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Sample records for aortic arch evaluation

  1. Preoperative evaluation value of aortic arch lesions by multidetector computed tomography angiography in type A aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fang; Chen, Qiang; Lai, Qing-quan; Huang, Wen-han; Wu, Hong; Li, Wei-cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to preoperatively evaluate the value of aortic arch lesions by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography in type A aortic dissection (AD). From January 2013 to December 2015, we enrolled 42 patients with type A AD who underwent MDCT angiography in our hospital. The institutional database of patients was retrospectively reviewed to identify MDCT angiography examinations for type A AD. Surgical corrections were conducted in all patients to confirm diagnostic accuracy. In this study, the diagnostic accuracy of MDCT angiography was 100% in all 42 patients. The intimal tear site locations that were identified in patients included the ascending aorta (n = 25), aortic arch (n = 12), and all other sites (n = 5). Compared with the control group, there were significant differences in the aortic arch anatomy among the cases. Regarding the distance between the left common carotid and left subclavian arteries, compared with the control group, most cases with type A AD had a significant variation. MDCT angiography plays an important role in detecting aortic arch lesions of type A AD, especially in determining the location of the intimal entry site and change of branch blood vessels. Surgeons can formulate an appropriate operating plan, according to the preoperative MDCT diagnosis information. PMID:27684852

  2. Bovine aortic arch with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Idhrees, Mohammed; Cherian, Vijay Thomas; Menon, Sabarinath; Mathew, Thomas; Dharan, Baiju S; Jayakumar, K

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy was diagnosed to have supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). On evaluation of CT angiogram, there was associated bovine aortic arch (BAA). Association of BAA with SVAS has not been previously reported in literature, and to best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SVAS with BAA. Recent studies show BAA as a marker for aortopathy. SVAS is also an arteriopathy. In light of this, SVAS can also possibly be a manifestation of aortopathy associated with BAA.

  3. [Double aortic arch with dominant left arch: case report].

    PubMed

    Ece, Ibrahim; Paç, Feyza Ayşenur; Paç, Mustafa; Ballı, Sevket

    2012-09-01

    A vascular ring is defined as an anomaly of the great arteries (aortic arch and its branches) that compresses the trachea or esophagus. Double aortic arch is the most common vascular ring. Double aortic arch is very rare and typically becomes symptomatic in infancy or early childhood. We present a 7-year-old girl admitted to our clinic for evaluation of recurrent respiratory infection with dysphagia. Double aortic arch was suspected from echocardiography and diagnosed with cardiac computed tomography. Left aortic arcus was larger than the right at computed tomography and cardiac catheterisation. After surgery the symptoms improved strikingly. We conclude that vascular ring should be considered in the patients presenting with recurrent pulmonary infections and dysphagia. Early diagnosis and treatment may prevent chronic, irreversible complications.

  4. Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Qiang; Yao, Feng; Shang, An-Dong; Pan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch is uncommonly associated with cancer, and is extremely rare in pulmonary cancer. Here, we report an unusual and successfully treated case of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm in a male patient with lung squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: A 64-year-old male patient was admitted to the Emergency Department, presenting with massive hemoptysis (>500 mL blood during the 12 hours prior to treatment). The diagnosis of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm was confirmed after inspection of computed tomographic angiography and three-dimensional reconstruction. We processed the immediate endovascular stent-grafting for this patient. Results: This patient recovered with no filling or enlargement of the pseudoaneurysm, no episodes of hemoptysis, and no neurological complications during the 4-week follow-up period. Conclusion: Herein, we compare our case with other cancer-related pseudoaneurysms in the medical literature and summarize the clinical features and treatment of this unusual case. PMID:27495079

  5. Aortic Arch Interruption and Persistent Fifth Aortic Arch in Phace Syndrome: Prenatal Diagnosis and Postnatal Course.

    PubMed

    Chiappa, Enrico; Greco, Antonella; Fainardi, Valentina; Passantino, Silvia; Serranti, Daniele; Favilli, Silvia

    2015-09-01

    PHACE is a rare congenital neurocutaneous syndrome where posterior fossa malformations, hemangiomas, cerebrovascular anomalies, aortic arch anomalies, cardiac defects, and eye abnormalities are variably associated. We describe the prenatal detection and the postnatal course of a child with PHACE syndrome with a unique type of aortic arch anomaly consisting of proximal interruption of the aortic arch and persistence of the fifth aortic arch. The fifth aortic arch represented in this case a vital systemic-to-systemic connection between the ascending aorta and the transverse portion of the aortic arch allowing adequate forward flow through the aortic arch without surgical treatment.

  6. Fetal Aortic Arch Anomalies: Key Sonographic Views for Their Differential Diagnosis and Clinical Implications Using the Cardiovascular System Sonographic Evaluation Protocol.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Coral; Gámez, Francisco; Pérez, Ricardo; Álvarez, Teresa; De León-Luis, Juan

    2016-02-01

    Aortic arch anomalies are present in 1% to 2% of the general population and are commonly associated with congenital heart disease, chromosomal defects, and tracheaesophageal compression in postnatal life. The sonographically based detection of aortic arch anomalies lies in the 3-vessel and trachea view. Although highly sensitive, this view alone does not allow identification of the aortic arch branching pattern, which prevents an accurate diagnosis. The systematic addition of a subclavian artery view as part of a standardized procedure may be useful in the differential diagnosis of these conditions. We describe the sonographic assessment of fetal aortic arch anomalies by combining 2 fetal transverse views: the 3-vessel and trachea view and the subclavian artery view, which are included in the cardiovascular system sonographic evaluation protocol. We also review the sonographic findings and the clinical implications of fetal aortic arch anomalies.

  7. Aortic coarctation with persistent fifth left aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Giuseppe; Caianiello, Giuseppe; Palladino, Maria Teresa; Iacono, Carola; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Calabrò, Raffaele

    2009-08-14

    A neonate with severe aortic coarctation showed a double lumen transverse aorta (persistent fifth aortic arch) with both channels joining at the isthmus where the obstruction was confirmed by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Surgical repair was performed with a pantaloon-shaped patch. Persistent fifth aortic arch does not result in a vascular ring and, per se, is not hemodynamically significant unless associated with other cardiac malformations.

  8. Techniques for aortic arch endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Hongku, Kiattisak; Dias, Nuno; Sonesson, Bjorn; Resch, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews endovascular strategies for aortic arch repair. Open repair remains the gold standard particularly for good risk patients. Endovascular treatment potentially offers a less invasive repair. Principles, technical considerations, devices and outcomes of each technique are discussed and summarized. Hybrid repair combines less invasive revascularization options, instead of arch replacement while extending stent-graft into the arch. Outcomes vary with regard to extent of repair and aortic arch pathologies treated. Results of arch chimney and other parallel graft techniques perhaps make it a less preferable choice for elective cases. However, they are very appealing options for urgent or bailout situations. Fenestrated stent-grafting is subjected to many technical challenges in aortic arch due to difficulties in stent-graft orientation and fenestration positioning. In situ fenestration techniques emerge to avoid these problems, but durability of stent-grafts after fenestration and ischemic consequences of temporary carotid arteries coverage raises some concern total arch repair using this technique. Arch branched graft is a new technology. Early outcomes did not meet the expectation; however the results have been improving after its learning curve period. Refining stent-graft technologies and implantation techniques positively impact outcomes of endovascular approaches.

  9. Patient management in aortic arch surgery†.

    PubMed

    Peterss, Sven; Pichlmaier, Maximilian; Curtis, Alexander; Luehr, Maximilian; Born, Frank; Hagl, Christian

    2017-01-01

    SummaryAortic arch surgery requires complex patient management beyond the manual replacement of the diseased vessel. These procedures include (i) a thorough and pathologically adjusted preoperative evaluation, (ii) initiation and control of cardiopulmonary bypass, (iii) cerebral protection strategies and (iv) techniques to protect the abdominal end organs during prolonged operations. Due to the complexity of aortic arch procedures, multimodal real-time surveillance is required during all stages of the operation. Although having the patient survive the operation is the major goal, further observation is necessary because of the chronicity of the disease. This review summarizes specific aspects of patient management during and after operations requiring periods of circulatory arrest, without necessarily referring to all studies on this topic. The pros and cons of different strategies are weighed against each other, including the personal experience of the authors. A number of questions are raised without providing a 'right' or 'wrong' answer. We show that a number of different well-established strategies can result in comparable excellent long-lasting surgical results.

  10. Supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult with anomalies of aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Acrisio Sales; Alencar, Polyanna; Santos, Alana Neiva; Lobo, Roberto Augusto de Mesquita; de Mesquita, Fernando Antônio; Guimarães, Aloyra Guedis

    2013-01-01

    The supravalvular aortic stenosis is a rare congenital heart defect being very uncommon in adults. We present a case of supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult associated with anomalies of the aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation, which was submitted to aortic valve replacement and arterioplasty of the ascending aorta with a good postoperative course. PMID:24598962

  11. A bovine aortic arch in humans.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; González-Santos, Jose María; López-Rodriguez, Javier; Dalmau-Sorli, María José; Bueno-Codoñer, María; Arévalo-Abascal, Adolfo; Fdez García-Hierro, Jose Ma; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Arnáiz, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We describe a curious congenital variation of human aortic arch (AA) branching pattern termed the "bovine aortic arch". Rather than arising directly from the AA as a separate branch as occurs in the most common AA branching pattern, the left common carotid artery moves to the right and merges from the brachiocephalic trunk. It is the normal AA branching pattern presented in a number of animals (canines, felines or Macaque monkeys) but it has nothing to do with anatomy of AA in ruminant animals, including cattle and buffalo. That is why it is one of the most widely misnomers used in medical literature whose origin is nowadays unknown.

  12. Arch Reconstruction with Autologous Pulmonary Artery Patch in Interrupted Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won-Young

    2014-01-01

    Various surgical techniques have been developed for the repair of an interrupted aortic arch. However, tension and Gothic arch formation at the anastomotic site have remained major problems for these techniques: Excessive tension causes arch stenosis and left main bronchus compression, and Gothic arch configuration is related to cardiovascular complications. To resolve these problems, we adopted a modified surgical technique of distal aortic arch augmentation using an autologous main pulmonary artery patch. The descending aorta was then anastomosed to the augmented aortic arch in an end-to-side manner. Here, we report two cases of interrupted aortic arch that were repaired using this technique. PMID:24782962

  13. Arch reconstruction with autologous pulmonary artery patch in interrupted aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Young; Park, Jeong-Jun

    2014-04-01

    Various surgical techniques have been developed for the repair of an interrupted aortic arch. However, tension and Gothic arch formation at the anastomotic site have remained major problems for these techniques: Excessive tension causes arch stenosis and left main bronchus compression, and Gothic arch configuration is related to cardiovascular complications. To resolve these problems, we adopted a modified surgical technique of distal aortic arch augmentation using an autologous main pulmonary artery patch. The descending aorta was then anastomosed to the augmented aortic arch in an end-to-side manner. Here, we report two cases of interrupted aortic arch that were repaired using this technique.

  14. A bovine aortic arch in humans

    PubMed Central

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; González-Santos, Jose María; López-Rodriguez, Javier; Dalmau-Sorli, María José; Bueno-Codoñer, María; Arévalo-Abascal, Adolfo; Fdez García-Hierro, Jose Ma; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Arnáiz, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We describe a curious congenital variation of human aortic arch (AA) branching pattern termed the “bovine aortic arch”. Rather than arising directly from the AA as a separate branch as occurs in the most common AA branching pattern, the left common carotid artery moves to the right and merges from the brachiocephalic trunk. It is the normal AA branching pattern presented in a number of animals (canines, felines or Macaque monkeys) but it has nothing to do with anatomy of AA in ruminant animals, including cattle and buffalo. That is why it is one of the most widely misnomers used in medical literature whose origin is nowadays unknown. PMID:24973853

  15. [Single coronary artery and right aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Coronary anomalies are mostly asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during coronary angiography or echocardiography. However, they must be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of angina, dyspnea, syncope, acute myocardial infarction or sudden death in young patients. The case is presented of two rare anomalies, single coronary artery originating from right sinus of Valsalva and right aortic arch, in a 65 year-old patient with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease treated percutaneously.

  16. Aortic arch dissection: a controversy of classification.

    PubMed

    Lempel, Jason K; Frazier, Aletta Ann; Jeudy, Jean; Kligerman, Seth J; Schultz, Randall; Ninalowo, Hammed A; Gozansky, Elliott K; Griffith, Bartley; White, Charles S

    2014-06-01

    Aortic dissections originating in the ascending aorta and descending aorta have been classified as type A and type B dissections, respectively. However, dissections with intimal flap extension into the aortic arch between the innominate and left subclavian arteries are not accounted for adequately in the widely used Stanford classification. This gap has been the subject of controversy in the medical and surgical literature, and there is a tendency among many radiologists to categorize such arch dissections as type A lesions, thus making them an indication for surgery. However, the radiologic perspective is not supported by either standard dissection classification or current clinical management. In this special report, the origin of dissection classification and its evolution into current radiologic interpretation and surgical practice are reviewed. The cause for the widespread misconception about classification and treatment algorithms is identified. Institutional review board approval and waiver of informed consent were obtained as part of this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study to assess all aortic dissection studies performed at the University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore between 2010 and 2012 to determine the prevalence of arch dissections. Finally, a unified classification system that reconciles imaging interpretation and management implementation is proposed.

  17. Adult presentation with vascular ring due to double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Henryk; Uebing, Anselm; Mohiaddin, Raad

    2006-11-01

    This is a case report on the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose vascular ring due to double aortic arch in an adult presenting with an abnormal chest X-ray. The experience in this case and the literature review identify the benefits of using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to clarify complex aortic arch anatomy.

  18. Growth and hemodynamics after early embryonic aortic arch occlusion.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Stephanie E; Menon, Prahlad G; Kowalski, William J; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B; Butcher, Jonathan T; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-08-01

    The majority of severe clinically significant forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) are associated with great artery lesions, including hypoplastic, double, right or interrupted aortic arch morphologies. While fetal and neonatal interventions are advancing, their potential ability to restore cardiac function, optimal timing, location, and intensity required for intervention remain largely unknown. Here, we combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with in vivo experiments to test how individual pharyngeal arch artery hemodynamics alter as a result of local interventions obstructing individual arch artery flow. Simulated isolated occlusions within each pharyngeal arch artery were created with image-derived three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of normal chick pharyngeal arch anatomy at Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) developmental stages HH18 and HH24. Acute flow redistributions were then computed using in vivo measured subject-specific aortic sinus inflow velocity profiles. A kinematic vascular growth-rendering algorithm was then developed and implemented to test the role of changing local wall shear stress patterns in downstream 3D morphogenesis of arch arteries. CFD simulations predicted that altered pressure gradients and flow redistributions were most sensitive to occlusion of the IVth arches. To evaluate these simulations experimentally, a novel in vivo experimental model of pharyngeal arch occlusion was developed and implemented using two-photon microscopy-guided femtosecond laser-based photodisruption surgery. The right IVth arch was occluded at HH18, and resulting diameter changes were followed for up to 24 h. Pharyngeal arch diameter responses to acute hemodynamic changes were predicted qualitatively but poorly quantitatively. Chronic growth and adaptation to hemodynamic changes, however, were predicted in a subset of arches. Our findings suggest that this complex biodynamic process is governed through more complex forms of mechanobiological

  19. Growth and hemodynamics after early embryonic aortic arch occlusion*

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephanie E.; Menon, Prahlad G.; Kowalski, William J.; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    The majority of severe clinically significant forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with great artery lesions, including hypoplastic, double, right or interrupted aortic arch morphologies. While fetal and neonatal interventions are advancing, their potential ability to restore cardiac function, optimal timing, location, and intensity required for intervention remain largely unknown. We here combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with in vivo experiments to test how individual pharyngeal arch artery hemodynamics alters as a result of local interventions to obstruct individual arch artery flow. Simulated isolated occlusions within each pharyngeal arch artery were created with image derived three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of normal chick pharyngeal arch anatomy at Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) developmental stages HH18 and HH24. Acute flow redistributions were then computed using in vivo measured subject-specific aortic sinus inflow velocity profiles. A kinematic vascular growth-rendering algorithm was then developed and implemented to test the role of changing local wall shear stress patterns in downstream 3D morphogenesis of arch arteries. CFD simulations predicted that altered pressure gradients and flow redistributions were most sensitive to occlusion of the IVth arches. To evaluate these simulations experimentally, a novel in vivo experimental model of pharyngeal arch occlusion was developed and implemented using two-photon microscopy guided femtosecond laser based photodisruption surgery. The right IVth arch was occluded at HH18, and resulting diameter changes were followed for up to 24 hours. Pharyngeal arch diameter responses to acute hemodynamic changes were predicted qualitatively but poorly quantitatively. Chronic growth and adaptation to hemodynamic changes however were predicted in a subset of arches. Our findings suggest that this complex biodynamic process is governed through more complex forms of mechanobiological

  20. Blood flow characteristics in the aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Mihaiescu, Mihai; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2012-11-01

    The purpose with this study is to investigate the flow characteristics of blood in the aortic arch. Cardiovascular diseases are associated with specific locations in the arterial tree. Considering atherogenesis, it is claimed that the Wall Shear Stress (WSS) along with its temporal and spatial gradients play an important role in the development of the disease. The WSS is determined by the local flow characteristics, that in turn depends on the geometry as well as the rheological properties of blood. In this numerical work, the time dependent fluid flow during the entire cardiac cycle is fully resolved. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different Red Blood Cell loading. Data obtained through Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging have been used in order to reconstruct geometries of the the aortic arch. Here, three different geometries are studied out of which two display malformations that can be found in patients having the genetic disorder Turner's syndrome. The simulations show a highly complex flow with regions of secondary flow that is enhanced for the diseased aortas. The financial support from the Swedish Research Council (VR) and the Sweden-America Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. Critical Transitions in Early Embryonic Aortic Arch Patterning and Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, William J.; Dur, Onur; Wang, Yajuan; Patrick, Michael J.; Tinney, Joseph P.; Keller, Bradley B.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2013-01-01

    Transformation from the bilaterally symmetric embryonic aortic arches to the mature great vessels is a complex morphogenetic process, requiring both vasculogenic and angiogenic mechanisms. Early aortic arch development occurs simultaneously with rapid changes in pulsatile blood flow, ventricular function, and downstream impedance in both invertebrate and vertebrate species. These dynamic biomechanical environmental landscapes provide critical epigenetic cues for vascular growth and remodeling. In our previous work, we examined hemodynamic loading and aortic arch growth in the chick embryo at Hamburger-Hamilton stages 18 and 24. We provided the first quantitative correlation between wall shear stress (WSS) and aortic arch diameter in the developing embryo, and observed that these two stages contained different aortic arch patterns with no inter-embryo variation. In the present study, we investigate these biomechanical events in the intermediate stage 21 to determine insights into this critical transition. We performed fluorescent dye microinjections to identify aortic arch patterns and measured diameters using both injection recordings and high-resolution optical coherence tomography. Flow and WSS were quantified with 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Dye injections revealed that the transition in aortic arch pattern is not a uniform process and multiple configurations were documented at stage 21. CFD analysis showed that WSS is substantially elevated compared to both the previous (stage 18) and subsequent (stage 24) developmental time-points. These results demonstrate that acute increases in WSS are followed by a period of vascular remodeling to restore normative hemodynamic loading. Fluctuations in blood flow are one possible mechanism that impacts the timing of events such as aortic arch regression and generation, leading to the variable configurations at stage 21. Aortic arch variations noted during normal rapid vascular remodeling at stage 21 identify a

  2. Interrupted aortic arch: A misdiagnosed cause of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ponte, Marta; Dias, Adelaide; Dias Ferreira, Nuno; Fonseca, Conceição; Mota, João Carlos; Gama, Vasco

    2014-06-01

    We present the case of a 47-year-old man with hypertension for over 20 years, referred to our hospital due to mild aortic dilatation detected on a transthoracic echocardiogram. On physical examination weak lower limb pulses and a blood pressure differential of >50 mmHg between arms and legs were detected. Complete interruption of the aortic arch below the left subclavian artery was diagnosed by computed tomography angiography. With this case we aim to draw attention to aortic coarctation and interrupted aortic arch as potential causes of hypertension and to highlight the importance of the physical examination in the diagnosis of secondary causes of hypertension.

  3. Endovascular Stent Grafting for Aortic Arch Aneurysm in Aortoiliac Occlusive Disease following Aortic Arch Debranching and Aortobifemoral Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Canbay, Cagla; Onal, Yilmaz; Beyaz, Metin Onur; Sayin, Omer Ali; Barburoglu, Mehmet; Yornuk, Mesut; Acunas, Bulent; Alpagut, Ufuk; Dayioglu, Enver

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms constitutes high mortality and morbidity rates despite improvements in surgery, anesthesia, and technology. Endovascular stent grafting may be an alternative therapy with lower risks when compared with conventional techniques. However, sometimes the branches of the aortic arch may require transport to the proximal segments prior to successful thoracic aortic endovascular stent grafting. Atherosclerosis is accounted among the etiology of both aneurysms and occlusive diseases that can coexist in the same patient. In these situations stent grafting may even be more complicated. In this report, we present the treatment of a 92-year-old patient with aortic arch aneurysm and proximal descending aortic aneurysm. For successful thoracic endovascular stent grafting, the patient needed an alternative route other than the native femoral and iliac arteries for the deployment of the stent graft. In addition, debranching of left carotid and subclavian arteries from the aortic arch was also required for successful exclusion of the thoracic aneurysm.

  4. Ductal stent implantation in tetralogy of fallot with aortic arch abnormality.

    PubMed

    Tola, Hasan Tahsin; Ergul, Yakup; Saygi, Murat; Ozyilmaz, Isa; Guzeltas, Alper; Odemis, Ender

    2015-06-01

    Stenting of patent ductus arteriosus is an alternative to palliative cardiac surgery in newborns with duct-dependent or decreased pulmonary circulation; however, the use of this technique in patients with an aortic arch abnormality presents a challenge. Tetralogy of Fallot is a congenital heart defect that is frequently associated with anomalies of the aortic arch and its branches. The association is even more common in patients with chromosome 22q11 deletion. We present the case of an 18-day-old male infant who had cyanosis and a heart murmur. After an initial echocardiographic evaluation, the patient was diagnosed with tetralogy of Fallot and right-sided aortic arch. The pulmonary annulus and the main pulmonary artery and its branches were slightly hypoplastic; the ductus arteriosus was small. Conventional and computed tomographic angiograms revealed a double aortic arch and an aberrant left subclavian artery. The right aortic arch branched into the subclavian arteries and continued into the descending aorta, whereas the left aortic arch branched into the common carotid arteries and ended with the patent ductus arteriosus. After evaluation of the ductal anatomy, we implanted a 3.5 × 15-mm coronary stent in the duct. Follow-up injections showed augmented pulmonary flow and an increase in oxygen saturation from 65% to 94%. The patient was also found to have chromosome 22q11 deletion.

  5. Safety and Efficacy of an Aortic Arch Stent Graft with Window-Shaped Fenestration for Supra-Aortic Arch Vessels: an Experimental Study in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Ha; Choe, Jeong Cheon; Kim, Sang-Pil; Park, Tae Sik; Ahn, Jinhee; Park, Jin Sup; Lee, Hye Won; Oh, Jun-Hyok; Choi, Jung Hyun; Cha, Kwang Soo

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Thoracic endovascular aortic repair exhibits limitations in cases where the aortic pathology involves the aortic arch. We had already developed a fenestrated aortic stent graft (FASG) with a preloaded catheter for aortic pathology involving the aortic arch. FASG was suitable for elective cases. Materials and Methods An aortic arch stent graft with a window-shaped fenestration (FASG-W) for supra-aortic arch vessels is suitable for emergent cases. This study aims to test a FASG-W for supra-aortic arch vessels and to perform a preclinical study in swine to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this device. Six FASG-Ws with 1 preloaded catheter were advanced through the iliac artery in 6 swine. The presence of endoleak and the patency and deformity of the grafts were examined with computed tomography (CT) at 4 weeks postoperatively. A postmortem examination was performed at 8 weeks. The mean procedure time for FASG-W was 27.15±4.02 minutes. The mean time for the selection of the right carotid artery was 5.72±0.72 minutes. Results Major adverse events were not observed in any of the 6 pigs who survived for 8 weeks. For the FASG-W, no endoleaks, no disconnection, and no occlusion of the stent grafts were observed in the CT findings or the postmortem gross findings. Conclusion The procedure with the FASG-W was able to be performed safely in a relatively short procedure time and involved an easy technique. The FASG-W was found to be safe and convenient for use in this preclinical study of swine. PMID:28382077

  6. MDCT and 3D evaluation of type 2 hypoplastic pulmonary artery sling associated with right lung agenesis, hypoplastic aortic arch, and long segment tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Edward Y

    2007-11-01

    The early diagnosis and complete anatomic evaluation of pulmonary artery sling, a congenital vascular anomaly in which left pulmonary artery arises from the right pulmonary artery, is paramount for proper patient management, because patients with this disorder frequently have other congenital anomalies resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Until recently, pulmonary artery sling in the neonate has been established with standard radiologic imaging studies such as plain radiographs, barium swallow studies, fluoroscopy-guided airway studies, and echocardiograms. However, with the development and widespread availability of multidetector computed tomography, pulmonary artery sling is increasingly evaluated with this newer technology. This case report presents a rare incidence of type 2 hypoplastic pulmonary artery sling in a neonate associated with right lung agenesis, hypoplastic aortic arch, and long segment tracheal stenosis. Multidetector computed tomography combined with 3-dimensional evaluation was particularly helpful in making a correct diagnosis of the complicated anatomic anomalies found in this case.

  7. Translocation of the Aortic Arch with Norwood Procedure for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome Variant with Circumflex Retroesophageal Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chee-Hoon; Seo, Dong Ju; Bang, Ji Hyun; Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Jeong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Retroesophageal aortic arch, in which the aortic arch crosses the midline behind the esophagus to the contralateral side, is a rare form of vascular anomaly. The complete form may cause symptoms by compressing the esophagus or the trachea and need a surgical intervention. We report a rare case of a hypoplastic left heart syndrome variant with the left retroesophageal circumflex aortic arch in which the left aortic arch, retroesophageal circumflex aorta, and the right descending aorta with the aberrant right subclavian artery encircle the esophagus completely, thus causing central bronchial compression. Bilateral pulmonary artery banding and subsequent modified Norwood procedure with extensive mobilization and creation of the neo-aorta were performed. As a result of the successful translocation of the aorta, the airway compression was relieved. The patient underwent the second-stage operation and is doing well currently. PMID:25207249

  8. [Morphologic report and clinical evaluation of findings in a case of complete transposition of the great vessels of the heart and tubular hypoplasia of part of the aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Radović, S; Vuković, V; Mesihović, H

    1989-01-01

    We present a case of the coexistence transposition of the great vessels, atrial and ventricular septal defects, and extreme tubular hypoplasia of the aortic arch between the left common carotid and left subclavian arteries. Beside the thorough morphological description of that uncommon combined heart malformation, evaluation of clinical analysis is performed and compared with theoretically reconstructed chemodynamismus during patient's life.

  9. Abnormal aortic arch morphology in Turner syndrome patients is a risk factor for hypertension.

    PubMed

    De Groote, Katya; Devos, Daniël; Van Herck, Koen; Demulier, Laurent; Buysse, Wesley; De Schepper, Jean; De Wolf, Daniël

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension in Turner syndrome (TS) is a multifactorial, highly prevalent and significant problem that warrants timely diagnosis and rigorous treatment. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between abnormal aortic arch morphology and hypertension in adult TS patients. This was a single centre retrospective study in 74 adult TS patients (age 29.41 ± 8.91 years) who underwent a routine cardiac MRI. Patients were assigned to the hypertensive group (N = 31) if blood pressure exceeded 140/90 mmHg and/or if they were treated with antihypertensive medication. Aortic arch morphology was evaluated on MRI images and initially assigned as normal (N = 54) or abnormal (N = 20), based on the curve of the transverse arch and the distance between the left common carotid-left subclavian artery. We additionally used a new more objective method to describe aortic arch abnormality in TS by determination of the relative position of the highest point of the transverse arch (AoHP). Logistic regression analysis showed that hypertension is significantly and independently associated with age, BMI and abnormal arch morphology, with a larger effect size for the new AoHP method than for the classical method. TS patients with hypertension and abnormal arch morphology more often had dilatation of the ascending aorta. There is a significant association between abnormal arch morphology and hypertension in TS patients, independent of age and BMI, and not related to other structural heart disease. We suggest that aortic arch morphology should be included in the risk stratification for hypertension in TS and propose a new quantitative method to express aortic arch morphology.

  10. Bare Metal Stenting for Endovascular Exclusion of Aortic Arch Thrombi

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Hoffman, Andras; Autschbach, Ruediger; Damberg, Anneke L. M.

    2013-08-01

    BackgroundAortic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch are rare but are associated with a relevant risk of major stroke or distal embolization. Although stent grafting is commonly used as a treatment option in the descending aorta, only a few case reports discuss stenting of the aortic arch for the treatment of a thrombus. The use of bare metal stents in this setting has not yet been described.MethodsWe report two cases of ascending and aortic arch thrombus that were treated by covering the thrombus with an uncovered stent. Both procedures were performed under local anesthesia via a femoral approach. A femoral cutdown was used in one case, and a total percutaneous insertion was possible in the second case.ResultsBoth procedures were successfully performed without any periprocedural complications. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. In both cases, no late complications or recurrent embolization occurred at midterm follow-up, and control CT angiography at 1 respectively 10 months revealed no stent migration, freely perfused supra-aortic branches, and no thrombus recurrence.ConclusionTreating symptomatic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch with a bare metal stent is feasible. This technique could constitute a minimally invasive alternative to a surgical intervention or complex endovascular therapy with fenestrated or branched stent grafts.

  11. Morphology of aortic arch obstruction with patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Bruno; Chiariello, Luigi; Mercanti, Corrado; Bosman, Cesare; Colloridi, Vicenzo; Reale, Attilio; Marino, Benedetto

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-one hearts with aortic arch obstruction and patent ductus arteriosus were examined with special reference to associated cardiac anomalies. Six presented with complete interruption of the aortic arch, four with atretic isthmus, twelve with coarctation, and three with tubular hypoplasia. Associated cardiac anomalies were divided into two main groups: (1) septal defect with left-to-right shunt, and (2) left ventricular inflow and/or outflow obstruction. A high incidence (9/19=47.4%) of ventriculo-infundibular malalignment type of ventricular septal defect with subaortic stenosis was observed. Associated cardiac lesions that reduce blood flow in the aortic arch during fetal life may be responsible for poor development of this structure. Images PMID:15216214

  12. Mechanism of smart baroreception in the aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kember, G. C.; Armour, J. A.; Zamir, M.

    2006-09-01

    A mechanism is proposed by which the patch of baroreceptors along the inner curvature of the arch of the aorta can sense hemodynamic events occurring downstream from the aortic arch, in the periphery of the arterial tree. Based on a solution of equations governing the elastic movements of the aortic wall, it is shown that the pressure distribution along the patch of baroreceptors has the same functional form as the distribution of strain along the patch. The significance of these findings are discussed, particularly as they relate to the possibility of a neuromechanical basis of essential hypertension.

  13. Endovascular repair of the aortic arch in pigs by improved double-branched stent grafts

    PubMed Central

    Lin, C; Wang, L; Lu, Q; Li, C

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of total endovascular repair of the aortic arch in pigs using improved integrated double-branched stent grafts. Methods Improved self-expandable stent grafts with a main body and two integrated branches were prepared for the repair of the aortic arch in six pigs. The feasibility of using these stent grafts was evaluated with arteriography, computed tomography (CT), computed tomography angiography (CTA) and autopsy three months following the procedure. Results The double-branched stent grafts were placed successfully in the aortic arch in all six pigs. All pigs survived for at least three months and their biological behaviour was normal. Arteriography, CTA and animal necropsy revealed good fixation in all cases. Aortic valve function and coronary ostia remained intact, and CT of the head did not detect any lesion of cerebral infarction. Conclusions Endovascular repair of the aortic arch with an integrated double-branched stent graft is safe and feasible in animal studies. PMID:23484997

  14. Total Arch versus Hemiarch Replacement for Type A Acute Aortic Dissection: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Nicolò, Francesca; Bovio, Emanuele; Serrao, Andrea; Zeitani, Jacob; Scafuri, Antonio; Chiariello, Luigi; Ruvolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated early and intermediate outcomes of aortic arch surgery in patients with type A acute aortic dissection (AAD), investigating the effect of arch surgery extension on postoperative results. From January 2006 through July 2013, 201 patients with type A AAD underwent urgent corrective surgery at our institution. Of the 92 patients chosen for this study, 59 underwent hemiarch replacement (hemiarch group), and 33 underwent total arch replacement (total arch group) in conjunction with ascending aorta replacement. The operative mortality rate was 22%. Total arch replacement was associated with a 33% risk of operative death, versus 15% for hemiarch (P=0.044). Multivariable analysis found these independent predictors of operative death: age (odds ratio [OR]=1.13/yr; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–1.23; P=0.002), body mass index >30 kg/m2 (OR=9.9; 95% CI, 1.28–19; P=0.028), postoperative low cardiac output (OR=10.6; 95% CI, 1.18–25; P=0.035), and total arch replacement (OR=8.8; 95% CI, 1.39–15; P=0.021) The mean overall 5-year survival rate was 59.3% ± 5.5%, and mean 5-year freedom from distal reintervention was 95.4% ± 3.2% (P=NS). In type A AAD, aortic arch surgery is still associated with high operative mortality rates; hemiarch replacement can be performed more safely than total arch replacement. Rates of distal aortic reoperation were not different between the 2 surgical strategies. PMID:28100966

  15. Early Results of Chimney Technique for Type B Aortic Dissections Extending to the Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chen; Tang, Hanfei; Qiao, Tong; Liu, Changjian; Zhou, Min

    2016-01-15

    ObjectiveTo summarize our early experience gained from the chimney technique for type B aortic dissection (TBAD) extending to the aortic arch and to evaluate the aortic remodeling in the follow-up period.MethodsFrom September 2011 to July 2014, 27 consecutive TBAD patients without adequate proximal landing zones were retrograde analyzed. Chimney stent-grafts were deployed parallel to the main endografts to reserve flow to branch vessels while extending the landing zones. In the follow-up period, aortic remodeling was observed with computed tomography angiography.ResultsThe technical success rate was 100 %, and endografts were deployed in zone 0 (n = 3, 11.1 %), zone 1 (n = 18, 66.7 %), and zone 2 (n = 6, 22.2 %). Immediately, proximal endoleaks were detected in 5 patients (18.5 %). During a mean follow-up period of 17.6 months, computed tomography angiography showed all the aortic stent-grafts and chimney grafts to be patent. Favorable remodeling was observed at the level of maximum descending aorta and left subclavian artery with expansion of true lumen (from 18.4 ± 4.8 to 25 ± 0.86 mm, p < 0.001 and 27.1 ± 0.62 to 28.5 ± 0.37 mm, p < 0.001) and depressurization of false lumen (from 23.7 ± 2.7 to 8.7 ± 3.8 mm, p < 0.001, from 5.3 ± 1.2 to 2.1 ± 2.1 mm, p < 0.001). While at the level of maximum abdominal aorta, suboptimal remodeling of the total aorta (from 24.1 ± 0.4 to 23.6 ± 1.5 mm, p = 0.06) and true lumen (from 13.8 ± 0.6 to 14.5 ± 0.4 mm, p = 0.08) was observed.ConclusionBased on our limited experience, the chimney technique with thoracic endovascular repair is demonstrated to be promising for TBAD extending to the arch with favorable aortic remodeling.

