the relevant optical properties of the eye that ultimately define these systems, AO componentry and operation tailored for ophthalmic use, and of course use of the latest technologies and methods in OCT for ocular imaging. It surveys the wide range of AO-OCT designs that have been developed for retinal imaging, with AO integrated into every major OCT design configuration. Finally, it reviews the scientific and clinical studies reported to date that show the exciting potential of AO-OCT to image the microscopic retina and fundus in ways not previously possible with other noninvasive methods and a look to future developments in this rapidly growing field.

  16. Experimental analysis of a TEM plane transmission line for DNA studies at 900 MHz EM fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, F.; Doria, D.; Lorusso, A.; Nassisi, V.; Velardi, L.; Alifano, P.; Monaco, C.; Talà, A.; Tredici, M.; Rainò, A.

    2006-07-01

    A suitable plane transmission line was developed and its behaviour analysed at 900 MHz radiofrequency fields to study DNA mutability and the repair of micro-organisms. In this work, utilizing such a device, we investigated the behaviour of DNA mutability and repair of Escherichia coli strains. The transmission line was very simple and versatile in changing its characteristic resistance and field intensity by varying its sizes. In the absence of cell samples inside the transmission line, the relative modulation of the electric and/or magnetic field was ±31% with respect to the mean values, allowing the processing of more samples at different exposure fields in a single run. A slight decrease in spontaneous mutability to rifampicin-resistance of the E. coli JC411 strain was demonstrated in mismatch-repair proficient samples exposed to the radio-frequency fields during their growth on solid medium.

  17. Watching the action unfold: New cryo-EM images capture CRISPR’s interaction with target DNA | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Using the Nobel-prize winning technique of cryo-EM, researchers led by CCR Senior Investigator Sriram Subramaniam, Ph.D., have captured a series of highly detailed images of a protein complex belonging to the CRISPR system that can be used by bacteria to recognize and destroy foreign DNA. The images reveal the molecule’s form before and after its interaction with DNA and help illuminate both how the complex functions and how it can be blocked. Read more... 

  18. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  19. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  20. Diferentes Metodologias Aplicadas ao Ensino de Astronomia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, E.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2007-08-01

    Espera-se que o educando ao final da educação básica, adquira uma compreensão atualizada das hipóteses, modelos e formas de investigação sobre a origem e evolução do Universo em que vive. O presente trabalho tem como principal objetivo compreender dentre três práticas pedagógicas adotadas no Ensino de Astronomia, na terceira série do Ensino Médio, da Escola Estadual Colônia dos Pescadores, qual melhor cumpre o papel de formação e aprendizagem para vida. A pesquisa preliminar foi através de um questionário onde o intuito foi diagnosticar o conhecimento já existente acerca do tema em questão. O questionário é composto de vinte questões dissertativas e objetivas, onde os educandos das três turmas envolvidas o responderam. Este trabalho utiliza as seguintes metodologias: a tradicional, onde o professor é um repassador de informações, fazendo uso exclusivo de lousa e giz; a segunda também de forma tradicional, porém com auxílio de multimídia para desenvolvimento das aulas e aterceira sob forma de seminários, elaborados e apresentados pelos educandos, no qual o educador faz apenas as intervenções necessárias. Ao final do trabalho os alunos responderão novamente o questionário inicial para diagnosticar dentre as três metodologias utilizadas qual apresentou melhor resultado. Os resultados preliminares obtidos, já podem ser observados e, dos 119 alunos entrevistados, as respostas obtidas são as mais diversas e evidenciam que a grande maioria nunca teve em sua vida escolar o tema Astronomia. Ao serem questionados se já haviam estudado Astronomia as respostas foram: turma A: sim 43%; turma B: sim: 21%; turma C: sim: 24%. Porém quando questionados a respeito do significado de Astronomia observou-se que: turma A: 100% de acertos; turma B: 64% acertos; turma C: 84% de acertos, demonstrando claramente a aprendizagem em diferentes esferas, não dependendo unicamente da escola. Até o presente momento, verificou-se que há interesse em

  1. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  2. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  3. AO Group Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2005-10-04

    The Adaptive Optics (AO) Group in I Division develops and tests a broad range of advanced wavefront control technologies. Current applications focus on: Remote sensing, High power lasers, Astronomy, and Human vision. In the area of remote sensing, the AO Group leads a collaborative effort with LLNL's Nonproliferation, Arms Control & International Security (NAI) Directorate on Enhanced Surveillance Imaging. The ability to detect and identify individual people or vehicles from long-range is an important requirement for proliferation detection and homeland security. High-resolution imaging along horizontal paths through the atmosphere is limited by turbulence, which blurs and distorts the image. For ranges over {approx}one km, visible image resolution can be reduced by over an order of magnitude. We have developed an approach based on speckle imaging that can correct the turbulence-induced blurring and provide high resolution imagery. The system records a series of short exposure images which freeze the atmospheric effects. We can then estimate the image magnitude and phase using a bispectral estimation algorithm which cancels the atmospheric effects while maintaining object information at the diffraction limit of the imaging system.

  4. Cryo-EM structure of a helicase loading intermediate containing ORC-Cdc6-Cdt1-MCM2-7 bound to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingchuan; Evrin, Cecile; Samel, Stefan; Fernández-Cid, Alejandra; Riera, Alberto; Kawakami, Hironori; Stillman, Bruce; Speck, Christian; Li, Huilin

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the Cdt1-bound replicative helicase core MCM2-7 is loaded onto DNA by the ORC-Cdc6 ATPase to form a pre-Replicative Complex (pre-RC) with a MCM2-7 double-hexamer encircling DNA. Using purified components in the presence of ATPγS, we have captured in vitro an intermediate in pre-RC assembly that contains a complex between the hetero-heptameric ORC-Cdc6 and the hetero-heptameric Cdt1-MCM2-7, called the OCCM complex. Cryo-EM studies of the 14-protein complex reveal that the two separate heptameric complexes are extensively engaged, with the ORC-Cdc6 N-terminal AAA+ domains latching onto the C-terminal AAA+ motor domains of the MCM2-7 hexamer. ORC-Cdc6 undergoes a concerted conformational change into a right-handed spiral with the helical symmetry identical to the DNA double helix. The results show a striking structural similarity between the ORC-Cdc6 helicase loader and the Replication Factor-C clamp loader and suggest a conserved mechanism of action. PMID:23851460

  5. Cryo-EM structure of a helicase loading intermediate containing ORC-Cdc6-Cdt1-MCM2-7 bound to DNA.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingchuan; Evrin, Cecile; Samel, Stefan A; Fernández-Cid, Alejandra; Riera, Alberto; Kawakami, Hironori; Stillman, Bruce; Speck, Christian; Li, Huilin

    2013-08-01

    In eukaryotes, the Cdt1-bound replicative helicase core MCM2-7 is loaded onto DNA by the ORC-Cdc6 ATPase to form a prereplicative complex (pre-RC) with an MCM2-7 double hexamer encircling DNA. Using purified components in the presence of ATP-γS, we have captured in vitro an intermediate in pre-RC assembly that contains a complex between the ORC-Cdc6 and Cdt1-MCM2-7 heteroheptamers called the OCCM. Cryo-EM studies of this 14-subunit complex reveal that the two separate heptameric complexes are engaged extensively, with the ORC-Cdc6 N-terminal AAA+ domains latching onto the C-terminal AAA+ motor domains of the MCM2-7 hexamer. The conformation of ORC-Cdc6 undergoes a concerted change into a right-handed spiral with helical symmetry that is identical to that of the DNA double helix. The resulting ORC-Cdc6 helicase loader shows a notable structural similarity to the replication factor C clamp loader, suggesting a conserved mechanism of action.

  6. Cryo-EM structure of a helicase loading intermediate containing ORC–Cdc6–Cdt1–MCM2-7 bound to DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jingchuan; Evrin, Cecile; Samel, Stefan A.; Fernández-Cid, Alejandra; Riera, Alberto; Kawakami, Hironori; Stillman, Bruce; Speck, Christian; Li, Huilin

    2013-07-14

    In eukaryotes, the Cdt1-bound replicative helicase core MCM2-7 is loaded onto DNA by the ORC–Cdc6 ATPase to form a prereplicative complex (pre-RC) with an MCM2-7 double hexamer encircling DNA. Using purified components in the presence of ATP-γS, we have captured in vitro an intermediate in pre-RC assembly that contains a complex between the ORC–Cdc6 and Cdt1–MCM2-7 heteroheptamers called the OCCM. Cryo-EM studies of this 14-subunit complex reveal that the two separate heptameric complexes are engaged extensively, with the ORC–Cdc6 N-terminal AAA+ domains latching onto the C-terminal AAA+ motor domains of the MCM2-7 hexamer. The conformation of ORC–Cdc6 undergoes a concerted change into a right-handed spiral with helical symmetry that is identical to that of the DNA double helix. The resulting ORC–Cdc6 helicase loader shows a notable structural similarity to the replication factor C clamp loader, suggesting a conserved mechanism of action.

  7. MEMS AO for Planet Finding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Shanti; Wallace, J. Kent; Shao, Mike; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Levine, B. Martin; Samuele, Rocco; Lane, Benjamin; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy; Hicks, Brian; hide

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for planet finding using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) Adaptive Optics (AO). The use of a deformable mirror (DM) is described as a part of the instrument that was designed with a nulling interferometer. The strategy that is used is described in detail.

  8. Difficulties of First Years Elementary School Teachers with the Teaching of Astronomy. (Breton Title: Dificuldades de Professores dos Anos Iniciais do Ensino Fundamental em Relação ao Ensino da Astronomia. ) Dificultades de LOS Profesores de los Primeros Años de la Escuela Primaria en Relación a la Enseñanza de la Astronomía

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhi, Rodolfo; Nardi, Roberto

    2005-12-01

    This paper reports Primary School teachers' discourses analysis about their difficulties related to the teaching of Astronomy. It reports partial data of a master's level research carried out in the last two years, named "An exploratory study for inserting Astronomy in primary school teachers' education" (LANGHI, 2004). The study took into consideration students' and teachers' common sense conceptions about astronomical phenomena, conceptual mistakes in textbooks, and Astronomy's suggestions given by the PCN (Parâmetros Curriculares Nacionais - The Brazilian National Curriculum Standards). The paper aims to characterize teachers' difficulties, in order to provide subsides to the implementation of an initial or continuing education program. This study is justified by the fact that courses plans like these only will be adapted to the teacher's (and students') reality, if there is a primary investigation about what the teachers really need to know about Astronomy. This fact was possible here by the enunciations interpretation of a teachers' sample using semi-structured interviews, according to discourse analysis procedures. The research outcomes show difficulties related to factors like: those of personal order, methodological, on teacher's formation, educational infrastructure and other related to information sources for educators. Este artigo, que relata as dificuldades de professores em relação ao ensino da Astronomia, faz parte de um estudo exploratório para a inserção da Astronomia na formação de professores dos anos iniciais do Ensino Fundamental. Esse estudo leva em consideração as concepções alternativas de alunos e professores sobre fenômenos astronômicos, os erros conceituais em livros didáticos e as sugestões de conteúdos de Astronomia constantes nos PCN (Parâmetros Curriculares Nacionais). Caracterizar as dificuldades dos professores é a questão central deste texto, apontando para o objetivo de contribuir com subsídios para um futuro

  9. The Universe in a Box: Introduction to the Study of Astronomy in the Initial Formation of Physics Teachers. (Spanish Title: El Universo Representado en Una Caja: Introducción al Estudio de la Astronomía en la Formación Inicial de Profesores de Física.) O Universo Representado em Uma Caixa: Introdução ao Estudo da Astronomia NA Formação Inicial de Professores de Física

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhini, Marcos Daniel

    2009-07-01

    This is a report of an activity of introduction to the study of Astronomy developed with a group of future Physics teachers at a Brazilian public university. Such activity had the goal of giving privileged emphasis to notions of spatiality, alternative conceptions of the participants and the process of interaction among peers, and consisted of the representation, in a three dimensional space, of the models of the universe that the participants had. The results, which were categorized as miscellaneous, geocentric, heliocentric and acentric models of the universe, were qualitatively analyzed. Analyses of the activity in the perspective of the participants are indicated and additional considerations are made regarding its use as a resource for teaching Astronomy and for teacher training. Este es el informe de una actividad para presentar un estudio introductorio de la Astronomía, desarrollado con una clase de futuros profesores de física en una universidad pública brasileña. Esta actividad tuvo como objetivo centrar las nociones de espacialidad, las concepciones alternativas de los participantes y el proceso de interacción entre pares, y consistió en la representación en un espacio tridimensional, de los modelos del universo que los participantes habían. Los resultados, que se clasificaron en universo miscelania, geocéntrico, heliocéntrico y acentrico, se analizaron cualitativamente. Son identificadas análisis de la actividad por los participantes, e hizo observaciones sobre su uso como recurso para la enseñanza de la astronomía y la formación de docentes. Trata-se do relato de uma atividade de introdução ao estudo da Astronomia, desenvolvida com uma turma de futuros professores de Física, em uma universidade pública brasileira. Tal atividade teve como meta privilegiar noções de espacialidade, as concepções alternativas dos participantes e o processo de interação entre pares e constou da representação, em um espaço tridimensional, dos

  10. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  11. SRAO: the first southern robotic AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Nicholas M.; Ziegler, Carl; Tokovinin, Andrei

    2016-08-01

    We present plans for SRAO, the first Southern Robotic AO system. SRAO will use AO-assisted speckle imaging and Robo-AO-heritage high efficiency observing to confirm and characterize thousands of planet candidates produced by major new transit surveys like TESS, and is the first AO system to be capable of building a comprehensive several-thousand-target multiplicity survey at sub-AU scales across the main sequence. We will also describe results from Robo-AO, the first robotic LGS-AO system. Robo-AO has observed tens of thousands of Northern targets, often using a similar speckle or Lucky-Imaging assisted mode. SRAO will be a moderate-order natural-guide-star adaptive optics system which uses an innovative photoncounting wavefront sensor and EMCCD speckle-imaging camera to guide on faint stars with the 4.1m SOAR telescope. The system will produce diffraction-limited imaging in the NIR on targets as faint as mν = 16. In AO-assisted speckle imaging mode the system will attain the 30-mas visible diffraction limit on targets at least as faint as mν = 17. The system will be the first Southern hemisphere robotic adaptive optics system, with overheads an order of magnitude smaller than comparable systems. Using Robo-AO's proven robotic AO software, SRAO will be capable of observing overheads on sub-minute scales, allowing the observation of at least 200 targets per night. SRAO will attain three times the angular resolution of the Palomar Robo-AO system in the visible.

  12. MagAO: status and science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzinski, Katie M.; Close, Laird M.; Males, Jared R.; Hinz, Phil M.; Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Briguglio, Runa; Follette, Katherine B.; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio; Vezilj, Jennifer; Xompero, Marco; Wu, Ya-Lin

    2016-07-01

    "MagAO" is the adaptive optics instrument at the Magellan Clay telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. MagAO has a 585-actuator adaptive secondary mirror and 1000-Hz pyramid wavefront sensor, operating on natural guide stars from R-magnitudes of -1 to 15. MagAO has been in on-sky operation for 166 nights since installation in 2012. MagAO's unique capabilities are simultaneous imaging in the visible and infrared with VisAO and Clio, excellent performance at an excellent site, and a lean operations model. Science results from MagAO include the first ground-based CCD image of an exoplanet, demonstration of the first accreting protoplanets, discovery of a new wide-orbit exoplanet, and the first empirical bolometric luminosity of an exoplanet. We describe the status, report the AO performance, and summarize the science results. New developments reported here include color corrections on red guide stars for the wavefront sensor; a new field stop stage to facilitate VisAO imaging of extended sources; and eyepiece observing at the visible-light diffraction limit of a 6.5-m telescope. We also discuss a recent hose failure that led to a glycol coolant leak, and the recovery of the adaptive secondary mirror (ASM) after this recent (Feb. 2016) incident.

  13. Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genome and Epigenome Instability Symposium and Epigenetic Mechanisms, DNA Repair, and Chromatin Symposium at the EMS 2008 Annual Meeting - October 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F; Kovalchuk, Olga; Dolinoy, Dana C; Dubrova, Yuri E; Coleman, Matthew A; Schär, Primo; Pogribny, Igor; Hendzel, Michael

    2010-02-19

    The Low Dose Radiation Symposium thoughtfully addressed ionizing radiation non-mutational but transmissable alterations in surviving cells. Deregulation of epigenetic processes has been strongly implicated in carcinogenesis, and there is increasing realization that a significant fraction of non-targeted and adaptive mechanisms in response to ionizing radiation are likely to be epigenetic in nature. Much remains to be learned about how chromatin and epigenetic regulators affect responses to low doses of radiation, and how low dose radiation impacts other epigenetic processes. The Epigenetic Mechanisms Symposium focused on on epigenetic mechanisms and their interplay with DNA repair and chromatin changes. Addressing the fact that the most well understood mediators of epigenetic regulation are histone modifications and DNA methylation. Low levels of radiation can lead to changes in the methylation status of certain gene promoters and the expression of DNA methyltransferases, However, epigenetic regulation can also involve changes in higher order chromosome structure.

  14. PSF reconstruction for AO photometry and astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascenso, J.; Neichel, B.; Silva, M.; Fusco, T.; Garcia, P.

    2015-12-01

    Extracting accurate photometry (and astrometry) from images taken with adaptive optics assisted instruments is particularly challenging. Current post-processing tools are not prepared to achieve high accuracy from AO data, especially in limiting cases of crowded fields and marginally resolved sources. We quantify the limitations of these tools with synthetic images, and present a proof-of-concept study showing the potential of using reconstructed PSFs from the (GL)AO system telemetry to increase the measured photometric accuracy. We show that the photometric accuracy is significantly improved with a good PSF reconstruction in considerably crowded regions. We demonstrate the need for a dedicated post-processing tool that incorporates available information about the PSF, as well as the ability to adjust to the spatial variations of the PSF characteristic of AO data.

  15. Twelve thousand laser-AO observations: first results from the Robo-AO large surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Nicholas M.; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed L.

    2014-07-01

    Robo-AO is the first AO system which can feasibly perform surveys of thousands of targets. The system has been operating in a fully robotic mode on the Palomar 1.5m telescope for almost two years. Robo-AO has completed nearly 12,000 high-angular-resolution observations in almost 20 separate science programs including exoplanet characterization, field star binarity, young star binarity and solar system observations. We summarize the Robo-AO surveys and the observations completed to date. We also describe the data-reduction pipeline we developed for Robo-AO—the first fully-automated AO data-reduction, point-spread-function subtraction and companion-search pipeline.

  16. Characterization of an AO-OCT system

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J W; Zawadzki, R J; Jones, S; Olivier, S; Werner, J S

    2007-07-26

    Adaptive optics (AO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are powerful imaging modalities that, when combined, can provide high-volumetric-resolution, images of the retina. The AO-OCT system at UC Davis has been under development for 2 years and has demonstrated the utility of this technology for microscopic, volumetric, in vivo retinal imaging [1]. The current system uses an AOptix bimorph deformable mirror (DM) for low-order, high-stroke correction [2] and a 140-actuator Boston Micromachines DM for high-order correction [3]. We are beginning to investigate the potential for increasing the image contrast in this system using higher-order wavefront correction. The first step in this analysis is to quantify the residual wavefront error (WFE) in the current system. Developing an error budget is a common tool for improved performance and system design in astronomical AO systems [4, 5]. The process for vision science systems is also discussed in several texts e.g. [6], but results from this type of analysis have rarely been included in journal articles on AO for vision science. Careful characterization of the AO system will lead to improved performance and inform the design of a future high-contrast system. In general, an AO system error budget must include an analysis of three categories of residual WFE: errors in measuring the phase, errors caused by limitations of the DM(s), and errors introduced by temporal variation. Understanding the mechanisms and relative size of these errors is critical to improving system performance. In this paper we discuss the techniques for characterizing these error sources in the AO-OCT system. It is useful to first calculate an error budget for the simpler case using a model eye, and then add the additional errors introduced for the case of a human subject. Measurement error includes calibration error, wavefront sensor (WFS) CCD noise, and sampling errors. Calibration errors must be measured by an external system. Typically this

  17. AoB PLANTS: origins and features.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael B

    2009-01-01

    AoB PLANTS is a peer reviewed, Open Access (OA) journal owned and run by plant biologists and published by Oxford University Press. The journal publishes research papers, reviews and opinion papers on all aspects of land based plant biology. They are made available rapidly online and can be accessed without the need for subscriptions or payment. Several difficulties in conventional publishing of peer-reviewed manuscripts encouraged AoB PLANTS to adopt OA. Open Access helps sidestep library budgets which are struggling to purchase the increasing numbers of journals. Open Access makes research freely available both to the academic community and beyond while publishing online only eliminates the need to reject good manuscripts simply to control the size of the printed journal. Finally, the journal chose to go OA to ensure the widest possible international readership for the growing amount of high-quality plant science research being carried out worldwide in response to problems such as climate change and food shortages. Responses to a wide-ranging online questionnaire indicated strong international support for a journal such as AoB PLANTS. AoB PLANTS strives for fair and rapid peer review followed by fast publication of accepted papers. For an initial period, there will be no OA fees, and fees will remain modest once introduced. AoB PLANTS adopts double-blind peer review using published criteria for acceptability as a basis for decision-making. Accepted papers are published shortly after acceptance together with referees' analyses using Stanford University Libraries High Wire Press H2O platform. Authors retain ownership of the copyright in their papers.

  18. Recent enhancements to the NAOMI AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolley, Paul D.; Goodsell, Stephen; Benn, Chris R.; Gregory, Thomas; Rees, Simon; van der Hoeven, Michiel; Blanken, Maarten; Pit, Renee

    2004-10-01

    The Nasmyth Adaptive Optics Multipurpose Instrument (NAOMI) is the adaptive optics (AO) platform on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) at the Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes (ING). Until recently NAOMI has been concentrating on near infrared observations using the Isaac Newton Group Red Imaging Device (INGRID). Recent developments have added an extra optical port to NAOMI. The observer can now rapidly switch between infrared and optical instrumentation during AO observing, making the system more appealing for visiting instruments. To allow for the operation of the common user optical spectrograph OASIS, a new optical path was created around the existing NAOMI optics. Various mechanisms were also added to the whole optical system. The OASIS beam was reshaped to f/20. The original optical/IR beam remains unchanged at f/16, and forms a new universal science port (USP). The existing Nasmyth Calibration Unit (NCU) has been replaced with a new design. This new NCU has multiple fibre-fed light sources that include continuum and arc lamps. The intensity of light can be individually adjusted via computer control. A new acquisition camera is mounted such that it can be used simultaneously with the spectral lamps. Software upgrades now allow faster deformable mirror calibration. A moveable mirror is used to select which science port will receive the light. Enhancements to the NAOMI AO system are discussed in this paper and suggestions for possible future upgrades.

  19. MEMS DM development at Iris AO, Inc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmbrecht, Michael A.; He, Min; Kempf, Carl J.; Besse, Marc

    2011-03-01

    Iris AO is actively developing piston-tip-tilt (PTT) segmented MEMS deformable mirrors (DM) and adaptive optics (AO) controllers for these DMs. This paper discusses ongoing research at Iris AO that has advanced the state-of-the-art of these devices and systems over the past year. Improvements made to open-loop operation and mirror fabrication enables mirrors to open-loop flatten to 4 nm rms. Additional testing of an anti snap-in technology was conducted and demonstrates that the technology can withstand 100 million snap-in events without failure. Deformable mirrors with dielectric coatings are shown that are capable of handling 630 W/cm2 of incident laser power. Over a localized region on the segment, the dielectric coatings can withstand 100kW/cm2 incident laser power for 30 minutes. Results from the first-ever batch of PTT489 DMs that were shipped to pilot customers are reported. Optimizations made to the open-loop PTT controller are shown to have latencies of 157.5 μs and synchronous array update rates of nearly 6.5 kHz. Finally, plans for the design and fabrication of the next-generation PTT939 DM are presented.

  20. Deformable mirror designs for extreme AO (XAO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaco, Jeffrey; Wirth, Allan

    2014-08-01

    One of the science missions for the next generation of extremely large ground based telescopes (30-42m apertures) is the imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets. To achieve that goal an Adaptive Optics (AO) subsystem with a very large number of corrected modes is required. To provide contrast ratios in the range of 10-9 or better for a 42m telescope an AO system with 25,000 to 60,000 channels will be needed. This is approximately an order of magnitude beyond the current state of the art. Adaptive Optics Associates Xinetics has developed the Photonex Module Deformable Mirror (DM) technology specifically to address the needs of extreme AO for high contrast applications. A Photonex Module is a monolithic block of electrostrictive ceramic in which a high density of individually addressable actuators are formed by screen printing of electrodes and partial wire saw cutting of the ceramic. The printed electrode structures also allow all electrical connections to be made at the back surface of the module via flex circuits. Actuator spacings of 1mm or less have been achieved using this approach. The individual modules can be edge butted and bonded to achieve high actuator count. The largest DMs fabricated to date have 4096 actuators in a 64X64mm array. In this paper the engineering challenges in extending this technology by a factor of ten or more in actuator count will be discussed. A conceptual design for a DM suitable for XAO will be presented. Approaches for a support structure that will maintain the low spatial frequency surface figure of this large (~0.6m) DM and for the electrical interface to the tens of thousands of actuators will be discussed. Finally, performance estimates will be presented.

  1. AO corrected satellite imaging from Mount Stromlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennet, F.; Rigaut, F.; Price, I.; Herrald, N.; Ritchie, I.; Smith, C.

    2016-07-01

    The Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics have been developing adaptive optics systems for space situational awareness. As part of this program we have developed satellite imaging using compact adaptive optics systems for small (1-2 m) telescopes such as those operated by Electro Optic Systems (EOS) from the Mount Stromlo Observatory. We have focused on making compact, simple, and high performance AO systems using modern high stroke high speed deformable mirrors and EMCCD cameras. We are able to track satellites down to magnitude 10 with a Strehl in excess of 20% in median seeing.

  2. AO Observations of Three Powerful Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    de Vries, W; van Bruegel, W; Quirrenbach, A

    2002-08-01

    The host galaxies of powerful radio sources are ideal laboratories to study active galactic nuclei (AGN). The galaxies themselves are among the most massive systems in the universe, and are believed to harbor supermassive black holes (SMBH). If large galaxies are formed in a hierarchical way by multiple merger events, radio galaxies at low redshift represent the end-products of this process. However, it is not clear why some of these massive ellipticals have associated radio emission, while others do not. Both are thought to contain SMBHs, with masses proportional to the total luminous mass in the bulge. It either implies every SMBH has recurrent radio-loud phases, and the radio-quiet galaxies happen to be in the ''low'' state, or that the radio galaxy nuclei are physically different from radio-quiet ones, i.e. by having a more massive SMBH for a given bulge mass. Here we present the first results from our adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy pilot program on three nearby powerful radio galaxies. Initiating a larger, more systematic AO survey of radio galaxies (preferentially with Laser Guide Star equipped AO systems) has the potential of furthering our understanding of the physical properties of radio sources, their triggering, and their subsequent evolution.

  3. Results of AO simulations for ELTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conan, Rodolphe; Le Louarn, Miska; Braud, J.; Fedrigo, Enrico; Hubin, Norbert N.

    2003-01-01

    The design and elaboration of Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT) with primary mirror from 20m to 100m face with many challenges: mechanical, optical, computational, etc. To benefit completely of the full potentiality of such facilities, an Adaptive Optics System (AOS) have also to be designed for these telescopes. For whole field--of--view compensation and full sky coverage, the new but promising Multi--Conjugated Adaptive Optics (MCAO) technique has to be envisaged. The first step towards the design of an MCAO system is the numerical simulation. This is the first challenge we have to face. The scale of AO simulations being imposed by the ratio (D/r0), the simulation requirements of a MCAOS for an ELT, in terms of computing power and memory available to store the data, reach and sometimes overcome the capacity of actual computers. In ESO, we have evaluated different hardware and software strategies to achieve MCAO simulations goals. Two codes have been developed to simulate MCAOS using an analytical and an end-to-end model. The goals and advantages/limitations of both approaches is shown. The hardware requirements for both methods is also given through the size of their largest matrices. And finally, results of hardware and software tests for MCAO simulations with PC--cluster and paralleled code are presented.

  4. AO Infrared Imaging of M71 Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberg, Andres; Richer, H.; Brewer, J.; Davis, S.; Hickson, P.; Knigge, C.; Dieball, A.; Hurley, J.; Shara, M.; Hansen, B.; Gebhardt, K.; Fahlman, G.

    2007-05-01

    In this poster we present infrared H and K AO data taken with ALTAIR/NIRI on Gemini North of the globular cluster Messier 71. This data represents approximately 22ks of observations in H and 17ks in K, in a field 22x22 arcsec centered on the core of the cluster. These data were secured under superb conditions and will provide an excellent opportunity to pursue our scientific goals. These goals include the observation of the end of hydrogen-burning main sequence in a moderately metal-rich globular cluster and, by fitting the brightness profile and looking for deviations from a King model, we will search for evidence for a central black hole in this cluster.

  5. Review of AO calibrations, or how to best educate your AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Johann

    2016-07-01

    If the Real-Time Computer is the heart of an AO system, the Wavefront Sensor (WFS) its eyes, the Deformable Mirror (DM) its hands and the control strategy its nervous system, the sum of all those parts is made into a harmonious entity thanks to calibrations. This paper does not have the ambition to provide an overview of all the currently existing calibration strategies, but rather to focus on a few challenging problems and their recent evolution in the era of adaptive telescopes, mostly based on the experience of ESO's Adaptive Optics Instruments in general and the AO Facility in particular. Single most important calibration in post-focal AO system, the recording of the Interaction Matrix (IM) between WFS and DM has since long evolved to use fast modulation techniques, has shown to be feasible on-sky and is now almost free from measurements thanks to its pseudo-synthetic generation, quasi-mandatory solution in an adaptive telescope. Pseudo- because it requires an unprecedented knowledge of the components' characteristics, especially the WFS, DM and the optical registration between the two. Bigger telescopes and the use of Laser Guide Stars (LGS) also mean that the properties of the system will change in time and thus need to be constantly updated thanks to online diagnosis tools for spot size measurement, atmosphere monitoring, Wavefront Sensing and control optimization. New loops come into play like the one to minimize LGS Jitter and the one taking over the telescope active optics by means of offloading the DM low orders, and they all require calibration. More calibration means more time and one has to carefully balance the calibrations that require precious telescope night time, day time or for the best, no telescope time at all. Their importance sometimes underestimated, calibrations have repeatedly shown to be a vital part in the optimum functioning of present and future AO systems.

  6. LGS-AO Imaging of Every Kepler Planet Candidate: the Robo-AO KOI Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas; Morton, Timothy; Ziegler, Carl; Nofi, Larissa; Atkinson, Dani; Riddle, Reed

    2015-12-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging, to search for blended nearby stars which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. We will present the results from searching for companions around over 3,000 Kepler planet hosts in 2012-2015. We will describe our first data release covering 715 planet candidate hosts, and give a preview of ongoing results including improved statistics on the likelihood of false positive planet detections in the Kepler dataset, many new planets in multiple star systems, and new exotic multiple star systems containing Kepler planets. We will also describe the automated Robo-AO survey data reduction methods, including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for extremely large adaptive optics surveys. Our first data release covered 715 objects, searching for companions from 0.15” to 2.5” separation with contrast up to 6 magnitudes. We measured the overall nearby-star-probability for Kepler planet candidates to be 7.4+/-1.0%, and we will detail the variations in this number with stellar host parameters. We will also discuss plans to extend the survey to other transiting planet missions such as K2 and TESS as Robo-AO is in the process of being re-deployed to the 2.1-m telescope at Kitt Peak for 3 years and a higher-contrast Robo-AO system is being developed for the 2.2-m UH telescope on Maunakea.

  7. Directly Imaging Planets with SCExAO: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Thayne M.; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Lozi, Julien; Tamura, Motohide; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Uyama, Taichi; Garcia, Eugenio

    2017-01-01

    We present the first science results from the newly commissioned Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics project, an experimental system dedicated to image faint jovian planets around nearby stars. SCExAO is now achieving true extreme AO capability. We describe the typical performance of SCExAO, the first images of benchmark exoplanets and planet-forming disks, and SCExAO’s first science results. Finally, we briefly chart the path forward for SCExAO to achieve its full scientific capability, including imaging mature planets in reflected light.

  8. Electromagnetic DM technology meets future AO demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelinck, Roger; Rosielle, Nick; Steinbuch, Maarten; Doelman, Niek

    New deformable mirror technology is developed by the Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Delft University of Technology and TNO Science and Industry. Several prototype adaptive deformable mirrors are realized mirrors, up to 427 actuators and ∅150mm diameter, with characteristics suitable for future AO systems. The prototypes consist of a 100µm thick, continuous facesheet on which low voltage, electromagnetic, push-pull actuators impose out-of-plane displacements. The variable reluctance actuators with ±10µm stroke and nanometer resolution are located in a standard actuator module. Each module with 61 actuators connects to a single PCB with dedicated, 16 bit, PWM based, drivers. A LVDS multi-drop cable connects up to 32 actuator modules. With the actuator module, accompanying PCB and multi-drop system the deformable mirror technology is made modular in its mechanics and electronics. An Ethernet-LVDS bridge enables any commercial PC to control the mirror using the UDP standard. Latest results of the deformable mirror technology development are presented.

  9. Participation of DNA structure on sperm chromatin organization.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Mascorro, G; Vergara-Onofre, M; Mercado, E; Hernández-Pérez, O; Rosado, A

    2000-01-01

    The in vitro interaction between purified bovine liver and sperm DNA with somatic histones, to form nucleosomes, and with bovine and salmon protamines were studied. DNAse or microccocal nuclease digestion of liver DNA-histone reassociated chromatin produced the expected polynucleosome type of fragments. Electrophoretic patterns of digested sperm-DNA nucleosomes were different. Micrococcal nuclease digestion produced mainly fragments smaller than 100 bp and some nucleosome-type particles. Under DNAse activity most of the products were smaller than 100 bp, indicating an increased susceptibility of the sperm DNA-histone complexes to the hydrolytic activity of both nucleases, particularly toward DNAse I. This differential susceptibility was confirmed by sucrose gradient spectrophotometric analysis. Acridine orange (AO) staining of histone-DNA reassociated nucleosomes showed significant differences in fluorescence intensity, sperm DNA-histone complexes being almost twice as fluorescent as liver DNA-histone complexes. On the contrary, liver DNA/protamine complexes stained with AO were consistently more fluorescent than sperm DNA-protamine complexes. Finally, no differences in either fluorescence intensity or spectra were observed when liver and sperm DNA were stained with AO after interaction with salmon protamines. The data suggest that sperm DNA has important structural characteristics that differentiates it from somatic DNA. These differences seem to be species specific and must surely play an important role on the determination of the dramatic sequence of that participates sperm chromatin organization.

  10. Model carcinogen adsorption dynamics of DNA gel.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Naoko; Naito, Daisuke; Rokugawa, Isamu; Yamamoto, Takao; Dobashi, Toshiaki

    2014-09-01

    We have derived theoretical equations describing the adsorption of carcinogen to gels in an immersion medium containing carcinogens. The theory was developed for a cylindrical boundary condition under the assumption of a carcinogen diffusion-limited process combined with the "moving boundary picture (Furusawa et al., 2007)". The time course of the adsorbed carcinogen layer thickness and that of the carcinogen concentration in an immersion medium were expressed by a set of scaled variables, and the asymptotic behavior in the initial stage was derived. Experiments based on the theory were performed using a DNA gel sandwiched between a set of coverglasses in a medium containing acridine orange (AO). The boundary between the AO-adsorbed gel layer and AO-nonadsorbed gel layer was traced during the immersion. The time courses of the AO-adsorbed gel layer thickness and the AO concentration in the immersion medium were well explained by the theory, and the number ratio of the total AO molecules to the adsorption sites in the DNA gel was determined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. WIYN active optics: a platform for AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Code, Arthur D.; Claver, Charles F.; Goble, Larry W.; Jacoby, George H.; Sawyer, David G.

    1998-09-01

    The WIYN 3.5 meter telescope is situated on the southwest ridge of Kitt Peak yielding excellent atmosphere seeing conditions. As such, the telescope and enclosure design was directed towards exploiting this feature. The primary mirror was spun cast and figured by the Steward Observatory Mirror Laboratory and the secondary mirror by Contraves. In both cases the performance exceeded the design specifications. The borosilicate primary is actively temperature controlled to within 0.2 C of the desired temperature, typically 0.5 degrees C below the ambient air. The telescope structure is also temperature controlled and the enclosure is opened to the outside ion all sides, which all heat sources are vented to ducts carrying air downwind of the facility. The primary mirror is actively controlled for low order aberrations by 66 axial actuators which are adjusted open loop via force matrix look-up tables and closed loop via real-time wavefront curvature sensing measurements. The active optics also included real-time collimation and focus control. The telescope drive and guider are capable of providing tracking to a few hundredths of a second of arc. By employing active telescope control at this level, it is possible to maintain telescope and local wavefront distortion to a level where atmospheric effects dominate the image quality. Since a significant fraction of the power in the atmospheric disturbances is contained in image motion the first step in adaptive optics control will be simple tip tilt. Studies of higher order AO system are being carried out, as well as additional test characterizing the telescope and site. It is intended to continue such studies in an attempt to establish long term variances.

  12. NFIRAOS Multiconjugate AO System for TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herriot, Glen; Andersen, David; Atwood, Jenny; Byrnes, Peter; Boyer, Corinne; Caputa, Kris; Correia, Carlos; Dunn, Jennifer; Ellerbroek, Brent; Fitzsimmons, Joeleff; Gilles, Luc; Hickson, Paul; Hill, Alexis; Pazder, John; Reshetov, Vlad; Smith, Malcolm; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Wang, Lianqi; Wevers, Ivan

    2011-09-01

    NFIRAOS, the Adaptive Optics system for the Thirty Meter Telescope, is a Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics System of order 60x60 with two deformable mirrors and six laser guide star wavefront sensors. NFIRAOS is 8 x 10 x 5 m (L x W x H) on a Nasmyth Platform and supports three client instruments operating over 0.8 - 2.5 μm wavelength range. In this paper we discuss: NFIRAOS' requirements and architecture; changes to NFIRAOS since the last AO4ELT conference; interior details of NFIRAOS; interfaces to instruments; integration and verification plans. Top-level science requirements include 50% sky coverage at the galactic pole with <187 nm wavefront error. Astrometry is an important science driver - to minimize image distortion, we have recently revised the optical design to use four off-axis paraboloidal mirrors. We have vastly simplified the laser WFS zoom optics and moved them inside the cold enclosure. To control image magnification, differential magnification and tip/tilt/focus, NFIRAOS' client instruments have three low-order warfront sensors monitoring near-infrared natural guide stars. These stars are sharpened by NFIRAOS, which assists sky coverage. NFIRAOS will have high throughput and low thermal background - it will be cooled to -30 °C. The insulated walls have a buried cold plate to intercept heat leakage and isothermalize the interior of NFIRAOS. Instruments have stringent requirements on heat leakage and must provide their own rotator and interface to NFIRAOS, including a rotating seal. For wavelength and flat field calibration of client instruments, a NFIRAOS Science Calibration Unit (NSCU) feeds light in the entrance window, through NFIRAOS, to instruments. Inside NFIRAOS are deployable light sources simulating natural and laser guide stars, a focal plane mask with pinholes illuminated by the NSCU, as well as a turbulence phase screen. A prototype screen has been manufactured by magneto-rheological machining. We are currently updating the NFIRAOS

  13. Robo-AO: Performance and Characterization at Palomar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Baranec, C.; Riddle, R. L.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Law, N. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Dekany, R.; Bui, K.; Davis, J.; Burse, M.; Das, H.; Punnadi, S.; Chordia, P.

    2013-01-01

    Hosted at the Palomar 60-inch telescope, Robo-AO is the world's first completely autonomous, laser-beacon supported adaptive optics (AO) system, delivering diffraction-limited images in the visible and IR wavelengths. With simultaneous turbulence monitoring using a MASS-DIMM instrument, we have characterized the performance of Robo-AO as a function of local seeing, turbulence profile, laser return power and the brightness of the tip-tilt star. We shall present the various AO metrics: The full-width at half maxima of the point spread function, the Strehl ratio, the isoplanatic angle and their variations with the atmospheric and operating conditions. Strategies for optimizing robotic AO observations based on varying conditions will be discussed.

  14. On random walk de Lévy aplicado aos mapas de variâncias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klafke, J. C.

    2003-08-01

    Uma pergunta que surge ao nos confrontarmos com os mapas de variâncias, ou s-Maps [Klafke, J. C. "Estudo da Difusão Caótica em Ressonâncias Asteroidais", Tese de Doutorado, IAG/USP, 2002] diz respeito ao conteúdo físico de tais representações do espaço de fase. Ou seja, o que representa as variâncias das ações obtidas para uma determinada condição inicial e como relacioná-las com o tempo de difusão das órbitas, supondo-se que estas de fato estejam envolvidas em um processo difusivo? Para discutirmos essa questão, lançamos mão da modelagem dos processos estocásticos subjacentes às variâncias determinadas e implementamos uma série de simulações do tipo Monte Carlo a partir das informações registradas nos s-Maps calculados para algumas ressonâncias asteroidais bem estudadas (p.ex. 3: 1, 2: 1 e 3: 2). Para tanto, temos usado uma função de densidade de probabilidade gaussiana ao definir os n passos que permitirão estabelecer uma relação direta entre o Mapa de Difusão e o Mapa de Variâncias. Contudo, os resultados obtidos até agora tem subestimado o tempo de difusão esperado para os fenômenos conhecidos. Tal se deve ao fato de que, no processo difusivo real, é possível existirem passos de comprimento consideravelmente maiores que a média estabelecida pelas distribuições gaussiana ou normal, sobretudo quando se cruza uma região caótica. Neste trabalho, apresentamos os resultados comparativos de simulações de Monte Carlo com base no random walk de Lévy [Klafter, J. et al. 2002. "Beyond Brownian motion", Phys. Today, Feb, 33-39.], o qual possibilita passos esporádicos de comprimento acima do valor médio (saltos) permitindo estabelecer uma escala de tempo mais próxima da esperada para a difusão.

  15. The path to visible extreme adaptive optics with MagAO-2K and MagAO-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Males, Jared R.; Close, Laird M.; Guyon, Olivier; Morzinski, Katie M.; Hinz, Philip; Esposito, Simone; Pinna, Enrico; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Riccardi, Armando; Puglisi, Alfio; Mazin, Ben; Ireland, Michael J.; Weinberger, Alycia; Conrad, Al; Kenworthy, Matthew; Snik, Frans; Otten, Gilles; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Lozi, Julien

    2016-07-01

    The next generation of extremely large telescopes (ELTs) have the potential to image habitable rocky planets, if suitably optimized. This will require the development of fast high order "extreme" adaptive optics systems for the ELTs. Located near the excellent site of the future GMT, the Magellan AO system (MagAO) is an ideal on-sky testbed for high contrast imaging development. Here we discuss planned upgrades to MagAO. These include improvements in WFS sampling (enabling correction of more modes) and an increase in speed to 2000 Hz, as well as an H2RG detector upgrade for the Clio infrared camera. This NSF funded project, MagAO-2K, is planned to be on-sky in November 2016 and will significantly improve the performance of MagAO at short wavelengths. Finally, we describe MagAO-X, a visible-wavelength extreme-AO "afterburner" system under development. MagAO-X will deliver Strehl ratios of over 80% in the optical and is optimized for visible light coronagraphy.

  16. Caffeine and other xanthines as cytochemical blockers and removers of heterocyclic DNA intercalators from chromatin.

    PubMed

    Lyles, Mark B; Cameron, Ivan L

    2002-01-01

    Caffeine (CAF) and other xanthines non-covalently bind with the cationic fluorescent dye acridine orange (AO) and with other heterocyclic mutagens and carcinogens that are known to intercalate into double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Fluorescence microscopy and spectrofluorometry studies were employed to test the ability of caffeine and certain other methyl substituted xanthines, with different binding affinities for AO, to inhibit and to reverse the intercalation of AO and other heterocyclic agents from intercalation with the DNA of nuclear chromatin of air-dried cells. Results indicated that xanthines with binding affinity for AO greater than 150 m(-1) block the AO molecule in a concentration dependent manner and comply with mass action kinetics. Thus CAF and other xanthines can be used to either inhibit intercalation of AO into nuclear DNA or to remove AO once intercalated into nuclear DNA. The interactions between other planar heterocyclics, xanthines, and nuclear chromatin dsDNA were also found to be non-covalent. Studies are needed to determine the ability of CAF and other xanthines to block and/or remove polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) intercalators from the DNA of living cells.

  17. First closed-loop visible AO test results for the advanced adaptive secondary AO system for the Magellan Telescope: MagAO's performance and status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Laird M.; Males, Jared R.; Kopon, Derek A.; Gasho, Victor; Follette, Katherine B.; Hinz, Phil; Morzinski, Katie; Uomoto, Alan; Hare, Tyson; Riccardi, Armando; Esposito, Simone; Puglisi, Alfio; Pinna, Enrico; Busoni, Lorenzo; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Quiros-Pacheco, Fernando; Argomedo, Javier

    2012-07-01

    The heart of the 6.5 Magellan AO system (MagAO) is a 585 actuator adaptive secondary mirror (ASM) with <1 msec response times (0.7 ms typically). This adaptive secondary will allow low emissivity and high-contrast AO science. We fabricated a high order (561 mode) pyramid wavefront sensor (similar to that now successfully used at the Large Binocular Telescope). The relatively high actuator count (and small projected ~23 cm pitch) allows moderate Strehls to be obtained by MagAO in the “visible” (0.63-1.05 μm). To take advantage of this we have fabricated an AO CCD science camera called "VisAO". Complete “end-to-end” closed-loop lab tests of MagAO achieve a solid, broad-band, 37% Strehl (122 nm rms) at 0.76 μm (i’) with the VisAO camera in 0.8” simulated seeing (13 cm ro at V) with fast 33 mph winds and a 40 m Lo locked on R=8 mag artificial star. These relatively high visible wavelength Strehls are enabled by our powerful combination of a next generation ASM and a Pyramid WFS with 400 controlled modes and 1000 Hz sample speeds (similar to that used successfully on-sky at the LBT). Currently only the VisAO science camera is used for lab testing of MagAO, but this high level of measured performance (122 nm rms) promises even higher Strehls with our IR science cameras. On bright (R=8 mag) stars we should achieve very high Strehls (>70% at H) in the IR with the existing MagAO Clio2 (λ=1-5.3 μm) science camera/coronagraph or even higher (~98% Strehl) the Mid-IR (8-26 microns) with the existing BLINC/MIRAC4 science camera in the future. To eliminate non-common path vibrations, dispersions, and optical errors the VisAO science camera is fed by a common path advanced triplet ADC and is piggy-backed on the Pyramid WFS optical board itself. Also a high-speed shutter can be used to block periods of poor correction. The entire system passed CDR in June 2009, and we finished the closed-loop system level testing phase in December 2011. Final system acceptance (

  18. AO 0235+164 and Surrounding Field: Surprising HST Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbidge, E. M.; Beaver, E. A.; Cohen, Ross D.; Junkkarinen, V. T.; Lyons, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    Results obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope on the highly variable radio, x-ray, and gamma-ray emitting QSO (or BL Lac object) AO 0235 + 164 are presented and analyzed. WFPC2 images were obtained in 1994 June, when AO 0235 + 164 was bright (m approx. 17), and the results are described in Sec. 3. After subtraction of the PSF of the QSO, hereafter called AO following the nomenclature of Yanny et al. (1989), the companion object named A, 2 sec south of AO, is discovered not to be an elliptical galaxy as hypothesized earlier, but to be an AGN object, with a central UV-bright point-source nucleus and faint surrounding nebulosity extending to AO. The second companion object 1.3 sec east of AO discovered by Yanny et al. (1989) and named object Al, appears more like a normal spiral galaxy. We have measured the positions, luminosities, and colors of some 30 faint objects in the field around AO 0235 + 16; most are extended and may be star-forming galaxies in a loose group or cluster. Our most surprising result of the HST observations comes from FOS spectra obtained in 1995 July, discussed in Sec. 4. Because of a positioning error of the telescope and AO's faintness at that time (m approx. 20), object A was observed instead of the intended target AO. Serendipitously, we discovered A to have broad deep BALQSO-type absorptions of C IV, Si IV, N V shortward of broad emissions. A is thus ejecting high velocity, highly ionized gas into the surrounding IGM. We discuss in Sec. 5 the relationship of the objects in the central 10 sec X 1O sec region around AO, where redshifts z(sub e) = 0.94, z(sub a) = 0.524, 0.851 in AO, (sub e) = 0.524 and Z(sub BAL)=0.511 in A, are found. We hypothesize that some of the 30 faint objects in the 77 sec. x 77 sec. field may be part of a large star-forming region at z approx. 0.5, as suggested for a few objects by Yanny et al. (1989). The proximity of two highly active extragalactic objects, AO 0235+164 and its AGN companion A, is remarkable and

  19. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO Project: Progress and Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Nemanja; Martinache, F.; Guyon, O.; Clergeon, C.; Garrel, V.

    2013-01-01

    The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO (SCExAO) instrument consists of a high performance Phase Induced Amplitude Apodisation (PIAA) coronagraph combined with an extreme Adaptive Optics (AO) system operating in the near-infrared (H band). The extreme AO system driven by the 2000 element deformable mirror will allow for Strehl ratios>90% to be achieved in the H-band when it goes closed loop. This makes the SCExAO instrument a powerful platform for high contrast imaging down to angular separations of the order of 1 λ/D. In this paper we report on the recent progress in regards to the development of the instrument, which includes the addition of a visible bench that makes use of the light at shorter wavelengths not currently utilized by SCExAO and closing the loop on the tip/tilt wavefront sensor. We will also discuss two exciting guest instruments which will expand the capabilities of SCExAO over the next few years; namely CHARIS which is a integral field spectrograph as well as VAMPIRES, a visible aperture masking experiment based on polarimetric analysis of circumstellar disks.

  20. The Robo-AO automated intelligent queue system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, Reed L.; Hogstrom, Kristina; Papadopoulos, Athanasios; Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas M.

    2014-07-01

    Robo-AO is the first automated laser adaptive optics instrument. In just its second year of scientific operations, it has completed the largest adaptive optics surveys to date, each comprising thousands of targets. Robo-AO uses a fully automated queue scheduling system that selects targets based on criteria entered on a per observing program or per target basis, and includes the ability to coordinate with US Strategic Command automatically to avoid lasing space assets. This enables Robo-AO to select among thousands of targets at a time, and achieve an average observation rate of approximately 20 targets per hour.

  1. SCExAO: First Results and On-Sky Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Clergeon, Christophe; McElwain, Michael; Thalmann, Christian; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Singh, Garima; Kudo, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    We present new on-sky results for the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics imager (SCExAO) verifying and quantifying the contrast gain enabled by key components: the closed-loop coronagraphic low-order wavefront sensor (CLOWFS) and focal plane wavefront control ("speckle nulling"). SCExAO will soon be coupled with a high-order, Pyramid wavefront sensor which will yield greater than 90% Strehl ratio and enable 10(exp 6) -10(exp 7) contrast at small angular separations allowing us to image gas giant planets at solar system scales. Upcoming instruments like VAMPIRES, FIRST, and CHARIS will expand SCExAO's science capabilities.

  2. SCExAO: First Results and On-Sky Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Thayne; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Clergeon, Christophe; McElwain, Michael; Thalmann, Christian; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Singh, Garima; Kudo, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    We present new on-sky results for the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics imager (SCExAO) verifying and quantifying the contrast gain enabled by key components: the closed-loop coronagraphic low-order wavefront sensor (CLOWFS) and focal plane wavefront control (``speckle nulling''). SCExAO will soon be coupled with a high-order, Pyramid wavefront sensor which will yield > 90% Strehl ratio and enable 106-107 contrast at small angular separations allowing us to image gas giant planets at solar system scales. Upcoming instruments like VAMPIRES, FIRST, and CHARIS will expand SCExAO's science capabilities.

  3. LGS-AO Imaging of Every Kepler Planet Candidate: the Robo-AO KOI Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Nicholas Michael; Baranec, Christoph; Morton, Timothy; Ziegler, Carl; Atkinson, Dani; Riddle, Reed

    2015-08-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging, to search for blended nearby stars which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. We will present the results from searching for companions around over 3,000 Kepler planet hosts in 2012-2015. We will describe our first data release covering 715 planet candidate hosts, and give a preview of ongoing results including improved statistics on the likelihood of false positive planet detections in the Kepler dataset, many new planets in multiple star systems, and new exotic multiple star systems containing Kepler planets.We will also describe the automated Robo-AO survey data reduction methods, including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for extremely large adaptive optics surveys.Our first data release covered 715 objects, searching for companions from 0.15” to 2.5” separation with contrast up to 6 magnitudes. We measured the overall nearby-star-probability for Kepler planet candidates to be 7.4+/-1.0%, and we will detail the variations in this number with stellar host parameters. We will also discuss several KOIs of particular interest, including KOI-191 and KOI-1151, which are both multi-planet systems with detected stellar companions whose unusual planetary system architecture might be best explained if they are ``coincident multiple'' systems, with several transiting planets shared between the two stars. Finally, we will discuss and update the 98%-confidence evidence from our survey that third bodies in star/planet systems produce an excess of close-in giant planets.

  4. Real-time processing for the ATST AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, K.; Rimmele, T.

    The real-time processing requirements for the four meter Advanced Technology Solar Telescope extended source high order adaptive optics system will be approximately 15 times that of the Dunn Solar Telescope AO systems on which the ATST AO system is based. The ATST AO, with its approximately 1232 subapertures, will use massively parallel processing and is based on Analog Devices TigerSHARC DSPs as the central processing units. We will discuss the requirements for processing and data handling and the architecture of the correlating Shack-Hartmannn and reconstructor processing unit and present the results of bench-mark testing of the DSP hardware that was selected for the ATST AO system.

  5. Visible AO Observations at Halpha for Accreting Young Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, L. M.; Follette, K.; Males, J. R.; Morzinski, K.; Rodigas, T. J.; Hinz, P.; Wu, Y.-L.; Apai, D.; Najita, J.; Puglisi, A.; Esposito, S.; Riccardi, A.; Bailey, V.; Xompero, M.; Briguglio, R.; Weinberger, A.

    2014-01-01

    We utilized the new high-order (250-378 mode) Magellan Adaptive Optics system (MagAO) to obtain very high-resolution science in the visible with MagAO's VisAO CCD camera. In the good-median seeing conditions of Magellan (0.5-0.7'') we find MagAO delivers individual short exposure images as good as 19 mas optical resolution. Due to telescope vibrations, long exposure (60s) r' (0.63μm) images are slightly coarser at FWHM = 23-29 mas (Strehl ~ 28%) with bright (R < 9 mag) guide stars. These are the highest resolution filled-aperture images published to date. Images of the young (~ 1 Myr) Orion Trapezium θ1 Ori A, B, and C cluster members were obtained with VisAO. In particular, the 32 mas binary θ1 Ori C 1 C 2 was easily resolved in non-interferometric images for the first time. Relative positions of the bright trapezium binary stars were measured with ~ 0.6-5 mas accuracy. In the second commissioning run we were able to correct 378 modes and achieved good contrasts (Strehl>20% on young transition disks at Hα). We discuss the contrasts achieved at Hα and the possibility of detecting low mass (~ 1-5 Mjup) planets (past 5AU) with our new SAPPHIRES survey with MagAO at Hα.