  16. Rapidly growing aortic arch aneurysm in Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Nozomi; Sakano, Yasuhito; Ohki, Shin-Ichi; Misawa, Yoshio

    2011-03-01

    We present a patient with a nine-year history of Behçet's disease (BD), who developed a rapidly expanding aneurysm of the aortic arch. Three-dimensional computed tomography demonstrated a saccular aortic arch aneurysm with a maximal diameter of 5 cm. No bacteria were detected by serial blood cultures. The aneurysm, however, showed a multi-lobular cavity, mimicking an infectious aneurysm. Therefore, we prescribed antibacterial agents for one week. The patient still had a high-fever and an elevated C-reactive protein level thereafter. Aortic arch replacement was performed emergently. Because we were unable to determine whether the aneurysm was caused by infection or BD, the implanted prosthetic graft and the anastomotic sites were covered with a pedicle graft of the greater omentum, and we continued to administer antibacterial agents for four weeks postoperatively. The pathological examination showed neither bacteria nor cystic medial necrosis in the resected aortic wall. Inflammatory changes with eosinophilic infiltration were recognized mainly around the adventitia near the aneurysm. The patient had a favorable postoperative course without any complications.

  17. Total Aortic Arch Replacement: Superior Ventriculo-Arterial Coupling with Decellularized Allografts Compared with Conventional Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Schmack, Bastian; Korkmaz, Sevil; Li, Shiliang; Chaimow, Nicole; Pätzold, Ines; Becher, Peter Moritz; Hartyánszky, István; Soós, Pál; Merkely, Gergő; Németh, Balázs Tamás; Istók, Roland; Veres, Gábor; Merkely, Béla; Terytze, Konstantin; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Background To date, no experimental or clinical study provides detailed analysis of vascular impedance changes after total aortic arch replacement. This study investigated ventriculoarterial coupling and vascular impedance after replacement of the aortic arch with conventional prostheses vs. decellularized allografts. Methods After preparing decellularized aortic arch allografts, their mechanical, histological and biochemical properties were evaluated and compared to native aortic arches and conventional prostheses in vitro. In open-chest dogs, total aortic arch replacement was performed with conventional prostheses and compared to decellularized allografts (n = 5/group). Aortic flow and pressure were recorded continuously, left ventricular pressure-volume relations were measured by using a pressure-conductance catheter. From the hemodynamic variables end-systolic elastance (Ees), arterial elastance (Ea) and ventriculoarterial coupling were calculated. Characteristic impedance (Z) was assessed by Fourier analysis. Results While Ees did not differ between the groups and over time (4.1±1.19 vs. 4.58±1.39 mmHg/mL and 3.21±0.97 vs. 3.96±1.16 mmHg/mL), Ea showed a higher increase in the prosthesis group (4.01±0.67 vs. 6.18±0.20 mmHg/mL, P<0.05) in comparison to decellularized allografts (5.03±0.35 vs. 5.99±1.09 mmHg/mL). This led to impaired ventriculoarterial coupling in the prosthesis group, while it remained unchanged in the allograft group (62.5±50.9 vs. 3.9±23.4%). Z showed a strong increasing tendency in the prosthesis group and it was markedly higher after replacement when compared to decellularized allografts (44.6±8.3dyn·sec·cm−5 vs. 32.4±2.0dyn·sec·cm−5, P<0.05). Conclusions Total aortic arch replacement leads to contractility-afterload mismatch by means of increased impedance and invert ventriculoarterial coupling ratio after implantation of conventional prostheses. Implantation of decellularized allografts preserves vascular impedance

  18. Complex Atheromatosis of the Aortic Arch in Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Capmany, Ramón Pujadas; Ibañez, Montserrat Oliveras; Pesquer, Xavier Jané

    2010-01-01

    In many stroke patients it is not possible to establish the etiology of stroke. However, in the last two decades, the use of transesophageal echocardiography in patients with stroke of uncertain etiology reveals atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic arch, which often protrude into the lumen and have mobile components in a high percentage of cases. Several autopsy series and retrospective studies of cases and controls have shown an association between aortic arch atheroma and arterial embolism, which was later confirmed by prospectively designed studies. The association with ischemic stroke was particularly strong when atheromas were located proximal to the ostium of the left subclavian artery, when the plaque was ≥ 4 mm thick and particularly when mobile components are present. In these cases, aspirin might not prevent adequately new arterial ischemic events especially stroke. Here we review the evidence of aortic arch atheroma as an independent risk factor for stroke and arterial embolism, including clinical and pathological data on atherosclerosis of the thoracic aorta as an embolic source. In addition, the impact of complex plaques (≥ 4 mm thick, or with mobile components) on increasing the risk of stroke is also reviewed. In non-randomized retrospective studies anticoagulation was superior to antiplatelet therapy in patients with stroke and aortic arch plaques with mobile components. In a retrospective case-control study, statins significantly reduced the relative risk of new vascular events. However, given the limited data available and its retrospective nature, randomized prospective studies are needed to establish the optimal secondary prevention therapeutic regimens in these high risk patients. PMID:21804777

  19. Atresia of the Aortic Arch in 4-Year-Old Child: A Clinical Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Nigro Stimato, Vittoria; Didier, Dominique; Beghetti, Maurice; Tissot, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Atresia of the aortic arch is a rare congenital heart defect with a high mortality when associated with other intracardiac defects. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) provides the exact anatomy of the aortic arch and collateral circulation and is useful to diagnose-associated aortic arch anomalies. This report describes the case of a 4-year-old child with atresia of the aortic arch, referred to our institution with the diagnosis of aortic coarctation and bicuspid aortic valve. On clinical exam, the femoral pulses were not palpable and there was a significant differential blood pressure between the upper and lower limbs. The echocardiography showed a severely stenotic bicuspid aortic valve but was limited for the exact description of the aortic arch. CMR showed absence of lumen continuity between the ascending and descending aorta distal to the left subclavian artery, extending over 5 mm, with the presence of a bend in the arch and diverticulum on either side of the zone of discontinuity, suggesting the diagnosis atresia of the aortic arch rather than coarctation or interruption. The patient benefited from a successful surgical commissurotomy of the aortic valve and reconstruction of the aortic arch with a homograft. The post-operative CMR confirmed the good surgical result. This case emphasizes the utility of CMR to provide good anatomical information to establish the exact diagnosis and the operative strategy. PMID:25853109

  20. Aortic arch geometry and exercise-induced hypertension in aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    De Caro, Enrico; Trocchio, Gianluca; Smeraldi, Attilio; Calevo, Maria Grazia; Pongiglione, Giacomo

    2007-05-01

    Hypertension at rest or during effort is not uncommon in patients with aortic coarctation (CoA), even those with a successful repair or mild degree of obstruction. Anatomic factors and functional abnormalities have been proposed as causes of this finding. Recently, aortic arch geometry was reported in association with hypertension at rest in patients with successful CoA repair. Forty-one patients (age 15.7 +/- 4.6 years) without significant obstruction at rest (mean systolic Doppler gradient at rest < or =25 mm Hg) were selected for the study. All patients underwent a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test and magnetic resonance imaging of the aorta. Aortic arch shape was defined on global geometry as normal, gothic, and crenel. Percentage of anatomic narrowing (AN) was also calculated. Twenty-four patients (58%) showed exercise-induced hypertension (EIH). Regarding the shape of the aortic arch, normal geometry was present in 17 patients (41%), 9 (21%) had gothic geometry, and 15 (36%) had crenel geometry. There were no differences among the 3 geometries in regard to the incidence of EIH (70.6% in normal, 55.6% in gothic, and 46.7% in crenel) or AN (36.9% in normal, 33.5% in gothic, and 36.6% in crenel). In conclusion, our results fail to show a correlation between a specific aortic arch shape and the incidence of EIH and significant AN in patients with native or residual CoA or repeat CoA. Therefore, at present, the role of aortic arch geometry in identifying patients at risk of EIH is still uncertain.

  1. Biomechanical characterization of ascending aortic aneurysm with concomitant bicuspid aortic valve and bovine aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Pham, T; Martin, C; Elefteriades, J; Sun, W

    2013-08-01

    Studies have shown that patients harboring bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) or bovine aortic arch (BAA) are more likely than the general population to develop ascending aortic aneurysm (AsAA). A thorough quantification of the AsAA tissue properties for these patient groups may offer insights into the underlying mechanisms of AsAA development. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate and compare the mechanical and microstructural properties of aortic tissues from AsAA patients with and without concomitant BAV or BAA. AsAA (n=20), BAV (n=20) and BAA (n=15) human tissues were obtained from patients who underwent elective AsAA surgery. Planar biaxial and uniaxial failure tests were used to characterize the mechanical and failure properties of the tissues, respectively. Histological analysis was performed to detect medial degenerative characteristics of aortic aneurysm. Individual layer thickness and composition were quantified for each patient group. The circumferential stress-strain response of the BAV samples was stiffer than both AsAA (p=0.473) and BAA (p=0.152) tissues at a low load. The BAV samples were nearly isotropic, while AsAA and BAA samples were anisotropic. The areal strain of BAV samples was significantly less than that of AsAA (p=0.041) and BAA (p=0.004) samples at a low load. The BAA samples were similar to the AsAA samples in both mechanical and failure properties. On the microstructural level, all samples displayed moderate medial degeneration, characterized by elastin fragmentation, cell loss, mucoid accumulation and fibrosis. The ultimate tensile strength of BAV and BAA sampleswere also found to decrease with age. Overall, the BAV samples were stiffer than both AsAA and BAA samples, and the BAA samples were similar to the AsAA samples. The BAV samples were thinnest, with less elastin than AsAA and BAA samples, which may be attributed to the loss of extensibility of these tissues at a low load. No apparent difference in failure mechanics among

  2. Neonatal aortic arch hemodynamics and perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, Kerem; Dur, Onur; Sundareswaran, Kartik; Kanter, Kirk; Fogel, Mark; Yoganathan, Ajit; Undar, Akif

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study is to quantify the detailed three-dimensional (3D) pulsatile hemodynamics, mechanical loading, and perfusion characteristics of a patient-specific neonatal aortic arch during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The 3D cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reconstruction of a pediatric patient with a normal aortic arch is modified based on clinical literature to represent the neonatal morphology and flow conditions. The anatomical dimensions are verified from several literature sources. The CPB is created virtually in the computer by clamping the ascending aorta and inserting the computer-aided design model of the 10 Fr tapered generic cannula. Pulsatile (130 bpm) 3D blood flow velocities and pressures are computed using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Second order accurate CFD settings are validated against particle image velocimetry experiments in an earlier study with a complex cardiovascular unsteady benchmark. CFD results in this manuscript are further compared with the in vivo physiological CPB pressure waveforms and demonstrated excellent agreement. Cannula inlet flow waveforms are measured from in vivo PC-MRI and 3 kg piglet neonatal animal model physiological experiments, distributed equally between the head-neck vessels and the descending aorta. Neonatal 3D aortic hemodynamics is also compared with that of the pediatric and fetal aortic stages. Detailed 3D flow fields, blood damage, wall shear stress (WSS), pressure drop, perfusion, and hemodynamic parameters describing the pulsatile energetics are calculated for both the physiological neonatal aorta and for the CPB aorta assembly. The primary flow structure is the high-speed canulla jet flow (approximately 3.0 m/s at peak flow), which eventually stagnates at the anterior aortic arch wall and low velocity flow in the cross-clamp pouch. These structures contributed to the reduced flow pulsatility (85%), increased WSS (50%), power loss (28%), and blood

  3. [Relationship between aortic arch shape and blood pressure response after coarctation repair].

    PubMed

    Ou, P; Mousseaux, E; Auriacombe, L; Pédroni, E; Balleux, F; Sidi, D; Bonnet, D

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms of secondary hypertension after repair of coarctation of the aorta are not well understood. Abnormalities of the architecture of the aortic arch and their consequences on blood pressure have not been studied. In order to study the relationship between abnormalities or aortic arch architecture and resting blood pressure ninety-four patients without re-coarctation were followed up prospectively from 1997 to 2004 (mean age 16.9 +/- 8.1 years; mean weight 57.5 +/- 18.3 Kg; interval since surgery 16.3 +/- 5.4 years). All underwent MRI angiography of the thoracic aorta which enabled the abnormalities to be classified in 3 groups: gothic arch, crenellated arch and roman arch. Twenty-four patients (25.5%) were hypertensive and 70 (74.4%) normotensive. There were 40 gothic arches (42.5%). 14 crenellated arches (15%) and 40 roman arches (42.5%). Gothic arches were more commonly observed in the hypertensive patients (18/40, [45%, 95% CI 31-62]) than the crenellated arches (4/14, [28.5%, 95% CI 7-48]) or the roman arches (2/40, [5%, 95% CI 2-12]). Only the gothic arch was independently correlated with hypertension on multivariate analysis. The authors conclude that gothic deformation of the aortic arch is an independent predictive factor of hypertension in patients operated for coarctation with an excellent result on the isthmic region. Patients with a gothic appearance of their aortic arch should be followed up closely.

  4. The application of autologous pulmonary artery in surgical correction of complicated aortic arch anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Shusheng; Cen, Jianzheng; Chen, Jimei; Xu, Gang; He, Biaochuan; Teng, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background In the patients with longer-segment aortic arch hypoplasia or interruption with ventricular septal defect, surgery with homograft vessel or autologous pericardial patch to augment descending aortic arch will not result in adverse reactions caused by end-to-end anastomosis. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed primary experience of surgical correction of complicated aortic arch anomaly with autologous main pulmonary artery. Methods From July 2010 to March 2016, the twenty-one cases of aortic arch complex anomalies were reconstructed with autologous main pulmonary artery. There were 5 patients with interrupted aortic arch and 16 patients with coarctation of aorta. In patients with interrupted aortic arch, anterior wall of main pulmonary artery was excised to form a conduit whose diameter varied according to the area of patient’s body surface. Both ends of the conduit were anastomosed to aortic arch and descending aorta, respectively. In other patients with coarctation of aorta, aortic arch was augmented with tailored pulmonary artery patch in oval shape. The defect of main pulmonary artery was repaired with autologous pericardial patch. Results There was only one patient died of multiple organ failure postoperatively. The other twenty patients survived without any neurologic complications. Differences of blood pressure between upper and lower limbs were not significant in all cases. During follow-up period, the echocardiography for all patients in the third, sixth, twelfth, and twenty-fourth months showed that blood flow in the descending aortic arch was fluent and there was no obvious blood pressure gradient. Conclusions Autologous main pulmonary artery can be used to repair complicated aortic arch anomalies completely without any anastomotic tension or bronchial obstruction postoperatively. This procedure is feasible and possesses predominant early and mid-term effects, and autologous main pulmonary artery can retain growth capacity during follow

  5. Aortic Arch Aneurysms: Treatment with Extra anatomical Bypass and Endovascular Stent-Grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Noriyuki; Shimono, Takatsugu; Hirano, Tadanori; Mizumoto, Toru; Ishida, Masaki; Fujii, Hideki; Yada, Isao; Takeda, Kan

    2002-10-15

    Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is emerging as an attractive alternative to surgical graft replacement. However,patients with aortic arch aneurysms are often excluded from the target of endovascular repair because of lack of suitable landing zones, especially at the proximal ones. In this paper we describe our method for treating patients with aortic arch aneurysms using a combination of extra anatomical bypass surgery and endovascular stent-grafting.

  6. Unusual vascular ring anomaly associated with a persistent right aortic arch in two dogs.

    PubMed

    House, A K; Summerfield, N J; German, A J; Noble, P J M; Ibarrola, P; Brockman, D J

    2005-12-01

    An unusual vascular ring anomaly consisting of a persistent right aortic arch and a left ligamentum arteriosum extending from the main pulmonary artery to an aberrant left subclavian artery and left aortic arch remnant complex was identified in a German shepherd dog and a great Dane. The left subclavian artery and left aortic arch remnant complex originated at the junction between the right distal aortic arch and the descending aorta and coursed dorsal to the oesophagus in a cranial direction. The attachment of the ligamentum arteriosum to the aberrant left subclavian artery was approximately 5 cm cranial to the point of origin of the aberrant left subclavian artery and left aortic arch remnant complex from the descending aorta in both dogs. This anomaly observed in both dogs is similar to an anomaly reported in humans, in which a persistent right aortic arch is found in conjunction with an aberrant left subclavian artery and a left aortic arch remnant (Kommerell's diverticulum). Surgical ligation and division of the left ligamentum arteriosum in both dogs, along with division of the left subclavian artery in the great Dane, resulted in resolution of clinical signs in both of the dogs in this report.

  7. Surgical repair of truncus arteriosus associated with interrupted aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Lacour-Gayet, François; Goldberg, Steven

    2008-01-01

    The surgical repair of truncus arteriosus associated with an interrupted aortic arch (TAC-IAA) requires performing two major procedures at the same time. Due to the small number of patients, there is nearly no surgical learning curve. The surgical technique has greatly improved since the introduction of a homograft patch enlargement of the small ascending aorta. The association with a severe truncal regurgitation is a major risk factor as well as the presence of preoperative multiple organs failure. The series published by single centers are ≪10 patients, which make statistical analysis troublesome. The mortality varies from 0% to 50%. The multicentric study published in 2006 by the Congenital Heart Surgeons Society (CHSS) reports a 68% mortality (34/50). Nevertheless, the results can be excellent in experienced centers using a modern one stage surgical technique, undertaken in the first week of life.

  8. Spontaneous bilateral carotid artery dissection in a patient with bovine aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Cock, Dries De; Meuris, Bart; Benett, Johan; Desmet, Walter

    2014-08-01

    Carotid artery dissections are commonly associated with trauma or various connective tissue disorders. Dissection of the cerebrovascular arteries can result in ischemic stroke and is a frequent stroke etiology in younger patients. Anatomical variants of aortic arch branching, such as the 'bovine' aortic arch, are assumed to have little or no physiological consequence. To the best of our knowledge, we present for the first time a case of spontaneous dissection of the common origin of the innominate and left common carotid artery in a bovine aortic arch, resulting in bilateral dissection of the carotid arteries.

  9. Anomalous Origin of the Left Vertebral Artery from the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Evan H.; Song, Linda H.; Villela, Natalia L. A.; Fasani-Feldberg, Gregory B.; Jacobs, Jonathan L.; Kim, Dolly O.; Nathawat, Akshay; Patel, Devika; Bender, Roger B.; Peters, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomic anomalies of the aortic arch have implications for clinical practice if their significance is understood. Our case study involves a cadaveric finding of the left vertebral artery originating directly from the aortic arch. Although this anatomical variation has been documented, the prevalence of this anomaly may be generally underestimated. After noting this anomaly, we analyzed 27 cases and found that four female cadavers had the left vertebral artery originating from the aortic arch rather than the left subclavian artery. With a prevalence rate of 14.8%, it would seem that this anomaly is more significant than previously thought, which could have implications for surgical practice. PMID:27757404

  10. A fatal case of iatrogenic aortic arch rupture occurred during a tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Rosario; Leoncini, Andrea; Molinelli, Andrea; Ventura, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    The authors illustrate a rare case of aortic arch rupture in a 60-year-old woman, occurred during a tracheostomy performed using the Griggs method. The autopsy examination showed an aortic arch rupture in an intermediate position situated in the area between the brachiocephalic artery ostium and the left common carotid artery ostium, associated to a hemorrhage filling of the adjacent connective and muscular tissue. The death was therefore determined by cardiac arrest secondary to massive hemorrhagic hypovolemic shock caused by the aortic arch rupture. The lethal iatrogenic lesion was determined by the aortic arch traction caused by the dilatation. The surgeon's incautious use of the Howard-Kelly forceps introduced in the mediastinum was therefore hypothesized.

  11. Right aortic arch with aberrant left innominate artery arising from Kommerell's diverticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Faistauer, Ângela; Torres, Felipe Soares; Faccin, Carlo Sasso

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of an uncommon thoracic aorta anomaly-right aortic arch with aberrant left innominate artery arising from Kommerell's diverticulum-that went undiagnosed until adulthood. PMID:27777481

  12. Imaging a boa constrictor--the incomplete double aortic arch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Rajeev L; Kanwar, Anubhav; Jacobi, Adam; Sanz, Javier

    2012-11-01

    Incomplete double aortic arch is a rare anomaly resulting from atresia rather than complete involution in the distal left arch resulting in a non-patent fibrous cord between the left arch and descending thoracic aorta. This anatomic anomaly may cause symptomatic vascular rings, leading to stridor, wheezing, or dysphagia, requiring surgical transection of the fibrous cord. Herein, we describe an asymptomatic 59 year-old man presenting for contrast-enhanced CT angiography to assess cardiac anatomy prior to radiofrequency ablation, who was incidentally found to have an incomplete double aortic arch with hypoplasia of the left arch segment and an aortic diverticulum. Recognition of this abnormality by imaging is important to inform both corrective surgery in symptomatic patients, as well as assist in the planning of percutaneous coronary and vascular interventions.

  13. Successful percutaneous stent implantation for isolated dismal transverse aortic arch kinking

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zhi-Liang; Tsauo, Jia-Yu; Chen, Mao; Feng, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Isolated dismal transverse aortic arch kinking in adults is rare, and there is no recommended therapy at present. Percutaneous stent implantation may be an effective method to correct it and could be considered. Patient concerns: We report a 46-year-old woman who suffered from recurrent migraine and refractory hypertension with a significant systolic blood pressure difference between upper limbs. Diagnoses: The woman was diagnosed with isolated dismal transverse aortic arch kinking with refractory hypertension. Interventions: Percutaneous stent implantation was performed. Due to the kinking nature of the diseased transverse aortic arch, the first covered stent moved forward to the proximal transverse aortic arch during deploying without the left common carotid artery occlusion. And then, a second stent was placed to cover the residual kinked part of the dismal transverse arch. Outcomes: Angiography and post-procedural computed tomography angiography revealed fully corrected of the diseased segment. At 6-month follow-up after procedure, the patient was free of any symptoms and had a normal blood pressure under antihypertensive treatment. Lessons: This case indicates that transverse aortic arch kinking in isolation can be well treated by percutaneous stent implantation in adult patients. Unlike pure aortic coarctation, elongation and bucking give the rise to the occurrence rate of stent sliding and migration and sometimes a second stent is needed. PMID:28272200

  14. Anomaly in aortic arch alters pathological outcome of transient global ischemia in Rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Koichi; Yasuhara, Takao; Maki, Mina; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Yu, Guolong; Xu, Lin; Tambrallo, Laura; Rodriguez, Nancy A.; Stern, David M.; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Buccafusco, Jerry J.; Kawase, Takeshi; Hess, David C.; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated a non-human primate (NHP) transient global ischemia (TGI) model which was induced by clipping the arteries originating from the aortic arch. Previously we demonstrated that our TGI model in adult Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) results in marked neuronal cell loss in the hippocampal region, specifically the cornu Ammonis (CA1) region. However, we observed varying degrees of hippocampal cell loss among animals. Here, we report for the first time an anomaly of the aortic arch in some Rhesus macaques that appears as a key surgical factor in ensuring the success of the TGI model in this particular NHP. Eleven adult Rhesus macaques underwent the TGI surgery, which involved 10-15-minute clipping of both innominate and subclavian arteries. Animals were allowed to survive between 1 day and 28 days after TGI. Because of our experience and knowledge that Japanese macaques exhibited only innominate and subclavian arteries arising from the aortic arch, macroscopic visualization of these two arteries alone in the Rhesus macaques initially assured us that clipping both arteries was sufficient to produce TGI. During the course of one TGI operation, however, we detected 3 arterial branches arising from the aortic arch, which prompted us to subsequently search for 3 branches in succeeding TGI surgeries. In addition, we performed post-mortem examination of the heart to confirm the number of arterial branches in the aortic arch. Finally, in order to reveal the pathological effect of the aortic arch anomaly, we compared the hippocampal cell loss between animals found to have 3 arterial branches but had all or only two branches clipped during TGI operation. Post-mortem examination revealed eight NHPs had the typical two arterial aortic branches, but three NHPs displayed an extra arterial aortic branch, indicating that about 30% of Rhesus macaques had 3 arterial branches arising from the aorta. Histological analyses using Nissl staining showed that in NHPs with the

  15. Development of the human aortic arch system captured in an interactive three-dimensional reference model.

    PubMed

    Rana, M Sameer; Sizarov, Aleksander; Christoffels, Vincent M; Moorman, Antoon F M

    2014-06-01

    Variations and mutations in the human genome, such as 22q11.2 microdeletion, can increase the risk for congenital defects, including aortic arch malformations. Animal models are increasingly expanding our molecular and genetic insights into aortic arch development. However, in order to justify animal-to-human extrapolations, a human morphological, and molecular reference model would be of great value, but is currently lacking. Here, we present interactive three-dimensional reconstructions of the developing human aortic arch system, supplemented with the protein distribution of developmental markers for patterning and growth, including T-box transcription factor TBX1, a major candidate for the phenotypes found in patients with the 22q11.2 microdeletion. These reconstructions and expression data facilitate unbiased interpretations, and reveal previously unappreciated aspects of human aortic arch development. Based on our reconstructions and on reported congenital anomalies of the pulmonary trunk and tributaries, we postulate that the pulmonary arteries originate from the aortic sac, rather than from the sixth pharyngeal arch arteries. Similar to mouse, TBX1 is expressed in pharyngeal mesenchyme and epithelia. The endothelium of the pharyngeal arch arteries is largely negative for TBX1 and family member TBX2 but expresses neural crest marker AP2α, which gradually decreases with ongoing development of vascular smooth muscle. At early stages, the pharyngeal arch arteries, aortic sac, and the dorsal aortae in particular were largely negative for proliferation marker Ki67, potentially an important parameter during aortic arch system remodeling. Together, our data support current animal-to-human extrapolations and future genetic and molecular analyses using animal models of congenital heart disease. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Goal-directed-perfusion in neonatal aortic arch surgery

    PubMed Central

    Purbojo, Ariawan; Muench, Frank; Juengert, Joerg; Rueffer, André

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of mortality and morbidity in congenital cardiac surgery has always been and remains a major target for the complete team involved. As operative techniques are more and more standardized and refined, surgical risk and associated complication rates have constantly been reduced to an acceptable level but are both still present. Aortic arch surgery in neonates seems to be of particular interest, because perfusion techniques differ widely among institutions and an ideal form of a so called “total body perfusion (TBP)” is somewhat difficult to achieve. Thus concepts of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA), regional cerebral perfusion (RCP/with cardioplegic cardiac arrest or on the perfused beating heart) and TBP exist in parallel and all carry an individual risk for organ damage related to perfusion management, chosen core temperature and time on bypass. Patient safety relies more and more on adequate end organ perfusion on cardiopulmonary bypass, especially sensitive organs like the brain, heart, kidney, liver and the gut, whereby on adequate tissue protection, temperature management and oxygen delivery should be visualized and monitored. PMID:27709094

  17. Aortic angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Aortic regurgitation Aortic stenosis Congenital (present from birth) problems Double aortic arch ... Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Aortic dissection Aortic insufficiency Aortic stenosis Magnetic resonance ... Patient Instructions Abdominal ...

  18. One-stage hybrid procedure without sternotomy for treating thoracic aortic pathologies that involve distal aortic arch: a single-center preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Changwei; Guo, Xi; Sun, Lizhong; Huang, Lianjun; Lai, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to evaluate the initial results of a hybrid procedure without sternotomy for treating descending thoracic aortic disease that involves distal aortic arch. It also intends to report our initial experience in performing this procedure. Methods A total of 45 patients (35 males and 10 females) with descending thoracic aortic disease underwent a hybrid procedure, namely, thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) combined with supra-arch branch vessel bypass, in our center from April 2009 to August 2014. Right axillary artery to left axillary artery bypass (n=20) or right axillary artery to left common carotid artery (LCCA) and left axillary artery bypass (n=25) were performed. The conditions of all patients were followed up from the 2nd month to the 65th month postoperative (mean, 26.0±17.1). Mortality within 30 days, complications such as endoleak after the hybrid procedure, and stenosis or blockage of the bypass graft during the follow-up period was assessed. Results All the patients underwent a one-stage procedure. One case of death and one case of cerebral infarction were reported within 30 days. One patient died of the sudden drop in blood pressure during the 2nd day of operation. Meanwhile, another patient suffered from cerebral infarction. Two patients underwent open surgery, and one of them had to undergo a second TEVAR during the follow-up period. Moreover, endoleak occurred in two patients and a newly formed intimal tear was observed in one patient. Overall, 93.2% of the patients survived without any complication related to the hybrid procedure. Conclusions Initial results suggest that the one-stage hybrid procedure is a suitable therapeutic option for thoracic aortic pathologies that involve distal aortic arch. However, this procedure is not recommended for type-B aortic dissection, in which a tear is located in the greater curvature or near the left subclavian artery (LSA), because of the high possibility of endoleak occurrence

  19. Relay NBS Graft with the Plus Delivery System to Improve Deployment in Aortic Arch with Small Radius Curve

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Seitun, Sara; Guastavino, Andrea; Scarano, Flavio; Passerone, Gian Carlo

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this report is to describe deployment of the Relay NBS Thoracic Stent Graft with the Plus Delivery System (Bolton Medical, Sunrise, FL) in a flexible resin arch model with a 15-mm radius curve as well as our preliminary clinical results. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System was evaluated by way of bench testing, which was performed with stent grafts with diameters ranging from 24 to 46 mm and lengths ranging from 100 to 250 mm in flexible resin arch models with a 15-mm arch radius of curvature. The deployment sequence was analyzed. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System was deployed in two patients, respectively, having a 6.5-cm penetrating aortic ulcer of the proximal third of the descending thoracic aorta and a DeBakey type-I aortic dissection with chronic false lumen dilatation after surgery due to an entry site at the distal thoracic aorta. Bench tests showed proper conformation and apposition of the Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System in the flexible resin model. This stent graft was deployed successfully into the two patients with a correct orientation of the first stent and without early or late complications. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System ensures an optimal conformation and apposition of the first stent in the aortic arch with a small radius of curvature.

  20. Relay NBS graft with the plus delivery system to improve deployment in aortic Arch with small radius curve.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G; Seitun, Sara; Guastavino, Andrea; Scarano, Flavio; Passerone, Gian Carlo

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe deployment of the Relay NBS Thoracic Stent Graft with the Plus Delivery System (Bolton Medical, Sunrise, FL) in a flexible resin arch model with a 15-mm radius curve as well as our preliminary clinical results. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System was evaluated by way of bench testing, which was performed with stent grafts with diameters ranging from 24 to 46 mm and lengths ranging from 100 to 250 mm in flexible resin arch models with a 15-mm arch radius of curvature. The deployment sequence was analyzed. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System was deployed in two patients, respectively, having a 6.5-cm penetrating aortic ulcer of the proximal third of the descending thoracic aorta and a DeBakey type-I aortic dissection with chronic false lumen dilatation after surgery due to an entry site at the distal thoracic aorta. Bench tests showed proper conformation and apposition of the Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System in the flexible resin model. This stent graft was deployed successfully into the two patients with a correct orientation of the first stent and without early or late complications. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System ensures an optimal conformation and apposition of the first stent in the aortic arch with a small radius of curvature.

  1. Valve-sparing replacement of the ascending aorta and aortic arch in a child with Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozker, Emre; Vuran, Can; Saritas, Bülent; Türköz, Riza

    2012-05-01

    We describe a successful surgical treatment in a 2.5-year old boy with Loeys-Dietz syndrome, in whom we performed aortic arch and ascending aorta replacement with a valve-sparing operation (VSO) of the aortic root because of significant aortic insufficiency and dilation of the aortic root. We believe that VSO is ideal for treating young patients with aortic root aneurysm with normal or minimally diseased aortic cusps to avoid the disadvantages of prosthetic valve replacements.

  2. Role of aortic arch vascular mechanics in cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Klassen, Stephen A; Chirico, Daniele; Dempster, Kylie S; Shoemaker, J Kevin; O'Leary, Deborah D

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity (cvBRS) measures the efficiency of the cardiovagal baroreflex to modulate heart rate in response to increases or decreases in systolic blood pressure (SBP). Given that baroreceptors are located in the walls of the carotid sinuses (CS) and aortic arch (AA), the arterial mechanics of these sites are important contributors to cvBRS. However, the relative contribution of CS and AA mechanics to cvBRS remains unclear. This study employed sex differences as a model to test the hypothesis that differences in cvBRS between groups would be explained by the vascular mechanics of the AA but not the CS. Thirty-six young, healthy, normotensive individuals (18 females; 24 ± 2 yr) were recruited. cvBRS was measured using transfer function analysis of the low-frequency region (0.04-0.15 Hz). Ultrasonography was performed at the CS and AA to obtain arterial diameters for the measurement of distensibility. Local pulse pressure (PP) was taken at the CS using a hand-held tonometer, whereas AA PP was estimated using a transfer function of brachial PP. Both cvBRS (25 ± 11 vs. 19 ± 7 ms/mmHg, P = 0.04) and AA distensibility (16.5 ± 6.0 vs. 10.5 ± 3.8 mmHg(-1) × 10(-3), P = 0.02) were greater in females than males. Sex differences in cvBRS were eliminated after controlling for AA distensibility (P = 0.19). There were no sex differences in CS distensibility (5.32 ± 2.3 vs. 4.63 ± 1.3 mmHg(-1) × 10(-3), P = 0.32). The present data demonstrate that AA mechanics are an important contributor to differences in cvBRS.

  3. [Surgical treatment for aortic arch aneurysm: newly developed procedures and their outcomes].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The surgical treatment of aortic arch aneurysm including newly developed procedures and their outcomes is reviewed. Major advances in aortic arch repair have been made by meticulous brain protection with antegrade-selective and retrograde cerebral perfusion in addition to hypothermia circulatory arrest and refinement of surgical techniques. Total arch replacement using a multibranched prosthetic graft with antegrade-selective cerebral perfusion (SCP) under hypothermia through a median sternotomy has been standardized, resulting in lower mortality and cerebral mortality rates. In particular, the impact of the use of the axillary artery for cardiopulmonary bypass and of the stepwise or elephant trunk technique for distal anastomosis has recently been assessed. In addition, arch repair under moderate hypothermia in conjunction with SCP has been attempted without any serious problems. The surgical strategy for extended aortic aneurysms is also of concern. A two-stage approach with an elephant trunk procedure is employed predominantly for high-risk patients, while one-stage repair is aggressively applied for relatively young, low-risk patients. In contrast, there has been great progress in stent graft therapy for aortic arch lesions. Arch stent graft repairs including hybrid procedures have been attempted in elderly, high-risk patients. Consequently, these comorbid procedures can be used satisfactorily.

  4. Anatomical Variations in the Branching Pattern of Human Aortic Arch: A Cadaveric Study from Central India

    PubMed Central

    Budhiraja, Virendra; Rastogi, Rakhi; Jain, Vaishali; Bankwar, Vishal; Raghuwanshi, Shiv

    2013-01-01

    Variations of the branches of aortic arch are due to alteration in the development of certain branchial arch arteries during embryonic period. Knowledge of these variations is important during aortic instrumentation, thoracic, and neck surgeries. In the present study we observed these variations in fifty-two cadavers from Indian populations. In thirty-three (63.5%) cadavers, the aortic arch showed classical branching pattern which includes brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery, and left subclavian artery. In nineteen (36.5%) cadavers it showed variations in the branching pattern, which include the two branches, namely, left subclavian artery and a common trunk in 19.2% cases, four branches, namely, brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery, left vertebral artery, and left subclavian artery in 15.3% cases, and the three branches, namely, common trunk, left vertebral artery, and left subclavian artery in 1.9% cases. PMID:25938106

  5. The macroanatomical investigations on the aortic arch in porcupines (Hystrix cristata).

    PubMed

    Atalar, O; Yilmaz, S; Burma, O; Ilkay, E

    2003-12-01

    The anatomy of aortic arch in porcupine was studied. Angiography was applied to each of the three adult porcupines (two males, one female) following the injection of latex from the abdominal aorta for the examination of aortic arch. The results indicated that three arteries arose from aortic arch in porcupine. These were truncus brachiocephalicus, arteria carotis communis sinistra and arteria subclavia sinistra. The truncus brachiocephalicus in porcupine yielded arteria subclavia dextra and arteria carotis communis dextra. Truncus bicaroticus was absent. The origin of truncus costocervicalis (right) and arteria vertebralis (right) arose from a common root. Left or right axillary arteries seemed to be a continuation of subclavian arteries. The results of this study may contribute to the data in this area of science.

  6. Subgross and macroscopic investigation of blood vessels originating from aortic arch in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera).

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, V; Cevik-Demirkan, A; Türkmenoğlu, I

    2008-04-01

    A total of 10 adult, healthy, male chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) were used to investigate the vessels originating from aortic arch. Coloured latex was injected into the carotid arteries following conventional anatomical applications in all the chinchillas examined. The brachiocephalic trunk and the left subclavian artery arose from the aortic arch at the level of the second intercostal region in the thoracic cavity. The right and left subclavian arteries detached branches at the level of first intercostal region and divided into the following vessels: internal thoracic artery, dorsal scapular artery, vertebral artery, superficial cervical artery and axillar artery. The vessels originating from the aortic arch displayed some significant differences in chinchillas compared to rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, porcupines and other laboratory rodents.

  7. ``Smart'' baroreception along the aortic arch, with reference to essential hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kember, G. C.; Zamir, M.; Armour, J. A.

    2004-11-01

    Beat-to-beat regulation of heart rate is dependent upon sensing of local stretching or local “disortion” by aortic baroreceptors. Distortions of the aortic wall are due mainly to left ventricular output and to reflected waves arising from the arterial tree. Distortions are generally believed to be useful in cardiac control since stretch receptors or aortic baroreceptors embedded in the adventitia of the aortic wall, transduce the distortions to cardiovascular neural reflex pathways responsible for beat-to-beat regulation of heart rate. Aortic neuroanatomy studies have also found a continuous strip of mechanosensory neurites spread along the aortic inner arch. Although their purpose is now unknown, such a combined sensing capacity would allow measurement of the space and time dependence of inner arch wall distortions due, among other things, to traveling waves associated with pulsatile flow in an elastic tube. We call this sensing capability-“smart baroreception.” In this paper we use an arterial tree model to show that the cumulative effects of wave reflections, from many sites far downstream, have a surprisingly pronounced effect on the pressure distribution in the root segment of the tree. By this mechanism global hemodynamics can be focused by wave reflections back to the aortic arch, where they can rapidly impact cardiac control via smart baroreception. Such sensing is likely important to maintain efficient heart function. However, alterations in the arterial tree due to aging and other natural processes can lead in such a system to altered cardiac control and essential hypertension.

  8. Surgical management of a hypoplastic distal aortic arch and coarctation of aorta in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome, ascending aortic aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Sabol, Frantisek; Kolesar, Adrián; Toporcer, Tomás; Bajmoczi, Milan

    2014-10-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome has been associated with cardiovascular malformations, but only 3 cases have been reported to be associated with aortic coarctation and surgical management is not defined. A 51-year old woman with Klippel-Feil syndrome associated with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta, hypoplastic aortic arch and aortic coarctation at the level of the left subclavian artery presented with shortness of breath 2 years after diagnosis. Imaging identified interim development of a 7.2-cm aneurysm at the level of the aortic coarctation. She underwent surgical repair with a Dacron interposition graft under hypothermic circulatory arrest. She continues to do well 18 months following repair.

  9. Multidetector Computed Tomography for Congenital Anomalies of the Aortic Arch: Vascular Rings.

    PubMed

    García-Guereta, Luis; García-Cerro, Estefanía; Bret-Zurita, Montserrat

    2016-07-01

    The development of multidetector computed tomography has triggered a revolution in the study of the aorta and other large vessels and has replaced angiography in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the aortic arch, particularly vascular rings. The major advantage of multidetector computed tomography is that it permits clear 3-dimensional assessment of not only vascular structures, but also airway and esophageal compression. The current update aims to summarize the embryonic development of the aortic arch and the developmental anomalies leading to vascular ring formation and to discuss the current diagnostic and therapeutic role of multidetector computed tomography in this field.

  10. Interrupted aortic arch type B in A patient with cat eye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Belangero, Sintia Iole Nogueira; Bellucco, Fernanda Teixeira da Silva; Cernach, Mirlene C S P; Hacker, April M; Emanuel, Beverly S; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2009-05-01

    We report a patient with cat eye syndrome and interrupted aortic arch type B, a typical finding in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Chromosomal analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) showed a supernumerary bisatellited isodicentric marker chromosome derived from chromosome 22. The segment from 22pter to 22q11.2 in the supernumerary chromosome found in our patient does not overlap with the region deleted in patients with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. However, the finding of an interrupted aortic arch type B is unusual in CES, although it is a frequent heart defect in the 22q11 deletion syndrome.

  11. Aortic arch tortuosity with PHACE syndrome – a rare case scenario

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, AK; Ganigara, M; Baidwan, A; Vyas, YS; Rao, NK

    2016-01-01

    PHACE syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous disorder characterised by an association of infantile haemangiomas with structural anomalies of brain, cerebral vasculature, eye, aorta and chest wall.1 Coarctation of aorta (COA) is most the common cardiac anomaly reported in PHACE syndrome. COA or interrupted aortic arch in PHACE is unique and complex both in location and character compared to the typical coarctation anatomy. Arterial tortuosity of the cerebral vasculature has been well described in literature in PHACE syndrome. We present a rare case of tortuous aortic arch continuing as descending aorta in an infant with PHACE syndrome.

  12. Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion in complex congenital aortic arch pathology: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    De Rita, Fabrizio; Lucchese, Gianluca; Barozzi, Luca; Menon, Tiziano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2011-11-01

    Simultaneous cerebro-myocardial perfusion has been described in neonatal and infant arch surgery, suggesting a reduction in cardiac morbidity. Here reported is a novel technique for selective cerebral perfusion combined with controlled and independent myocardial perfusion during surgery for complex or recurrent aortic arch lesions. From April 2008 to April 2011, 10 patients with arch pathology underwent surgery (two hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS], four recurrent arch obstruction, two aortic arch hypoplasia + ventricular septal defect [VSD], one single ventricle + transposition of the great arteries + arch hypoplasia, one interrupted aortic arch type B + VSD). Median age was 63 days (6 days-36 years) and median weight 4.0 kg (1.6-52). Via midline sternotomy, an arterial cannula (6 or 8 Fr for infants) was directly inserted into the innominate artery or through a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft (for neonates <2.0 kg). A cardioplegia delivery system was inserted into the aortic root. Under moderate hypothermia, ascending and descending aorta were cross-clamped, and "beating heart and brain" aortic arch repair was performed. Arch repair was composed of patch augmentation in five, end-to-side anastomosis in three, and replacement in two patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 163 ± 68 min (71-310). In two patients only (one HLHS, one complex single ventricle), a period of cardiac arrest was required to complete intracardiac repair. In such cases, antegrade blood cardioplegia was delivered directly via the same catheter used for selective myocardial perfusion. Average time of splanchnic ischemia during cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 39 ± 18 min (17-69). Weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved without inotropic support in three and with low dose in seven patients. One patient required veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Four patients, body weight <3.0 kg, needed delayed sternal closure. No neurologic dysfunction was noted

  13. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome with multivessel cervical artery dissections and a double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Nouh, Amre; Ruland, Sean; Schneck, Michael J; Pasquale, David; Biller, José

    2014-02-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) has been associated with exposure to vasoactive substances and few reports with cervical arterial dissections (CADs). We evaluated a 32-year-old woman with history of depression, migraines without aura, and cannabis use who presented with a thunderclap headache unresponsive to triptans. She was found to have bilateral occipital infarcts, bilateral extracranial vertebral artery dissections, bilateral internal carotid artery dissecting aneurysms, and extensive distal multifocal segmental narrowing of the anterior and posterior intracranial circulation with a "sausage on a string-like appearance" suggestive of RCVS. Subsequently, she was found to have a distal thrombus of the basilar artery, was anticoagulated, and discharged home with no residual deficits. We highlight the potential association of CADs and RCVS. The association of RCVS and a double aortic arch has not been previously reported.

  14. Pulsatile flows and wall-shear stresses in models simulating normal and stenosed aortic arches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rong Fung; Yang, Ten-Fang; Lan, Y.-K.

    2010-03-01

    Pulsatile aqueous glycerol solution flows in the models simulating normal and stenosed human aortic arches are measured by means of particle image velocimetry. Three transparent models were used: normal, 25% stenosed, and 50% stenosed aortic arches. The Womersley parameter, Dean number, and time-averaged Reynolds number are 17.31, 725, and 1,081, respectively. The Reynolds numbers based on the peak velocities of the normal, 25% stenosed, and 50% stenosed aortic arches are 2,484, 3,456, and 3,931, respectively. The study presents the temporal/spatial evolution processes of the flow pattern, velocity distribution, and wall-shear stress during the systolic and diastolic phases. It is found that the flow pattern evolving in the central plane of normal and stenosed aortic arches exhibits (1) a separation bubble around the inner arch, (2) a recirculation vortex around the outer arch wall upstream of the junction of the brachiocephalic artery, (3) an accelerated main stream around the outer arch wall near the junctions of the left carotid and the left subclavian arteries, and (4) the vortices around the entrances of the three main branches. The study identifies and discusses the reasons for the flow physics’ contribution to the formation of these features. The oscillating wall-shear stress distributions are closely related to the featured flow structures. On the outer wall of normal and slightly stenosed aortas, large wall-shear stresses appear in the regions upstream of the junction of the brachiocephalic artery as well as the corner near the junctions of the left carotid artery and the left subclavian artery. On the inner wall, the largest wall-shear stress appears in the region where the boundary layer separates.

  15. Application of the Bolton Relay Device for Thoracic Endografting In or Near the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Riambau, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular correction of aortic arch pathology remains a challenge, with a variety of techniques proposed over the years to minimize complications and enhance the probability of a successful result. A variety of approaches have been developed in order to deal with the aortic arch pathology and its idiosyncrasies. We review potential interventional techniques for the repair of aortic arch pathologies, beginning with conventional aortic arch surgery, followed by hybrid treatments and those along the endovascular spectrum (parallel and fenestrated endografts, scalloped endografts, and ascending and new branched endografts). We finish with an overview of all the Bolton Medical (Barcelona, Spain and Sunrise, FL, USA) thoracic platforms. Endovascular techniques show acceptable results in selected cases. Both proximal Bolton Relay configurations (with and without a bare stent) offer conformability and accuracy on deployment with very low rates of stroke. Fenestrated and scalloped designs are also useful for selected cases. Ascending and branched Bolton devices are very promising platforms for a serious, full endovascular approach to the aorta. PMID:26798752

  16. Complete endovascular debranching of the aortic arch: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joseph; Nykamp, Madeline; Remund, Tyler

    2015-01-01

    Patients suffering from aortic arch aneurysms continue to encounter few treatment options. Because of co-morbidities, most are deemed to not be open surgical candidates. The two cases presented here demonstrate a novel endovascular approach in the care of an arch aneurysm complicated by dissection. Even though final graft configurations differed slightly between the two cases, all three great vessels were successfully de-branched through the combination of standard endovascular aneurysm repair techniques and modifications to off-the-shelf devices. Aortic flow was compartmentalized in the ascending aorta at or near the level of the sinotubular junction. This was done with a physician-assembled endografts. One of these lumens was dedicated to the descending aorta, while the other was further divided into three channels used to stent the great vessels. Completion angiography demonstrated patency in the arch, great vessels, and descending aorta. No endoleaks have been reported. Although data is limited, this approach appears promising. PMID:25015113

  17. Surgical management of acute type A aortic dissection: branch-first arch replacement with total aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, Sean D.; Perera, Nisal K.

    2016-01-01

    Acute type A dissection (ATAAD) remains a morbid condition with reported surgical mortality as high as 25%. We describe our surgical approach to ATAAD and discuss the indications for adjunct techniques such as the frozen elephant trunk or complete aortic repair with endovascular methods. Arch replacement using the “branch-first technique” allows for complete root, ascending aorta, and arch replacement. A long landing zone is created for proximal endografting with a covered stent. Balloon-assisted intimal disruption and bare metal stenting of all residual dissected aorta to the level of the aortic bifurcation is then performed to obliterate the false lumen (FL) and achieve single true lumen (TL) flow. Additional branch vessel stenting is performed as required. PMID:27386413

  18. Validation of the murine aortic arch as a model to study human vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Casteleyn, Christophe; Trachet, Bram; Van Loo, Denis; Devos, Daniel G H; Van den Broeck, Wim; Simoens, Paul; Cornillie, Pieter

    2010-01-01

    Although the murine thoracic aorta and its main branches are widely studied to gain more insight into the pathogenesis of human vascular diseases, detailed anatomical data on the murine aorta are sparse. Moreover, comparative studies between mice and men focusing on the topography and geometry of the heart and aorta are lacking. As this hampers the validation of murine vascular models, the branching pattern of the murine thoracic aorta was examined in 30 vascular corrosion casts. On six casts the intrathoracic position of the heart was compared with that of six younger and six older men of whom contrast-enhanced computer tomography images of the thorax were three-dimensionally reconstructed. In addition, the geometry of the human thoracic aorta was compared with that of the mouse by reconstructing micro-computer tomography images of six murine casts. It was found that the right brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery branched subsequently from the aortic arch in both mice and men. The geometry of the branches of the murine aortic arch was quite similar to that of men. In both species the initial segment of the aorta, comprising the ascending aorta, aortic arch and cranial/superior part of the descending aorta, was sigmoidally curved on a cranial/superior view. Although some analogy between the intrathoracic position of the murine and human heart was observed, the murine heart manifestly deviated more ventrally. The major conclusion of this study is that, in both mice and men, the ascending and descending aorta do not lie in a single vertical plane (non-planar aortic geometry). This contrasts clearly with most domestic mammals in which a planar aortic pattern is present. As the vascular branching pattern of the aortic arch is also similar in mice and men, the murine model seems valuable to study human vascular diseases. PMID:20345858

  19. Validation of the murine aortic arch as a model to study human vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Casteleyn, Christophe; Trachet, Bram; Van Loo, Denis; Devos, Daniel G H; Van den Broeck, Wim; Simoens, Paul; Cornillie, Pieter

    2010-05-01

    Although the murine thoracic aorta and its main branches are widely studied to gain more insight into the pathogenesis of human vascular diseases, detailed anatomical data on the murine aorta are sparse. Moreover, comparative studies between mice and men focusing on the topography and geometry of the heart and aorta are lacking. As this hampers the validation of murine vascular models, the branching pattern of the murine thoracic aorta was examined in 30 vascular corrosion casts. On six casts the intrathoracic position of the heart was compared with that of six younger and six older men of whom contrast-enhanced computer tomography images of the thorax were three-dimensionally reconstructed. In addition, the geometry of the human thoracic aorta was compared with that of the mouse by reconstructing micro-computer tomography images of six murine casts. It was found that the right brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery branched subsequently from the aortic arch in both mice and men. The geometry of the branches of the murine aortic arch was quite similar to that of men. In both species the initial segment of the aorta, comprising the ascending aorta, aortic arch and cranial/superior part of the descending aorta, was sigmoidally curved on a cranial/superior view. Although some analogy between the intrathoracic position of the murine and human heart was observed, the murine heart manifestly deviated more ventrally. The major conclusion of this study is that, in both mice and men, the ascending and descending aorta do not lie in a single vertical plane (non-planar aortic geometry). This contrasts clearly with most domestic mammals in which a planar aortic pattern is present. As the vascular branching pattern of the aortic arch is also similar in mice and men, the murine model seems valuable to study human vascular diseases.

  20. Morphometric changes in the aortic arch with advancing age in fetal to mature thoroughbred horses

    PubMed Central

    ENDOH, Chihiro; MATSUDA, Kazuya; OKAMOTO, Minoru; TSUNODA, Nobuo; TANIYAMA, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Aortic rupture is a well recognized cause of sudden death in thoroughbred horses. Some microscopic lesions, such as those caused by cystic medial necrosis and medionecrosis, can lead to aortic rupture. However, these microscopic lesions are also observed in normal horses. On the other hand, a previous study of aortic rupture suggested that underlying elastin and collagen deposition disorders might be associated with aortic rupture. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the structural components of the tunica media of the aortic arch, which is composed of elastin, collagen, smooth muscle cells and mucopolysaccharides (MPS), in fetal to mature thoroughbred horses. The percentage area of elastin was greatest in the young horses and subsequently decreased with aging. The percentage area of collagen increased with aging, and the elderly horses (aged ≥20) exhibited significantly higher percentage areas of collagen than the young horses. The percentage area of smooth muscle cells did not change with age. The percentage area of MPS was inversely proportional to the percentage area of elastin. The fetuses exhibited a markedly larger percentage area of MPS than the mature horses. We concluded that the medial changes seen in the aortic arch, which included a reduction in the amount of elastin and increases in the amounts of collagen and MPS, were age-related variations. PMID:28190824

  1. [Aortic arch and valve replacement in a hemodialysis patient with a porcelain aorta;report of a case].

    PubMed

    Ban, Tetsuaki; Aizawa, Kei; Oki, Shin-ichi; Misawa, Yoshio

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis with chronic renal failure requiring hemodialysis. A 75-year-old man complained of back pain and hoarseness. He had been on dialysis for 15 years. A computed tomography scan of the chest showed marked calcification in the thoracic aortic arch, which is known as a porcelain aorta, and a distal arch aneurysm. Echocardiographic examination showed moderate aortic valve stenosis with calcification. An operation was scheduled, and both the aortic valve and the aortic arch aneurysm were successfully replaced with a mechanical valve and a prosthetic graft. Cardiovascular surgery for patients complicated by a porcelain aorta requires extra cares for the establishment of cardiopulmonary bypass and anastomoses of the aorta.

  2. Total arch repair for acute type A aortic dissection with open placement of a modified triple-branched stent graft and the arch open technique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In total arch repair with open placement of a triple-branched stent graft for acute type A aortic dissection, the diameters of the native arch vessels and the distances between 2 neighboring arch vessels did not always match the available sizes of the triple-branched stent grafts, and insertion of the triple-branched stent graft through the distal ascending aortic incision was not easy in some cases. To reduce those two problems, we modified the triple-branched stent graft and developed the arch open technique. Methods and results Total arch repair with open placement of a modified triple-branched stent graft and the arch open technique was performed in 25 consecutive patients with acute type A aortic dissection. There was 1 surgical death. Most survivors had an uneventful postoperative course. All implanted stents were in a good position and wide expansion, there was no space or blood flow surrounding the stent graft. Complete thrombus obliteration of the false lumen was found around the modified triple-branched stent graft in all survivors and at the diaphragmatic level in 20 of 24 patients. Conclusions The modified triple-branched stent graft could provide a good match with the different diameters of the native arch vessels and the various distances between 2 neighboring arch vessels, and it’s placement could become much easier by the arch open technique. Consequently, placement of a modified triple-branched stent graft could be easily used in most patients with acute type A aortic dissection for effective total arch repair. PMID:25085259

  3. Primary repair of interrupted aortic arch and associated heart lesions in newborns.

    PubMed

    Tláskal, T; Chaloupecky, V; Marek, J; Hŭcín, B; Kostelka, M; Tax, P; Kucera, V; Janousek, J; Skovránek, J; Reich, O

    1997-04-01

    Primary repair of interrupted aortic arch and associated heart lesions was performed in 13 patients aged from 1 to 85 days. The surgery was performed through the midline sternotomy approach in extracorporeal circulation and deep hypothermia. Hypothermic circulatory arrest at 14 to 19 degrees C was used for reconstruction of the aortic arch. In all patients it was possible to perform a direct anastomosis between the ascendent and descendent aorta. At the same time closure of the ventricular septal defect was performed in 11 patients, closure of the atrial septal defect in 4, correction of persistent truncus arteriosus in 3, resection of subaortic stenosis in 2, arterial switch repair of transposition of the great arteries in 1, correction of double outlet right ventricle in 1 and patch closure of aortico-pulmonary window in 1 patient. Three (23.1%) newborns died in the early postoperative period: two from sepsis and one from multiple organ failure. Ten patients (76.9%) were followed up for 1 to 29 months postoperatively. All of them are in very good condition with a nonrestrictive aortic anastomosis. Primary one-stage repair of interrupted aortic arch and associated heart lesions is preferred to the two-stage repair in all newborns with this critical congenital heart disease.

  4. The evolution of amphibian metamorphosis: insights based on the transformation of the aortic arches of Pelobates fuscus (Anura)

    PubMed Central

    Kolesová, Hana; Lametschwandtner, Alois; Roček, Zbyněk

    2007-01-01

    In order to gain insights into how the aortic arches changed during the transition of vertebrates to land, transformations of the aortic arches during the metamorphosis of Pelobates fuscus were investigated and compared with data from the early development of a recent ganoid fish Amia calva and a primitive caudate amphibian Salamandrella keyserlingi. Although in larval Pelobates, as in other non-pipid anurans, the gill arches serve partly as a filter-feeding device, their aortic arches maintain the original piscine-like arrangement, except for the mandibular and hyoid aortic arches which were lost. As important pre-adaptations for breathing of atmospheric oxygen occur in larval Pelobates (which have well-developed, though non-respiratory lungs and pulmonary artery), transformation of aortic arches during metamorphosis is fast. The transformation involves disappearance of the ductus Botalli, which results in a complete shunting of blood into the lungs and skin, disappearance of the ductus caroticus, which results in shunting of blood into the head through the arteria carotis interna, and disappearance of arch V, which results in shunting blood to the body through arch IV (systemic arch). It is supposed that the branching pattern of the aortic arches of permanently water-dwelling piscine ancestors, of intermediate forms which occasionally left the water and of primitive tetrapods capable of spending longer periods of time on land had been the same as in the prematamorphic anuran larvae or in some metamorphosed caudates in which the ductus caroticus and ductus Botalli were not interrupted, and arch V was still complete. PMID:17367494

  5. Giant Aortic Arch Aneurysm and Cardio-vocal Syndrome: Still An Open-surgery Indication

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Jose M.; Esteban, Maria; Lara, Juan; Rodriguez-Vazquez, Jose F.; Verdugo-Lopez, Samuel; Lopez-Checa, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    The Cardio-vocal Syndrome (Ortner’s syndrome) is described as hoarseness due to the left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, caused by a specific cardiovascular pathology. In this case, we present a patient with a giant aortic arch aneurysm with an initial clinical presentation of Cardio-vocal Syndrome. The conventional open-surgery, instead of endovascular approach, was useful to control the morbidity from the compressive effect of adjacent structures, also preventing the aortic rupture. We strongly recommend analyzing carefully the individual case and the clinical targets to resolve, because the new technologies are not always the most effective therapeutic response.

  6. Aortic arch aneurysm, pseudocoarctation, and coronary artery disease in a patient with Behçet's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bardakci, Hasmet; Kervan, Umit; Boysan, Emre; Birincioglu, Levent; Cobanoglu, Adnan

    2007-01-01

    Aortic arch aneurysm, pseudocoarctation, and coronary artery stenosis are extremely rare in Behçet's syndrome. We present the case of a 25-year-old man with Behçet's syndrome who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting for severe stenosis in the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery and concomitant surgical correction of a saccular aneurysm that was causing pseudocoarctation of the aortic arch. The surgery was successful.

  7. Successful total correction of congenital interruption of the aortic arch and ventricular septal defect

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M. P.; Bentall, H. H.; Oakley, C. M.

    1970-01-01

    Successful surgical correction of the complex anomaly of interruption of the aortic arch and intracardiac ventricular septal defect is reported. The patient was a boy 5 years old when he first came under treatment. The total correction was performed in two stages. At the first operation, at the age of 7 years, continuity of the aortic arch was achieved by insertion of a Teflon graft, employing left heart bypass. The ventricular septal defect was closed at the age of 13 years on total cardiopulmonary bypass. Two and half years after the total correction the boy is alive and well. The difficulties in diagnosing the condition are discussed. The role of left heart bypass is emphasized. Images PMID:5489187

  8. Aortic arch aneurysm of Takayasu arteritis associated with entero-Behçet disease.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yoshimori; Akita, Toshiaki; Usui, Akihiko; Ichihashi, Ryoichi; Ito, Masafumi; Ueda, Yuichi

    2007-06-01

    We report a case of a ruptured aortic arch aneurysm due to Takayasu arteritis concomitant with entero-Behçet disease. A 53-year-old woman with total left lung atelectasis underwent emergency total aortic arch replacement with a modified Bentall operation and elephant trunk procedure. The postoperative course was highly eventful. A pseudoaneurysm of the left coronary button occurred with mediastinitis due to fistula of the left bronchus into the remnant of the aneurysmal wall. The left main trunk was reconstructed with a saphenous vein graft. The left bronchial fistula into the esophagus was exposed and an esophageal stent was placed. Finally, the saphenous vein graft ruptured and the patient expired. The autopsy diagnosis was Takayasu arteritis. This is the first reported case of concomitant Takayasu arteritis and entero-Behçet disease.

  9. Mid-Term Outcomes of a Modification of Extended Aortic Arch Anastomosis with Pulmonary Artery Banding in Single Ventricle Neonates with Hypoplastic Transverse Arch

    PubMed Central

    Thang, Bui Quoc; Furugaki, Tatsuya; Osaka, Motoo; Watanabe, Yutaka; Kanemoto, Shinya; Suetsugu, Fuminaga

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There is less certainty regarding the best strategy for treating neonates with functional single ventricle (SV) and hypoplastic aortic arch. We have applied a modified extended aortic arch anastomosis (EAAA) and main pulmonary artery banding (PAB) as an initial palliation in neonates with transverse arch hypoplasia and assessed the mid-term outcomes. Methods: In total, 10 neonates with functional SV and extensive hypoplasia or interruption of the arch underwent a modified EAAA (extended arch anastomosis with a subclavian flap) concomitant with main PAB through a thoracotomy without cardiopulmonary bypass. Patient age and weight ranged from 4 to 14 days and 2.3 to 3.8 kg, respectively. Results: There were no hospital deaths although there were two late deaths. Gradients across the arch were 0 to 7 mmHg at postoperative day 1 and no arch reoperations were required. Two patients required balloon aortoplasty. Nine underwent bidirectional cavopulmonary shunt and two of them needed concomitant Damus–Kaye–Stansel (DKS) anastomosis. Six have completed Fontan. Conclusion: Our modification of EAAA with main PAB for SV neonates may benefit a certain population with transverse arch hypoplasia as an option to be considered. Patients with the potential for developing outflow obstruction may be best managed with an initial DKS-type palliation. PMID:27725352

  10. Interrupted Aortic Arch Associated with Absence of Left Common Carotid Artery: Imaging with MDCT

    SciTech Connect

    Onbas, Omer Olgun, Hasim; Ceviz, Naci; Ors, Rahmi; Okur, Adnan

    2006-06-15

    Interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is a rare severe congenital heart defect defined as complete luminal and anatomic discontinuity between ascending and descending aorta. Although its association with various congenital heart defects has been reported, absence of left common carotid artery (CCA) in patients with IAA has not been reported previously. We report a case of IAA associated with the absence of left CCA which was clearly shown on multidetector-row spiral CT.

  11. Thoracoscopic correction of a congenital persistent right aortic arch in a young cat

    PubMed Central

    Plesman, Rhea; Johnson, Matthew; Rurak, Sarah; Ambrose, Barbara; Shmon, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    A 9-week-old kitten was diagnosed with a congenital vascular ring anomaly by means of an esophageal contrast study. At 6 mo of age, a non-selective vascular study was used to diagnose a persistent right aortic arch (PRAA). Left-sided thoracoscopic surgery was performed, using a Liga-Sure vessel sealant device to seal and transect the ligamentum arteriosum. PMID:22467970

  12. Retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) in aortic arch surgery: efficacy and possible mechanisms of brain protection.

    PubMed

    Bavaria, J E; Pochettino, A

    1997-07-01

    Retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) was first introduced to treat air embolism during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Its use was reintroduced to extend the safety of hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) during operations involving an open aortic arch. RCP seems to prevent cerebral rewarming during HCA. Both clinical and animal data suggest that RCP provides between 10% and 30% of baseline cerebral blood flow when administered through the superior vena cava (SVC) at jugular pressures of 20 to 25 mm Hg. RCP flows producing jugular venous pressures higher than 30 mm Hg may cause cerebral edema. Cerebral blood flow generated by RCP is able to sustain some cerebral metabolic activity, yet is not able to fully meet cerebral energy demands even at temperatures of 12 degrees to 18 degrees C. RCP may further prevent embolic events during aortic arch surgery when administered at moderate jugular vein pressures (< 40 mm Hg). Clinical results suggest that RCP, when applied during aortic arch reconstruction, may extend the safe HCA period and improve morbidity and mortality, especially when HCA times are more than 60 minutes. RCP applied in patients and severe carotid and brachiocephalic occlusive disease may be ineffective, and caution is in order when RCP times are greater than 90 minutes.

  13. Essential roles of the winged helix transcription factor MFH-1 in aortic arch patterning and skeletogenesis.

    PubMed

    Iida, K; Koseki, H; Kakinuma, H; Kato, N; Mizutani-Koseki, Y; Ohuchi, H; Yoshioka, H; Noji, S; Kawamura, K; Kataoka, Y; Ueno, F; Taniguchi, M; Yoshida, N; Sugiyama, T; Miura, N

    1997-11-01

    Mesenchyme Fork Head-1 (MFH-1) is a forkhead (also called winged helix) transcription factor defined by a common 100-amino acid DNA-binding domain. MFH-1 is expressed in non-notochordal mesoderm in the prospective trunk region and in cephalic neural-crest and cephalic mesoderm-derived mesenchymal cells in the prechordal region of early embryos. Subsequently, strong expression is localized in developing cartilaginous tissues, kidney and dorsal aortas. To investigate the developmental roles of MFH-1 during embryogenesis, mice lacking the MFH-1 locus were generated by targeted mutagenesis. MFH-1-deficient mice died embryonically and perinatally, and exhibited interrupted aortic arch and skeletal defects in the neurocranium and the vertebral column. Interruption of the aortic arch seen in the mutant mice was the same as in human congenital anomalies. These results suggest that MFH-1 has indispensable roles during the extensive remodeling of the aortic arch in neural-crest-derived cells and in skeletogenesis in cells derived from the neural crest and the mesoderm.

  14. Multimodal optical measurement in vitro of surface deformations and wall thickness of the pressurized aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Katia; Humphrey, Jay D

    2015-04-01

    Computational modeling of arterial mechanics continues to progress, even to the point of allowing the study of complex regions such as the aortic arch. Nevertheless, most prior studies assign homogeneous and isotropic material properties and constant wall thickness even when implementing patient-specific luminal geometries obtained from medical imaging. These assumptions are not due to computational limitations, but rather to the lack of spatially dense sets of experimental data that describe regional variations in mechanical properties and wall thickness in such complex arterial regions. In this work, we addressed technical challenges associated with in vitro measurement of overall geometry, full-field surface deformations, and regional wall thickness of the porcine aortic arch in its native anatomical configuration. Specifically, we combined two digital image correlation-based approaches, standard and panoramic, to track surface geometry and finite deformations during pressurization, with a 360-deg fringe projection system to contour the outer and inner geometry. The latter provided, for the first time, information on heterogeneous distributions of wall thickness of the arch and associated branches in the unloaded state. Results showed that mechanical responses vary significantly with orientation and location (e.g., less extensible in the circumferential direction and with increasing distance from the heart) and that the arch exhibits a nearly linear increase in pressure-induced strain up to 40%, consistent with other findings on proximal porcine aortas. Thickness measurements revealed strong regional differences, thus emphasizing the need to include nonuniform thicknesses in theoretical and computational studies of complex arterial geometries.

  15. Carbon Dioxide in the Aortic Arch: Coronary Effects and Implications in a Swine Study

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, William C. Porter, Thomas R.; Culp, William C.; Vonk, Brian N.