  6. Beyond the Blur: Construction and Characterization of the First Autonomous AO System, and, An AO Survey of Magnetar Proper Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh Prakash

    Adaptive optics (AO) corrects distortions created by atmospheric turbulence and delivers diffraction-limited images on ground-based telescopes. The vastly improved spatial resolution and sensitivity has been utilized for studying everything from the magnetic fields of sunspots upto the internal dynamics of high-redshift galaxies. This thesis about AO science from small and large telescopes is divided into two parts: Robo-AO and magnetar kinematics. In the first part, I discuss the construction and performance of the world's first fully autonomous visible light AO system, Robo-AO, at the Palomar 60-inch telescope. Robo-AO operates extremely efficiently with an overhead < 50s, typically observing about 22 targets every hour. We have performed large AO programs observing a total of over 7,500 targets since May 2012. In the visible band, the images have a Strehl ratio of about 10% and achieve a contrast of upto 6 magnitudes at a separation of 1‧‧. The full-width at half maximum achieved is 110-130 milli-arcsecond. I describe how Robo-AO is used to constrain the evolutionary models of low-mass pre-main-sequence stars by measuring resolved spectral energy distributions of stellar multiples in the visible band, more than doubling the current sample. I conclude this part with a discussion of possible future improvements to the Robo-AO system. In the second part, I describe a study of magnetar kinematics using high-resolution near-infrared (NIR) AO imaging from the 10-meter Keck II telescope. Measuring the proper motions of five magnetars with a precision of upto 0.7 milli-arcsecond/yr -1, we have more than tripled the previously known sample of magnetar proper motions and proved that magnetar kinematics are equivalent to those of radio pulsars. We conclusively showed that SGR 1900+14 and SGR 1806-20 were ejected from the stellar clusters with which they were traditionally associated. The inferred kinematic ages of these two magnetars are 6 +/- 1.8 kyr and 650 +/-3 00

  7. DNA Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2002-11-01

    DNA is one candidate of promising molecules for molecular electronic devices, since it has the double helix structure with pi-electron bases for electron transport, the address at 0.4 nm intervals, and the self-assembly. Electrical conductivity and nanostructure of DNA and modified DNA molecules are investigated in order to research the application of DNA in nanoelectronic devices. It has been revealed that DNA is a wide-gap semiconductor in the absence of doping. The conductivity of DNA has been controlled by chemical doping, electric field doping, and photo-doping. It has found that Poly(dG)[middle dot]Poly(dC) has the best conductivity and can function as a conducting nanowire. The pattern of DNA network is controlled by changing the concentration of the DNA solution.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  9. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  10. Period Studies of Close Binaries, AO Cam and AW Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chun-Hwey; Han, Won-Yong; Nha, Il-Seong

    1992-06-01

    Photoelectric observations of close binary stars, AO Cam and AW Cam, were made during the 1984 observing season with the 61cm reflector at the Sobaeksan Observatory. One time of primary minimum for AO Cam and three primary epochs for AW Cam were derived from the observation of these two system. Times of minimum light of these two binaries collected from literature were analyzed with a least square fitting method. New improved light elements for AO Cam and AW Cam were determined. The orbital period of AO Cam had been constant from October, 1980(JD 2444520) to February, 1985(JD 2446107). However, one secondary time of minimum(JD 2447864.7879) of AO Cam published recently by Mullis and Faulkner(1991) shows large deviation of about 4.6 minutes (0.d0032) from the one predicted by our new light elements. Future observations of times of minima for this system are needed to test this period change. The orbital period of AW Cam has been constant as P = 0d77134645 for about sixty years from the early 1930's to the present.

  11. Characterizing and mitigating vibrations for SCExAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozi, Julien; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Singh, Garima; Goebel, Sean; Norris, Barnaby; Okita, Hirofumi

    2016-07-01

    The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) instrument, under development for the Subaru Telescope, has currently the fastest on-sky wavefront control loop, with a pyramid wavefront sensor running at 3.5 kHz. But even at that speed, we are still limited by low-frequency vibrations. The current main limitation was found to be vibrations attributed mainly to the rotation of the telescope. Using the fast wavefront sensors, cameras and accelerometers, we managed to identify the origin of most of the vibrations degrading our performance. Low-frequency vibrations are coming from the telescope drive in azimuth and elevation, as well as the elevation encoders when the target is at transit. Other vibrations were found at higher frequency coming from the image rotator inside Subaru's adaptive optics facility AO188. Different approaches are being implemented to take care of these issues. The PID control of the image rotator has been tuned to reduce their high-frequency contribution. We are working with the telescope team to tune the motor drives and reduce the impact of the elevation encoder. A Linear Quadratic Gaussian controller (LQG, or Kalman filter) is also being implemented inside SCExAO to control these vibrations. These solutions will not only improve significantly SCExAOs performance, but will also help all the other instruments on the Subaru Telescope, especially the ones behind AO188. Ultimately, this study will also help the development of the TMT, as these two telescopes share very similar drives.

  12. A pyramid sensor based AO system for Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirós-Pacheco, F.; Pinna, E.; Esposito, S.; Riccardi, A.; Rabien, S.

    2011-09-01

    Since the introduction of the pyramid wavefront sensor in the mid 90s, various authors have shown both theoretically and with the aid of simulations that pyramid sensors can achieve a better performance than traditional Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. Recently the First-Light AO system (FLAO) at the Large Binocular Telescope has demonstrated excellent on sky performance achieved with a pyramid based system. Motivated by these results, we will present in this paper a first heuristic analysis scaling up the FLAO performance to the case of an Extremely Large Telescope (ELT). We support our arguments with preliminary numerical simulations for the case of the European ELT using the M4 adaptive corrector and a properly matched pyramid sensor. Such a system could be used as a first-light natural guide-star AO system for the European ELT offering the advantages of a demonstrated AO system with practically off-the-shelf technology.

  13. Second generation Robo-AO instruments and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas M.; Chun, Mark R.; Lu, Jessica R.; Connelley, Michael S.; Hall, Donald; Atkinson, Dani; Jacobson, Shane

    2014-07-01

    The prototype Robo-AO system at the Palomar Observatory 1.5-m telescope is the world's first fully automated laser adaptive optics instrument. Scientific operations commenced in June 2012 and more than 12,000 observations have since been performed at the ~0.12" visible-light diffraction limit. Two new infrared cameras providing high-speed tip-tilt sensing and a 2' field-of-view will be integrated in 2014. In addition to a Robo-AO clone for the 2-m IGO and the natural guide star variant KAPAO at the 1-m Table Mountain telescope, a second generation of facility-class Robo-AO systems are in development for the 2.2-m University of Hawai'i and 3-m IRTF telescopes which will provide higher Strehl ratios, sharper imaging, ~0.07", and correction to λ = 400 nm.

  14. Nanoscale imaging in DNA nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, Ralf; Scheible, Max; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2012-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology has developed powerful techniques for the construction of precisely defined molecular structures and machines, and nanoscale imaging methods have always been crucial for their experimental characterization. While initially atomic force microscopy (AFM) was the most widely employed imaging method for DNA-based molecular structures, in recent years a variety of other techniques were adopted by researchers in the field, namely electron microscopy (EM), super-resolution fluorescence microscopy, and high-speed AFM. EM is now typically applied for the characterization of compact nanoobjects and three-dimensional (3D) origami structures, as it offers better resolution than AFM and can be used for 3D reconstruction from single-particle analysis. While the small size of DNA nanostructures had previously precluded the application of fluorescence microscopic methods, the development of super-resolution microscopy now facilities the application of fast and powerful optical methods also in DNA nanotechnology. In particular, the observation of dynamical processes associated with DNA nanoassemblies-e.g., molecular walkers and machines-requires imaging techniques that are both fast and allow observation under native conditions. Here single-molecule fluorescence techniques and high-speed AFM are beginning to play an increasingly important role. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  16. High-Performance CCSDS AOS Protocol Implementation in FPGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clare, Loren P.; Torgerson, Jordan L.; Pang, Jackson

    2010-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Advanced Orbiting Systems (AOS) space data link protocol provides a framing layer between channel coding such as LDPC (low-density parity-check) and higher-layer link multiplexing protocols such as CCSDS Encapsulation Service, which is described in the following article. Recent advancement in RF modem technology has allowed multi-megabit transmission over space links. With this increase in data rate, the CCSDS AOS protocol implementation needs to be optimized to both reduce energy consumption and operate at a high rate.

  17. Initial Performance of the Keck AO Wavefront Controller System

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, E M; Acton, D S; An, J R; Avicola, K; Beeman, B V; Brase, J M; Carrano, C J; Gathright, J; Gavel, D T; Hurd, R L; Lai, O; Lupton, W; Macintosh, B A; Max, C E; Olivier, S S; Shelton, J C; Stomski, P J; Tsubota, K; Waltjen, K E; Watson, J A; Wizinowich, P L

    2001-03-01

    The wavefront controller for the Keck Observatory AO system consists of two separate real-time control loops: a tip-tilt control loop to remove tilt from the incoming wavefront, and a deformable mirror control loop to remove higher-order aberrations. In this paper, we describe these control loops and analyze their performance using diagnostic data acquired during the integration and testing of the AO system on the telescope. Disturbance rejection curves for the controllers are calculated from the experimental data and compared to theory. The residual wavefront errors due to control loop bandwidth are also calculated from the data, and possible improvements to the controller performance are discussed.

  18. Initial performance of the Keck AO wavefront controller system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Erik M.; Acton, D. Scott; An, Jong R.; Avicola, Kenneth; Beeman, Bart V.; Brase, James M.; Carrano, Carmen J.; Gathright, John; Gavel, Donald T.; Hurd, Randall L.; Lai, Olivier; Lupton, William; Macintosh, Bruce A.; Max, Claire E.; Olivier, Scot S.; Shelton, J. Christopher; Stomski, Paul J.; Tsubota, Kevin; Waltjen, Kenneth E.; Watson, James A.; Wizinowich, Peter L.

    2000-07-01

    The wavefront controller for the Keck Observatory AO system consists of two separate real-time control loops: a tip-tilt control loop to remove tilt from the incoming wavefront, and a deformable mirror control loop to remove higher-order aberrations. In this paper, we describe these control loops and analyze their performance using diagnostic data acquired during the integration and testing of the AO system on the telescope. Disturbance rejection curves for the controllers are calculated from the experimental data and compared to theory. The residual wavefront errors due to control loop bandwidth are also calculated from the data, and possible improvements to the controller performance are discussed.

  19. A Prediction of the Damping Properties of Hindered Phenol AO-60/polyacrylate Rubber (AO-60/ACM) Composites through Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Da-Wei; Zhao, Xiu-Ying; Zhang, Geng; Li, Qiang-Guo; Wu, Si-Zhu

    2016-05-01

    Molecule dynamics (MD) simulation, a molecular-level method, was applied to predict the damping properties of AO-60/polyacrylate rubber (AO-60/ACM) composites before experimental measures were performed. MD simulation results revealed that two types of hydrogen bond, namely, type A (AO-60) -OH•••O=C- (ACM), type B (AO-60) - OH•••O=C- (AO-60) were formed. Then, the AO-60/ACM composites were fabricated and tested to verify the accuracy of the MD simulation through dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). DMTA results showed that the introduction of AO-60 could remarkably improve the damping properties of the composites, including the increase of glass transition temperature (Tg) alongside with the loss factor (tan δ), also indicating the AO-60/ACM(98/100) had the best damping performance amongst the composites which verified by the experimental.

  20. Experimental and theoretical investigation effect of flavonols antioxidants on DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, Ali A; Heydari-Soureshjani, E; Jafari-Asl, M; Rezaei, B; Ghasemi, Jahan B; Aghaee, Elham

    2015-08-05

    A new electrochemical biosensor was developed to demonstrate the effect of Acridine Orange (AO) on DNA damage. Then, the biosensor was used to check the inhibitors effect of three flavonols antioxidants (myricetin, fisetin and kaempferol) on DNA damage. Acridine Orange (AO) was used as a damaging agent because it shows a high affinity to nucleic acid and stretch of the double helical structure of DNA. Decreasing on the oxidation signals of adenine and guanine (in the DNA) in the presence of AO were used as probes to study the antioxidants power, using DNA-modified screen printed graphene electrode (DNA/SPGE). The results of our study showed that the DNA-biosensor could be suitable biosensor to investigate the inhibitors ability of the flavonols antioxidants on the DNA damage. The linear dependency was detected in the two regions in the ranges of 1.0-15.0 and 15.0-500.0 pmol L(-1). The detection limit was found 0.5 pmol L(-1) and 0.6 pmol L(-1) for guanine and adenine, respectively. To confirm the electrochemical results, Uv-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopic methods were used too. Finally molecular dynamic (MD) simulation was performed on the structure of DNA in a water box to study any interaction between the antioxidant, AO and DNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. EMS Student Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogle, Patrick

    This student guide is one of a series of self-contained materials for students enrolled in an emergency medical services (EMS) training program. Discussed in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: the purpose and history of EMS professionals; EMS training, certification and examinations (national and state certification and…

  2. DNA Flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widom, Jonathan

    2005-03-01

    Classic experimental and theoretical analyses led to a unified view of DNA as a semiflexible polymer, characterized by a bending persistence length, P, ˜50 nm (˜150 bp). In this view, DNA lengths that are greater than P are, on average, spontaneously gently bent, and require relatively little force to bend significantly, while DNA lengths that are shorter than P are nearly straight, and require great force to bend significantly. Nevertheless, sharply bent DNA plays important roles in biology. We used the method of ligase catalyzed DNA cyclization to investigate the spontaneous looping of short DNAs. Remarkably, DNAs as short as 84 bp spontaneously bend into circles, and 94 bp DNA sequences cyclize up to 10^5 times more easily than predicted from classic theories of DNA bending. In subsequent studies we find that the twistability of sharply looped DNAs exceeds the prediction of classic theories by up to 400-fold. These results can only be understood by greatly enhanced DNA flexibility, not by permanent bends. Our results provide striking support for two new theories of DNA mechanics based on local melted or kinked regions, and they establish DNA as an active participant in the formation and function of looped regulatory complexes in vivo.

  3. Course Material Model in A&O Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levasma, Jarkko; Nykanen, Ossi

    One of the problematic issues in the content development for learning environments is the process of importing various types of course material into the environment. This paper describes a method for importing material into the A&O open learning environment by introducing a material model for metadata recognized by the environment. The first…

  4. Transduction of DNA information through water and electromagnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Montagnier, Luc; Del Giudice, Emilio; Aïssa, Jamal; Lavallee, Claude; Motschwiller, Steven; Capolupo, Antonio; Polcari, Albino; Romano, Paola; Tedeschi, Alberto; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The experimental conditions by which electromagnetic signals (EMS) of low frequency can be emitted by diluted aqueous solutions of some bacterial and viral DNAs are described. That the recorded EMS and nanostructures induced in water carry the DNA information (sequence) is shown by retrieval of that same DNA by classical PCR amplification using the TAQ polymerase, including both primers and nucleotides. Moreover, such a transduction process has also been observed in living human cells exposed to EMS irradiation. These experiments suggest that coherent long-range molecular interaction must be present in water to observe the above-mentioned features. The quantum field theory analysis of the phenomenon is presented in this article.

  5. DNA Camouflage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-08

    1 DNA Camouflage Supplementary Information Bijan Zakeri1,2*, Timothy K. Lu1,2*, Peter A. Carr2,3* 1Department of Electrical Engineering and...ll.mit.edu). Distribution A: Public Release   2 Supplementary Figure 1 DNA camouflage with the 2-state device. (a) In the presence of Cre, DSD-2[α...Supplementary Figure 2 DNA shuffling does not comprise sequencing outside of DSDs. (a) Sequencing of 1 kb downstream of DSD-2[α] produces high quality

  6. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  7. EM International. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    It is the intent of EM International to describe the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management`s (EM`s) various roles and responsibilities within the international community. Cooperative agreements and programs, descriptions of projects and technologies, and synopses of visits to international sites are all highlighted in this semiannual journal. Focus on EM programs in this issue is on international collaboration in vitrification projects. Technology highlights covers: in situ sealing for contaminated sites; and remote sensors for toxic pollutants. Section on profiles of countries includes: Arctic contamination by the former Soviet Union, and EM activities with Germany--cooperative arrangements.

  8. Energy transfer from thiacyanine to acridine orange facilitated by DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Jimut Kanti; Mandal, Anil Kumar; Pal, Medini Kanta

    1999-08-01

    The drastic enhancement of the fluorescence of 3,3'-diethyl thiacyanine iodide (THIA) in the presence of DNA is mainly due to the reduction of skeleton vibration of the dye on its binding to DNA, as inferred from the enhancement of fluorescence of THIA with increasing the solvent viscosity by sucrose, glycerol or poly-(vinyl alcohol), or by freezing a methanolic solution of the dye. Energy transfer from THIA to acridine orange (AO), both bound to DNA has been observed and characterised by the enhancement of AO fluorescence at 524 nm with congruent reduction of DNA-THIA fluorescence. Energy transfer between the two dyes in the absence of polymer has also been observed but to a minor extent. Keeping DNA and AO concentrations fixed when the concentration of THIA is increased, the fluorescence peak of AO shifts from 524 to 560 nm indicating the formation of an exciplex. Time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy gives characteristic evidence for the energy transfer and also for the exciplex formation.

  9. Structure of DNA-liposome complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lasic, D.D.; Strey, H.; Podgornik, R.; Stuart, M.C.A.; Frederik, P.M.

    1997-01-29

    Despite numerous studies and commericially available liposome kits, however, the structure of DNA-cationic liposome complexes is still not yet well understood. We have investigated the structure of these complexes using high-resolution cryo electron microscopy (EM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). 14 refs., 3 figs.

  10. DNA ligases.

    PubMed

    Tabor, S

    2001-05-01

    DNA ligases catalyze the formation of phosphodiester bonds between juxtaposed 5' phosphate and a 3'-hydroxyl terminus in duplex DNA. This activity can repair single-stranded nicks in duplex DNA and join duplex DNA restriction fragments having either blunt ends or homologous cohesive ends. Two ligases are used for nucleic acid research and their reaction conditions and applications are described in this unit: E. coli ligase and T4 ligase. These enzymes differ in two important properties. One is the source of energy: T4 ligase uses ATP, while E. coli ligase uses NAD. Another important difference is their ability to ligate blunt ends; under normal reaction conditions, only T4 DNA ligase will ligate blunt ends.

  11. Diffraction limited operation with ARGOS: a hybrid AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaglia, M.; Busoni, L.; Quirós-Pacheco, F.; Esposito, S.

    2010-07-01

    ARGOS, the Laser Guide Star (LGS) facility of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), implements a Ground Layer Adaptive Optics (GLAO) system, using 3 low-altitude beacons, to improve the resolution over the 4'×4' FoV of the imager and Multi Object Spectrograph (MOS) LUCIFER. In this paper we discuss the performance and the reconstruction scheme of an hybrid AO system using the ARGOS Rayleigh beacons complemented with a single faint high-altitude star (NGS or sodium beacon) to sense the turbulence of the upper atmosphere allowing an high degree of on-axis correction. With the ARGOS system, the NGS-upgrade can be immediately implemented at LBT using the already existing Pyramid WFS offering performance similar to the NGS AO system with the advantage of a larger sky coverage.

  12. Real-time control system verification for ELT AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, Alastair; Myers, Richard; Morris, Tim; Bharmal, Nazim; Bitenc, Urban; Dipper, Nigel; Reeves, Andrew; Gendron, Eric; Rousset, Gérard; Hubert, Zoltan; Vidal, Fabrice; Matin, Olivier; Gratadour, Damien; Chemla, Fanny

    2013-12-01

    ELT AO systems have demanding computational requirements for real-timecontrol. These systems are required to be fully tested and robustbefore commissioning so that valuable on-sky time is not wasted. Inthis talk I will report recent work at Durham on our ELT AO real-timecontrol system, algorithms that we use to improve robustness, anddevelopment of an end-to-end testing environment that will allow fulltesting of real-time control systems, including both Monte-Carlosimulation and hardware approaches. The talk will include experiencegained with CANARY, how the robustness of this system has beenimproved, and our experience operating with four laser guide stars. Workcarried out in this area on the DRAGON test-bench will also bedescribed.

  13. Intelligent vibration control of ELTs and large AO hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pott, J.-U.; Kürster, M.; Trowitzsch, J.; Borelli, J.; Rohloff, R.-R.; Herbst, T.; Böhm, M.; Keck, A.; Ruppel, T.; Sawodny, O.

    2012-07-01

    MPIA leads the construction of the LINC-NIRVANA instrument, the MCAO-supported Fizeau imager for the LBT, serves as pathfinder for future ELT-AO imagers in terms of size and technology. In this contribution, we review recent results and significant progress made on the development of key items of our stratgey to achieve a piston stability of up to 100nm during a science exposure. We present an overview of our vibration control strategies for optical path and tip-tilt stabilization, involving accelerometer based real-time vibration measurements, vibration sensitive active control of actuators, and the development of a dynamical model of the LBT. MPIA also co-develops the E-ELT first-light NIR imager MICADO (both SCAO and MCAO assisted). Our experiences, made with LINC-NIRVANA, will be fed into the MICADO structural AO design to reach highest on-sky sensitivity.

  14. Characterization, Expression Profile, and Promoter Analysis of the Rhodeus uyekii Vitellogenin Ao1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Hee Jeong; Kim, Ju Lan; Moon, Ji Young; Kim, Woo-Jin; Kim, Hyung Soo; Park, Jung Youn; Cho, Hyun Kook; An, Cheul Min

    2014-01-01

    The fish Vitellogenin (Vg) gene has been applied as a biomarker for exposure to estrogenic compounds in the aquatic environment. In this study, we cloned and characterized Vg cDNA from the Korean rose bitterling Rhodeus uyekii (Ru-Vg). The Ru-Vg cDNA encodes a 1424-amino-acid polypeptide that belongs to the VgAo1 family and contains a putative signal peptide, lipovitellin I, phosvitin, and lipovitellin II, but does not contain the vWFD domain or the C-terminal peptide. The deduced Ru-Vg protein has high amino acid identity (73.97%–32.17%) with fish Vg proteins. Pairwise alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that Ru-Vg is most closely related to Acheilognathus yamatsutae Vg. Ru-Vg transcripts were detected using quantitative polymerase chain reaction in all tissues tested, with the highest level of expression observed in the ovary. Ru-Vg mRNA was upregulated in R. uyekii hepatopancreas cells in response to treatment with 17β-estradiol (E2) or 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2). Luciferase reporter expression, driven by the 5'-regulatory region of the Ru-Vg gene spanning from −1020 bp to the start codon was induced by the estrogen receptor and was synergistically activated by treatment with E2 or EE2. These results suggest that R. uyekii and the Ru-Vg gene may be useful as biomarkers for exposure to E2 or EE2. PMID:25329620

  15. Characterization, expression profile, and promoter analysis of the Rhodeus uyekii vitellogenin Ao1 gene.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hee Jeong; Kim, Ju Lan; Moon, Ji Young; Kim, Woo-Jin; Kim, Hyung Soo; Park, Jung Youn; Cho, Hyun Kook; An, Cheul Min

    2014-10-17

    The fish Vitellogenin (Vg) gene has been applied as a biomarker for exposure to estrogenic compounds in the aquatic environment. In this study, we cloned and characterized Vg cDNA from the Korean rose bitterling Rhodeus uyekii (Ru-Vg). The Ru-Vg cDNA encodes a 1424-amino-acid polypeptide that belongs to the VgAo1 family and contains a putative signal peptide, lipovitellin I, phosvitin, and lipovitellin II, but does not contain the vWFD domain or the C-terminal peptide. The deduced Ru-Vg protein has high amino acid identity (73.97%-32.17%) with fish Vg proteins. Pairwise alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that Ru-Vg is most closely related to Acheilognathus yamatsutae Vg. Ru-Vg transcripts were detected using quantitative polymerase chain reaction in all tissues tested, with the highest level of expression observed in the ovary. Ru-Vg mRNA was upregulated in R. uyekii hepatopancreas cells in response to treatment with 17β-estradiol (E2) or 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2). Luciferase reporter expression, driven by the 5'-regulatory region of the Ru-Vg gene spanning from -1020 bp to the start codon was induced by the estrogen receptor and was synergistically activated by treatment with E2 or EE2. These results suggest that R. uyekii and the Ru-Vg gene may be useful as biomarkers for exposure to E2 or EE2.

  16. Analysis of Alternatives (AoA) Process Improvement Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    of U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) Analysis Center (TRAC’s) AoA Primer and previous acquisition reviews (Decker- Wagner , etc.). (5...2009................................................................36 Figure E-7. Decker- Wagner (Army Acquisition Review) Findings, Jan 2011(1 of 2...37 Figure E-8. Decker- Wagner (Army Acquisition Review) Findings, Jan 2011(2 of 2).................38 Figure E-9. Goldwater Nichols

  17. High-Resolution Imaging of Asteroids/Satellites with AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merline, William

    2012-02-01

    We propose to make high-resolution observations of asteroids using AO, to measure size, shape, and pole position (spin vectors), and/or to search for satellites. We have demonstrated that AO imaging allows determination of the pole/dimensions in 1 or 2 nights on a single target, rather than the years of observations with lightcurve inversion techniques that only yield poles and axial ratios, not true dimensions. Our new technique (KOALA) combines AO imaging with lightcurve and occultation data for optimum size/shape determinations. We request that LGS be available for faint targets, but using NGS AO, we will measure several large and intermediate asteroids that are favorably placed in spring/summer of 2012 for size/shape/pole. Accurately determining the volume from the often-irregular shape allows us to derive densities to much greater precision in cases where the mass is known, e.g., from the presence of a satellite. We will search several d! ozen asteroids for the presence of satellites, particularly in under-studied populations, particularly NEOs (we have recently achieved the first-ever optical image of an NEO binary [Merline et al. 2008b, IAUC 8977]). Satellites provide a real-life lab for testing collisional models. We will search for satellites around special objects at the request of lightcurve observers, and we will make a search for debris in the vicinity of Pluto, in support of the New Horizons mission. Our shape/size work requires observations over most of a full rotation period (typically several hours).

  18. Propeller Design for Naval Auxiliary AO-177 Jumbo.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    Design for Naval Auxiliary AO-177 Jumbo 12 Di -RSONAL AUTHOR(S) Kim, Ki-Han 1 3a TYPE OF REPORT 1,3b TIME COVERED 114 DATE OF REPORT (Year., Month. Day) us...3367 0441 09:11 .1507 .1604 .71 .0442 .1118 .1024 .0906 .0770 OsSO 00000 L3 I 93 S 417 3969 - 3452 -3069 -296 -. 299 to .: -. 039 -. 1612 -. 1424 -. 1304

  19. AO Distal Radius Fracture Classification: Global Perspective on Observer Agreement.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Prakash; Teunis, Teun; Giménez, Beatriz Bravo; Verstreken, Frederik; Di Mascio, Livio; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2017-02-01

    Background The primary objective of this study was to test interobserver reliability when classifying fractures by consensus by AO types and groups among a large international group of surgeons. Secondarily, we assessed the difference in inter- and intraobserver agreement of the AO classification in relation to geographical location, level of training, and subspecialty. Methods A randomized set of radiographic and computed tomographic images from a consecutive series of 96 distal radius fractures (DRFs), treated between October 2010 and April 2013, was classified using an electronic web-based portal by an invited group of participants on two occasions. Results Interobserver reliability was substantial when classifying AO type A fractures but fair and moderate for type B and C fractures, respectively. No difference was observed by location, except for an apparent difference between participants from India and Australia classifying type B fractures. No statistically significant associations were observed comparing interobserver agreement by level of training and no differences were shown comparing subspecialties. Intra-rater reproducibility was "substantial" for fracture types and "fair" for fracture groups with no difference accounting for location, training level, or specialty. Conclusion Improved definition of reliability and reproducibility of this classification may be achieved using large international groups of raters, empowering decision making on which system to utilize. Level of Evidence Level III.

  20. Single-shot retinal imaging with AO spectral OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Rha, Jungtae; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Miller, Donald T.

    2005-04-01

    We demonstrate for the first time an adaptive optics (AO) spectral OCT retina camera that acquires with unprecedented 3D resolution (2.9 μm lateral; 5.5 μm axial) single shot B-scans of the living human retina. The camera centers on a Michelson interferometer that consists of a superluminescent diode for line illuminating the subject's retinal; voice coil translator for controlling the optical path length of the reference channel; and an imaging spectrometer that is cascaded with a 12-bit area CCD array. The imaging spectrometer was designed with negligible off-axis aberrations and was constructed from stock optical components. AO was integrated into the detector channel of the interferometer and dynamically compensated for most of the ocular aberration across a 6 mm pupil. Short bursts of B-scans, with 100 Ascans each, were successfully acquired at 1 msec intervals. Camera sensitivity was found sufficient to detect reflections from all major retinal layers. Individual outer segments of photoreceptors at different retinal eccentricities were observed in vivo. Periodicity of the outer segments matched cone spacing as measured from AO flood illuminated images of the same patches of retina.

  1. LDEF results for polymer matrix composite experiment AO 180

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    This report represents a summary of the results obtained to-date on a polymer matrix composite experiment (AO 180) located at station D-12, about 82 deg off the 'ram' direction. Different material systems comprised of graphite, boron, and aramid (Kevlar) fiber reinforcements were studied. Although previous results were presented on in-situ thermal-vacuum cycling effects, particularly dimensional changes associated with outgassing, additional comparative data will be shown from ground-based tests on control and flight samples. The system employed was fully automated for thermal-vacuum cycling using a laser interferometer for monitoring displacements. Erosion of all three classes of materials due to atomic oxygen (AO) will also be discussed, including angle of incidence effects. Data from this experiment will be compared to published results for similar materials in other LDEF experiments. Composite materials' erosion yields will be presented on an AO design nomogram useful for estimating total material loss for given exposure conditions in low Earth orbit (LEO). Optical properties of these materials will also be compared with control samples. A survey of the damage caused by micrometeoroids/debris impacts will be addressed as they relate to polymer matrix composites. Correlations between hole size and damage pattern will be given. Reference to a new nomogram for estimating the number distribution of micrometeoroid/debris impacts for a given space structure as a function of time in LEO will be addressed based on LDEF data.

  2. LDEF results for polymer matrix composite experiment AO 180

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    This report represents a summary of the results obtained to-date on a polymer matrix composite experiment (AO 180) located at station D-12, about 82 deg off the 'ram' direction. Different material systems comprised of graphite, boron, and aramid (Kevlar) fiber reinforcements were studied. Although previous results were presented on in-situ thermal-vacuum cycling effects, particularly dimensional changes associated with outgassing, additional comparative data will be shown from ground-based tests on control and flight samples. The system employed was fully automated for thermal-vacuum cycling using a laser interferometer for monitoring displacements. Erosion of all three classes of materials due to atomic oxygen (AO) will also be discussed, including angle of incidence effects. Data from this experiment will be compared to published results for similar materials in other LDEF experiments. Composite materials' erosion yields will be presented on an AO design nomogram useful for estimating total material loss for given exposure conditions in low Earth orbit (LEO). Optical properties of these materials will also be compared with control samples. A survey of the damage caused by micrometeoroids/debris impacts will be addressed as they relate to polymer matrix composites. Correlations between hole size and damage pattern will be given. Reference to a new nomogram for estimating the number distribution of micrometeoroid/debris impacts for a given space structure as a function of time in LEO will be addressed based on LDEF data.

  3. Patenting DNA.

    PubMed

    Bobrow, Martin; Thomas, Sandy

    2002-12-01

    The protection of inventions based on human DNA sequences has been achieved mainly through application of the patent system. Over the past decade, there has been continuing debate about whether this use of intellectual property rights is acceptable. Companies and universities have been active during this period in filing thousands of patent applications. Although many have argued that to claim a DNA sequence in a patent is to claim a discovery, patent law allows discoveries that are useful to be claimed as part of an invention. As the technology to isolate DNA sequences has advanced, the criterion for inventiveness, necessary for any invention to be eligible for filing, has become more difficult to justify in the case of claims to DNA sequences. Moreover, the discovery that a gene is associated with a particular disease is, it is argued, to discover a fact about the world and undeserving of the status of an invention. Careful examination of the grounds for allowing the patenting of DNA sequences as research tools suggests such rewards will rarely be justified. The patenting of DNA sequences as chemical intermediates necessary for the manufacture of therapeutic proteins is, however, reasonable given that the information within the sequence is applied to produce a tangible substance which has application as a medicine. Despite the legal, technical and political complexities of applying the flexibilities with the current law, it is argued that much could be achieved in the area of patenting DNA by raising the thresholds for patentability.

  4. [DNA computing].

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Janusz; Krasiński, Tadeusz; Popławski, Tomasz; Sakowski, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Biocomputers can be an alternative for traditional "silicon-based" computers, which continuous development may be limited due to further miniaturization (imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle) and increasing the amount of information between the central processing unit and the main memory (von Neuman bottleneck). The idea of DNA computing came true for the first time in 1994, when Adleman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using short DNA oligomers and DNA ligase. In the early 2000s a series of biocomputer models was presented with a seminal work of Shapiro and his colleguas who presented molecular 2 state finite automaton, in which the restriction enzyme, FokI, constituted hardware and short DNA oligomers were software as well as input/output signals. DNA molecules provided also energy for this machine. DNA computing can be exploited in many applications, from study on the gene expression pattern to diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The idea of DNA computing is still in progress in research both in vitro and in vivo and at least promising results of these research allow to have a hope for a breakthrough in the computer science.

  5. DNA Labeling Using DNA Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Tomkuvienė, Miglė; Kriukienė, Edita; Klimašauskas, Saulius

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases) uniquely combine the ability to recognize and covalently modify specific target sequences in DNA using the ubiquitous cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet). Although DNA methylation plays important roles in biological signaling, the transferred methyl group is a poor reporter and is highly inert to further biocompatible derivatization. To unlock the biotechnological power of these enzymes, two major types of cofactor AdoMet analogs were developed that permit targeted MTase-directed attachment of larger moieties containing functional or reporter groups onto DNA. One such approach (named sequence-specific methyltransferase-induced labeling, SMILing) uses reactive aziridine or N-mustard mimics of the cofactor AdoMet, which render targeted coupling of a whole cofactor molecule to the target DNA. The second approach (methyltransferase-directed transfer of activated groups, mTAG) uses AdoMet analogs with a sulfonium-bound extended side chain replacing the methyl group, which permits MTase-directed covalent transfer of the activated side chain alone. As the enlarged cofactors are not always compatible with the active sites of native MTases, steric engineering of the active site has been employed to optimize their alkyltransferase activity. In addition to the described cofactor analogs, recently discovered atypical reactions of DNA cytosine-5 MTases involving non-cofactor-like compounds can also be exploited for targeted derivatization and labeling of DNA. Altogether, these approaches offer new powerful tools for sequence-specific covalent DNA labeling, which not only pave the way to developing a variety of useful techniques in DNA research, diagnostics, and nanotechnologies but have already proven practical utility for optical DNA mapping and epigenome studies.

  6. Leveraging EMS and VPP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Elements of EMS  International Standards Organization ( ISO ) 14001 , Environmental Management Systems  The Key Elements of EMS: - Policy - Planning...wingman-- ON and OFF duty Fully Conforming vs. Fully Implemented  “Fully Conforming”  Meets standards established in ISO 14001  ESOH council...e n c e Every airman looking out for his wingman-- ON and OFF duty EMS & VPP Commonalities Environmental Management System ISO 14001 : 2004 Voluntary

  7. Suppression of Plant Immune Responses by the Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 Type III Effector Tyrosine Phosphatases HopAO1 and HopAO2

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-Ojeda, María Pilar; Moreno-Pérez, Alba; Ramos, Cayo; López-Solanilla, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    The effector repertoire of the olive pathogen P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 includes two members of the HopAO effector family, one of the most diverse T3E families of the P. syringae complex. The study described here explores the phylogeny of these dissimilar members, HopAO1 and HopAO2, among the complex and reveals their activities as immune defense suppressors. Although HopAO1 is predominantly encoded by phylogroup 3 strains isolated from woody organs of woody hosts, both HopAO1 and HopAO2 are phylogenetically clustered according to the woody/herbaceous nature of their host of isolation, suggesting host specialization of the HopAO family across the P. syringae complex. HopAO1 and HopAO2 translocate into plant cells and show hrpL-dependent expression, which allows their classification as actively deployed type III effectors. Our data also show that HopAO1 and HopAO2 possess phosphatase activity, a hallmark of the members of this family. Both of them exert an inhibitory effect on early plant defense responses, such as ROS production and callose deposition, and are able to suppress ETI responses induced by the effectorless polymutant of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (DC3000D28E) in Nicotiana. Moreover, we demonstrate that a ΔhopAO1 mutant of P. savastanoi NCPBB 3335 exhibits a reduced fitness and virulence in olive plants, which supports the relevance of this effector during the interaction of this strain with its host plants. This work contributes to the field with the first report regarding functional analysis of HopAO homologs encoded by P. syringae or P. savastanoi strains isolated from woody hosts. PMID:28529516

  8. Suppression of Plant Immune Responses by the Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 Type III Effector Tyrosine Phosphatases HopAO1 and HopAO2.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Ojeda, María Pilar; Moreno-Pérez, Alba; Ramos, Cayo; López-Solanilla, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    The effector repertoire of the olive pathogen P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 includes two members of the HopAO effector family, one of the most diverse T3E families of the P. syringae complex. The study described here explores the phylogeny of these dissimilar members, HopAO1 and HopAO2, among the complex and reveals their activities as immune defense suppressors. Although HopAO1 is predominantly encoded by phylogroup 3 strains isolated from woody organs of woody hosts, both HopAO1 and HopAO2 are phylogenetically clustered according to the woody/herbaceous nature of their host of isolation, suggesting host specialization of the HopAO family across the P. syringae complex. HopAO1 and HopAO2 translocate into plant cells and show hrpL-dependent expression, which allows their classification as actively deployed type III effectors. Our data also show that HopAO1 and HopAO2 possess phosphatase activity, a hallmark of the members of this family. Both of them exert an inhibitory effect on early plant defense responses, such as ROS production and callose deposition, and are able to suppress ETI responses induced by the effectorless polymutant of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (DC3000D28E) in Nicotiana. Moreover, we demonstrate that a ΔhopAO1 mutant of P. savastanoi NCPBB 3335 exhibits a reduced fitness and virulence in olive plants, which supports the relevance of this effector during the interaction of this strain with its host plants. This work contributes to the field with the first report regarding functional analysis of HopAO homologs encoded by P. syringae or P. savastanoi strains isolated from woody hosts.

  9. SIMS chemical and isotopic analysis of impact features from LDEF experiments AO187-1 and AO187-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stadermann, Frank J.; Amari, Sachiko; Foote, John; Swan, Pat; Walker, Robert M.; Zinner, Ernst

    1995-01-01

    Previous secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) studies of extended impact features from LDEF capture cell experiment AO187-2 showed that it is possible to distinguish natural and man-made particle impacts based on the chemical composition of projectile residues. The same measurement technique has now been applied to specially prepared gold target impacts from experiment AO187-1 in order to identify the origins of projectiles that left deposits too thin to be analyzed by conventional energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The results indicate that SIMS may be the method of choice for the analysis of impact deposits on a variety of sample surfaces. SIMS was also used to determine the isotopic compositions of impact residues from several natural projectiles. Within the precision of the measurements all analyzed residues show isotopically normal compositions.

  10. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  11. DNA Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    Explains a method to enable students to understand DNA and protein synthesis using model-building and role-playing. Acquaints students with the triplet code and transcription. Includes copies of the charts used in this technique. (DDR)

  12. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  13. Unravelling DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Rs; Danilowicz, C.

    2004-04-01

    The forces involved in the biology of life are carefully balanced between stopping thermal fluctuations ripping our DNA apart and having bonds weak enough to allow enzymes to function. The application of recently developed techniques for measuring piconewton forces and imaging at the nanometre scale on a molecule-by-molecule basis has dramatically increased the impact of single-molecule biophysics. This article describes the most commonly used techniques for imaging and manipulating single biomolecules. Using these techniques, the mechanical properties of DNA can be investigated, for example through measurements of the forces required to stretch and unzip the DNA double helix. These properties determine the ease with which DNA can be folded into the cell nucleus and the size and complexity of the accompanying cellular machinery. Part of this cellular machinery is enzymes, which manipulate, repair and transcribe the DNA helix. Enzymatic function is increasingly being investigated at the single molecule level to give better understanding of the forces and processes involved in the genetic cycle. One of the challenges is to transfer this understanding of single molecules into living systems. Already there have been some notable successes, such as the development of techniques for gene expression through the application of mechanical forces to cells, and the imaging and control of viral infection of a cell. This understanding and control of DNA has also been used to design molecules, which can self-assemble into a range of structures.

  14. DNA adductomics.

    PubMed

    Balbo, Silvia; Turesky, Robert J; Villalta, Peter W

    2014-03-17

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the (32)P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LC-MS(n)), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LC-MS(n) instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology.

  15. Apple fruit copper amine oxidase isoforms: peroxisomal MdAO1 prefers diamines as substrates, whereas extracellular MdAO2 exclusively utilizes monoamines.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Adel; Trobacher, Christopher P; Cooke, Alison R; Meyers, Ashley J; Hall, J Christopher; Shelp, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    4-Aminobutyrate (GABA) accumulates in apple fruit during controlled atmosphere storage. A potential source of GABA is the polyamine putrescine, which can be oxidized via copper-containing amine oxidase (CuAO), resulting in the production 4-aminobutanal/Δ(1)-pyrroline, with the consumption of O2 and release of H2O2 and ammonia. Five putative CuAO genes (MdAO genes) were cloned from apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. Empire) fruit, and the deduced amino acid sequences found to contain the active sites typically conserved in CuAOs. Genes encoding two of these enzymes, MdAO1 and MdAO2, were highly expressed in apple fruit and selected for further analysis. Amino acid sequence analysis predicted the presence of a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal 1 tripeptide in MdAO1 and an N-terminal signal peptide and N-glycosylation site in MdAO2. Transient expression of green fluorescent fusion proteins in Arabidopsis protoplasts or onion epidermal cells revealed a peroxisomal localization for MdAO1 and an extracellular localization for MdAO2. The enzymatic activities of purified recombinant MdAO1 and MdAO2 were measured continuously as H2O2 production using a coupled reaction. MdAO1 did not use monoamines or polyamines and displayed high catalytic efficiency for 1,3-diaminopropane, putrescine and cadaverine, whereas MdAO2 exclusively utilized aliphatic and aromatic monoamines, including 2-phenylethylamine and tyramine. Together, these results indicate that MdAO1 may contribute to GABA production via putrescine oxidation in the peroxisome of apple fruit under controlled atmosphere conditions. MdAO2 seems to be involved in deamination of 2-phenylethylamine, which is a step in the biosynthesis of 2-phenylethanol, a contributor to fruit flavor and flower fragrance. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  17. Green FLASH: energy efficient real-time control for AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratadour, D.; Dipper, N.; Biasi, R.; Deneux, H.; Bernard, J.; Brule, J.; Dembet, R.; Doucet, N.; Ferreira, F.; Gendron, E.; Laine, M.; Perret, D.; Rousset, G.; Sevin, A.; Bitenc, U.; Geng, D.; Younger, E.; Andrighettoni, M.; Angerer, G.; Patauner, C.; Pescoller, D.; Porta, F.; Dufourcq, G.; Flaischer, A.; Leclere, J.-B.; Nai, A.; Palazzari, P.; Pretet, D.; Rouaud, C.

    2016-07-01

    The main goal of Green Flash is to design and build a prototype for a Real-Time Controller (RTC) targeting the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) Adaptive Optics (AO) instrumentation. The E-ELT is a 39m diameter telescope to see first light in the early 2020s. To build this critical component of the telescope operations, the astronomical community is facing technical challenges, emerging from the combination of high data transfer bandwidth, low latency and high throughput requirements, similar to the identified critical barriers on the road to Exascale. With Green Flash, we will propose technical solutions, assess these enabling technologies through prototyping and assemble a full scale demonstrator to be validated with a simulator and tested on sky. With this R&D program we aim at feeding the E-ELT AO systems preliminary design studies, led by the selected first-light instruments consortia, with technological validations supporting the designs of their RTC modules. Our strategy is based on a strong interaction between academic and industrial partners. Components specifications and system requirements are derived from the AO application. Industrial partners lead the development of enabling technologies aiming at innovative tailored solutions with potential wide application range. The academic partners provide the missing links in the ecosystem, targeting their application with mainstream solutions. This increases both the value and market opportunities of the developed products. A prototype harboring all the features is used to assess the performance. It also provides the proof of concept for a resilient modular solution to equip a large scale European scientific facility, while containing the development cost by providing opportunities for return on investment.

  18. Identification of system misregistrations during AO-corrected observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béchet, C.; Thiébaut, É.; .; Tallon, M.; Kolb, J.; Madec, P.-Y.

    2011-09-01

    The E-ELT will be equipped with a deformable mirror inside the telescope. The performance of reconstruction and control depends on the calibration of the interaction matrix- or a model of the interaction matrix- , which characterizes the system and the relationship between the commands sent to the deformable mirrors (DM) and the wavefront sensors (WFS) slopes. Such a calibration will be more complex than for the current systems at the VLT since it will have to be at least partly measured on sky and for a much larger number of degrees of freedom (more than 5000). In addition, gravity or temperature variations for instance are likely to introduce slow evolution of the matching between the M4 Deformable mirror and the WFS geometry. This can occur during observations and therefore degrade the adaptive optics (AO) correction. To relax the need of frequent painful calibrations and to prevent a loss of performance due to misregistrations, we investigate how to track the evolution of the interaction matrix errors in closed-loop without introducing any degradation in the observations. This is done thanks to identification methods and optimization theory. First, we formally describe the problem and the difficulties of such an identification in closed-loop configuration. Then, we present 2 solutions, based on the optimization of the error of estimates of the WFS slopes, at the output of the closed-loop AO. The performance of the methods and their limitations are discussed formally and thanks to numerical simulations of a high order AO system. We finally explore to which extent these methods currently studied for the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) at the VLT can be applied to the E-ELT.

  19. Intramedullary locking femoral nails. Experience with the AO nail.

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, A. B.; Yeates, H. A.

    1991-01-01

    The AO interlocking nail was introduced to the Ulster Hospital, Dundonald in 1988 and since then has been used in over 50 patients with femoral shaft fractures. We have reviewed 45 patients with 46 femoral shaft fractures treated between June 1988 and April 1990. These included four compound fractures and 13 comminuted fractures. The results compare favourably with other series. The union rate was 98% and there were no instances of deep infection. The alternative treatment methods available are discussed along with a review of the relevant literature. Images Fig 3 Fig 5 PMID:1785145

  20. Stream-Field Interactions in the Magnetic Accretor AO Piscium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellier, Coel; van Zyl, Liza

    2005-06-01

    UV spectra of the magnetic accretor AO Psc show absorption features for half the binary orbit. The absorption is unlike the wind-formed features often seen in similar stars. Instead, we attribute it to a fraction of the stream that overflows the impact with the accretion disk. Rapid velocity variations can be explained by changes in the trajectory of the stream depending on the orientation of the white dwarf's magnetic field. Hence, we are directly observing the interaction of an accretion stream with a rotating field. We compare this behavior to that seen in other intermediate polars and in SW Sex stars.

  1. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  2. Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In the past two decades, ancient DNA research has progressed from the retrieval of small fragments of mitochondrial DNA from a few late Holocene specimens, to large-scale studies of ancient populations, phenotypically important nuclear loci, and even whole mitochondrial genome sequences of extinct species. However, the field is still regularly marred by erroneous reports, which underestimate the extent of contamination within laboratories and samples themselves. An improved understanding of these processes and the effects of damage on ancient DNA templates has started to provide a more robust basis for research. Recent methodological advances have included the characterization of Pleistocene mammal populations and discoveries of DNA preserved in ancient sediments. Increasingly, ancient genetic information is providing a unique means to test assumptions used in evolutionary and population genetics studies to reconstruct the past. Initial results have revealed surprisingly complex population histories, and indicate that modern phylogeographic studies may give misleading impressions about even the recent evolutionary past. With the advent and uptake of appropriate methodologies, ancient DNA is now positioned to become a powerful tool in biological research and is also evolving new and unexpected uses, such as in the search for extinct or extant life in the deep biosphere and on other planets. PMID:15875564

  3. Characterization of Aldehyde Oxidase (AO) Genes Involved in the Accumulation of Carotenoid Pigments in Wheat Grain

    PubMed Central

    Colasuonno, Pasqualina; Marcotuli, Ilaria; Lozito, Maria L.; Simeone, Rosanna; Blanco, Antonio; Gadaleta, Agata

    2017-01-01

    Aldehyde Oxidase (AO) enzyme (EC 1.2.3.1) catalyzes the final steps of carotenoid catabolism and it is a key enzyme in the abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis. AO isoforms are located in the cytosolic compartment of tissues in many plants, where induce the oxidation of aldehydes into carboxylic acid, and in addition, catalyze the hydroxylation of some heterocycles. The goal of the present study was to characterize the AO genes involved in the accumulation of carotenoid pigments in wheat grain, an important quantitative trait controlled by multiple genes. The cDNAs corresponding to the four AO isoforms from Arabidopsis thaliana and five AO isoforms from Brachypodium distachyon were used as query in 454 sequence assemblies data for Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring (https://urgi.versailles.inra.fr/blast/blast.php) to obtain the partial or whole orthologous wheat AO sequences. Three wheat isoforms, designated AO1, AO2, and AO3 were located on the chromosome groups 2, 5, and 7, respectively, and mapped on two consensus wheat maps by SNP markers located within the AO gene sequences. To validate the possible relationships between AO3 genes and carotenoid accumulation in wheat, the expression levels of AO-A3 and AO-B3 gene were determined during the kernel maturation stage of two durum wheat cultivars, Ciccio and Svevo, characterized by a low and high carotenoid content, respectively. Different AO-A3 gene expression values were observed between the two cultivars indicating that the AO-A3 allele present in Ciccio was more active in carotenoid degradation. A gene marker was developed and can be used for marker-assisted selection in wheat breeding programs. PMID:28596779

  4. Titanium alloys (AoN) and their involvement in osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Danza, Matteo; Zollino, Ilaria; Candotto, Valentina; Cura, Francesca; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background: Osseointegration is essential for a long-term successful and inflammation-free dental implant. Such a result depends on osteoblastic cells growth and differentiation at the tissue-implant interface. The aim of this study was to compare two different AoN titanium layers (GR4 and GR5) to investigate which one had a greater osteoconductive power using human osteoblasts (HOb) culture at two different time-points. Materials and Methods: The expression levels of some bone-related (ALPL, COL1A1, COL3A1, SPP1, RUNX2, and SPARC) were analyzed using real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real time RT-PCR). Results: Real-time RT-PCR data showed that after 3 days of treatment with TiA4GR, the genes up-regulated were COL3A1, ALPL, SPP1, and RUNX2. Moreover, no difference in gene expression was noticed 4 days later. On the other hand, the genes that overexpressed after 3 days of treatment with AoN5GR were ALPL, SPP1, and RUNX2. In both cases, the expression of COL1A1 and SPARC was negatively regulated. Conclusion: Our data showed that both titanium surfaces led to osteoblasts recruitment, maturation, and differentiation, thus promoting osseointegration at the tissue-implant interface. PMID:23814585

  5. Titanium alloys (AoN) and their involvement in osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Danza, Matteo; Zollino, Ilaria; Candotto, Valentina; Cura, Francesca; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    Osseointegration is essential for a long-term successful and inflammation-free dental implant. Such a result depends on osteoblastic cells growth and differentiation at the tissue-implant interface. The aim of this study was to compare two different AoN titanium layers (GR4 and GR5) to investigate which one had a greater osteoconductive power using human osteoblasts (HOb) culture at two different time-points. The expression levels of some bone-related (ALPL, COL1A1, COL3A1, SPP1, RUNX2, and SPARC) were analyzed using real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real time RT-PCR). Real-time RT-PCR data showed that after 3 days of treatment with TiA4GR, the genes up-regulated were COL3A1, ALPL, SPP1, and RUNX2. Moreover, no difference in gene expression was noticed 4 days later. On the other hand, the genes that overexpressed after 3 days of treatment with AoN5GR were ALPL, SPP1, and RUNX2. In both cases, the expression of COL1A1 and SPARC was negatively regulated. Our data showed that both titanium surfaces led to osteoblasts recruitment, maturation, and differentiation, thus promoting osseointegration at the tissue-implant interface.

  6. Illuminating Free-floating Planet Demographics with Keck AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Calen B.

    2017-01-01

    The frequency and mass function of free-floating planets (FFPs) are unknown. Gravitational microlensing is able to explore the demographics of FFPs, which are identifiable as short-timescale microlensing events, lasting of-order 1 day for Jupiter-mass planets. In 2011, the MOA ground-based microlensing survey group announced the discovery of an excess of short-timescale microlensing events over what was expected from Galactic models that incorporate stellar densities and kinematics. They account for this excess by positing a population of Jupiter-mass FFPs that outnumbers stars by a ratio of nearly 2:1. However, there are several other possible astrophysical explanations for short-timescale microlensing events, including bound planets on wide orbits and high-velocity stars. Although the specific events identified by MOA lack mass measurements, high-resolution imaging can determine whether the lens systems are luminous, which would exclude the FFP conclusion through proof by contradiction. We have taken H-band adaptive optics (AO) observations of the MOA FFP candidates using NIRC2 on Keck II in order to test this result. Here I will present preliminary results from these AO observations, which will help inform our understanding of the demographics of FFPs.

  7. Studying binary asteroids with NGS and LGS AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchis, Franck; Berthier, Jerome; Descamps, Pascal; Hestroffer, Daniel; Vachier, Frederic; Laver, Conor; de Pater, Imke; Gavel, Don T.

    2004-10-01

    Since the discovery of Dactyl orbiting around Ida by the Galileo spacecraft in 1993, over twenty-five binary asteroid systems have been discovered using radar, direct imaging and Adaptive Optics observations. Asteroidal moon discoveries dramatically increased with the advent of this last technique on ground based telescopes. Our group focuses on the search and study of double asteroids in the main-belt, in the Trojan population and beyond Neptune's orbit. We have been using several of the AO systems available (Lick-3m, Palomar-5m, VLT-8m, Keck-10m) and related techniques such as Appulse and Laser Guide Star observations to broaden the sample of asteroids observed from the main-belt out to the Kuiper Belt. We will present a quality comparison between various techniques and different AO systems with NGS and will detail our first successful observations with the Lick LGS system. Precise orbital elements of the secondary can be determined by multiple observations spanning large periods of time (several months). Our group developed a method to predict the ephemeris of a secondary companion. Without any assumptions, this method, tested successfully on 22 Kalliope and 121 Hermione binary systems, leads to the direct determination of important physical parameters of the targets, such as their mass and the interior structure, as well as gives direct insights on their formation processes that may be otherwise only be speculated on from spacecraft mission flybys.

  8. Dynamics of the binding of acridine dyes to DNA investigated by triplet excited state probe techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Geacintov, N.E.; Waldmeyer, J.; Kuzmin, V.A.; Kolubayev, T.

    1981-11-26

    The binding of the polynuclear aromatic dyes acridine orange (AO) and proflavin (PF) to DNA in aqueous phosphate buffer solution at 25 +- 1/sup 0/C has been studied by measuring the properties of the triplet excited states of these dyes. The triplet lifetimes can be measured either by triplet-triplet absorption flash photolysis techniques or by delayed fluorescence methods. The triplet lifetimes of AO vary from about 0.5 ms with no DNA present to 20 to 35 ms at DNA concentration above 10/sup -3/M expressed in concentration of DNA phosphate (P), or at (P)/(D) ratios above 1000 ((D) is the dye concentration). At all DNA concentrations the decay profiles are exponential, except at high excitation intensities where nonexponentialities, attributed to triplet-triplet annihilation, become apparent. Similar results are observed with PF-DNA solutions. The exponentiality of the triplet decay at all DNA concentrations is attributed to rapid association and dissociation of the dye-DNA complexes on the time scales of the triplet lifetimes. A simplified one-step binding model is utilized to describe this effect. A dissociation rate of AO-DNA complexes greater than or equal to 10/sup 3/s/sup -1/ has been estimated from these results. It is shown that a detailed study of the triplet lifetime vs. DNA concentration provides a novel method for the estimation of the apparent equilibrium association constant K* for dye molecules in the triplet excited state and DNA. For AO, K* approx. = 10/sup 5/ M/sup -1/, while for PF it is approx. = 3 x 10/sup 4/ M/sup -1/. These values are of the same order of magnitude as the ground-state dye-DNA equilibrium association constants measured by others.

  9. EMS in the pueblos.

    PubMed

    Vigil, M A

    1994-02-01

    Imagine creating a movie by excerpting scenes from "Dances With Wolves," splicing it with footage from "Code 3" or "Emergency Response" and then flavoring the script with the mystery of a Tony Hillerman novel. A film producer would probably find it quite difficult to choreograph a finished product from such a compilation of material. To hundreds of Native American EMS providers, however, such a movie is played out every day in Indian country. And with this movie come some real-life problems, including trauma, which is the number-one cause of premature death among Native Americans. But a high trauma rate is just one of the challenges facing tribal EMS responders. There's also prolonged response and transport, the problems involved in maintaining the unique culture and standard of care, the challenges of tribal EMS administration and EMS education of Native American students, and the unsure future of Native American EMS. Beyond that, there's the fact that EMS is a s unique to each Indian reservation as are the cultures of the native peoples who reside on these lands. Yet while no two systems are alike, most tribal EMS providers face similar challenges.

  10. DNA codes

    SciTech Connect

    Torney, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    We have begun to characterize a variety of codes, motivated by potential implementation as (quaternary) DNA n-sequences, with letters denoted A, C The first codes we studied are the most reminiscent of conventional group codes. For these codes, Hamming similarity was generalized so that the score for matched letters takes more than one value, depending upon which letters are matched [2]. These codes consist of n-sequences satisfying an upper bound on the similarities, summed over the letter positions, of distinct codewords. We chose similarity 2 for matches of letters A and T and 3 for matches of the letters C and G, providing a rough approximation to double-strand bond energies in DNA. An inherent novelty of DNA codes is 'reverse complementation'. The latter may be defined, as follows, not only for alphabets of size four, but, more generally, for any even-size alphabet. All that is required is a matching of the letters of the alphabet: a partition into pairs. Then, the reverse complement of a codeword is obtained by reversing the order of its letters and replacing each letter by its match. For DNA, the matching is AT/CG because these are the Watson-Crick bonding pairs. Reversal arises because two DNA sequences form a double strand with opposite relative orientations. Thus, as will be described in detail, because in vitro decoding involves the formation of double-stranded DNA from two codewords, it is reasonable to assume - for universal applicability - that the reverse complement of any codeword is also a codeword. In particular, self-reverse complementary codewords are expressly forbidden in reverse-complement codes. Thus, an appropriate distance between all pairs of codewords must, when large, effectively prohibit binding between the respective codewords: to form a double strand. Only reverse-complement pairs of codewords should be able to bind. For most applications, a DNA code is to be bi-partitioned, such that the reverse-complementary pairs are separated

  11. Robo-AO: autonomous and replicable laser-adaptive-optics and science system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, C.; Riddle, R.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Law, N.; Tendulkar, S.; Kulkarni, S.; Dekany, R.; Bui, K.; Davis, J.; Burse, M.; Das, H.; Hildebrandt, S.; Punnadi, S.; Smith, R.