    2003-04-15

    Purpose: CO{sub 2} angiography is considered dangerous in the aortic arch where bubbles may cause critical cerebral and cardiac ischemia. We investigated CO{sub 2}distribution, physiologic effects in the heart, methods of detection and treatments. Methods: Eight pigs had CO{sub 2}and iodinated contrast arch angiograms in supine and both lateral decubitus positions. An electrocardiogram, physiologic data and cardiac ultrasound were obtained. Therapies included precordial thumps and rolls to lateral decubitus positions. Results: Supine high descending aorta CO{sub 2} injections floated retrograde up the arch during diastole and preferentially filled the right coronary artery (RCA): mean score 3.5 (of 4), in nominate artery 2.4, left coronary artery 1.2; n = 17; p = 0.0001. Aortic root injections preferentially filled the RCA when the animal was supine, left coronary in the right decubitus position, and showed a diffuse pattern in the left decubitus position. Right decubitus rolls filled both coronaries causing several lethal arrhythmias. Precordialthumps successfully cleared CO{sub 2}. Ultrasound is a sensitive detector of myocardial CO{sub 2}. Conclusion: Arch distribution of CO{sub 2} primarily involves the RCA. Diagnostic ultrasound detects cardiac CO{sub 2} well. Precordial thumps are an effective treatment.

  16. The right-sided aortic arch with unusual course of bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerves: a report of rare variations.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Kanazawa, Jun; Numata, Norio; Hitomi, Jiro

    2017-02-01

    We describe a rare case of the right-sided aortic arch, the unusual origin of the main arterial vessels and the unusual courses of bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerves in a Japanese cadaver. Chiefly, the right-sided aortic arch turned to the left side from the dorsal part of the trachea and esophagus, and Kommerell's diverticulum was found at the end of the arch. The right common carotid artery arose from the end part of the ascending aorta, but the left common carotid artery arose from the proximal portion of the ascending aorta. The right subclavian artery arose from the upper edge of the aortic arch, but the left one arose from the front wall at the upper side of the ligamentum arteriosum. The right recurrent laryngeal nerve hooked around the aortic arch (but not the right subclavian artery) dorsoventrally, and the left recurrent laryngeal nerve hooked around the ligamentum arteriosum and arose from the ventral side (but not dorsal) of the aortic arch. These variations are very rare, and understanding them is useful and important for clinical research.

  17. Internal right ventricular band for multiple ventricular septal defects in a neonate undergoing arterial switch and aortic arch repair.

    PubMed

    Carroll, William W; Shirali, Girish S; Bradley, Scott M

    2011-01-01

    A neonate presented with d-transposition of the great arteries, aortic arch hypoplasia, aortic coarctation, and multiple ventricular septal defects. During the arterial switch procedure and the aortic arch repair, a fenestrated Gore-Tex disk (W.L. Gore & Assoc, Flagstaff, AZ) was sewn into the right ventricular outflow tract to restrict pulmonary blood flow. The internal right ventricular band successfully controlled the pulmonary blood flow, maintaining a systemic oxygen saturation of 88% to 92%, and allowing growth from 3.5 to 10.5 kg. At 8 months of age, the internal band in the patient was removed, and the ventricular septal defects were successfully closed.

  18. A Case of Acute Traumatic Aortic Injury of a Right-sided Aortic Arch with Rupture of an Aberrant Left Subclavian Artery

    PubMed Central

    Taif, Sawsan; Al Kalbani, Jokha

    2013-01-01

    Acute traumatic aortic injury is a potentially lethal condition with most patients die at the scene of the accidents. Rapid deceleration due to motor vehicle accidents is the commonest mechanism of injury. These injuries can be successfully repaired in the few patients who survive the initial trauma if proper diagnosis and rapid treatment are provided. The occurrence of acute traumatic aortic injury in patients with congenital abnormality of the aortic arch has been rarely reported; however, it renders the diagnosis and treatment more difficult. In this paper, we describe an extremely rare case of aortic injury in a young patient who had a right sided aortic arch with rupture of an aberrant left subclavian artery. The patient was suspected to have a Kommerell’s diverticulum in the aberrant subclavian artery origin. This injury resulted in an unusually huge pseudoaneurysm involving part of the mediastinum and extending into the neck. Unfortunately; patient succumbed in spite of surgical intervention. PMID:24421931

  19. Endovascular Repair of a Right-Sided Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Associated with a Right Aortic Arch and a Left Subclavian Artery Arising from a Kommerell's Diverticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Avgerinos, Efthimios D.; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Psarros, Vasileios; Bastounis, Elias

    2009-07-15

    This case report describes the endovascular repair of a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with a right aortic arch and an aberrant left subclavian artery. A 76-year-old male with multiple comorbidities was incidentally found to have a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm with a maximum diameter of 6.2 cm. Additionally, there was a right aortic arch with a retroesophageal segment and separate arch branches arising in the following order: left common carotid artery, right common carotid artery, right subclavian artery, and left subclavian artery that was aberrant, arising from a Kommerrell's diverticulum. The aneurysm was successfully excluded by deployment of a Zenith TX1 36 x 32 x 20-mm stent-graft using wire traction technique via the left femoral and right brachial arteries in order to deal with two severe aortic angulations. At 18-month follow-up the patient was doing well, with aneurysm sac shrinkage to 5.9 cm and no signs of endoleak or migration. Endovascular repair of right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysms with a right arch and aberrant left subclavian artery is feasible, safe, and effective. In such rare configurations, which demand considerably increased technical dexterity and center experience, endovascular repair emerges as an attractive therapeutic option.

  20. Central retinal artery occlusion following laser treatment for ocular ischemic aortic arch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Payal J.; Ellis, Brian; DiGiovine, Lauren R.; Hogg, Jeffery P.; Leys, Monique J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Ocular ischemic syndrome is a rare blinding condition generally caused by disease of the carotid artery. We describe a 69-year-old female with a 50 pack-year smoking history with aortic arch syndrome causing bilateral ocular ischemic syndrome. Methods: The patient presented with progressive visual loss and temple pain. Slit lamp biomicroscopy revealed bilateral iris neovascularization. This finding prompted a cardiovascular work up. Panretinal photocoagulation with retrobulbar block was performed in the right eye. Results: A temporal artery biopsy was negative. The carotid duplex ultrasound showed only a 1–39% stenosis. MRA revealed a more proximal occlusion of the aortic branch for which she underwent subclavian carotid bypass surgery. At the one month follow up, the right eye suffered profound vision loss secondary to a central retinal artery occlusion. Conclusion: Ocular neovascularization may be one of the clinical manifestations of aortic arch syndrome. This case also illustrates the limitations of relying solely on carotid duplex ultrasound testing. We caution against overly aggressive panretinal photocoagulation utilizing retrobulbar anesthesia. PMID:27625958

  1. Analysis of early and long-term outcomes of acute type A aortic dissection according to the new international aortic arch surgery study group recommendations.

    PubMed

    Colli, Andrea; Carrozzini, Massimiliano; Galuppo, Marco; Comisso, Marina; Toto, Francesca; Gregori, Dario; Gerosa, Gino

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate predictors of early and long-term outcomes of surgical repair of acute Type A aortic dissection. Retrospective single-centre study evaluating patients surgically treated between 1998 and 2013. Clinical follow-up was performed. Complications were classified according to the International Aortic Arch Surgery Study Group recommendations. Statistical analysis included univariate and multivariate analysis of preoperative and operative data. One hundred eighty-five patients were evaluated. The follow-up was complete for 180 patients (97 %). Mean age was 63 years, 82 % had a DeBakey type I aortic dissection, 18 % a type II. Eleven patients (6 %) died intraoperatively, 119 of the remaining (68 %) had postoperative complications. Thirty-day mortality was 21 % (38 patients). Average ICU and hospital stay were 6 and 14 days, respectively. During a mean follow-up time of 6 ± 4 years we observed 44 deaths (31 %). Twenty patients (14 %) needed late thoracic aorta reoperation. Results from the multivariate analysis are as follows. Thirty-day mortality was associated with abdominal pain at presentation (p < 0.01). The incidence of postoperative complications was related to older age at intervention (p < 0.01) and longer cross-clamp time (p < 0.01). Mortality at follow-up was significantly increased by older age at intervention (p < 0.01), with a logarithmic growth after 60 years, female sex (p < 0.01), preoperative limb ischemia (p = 0.02) and DHCA (p < 0.01). The surgical results of type A aortic dissection are affected by age at intervention with a logarithmic increase of late mortality in patients older than 60 years.

  2. Selective Heart, Brain and Body Perfusion in Open Aortic Arch Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Sven; Kari, Fabian; Rylski, Bartosz; Siepe, Matthias; Benk, Christoph; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Open aortic arch replacement is a complex and challenging procedure, especially in post dissection aneurysms and in redo procedures after previous surgery of the ascending aorta or aortic root. We report our experience with the simultaneous selective perfusion of heart, brain, and remaining body to ensure optimal perfusion and to minimize perfusion-related risks during these procedures. We used a specially configured heart–lung machine with a centrifugal pump as arterial pump and an additional roller pump for the selective cerebral perfusion. Initial arterial cannulation is achieved via femoral artery or right axillary artery. After lower body circulatory arrest and selective antegrade cerebral perfusion for the distal arch anastomosis, we started selective lower body perfusion simultaneously to the selective antegrade cerebral perfusion and heart perfusion. Eighteen patients were successfully treated with this perfusion strategy from October 2012 to November 2015. No complications related to the heart–lung machine and the cannulation occurred during the procedures. Mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 239 ± 33 minutes, the simultaneous selective perfusion of brain, heart, and remaining body lasted 55 ± 23 minutes. One patient suffered temporary neurological deficit that resolved completely during intensive care unit stay. No patient experienced a permanent neurological deficit or end-organ dysfunction. These high-risk procedures require a concept with a special setup of the heart–lung machine. Our perfusion strategy for aortic arch replacement ensures a selective perfusion of heart, brain, and lower body during this complex procedure and we observed excellent outcomes in this small series. This perfusion strategy is also applicable for redo procedures. PMID:27729705

  3. Haemodynamical stress in mouse aortic arch with atherosclerotic plaques: Preliminary study of plaque progression

    PubMed Central

    Assemat, P.; Siu, K.K.; Armitage, J.A.; Hokke, S.N.; Dart, A.; Chin-Dusting, J.; Hourigan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques develop at particular sites in the arterial tree, and this regional localisation depends largely on haemodynamic parameters (such as wall shear stress; WSS) as described in the literature. Plaque rupture can result in heart attack or stroke and hence understanding the development and vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques is critically important. The purpose of this study is to characterise the haemodynamics of blood flow in the mouse aortic arch using numerical modelling. The geometries are digitalised from synchrotron imaging and realistic pulsatile blood flow is considered under rigid wall assumptions. Two cases are considered; arteries with and without plaque. Mice that are fed under fat diet present plaques in the aortic arch whose size is dependent on the number of weeks under the diet. The plaque distribution in the region is however relatively constant through the different samples. This result underlines the influence of the geometry and consequently of the wall shear stresses for plaque formation with plaques growing in region of relative low shear stresses. A discussion of the flow field in real geometry in the presence and absence of plaques is conducted. The presence of plaques was shown to alter the blood flow and hence WSS distribution, with regions of localised high WSS, mainly on the wall of the brachiocephalic artery where luminal narrowing is most pronounced. In addition, arch plaques are shown to induce recirculation in the blood flow, a phenomenon with potential influence on the progression of the plaques. The oscillatory shear index and the relative residence time have been calculated on the geometry with plaques to show the presence of this recirculation in the arch, an approach that may be useful for future studies on plaque progression. PMID:25349678

  4. Right Aortic Arch Detected Prenatally: A Rare Case With Bilateral Arterial Duct and Nonconfluent Pulmonary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Silvia; Fainardi, Valentina; Spaziani, Gaia; Favilli, Silvia; Chiappa, Enrico

    2015-09-01

    We describe a rare case of right aortic arch (RAA) and nonconfluent pulmonary arteries. RAA and a right-sided arterial duct (AD) were identified on the prenatal scan, but a second left-sided AD and disconnection of the left pulmonary artery were missed. The missed diagnosis in fetal life adversely affected postnatal management. We suggest that fetuses with a prenatal diagnosis of RAA and right-sided AD be delivered in tertiary care centres to rule out an association with bilateral AD and nonconfluent pulmonary arteries after birth. Prompt postnatal diagnosis will enable preservation of flow in the disconnected pulmonary artery through prostaglandin E1 infusion until surgical reconstruction.

  5. Persistent right aortic arch and cribiform plate aplasia in a northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Maclean, Robert A; Imai, Denise; Dold, Christopher; Haulena, Martin; Gulland, Frances M D

    2008-04-01

    A female weanling northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) presented to The Marine Mammal Center in Sausalito, California, USA, in poor body condition. An esophageal obstruction was diagnosed by contrast radiography and esophagoscopy, but despite extensive diagnostics and supportive care, the seal died 6 days later. On postmortem examination, the right aortic arch was persistent, forming a vascular ring anomaly with a patent ductus arteriosus that compressed the distal esophagus. Aplasia of the right cribiform plate and hypoplasia of the right olfactory nerve was also identified. A review of necropsy reports from January 1988 to December 2003 revealed 16 severe congenital anomalies in 454 juvenile northern elephant seals that stranded in northern California.

  6. A rare association of interrupted aortic arch type C and microdeletion 22q11.2.

    PubMed

    Cuturilo, Goran; Drakulic, Danijela; Stevanovic, Milena; Jovanovic, Ida; Djukic, Milan; Miletic-Grkovic, Slobodanka; Atanaskovic-Markovic, Marina

    2008-10-01

    Microdeletion 22q11.2 is associated with a variety of findings, and the most common are cardiac defects. It is very frequently associated with interrupted aortic arch (IAA) type B and very rarely with type A and type C. Here we report the first case of IAA type C associated with 22q11.2 deletion in Serbia and, to the best of our knowledge, the fourth case described worldwide so far. By this report we would like to point out that all patients with IAA type C who have additional features specific for 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome should be screened for the presence of this deletion.

  7. A rare case of multiple bronchial artery aneurysms associated with a double aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Rameysh Danovani; Chen, Zhi Yong; Low, Teck Boon; Ng, Keng Sin

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial artery aneurysm is uncommon, and the occurrence of multiple aneurysms arising from a bronchial artery is even rarer. To date, there has been only one published case report describing double bronchial artery aneurysms. We herein describe a case of three aneurysms arising from a left bronchial artery, accompanied by multiple bilateral hypertrophied bronchial and intercostobronchial arteries, as well as a double aortic arch. Bronchial artery aneurysm is potentially life-threatening, and immediate treatment is recommended to minimise the potential risk of rupture. The aneurysms in our case were successfully treated via transcatheter arterial embolisation using coils. PMID:25820859

  8. Interrupted aortic arch with isolated persistent left superior vena cava in patient with Turners syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kattea, M. Obadah; Smettei, Osama A.; Kattea, Abdulrahman; Abazid, Rami M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 13-year-old female with Turner syndrome (TS), who presented with unexplained lower limbs swelling and ejection systolic murmur at the left second intercostal space. Suspicion of mild aortic coarctation was made by echocardiography. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) showed a complete interruption of the aortic arch (IAA) below the left subclavian artery with persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) and absent right SVC, defined as an isolated PLSVC. The patient underwent successful surgical correction after unsuccessful trial of transcatheter stent placement. We present this case of asymptomatic IAA to draw attention to the importance of CTA in diagnosing such rare anomalies and ruling out asymptomatic major cardiovascular abnormalities in patient with TS. PMID:27843801

  9. Late presentation of double aortic arch in school-age children presumed to have asthma: the benefits of spirometry and examination of the flow-volume curve.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Derek A

    2009-10-01

    Children with double aortic arch most often present in infancy. This report presents 3 patients in whom the diagnosis of double aortic arch was not revealed until later in childhood. They were all given a misdiagnosis of asthma, but abnormalities detected on the flow-volume curve led to the true diagnosis.

  10. Simultaneous cusp-sparing aortic root replacement and coarctectomy with total arch replacement from the midline incision.

    PubMed

    Okita, Yutaka; Takanashi, Shuichiro; Fukumura, Yoshiaki

    2014-07-01

    Four cases of simultaneous surgery for aortic root aneurysm with aortic regurgitation and coarctation of the aorta were presented. Age at surgery ranged from 18 to 37 years and all were male. All had annuloaortic ectasia and dilatation of the ascending aorta, 3 had bicuspid aortic valve and 1 had acute localized aortic dissection. Preoperative grade of aortic regurgitation was trivial in 1, moderate in 2 and severe in 1. Three had aortic valve-sparing root replacement with reimplantation technique and 1 had plication of the sinotubular junction. All patients had total arch replacement, coarctectomy and orthogonal anastomosis to the descending aorta. Antegrade cerebral perfusion was used for brain protection. All patients survived and postoperative pressure difference between the upper and lower extremities disappeared. Postoperative aortogram was satisfactory.

  11. Unsteady and three-dimensional simulation of blood flow in the human aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Shahcheraghi, N; Dwyer, H A; Cheer, A Y; Barakat, A I; Rutaganira, T

    2002-08-01

    A three-dimensional and pulsatile blood flow in a human aortic arch and its three major branches has been studied numerically for a peak Reynolds number of 2500 and a frequency (or Womersley) parameter of 10. The simulation geometry was derived from the three-dimensional reconstruction of a series of two-dimensional slices obtained in vivo using CAT scan imaging on a human aorta. The numerical simulations were obtained using a projection method, and a finite-volume formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations was used on a system of overset grids. Our results demonstrate that the primary flow velocity is skewed towards the inner aortic wall in the ascending aorta, but this skewness shifts to the outer wall in the descending thoracic aorta. Within the arch branches, the flow velocities were skewed to the distal walls with flow reversal along the proximal walls. Extensive secondary flow motion was observed in the aorta, and the structure of these secondary flows was influenced considerably by the presence of the branches. Within the aorta, wall shear stresses were highly dynamic, but were generally high along the outer wall in the vicinity of the branches and low along the inner wall, particularly in the descending thoracic aorta. Within the branches, the shear stresses were considerably higher along the distal walls than along the proximal walls. Wall pressure was low along the inner aortic wall and high around the branches and along the outer wall in the ascending thoracic aorta. Comparison of our numerical results with the localization of early atherosclerotic lesions broadly suggests preferential development of these lesions in regions of extrema (either maxima or minima) in wall shear stress and pressure.

  12. Right Aortic Arch with a Retroesophageal Left Subclavian Artery and an Anomalous Origin of the Pulmonary Artery from the Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Chang-Seok; Shim, Man-shik; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Jun, Tae-Gook

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a newborn with a rare anatomic variation: a right aortic arch with a retroesophageal left subclavian artery and an anomalous origin of the pulmonary artery from the aorta. This variation was diagnosed using echocardiography and computed tomography, and we treated the condition surgically. PMID:28180103

  13. Isolated left brachiocephalic artery with the right aortic arch: A rare differential of large patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Gajendra; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Kothari, Shyam Sundar

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of isolation of the left brachiocephalic artery with the right aortic arch in a 9-year-old male child masquerading as large patent ductus arteriosus with left-to-right shunt. We have emphasized the subtle clinical findings which served as clues to the diagnosis. PMID:28163435

  14. Use of through-and-through guidewire for delivering large stent-grafts into the distal aortic arch

    SciTech Connect

    Shammari, Muhammad Al; Taylor, Peter; Reidy, John F.

    2000-05-15

    The availability of large diameter stent-grafts is now allowing the endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Most aneurysms are closely related to the distal arch and it is thus necessary to pass the delivery systems into the arch to effectively cover the proximal neck. Even with extra-stiff guidewires in position, it may still be difficult to achieve this, as a result of tortuosity at the iliac arteries and the aorta. We detail a technique where a stiff guidewire is passed from a brachial entry point through the aorta and out at the femoral arteriotomy site. This allows extra-support and may enable the delivery system to be passed further into the aortic arch than it could with just the regular guidewire position.

  15. Results of "elephant trunk" total aortic arch replacement using a multi-branched, collared graft prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Stefan R B; Dell'Aquila, Angelo M; Akil, Ali; Schlarb, Dominik; Panuccio, Guiseppe; Martens, Sven; Rukosujew, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    We report on our experience with a simplified elephant trunk (ET) procedure with a multi-branched prosthesis (Vascutek(®) Siena™ Collared Graft). It consists of a proximal portion (20 cm) with prefabricated side branches, a collar and a distal portion (30 cm). The collar, which can be trimmed into any desired diameter, constitutes the suture portion to the descending aorta. Radiopaque markers in the distal portion indicate the landing zone. Between January 2011 and June 2013, 20 consecutive patients (10 women; mean age, 66 ± 9.3 years) underwent ET procedure, including 6 re-do cases. Underlying aortic diseases were acute dissection (n = 6), chronic dissection (n = 4), aneurysm (n = 8) and PAU (n = 2). Mean preoperative diameter of the descending aorta was 49.1 ± 12.9 mm (range 74.7-29.7 mm). Concomitant procedures included ascending aortic replacement in 16 patients; root replacement in 2; AVR in 2, CABG in 3 and mitral repair in 1 patient. CPB time was 263 ± 94 min; mean duration of ACP was 65 ± 14 min. Two patients died on POD 8 and 78, respectively. Major adverse events included stroke (n = 1), resternotomy for bleeding (n = 2), renal failure requiring temporary dialysis (n = 1) and recurrent nerve paresis (n = 2). After a mean follow-up of 10 ± 8 months, all discharged patients were alive. Seven patients underwent stent-graft implantation of the descending aorta and one patient underwent open descending aortic replacement. The last generation of multi-branched arch prosthesis and especially the Vascutek(®) Siena™ Collared Graft make ET procedure a reasonable treatment option even in patients with acute aortic dissection.

  16. Bovine Aortic Arch and Bilateral Retroesophageal Course of Common Carotid Arteries in a Symptomatic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Bissacco, Daniele; Domanin, Maurizio; Schinco, Giuseppina; Gabrielli, Livio

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical variations of carotid arteries may be related to their development (agenesis, aplasia, hypoplasia) or course (coiling, kinking, tortuosity). Partial or total aberrancies in carotid vessel anatomy rarely occur. We describe the case of a 95-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of confusion and disorientation together with upper limb clonus. Computed tomography (CT)-scan revealed a left frontal brain injury with a not conclusive carotid doppler ultrasound. CT angiography reported a bovine aortic arch with bilateral retroesophageal course of both common carotid arteries and left severe (>70%) internal carotid artery stenosis. The knowledge of anatomical variations of the course of carotid arteries is relevant for possible surgical or endovascular repair or in case of otolaryngology or intubation procedures. PMID:27699162

  17. Sustained maternal hyperoxygenation improves aortic arch dimensions in fetuses with coarctation

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Shi; Zhou, Jiawei; Peng, Qinghai; Deng, Wen; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Yili; Wang, Tao; Zhou, Qichang

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the impact of maternal hyperoxygenation (HO) on cardiac dimensions in fetuses with isolated Coarctation (CoA). Fetal echocardiography was performed serially in 48 fetuses with CoA and gestation age matched normal fetues. The Z-scores for the mitral valve (MV), tricuspid valve (TV), aortic valve (AV), ascending aorta (AAo), isthmus, pulmonary valve (PV), main pulmonary artery (MPA), and descending aorta (DAo) were measured and compared among normal fetuses, CoA fetuses with oxygen and CoA fetuses with air. In the group with oxygen, 6 L/min oxygen was administered to the mother using a face mask. Regression analyses were performed to identify potential factors for HO outcome. The left heart dimension Z-scores increased gradually during HO therapy periods, especially at 4 weeks after oxygen therapy (P < 0.05). As for the case group with air, the left heart dimension remained unchanged. The duration of HO was associated with aortic arch Z-scores (adjusted R2 = 0.199, 0.60 for AAO and isthmus, respectively). Sustained maternal middle-flow oxygenation can be safely used to improve left heart dimensions in fetuses with isolated CoA. The duration of HO were associated with treatment outcome. These findings may provide useful information for developing novel treatment strategies. PMID:27982102

  18. Aortic arch shape is not associated with hypertensive response to exercise in patients with repaired congenital heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aortic arch geometry is linked to abnormal blood pressure (BP) response to maximum exercise. This study aims to quantitatively assess whether aortic arch geometry plays a role in blood pressure (BP) response to exercise. Methods 60 age- and BSA-matched subjects – 20 post-aortic coarctation (CoA) repair, 20 transposition of great arteries post arterial switch operation (ASO) and 20 healthy controls – had a three-dimensional (3D), whole heart magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at 1.5 Tesla, 3D geometric reconstructions created from the MRA. All subjects underwent cardiopulmonary exercise test on the same day as MRA using an ergometer cycle with manual BP measurements. Geometric analysis and their correlation with BP at peak exercise were assessed. Results Arch curvature was similarly acute in both the post-CoA and ASO cases [0.05 ± 0.01 vs. 0.05 ± 0.01 (1/mm/m2); p = 1.0] and significantly different to that of normal healthy controls [0.05 ± 0.01 vs. 0.03 ± 0.01 (1/mm/m2), p < 0.001]. Indexed transverse arch cross sectional area were significantly abnormal in the post-CoA cases compared to the ASO cases (117.8 ± 47.7 vs. 221.3 ± 44.6; p < 0.001) and controls (117.8 ± 47.7 vs. 157.5 ± 27.2 mm2; p = 0.003). BP response to peak exercise did not correlate with arch curvature (r = 0.203, p = 0.120), but showed inverse correlation with indexed minimum cross sectional area of transverse arch and isthmus (r = -0.364, p = 0.004), and ratios of minimum arch area/ descending diameter (r = -0.491, p < 0.001). Conclusion Transverse arch and isthmus hypoplasia, rather than acute arch angulation plays a role in the pathophysiology of BP response to peak exercise following CoA repair. PMID:24219806

  19. Oncological resection of lung cancer invading the aortic arch In full thickness using a non-fenestrated endograft.

    PubMed

    Santana-Rodríguez, Norberto; Martel, Efrén; Clavo, Bernardino; Llontop, Pedro; Calderón-Murgas, César; Raad, Wissam N; Alshehri, Khalid; Ayub, Adil; Jenny Huang, Chyun-Yin; Hussein, Mohamed; Alayón, Santiago; Bhora, Faiz Y

    2016-09-01

    T4 lung cancer invading the full thickness of the aortic arch was completely removed in a 78-year-old lady using a non-fenestrated endograft closing the left subclavian artery origin without performing surgical revascularization. Left thoracotomy and upper lobectomy with resection of superior segment of the lower lobe and full thickness of the infiltrated aorta was performed without covering the aortic defect. The margins of the specimen were free of tumor. The patient survived 32 months. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:412-415. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Bending and pressurisation test of the human aortic arch: experiments, modelling and simulation of a patient-specific case.

    PubMed

    García-Herrera, Claudio M; Celentano, Diego J; Cruchaga, Marcela A

    2013-01-01

    This work presents experiments, modelling and simulation aimed at describing the mechanical behaviour of the human aortic arch during the bending and pressurisation test. The main motivation is to describe the material response of this artery when it is subjected to large quasi-static deformations in three different stages: bending, axial stretching and internal pressurisation. The sample corresponds to a young artery without cardiovascular pathologies. The pressure levels are within the normal and hypertension physiological ranges. The two principal findings of this work are firstly, the material characterisation performed via tensile test measurements that serve to derive the material parameters of a hyperelastic isotropic constitutive model and, secondly, the assessment of these material parameters in the simulation of the bending and pressurisation test. Overall, the reported material characterisation was found to provide a realistic description of the mechanical behaviour of the aortic arch under severe complex loading conditions considered in the bending and pressurisation test.

  1. Clinical Evaluation of Efficacy of CIA and CNA Intrusion Arches

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Sambhav; Pandey, Vinisha

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Excessive overbite is one of the most common problems that confront the orthodontist. Deep bite can be due to infraocclusion of posterior teeth, supraocclusion of anterior teeth or a combination of the two. Correction of same can be carried out by extrusion of molars, intrusion of incisors or by a combination of both respectively. Various intrusion arches are recommended for correcting deep bite by true intrusion of anterior teeth, Utility arches, Segmental arch, Connecticut Intrusion Arch (CIA) and Connecticut New Arch (CNA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical efficacy of CIA and CNA intrusion arches. Materials and Methods Tracings recorded from pre and post-treatment lateral cephalograms of 25 patients treated by CIA (Group I) and another 25 patients treated by CNA (Group II) intrusion arches in deep bite cases after four months of treatment were analysed and findings were recorded. Statistical Analysis Paired t-test was used to compare pre and post-treatment changes within Groups I and II and unpaired t-test was used to compare treatment changes between Group I and Group II. A P-value of < 0.05 was set for statistical significance. Results Findings of this study demonstrate that an average of 1mm of intrusion takes place with CIA intrusion arch and 1.3mm with CNA intrusion arch in a period of 4 months. Both intrusion arches do not affect the position of molar in vertical or anteroposterior plane. Interpretation & Conclusion Both CIA and CNA intrusion arches are effective in bringing about intrusion of lower incisors. PMID:26501008

  2. Surgical management of a neonate with congenitally corrected transposition of the great vessels, hypoplastic right aortic arch, and Ebstein anomaly.

    PubMed

    Filippelli, Sergio; Perri, Gianluigi; Kirk, Richard; Hasan, Asif; Griselli, Massimo

    2013-11-01

    We report a neonate with a primary diagnosis of congenitally corrected transposition (ccTGA) of the great vessels, hypoplastic right aortic arch, and a severely regurgitant Ebstein tricuspid valve (TV). During the fetal period, she was listed for heart transplantation, and two weeks after birth due to a deterioration of her general condition, we performed a Norwood-Sano modified procedure. After 58 days a donor heart became available and the baby successfully received a orthotopic heart transplantation.

  3. Evaluation of continuous arch and segmented arch leveling techniques in adult patients--a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Weiland, F J; Bantleon, H P; Droschl, H

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of overbite correction achieved by a conventional continuous arch wire technique and the segmented arch technique as recommended by Burstone. The sample comprised 50 adult patients (age 18 to 40 years) with deep bites. Twenty-five patients were treated with a continuous arch wire technique (CAW); in the second half of the sample, the segmented arch technique (Burstone) was used for correction of the vertical malocclusion. Lateral cephalograms and plaster cast models taken before and immediately after treatment were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed on the collected data. The results showed that both techniques produced a highly significant overbite reduction (CAW: -3.17 mm, p < 0.001; Burstone: -3.56 mm, p < 0.001). The CAW group showed an extrusion in the molar area with subsequent posterior rotation of the mandible (6occl-ML: +1.30 mm; 6occl-NSL: +1.63 mm; ML/NSL: +1.94 degrees, all p < 0.001). The Burstone group, however, showed overbite reduction by incisor intrusion without any substantial extrusion of posterior teeth (upper 1-NSL: -1.50 mm; lower 1-ML: -1.72 mm; both p < 0.001). As a consequence, no significant posterior rotation of the mandible took place (ML/NSL: +0.52 degrees, n.s.). It is concluded that in adult patients the segmented arch technique (Burstone) can be considered as being superior to a conventional continuous arch wire technique if arch leveling by incisor intrusion is indicated.

  4. Evaluation of the fit of preformed nickel titanium arch wires on normal occlusion dental arches

    PubMed Central

    Al-Barakati, Rakhn G.; Alqahtani, Nasser D.; AlMadi, Abdulaziz; Albarakati, Sahar F.; ALKofide, Eman A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the fits of preformed nickel titanium (NiTi) archwires on dental arches with normal occlusion. Methods Forty sets of upper and lower plaster models were obtained from men and women with Class I occlusions. Preformed 0.016″ × 0.022″ NiTi archwires from Rocky Mountain Orthodontics (RMO), 3 M Unitek, Ormco, and Dentaurum were evaluated in terms of their fits on dental arches from male, female, and combined cases. Data were analyzed by using fourth- and sixth-order polynomial equations, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the Duncan post hoc test. Results In the upper arches, the best fit and least error were obtained with RMO Ovoid and Ormco Orthos Large archwires for male cases, but with 3 M Orthoform LA archwires for female and combined cases. In the lower arches, the best fit and least error were obtained with Ormco Orthos Large for male cases, with 3 M Orthoform LA and RMO Normal for female cases, and with 3 M Orthoform LA, RMO Normal, Ormco Orthos Large, and Ormco Orthos Small for combined cases. When both dental arches were matched, Ormco Orthos Large was the best wire for male cases. 3 M Orthoform LA was the best wire for female and combined cases. Conclusions Using an archwire form with the best fit to the dental arch should produce minimal changes in the dental arch form when NiTi wires are used and require less customization when stainless-steel wires are used. PMID:26792965

  5. Aortic tissue properties in porcine models: A comparison of ex vivo mechanical test results after simulated aortic arch reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Pittaccio, S; Migliavacca, F; Hjordtal, V; Smerup, M; Frund, E-T; Villa, T; Morre-Pedersen, E; De Leval, M R

    2005-01-01

    Surgical interventions on the arterial wall can produce modifications to its tissue characteristics, and the addition of synthetic materials of different types can have implications on hemodynamics and blood vessel wall behavior. This work studies the midterm effects of end-to-end anastomosis (E/E), Gore-tex graft interposition (GGI) and Gore-tex patch graft aortoplasty (GPGA) in aortic arch reconstruction. The study comprised of two groups of healthy Danish sows. The sows in the first group (short term (ST)) weighed about 40 kg, underwent a surgical operation and were sacrificed on the same day. The sows in the second group (midterm (MT)) weighed 5-10 kg, underwent a surgical operation and were then allowed to grow to a weight of about 30-40 kg, before being sacrificed. One sow in each group was scheduled for E/E and one sow for GGI. One sow in ST and two sows in MT received GPGA. The overall average wall thickness was 1.93 mm. Relaxation constant values were significantly higher for ST (5.221 +/- 1.832 sec) than for MT (2.184 +/- 1.216 sec). GPGA showed a greater impact on relaxation than other procedures, enhancing the viscous character. The working-point Young's modulus (Epw ) was not significantly different in ST and MT. Circumferential samples had different Epw (0.419 +/- 0.77 MPa) from longitudinal samples (0.902 +/- 0.378 MPa). There also appeared to be a significant difference between samples cut longitudinally on the left and the right sides of the wall. The overall average Epw value was 0.6609 +/- 0.3641 MPa.

  6. Role of Endothelin-1/Endothelin-A receptor-mediated signaling pathway in the aortic arch patterning in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, H.; Hammer, R. E.; Richardson, J. A.; Williams, S. C.; Clouthier, D. E.; Yanagisawa, M.