    2012-07-01

    We have created a new autonomous laser-guide-star adaptive-optics (AO) instrument on the 60-inch (1.5-m) telescope at Palomar Observatory called Robo-AO. The instrument enables diffraction-limited resolution observing in the visible and near-infrared with the ability to observe well over one-hundred targets per night due to its fully robotic operation. Robo-AO is being used for AO surveys of targets numbering in the thousands, rapid AO imaging of transient events and long-term AO monitoring not feasible on large diameter telescope systems. We have taken advantage of cost-effective advances in deformable mirror and laser technology while engineering Robo-AO with the intention of cloning the system for other few-meter class telescopes around the world.

  12. Evaluation of Acridine Orange Derivatives as DNA-Targeted Radiopharmaceuticals for Auger Therapy: Influence of the Radionuclide and Distance to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Edgar; Do Quental, Letícia; Palma, Elisa; Oliveira, Maria Cristina; Mendes, Filipa; Raposinho, Paula; Correia, Isabel; Lavrado, João; di Maria, Salvatore; Belchior, Ana; Vaz, Pedro; Santos, Isabel; Paulo, António

    2017-02-01

    A new family of 99mTc(I)- tricarbonyl complexes and 125I-heteroaromatic compounds bearing an acridine orange (AO) DNA targeting unit was evaluated for Auger therapy. Characterization of the DNA interaction, performed with the non-radioactive Re and 127I congeners, confirmed that all compounds act as DNA intercalators. Both classes of compounds induce double strand breaks (DSB) in plasmid DNA but the extent of DNA damage is strongly dependent on the linker between the Auger emitter (99mTc or 125I) and the AO moiety. The in vitro evaluation was complemented with molecular docking studies and Monte Carlo simulations of the energy deposited at the nanometric scale, which corroborated the experimental data. Two of the tested compounds, 125I-C5 and 99mTc-C3, place the corresponding radionuclide at similar distances to DNA and produce comparable DSB yields in plasmid and cellular DNA. These results provide the first evidence that 99mTc can induce DNA damage with similar efficiency to that of 125I, when both are positioned at comparable distances to the double helix. Furthermore, the high nuclear retention of 99mTc-C3 in tumoral cells suggests that 99mTc-labelled AO derivatives are more promising for the design of Auger-emitting radiopharmaceuticals than the 125I-labelled congeners.

  13. Evaluation of Acridine Orange Derivatives as DNA-Targeted Radiopharmaceuticals for Auger Therapy: Influence of the Radionuclide and Distance to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Edgar; do Quental, Letícia; Palma, Elisa; Oliveira, Maria Cristina; Mendes, Filipa; Raposinho, Paula; Correia, Isabel; Lavrado, João; Di Maria, Salvatore; Belchior, Ana; Vaz, Pedro; Santos, Isabel; Paulo, António

    2017-01-01

    A new family of 99mTc(I)- tricarbonyl complexes and 125I-heteroaromatic compounds bearing an acridine orange (AO) DNA targeting unit was evaluated for Auger therapy. Characterization of the DNA interaction, performed with the non-radioactive Re and 127I congeners, confirmed that all compounds act as DNA intercalators. Both classes of compounds induce double strand breaks (DSB) in plasmid DNA but the extent of DNA damage is strongly dependent on the linker between the Auger emitter (99mTc or 125I) and the AO moiety. The in vitro evaluation was complemented with molecular docking studies and Monte Carlo simulations of the energy deposited at the nanometric scale, which corroborated the experimental data. Two of the tested compounds, 125I-C5 and 99mTc-C3, place the corresponding radionuclide at similar distances to DNA and produce comparable DSB yields in plasmid and cellular DNA. These results provide the first evidence that 99mTc can induce DNA damage with similar efficiency to that of 125I, when both are positioned at comparable distances to the double helix. Furthermore, the high nuclear retention of 99mTc-C3 in tumoral cells suggests that 99mTc-labelled AO derivatives are more promising for the design of Auger-emitting radiopharmaceuticals than the 125I-labelled congeners. PMID:28211920

  14. DNA origami nanopores for controlling DNA translocation.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Bell, Nicholas A W; Thacker, Vivek V; Göpfrich, Kerstin; Misiunas, Karolis; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2013-07-23

    We combine DNA origami structures with glass nanocapillaries to reversibly form hybrid DNA origami nanopores. Trapping of the DNA origami onto the nanocapillary is proven by imaging fluorescently labeled DNA origami structures and simultaneous ionic current measurements of the trapping events. We then show two applications highlighting the versatility of these DNA origami nanopores. First, by tuning the pore size we can control the folding of dsDNA molecules ("physical control"). Second, we show that the specific introduction of binding sites in the DNA origami nanopore allows selective detection of ssDNA as a function of the DNA sequence ("chemical control").

  15. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  16. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  17. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  18. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  19. DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marinus, M.G.; Løbner-Olesen, A.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication errors, controlling the frequency of initiation of chromosome replication at oriC, and regulation of transcription initiation at promoters containing GATC sequences. In contrast, there is no known function for Dcm methylation although Dcm recognition sites constitute sequence motifs for Very Short Patch repair of T/G base mismatches. In certain bacteria (e.g., Vibrio cholerae, Caulobacter crescentus) adenine methylation is essential and in C. crescentus, it is important for temporal gene expression which, in turn, is required for coordinating chromosome initiation, replication and division. In practical terms, Dam and Dcm methylation can inhibit restriction enzyme cleavage; decrease transformation frequency in certain bacteria; decrease the stability of short direct repeats; are necessary for site-directed mutagenesis; and to probe eukaryotic structure and function. PMID:26442938

  20. DNA binding studies of hematoxylin-Dy(ш) complex by spectrometry using acridine orange as a probe.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoli; Huang, Jianhang; Wang, Xingming

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of a hematoxylin(HE)-Dy(Ш) complex with herring sperm DNA(hsDNA) was studied using acridine orange(AO) as a probe by UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism(CD), fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosity measurements. From the results of the probe experiment, we found that the HE-Dy(Ш) complex could compete with AO for intercalating into hsDNA. The binding constants of the HE-Dy(Ш) complex to hsDNA was obtained by the double reciprocal method and indicated that the affinity between hsDNA and the complex is weaker than that between hsDNA and classical intercalators. The thermodynamic parameters(ΔH°, ΔG°, ΔS°) were calculated from the UV-vis absorption data measured at two different temperatures. Further experimental results suggested that there exist groove binding and partial intercalation binding between hsDNA and HE-Dy(Ш) complex.

  1. Diferentes metodologias aplicadas ao ensino de astronomia no Ensino Médio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, E.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2009-03-01

    O presente trabalho de intervenção foi realizado junto à Escola Estadual Colònia dos Pescadores na cidade de Caraguatatuba, com très turmas do terceiro ano do Ensino Médio, envolvendo 119 alunos com idades entre 16 e 19 anos. A fase inicial foi composta de um questionário de vinte questíes dissertativas e objetivas, aplicado pelo professor titular da sala, que era o mesmo nas très turmas, para diagnosticar nos educandos os conceitos prévios sobre Astronomia e, partindo destes realizar um trabalho de intervenção nas classes envolvidas utilizando, em cada uma, metodologias diferentes: (A) sob forma de seminários, elaborados e apresentados pelos educandos, no qual o educador faz apenas as intervençíes necessárias; (B) de forma tradicional, com auxílio de multimídias para desenvolvimento das aulas e a terceira (C) tradicional, fazendo uso exclusivo de lousa e giz. Ao final do trabalho os alunos responderam novamente o questionário inicial para diagnosticar dentre as très metodologias utilizadas qual apresentou melhores aplicaçíes, os resultados iniciais foram comparados com os finais. Quando questionados a respeito do significado de Astronomia observou-se inicialmente que os acertos na turma A foram de 100%, turma B: 64%, turma C: 84%, após a intervenção os acertos foram: 100%, 97% e 85% respectivamente, demonstrando que houve um avanço significativo na turma B, a turma A manteve seu índice e a turma C evoluiu, porém não tanto quanto a B. Quando interrogados sobre quantos planetas vocè acha que existem em nosso Sistema Solar? os acertos foram: turma A: 39%, turma B: 48% e turma C: 46%, após o desenvolvimento do trabalho os acertos foram 94%, 97% e 90% respectivamente. Dentro das respostas obtidas observa-se que a metodologia tradicional com o auxílio de multimeios, aplicada na turma B, demonstrou melhores resultados, sendo a mais significativa. Outra conclusão muito importante é que apesar de o tema Astronomia ser amplamente

  2. Experience And Results With Preoperatively Shaped AO Mandibular Reconstruction Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuters, Ulrich; Prein, Joachim; Muller, Werner

    1989-04-01

    As a rule continuous bony defects of the mandible after tumour resection are temporarily bridged with the AO reconstruction plate. To precontour the plate, CT-scans of the mandible at a scale of 1:1 6 mm above and parallel to the inferior margin are needed. Corresponding layers further cranial show the anatomy of the chin. Using a lateral cephalograph, the mandibular angle and the length of the plate in the ascending ramus are measured. Of the 19 preshaped reconstruction plates implanted, 11 did not need any intraoperative adjustment of shape. The other 8 plates needed only slight modifications of contour. Preoperative bending of the reconstruction plate reduces the time taken for the operation, protects the material and the plate is precisely shaped.

  3. The 1987 outburst of the BL Lacertid AO 0235 + 164

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, J. R.; Smith, A. G.

    1989-08-01

    The violently variable BL Lacertid AO 0235 + 164 displayed a 3.24 magnitude outburst in early 1987. This outburst was observed intensively from Rosemary Hill Observatory in three colors. Long term monitoring observations made at Rosemary Hill are examined in an effort to find any recurring timescales associated with this outburst and previous large amplitude outbursts. The energetics of the 1987 outburst are analyzed in terms of the Shields and Wheeler model of a magnetized accretion disk. The timescales identified in the power spectrum (2.8 and 1.6 yr) are input into the model as the storage timescales. Since the emitted energy calculated from the optical burst cannot be stored in a magnetized disk at an allowable radius, it is concluded that either the storage timescales are longer than those identified in the power spectrum, or relativistic beaming effects must be considered, with a Doppler factor of 1.3 to 1.6.

  4. LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray H11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray H11 The Interplanetary Dust Experiment hardware has a thin brown stain on the exposed surfaces. A deeper brown stain, probably from the material underneath the small electrical cover plate of the detector frame, can be seen in the upper right corner of some of the detectors. Stain that was seen on the solar sensor base plate in the flight photograph cannot be seen because of reflected light. The colors seen in the detector's mirror like surface are reflections of the surrounding area. A dark spot seen on a detector in the third row from the top in the flight photograph, was not found in a postflight inspection. A close inspection of this photograph does reveal several impact damage locations.

  5. Rejoining of DNA strand breaks by T4 DNA ligase in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, T; Edreira, A; Piñero, J

    2002-06-01

    We have tested the ability of T4 DNA ligase to rejoin radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in living hamster cells (CHO-K1, EM9, xrs-5). T4 DNA ligase was introduced into cells by electroporation prior to x-irradiation. Single- and double-strand breaks were measured by the alkaline comet assay technique, and double-strand breaks (DSBs) were evaluated by the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis method. In the comet assay, the three cell lines showed reduced tail moments following pretreatment with T4 DNA ligase, both directly after irradiation and after repair incubation for 4 h. Similarly, the results obtained from pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed reduced DSB frequencies after pretreatment with T4 DNA ligase. We conclude that exogeneous T4 ligase contributes to rejoining of radiation-induced strand breaks.

  6. The AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (PCCF)

    PubMed Central

    Joeris, Alexander; Lutz, Nicolas; Blumenthal, Andrea; Slongo, Theddy; Audigé, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose To achieve a common understanding when dealing with long bone fractures in children, the AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (AO PCCF) was introduced in 2007. As part of its final validation, we present the most relevant fracture patterns in the lower extremities of a representative population of children classified according to the PCCF. Patients and methods We included patients up to the age of 17 who were diagnosed with 1 or more long bone fractures between January 2009 and December 2011 at either of 2 tertiary care university hospitals in Switzerland. Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed. Results More lower extremity fractures occurred in boys (62%, n = 341). Of 548 fractured long bones in the lower extremity, 25% involved the femur and 75% the lower leg. The older the patients, the more combined fractures of the tibia and fibula were sustained (adolescents: 50%, 61 of 123). Salter-Harris (SH) fracture patterns represented 66% of single epiphyseal fractures (83 of 126). Overall, 74 of the 83 SH patterns occurred in the distal epiphysis. Of all the metaphyseal fractures, 74 of 79 were classified as incomplete or complete. Complete oblique spiral fractures accounted for 57% of diaphyseal fractures (120 of 211). Of all fractures, 7% (40 of 548) were classified in the category "other", including 29 fractures that were identified as toddler’s fractures. 5 combined lower leg fractures were reported in the proximal metaphysis, 40 in the diaphysis, 26 in the distal metaphysis, and 8 in the distal epiphysis. Interpretation The PCCF allows classification of lower extremity fracture patterns in the clinical setting. Re-introduction of a specific code for toddler’s fractures in the PCCF should be considered. PMID:27882811

  7. The AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (PCCF)

    PubMed Central

    Audigé, Laurent; Slongo, Theddy; Lutz, Nicolas; Blumenthal, Andrea; Joeris, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose The AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (PCCF) describes the localization and morphology of fractures, and considers severity in 2 categories: (1) simple, and (2) multifragmentary. We evaluated simple and multifragmentary fractures in a large consecutive cohort of children diagnosed with long bone fractures in Switzerland. Patients and methods Children and adolescents treated for fractures between 2009 and 2011 at 2 tertiary pediatric surgery hospitals were retrospectively included. Fractures were classified according to the AO PCCF. Severity classes were described according to fracture location, patient age and sex, BMI, and cause of trauma. Results Of all trauma events, 3% (84 of 2,730) were diagnosed with a multifragmentary fracture. This proportion was age-related: 2% of multifragmentary fractures occurred in school­children and 7% occurred in adolescents. In patients diagnosed with a single fracture only, the highest percentage of multifragmentation occurred in the femur (12%, 15 of 123). In fractured paired radius/ulna bones, multifragmentation occurred in 2% (11 of 687); in fractured paired tibia/fibula bones, it occurred in 21% (24 of 115), particularly in schoolchildren (5 of 18) and adolescents (16 of 40). In a multivariable regression model, age, cause of injury, and bone were found to be relevant prognostic factors of multifragmentation (odds ratio (OR) > 2). Interpretation Overall, multifragmentation in long bone fractures in children was rare and was mostly observed in adolescents. The femur was mostly affected in single fractures and the lower leg was mostly affected in paired-bone fractures. The clinical relevance of multifragmentation regarding growth and long-term functional recovery remains to be determined. PMID:27882814

  8. The AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (PCCF)

    PubMed Central

    Joeris, Alexander; Lutz, Nicolas; Blumenthal, Andrea; Slongo, Theddy; Audigé, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose To achieve a common understanding when dealing with long bone fractures in children, the AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (AO PCCF) was introduced in 2007. As part of its final validation, we present the most relevant fracture patterns in the upper extremities of a representative population of children classified according to the PCCF. Patients and methods We included children and adolescents (0–17 years old) diagnosed with 1 or more long bone fractures between January 2009 and December 2011 at the university hospitals in Bern and Lausanne (Switzerland). Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed and fractures were classified from standard radiographs. Results Of 2,292 upper extremity fractures in 2,203 children and adolescents, 26% involved the humerus and 74% involved the forearm. In the humerus, 61%, and in the forearm, 80% of single distal fractures involved the metaphysis. In adolescents, single humerus fractures were more often epiphyseal and diaphyseal fractures, and among adolescents radius fractures were more often epiphyseal fractures than in other age groups. 47% of combined forearm fractures were distal metaphyseal fractures. Only 0.7% of fractures could not be classified within 1 of the child-specific fracture patterns. Of the single epiphyseal fractures, 49% were Salter-Harris type-II (SH II) fractures; of these, 94% occurred in schoolchildren and adolescents. Of the metaphyseal fractures, 58% showed an incomplete fracture pattern. 89% of incomplete fractures affected the distal radius. Of the diaphyseal fractures, 32% were greenstick fractures. 24 Monteggia fractures occurred in pre-school children and schoolchildren, and 2 occurred in adolescents. Interpretation The pattern of pediatric fractures in the upper extremity can be comprehensively described according to the PCCF. Prospective clinical studies are needed to determine its clinical relevance for treatment decisions and prognostication

  9. HST and Keck AO Images of Vortices on Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke; Wong, M.; Luszcz-Cook, S.; Adamkovics, M.; Marcus, P.; Asay-Davis, X.; Conrad, A.; Go, C.

    2009-09-01

    Observations of Jupiter were conducted in April 2006 and May 2008 with both HST (250-890 nm) and the 10-m Keck telescope. On Keck we used the near-infrared camera NIRC2, coupled to the AO system, at 1.2 to 5 micrometers. At 5 um we are sensitive to Jupiter's thermal emission in cloud-free regions of the atmosphere, while at 1.2 um we see reflected sunlight from hazes and clouds in the troposphere-stratosphere. All small ovals (i.e., all except for Oval BA and the GRS) appear to be surrounded by bright rings at 5 mu, with typical brightness temperatures of 225-250 K, and hence probing depths to 2.5-4 bar. We argue that the small vortices are columnar structures, extending down into the water cloud. Air is rising along the center of these vortices, and descending around the outer periphery; the storm systems are likely fueled by the latent heat released from the water cloud. The descending part of the vertical circulation in the larger ovals is within the ovals, likely at the location of the red ring in Oval BA, which may indicate the maximum radial distance where such return flows can take place. On 19 July 2009, amateur observer Anthony Wesley (Australia) reported a dark spot/streak on Jupiter, near a southern latitude of 56 deg, which he attributed to an impact (analogous to the SL9 impact on Jupiter). We are scheduled to observe Jupiter with the Keck AO system on 24 July 2009 UT; if observations are successful, we will report preliminary results.

  10. The AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (PCCF).

    PubMed

    Joeris, Alexander; Lutz, Nicolas; Blumenthal, Andrea; Slongo, Theddy; Audigé, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose - To achieve a common understanding when dealing with long bone fractures in children, the AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (AO PCCF) was introduced in 2007. As part of its final validation, we present the most relevant fracture patterns in the upper extremities of a representative population of children classified according to the PCCF. Patients and methods - We included children and adolescents (0-17 years old) diagnosed with 1 or more long bone fractures between January 2009 and December 2011 at the university hospitals in Bern and Lausanne (Switzerland). Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed and fractures were classified from standard radiographs. Results - Of 2,292 upper extremity fractures in 2,203 children and adolescents, 26% involved the humerus and 74% involved the forearm. In the humerus, 61%, and in the forearm, 80% of single distal fractures involved the metaphysis. In adolescents, single humerus fractures were more often epiphyseal and diaphyseal fractures, and among adolescents radius fractures were more often epiphyseal fractures than in other age groups. 47% of combined forearm fractures were distal metaphyseal fractures. Only 0.7% of fractures could not be classified within 1 of the child-specific fracture patterns. Of the single epiphyseal fractures, 49% were Salter-Harris type-II (SH II) fractures; of these, 94% occurred in schoolchildren and adolescents. Of the metaphyseal fractures, 58% showed an incomplete fracture pattern. 89% of incomplete fractures affected the distal radius. Of the diaphyseal fractures, 32% were greenstick fractures. 24 Monteggia fractures occurred in pre-school children and schoolchildren, and 2 occurred in adolescents. Interpretation - The pattern of pediatric fractures in the upper extremity can be comprehensively described according to the PCCF. Prospective clinical studies are needed to determine its clinical relevance for treatment decisions and

  11. The AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (PCCF).

    PubMed

    Audigé, Laurent; Slongo, Theddy; Lutz, Nicolas; Blumenthal, Andrea; Joeris, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose - The AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (PCCF) describes the localization and morphology of fractures, and considers severity in 2 categories: (1) simple, and (2) multifragmentary. We evaluated simple and multifragmentary fractures in a large consecutive cohort of children diagnosed with long bone fractures in Switzerland. Patients and methods - Children and adolescents treated for fractures between 2009 and 2011 at 2 tertiary pediatric surgery hospitals were retrospectively included. Fractures were classified according to the AO PCCF. Severity classes were described according to fracture location, patient age and sex, BMI, and cause of trauma. Results - Of all trauma events, 3% (84 of 2,730) were diagnosed with a multifragmentary fracture. This proportion was age-related: 2% of multifragmentary fractures occurred in school-children and 7% occurred in adolescents. In patients diagnosed with a single fracture only, the highest percentage of multifragmentation occurred in the femur (12%, 15 of 123). In fractured paired radius/ulna bones, multifragmentation occurred in 2% (11 of 687); in fractured paired tibia/fibula bones, it occurred in 21% (24 of 115), particularly in schoolchildren (5 of 18) and adolescents (16 of 40). In a multivariable regression model, age, cause of injury, and bone were found to be relevant prognostic factors of multifragmentation (odds ratio (OR) > 2). Interpretation - Overall, multifragmentation in long bone fractures in children was rare and was mostly observed in adolescents. The femur was mostly affected in single fractures and the lower leg was mostly affected in paired-bone fractures. The clinical relevance of multifragmentation regarding growth and long-term functional recovery remains to be determined.

  12. The AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (PCCF).

    PubMed

    Joeris, Alexander; Lutz, Nicolas; Blumenthal, Andrea; Slongo, Theddy; Audigé, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose - To achieve a common understanding when dealing with long bone fractures in children, the AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (AO PCCF) was introduced in 2007. As part of its final validation, we present the most relevant fracture patterns in the lower extremities of a representative population of children classified according to the PCCF. Patients and methods - We included patients up to the age of 17 who were diagnosed with 1 or more long bone fractures between January 2009 and December 2011 at either of 2 tertiary care university hospitals in Switzerland. Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed. Results - More lower extremity fractures occurred in boys (62%, n = 341). Of 548 fractured long bones in the lower extremity, 25% involved the femur and 75% the lower leg. The older the patients, the more combined fractures of the tibia and fibula were sustained (adolescents: 50%, 61 of 123). Salter-Harris (SH) fracture patterns represented 66% of single epiphyseal fractures (83 of 126). Overall, 74 of the 83 SH patterns occurred in the distal epiphysis. Of all the metaphyseal fractures, 74 of 79 were classified as incomplete or complete. Complete oblique spiral fractures accounted for 57% of diaphyseal fractures (120 of 211). Of all fractures, 7% (40 of 548) were classified in the category "other", including 29 fractures that were identified as toddler's fractures. 5 combined lower leg fractures were reported in the proximal metaphysis, 40 in the diaphysis, 26 in the distal metaphysis, and 8 in the distal epiphysis. Interpretation - The PCCF allows classification of lower extremity fracture patterns in the clinical setting. Re-introduction of a specific code for toddler's fractures in the PCCF should be considered.

  13. Prokaryotic DNA ligases unwind superhelical DNA.

    PubMed

    Ivanchenko, M; van Holde, K; Zlatanova, J

    1996-09-13

    We have studied the effect on DNA topology of binding of prokaryotic DNA ligases (T4 and E. coli) to superhelical or nicked circular DNA. Performing topoisomerase I-mediated relaxation in the presence of increasing amounts of T4 ligase led to a shift in the topoisomer distribution to increasingly more negative values. This result suggested that T4 ligase unwound the DNA and was further substantiated by ligation of nicked circular molecules by E. coli DNA ligase in the presence of increasing amounts of T4 ligase. Such an experiment was possible since the two DNA ligases require different cofactors for enzymatic activity. Performing a similar experiment with reverse partners, using E. coli DNA ligase as ligand, and T4 ligase as sealing agent, we observed that the E. coli enzyme also unwound the DNA. Thus, prokaryotic DNA ligases can be added to an ever-growing list of DNA-binding proteins that unwind the DNA upon binding.

  14. 76 FR 52972 - United States v. Regal Beloit Corp. and A.O. Smith Corp.; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... acquisition by Regal Beloit Corporation (``RBC'') of the electric motor business of A.O. Smith Corporation... Corporation (``RBC'') and A.O. Smith Corporation (``AOS'') to enjoin RBC's proposed acquisition of the... proposed acquisition of the electric motor business from AOS likely would substantially lessen competition...

  15. Robo-AO KP: A new era in robotic adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, Reed L.; Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Duev, Dmitry; Ziegler, Carl; Jensen-Clem, Rebecca M.; Atkinson, Dani Eleanor; Tanner, Angelle M.; Zhang, Celia; Ray, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Robo-AO is the first and only fully automated adaptive optics laser guide star AO instrument. It was developed as an instrument for 1-3m robotic telescopes, in order to take advantage of their availability to pursue large survey programs and target of opportunity observations that aren't possible with other AO systems. Robo-AO is currently the most efficient AO system in existence, and it can achieve an observation rate of 20+ science targets per hour. In more than three years of operations at Palomar Observatory, it has been quite successful, producing technology that is being adapted by other AO systems and robotic telescope projects, as well as several high impact scientific publications. Now, Robo-AO has been selected to take over operation of the Kitt Peak National Observatory 2.1m telescope. This will give Robo-AO KP the opportunity to pursue multiple science programs consisting of several thousand targets each during the three years it will be on the telescope. One-sixth of the observing time will be allocated to the US community through the NOAO TAC process. This presentation will discuss the process adapting Robo-AO to the KPNO 2.1m telescope, the plans for integration and initial operations, and the science operations and programs to be pursued.

  16. LDEF (Flight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray G10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray G10 The flight/on-orbit photograph of the G10 experi ment tray was taken from the Orbiter aft flight deck during the LDEF retrieval. A light brown stain can be seen on the experiment tray flanges and to a lesser degree on the IDE Chemglaze Z tained their integrity. A light tan stain on the solar sensor base plate, located in the center of the tray, is more easily seen than that on the IDE mounting plate. Surface defects are highly visible due to the lighting conditions existing at the time the photograph was taken. The lighting angle is such that many impact craters can be seen. Two (2) detectors, located in the twenty (20) detector layout in the lower left corner of the tray, seem to have defects. A triangular shaped discoloration appears on the second detector from the left and in the second row from the bottom. Another irregular shaped discoloration can be seen on the fourth detector from the left and in the third row from the bottom. These discolorations appear to be due to material and/or fabrication defects and not reflected light. The blue colors on the detector's mirror like surface are caused by reflections of the LDEF surroundings.

  17. LDEF (Flight), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray H09

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray H09 The flight photograph of the Interstellar Gas Experiment was taken from the Orbiter aft flight deck during the LDEF retrieval. A very light contamination stain is present on the experiment tray flanges and on the most of the visible LDEF structure. The exception being a darker stain on the structure adjacent to thermal covers that provide venting for the LDEF interior. Both paint dots appear to be heavily coated with the brown contamination stain. The color of the white thermal control paint on the IGE has changed and now varies from off-white to a dark brown. The darker brown areas on the experiment baseplate, around the grid voltage cable connectors, appear to have come from contaminants flowing from inside the LDEF. A dark stain area can be seen on the lower half of the tray's right sidewall but a shadow hides most of the dark stain in the upper left corner of the tray. A lighter stain coats portions of the experiment baseplate and the outside of the canister housing. A beryllium copper collector foil is clearly visible in the lower left canister housing as are the baffles and reflected light from the fine wire mesh grid near the top of the canister housing. Due to an experi- ment system malfunction, the canister collector foils that are visible were exposed for the total mission.

  18. Ruled and holographic experiment (AO 138-5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnemason, Francis

    1993-01-01

    The AO 138-5 experiment was designed, via the FRECOPA (FRench COoperative PAyload) experiment with the aim to study the optical behavior of different diffraction gratings submitted to space vacuum long exposure and solar irradiation. Samples were ruled and holographic gratings, masters or replica, and some additional control mirrors with various coatings. The experiment was located on the B3, trailing edge of the LDEF and was protected against Atomic Oxygen flux. The experienced thermal cycling was evaluated from -23 C to 66 C during the flight, 34,000 orbits. The samples (two batches of four pieces) were located on a dedicated plate, by a pair of equivalent gratings or mirrors; optical faces were located on the external side. The plate was inside a canister, which had been opened in space for ten months. When the satellite returned to Kennedy Space Center, the remaining vacuum in the canister was still correct. The analysis focused on the triple point characterization including light efficiency, wavefront flatness quality and stray light level. Tests were conducted on control mirrors and gratings (rules and holographic master or replica) loaded but not exposed to cosmic dust or direct solar irradiations. They did not show any significant variations. Solar exposure had damaged the coating (aluminum and platinum) reflectivity in the Ultra-Violet region; the degradation is higher with the gratings, in terms of efficiency. However, wavefront flatness quality and stray light level tests revealed no additional changes.

  19. Atomic oxygen effects on LDEF experiment AO171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.; Finckenor, Miria M.; Norwood, Joseph K.

    1993-01-01

    The Solar Array Materials Passive Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment (SAMPLE), AO171, contained in total approximately 100 materials and materials processes with a 300 specimen complement. With the exception of experiment solar cell and solar cell modules, all test specimens were weighed before flight, thus allowing an accurate determination of mass loss as a result of space exposure. Since almost all of the test specimens were thermal vacuum baked before flight, the mass loss sustained can be attributed principally to atomic oxygen attack. The atomic oxygen effects observed and measured in five classes of materials is documented. The atomic oxygen reactivity values generated for these materials are compared to those values derived for the same materials from exposures on short term shuttle flights. An assessment of the utility of predicting long term atomic oxygen effects from short term exposures is given. This experiment was located on Row 8 position A which allowed all experiment materials to be exposed to an atomic oxygen fluence of 6.93 x 10(exp 21) atoms/cm(sup 2) as a result of being positioned 38 degrees off the RAM direction.

  20. LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray G10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray G10 The IDE experiment appears to be in excellent condition in the postflight photograph. All bond joints seem to have survived the space environment and the experiment hardware seems to be intact. The direction and intensity of the artificial light source has caused hot spots and reflections that tend to wash out the brown stain on the exposed surfaces. A close inspection of individual detectors reveal locations where impacts have occurred and damage is present. In the detector layout in the lower left corner of the tray, two detectors continue to show the discolorations observed in the flight photograph. A triangular shape can be seen in the detector located in the second horizontal row from the bottom and the second vertical row from the left. The other detector, located in the third horizontal row from the bottom and the fourth vertical row from the left has an irregular shaped, very faint, discolora tion. The blue color in the detectors metallic surface is caused by reflections of the surrounding area.

  1. Transcription initiation complex structures elucidate DNA opening.

    PubMed

    Plaschka, C; Hantsche, M; Dienemann, C; Burzinski, C; Plitzko, J; Cramer, P

    2016-05-19

    Transcription of eukaryotic protein-coding genes begins with assembly of the RNA polymerase (Pol) II initiation complex and promoter DNA opening. Here we report cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of yeast initiation complexes containing closed and open DNA at resolutions of 8.8 Å and 3.6 Å, respectively. DNA is positioned and retained over the Pol II cleft by a network of interactions between the TATA-box-binding protein TBP and transcription factors TFIIA, TFIIB, TFIIE, and TFIIF. DNA opening occurs around the tip of the Pol II clamp and the TFIIE 'extended winged helix' domain, and can occur in the absence of TFIIH. Loading of the DNA template strand into the active centre may be facilitated by movements of obstructing protein elements triggered by allosteric binding of the TFIIE 'E-ribbon' domain. The results suggest a unified model for transcription initiation with a key event, the trapping of open promoter DNA by extended protein-protein and protein-DNA contacts.

  2. EMS in Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Ramalanjaona, Georges; Brogan, Gerald X

    2009-02-01

    Mauritius lies in the southwest Indian Ocean about 1250 miles from the African coast and 500 miles from Madagascar. Mauritius (estimated population 1,230,602) became independent from the United Kingdom in 1968 and has one of the highest GDP per capita in Africa. Within Mauritius there is a well established EMS system with a single 999 national dispatch system. Ambulances are either publicly or privately owned. Public ambulances are run by the Government (SAMU). Megacare is a private subscriber only ambulance service. The Government has recently invested in new technology such as telemedicine to further enhance the role of EMS on the island. This article describes the current state of EMS in Mauritius and depicts its development in the context of Government effort to decentralise and modernise the healthcare system.

  3. EMS -- Error Message Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, P. C. T.; Chipperfield, A. J.; Draper, P. W.

    This document describes the Error Message Service, EMS, and its use in system software. The purpose of EMS is to provide facilities for constructing and storing error messages for future delivery to the user -- usually via the Starlink Error Reporting System, ERR (see SUN/104). EMS can be regarded as a simplified version of ERR without the binding to any software environment (e.g., for message output or access to the parameter and data systems). The routines in this library conform to the error reporting conventions described in SUN/104. A knowledge of these conventions, and of the ADAM system (see SG/4), is assumed in what follows. This document is intended for Starlink systems programmers and can safely be ignored by applications programmers and users.

  4. OV-Wav: um novo pacote para análise multiescalar em astronomia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, D. N. E.; Rabaça, C. R.

    2003-08-01

    Wavelets e outras formas de análise multiescalar têm sido amplamente empregadas em diversas áreas do conhecimento, sendo reconhecidamente superiores a técnicas mais tradicionais, como as análises de Fourier e de Gabor, em certas aplicações. Embora a teoria dos wavelets tenha começado a ser elaborada há quase trinta anos, seu impacto no estudo de imagens astronômicas tem sido pequeno até bem recentemente. Apresentamos um conjunto de programas desenvolvidos ao longo dos últimos três anos no Observatório do Valongo/UFRJ que possibilitam aplicar essa poderosa ferramenta a problemas comuns em astronomia, como a remoção de ruído, a detecção hierárquica de fontes e a modelagem de objetos com perfis de brilho arbitrários em condições não ideais. Este pacote, desenvolvido para execução em plataforma IDL, teve sua primeira versão concluída recentemente e está sendo disponibilizado à comunidade científica de forma aberta. Mostramos também resultados de testes controlados ao quais submetemos os programas, com a sua aplicação a imagens artificiais, com resultados satisfatórios. Algumas aplicações astrofísicas foram estudadas com o uso do pacote, em caráter experimental, incluindo a análise da componente de luz difusa em grupos compactos de galáxias de Hickson e o estudo de subestruturas de nebulosas planetárias no espaço multiescalar.

  5. Optical DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaywargi, Deepak; Lewis, Dave; Kirovski, Darko

    A certificate of authenticity (COA) is an inexpensive physical object with a random and unique structure S which is hard to near-exactly replicate. An inexpensive device should be able to scan object’s physical “fingerprint,” a set of features that represents S. In this paper, we explore one set of requirements that optical media such as DVDs should satisfy, to be considered as COAs. As manufacturing of such media produces inevitable errors, we use the locations and count of these errors as a “fingerprint” for each optical disc: its optical DNA. The “fingerprint” is signed using publisher’s private-key and the resulting signature is stored onto the optical medium using a post-production process. Standard DVD players with altered firmware that includes publisher’s public-key, should be able to verify the authenticity of DVDs protected with optical DNA. Our key finding is that for the proposed protocol, only DVDs with exceptional wear-and-tear characteristics would result in an inexpensive and viable anti-counterfeiting technology.

  6. DNA nanostructure meets nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guomei; Surwade, Sumedh P; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Haitao

    2013-04-07

    Recent advances in DNA nanotechnology have made it possible to construct DNA nanostructures of almost arbitrary shapes with 2-3 nm of precision in their dimensions. These DNA nanostructures are ideal templates for bottom-up nanofabrication. This review highlights the challenges and recent advances in three areas that are directly related to DNA-based nanofabrication: (1) fabrication of large scale DNA nanostructures; (2) pattern transfer from DNA nanostructure to an inorganic substrate; and (3) directed assembly of DNA nanostructures.

  7. Interaction between tryptophan-Sm(III) complex and DNA with the use of a acridine orange dye fluorophor probe.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiao Li; Zhao, Na; Wang, Xing Ming

    2016-02-01

    The interaction of the Trp-Sm(III) complex with herring sperm DNA (hs-DNA) was investigated with the use of acridine orange (AO) dye as a spectral probe for UV-vis spectrophotometry and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results showed that the both the Trp-Sm(III) complex and the AO molecule could intercalate into the double helix of the DNA. The Sm(III)-(Trp)3 complex was stabilized by intercalation into the DNA with binding constants: K(Ө)25°C  = 7.14 × 10(5)  L·mol(-1) and K(Ө) 37°C  = 5.28 × 10(4)  L·mol(-1), and it could displace the AO dye from the AO-DNA complex in a competitive reaction. Computation of the thermodynamic functions demonstrates that Δr Hm (Ө) is the primary driving power of the interaction between the Sm(III)(Trp)3 complex and the DNA. The results from Scatchard and viscometry methods suggested that the interaction mode between the Sm(III)(Trp)3 complex and the hs-DNA is groove binding and weak intercalation binding. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. National EMS Research Agenda.

    PubMed

    Sayre, M R; White, L J; Brown, L H; McHenry, S D

    2002-01-01

    Now, more than ever before, the spirit of the emergency services professional is recognized by people everywhere. Individuals from every walk of life comprehend the reality of the job these professionals do each day. Placing the safety of others above their own is their acknowledged responsibility. Rescue and treatment of ill and injured patients are their purpose as well as their gratification. The men and women who provide prehospital care are well aware of the unpredictable nature of emergency medical services (EMS). Prehospital care is given when and where it is needed: in urban settings with vertical challenges and gridlock; in rural settings with limited access; in confined spaces; within entrapments; or simply in the street, exposed to the elements. Despite the challenges, EMS professionals rise to the occasion to do their best with the resources available. Despite more than 30 years of dedicated service by thousands of EMS professionals, academic researchers, and public policy makers, the nation's EMS system is treating victims of illness and injury with little or no evidence that the care they provide is optimal. A national investment in the EMS research infrastructure is necessary to overcome obstacles currently impeding the accumulation of essential evidence of the effectiveness of EMS practice. Funding is required to train new researchers and to help them establish their careers. Financial backing is needed to support the development of effective prehospital treatments for the diseases that drive the design of the EMS system, including injury and sudden cardiac arrest. Innovative strategies to make EMS research easier to accomplish in emergency situations must be implemented. Researchers must have access to patient outcome information in order to evaluate and improve prehospital care. New biomedical and technical advances must be evaluated using scientific methodology. Research is the key to maintaining focus on improving the overall health of the

  9. MagAO: Status and on-sky performance of the Magellan adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzinski, Katie M.; Close, Laird M.; Males, Jared R.; Kopon, Derek; Hinz, Phil M.; Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Puglisi, Alfio; Pinna, Enrico; Briguglio, Runa; Xompero, Marco; Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Bailey, Vanessa; Follette, Katherine B.; Rodigas, T. J.; Wu, Ya-Lin; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Argomedo, Javier; Busoni, Lorenzo; Hare, Tyson; Uomoto, Alan; Weinberger, Alycia

    2014-07-01

    MagAO is the new adaptive optics system with visible-light and infrared science cameras, located on the 6.5-m Magellan "Clay" telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The instrument locks on natural guide stars (NGS) from 0th to 16th R-band magnitude, measures turbulence with a modulating pyramid wavefront sensor binnable from 28×28 to 7×7 subapertures, and uses a 585-actuator adaptive secondary mirror (ASM) to provide at wavefronts to the two science cameras. MagAO is a mutated clone of the similar AO systems at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) at Mt. Graham, Arizona. The high-level AO loop controls up to 378 modes and operates at frame rates up to 1000 Hz. The instrument has two science cameras: VisAO operating from 0.5-1μm and Clio2 operating from 1-5 μm. MagAO was installed in 2012 and successfully completed two commissioning runs in 2012-2013. In April 2014 we had our first science run that was open to the general Magellan community. Observers from Arizona, Carnegie, Australia, Harvard, MIT, Michigan, and Chile took observations in collaboration with the MagAO instrument team. Here we describe the MagAO instrument, describe our on-sky performance, and report our status as of summer 2014.

  10. Patterns of Impairments in AOS and Mechanisms of Interaction between Phonological and Phonetic Encoding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laganaro, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: One reason why the diagnosis of apraxia of speech (AOS) and its underlying impairment are often debated may lie in the fact that most patients do not display pure patterns of AOS. Mixed patterns are clearly acknowledged at other levels of impairment (e.g., lexical-semantic and lexical-phonological), and they have contributed to debate…

  11. SCExAO as a precursor to an ELT exoplanet direct imaging instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Nemanja; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Clergeon, Christophe; Singh, Garima; Vievard, Sebastien; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Garrel, Vincent; Norris, Barnaby; Tuthill, Peter; Stewart, Paul; Huby, Elsa; Perrin, Guy; Lacour, Sylvestre

    2013-12-01

    The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO (SCExAO) instrument consists of a high performance Phase Induced Amplitude Apodisation (PIAA) coronagraph combined with an extreme Adaptive Optics (AO) system operating in the near-infrared (H band). The extreme AO system driven by the 2000 element deformable mirror will allow for Strehl ratios>90% to be achieved in the H-band when it goes closed loop. This makes the SCExAO instrument a powerful platform for high contrast imaging down to angular separations of the order of 1 lambda/D and an ideal testbed for exploring coronagraphic techniques for ELTs. In this paper we report on the recent progress in regards to the development of the instrument, which includes the addition of a visible bench that makes use of the light at shorter wavelengths not currently utilized by SCExAO and closing the loop on the tip/tilt wavefront sensor. We will also discuss several exciting guest instruments which will expand the capabilities of SCExAO over the next few years; namely CHARIS which is a integral field spectrograph as well as VAMPIRES, a visible aperture masking experiment based on polarimetric analysis of circumstellar disks. In addition we will elucidate the unique role extreme AO systems will play in enabling high precision radial velocity spectroscopy for the detection of small companions.

  12. Patterns of Impairments in AOS and Mechanisms of Interaction between Phonological and Phonetic Encoding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laganaro, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: One reason why the diagnosis of apraxia of speech (AOS) and its underlying impairment are often debated may lie in the fact that most patients do not display pure patterns of AOS. Mixed patterns are clearly acknowledged at other levels of impairment (e.g., lexical-semantic and lexical-phonological), and they have contributed to debate…

  13. Structure and operation of the DNA-translocating type I DNA restriction enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Kennaway, Christopher K.; Taylor, James E.; Song, Chun Feng; Potrzebowski, Wojciech; Nicholson, William; White, John H.; Swiderska, Anna; Obarska-Kosinska, Agnieszka; Callow, Philip; Cooper, Laurie P.; Roberts, Gareth A.; Artero, Jean-Baptiste; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Trinick, John; Kneale, G. Geoff; Dryden, David T.F.

    2012-01-01

    Type I DNA restriction/modification (RM) enzymes are molecular machines found in the majority of bacterial species. Their early discovery paved the way for the development of genetic engineering. They control (restrict) the influx of foreign DNA via horizontal gene transfer into the bacterium while maintaining sequence-specific methylation (modification) of host DNA. The endonuclease reaction of these enzymes on unmethylated DNA is preceded by bidirectional translocation of thousands of base pairs of DNA toward the enzyme. We present the structures of two type I RM enzymes, EcoKI and EcoR124I, derived using electron microscopy (EM), small-angle scattering (neutron and X-ray), and detailed molecular modeling. DNA binding triggers a large contraction of the open form of the enzyme to a compact form. The path followed by DNA through the complexes is revealed by using a DNA mimic anti-restriction protein. The structures reveal an evolutionary link between type I RM enzymes and type II RM enzymes. PMID:22215814

  14. Multi-conjugate AO for the European Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla, I.; Béchet, C.; Le Louarn, M.; Tallon, M.; Sánchez-Capuchino, J.; Collados Vera, M.

    2012-07-01

    The European Solar Telescope (EST) will be a 4-meter diameter world-class facility, optimized for studies of the magnetic coupling between the deep photosphere and upper chromosphere. It will specialize in high spatial resolution observations and therefore it has been designed to incorporate an innovative built-in Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics system (MCAO). It combines a narrow field high order sensor that will provide the information to correct the ground layer and a wide field low order sensor for the high altitude mirrors used in the MCAO mode. One of the challenging particularities of solar AO is that it has to be able to correct the turbulence for a wide range of observing elevations, from zenith to almost horizon. Also, seeing is usually worse at day-time, and most science is done at visible wavelengths. Therefore, the system has to include a large number of high altitude deformable mirrors. In the case of the EST, an arrangement of 4 high altitude DMs is used. Controlling such a number of mirrors makes it necessary to use fast reconstruction algorithms to deal with such large amount of degrees of freedom. For this reason, we have studied the performance of the Fractal Iterative Method (FriM) and the Fourier Transform Reconstructor (FTR), to the EST MCAO case. Using OCTOPUS, the end-to-end simulator of the European Southern Observatory, we have performed several simulations with both algorithms, being able to reach the science requirement of a homogeneous Strehl higher that 50% all over the 1 arcmin field of view.

  15. LDEF (Postflight), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray H06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray H06 The post landing photograph was taken from the Orbiter's cargo bay access hatch during post landing operations to prepare the Orbiter for the ferry flight from the Dryden Flight Research Center to the Kennedy Space Center. A very light contamination stain is present on the experiment tray flanges and on the most of the visible LDEF structure. The exception being a much darker stain on the structure adjacent to thermal covers that provide venting for the LDEF interior. The paint dot adjacent to the thermal cover vent area is heavily coated with the brown contamination stain while the paint dot adjacent to the center end cover plate has a very light coating. The color of the white thermal control paint on the IGE has changed and now varies from offwhite to a dark brown. The darker brown areas on the experiment baseplate, around the grid voltage cable connectors, appear to have come from contaminants flowing from inside the LDEF. A dark stain area can be seen on the tray's lower sidewall and in the upper left corner of the tray. A lighter stain coats portions of the experiment baseplate and the outside of the canister housing. A beryllium copper collector foil is clearly visible within the canister housings as are the baffles and reflected light from the fine wire mesh grid near the top of the canister housing. Due to an experi- ment system malfunction, the canister collector foils that are visible were exposed for the total mission.

  16. LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray B12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray B12 The postflight photograph shows little change of the exposed surfaces when compared with the prelaunch photograph. Although not noticable in the photograph, a light coating of contamination was seen on all experiment surfaces in this location. The difference in colors of the IDE detectors, located on the right hand mounting plate, is a result of the reflected surroundings and not related to space exposure. A close observation of the detector surfaces reveal that some damage has occured from meteroid and/or debris impacts. One impact crater can be seen, upper right quadrant, on the detector located in the sixth (6th) row down from the top and the fifth (5th) row from the right. Other impacts, smaller in size, show as small white dots on the detector surface. The solar sensor seems to have changed little, if any. However, the color of the solar array baseplate, showing indications of contamination, appears to be darker than the detector mounting plate. The center section cover plate shows little change when compared with the pre-launch photograph. However, during inspection, a light coat of the brown contamination has been observed on all surfaces. The color of the bonding material (RTV) used to secure several thin specimen, sapphire, to individual mounting plates has changed from pink to gold. At one location, that of a single specimen, the bonding material is more gray than gold in color. This has been attributed to the specimen being considerably thicker. The EPDS thermal cover in the right hand side of the tray shows a light coating of brown contamination on the Chemglaze II A-276 white paint.

  17. GLAS/NAOMI: ground-layer AO at the William Herschel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benn, Chris; Abrams, Don; Agocs, Tibor; Cano, Diego; Gregory, Tom; Guerra, Juan Carlos; Martin, Olivier; Morris, Tim; Myers, Richard; Rix, Samantha; Rutten, Rene; Skillen, Ian; Skvarč, Jure; Tulloch, Simon

    2008-07-01

    GLAS is an upgrade of the William Herschel Telescope's existing natural-guide-star (NGS) AO system NAOMI to incorporate a 20-W Rayleigh laser guide star (LGS) projected to an altitude of 15 km. It is currently being commissioned on-sky, and we review here the current status of the project. GLAS/NAOMI delivers dramatic improvements in PSF in both the near-IR (AO-corrected FWHM close to the diffraction limit, >~ 0.15 arcsec) and in the optical (factor of ~ 2 reduction in FWHM). The performance is similar to that with NGS, and is consistent with predictions from modelling. The main advantage over NGS AO is the large gain in sky coverage (from ~ 1% to ~ 100% at galactic latitude 40°). GLAS provides the first on-sky demonstration of closed-loop ground-layer AO (GLAO), and is the first Rayleigh LGS AO system to be offered for general use, at any telescope.

  18. Lick Observatory's Shane telescope adaptive optics system (ShaneAO): research directions and progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavel, Donald T.; Kupke, Renate; Rudy, Alexander R.; Srinath, Srikar; Dillon, Daren; Poyneer, Lisa A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a review of the ongoing research activity surrounding the adaptive optics system at the Shane telescope (ShaneAO) particularly the R&D efforts on the technology and algorithms for that will advance AO into wider application for astronomy. We are pursuing the AO challenges for whole sky coverage diffraction-limited correction down to visible science wavelengths. This demands high-order wavefront correction and bright artificial laser beacons. We present recent advancements in the development of MEMS based AO correction, woofer-tweeter architecture, wind-predictive wavefront control algorithms, atmospheric characterization, and a pulsed fiber amplifier guide star laser tuned for optical pumping of the sodium layer. We present the latest on-sky results from the new AO system and present status and experimental plans for the optical pumping guide star laser.

  19. AO-308: the high-order adaptive optics system at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumko, Sergey; Gorceix, Nicolas; Choi, Seonghwan; Kellerer, Aglaé; Cao, Wenda; Goode, Philip R.; Abramenko, Volodymyr; Richards, Kit; Rimmele, Thomas R.; Marino, Jose

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we present Big Bear Solar Observatory's (BBSO) newest adaptive optics system - AO-308. AO-308 is a result of collaboration between BBSO and National Solar Observatory (NSO). AO-308 uses a 357 actuators deformable mirror (DM) from Xinetics and its wave front sensor (WFS) has 308 sub-apertures. The WFS uses a Phantom V7.3 camera which runs at 2000 Hz with the region of interest of 416×400 pixels. AO-308 utilizes digital signal processors (DSPs) for image processing. AO-308 has been successfully used during the 2013 observing season. The system can correct up to 310 modes providing diffraction limited images at all wavelengths of interest.

  20. Robo-AO: Initial results from the first autonomous laser guide star adaptive optics instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, R. L.; Baranec, C.; Law, N. M.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Tendulkar, S.; Hogstrom, K.; Bui, K.; Burse, M.; Chordia, P.; Das, H.; Dekany, R.; Kulkarni, S.; Punnadi, S.; Smith, R.

    2014-12-01

    Large surveys are discovering thousands of objects which require further characterization at high angular resolution. The demands on space-based observatories and large telescopes with AO systems leave them generally unavailable for large high angular resolution surveys. To address this gap, we have developed Robo-AO, the first robotic laser AO system, as an economical and efficient imaging instrument for 1-3 m class telescopes. Observations of over 200 stellar objects per night have routinely been performed, with target-to-target observation overheads of less than 1.5 minutes. Scientific programs of several thousands of targets can be executed in mere weeks, and Robo-AO has already completed the three largest AO surveys to date.

  1. Aquisição de Estreptococos Mutans e Desenvolvimento de Cárie Dental em Primogênitos

    PubMed Central

    NOCE, Erica; RUBIRA, Cassia Maria Fischer; da Silva ROSA, Odila Pereira; da SILVA, Salete Moura Bonifácio; BRETZ, Walter Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Objetivo Avaliar o momento de aquisição de estreptococos mutans (EM), desenvolvimento de cárie dental e as variáveis a eles associadas no decorrer de 23 meses, em primogênitos de famílias de baixo nível socioeconômico, desde os sete meses de idade. Método A amostra foi selecionada com base em mães densamente colonizadas por EM, incluindo todos os membros de 14 famílias que conviviam na mesma casa. Foram envolvidos no estudo 14 mães, pais e primogênitos e 8 parentes, na maioria avós. Exames clínicos e radiográficos iniciais determinaram os índices de cárie e condição periodontal dos adultos. Contagens de EM foram feitas em todos os adultos nas duas primeiras visitas. Nas crianças foram avaliados os níveis de EM, o número de dentes e de cáries, em quatro visitas. Resultados A prevalência de EM nos adultos foi alta, estando ausente em apenas um dos pais. EM foram detectados em 1, 2, 3 e 10 crianças, respectivamente nas visitas #1, 2, 3 e 4. A cárie dental foi detectada em apenas três crianças na última visita (aos 30 meses de idade), as quais apresentaram escores de EM significantemente maiores que as crianças sem cárie, na mesma visita. Conclusão Exclusivamente a condição social de baixa renda e mães densamente colonizadas por EM não são sinônimo de colonização precoce e alta atividade de cárie em crianças cuidadas em casa. O desenvolvimento de cárie está significantemente associado a escores elevados de EM nas crianças. PMID:22022218

  2. Determinação de regiões de órbitas diretas estáveis ao redor da Lua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, C. F.; Winter, O. C.; Vieira Neto, E.

    2003-08-01

    Neste Trabalho estamos investigando regiões do sistema Terra-Lua que contêm órbitas diretas estáveis ao redor da Lua visando a utilização destas órbitas em futuras missões de veículos espaciais como alternativas de trajetórias com baixo custo de manutenção. Adotando-se o problema restrito de três corpos, Terra-Lua-partícula, a localização e a extensão destas regiões de estabilidade foram investigadas numericamente considerando como estável toda órbita que permanece ao redor a Lua por, no mínimo, 1000 dias com energia de dois corpos da partícula em relação à Lua negativa. A estabilidade de tais regiões está associada a duas famílias de órbitas periódicas simples H1 e H2 e a órbitas quase-periódicas associadas a elas. Uma vez identificadas as regiões de estabilidade passamos a analisá-las introduzindo, paulatinamente, outras interações relevantes ao sistema como as perturbações do Sol (via problema restrito de quatro corpos), das marés, da pressão de radiação e do achatamento terrestre. Os resultados encontrados até o momento mostram que a perturbação do Sol é a única que reduz significativamente o tamanho das regiões de estabilidade. Também estamos investigando o comportamento de tais regiões quando características intrínsecas do sistema como as excentricidades das órbitas da Terra e da Lua e a inclinação da órbita Lua são consideradas. Com este estudo estamos reunindo informações que nos permitirão compreender a evolução das regiões de estabilidade no sistema Terra-Lua, bem como estabelecer parâmetros adequados para a utilização das trajetórias estáveis em futuras missões espaciais. Agradecimentos: Este projeto conta com o apoio do CNPq, da Capes e da Fapesp.

  3. DNA ligase I, the replicative DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Howes, Timothy R L; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2012-01-01

    Multiple DNA ligation events are required to join the Okazaki fragments generated during lagging strand DNA synthesis. In eukaryotes, this is primarily carried out by members of the DNA ligase I family. The C-terminal catalytic region of these enzymes is composed of three domains: a DNA binding domain, an adenylation domain and an OB-fold domain. In the absence of DNA, these domains adopt an extended structure but transition into a compact ring structure when they engage a DNA nick, with each of the domains contacting the DNA. The non-catalytic N-terminal region of eukaryotic DNA ligase I is responsible for the specific participation of these enzymes in DNA replication. This proline-rich unstructured region contains the nuclear localization signal and a PCNA interaction motif that is critical for localization to replication foci and efficient joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I initially engages the PCNA trimer via this interaction motif which is located at the extreme N-terminus of this flexible region. It is likely that this facilitates an additional interaction between the DNA binding domain and the PCNA ring. The similar size and shape of the rings formed by the PCNA trimer and the DNA ligase I catalytic region when it engages a DNA nick suggest that these proteins interact to form a double-ring structure during the joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I also interacts with replication factor C, the factor that loads the PCNA trimeric ring onto DNA. This interaction, which is regulated by phosphorylation of the non-catalytic N-terminus of DNA ligase I, also appears to be critical for DNA replication.

  4. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  5. Cryo-EM structures and atomic model of the HIV-1 strand transfer complex intasome.

    PubMed

    Passos, Dario Oliveira; Li, Min; Yang, Renbin; Rebensburg, Stephanie V; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Jeon, Youngmin; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Craigie, Robert; Lyumkis, Dmitry

    2017-01-06

    Like all retroviruses, HIV-1 irreversibly inserts a viral DNA (vDNA) copy of its RNA genome into host target DNA (tDNA). The intasome, a higher-order nucleoprotein complex composed of viral integrase (IN) and the ends of linear vDNA, mediates integration. Productive integration into host chromatin results in the formation of the strand transfer complex (STC) containing catalytically joined vDNA and tDNA. HIV-1 intasomes have been refractory to high-resolution structural studies. We used a soluble IN fusion protein to facilitate structural studies, through which we present a high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the core tetrameric HIV-1 STC and a higher-order form that adopts carboxyl-terminal domain rearrangements. The distinct STC structures highlight how HIV-1 can use the common retroviral intasome core architecture to accommodate different IN domain modules for assembly.

  6. Systematical investigation of binding interaction between novel ruthenium(II) arene complex with curcumin analogs and ctDNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shan; Liang, Yu; Huang, Chusheng; Su, Wei; Lei, Xiaolin; Liu, Yi; Xiao, Qi

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the interaction between a novel ruthenium(II) arene complex with curcumin analogs and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) was investigated systematically by viscosity measurement, the DNA melting approach, multispectroscopic techniques and electrochemical methods. The absorption spectra of the ctDNA-drug complex showed a slight red shift and a weak hypochromic effect. The relative viscosity and melting temperature of ctDNA increased on addition of the drug. The evidence obtained from fluorescence competitive experiments indicated that the binding mode of the drug with ctDNA was intercalative. Using acridine orange (AO) as a fluorescence probe, the drug statically quenched the fluorescence of the ctDNA-AO complex, and hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions played vital roles in the binding interaction between the drug and ctDNA. The influences of ionic strength, chemical denaturants and pH on the binding interaction were also investigated. Circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectra suggested that this drug might bond with the G-C base pairs of ctDNA and the right-handed B-form helicity of ctDNA remained after drug binding. The intercalative binding between the drug and ctDNA was further investigated using electrochemical techniques. All these results suggested that the biological activity of ctDNA was affected by ruthenium(II) arene complex with curcumin analogs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps = 0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps = 0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps = 0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on

  8. Synthesis of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2008-11-18

    A method of synthesizing a desired double-stranded DNA of a predetermined length and of a predetermined sequence. Preselected sequence segments that will complete the desired double-stranded DNA are determined. Preselected segment sequences of DNA that will be used to complete the desired double-stranded DNA are provided. The preselected segment sequences of DNA are assembled to produce the desired double-stranded DNA.

  9. LDEF: Dosimetric measurement results (AO 138-7 experiment)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourrieau, J.

    1993-01-01

    One of the objectives of the AO 138-7 experiment on board the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was a total dose measurement with Thermo Luminescent Detectors (TLD 100). Two identical packages, both of them including five TLD's inside various aluminum shields, are exposed to the space environment in order to obtain the absorbed dose profile. Radiation fluence received during the total mission length was computed, taking into account the trapped particles (AE8 and AP8 models during solar maximum and minimum periods) and the cosmic rays; due to the magnetospheric shielding the solar proton fluences are negligible on the LDEF orbit. The total dose induced by these radiations inside a semi infinite plane shield of aluminum are computed with the radiation transport codes available at DERTS. The dose profile obtained is in good agreement with the evaluation by E.V. Benton. TLD readings are performed after flight; due to the mission duration increase a post flight calibration was necessary in order to cover the range of the in flight induced dose. The results obtained, similar (plus or minus 30 percent) for both packages, are compared with the dose profile computation. For thick shields it seems that the measurements exceed the forecast (about 40 percent). That can be due to a cosmic ray and trapped proton contributions coming from the backside (assumed as perfectly shielded by the LDEF structure in the computation), or to an underestimate of the proton or cosmic ray fluences. A fine structural shielding analysis should be necessary in order to determine the origin of this slight discrepancy between forecast and in flight measurements. For the less shielded dosimeters, mainly exposed to the trapped electron flux, a slight overestimation of the dose (less than 40 percent) appears. Due to the dispersion of the TLD's response, this cannot be confirmed. In practice these results obtained on board LDEF, with less than a factor 1.4 between measurements and forecast

  10. Bringing the Visible Universe into Focus with Robo-AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas M.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh P.; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol K.; Davis, Jack T. C.; Dekany, Richard G.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Morton, Timothy D.; Ofek, Eran O.; Punnadi, Sujit

    2013-02-01

    focus a high-power laser beam in the direction of the astronomical target to create an artificial reference of known shape, also known as a 'laser guide star'. The Robo-AO laser adaptive optics system employs a 10-W ultraviolet laser focused at a distance of 10 km to generate a laser guide star. Wavefront sensor measurements of the laser guide star drive the adaptive optics correction resulting in diffraction-limited images that have an angular resolution of ~0.1 arc seconds on a 1.5-m telescope.

  11. Bringing the visible universe into focus with Robo-AO.

    PubMed

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas M; Ramaprakash, A N; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh P; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol K; Davis, Jack T C; Dekany, Richard G; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Morton, Timothy D; Ofek, Eran O; Punnadi, Sujit

    2013-02-12

    a high-power laser beam in the direction of the astronomical target to create an artificial reference of known shape, also known as a 'laser guide star'. The Robo-AO laser adaptive optics system, employs a 10-W ultraviolet laser focused at a distance of 10 km to generate a laser guide star. Wavefront sensor measurements of the laser guide star drive the adaptive optics correction resulting in diffraction-limited images that have an angular resolution of ~0.1 arc seconds on a 1.5-m telescope.

  12. Bringing the Visible Universe into Focus with Robo-AO

    PubMed Central

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas M.; Ramaprakash, A.N.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh P.; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol K.; Davis, Jack T.C.; Dekany, Richard G.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Morton, Timothy D.; Ofek, Eran O.; Punnadi, Sujit

    2013-01-01

    focus a high-power laser beam in the direction of the astronomical target to create an artificial reference of known shape, also known as a 'laser guide star'. The Robo-AO laser adaptive optics system2,3 employs a 10-W ultraviolet laser focused at a distance of 10 km to generate a laser guide star. Wavefront sensor measurements of the laser guide star drive the adaptive optics correction resulting in diffraction-limited images that have an angular resolution of ~0.1 arc seconds on a 1.5-m telescope. PMID:23426078

  13. LDEF: Dosimetric measurement results (AO 138-7 experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrieau, J.

    1993-04-01

    One of the objectives of the AO 138-7 experiment on board the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was a total dose measurement with Thermo Luminescent Detectors (TLD 100). Two identical packages, both of them including five TLD's inside various aluminum shields, are exposed to the space environment in order to obtain the absorbed dose profile. Radiation fluence received during the total mission length was computed, taking into account the trapped particles (AE8 and AP8 models during solar maximum and minimum periods) and the cosmic rays; due to the magnetospheric shielding the solar proton fluences are negligible on the LDEF orbit. The total dose induced by these radiations inside a semi infinite plane shield of aluminum are computed with the radiation transport codes available at DERTS. The dose profile obtained is in good agreement with the evaluation by E.V. Benton. TLD readings are performed after flight; due to the mission duration increase a post flight calibration was necessary in order to cover the range of the in flight induced dose. The results obtained, similar (plus or minus 30 percent) for both packages, are compared with the dose profile computation. For thick shields it seems that the measurements exceed the forecast (about 40 percent). That can be due to a cosmic ray and trapped proton contributions coming from the backside (assumed as perfectly shielded by the LDEF structure in the computation), or to an underestimate of the proton or cosmic ray fluences. A fine structural shielding analysis should be necessary in order to determine the origin of this slight discrepancy between forecast and in flight measurements. For the less shielded dosimeters, mainly exposed to the trapped electron flux, a slight overestimation of the dose (less than 40 percent) appears. Due to the dispersion of the TLD's response, this cannot be confirmed. In practice these results obtained on board LDEF, with less than a factor 1.4 between measurements and forecast

  14. The EM Earthquake Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. B., II; Saxton, P. T.

    2013-12-01

    Many attempts have been made to determine a sound forecasting method regarding earthquakes and warn the public in turn. Presently, the animal kingdom leads the precursor list alluding to a transmission related source. By applying the animal-based model to an electromagnetic (EM) wave model, various hypotheses were formed, but the most interesting one required the use of a magnetometer with a differing design and geometry. To date, numerous, high-end magnetometers have been in use in close proximity to fault zones for potential earthquake forecasting; however, something is still amiss. The problem still resides with what exactly is forecastable and the investigating direction of EM. After the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake, American earthquake investigators predetermined magnetometer use and a minimum earthquake magnitude necessary for EM detection. This action was set in motion, due to the extensive damage incurred and public outrage concerning earthquake forecasting; however, the magnetometers employed, grounded or buried, are completely subject to static and electric fields and have yet to correlate to an identifiable precursor. Secondly, there is neither a networked array for finding any epicentral locations, nor have there been any attempts to find even one. This methodology needs dismissal, because it is overly complicated, subject to continuous change, and provides no response time. As for the minimum magnitude threshold, which was set at M5, this is simply higher than what modern technological advances have gained. Detection can now be achieved at approximately M1, which greatly improves forecasting chances. A propagating precursor has now been detected in both the field and laboratory. Field antenna testing conducted outside the NE Texas town of Timpson in February, 2013, detected three strong EM sources along with numerous weaker signals. The antenna had mobility, and observations were noted for recurrence, duration, and frequency response. Next, two

  15. DNA encoding a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-08-15

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  16. DNA systematics. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: PLANTS: PLANT DNA: Contents and Systematics. Repeated DNA Sequences and Polyploidy in Cereal Crops. Homology of Nonrepeated DNA Sequences in Phylogeny of Fungal Species. Chloropast DNA and Phylogenetic Relationships. rDNA: Evolution Over a Billion Years. 23S rRNA-derived Small Ribosomal RNAs: Their Structure and Evolution with Reference to Plant Phylogeny. Molecular Analysis of Plant DNA Genomes: Conserved and Diverged DNA Sequences. A Critical Review of Some Terminologies Used for Additional DNA in Plant Chromosomes and Index.

  17. Robo-AO: The First Autonomous Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System for Small Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, Reed L.; Baranec, C.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Law, N.; Tendulkar, S.; Kulkarni, S.; Bui, K.; Burse, M.; Chordia, P.; Das, H.; Dekany, R.; Kasliwal, M.; Ofek, E.; Zolkower, J.

    2011-01-01

    Robo-AO will be the first fully autonomous laser guide star adaptive optics and science system. Specifically designed to take advantage of small (1 to 3 meter) telescopes, Robo-AO will deliver high angular resolution science in the visible and near infrared for up to hundreds of targets per night. This will enable the exploration of science programs not practical for larger aperture adaptive optics systems. This presentation discusses the current status of the Robo-AO project, including the laboratory testbed, laser guide star facility and plans for a demonstration of the fully autonomous system next year.

  18. Vibrations in MagAO: resonance sources identification and first approaches for modeling and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcés, Javier; Zúñiga, Sebastián.; Close, Laird; Males, Jared; Morzinski, Katie; Escárate, Pedro; Castro, Mario; Marchioni, José; Rojas, Diego

    2016-07-01

    The Magellan Telescope Adaptive Optics System (MagAO) is subject to resonance effects induced by elements within the system instrumentation, such as fans and cooling pumps. Normalized PSDs are obtained through frequency-based analysis of closed-loop on-sky data, detecting and measuring vibration effects. Subsequently, a space-state model for the AO loop is obtained, using a standard AO loop scheme with an integrator-based controller and including the vibration effects as disturbances. Finally, a new control alternative is proposed, focusing on residual phase variance minimization through the design and simulation of an optimal LQG control approach.

  19. Molecular DNA switches and DNA chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Berkey, Cristin; Lavi, Uri; Cantor, Charles R.; Smith, Cassandra L.

    1999-06-01

    We present an assay to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms on a chip using molecular DNA switches and isothermal rolling- circle amplification. The basic principle behind the switch is an allele-specific oligonucleotide circularization, mediated by DNA ligase. A DNA switch is closed when perfect hybridization between the probe oligonucleotide and target DNA allows ligase to covalently circularize the probe. Mismatches around the ligation site prevent probe circularization, resulting in an open switch. DNA polymerase is then used to preferentially amplify the closed switches, via rolling-circle amplification. The stringency of the molecular switches yields 102 - 103 fold discrimination between matched and mismatched sequences.

  20. EMS & the DEA.

    PubMed

    Beeson, Jeff; Ayres, Chris

    2010-01-01

    It's clear that EMS medical directors and management staff must be vigilant in their oversight of implementation, administration and monitoring of controlled substances within their agencies to best serve the public and avoid running afoul of investigation and incurring significant penalties. Those potentially affected by the need for individual registrations of both emergency vehicles and central inventory systems should carefully monitor upcoming developments in the interpretation od DEA regulations.

  1. Acridine orange--its use in the specific staining of DNA in mammalian tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Dutt, M K

    1981-01-01

    This paper reports on a new method for the use of acridine orange (AO) in an aqueous solution at pH 4.5 for staining DNA of rat tissue sections from which RNA has been extracted selectively with cold phosphoric acid. Not only this, AO can also be used as dye-SO2 reagent, prepared with NHCl and potassium metabisulphite, for staining DNA-aldehyde molecules of acid-hydrolysed tissue sections. AO samples, manufactured by the National Aniline Division as well as by G. T. Gurr have been used with equal success. Studies of stained sections under light microscope reveal the presence of specifically stained yellowish-orange nuclei. Those sections under fluorescent microscope with proper exciter and barrier filters reveal nuclei of maroon colour. The in situ absorption spectra of nuclei stained with AO-SO2 following acid-hydrolysis of tissue sections as well as those of nuclei stained with an aqueous solution of the dye following extraction of RNA have been presented herein. The mode of binding in the former case has been considered to be due to binding of the teritary amino group of the dye molecules with the DNA-aldehyde molecules and in the latter case to be due to electrostatic binding between the positively charged dye molecules with negatively charged phosphate groups of DNA. Implications of all these findings have been discussed.

  2. DNA vaccines: a simple DNA sensing matter?

    PubMed

    Coban, Cevayir; Kobiyama, Kouji; Jounai, Nao; Tozuka, Miyuki; Ishii, Ken J

    2013-10-01

    Since the introduction of DNA vaccines two decades ago, this attractive strategy has been hampered by its low immunogenicity in humans. Studies conducted to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines have shown that understanding the mechanism of action of DNA vaccines might be the key to successfully improving their immunogenicity. Our current understanding is that DNA vaccines induce innate and adaptive immune responses in two ways: (1) encoded protein (or polypeptide) antigen(s) by the DNA plasmid can be expressed in stromal cells (i.e., muscle cells) as well as DCs, where these antigens are processed and presented to naïve CD4 or CD8 T cells either by direct or cross presentation, respectively; and (2) the transfected DNA plasmid itself may bind to an un-identified cytosolic DNA sensor and activate the TBK1-STING pathway and the production of type I interferons (IFNs) which function as an adjuvant. Recent studies investigating double-stranded cytosolic DNA sensor(s) have highlighted new mechanisms in which cytosolic DNA may release secondary metabolites, which are in turn recognized by a novel DNA sensing machinery. Here, we discuss these new metabolites and the possibilities of translating this knowledge into improved immunogenicity for DNA vaccines.

  3. DNA Repair by Reversal of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chengqi; He, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous factors constantly challenge cellular DNA, generating cytotoxic and/or mutagenic DNA adducts. As a result, organisms have evolved different mechanisms to defend against the deleterious effects of DNA damage. Among these diverse repair pathways, direct DNA-repair systems provide cells with simple yet efficient solutions to reverse covalent DNA adducts. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the field of direct DNA repair, namely, photolyase-, alkyltransferase-, and dioxygenase-mediated repair processes. We present specific examples to describe new findings of known enzymes and appealing discoveries of new proteins. At the end of this article, we also briefly discuss the influence of direct DNA repair on other fields of biology and its implication on the discovery of new biology. PMID:23284047

  4. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray B12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray B12 The prelaunch photograph shows the six (6) inch deep Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) master control tray. The tray has three (3) mounting/cover plates elevated on fiberglass stand-offs to provide clearance and protection for hardware and electronics located underneath. The stand-offs also raise the plates to a level that minimizes shading of detectors by the tray sidewalls. The mounting plate located at the left hand end of the tray is populated with eighty (80) metaloxide-silicon (MOS) capacitor-type impact sensors and one (1) solar sensor that is located approximately in the center of the mounting plate. The IDE sensors are two (2) inch diameter MOS capacitor structures approximately 250 um thick. The detectors are formed by growing either 0.4um or 1.0um thick silicon oxide, SiO2, layer on the 250um thick, B-doped polished silicon wafer. The top metal contact, the visible surface, was formed by vapor deposition of 1000A of aluminum on the SiO2 surface. Aluminum was also vapor deposited on the backside to form the contact with the silicon substrate. Gold wires are bonded to the front and back aluminum layers for use in connecting the detectors to the circuits. The complete wafers, IDE detectors, are mounted on chromic anodized aluminum frames by bonding the detector backside to the aluminum frame with a space qualified RTV silicon adhesive, de-volatized RTV-511. The difference in colors of the detectors is caused by reflections in the metallized surfaces. A reflection of one of the technicians is visible in the three (3) rows of detector on the left hand side of the mounting plate. The solar sensor, located at the mounting plate center, consist of four (4) silicon solar cells connected in series and associated circuity bonded to an aluminum baseplate. The solar sensor registered each orbital sunrise independant of LDEF orientation at the time of sunrise. When IDE solar sensor data from the six

  5. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to the DNA mapping and sequencing technologies. In particular, the present invention provides enhanced methods and compositions for the physical mapping and positional cloning of genomic DNA. The present invention also provides a useful analytical technique to directly map cloned DNA sequences onto individual stretched DNA molecules.

  6. Closeup of CO172AO8, showing section of building 211 closest to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up of CO-172-AO-8, showing section of building 211 closest to building 206. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Quartermaster's Storehouse, Southwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Robo-AO: An Autonomous Laser Adaptive Optics and Science System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Law, Nicholas; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Dekany, Richard; Bui, Khanh; Davis, Jack; Zolkower, Jeff; Fucik, Jason; Burse, Mahesh; Das, Hillol; Chordia, Pravin; Kasliwal, Mansi; Ofek, Eran; Morton, Timothy; Johnson, John

    2011-07-01

    Robo-AO, a fully autonomous, laser guide star adaptive optics and science system, is being commissioned at Palomar Observatory's 60-inch telescope. Here we discuss the instrument, scientific goals and results of initial on-sky operation.

  8. Te Ao Kori as Expressive Movement in Aotearoa New Zealand Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE): A Narrative Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legge, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    A unique aspect of Aotearoa/New Zealand physical education is the inclusion of Maori culture in the form of te ao kori. Te ao kori translates to mean the world of movement and is represented by the interpretation of indigenous movement, games and pastimes. Participation in te ao kori means the sports-based normative frame of reference for physical…

  9. Poxvirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses are large, enveloped viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm and encode proteins for DNA replication and gene expression. Hairpin ends link the two strands of the linear, double-stranded DNA genome. Viral proteins involved in DNA synthesis include a 117-kDa polymerase, a helicase–primase, a uracil DNA glycosylase, a processivity factor, a single-stranded DNA-binding protein, a protein kinase, and a DNA ligase. A viral FEN1 family protein participates in double-strand break repair. The DNA is replicated as long concatemers that are resolved by a viral Holliday junction endonuclease. PMID:23838441

  10. Visualization of Bacteriophage T3 Capsids with DNA Incompletely Packaged In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ping-An; Wright, Elena T.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Hakala, Kevin; Wu, Weimin; Serwer, Philip; Jiang, Wen

    2009-01-01

    The tightly packaged dsDNA genome in the mature particles of many tailed bacteriophages has been shown to form multiple concentric rings when reconstructed from cryo-electron micrographs. However, recent single-particle DNA packaging force measurements have suggested that incompletely packaged DNA (ipDNA) is less ordered when it is shorter than ∼25% of the full genome length. The study presented here initially achieves both the isolation and the ipDNA length-based fractionation of ipDNA-containing T3 phage capsids (ipDNA-capsids) produced by DNA packaging in vivo; some ipDNA has quantized lengths, as judged by high-resolution gel electrophoresis of expelled DNA. This is the first isolation of such particles among the tailed dsDNA bacteriophages. The ipDNA-capsids are a minor component (containing ∼10-4 of packaged DNA in all particles) and are initially detected by non-denaturing gel electrophoresis after partial purification by buoyant density centrifugation. The primary contaminants are aggregates of phage particles and empty capsids. This study then investigates ipDNA conformations by the first cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) of ipDNA-capsids produced in vivo. The 3-D structures of DNA-free capsids, ipDNA-capsids with various lengths of ipDNA, and mature bacteriophage are reconstructed, which reveals the typical T=7l icosahedral shell of many tailed dsDNA bacteriophages. Though the icosahedral shell structures of these capsids are indistinguishable at the current resolution for the protein shell (∼15 Å), the conformations of the DNA inside the shell are drastically different. T3 ipDNA-capsids with 10.6 kb or shorter dsDNA (<28% of total genome) have an ipDNA conformation indistinguishable from random. However, T3 ipDNA-capsids with 22 kb DNA (58% of total genome) forms a single DNA ring next to the inner surface of the capsid shell. In contrast, dsDNA fully packaged (38.2 kb) in mature T3 phage particles forms multiple concentric rings like those seen

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Robo-AO Kepler planetary candidate survey. II. (Baranec+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, C.; Ziegler, C.; Law, N. M.; Morton, T.; Riddle, R.; Atkinson, D.; Schonhut, J.; Crepp, J.

    2016-10-01

    We selected targets that we had not previously observed from the KOI Catalog based on the Q1-Q12 Kepler data (Rowe et al. 2015, Cat. J/ApJS/217/16). These targets were added to the Robo-AO intelligent observing queue and observed during the summer of 2013. We obtained high angular resolution images of 956 Kepler planet candidate host stars with the Robo-AO robotic laser AOs system over the course of 19 nights between 2013 July 21 and 2013 October 25, detailed in Table5. We also include 13 images from 2012 (2012 July 16-September 13) that required additional confirmation of the KOI position in the Robo-AO field of view. All the observations were performed in a queue-scheduled mode in combination with other science programs using the Robo-AO autonomous laser AO system mounted on the robotic 1.5m telescope at Palomar Observatory (exposure time: 90s; observation wavelengths: 600-950nm; FWHM resolution: 0.12''-0.15''; field of view: 44''*44''; pixel scale: 43.1mas/pix; detector format: 10242 pixels; targets observed/hour: 20). We obtained images of 50 KOIs with the NIRC2 instrument behind the Keck II AO system that were previously observed with Robo-AO and had evidence of a companion. Observations were conducted on 2013 June 25, 2013 August 24 and 25, 2014 August 17, and 2015 July 25 in the K, Ks, or Kp filters, and in the narrow mode of NIRC2 (9.952mas/pixel). (4 data files).

  12. Thin glass shells for AO: from plano to off-axis aspherics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harel, Emmanuelle; Anretar, Alain; Antelme, Jean-Pierre; Caillon, Stéphane; Dussourd, Adrien; Foucaud, Guillaume; Jaury, Hervé; Roure, Océane; William, Jean-Philippe; Wuillaume, Philippe; Ruch, Eric; Geyl, Roland

    2016-07-01

    Reosc has been working on thin glass shells for many years and was recently selected by ESO for the production of the E-ELT M4 mirror thin glass shells. Previously Reosc also produced the aspheric thin shell for the VLT-M2 AO Facility. Based on this experience we will discuss how off axis thin glass shells can be made for the next generation AO systems like the GMT one.

  13. East Asian winter temperature variation associated with the combined effects of AO and WP pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Jin; Ahn, Joong-Bae

    2016-04-01

    The combined effects of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and Western Pacific (WP) teleconnection pattern on the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) over the last 56 years (1958/59-2013/2014) were investigated using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data (Park and Ahn, 2015). The study results revealed that the effect of the AO on winter temperature in East Asia could be changed depending on the phases of the WP pattern in the North Pacific. The negative relationship between the EAWM and the AO increased when the AO and WP were in-phase with each other. Hence, when winter negative (positive) AO was accompanied by negative (positive) WP, negative (positive) temperature anomalies were dominant across the entire East Asia region. Conversely, when the AO and WP were of-of-phase, the winter temperature anomaly in East Asia did not show distinct changes. Furthermore, from the perspective of stationary planetary waves, the zonal wavenumber-2 patterns of sea level pressure and geopotential height at 500hPa circulation strengthened when the AO and WP were in-phase but were not significant for the out-of-phase condition. It explained the possible mechanism of the combined effects of the AO and WP on the circulation related to EAWM. Reference Park, H.-J., and J.-B. Ahn (2015) Combined effect of the Arctic Oscillation and the Western Pacific pattern on East Asia winter temperature, Clim. Dyn. DOI:10.1007/s00382-015-2763-2. Acknowledgements This work was funded by the Korea Meteorological Administration Research and Development Program under grant KMIPA2015-2081.

  14. OPERA, an automatic PSF reconstruction software for Shack-Hartmann AO systems: application to Altair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolissaint, Laurent; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Marino, Jose

    2004-10-01

    When doing high angular resolution imaging with adaptive optics (AO), it is of crucial importance to have an accurate knowledge of the point spread function associated with each observation. Applications are numerous: image contrast enhancement by deconvolution, improved photometry and astrometry, as well as real time AO performance evaluation. In this paper, we present our work on automatic PSF reconstruction based on control loop data, acquired simultaneously with the observation. This problem has already been solved for curvature AO systems. To adapt this method to another type of WFS, a specific analytical noise propagation model must be established. For the Shack-Hartmann WFS, we are able to derive a very accurate estimate of the noise on each slope measurement, based on the covariances of the WFS CCD pixel values in the corresponding sub-aperture. These covariances can be either derived off-line from telemetry data, or calculated by the AO computer during the acquisition. We present improved methods to determine 1) r0 from the DM drive commands, which includes an estimation of the outer scale L0 2) the contribution of the high spatial frequency component of the turbulent phase, which is not corrected by the AO system and is scaled by r0. This new method has been implemented in an IDL-based software called OPERA (Performance of Adaptive Optics). We have tested OPERA on Altair, the recently commissioned Gemini-North AO system, and present our preliminary results. We also summarize the AO data required to run OPERA on any other AO system.

  15. Estudo comparativo entre estrelas centrais de nebulosas planetárias deficientes em hidrogênio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolino, W. L. F.; de Araújo, F. X.

    2003-08-01

    Apresentamos neste trabalho o resultado de um estudo das principais características espectrais das estrelas centrais de nebulosas planetárias (ECNP) deficientes em hidrogênio. A origem e a evolução dessas estrelas ainda constitui um problema em aberto na evolução estelar. Geralmente esses objetos são divididos em [WCE], [WCL] e [WELS]. Os tipos [WCE] e [WCL] apresentam um espectro típico de uma estrela Wolf-Rayet carbonada de população I e as [WELS] apresentam linhas fracas de carbono e oxigênio em emissão. Existem evidências que apontam a seguinte sequência evolutiva : [WCL] = > [WCE] = > [WELS] = > PG 1159 (pré anã-branca). No entanto, tal cenário apresenta falhas como por exemplo a falta de ECNP entre os tipos [WCL] e [WCE]. Baseados em uma amostra de 24 objetos obtida no telescópio de 1.52m em La Silla, Chile (acordo ESO/ON), ao longo do ano 2000, apresentamos os resultados da comparação das larguras equivalentes de diversas linhas relevantes entre os tipos [WCL], [WCE] e [WELS]. Verificamos que nossos dados estão de acordo com a sequência evolutiva. Baseado nas linhas de C IV, conseguimos dividir pela primeira vez as [WELS] em dois grupos principais. Além disso, os dados reforçam a afirmação de que as [WCE] são as estrelas que possuem a maior temperatura entre as ECNP deficientes em hidrogênio. Discutimos ainda, a escassez de dados disponíveis na literatura e a necessidade da obtenção de parametros físicos para estes objetos.

  16. Sobre o uso das séries de Puiseux em mecanica celeste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloni, O. I.

    2003-08-01

    Neste trabalho é apresentada uma demonstração do uso dos diferentes desenvolvimentos em séries para as equações de perturbação em Mecânica Celeste no marco Hamiltoniano. Em trabalhos clássicos como os de Poincaré (Poincaré, 1893) por exemplo, já esta planteado o uso de potências não inteiras no pequeno parâmetro, o que evidencia a não analiticidade das funções quando uma ressonância ocorre. Nestes trabalhos os desenvolvimentos são na raíz quadrada da massa de Júpiter (o pequeno parâmetro). Mais recentemente (Ferraz-Mello, 1985) outros tipos de desenvolvimentos foram aplicados modificando substancialmente as ordens de grandeza e a velocidade de convergência das séries. Com esta abordagem, os desenvolvimentos foram expressados em termos da raíz cúbica do pequeno parâmetro. Neste trabalho apresentamos um enfoque geral, onde os diferentes tipos de desenvolvimentos em séries de Puiseux (Valiron, 1950) são obtidos a partir da aplicação de Teorema de Preparação de Weierstrass (Goursat, 1916) considerando a equação de Hamilton-Jacobi como uma equação algébrica. Os resultados são aplicados ao problema restrito dos três corpos em ressonância de primeira ordem e, dependendo da grandeza da excentricidade do asteróide em relação à de Júpiter, obtemos os diferentes desenvolvimentos, em raíz quadrada ou raíz cúbica da massa de Júpiter.

  17. Robo-AO: Initial results from the first autonomous laser guide star adaptive optics instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, R.; Baranec, C.; Law, N. M.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Tendulkar, S.; Hogstrom, K.; Bui, K.; Burse, M.; Chordia, P.; Das, H.; Dekany, R.; Kulkarni, S.; Punnadi, S.; Smith, R.

    2014-03-01

    Large surveys, such as the Kepler mission and Palomar Transient Factory, are discovering upwards of thousands of objects which require further characterization at angular resolutions significantly finer than normally allowed by atmospheric seeing. The demands on precious space-based observatories (i.e. Hubble Space Telescope) and large telescopes with adaptive optics (AO) systems (i.e. Keck, VLT, Gemini) leave them generally unavailable for high angular resolution surveys of more than a few hundred targets at a time. To address the gap between scientific objects and available telescopes, we have developed Robo-AO, the first robotic laser AO system, as an economical and efficient imaging instrument for the more readily available 1-3 m class telescopes. The Robo-AO system system demonstrates angular resolutions approaching the visible diffraction limit of the Palomar 60-inch telescope. Observations of over 200 stellar objects per night have routinely been performed, with target-to-target observation overheads of less than 1.5 minutes. Scientific programs requiring high-resolution follow-up characterization of several thousands of targets can thus be executed in mere weeks, and Robo-AO has already completed the three largest AO surveys to date.

  18. Elevated ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) in nelfinavir mesylate (Viracept®, Roche): overview

    PubMed Central

    Pozniak, Anton; Müller, Lutz; Salgo, Miklos; Jones, Judith K; Larson, Peter; Tweats, David

    2009-01-01

    Roche's protease inhibitor nelfinavir mesylate (Viracept®) produced between March 2007-June 2007 was found to contain elevated levels of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), a known mutagen (alkylator) – leading to a global recall of the drug. EMS levels in a daily dose (2,500 mg Viracept/day) were predicted not to exceed a dose of ~2.75 mg/day (~0.055 mg/kg/day based on 50 kg patient). As existing toxicology data on EMS did not permit an adequate patient risk assessment, a comprehensive animal toxicology evaluation of EMS was conducted. General toxicity of EMS was investigated in rats over 28 days. Two studies for DNA damage were performed in mice; chromosomal damage was assessed using a micronucleus assay and gene mutations were detected using the MutaMouse transgenic model. In addition, experiments designed to extrapolate animal exposure to humans were undertaken. A general toxicity study showed that the toxicity of EMS occurred only at doses ≥ 60 mg/kg/day, which is far above that received by patients. Studies for chromosomal damage and mutations in mice demonstrated a clear threshold effect with EMS at 25 mg/kg/day, under chronic dosing conditions. Exposure analysis (Cmax) demonstrated that ~370-fold higher levels of EMS than that ingested by patients, are needed to saturate known, highly conserved, error-free, mammalian DNA repair mechanisms for alkylation. In summary, animal studies suggested that patients who took nelfinavir mesylate with elevated levels of EMS are at no increased risk for carcinogenicity or teratogenicity over their background risk, since mutations are prerequisites for such downstream events. These findings are potentially relevant to >40 marketed drugs that are mesylate salts. PMID:19660105

  19. Why do Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Professionals Leave EMS?

    PubMed

    Blau, Gary; Chapman, Susan A

    2016-12-01

    The objective was to determine why Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)-Basics and Paramedics leave the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) workforce. Data were collected through annual surveys of nationally registered EMT-Basics and Paramedics from 1999 to 2008. Survey items dealing with satisfaction with the EMS profession, likelihood of leaving the profession, and likelihood of leaving their EMS job were assessed for both EMT-Basics and Paramedics, along with reasons for leaving the profession. Individuals whose responses indicated that they were not working in EMS were mailed a special exit survey to determine the reasons for leaving EMS. The likelihood of leaving the profession in the next year was low for both EMT-Basics and Paramedics. Although overall satisfaction levels with the profession were high, EMT-Basics were significantly more satisfied than Paramedics. The most important reasons for leaving the profession were choosing to pursue further education and moving to a new location. A desire for better pay and benefits was a significantly more important reason for EMT-Paramedics' exit decisions than for EMT-Basics. Given the anticipated increased demand for EMS professionals in the next decade, continued study of issues associated with retention is strongly recommended. Some specific recommendations and suggestions for promoting retention are provided. Blau G , Chapman SA . Why do Emergency Medical Services (EMS) professionals leave EMS? Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016;31(Suppl. 1):s105-s111.

  20. DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-09-18

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span.

  1. DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2015-01-01

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span. PMID:26385091

  2. DNA degradation with ozone.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Franco

    2006-05-30

    DNA was ozonized in solution and the reaction was followed with polarimetry and with iodimetry. Polarimetry was used to determine the molar ratio DNA/O(3) when the DNA optical activity vanishes completely. At a molar ratio DNA/O(3)=2.3 the supramolecular structure of DNA collapses completely. Instead, iodimetry shows that the ozonolysis proceeds until all the nucleobases have been destroyed, an event which occurs at a molar ratio DNA/O(3)=1.1. The ozonolysis of DNA was also followed spectrophotometrically. DNA is reactive with ozone also in the solid state, as fixed bed. Clear indication about its oxidation derives from the FT-IR spectra from polarimetric measurements and from thermal analysis performed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermogravimetric analysis (DTG) and from differential thermal analysis (DTA). Particular remarkable is the fact that RNA has been found much less reactive toward ozone in the solid state than DNA.

  3. Mammalian DNA helicase.

    PubMed Central

    Hübscher, U; Stalder, H P

    1985-01-01

    A forked DNA was constructed to serve as a substrate for DNA helicases. It contains features closely resembling a natural replication fork. The DNA was prepared in large amounts and was used to assay displacement activity during isolation from calf thymus DNA polymerases alpha holoenzyme. One form of DNA polymerase alpha holoenzyme is possibly involved leading strand replication at the replication fork and possesses DNA dependent ATPase activity (Ottiger, H.-P. and Hübscher, U. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 3993-3997). The enzyme can be separated from DNA polymerase alpha by velocity sedimentation in conditions of very low ionic strength and then be purified by chromatography on Sephacryl S-200 and ATP-agarose. At all stages of purification, DNA dependent ATPase and displacement activity profiles were virtually superimposable. The DNA dependent ATPase can displace a hybridized DNA fragment with a short single-stranded tail at its 3'hydroxyl end only in the presence of ATP, and this displacement relies on ATP hydrolysis. Furthermore, homogeneous single-stranded binding proteins from calf thymus as well as from other tissues cannot perform this displacement reaction. By all this token the DNA dependent ATPase appears to be a DNA helicase. It is suggested that this DNA helicase might act in concert with DNA polymerase alpha at the leading strand, possibly pushing the replication fork ahead of the polymerase. Images PMID:3162158

  4. New branched DNA constructs.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Madhavaiah; Keller, Sascha; Gloeckner, Christian; Bornemann, Benjamin; Marx, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The Watson-Crick base pairing of DNA is an advantageous phenomenon that can be exploited when using DNA as a scaffold for directed self-organization of nanometer-sized objects. Several reports have appeared in the literature that describe the generation of branched DNA (bDNA) with variable numbers of arms that self-assembles into predesigned architectures. These bDNA units are generated by using cleverly designed rigid crossover DNA molecules. Alternatively, bDNA can be generated by using synthetic branch points derived from either nucleoside or non-nucleoside building blocks. Branched DNA has scarcely been explored for use in nanotechnology or from self-assembling perspectives. Herein, we wish to report our results for the synthesis, characterization, and assembling properties of asymmetrical bDNA molecules that are able to generate linear and circular bDNA constructs. Our strategy for the generation of bDNA is based on a branching point that makes use of a novel protecting-group strategy. The bDNA units were generated by means of automated DNA synthesis methods and were used to generate novel objects by employing chemical and biological techniques. The entities generated might be useful building blocks for DNA-based nanobiotechnology.

  5. Review of adaptive optics OCT (AO-OCT): principles and applications for retinal imaging [Invited

    PubMed Central

    Pircher, Michael; Zawadzki, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    In vivo imaging of the human retina with a resolution that allows visualization of cellular structures has proven to be essential to broaden our knowledge about the physiology of this precious and very complex neural tissue that enables the first steps in vision. Many pathologic changes originate from functional and structural alterations on a cellular scale, long before any degradation in vision can be noted. Therefore, it is important to investigate these tissues with a sufficient level of detail in order to better understand associated disease development or the effects of therapeutic intervention. Optical retinal imaging modalities rely on the optical elements of the eye itself (mainly the cornea and lens) to produce retinal images and are therefore affected by the specific arrangement of these elements and possible imperfections in curvature. Thus, aberrations are introduced to the imaging light and image quality is degraded. To compensate for these aberrations, adaptive optics (AO), a technology initially developed in astronomy, has been utilized. However, the axial sectioning provided by retinal AO-based fundus cameras and scanning laser ophthalmoscope instruments is limited to tens of micrometers because of the rather small available numerical aperture of the eye. To overcome this limitation and thus achieve much higher axial sectioning in the order of 2-5µm, AO has been combined with optical coherence tomography (OCT) into AO-OCT. This enabled for the first time in vivo volumetric retinal imaging with high isotropic resolution. This article summarizes the technical aspects of AO-OCT and provides an overview on its various implementations and some of its clinical applications. In addition, latest developments in the field, such as computational AO-OCT and wavefront sensor less AO-OCT, are covered. PMID:28663890

  6. Review of adaptive optics OCT (AO-OCT): principles and applications for retinal imaging [Invited].

    PubMed

    Pircher, Michael; Zawadzki, Robert J

    2017-05-01

    In vivo imaging of the human retina with a resolution that allows visualization of cellular structures has proven to be essential to broaden our knowledge about the physiology of this precious and very complex neural tissue that enables the first steps in vision. Many pathologic changes originate from functional and structural alterations on a cellular scale, long before any degradation in vision can be noted. Therefore, it is important to investigate these tissues with a sufficient level of detail in order to better understand associated disease development or the effects of therapeutic intervention. Optical retinal imaging modalities rely on the optical elements of the eye itself (mainly the cornea and lens) to produce retinal images and are therefore affected by the specific arrangement of these elements and possible imperfections in curvature. Thus, aberrations are introduced to the imaging light and image quality is degraded. To compensate for these aberrations, adaptive optics (AO), a technology initially developed in astronomy, has been utilized. However, the axial sectioning provided by retinal AO-based fundus cameras and scanning laser ophthalmoscope instruments is limited to tens of micrometers because of the rather small available numerical aperture of the eye. To overcome this limitation and thus achieve much higher axial sectioning in the order of 2-5µm, AO has been combined with optical coherence tomography (OCT) into AO-OCT. This enabled for the first time in vivo volumetric retinal imaging with high isotropic resolution. This article summarizes the technical aspects of AO-OCT and provides an overview on its various implementations and some of its clinical applications. In addition, latest developments in the field, such as computational AO-OCT and wavefront sensor less AO-OCT, are covered.

  7. Identified EM Earthquake Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kenneth, II; Saxton, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Many attempts have been made to determine a sound forecasting method regarding earthquakes and warn the public in turn. Presently, the animal kingdom leads the precursor list alluding to a transmission related source. By applying the animal-based model to an electromagnetic (EM) wave model, various hypotheses were formed, but the most interesting one required the use of a magnetometer with a differing design and geometry. To date, numerous, high-end magnetometers have been in use in close proximity to fault zones for potential earthquake forecasting; however, something is still amiss. The problem still resides with what exactly is forecastable and the investigating direction of EM. After a number of custom rock experiments, two hypotheses were formed which could answer the EM wave model. The first hypothesis concerned a sufficient and continuous electron movement either by surface or penetrative flow, and the second regarded a novel approach to radio transmission. Electron flow along fracture surfaces was determined to be inadequate in creating strong EM fields, because rock has a very high electrical resistance making it a high quality insulator. Penetrative flow could not be corroborated as well, because it was discovered that rock was absorbing and confining electrons to a very thin skin depth. Radio wave transmission and detection worked with every single test administered. This hypothesis was reviewed for propagating, long-wave generation with sufficient amplitude, and the capability of penetrating solid rock. Additionally, fracture spaces, either air or ion-filled, can facilitate this concept from great depths and allow for surficial detection. A few propagating precursor signals have been detected in the field occurring with associated phases using custom-built loop antennae. Field testing was conducted in Southern California from 2006-2011, and outside the NE Texas town of Timpson in February, 2013. The antennae have mobility and observations were noted for

  8. Amplified DNA Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willner, Itamar; Shlyahovsky, Bella; Willner, Bilha; Zayats, Maya

    Amplified detection of DNA is a central research topic in modern bioanalytical science. Electronic or optical transduction of DNA recognition events provides readout signals for DNA biosensors. Amplification of the DNA analysis is accomplished by the coupling of nucleic acid-functionalized enzymes or nucleic acid-functionalized nanoparticles (NP) as labels for the DNA duplex formation. This chapter discusses the amplified amperometric analysis of DNA by redox enzymes, the amplified optical sensing of DNA by enzymes or DNAzymes, and the amplified voltammetric, optical, or microgravimetric analysis of DNA using metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles. Further approaches to amplify DNA detection involve the use of micro-carriers of redox compounds as labels for DNA complex formation on electrodes, or the use of micro-objects such as liposomes, that label the resulting DNA complexes on electrodes and alter the interfacial properties of the electrodes. Finally, DNA machines are used for the optical detection of DNA, and the systems are suggested as future analytical procedures that could substitute the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process.

  9. Immune protection of microneme 7 (EmMIC7) against Eimeria maxima challenge in chickens.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingwei; Zhang, Zhenchao; Li, Menghui; Song, Xiaokai; Yan, Ruofeng; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, the immune protective effects of recombinant microneme protein 7 of Eimeria maxima (rEmMIC7) and a DNA vaccine encoding this antigen (pVAX1-EmMIC7) on experimental challenge were evaluated. Two-week-old chickens were randomly divided into five groups. Experimental groups of chickens were immunized with 100 μg DNA vaccine pVAX1-MIC7 or 200 μg rEmMIC7, while control groups of chickens were injected with pVAX1 plasmid or sterile phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The results showed that the anti-EmMIC7 antibody titres in chickens of both rEmMIC7 and pVAX1-MIC7 groups were significantly higher as compared to PBS and pVAX1 control (P < .05). The splenocytes from both vaccinated groups of chickens displayed significantly greater proliferation response compared with the controls (P < .05). Serum from chickens immunized with pVAX1-MIC7 and rEmMIC7 displayed significantly high levels of interleukin-2, interferon-γ, IL-10, IL-17, tumour growth factor-β and IL-4 (P < .05) compared to those of negative controls. The challenge experiment results showed that both the recombinant antigen and the DNA vaccine could obviously alleviate jejunum lesions, body weight loss and enhance oocyst decrease ratio. The anti-coccidial index (ACI) of the pVAX1-MIC7 group was 167.84, higher than that of the recombinant MIC7 protein group, 167.10. Our data suggested that immunization with EmMIC7 was effective in imparting partial protection against E. maxima challenge in chickens and it could be an effective antigen candidate for the development of new vaccines against E. maxima.

  10. Requirements Modeling with the Aspect-oriented User Requirements Notation (AoURN): A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussbacher, Gunter; Amyot, Daniel; Araújo, João; Moreira, Ana

    The User Requirements Notation (URN) is a recent ITU-T standard that supports requirements engineering activities. The Aspect-oriented URN (AoURN) adds aspect-oriented concepts to URN, creating a unified framework that allows for scenario-based, goal-oriented, and aspect-oriented modeling. AoURN is applied to the car crash crisis management system (CCCMS), modeling its functional and non-functional requirements (NFRs). AoURN generally models all use cases, NFRs, and stakeholders as individual concerns and provides general guidelines for concern identification. AoURN handles interactions between concerns, capturing their dependencies and conflicts as well as the resolutions. We present a qualitative comparison of aspect-oriented techniques for scenario-based and goal-oriented requirements engineering. An evaluation carried out based on the metrics adapted from literature and a task-based evaluation suggest that AoURN models are more scalable than URN models and exhibit better modularity, reusability, and maintainability.

  11. Snow-(N)AO relationship revisited over the whole twentieth century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douville, H.; Peings, Y.; Saint-Martin, D.

    2017-01-01

    Several studies suggest that the Siberian snow cover in fall is a source of predictability of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) in winter. Although a plausible dynamical mechanism was proposed, the robustness of this relationship was recently challenged. Here we use two atmospheric reanalyses to revisit the snow-AO relationship and its modulation across the whole twentieth century. While our results support a stratospheric pathway mechanism, they show that the snow-AO relationship has only emerged in the 1970s and should be rather analyzed as a contrasted multidecadal behavior of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Pacific North America pattern. They confirm that the quasi-biennial oscillation is a plausible candidate for the modulation of the snow-(N)AO relationship across the twentieth century, but they further show that this modulation might be a purely stochastic effect. Therefore, they emphasize the limitations of any empirical prediction of the (N)AO only based on snow and/or sea ice predictors.

  12. Modeling DNA Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  13. Structural Organization of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    1986-01-01

    Explains the structural organization of DNA by providing information on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and higher organization levels of the molecule. Also includes illustrations and descriptions of sign-inversion and rotating models for supercoiling of DNA. (ML)

  14. DNA tagged microparticles

    DOEpatents

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  15. Modeling DNA Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  16. Unusual DNA structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, R.D.; Harvey, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Unusual DNS Structures and the Probes Used for Their Detection; The Specificity of Single Strand Specific Endonucleases; Chromatin STructure and DNA Structure at the hsp 26 Locus of Drosophilia; Cruciform Extrusion in Supercoiled DNA-Mechanisms and Contextual Influence; Torsional Stress, Unusual DNA Structures, and Eukaryotic Gene Expression; DNA Sequence and Structure: Bending to Biology. Cruciform Transitions Assayed Using a Psoralen Cross-linking Method: Applications to Measurements of DNA Torisonal Tension; NMR-Distance Geometry Studies of Helical Errors and Sequence Dependent Conformations of DNA in Solution; Hyperreactivity of the B-Z Junctions Probed by Two Aromatic Chemical Carcinogens; Inherently Curved DNA and Its Structural Elements; and DNA Flexibility Under Control: The Juma Algorithm and its Application to BZ Junctions.

  17. Structural Organization of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    1986-01-01

    Explains the structural organization of DNA by providing information on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and higher organization levels of the molecule. Also includes illustrations and descriptions of sign-inversion and rotating models for supercoiling of DNA. (ML)

  18. DNA Spools under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulić, I. M.; Schiessel, H.

    2004-06-01

    DNA spools, structures in which DNA is wrapped and helically coiled onto itself or onto a protein core, are ubiquitous in nature. We develop a general theory describing the nonequilibrium behavior of DNA spools under linear tension. Two puzzling and seemingly unrelated recent experimental findings, the sudden quantized unwrapping of nucleosomes and that of DNA toroidal condensates under tension, are theoretically explained and shown to be of the same origin. The study provides new insights into nucleosome and chromatin fiber stability and dynamics.

  19. Up-Regulated Expression of AOS-LOXa and Increased Eicosanoid Synthesis in Response to Coral Wounding

    PubMed Central

    Lõhelaid, Helike; Teder, Tarvi; Tõldsepp, Kadri; Ekins, Merrick; Samel, Nigulas

    2014-01-01

    In octocorals, a catalase–like allene oxide synthase (AOS) and an 8R-lipoxygenase (LOX) gene are fused together encoding for a single AOS-LOX fusion protein. Although the AOS-LOX pathway is central to the arachidonate metabolism in corals, its biological function in coral homeostasis is unclear. Using an acute incision wound model in the soft coral Capnella imbricata, we here test whether LOX pathway, similar to its role in plants, can contribute to the coral damage response and regeneration. Analysis of metabolites formed from exogenous arachidonate before and after fixed time intervals following wounding indicated a significant increase in AOS-LOX activity in response to mechanical injury. Two AOS-LOX isoforms, AOS-LOXa and AOS-LOXb, were cloned and expressed in bacterial expression system as active fusion proteins. Transcription levels of corresponding genes were measured in normal and stressed coral by qPCR. After wounding, AOS-LOXa was markedly up-regulated in both, the tissue adjacent to the incision and distal parts of a coral colony (with the maximum reached at 1 h and 6 h post wounding, respectively), while AOS-LOXb was stable. According to mRNA expression analysis, combined with detection of eicosanoid product formation for the first time, the AOS-LOX was identified as an early stress response gene which is induced by mechanical injury in coral. PMID:24551239

  20. Nanopores: Flossing with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasianowicz, John J.

    2004-06-01

    Passing a DNA strand many times back-and-forth through a protein nanopore would enable the interaction between them to be studied more closely. This may now be possible, using a dumbbell-shaped DNA-polymer complex, which may lead to a more reliable analysis of DNA sequences using nanopores.

  1. DNAzymes in DNA Nanomachines and DNA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu; Tian, Ye; Chen, Yi; Mao, Chengde

    This chapter discusses our efforts in using DNAzymes in DNA nano-machines and DNA analysis systems. 10-23 DNAzymes can cleave specific phos-phodiester bonds in RNA. We use them to construct an autonomous DNA-RNA chimera nanomotor, which constantly extracts chemical energy from RNA substrates and transduces the energy into a mechanical motion: cycles of contraction and extension. The motor's motion can be reversibly turned on and off by a DNA analogue (brake) of the RNA substrate. Addition and removal of the brake stops and restarts, respectively, the motor's motion. Furthermore, when the RNA substrates are preorganized into a one-dimensional track, a DNAzyme can continuously move along the track so long as there are substrates available ahead. Based on a similar mechanism, a novel DNA detection system has been developed. A target DNA activates a DNAzyme to cleave RNA-containing molecular beacons (MB), which generates an enhanced fluorescence signal. A following work integrates two steps of signal amplifications: a rolling-circle amplification (RCA) to synthesize multiple copies of DNAzymes, and the DNAzymes catalyze a chemical reaction to generate a colorimetric signal. This method allows detection of DNA analytes whose concentration is as low as 1 pM.

  2. Three-Dimensional DNA Nanostructures Assembled from DNA Star Motifs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Cheng; Zhang, Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Tile-based DNA self-assembly is a promising method in DNA nanotechnology and has produced a wide range of nanostructures by using a small set of unique DNA strands. DNA star motif, as one of DNA tiles, has been employed to assemble varieties of symmetric one-, two-, three-dimensional (1, 2, 3D) DNA nanostructures. Herein, we describe the design principles, assembly methods, and characterization methods of 3D DNA nanostructures assembled from the DNA star motifs.

  3. Optical-X-ray Observations of BL Lacertae Object AO 0235+164

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Emily S.; Webb, James R.; Balonek, Thomas J.; McGrath, Elizabeth; Shrader, Chris R.

    1998-11-01

    The BL Lacertea object AO 0235+164 dramatically increased in brightness on October 20, 1997. This outburst was observed with the 1 meter SARA (Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy) telescope located at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) located southwest of Tucson, Arizona. As a result of our observations, AO 0235+164 was also observed during the outbust by the Rossi X-ray Timing Experiment (RXTE) and Foggy Bottom Observaotry, Colgate Univserity, New York as a part of a Target of Opportunity (TOO) program. We present here the historical lightcurve of AO 0235+164, Optical observations during the ourtburst from the SARA and Foggy Bottom Observatories and X-ray observations from RXTE. Also, we present multifrequency data during this period and compare the variability of the Optical and X-ray bands.

  4. SAXO, the SPHERE extreme AO system: on-sky final performance and future improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusco, T.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Mouillet, D.; Costille, A.; Petit, C.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Dohlen, K.; Milli, J.; Girard, J.; Kasper, M.; Vigan, A.; Suarez, M.; Soenke, C.; Downing, M.; N'Diaye, M.; Baudoz, P.; Sevin, A.; Baruffolo, A.; Schmid, H.-M.; Salasnich, B.; Hugot, E.; Hubin, N.

    2016-07-01

    The SPHERE (Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet Research) instrument aims at detecting extremely faint sources (giant extrasolar planets) in the vicinity of bright stars1. Such a challenging goal requires the use of a very-high-order performance Adaptive Optics [AO] system feeding the scientific instruments with a quasi-perfect flat wave front corrected from all the atmospheric turbulence and internal defects. This AO system, called SAXO (Sphere Ao for eXoplanet Observation) is the heart of the instrument, a heart beating 1200 time per second and providing unprecedented image quality for a large ground based telescope at optical/near infrared wavelength. We will present the latest results obtained on-sky, demonstrating its exceptional performance (in terms of correction quality, stability and robustness) and tremendous potentiality for high contrast imaging and more specifically for exoplanet discovery.

  5. Deep-water sponges (Porifera) from Bonaire and Klein Curaçao, Southern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Van Soest, Rob W M; Meesters, Erik H W G; Becking, Leontine E

    2014-10-29

    Four submersible dives off the coast of Bonaire (Caribbean Netherlands) and Klein Curaçao (Curaçao) to depths of 99.5-242 m, covering lower mesophotic and upper dysphotic zones, yielded 52 sponge specimens belonging to 31 species. Among these we identified 13 species as new to science. These are Plakinastrella stinapa n. sp., Pachastrella pacoi n. sp., Characella pachastrelloides n. sp., Geodia curacaoensis n. sp., Caminus carmabi n. sp., Discodermia adhaerens n. sp., Clathria (Microciona) acarnoides n. sp., Antho (Acarnia) pellita n. sp., Parahigginsia strongylifera n. sp., Calyx magnoculata n. sp., Neopetrosia dutchi n. sp., Neopetrosia ovata n. sp. and Neopetrosia eurystomata n. sp. We also report an euretid hexactinellid, which belongs to the rare genus Verrucocoeloidea, recently described (2014) as V. liberatorii Reiswig & Dohrmann. The remaining 18 already known species are all illustrated by photos of the habit, either in situ or 'on deck', but only briefly characterized in an annotated table to confirm their occurrence in the Southern Caribbean. The habitat investigated-steep limestone rocks, likely representing Pleistocene fossil reefs--is similar to deep-water fossil reefs at Barbados of which the sponges were sampled and studied by Van Soest and Stentoft (1988). A comparison is made between the two localities, showing a high degree of similarity in sponge composition: 53% of the present Bonaire-Klein Curaçao species were also retrieved at Barbados. At the level of higher taxa (genera, families) Bonaire-Klein Curaçao shared approximately 80% of its lower mesophotic and upper dysphotic sponge fauna with Barbados, despite a distance between them of 1000 km, indicating high faunal homogeneity. We also preliminarily compared the shallow-water (euphotic) sponge fauna of Curaçao with the combined data available for the Barbados, Bonaire and Klein Curaçao mesophotic and upper dysphotic sponges, which resulted in the conclusion that the two faunas show only

  6. Novel algorithm implementations in DARC: the Durham AO real-time controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, Alastair; Bitenc, Urban; Jenkins, David

    2016-07-01

    The Durham AO Real-time Controller has been used on-sky with the CANARY AO demonstrator instrument since 2010, and is also used to provide control for several AO test-benches, including DRAGON. Over this period, many new real-time algorithms have been developed, implemented and demonstrated, leading to performance improvements for CANARY. Additionally, the computational performance of this real-time system has continued to improve. Here, we provide details about recent updates and changes made to DARC, and the relevance of these updates, including new algorithms, to forthcoming AO systems. We present the computational performance of DARC when used on different hardware platforms, including hardware accelerators, and determine the relevance and potential for ELT scale systems. Recent updates to DARC have included algorithms to handle elongated laser guide star images, including correlation wavefront sensing, with options to automatically update references during AO loop operation. Additionally, sub-aperture masking options have been developed to increase signal to noise ratio when operating with non-symmetrical wavefront sensor images. The development of end-user tools has progressed with new options for configuration and control of the system. New wavefront sensor camera models and DM models have been integrated with the system, increasing the number of possible hardware configurations available, and a fully open-source AO system is now a reality, including drivers necessary for commercial cameras and DMs. The computational performance of DARC makes it suitable for ELT scale systems when implemented on suitable hardware. We present tests made on different hardware platforms, along with the strategies taken to optimise DARC for these systems.