    1998-01-01

    The intercellular signaling mediated by endothelins and their G protein-coupled receptors has recently been shown to be essential for the normal embryonic development of subsets of neural crest cell derivatives. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is proteolytically generated from its inactive precursor by endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) and acts on the endothelin-A (ETA) receptor. Genetic disruption of this ET-1/ECE-1/ETA pathway results in defects in branchial arch- derived craniofacial tissues, as well as defects in cardiac outflow and great vessel structures, which are derived from cephalic (cardiac) neural crest. In this study, in situ hybridization of ETA-/- and ECE-1(-)/- embryos with a cardiac neural crest marker, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein-1, shows that the migration of neural crest cells from the neural tube to cardiac outflow tract is not affected in these embryos. Immunostaining of an endothelial marker, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule CD-31, shows that the initial formation of the branchial arch arteries is not disturbed in ETA-/- or ECE-1(-)/- embryos. To visualize the subsequent patterning of arch vessels in detail, we generated ETA-/- or ECE-1(-)/- embryos that expressed an SM22alpha-lacZ marker transgene in arterial smooth muscle cells. Wholemount X-gal staining of these mutant embryos reveals that the abnormal regression and persistence of specific arch arteries results in disturbance of asymmetrical remodeling of the arch arteries. These defects include abnormal regression of arch arteries 4 and 6, enlargement of arch artery 3, and abnormal persistence of the bilateral ductus caroticus and right dorsal aorta. These abnormalities eventually lead to various types of great vessel malformations highly similar to those seen in neural crest-ablated chick embryos and human congenital cardiac defects. This study demonstrates that ET-1/ETA-mediated signaling plays an essential role in a complex process of aortic arch patterning by affecting

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Proximal Aortic Arch Lesions through a Retrograde Approach

    PubMed Central

    Samaniego, Edgar A.; Katzen, Barry T.; Kreusch, Andreas S.; Uthoff, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Tandem atherosclerotic lesions of the carotid bifurcation and the ipsilateral proximal common carotid artery (CCA) or innominate arteries (IA) can be challenging to treat. A surgical approach may treat the lesion at the carotid bifurcation, but proximal CCA or IA lesions require a major surgical exposure. An endovascular approach is challenging as well since anatomic variations, such as a type III aortic arch, can render navigation very difficult. We report our experience in the hybrid surgical and endovascular treatment of complex proximal CCA and IA lesions. Eleven patients who underwent hybrid procedures with surgical exposure (with or without endarterectomy) of the carotid artery and retrograde endovascular intervention of a proximal lesion were included in the study. The mean percentage of stenosis was 81%. Seven patients underwent a carotid endarterectomy (CEA), and 4 patients underwent only a surgical cutdown for retrograde endovascular access of the IA or left CCA. All procedures were technically successful. Eight patients had no symptoms within 30 days of the procedure. The hybrid retrograde endovascular approach through carotid exposure with or without CEA appears to be effective and safe in selected patients who have a high-risk complex anatomy of tandem lesions. PMID:25999991

  8. Relationship between hemodynamics and atherosclerosis in aortic arches of apolipoprotein E-null mice on 129S6/SvEvTac and C57BL/6J genetic backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Hirofumi; Hagaman, John; Friedman, Morton H.; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2011-01-01

    Objective We investigated the relationships between hemodynamics and differential plaque development at the aortic arch of apolipoprotein E (apoE)-null mice on 129S6/SvEvTac (129) and C57BL/6J (B6) genetic backgrounds. Methods Mean flow velocities at the ascending and descending aorta (mVAA and mVDA) were measured by Doppler ultrasound in wild type and apoE-null male mice at 3 and 9 months of age. Following dissection of the aortic arches, anatomical parameters and plaque areas were evaluated. Results Arch plaques were five times bigger in 129-apoE than in B6-apoE mice at 3 months, and twice as large at 9 months. The geometric differences, namely larger vessel diameter in the B6 strain and broader inner curvature of the aortic arch in the 129 strain, were exaggerated in 9-month-old apoE-null mice. Cardiac output and heart rate under anesthesia were significantly higher in the B6 strain than in the 129 strain. The values of mVAA were similar in the two strains, while mVDA was lower in the 129 strain. However, there was a 129-apoE-specific reduction of flow velocities with age, and both mVAA and mVDA were significantly lower in 129-apoE than in B6-apoE mice at 9 months. The mean relative wall shear stress (rWSS) over the aortic arch in 129-apoE and B6-apoE mice were not different, but animals with lower mean rWSS had larger arch plaques within each strain. Conclusions The plaque formation in the arch of apoE-null mice is accompanied by strain-dependent changes in both arch geometry and hemodynamics. While arch plaque sizes negatively correlate with mean rWSS, additional factors are necessary to account for the strain differences in arch plaque development. PMID:22078246

  9. Congenital subclavian steal syndrome with multiple cerebellar infarctions caused by an atypical circumflex retroesophageal right aortic arch with atretic aberrant left subclavian artery.

    PubMed

    Mamopoulos, Apostolos T; Luther, Bernd

    2014-09-01

    A right-sided aortic arch is a rare anomaly with an incidence of 0.1% worldwide and is usually associated with a mirror image of all supra-aortic branches or an aberrant left subclavian artery. The latter is often associated with a Kommerell diverticulum, although it can rarely be hypoplastic or atretic and lead to congenital subclavian steal. In most patients, the situation is well-tolerated. In this report, we present a case of subclavian steal syndrome with multiple cerebellar infarcts in a patient with an atypical right-sided aortic arch and an atretic aberrant left subclavian artery arising from a left-sided descending thoracic aorta.

  10. Minimally invasive Ivor-Lewis esophagectomy for esophageal cancer with right aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Linson, Jeremy; Ahmed, Bestoun; Awad, Ziad

    2017-01-01

    Right aortic arch (RAA) is a rare congenital vascular abnormality in which the aorta descends in the right thorax and encircles the esophagus. Historically, esophagectomy for patients for RAA is done through a left thoracotomy as exposure and mobilization of the esophagus is difficult through a right thoracotomy. A 73-year-old male was found to have an esophageal adenocarcinoma. Endoscopic ultrasound showed a T3N0 lesion in the lower third of the esophagus. PET CT demonstrated a circumferential lesion without evidence of distant disease or involved lymph nodes and a RAA which was not associated with congenital heart disease or symptoms. The patient received neo-adjuvant chemoradiation (50.4 Gy) with carboplatin and paclitaxel. Minimally invasive Ivor-Lewis esophagectomy (MIE) utilizing conventional right thoracoscopy was done. Esophageal mobilization, transection and mediastinal lymph node dissection was performed through anteriorly placed trocars, thereby avoiding the right side descending aorta that is lying anterior and to the right of the esophagus. In this video we demonstrate MIE utilizing right thoracoscopy. Total operative time was 250 minutes and the patient was discharged home on post-operative day 8. Final pathology showed complete pathological response, with 0/22 involved lymph nodes and uninvolved surgical margins. Minimally invasive esophagectomy has been reported to deliver superior outcomes to the open approach. MIE can be performed in selected patients with RAA, and herein we demonstrate a minimally invasive option for the treatment of distal esophageal cancer in patients with RAA. To our knowledge this is the 1st reported case in the English literature utilizing this approach in patient with RAA.

  11. Hybrid Repair of Complex Thoracic Aortic Arch Pathology: Long-Term Outcomes of Extra-anatomic Bypass Grafting of the Supra-aortic Trunk

    SciTech Connect

    Lotfi, S. Clough, R. E.; Ali, T.; Salter, R.; Young, C. P.; Bell, R.; Modarai, B.; Taylor, P.

    2013-02-15

    Hybrid repair constitutes supra-aortic debranching before thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). It offers improved short-term outcome compared with open surgery; however, longer-term studies are required to assess patient outcomes and patency of the extra-anatomic bypass grafts. A prospectively maintained database of 380 elective and urgent patients who had undergone TEVAR (1997-2011) was analyzed retrospectively. Fifty-one patients (34 males; 17 females) underwent hybrid repair. Median age was 71 (range, 18-90) years with mean follow-up of 15 (range, 0-61) months. Perioperative complications included death: 10 % (5/51), stroke: 12 % (6/51), paraplegia: 6 % (3/51), endoleak: 16 % (8/51), rupture: 4 % (2/51), upper-limb ischemia: 2 % (1/51), bypass graft occlusion: 4 % (2/51), and cardiopulmonary complications in 14 % (7/51). Three patients (6 %) required emergency intervention for retrograde dissection: (2 aortic root repairs; 2 innominate stents). Early reintervention was performed for type 1 endoleak in two patients (2 proximal cuff extensions). One patient underwent innominate stenting and revision of their bypass for symptomatic restenosis. At 48 months, survival was 73 %. Endoleak was detected in three (6 %) patients (type 1 = 2; type 2 = 1) requiring debranching with proximal stent graft (n = 2) and proximal extension cuff (n = 1). One patient had a fatal rupture of a mycotic aneurysm and two arch aneurysms expanded. No bypass graft occluded after the perioperative period. Hybrid operations to treat aortic arch disease can be performed with results comparable to open surgery. The longer-term outcomes demonstrate low rates of reintervention and high rates of graft patency.

  12. Trade in the hammer for a power driver—perspectives on the frozen elephant trunk repair for aortic arch disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Like a power driver for which the bit can be changed for each screw that is turned, improvement of brain protection strategies and the development of hybrid techniques have provided us with the ability to offer tailored repair options for patients with complex thoracic disease involving the arch. Variations of the frozen elephant trunk operation have been the most versatile of the newer hybrid approaches to repair complex thoracic aortic pathology. The frozen elephant trunk procedure includes the use of circulatory arrest in combination with suturing a stentgraft into the arch, and may reduce the risk of stroke and endoleaks. This article describes various methods of performing the frozen elephant trunk procedure with a focus on preoperative considerations including the etiology of disease, the time and urgency of presentation, and the indications to operate. PMID:24109573

  13. Congenital Cardiac, Aortic Arch, and Vascular Bed Anomalies in PHACE Syndrome (From The International PHACE Syndrome Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Michelle L.; Frommelt, Peter C.; Blei, Francine; Breur, Johannes M.P.J.; Cordisco, Maria R.; Frieden, Ilona J.; Goddard, Deborah S.; Holland, Kristen E.; Krol, Alfons L.; Maheshwari, Mohit; Metry, Denise W.; Morel, Kimberly D.; North, Paula E.; Pope, Elena; Shieh, Joseph T.; Southern, James F.; Wargon, Orli; Siegel, Dawn H.; Drolet, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    PHACE syndrome represents the association of large infantile hemangiomas of the head and neck with brain, cerebrovascular, cardiac, ocular, and ventral/midline defects. Cardiac and cerebrovascular anomalies are the most common extracutaneous features of PHACE, and they also constitute the greatest source of potential morbidity. Congenital heart disease in PHACE is incompletely described, and this study was conducted to better characterize its features. This study of the International PHACE Syndrome Registry represents the largest central review of clinical, radiology, and pathology data for cardiovascular anomalies in PHACE patients to date. 62/150 (41%) subjects had intracardiac, aortic arch, or brachiocephalic vessel anomalies. Aberrant origin of a subclavian artery was the most common cardiovascular anomaly (present in 31/150 (21%) of subjects). Coarctation was the second most common anomaly, identified in 28/150 (19%), and can be missed clinically in PHACE patients because of the frequent association of arch obstruction with aberrant subclavian origin. 23/62 (37%) subjects with cardiovascular anomalies required procedural intervention. A higher percentage of hemangiomas were located on the left side of the head/neck in patients with coarctation (46% vs. 39%); however, hemangioma distribution did not predict the presence of cardiovascular anomalies overall. In conclusion, PHACE is associated with a high risk of congenital heart disease. Cardiac and aortic arch imaging with detailed assessment of arch patency and brachiocephalic origins is essential for any patient suspected of having PHACE. Longitudinal investigation is needed to determine the long-term outcomes of cardiovascular anomalies in PHACE. PMID:24079520

  14. Right Cervical Aortic Arch and Pseudocoarctation of the Aorta Associated with Aneurysms and Steal Phenomena: US, CTA, and MRA Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Tanju, Sumru Ustuner, Evren; Erden, Ilhan; Aytac, Suat Kemal

    2007-02-15

    A 55-year-old woman presented with right cervical aortic arch with pseudocoarctation of the aorta further complicated by the presence of multiple aneurysms and a high-grade stenosis at the origin of the left subclavian trunk from the aorta causing a discrepancy in blood pressure between the right and left arms. The branching pattern and the resulting complex steal syndromes involving the left carotid and the subclavian system are unique. The computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and Doppler ultrasound findings are described.

  15. Adult Onset Dysphagia: Right Sided Aortic Arch, Ductus Diverticulum, and Retroesophageal Ligamentum Arteriosum Comprising an Obstructing Vascular Ring

    PubMed Central

    Raheja, Hitesh; Kamholz, Stephan; Shetty, Vijay

    2017-01-01

    A 49-year-old African American male patient with no past medical history was admitted because of 3 months of difficulty swallowing solid and liquid foods. He had constant retrosternal discomfort and appeared malnourished. The chest radiograph revealed a right sided aortic arch with tracheal deviation to the left. A swallow study confirmed a fixed esophageal narrowing at the level of T6. Contrast enhanced Computed Tomography (CT) angiogram of the chest and neck revealed a mirror image right aortic arch with a left sided cardiac apex and a prominent ductus diverticulum (measuring 1.7 × 1.8 cm). This structure extended posterior to and indented the mid esophagus. A left posterolateral thoracotomy was performed and the ductus diverticulum was resected. A retroesophageal ligamentum arteriosum was found during surgery and divided. This rare combination of congenital anatomical aberrations led to severe dysphagia in our patient. Successful surgical correction in the form of resection of the ductus diverticulum and division of the retroesophageal ligamentum arteriosum led to complete resolution of our patient's symptoms.

  16. Chronic False Aneurysm after a Healed Rupture of the Aortic Isthmus: TEVAR, Hybrid Surgery, or Open Arch Repair?

    PubMed

    Nizet, Christophe; Van Damme, Hendrik; Boesmans, Evelyne; Lavigne, Jean-Paul; Creemers, Etienne; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of post-traumatic chronic false aneurysm of the aortic isthmus in a 34-year-old man who had been involved in a car accident 10 years earlier. An initial chest X-ray demonstrated a calcified mass in the upper mediastinum and computed tomography scan revealed a false aneurysm of the aortic isthmus arising above the left subclavian artery. Partial covered rupture of the aorta is not always easy to diagnose and can remain clinically silent in a polytrauma patient. The duration from rupture to false aneurysm formation may extend over many years. This chronic lesion can be managed by surgery, by an endovascular procedure, or by a combined procedure. This case report highlights the current therapeutic approach. A debranching procedure was done in view of a secondary exclusion of the huge false aneurysm by a stent graft. Unfortunately, the false aneurysm ruptured during the procedure and a replacement of the aortic arch and the isthmus under total circulatory arrest was successfully done. The patient was doing well at 9-month follow-up.

  17. Three-region perfusion strategy for aortic arch reconstruction in the Norwood.

    PubMed

    Karavas, Alexandros N; Deschner, Benjamin W; Scott, John W; Mettler, Bret A; Bichell, David P

    2011-09-01

    We describe a new method of selective regional perfusion during arch reconstruction in the Norwood procedure. The strategy involves direct sequential perfusion of the coronary and splanchnic circulations coupled with continuous cerebral perfusion, while repairing the arch in a distal to proximal fashion. This technique provides the potential for decreased coronary and splanchnic ischemic times, which in combination with continuous selective cerebral perfusion may further allow for warmer operating temperatures and decreased overall bypass times.

  18. Anomalous origin of the left innominate (brachiocephalic) artery in the right aortic arch: How can it be anomalous when the left innominate artery is absent?

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Francesca; Bonnet, Damien; Geva, Tal; Sanders, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    An unusual case of a rare vascular ring, which has been called right aortic arch with aberrant left innominate artery, is presented. The appearance of this case led to the realization that there is really no innominate artery present in this anomaly but only the left dorsal aorta. We present a clarification of the nature and likely development of the vessels present. PMID:27212855

  19. A new concentric double prosthesis for sutureless, magnetic-assisted aortic arch inclusion.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Acute dissection of the ascending aorta is a life-threatening condition in which the aortic wall develops one or more tears of the intima associated with intramural rupture of the media layer with subsequent formation of a two lumina vessel. The remaining outer layer is just the adventitia, with high risk of complete rupture. Vital organs may be under-perfused. Mortality rate in this acute event is about 50% if an emergent surgical procedure is not performed as soon as possible to replace the tract affected by the primary rupture. Nevertheless, the emergent surgical procedure is affected by high risk of mortality or severe neurologic sequelae, due to the need for deep hypothermia and cardiocirculatory arrest and different methods of cerebral protection. If the patient survives the acute event, a frequent outcome is the establishment of a chronic aortic dissection in the remaining aorta and late chronic dissecting aneurysm, usually starting from the surgical suture itself. Traumatism of surgical stitches and of direct blood flow pressure on weak aortic wall can be important contributing factors of the chronic disease. In conclusions, the majority of these patients undergoes a high risk operation without a complete solution of the disease. We hypothesize that excluding the aortic layers from the blood direct flow and using an anastomotic technique which does not include surgical stitches could help to significantly reduce the recurrence of aortic dissection after the acute event and shorten hypothermic arrest duration. We devised a double tubular prosthesis consisting of two concentric artificial tubes between which the aortic wall is confined and excluded from direct blood flow. We also devised a magnetic assisted sutureless anastomotic technique that seals the aortic tissue between the two prostheses and avoids the perforation of the fragile aortic wall with surgical stitches. We are presenting here this new prototype and draw a few different models. Both acute and

  20. Left thoracoscopic two-stage repair of tracheoesophageal fistula with a right aortic arch and a vascular ring

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Kazuo; Uchida, Hiroo; Tainaka, Takahisa; Tanano, Akihide; Shirota, Chiyoe; Yokota, Kazuki; Murase, Naruhiko; Shirotsuki, Ryo; Chiba, Kosuke; Hinoki, Akinari

    2017-01-01

    A right aortic arch (RAA) is found in 5% of neonates with tracheoesophageal fistulae (TEF) and may be associated with vascular rings. Oesophageal repairs for TEF with an RAA via the right chest often pose surgical difficulties. We report for the first time in the world a successful two-stage repair by left-sided thoracoscope for TEF with an RAA and a vascular ring. We switched from right to left thoracoscopy after finding an RAA. A proximal oesophageal pouch was hemmed into the vascular ring; therefore, we selected a two-stage repair. The TEF was resected and simple internal traction was placed into the oesophagus at the first stage. Detailed examination showed the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) completing a vascular ring. The subsequent primary oesophago-oesophagostomy and dissection of PDA was performed by left-sided thoracoscope. Therefore, left thoracoscopic repair is safe and feasible for treating TEF with an RAA and a vascular ring. PMID:27143697

  1. Sternum-Sparing Hybrid Repair of a Symptomatic Innominate Artery Aneurysm in a Frail Patient with Bovine Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Pellenc, Quentin; Avramenko, Alla; Mordant, Pierre; Castier, Yves

    2016-08-01

    We present the case of a 65-year-old man with a bovine aortic arch variation, who presented a symptomatic aneurysm of the innominate artery. Standard open repair was contraindicated and an hybrid approach was performed, regarding general status (Organisation Mondiale de la Santé (OMS) Performance Status score 3 and American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status classification system score 3). Right common carotid artery and right subclavian artery were revascularized surgically from the left common carotid artery. Proximal aneurysm exclusion was performed with a vascular plug. Follow-up computed tomography angiography confirmed the exclusion of the innominate artery aneurysm. Vascular plugs can be used safely through a sternum-sparing hybrid approach to treat symptomatic innominate artery aneurysms in frail patients.

  2. A Case of an Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Ruptured Dissection of a Right Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Born, Christine; Forster, Andreas; Rock, Clemens; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen; Rieger, Johannes; Reiser, Maximilian

    2003-09-15

    We report a case of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a rare underlying cause. The patient was unconscious when he was admitted to the hospital. No chest radiogram was performed. Routine diagnostic measures, including endoscopy, failed to reveal the origin of the bleeding, which was believed to originate from the esophagus secondary to a peptic ulcer or varices. Exploratory laparotomy added no further information, but contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the chest showed dextroposition of the widened aortic arch with a ruptured type-B dissection and a consecutive aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF). The patient died on the day of admission. Noninvasive MSCT angiography gives rapid diagnostic information on patients with occult upper gastrointestinal bleeding and should be considered before more invasive conventional angiography or surgery.

  3. Early Lung Function Testing in Infants with Aortic Arch Anomalies Identifies Patients at Risk for Airway Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roehr, Charles Christoph; Wilitzki, Silke; Opgen-Rhein, Bernd; Kalache, Karim; Proquitté, Hans; Bührer, Christoph; Schmalisch, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    Background Aortic arch anomalies (AAA) are rare cardio-vascular anomalies. Right-sided and double-sided aortic arch anomalies (RAAA, DAAA) are distinguished, both may cause airway obstructions. We studied the degree of airway obstruction in infants with AAA by neonatal lung function testing (LFT). Patients and Methods 17 patients (10 RAAA and 7 DAAA) with prenatal diagnosis of AAA were investigated. The median (range) post conception age at LFT was 40.3 (36.6–44.1) weeks, median body weight 3400 (2320–4665) g. Measurements included tidal breathing flow-volume loops (TBFVL), airway resistance (Raw) by bodyplethysmography and the maximal expiratory flow at functional residual capacity (V′maxFRC) by rapid thoracic-abdominal compression (RTC) technique. V′maxFRC was also expressed in Z-scores, based on published gender-, age and height-specific reference values. Results Abnormal lung function tests were seen in both RAAA and DAAA infants. Compared to RAAA infants, infants with DAAA had significantly more expiratory flow limitations in the TBFVL, (86% vs. 30%, p<0.05) and a significantly increased Raw (p = 0.015). Despite a significant correlation between Raw and the Z-score of V′maxFRC (r = 0.740, p<0.001), there were no statistically significant differences in V′maxFRC and it's Z-scores between RAAA and DAAA infants. 4 (24%) infants (2 RAAA, 2 DAAA) were near or below the 10th percentile of V′maxFRC, indicating a high risk for airway obstruction. Conclusion Both, infants with RAAA and DAAA, are at risk for airway obstruction and early LFT helps to identify and to monitor these infants. This may support the decision for therapeutic interventions before clinical symptoms arise. PMID:21966379

  4. Potential Molecular Mechanism of Retrograde Aortic Arch Stenosis in the Hybrid Approach to Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hibino, Narutoshi; Cismowski, Mary J.; Lilly, Brenda J.; McConnell, Patrick I.; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Cheatham, John P.; Lucchesi, Pamela A.; Galantowicz, Mark E.; Trask, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The hybrid palliation for hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) has emerged as an alternative approach to the Norwood procedure. The development of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in-stent stenosis can cause retrograde aortic arch stenosis (RAAS), leading to significant morbidity. This study aimed to identify potential mechanisms of PDA in-stent stenosis contributing to RAAS. METHODS Tissues from stented PDA were collected from 17 patients undergoing comprehensive stage 2 repair between 2009 and 2014. Patients requiring RAAS intervention based on cardiology–surgery consensus were defined as RAAS (+) (n=10), whereas patients without any RAAS intervention were defined as RAAS (−) (n=7). Tissues were examined by qPCR analysis for vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) differentiation and proliferation markers. RESULTS Patient characteristics were: HLHS with aortic atresia: 6; HLHS with aortic stenosis: 3; unbalanced AVC: 3; DILV/TGA: 3; DORV: 2. VSMC differentiation markers (β–actin, SM22, and calponin) and signaling pathways for VSMC modulation (TGFβ1, Notch, and PDGF-BB) were significantly higher in the RAAS (+) than in RAAS (−). The proliferation marker Ki67 was increased in RAAS (+). Cell cycle markers were comparable in both groups. CONCLUSION Increased VSMC differentiation and proliferation markers suggest a mechanism for inward neointima formation of the PDA in RAAS. The apparent lack of change in cell cycle markers is contrary to coronary artery in-stent stenosis, suggesting further targets should be examined. Combined primary in vitro PDA cell culture and proteomics can be strong tools to elucidate targets to reduce PDA in-stent stenosis for RAAS in the future. PMID:26163359

  5. A computational study of the role of the aortic arch in idiopathic unilateral vocal-fold paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Megan J.; Ayylasomayajula, Avinash; Behkam, Reza; Bierhals, Andrew J.; Jacobs, M. Eileen; Edgar, Julia D.; Paniello, Randal C.; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Unilateral vocal-fold paralysis (UVP) occurs when one of the vocal folds becomes paralyzed due to damage to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). Individuals with UVP experience problems with speaking, swallowing, and breathing. Nearly two-thirds of all cases of UVP is associated with impaired function of the left RLN, which branches from the vagus nerve within the thoracic cavity and loops around the aorta before ascending to the larynx within the neck. We hypothesize that this path predisposes the left RLN to a supraphysiological, biomechanical environment, contributing to onset of UVP. Specifically, this research focuses on the identification of the contribution of the aorta to onset of left-sided UVP. Important to this goal is determining the relative influence of the material properties of the RLN and the aorta in controlling the biomechanical environment of the RLN. Finite element analysis was used to estimate the stress and strain imposed on the left RLN as a function of the material properties and loading conditions. The peak stress and strain in the RLN were quantified as a function of RLN and aortic material properties and aortic blood pressure using Spearman rank correlation coefficients. The material properties of the aortic arch showed the strongest correlation with peak stress [ρ = −0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI), −1.00 to −0.25] and strain (ρ = −0.62, 95% CI, −0.99 to −0.24) in the RLN. Our results suggest an important role for the aorta in controlling the biomechanical environment of the RLN and potentially in the onset of left-sided UVP that is idiopathic. PMID:25477351

  6. Self-Expandable Stent for Repairing Coarctation of the Left-Circumferential Aortic Arch with Right-sided Descending Aorta and Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery with Kommerell's Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khajali, Zahra; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Pouraliakbar, Hamidreza; Mohebbi, Bahram; Aeinfar, Kamran; Zolfaghari, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Endovascular treatment offers a great advantage in the management of main arteries stenoses. However, simultaneous presence of a group of anomalies may complicate the situation. Here we present a case of 21-year-old man with aortic coarctation. Radiographic imaging and angiography demonstrated aortic coarctation of the left-circumferential aortic arch, right-sided descending aorta, and Kommerell's diverticulum at the origin of right subclavian artery. These anomalies have rarely been reported to concurrently exist in the same case and the treatment is challenging. Percutaneous treatment for repair of aortic coarctation was successfully performed with deployment of self-expanding nitinol stents. Follow-up demonstrated the correction of blood pressure and improvement of the symptoms. It appears that deployment of self-expandable nitinol stents present a viable option for the management of coarcted aorta in patients having all or some of these anomalies together.

  7. Tbx1 haploinsufficieny in the DiGeorge syndrome region causes aortic arch defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, E A; Vitelli, F; Su, H; Morishima, M; Huynh, T; Pramparo, T; Jurecic, V; Ogunrinu, G; Sutherland, H F; Scambler, P J; Bradley, A; Baldini, A

    2001-03-01

    DiGeorge syndrome is characterized by cardiovascular, thymus and parathyroid defects and craniofacial anomalies, and is usually caused by a heterozygous deletion of chromosomal region 22q11.2 (del22q11) (ref. 1). A targeted, heterozygous deletion, named Df(16)1, encompassing around 1 megabase of the homologous region in mouse causes cardiovascular abnormalities characteristic of the human disease. Here we have used a combination of chromosome engineering and P1 artificial chromosome transgenesis to localize the haploinsufficient gene in the region, Tbx1. We show that Tbx1, a member of the T-box transcription factor family, is required for normal development of the pharyngeal arch arteries in a gene dosage-dependent manner. Deletion of one copy of Tbx1 affects the development of the fourth pharyngeal arch arteries, whereas homozygous mutation severely disrupts the pharyngeal arch artery system. Our data show that haploinsufficiency of Tbx1 is sufficient to generate at least one important component of the DiGeorge syndrome phenotype in mice, and demonstrate the suitability of the mouse for the genetic dissection of microdeletion syndromes.

  8. An unusual case of multiple aortic abnormalities: total occlusion of aortic arch, left external iliac artery, and bicuspid aortic valve in a 21-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Tanindi, Asli; Tavil, Yusuf; Mutluay, Ruya; Taktak, Hacer; Cengel, Atiye

    2007-03-01

    An unusual case of total occlusion of aorta just distal to the left subclavian artery, bicuspid aortic valve, and occluded left external iliac artery in a 21-year-old man who was admitted with headache and severe hypertension is presented. We wish to report this case because so far there have been none reported with such multiple aortic abnormalities, although several documented cases of isolated total occlusion of aorta exist. Our patient underwent a successful surgical correction, i.e., patch plasty to the coarcted segment and end to side - end to side aortal-aortal bypass with Dacron graft.

  9. Evaluation of dental arch width and form changes after orthodontic treatment and retention with a new computerized method.

    PubMed

    Taner, Tülin Ugur; Ciger, Semra; El, Hakan; Germeç, Derya; Es, Alphan

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate longitudinal arch width and form changes and to define arch form types with a new computerized method. Maxillary and mandibular models of 21 Class II Division 1 patients were examined before treatment (T(0)), after treatment (T(1)), and an average of 3 years after retention (T(2)). Arch width measurements were made directly on scanned images of maxillary and mandibular models. Arch form changes at T(0)-T(1) and T(1)-T(2) were evaluated by superimposing the computer-generated Bezier arch curves with a computer program. Types of dental arch forms were defined by superimposing them with the pentamorphic arch system, which included 5 different types of arch forms: normal, ovoid, tapered, narrow ovoid, and narrow tapered. Maxillary arch widths were increased during orthodontic treatment. Mandibular posterior arch widths were also increased. The expansion of the mandibular arch forms was less than in the maxillary arch forms. Arch width changes were generally stable, except for reduction in maxillary and mandibular interlateral, inter-first premolar, and mandibular intercanine widths. Pretreatment maxillary arch forms were mostly tapered; mandibular arch forms were tapered and narrow tapered. In maxillary arch forms, 76% of the treatment changes were maintained. Mandibular arch form was maintained in 67% of the sample, both during treatment and after retention. In mandibular arches, 71% of orthodontically induced arch form changes were maintained.

  10. Hybrid repair of penetrating aortic ulcer associated with right aortic arch and aberrant left innominate artery arising from aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum with simultaneous repair of bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanyuan; Yang, Bin; Cai, Hongbo; Jin, Hui

    2014-02-01

    We present the first case of a hybrid endovascular approach to a penetrating aortic ulcer on the left descending aorta with a right aortic arch and aberrant left innominate artery arising from an aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum. The patient also had bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms. The three-step procedure consisted of a carotid-carotid bypass, followed by endovascular exclusion of the ulcer and the aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum, and then completion by covering the iliac aneurysms. The patient had no complications at 18 months after surgery. In such rare configurations, endovascular repair is a safe therapeutic option.

  11. In vitro flow investigations in the aortic arch during cardiopulmonary bypass with stereo-PIV.

    PubMed

    Büsen, Martin; Kaufmann, Tim A S; Neidlin, Michael; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Sonntag, Simon J

    2015-07-16

    The cardiopulmonary bypass is related to complications like stroke or hypoxia. The cannula jet is suspected to be one reason for these complications, due to the sandblast effect on the vessel wall. Several in silico and in vitro studies investigated the underlying mechanisms, but the applied experimental flow measurement techniques were not able to address the highly three-dimensional flow character with a satisfying resolution. In this work in vitro flow measurements in a cannulated and a non-cannulated aortic silicone model are presented. Stereo particle image velocimetry measurements in multiple planes were carried out. By assembling the data of the different measurement planes, quasi 3D velocity fields with a resolution of~1.5×1.5×2.5 mm(3) were obtained. The resulting velocity fields have been compared regarding magnitude, streamlines and vorticity. The presented method shows to be a suitable in vitro technique to measure and address the three-dimensional aortic CPB cannula flow with a high temporal and spatial resolution.

  12. Endovascular Embolization of Bronchial Artery Originating from the Upper Portion of Aortic Arch in Patients with Massive Hemoptysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Sen Sun, Xi-Wen Yu, Dong Jie, Bing

    2013-05-15

    PurposeOur experience with endovascular embolization (EVE) of the bronchial artery (BA) originating from the upper portion of the aortic arch (AA) in six patients is described.MethodsAltogether, 818 patients with hemoptysis underwent multidetector row computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) before EVE or AA angiography during EVE. Aberrant BAs originating from the upper portion of the AA were the source of massive hemoptysis in six patients (0.73 %). MDCT angiograms and/or Digital subtraction angiograms were retrospectively reviewed. Selective catheterization and embolization were performed.ResultsThe ostia of the BAs were located on the superior surface of the AA between the brachiocephalic trunk and left common carotid artery in three patients, the junction of the aorta and medial surface of the left subclavian artery in two, and the posterior wall of the upper portion of the AA in one. The six BAs comprised two common trunks, three single right sides, and one single left side. The targeted vessels were successfully catheterized and embolized by a coaxial microcatheter system using polyvinyl alcohol particles. Other pathologic BAs and nonbronchial systemic arteries also were embolized. Bleeding was immediately controlled in all patients with no recurrence of hemoptysis. No procedure-related complications occurred.ConclusionsApplication of EVE of anomalous origin of BAs in patients with hemoptysis is important, as demonstrated in the six reported patients. MDCTA before EVE or AA angiography during EVE is critical to avoid missing a rare aberrant BA originating from the upper portion of the AA.

  13. ArchE - An Architecture Design Assistant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-30

    X, Module X 3 Author / Presenter, Date if Needed What is ArchE? ArchE is a software architecture design assistant, which: • Takes quality and...functional requirements as input • Elicits key quality attribute information to refine quality requirements • Elicits key architectural information...Derives candidate architectures • Evaluates whether quality requirements are satisfied • Identifies tradeoffs • Suggests alternative architectures ArchE is

  14. Simultaneous Individually Controlled Upper and Lower Body Perfusion for Valve-Sparing Root and Total Aortic Arch Replacement: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Philip; Mayer, Rick; Adams, Corey; Chu, Michael W.A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Optimal perfusion strategies for extensive aortic resection in patients with mega-aortic syndromes include: tailored myocardial preservation, antegrade cerebral perfusion, controlled hypothermia and selective organ perfusion. Typically, the aortic arch resection and elephant trunk procedure are performed under hypothermic circulatory arrest with myocardial and cerebral protection. However, mesenteric and systemic ischemia occur during circulatory arrest and commonly rely upon deep hypothermia alone for metabolic protection. We hypothesized that simultaneously controlled mesenteric and systemic perfusion can attenuate some of the metabolic debt accrued during circulatory arrest, which may help improve perioperative outcomes. The perfusion strategy consisted of delivering a 1 to 3 liter per minute flow at 25°C to the head/upper body via right axillary graft and simultaneous perfusion to the lower body/mesenteric organs of 1 to 3 liters per minute at 30°C via a right femoral arterial graft. We describe our technique of simultaneous mesenteric, systemic, cerebral and myocardial perfusion, and protection utilized for a young male patient with Marfan’s syndrome, while undergoing a valve sparing root replacement, total arch replacement and elephant trunk reconstruction. This perfusion technique allowed us to deliver differential flow rates and temperatures to the upper and lower body (cold head/warm lower body perfusion) to minimize ischemic debt and quickly reverse metabolic derangements. PMID:22416605

  15. CT and MRI in the Evaluation of Thoracic Aortic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most commonly used imaging examinations to evaluate thoracic aortic diseases because of their high spatial and temporal resolutions, large fields of view, and multiplanar imaging reconstruction capabilities. CT and MRI play an important role not only in the diagnosis of thoracic aortic disease but also in the preoperative assessment and followup after treatment. In this review, the CT and MRI appearances of various acquired thoracic aortic conditions are described and illustrated. PMID:24396601

  16. Saccular Aneurysms of the Transverse Aortic Arch Based on a Presentation at the 2013 VEITH Symposium, November 19–23, 2013 (New York, NY, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    Saccular aneurysms of the aortic arch, whether single or multiple, are uncommon. The choice of repair technique is influenced by patients' comorbidities and age. Repairing saccular aneurysms with traditional open techniques can be technically demanding; therefore, endovascular technology and a variety of hybrid approaches have been developed to facilitate such repairs and, potentially, to improve clinical outcomes, especially in high-risk patients. There have been no large, randomized studies to compare the outcomes of these different treatment options in patients with single or multiple saccular aneurysms of the arch. In this review, we outline the etiology and common locations of these aneurysms, the different open, completely endovascular, and hybrid techniques used to treat them, and the treatment selection process. PMID:26798759

  17. Successful staged repair for a rare type of truncus arteriosus with interruption of the aortic arch and abnormal origin of the left coronary artery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report a successful staged repair for a quite rare combination of truncus arteriosus (TA), Van Praagh type A4, and abnormal origin of the left coronary artery (CA). Furthermore, the case was complicated by a variant of the chromosomal anomaly in cat-cry syndrome. The presence of interruption of the aortic arch (IAA) and abnormal CA origin has been previously reported to increase mortality. To decrease the risk of bronchomalacia in infants, bilateral pulmonary artery banding (PAB) was performed as the first stage procedure for adjusting the pulmonary flow. Staged repair is a useful strategy for infants with complex TA. PMID:23714656

  18. Successful staged repair for a rare type of truncus arteriosus with interruption of the aortic arch and abnormal origin of the left coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Uchita, Shunji; Harada, Yorikazu; Honda, Kentaro; Toguchi, Koji; Nishimura, Yoshiharu; Suenaga, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Takashi; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Okamura, Yoshitaka

    2013-05-28

    We report a successful staged repair for a quite rare combination of truncus arteriosus (TA), Van Praagh type A4, and abnormal origin of the left coronary artery (CA). Furthermore, the case was complicated by a variant of the chromosomal anomaly in cat-cry syndrome. The presence of interruption of the aortic arch (IAA) and abnormal CA origin has been previously reported to increase mortality. To decrease the risk of bronchomalacia in infants, bilateral pulmonary artery banding (PAB) was performed as the first stage procedure for adjusting the pulmonary flow. Staged repair is a useful strategy for infants with complex TA.

  19. Diagnosis and surgical treatment of an aneurysm on a cervical aortic arch associated with an anomalous origin of the left main coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Charrot, Florent; Tarmiz, Amine; Glock, Yves; Léobon, Bertrand

    2010-02-01

    Cervical aortic arch (CAA) is a rare congenital anomaly. An aneurysm developed on a CAA is even rarer and a life threatening condition. We report the diagnosis and surgical treatment of an aneurysm on a CAA associated with an anomalous origin of the left main coronary artery. The surgical procedure consisted in the resection of the aneurysm, a direct aorto aortic anastomosis and a coronary artery bypass to the left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a good result at 11 months. This first case reported of an anomaly of a coronary artery origin associated with an aneurysm on a CAA, underlines the interest of a preoperative complete anatomical and functional diagnosis, to define an optimal intraoperative strategy.

  20. Dental arch asymmetry in young healthy human subjects evaluated by Euclidean distance matrix analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Serrao, G

    1993-03-01

    Form differences between biological structures can be evaluated using several approaches. A recently proposed method (Euclidean distance matrix analysis; EDMA) seems to be able to differentiate between size and shape differences. Here it has been applied to study the asymmetry of mandibular and maxillary arches in 50 men and 45 women with sound dentitions. The centres of gravity (centroids) of the occlusal surfaces of all permanent teeth (right second molar to left second molar) were individualized on the dental casts of subjects. The form of the right and left maxillary and mandibular hemi-arches was separately assessed by calculating all the possible linear distances between pairs of teeth within arch and side. Side differences were tested by EDMA. In men, the maxillary and the mandibular arches were both symmetrical (i.e. there were no significant differences in size or shape between the left and right hemi-arches). In women, the mandibular arch was symmetrical, but in the maxillary arch the two antimeres had a significantly different shape. No size differences were found between the left and right female hemi-arches.

  1. Double aortic arch

    MedlinePlus

    ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 432. ... MK. Vascular ring. In: Park MK, ed. Park's Pediatric Cardiology for Practitioners . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  2. An unusual constellation of congenital malformations in a single patient including partial anomalous pulmonary venous return, persistent left superior vena cava, aberrant pulmonary fissure, anomalous aortic arch, tracheal diverticulum and annular pancreas.

    PubMed

    Lapa, T; Vedelago, J; Kim, H; Patrick, E

    2014-10-31

    We report a case of a male patient with a constellation of rare congenital anomalies consisting of: partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR), persistent left superior vena cava, 'bovine arch' aortic branching, tracheal diverticulum, aberrant lung fissure anatomy and an annular pancreas. He had presented with a history of worsening dyspnoea. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a single patient with such a vast constellation of anomalies. The radiological evaluations, epidemiology, embryology and clinical features of the anomalies are discussed. It is important for radiologists to be aware of each of these anomalies as distinct entities; detection of a single anomaly should alert to the possibility that further anatomic aberrancies may be present.

  3. Subcoronary versus supracoronary aortic stenosis. an experimental evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Valvular aortic stenosis is the most common cause of left ventricular hypertrophy due to gradually increasing pressure work. As the stenosis develop the left ventricular hypertrophy may lead to congestive heart failure, increased risk of perioperative complications and also increased risk of sudden death. A functional porcine model imitating the pathophysiological nature of valvular aortic stenosis is very much sought after in order to study the geometrical and pathophysiological changes of the left ventricle, timing of surgery and also pharmacological therapy in this patient group. Earlier we developed a porcine model for aortic stenosis based on supracoronary aortic banding, this model may not completely imitate the pathophysiological changes that occurs when valvular aortic stenosis is present including the coronary blood flow. It would therefore be desirable to optimize this model according to the localization of the stenosis. Methods In 20 kg pigs subcoronary (n = 8), supracoronary aortic banding (n = 8) or sham operation (n = 4) was preformed via a left lateral thoracotomy. The primary endpoint was left ventricular wall thickness; secondary endpoints were heart/body weight ratio and the systolic/diastolic blood flow ratio in the left anterior descending coronary. Statistical evaluation by oneway anova and unpaired t-test. Results Sub- and supracoronary banding induce an equal degree of left ventricular hypertrophy compared with the control group. The coronary blood flow ratio was slightly but not significantly higher in the supracoronary group (ratio = 0.45) compared with the two other groups (subcoronary ratio = 0.36, control ratio = 0.34). Conclusions A human pathophysiologically compatible porcine model for valvular aortic stenosis was developed by performing subcoronary aortic banding. Sub- and supracoronary aortic banding induce an equal degree of left ventricular hypertrophy. This model may be valid for experimental investigations of aortic

  4. Anomalous origin of the right pulmonary artery from the ascending aorta accompanied by absent pulmonary valve syndrome and right-sided aortic arch: a rare case in adult congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Khajali, Zahra; Mohammadzadeh, Ali; Khayatzadeh, Marzieh

    2015-04-01

    We present a rare congenital heart disease in a 20-year-old man with anomalous origin of the right pulmonary artery from the ascending aorta, accompanied by absent pulmonary valve syndrome, and a right-sided aortic arch suspected initially in transthoracic echocardiography and subsequently confirmed by cardiac catheterisation and computed tomography angiography.

  5. Hybrid antegrade repair of the arch and descending thoracic aorta with a new integrated stent-Dacron graft in acute type A aortic dissection: a look into the future with new devices.

    PubMed

    Mestres, Carlos-A; Fernández, Claudio; Josa, Miguel; Mulet, Jaime

    2007-04-01

    A young male patient underwent supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta for acute type A dissection under hypothermic circulatory arrest. After discharge, he was readmitted two weeks later due to severe aortic regurgitation and acute arch redissection. Under a second period of hypothermic circulatory arrest three weeks after the initial operation, radical treatment with aortic valve replacement, replacement of the ascending aorta and arch, together with antegrade deployment of a stent-graft in the true lumen for frozen elephant-trunk technique, were successfully performed. Computed tomography at four weeks showed complete proximal repair and thrombosis of the false lumen. Transesophageal echocardiography at eight weeks confirmed repair. The patient is currently leading an active life. A hybrid approach for complex cases of acute type A dissection with arch involvement can be considered for the future.

  6. [Dissecting aneurysms at the bases of the brachiocephalic artery and the left common carotid artery due to localized dissection of the aortic arch; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Higashi, Shigeki; Yoshida, Y; Mitsuoka, H

    2007-07-01

    A 43-year-old male lost consciousness immediately after archery practice, and was brought to our hospital by ambulance. Angiography showed dissecting aneurysms at the bases of the brachiocephalic artery and the left common carotid artery, causing compression of these arteries. Under cardiopulmonary bypass with selective cerebral perfusion, the blood supply to these arteries was restored with a bifurcated graft. Surgical specimen showed localized dissection of the aortic arch at the bifurcation to the brachiocephalic artery and the left common carotid artery, with the formation of dissecting aneurysms at the bases of both arteries. The aneurysms were filled with thrombi. In addition to these dissecting aneurysms, there were arterial dissections involving the brachiocephalic artery and the bilateral common carotid arteries. Histopathological examination of the vessel wall showed no evidence of atherosclerosis or vasculitis, and no abnormalities in the arrangement of elastic fibers.

  7. Helical (spiral) CT in the evaluation of emergent thoracic aortic syndromes. Traumatic aortic rupture, aortic aneurysm, aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, S; Stuk, J L; Kaufman, J A

    1999-05-01

    For the near future, CT will play the critical and dominant role in the evaluation of patients presenting with emergent aortic syndromes. Its convenience, accuracy, and utility in the rapid evaluation of not just the aorta, but the entire thorax, make it ideally suited for use in emergency settings. Further benefits are likely to be realized in speed and resolution with multislice CT, although it is as yet not widely available.

  8. Early Diagnosis and Repair of Double Saccular Aneurysms of the Aortic Arch Associated With Aortic Coarctation in an Infant With Loeys-Dietz Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ilyin, Vladimir N; Kornoukhov, O Ju; Khovrin, Valery V; Kryukov, Vladislav A; Valitova, Asia A; Ilina, Maria V

    2016-03-01

    Multiple saccular aneurysms of the thoracic aorta in neonates and infants are exceedingly rare. An association of these aneurysms with Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) in older age-groups is well known. This case report describes the diagnosis and subsequent successful repair of aortic coarctation associated with double saccular aneurysms of the thoracic aorta in patient with LDS during the first year of life.

  9. Evaluation of regional aortic distensibility using color kinesis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoshimasa; Kotoh, Keiju; Yamashita, Akio; Furuta, Hidetoshi; Shimazu, Chikasi; Misaki, Takurou

    2003-01-01

    Regional aortic stiffness cannot be evaluated by conventional methods. Regional aortic wall velocity during systole in the descending aorta was evaluated by using transesophageal echocardiography with color kinesis. The authors defined regional aortic distensibility (RAD) by considering pulse pressure, with RAD (microm/s/mm Hg) = (regional aortic wall velocity)/(pulse pressure). RAD was evaluated in 38 patients who had coronary artery disease (CAD) and 10 who did not. RAD decreased depending on aging (partial regression coefficient was -5.39 x 10(-1), p<0.001), and RAD was lower in the CAD group than that in the no-CAD group (p<0.05). In the CAD group, 19 patients had a single fixed plaque (4 calcified and 15 noncalcified plaques). RAD in the calcified plaque was lower than that in the noncalcified plaque (p<0.01), and RAD was lower in the noncalcified plaque than that in the no-plaque region (p<0.05). In noncalcified plaques, the relation between RAD and maximum intimal thickness had a significant correlation, r=0.7, p<0.001. The residual of RAD from the regression line was significantly larger in the calcified plaque than that in the noncalcified plaque (p<0.001). In conclusion, RAD can express increasing regional aortic wall stiffness brought about by arteriosclerosis quantitatively. Color kinesis provides information on characteristic difference between calcified and noncalcified plaque.

  10. Human dental arch shape evaluated by euclidean-distance matrix analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Tartaglia, G

    1993-04-01

    Form differences between biological structures can be evaluated using several approaches. When landmark data are available, a recently proposed method (euclidean-distance matrix analysis) seems to be able to differentiate between size and shape differences. This method also localizes those areas which differ most between the two structures. We have applied it to analyze the sexual dimorphism in dental arch form in a sample of 50 men and 45 women. Subjects ranged in age between 20 and 27 years, and had sound dentitions. Fourteen landmarks, corresponding to the centers of gravity (centroids) of the occlusal surfaces of all permanent teeth (right second molar to left second molar), were individualized on the dental casts of subjects. All the possible linear distances between pairs of teeth were computed, thus creating four mean form matrices (one for each arch within sex). Gender differences were tested by using euclidean-distance matrix analysis. No significant differences were demonstrated in the shape of arches, while male arches proved to be slightly bigger than female arches.

  11. Biomechanical Evaluation of Ascending Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Avanzini, Andrea; Battini, Davide

    2014-01-01

    The biomechanical properties of ascending aortic aneurysms were investigated only in the last decade in a limited number of studies. Indeed, in recent years, there has been a growing interest in this field in order to identify new predictive parameters of risk of dissection, which may have clinical relevance. The researches performed so far have been conducted according to the methods used in the study of abdominal aortic aneurysms. In most cases, uniaxial or biaxial tensile tests were used, while in a smaller number of studies other methods, such as opening angle, bulge inflation, and inflation-extension tests, were used. However, parameters and protocols of these tests are at present very heterogeneous in the studies reported in the literature, and, therefore, the results are not comparable and are sometimes conflicting. The purpose of this review then thence to provide a comprehensive analysis of the experimental methodology for determination of biomechanical properties in the specific field of aneurysms of the ascending aorta to allow for better comparison and understanding of the results. PMID:24991568

  12. Is moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion superior to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in elective aortic arch surgery?

    PubMed

    Poon, Shi Sum; Estrera, Anthony; Oo, Aung; Field, Mark

    2016-09-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether moderate hypothermia circulatory arrest with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP) is more beneficial than deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in elective aortic arch surgery. Altogether, 1028 papers were found using the reported search, of which 6 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. There were four retrospective observational studies, one prospective randomized controlled trial and one meta-analysis study. There were no local or neuromuscular complications related to axillary arterial cannulation reported. In the elective setting, four studies showed that the in-hospital mortality for moderate hypothermia is consistently low, ranging from 1.0 to 4.3%. In a large series of hemiarch replacement comparing 682 cases of deep hypothermia with 94 cases of moderate hypothermia with SACP, 20 cases (2.8%) of permanent neurological deficit were reported, compared to 3 cases (3.2%) in moderate hypothermia. Three observational studies and a meta-analysis study did not identify an increased risk of postoperative renal failure and dialysis following either deep or moderate hypothermia although a higher incidence of stroke was reported in the meta-analysis study with deep hypothermia (12.7 vs 7.3%). Longer cardiopulmonary bypass time and circulatory arrest time were reported in four studies for deep hypothermia, suggesting an increased time required for systemic cooling and rewarming in that group. Overall, these findings suggested that in elective aortic arch surgery, moderate hypothermia with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion adapted to the duration of circulatory arrest can be performed safely with acceptable mortality and morbidity outcomes. The risk of spinal cord

  13. [Coarctation of the aorta with aortic arch hypoplasia in newborn with partial trisomy 11q associated to 4q interstitial deletion].

    PubMed

    Palano, G M; Licata, F; Carpinato, C; Sottile, F; Sciuto, R; Mattina, T; Distefano, G

    2010-12-01

    This article reports the case of newborn with multiple dimorphisms (microcephaly, hypertelorism, wide and flat nasal bridge, small nose, long philtrum, microretrognathia, malformed and low-set ears, short neck, redundant nuchal skin, genital anomalies), admitted in the hospital after two days from delivery for torpor, poor food and cyanosis. Babies were affected, at color-Doppler echocardiography, by coarctation of the aorta (CoA) with aortic arch hypoplasia. CoA is often associated to genetic and environmental factors that interact frequently. In this study the anamnestic absence of teratogen noxae and the presence of facial and genital anomalies suggest a genetic study to provide appropriate genetic information to parents. G-banding chromosomic analysis revealed a 46, XX der 4t(4;11) karyotype with partial 11q trisomy confirmed with FISH chromosome painting 4;11 and with FISH subtelomere specific 4(p/q)11(p/q). These techniques showed that derivative chromosome 4 was constituted by chromosome 4 with partial deletion in the q35 region and by 11q21 translocation. This rare anomaly is often inherited by an unbalanced segregation of a balanced translocation, present in one of the two parents. In the present study, the father carried a t(4q;11q) balanced translocation. A CGH-array analysis was executed to the child for the breakpoints definition. As 11q trisomy cases reported in literature are still few, this case can contribute to improve our knowledge on the genotype-phenotype correlation in this rare genetic anomaly.

  14. Precise treatment of aortic aneurysm by three-dimensional printing and simulation before endovascular intervention.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ding; Luo, Han; Yang, Hongliu; Huang, Bin; Zhu, Jingqiang; Zhao, Jichun

    2017-04-11

    In this study, three-dimensional printing (3Dp) models and simulation surgeries (SSs) were applied in two challenging aortic cases. The first was an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a complex neck, and the second was a thoracic aortic dissection aneurysm (TADA) with an angled arch. In order to avoid unpredictable obstacles and difficulties, we made optimal surgical plans by using 3D models and virtual simulations. Based on preoperative evaluation system, the surgical plans seemed more reasonable and time-saving.

  15. Cephalometric evaluation of open bite treatment with NiTi arch wires and anterior elastics.

    PubMed

    Küçükkeleş, N; Acar, A; Demirkaya, A A; Evrenol, B; Enacar, A

    1999-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate cephalometrically the effects of open bite treatment with NiTi arch wires and anterior elastics. The study group comprised of 17 patients who displayed a high angle skeletal pattern, along with an anterior open bite. After initial leveling, 0.016 x 0.022 inch upper accentuated-curve and lower reverse-curve arch wires were placed, with anterior elastics applied in the canine regions. Cephalometric assessment was carried out on lateral head films taken at the beginning of treatment and on average 2.8 months after open bite closure was obtained. The results of this study indicated that open bite closure had been achieved mainly by extrusion of the lower incisors and uprighting of the upper incisors. The functional occlusal plane was leveled by extrusion of lower premolars and uprighting of lower molars. Lateral cephalograms obtained from 10 patients who had been available after 1 year postretention were used to evaluate relapse changes. During the follow-up period, position of the upper and lower incisors and the inclination of the occlusal plane were maintained. However, extrusion of upper and lower molar teeth resulted in a reduction in overbite.

  16. [Evaluation of aortic valve replacement involving small severely calcified aortic annulus in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, M; Nishimura, Y; Hiramatsu, K; Komori, S; Shibata, M; Yuzaki, M; Okamura, Y

    2006-04-01

    We performed aortic valve replacement in 24 patients aged over 70 with small calcified valves. The surgical management of such patients remains controversial as the extensive calcification compromises implantation. Hence, we used an ultrasonic debridement instrument to remove calcium and selected a small prosthesis with the largest possible orifice without enlargement of the aortic annulus. Echocardiography showed significant reductions in left ventricular mass index compared with preoperative values. Early and mid-term prognosis has been relatively good.

  17. Triple-branched stent graft for arch repair in a pregnant woman with acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Ma, Xiaochun; Wang, Zhengjun; Zou, Chengwei

    2017-03-12

    A woman aged 36 years at 36 weeks of pregnancy sought medical attention at the Shandong Provincial Hospital affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong, China, after experiencing acute chest pain. The patient was diagnosed with chronic hypertension, severe pre-eclampsia, acute aortic dissection, aortic regurgitation, and heart failure. Computed tomography examination demonstrated a DeBakey type I aortic dissection that involved the origin of the innominate artery, the left common carotid artery, and the left subclavian artery. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Radionuclide angiography in evaluation of left ventricular function following aortic valve replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Santinga, J.T.; Kirsh, M.M.; Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.; Pitt, B.

    1981-05-01

    Congestive heart failure in patients surviving aortic valve replacement has been associated with a high late mortality. To determine whether myocardial dysfunction in these patients occurred preoperatively, perioperatively, or during the early postoperative period, 19 consecutive patients undergoing aortic valve replacement using cardioplegia and hypothermia were studied by multiple-gated cardiac blood pool imaging. The resting ejection fractions for 8 patients with aortic stenosis did not show significant changes following operation. The 11 patients with aortic insufficiency has resting preoperative values of 58 +/- 15%, which fell to 38 +/- 18% immediately postoperatively (p less than 0.01), with the late values being 51 +/- 16%. Eight of 18 patients (44%) showed deterioration of regional wall motion immediately after operation, which persisted in 3 during the late evaluation. The occurrence of new perioperative regional wall motion abnormalities and persistent perioperative depression in left ventricular function in some patients suggest the need for further improvement in myocardial protection during cardiopulmonary bypass for aortic valve replacement.

  19. Computational evaluation of aortic occlusion and the proposal of a novel, improved occluder: Constrained endo-aortic balloon occlusion.

    PubMed

    de Vaal, M H; Gee, M W; Stock, U A; Wall, W A

    2016-12-01

    Because aortic occlusion is arguably one of the most dangerous aortic manipulation maneuvers during cardiac surgery in terms of perioperative ischemic neurological injury, the purpose of this investigation is to assess the structural mechanical impact resulting from the use of existing and newly proposed occluders. Existing (clinically used) occluders considered include different cross-clamps (CCs) and endo-aortic balloon occlusion (EABO). A novel occluder is also introduced, namely, constrained EABO (CEABO), which consists of applying a constrainer externally around the aorta when performing EABO. Computational solid mechanics are employed to investigate each occluder according to a comprehensive list of functional requirements. The potential of a state of occlusion is also considered for the first time. Three different constrainer designs are evaluated for CEABO. Although the CCs were responsible for the highest strains, largest deformation, and most inefficient increase of the occlusion potential, it remains the most stable, simplest, and cheapest occluder. The different CC hinge geometries resulted in poorer performance of CC used for minimally invasive procedures than conventional ones. CEABO with a profiled constrainer successfully addresses the EABO shortcomings of safety, stability, and positioning accuracy, while maintaining its complexities of operation (disadvantage) and yielding additional functionalities (advantage). Moreover, CEABO is able to achieve the previously unattainable potential to provide a clinically determinable state of occlusion. CEABO offers an attractive alternative to the shortcomings of existing occluders, with its design rooted in achieving the highest patient safety. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography in the evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Amparo, E G; Hoddick, W K; Hricak, H; Sollitto, R; Justich, E; Filly, R A; Higgins, C B

    1985-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate abdominal aortic aneurysms in 27 patients. The findings were compared retrospectively with CT, ultrasound (US), and angiography in 17 cases and prospectively with US in 10 cases. MRI identified the renal arteries in all cases, demonstrated involvement at or above the origin of the renal arteries in eight patients, and showed extension of the aneurysm into the iliac arteries in 12 cases. The outer dimension of the aneurysm, the diameter of the residual lumen, and the length of the aneurysm were measured easily from the MR images. The measurements of transverse dimension of the abdominal aortic aneurysm were similar for MRI, CT, and US. MRI more accurately defined extension above the renal arteries and below the aortic bifurcation. It is concluded that MRI provides the necessary information for the surveillance and preoperative evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  1. Dental arch asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubair, Nabil Muhsen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to assess the dental arch asymmetry in a Yemeni sample aged (18-25) years. Materials and Methods: The investigation involved clinical examination of 1479 adults; only 253 (129 females, 124 males) out of the total sample were selected to fulfill the criteria for the study sample. Study models were constructed and evaluated to measure mandibular arch dimensions. Three linear distances were utilized on each side on the dental arch: Incisal-canine distance, canine-molar distance and incisal-molar distance, which represent the dental arch segmental measurements. Results: When applying “t-test” at P < 0.05, no significant differences were found between the right and left canine-molar, incisal-canine and incisal-molar distances in both dental arches for both sexes. The greater variation (0.30 mm) was observed between right and left canine-molar distance in the maxillary dental arch in male and the smaller (0.04 mm) in the mandibular dental arch between the right and left canine-molar distance in females. Conclusion: The findings of the present study revealed a symmetrical pattern of dental arches, since the right and left sides showed no statistically significant difference. In general, it can be observed that the measurements related to the central incisors and canines have the widest range of reading and give the impression that the location of central incisor and canines to each other and to other teeth is the strongest factor in determining the dental arch asymmetry. PMID:24966774

  2. High arch

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition can make it difficult to fit into shoes. People who have high arches most often need ... Symptoms include: Shortened foot length Difficulty fitting shoes Foot pain with walking, standing, and running (not everyone has this symptom)

  3. Endovascular Treatment of Late Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms after Surgical Repair of Congenital Aortic Coarctation in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Juszkat, Robert; Perek, Bartlomiej; Zabicki, Bartosz; Trojnarska, Olga; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Smoczyk, Wiesław; Pukacki, Fryderyk

    2013-01-01

    Background In some patients, local surgery-related complications are diagnosed many years after surgery for aortic coarctation. The purposes of this study were: (1) to systematically evaluate asymptomatic adults after Dacron patch repair in childhood, (2) to estimate the formation rate of secondary thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) and (3) to assess outcomes after intravascular treatment for TAAs. Methods This study involved 37 asymptomatic patients (26 female and 11 male) who underwent surgical repair of aortic coarctation in the childhood. After they had reached adolescence, patients with secondary TAAs were referred to endovascular repair. Results Follow-up studies revealed TAA in seven cases (19%) (including six with the gothic type of the aortic arch) and mild recoarctation in other six (16%). Six of the TAA patients were treated with stentgrafts, but one refused to undergo an endovascular procedure. In three cases, stengrafts covered the left subclavian artery (LSA), in another the graft was implanted distally to the LSA. In two individuals, elective hybrid procedures were performed with surgical bypass to the supraaortic arteries followed by stengraft implantation. All subjects survived the secondary procedures. One patient developed type Ia endoleak after stentgraft implantation that was eventually treated with a debranching procedure. Conclusions The long-term course of clinically asymptomatic patients after coarctation patch repair is not uncommonly complicated by formation of TAAs (particularly in individuals with the gothic pattern of the aortic arch) that can be treated effectively with stentgrafts. However, in some patients hybrid procedures may be necessary. PMID:24386233

  4. Aortic Blood Flow Reversal Determines Renal Function: Potential Explanation for Renal Dysfunction Caused by Aortic Stiffening in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2015-07-01

    Aortic stiffness determines the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and predicts the progressive decline of the GFR. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanism remains obscure. Recent evidence has shown a close link between aortic stiffness and the bidirectional (systolic forward and early diastolic reverse) flow characteristics. We hypothesized that the aortic stiffening-induced renal dysfunction is attributable to altered central flow dynamics. In 222 patients with hypertension, Doppler velocity waveforms were recorded at the proximal descending aorta to calculate the reverse/forward flow ratio. Tonometric waveforms were recorded to measure the carotid-femoral (aortic) and carotid-radial (peripheral) pulse wave velocities, to estimate the aortic pressure from the radial waveforms, and to compute the aortic characteristic impedance. In addition, renal hemodynamics was evaluated by duplex ultrasound. The estimated GFR was inversely correlated with the aortic pulse wave velocity, reverse/forward flow ratio, pulse pressure, and characteristic impedance, whereas it was not correlated with the peripheral pulse wave velocity or mean arterial pressure. The association between aortic pulse wave velocity and estimated GFR was independent of age, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and antihypertensive medication. However, further adjustment for the aortic reverse/forward flow ratio and pulse pressure substantially weakened this association, and instead, the reverse/forward flow ratio emerged as the strongest determinant of estimated GFR (P=0.001). A higher aortic reverse/forward flow ratio was also associated with lower intrarenal forward flow velocities. These results suggest that an increase in aortic flow reversal (ie, retrograde flow from the descending thoracic aorta toward the aortic arch), caused by aortic stiffening and impedance mismatch, reduces antegrade flow into the kidney and thereby deteriorates renal function.

  5. Distant downstream steady-state flow studies of a mechanical heart valve: PIV study of secondary flow in a model aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, Brandon R.; Popma, Christopher J.; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    Each year, hundreds of thousands of aortic and mitral heart valves are replaced with prosthetic valves. In efforts to develop a valve that does not require lifelong anticoagulation therapy, previous experimental research has been devoted to analyzing the hemodynamics of various heart valve designs, limited to the flow up to only 2 diameters downstream of the valve. Two-component, two-dimensional (2C-2D) particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used in this study to examine secondary flow velocity fields in a curved tube modeling an aorta at five locations (0-, 45-, 90-, 135-, 180-degrees). A bileaflet valve, opened to 30-, 45-, and 59-degrees, and one (no-valve) baseline condition were examined under three steady flow inflows (Re = 218, 429, 634). In particular, variations in the two-dimensional turbulent shear stresses at each cross sectional plane were analyzed. The results suggest that bileaflet valves in the aortic model produce significant turbulence and vorticity up to 5.5 downstream diameters, i.e. up to the 90-degrees location. Expanding this research towards aortic heart valve hemodynamics highlights a need for additional studies extending beyond the typical few diameters downstream to fully characterize valvular function. Supported by the NSF Grant No. CBET- 0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  6. Computed tomography evaluation for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI): imaging of the aortic root and iliac arteries.

    PubMed

    Schoenhagen, Paul; Kapadia, Samir R; Halliburton, Sandra S; Svensson, Lars G; Tuzcu, E Murat

    2011-01-01

    For patients with severe aortic stenosis, open-heart surgical valve replacement remains the current clinical standard with documented, excellent long-term outcome. Over the past few years, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has developed into a treatment alternative for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Because transcatheter valvular procedures are characterized by lack of exposure of the operative field, image guidance is critical. This Pictorial Essay describes the role of 3-dimensional imaging with multidetector row computed tomography for detailed reconstructions of the aortic valve, aortic root, and iliac arteries in the context of TAVI.

  7. Diagnosis and treatment planning of acute aortic emergencies using a handheld DICOM viewer.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Asim F; Norton, Patrick T; Carr, Thomas M; Stone, James R; Hagspiel, Klaus D; Dake, Michael D

    2013-08-01

    Acute aortic syndromes and traumatic aortic injury are often diagnosed on CT angiography, possibly requiring emergent intervention. Advances in handheld computing have created the possibility of viewing full DICOM datasets from a remote location. We evaluated the ability to diagnose and characterize acute aortic pathologies on CT angiograms of the thorax using an iPhone-based DICOM viewer. This study was performed after Institutional Review Board approval. Fifteen CT angiograms of the thorax in suspected acute aortic syndromes were evaluated by three blinded radiologists on a handheld device using a DICOM viewer. Studies were evaluated for the ability to identify and classify aortic dissection, transection, or intramural hematoma, measure aortic dimensions, and identify mediastinal hematoma, arch variants, and pulmonary pathology. Studies were compared to blinded interpretations on a dedicated PACS workstation. The aortic pathology was correctly identified as aortic transection/pseudoaneurysm (n = 5), type A dissection (n = 2), and type A intramural hematoma (n = 1) by all reviewers, with no false-positive interpretations. This represents a sensitivity and specificity of 100 %. Mediastinal hematoma (n = 6), pneumothorax (five right, three left), and arch vessel involvement (n = 2) were identified in all cases. There was 88.5 % accuracy in identifying arch variants. Measurement of the size of the involved aortic segment was similar on handheld device and PACS workstation; however the adjacent normal aorta was 1.2 ± 1.0 mm larger on the handheld device (p = 0.03). Handheld DICOM viewers may be useful for emergent consultations and triage, and may expedite preprocedure planning to reduce the time interval between diagnostic scan and therapeutic intervention.

  8. Evaluation of Intravascular Hemolysis With Erythrocyte Creatine in Patients With Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Tetsuro; Okumiya, Toshika; Kubo, Toru; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Yoshihisa

    2016-07-27

    Chronic intravascular hemolysis has been identified in patients with cardiac valve prostheses, but only a few case reports have evaluated intravascular hemolysis in patients with native valvular heart disease. To detect intravascular hemolysis in patients with aortic stenosis, erythrocyte creatine was evaluated with hemodynamic indices obtained by echocardiography.Erythrocyte creatine, a marker of erythrocyte age, was assayed in 30 patients with aortic stenosis and 10 aged matched healthy volunteers. Peak flow velocity of the aortic valve was determined by continuous-wave Doppler echocardiography. Twenty of 30 patients with aortic stenosis had high erythrocyte creatine levels (> 1.8 µmol/g Hb) and erythrocyte creatine was significantly higher as compared with control subjects (1.98 ± 0.49 versus 1.52 ± 0.19 µmol/g Hb, P = 0.007). Peak transvalvular pressure gradient ranged from 46 to 142 mmHg and peak flow velocity ranged from 3.40 to 5.95 m/second. Patients with aortic stenosis had a significantly lower erythrocyte count (387 ± 40 versus 436 ± 42 × 10(4) µL, P = 0.002) and hemoglobin (119 ± 11 versus 135 ± 11 g/L, P < 0.001) as compared with control subjects. Erythrocyte creatine had a fair correlation with peak flow velocity (r = 0.55, P = 0.002).In conclusion, intravascular hemolysis due to destruction of erythrocytes was detected in patients with moderate to severe aortic stenosis and the severity of intravascular hemolysis was related to valvular flow velocity of the aortic valve.

  9. Patient evaluation and selection for transcatheter aortic valve replacement: the heart team approach.

    PubMed

    Sintek, Marc; Zajarias, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been shown to significantly impact mortality and quality of life in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who are deemed high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Essential to these outcomes is proper patient selection. The multidisciplinary TAVR heart team was created to provide comprehensive patient evaluation and aid in proper selection. This review with outline the history and components of the heart team, and delineate the team's role in risk and frailty assessment, evaluation of common co-morbidities that impact outcomes, and the complex multi-modality imaging necessary for procedural planning and patient selection. The heart team is critical in determining patient eligibility and benefit and the optimal operative approach for TAVR. The future of structural heart disease will certainly require a team approach, and the TAVR heart team will serve as the successful model.