  7. Estudo em microondas do aprisionamento e precipitação de elétrons em explosões solares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosal, A. C.; Costa, J. E. R.

    2003-08-01

    Uma explosão solar é uma variação rápida e intensa do brilho que ocorre nas chamadas regiões ativas da atmosfera, constituídas por um plasma magnetizado com intensa indução magnética. Os modelos de explosões solares atuais, discutidos na literatura, apresentam características de aprisionamento e precipitação de elétrons em ambientes magnéticos simplificados. Neste trabalho, nos propusemos a separar a emissão dos elétrons aprisionados da emissão dos elétrons em precipitação apenas a partir da emissão em microondas, melhorando portanto o controle sobre o conjunto de parâmetros inferidos. A emissão em microondas da população em precipitação é bastante fraca e portanto da nossa base de dados de 130 explosões observadas pelo Rádio Polarímetro de Nobeyama, em sete freqüências, apenas para 32 foi possível separar as duas componentes de emissão com uma boa razão sinal/ruído. A partir de estudos das escalas de tempo das emissões devidas à variação gradual da emissão no aprisionamento e da variação rápida da emissão dos elétrons em precipitação foi possível obter a separação utilizando um filtro temporal nas emissões resultantes. Em nossa análise destas explosões estudamos os espectros girossincrotrônicos da emissão gradual, a qual associamos provir do topo dos arcos magnéticos e da emissão de variação rápida associada aos elétrons em precipitação. Estes espectros foram calculados e dos quais inferimos que a indução magnética efetiva do topo e dos pés foi em média, Btopo = 236 G e Bpés = 577 G, inferidas das freqüências de pico dos espectros em ntopo = 11,8 GHz e npés = 14,6 GHz com leve anisotropia (pequeno alargamento espectral). O índice espectral da distribuição não-térmica de elétrons d, inferido do índice espectral de fótons da emissão em regime opticamente fino, foi de dtopo = 3,3 e dpés = 3,9. Estes parâmetros são típicos da maioria das análises realizadas em ambiente único de

  8. The Many Sides of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores the meaning of DNA. Discusses histories of DNA, literature on DNA, the contributions of Max Delbruck and Barbara McClintock, life, views of control, current research, and the language of DNA. Contains 24 references. (JRH)

  9. The Many Sides of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores the meaning of DNA. Discusses histories of DNA, literature on DNA, the contributions of Max Delbruck and Barbara McClintock, life, views of control, current research, and the language of DNA. Contains 24 references. (JRH)

  10. Electron Microscopic Visualization of Protein Assemblies on Flattened DNA Origami.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Leena; Dhakal, Soma; Nichols, Joseph; Mahoney, Jacob; Dosey, Anne M; Jiang, Shuoxing; Sunahara, Roger K; Skiniotis, Georgios; Walter, Nils G

    2015-07-28

    DNA provides an ideal substrate for the engineering of versatile nanostructures due to its reliable Watson-Crick base pairing and well-characterized conformation. One of the most promising applications of DNA nanostructures arises from the site-directed spatial arrangement with nanometer precision of guest components such as proteins, metal nanoparticles, and small molecules. Two-dimensional DNA origami architectures, in particular, offer a simple design, high yield of assembly, and large surface area for use as a nanoplatform. However, such single-layer DNA origami were recently found to be structurally polymorphous due to their high flexibility, leading to the development of conformationally restrained multilayered origami that lack some of the advantages of the single-layer designs. Here we monitored single-layer DNA origami by transmission electron microscopy (EM) and discovered that their conformational heterogeneity is dramatically reduced in the presence of a low concentration of dimethyl sulfoxide, allowing for an efficient flattening onto the carbon support of an EM grid. We further demonstrated that streptavidin and a biotinylated target protein (cocaine esterase, CocE) can be captured at predesignated sites on these flattened origami while maintaining their functional integrity. Our demonstration that protein assemblies can be constructed with high spatial precision (within ∼2 nm of their predicted position on the platforms) by using strategically flattened single-layer origami paves the way for exploiting well-defined guest molecule assemblies for biochemistry and nanotechnology applications.

  11. Archaeal DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  12. DNA-Mediated Electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Buzzeo, Marisa C.

    2009-01-01

    The base pair stack of DNA has been demonstrated as a medium for long range charge transport chemistry both in solution and at DNA-modified surfaces. This chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to structural perturbations in the base pair stack as occur with lesions, single base mismatches, and protein binding. We have exploited this sensitivity for the development of reliable electrochemical assays based on DNA charge transport at self-assembled DNA monolayers. Here we discuss the characteristic features, applications, and advantages of DNA-mediated electrochemistry. PMID:18980370

  13. DNA Sequencing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1992-01-01

    An automated DNA sequencing apparatus having a reactor for providing at least two series of DNA products formed from a single primer and a DNA strand, each DNA product of a series differing in molecular weight and having a chain terminating agent at one end; separating means for separating the DNA products to form a series bands, the intensity of substantially all nearby bands in a different series being different, band reading means for determining the position an This invention was made with government support including a grant from the U.S. Public Health Service, contract number AI-06045. The U.S. government has certain rights in the invention.

  14. DNA Functionalization of Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang; Gang, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    DNA-nanoparticle conjugates are hybrid nanoscale objects that integrate different types of DNA molecules and inorganic nanoparticles with a typical architecture of a DNA shell around an inorganic core. Such incorporation provides particles with unique properties of DNA, addressability and recognition, but, at the same time, allows exploiting the properties of the particle's inorganic core. Thus, these hybrid nano-objects are advantageous for rational fabrication of functional materials and for biomedical applications. Here, we describe several established DNA functionalization procedures for different types of surface ligands and nanoparticle core materials.

  15. DNA structure and function.

    PubMed

    Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2015-06-01

    The proposal of a double-helical structure for DNA over 60 years ago provided an eminently satisfying explanation for the heritability of genetic information. But why is DNA, and not RNA, now the dominant biological information store? We argue that, in addition to its coding function, the ability of DNA, unlike RNA, to adopt a B-DNA structure confers advantages both for information accessibility and for packaging. The information encoded by DNA is both digital - the precise base specifying, for example, amino acid sequences - and analogue. The latter determines the sequence-dependent physicochemical properties of DNA, for example, its stiffness and susceptibility to strand separation. Most importantly, DNA chirality enables the formation of supercoiling under torsional stress. We review recent evidence suggesting that DNA supercoiling, particularly that generated by DNA translocases, is a major driver of gene regulation and patterns of chromosomal gene organization, and in its guise as a promoter of DNA packaging enables DNA to act as an energy store to facilitate the passage of translocating enzymes such as RNA polymerase.

  16. Rise of the Machines: Automated Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics Observations of Thousands of Objects with Robo-AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, Reed L.; Baranec, C.; Law, N. M.; Tendulkar, S. P.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Dekany, R.; Bui, K.; Burse, M.; Das, H.; Punnadi, S.; Chordia, P.

    2013-01-01

    Robo-AO is the first fully automated laser guide star adaptive optics instrument. Robo-AO has completed thousands of automated AO observations at the visible diffraction limit for several scientific programs during its first semester of science observations. These programs include: the Ultimate Binarity Survey to examine stellar binarity properties across the main sequence and beyond; a survey of 1,000 Kepler objects of interest; the multiplicity of solar type stars; and several programs for high precision astrometric observations. A new infrared camera is under development for Robo-AO, and a clone of the system is in the planning stages. This presentation will discuss the Robo-AO instrument capabilities, summarize the science programs undertaken, and discuss the future of Robo-AO.

  17. Supramolecular DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Christopher K; Hamblin, Graham D; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2011-12-01

    The powerful self-assembly features of DNA make it a unique template to finely organize and control matter on the nanometre scale. While DNA alone offers a high degree of fidelity in its self-assembly, a new area of research termed 'supramolecular DNA assembly' has recently emerged. This field combines DNA building blocks with synthetic organic, inorganic and polymeric structures. It thus brings together the toolbox of supramolecular chemistry with the predictable and programmable nature of DNA. The result of this molecular partnership is a variety of hybrid architectures, that expand DNA assembly beyond the boundaries of Watson-Crick base pairing into new structural and functional properties. In this tutorial review we outline this emerging field of study, and describe recent research aiming to synergistically combine the properties inherent to DNA with those of a number of supramolecular scaffolds. This ultimately creates structures with numerous potential applications in materials science, catalysis and medicine.

  18. Drying of DNA droplets.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaohua; Li, Bingquan; Petersen, Eric; Seo, Young-Soo; Samuilov, Vladimir A; Chen, Yong; Sokolov, Jonathan C; Shew, Chwen-Yang; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2006-07-04

    The evaporation kinetics of droplets containing DNA was studied, as a function of DNA concentration. Drops containing very low DNA concentrations dried by maintaining a constant base, whereas those with high concentration dried with a constant contact angle. To understand this phenomenon, the distribution of the DNA inside the droplet was measured using confocal microscopy. The results indicated that the DNA was condensed mostly on the surface of the droplets. In the case of high concentration droplets, it formed a shell, whereas isolated islands were found for droplets of low DNA concentrations. Rheologic results indicate the formation of a hydro gel in the low concentration drops, whereas phase separation between the self-assembled DNA structures and the water phase occurred at higher concentration.

  19. EPA LABORATORIES IMPLEMENT EMS PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper highlights the breadth and magnitude of carrying out an effective Environmental Management System (EMS) program at the U.S. EPA's research and development laboratories. Federal research laboratories have unique operating challenges compared to more centralized industr...

  20. [DNA methylation and epigenetics].

    PubMed

    Vaniushin, B F

    2006-09-01

    In eukaryotic cells, nuclear DNA is subject to enzymatic methylation with the formation of 5-methylcytosine residues, mostly within the CG and CNG sequences. In plants and animals this DNA methylation is species-, tissue-, and organelle-specific. It changes (decreases) with age and is regulated by hormones. On the other hand, genome methylation can control hormonal signal. Replicative and post-replicative DNA methylation types are distinguished. They are mediated by multiple DNA methyltransferases with different site-specificity. Replication is accompanied by the appearance of hemimethylated DNA sites. Pronounced asymmetry of the DNA strand methylation disappears to the end of the cell cycle. A model of methylation-regulated DNA replication is proposed. DNA methylation controls all genetic processes in the cell (replication, transcription, DNA repair, recombination, and gene transposition). It is the mechanism of cell differentiation, gene discrimination and silencing. In animals, suppression of DNA methylation stops development (embryogenesis), switches on apoptosis, and is usually lethal. Disruption of DNA methylation pattern results in the malignant cell transformation and serves as one of the early diagnostic features of carcinogenesis. In malignant cell the pattern of DNA methylation, as well as the set of DNA methyltransferase activities, differs from that in normal cell. In plants inhibition of DNA methylation is accompanied by the induction of seed storage and florescence genes. In eukaryotes one and the same gene can be simultaneously methylated both at cytosine and adenine residues. It can be thus suggested, that the plant cell contains at least two different, and probably, interdependent systems of DNA methylation. The first eukaryotic adenine DNA methyltransferase was isolated from plants. This enzyme methylates DNA with the formation of N6-methyladenine residues in the sequence TGATCA (TGATCA-->TGm6ATCA). Plants possess AdoMet-dependent endonucleases

  1. Astronomia para/com crianças carentes em Limeira

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretones, P. S.; Oliveira, V. C.

    2003-08-01

    Em 2001, o Instituto Superior de Ciências Aplicadas (ISCA Faculdades de Limeira) iniciou um projeto pelo qual o Observatório do Morro Azul empreendeu uma parceria com o Centro de Promoção Social Municipal (CEPROSOM), instituição mantida pela Prefeitura Municipal de Limeira para atender crianças e adolescentes carentes. O CEPROSOM contava com dois projetos: Projeto Centro de Convivência Infantil (CCI) e Programa Criança e Adolescente (PCA), que atendiam crianças e adolescentes em Centros Comunitários de diversas áreas da cidade. Esses projetos têm como prioridades estabelecer atividades prazerosas para as crianças no sentido de retirá-las das ruas. Assim sendo, as crianças passaram a ter mais um tipo de atividade - as visitas ao observatório. Este painel descreve as várias fases do projeto, que envolveu: reuniões de planejamento, curso de Astronomia para as orientadoras dos CCIs e PCAs, atividades relacionadas a visitas das crianças ao Observatório, proposta de construção de gnômons e relógios de Sol nos diversos Centros Comunitários de Limeira e divulgação do projeto na imprensa. O painel inclui discussões sobre a aprendizagem de crianças carentes, relatos que mostram a postura das orientadoras sobre a pertinência do ensino de Astronomia, relatos do monitor que fez o atendimento no Observatório e o que o número de crianças atendidas representou para as atividades da instituição desde o início de suas atividades e, em particular, em 2001. Os resultados são baseados na análise de relatos das orientadoras e do monitor do Observatório, registros de visitas e matérias da imprensa local. Conclui com uma avaliação do que tal projeto representou para as Instituições participantes. Para o Observatório, em particular, foi feita uma análise com relação às outras modalidades de atendimentos que envolvem alunos de escolas e público em geral. Também é abordada a questão do compromisso social do Observatório na educação do

  2. The Robo-AO software: fully autonomous operation of a laser guide star adaptive optics and science system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, Reed L.; Burse, Mahesh P.; Law, Nicholas M.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Baranec, Christoph; Rudy, Alexander R.; Sitt, Marland; Arya, Ankit; Papadopoulos, Athanasios; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Dekany, Richard G.

    2012-07-01

    Robo-AO is the first astronomical laser guide star adaptive optics (AO) system designed to operate completely independent of human supervision. A single computer commands the AO system, the laser guide star, visible and near-infrared science cameras (which double as tip-tip sensors), the telescope, and other instrument functions. Autonomous startup and shutdown sequences as well as concatenated visible observations were demonstrated in late 2011. The fully robotic software is currently operating during a month long demonstration of Robo- AO at the Palomar Observatory 60-inch telescope.

  3. Distribution of unselectively bound ligands along DNA.

    PubMed

    Lando, Dmitri Y; Nechipurenko, Yury D

    2008-10-01

    Unselective and reversible adsorption of ligands on DNA for a model of binding proposed by Zasedatelev, Gursky, and Volkenshtein is considered. In this model, the interaction between neighboring ligands located at the distance of i binding centers is characterized by the statistical weight ai. Each ligand covers L binding centers. For this model, expressions for binding averages are represented in a new simple form. This representation is convenient for the calculation of the fraction of inter-ligand distances of i binding centers fd(i) and the fraction of binding centers included in the distances of i binding centers fbc(i) for various types of interaction between bound ligands. It is shown that, for non-cooperative binding, contact cooperativity and long-range cooperativity, the fraction of the zero inter-ligand distance fd(0) is maximal at any relative concentration of bound ligands (r). Calculations demonstrate that, at low r, fd(0) approximately r.ao, and fd(i) approximately r at 1ao not equal to 1, ai=1 for i not equal 0). The function fd(i) decreases in this i interval, but the decrease is very slow. If i>1/r-L, then fd(i) rapidly decreases with i at any r for all types of inter-ligand interaction. At high ligand concentration (r is close to rmax=L(-1)), fd(0) is close to unity and fd(i) rapidly decreases with i for any type of inter-ligand interaction. For strong contact cooperativity, fd(0) is close to unity in a much lager r interval ((0.5-1).rmax), and fd(1) approximately ao(-1) at r approximately 0.5.rmax. In the case of long-range interaction between bound ligands, the dependence fd(i) is more complex and has a maximum at i approximately (1/r-L)1/2 for anti-cooperative binding. fbc(i) is maximal at i approximately 1/r-L for all types of binding except the contact cooperativity. A strong asymmetry in the influence of contact cooperativity and

  4. Forensic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Jessica; Lehman, Donald C

    2012-01-01

    Before the routine use of DNA profiling, blood typing was an important forensic tool. However, blood typing was not very discriminating. For example, roughly 30% of the United States population has type A-positive blood. Therefore, if A-positive blood were found at a crime scene, it could have come from 30% of the population. DNA profiling has a much better ability for discrimination. Forensic laboratories no longer routinely determine blood type. If blood is found at a crime scene, DNA profiling is performed. From Jeffrey's discovery of DNA fingerprinting to the development of PCR of STRs to the formation of DNA databases, our knowledge of DNA and DNA profiling have expanded greatly. Also, the applications for which we use DNA profiling have increased. DNA profiling is not just used for criminal case work, but it has expanded to encompass paternity testing, disaster victim identification, monitoring bone marrow transplants, detecting fetal cells in a mother's blood, tracing human history, and a multitude of other areas. The future of DNA profiling looks expansive with the development of newer instrumentation and techniques.

  5. Enzymatic initiation of DNA synthesis by yeast DNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Plevani, P; Chang, L M

    1977-01-01

    Partially purified yeast RNA polymerases (RNA nucleotidyltransferases) initiate DNA synthesis by yeast DNA polymerase (DNA nucleotidyltransferase) I and to a lesser extent yeast DNA polymerase II in the replication of single-stranded DNA. The enzymatic initiation of DNA synthesis on phage fd DNA template occurs with dNTPs alone and is further stimulated by the presence of rNTPs in DNA polymerase I reactions. The presence of rNTPs has no effect on the RNA polymerase initiation of the DNA polymerase II reaction. RNA polymerases I and III are more efficient in initiation of DNA synthesis than RNA polymerase II. Analyses of the products of fd DNA replication show noncovalent linkage between the newly synthesized DNA and the template DNA, and covalent linkage between the newly synthesized RNA and DNA. PMID:325562

  6. Functional DNA Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhao

    The discovery of DNA helical structure opened the door of modern molecular biology. Ned Seeman utilized DNA as building block to construct different nanoscale materials, and introduced a new field, know as DNA nanotechnology. After several decades of development, different DNA structures had been created, with different dimension, different morphology and even with complex curvatures. In addition, after construction of enough amounts DNA structure candidates, DNA structure template, with excellent spatial addressability, had been used to direct the assembly of different nanomaterials, including nanoparticles and proteins, to produce different functional nanomaterials. However there are still many challenges to fabricate functional DNA nanostructures. The first difficulty is that the present finite sized template dimension is still very small, usually smaller than 100nm, which will limit the application for large amount of nanomaterials assembly or large sized nanomaterials assembly. Here we tried to solve this problem through developing a new method, superorigami, to construct finite sized DNA structure with much larger dimension, which can be as large as 500nm. The second problem will be explored the ability of DNA structure to assemble inorganic nanomaterials for novel photonic or electronic properties. Here we tried to utilize DNA Origami method to assemble AuNPs with controlled 3D spacial position for possible chiral photonic complex. We also tried to assemble SWNT with discrete length for possible field effect transistor device. In addition, we tried to mimic in vivo compartment with DNA structure to study internalized enzyme behavior. From our results, constructed DNA cage origami can protect encapsulated enzyme from degradation, and internalized enzyme activity can be boosted for up to 10 folds. In summary, DNA structure can serve as an ideal template for construction of functional nanomaterials with lots of possibilities to be explored.

  7. GPS-Based Navigation And Orbit Determination for the AMSAT AO-40 Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, George; Moreau, Michael; Carpenter, Russell; Bauer, Frank

    2002-01-01

    The AMSAT OSCAR-40 (AO-40) spacecraft occupies a highly elliptical orbit (HEO) to support amateur radio experiments. An interesting aspect of the mission is the attempted use of GPS for navigation and attitude determination in HEO. Previous experiences with GPS tracking in such orbits have demonstrated the ability to acquire GPS signals, but very little data were produced for navigation and orbit determination studies. The AO-40 spacecraft, flying two Trimble Advanced Navigation Sensor (TANS) Vector GPS receivers for signal reception at apogee and at perigee, is the first to demonstrate autonomous tracking of GPS signals from within a HEO with no interaction from ground controllers. Moreover, over 11 weeks of total operations as of June 2002, the receiver has returned a continuous stream of code phase, Doppler, and carrier phase measurements useful for studying GPS signal characteristics and performing post-processed orbit determination studies in HEO. This paper presents the initial efforts to generate AO-40 navigation solutions from pseudorange data reconstructed from the TANS Vector code phase, as well as to generate a precise orbit solution for the AO-40 spacecraft using a batch filter.

  8. Effects of adrenergic agents on the expression of zebrafish (Danio rerio) vitellogenin Ao1

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Naida; Jin Xia; He Jiangyan; Yin Zhan

    2009-07-01

    Teleost vitellogenins (VTGs) are large multidomain apolipoproteins, traditionally considered to be estrogen-responsive precursors of the major egg yolk proteins, expressed and synthesized mainly in hepatic tissue. The inducibility of VTGs has made them one of the most frequently used in vivo and in vitro biomarkers of exposure to estrogen-active substances. A significant level of zebrafish vtgAo1, a major estrogen responsive form, has been unexpectedly found in heart tissue in our present studies. Our studies on zebrafish cardiomyopathy, caused by adrenergic agonist treatment, suggest a similar protective function of the cardiac expressed vtgAo1. We hypothesize that its function is to unload surplus intracellular lipids in cardiomyocytes for 'reverse triglyceride transportation' similar to that found in lipid transport proteins in mammals. Our results also demonstrated that zebrafish vtgAo1 mRNA expression in heart can be suppressed by both {alpha}-adrenergic agonist, phenylephrine (PE) and {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol (ISO). Furthermore, the strong stimulation of zebrafish vtgAo1 expression in plasma induced by the {beta}-adrenergic antagonist, MOXIsylyl, was detected by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA). Such stimulation cannot be suppressed by taMOXIfen, an antagonist to estrogen receptors. Thus, our present data indicate that the production of teleost VTG in vivo can be regulated not only by estrogenic agents, but by adrenergic signals as well.

  9. Is the BL Lacertae object AO 0235 + 164 being lensed by its intervening MG II absorber?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Roberto G.; Crawford, Carolin S.; Merrifield, Michael R.; Hutchings, John B.; McHardy, Ian M.

    1993-09-01

    We report the results of deep CFHT imaging of the BL Lac object AO 0235 + 164. This object exhibits Mg II absorption features and has been considered to be the best candidate for a microlensed BL Lac on the basis of its multiple redshift systems, decentered host, and extreme apparent superluminal motion. We test the microlensing hypothesis by modeling our images with a two-dimensional image fitting routine. The resulting best-fit models allow us to put strong constraints on lensing scenarios for this object, and to put limits on the mass-to-light ratio of the foreground Mg II absorbing galaxy. We conclude that, while AO 0235 + 164 is almost certainly being weakly amplified by macrolensing, microlensing by stars in the foreground lens is unnecessary in order to explain the observed properties of AO 0235 + 164. These results are combined with the work of previous authors to suggest that the (probably lensing) Mg II absorbing galaxy in the foreground of AO 0235 + 164 is embedded in a cooling flow.

  10. Performance of a MEMS-based AO-OCT system using Fourier Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J; Zawadzki, R; Jones, S; Olivier, S; Werner, J S

    2009-01-21

    Adaptive optics (AO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are powerful imaging modalities that, when combined, can provide high-resolution (3.5 {micro}m isotropic), 3-D images of the retina. The AO-OCT system at UC Davis has demonstrated the utility of this technology for microscopic, volumetric, in vivo retinal imaging. The current system uses an AOptix bimorph deformable mirror (DM) for low-order, high-stroke correction and a 140-actuator Boston Micromachines DM for high-order correction. Developments to improve performance or functionality of the instrument are on-going. Based on previous work in system characterization we have focused on improved AO control. We present preliminary results and remaining challenges for a newly implemented Fourier transform reconstructor (FTR). The previously reported error budget analysis is also reviewed and updated, with consideration of how to improve both the amount of residual error and the robustness of the system. Careful characterization of the AO system will lead to improved performance and inform the design of future systems.

  11. Extreme AO: The future of high-contrast imaging with adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, B.

    2001-05-01

    Title: Extreme AO: The future of high-contrast-imaging with adaptive optics. Adaptive optics (AO) partially cancels wavefront aberrations caused by atmospheric turbulence and can allow ground-basd telescope to reach their full diffraction-limited resolution. A fundamental limitation of all AO systems is that they have little effect on the atmospheric scattered light halo beyond a control radius roughly given by the wavelength of interest divided by the effective actuator spaceing d; for typical modern AO systems, d=60 cm and the control radius is about 0.6 arcseconds at H band. AO can still enhance contrast even beyond this radius, especially for point-source companions, by concentrating the light from the companion into a diffraction-limited spike, but the residual light remains a limitation on our ability to carry out high-contrast imaging from the ground. We will discuss potential improvements to AO over the next decade and the science they will enable. First, in the near term, high-order AO systems will soon be operational on most 8-10 m telescopes; such systems are theoretically capable of directly detecting extrasolar planets in wide (20-150 AU) orbits, and the capabilities and limitations of these systems will be discussed. Second, in the moderate term, new instrument technologies could substantially increase the performance of these systems, including exotic phase-based coronagraphs or "dark speckle" techniques. Third, it will soon be possible to construct "extreme" adaptive optics (EAO) systems, with many thousand actuators and d=5-20cm, capable of more deeply surpressing the atmospheric halo out to a much larger radius than current systems. Coronagraphs and EAO will substantially increase our sensitivity to diffuse circumstellar dust and could conceivably reach the contrast levels necessary to see giant plants around a handful of nearby stars. Finally, within a decade construction should be underway on next-generation extremely large (25-100 m) telescopes

  12. Improved tilt sensing in an LGS-based tomographic AO system based on instantaneous PSF estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veran, Jean-Pierre

    2013-12-01

    Laser guide star (LGS)-based tomographic AO systems, such as Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO), Multi-Object AO (MOAO) and Laser Tomography AO (LTAO), require natural guide stars (NGSs) to sense tip-tilt (TT) and possibly other low order modes, to get rid of the LGS-tilt indetermination problem. For example, NFIRAOS, the first-light facility MCAO system for the Thirty Meter Telescope requires three NGSs, in addition to six LGSs: two to measure TT and one to measure TT and defocus. In order to improve sky coverage, these NGSs are selected in a so-called technical field (2 arcmin in diameter for NFIRAOS), which is much larger than the on-axis science field (17x17 arcsec for NFIRAOS), on which the AO correction is optimized. Most times, the NGSs are far off-axis and thus poorly corrected by the high-order AO loop, resulting in spots with low contrast and high speckle noise. Accurately finding the position of such spots is difficult, even with advanced methods such as matched-filtering or correlation, because these methods rely on the knowledge of an average spot image, which is quite different from the instantaneous spot image, especially in case of poor correction. This results in poor tilt estimation, which, ultimately, impacts sky coverage. We propose to improve the estimation of the position of the NGS spots by using, for each frame, a current estimate of the instantaneous spot profile instead of an average profile. This estimate can be readily obtained by tracing wavefront errors in the direction of the NGS through the turbulence volume. The latter is already computed by the tomographic process from the LGS measurements as part of the high order AO loop. Computing such a wavefront estimate has actually already been proposed for the purpose of driving a deformable mirror (DM) in each NGS WFS, to optically correct the NGS spot, which does lead to improved centroiding accuracy. Our approach, however, is much simpler, because it does not require the complication of extra DMs

  13. The DNA-polymerase-X family: controllers of DNA quality?

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Kristijan; Shevelev, Igor; Hübscher, Ulrich

    2004-12-01

    Synthesis of the genetic material of the cell is achieved by a large number of DNA polymerases. Besides replicating the genome, they are involved in DNA-repair processes. Recent studies have indicated that certain DNA-polymerase-X-family members can synthesize unusual DNA structures, and we propose that these DNA structures might serve as 'flag wavers' for the induction of DNA-repair and/or DNA-damage-checkpoint pathways.

  14. Busca de estruturas em grandes escalas em altos redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boris, N. V.; Sodrã©, L., Jr.; Cypriano, E.

    2003-08-01

    A busca por estruturas em grandes escalas (aglomerados de galáxias, por exemplo) é um ativo tópico de pesquisas hoje em dia, pois a detecção de um único aglomerado em altos redshifts pode por vínculos fortes sobre os modelos cosmológicos. Neste projeto estamos fazendo uma busca de estruturas distantes em campos contendo pares de quasares próximos entre si em z Â3 0.9. Os pares de quasares foram extraídos do catálogo de Véron-Cetty & Véron (2001) e estão sendo observados com os telescópios: 2,2m da University of Hawaii (UH), 2,5m do Observatório de Las Campanas e com o GEMINI. Apresentamos aqui a análise preliminar de um par de quasares observado nos filtros i'(7800 Å) e z'(9500 Å) com o GEMINI. A cor (i'-z') mostrou-se útil para detectar objetos "early-type" em redshifts menores que 1.1. No estudo do par 131046+0006/J131055+0008, com redshift ~ 0.9, o uso deste método possibilitou a detecção de sete objetos candidatos a galáxias "early-type". Num mapa da distribuição projetada dos objetos para 22 < i' < 25 observou-se que estas galáxias estão localizadas próximas a um dos quasares e há indícios de que estejam aglomeradas dentro de um área de ~ 6 arcmin2. Se esse for o caso, estes objetos seriam membros de uma estrutura em grande escala. Um outro argumento em favor dessa hipótese é que eles obedecem uma relação do tipo Kormendy (raio equivalente X brilho superficial dentro desse raio), como a apresentada pelas galáxias elípticas em z = 0.

  15. DNA profiles from fingermarks.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Jennifer E L; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Criminal investigations would be considerably improved if DNA profiles could be routinely generated from single fingermarks. Here we report a direct DNA profiling method that was able to generate interpretable profiles from 71% of 170 fingermarks. The data are based on fingermarks from all 5 digits of 34 individuals. DNA was obtained from the fingermarks using a swab moistened with Triton-X, and the fibers were added directly to one of two commercial DNA profiling kits. All profiles were obtained without increasing the number of amplification cycles; therefore, our method is ideally suited for adoption by the forensic science community. We indicate the use of the technique in a criminal case in which a DNA profile was generated from a fingermark on tape that was wrapped around a drug seizure. Our direct DNA profiling approach is rapid and able to generate profiles from touched items when current forensic practices have little chance of success.

  16. Electrocatalysis in DNA Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Furst, Ariel; Hill, Michael G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2014-01-01

    Electrocatalysis is often thought of solely in the inorganic realm, most often applied to energy conversion in fuel cells. However, the ever-growing field of bioelectrocatalysis has made great strides in advancing technology for both biofuel cells as well as biological detection platforms. Within the context of bioelectrocatalytic detection systems, DNA-based platforms are especially prevalent. One subset of these platforms, the one we have developed, takes advantage of the inherent charge transport properties of DNA. Electrocatalysis coupled with DNA-mediated charge transport has enabled specific and sensitive detection of lesions, mismatches and DNA-binding proteins. Even greater signal amplification from these platforms is now being achieved through the incorporation of a secondary electrode to the platform both for patterning DNA arrays and for detection. Here, we describe the evolution of this new DNA sensor technology. PMID:25435647

  17. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    PubMed

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  18. DNA topology and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions. PMID:24755522

  19. DNA supercoiling during transcription.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D

    2016-11-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  20. Rifampin and vaccinia DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, M

    1977-01-01

    The effect of rifampin on the replication of vaccinia DNA was studied in mouse L cells by a cytochemical techinque and by alkaline sucrose sedimentation analysis of newly synthesized viral DNA molecules. By the use of a fluorescent DNA-binding compound (Hoechst 33258), the sequential appearance, size, and location of the viral "factories" in rifampin-treated, virus-infected cells were found to be indistinguishable from those observed in untreated, infected cells. Sedimentation analysis in alkaline scurose gradients of the viral DNA molecules labeled in pulse-chase experiments showed that formation of small fragments, elongation into "intermediate"-sized molecules, and maturation into full-length viral DNA and, finally, into cross-linked viral DNA molecules occurred in the absence or presence of rifampin. The results support the view that the primary effect of the drug is related to assembly or morphogenesis. Images PMID:833950

  1. DNA synthesis security.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Ali; Chyba, Christopher F

    2012-01-01

    It is generally assumed that genetic engineering advances will, inevitably, facilitate the misapplication of biotechnology toward the production of biological weapons. Unexpectedly, however, some of these very advances in the areas of DNA synthesis and sequencing may enable the implementation of automated and nonintrusive safeguards to avert the illicit applications of biotechnology. In the case of DNA synthesis, automated DNA screening tools could be built into DNA synthesizers in order to block the synthesis of hazardous agents. In addition, a comprehensive safety and security regime for dual-use genetic engineering research could include nonintrusive monitoring of DNA sequencing. This is increasingly feasible as laboratories outsource this service to just a few centralized sequencing factories. The adoption of automated, nonintrusive monitoring and surveillance of the DNA synthesis and sequencing pipelines may avert many risks associated with dual-use biotechnology. Here, we describe the historical background and current challenges associated with dual-use biotechnologies and propose strategies to address these challenges.

  2. DNA supercoiling during transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  3. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  4. DNA-based machines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H⁺/OH⁻), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications.

  5. Recombinant DNA. Part F

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 36 papers. Some of the titles are: Site-specific cleavage of DNA at 8-, 9-, and 10-bp sequences; The use of DNA methylases to alter the apparent recognition specificities of restriction endonucleases; Random cloning and sequencing by the M13/Dideoxynucleotide chain termination method; Solid-phase methods for sequencing of oligodeoxynucleotides and DNA; and Analysis of modified nucleosides and nucleotide sequence of tRNA.

  6. Forensic DNA testing.

    PubMed

    Butler, John M

    2011-12-01

    Forensic DNA testing has a number of applications, including parentage testing, identifying human remains from natural or man-made disasters or terrorist attacks, and solving crimes. This article provides background information followed by an overview of the process of forensic DNA testing, including sample collection, DNA extraction, PCR amplification, short tandem repeat (STR) allele separation and sizing, typing and profile interpretation, statistical analysis, and quality assurance. The article concludes with discussions of possible problems with the data and other forensic DNA testing techniques.

  7. Multiprotein DNA Looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Jose M. G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2006-06-01

    DNA looping plays a fundamental role in a wide variety of biological processes, providing the backbone for long range interactions on DNA. Here we develop the first model for DNA looping by an arbitrarily large number of proteins and solve it analytically in the case of identical binding. We uncover a switchlike transition between looped and unlooped phases and identify the key parameters that control this transition. Our results establish the basis for the quantitative understanding of fundamental cellular processes like DNA recombination, gene silencing, and telomere maintenance.

  8. Phytoplasma plasmid DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mark T; Liefting, Lia W

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplasma plasmids have generally been detected from DNA extracted from plants and insects using methods designed for the purification of total phytoplasma DNA. Methods include extraction from tissues that are high in phytoplasma titre, such as the phloem of plants, with the use of CsCl-bisbenzimide gradients that exploit the low G+C content of phytoplasma DNA. Many of the methods employed for phytoplasma purification have been described elsewhere in this book. Here we describe in detail two methods that are specifically aimed at isolating plasmid DNA.

  9. Disentangling DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  10. Disentangling DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. DNA: An Extensible Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluzel, Philippe; Lebrun, Anne; Heller, Christoph; Lavery, Richard; Viovy, Jean-Louis; Chatenay, Didier; Caron, Francois

    1996-02-01

    The force-displacement response of a single duplex DNA molecule was measured. The force saturates at a plateau around 70 piconewtons, which ends when the DNA has been stretched about 1.7 times its contour length. This behavior reveals a highly cooperative transition to a state here termed S-DNA. Addition of an intercalator suppresses this transition. Molecular modeling of the process also yields a force plateau and suggests a structure for the extended form. These results may shed light on biological processes involving DNA extension and open the route for mechanical studies on individual molecules in a previously unexplored range.

  12. DNA ELECTROPHORESIS AT SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    RAFAILOVICH, MIRIAM; SOKOLOV, JONATHAN; GERSAPPE, DILIP

    2003-09-01

    During this year we performed two major projects: I. We developed a detailed theoretical model which complements our experiments on surface DNA electrophoresis. We found that it was possible to enhance the separation of DNA chains by imposing a chemical nanoscale pattern on the surface. This approach utilized the surface interaction effect of the DNA chains with the substrate and is a refinement to our previous method in which DNA chains were separated on homogeneous flat surfaces. By introducing the nano-patterns on the surface, the conformational changes of DNA chains of different lengths can be amplified, which results in the different friction strengths with the substrate surface. Our results also show that, when compared to the DNA electrophoresis performed on homogeneous flat surfaces, nanopatterned surfaces offer a larger window in choosing different surface interactions to achieve separation. II. In collaboration with a large international manufacturer of skin care products we also embarked on a project involving photo toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, which are a key ingredient in sunscreen and cosmetic lotions. The results clearly implicated the nanoparticles in catalyzing damage to chromosomal DNA. We then used this knowledge to develop a polymer/anti-oxidant coating which prevented the photocatalytic reaction on DNA while still retaining the UV absorptive properties of the nanoparticles. The standard gel electrophoresis was not sufficient in determining the extent of the DNA damage. The conclusions of this study were based predominantly on analysis obtained with the surface electrophoresis method.

  13. Function of transcription factors at DNA lesions in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Malewicz, Michal; Perlmann, Thomas

    2014-11-15

    Cellular systems for DNA repair ensure prompt removal of DNA lesions that threaten the genomic stability of the cell. Transcription factors (TFs) have long been known to facilitate DNA repair via transcriptional regulation of specific target genes encoding key DNA repair proteins. However, recent findings identified TFs as DNA repair components acting directly at the DNA lesions in a transcription-independent fashion. Together this recent progress is consistent with the hypothesis that TFs have acquired the ability to localize DNA lesions and function by facilitating chromatin remodeling at sites of damaged DNA. Here we review these recent findings and discuss how TFs may function in DNA repair.

  14. Analysis of mtDNA/nDNA Ratio in Mice.

    PubMed

    Quiros, Pedro M; Goyal, Aashima; Jha, Pooja; Auwerx, Johan

    2017-03-02

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lacks the protection provided by the nucleosomes in the nuclear DNA and does not have a DNA repair mechanism, making it highly susceptible to damage, which can lead to mtDNA depletion. mtDNA depletion compromises the efficient function of cells and tissues and thus impacts negatively on health. Here, we describe a brief and easy protocol to quantify mtDNA copy number by determining the mtDNA/nDNA ratio. The procedure has been validated using a cohort of young and aged mice. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Streptavidin crystals as nanostructured supports and image-calibration references for cryo-EM data collection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liguo; Ounjai, Puey; Sigworth, Fred J

    2008-11-01

    For cryo-EM structural studies, we seek to image membrane proteins as single particles embedded in proteoliposomes. One technical difficulty has been the low density of liposomes that can be trapped in the approximately 100nm ice layer that spans holes in the perforated carbon support film of EM grids. Inspired by the use of two-dimensional (2D) streptavidin crystals as an affinity surface for biotinylated DNA (Crucifix et al., 2004), we propose to use the crystals to tether liposomes doped with biotinylated lipids. The 2D crystal image also serves as a calibration of the image formation process, providing an absolute conversion from electrostatic potentials in the specimen to the EM image intensity, and serving as a quality control of acquired cryo-EM images. We were able to grow streptavidin crystals covering more than 90% of the holes in an EM grid, and which remained stable even under negative stain. The liposome density in the resulting cryo-EM sample was uniform and high due to the high-affinity binding of biotin to streptavidin. Using computational methods, the 2D crystal background can be removed from images without noticeable effect on image properties.

  16. The Effectiveness of a Mixed-Mode Survey on Domestic Violence in Curaçao: Response and Data Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Wijk, Nikil; de Leeuw, Edith; de Bruijn, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    To collect reliable statistical data on domestic violence in Curaçao, we conducted a large-scale quantitative study (n = 816). To meet with the special needs of the population and topic, we designed a tailored mixed-mode survey to assess the prevalence of domestic violence in Curaçao and its health consequences. Great care was taken to reduce…

  17. ecoAO: A Simple System for the Study of Human Aldehyde Oxidases Role in Drug Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Although aldehyde oxidase (AO) is an important hepatic drug-metabolizing enzyme, it remains understudied and is consequently often overlooked in preclinical studies, an oversight that has resulted in the failure of multiple clinical trials. AO’s preclusion to investigation stems from the following: (1) difficulties synthesizing metabolic standards due to the chemospecificity and regiospecificity of the enzyme and (2) significant inherent variability across existing in vitro systems including liver cytosol, S9 fractions, and primary hepatocytes, which lack specificity and generate discordant expression and activity profiles. Here, we describe a practical bacterial biotransformation system, ecoAO, addressing both issues simultaneously. ecoAO is a cell paste of MoCo-producing Escherichia coli strain TP1017 expressing human AO. It exhibits specific activity toward known substrates, zoniporide, 4-trans-(N,N-dimethylamino)cinnamaldehyde, O6-benzylguanine, and zaleplon; it also has utility as a biocatalyst, yielding milligram quantities of synthetically challenging metabolite standards such as 2-oxo-zoniporide. Moreover, ecoAO enables routine determination of kcat and V/K, which are essential parameters for accurate in vivo clearance predictions. Furthermore, ecoAO has potential as a preclinical in vitro screening tool for AO activity, as demonstrated by its metabolism of 3-aminoquinoline, a previously uncharacterized substrate. ecoAO promises to provide easy access to metabolites with the potential to improve pharmacokinetic clearance predictions and guide drug development. PMID:28884164

  18. p53 oligomerization and DNA looping are linked with transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, J E; Tegtmeyer, P; Mayr, G A; Reed, M; Wang, Y; Wang, P; Hough, P V; Mastrangelo, I A

    1994-01-01

    We examined the role of p53 oligomerization in DNA binding and in transactivation. By conventional electron microscopy (EM) and scanning transmission EM, we find that wild-type tetramers contact 18-20 bp at single or tandem 19 bp consensus sequences and also stack in apparent register, tetramer on top of tetramer. Stacked tetramers link separated DNA binding sites with DNA loops. Interestingly, the p53(1-320) segment, which lacks the C-terminal tetramerization domain, binds DNA consensus sites as stacked oligomers. Although the truncated protein binds DNA with reduced efficiency, it nevertheless induces DNA looping by self-association. p53, therefore, has a C-terminal tetramerization domain that enhances DNA binding and a non-tetrameric oligomerization domain that stacks p53 at consensus sites and loops separated consensus sites via protein-protein interactions. Using model promoters, we demonstrate that wild-type and tetramerization-deficient p53s activate transcription well when tandem consensus sites are proximal to TATA sequences and poorly when tandem sites are distal. In the presence of proximal sites, however, stimulation by distal sites increases 25-fold. Tetramerization and stacking of tetramers, therefore, provide dual mechanisms to augment the number of p53 molecules available for activation through p53 response elements. DNA looping between separated response elements further increases the concentration of local p53 by translocating distally bound protein to the promoter. Images PMID:7813439

  19. Oxidative DNA modifications.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Henrik E

    2005-07-01

    Oxidative DNA modifications are frequent in mammalian DNA and have been suggested an important mechanism in carcinogenesis, diabetes and ageing. The foundations for this suggestion are: Evidence for the importance of oxidative DNA modifications in cancer development is: high levels of oxidative lesions in cancer tissue; highly conserved and specific DNA repair systems targeting oxidative lesions; high levels of oxidative DNA lesions in oxidative DNA repair knock-out animals; defective repair of oxidative lesions in cancer-prone progeria syndromes; reduced cancer incidence in populations with high dietary antioxidant intake; and increased oxidative stress to DNA in tobacco smokers. Conflicting evidence for a relation between oxidative stress to DNA and cancer is: disagreement about the true levels and occurrence of the oxidative lesions in vivo; failure to identify the localization of oxidative lesions in important genes, e.g. tumor suppressor and oncogenes; lack of evidence that the oxidative lesions induce mutations in vivo; no cancer development in animals knocked-out for specific DNA repair enzymes in spite of high tissue levels of oxidative lesions; and unchanged cancer rates after antioxidant interventions in large clinical controlled and randomized trials. The rate of DNA oxidation has been estimated from urinary excretion of repair products and it is evident that if these lesions were not repaired, a large part of DNA would be oxidized to a degree not compatible with living. The methodologies by which oxidative DNA modifications are measured cover a wide and different range, advantages and disadvantages will be presented. One particular problem is artificial oxidation, and methods to prevent such artifacts will be presented together with results from a large interlaboratory standardization program. The methodology by which the lesions can be measured is complicated and prone to artifacts during DNA isolation, digestion, derivatization and maybe even during

  20. Biochemical behavior of N-oxidized cytosine and adenine bases in DNA polymerase-mediated primer extension reactions

    PubMed Central

    Tsunoda, Hirosuke; Kudo, Tomomi; Masaki, Yoshiaki; Ohkubo, Akihiro; Seio, Kohji; Sekine, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    To clarify the biochemical behavior of 2′-deoxyribonucleoside 5′-triphosphates and oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) containing cytosine N-oxide (Co) and adenine N-oxide (Ao), we examined their base recognition ability in DNA duplex formation using melting temperature (Tm) experiments and their substrate specificity in DNA polymerase-mediated replication. As the result, it was found that the Tm values of modified DNA–DNA duplexes incorporating 2′-deoxyribonucleoside N-oxide derivatives significantly decreased compared with those of the unmodified duplexes. However, single insertion reactions by DNA polymerases of Klenow fragment (KF) (exo−) and Vent (exo−) suggested that Co and Ao selectively recognized G and T, respectively. Meanwhile, the kinetic study showed that the incorporation efficiencies of the modified bases were lower than those of natural bases. Ab initio calculations suggest that these modified bases can form the stable base pairs with the original complementary bases. These results indicate that the modified bases usually recognize the original bases as partners for base pairing, except for misrecognition of dATP by the action of KF (exo−) toward Ao on the template, and the primers could be extended on the template DNA. When they misrecognized wrong bases, the chain could not be elongated so that the modified base served as the chain terminator. PMID:21300642

  1. Observações simultâneas no óptico e infravermelho próximo dos BL Lacs PKS 2005-489 e PKS 2155-304 em diversas escalas de tempo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominici, T. P.; Abraham, Z.; Galo, A. L.

    2003-08-01

    A existência de variações rápidas de brilho em alguns blazares é um fenômeno bem comprovado, mas até agora não sabemos ao certo quais são os mecanismos físicos envolvidos. A maior dificuldade é a ausência de observações multibanda simultâneas que poderiam fornecer vínculos aos modelos. Buscando colaborar com a discussão estudamos o comportamento de dois BL Lacs, PKS 2005-489 e PKS 2155-304, em relação à variabilidade em diversas escalas de tempo, de poucos minutos até vários meses, com observações simultâneas em seis bandas espectrais (óptico e infravermelho próximo). Para tanto dois telescópios do LNA foram utilizados em conjunto nas campanhas observacionais realizadas em 2001 e 2002, cujos resultados são apresentados aqui. As duas fontes apresentaram características bastante diferentes, inclusive em relação à existência de variabilidade nos índices espectrais. Particularmente, registramos a primeira detecção de variações em escalas de tempo da ordem de poucos minutos em PKS 2005-489, com evidências da presença de um atraso entre as curvas de luz nas bandas V e R e a variação em R ocorrendo antes (o contrário do esperado no modelo de shock-in-jet). Em PKS 2155-304 detectamos pela primeira vez variabilidade em escalas de tempo de poucos minutos no infravermelho em um AGN. As observações indicam que as variações de brilho em blazares são o resultado da ação de mais de um fenômeno, especialmente em escalas de tempo muito curtas. Alguns cenários físicos são sugeridos para explicar os resultados observacionais.

  2. Termination of Pregnancy in Curaçao: Need for Improvement of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, Adriana A.; Alberts, Jantina F.; de Bruijn, Jeanne; Jong, Betty Meyboom-de; Kleiverda, Gunilla

    2012-01-01

    Background: In Curaçao Termination of Pregnancy (TOP) is still forbidden by law, although a policy of tolerance has been stipulated since 1999. This paper is about the prevalence of TOP and about its health complications. These data on TOP are officially unknown but are suspected to be rather high. Methods: One year registration of illegal performed termination of pregnancy cases by all general physicians (GPs) practicing TOP in Curaçao. The registration included patient characteristics according to the model of the National Abortion Registration in The Netherlands, adjusted to the local Curaçao situation. Socio demographic characteristics, number of previous pregnancies and TOPs, pregnancy duration, contraception methods and reason for failure were registered. The comparative part of the research compares TOP rates of Curaçao with those of Antillean women in the Netherlands. The gynaecologists in the referral hospital registered complications requiring hospital admission after TOP. Results: All GPs performing TOP participated and the majority registered extensively. The total number of registered TOP was 1126. 666 of the 1126 were registered using the local adjusted Abortion Registration Model. With 30.000 women aged between 15 and 45 living in Curaçao, the TOP rate was at least 38 (per 1000 in that age category), comparable to rates for Antillean women in the Netherlands. Mean age was 26.9 years. Nearly half (47%) had one or more TOPs before; the majority (53%) was less than 7 weeks pregnant and two third (67%) had one or more children. Two third of the women did not use contraception (63%). For those using contraception, main reason for failure was inconsistent use (50%). There were 14 hospital admissions due to complications of TOP. Conclusion: The number of TOP is high in Curaçao and comparable to (first generation) Antillean women living abroad in the Netherlands. Most unintended pregnancies originated from no or inconsistent use of reliable

  3. DNA repair genes of mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Fuscoe, J.C.; Weber, C.A.

    1985-09-27

    In the CHO cell line various mutations affecting DNA repair have been obtained. Mutants that belong to five genetic complementation groups for UV sensitivity and resemble the cells from individuals having the cancer-prone genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum were previously identified. Each mutant is defective in the incision step of nucleotide excision repair and hypersensitive to bulky DNA lesions. A sixth genetic complementation group for UV sensitivity has now been identified with UV27-1. These UV mutants can be divided into two subgroups; only Groups 2 and 4 are extremely sensitive to mitomycin C and other DNA cross-linking agents. The clear-cut phenotypes of the CHO mutants have allowed us to construct hybrid cells by fusion with human lymphocytes and thereby identify which human chromosomes carry genes that correct the CHO mutations. The first two mutants analyzed, UV20 (excision-repair deficient; UV Group 2) and EM9, which has very high SCE, are both corrected by chromosome 19. 46 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Many Ways to Loop DNA

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Jack D.

    2013-01-01

    In the 1960s, I developed methods for directly visualizing DNA and DNA-protein complexes using an electron microscope. This made it possible to examine the shape of DNA and to visualize proteins as they fold and loop DNA. Early applications included the first visualization of true nucleosomes and linkers and the demonstration that repeating tracts of adenines can cause a curvature in DNA. The binding of DNA repair proteins, including p53 and BRCA2, has been visualized at three- and four-way junctions in DNA. The trombone model of DNA replication was directly verified, and the looping of DNA at telomeres was discovered. PMID:24005675

  6. Detecção inesperada de efeitos de lentes fracas em grupos de galáxias pouco luminosos em raios-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, R.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Sodrã©, L., Jr.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Cypriano, E. S.; Lengruber, L. L.; Cuevas, H.; Ramirez, A.

    2003-08-01

    Obtivemos, como parte do programa de verificação científica do GMOS Sul, imagens profundas de três grupos de galáxias: G97 e G102 (z~0,4) e G124 (z = 0,17). Esses alvos foram selecionados a partir do catálogo de fontes extensas de Vikhlinin (1998), por terem luminosidades em raios X menores que 3´1043 ergs s-1, valor cerca de uma ou duas ordens de grandeza inferior ao de aglomerados de galáxias. O objetivo primário dessas observações é o estudo da evolução de galáxias em grupos. Grupos são ambientes menos densos que aglomerados, contêm a grande maioria das galáxias do Universo mas que, até o momento, foram estudados detalhadamente apenas no Universo local (z~0). Com esses dados efetuamos uma análise estatística da distorção na forma das galáxias de fundo (lentes gravitacionais fracas) como forma de inferir o conteúdo e a distribuição de massa nesses grupos apesar de que, em princípio, esse efeito não deveria ser detectado uma vez que os critérios de seleção adotados previlegiam sistemas de baixa massa. De fato, para G124 obtivemos apenas um limite superior para sua massa que é compatível com sua luminosidade em raios X. De modo contrário e surpreendente, os objetos G102 e G097, aparentam ter massas que resultariam em dispersões de velocidade maiores que 1000 km s-1, muito maiores do que se espera para grupos de galáxias. Com efeito, para G097 obtivemos, a partir de dados do satélite XMM, uma estimativa para a temperatura do gás intragrupo de kT = 2,6 keV, que é tipica de sistemas com dispersões de velocidade de ~ 600 km s-1, bem característica de grupos. Essas contradições aparentes entre lentes fracas e raios X podem ser explicadas de dois modos: i) a massa obtida por lentes estaria sobreestimada devido à superposição de estruturas massivas ao longo da linha de visada ou ii) a temperatura do gás do meio intra-grupo reflete o potencial gravitacional de estruturas menores que estariam se fundindo para formar uma

  7. Routine DNA testing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Routine DNA testing. It’s done once you’ve Marker-Assisted Breeding Pipelined promising Qantitative Trait Loci within your own breeding program and thereby established the performance-predictive power of each DNA test for your germplasm under your conditions. By then you are ready to screen your par...

  8. Stool DNA Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... result. A test is considered negative if DNA markers common to colon cancer or precancerous polyps and signs of blood are ... result. A test is considered positive if DNA markers common to colon cancer or precancerous polyps or signs of blood are ...

  9. Metal Sensing by DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenhu; Saran, Runjhun; Liu, Juewen

    2017-06-28

    Metal ions are essential to many chemical, biological, and environmental processes. In the past two decades, many DNA-based metal sensors have emerged. While the main biological role of DNA is to store genetic information, its chemical structure is ideal for metal binding via both the phosphate backbone and nucleobases. DNA is highly stable, cost-effective, easy to modify, and amenable to combinatorial selection. Two main classes of functional DNA were developed for metal sensing: aptamers and DNAzymes. While a few metal binding aptamers are known, it is generally quite difficult to isolate such aptamers. On the other hand, DNAzymes are powerful tools for metal sensing since they are selected based on catalytic activity, thus bypassing the need for metal immobilization. In the last five years, a new surge of development has been made on isolating new metal-sensing DNA sequences. To date, many important metals can be selectively detected by DNA often down to the low parts-per-billion level. Herein, each metal ion and the known DNA sequences for its sensing are reviewed. We focus on the fundamental aspect of metal binding, emphasizing the distinct chemical property of each metal. Instead of reviewing each published sensor, a high-level summary of signaling methods is made as a separate section. In principle, each signaling strategy can be applied to many DNA sequences for designing sensors. Finally, a few specific applications are highlighted, and future research opportunities are discussed.

  10. Behavior of supercoiled DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Strick, T R; Allemand, J F; Bensimon, D; Croquette, V

    1998-01-01

    We study DNA supercoiling in a quantitative fashion by micromanipulating single linear DNA molecules with a magnetic field gradient. By anchoring one end of the DNA to multiple sites on a magnetic bead and the other end to multiple sites on a glass surface, we were able to exert torsional control on the DNA. A rotating magnetic field was used to induce rotation of the magnetic bead, and reversibly over- and underwind the molecule. The magnetic field was also used to increase or decrease the stretching force exerted by the magnetic bead on the DNA. The molecule's degree of supercoiling could therefore be quantitatively controlled and monitored, and tethered-particle motion analysis allowed us to measure the stretching force acting on the DNA. Experimental results indicate that this is a very powerful technique for measuring forces at the picoscale. We studied the effect of stretching forces ranging from 0.01 pN to 100 pN on supercoiled DNA (-0.1 < sigma < 0.2) in a variety of ionic conditions. Other effects, such as stretching-relaxing hysteresis and the braiding of two DNA molecules, are discussed. PMID:9545060

  11. Characterization of muntjac DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.C.

    1981-05-27

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in muntjac chromosomes is generally proportional to the chromosomal DNA content, but the SCE frequency is reduced in the heterochromatic neck region of the X chromosome. The physical properties of muntjac DNA and the kinetics of repair of UV damage in muntjac heterochromatin and euchromatin were examined and compared with the distribution of sister chromatid exchange.

  12. Curating DNA specimens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    DNA data are used in a variety of ethnobiological disciplines including archaeology, conservation, ecology, medicinal plants and natural products research, taxonomy and systematics, crop evolution and domestication, and genetic diversity. It frequently is convenient to store and share DNA among coop...

  13. DNA-cell conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-05-03

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  14. Human Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Ian J.; Reyes, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of the process of DNA replication in mitochondria is in its infancy. For many years, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome was regarded as greatly simplified compared to the nucleus. Mammalian mitochondria were reported to lack all DNA repair systems, to eschew DNA recombination, and to possess but a single DNA polymerase, polymerase γ. Polγ was said to replicate mitochondrial DNA exclusively via one mechanism, involving only two priming events and a handful of proteins. In this “strand-displacement model,” leading strand DNA synthesis begins at a specific site and advances approximately two-thirds of the way around the molecule before DNA synthesis is initiated on the “lagging” strand. Although the displaced strand was long-held to be coated with protein, RNA has more recently been proposed in its place. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA molecules with all the features of products of conventional bidirectional replication have been documented, suggesting that the process and regulation of replication in mitochondria is complex, as befits a genome that is a core factor in human health and longevity. PMID:23143808

  15. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  16. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  17. Modeling DNA Replication Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Broyde, S.; Roy, D.; Shapiro, R.

    1997-06-01

    While there is now available a great deal of information on double stranded DNA from X-ray crystallography, high resolution NMR and computer modeling, very little is known about structures that are representative of the DNA core of replication intermediates. DNA replication occurs at a single strand/double strand junction and bulged out intermediates near the junction can lead to frameshift mutations. The single stranded domains are particularly challenging. Our interest is focused on strategies for modeling the DNA of these types of replication intermediates. Modeling such structures presents special problems in addressing the multiple minimum problem and in treating the electrostatic component of the force field. We are testing a number of search strategies for locating low energy structures of these types and we are also investigating two different distance dependent dielectric functions in the coulombic term of the force field. We are studying both unmodified DNA and DNA damaged by aromatic amines, carcinogens present in the environment in tobacco smoke, barbecued meats and automobile exhaust. The nature of the structure adopted by the carcinogen modified DNA at the replication fork plays a key role in determining whether the carcinogen will cause a mutation during replication that can initiate the carcinogenic process. In the present work results are presented for unmodified DNA.

  18. Multiscale simulation of DNA.

    PubMed

    Dans, Pablo D; Walther, Jürgen; Gómez, Hansel; Orozco, Modesto

    2016-04-01

    DNA is not only among the most important molecules in life, but a meeting point for biology, physics and chemistry, being studied by numerous techniques. Theoretical methods can help in gaining a detailed understanding of DNA structure and function, but their practical use is hampered by the multiscale nature of this molecule. In this regard, the study of DNA covers a broad range of different topics, from sub-Angstrom details of the electronic distributions of nucleobases, to the mechanical properties of millimeter-long chromatin fibers. Some of the biological processes involving DNA occur in femtoseconds, while others require years. In this review, we describe the most recent theoretical methods that have been considered to study DNA, from the electron to the chromosome, enriching our knowledge on this fascinating molecule. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. DNA replication in thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Majerník, A I; Jenkinson, E R; Chong, J P J

    2004-04-01

    DNA replication enzymes in the thermophilic Archaea have previously attracted attention due to their obvious use in methods such as PCR. The proofreading ability of the Pyrococcus furiosus DNA polymerase has resulted in a commercially successful product (Pfu polymerase). One of the many notable features of the Archaea is the fact that their DNA processing enzymes appear on the whole to be more like those found in eukaryotes than bacteria. These proteins also appear to be simpler versions of those found in eukaryotes. For these reasons, archaeal organisms make potentially interesting model systems to explore the molecular mechanisms of processes such as DNA replication, repair and recombination. Why archaeal DNA-manipulation systems were adopted over bacterial systems by eukaryotic cells remains a most interesting question that we suggest may be linked to thermophily.

  20. Fidelity of DNA polymerases in DNA amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Keohavong, P.; Thilly, W.G. )

    1989-12-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to separate and isolate the products of DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The strategy permitted direct enumeration and identification of point mutations created by T4, modified T7, Klenow fragment of polymerase I, and Thermus aquaticus (Tag) DNA polymerases. Incorrectly synthesized sequences were separated from the wild type by DGGE as mutant/wild-type heteroduplexes and the heteroduplex fraction was used to calculate the average error rate (mutations per base duplication). The error rate induced in the 104-base-pair low-temperature melting domain of exon 3 of the human hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene was {approx} 3.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} for modified T7, 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for Klenow fragment, and 2.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for Taq polymerases after a 10{sup 6}-fold amplification. The error rate for T4 DNA polymerase was not more than 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} error per base duplication. The predominant mutations were sequenced and found to be transitions of G{center dot}C to A{center dot}T for T4 and modified T7 DNA polymerases, and A{center dot}T to G{center dot}C for Taq polymerase. Klenow fragment induced both possible transitions and deletions of 2 and 4 base pairs.

  1. DNA damage by smoke: Protection by turmeric and other inhibitors of ROS

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivas, L.; Shalini, V.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Twigs-dry leaves smoke condensate (TDS), as a source of clastogenic ROS and carcinogenic PAH, was investigated for its in vitro DNA-damaging effect in calf thymus DNA and human peripheral lymphocytes. An aqueous turmeric component--Aq.T--with an established antioxidant activity, was tested as a DNA protectant. TDS induced 13-fold damage to calf thymus DNA as judged by the emergence of a DNA damage specific, fluorescent product (em: 405 nm). Aq.T at 800 ng/microL extended 69% protection to calf thymus DNA and was comparable to the other protectants such as curcumin, BHA, vitamin E, SOD, and CAT. In human peripheral lymphocytes, TDS induced extensive DNA damage in comparison with the tumor promoter TPA, as judged by FADU. Aq.T at 300 ng/microL extended 90% protection to human lymphocyte DNA against TDS-induced damage, and was more effective than the other protectants--DABCO, D-mannitol, sodium benzoate, vitamin E (ROS quenchers), SOD, CAT (antioxidant enzymes), tannic acid, flufenamic acid, BHA, BHT, n-PG, curcumin and quercetin (antioxidants). Aq.T offered 65% protection to human lymphocyte DNA against TPA-induced damage and was comparable to SOD. The above results indicate that TDS induces substantial DNA damage in calf thymus DNA and human lymphocytes and Aq.T is an efficient protectant.

  2. The SCExAO high contrast imager: transitioning from commissioning to science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, N.; Guyon, O.; Lozi, J.; Currie, T.; Hagelberg, J.; Norris, B.; Singh, G.; Pathak, P.; Doughty, D.; Goebel, S.; Males, J.; Kuhn, J.; Serabyn, E.; Tuthill, P.; Schworer, G.; Martinache, F.; Kudo, T.; Kawahara, H.; Kotani, T.; Ireland, M.; Feger, T.; Rains, A.; Bento, J.; Schwab, C.; Coutts, D.; Cvetojevic, N.; Gross, S.; Arriola, A.; Lagadec, T.; Kasdin, J.; Groff, T.; Mazin, B.; Minowa, Y.; Takato, N.; Tamura, M.; Takami, H.; Hayashi, M.

    2016-07-01

    SCExAO is the premier high-contrast imaging platform for the Subaru Telescope. It offers high Strehl ratios at near-IR wavelengths (y-K band) with stable pointing and coronagraphs with extremely small inner working angles, optimized for imaging faint companions very close to the host. In the visible, it has several interferometric imagers which offer polarimetric and spectroscopic capabilities. A recent addition is the RHEA spectrograph enabling spatially resolved high resolution spectroscopy of the surfaces of giant stars, for example. New capabilities on the horizon include post-coronagraphic spectroscopy, spectral differential imaging, nulling interferometry as well as an integral field spectrograph and an MKID array. Here we present the new modules of SCExAO, give an overview of the current commissioning status of each of the modules and present preliminary results.

  3. Identification and calibration of the interaction matrix parameters for AO and MCAO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neichel, Benoit; Parisot, Amelie; Petit, Cyril; Fusco, Thierry; Rigaut, François

    2012-07-01

    New tomographic Adaptive Optics (AO) concepts require a good knowledge of the system geometry and characteristics. These parameters are used to feed the tomographic reconstructors. In this paper we present a method to precisely identify the parameters required to construct an accurate synthetic set of models such as inuence functions, mis-registrations, directions of analysis or altitude of the DMs. The method is based on a multiparameter t of the interaction matrix. This identication method nds also its application in high contrast AO systems, such as SPHERE : in that case it is used as a diagnostic tool in order to precisely realign the system. The method has been tested and successfully implemented on HOMER, SPHERE and GeMS. Experimental results for these three systems are presented.

  4. The role of AO external fixation in proximal femoral osteotomies in the pediatric neuromuscular population.

    PubMed

    Handelsman, John E; Weinberg, Jacob; Razi, Afshin; Mulley, Debra A

    2004-09-01

    Internal fixation in proximal femoral osteotomies using traditional devices may be sub-optimal in children with neuromuscular disorders who have small or osteopenic bone. In this population, between 1988 and 2000, we performed 36 proximal femoral varus osteotomies in 28 patients. These were controlled by the AO external fixator. The average age at surgery was 7 years (range, 2-13 years). A mean varus correction of 34 degrees (range, 15-90 degrees) was obtained. Complications consisted of one superficial pin tract infection, one skin breakdown, and one non-union. Other than the non-union, all osteotomies were stable at the time of the fixator removal. The AO external fixator is an effective alternative in maintaining corrective proximal femoral osteotomies in children with fragile bones.

  5. DM dimensioning for the next generation AO systems : strategies and rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costille, A.; Conan, J.-M.

    2007-07-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) provides a real time correction of turbulence and allows to improve the angular resolution of the astronomical telescopes. The design of AO systems and of its key components (deformable mirror (DM), wave-front sensors...) is very important to provide the best performance. The definition rules are well known for 10m class telescopes. However the study of the next generation of telescopes, especially the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT), associated with the development of new technological solutions, particularly concerning DMs, require to refine and in some cases to reconsider these rules. Both turbulent parameters (seeing, outer scale ...), telescope effects, system design and performance requirements have to be considered in order to define the DM key parameters (stroke, inter-actuator stroke, influence function ...). We present a study based on the combination of analytical expressions and numerical simulation results. We do not give absolute rules of design but we present key aspects to keep in mind when designing the DM.

  6. Assessment of Assembling Objects (AO) for Improving Predictive Performance of the Armed Forces Qualification Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    Although the ASVAB has not historically been predictive of attrition ( Laurence , Naughton, & Harris, 1996), the AO subtest has indeed shown...internal consistency (e.g., Earles & Ree , 1992). Alderton and colleagues (1997) found that PC had fairly low test-retest reliability, which was well... Ree (1992) found that WK is a slightly better predictor of course grades than PC across a variety of job types. Mirroring the research on the two

  7. Real-time control for the high order, wide field DRAGON AO test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, Alastair; Bharmal, Nazim A.; Bitenc, Urban; Dipper, Nigel; Morris, Tim; Myers, Richard; Reeves, Andrew; Younger, Eddy

    2014-07-01

    DRAGON is a high order, wide field AO test-bench at Durham. A key feature of DRAGON is the ability to be operated at real-time rates, i.e. frame rates of up to 1kHz, with low latency to maintain AO performance. Here, we will present the real-time control architecture for DRAGON, which includes two deformable mirrors, eight wavefront sensors and thousands of Shack-Hartmann sub-apertures. A novel approach has been taken to allow access to the wavefront sensor pixel stream, reducing latency and peak computational load, and this technique can be implemented for other similar wavefront sensor cameras with no hardware costs. We report on experience with an ELT-suitable wavefront sensor camera. DRAGON will form the basis for investigations into hardware acceleration architectures for AO real-time control, and recent work on GPU and many-core systems (including the Xeon Phi) will be reported. Additionally, the modular structure of DRAGON, its remote control capabilities, distribution of AO telemetry data, and the software concepts and architecture will be reported. Techniques used in DRAGON for pixel processing, slope calculation and wavefront reconstruction will be presented. This will include methods to handle changes in CN2 profile and sodium layer profile, both of which can be modelled in DRAGON. DRAGON software simulation techniques linking hardware-in-the-loop computer models to the DRAGON real-time system and control software will also be discussed. This tool allows testing of the DRAGON system without requiring physical hardware and serves as a test-bed for ELT integration and verification techniques.

  8. Analysis of Alternatives (AoA) for KC-135 Recapitalization. Executive Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Integrative research projects and work on modeling and simulation are conducted on a PAF-wide basis. The research reported here was prepared within the...Electric and Pratt & Whitney. The Air Force’s Aeronautical Systems Center, part of Air Force Materiel Command, proposed three new- design tankers that were...and Analysis Division (AMC/A59) made significant contributions to the AoA’s effectiveness analysis, especially in the detailed modeling of tanker

  9. Bridging FPGA and GPU technologies for AO real-time control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, Denis; Lainé, Maxime; Bernard, Julien; Gratadour, Damien; Sevin, Arnaud

    2016-07-01

    Our team has developed a common environment for high performance simulations and real-time control of AO systems based on the use of Graphics Processors Units in the context of the COMPASS project. Such a solution, based on the ability of the real time core in the simulation to provide adequate computing performance, limits the cost of developing AO RTC systems and makes them more scalable. A code developed and validated in the context of the simulation may be injected directly into the system and tested on sky. Furthermore, the use of relatively low cost components also offers significant advantages for the system hardware platform. However, the use of GPUs in an AO loop comes with drawbacks: the traditional way of offloading computation from CPU to GPUs - involving multiple copies and unacceptable overhead in kernel launching - is not well suited in a real time context. This last application requires the implementation of a solution enabling direct memory access (DMA) to the GPU memory from a third party device, bypassing the operating system. This allows this device to communicate directly with the real-time core of the simulation feeding it with the WFS camera pixel stream. We show that DMA between a custom FPGA-based frame-grabber and a computation unit (GPU, FPGA, or Coprocessor such as Xeon-phi) across PCIe allows us to get latencies compatible with what will be needed on ELTs. As a fine-grained synchronization mechanism is not yet made available by GPU vendors, we propose the use of memory polling to avoid interrupts handling and involvement of a CPU. Network and Vision protocols are handled by the FPGA-based Network Interface Card (NIC). We present the results we obtained on a complete AO loop using camera and deformable mirror simulators.

  10. World-wide deployment of Robo-AO visible-light robotic laser adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas Michael; Lu, Jessica R.; Tonry, John; Tully, R. Brent; Wright, Shelley; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Severson, Scott; Choi, Philip; Ramaprakash, A.; Chun, Mark; Connelley, Mike; Tokunaga, Alan; Hall, Donald

    2015-08-01

    In the next few years, several modest-sized telescopes around the world will be upgraded with autonomous laser adaptive optics systems based on the Robo-AO prototype deployed at the Palomar Observatory 1.5-m telescope. The prototype commenced scientific operations in June 2012 and more than 19,000 observations have since been performed at the ~0.12" visible-light diffraction limit. We are planning to move the prototype system to the 2.1-m telescope at Kitt Peak for a 3-year deployment which will serve a consortium of users including Caltech, the University of Hawai`i, IUCAA, NCU and institutions in China. Additionally, 2 months per year will be made available to the US astronomical community.New Robo-AO systems are in various stages of development: a clone by IUCAA for the 2-m IGO telescope in India; a natural guide star variant, KAPAO, by Pomona College at the 1-m Table Mountain telescope in California; and second generation Robo-AO systems are planned for the 3-m IRTF and 2.2-m University of Hawai'i telescopes on Maunakea, Hawai`i. The latter will exploit Maunakea's excellent observing conditions to provide higher Strehl ratios, sharper imaging, ~0.07", and correction to lambda = 400 nm. An additional infrared integral-field spectrograph will be fed by the UH 2.2-m Robo-AO system to quickly classify transients, such as supernovae and asteroids, discovered by the ATLAS system in Hawai`i.

  11. The investigation of determination asteroids positions errors by observations of telescope SBG AO UFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaizer, G. T.; Skripnichenko, P. V.

    2013-07-01

    The article is about investigation of influence astrometric CCD image processing conditions on the accuracy of determining the positions of asteroids. The main this research's problem is dependence of calculatedasteroids coordinates error from used in the processing mathematical model that approximated the image of the objects on the CCD image. In thearticle described of the effect of Lorentz and Moffatt profiles on the accuracy ofasteroids positions determining by the observation from SBG AO UFU.

  12. DNA supercoiling and its role in DNA decatenation and unknotting

    PubMed Central

    Witz, Guillaume; Stasiak, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal and plasmid DNA molecules in bacterial cells are maintained under torsional tension and are therefore supercoiled. With the exception of extreme thermophiles, supercoiling has a negative sign, which means that the torsional tension diminishes the DNA helicity and facilitates strand separation. In consequence, negative supercoiling aids such processes as DNA replication or transcription that require global- or local-strand separation. In extreme thermophiles, DNA is positively supercoiled which protects it from thermal denaturation. While the role of DNA supercoiling connected to the control of DNA stability, is thoroughly researched and subject of many reviews, a less known role of DNA supercoiling emerges and consists of aiding DNA topoisomerases in DNA decatenation and unknotting. Although DNA catenanes are natural intermediates in the process of DNA replication of circular DNA molecules, it is necessary that they become very efficiently decatenated, as otherwise the segregation of freshly replicated DNA molecules would be blocked. DNA knots arise as by-products of topoisomerase-mediated intramolecular passages that are needed to facilitate general DNA metabolism, including DNA replication, transcription or recombination. The formed knots are, however, very harmful for cells if not removed efficiently. Here, we overview the role of DNA supercoiling in DNA unknotting and decatenation. PMID:20026582

  13. Using the Fingerprinting Method to Customize RTLS Based on the AoA Ranging Technique

    PubMed Central

    Jachimczyk, Bartosz; Dziak, Damian; Kulesza, Wlodek J.

    2016-01-01

    Real-time Locating Systems (RTLSs) have the ability to precisely locate the position of things and people in real time. They are needed for security and emergency applications, but also for healthcare and home care appliances. The research aims for developing an analytical method to customize RTLSs, in order to improve localization performance in terms of precision. The proposed method is based on Angle of Arrival (AoA), a ranging technique and fingerprinting method along with an analytically defined uncertainty of AoA, and a localization uncertainty map. The presented solution includes three main concerns: geometry of indoor space, RTLS arrangement, and a statistical approach to localization precision of a pair of location sensors using an AoA signal. An evaluation of the implementation of the customized RTLS validates the analytical model of the fingerprinting map. The results of simulations and physical experiments verify the proposed method. The research confirms that the analytically established fingerprint map is the valid representation of RTLS’ performance in terms of precision. Furthermore, the research demonstrates an impact of workspace geometry and workspace layout onto the RTLS’ performance. Moreover, the studies show how the size and shape of a workspace and the placement of the calibration point affect the fingerprint map. Withal, the performance investigation defines the most effective arrangement of location sensors and its influence on localization precision. PMID:27314354

  14. Using the Fingerprinting Method to Customize RTLS Based on the AoA Ranging Technique.

    PubMed

    Jachimczyk, Bartosz; Dziak, Damian; Kulesza, Wlodek J

    2016-06-14

    Real-time Locating Systems (RTLSs) have the ability to precisely locate the position of things and people in real time. They are needed for security and emergency applications, but also for healthcare and home care appliances. The research aims for developing an analytical method to customize RTLSs, in order to improve localization performance in terms of precision. The proposed method is based on Angle of Arrival (AoA), a ranging technique and fingerprinting method along with an analytically defined uncertainty of AoA, and a localization uncertainty map. The presented solution includes three main concerns: geometry of indoor space, RTLS arrangement, and a statistical approach to localization precision of a pair of location sensors using an AoA signal. An evaluation of the implementation of the customized RTLS validates the analytical model of the fingerprinting map. The results of simulations and physical experiments verify the proposed method. The research confirms that the analytically established fingerprint map is the valid representation of RTLS' performance in terms of precision. Furthermore, the research demonstrates an impact of workspace geometry and workspace layout onto the RTLS' performance. Moreover, the studies show how the size and shape of a workspace and the placement of the calibration point affect the fingerprint map. Withal, the performance investigation defines the most effective arrangement of location sensors and its influence on localization precision.

  15. Correction of shortening and/or angular deformities by distraction osteogenesis using AO-tubular fixator.

    PubMed

    Sangkaew, Chanchit

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen patients (20 bony segments) who had shortening and/or angular deformities were treated by distraction osteogenesis using AO-tubular external fixator. The mean angular correction was 18.9 degrees (range, 8-40 degrees). Of the group in whom shortening and angulation was corrected, the mean length gained was 4.2 cm (3-6 cm). The mean treatment time was 4.9 months (range, 2-13 months) and the mean follow-up was 12 months after removal of the fixator (range, 3-30 months). Delayed union with loosening of the fixator occurred in one patient which resulted in residual shortening of 1.5 cm. The author's technique of distraction osteogenesis using AO-tubular fixator with the new distraction rate of 1 mm/48 h (1 mm/step) could adequately correct shortening and/or angular deformities. No extra equipment was needed other than the readily-available AO-tubular fixation systems. No serious complications such as neurovascular injury were encountered.

  16. AO/NAO Response to Climate Change. 1; Respective Influences of Stratospheric and Tropospheric Climate Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.; Perlwitz, J.; Lonergan, P.

    2005-01-01

    We utilize the GISS Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model and 8 different climate change experiments, many of them focused on stratospheric climate forcings, to assess the relative influence of tropospheric and stratospheric climate change on the extratropical circulation indices (Arctic Oscillation, AO; North Atlantic Oscillation, NAO). The experiments are run in two different ways: with variable sea surface temperatures (SSTs) to allow for a full tropospheric climate response, and with specified SSTs to minimize the tropospheric change. The results show that tropospheric warming (cooling) experiments and stratospheric cooling (warming) experiments produce more positive (negative) AO/NAO indices. For the typical magnitudes of tropospheric and stratospheric climate changes, the tropospheric response dominates; results are strongest when the tropospheric and stratospheric influences are producing similar phase changes. Both regions produce their effect primarily by altering wave propagation and angular momentum transports, but planetary wave energy changes accompanying tropospheric climate change are also important. Stratospheric forcing has a larger impact on the NAO than on the AO, and the angular momentum transport changes associated with it peak in the upper troposphere, affecting all wavenumbers. Tropospheric climate changes influence both the A0 and NAO with effects that extend throughout the troposphere. For both forcings there is often vertical consistency in the sign of the momentum transport changes, obscuring the difference between direct and indirect mechanisms for influencing the surface circulation.

  17. AO modelling for wide-field E-ELT instrumentation using Monte-Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, Alastair; Morris, Simon; Morris, Tim; Myers, Richard

    2014-08-01

    Extensive simulations of AO performance for several E-ELT instruments (including EAGLE, MOSAIC, HIRES and MAORY) have been ongoing using the Monte-Carlo Durham AO Simulation Package. We present the latest simulation results, including studies into DM requirements, dependencies of performance on asterism, detailed point spread function generation, accurate telescope modelling, and studies of laser guide star effects. Details of simulations will be given, including the use of optical models of the E-ELT to generate wave- front sensor pupil illumination functions, laser guide star modelling, and investigations of different many-layer atmospheric profiles. We discuss issues related to ELT-scale simulation, how we have overcome these, and how we will be approaching forthcoming issues such as modelling of advanced wavefront control, multi-rate wavefront sensing, and advanced treatment of extended laser guide star spots. We also present progress made on integrating simulation with AO real-time control systems. The impact of simulation outcomes on instrument design studies will be discussed, and the ongoing work plan presented.

  18. AOS: adaptive offset time scheduling for TCP fairness in optical burst-switched network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hongyun; Zhao, Yongxiang; Chen, Changjia

    2005-11-01

    Optical Burst-switched (OBS) is a promising switching technology and expected to support the future Internet backbone with dramatically increasing bandwidth demand. In an OBS network, burst contention causes burst loss due to bufferless nature of OBS core network. This kind of burst loss will interact with the above TCP layer. In this paper, we study the impact of this interaction on TCP fairness. We find significant unfairness among TCP flows that share the OBS core network, i.e. one flow obtains higher throughput while any others with much lower throughputs. The cause is the phenomenon called "the bigger eats the smaller (BES)", in which a TCP flow with higher rate occasionally will "see" less burst contentions and increase its rate further, while a TCP with lower rate will see more burst contentions and decrease its rate continually. Discuss a simple model to explain BES and verify that a continuous sequence of bursts will enhance BES. Then observe that offset time will be a good choice to control TCP fairness by a curve of unfairness control with offset time adjustment. Finally an adaptive offset time scheduling (AOS) algorithm is proposed. AOS assigns burst offset time value adaptive to the rate of TCP flow. The simulation results show that the fairness can be significantly improved by our AOS scheme.

  19. New classification system for long-bone fractures supplementing the AO/OTA classification.

    PubMed

    Garnavos, Christos; Kanakaris, Nikolaos K; Lasanianos, Nikolaos G; Tzortzi, Paraskevi; West, Robert M

    2012-05-01

    This article describes a novel, clinically oriented classification system for long-bone fractures that is simple, reliable, and useful to predict treatment method, complications, and outcome. The reliability and memorability of the new classification were statistically tested and compared with the AO-Müller/Orthopaedic Trauma Association (AO/OTA) long-bone fracture classification. The proposed classification system was also clinically validated with a targeted pilot study designed for content and clinical outcome retrospectively reviewing 122 closed tibial shaft fractures, which were used as a representative paradigm of long-bone fractures. Statistical evaluation showed that the proposed classification system had improved inter- and intraobserver variation agreement and easier memorability compared with the AO/OTA classification system. The clinical validation study showed its predictive value regarding selection of treatment method, complication rate, and injury outcome.The proposed classification system proved simple, reliable, and memorable. Its clinical value appeared strong enough to justify the organization of larger studies for a complete assessment of its clinical usefulness for all long-bone fractures.

  20. Integration, tests and laboratory performance of SAXO, the VLT-SPHERE extreme AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, C.; Fusco, T.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Sevin, A.; Suarez, M.; Charton, J.; Baudoz, P.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Buey, T.; Dohlen, K.; Feautrier, P.; Fedrigo, E.; Fleuzry, B.; Gach, J.-L.; Hubin, N.; Kasper, M.; Mouillet, D.; Perret, D.; Puget, P.; Sinquin, J.-C.; Soenke, C.; Wildi, F.

    2011-09-01

    Direct detection and spectral characterization of extra-solar planets is one of the most exciting but also one of the most challenging areas in modern astronomy due to the very large contrast between the host star and the planet at very small angular separations. SPHERE (Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet Research in Europe) is a second-generation instrument for the ESO VLT dedicated to this scientific objective. It combines an extreme adaptive optics system, various coronagraphic devices and a suite of focal instruments providing imaging, integral field spectroscopy and polarimetry capabilities in the visible and near-infrared spectral ranges. The extreme AO system, SAXO, is the heart of the SPHERE system, providing to the scientific instruments a flat wavefront corrected from all the atmospheric turbulence and internal defects. We will present a status of SAXO assembly integration and performance. The main requirements and system characteristics will be recalled, then each sub system will be individually presented and fully characterized and finally the full AO loop performance will be quantified. It will be demonstrated that SAXO will meet its challenging requirements (more than 90% of SR in H band with a residual jitter lower than 3 milli-arcseconds for average observation conditions on the VLT). Thanks to a coronagraphic analysis of the AO residuals, a detailed comparison between actual and simulated residual intensity profiles will be provided and will help to adjust the expected performance of the SPHERE system on sky, knowing that its first light is foreseen for mid 2012.

  1. SCExAO: the most complete instrument to characterize exoplanets and stellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozi, Julien; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Singh, Garima; Doughty, Danielle; Pathak, Prashant; Goebel, Sean; Kudo, Tomoyuki

    2015-12-01

    The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) instrument, currently under development for the Subaru Telescope, optimally combines state-of-the-art technologies to directly study exoplanets and stellar environments at the diffraction limit, both in visible and infrared light (0.6 to 2.4 um). The instrument already includes an ultra-fast visible pyramid wavefront sensor operating at 3.5 kHz, a 2k-actuator deformable mirror, a set of optimal coronagraphs that can work as close as 1 l/D, a low-order wavefront sensor, a high-speed speckle control, and two visible interferometric modules, VAMPIRES and FIRST. Stability of the wavefront correction has already been demonstrated on sky, and SCExAO is already producing scientific results. After the integration of the Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) CHARIS and a Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector (MKID) in 2016, SCExAO will be one of the most powerful and effective tools for characterizing exoplanets and disks.

  2. Microwelding of various metallic materials under ultravacuum (AO 138-10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assie, Jean Pierre; Conde, Eric

    1991-01-01

    The first finding from the AO 138-10 is that cold welding never occurred, and that microwelds didn't even affect the reference (presumably microweld prone) pairs of metals consisting of gold, silver, and chromium. The scientific disappointment from these results must be tempered by the notion of a static AO 138-10 experiment, reflecting the passive character of the global Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) flight. Thus far, it has been theorized that cold welding results from the peeling of the oxide layer, that is formed in an earth environment, by the space environment since such a layer no longer grows in space. In fact, such stripping of the oxide layer supposes relative motion of the contacting materials. In the absence of such motion, as in this experiment, oxidation will preserve its integrity and continue to prevent microwelding. More bewildering is that there was no microwelding of the reference pairs. Even though AO 138-10 failed scientific expectations, as did the LDEF structure with cold welding, the positive, functional aspect to keep in mind is the safe operation of single-shot (appendage releasing and/or latching) mechanisms, unhindered by microwelding in a space vacuum, as now demonstrated by the statically representative pairs of materials. Other aspects of the experiment are discussed.

  3. PHOTOMETRIC EVOLUTION OF SNe Ib/c 2004ao, 2004gk, AND 2006gi

    SciTech Connect

    Elmhamdi, Abouazza; Kordi, Ayman; Tsvetkov, Dmitry; Danziger, I. John

    2011-04-20

    Photometric observations of three core collapse supernovae (SNe 2004ao, 2004gk, and 2006gi), covering about 200 days of evolution, are presented and analyzed. The photometric behavior of the three objects is consistent with their membership in the envelope-stripped Type Ib/c class. Pseudobolometric light curves are constructed. The corresponding measured e-folding times are found to be faster compared to the {sup 56}Co decay (i.e., 111.3 days), suggesting that a proportion of {gamma}-rays increasing with time have escaped without thermalization, owing to the low-mass nature of the ejecta. SN 2006gi has almost identical post-maximum decline phase luminosities as SN 1999ex and found to be similar to both SNe 1999dn and 1999ex in terms of the quasi-bolometric shape, placing it among the fast decliner Ib objects. SN 2004ao appears to fit within the slow decliner Ib SNe. SNe 2004ao and 2004gk display almost identical luminosities in the [50-100] day time interval, similar to SN 1993J. A preliminary simplified {gamma}-ray deposition model is described and applied to the computed pseudobolometric light curves, allowing one to find a range in the ejecta and {sup 56}Ni masses. The optical and quasi-bolometric light curves and the B - V color evolution of SN 2004gk are found to show a sudden drop after day 150. Correlating this fact to dust formation is premature and requires further observational evidence.

  4. Simple & Safe Genomic DNA Isolation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for purifying DNA using either bacteria or rat liver is presented. Directions for doing a qualitative DNA assay using diphenylamine and a quantitative DNA assay using spectroscopy are included. (KR)

  5. Simple & Safe Genomic DNA Isolation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for purifying DNA using either bacteria or rat liver is presented. Directions for doing a qualitative DNA assay using diphenylamine and a quantitative DNA assay using spectroscopy are included. (KR)

  6. Studying DNA in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarins, Silja

    1993-01-01

    Outlines a workshop for teachers that illustrates a method of extracting DNA and provides instructions on how to do some simple work with DNA without sophisticated and expensive equipment. Provides details on viscosity studies and breaking DNA molecules. (DDR)

  7. Studying DNA in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarins, Silja

    1993-01-01

    Outlines a workshop for teachers that illustrates a method of extracting DNA and provides instructions on how to do some simple work with DNA without sophisticated and expensive equipment. Provides details on viscosity studies and breaking DNA molecules. (DDR)

  8. Recent progress with the DNA repair mutants of Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Salazar, E.P.; Brookman, K.W.; Collins, C.C.; Stewart, S.A.; Busch, D.B.; Weber, C.A.

    1986-04-02

    Repair deficient mutants of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are being used to identify human genes that correct the repair defects and to study mechanisms of DNA repair and mutagenesis. Five independent tertiary DNA transformants were obtained from the EM9 mutant. In these clones a human DNA sequence was identified that correlated with the resistance of the cells to CldUrd. After Eco RI digestion, Southern transfer, and hybridization of transformant DNAs with the BLUR-8 Alu family sequence, a common fragment of 25 to 30 kb was present. 37 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Purification of mammalian DNA repair protein XRCC1

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I.

    1995-11-01

    Malfunctioning DNA repair systems lead to cancer mutations, and cell death. XRCC1 (X-ray Repair Cross Complementing) is a human DNA repair gene that has been found to fully correct the x-ray repair defect in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutant EM9. The corresponding protein (XRCC1) encoded by this gene has been linked to a DNA repair pathway known as base excision repair, and affects the activity of DNA ligase III. Previously, an XRCC1 cDNA minigene (consisting of the uninterrupted coding sequence for XRCC1 protein followed by a decahistidine tag) was constructed and cloned into vector pET-16b for the purpose of: (1) overproduction of XRCC1 in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; and (2) to facilitate rapid purification of XRCC1 from these systems. A vector is basically a DNA carrier that allows recombinant protein to be cloned and overexpressed in host cells. In this study, XRCC1 protein was overexpressed in E. coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Currently, the XRCC1 minigene is being inserted into a new vector [pET-26b(+)] in hopes to increase overexpression and improve purification. Once purified XRCC1 can be crystallized for structural studies, or studied in vitro for its biological function.

  10. DNA Based Molecular Scale Nanofabrication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-04

    water adsorption on DNA origami template and its impact on DNA-mediated chemical reactions. We also extended the concept of DNA-mediated reaction to...other nanoscale templates, (b) Studied the thermal and chemical stability of DNA origami template. The result shows that the DNA nanostructures can be...potentially used in very harsh chemical environments, (c) Studied the effect of DNA origami template on the growth of self-assembled monolayer (SAM

  11. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  12. DNA UVB dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Regan, J D; Yoshida, H

    1995-11-01

    DNA can be used to establish and monitor solar UVB dose. Since the principal molecular site of UVB damage in living organisms is DNA, it is logical to quantitate biologically effective solar UVB in DNA dosimeters. In addition to their particular sensitivity to UVB, DNA dosimeters have the advantage of a 2 pi geometry for collecting diffuse UVB radiation from all vectors, low cost, small size and portability, and no moving parts. Both molecular (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and biological (bacteriophage plaques) dosimeters can be quantitated as endpoints to yield the total dose. DNA dosimeters integrate the absorbed energy of all UVB wavelengths (290-320 nm), are highly sensitive to the differential biological effectiveness of these wavelengths, and also integrate over time in hours, days or weeks of exposure. Our experiments have focused on the demonstration of DNA solar dosimeters in the ocean at various depths, the application of the dosimeters to the terrestrial monitoring of solar UVB under various conditions, and the development of a mini-dosimeter which uses nanograms of DNA and is assayed by polymerase chain reaction.

  13. DNA vaccines against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bruffaerts, Nicolas; Huygen, Kris; Romano, Marta

    2014-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health problem and novel vaccination regimens are urgently needed. DNA vaccines against TB have been tested in various preclinical models and strategies have been developed to increase their immunogenicity in large animal species. DNA vaccines are able to induce a wide variety of immune responses, including CD8(+) T-cell-mediated cytolytic and IFN-γ responses. DNA vaccination may be valuable in heterologous prime-boost strategies with the currently used bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. This approach could broaden the antigenic repertoire of BCG and enhance its weak induction of MHC class I-restricted immune responses. DNA vaccines offer a number of advantages over certain other types of vaccines, such as the induction of robust MHC class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), their generic manufacturing platform and their relatively low manufacturing costs. Because of their strong potential for inducing memory responses, DNA vaccines are particularly suited for priming immune responses. Furthermore, DNA vaccine technology may help antigen discovery by facilitating screening of candidate vaccines. Co-administration of BCG with plasmid DNA coding for immunodominant, subdominant and phase-specific antigens, poorly expressed by BCG, may lead to the development of improved TB vaccines.

  14. DNA Import into Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, Yu M; Dietrich, A; Weber-Lotfi, F; Ibrahim, N; Klimenko, E S; Tarasenko, V I; Bolotova, T A; Koulintchenko, M V

    2016-10-01

    In recent decades, it has become evident that the condition for normal functioning of mitochondria in higher eukaryotes is the presence of membrane transport systems of macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids). Natural competence of the mitochondria in plants, animals, and yeasts to actively uptake DNA may be directly related to horizontal gene transfer into these organelles occurring at much higher rate compared to the nuclear and chloroplast genomes. However, in contrast with import of proteins and tRNAs, little is known about the biological role and molecular mechanism underlying import of DNA into eukaryotic mitochondria. In this review, we discuss current state of investigations in this area, particularly specificity of DNA import into mitochondria and its features in plants, animals, and yeasts; a tentative mechanism of DNA import across the mitochondrial outer and inner membranes; experimental data evidencing several existing, but not yet fully understood mechanisms of DNA transfer into mitochondria. Currently available data regarding transport of informational macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) into the mitochondria do not rule out that the mechanism of protein and tRNA import as well as tRNA and DNA import into the mitochondria may partially overlap.

  15. The "interceptor" properties of chlorophyllin measured within the three-component system: intercalator-DNA-chlorophyllin.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Monika; Wieczorek, Zbigniew; Wieczorek, Jolanta; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2006-08-20

    In aqueous solutions, in the presence of double-stranded DNA, chlorophyllin (CHL) forms complexes with each of the three DNA intercalators: acridine orange (AO), quinacrine mustard (QM), and doxorubicin (DOX). The evidence for these interactions was obtained by measurement changes in the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the mixtures containing DNA and intercalators during titration with CHL. A model of simple competition between DNA and CHL for the intercalator was used to define the measured interactions. The concentrations of the complexes estimated based on this model were consistent with the concentrations obtained by actual measurement of the absorption spectra. The present data provide further support for the role of chlorophyllin as an "interceptor" that may neutralize biological activity of aromatic compounds including mutagens and antitumor drugs.

  16. DNA-PK assay

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Connelly, Margery A.

    2004-10-12

    The present invention provides a method for detecting DNA-activated protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity in a biological sample. The method includes contacting a biological sample with a detectably-labeled phosphate donor and a synthetic peptide substrate defined by the following features to provide specific recognition and phosphorylation by DNA-PK: (1) a phosphate-accepting amino acid pair which may include serine-glutamine (Ser-Gln) (SQ), threonine-glutamine (Thr-Gln) (TQ), glutamine-serine (Gln-Ser) (QS), or glutamine-threonine (Gln-Thr) (QT); (2) enhancer amino acids which may include glutamic acid or glutamine immediately adjacent at the amino- or carboxyl- side of the amino acid pair and forming an amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (3) a first spacer sequence at the amino terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (4) a second spacer sequence at the carboxyl terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit, which spacer sequences may include any combination of amino acids that does not provide a phosphorylation site consensus sequence motif; and, (5) a tag moiety, which may be an amino acid sequence or another chemical entity that permits separating the synthetic peptide from the phosphate donor. A compostion and a kit for the detection of DNA-PK activity are also provided. Methods for detecting DNA, protein phosphatases and substances that alter the activity of DNA-PK are also provided. The present invention also provides a method of monitoring protein kinase and DNA-PK activity in living cells. -A composition and a kit for monitoring protein kinase activity in vitro and a composition and a kit for monitoring DNA-PK activities in living cells are also provided. A method for identifying agents that alter protein kinase activity in vitro and a method for identifying agents that alter DNA-PK activity in living cells are also provided.

  17. The European Mobile System (EMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongejans, A.; Rogard, R.; Mistretta, I.; Ananasso, F.

    1993-01-01

    The European Space Agency is presently procuring an L band payload in order to promote a regional European L band system coping with the specific needs of the European market. The payload, and the two communications systems to be supported, are described below. The potential market for EMS in Europe is discussed.

  18. Improving Laser-Guide Star AO Observations via Mesospheric Sodium Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteley, R.; Yavorski, J.; Jelks, C.; Colburn, W.; Berner, K.

    The use of modern Adaptive Optics (AO) systems allows large telescopes to approach diffraction limited seeing. This technique can improve the imaging resolution of a large telescope by more than an order of magnitude. Such a capability provides real improvement in ground-based space situational awareness (SSA) observations. The drawback to current adaptive optics systems is that they only improve resolution over small imaging regions, sometimes as small as a few tens of arc seconds. Such small imaging regions limit the availability of suitable guide stars, which in turn limits the availability and duty cycle of an AO system. This limitation has led to the development of systems for producing artificial guide stars, which can be created along a line of sight coincident with that of the telescope. The most commonly used artificial guide stars are created by tuning a laser to the frequency of the Sodium D1/D2 line complex, and exciting sodium atoms in the Earth's mesosphere. The mesospheric sodium layer is exceptionally rarified, and has densities that vary diurnally, seasonally, and geographically. Our investigation centers on the use of sounding rockets to deliver substantial quantities of atomic sodium to the mesospheric layer. This direct enhancement of the sodium layer could increase the number of nights that laser-guide star AO observations could be performed, as well as increasing guide star brightness. These improvements should yield better AO wavefront correction and faster imaging frame rates. For the SSA application, these improvements will lead to more and better imaging opportunities. We will present a basic overview of the relevant mesospheric dynamics, with emphasis on sodium dwell times and replenishment rates. We will present several possible mechanisms for delivery and deployment of atomic sodium in the mesosphere, and demonstrate the trade-offs in their use. We will present a possible concept of operation for notional delivery systems. Finally, we

  19. A double-hexameric MCM2-7 complex is loaded onto origin DNA during licensing of eukaryotic DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Evrin, C.; Li, H.; Clarke, P.; Zech, J.; Lurz, R.; Sun, J.; Uhle, S.; Stillman, B.; Speck, C.

    2009-12-01

    During pre-replication complex (pre-RC) formation, origin recognition complex (ORC), Cdc6, and Cdt1 cooperatively load the 6-subunit mini chromosome maintenance (MCM2-7) complex onto DNA. Loading of MCM2-7 is a prerequisite for DNA licensing that restricts DNA replication to once per cell cycle. During S phase MCM2-7 functions as part of the replicative helicase but within the pre-RC MCM2-7 is inactive. The organization of replicative DNA helicases before and after loading onto DNA has been studied in bacteria and viruses but not eukaryotes and is of major importance for understanding the MCM2-7 loading mechanism and replisome assembly. Lack of an efficient reconstituted pre-RC system has hindered the detailed mechanistic and structural analysis of MCM2-7 loading for a long time. We have reconstituted Saccharomyces cerevisiae pre-RC formation with purified proteins and showed efficient loading of MCM2-7 onto origin DNA in vitro. MCM2-7 loading was found to be dependent on the presence of all pre-RC proteins, origin DNA, and ATP hydrolysis. The quaternary structure of MCM2-7 changes during pre-RC formation: MCM2-7 before loading is a single hexamer in solution but is transformed into a double-hexamer during pre-RC formation. Using electron microscopy (EM), we observed that loaded MCM2-7 encircles DNA. The loaded MCM2-7 complex can slide on DNA, and sliding is not directional. Our results provide key insights into mechanisms of pre-RC formation and have important implications for understanding the role of the MCM2-7 in establishment of bidirectional replication forks.

  20. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  1. Biology of DNA restriction.

    PubMed Central

    Bickle, T A; Krüger, D H

    1993-01-01

    Our understanding of the evolution of DNA restriction and modification systems, the control of the expression of the structural genes for the enzymes, and the importance of DNA restriction in the cellular economy has advanced by leaps and bounds in recent years. This review documents these advances for the three major classes of classical restriction and modification systems, describes the discovery of a new class of restriction systems that specifically cut DNA carrying the modification signature of foreign cells, and deals with the mechanisms developed by phages to avoid the restriction systems of their hosts. PMID:8336674

  2. Making DNA add.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, F; Fliss, M; Bancroft, C

    1996-07-12

    Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of using DNA-based experiments to compute solutions to combinatorial problems. However, a prerequisite for designing a computer useful in a wide range of applications is the ability to perform mathematical calculations. The development of a DNA-based algorithm for addition is presented. The DNA representation of two nonnegative binary numbers is presented in a form permitting a chain of primer extension reactions to carry out the addition operation. To demonstrate the feasibility of this algorithm, a simple example was executed biochemically.

  3. Plasmid DNA manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Aaron E; Williams, James A

    2007-01-01

    Today, plasmid DNA is becoming increasingly important as the next generation of biotechnology products (gene medicines and DNA vaccines) make their way into clinical trials, and eventually into the pharmaceutical marketplace. This review summarizes recent patents and patent applications relating to plasmid manufacturing, in the context of a comprehensive description of the plasmid manufacturing intellectual property landscape. Strategies for plasmid manufacturers to develop or in-license key plasmid manufacturing technologies are described with the endpoint of efficiently producing kg quantities of plasmid DNA of a quality that meets anticipated European and FDA quality specifications for commercial plasmid products.

  4. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  5. Environmental toxicants cause sperm DNA fragmentation as detected by the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA[reg])

    SciTech Connect

    Evenson, Donald P. . E-mail: scsa@brookings.net; Wixon, Regina

    2005-09-01

    Studies over the past two decades have clearly shown that reproductive toxicants cause sperm DNA fragmentation. This DNA fragmentation can usually be detected prior to observing alterations of metaphase chromosomes in embryos. Thus, Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA)-detected DNA damage is viewed as the molecular precursor to later gross chromosome damage observed under the light microscope. SCSA measurements of animal or human sperm consist of first obtaining a fresh or flash frozen neat semen sample in LN2 or dry ice. Samples are then sent to a SCSA diagnostic laboratory where the samples are thawed, diluted to {approx}1-2 x 106 sperm/ml, treated for 30 s with a pH 1.2 detergent buffer and then stained with acridine orange (AO). The low pH partially denatures DNA at the sites of DNA strand breaks and the AO-ssDNA fluoresces red while the AO-dsDNA fluoresces green. Flow cytometry measurements of 5000 sperm/sample provide statistically robust data on the ratio of red to green sperm, the extent of the DNA fragmentation and the standard deviations of measures. Numerous experiments on rodents treated with reproductive toxicants clearly showed that SCSA measures are highly dose responsive and have a very low CV. Different agents that act on germ cells at various stages of development usually showed sperm DNA fragmentation when that germ cell fraction arrived in the epididymis or ejaculate. Some of these treated samples were capable of successful in vitro fertilization but with frequent embryo failure. A 2-year longitudinal study of men living a valley town with a reported abnormal level of infertility and spontaneous miscarriages and also a seasonal atmospheric smog pollution, showed, for the first time, that SCSA measurements of human sperm DNA fragmentation were detectable and correlated with dosage of air pollution while the classical semen measures were not correlated. Also, young men spraying pesticides without protective gear are at an increased risk for

  6. Human RECQ1 helicase-driven DNA unwinding, annealing, and branch migration: Insights from DNA complex structures

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Ashley C. W.; Gomathinayagam, Shivasankari; Swuec, Paolo; Berti, Matteo; Schnecke, Christina; Marino, Francesca; von Delft, Frank; Renault, Ludovic; Costa, Alessandro; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    RecQ helicases are a widely conserved family of ATP-dependent motors with diverse roles in nearly every aspect of bacterial and eukaryotic genome maintenance. However, the physical mechanisms by which RecQ helicases recognize and process specific DNA replication and repair intermediates are largely unknown. Here, we solved crystal structures of the human RECQ1 helicase in complexes with tailed-duplex DNA and ssDNA. The structures map the interactions of the ssDNA tail and the branch point along the helicase and Zn-binding domains, which, together with reported structures of other helicases, define the catalytic stages of helicase action. We also identify a strand-separating pin, which (uniquely in RECQ1) is buttressed by the protein dimer interface. A duplex DNA-binding surface on the C-terminal domain is shown to play a role in DNA unwinding, strand annealing, and Holliday junction (HJ) branch migration. We have combined EM and analytical ultracentrifugation approaches to show that RECQ1 can form what appears to be a flat, homotetrameric complex and propose that RECQ1 tetramers are involved in HJ recognition. This tetrameric arrangement suggests a platform for coordinated activity at the advancing and receding duplexes of an HJ during branch migration. PMID:25831490

  7. Human RECQ1 helicase-driven DNA unwinding, annealing, and branch migration: insights from DNA complex structures.

    PubMed

    Pike, Ashley C W; Gomathinayagam, Shivasankari; Swuec, Paolo; Berti, Matteo; Zhang, Ying; Schnecke, Christina; Marino, Francesca; von Delft, Frank; Renault, Ludovic; Costa, Alessandro; Gileadi, Opher; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2015-04-07

    RecQ helicases are a widely conserved family of ATP-dependent motors with diverse roles in nearly every aspect of bacterial and eukaryotic genome maintenance. However, the physical mechanisms by which RecQ helicases recognize and process specific DNA replication and repair intermediates are largely unknown. Here, we solved crystal structures of the human RECQ1 helicase in complexes with tailed-duplex DNA and ssDNA. The structures map the interactions of the ssDNA tail and the branch point along the helicase and Zn-binding domains, which, together with reported structures of other helicases, define the catalytic stages of helicase action. We also identify a strand-separating pin, which (uniquely in RECQ1) is buttressed by the protein dimer interface. A duplex DNA-binding surface on the C-terminal domain is shown to play a role in DNA unwinding, strand annealing, and Holliday junction (HJ) branch migration. We have combined EM and analytical ultracentrifugation approaches to show that RECQ1 can form what appears to be a flat, homotetrameric complex and propose that RECQ1 tetramers are involved in HJ recognition. This tetrameric arrangement suggests a platform for coordinated activity at the advancing and receding duplexes of an HJ during branch migration.

  8. Development of Phosphorothioate DNA and DNA Thioaptamers.

    PubMed

    Volk, David E; Lokesh, Ganesh L R

    2017-07-13

    Nucleic acid aptamers are short RNA- or DNA-based affinity reagents typically selected from combinatorial libraries to bind to a specific target such as a protein, a small molecule, whole cells or even animals. Aptamers have utility in the development of diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic applications due to their size, physico-chemical nature and ease of synthesis and modification to suit the application. A variety of oligonucleotide modifications have been used to enhance the stability of aptamers from nuclease degradation in vivo. The non-bridging oxygen atoms of the phosphodiester backbones of RNA and DNA aptamers can be substituted with one or two sulfur atoms, resulting in thioaptamers with phosphorothioate or phosphorodithioate linkages, respectively. Such thioaptamers are known to have increased binding affinity towards their target, as well as enhanced resistance to nuclease degradation. In this review, we discuss the development of phosphorothioate chemistry and thioaptamers, with a brief review of selection methods.

  9. Architecture and ssDNA interaction of the Timeless-Tipin-RPA complex

    PubMed Central

    Witosch, Justine; Wolf, Eva; Mizuno, Naoko

    2014-01-01

    The Timeless-Tipin (Tim-Tipin) complex, also referred to as the fork protection complex, is involved in coordination of DNA replication. Tim-Tipin is suggested to be recruited to replication forks via Replication Protein A (RPA) but details of the interaction are unknown. Here, using cryo-EM and biochemical methods, we characterized complex formation of Tim-Tipin, RPA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Tim-Tipin and RPA form a 258 kDa complex with a 1:1:1 stoichiometry. The cryo-EM 3D reconstruction revealed a globular architecture of the Tim-Tipin-RPA complex with a ring-like and a U-shaped domain covered by a RPA lid. Interestingly, RPA in the complex adopts a horse shoe-like shape resembling its conformation in the presence of long ssDNA (>30 nucleotides). Furthermore, the recruitment of the Tim-Tipin-RPA complex to ssDNA is modulated by the RPA conformation and requires RPA to be in the more compact 30 nt ssDNA binding mode. The dynamic formation and disruption of the Tim-Tipin-RPA-ssDNA complex implicates the RPA-based recruitment of Tim-Tipin to the replication fork. PMID:25348395

  10. Cosmic muon induced EM showers in NO$\

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Nitin; Duyang, Hongyue; Shanahan, Peter; Mishra, Sanjib; Bhuyan, Bipul

    2016-11-15

    Here, the NuMI Off-Axis ve Appearance (NOvA) experiment is a ne appearance neutrino oscillation experiment at Fermilab. It identifies the ne signal from the electromagnetic (EM) showers induced by the electrons in the final state of neutrino interactions. Cosmic muon induced EM showers, dominated by bremsstrahlung, are abundant in NOvA far detector. We use the Cosmic Muon- Removal technique to get pure EM shower sample from bremsstrahlung muons in data. We also use Cosmic muon decay in flight EM showers which are highly pure EM showers.The large Cosmic-EM sample can be used, as data driven method, to characterize the EM shower signature and provides valuable checks of the simulation, reconstruction, particle identification algorithm, and calibration across the NOvA detector.

  11. DNA-templated nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Becerril, Héctor A; Woolley, Adam T

    2009-02-01

    Nanofabrication, or the organizational control over matter at the nanometre scale, is an intriguing scientific challenge requiring multidisciplinary tools for its solution. DNA is a biomolecule that can be combined with other nanometre-scale entities through chemical self-assembly to form a broad variety of nanomaterials. In this tutorial review we present the principles that allow DNA to interact with other chemical species, and describe the challenges and potential applications of DNA as a template for making both biological and inorganic features with nanometre resolution. As such, this report should be of interest to chemists, surface and materials scientists, biologists, and nanotechnologists, as well as others who seek to use DNA in nanofabrication.

  12. Retroviral DNA Integration

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into host chromatin is the defining step of retroviral replication. This enzymatic process is catalyzed by the virus-encoded integrase protein, which is conserved among retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons. Retroviral integration proceeds via two integrase activities: 3′-processing of the viral DNA ends, followed by the strand transfer of the processed ends into host cell chromosomal DNA. Herein we review the molecular mechanism of retroviral DNA integration, with an emphasis on reaction chemistries and architectures of the nucleoprotein complexes involved. We additionally discuss the latest advances on anti-integrase drug development for the treatment of AIDS and the utility of integrating retroviral vectors in gene therapy applications. PMID:27198982

  13. FBI's DNA analysis program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, John R.

    1994-03-01

    Forensic DNA profiling technology is a significant law enforcement tool due to its superior discriminating power. Applying the principles of population genetics to the DNA profile obtained in violent crime investigations results in low frequency of occurrence estimates for the DNA profile. These estimates often range from a frequency of occurrence of 1 in 50 unrelated individuals to 1 in a million unrelated individuals or even smaller. It is this power to discriminate among individuals in the population that has propelled forensic DNA technology to the forefront of forensic testing in violent crime cases. Not only is the technology extremely powerful in including or excluding a criminal suspect as the perpetrator, but it also gives rise to the potential of identifying criminal suspects in cases where the investigators of unknown suspect cases have exhausted all other available leads.

  14. Making DNA Fingerprints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunley, Kathie F.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity to simulate electrophoresis using everyday items. Uses adding machine paper to construct a set of DNA fingerprints that can be used to solve crime cases designed by students in any biology class. (JRH)

  15. Multiplex analysis of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Kieffer-Higgins, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    This invention features vectors and a method for sequencing DNA. The method includes the steps of: a) ligating the DNA into a vector comprising a tag sequence, the tag sequence includes at least 15 bases, wherein the tag sequence will not hybridize to the DNA under stringent hybridization conditions and is unique in the vector, to form a hybrid vector, b) treating the hybrid vector in a plurality of vessels to produce fragments comprising the tag sequence, wherein the fragments differ in length and terminate at a fixed known base or bases, wherein the fixed known base or bases differs in each vessel, c) separating the fragments from each vessel according to their size, d) hybridizing the fragments with an oligonucleotide able to hybridize specifically with the tag sequence, and e) detecting the pattern of hybridization of the tag sequence, wherein the pattern reflects the nucleotide sequence of the DNA.

  16. Close encounters with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Maffeo, C.; Yoo, J.; Comer, J.; Wells, D. B.; Luan, B.; Aksimentiev, A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, the all-atom molecular dynamics method has grown in the scale of both systems and processes amenable to it and in its ability to make quantitative predictions about the behavior of experimental systems. The field of computational DNA research is no exception, witnessing a dramatic increase in the size of systems simulated with atomic resolution, the duration of individual simulations and the realism of the simulation outcomes. In this topical review, we describe the hallmark physical properties of DNA from the perspective of all-atom simulations. We demonstrate the amazing ability of such simulations to reveal the microscopic physical origins of experimentally observed phenomena and we review the frustrating limitations associated with imperfections of present atomic force fields and inadequate sampling. The review is focused on the following four physical properties of DNA: effective electric charge, response to an external mechanical force, interaction with other DNA molecules and behavior in an external electric field. PMID:25238560

  17. Elastic Shapes of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fain, Boris; Rudnick, Joseph

    1997-03-01

    Short segments of DNA assume shapes that minimize their elastic energy. Modeling of the various mechanisms involving the molecule - replication, transcription, packaging, etc. - requires a description of the conformations of DNA under constraints. We develop a formalism that obtains analytic expressions for shape, link, twist and extension of a segment subject to sufficient number of constraints. We apply our technique to two particular cases: a) Stretched twisted linear DNA. This is an interesting test for our formalism, especially in light of recent experiments(Strick T.R., Allemand J.-F., Bensimon A., Croquette V. Science) 271 1835-1837, (1996). The molecule remains extended until a critical twist is reached, at which point it undergoes a plectonemic transition. b) Closed circular DNA. Describing the shapes of such molecules has been an outstanding problem for some time. We obtain a family of curves classified by their deviation in link from the plain circle.