  10. [Evaluation of the timing of orthodontic arch expansion and graft in cleft lip and palate].

    PubMed

    Chang, Le; Wang, Yingnan; Liu, Hongyan

    2016-04-01

    Maxillary transverse growth is inhibited by congenital cleft, early surgical scar strain, and oppression of lipmuscles in patients with cleft lip and palate. Clinical manifestations have shown severely constricted maxilla, insufficientmaxillary width, mismatch of upper and lower dental arches, and crossbite. Alveolar bone graft and arch expansion can effectively correct the deficiency in maxillary width. This paper discusses the timing and success rate of alveolar bone graft, as wellas the relationship between alveolar bone graft and arch expansion. Secondary alveolar bone graft is optimally performed beforepermanent canine eruption, especially when the teeth have formed between half and three quarters of their roots. Rapid maxillaryexpansion prior to alveolar bone graft is beneficial because this process increases the gap of the cleft, expands bone graft, andreduces the difficulty. However, the stability of this process remains controversial. Small-scale studies have reported that rapidmaxillary expansion after alveolar bone graft can open the midpalatal suture without bone graft loss. Slow maxillary expansioncan provide continuous light forces to reconstruct the bone. However, these studies are coordinated with fixed orthodontictreatment. Further research is necessary to determine the effects of maxillary expansion on long-term stability of teeth.

  11. Evaluation the Aortic Aneurysm Remodeling After a Successful Stentgraft Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Nowicka, Monika; Kowalczyk, Agnieszka; Rusak, Grażyna; Ratajczak, Przemysław; Sobociński, Bartosz

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Routine imaging follow-up after endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) is mainly aimed at detection of endoleaks. The aim of the study was to assess changes in the size of the abdominal aortic aneurysm sack using CT angiography (CTA) after successful treatment using endovascular stent graft implantation. Material/Methods A retrospective analysis of CTA results included 102 patients aged 54–88, who had no postoperative complications. Patients underwent CTA before EVAR and after the treatment (mean time between studies, 7.6 months). The largest cross-sectional area of the aneurysm sac was measured using a curved multiplanar reconstruction. A change of the aneurysm cross-sectional over 10% was considered significant. Results The average cross-sectional area decreased after EVAR by 3% and this change was not statistically significant. Regression of the cross-sectional area was observed in 18.6% of patients, progression was in 23.5%, and no change was seen in 57.8%. Cross-sectional areas before and after EVAR were significantly correlated (r=0.75, p<0.0001). There was no correlation between the cross-sectional area change after EVAR and patients’ age or the time between the treatment and the follow-up CTA. Cross-sectional area before the treatment predicted changes in the aneurysm size after EVAR (p=0.0045). Conclusions Remodeling of abdominal aortic aneurysms after EVAR is not uniform. The change of aneurysm size depends on the initial aneurysm size but not on the time from EVAR. The size of the aneurysm after EVAR should not be considered as a measure of the treatment efficacy. PMID:27800038

  12. Long-term evaluation of direct repair of traumatic isthmic aortic transection.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, G; Fontan, F; Deville, C; Madonna, F; Thibaud, D

    1989-01-01

    Direct repair of traumatic aortic isthmic transection eliminates the late complications of prosthetic graft repair. This study evaluates the long-term fate of direct aortic repair to which little attention has been paid. Among 32 patients operated upon from 1965 to 1987, 27 (84%) underwent direct repair. The tear was circumferential in 15 patients and partial in 12. Multiple traumatic lesions were present in 26 patients, including intracranial injury in 19. Partial cardiopulmonary bypass was used in 15 patients and simple aortic cross-clamping in 12. No paraplegia was observed. There were 4 deaths from associated lesions among the 14 patients operated upon for acute traumatic isthmic transection and no deaths in the others. Among the 23 survivors, 4 were lost to follow-up; the other 19 patients have excellent clinical results. Intravenous digital aortic angiography performed in 14 patients at a mean delay of 5 years 3 months showed excellent aortic reconstruction in all cases. Technically more demanding and faster than a graft interposition, direct repair is recommended as the procedure of choice in the surgical treatment of traumatic isthmic transection, particularly in young patients, the group most at risk from this lesion.

  13. Reliability of antagonistic arch impression in dental prostheses: clinical evaluation of different preimpression preparation procedures.

    PubMed

    Scotti, R; Lugli, M; D'Elia, A

    1995-08-01

    This study compared the influence of different methods of preimpression preparation on the quality of occlusal reproduction in irreversible hydrocolloid impressions. A total of 30 impressions of the lower dental arch of a patient were made with five different preimpression preparation procedures. Stone casts were made and analyzed. Critical comparison showed that the preimpression preparation influenced the quality of the occlusal surface of the cast. Fingerpainting the occlusal surface with fluid hydrocolloid before positioning the loaded impression tray, associated with use of a saliva ejector, reduced the incidence of macroscopic defects on the occlusal surface of the impressions.

  14. Evaluation of anatomic landmarks and safe zones for screw placement in the atlas via the posterior arch.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Matthias; Barvencik, Florian; Briem, Daniel; Kolb, Jan P; Seitz, Sebastian; Rueger, Johannes M; Püschel, Klaus; Amling, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have evaluated quantitative anatomic data for direct lateral mass screw fixation. To analyze anatomic landmarks and safe zones for optimal screw placement through the posterior arc of the human atlas, morphometric parameters of 41 adult native human atlas specimens were quantitatively measured. Internal dimensions of the atlas (lateral mass, maximum and minimum intraosseous screw length), minimum height and width of the posterior arc and optimal screw insertion angles were defined on pQCT scans. By this, an optimal posterior screw insertion point (OIP) and a preferable screw direction (PSD) through the posterior arch into the lateral mass of C1 were defined. External dimensions (transverse and sagittal diameter) as well as the width of the mid-portion of C1 lateral mass were significantly higher in male specimens. The mean height of the posterior arch at the vertebral artery groove was 4.1 +/- 0.8 mm in female and 4.6 +/- 0.9 mm in male specimens. The optimal screw insertion point was located 21.6 +/- 1.7 mm in female and 23.6 +/- 2.3 mm in male lateral from the posterior tubercle of C1 (P < 0.01). The preferable screw direction was a mean medial inclination of 7.9 +/- 1.9 degrees in female and 7.3 +/- 2.7 degrees in male specimens and a mean rostral direction of 2.4 +/- 1.8 degrees in female and 3.1 +/- 1.7 degrees in male specimens. In conclusion, the presented study provides information for the use and design of upper cervical spine instrumentation techniques, such as screw placement to C1 via the posterior arch. The characterization of working areas and safe zones (OIP, PSD) might contribute to a minimization of screw malposition in this highly demanding instrumentation technique.

  15. Evaluation of facial morphology and sagittal relationship between dental arches in primary and mixed dentition

    PubMed Central

    Traldi, Aline; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; de Souza, Luciane Zanin; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia Scudeler

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess facial morphology (Pattern) and sagittal relationship between dental arches (Class), and establish a potential association between them and the variables sex, age and ethnicity, among schoolchildren aged between 4 and 9 years old (mean age of 6.7 years) in primary and mixed dentitions. METHODS: The sample comprised 875 children (457 males and 418 females) attending schools in Descalvado, São Paulo, Brazil. An attempt was made with a view to establish a potential association between children's morphological features with sex, age and ethnicity. RESULTS: Descriptive analysis revealed a predominance of facial Pattern I (69.9 %) and Class I (67.4 %). Statistical tests (p < 0.001) showed that Class I was more frequent among Pattern I children, whereas Class II prevailed among Pattern II, and Class III was frequent among Pattern I and III children. Ethnicity was the only variable associated with facial pattern. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that facial pattern and sagittal relationship between dental arches tend to be correlated. Ethnicity was associated with facial pattern, with Pattern I being the most recurrent among Caucasians and facial Pattern II being recurrent among Afro-descendant subjects. PMID:26352847

  16. Type-A acute aortic dissection: combined operation plus stent management.

    PubMed

    Roux, Daniel; Brouchet, Laurent; Concina, Philippe; Elghobary, Tamer; Glock, Yves; Fournial, Gérard

    2002-05-01

    When the port of entry of acute type-A aortic dissection is at the level of the horizontal portion of the aortic arch, the latter should be replaced by a prosthesis. To avoid performing this difficult procedure in an emergency situation, we place a stent in the aortic arch. Then we replace the ascending aorta by a prosthesis.

  17. The role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the assessment of severe aortic stenosis and in post-procedural evaluation following transcatheter aortic valve implantation and surgical aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Musa, Tarique Al; Plein, Sven; Greenwood, John P

    2016-06-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular disease in the western world with a prevalence expected to double within the next 50 years. International guidelines advocate the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as an investigative tool, both to guide diagnosis and to direct optimal treatment. CMR is the reference standard for quantifying both left and right ventricular volumes and mass, which is essential to assess the impact of AS upon global cardiac function. Given the ability to image any structure in any plane, CMR offers many other diagnostic strengths including full visualisation of valvular morphology, direct planimetry of orifice area, the quantification of stenotic jets and in particular, accurate quantification of valvular regurgitation. In addition, CMR permits reliable and accurate measurements of the aortic root and arch which can be fundamental to appropriate patient management. There is a growing evidence base to indicate tissue characterisation using CMR provides prognostic information, both in asymptomatic AS patients and those undergoing intervention. Furthermore, a number of current clinical trials will likely raise the importance of CMR in routine patient management. This article will focus on the incremental value of CMR in the assessment of severe AS and the insights it offers following valve replacement.

  18. The role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the assessment of severe aortic stenosis and in post-procedural evaluation following transcatheter aortic valve implantation and surgical aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Tarique Al; Plein, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular disease in the western world with a prevalence expected to double within the next 50 years. International guidelines advocate the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as an investigative tool, both to guide diagnosis and to direct optimal treatment. CMR is the reference standard for quantifying both left and right ventricular volumes and mass, which is essential to assess the impact of AS upon global cardiac function. Given the ability to image any structure in any plane, CMR offers many other diagnostic strengths including full visualisation of valvular morphology, direct planimetry of orifice area, the quantification of stenotic jets and in particular, accurate quantification of valvular regurgitation. In addition, CMR permits reliable and accurate measurements of the aortic root and arch which can be fundamental to appropriate patient management. There is a growing evidence base to indicate tissue characterisation using CMR provides prognostic information, both in asymptomatic AS patients and those undergoing intervention. Furthermore, a number of current clinical trials will likely raise the importance of CMR in routine patient management. This article will focus on the incremental value of CMR in the assessment of severe AS and the insights it offers following valve replacement. PMID:27429910

  19. Maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width groups

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Fazal; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups. Materials and Methods: The calculated sample size was 128 subjects. The crown width/height, arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width of the maxilla and mandible were obtained via digital calliper (Mitutoyo, Japan). A total of 4325 variables were measured. The sex differences in the crown width and height were evaluated. Analysis of variance was applied to evaluate the differences between arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups. Results: Males had significantly larger mean values for crown width and height than females (P ≤ 0.05) for maxillary and mandibular arches, both. There were no significant differences observed for the crown width/height ratio in various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups (P ≤ 0.05) in maxilla and mandible, both. Conclusions: Our results indicate sexual disparities in the crown width and height. Crown width and height has no significant relation to various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups of maxilla and mandible. Thus, it may be helpful for orthodontic and prosthodontic case investigations and comprehensive management. PMID:26929686

  20. [Anesthesia for total and descending aorta replacement and aortic valve replacement for post-repair aneurysm of coarctation of aorta and aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Furuichi, Yuko; Shimizu, Jun; Sakamoto, Atsuhiro

    2012-04-01

    We experienced anesthesia for total arch and descending aorta replacement and aortic valve replacement for post-repair aneurysm of coarctation of aorta and aortic stenosis. Because there was possibility that post coarctectomy syndrome would occur after repair of coarctation of aorta, administration of depressor that acts on renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and careful observation were needed postoperatively. In consideration of the development of collateral vessels, preoperative imaging evaluation was added and operative method in cardiopulmonary bypass was adjusted. Careful preoperative evaluation is very important in cardiac anesthesia.

  1. Intermittent Aortic Valve Opening and Risk of Thrombosis in VAD Patients.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Claudius; Chivukula, Venkat Keshav; McGah, Patrick; Prisco, Anthony R; Beckman, Jennifer A; Mokadam, Nahush A; Aliseda, Alberto

    2017-01-20

    This study evaluates quantitatively the impact that intermittent Aortic Valve opening has on the thrombogenicity in the aortic arch region for patients under Left Ventricular Assist Device therapy. The influence of flow through the Aortic Valve, opening once every five cardiac cycles, on the flow patterns in the ascending aortic is measured in a patient-derived CT-image-based model, after LVAD implantation. The mechanical environment of flowing platelets is investigated, by statistical treatment of outliers in Lagrangian particle tracking, and thrombogenesis metrics (platelet residence times and activation state characterized by shear stress accumulation) are compared for the cases of no Aortic Valve opening and intermittent Aortic Valve opening. All hemodynamics metrics are improved by Aortic Valve opening, even at a reduced frequency and flow rate. Residence times of platelets or microthrombi are reduced significantly by transvalvular flow, as are the shear stress history experienced and the shear stress magnitude and gradients on the aortic root endothelium. The findings of this device-neutral study support the multiple advantages of management that enables Aortic Valve opening, providing a rationale for establishing this as a standard in long-term treatment and care for advanced heart failure patients.

  2. Stress echocardiography in paediatrics: implications for the evaluation of anomalous aortic origin of the coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W Reid

    2015-12-01

    Stress echocardiography in paediatrics is used to evaluate pre- and post-operative coronary artery conditions, as well as to gain haemodynamic information for a variety of diagnoses, although evidence regarding sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value is lacking. This review will consider the available literature with a focus on anomalous aortic origin of the coronary arteries and discuss a practical approach to test selection and use.

  3. Reference points suitable for evaluation of the additional arch length required for leveling the curve of Spee

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-Hwa; Gang, Sung-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Objective The additional arch length required for leveling (AALL) the curve of Spee (COS) can be estimated by subtracting the two-dimensional (2D) arch circumference, which is the projection of the three-dimensional (3D) arch circumference onto the occlusal plane, from the 3D arch circumference, which represents the arch length after leveling the COS. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the cusp tips or proximal maximum convexities are more appropriate reference points for estimating the AALL. Methods Sixteen model setups of the mandibular arch with COS depths ranging from 0 mm to 4.7 mm were constructed using digital simulation. Arch circumferences in 2D and 3D were measured from the cusp tips and proximal maximum convexities and used to calculate the AALL. The values obtained using the two reference points were compared with the paired t-test. Results Although the 3D arch circumference should be constant regardless of the COS depth, it decreased by 3.8 mm in cusp tip measurements and by 0.4 mm in proximal maximum convexity measurements as the COS deepened to 4.7 mm. AALL values calculated using the cusp tips as reference points were significantly smaller than those calculated using the proximal maximum convexities (p = 0.002). Conclusions The AALL is underestimated when the cusp tips are used as measurement reference points; the AALL can be measured more accurately using the proximal maximum convexities. PMID:27896209

  4. Aiming at One-Stage Corrective Surgery for Extended Thoracic Aortic Dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Niinimaki, Eetu; Kajander, Henri; Paavonen, Timo; Sioris, Thanos; Mennander, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Definitive treatment of extended thoracic aortic dilatation is a major surgical challenge. Histopathology of resected thoracic aortic wall may reveal undiagnosed aortitis affecting outcome. We sought to investigate the benefit of thorough histopathology after one-stage corrective surgery for the treatment of extended thoracic aortic dilatation. Five patients underwent one-stage corrective surgery using the hybrid open arch repair by the frozen elephant trunk together with endovascular aortic grafting. A representative sample of the resected aortic arch was procured for histology. T- and B-lymphocytes, plasma cells, macrophages, and immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) positivity were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The mean preoperative maximum aortic diameter was 54 mm (range, 41–79 mm). The mean follow-up was 18 months (range, 1–24 months). As confirmed by computed tomography (CT) upon follow-up, complete thrombosis of the false lumen at the level of the frozen elephant trunk was achieved in all patients with dissection. One patient was operated due to atherosclerotic dilatation of the thoracic aorta, and postoperative CT showed successful exclusion of the atherosclerotic dilatation; this 75-year-old man was diagnosed with IgG4-positive aortitis and experienced unexpected blindness after surgery without evidence of emboli or long-term neurological impairment upon repeated brain CT. The hybrid open arch repair by the frozen elephant trunk and simultaneous endovascular repair is a feasible choice for one-stage surgery through sternotomy aiming at definitive treatment of extended thoracic aortic pathology. However, systematic evaluation of inflammation may reveal concealed aortitis affecting postoperative outcome and need for long-term surveillance. PMID:25075162

  5. 4D Flow MRI in bicuspid aortic valve disease demonstrates altered distribution of aortic blood flow helicity

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, R.; Bock, J.; Barker, A. J.; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, F.; Wallis, W.; Korvink, J. G.; Bissell, M. M.; Schulz-Menger, J.; Markl, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Changes in aortic geometry or presence of aortic valve disease can result in substantially altered aortic hemodynamics. Dilatation of the ascending aorta or aortic valve abnormalities can result in an increase in helical flow. Methods 4D flow MRI was used to test the feasibility of quantitative helicity analysis using equidistantly distributed 2D planes along the entire aorta. The evaluation of the method included three parts: 1) the quantification of helicity in 12 healthy subjects, 2) an evaluation of observer variability and test-retest reliability, and 3) the quantification of helical flow in 16 patients with congenitally altered bicuspid aortic valves. Results Helicity quantification in healthy subjects revealed consistent directions of flow rotation along the entire aorta with high clockwise helicity in the aortic arch and an opposite rotation sense in the ascending and descending aorta. The results demonstrated good scan-rescan and inter- and intra-observer agreement of the helicity parameters. Helicity quantification in patients revealed a significant increase of absolute peak relative helicity during systole and a considerably greater heterogeneous distribution of mean helicity in the aorta. Conclusion The method has the potential to serve as a reference distribution for comparisons of helical flow between healthy subjects and patients or between different patient groups. PMID:23716466

  6. Clinical Evaluation of Different Pre-impression Preparation Procedures of Dental Arch

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Nitin; Arora, Monika; Gupta, Naveen; Agarwal, Manisha; Verma, Rohit; Rathod, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bubbles and voids on the occlusal surface impede the actual intercuspation and pre-impression preparation aims to reduce the incidence of air bubbles and voids as well as influences the quality of occlusal reproduction and actual clinical intercuspation in the articulator. The study was undertaken to determine the influence of different pre-impression preparation procedures of antagonistic dental arch on the quality of the occlusal reproduction of the teeth in irreversible hydrocolloid impressions and to determine most reliable pre-impression preparation method to reduce the incidence of air bubbles. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 subjects were selected having full complement of mandibular teeth from second molar to second molar with well demarcated cusp height. 200 impressions were made with irreversible hydrocolloid material. The impressions were divided into five groups of 40 impressions each and each group had one specific type of pre-impression preparation. All the impressions were poured in die stone. A stereomicroscope with graduated eyepiece was used to count the number of bubbles on the occlusal surface of premolars and molars. The mean and standard deviations were calculated for each group. Mann–Whitney U-test was applied to find the significant difference between different groups. Results: Least bubbles were found in the group in which oral cavity was dried by saliva ejector and fluid hydrocolloid was finger painted onto the occlusal surfaces immediately before the placement of impression tray in the mouth. Conclusion: It was found that finger painting the tooth surfaces with fluid hydrocolloid immediately before the placement of loaded impression tray in the mouth was the most reliable method. The oral cavity can be cleared more easily of excess saliva by vacuum suction rather than by use of an astringent solution. PMID:26229376

  7. Evaluation of Aortic Blood Flow and Wall Shear Stress in Aortic Stenosis and Its Association With Left Ventricular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Karunaharamoorthy, Achudhan; Trauzeddel, Ralf Felix; Barker, Alex J; Blaszczyk, Edyta; Markl, Michael; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic stenosis (AS) leads to variable stress for the left ventricle (LV) and consequently a broad range of LV remodeling. Study aim was to describe blood flow patterns in the ascending aorta of AS patients and determine their association with remodeling. Methods and Results Thirty-seven patients with AS (14 mild, 8 moderate, 15 severe; age 63±13 years) and 37 healthy controls (age 60±10 years) underwent 4D-flow MRI. Helical and vortical flow formations and flow eccentricity were assessed in the ascending aorta. Normalized flow displacement from the vessel center and peak systolic wall shear stress (WSSpeak) in the ascending aorta were quantified. LV remodeling was assessed based on LV mass index (LVMI-I) and the ratio of LV mass to enddiastolic volume (relative wall mass; RWM). Marked helical and vortical flow formation and eccentricity were more prevalent in patients with AS than in healthy subjects, and AS patients exhibited an asymmetric and elevated distribution of WSSpeak. In AS, aortic orifice area was strongly negatively associated with vortical flow formation (p=0.0274), eccentricity (p=0.0070) and flow displacement (p=0.0021). Bicuspid aortic valve was associated with more intense helical (p=0.0098) and vortical flow formation (p=0.0536), higher flow displacement (p=0.11) and higher WSSpeak (p=0.0926). LVM-I and RWM were significantly associated with aortic orifice area (p=0.0611, p=0.0058) and flow displacement (p=0.0058, p=0.0283). Conclusions In this pilot study, AS leads to abnormal blood flow pattern and WSSpeak in the ascending aorta. In addition to aortic orifice area, normalized flow displacement was significantly associated with LV remodeling. PMID:26917824

  8. Myocardial oxygen supply/demand ratio in aortic stenosis: hemodynamic and echocardiographic evaluation of patients with and without angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Nadell, R; DePace, N L; Ren, J F; Hakki, A H; Iskandrian, A S; Morganroth, J

    1983-08-01

    Angina pectoris is a common symptom in patients with aortic stenosis without coronary artery disease. To investigate the correlates of angina pectoris, echocardiographic and hemodynamic data from 44 patients with aortic stenosis and no coronary artery disease (mean age 56 +/- 10 years) were analyzed. Twenty-three patients had no angina pectoris and 21 patients had angina pectoris. The ratio of the diastolic pressure-time index (area between the aortic and left ventricular pressure curves during diastole) to the systolic pressure-time index (area under the left ventricular pressure curve during systole), an index of the oxygen supply/demand ratio, was not different in patients with or without angina pectoris. There were no differences between patients with and without angina pectoris in echocardiographically determined wall thickness, chamber size, systolic and diastolic wall stress and left ventricular mass; in electrocardiographically defined voltage; and in hemodynamically defined aortic valve area, transaortic gradient and stroke work index. Thus, echocardiographic and hemodynamic measurements at rest are not significantly different in the presence or absence of angina pectoris in patients with aortic stenosis. Dynamic data appear to be essential for evaluation of the mechanisms of angina pectoris in patients with aortic stenosis.

  9. Multimodality imaging assessment for Thoraflex hybrid total arch replacement.

    PubMed

    Wong, Randolph Hl; Ho, Jacky Yk; Underwood, Malcolm J

    2016-06-01

    Conventionally, aortic pathologies involving the ascending, arch, and descending thoracic aorta are treated by a staged operation. The Thoraflex device is a composite 4-branched graft with a distal endovascular stent, which allows one-stage treatment of these pathologies. We describe our multimodality hybrid approach for total arch replacement using the Thoraflex device with the adjunct of intraoperative 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography, Endo-EYE endoscopy, and on-table aortography in a hybrid operating room. These multimodality assessments can ascertain adequate sealing of a distal aortic tear and proper opening of the endograft, and provide on-table functional assessment of false lumen hemodynamics. Early results are promising.

  10. Comparative evaluation of border molding, using two different techniques in maxillary edentulous arches - An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Yarapatineni, Rameshbabu; Vilekar, Abhishek; Kumar, J Phani; Kumar, G Ajay; Aravind, Prasad; Kumar, P Anil

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was undertaken to compare the retention between sectional border molding using low fusing greenstick compound and single step border molding using condensation silicone (putty) impression material in three stages- A. Immediately following border molding, B. After final impression and C. With the finished permanent denture base. Materials & Methods: In this study evaluation of retentive values of sectional border molding (Group I) (custom impression trays border molded with green stick compound ) and single step border molding (Group II) ( border molding with condensation silicone (putty) impression material ). In both techniques definitive wash impression were made with light body condensation silicone and permanent denture base with heat cure polymerization resin. Results: Group II was significantly higher (mean=8011.43) than Group I (mean=5777.43) in test-A. The t-value (1.5883) infers that there was significant difference between Group I and Group II (p =0.15). Group I was significantly higher (mean=6718.57) than Group II (mean=5224.29) in test -B. The t-value (1.6909) infers that there was significant difference between Group I and Group II (p=0.17). Group II was higher (mean=4025.14) than Group I (mean=3835.07) in test -C. The t-value was 0.1239. But it was found to be statistically insignificant (p=0.005). Conclusion: Within the limitation of this clinical study border molding custom tray with low fusing green stick compound provided similar retention as compared to custom impression tray with condensation silicone in permanent denture base. How to cite this article: Yarapatineni R, Vilekar A, Kumar JP, Kumar GA, Aravind P, Kumar PA. Comparative evaluation of border molding, using two different techniques in maxillary edentulous arches - An in vivo study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):82-7 . PMID:24453450

  11. [Echocardiography in the evaluation and pre- and postoperative follow-up of chronic aortic insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Karam, R; Esquivel-Avila, J G; Sánchez Torres, G; Sánchez Samayoa, C

    1984-01-01

    In chronic aortic regurgitation (CAoR) is difficult to determine the moment in which volume overload produces the myocardial deterioration which originates symptoms. We pretend to demonstrate the utility of echocardiography in defining the correct timing of operative correction in CAoR with pre- and post-operative comparison. Thirteen patients with CAoR (systolic ventricular-aortic gradient less than 20 mmHg) in whom the aortic valve was replaced were studied with an average of 13.7 months of follow-up. Two patients died immediately after surgery. Those remaining had a decrease in cardiomegaly grade and moved into functional class I. The echocardiogram revealed a significant reduction (P less than 0.01) in diameters of the left ventricle. The ejection fraction increased (P less than 0.05) in the post-operative period. Fractional shortening (FS) and mean velocity of circumferential shortening showed no significant change. The index end-systolic diameter over normalized velocity of the posterior wall IESD/NVPW) decreased considerably and the mean velocity of circumferential relaxation (Vcfr) increased (P less than 0.001) after surgical treatment. The preoperative ESD/NVPW index and Vcfr correlated well with the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (r = 0.891 and r = -0.885, respectively). There was no difference in the course of those patients with diminished FS. The ESD/NVPW index and the Vcfr allowed a better evaluation of the residual volume, of the Frank-Starling law and of distensibility as an expression of the ventricular function. Consequently we conclude these indices are useful to establish the best moment for pre-operative catheterization in patients with CAoR.

  12. Evaluation of the CritiView in pig model of abdominal aortic occlusion and graded hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayevsky, A.; Preisman, S.; Willenz, P. E.; Castel, D.; Perel, A.; Givony, D.; Dekel, N.; Oren, L.; Pewzner, E.

    2009-02-01

    We hypothesize that in the presence of reduced oxygen delivery and extraction, blood flow will be redistributed in order to protect the most vital organs (e.g., brain and heart) by increasing their regional blood flow, while O2 delivery to the less vital organs (e.g., GI tract or urethral wall) will diminish. Evaluation of mitochondrial function in vivo could be done by monitoring the oxidation reduction state of the respiratory chain. Thus, the NADH redox state of less vital organs could serve as an indicator of overall O2 imbalance as well as an endpoint of resuscitation. We have therefore tested, in a pig model, a new medical device providing real time data on NADH redox state and tissue blood flow- TBF This device contains a modified three way Foley catheter with a fiber optic probe which connects the measurement unit to the tested tissue. Female pigs underwent graded hemorrhage (GH) or Aortic clamping (AC). The main effects of GH started when blood volume decreased by 30%. At 40% blood loss, minimal levels of TBF were correlated to the maximal NADH levels. The values of the 2 parameters returned to baseline after retransfusion of the shed blood. Aortic clamping led to significant decrease in TBF while NADH levels increased. After aortic declamping the parameters recovered to normal values. Due to the short length of the urethra in female pigs and the instable contact between the probe and the tissue, inconsistency of the responses was observed. Our preliminary results show that the CritiView may be a useful tool for the detection of body O2 imbalance.

  13. CT evaluation prior to transapical aortic valve replacement: semi-automatic versus manual image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Foldyna, Borek; Jungert, Camelia; Luecke, Christian; von Aspern, Konstantin; Boehmer-Lasthaus, Sonja; Rueth, Eva Maria; Grothoff, Matthias; Nitzsche, Stefan; Gutberlet, Matthias; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm; Lehmkuhl, Lukas

    2015-08-01

    To compare the performance of semi-automatic versus manual segmentation for ECG-triggered cardiovascular computed tomography (CT) examinations prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), with focus on the speed and precision of experienced versus inexperienced observers. The preoperative ECG-triggered CT data of 30 consecutive patients who were scheduled for TAVR were included. All datasets were separately evaluated by two radiologists with 1 and 5 years of experience (novice and expert, respectively) in cardiovascular CT using an evaluation software program with or without a semi-automatic TAVR workflow. The time expended for data loading and all segmentation steps required for the implantation planning were assessed. Inter-software as well as inter-observer reliability analysis was performed. The CT datasets were successfully evaluated, with mean duration between 520.4 ± 117.6 s and 693.2 ± 159.5 s. The three most time-consuming steps were the 3D volume rendering, the measurement of aorta diameter and the sizing of the aortic annulus. Using semi-automatic segmentation, a novice could evaluate CT data approximately 12.3% faster than with manual segmentation, and an expert could evaluate CT data approximately 10.3% faster [mean differences of 85.4 ± 83.8 s (p < 0.001) and 59.8 ± 101 s (p < 0.001), respectively]. The inter-software reliability for a novice was slightly lower than for an expert; however, the reliability for a novice and expert was excellent (ICC 0.92, 95% CI 0.75-0.97/ICC 0.96, 95% CI 0.91-0.98). Automatic aortic annulus detection failed in two patients (6.7%). The study revealed excellent inter-software and inter-observer reliability, with a mean ICC of 0.95. TAVR evaluation can be accomplished significantly faster with semi-automatic rather than with manual segmentation, with comparable exactness, showing a benefit for experienced and inexperienced observers.

  14. Impact of Endografting on the Thoracic Aortic Anatomy: Comparative Analysis of the Aortic Geometry before and after the Endograft Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Midulla, Marco; Moreno, Ramiro; Negre-Salvayre, Anne; Nicoud, Franc; Pruvo, Jean Pierre; Haulon, Stephan; Rousseau, Hervé

    2013-03-13

    PurposeAlthough the widespread acceptance of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) as a first-line treatment option for a multitude of thoracic aortic diseases, little is known about the consequences of the device implantation on the native aortic anatomy. We propose a comparative analysis of the pre- and postoperative geometry on a clinical series of patients and discuss the potential clinical implicationsMethodsCT pre- and postoperative acquisitions of 30 consecutive patients treated by TEVAR for different pathologies (20 thoracic aortic aneurysms, 6 false aneurysms, 3 penetrating ulcers, 1 traumatic rupture) were used to model the vascular geometry. Pre- and postoperative geometries were compared for each patient by pairing and matching the 3D models. An implantation site was identified, and focal differences were detected and described.ResultsSegmentation of the data sets was successfully performed for all 30 subjects. Geometry differences between the pre- and postoperative meshes were depicted in 23 patients (76 %). Modifications at the upper implantation site were detected in 14 patients (47 %), and among them, the implantation site involved the arch (Z0–3) in 11 (78 %).ConclusionModeling the vascular geometry on the basis of imaging data offers an effective tool to perform patient-specific analysis of the vascular geometry before and after the treatment. Future studies will evaluate the consequences of these changes on the aortic function.

  15. Three-dimensional digital evaluation of dental arches in infants with cleft lip and/or palate.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Viviane Mendes; Jorge, Paula Karine; Carrara, Cleide Felício Carvalho; Gomide, Márcia Ribeiro; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; Oliveira, Thais Marchini

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure and compare the dimensions of the dental arches on three-dimensional digital study models in children with and without cleft lip and palate before the primary surgery. The sample consisted of 223 digital models of children aged 3-9 months, divided into 5 groups: without craniofacial deformities, unilateral and bilateral incomplete cleft lip and alveolus, unilateral and bilateral complete cleft lip and alveolus, unilateral cleft lip and palate, and bilateral cleft lip and palate. Dental casts of the maxillary dental arches of the children were used. The dental casts underwent a process of scanning through 3D scanner and the measurements used for the correlation among groups were made on the scanned images. Statistical analysis was performed by t test and ANOVA followed by Tukey test. The results showed that the intercanine distance and anterior cleft width was wider in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate. The intertuberosity distances and posterior cleft width was wider in children with bilateral cleft lip and palate among the groups. Children with cleft lip and palate before the primary surgery had wider maxillary arch dimensions than the children without cleft lip and palate.

  16. 3D evaluation of maxillary arches in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients treated with nasoalveolar moulding vs. Hotz's plate.

    PubMed

    Cerón-Zapata, A M; López-Palacio, A M; Rodriguez-Ardila, M J; Berrio-Gutiérrez, L M; De Menezes, M; Sforza, C

    2016-02-01

    To compare the three-dimensional changes occurring in the maxillary arch during the use of modified pre-surgical nasoalveolar moulding (PNAM) and Hotz's plate. A clinical trial including 32 children with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP), 16 treated with Hotz's plate and 16 with PNAM, was performed. Impressions of the maxillary arches were taken: A. prior to pre-surgical orthopaedics, B. before cheiloplasty and C. after cheiloplasty. Models were digitised using a stereophotogrammetric instrument, and geodesic distances were calculated: anterior, canine and posterior widths of the arch, and lengths and cleft depths of the larger and shorter segments. The time and treatment effects were assessed by two-factor anova. A significant effect of treatment was found for cleft depth at the larger segment: children treated with Hotz's plate had significantly deeper cleft than children treated with PNAM. All distances significantly changed during time: the anterior and canine widths decreased, while the posterior width, the lengths and depths of the cleft segments increased. Significant treatment per time interactions was found. The anterior and canine widths reduced more with PNAM between time points A and B while Hotz's treatment was more effective between B and C. The shorter segment depth increased more between B and C with PNAM, and between A and B with Hotz's plate. During pre-surgical orthopaedics, therapy with PNAM obtained the best results in reducing the width at the anterior segment of the cleft. This treatment gave a lower increase in cleft depth than treatment with Hotz's plate.