  18. Making DNA Fingerprints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunley, Kathie F.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity to simulate electrophoresis using everyday items. Uses adding machine paper to construct a set of DNA fingerprints that can be used to solve crime cases designed by students in any biology class. (JRH)

  19. DNA complexes: Durable binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Adam R.

    2011-11-01

    A tetra-intercalator compound that threads through a DNA double-helix to form a remarkably stable complex exhibits an unusual combination of sequence specificity and rapid association yet slow dissociation.

  20. DNA reviews: hair.

    PubMed

    Graham, E A M

    2007-06-01

    Human and nonhuman hairs are often recovered during forensic investigation. As with all other biological samples that may be collected, via DNA analysis, hairs have the potential to provide the investigating authority with valuable intelligence pertaining to the identity of offenders, victims and even pets. DNA analysis of hairs is not however a straightforward process. The biochemical make up of hairs provide the DNA analyst with a unique set of challenges that must be overcome before any useful information can be gleaned from the evidence. This short review provides an overview of the location and condition of DNA within hair samples, and discusses the analytical methods that are employed to maximise the information that can be obtained from this sample type.

  1. Automated DNA profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Graham, Eleanor A M

    2005-12-01

    DNA profile analysis is not a simple process. Stringent demands are placed on the accuracy and consistency of forensic evidence so that complex, robust, and reproducible guidelines are necessary to assist the analyst and ensure mistakes are eliminated before a final profile is reported. The guidelines used for forensic DNA profile interpretation are formulated by investigation and statistical evaluation of all aspects of the analytical procedure. All the resulting rules, formulas, and thresholds are perfectly suited to programming of "expert systems"-software programs that imitate the human expert in decision-based processes to formulate a conclusion. Expert systems in forensic DNA analysis will contribute greatly to this field by increasing analytical throughput. The net result of this will be an increase in the human resources available for the research and development of improved methodologies, to ensure that forensic DNA profiling continues to advance at its current impressive rate.

  2. DNA Vaccination in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Dey, Sohini; Chellappa, Madhan Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Robust and sustainable development of poultry industry requires prevention of deadly infectious diseases. Vigorous vaccination of the birds is a routine practice; however, the live and inactivated vaccines that are used have inherent disadvantages. New-generation vaccines such as DNA vaccines offer several advantages over conventional vaccines. DNA vaccines, which encode an antigen of interest or multiple antigens in the target host, are stable, easy to produce and administer, do not require cold chain maintenance, and are not affected by the maternal antibodies. In addition, DNA vaccines can also be administered in ovo, and thus, mass vaccination and early induction of immune response can effectively be achieved. In this chapter, we focus on the development of DNA vaccines against important infectious viral as well as parasitic diseases of poultry.

  3. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  4. DNA damage and carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Stelow, R B

    1980-01-01

    Although cancer may arise as a result of many different types of molecular changes, there is little reason to doubt that changes to DNA are one of the more important ones in cancer initiation. Although DNA repair mechanisms seem able to eliminate a very large fraction of deleterious changes to DNA, we not only have little insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in such repair, but have a negligible amount of information to permit us to estimate the shape of dose response relations at low doses. The case of skin cancer is a special one, in that the average population is exposed to sufficient solar uv so that the effects of small increments in uv dose may be estimated. An approximate 85% reduction in DNA repair increases skin cancer incidence 10/sup 4/ fold.

  5. Interaction of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.C.; Simpson, W.A.; Raghow, R.; Hasty, K.

    1986-03-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) is a large multidomain glycoprotein found in the basement membrane, on cell surface and in plasma. The interactions of Fn with DNA may be significant in glomerular deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The authors examined the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn by a solid phase assay in which Fn was coated to microtiter plates and reacted with (/sup 3/H)DNA or DNA complexes with a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody. The optimal interaction of DNA with Fn occurs at <0.1M NaCl suggesting that the binding is charge dependent; the specificity of this binding was shown by competitive inhibition and locking experiments using anti-Fn. The binding was maximum at pH 6.5 and in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. The addition of Clq enhanced the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn, whereas heparan sulfate inhibited such binding. The monomeric or aggregated IgC did not bind Fn but aggregated IgG bound to Fn in the presence of Clq. Furthermore, DNA-anti-DNA complexes in sera from active SLE patients bound Fn which was enhanced in the presence of Clq; DNase abolished this binding indicating that the interaction of these complexes was mediated by DNA. These observations may partially explain the molecular mechanism(s) of the deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in basement membrane.

  6. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Shara Carol

    2003-01-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices to a length greater than

  7. Electrochemical DNA Sensors for Detection of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Diculescu, Victor Constantin; Paquim, Ana-Maria Chiorcea; Brett, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemical devices have received particular attention due to their rapid detection and great sensitivity for the evaluation of DNA-hazard compounds interaction mechanisms. Several types of bioanalytical method use nucleic acids probes to detect DNA damage. This article reviews current directions and strategies in the development and applications of electrochemical DNA sensors for the detection of DNA damage.

  8. Blowing DNA bubbles.

    PubMed

    Severin, N; Zhuang, W; Ecker, C; Kalachev, A A; Sokolov, I M; Rabe, J P

    2006-11-01

    We report here experimental observations which indicate that topologically or covalently formed polymer loops embedded in an ultrathin liquid film on a solid substrate can be "blown" into circular "bubbles" during scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging. In particular, supercoiled vector DNA has been unraveled, moved, stretched, and overstretched to two times its B-form length and then torn apart. We attribute the blowing of the DNA bubbles to the interaction of the tapping SFM tip with the ultrathin liquid film.

  9. Das DNA-Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, Stefan

    Im Jahre 1953 wurde von James Watson und Francis Crick erstmalig der strukturelle Aufbau der sogenannten DNA (Desoxyribonukleinsäure) beschrieben, welche das Erbgut jedes Lebewesens enthält. Der wesentliche Teil des Erbguts wird dabei durch eine sehr lange Folge der vier Basen Adenin (A), Cytosin (C), Guanin (G) und Thymin (T) codiert. Seit einigen Jahren ist es möglich, die Folge der vier Basen zu einer gegebenen DNA zu bestimmen. Biologen bezeichnen diesen Vorgang als Sequenzierung.

  10. Programming DNA tube circumferences.

    PubMed

    Yin, Peng; Hariadi, Rizal F; Sahu, Sudheer; Choi, Harry M T; Park, Sung Ha; Labean, Thomas H; Reif, John H

    2008-08-08

    Synthesizing molecular tubes with monodisperse, programmable circumferences is an important goal shared by nanotechnology, materials science, and supermolecular chemistry. We program molecular tube circumferences by specifying the complementarity relationships between modular domains in a 42-base single-stranded DNA motif. Single-step annealing results in the self-assembly of long tubes displaying monodisperse circumferences of 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, or 20 DNA helices.

  11. Issues in DNA Fingerprinting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    specialists in forensic science , where one must learn to deal with degraded specimens that are not obtained from well run scientific laboratories. Some of...methods are a most powerful adjunct to forensic science for personal identification and have immense benefit to the public" and later "DNA typing is... forensic science . National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. Devlin, B., Risch, N., and Roeder, K. (1990). No excess of homozygosity at loci used for DNA

  12. In situ structure and dynamics of DNA origami determined through molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2013-01-01

    The DNA origami method permits folding of long single-stranded DNA into complex 3D structures with subnanometer precision. Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and recently cryo-EM tomography have been used to characterize the properties of such DNA origami objects, however their microscopic structures and dynamics have remained unknown. Here, we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that characterized the structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects in unprecedented microscopic detail. When simulated in an aqueous environment, the structures of DNA origami objects depart from their idealized targets as a result of steric, electrostatic, and solvent-mediated forces. Whereas the global structural features of such relaxed conformations conform to the target designs, local deformations are abundant and vary in magnitude along the structures. In contrast to their free-solution conformation, the Holliday junctions in the DNA origami structures adopt a left-handed antiparallel conformation. We find the DNA origami structures undergo considerable temporal fluctuations on both local and global scales. Analysis of such structural fluctuations reveals the local mechanical properties of the DNA origami objects. The lattice type of the structures considerably affects global mechanical properties such as bending rigidity. Our study demonstrates the potential of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to play a considerable role in future development of the DNA origami field by providing accurate, quantitative assessment of local and global structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects. PMID:24277840

  13. In situ structure and dynamics of DNA origami determined through molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2013-12-10

    The DNA origami method permits folding of long single-stranded DNA into complex 3D structures with subnanometer precision. Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and recently cryo-EM tomography have been used to characterize the properties of such DNA origami objects, however their microscopic structures and dynamics have remained unknown. Here, we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that characterized the structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects in unprecedented microscopic detail. When simulated in an aqueous environment, the structures of DNA origami objects depart from their idealized targets as a result of steric, electrostatic, and solvent-mediated forces. Whereas the global structural features of such relaxed conformations conform to the target designs, local deformations are abundant and vary in magnitude along the structures. In contrast to their free-solution conformation, the Holliday junctions in the DNA origami structures adopt a left-handed antiparallel conformation. We find the DNA origami structures undergo considerable temporal fluctuations on both local and global scales. Analysis of such structural fluctuations reveals the local mechanical properties of the DNA origami objects. The lattice type of the structures considerably affects global mechanical properties such as bending rigidity. Our study demonstrates the potential of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to play a considerable role in future development of the DNA origami field by providing accurate, quantitative assessment of local and global structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects.

  14. DNA methylation and differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Michalowsky, L A; Jones, P A

    1989-01-01

    The methylation of specific cytosine residues in DNA has been implicated in regulating gene expression and facilitating functional specialization of cellular phenotypes. Generally, the demethylation of certain CpG sites correlates with transcriptional activation of genes. 5-Azacytidine is an inhibitor of DNA methylation and has been widely used as a potent activator of suppressed genetic information. Treatment of cells with 5-azacytidine results in profound phenotypic alterations. The drug-induced hypomethylation of DNA apparently perturbs DNA-protein interactions that may consequently alter transcriptional activity and cell determination. The inhibitory effect of cytosine methylation may be exerted via altered DNA-protein interactions specifically or may be transduced by a change in the conformation of chromatin. Recent studies have demonstrated that cytosine methylation also plays a central role in parental imprinting, which in turn determines the differential expression of maternal and paternal genomes during embryogenesis. In other words, methylation is the mechanism whereby the embryo retains memory of the gametic origin of each component of genetic information. A memory of this type would probably persist during DNA replication and cell division as methylation patterns are stable and heritable. PMID:2466640

  15. Toward larger DNA origami.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Alexandria N; Saaem, Ishtiaq; Vogen, Briana N; Brown, Stanley; LaBean, Thomas H

    2014-10-08

    Structural DNA nanotechnology, and specifically scaffolded DNA origami, is rapidly developing as a versatile method for bottom-up fabrication of novel nanometer-scale materials and devices. However, lengths of conventional single-stranded scaffolds, for example, 7,249-nucleotide circular genomic DNA from the M13mp18 phage, limit the scales of these uniquely addressable structures. Additionally, increasing DNA origami size generates the cost burden of increased staple-strand synthesis. We addressed this 2-fold problem by developing the following methods: (1) production of the largest to-date biologically derived single-stranded scaffold using a λ/M13 hybrid virus to produce a 51 466-nucleotide DNA in a circular, single-stranded form and (2) inexpensive DNA synthesis via an inkjet-printing process on a chip embossed with functionalized micropillars made from cyclic olefin copolymer. We have experimentally demonstrated very efficient assembly of a 51-kilobasepair origami from the λ/M13 hybrid scaffold folded by chip-derived staple strands. In addition, we have demonstrated two-dimensional, asymmetric origami sheets with controlled global curvature such that they land on a substrate in predictable orientations that have been verified by atomic force microscopy.

  16. Variations in brain DNA

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Jesús; Gómez-Ramos, Alberto; Soriano, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    It is assumed that DNA sequences are conserved in the diverse cell types present in a multicellular organism like the human being. Thus, in order to compare the sequences in the genome of DNA from different individuals, nucleic acid is commonly isolated from a single tissue. In this regard, blood cells are widely used for this purpose because of their availability. Thus blood DNA has been used to study genetic familiar diseases that affect other tissues and organs, such as the liver, heart, and brain. While this approach is valid for the identification of familial diseases in which mutations are present in parental germinal cells and, therefore, in all the cells of a given organism, it is not suitable to identify sporadic diseases in which mutations might occur in specific somatic cells. This review addresses somatic DNA variations in different tissues or cells (mainly in the brain) of single individuals and discusses whether the dogma of DNA invariance between cell types is indeed correct. We will also discuss how single nucleotide somatic variations arise, focusing on the presence of specific DNA mutations in the brain. PMID:25505410

  17. Transcription of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Tabak, H F; Grivell, L A; Borst, P

    1983-01-01

    While mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is the simplest DNA in nature, coding for rRNAs and tRNAs, results of DNA sequence, and transcript analysis have demonstrated that both the synthesis and processing of mitochondrial RNAs involve remarkably intricate events. At one extreme, genes in animal mtDNAs are tightly packed, both DNA strands are completely transcribed (symmetric transcription), and the appearance of specific mRNAs is entirely dependent on processing at sites signalled by the sequences of the tRNAs, which abut virtually every gene. At the other extreme, gene organization in yeast (Saccharomyces) is anything but compact, with long stretches of AT-rich DNA interspaced between coding sequences and no obvious logic to the order of genes. Transcription is asymmetric and several RNAs are initiated de novo. Nevertheless, extensive RNA processing occurs due largely to the presence of split genes. RNA splicing is complex, is controlled by both mitochondrial and nuclear genes, and in some cases is accompanied by the formation of RNAs that behave as covalently closed circles. The present article reviews current knowledge of mitochondrial transcription and RNA processing in relation to possible mechanisms for the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression.

  18. DNA biosensors that reason.

    PubMed

    Sainz de Murieta, Iñaki; Rodríguez-Patón, Alfonso

    2012-08-01

    Despite the many designs of devices operating with the DNA strand displacement, surprisingly none is explicitly devoted to the implementation of logical deductions. The present article introduces a new model of biosensor device that uses nucleic acid strands to encode simple rules such as "IF DNA_strand(1) is present THEN disease(A)" or "IF DNA_strand(1) AND DNA_strand(2) are present THEN disease(B)". Taking advantage of the strand displacement operation, our model makes these simple rules interact with input signals (either DNA or any type of RNA) to generate an output signal (in the form of nucleotide strands). This output signal represents a diagnosis, which either can be measured using FRET techniques, cascaded as the input of another logical deduction with different rules, or even be a drug that is administered in response to a set of symptoms. The encoding introduces an implicit error cancellation mechanism, which increases the system scalability enabling longer inference cascades with a bounded and controllable signal-noise relation. It also allows the same rule to be used in forward inference or backward inference, providing the option of validly outputting negated propositions (e.g. "diagnosis A excluded"). The models presented in this paper can be used to implement smart logical DNA devices that perform genetic diagnosis in vitro.

  19. Ribonucleotide triggered DNA damage and RNA-DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bret D; Williams, R Scott

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that the transient contamination of DNA with ribonucleotides exceeds all other known types of DNA damage combined. The consequences of ribose incorporation into DNA, and the identity of protein factors operating in this RNA-DNA realm to protect genomic integrity from RNA-triggered events are emerging. Left unrepaired, the presence of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA impacts cellular proliferation and is associated with chromosome instability, gross chromosomal rearrangements, mutagenesis, and production of previously unrecognized forms of ribonucleotide-triggered DNA damage. Here, we highlight recent findings on the nature and structure of DNA damage arising from ribonucleotides in DNA, and the identification of cellular factors acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR) to counter RNA-triggered DNA damage. PMID:25692233

  20. Ribonucleotide triggered DNA damage and RNA-DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Bret D; Williams, R Scott

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that the transient contamination of DNA with ribonucleotides exceeds all other known types of DNA damage combined. The consequences of ribose incorporation into DNA, and the identity of protein factors operating in this RNA-DNA realm to protect genomic integrity from RNA-triggered events are emerging. Left unrepaired, the presence of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA impacts cellular proliferation and is associated with chromosome instability, gross chromosomal rearrangements, mutagenesis, and production of previously unrecognized forms of ribonucleotide-triggered DNA damage. Here, we highlight recent findings on the nature and structure of DNA damage arising from ribonucleotides in DNA, and the identification of cellular factors acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR) to counter RNA-triggered DNA damage.

  1. DNA DAMAGE BINDING PROTEIN2 Shapes the DNA Methylation Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Schalk, Catherine; Kramdi, Amira; Ahmed, Ikhlak; Cognat, Valérie; Graindorge, Stéfanie; Bergdoll, Marc; Baumberger, Nicolas; Heintz, Dimitri; Bowler, Chris; Genschik, Pascal; Barneche, Fredy; Molinier, Jean

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA repair pathways help to maintain genome integrity and epigenomic patterns. However, the factors at the nexus of DNA repair and chromatin modification/remodeling remain poorly characterized. Here, we uncover a previously unrecognized interplay between the DNA repair factor DNA DAMAGE BINDING PROTEIN2 (DDB2) and the DNA methylation machinery in Arabidopsis thaliana. Loss-of-function mutation in DDB2 leads to genome-wide DNA methylation alterations. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicate that at many repeat loci, DDB2 influences de novo DNA methylation by interacting with ARGONAUTE4 and by controlling the local abundance of 24-nucleotide short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). We also show that DDB2 regulates active DNA demethylation mediated by REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 and DEMETER LIKE3. Together, these findings reveal a role for the DNA repair factor DDB2 in shaping the Arabidopsis DNA methylation landscape in the absence of applied genotoxic stress. PMID:27531226

  2. Correlation of the NBME advanced clinical examination in EM and the national EM M4 exams.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Katherine; Miller, Emily S; Lawson, Luan; Wald, David; Beeson, Michael; Heitz, Corey; Morrissey, Thomas; House, Joseph; Poznanski, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Since 2011 two online, validated exams for fourth-year emergency medicine (EM) students have been available (National EM M4 Exams). In 2013 the National Board of Medical Examiners offered the Advanced Clinical Examination in Emergency Medicine (EM-ACE). All of these exams are now in widespread use; however, there are no data on how they correlate. This study evaluated the correlation between the EM-ACE exam and the National EM M4 Exams. From May 2013 to April 2014 the EM-ACE and one version of the EM M4 exam were administered sequentially to fourth-year EM students at five U.S. medical schools. Data collected included institution, gross and scaled scores and version of the EM M4 exam. We performed Pearson's correlation and random effects linear regression. 305 students took the EM-ACE and versions 1 (V1) or 2 (V2) of the EM M4 exams (281 and 24, respectively) [corrected].The mean percent correct for the exams were as follows: EM-ACE 74.9 (SD-9.82), V1 83.0 (SD-6.39), V2 78.5 (SD-7.70) [corrected]. Pearson's correlation coefficient for the V1/EM-ACE was 0.53 (0.43 scaled) and for the V2/EM-ACE was 0.58 (0.41 scaled) [corrected]. The coefficient of determination for V1/ EM-ACE was 0.73 and for V2/EM-ACE 0.71 (0.65 and .49 for scaled scores) [ERRATUM]. The R-squared values were 0.28 and 0.30 (0.18 and 0.13 scaled), respectively [corrected]. There was significant cluster effect by institution. There was moderate positive correlation of student scores on the EM-ACE exam and the National EM M4 Exams.

  3. Supramolecular Complexes of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, G.; Scherman, D.

    Deoxyribose nucleic acid or DNA is a linear polymer in the form of a double strand, synthesised by sequential polymerisation of a large number of units chosen from among the nucleic bases called purines (adenosine A and guanosine G) and pyrimidines (cytosine C and thymidine T). DNA contains all the genetic information required for life. It exists in the form of a limited number (a few dozen) of very big molecules, called chromosomes. This genetic information is first of all transcribed. In this process, a restricted fragment of the DNA called a gene is copied in the form of ribonucleic acid, or RNA. This RNA is itself a polymer, but with a single strand in which the sequence of nucleic acids is schematically analogous to the sequence on one of the two strands of the transcribed DNA. Finally, this RNA is translated into a protein, yet another linear polymer. The proteins make up the main part of the active constituents ensuring the survival of the cell. Any loss of information, either by mutation or by deletion of the DNA, will cause an imbalance in the cell's metabolism that may in turn lead to incurable pathologies. Several strategies have been developed to reduce the consequences of such genetic deficiencies or, more generally, to act, by amplifying or suppressing them, on the mechanisms leading from the reading of the genetic information to the production of proteins: Strategies aiming to introduce synthetic DNA or RNA, which selectively block the expression of certain genes, are now being studied by an increasing number of research scientists and pharmacologists. They use antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides or interfering oligoribonucleotides and they already have clinical applications. This kind of therapy is often called gene pharmacology. Other, more ambitious strategies aim to repair in situ mutated or incomplete DNA within the chromosomes themselves, by introducing short sequences of DNA or RNA which recognise and take the place of mutations. This is the

  4. Increasing Efficiency at the NTF by Optimizing Model AoA Positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Bradley L.; Spells, Courtney

    2006-01-01

    The National Transonic Facility (NTF) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is a national resource for aeronautical research and development. The government, military and private industries rely on the capability of this facility for realistic flight data. Reducing the operation costs and keeping the NTF affordable is essential for aeronautics research. The NTF is undertaking an effort to reduce the time between data points during a pitch polar. This reduction is being driven by the operating costs of a cryogenic facility. If the time per data point can be reduced, a substantial cost savings can be realized from a reduction in liquid nitrogen (LN2) consumption. It is known that angle-of-attack (AoA) positioning is the longest lead-time item between points. In January 2005 a test was conducted at the NTF to determine the cause of the long lead-time so that an effort could be made to improve efficiency. The AoA signal at the NTF originates from onboard instrumentation then travels through a number of different systems including the signal conditioner, digital voltmeter, and the data system where the AoA angle is calculated. It is then fed into a closed loop control system that sets the model position. Each process along this path adds to the time per data point affecting the efficiency of the data taking process. Due to the nature of the closed loop feed back AoA control and the signal path, it takes approximately 18 seconds to take one pitch pause point with a typical AoA increment. Options are being investigated to reduce the time delay between points by modifying the signal path. These options include: reduced signal filtering, using analog channels instead of a digital volt meter (DVM), re-routing the signal directly to the AoA control computer and implementing new control algorithms. Each of these has potential to reduce the positioning time and together the savings could be significant. These timesaving efforts are essential but must be weighed against

  5. Novel DNA nanoparticles and networks.

    PubMed

    Seela, Frank; Jawalekar, Anup M; Sirivolu, Venkata R; Rosemeyer, Helmut; He, Yang; Leonard, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Joining the thrombin-binding aptamer 5-d(GGTTGGTGTGGTTGG) and the minihairpin 5-d(GCGAAGC) leads to new DNA nanoparticles, which are different from rod-like helical double-stranded DNA. Covalent interstrand cross-links in DNA duplexes generated by bifunctional alkadiyne chains were used to build-up the DNA networks.

  6. DNA as an Optical Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    of DNA, and a natural DNA source is more appropriate. Currently available sources of natural DNA include fish sperm (e.g., from salmon or herring...harvesting of the fish’s waste milt and roe sacs. (Unlike meat and eggs , these elements are not used for cuisine.) From these, DNA is extracted and

  7. The absence of supercoiling in kinetoplast DNA minicircles.

    PubMed

    Rauch, C A; Perez-Morga, D; Cozzarelli, N R; Englund, P T

    1993-02-01

    Crithidia fasciculata kinetoplast DNA is a mitochondrial DNA composed of 5000 minicircles and approximately 25 maxicircles, all catenated into a giant network. By comparing the linking number of minicircles released from the network by limited sonication with that of control minicircles, we demonstrate that not only does the elaborate catenation of the network not cause supercoiling, but that there is no minicircle supercoiling at all. The absence of catenation-induced supercoiling is explained by our finding [using electron microscopy (EM) and gel electrophoresis] that network minicircles are joined by only one interlock; single interlocking can be accommodated without helix distortion. EM revealed that propidium diiodide supertwists all the network minicircles and thereby condenses the network into a much smaller size while maintaining its planarity. At high dye concentration the network is condensed to a size comparable to that found in vivo. Nevertheless, network minicircles bind less propidium than free minicircles, indicating that catenation into a network restricts the supercoiling of individual rings. These studies show that the mitochondrion of trypanosomatids may be a unique niche in nature where a covalently-closed circular DNA is not supercoiled. This absence of supercoiling may be a major factor in promoting the formation of the network.

  8. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO135 : Effect of Space Exposure on Pyroelectric Infrared Detectors, Tray E05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO135 : Effect of Space Exposure on Pyroelectric Infrared Detectors, Tray E05 The prelaunch photograph was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to installation of the integrated tray on the LDEF. The Space Exposure on Pyroelectric Infrared Detectors Experiment (AO135) consist of twenty detectors of three different types of materials, lithium-tantalate, strontium-barium-niobate and triglycine-sulfide. The Pyroelectric infrered detector experiment is an integral part of the Active Optical System Component Experiment (S0050) that contains 136 test specimen and is located in a six (6) inch deep LDEF peripheral experiment tray. The experiment tray is divided into six sections, each consisting of a 1/4 inch thick chromic anodized aluminum base plate and a 1/16th inch thick aluminum hat shaped structure for mounting the test specimen. The test specimen are typi- cally placed in fiberglass-epoxy retainer strip assemblies prior to installation on the hat shaped mounting structure. Five of the six sections are covered by a 1/8 inch thick anodized aluminum sun screen with openings that allowed 56 percent transmission over the central region. Two subexperiments, The Optical Materials and UV Detectors Experiment (S0050-01) consist of 15 optical windows, filters and detectors and occupies one of the trays six sub-sections and The Optical Substrates and Coatings Experiment (S0050-02 ) that includes 12 substrates and coatings and a secondary experiment, The Holographic Data Storage Crystal Experiment (AO044) with four crystals, are also mounted in the integrated tray. The experiment structure was assembled with non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners.

  9. AO fixateur interne in treating burst fractures of the thoracolumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Liu, C L; Wang, S T; Lin, H J; Kao, H C; Yu, W K; Lo, W H

    1999-09-01

    A burst fracture of the thoracolumbar junction is an unstable spinal fracture, which is caused by high-energy trauma. There are many methods of treatment, both surgical and nonsurgical, in dealing with spinal burst fractures. The Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) Fixateur Interne (FI) system was introduced in 1985 for posterior spine surgery with a transpedicular screw system. From April, 1989, through December, 1994, we encountered 42 patients with 42 acute burst fractures of the spine; 26 were male and 16 were female, with an average age of 41.2 years. One fracture occurred on T11, seven on T12, 16 on L1, 11 on L2, one on L3, four on L4 and two on L5. According to the Denis classification, there were eight type A, 23 type B, five type C, three type D and three type E fractures. All of these patients received posterior reduction without decompression, posterior short segmental fixation with AO FI instrumentation and posterior fusion. After follow-up for an average of 66.1 months, all fractures were found to have united with residual back pain in only six patients; five patients, including one with nonunion, had back pain without the necessity of medication, and the other one had occasional back pain that was well controlled by medication. The immediate postoperative Cobb's angle improved by an average of 14.2 degrees, and there was an average loss of 3.3 degrees at final follow-up. All patients were neurologically intact at final follow-up except two patients, who were Frankel D. Seven patients had complications during follow-up; one experienced nonunion; four experienced screw breakage, one had screw pullout, and the other experienced breakage of the connecting rod. From our retrospective study, the outcome of burst fracture of the spine treated with AO FI instrumentation system was satisfactory.

  10. Development and validation of the AO pediatric comprehensive classification of long bone fractures by the Pediatric Expert Group of the AO Foundation in collaboration with AO Clinical Investigation and Documentation and the International Association for Pediatric Traumatology.

    PubMed

    Slongo, Theddy; Audigé, Laurent; Schlickewei, Wolfgang; Clavert, Jean-Michel; Hunter, James

    2006-01-01

    A series of four agreement studies (classification sessions) were conducted to support the development and validation of a comprehensive pediatric long bone fracture classification system. This system follows the principle of the Müller-AO classification for long bones in adults and integrates most relevant existing pediatric classification systems. The diagnosis includes the distinction between epiphyseal (E), metaphyseal (M), or diaphyseal (D) fractures, as well as identification of child-specific features. This article describes the proposed system in some detail. Digital standard preoperative anteroposterior and lateral radiographs from 267 consecutive pediatric patients (<16 years old and open physis) with single fractures of the distal humerus, radius, or tibia were collected at a single university children's hospital. Fractures were classified independently by five experienced pediatric surgeons. The classification process was assessed for reliability using the kappa coefficient and accuracy using latent class modeling separately for each bone for bone type, and separately for each bone type for child codes. At the last classification session, kappa values for E-M-D and child code classifications were mostly above 0.90, and accuracy estimates were between 75% and 100% for different surgeons, types, and bones. Disagreement and misclassification of fractures were overall very low; hence, experienced and trained surgeons can classify pediatric long bone fractures using the proposed system with high accuracy based on standard radiographic views. The authors encourage wide consultation and further evaluation of this proposed pediatric long bone classification system with a larger number of future users with different training before being used for documentation and clinical studies.

  11. DNA packaging intermediates of bacteriophage Φ174

    PubMed Central

    Music, Cynthia L; Cheng, R Holland; Bowen, Zorina; McKenna, Robert; Rossmann, Michael G; Baker, Timothy S; Incardona, Nino L

    2014-01-01

    Background Like many viruses, bacteriophage ΦX174 packages its I)NA genome into a procapsid that is assembled from structural intermediates and scaffolding proteins. The procapsid contains the structural proteins F, G and H, as well as the scaffolding proteins B and D. Provirions are formed by packaging of DNA together with the small internal J proteins, while losing at least some of the B scaffolding proteins. Eventually, loss of the I) scaffolding proteins and the remaining B proteins leads to the formation of mature virions. Results ΦX174 108S 'procapsids' have been purified in milligram quantities by removing 114S (mature virion) and 70S (abortive capsid) particles from crude lysates by differential precipitation with polyethylene glycol. 132S 'provirions' were purified on sucrose gradients in the presence of EDTA. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) was used to obtain reconstructions of procapsids and provirions. Although these are very similar to each other, their structures differ greatly from that of the virion. The F and G proteins, whose atomic structures in virions were previously determined from X-ray crystallography, were fitted into the cryo-EM reconstructions. This showed that the pentamer of G proteins on each five-fold vertex changes its conformation only slightly during DNA packaging and maturation, whereas major tertiary and quaternary structural changes occur in the F protein. The procapsids and provirions were found to contain 120 copies of the I) protein arranged as tetramers on the twofold axes. IDNA might enter procapsids through one of the 30 Å diameter holes on the icosahedral three-fold axes. Conclusions Combining cryo-EM image reconstruction and X-ray crystallography has revealed the major conformational changes that can occur in viral assembly. The function of the scaffolding proteins may be, in part, to support weak interactions between the structural proteins in the procapsids and to cover surfaces that are subsequently required for

  12. Rayleigh guide star AO demonstrator for the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Paul; Bissonauth, Nirmal; O'Byrne, John W.; Dunlop, Colin N.; Gregory, Thomas; Morris, Timothy J.; Myers, Richard M.; Saunter, Christopher D.; Wilson, Richard W.

    2003-02-01

    An experimental Adaptive Optics system utilizing a low-altitude Rayleigh Laser Guide Star is presented. The current status of the project is described together with plans for future work, with the ultimate goal of providing demonstration Rayleigh LGS AO science on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. The implementation of the demonstration system is described in detail as are the technical challenges encountered during the development of the current shared-launch based system. Other papers in this conference describe a proposal for a facility class LGS system for the WHT and the performance of the observatory's NAOMI adaptive optics system.

  13. Using DARC in a multi-object AO bench and in a dome seeing instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez, Norman; Basden, Alistair; Guzmán, Dani; Dubost, Nicolás.; Berdja, Amokrane

    2014-07-01

    The Durham adaptive Optics Real Time Controller (DARC)1 is a real-time system for astronomical adaptive optics systems originally developed at Durham University and in use for the CANARY instrument. One of its main strengths is to be a generic and high performance real-time controller running on an off-the-shelf Linux computer. We are using DARC for two different implementations: BEAGLE,2 a Multi-Object AO (MOAO) bench system to experiment with novel tomographic reconstructors and LOTUCE2,3 an in-dome turbulence instrument. We present the software architecture for each application, current benchmarks and lessons learned for current and future DARC developers.

  14. Tomographic separation of composite spectra - The components of the O-star spectroscopic binary AO Cassiopeiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagnuolo, William G., Jr.; Gies, Douglas R.

    1991-01-01

    The UV photospheric lines of the short-period, double-lined O-star spectroscopic binary AO Cas are analyzed. Archival data from IUE (16 spectra uniformly distributed in orbital phase) were analyzed with a tomography algorithm to produce the separate spectra of the two stars in six spectral regions. The spectral classifications of the primary and secondary, O9.5 III and O8 V, respectively, were estimated through a comparison of UV line ratios with those in spectral standard stars. An intensity ratio of 0.5-0.7 (primary brighter) at 1600 A is compatible with the data.

  15. The adaptive optics modes for HARMONI: from Classical to Laser Assisted Tomographic AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neichel, B.; Fusco, T.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Correia, C.; Dohlen, K.; El-Hadi, K.; Blanco, L.; Schwartz, N.; Clarke, F.; Thatte, N. A.; Tecza, M.; Paufique, J.; Vernet, J.; Le Louarn, M.; Hammersley, P.; Gach, J.-L.; Pascal, S.; Vola, P.; Petit, C.; Conan, J.-M.; Carlotti, A.; Vérinaud, C.; Schnetler, H.; Bryson, I.; Morris, T.; Myers, R.; Hugot, E.; Gallie, A. M.; Henry, David M.

    2016-07-01

    HARMONI is a visible and NIR integral field spectrograph, providing the E-ELT's core spectroscopic capability at first light. HARMONI will work at the diffraction limit of the E-ELT, thanks to a Classical and a Laser Tomographic AO system. In this paper, we present the system choices that have been made for these SCAO and LTAO modules. In particular, we describe the strategy developed for the different Wave-Front Sensors: pyramid for SCAO, the LGSWFS concept, the NGSWFS path, and the truth sensor capabilities. We present first potential implementations. And we asses the first system performance.

  16. Optical Photometry of the flaring gamma-ray blazar AO 0235+164

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pursimo, Tapio; Losada, Illa R.; Messa, Matteo; Gafton, Emanuel; Ojha, Roopesh

    2016-03-01

    We report optical photometry of the blazar AO 0235+164 obtained with the 2.56m Nordic Optical Telescope in La Palma to look for any enhanced optical activity associated with a recent flare in the daily averaged gamma-ray flux seen in the public lightcurve of the Fermi/LAT instrument: http://fermi.gsfc.nasa.gov/FTP/glast/data/lat/catalogs/asp/current/lightcurves/0235+164_86400.png Fermi/LAT first reported a detection of gamma-ray activity from this source in Sep, 2008 (ATel#1744) and a short timescale flare in Oct 14, 2008 (ATel#1784).

  17. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO187-01 : The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids, Tray A03

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO187-01 : The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids, Tray A03 The prelaunch photograph shows the two (2) clam shell type canisters in their closed position. The canister shells are made of aluminum sheet material with end caps of diecast aluminum. The baseplate and support structure are fabricated from 6000 series aluminum. Fasteners are non-magnetic stainless steel. The electrical box and the stainless steel tubing located on the baseplate protect the drive system wiring. The experiment contains a timing mechanism that provides the intelligence to open the canisters after the Orbiter has departed the area and any initial outgassing or offgassing has occurred.

  18. Preliminary results from the chemistry of micrometeoroid experiment (AO 187-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horz, Friedrich; Bernhard, R. P.; See, Thomas H.; Warren, J.; Brownlee, Don E.; Laurance, M.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of experiment AO 187-1 was to expose high purity substrates of suitable cratering properties to obtain detailed crater statistics that may be converted into projectile masses and fluxes and to chemically characterize as many impactors as possible. The latter information would hopefully reveal distinct classes of natural and man-made particles in low-Earth orbit. It was found that crater that yield residues show that natural and man-made impactors may be differentiated and that diversity exists within each group. 'Chondritic' compositions dominate among natural particles, yet some craters contain unmelted fragments of minerals (Olivine and pyroxene).

  19. COMPASS: an efficient, scalable and versatile numerical platform for the development of ELT AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratadour, D.; Puech, M.; Vérinaud, C.; Kestener, P.; Gray, M.; Petit, C.; Brulé, J.; Clénet, Y.; Ferreira, F.; Gendron, E.; Lainé, M.; Sevin, A.; Rousset, G.; Hammer, F.; Jégouzo, I.; Paillous, Michele; Taburet, S.; Yang, Y.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Carlotti, A.; Westphal, M.; Epinat, B.; Ferrari, M.; Gautrais, T.; Lambert, J. C.; Neichel, B.; Rodionov, S.

    2014-08-01

    The main objective of the COMPASS project is to provide a full scale end-to-end AO development platform, able to address the E-ELT scale and designed as a free, open source numerical tool with a long term maintenance plan. The development of this platform is based on a full integration of software with hardware and relies on an optimized implementation on heterogeneous hardware using GPUs as accelerators. In this paper, we present the overall platform, the various work packages of this project, the milestones to be reached, the results already obtained and the first output of the ongoing collaborations.

  20. An overview of the first results on the solar array passive LDEF experiment (sample), AO171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F.; Young, Leighton E.

    1991-01-01

    Space environmental effects were visibly obvious on components of experiment AO171 which contained solar cells, composites, polymeric thin films, solar reflectors, protective coatings, metals, paints , and elastomers. Micrometeoroid/space debris impacts were observed on all experiment elements. Luminescence of polyimide, silicone, and polyurethane materials occurred under black light examination. Outgassing of RTV511 occurred mainly as a result of insufficient thermal vacuum bakeout. Solar cell degradation was predominantly below 10 percent. Elastomers lost mass and discolored; composites showed evidence of atomic oxygen attack, and unprotected thin polymer films eroded away.

  1. Direct hip joint distraction during acetabular fracture surgery using the AO universal manipulator.

    PubMed

    Calafi, L Afshin; Routt, M L Chip

    2010-02-01

    Certain acetabular fractures may necessitate distraction of the hip joint for removal of intra-articular debris and assessment of reduction. Distraction can be accomplished by manual traction, using a traction table or an AO universal manipulator (UM). The UM is a relatively simple and an inexpensive device that can provide focal distraction in a controlled manner without the risks associated with the use of a traction table. We describe a technique using the UM for hip joint distraction during acetabular fracture surgery through a Kocher-Langenbeck surgical exposure.

  2. Monitoring Io volcanism with AO telescopes during and after the NH flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchis, F.; Spencer, J. R.; Lopes, R. M.; Davies, A. G.; Dumas, C.

    2007-12-01

    To support the New Horizons (NH) Jupiter encounter we monitored Io's volcanic activity using high angular resolution images in the near infrared (1-5 microns) provided by adaptive optics (AO) systems available on 8-10m class telescopes. We initiated the campaign on Feb. 25 2007 with data obtained with the VLT-Yepun telescope (ESO, Paranal, Chile), just before NH closest approach. We continued monitoring with the Gemini North telescope (Hawaii, USA). The last observation was taken on May 28 2007. Numerous active volcanoes are visible in the data but the Tvashtar eruption is by far the most energetic. Extremely high angular resolution data from NH revealed fine detail of the eruption, such as the presence of an active plume [1]. This volcano has an interesting past history. It was seen as a powerful eruption from Nov. 26 1999 during the Galileo I25 [2] flyby to Feb. 19 2001 from the ground [3]. It was dormant or below our ground-based limit of detection (T<330 K assuming an area of 460 km2) between Dec 2001 and May 2004 [4,5]. The re-awakening of the volcano was reported by Laver et al. [6] in April 2006 based on Keck Adaptive Optics (AO) observations. Our last Gemini AO observation taken on May 26 shows that Tvashtar was still very active. Based on the previous behavior of this volcano [7] it is very likely that the activity reported in 2007 is a continuation of the Tvashtar-2006 eruption. Other hot spots, such as Loki Patera, Pele, and a new hot spot located north of Loki Patera, were seen in our data. We will describe the global picture of Io's volcanic activity derived from our observations, comparing it with previous observations from the Galileo spacecraft and using ground-based AO. 1. Spencer et al., AGU, this session, 2007 2. McEwen et al., Science, 288, 1193-1198, 2000 3. Marchis et al. Icarus, 160, 124-131, 2002 4. Marchis et al., Icarus, 176, 1, 2005 5. Marchis et al., AGU Fall meeting, V33C-1483, 2004 6. Laver et al., Icarus, in press, 2006 7. Milazzo et

  3. Future use of silicon photomultipliers for K AOS at MAMI and P¯ANDA at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achenbach, P.; Lorente, A. Sanchez; Majos, S. Sánchez; Pochodzalla, J.

    2009-10-01

    A characterization of scintillating fibres with silicon photomultiplier read-out was performed in view of their possible application in fibre tracking detector systems. Such a concept is being considered for the K AOS spectrometer at the Mainz Microtron MAMI and as a time-of-flight start detector for the hypernuclear physics programme at the P¯ANDA experiment of the FAIR project. Results on particle detection efficiency and time resolution are discussed. In summary, the silicon devices are very suitable for the detection of the low light yield from scintillating fibres insofar a trigger scheme is found to cope with the noise rate characteristics.

  4. The AIROPA software package: milestones for testing general relativity in the strong gravity regime with AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzel, Gunther; Lu, Jessica R.; Ghez, Andrea M.; Martinez, Gregory D.; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Britton, Matthew; Sitarski, Breann N.; Do, Tuan; Campbell, Randall D.; Service, Maxwell; Matthews, Keith; Morris, Mark R.; Becklin, E. E.; Wizinowich, Peter L.; Ragland, Sam; Doppmann, Greg; Neyman, Chris; Lyke, James; Kassis, Marc; Rizzi, Luca; Lilley, Scott; Rampy, Rachel

    2016-07-01

    General relativity can be tested in the strong gravity regime by monitoring stars orbiting the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center with adaptive optics. However, the limiting source of uncertainty is the spatial PSF variability due to atmospheric anisoplanatism and instrumental aberrations. The Galactic Center Group at UCLA has completed a project developing algorithms to predict PSF variability for Keck AO images. We have created a new software package (AIROPA), based on modified versions of StarFinder and Arroyo, that takes atmospheric turbulence profiles, instrumental aberration maps, and images as inputs and delivers improved photometry and astrometry on crowded fields. This software package will be made publicly available soon.

  5. B'NAI AO...alive, healthy and growing...a brief history.

    PubMed

    Williamowsky, Ben

    2006-03-01

    A daily minyan was held at 7:00 AM each morning at the recent Alpha Omega International Convention in Hollywood, Florida. That was Chanukah week, when a Torah reading is required. Thanks to a request by Allen Ressler, Torah reader, Rabbi Menachem Levy...who is connected local Chabad Congregation, joined us. As participants in the service crowded the designated prayer room, I was moved to reflect on how B'nai AO came about. At the suggestion of International Editor Dan Uditsky, I will share some facts, and especially my own personal memories.

  6. From DNA to transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Erez; Keren, Kinneret

    2004-06-01

    The rapid advance in molecular biology and nanotechnology opens up the possibility to explore the interface between biology and electronics at the single-molecule level. We focus on the organization of molecular electronic circuits. Interconnecting an immense number of molecular devices into a functional circuit and constructing a framework for integrated molecular electronics requires new concepts. A promising avenue relies on bottom-up assembly where the information for the circuit connectivity and functionality is embedded in the molecular building blocks. Biology can provide concepts and mechanisms for advancing this approach, but there is no straightforward way to apply them to electronics since biological molecules are essentially electrically insulating. Bridging the chasm between biology and electronics therefore presents great challenges. Circuit organization on the molecular scale is considered and contrasted with the levels of organization presented by the living world. The discussion then focuses on our proposal to harness DNA and molecular biology to construct the scaffold for integrated molecular electronics. DNA metallization is used to convert the DNA scaffold into a conductive one. We present the framework of sequence-specific molecular lithography based on the biological mechanism of homologous genetic recombination and carried out by the bacterial protein RecA. Molecular lithography enables us to use the information encoded in the scaffold DNA molecules for directing the construction of an electronic circuit. We show that it can lead all the way from DNA molecules to working transistors in a test-tube. Carbon nanotubes are incorporated as the active electronic components in the DNA-templated transistors. Our approach can, in principle, be applied to the fabrication of larger-scale electronic circuits. The realization of complex DNA-based circuits will, however, require new concepts and additional biological machinery allowing, for example

  7. Patterned Thread-like Micelles and DNA-Tethered Nanoparticles: A Structural Study of PEGylated Cationic Liposome–DNA Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Majzoub, Ramsey N.; Ewert, Kai K.; Jacovetty, Erica L.; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S.; Li, Youli; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2015-01-01

    The self-assembly of oppositely charged biomacromolecules has been extensively studied due to its pertinence in the design of functional nanomaterials. Using cryo electronic microscopy (cryo-EM), optical light scattering and fluorescence microscopy, we investigated the structure and phase behavior of PEGylated (PEG: poly(ethylene-glycol)) cationic liposome–DNA nanoparticles (CL–DNA NPs) as a function of DNA length, topology (linear and circular) and ρchg (the molar charge ratio of cationic lipid to anionic DNA). Although all NPs studied showed a lamellar internal nanostructure, NPs formed with short (~ 2 kbps), linear, polydisperse DNA were defect-rich and contained smaller domains. Unexpectedly, we found distinctly different equilibrium structures away from the isoelectric point. At ρchg > 1, in the excess cationic lipid regime, thread-like micelles rich in PEG-lipid were found to coexist with NPs, cationic liposomes and spherical micelles. At high concentrations these PEGylated thread-like micelles formed a well-ordered, patterned morphology with highly uniform inter-micellar spacing. At ρchg < 1, in the excess DNA regime and with no added salt, individual NPs were tethered together via long, linear DNA (48 kbps λ-phage DNA) into a biopolymer-mediated floc. Our results provide insight on what equilibrium nanostructures can form when oppositely charged macromolecules self-assemble in aqueous media. Self-assembled, well-ordered thread-like micelles and tethered nanoparticles may have a broad range of applications in bionanotechnology, including nanoscale lithograpy and the development of lipid-based multi-functional nanoparticle networks. PMID:26048043

  8. Cyclization of short DNA fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Pui-Man; Zhen, Yi

    2017-09-01

    From the per unit length free energy for DNA under tension, we have calculated an effective contour length dependent persistence length for short DNA. This effective persistence length results from the enhanced fluctuations in short DNA. It decreases for shorter DNA, making shorter DNA more flexible. The results of the J-factor calculated using this effective persistence length are in good agreement with experimental data.

  9. Forensic DNA Profiling and Database

    PubMed Central

    Panneerchelvam, S.; Norazmi, M.N.

    2003-01-01

    The incredible power of DNA technology as an identification tool had brought a tremendous change in crimnal justice . DNA data base is an information resource for the forensic DNA typing community with details on commonly used short tandem repeat (STR) DNA markers. This article discusses the essential steps in compilation of COmbined DNA Index System (CODIS) on validated polymerase chain amplified STRs and their use in crime detection. PMID:23386793

  10. Complaints against an EMS system.

    PubMed

    Colwell, Christopher B; Pons, Peter T; Pi, Randy

    2003-11-01

    Complaints against Emergency Medical Services (EMS) agencies represent a concerning and potentially time-consuming problem for all involved in the delivery of prehospital emergency medical care. The objective of this study was to identify the source of complaints against an EMS system to help focus quality and performance improvement and customer service efforts. We conducted a retrospective review of complaints filed against a busy urban EMS agency over a 6-year period. All complaints were included, totaled by season and by year, and categorized by originator and nature of the complaint. A total of 286 complaints were registered during the 6-year period, with an average of 48 per year and 9.3 per 10,000 responses. The most common originators of complaints were patients (53%) followed by medical personnel (19%) and family members or friends (12%). Rude behavior accounted for 23% of the complaints registered, followed by technical skills (20%), transport problems (18%), and loss of belongings (13%). The identification of areas of dissatisfaction will allow focused quality and performance improvement programs directed at customer service and risk management.

  11. DNA vaccines: a review.

    PubMed

    Lewis, P J; Babiuk, L A

    1999-01-01

    Therapeutic and prophylactic DNA vaccine clinical trials for a variety of pathogens and cancers are underway (Chattergoon et al., 1997; Taubes, 1997). The speed with which initiation of these trials occurred is no less than astounding; clinical trials for a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp160 DNA-based vaccine were underway within 36 months of the first description of "genetic immunization" (Tang et al., 1992) and within 24 months of publication of the first article describing intramuscular delivery of a DNA vaccine (Ulmer et al., 1993). Despite the relative fervor with which clinical trials have progressed, it can be safely stated that DNA-based vaccines will not be an immunological "silver bullet." In this regard, it was satisfying to see a publication entitled "DNA Vaccines--A Modern Gimmick or a Boon to Vaccinology?" (Manickan et al., 1997b). There is no doubt that this technology is well beyond the phenomenology phase of study. Research niches and models have been established and will allow the truly difficult questions of mechanism and application to target species to be studied. These two aspects of future studies are intricately interwoven and will ultimately determine the necessity for mechanistic understanding and the evolution of target species studies. The basic science of DNA vaccines has yet to be clearly defined and will ultimately determine the success or failure of this technology to find a place in the immunological arsenal against disease. In a commentary on a published study describing DNA vaccine-mediated protection against heterologous challenge with HIV-1 in chimpanzees, Ronald Kennedy (1997) states, "As someone who has been in the trenches of AIDS vaccine research for over a decade and who, together with collaborators, has attempted a number of different vaccine approaches that have not panned out, I have a relatively pessimistic view of new AIDS vaccine approaches." Kennedy then goes on to summarize a DNA-based multigene vaccine

  12. Human DNA polymerase α in binary complex with a DNA:DNA template-primer.

    PubMed

    Coloma, Javier; Johnson, Robert E; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya; Aggarwal, Aneel K

    2016-04-01

    The Polα/primase complex assembles the short RNA-DNA fragments for priming of lagging and leading strand DNA replication in eukaryotes. As such, the Polα polymerase subunit encounters two types of substrates during primer synthesis: an RNA:DNA helix and a DNA:DNA helix. The engagement of the polymerase subunit with the DNA:DNA helix has been suggested as the of basis for primer termination in eukaryotes. However, there is no structural information on how the Polα polymerase subunit actually engages with a DNA:DNA helix during primer synthesis. We present here the first crystal structure of human Polα polymerase subunit in complex with a DNA:DNA helix. Unexpectedly, we find that portion of the DNA:DNA helix in contact with the polymerase is not in a B-form but in a hybrid A-B form. Almost all of the contacts observed previously with an RNA primer are preserved with a DNA primer--with the same set of polymerase residues tracking the sugar-phosphate backbone of the DNA or RNA primer. Thus, rather than loss of specific contacts, the free energy cost of distorting DNA from B- to hybrid A-B form may augur the termination of primer synthesis in eukaryotes.

  13. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction and DNA repair network are involved in aluminum-induced DNA damage and adaptive response in root cells of Allium cepa L.

    PubMed

    Panda, Brahma B; Achary, V Mohan M

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we studied the role of signal transduction in aluminum (Al(3+))-induced DNA damage and adaptive response in root cells of Allium cepa L. The root cells in planta were treated with Al(3+) (800 μM) for 3 h without or with 2 h pre-treatment of inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein phosphatase. Also, root cells in planta were conditioned with Al(3+) (10 μM) for 2 h and then subjected to genotoxic challenge of ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS; 5 mM) for 3 h without or with the pre-treatment of the aforementioned inhibitors as well as the inhibitors of translation, transcription, DNA replication and repair. At the end of treatments, roots cells were assayed for cell death and/or DNA damage. The results revealed that Al(3+) (800 μM)-induced significant DNA damage and cell death. On the other hand, conditioning with low dose of Al(3+) induced adaptive response conferring protection of root cells from genotoxic stress caused by EMS-challenge. Pre-treatment of roots cells with the chosen inhibitors prior to Al(3+)-conditioning prevented or reduced the adaptive response to EMS genotoxicity. The results of this study suggested the involvement of MAPK and DNA repair network underlying Al-induced DNA damage and adaptive response to genotoxic stress in root cells of A. cepa.

  14. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction and DNA repair network are involved in aluminum-induced DNA damage and adaptive response in root cells of Allium cepa L.

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Brahma B.; Achary, V. Mohan M.

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we studied the role of signal transduction in aluminum (Al3+)-induced DNA damage and adaptive response in root cells of Allium cepa L. The root cells in planta were treated with Al3+ (800 μM) for 3 h without or with 2 h pre-treatment of inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein phosphatase. Also, root cells in planta were conditioned with Al3+ (10 μM) for 2 h and then subjected to genotoxic challenge of ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS; 5 mM) for 3 h without or with the pre-treatment of the aforementioned inhibitors as well as the inhibitors of translation, transcription, DNA replication and repair. At the end of treatments, roots cells were assayed for cell death and/or DNA damage. The results revealed that Al3+ (800 μM)-induced significant DNA damage and cell death. On the other hand, conditioning with low dose of Al3+ induced adaptive response conferring protection of root cells from genotoxic stress caused by EMS-challenge. Pre-treatment of roots cells with the chosen inhibitors prior to Al3+-conditioning prevented or reduced the adaptive response to EMS genotoxicity. The results of this study suggested the involvement of MAPK and DNA repair network underlying Al-induced DNA damage and adaptive response to genotoxic stress in root cells of A. cepa. PMID:24926302

  15. Facilitated diffusion with DNA coiling.

    PubMed

    Lomholt, Michael A; van den Broek, Bram; Kalisch, Svenja-Marei J; Wuite, Gijs J L; Metzler, Ralf

    2009-05-19

    When DNA-binding proteins search for their specific binding site on a DNA molecule they alternate between linear 1-dimensional diffusion along the DNA molecule, mediated by nonspecific binding, and 3-dimensional volume excursion events between successive dissociation from and rebinding to DNA. If the DNA molecule is kept in a straight configuration, for instance, by optical tweezers, these 3-dimensional excursions may be divided into long volume excursions and short hops along the DNA. These short hops correspond to immediate rebindings after dissociation such that a rebinding event to the DNA occurs at a site that is close to the site of the preceding dissociation. When the DNA molecule is allowed to coil up, immediate rebinding may also lead to so-called intersegmental jumps, i.e., immediate rebindings to a DNA segment that is far away from the unbinding site when measured in the chemical distance along the DNA, but close by in the embedding 3-dimensional space. This effect is made possible by DNA looping. The significance of intersegmental jumps was recently demonstrated in a single DNA optical tweezers setup. Here we present a theoretical approach in which we explicitly take the effect of DNA coiling into account. By including the spatial correlations of the short hops we demonstrate how the facilitated diffusion model can be extended to account for intersegmental jumping at varying DNA densities. It is also shown that our approach provides a quantitative interpretation of the experimentally measured enhancement of the target location by DNA-binding proteins.

  16. Chromatin and DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    MacAlpine, David M.; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    The size of a eukaryotic genome presents a unique challenge to the cell: package and organize the DNA to fit within the confines of the nucleus while at the same time ensuring sufficient dynamics to allow access to specific sequences and features such as genes and regulatory elements. This is achieved via the dynamic nucleoprotein organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin, the nucleosome, comprises a core particle with 147 bp of DNA wrapped 1.7 times around an octamer of histones. The nucleosome is a highly versatile and modular structure, both in its composition, with the existence of various histone variants, and through the addition of a series of posttranslational modifications on the histones. This versatility allows for both short-term regulatory responses to external signaling, as well as the long-term and multigenerational definition of large functional chromosomal domains within the nucleus, such as the centromere. Chromatin organization and its dynamics participate in essentially all DNA-templated processes, including transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Here we will focus mainly on nucleosomal organization and describe the pathways and mechanisms that contribute to assembly of this organization and the role of chromatin in regulating the DNA replication program. PMID:23751185

  17. Electroeluting DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Zarzosa-Alvarez, Ana L; Sandoval-Cabrera, Antonio; Torres-Huerta, Ana L; Bermudez-Cruz, Rosa M

    2010-09-05

    Purified DNA fragments are used for different purposes in Molecular Biology and they can be prepared by several procedures. Most of them require a previous electrophoresis of the DNA fragments in order to separate the band of interest. Then, this band is excised out from an agarose or acrylamide gel and purified by using either: binding and elution from glass or silica particles, DEAE-cellulose membranes, "crush and soak method", electroelution or very often expensive commercial purification kits. Thus, selecting a method will depend mostly of what is available in the laboratory. The electroelution procedure allows one to purify very clean DNA to be used in a large number of applications (sequencing, radiolabeling, enzymatic restriction, enzymatic modification, cloning etc). This procedure consists in placing DNA band-containing agarose or acrylamide slices into sample wells of the electroeluter, then applying current will make the DNA fragment to leave the agarose and thus be trapped in a cushion salt to be recovered later by ethanol precipitation.

  18. Yeast DNA plasmids.

    PubMed

    Gunge, N

    1983-01-01

    The study of yeast DNA plasmids has been initiated with the discovery of the 2-micron DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This multiple copy plasmid, organized into chromatin structure in vivo, probably exists in the nucleus and provides a good system to obtain information on eukaryotic DNA replication. Yeast transformation with the 2-micron DNA or artificially constructed chimeric plasmids had contributed significantly to the study of the molecular biology of yeast and eukaryotes, allowing the isolation and characterization of various genes, ars, centromeres, and telomeres, and also serving as a tool to study the expression of various heterologous genes. Encouraged by these fruitful results, new yeast plasmids have been screened among phylogenetically distant yeasts. The linear DNA plasmids (pGKl1 and pGKl2) from Kluyveromyces lactis are the first case of yeast plasmids associated with biological function (killer phenotype). This plasmid system would be ideal as a model to study the structure and function of eukaryotic linear chromosomes. The extracellular secretion of protein toxin suggests the plasmids to be an excellent candidate for a secretion vector. The importance of yeasts as suitable materials for the study of eukaryotic cell biology would be much enhanced by the advent of new transformation systems with diverse host yeasts of genetically and phylogenetically distinct properties.

  19. Chromatin and DNA replication.

    PubMed

    MacAlpine, David M; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2013-08-01

    The size of a eukaryotic genome presents a unique challenge to the cell: package and organize the DNA to fit within the confines of the nucleus while at the same time ensuring sufficient dynamics to allow access to specific sequences and features such as genes and regulatory elements. This is achieved via the dynamic nucleoprotein organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin, the nucleosome, comprises a core particle with 147 bp of DNA wrapped 1.7 times around an octamer of histones. The nucleosome is a highly versatile and modular structure, both in its composition, with the existence of various histone variants, and through the addition of a series of posttranslational modifications on the histones. This versatility allows for both short-term regulatory responses to external signaling, as well as the long-term and multigenerational definition of large functional chromosomal domains within the nucleus, such as the centromere. Chromatin organization and its dynamics participate in essentially all DNA-templated processes, including transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Here we will focus mainly on nucleosomal organization and describe the pathways and mechanisms that contribute to assembly of this organization and the role of chromatin in regulating the DNA replication program.

  20. Programmable Quantitative DNA Nanothermometers.

    PubMed

    Gareau, David; Desrosiers, Arnaud; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis

    2016-07-13

    Developing molecules, switches, probes or nanomaterials that are able to respond to specific temperature changes should prove of utility for several applications in nanotechnology. Here, we describe bioinspired strategies to design DNA thermoswitches with programmable linear response ranges that can provide either a precise ultrasensitive response over a desired, small temperature interval (±0.05 °C) or an extended linear response over a wide temperature range (e.g., from 25 to 90 °C). Using structural modifications or inexpensive DNA stabilizers, we show that we can tune the transition midpoints of DNA thermometers from 30 to 85 °C. Using multimeric switch architectures, we are able to create ultrasensitive thermometers that display large quantitative fluorescence gains within small temperature variation (e.g., > 700% over 10 °C). Using a combination of thermoswitches of different stabilities or a mix of stabilizers of various strengths, we can create extended thermometers that respond linearly up to 50 °C in temperature range. Here, we demonstrate the reversibility, robustness, and efficiency of these programmable DNA thermometers by monitoring temperature change inside individual wells during polymerase chain reactions. We discuss the potential applications of these programmable DNA thermoswitches in various nanotechnology fields including cell imaging, nanofluidics, nanomedecine, nanoelectronics, nanomaterial, and synthetic biology.

  1. Strandwise translocation of a DNA glycosylase on undamaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Yan; Nam, Kwangho; Spong, Marie C.; Banerjee, Anirban; Sung, Rou-Jia; Zhang, Michael; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2012-05-14

    Base excision repair of genotoxic nucleobase lesions in the genome is critically dependent upon the ability of DNA glycosylases to locate rare sites of damage embedded in a vast excess of undamaged DNA, using only thermal energy to fuel the search process. Considerable interest surrounds the question of how DNA glycosylases translocate efficiently along DNA while maintaining their vigilance for target damaged sites. Here, we report the observation of strandwise translocation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, MutM, along undamaged DNA. In these complexes, the protein is observed to translocate by one nucleotide on one strand while remaining untranslocated on the complementary strand. We further report that alterations of single base-pairs or a single amino acid substitution (R112A) can induce strandwise translocation. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that MutM can translocate along DNA in a strandwise fashion. These observations reveal a previously unobserved mode of movement for a DNA-binding protein along the surface of DNA.

  2. Active DNA unwinding dynamics during processive DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Morin, José A.; Cao, Francisco J.; Lázaro, José M.; Arias-Gonzalez, J. Ricardo; Valpuesta, José M.; Carrascosa, José L.; Salas, Margarita; Ibarra, Borja

    2012-01-01

    Duplication of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) requires a fine-tuned coordination between the DNA replication and unwinding reactions. Using optical tweezers, we probed the coupling dynamics between these two activities when they are simultaneously carried out by individual Phi29 DNA polymerase molecules replicating a dsDNA hairpin. We used the wild-type and an unwinding deficient polymerase variant and found that mechanical tension applied on the DNA and the DNA sequence modulate in different ways the replication, unwinding rates, and pause kinetics of each polymerase. However, incorporation of pause kinetics in a model to quantify the unwinding reaction reveals that both polymerases destabilize the fork with the same active mechanism and offers insights into the topological strategies that could be used by the Phi29 DNA polymerase and other DNA replication systems to couple unwinding and replication reactions. PMID:22573817

  3. Active DNA unwinding dynamics during processive DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Morin, José A; Cao, Francisco J; Lázaro, José M; Arias-Gonzalez, J Ricardo; Valpuesta, José M; Carrascosa, José L; Salas, Margarita; Ibarra, Borja

    2012-05-22

    Duplication of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) requires a fine-tuned coordination between the DNA replication and unwinding reactions. Using optical tweezers, we probed the coupling dynamics between these two activities when they are simultaneously carried out by individual Phi29 DNA polymerase molecules replicating a dsDNA hairpin. We used the wild-type and an unwinding deficient polymerase variant and found that mechanical tension applied on the DNA and the DNA sequence modulate in different ways the replication, unwinding rates, and pause kinetics of each polymerase. However, incorporation of pause kinetics in a model to quantify the unwinding reaction reveals that both polymerases destabilize the fork with the same active mechanism and offers insights into the topological strategies that could be used by the Phi29 DNA polymerase and other DNA replication systems to couple unwinding and replication reactions.

  4. DNA Origami with Double Stranded DNA as a Unified Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Han, Dongran; Nangreave, Jeanette; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2013-01-01

    Scaffolded DNA origami is a widely used technology for self-assembling precisely structured nanoscale objects that contain a large number of addressable features. Typical scaffolds are long, single strands of DNA (ssDNA) that are folded into distinct shapes through the action of many, short ssDNA staples that are complementary to several different domains of the scaffold. However, sources of long single stranded DNA are scarce, limiting the size and complexity of structures that can be assembled. Here we demonstrated that dsDNA scaffolds can be directly used to fabricate integrated DNA origami structures that incorporate both of the constituent ssDNA molecules. Two basic principles were employed in the design of scaffold folding paths – folding path asymmetry and periodic convergence of the two ssDNA scaffold strands. Asymmetry in the folding path minimizes unwanted complementarity between staples, and incorporating an offset between the folding paths of each ssDNA scaffold strand reduces the number of times that complementary portions of the strands are brought into close proximity with one another, both of which decrease the likelihood of dsDNA scaffold recovery. Meanwhile, the folding paths of the two ssDNA scaffold strands were designed to periodically converge to promote the assembly of a single, unified structure rather than two individual ones. Our results reveal that this basic strategy can be used to reliably assemble integrated DNA nanostructures from dsDNA scaffolds. PMID:22830653

  5. Active DNA demethylation by DNA repair: Facts and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Schuermann, David; Weber, Alain R; Schär, Primo

    2016-08-01

    Pathways that control and modulate DNA methylation patterning in mammalian cells were poorly understood for a long time, although their importance in establishing and maintaining cell type-specific gene expression was well recognized. The discovery of proteins capable of converting 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to putative substrates for DNA repair introduced a novel and exciting conceptual framework for the investigation and ultimate discovery of molecular mechanisms of DNA demethylation. Against the prevailing notion that DNA methylation is a static epigenetic mark, it turned out to be dynamic and distinct mechanisms appear to have evolved to effect global and locus-specific DNA demethylation. There is compelling evidence that DNA repair, in particular base excision repair, contributes significantly to the turnover of 5mC in cells. By actively demethylating DNA, DNA repair supports the developmental establishment as well as the maintenance of DNA methylation landscapes and gene expression patterns. Yet, while the biochemical pathways are relatively well-established and reviewed, the biological context, function and regulation of DNA repair-mediated active DNA demethylation remains uncertain. In this review, we will thus summarize and critically discuss the evidence that associates active DNA demethylation by DNA repair with specific functional contexts including the DNA methylation erasure in the early embryo, the control of pluripotency and cellular differentiation, the maintenance of cell identity, and the nuclear reprogramming. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. DNA endonuclease activities on psoralen plus ultraviolet light treated DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, M.W.; Clark, M.

    1986-03-01

    Activities of nuclear DNA endonucleases (Endos) from normal human lymphoblastoid cells on DNA treated with the DNA interstrand cross-linking agents 4,5'8-trimethyl psoralen (TMP) or 8-methoxypsoralen (MOP) plus long-wavelength (320-400 nm) ultraviolet light (UVA) were examined. Chromatin-associated DNA Endos were isolated from both cell lines and subjected to isoelectric focusing (IF). Each IF fraction was assayed for DNA Endo activity. Peaks of activity were pooled and assayed for activity on undamaged PM2 bacteriophage DNA and on PM2 DNA that had been treated with 15 ..mu..g/ml TMP or MOP in the dark and then exposed to UVA light. Unbound psoralen was removed by dialysis and a second dose of UVA light was given in order to increase the number of DNA cross-links. Two Endo activities were found which were active on TMP- and MOP-DNA: a major one, pI 4.6, which is also active on intercalated DNA, and a second, lesser one, pI 7.6, which is active on UVC (254 nm) light irradiated DNA. These results indicate that there are two different DNA Endos which act on both TMP- and MOP-treated DNA and that the major activity recognizes the intercalation of, and/or the cross-link produced by interaction of, psoralen with DNA.

  7. Elongation of primed DNA templates by eukaryotic DNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, J E; Longiaru, M; Horwitz, M S; Hurwitz, J

    1980-01-01

    The combined action of DNA polymerase alpha and DNA polymerase beta leads to the synthesis of full-length linear DNA strands with phi X174 DNA templates containing an RNA primer. The reaction can be carried out in two stages. In the first stage, DNA polymerase alpha catalyzes the synthesis of a chain that averaged 230 deoxynucleotides long and was covalently linked to the RNA primer. In the second stage, DNA polymerase beta elongates the DNA strand covalently attached to the RNA primer to full length. With DNA primers, DNA polymerase alpha catalyzes only limited deoxynucleotide addition whereas DNA polymerase beta alone elongates DNA primed templates to full length. DNA polymerase beta can also stimulate the synthesis of adenovirus DNA in vitro in the presence of a cytosol extract from adenovirus-infected cells. In all of these systems, dNMP incorporation catalyzed by DNA polymerase beta was sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide; however, this polymerase activity was resistant to N-ethylmaleimide with poly(rA) x (dT) as the primer template. Images PMID:6160581

  8. dnaA acts before dnaC in the initiation of DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Kung, F C; Glaser, D A

    1978-01-01

    We constructed a double mutant of Escherichia coli K-12 carrying dnaA(Ts) and dnaC(Cs) lesions. In this mutant DNA synthesis proeceeds normally at 32 degrees C and initiation is inhibited at both 41 and 20 degrees C. By shifting this culture grown at 32 degrees C to the two restrictive temperatures in different time sequences and assaying protein and DNA synthesis of cells growing at different temperatures, we found that dnaA and dnaC genes work independently with dnaA acting before dnaC. While preparing special strains for this work, we also showed that the order of genes in the neighborhood of dnaA is dnaA-tnaA-phoS-ilv. PMID:627535

  9. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Devika; Bradford, William D.; Freeland, Amy; Cady, Gillian; Wang, Jianmin

    2017-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in budding yeast are encoded by ~100–200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how “normal” copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen a yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2)-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a “normal” rDNA copy number. PMID:28915237

  10. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number.

    PubMed

    Salim, Devika; Bradford, William D; Freeland, Amy; Cady, Gillian; Wang, Jianmin; Pruitt, Steven C; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2017-09-15

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in budding yeast are encoded by ~100-200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how "normal" copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen the yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2)-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a "normal" rDNA copy number.

  11. Cosmic muon induced EM showers in NO$$\

    DOE PAGES

    Yadav, Nitin; Duyang, Hongyue; Shanahan, Peter; ...

    2016-11-15

    Here, the NuMI Off-Axis ve Appearance (NOvA) experiment is a ne appearance neutrino oscillation experiment at Fermilab. It identifies the ne signal from the electromagnetic (EM) showers induced by the electrons in the final state of neutrino interactions. Cosmic muon induced EM showers, dominated by bremsstrahlung, are abundant in NOvA far detector. We use the Cosmic Muon- Removal technique to get pure EM shower sample from bremsstrahlung muons in data. We also use Cosmic muon decay in flight EM showers which are highly pure EM showers.The large Cosmic-EM sample can be used, as data driven method, to characterize the EMmore » shower signature and provides valuable checks of the simulation, reconstruction, particle identification algorithm, and calibration across the NOvA detector.« less

  12. M S MOLECULARES Rumo aos limites da miniaturiza o - (Molecular Magnets - towards the limits of miniaturization)

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Mario S; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2010-01-01

    Por s culos, acreditou-se que o magnetismo s se manifestava em metais, como aqueles contendo ferro; hoje, a imagem mais comum de um m talvez seja a daquelas plaquinhas flex veis coladas geladeira com propagandas dos mais diversos tipos. O leitor conseguiria imaginar um material puramente org nico daqueles que formam os seres vivos como magn tico? E m s do tamanho de mol culas? fato: ambos existem. Esses novos materiais, conhecidos como magnetos moleculares, descobertos e desenvolvidos em v rios laborat rios do mundo, j re nem longa lista de aplica es, do tratamento do c ncer a refrigeradores ecol gicos, passando pela transmiss o de eletricidade sem perda de calor e a fabrica o de computadores extremamente velozes.

  13. Design and function of a structured illumination system for use in an AO microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissel, Matthew

    The design and function of a Structured Illumination system for use as part of an Adaptive Optics Structured Illumination Microscope (AOSIM) is presented. After successful implementation of AO in a standard widefield microscope, our lab wanted to apply the technology to a more advanced imaging modality that has a lot to gain from the AO system. SIM allows us to reconstruct an image with resolution beyond the Rayleigh limit of the optics, called a super-resolution image, by aliasing high spatial frequencies, outside the limit of the optics, to lower frequencies within the system pass band. The aliasing is accomplished by spatially modulating the illumination at a frequency near the cutoff frequency of the system. These aliased frequencies are superimposed on the lower spatial frequencies of the object in our image. Using multiple images and an inverse algorithm, we separate the aliased and normal frequencies, restore them to their original frequency positions, and recreate the original spectrum of the object. This allows us to recreate a super-resolution image of the object. We show that our SIM system creates images that are a higher resolution than a standard wide-field microscope.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Robo-AO observed cool subdwarf companions (Ziegler+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, C.; Law, N. M.; Baranec, C.; Riddle, R. L.; Fuchs, J. T.

    2017-09-01

    We selected targets from the 564 spectral type F- through M-subdwarf candidates studied by Marshall (2007, J/AJ/134/778). These targets were selected from the New Luyten Two-Tenths catalog (NLTT; Luyten, 1979nlcs.book.....L; Luyten & Hughes 1980, Proper-Motion Survey with the Forty-Eight Inch Schmidt Telescope LV First Supplement to the NLTT Catalogue (Minneapolis, MN: Univ. Minnesota Press)) of high proper motion stars (>0.18 arcsec/yr) using a reduced proper motion diagram (RPM). Of the 552 subdwarfs confirmed by Marshall, a randomly selected sample of 348 G-, K-, and M-subdwarfs were observed by Robo-AO when available between other high priority surveys. We obtained high-angular-resolution images of the 348 subdwarfs during 32 separate nights of observations between 2012 September 3 and 2013 August 21 (UT). The observations were performed using the Robo-AO laser adaptive optics system (Riddle et al. 2012SPIE.8447E..2OR; Baranec et al. 2013, J. Visualized Exp. 72 e50021; 2014ApJ...790L...8B) mounted on the Palomar 60 inch telescope. (1 data file).

  15. Facility class Rayleigh beacon AO system for the 4.2m William Herschel telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, René G.; Clark, Paul; Myers, Richard M.; Wilson, Richard W.; Bingham, Richard G.; Emsellem, Eric; Gregory, Thomas; Humphreys, Ronald A.; Knapen, Johan; Moretto, Gilberto; Morris, Simon L.; Talbot, Gordon

    2003-02-01

    A rationale is presented for the use of a relatively low-altitude (15km) Rayleigh Laser Guide Star to provide partial adaptive optics correction across a large fraction of the sky on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. The scientific motivation in relation to the available instrumentation suite is discussed and supported by model performance calculations, based on observed atmospheric turbulence distributions at the site. The proposed implementation takes the form of a laser system, beam diagnostics, tip-tilt mirror and beacon launch telescope, together with a range-gated wavefront sensor and processing system. It is designed to operate in conjunction with the telescope"s existing facility-class natural guide star AO system, NAOMI. Aspects of the proposed implementation are described as well as the technical features related to the system model and the error budget. In a separate paper the NAOMI AO system itself is presented. Other papers describe a demonstrator system and preliminary Rayleigh beacon wavefront sensing measurements at the site.

  16. Risk Factors Associated with Campylobacter jejuni Infections in Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles

    PubMed Central

    Endtz, Hubert P.; van West, Hanneke; Godschalk, Peggy C. R.; de Haan, Lidewij; Halabi, Yaskara; van den Braak, Nicole; Kesztyüs, Barbara I.; Leyde, Ewald; Ott, Alewijn; Verkooyen, Roel; Price, Lawrence J.; Woodward, David L.; Rodgers, Frank G.; Ang, C. Wim; van Koningsveld, Rinske; van Belkum, Alex; Gerstenbluth, Izzy

    2003-01-01

    A steady increase in the incidence of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) with a seasonal preponderance, almost exclusively related to Campylobacter jejuni, and a rise in the incidence of laboratory-confirmed Campylobacter enteritis have been reported from Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles. We therefore investigated possible risk factors associated with diarrhea due to epidemic C. jejuni. Typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis identified four epidemic clones which accounted for almost 60% of the infections. One hundred six cases were included in a case-control study. Infections with epidemic clones were more frequently observed in specific districts in Willemstad, the capital of Curaçao. One of these clones caused infections during the rainy season only and was associated with the presence of a deep well around the house. Two out of three GBS-related C. jejuni isolates belonged to an epidemic clone. The observations presented point toward water as a possible source of Campylobacter infections. PMID:14662945

  17. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO076 : Cascade Variable-Conductance Heat Pipe, Tray F09

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO076 : Cascade Variable-Conductance Heat Pipe, Tray F09 EL-1994-00302 LDEF (Prelaunch), AO076 : Cascade Variable-Conductance Heat Pipe, Tray F09 The prelaunch photograph was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to installation of the Cascade Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Experiment (CVCHPE) on the LDEF. The Cascade Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Experiment (CVCHPE) occupies a 6 inch deep LDEF peripheral experiment tray and consist of two series connected variable conductance heatpipes, a black chrome solar collector panel and a silvered TEFLON® radiator panel, a power source to support six thermistor-type temperature monitoring sensors and actuations of two valves. Fiberglass standoffs and internal insulation blankets thermally isolated the experiment from the experiment tray and the LDEF interior. The outside of the CVCHPE, except the collector and radiator panels, was covered with an aluminumized Kapton multilayer insulation (MLI) blanket with an outer layer of 0.076 mm thick Kapton. The two patches of thin film materials, part of Experiment S1001 by NASA GSFC, were attached to the cover of the external thermal blanket with Kapton tape. The experiment was assembled and mounted in the experiment tray with non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners.

  18. AO WFS detector developments at ESO to prepare for the E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downing, Mark; Casali, Mark; Finger, Gert; Lewis, Steffan; Marchetti, Enrico; Mehrgan, Leander; Ramsay, Suzanne; Reyes, Javier

    2016-07-01

    ESO has a very active on-going AO WFS detector development program to not only meet the needs of the current crop of instruments for the VLT, but also has been actively involved in gathering requirements, planning, and developing detectors and controllers/cameras for the instruments in design and being proposed for the E-ELT. This paper provides an overall summary of the AO WFS Detector requirements of the E-ELT instruments currently in design and telescope focal units. This is followed by a description of the many interesting detector, controller, and camera developments underway at ESO to meet these needs; a) the rationale behind and plan to upgrade the 240x240 pixels, 2000fps, "zero noise", L3Vision CCD220 sensor based AONGC camera; b) status of the LGSD/NGSD High QE, 3e- RoN, fast 700fps, 1760x1680 pixels, Visible CMOS Imager and camera development; c) status of and development plans for the Selex SAPHIRA NIR eAPD and controller. Most of the instruments and detector/camera developments are described in more detail in other papers at this conference.

  19. Closed-loop focal plane wavefront control with the SCExAO instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinache, Frantz; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Guyon, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Aims: This article describes the implementation of a focal plane based wavefront control loop on the high-contrast imaging instrument SCExAO (Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics). The sensor relies on the Fourier analysis of conventional focal-plane images acquired after an asymmetric mask is introduced in the pupil of the instrument. Methods: This absolute sensor is used here in a closed-loop to compensate for the non-common path errors that normally affects any imaging system relying on an upstream adaptive optics system.This specific implementation was used to control low-order modes corresponding to eight zernike modes (from focus to spherical). Results: This loop was successfully run on-sky at the Subaru Telescope and is used to offset the SCExAO deformable mirror shape used as a zero-point by the high-order wavefront sensor. The paper details the range of errors this wavefront-sensing approach can operate within and explores the impact of saturation of the data and how it can be bypassed, at a cost in performance. Conclusions: Beyond this application, because of its low hardware impact, the asymmetric pupil Fourier wavefront sensor (APF-WFS) can easily be ported in a wide variety of wavefront sensing contexts, for ground- as well space-borne telescopes, and for telescope pupils that can be continuous, segmented or even sparse. The technique is powerful because it measures the wavefront where it really matters, at the level of the science detector.

  20. Demonstration of the suitability of GPUs for AO real-time control at ELT scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitenc, Urban; Basden, Alastair G.; Dipper, Nigel A.; Myers, Richard M.

    2016-07-01

    We have implemented the full AO data-processing pipeline on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), within the framework of Durham AO Real-time Controller (DARC). The wavefront sensor images are copied from the CPU memory to the GPU memory. The GPU processes the data and the DM commands are copied back to the CPU. For a SCAO system of 80x80 subapertures, the rate achieved on a single GPU is about 700 frames per second (fps). This increases to 1100 fps (1565 fps) if we use two (four) GPUs. Jitter exhibits a distribution with the root-mean-square value of 20 μs-30 μs and a negligible number of outliers. The increase in latency due to the pixel data copying from the CPU to the GPU has been reduced to the minimum by copying the data in parallel to processing them. An alternative solution in which the data would be moved from the camera directly to the GPU, without CPU involvement, could be about 10%-20% faster. We have also implemented the correlation centroiding algorithm, which - when used - reduces the frame rate by about a factor of 2-3.

  1. LDEF (Postflight), AO187-01 : The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids, Tray A03

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO187-01 : The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids, Tray A03 EL-1994-00266 LDEF (Postflight), AO187-01 : The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids, Tray A03 The experiment is shown in the postflight configuration before closing the canisters with ground support equipment that bypassed the experiments onboard electronics circuitry. Three full panels and approximately 3/4th of the other panel are covered with gold foil (>99.99 percent pure). The remaining area on the fourth panel is covered with strips of other detector materials: zirconium, beryllium, titanium, platium, aluminum, carbon, Kapton, polyethylene and TEFLON®. A brown stain is visible on the experiment tray flanges, however, most of the stains observed in the flight photograph are obscured by reflected light. All materials remain intact with no visual evidence of damage to the experiment. The reflection of a video camera on a tripod and light sources can be seen on the gold foil covered panels. The experiment canisters are shown after being closed by using the experiments ground support equipment. The stain buildup can be clearly seen at the vertical center of the right tray flange. The clean area was located under the experiment tray clamp block and was not exposed to the staining medium. The stain also coats other areas that were exposed during the mission but are not as noticeable. The experiment hardware seems to be intact and have no damage.

  2. LDEF (Flight), AO187-01 : The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids, Tray A03

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO187-01 : The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids, Tray A03 EL-1994-00680 LDEF (Flight), AO187-01 : The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids, Tray A03 The flight photograph was taken with the LDEF on the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing the spacecraft in the cargo bay. The canisters are in their open condition (they were expected to open about two (2) weeks after launch and close about eleven (11) months into the mission) with three (3) full panels and 3/4th of the fourth panel covered with a highly reflective gold foil (>99.99 percent pure).The remaining area is covered with strips of other detector materials: zirconium, beryllium, titanium, platium, aluminum, carbon, Kapton, polyethylene and TEFLON®. The exposed fasteners are non-magnetic stainless steel. All of the exposed materials seem to be secure and no damage is evident. The contamination stain that has changed the white paint dot on the tray clamp blocks to brown also coats the tray flanges and the aluminum canister hardware. The end support beam scuff plate in the photograph was a bright yellow prior to launch but is a much darker, mustard yellow after the space exposure.

  3. Instrument control software development process for the multi-star AO system ARGOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulas, M.; Barl, L.; Borelli, J. L.; Gässler, W.; Rabien, S.

    2012-09-01

    The ARGOS project (Advanced Rayleigh guided Ground layer adaptive Optics System) will upgrade the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) with an AO System consisting of six Rayleigh laser guide stars. This adaptive optics system integrates several control loops and many different components like lasers, calibration swing arms and slope computers that are dispersed throughout the telescope. The purpose of the instrument control software (ICS) is running this AO system and providing convenient client interfaces to the instruments and the control loops. The challenges for the ARGOS ICS are the development of a distributed and safety-critical software system with no defects in a short time, the creation of huge and complex software programs with a maintainable code base, the delivery of software components with the desired functionality and the support of geographically distributed project partners. To tackle these difficult tasks, the ARGOS software engineers reuse existing software like the novel middleware from LINC-NIRVANA, an instrument for the LBT, provide many tests at different functional levels like unit tests and regression tests, agree about code and architecture style and deliver software incrementally while closely collaborating with the project partners. Many ARGOS ICS components are already successfully in use in the laboratories for testing ARGOS control loops.

  4. Duplication in DNA Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Masami; Kari, Lila; Kincaid, Zachary; Seki, Shinnosuke

    The duplication and repeat-deletion operations are the basis of a formal language theoretic model of errors that can occur during DNA replication. During DNA replication, subsequences of a strand of DNA may be copied several times (resulting in duplications) or skipped (resulting in repeat-deletions). As formal language operations, iterated duplication and repeat-deletion of words and languages have been well studied in the literature. However, little is known about single-step duplications and repeat-deletions. In this paper, we investigate several properties of these operations, including closure properties of language families in the Chomsky hierarchy and equations involving these operations. We also make progress toward a characterization of regular languages that are generated by duplicating a regular language.

  5. Capillary electrophoresis of DNA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alan; Nelson, Robert J

    2003-08-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an alternative to conventional slab gel electrophoresis for the separation of DNA fragments. CE offers a number of advantages over slab gel separations in terms of speed, resolution, sensitivity, and data handling. Separation times are generally only a few minutes and the DNA is detected either by UV absorption or by fluorescent labeling. The quantity of DNA required for separation is in the nanogram range. Single-base resolution can be obtained on fragments up to several hundred base pairs. In the presence of appropriate standards, fragments can be accurately sized based on relative electrophoretic mobility. A protocol for the analysis of synthetic oligonucleotides in a flowable matrix is described in this unit.

  6. DNA Methylation in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Li, En; Zhang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is one of the best characterized epigenetic modifications. In mammals it is involved in various biological processes including the silencing of transposable elements, regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting, and X-chromosome inactivation. This article describes how DNA methylation serves as a cellular memory system and how it is dynamically regulated through the action of the DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) and ten eleven translocation (TET) enzymes. Its role in the regulation of gene expression, through its interplay with histone modifications, is also described, and its implication in human diseases discussed. The exciting areas of investigation that will likely become the focus of research in the coming years are outlined in the summary. PMID:24789823

  7. Transposon facilitated DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, D.E.; Berg, C.M.; Huang, H.V.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate and develop methods that exploit the power of bacterial transposable elements for large scale DNA sequencing: Our premise is that the use of transposons to put primer binding sites randomly in target DNAs should provide access to all portions of large DNA fragments, without the inefficiencies of methods involving random subcloning and attendant repetitive sequencing, or of sequential synthesis of many oligonucleotide primers that are used to match systematically along a DNA molecule. Two unrelated bacterial transposons, Tn5 and {gamma}{delta}, are being used because they have both proven useful for molecular analyses, and because they differ sufficiently in mechanism and specificity of transposition to merit parallel development.

  8. Tunnelling microscopy of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selci, Stefano; Cricenti, Antonio

    1991-01-01

    Uncoated DNA molecules marked with an activated tris (1-aziridinyl) phosphine oxide (TAPO) solution were deposited on gold substrates and imaged in air with a high resolution Scanning Tunnelling Microscope (STM). The STM operated simultaneously in the constant-current and gap-modulated mode. Highly reproducible STM images have been obtained and interpreted in terms of expected DNA structure. The main periodicity, regularly presented in molecules several hundred Ångstrom long, ranges from 25 Å to 35 Å with an average diameter of 22 Å. Higher resolution images of the minor groove have revealed the phosphate groups along the DNA backbones. Constant-current images of TAPO deposited on gold show a crystalline structure of rows of molecules with a side-by-side spacing of 3 Å.

  9. DNA Vaccination Techniques.

    PubMed

    Fissolo, Nicolás; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory, demyelinating, and neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) in humans. Although the etiology of MS remains unknown, several lines of evidence support the notion that autoimmunity against components of the myelin sheath plays a major role in susceptibility to and development of the disease. At present, there are no approved MS therapies aimed specifically toward downregulating antigen-specific autoreactive immune cells. One antigen-specific approach that appears promising for the treatment of MS is DNA vaccination. This technique has demonstrated efficacy in clinical trials while maintaining safety.Here, we describe the generation of DNA vaccines containing immunologically relevant antigens of MS. Moreover, we present a detailed protocol for the prophylactic and therapeutic administration of DNA vaccines via intramuscular injection targeting on the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model resembling MS.

  10. DNA based molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Jens; Muschielok, Adam; Andrecka, Joanna; Kügel, Wolfgang; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.

    2009-12-01

    Most of the essential cellular processes such as polymerisation reactions, gene expression and regulation are governed by mechanical processes. Controlled mechanical investigations of these processes are therefore required in order to take our understanding of molecular biology to the next level. Single-molecule manipulation and force spectroscopy have over the last 15 years been developed into extremely powerful techniques. Applying these techniques to the investigation of proteins and DNA molecules has led to a mechanistic understanding of protein function on the level of single molecules. As examples for DNA based molecular machines we will describe single-molecule experiments on RNA polymerases as well as on the packaging of DNA into a viral capsid-a process that is driven by one of the most powerful molecular motors.

  11. Principles of DNA architectonics: design of DNA-based nanoobjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, O. A.; Pyshnyi, D. V.

    2012-02-01

    The methods of preparation of monomeric DNA blocks that serve as key building units for the construction of complex DNA objects are described. Examples are given of the formation of DNA blocks based on native and modified oligonucleotide components using hydrogen bonding and nucleic acid-specific types of bonding and also some affinity interactions with RNA, proteins, ligands. The static discrete and periodic two- and three-dimensional DNA objects reported to date are described systematically. Methods used to prove the structures of DNA objects and the prospects for practical application of nanostructures based on DNA and its analogues in biology, medicine and biophysics are considered. The bibliography includes 195 references.

  12. Design of a molecular support for cryo-EM structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Thomas G.; Bharat, Tanmay A. M.; Joerger, Andreas C.; Bai, Xiao-chen; Praetorius, Florian; Fersht, Alan R.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent rapid progress in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), there still exist ample opportunities for improvement in sample preparation. Macromolecular complexes may disassociate or adopt nonrandom orientations against the extended air–water interface that exists for a short time before the sample is frozen. We designed a hollow support structure using 3D DNA origami to protect complexes from the detrimental effects of cryo-EM sample preparation. For a first proof-of-principle, we concentrated on the transcription factor p53, which binds to specific DNA sequences on double-stranded DNA. The support structures spontaneously form monolayers of preoriented particles in a thin film of water, and offer advantages in particle picking and sorting. By controlling the position of the binding sequence on a single helix that spans the hollow support structure, we also sought to control the orientation of individual p53 complexes. Although the latter did not yet yield the desired results, the support structures did provide partial information about the relative orientations of individual p53 complexes. We used this information to calculate a tomographic 3D reconstruction, and refined this structure to a final resolution of ∼15 Å. This structure settles an ongoing debate about the symmetry of the p53 tetramer bound to DNA. PMID:27821763

  13. A decadal survey of AO wavefront sensing detector developments in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe

    2011-09-01

    The success of the next generation of instruments for 8 to 40-m class telescopes will depend on the ability of Adaptive Optics (AO) systems to provide excellent image quality and stability. This will be achieved by increasing the sampling, wavelength range and correction quality of the wave front error in both spatial and time domains. The modern generation of AO wavefront sensor detectors started in the late nineties with the development of the CCD50 detector by e2v under ESO contract for the ESO NAOS AO system. With a 128x128 pixels format, this 8 outputs CCD runs at a 500 Hz frame rate with a readout noise of 7e-. A major breakthrough has been achieved with the recent development of the CCD220, also by e2v technologies. This 240x240 pixels 8 outputs EMCCD (CCD with internal multiplication), also developed by e2v, has been jointly funded by ESO and Europe under the FP6 programme. The CCD220 detector and the OCAM2 camera are now the most sensitive system in the world for advanced adaptive optics systems, offering an astonishing <0.2 e readout noise at a frame rate of 1500 Hz with negligible dark current. Extremely easy to operate, OCAM2 only needs a 24 V power supply and a modest water cooling circuit. This system is extensively described elsewhere in this conference (see Gach J-L. et al). An upgrade of OCAM2 is foreseen to boost its frame rate to 2500 Hz, opening the window of XAO wavefront sensing for the ELT. Since this major success, new developments started in Europe. One is fully dedicated to Laser Guide Star AO for the ELT. The spot elongation from a LGS SH wavefront sensor induces an increase of the pixel format. Two detectors are currently developed by e2v. The NGSD will be a 672x672 pixels CMOS detector with a readout noise of 4e (goal 1e) at 700 Hz frame rate. The LGSD is a scaling of the NGSD with 1680x1680 pixels and 3 e readout noise (goal 1e) at 700 Hz frame rate. New technologies will be developed for that purpose: new CMOS pixel architecture, CMOS

  14. The Empathic Operating System (emOS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-15

    The Empathic Operating System ( emOS ) Physiological measurements have typically been limited to expensive and cumbersome clinical research equipment...Report: The Empathic Operating System ( emOS ) Report Title Physiological measurements have typically been limited to expensive and cumbersome clinical...C-0043 Proposal number: 62850-LS-DRP Project title: “The Empathic Operating System ( emOS )” Contract performance period: January 1, 2016 – April 7

  15. DNA templated magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsella, Joseph M.

    Recent discoveries in nanoscience are predicted to potentially revolutionize future technologies in an extensive number of fields. These developments are contingent upon discovering new and often unconventional methods to synthesize and control nanoscale components. Nature provides several examples of working nanotechnology such as the use of programmed self assembly to build and deconstruct complex molecular systems. We have adopted a method to control the one dimensional assembly of magnetic nanoparticles using DNA as a scaffold molecule. With this method we have demonstrated the ability to organize 5 nm particles into chains that stretch up to ˜20 mum in length. One advantage of using DNA compared is the ability of the molecule to interact with other biomolecules. After assembling particles onto DNA we have been able to cleave the molecule into smaller fragments using restriction enzymes. Using ligase enzymes we have re-connected these fragments, coated with either gold or iron oxide, to form long one-dimensional arrangements of the two different types of nanoparticles on a single molecular guide. We have also created a sensitive magnetic field sensor by incorporating magnetic nanoparticle coated DNA strands with microfabricated electrodes. The IV characteristics of the aligned nanoparticles are dependant on the magnitude of an externally applied magnetic field. This transport phenomenon known as tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) shows room temperature resistance of our devices over 80% for cobalt ferrite coated DNA when a field of 20 kOe is applied. In comparison, studies using two dimensional nanoparticle films of irox oxides xii only exhibit a 35% MR effect. Confinement into one dimension using the DNA guide produces a TMR mechanism which produces significant increases in magnetoresistance. This property can be utilized for applications in magnetic field sensing, data storage, and logic elements.

  16. Tuning porosity and radial mechanical properties of DNA origami nanotubes via crossover design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhipeng; Kawai, Kentaro; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Tabata, Osamu

    2017-06-01

    DNA origami nanotubes are utilized as structural platforms for the fabrication of various micro/nanosystems for drug delivery, optical or biological sensing, and even nanoscale robots. Their radial structural and mechanical properties, which play a crucial role in the effective use of micro/nanosystems, have not been fully studied. In particular, the effects of crossovers, which are basic structures for rationally assembling double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) helices into a nanotube configuration, have not yet been characterized experimentally. To investigate the effects of crossovers on the porosity and the radial mechanical properties of DNA origami nanotubes, we fabricated a DNA origami nanotube with varied crossover designs along the nanotube axis. The radial geometry of the DNA origami nanotube is experimentally characterized by both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Moreover, the radial mechanical properties of the DNA origami nanotube including the radial modulus are directly measured by force-distance-based AFM. These measurements reveal that the porosity and the radial modulus of DNA origami nanotubes can be tuned by adjusting the crossover design, which enables the optimal design and construction of DNA origami nanostructures for various applications.

  17. The DNA methylome

    PubMed Central

    Pelizzola, Mattia; Ecker, Joseph R.

    2010-01-01

    Methylation of cytosines is a pervasive feature of eukaryotic genomes and an important epigenetic layer that is fundamental for cellular differentiation processes and control of transcriptional potential. DNA methylation patterns can be inherited and influenced by the environment, diet and aging, and disrupted in diseases. Complete DNA methylomes for several organisms are now available, helping clarify the evolutionary story of this epigenetic mark and its distribution in key genomic elements. Nonetheless, a complete understanding of its role, the mechanisms responsible for its establishment and maintenance, and its cross talk with other components of cellular machiney remains elusive. PMID:21056564

  18. Towards single molecule DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao

    Single molecule DNA Sequencing technology has been a hot research topic in the recent decades because it holds the promise to sequence a human genome in a fast and affordable way, which will eventually make personalized medicine possible. Single molecule differentiation and DNA translocation control are the two main challenges in all single molecule DNA sequencing methods. In this thesis, I will first introduce DNA sequencing technology development and its application, and then explain the performance and limitation of prior art in detail. Following that, I will show a single molecule DNA base differentiation result obtained in recognition tunneling experiments. Furthermore, I will explain the assembly of a nanofluidic platform for single strand DNA translocation, which holds the promised to be integrated into a single molecule DNA sequencing instrument for DNA translocation control. Taken together, my dissertation research demonstrated the potential of using recognition tunneling techniques to serve as a general readout system for single molecule DNA sequencing application.

  19. An autoradiographic demonstration of nuclear DNA replication by DNA polymerase alpha and of mitochondrial DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Geuskens, M; Hardt, N; Pedrali-Noy, G; Spadari, S

    1981-01-01

    The incorporation of thymidine into the DNA of eukaryotic cells is markedly depressed, but not completely inhibited, by aphidicolin, a highly specific inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha. An electron microscope autoradiographic analysis of the synthesis of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in vivo in Concanavalin A stimulated rabbit spleen lymphocytes and in Hamster cell cultures, in the absence and in the presence of aphidicolin, revealed that aphidicolin inhibits the nuclear but not the mitochondrial DNA replication. We therefore conclude that DNA polymerase alpha performs the synchronous bidirectional replication of nuclear DNA and that DNA polymerase gamma, the only DNA polymerase present in the mitochondria, performs the "strand displacement" DNA synthesis of these organelles. Images PMID:6262734

  20. DNA banking and DNA databanking by academic and commercial laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, J.E. |; Reilly, P.R.

    1994-09-01

    The advent of DNA-based testing is giving rise to DNA banking (the long-term storage of cells, transformed cell lines, or extracted DNA for subsequent retrieval and analysis) and DNA data banking (the indefinite storage of information derived from DNA analysis). Large scale acquisition and storage of DNA and DNA data has important implications for the privacy rights of individuals. A survey of 148 academically based and commercial DNA diagnostic laboratories was conducted to determine: (1) the extent of their DNA banking activities; (2) their policies and experiences regarding access to DNA samples and data; (3) the quality assurance measures they employ; and (4) whether they have written policies and/or depositor`s agreements addressing specific issues. These issues include: (1) who may have access to DNA samples and data; (2) whether scientists may have access to anonymous samples or data for research use; (3) whether they have plans to contact depositors or retest samples if improved tests for a disorder become available; (4) disposition of samples at the end of the contract period if the laboratory ceases operations, if storage fees are unpaid, or after a death or divorce; (5) the consequence of unauthorized release, loss, or accidental destruction of samples; and (6) whether depositors may share in profits from the commercialization of tests or treatments developed in part from studies of stored DNA. The results suggest that many laboratories are banking DNA, that many have already amassed a large number of samples, and that a significant number plan to further develop DNA banking as a laboratory service over the next two years. Few laboratories have developed written policies governing DNA banking, and fewer still have drafted documents that define the rights and obligations of the parties. There may be a need for increased regulation of DNA banking and DNA data banking and for better defined policies with respect to protecting individual privacy.

  1. DNA damage signalling prevents deleterious telomere addition at DNA breaks

    PubMed Central

    Makovets, Svetlana; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2009-01-01

    The response to DNA damage involves regulation of multiple essential processes to maximize the accuracy of DNA damage repair and cell survival 1. Telomerase has the potential to interfere with repair by inappropriately adding telomeres to DNA breaks. It was unknown whether cells modulate telomerase in response to DNA damage, to increase the accuracy of repair. Here we report that telomerase action is regulated as a part of the cellular response to a DNA double-strand break (DSB). Using yeast, we show that the major ATR/Mec1 DNA damage signalling pathway regulates telomerase action at DSBs. Upon DNA damage, MEC1-RAD53-DUN1-dependent phosphorylation of the telomerase inhibitor Pif1 occurs. Utilizing a separation of function PIF1 mutation, we show that this phosphorylation is required for the Pif1-mediated telomerase inhibition that takes place specifically at DNA breaks, but not telomeres. Hence DNA damage signalling down-modulates telomerase action at a DNA break via Pif1 phosphorylation, thus preventing aberrant healing of broken DNA ends by telomerase. These findings uncover a novel regulatory mechanism that coordinates competing DNA end-processing activities and thereby promotes DNA repair accuracy and genome integrity. PMID:19838171

  2. DNA nanomechanical devices for molecular biology and DNA nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hongzhou

    The aim of nanotechnology is to put specific atomic and molecular species where we want them, when we want them there. Achieving such a dynamic and functional control could lead to molecular programming. Structural DNA nanotechnology offers a powerful route to this goal by combining stable branched DNA motifs with cohesive ends to produce objects, programmed nanomechanical devices and fixed or modified patterned lattices. In Chapter II, a two-armed nanorobotic device is built based on a DNA origami substrate. The arms face each other, ready to capture different DNA nanostructures into distinguishable nanopatterns. Combining with a simple error-correction protocol, we are able to achieve this goal in a nearly flawless fashion. In Chapter III, a DNA-based programmable assembly line is developed by combining three PX/JX2 cassettes and a novel DNA walker on a DNA origami substrate. This programmable assembly line can generate eight products by switching the cassettes to PX (ON) or JX2 (OFF) state when the DNA walker passes by. DNA nanomechanical devices hold the promise of controlling structure and performing exquisitely fine measurements on the molecular scale. Several DNA nanomechanical devices based on different biochemistry phenomena have been reported before. In Chapter IV, a scissors-based DNA device is built to measure the work that can be done by a DNA-bending protein (MutS) when it binds to DNA.

  3. The MeJA-inducible copper amine oxidase AtAO1 is expressed in xylem tissue and guard cells.

    PubMed

    Ghuge, Sandip A; Carucci, Andrea; Rodrigues-Pousada, Renato A; Tisi, Alessandra; Franchi, Stefano; Tavladoraki, Paraskevi; Angelini, Riccardo; Cona, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Copper amine oxidases oxidize the polyamine putrescine to 4-aminobutanal with the production of the plant signal molecule hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ammonia. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) gene At4g14940 (AtAO1, previously referred to as ATAO1) encodes an apoplastic copper amine oxidase expressed in lateral root cap cells and developing xylem, especially in root protoxylem and metaxylem precursors. In our recent study, we demonstrated that AtAO1 expression is strongly induced in the root vascular tissues by the wound-signal hormone methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Furthermore, we also demonstrated that the H2O2 derived by the AtAO1-driven oxidation of putrescine, mediates the MeJA-induced early protoxylem differentiation in Arabidopsis roots. H2O2 may contribute to protoxylem differentiation by signaling developmental cell death and by acting as co-substrate in peroxidase-mediated cell wall stiffening and lignin polymerization. Here, by the means of AtAO1 promoter::green fluorescent protein-β-glucuronidase (AtAO1::GFP-GUS) fusion analysis, we show that a strong AtAO1 gene expression occurs also in guard cells of leaves and flowers. The high expression levels of AtAO1 in tissues or cell types regulating water supply and water loss may suggest a role of the encoded protein in water balance homeostasis, by modulating coordinated adjustments in anatomical and functional features of xylem tissue and guard cells during acclimation to adverse environmental conditions.

  4. Evaluating the Reliability and Reproducibility of the AO and Lauge-Hansen Classification Systems for Ankle Injuries.

    PubMed

    Yin, Meng-Chen; Yuan, Xue-Fei; Ma, Jun-Ming; Xia, Ye; Wang, Tao; Xu, Xiao-Li; Yan, Yin-Jie; Xu, Jin-Hai; Ye, Jie; Tong, Zheng-Yi; Feng, Yan-Qi; Wang, Hong-Bo; Wu, Xue-Qun; Mo, Wen

    2015-07-01

    Ankle injuries are responsible for more than 5 million emergency department visits each year. The AO and Lauge-Hansen classification systems are widely used in the clinical diagnosis of ankle injuries. This study aimed to analyze the intraobserver reliability and interobserver reproducibility of the AO and Lauge-Hansen classification systems. In addition, the authors explored the differences among physicians' classification responses and evaluated the clinical value for diagnosis. Fifty-six patients with an ankle injury with complete clinical and radiologic data were enrolled. The definition of injury type, the index score typing methods, and the specific study criteria were explained in detail. Five observers, who were orthopedic surgeons, determined the classifications according to both the AO and Lauge-Hansen systems. The classification was repeated 1 month later. Cronbach's alpha and Cohen's kappa test were used to determine interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility. The physicians conducted 560 classifications (56 cases × 5 physicians × 2 times per patient). Average inter- and intraobserver kappa values for the AO system were 0.708 and 0.608, respectively. Average inter- and intraobserver kappa values for the Lauge-Hansen system were 0.402 and 0.398, respectively. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 96.7% for the AO system and 76.0% for the Lauge-Hansen system. The Lauge-Hansen classification system is a comprehensive yet cumbersome system. Comparatively, the AO classification system is easier to understand. This study shows that the AO classification system has more reliability and reproducibility, and thus has more value in clinical practice, than the Lauge-Hansen classification system.

  5. Methods of determining DNA conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, E.L.

    1994-04-01

    While the basic structure of DNA has been known since 1953, there is still a great void in terms of knowing how DNA interacts with its surroundings. Because the structure of biological molecules determines their function, the conformation of DNA is of prime importance in understanding its role in living organisms. We present two methods of determining some components of DNA`s conformation. One uses atomic force microscopy to determine the dimensions of DNA`s base pairs, and the other seeks to computationally determine the structure of DNA in different chemical environments.

  6. DNA Nanotechnology for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinit; Palazzolo, Stefano; Bayda, Samer; Corona, Giuseppe; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Rizzolio, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology is an emerging and exciting field, and represents a forefront frontier for the biomedical field. The specificity of the interactions between complementary base pairs makes DNA an incredible building material for programmable and very versatile two- and three-dimensional nanostructures called DNA origami. Here, we analyze the DNA origami and DNA-based nanostructures as a drug delivery system. Besides their physical-chemical nature, we dissect the critical factors such as stability, loading capability, release and immunocompatibility, which mainly limit in vivo applications. Special attention was dedicated to highlighting the boundaries to be overcome to bring DNA nanostructures closer to the bedside of patients. PMID:27022418

  7. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase wherein the modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase.

  8. DNA profiling of trace DNA recovered from bedding.

    PubMed

    Petricevic, Susan F; Bright, Jo-Anne; Cockerton, Sarah L

    2006-05-25

    Trace DNA is often detected on handled items and worn clothing examined in forensic laboratories. In this study, the potential transfer of trace DNA to bedding by normal contact, when an individual sleeps in a bed, is examined. Volunteers slept one night on a new, lower bed sheet in their own bed and one night in a bed foreign to them. Samples from the sheets were collected and analysed by DNA profiling. The results indicate that the DNA profile of an individual can be obtained from bedding after one night of sleeping in a bed. The DNA profile of the owner of the bed could also be detected in the foreign bed experiments. Since mixed DNA profiles can be obtained from trace DNA on bedding, caution should be exercised when drawing conclusions from DNA profiling results obtained from such samples. This transfer may have important repercussions in sexual assault investigations.

  9. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, S.; Richardson, C.

    1997-03-25

    A modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase is disclosed. The modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase. 6 figs.

  10. DNA tagged microparticles

    DOEpatents

    Farquar, George R.; Leif, Roald N.; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2016-03-22

    In one embodiment, a product includes a plurality of particles, each particle including: a carrier that includes a non-toxic material; and at least one DNA barcode coupled to the carrier, where the particles each have a diameter in a range from about 1 nanometer to about 100 microns.

  11. Enzymatic DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor); Breaker, Ronald R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses deoxyribonucleic acid enzymes--catalytic or enzymatic DNA molecules--capable of cleaving nucleic acid sequences or molecules, particularly RNA, in a site-specific manner, as well as compositions including same. Methods of making and using the disclosed enzymes and compositions are also disclosed.

  12. Field Deployable DNA analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, E; Christian, A; Marion, J; Sorensen, K; Arroyo, E; Vrankovich, G; Hara, C; Nguyen, C

    2005-02-09

    This report details the feasibility of a field deployable DNA analyzer. Steps for swabbing cells from surfaces and extracting DNA in an automatable way are presented. Since enzymatic amplification reactions are highly sensitive to environmental contamination, sample preparation is a crucial step to make an autonomous deployable instrument. We perform sample clean up and concentration in a flow through packed bed. For small initial samples, whole genome amplification is performed in the packed bed resulting in enough product for subsequent PCR amplification. In addition to DNA, which can be used to identify a subject, protein is also left behind, the analysis of which can be used to determine exposure to certain substances, such as radionuclides. Our preparative step for DNA analysis left behind the protein complement as a waste stream; we determined to learn if the proteins themselves could be analyzed in a fieldable device. We successfully developed a two-step lateral flow assay for protein analysis and demonstrate a proof of principle assay.

  13. DNA Replication Origins

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Alan C.; Méchali, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    The onset of genomic DNA synthesis requires precise interactions of specialized initiator proteins with DNA at sites where the replication machinery can be loaded. These sites, defined as replication origins, are found at a few unique locations in all of the prokaryotic chromosomes examined so far. However, replication origins are dispersed among tens of thousands of loci in metazoan chromosomes, thereby raising questions regarding the role of specific nucleotide sequences and chromatin environment in origin selection and the mechanisms used by initiators to recognize replication origins. Close examination of bacterial and archaeal replication origins reveals an array of DNA sequence motifs that position individual initiator protein molecules and promote initiator oligomerization on origin DNA. Conversely, the need for specific recognition sequences in eukaryotic replication origins is relaxed. In fact, the primary rule for origin selection appears to be flexibility, a feature that is modulated either by structural elements or by epigenetic mechanisms at least partly linked to the organization of the genome for gene expression. PMID:23838439

  14. Nutrients and DNA Methylation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Epigenetics is a new mechanism responsible for development, aging, and disease process such as cancer development. One major epigenetic phenomenon is DNA methylation, which attributes to gene expression and integrity. Deepening the knowledge on one-carbon metabolism is very important to understandin...

  15. Psoralen DNA photobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparro, F.P.

    1988-01-01

    This text covers the spectrum of psoralen photobiology from molecular mechanisms to their in vivo impact. HPLC, gel electrophoresis, and ELISA techniques are described. Also described is the most recent information on cellular mechanisms for the repair of psoralen photodamage in DNA, and the use of psoralens as structural probes and the newly ascribed effects of psoralens on membranes and proteins.

  16. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  17. Molecular Programming with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winfree, Erik

    2009-05-01

    Information can be stored in molecules and processed by molecular reactions. Molecular information processing is at the heart of all biological systems; might it soon also be at the heart of non-biological synthetic chemical systems? Perhaps yes. One technological approach comes from DNA nanotechnology and DNA computing, where DNA is used as a non-biological informational polymer that can be rationally designed to create a rich class of molecular systems -- for example, DNA molecules that self-assemble precisely, that fold into complex nanoscale objects, that act as mechanical actuators and molecular motors, and that make decisions based on digital and analog logic. I will argue that to fully exploit their design potential, we will need to invent programming languages for specifying the behavior of information-based molecular systems, to create theoretical tools for understanding and analyzing the behavior of molecular programs, to develop compilers that automate the design of molecules with the desired behaviors, and to expand experimental techniques so that the implementation and debugging of complex molecular systems becomes as commonplace and practical as computer programming.

  18. Impact of Alternative DNA Structures on DNA Damage, DNA Repair, and Genetic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guliang; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive genomic sequences can adopt a number of alternative DNA structures that differ from the canonical B-form duplex (i.e. non-B DNA). These non-B DNA-forming sequences have been shown to have many important biological functions related to DNA metabolic processes; for example, they may have regulatory roles in DNA transcription and replication. In addition to these regulatory functions, non-B DNA can stimulate genetic instability in the presence or absence of DNA damage, via replication-dependent and/or replication-independent pathways. This review focuses on the interactions of non-B DNA conformations with DNA repair proteins and how these interactions impact genetic instability. PMID:24767258

  19. [Function analysis of the effective strain Rhodococcus ruber Em1 in wastewater treatment system by quantitative competitive PCR].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling; Li, Xi-wu; Li, Xu-dong; Liu, Shuang-jiang; Liu, Zhi-pei; Tan, Zhou-liang

    2007-04-01

    A quantitative competitive PCR (QC-PCR) system was developed to quantify the number and analyze the function of the Rhodococcus ruber Em1 strain in a wastewater treatment system in Nanchong oil refinery plant. Strain Em1 was able to degrade various kinds of hydrocarbons and aromatic compounds with high efficiency and produce bioemulsifier, so it was introduced into the waste liquid petroleum-disposing system. The sediment samples were collected from the disposing system in the range of 5 months, and then the numbers of strain Eml and degrading efficiencies were studied. The results showed that the primers based on 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain Em1 were specific at species level. The PCR products amplified from sediment total DNA with the specific primers were cloned and sequenced, in which 62.2% were the fragments of 16S rRNA gene of strain Em1. Furthermore, the number of Em1 strain ranging from 3.4 x 10(5) - 4.3 x 10(8) CFU/g in the sediment samples were detected, which indicated that the strain Eml added into purposely did exist stably and reproduced well in the waste-deposing system during a long period. The high relativity, with relative coefficient R2 of 0.89, between Eml cell number and the amount of COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) removal proved that the strain Em1 played an important role in this bio-augmentation treatment system.

  20. An Affinity Propagation-Based DNA Motif Discovery Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chunxiao; Huo, Hongwei; Yu, Qiang; Guo, Haitao; Sun, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    The planted (l, d) motif search (PMS) is one of the fundamental problems in bioinformatics, which plays an important role in locating transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in DNA sequences. Nowadays, identifying weak motifs and reducing the effect of local optimum are still important but challenging tasks for motif discovery. To solve the tasks, we propose a new algorithm, APMotif, which first applies the Affinity Propagation (AP) clustering in DNA sequences to produce informative and good candidate motifs and then employs Expectation Maximization (EM) refinement to obtain the optimal motifs from the candidate motifs. Experimental results both on simulated data sets and real biological data sets show that APMotif usually outperforms four other widely used algorithms in terms of high prediction accuracy.