  17. Combined Interventional and Surgical Treatment for Acute Aortic Type A Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jincheng; Zhang Jinzhou Yang Jian; Zuo Jian; Zhang Jinbao; Yu Shiqiang; Chen Tao; Xu Xuezeng; Wei Xufeng; Yi Dinghua

    2008-07-15

    Surgical repair and endovascular stent-graft placement are both therapies for thoracic aortic dissection. A combination of these two approaches may be effective in patients with type A dissection. In this study, we evaluated the prognosis of this combined technique. From December 2003 to December 2006, 15 patients with type A dissection were admitted to our institute; clinical data were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up was performed at discharge and approximately 12 months after operation. Endovascular stent-graft placement by interventional radiology and surgical repair for reconstruction of aortic arch was performed in all patients. Total arch replacement for distal arch aneurysm was carried out under deep hypothermia with circulatory arrest; antegrade-selected cerebral perfusion was used for brain protection. Four patients concomitantly received a coronary artery bypass graft. Hospital mortality rate was 6.7%; the patient died of cerebral infarction. Neurological complications developed in two patients. Multi-detector-row computed tomography scans performed before discharge revealed complete thrombosis of the false lumen in six patients and partial thrombosis in eight patients. At the follow-up examination, complete thrombosis was found in another three patients, aortic rupture, endoleaks, or migration of the stent-graft was not observed and injuries of peripheral organs or anastomotic endoleaks did not occur. For patients with aortic type A dissection, combining intervention and surgical procedures is feasible, and complete or at least partial thrombosis of the false lumen in the descending aorta can be achieved. This combined approach simplified the surgical procedures and shortened the circulatory arrest time, minimizing the necessity for further aortic operation.

  18. Guilt by association: paradigm for detecting a silent killer (thoracic aortic aneurysm)

    PubMed Central

    Elefteriades, John A; Sang, Adam; Kuzmik, Gregory; Hornick, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have confirmed a close association between various medical conditions (intracranial aneurysm, abdominal aortic aneurysm, temporal arteritis, autoimmune disorder, renal cysts), certain aortic anatomic variants (bovine aortic arch, direct origin of left vertebral artery from aortic arch, bicuspid aortic valve), and family history of aneurysm disease with thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. This paper reviews these associations. We propose to capitalise on these associations as powerful and expanding opportunities to diagnose the virulent but silent disease of thoracic aortic aneurysm. This can be accomplished by recognition of this ‘guilt by association’ with the other conditions. Thus, patients with associated diseases and anatomic variants should be investigated for silent aortic aneurysms. Such a paradigm holds substantial potential for reducing death from the silent killer represented by thoracic aortic aneurysm disease. PMID:25932333

  19. Bronchial Aneurysms Mimicking Aortic Aneurysms: Endovascular Treatment in Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vernhet, Helene; Bousquet, Claudine; Jean, Betty; Lesnik, Alvian; Durand, Gerard; Giron, Jacques; Senac, Jean Paul

    1999-05-15

    Bronchial artery dilatation and aneurysm formation is a potential complication of local inflammation, especially in bronchiectasis. When the bronchial artery has an ectopic origin from the inferior segment of the aortic arch, aneurysms may mimick aortic aneurysms. Despite this particular location, endovascular treatment is possible. We report two such aneurysms that were successfully embolized with steel coils.

  20. Evaluation of the thrombus of abdominal aortic aneurysms using contrast enhanced ultrasound - preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łukasiewicz, Adam; Garkowski, Adam; Rutka, Katarzyna; Janica, Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula

    2016-09-01

    It is hypothesized that the degree of vascularization of the thrombus may have a significant impact on the rupture of aortic aneurysms. The presence of neovascularization of the vessel wall and mural thrombus has been confirmed only in histopathological studies. However, no non-invasive imaging technique of qualitative assessment of thrombus and neovascularization has been implemented so far. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been proposed as a feasible and minimally invasive technique for in vivo visualization of neovascularization in the evaluation of tumors and atherosclerotic plaques. The aim of this study was the evaluation of mural thrombus and AAAs wall with CEUS. CEUS was performed in a group of seventeen patients with AAAs. The mural thrombus enhancement was recognized in 12 cases, yet no significant correlation between the degree of contrast enhancement and AAAs diameter, thrombus width, and thrombus echogenicity was found. We observed a rise in AAAs thrombus heterogeneity with the increase in the aneurysm diameter (r = 0.62, p = 0.017). In conclusion CEUS can visualize small channels within AAAs thrombus, which could be a result of an ongoing angiogenesis. There is a need for further research to find out whether the degree of vascularization of the thrombus may have a significant impact on the rupture of aneurysms.

  1. Vascular Adaptations to Transverse Aortic Banding in Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    traces of Fig 7. Then the stenosis was added by increasing the resistance at the aortic arch (R ) by a factor of 30 (loose band) oraa 60 (tight band...Fig. 1. Drawing of a mouse heart and great vessels (A) showing the placement of a 0.4 mm constricting band around the aortic arch to produce cardiac...hypertrophy (B-C) via pressure overload. A Doppler probe (D) was used to measure flow velocity at the aortic valve (1), the mitral valve (2), the

  2. Paradoxical low flow aortic valve stenosis: incidence, evaluation, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Pibarot, Philippe; Dumesnil, Jean G

    2014-01-01

    Paradoxical low-flow (PLF) aortic stenosis is defined by a stroke volume index <35 ml/m(2) despite the presence of preserved LV ejection fraction (≥ 50 %). This entity is typically characterized by pronounced LV concentric remodeling with small LV cavity, impaired LV filling, increased arterial load, and reduced LV longitudinal shortening. Patients with PLF also have a worse prognosis compared to patients with normal flow. Because of the low flow state, these patients often have a low gradient despite the presence of severe stenosis, thus leading to discordant AS grading (i.e., aortic valve area < 1.0 cm(2) but mean gradient < 40 mmHg) and thus uncertainty about the indication of aortic valve replacement. Stress echocardiography and aortic valve calcium score by computed tomography may be helpful to differentiate true from pseudo severe stenosis and thereby guide therapeutic management in these patients. Aortic valve replacement improves outcomes in patients with PLF low gradient AS having evidence of severe stenosis. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement may provide an interesting alternative to surgery in these patients.

  3. Uncluttered single-image visualization of the abdominal aortic vessel tree: Method and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Won, Joong-Ho; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Napel, Sandy

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The authors develop a method to visualize the abdominal aorta and its branches, obtained by CT or MR angiography, in a single 2D stylistic image without overlap among branches. Methods: The abdominal aortic vasculature is modeled as an articulated object whose underlying topology is a rooted tree. The inputs to the algorithm are the 3D centerlines of the abdominal aorta, its branches, and their associated diameter information. The visualization problem is formulated as an optimization problem that finds a spatial configuration of the bounding boxes of the centerlines most similar to the projection of the input into a given viewing direction (e.g., anteroposterior), while not introducing intersections among the boxes. The optimization algorithm minimizes a score function regarding the overlap of the bounding boxes and the deviation from the input. The output of the algorithm is used to produce a stylistic visualization, made of the 2D centerlines modulated by the associated diameter information, on a plane. The authors performed a preliminary evaluation by asking three radiologists to label 366 arterial branches from the 30 visualizations of five cases produced by the method. Each of the five patients was presented in six different variant images, selected from ten variants with the three lowest and three highest scores. For each label, they assigned confidence and distortion ratings (low/medium/high). They studied the association between the quantitative metrics measured from the visualization and the subjective ratings by the radiologists. Results: All resulting visualizations were free from branch overlaps. Labeling accuracies of the three readers were 93.4%, 94.5%, and 95.4%, respectively. For the total of 1098 samples, the distortion ratings were low: 77.39%, medium: 10.48%, and high: 12.12%. The confidence ratings were low: 5.56%, medium: 16.50%, and high: 77.94%. The association study shows that the proposed quantitative metrics can predict a reader

  4. Arching Solar Prominence

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s STEREO (Ahead) spacecraft watched as an eruptive prominence rose up and arched out in a horseshoe shape far above the Sun’s surface (Aug. 25, 2010). The image and movie show the action in a...

  5. Intraoral gothic arch tracing.

    PubMed

    Rubel, Barry; Hill, Edward E

    2011-01-01

    In order to create optimum esthetics, function and phonetics in complete denture fabrication, it is necessary to record accurate maxillo-mandibular determinants of occlusion. This requires clinical skill to establish an accurate, verifiable and reproducible vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) and centric relation (CR). Correct vertical relation depends upon a consideration of several factors, including muscle tone, inter-dental arch space and parallelism of the ridges. Any errors made while taking maxillo-mandibular jaw relation records will result in dentures that are uncomfortable and, possibly, unwearable. The application of a tracing mechanism such as the Gothic arch tracer (a central bearing device) is a demonstrable method of determining centric relation. Intraoral Gothic arch tracers provide the advantage of capturing VDO and CR in an easy-to-use technique for practitioners. Intraoral tracing (Gothic arch tracing) is a preferred method of obtaining consistent positions of the mandible in motion (retrusive, protrusive and lateral) at a comfortable VDO.

  6. Aortic chondroid neoplasia in two Labrador Retriever dogs.

    PubMed

    Kohnken, R; Durham, J A; Premanandan, C; Scansen, B A

    2015-12-01

    In the same week, two Labrador Retriever dogs presented to The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center for cardiac evaluation. The presenting signs in both dogs included: weight loss, weakness, lethargy, and decreased femoral pulses. The first dog presented in cardiogenic shock and biventricular congestive heart failure, which initially responded to treatment; however, the dog was euthanized due to deteriorating clinical condition. In contrast, the second dog had a milder clinical course without signs of congestive heart failure, and remained stable over the 2-month period of clinical evaluation prior to euthanasia. Echocardiographic evaluation revealed a dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype in the first dog, while a space-occupying intraluminal mass originating at the aortic valve with preserved left ventricular systolic function was observed in the second dog. At autopsy, each dog had a large obstructive luminal mass affecting the ascending aorta and arch. Histopathology revealed that the mass in the first dog was consistent with a benign chondroma, while in the second dog the morphologic characteristics, mitotic activity, and infiltrative growth justified a diagnosis of chondrosarcoma. This report presents the contrasting clinical disease progression and findings in two dogs with aortic neoplasia, with a proposed pathogenesis of cardiac failure secondary to aortic neoplasia.

  7. Prospective Evaluation of the Correlation Between Torso Height and Aortic Anatomy in Respect of a Fluoroscopy Free Aortic Balloon Occlusion System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    middle of aortic zone I (left subclavian artery to celiac trunk) and zone III (infrarenal aorta) were developed from a random 20% of the cohort and...the celiac trunk, zone II is from the celiac trunk to the lowest renal artery, and the infrarenal aorta constitutes zone III (Fig 1).7 Zones I and III...femoral head, to several key aortic landmarks (bifurcation, take off of the lowest renal artery, celiac and left subcla- vian) were calculated. This

  8. Unexpected death caused by rupture of a dilated aorta in an adult male with aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Leth, Peter Mygind; Knudsen, Peter Thiis

    2015-09-01

    Aortic coarctation (AC) is a congenital aortic narrowing. We describe for the first time the findings obtained by unenhanced post mortem computed tomography (PMCT) in a case where the death was caused by cardiac tamponade from a ruptured aneurysmal dilatation of the ascending aorta and the aortic arch without dissection combined with aortic coarctation. The patient, a 46-year-old man, was found dead at home. PMCT showed haemopericardium and dilatation of the ascending aorta and the aortic arch. This appearance led to the mistaken interpretation that the images represented a dissecting aneurysm. The autopsy showed instead a thin-walled and floppy dilatation of the ascending aorta and aortic arch with a coarctation just proximal to the ligamentum arteriosum. A longitudinal tear was found in the posterior aortic wall just above the valves. Blood in the surrounding soft tissue intersected with a large haematoma (1000ml) in the pericardial sac. Cardiac hypertrophy (556g) was observed in the patient, though no other cardiovascular abnormalities were found. Histological analysis showed cystic medial necrosis of the ascending aortic wall. A ruptured aneurysmal dilatation of the ascending aorta and the aortic arch without aortic dissection associated with AC is an uncommon cause of haemopericardium that has only been described a few times before. The case is discussed in relation to other reported cases and in the context of the present understanding of this condition.

  9. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance evaluation of aortic stenosis severity using single plane measurement of effective orifice area

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is the standard method for the evaluation of the severity of aortic stenosis (AS). Valve effective orifice area (EOA) measured by the continuity equation is one of the most frequently used stenotic indices. However, TTE measurement of aortic valve EOA is not feasible or not reliable in a significant proportion of patients. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has emerged as a non-invasive alternative to evaluate EOA using velocity measurements. The objectives of this study were: 1) to validate a new CMR method using jet shear layer detection (JSLD) based on acoustical source term (AST) concept to estimate the valve EOA; 2) to introduce a simplified JSLD method not requiring vorticity field derivation. Methods and results We performed an in vitro study where EOA was measured by CMR in 4 fixed stenoses (EOA = 0.48, 1.00, 1.38 and 2.11 cm2) under the same steady flow conditions (4-20 L/min). The in vivo study included eight (8) healthy subjects and 37 patients with mild to severe AS (0.72 cm2 ≤ EOA ≤ 1.71 cm2). All subjects underwent TTE and CMR examinations. EOA was determinated by TTE with the use of continuity equation method (TTECONT). For CMR estimation of EOA, we used 3 methods: 1) Continuity equation (CMRCONT); 2) Shear layer detection (CMRJSLD), which was computed from the velocity field of a single CMR velocity profile at the peak systolic phase; 3) Single plane velocity truncation (CMRSPVT), which is a simplified version of CMRJSLD method. There was a good agreement between the EOAs obtained in vitro by the different CMR methods and the EOA predicted from the potential flow theory. In the in vivo study, there was good correlation and concordance between the EOA measured by the TTECONT method versus those measured by each of the CMR methods: CMRCONT (r = 0.88), CMRJSLD (r = 0.93) and CMRSPVT (r = 0.93). The intra- and inter- observer variability of EOA measurements was 5 ± 5% and 9 ± 5% for TTECONT, 2

  10. Evaluation of texture for classification of abdominal aortic aneurysm after endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    García, Guillermo; Maiora, Josu; Tapia, Arantxa; De Blas, Mariano

    2012-06-01

    The use of the endovascular prostheses in abdominal aortic aneurysm has proven to be an effective technique to reduce the pressure and rupture risk of aneurysm. Nevertheless, in a long-term perspective, complications such as leaks inside the aneurysm sac (endoleaks) could appear causing a pressure elevation and increasing the danger of rupture consequently. At present, computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is the most common examination for medical surveillance. However, endoleak complications cannot always be detected by visual inspection on CTA scans. The investigation on new techniques to detect endoleaks and analyse their effects on treatment evolution is of great importance for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) technique. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the capability of texture features obtained from the aneurysmatic thrombus CT images to discriminate different types of evolutions caused by endoleaks. The regions of interest (ROIs) from patients with different post-EVAR evolution were extracted by experienced radiologists. Three techniques were applied to each ROI to obtain texture parameters, namely the grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), the grey level run length matrix (GLRLM) and the grey level difference method (GLDM). The results showed that GLCM, GLRLM and GLDM features presented a good discrimination ability to differentiate between favourable or unfavourable evolutions. GLCM was the most efficient in terms of classification accuracy (93.41% ± 0.024) followed by GLRLM (90.17% ± 0.077) and finally by GLDM (81.98% ± 0.045). According to the results, we can consider texture analysis as complementary information to classified abdominal aneurysm evolution after EVAR.

  11. The cytotoxicity evaluation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on human aortic endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Gaoyuan; Wu, Hengfang; Xiong, Fei; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Zhirui; Bian, Zhiping; Xu, Jindan; Gu, Chunrong; Gu, Ning; Chen, Xiangjian; Yang, Di

    2013-05-01

    One major obstacle for successful application of nanoparticles in medicine is its potential nanotoxicity on the environment and human health. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxicity effect of dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated iron oxide (DMSA-Fe2O3) using cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Our results showed that DMSA-Fe2O3 in the culture medium could be absorbed into HAECs, and dispersed in the cytoplasm. The cytotoxicity effect of DMSA-Fe2O3 on HAECs was dose-dependent, and the concentrations no more than 0.02 mg/ml had little toxic effect which were revealed by tetrazolium dye assay. Meanwhile, the cell injury biomarker, lactate dehydrogenase, was not significantly higher than that from control cells (without DMSA-Fe2O3). However, the endocrine function for endothelin-1 and prostacyclin I-2, as well as the urea transporter function, was altered even without obvious evidence of cell injury in this context. We also showed by real-time PCR analysis that DMSA-Fe2O3 exposure resulted in differential effects on the expressions of pro- and anti-apoptosis genes of HAECs. Meanwhile, it was noted that DMSA-Fe2O3 exposure could activate the expression of genes related to oxidative stress and adhesion molecules, which suggested that inflammatory response might be evoked. Moreover, we demonstrated by in vitro endothelial tube formation that even a small amount of DMSA-Fe2O3 (0.01 and 0.02 mg/ml) could inhibit angiogenesis by the HAECs. Altogether, these results indicate that DMSA-Fe2O3 have some cytotoxicity that may cause side effects on normal endothelial cells.

  12. Morphological and Functional Evaluation of Quadricuspid Aortic Valves Using Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Inyoung; Park, Jung Ah; Choi, Bo Hwa; Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify the morphological and functional characteristics of quadricuspid aortic valves (QAV) on cardiac computed tomography (CCT). Materials and Methods We retrospectively enrolled 11 patients with QAV. All patients underwent CCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and 7 patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). The presence and classification of QAV assessed by CCT was compared with that of TTE and intraoperative findings. The regurgitant orifice area (ROA) measured by CCT was compared with severity of aortic regurgitation (AR) by TTE and the regurgitant fraction (RF) by CMR. Results All of the patients had AR; 9 had pure AR, 1 had combined aortic stenosis and regurgitation, and 1 had combined subaortic stenosis and regurgitation. Two patients had a subaortic fibrotic membrane and 1 of them showed a subaortic stenosis. One QAV was misdiagnosed as tricuspid aortic valve on TTE. In accordance with the Hurwitz and Robert's classification, consensus was reached on the QAV classification between the CCT and TTE findings in 7 of 10 patients. The patients were classified as type A (n = 1), type B (n = 3), type C (n = 1), type D (n = 4), and type F (n = 2) on CCT. A very high correlation existed between ROA by CCT and RF by CMR (r = 0.99) but a good correlation existed between ROA by CCT and regurgitant severity by TTE (r = 0.62). Conclusion Cardiac computed tomography provides comprehensive anatomical and functional information about the QAV. PMID:27390538

  13. Ten year clinical evaluation of Starr-Edwards 2400 and 1260 aortic valve prostheses.

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, D; Fessatidis, I; Sapsford, R; Oakley, C

    1987-01-01

    The long term performance characteristics of the 2400 and 1260 series of Starr-Edwards aortic prostheses were investigated by a follow up study of clinical outcome of 327 patients discharged from hospital with isolated aortic valve replacement. Follow up lasted for up to 10 years and was based on 1616 patient-years. The 2400 series cloth covered tracked valve was implanted in 182 patients from 1974 to 1980 and the 1260 series bare strut silastic ball valve was inserted in 145 patients from 1979 to 1983. Total 10 year mortality and valve related morbidity were low and no cases of mechanical valve failure were recorded. There were no significant actuarial differences in mortality or valve related morbidity between the 2400 and 1260 valves. Starr-Edwards models 2400 and 1260 aortic valve prostheses showed excellent durability without any mechanical failures over a 10 year period. The long term outcome of isolated aortic valve replacement with these models is associated with a low frequency of valve related complications. PMID:3580223

  14. Aortic Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ventricle Normal Heart Select Disease To Learn More Aortic Stenosis Aortic Insufficiency Aorta The aorta is the main ... the rest of your body. Aortic Valve In aortic stenosis, the aortic valve becomes narrowed and does not ...

  15. Relationship between radial and central arterial pulse wave and evaluation of central aortic pressure using the radial arterial pulse wave.

    PubMed

    Takazawa, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shindo, Naohisa; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Yamashina, Akira

    2007-03-01

    Since a decrease of central aortic pressure contributes to the prevention of cardiovascular events, simple measurement of not only brachial blood pressure but also central aortic pressure may be useful in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we simultaneously measured radial artery pulse waves non-invasively and ascending aortic pressure invasively, before and after the administration of nicorandil. We then compared changes in central aortic pressure and radial arterial blood pressure calibrated with brachial blood pressure in addition to calculating the augmentation index (AI) at the aorta and radial artery. After nicorandil administration, the reduction in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (Deltaa-SBP) was -14+/-15 mmHg, significantly larger than that in early systolic pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP) (-9+/-12 mmHg). The reduction in late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP2) was -15+/-14 mmHg, significantly larger than Deltar-SBP, but not significantly different from Deltaa-SBP. There were significant relationships between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP (r=0.81, p<0.001), and between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP2 (r=0.91, p<0.001). The slope of the correlation regression line with Deltar-SBP2 (0.83) was larger and closer to 1 than that with Deltar-SBP (0.63), showing that the relationship was close to 1:1. Significant correlations were obtained between aortic AI (a-AI) and radial AI (r-AI) (before nicorandil administration: r=0.91, p<0.001; after administration: r=0.70, p<0.001). These data suggest that the measurement of radial artery pulse wave and observation of changes in the late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (r-SBP2) in addition to the ordinary measurement of brachial blood pressure may enable a more accurate evaluation of changes in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (a-SBP).

  16. [Chronic type A aortic dissection associated with Turner syndrome; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hideyuki; Kozaki, Tomofumi; Kume, Masazumi; Miyamoto, Shinji

    2014-12-01

    Aortic dissection is a critical but rare complication of Turner syndrome. This report describes a case of chronic aortic dissection in a patient with Turner syndrome. A 54-year-old woman, suffering from mild back pain for 1 month, was referred to our hospital with a diagnosis of Stanford type A chronic aortic dissection and a bicuspid aortic valve with moderate regurgitation. Computed tomography revealed aortic dissection, involving all arch branches, extending from the ascending to the abdominal aorta. The true lumen of the brachial artery was nearly obstructed by the thrombosed false lumen. Elective aortic arch repair and aortic valve replacement were successfully performed. The patient was diagnosed with 45, XO Turner syndrome after surgery. Taking aortopathy of Turner syndrome into consideration, surveillance of the residual aorta was performed. No rapidly progressive dilatation of the residual aorta was detected during the 6 years' follow-up.

  17. Best strategy for cerebral protection in arch surgery - antegrade selective cerebral perfusion and adequate hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Friedrich W.; Etz, Christian D.

    2013-01-01

    Aortic arch surgery remains a complex surgical operation that necessitates specific neuroprotection strategies. Various approaches, such as hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA), retrograde cerebral perfusion, and antegrade selective cerebral perfusion (aSCP), have each enjoyed periods of popularity. However, while the overall surgical approach tend to favour HCA with aSCP, technical factors, such as perfusion site, perfusate temperature and flow rate and pH management, have not been conclusively elucidated. The optimal extent of hypothermia during circulatory arrest is also unclear, particularly with recent partiality for warmer temperatures. The following perspective details the preferred surgical practice for cerebral protection in aortic arch surgery, based on existing evidence. PMID:23977602

  18. Endovascular Treatment for Proximal Anastomotic Pseudoaneurysm after Total Arch Replacement in Behcet's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Tomoki; Ueda, Hideki; Watanabe, Michiko; Kohno, Hiroki; Tamura, Yusaku; Abe, Shinichiro; Inage, Yuichi; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Kanda, Tomoyoshi; Fujii, Masahiko; Matsumiya, Goro

    2016-07-01

    A 17-year-old patient underwent total arch replacement for aortic arch aneurysm due to vascular Behcet's disease (BD). Follow-up computed tomography, performed 6 months after the operation, demonstrated pseudoaneurysm formation at the proximal anastomotic site. We performed endovascular treatment and used a short stent graft that was originally designed for abdominal aortic aneurysm. To avoid the occlusion of the coronary or brachiocephalic artery (BCA) due to stent graft migration, we used right ventricular rapid pacing and BCA ballooning. Thus, we believe that endovascular treatment can be used for anastomotic complications in the ascending aorta after open surgery for connective tissue disorders including BD.

  19. How to Perfuse: Concepts of Cerebral Protection during Arch Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Habertheuer, Andreas; Wiedemann, Dominik; Kocher, Alfred; Laufer, Guenther; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2015-01-01

    Arch surgery remains undoubtedly among the most technically and strategically challenging endeavors in cardiovascular surgery. Surgical interventions of thoracic aneurysms involving the aortic arch require complete circulatory arrest in deep hypothermia (DHCA) or elaborate cerebral perfusion strategies with varying degrees of hypothermia to achieve satisfactory protection of the brain from ischemic insults, that is, unilateral/bilateral antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) and retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP). Despite sophisticated and increasingly individualized surgical approaches for complex aortic pathologies, there remains a lack of consensus regarding the optimal method of cerebral protection and circulatory management during the time of arch exclusion. Many recent studies argue in favor of ACP with various degrees of hypothermic arrest during arch reconstruction and its advantages have been widely demonstrated. In fact ACP with more moderate degrees of hypothermia represents a paradigm shift in the cardiac surgery community and is widely adopted as an emergent strategy; however, many centers continue to report good results using other perfusion strategies. Amidst this important discussion we review currently available surgical strategies of cerebral protection management and compare the results of recent European multicenter and single-center data. PMID:26713319

  20. Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Structured Reporting Web Tool for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Sulafa; Fegeler, Christian; Boeckler, Dittmar; H Schwartz, Lawrence; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Background The majority of radiological reports are lacking a standard structure. Even within a specialized area of radiology, each report has its individual structure with regards to details and order, often containing too much of non-relevant information the referring physician is not interested in. For gathering relevant clinical key parameters in an efficient way or to support long-term therapy monitoring, structured reporting might be advantageous. Objective Despite of new technologies in medical information systems, medical reporting is still not dynamic. To improve the quality of communication in radiology reports, a new structured reporting system was developed for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), intended to enhance professional communication by providing the pertinent clinical information in a predefined standard. Methods Actual state analysis was performed within the departments of radiology and vascular surgery by developing a Technology Acceptance Model. The SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis focused on optimization of the radiology reporting of patients with AAA. Definition of clinical parameters was achieved by interviewing experienced clinicians in radiology and vascular surgery. For evaluation, a focus group (4 radiologists) looked at the reports of 16 patients. The usability and reliability of the method was validated in a real-world test environment in the field of radiology. Results A Web-based application for radiological “structured reporting” (SR) was successfully standardized for AAA. Its organization comprises three main categories: characteristics of pathology and adjacent anatomy, measurements, and additional findings. Using different graphical widgets (eg, drop-down menus) in each category facilitate predefined data entries. Measurement parameters shown in a diagram can be defined for clinical monitoring and be adducted for quick adjudications. Figures for optional use to guide and standardize the

  1. Clarifying the anatomy of the fifth arch artery

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Gulati, Gurpreet Singh; Anderson, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    The artery allegedly forming in the fifth pharyngeal arch has increasingly been implicated as responsible for various vascular malformations in patients with congenitally malformed hearts. Observations from studies on developing embryos, however, have failed to provide support to substantiate several of these inferences such that the very existence of the fifth arch artery remains debatable. To the best of our knowledge, in only a solitary human embryo has a vascular channel been found that truly resembled the artery of the fifth arch. Despite the meager evidence to support its existence, the fifth arch artery has been invoked to explain the morphogenesis of double-barreled aorta, some unusual forms of aortopulmonary communications, and abnormalities of the brachiocephalic arteries. In most of these instances, the interpretations have proved fallible when examined in the light of existing knowledge of cardiac development. In our opinion, there are more plausible alternative explanations for the majority of these descriptions. Double-barreled aorta is more likely to result from retention of the recently identified dorsal collateral channels while abnormalities of brachiocephalic arteries are better explained on the basis of extensive remodeling of aortic arches during fetal development. Some examples of aortopulmonary communications, nonetheless, may well represent persistence of the developing artery of the fifth pharyngeal arch. We here present one such case — a patient with tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary atresia, in whom the fifth arch artery provided a necessary communication between the ascending aorta and the pulmonary arteries. In this light, we discuss the features we consider to be essential before attaching the tag of “fifth arch artery” to a candidate vascular channel. PMID:27011696

  2. Aortic Disease Presentation and Outcome Associated with ACTA2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Regalado, Ellen S.; Guo, Dongchuan; Prakash, Siddharth; Bensend, Tracy A.; Flynn, Kelly; Estrera, Anthony; Safi, Hazim; Liang, David; Hyland, James; Child, Anne; Arno, Gavin; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Braverman, Alan; Moran, Rocio; Morisaki, Takayuki; Morisaki, Hiroko; Consortium, Montalcino Aortic; Pyeritz, Reed; Coselli, Joseph; LeMaire, Scott; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2015-01-01

    Background ACTA2 mutations are the major cause of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. We sought to characterize these aortic diseases in a large case series of individuals with ACTA2 mutations. Methods and Results Aortic disease, management, and outcome associated with the first aortic event (aortic dissection or aneurysm repair) were abstracted from the medical records of 277 individuals with 41 various ACTA2 mutations. Aortic events occurred in 48% of these individuals, with the vast majority presenting with thoracic aortic dissections (88%) associated with 25% mortality. Type A dissections were more common than type B dissections (54% versus 21%), but the median age of onset of type B dissections was significantly younger than type A dissections (27 years, IQR 18–41 versus 36 years, IQR 26–45). Only 12% of aortic events were repair of ascending aortic aneurysms, which variably involved the aortic root, ascending aorta and aortic arch. Overall cumulative risk of an aortic event at age 85 years was 0.76 (95% CI 0.64, 0.86). After adjustment for intra-familial correlation, gender and race, mutations disrupting p.R179 and p.R258 were associated with significantly increased risk for aortic events, whereas p.R185Q and p.R118Q mutations showed significantly lower risk of aortic events compared to other mutations. Conclusions ACTA2 mutations are associated with high risk of presentation with an acute aortic dissection. The lifetime risk for an aortic event is only 76%, suggesting that additional environmental or genetic factors play a role in expression of aortic disease in individuals with ACTA2 mutations. PMID:25759435

  3. Mechanism of development of aortic transection: a possible new angle.

    PubMed

    Warwick, R; Mediratta, N; Pullan, M; Chalmers, J; Poullis, M

    2013-03-01

    Aortic transection injury is a frequently fatal injury secondary to sudden deceleration. To date magnitude of deceleration is the only factor known to influence the development of an aortic transection injury. We hypothesise that different 3D geometries of the aortic arch in healthy young adult patients as a possible predisposing factor for transection injuries when undergoing sudden deceleration. We extend this to hypothesise that the direction of deceleration may be important as well. In addition we hypothesise that the stage in the cardiac cycle, which determines central aortic blood pressure, when the deceleration occurs as an important factor. We utilise known engineering principles such as Newton's second Law of motion, moment of inertia, law of Laplace, and the theory of superposition to explain our hypothesis. We present limited data to demonstrate the wide variation in aortic arch 3D geometry to explain the possible an individual's variable susceptibility to transection injuries via the principle of moment of inertia. Engineering principles suggest that 3D aortic arch geometry, direction of deceleration and stage in the cardiac cycle, in addition to the magnitude of deceleration are potentially important factors in predisposing certain individuals in a given situation to aortic transaction injuries.

  4. Echocardiography as a Predicting Method in Diagnosis, Evaluation and Assessment of Children with Subvalvar Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Bejiqi, Ramush; Bejiqi, Hana; Retkoceri, Ragip

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obstruction to the left ventricular outflow of the heart may be above the aortic valve (5%), at the valve (74%), or in the subvalvar region (23%). These anomalies represent 3 to 6% of all patients with congenital heart defects (CHD), and it occurs more often in males (male-female ratio of 4:1). AIM: The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of transthoracic echocardiography in diagnosis of discrete subaortic membrane, to determine convenient time for surgical intervention, and for identifying involvement of the aortic valve by subaortic shelf. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective review of the medical records and echocardiograms of 18 patients [14 male (77%) and 4 female (23%)] with discrete subaortic membrane, aged 11 month to 12 years, with mean age of 5 years and 3 month, diagnosed at the Pediatric Clinic in Prishtina, during the period September, 1999 and December, 2010 were done. RESULTS: Four patients, in neonatal age were operated from critical coarctation of the aorta and, initial signs of congestive heart failure were presented. 2 of them were operated in Belgrade, Serbia and 2 in Lausanne, Switzerland. CONCLUSION: In all presented patients bicuspid aortic valve was noted, but none of them subaortic membrane was registered. PMID:27275334

  5. Consistency of aortic distensibility and pulse wave velocity estimates with respect to the Bramwell-Hill theoretical model: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is considered as an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality, and is increasingly used in clinical practice. This study aimed at evaluating the consistency of the automated estimation of regional and local aortic stiffness indices from cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) data. Results Forty-six healthy subjects underwent carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity measurements (CF_PWV) by applanation tonometry and CMR with steady-state free-precession and phase contrast acquisitions at the level of the aortic arch. These data were used for the automated evaluation of the aortic arch pulse wave velocity (Arch_PWV), and the ascending aorta distensibility (AA_Distc, AA_Distb), which were estimated from ascending aorta strain (AA_Strain) combined with either carotid or brachial pulse pressure. The local ascending aorta pulse wave velocity AA_PWVc and AA_PWVb were estimated respectively from these carotid and brachial derived distensibility indices according to the Bramwell-Hill theoretical model, and were compared with the Arch_PWV. In addition, a reproducibility analysis of AA_PWV measurement and its comparison with the standard CF_PWV was performed. Characterization according to the Bramwell-Hill equation resulted in good correlations between Arch_PWV and both local distensibility indices AA_Distc (r = 0.71, p < 0.001) and AA_Distb (r = 0.60, p < 0.001); and between Arch_PWV and both theoretical local indices AA_PWVc (r = 0.78, p < 0.001) and AA_PWVb (r = 0.78, p < 0.001). Furthermore, the Arch_PWV was well related to CF_PWV (r = 0.69, p < 0.001) and its estimation was highly reproducible (inter-operator variability: 7.1%). Conclusions The present work confirmed the consistency and robustness of the regional index Arch_PWV and the local indices AA_Distc and AA_Distb according to the theoretical model, as well as to the well established measurement of CF_PWV, demonstrating the relevance of the regional and local CMR indices. PMID

  6. Complications of intra-aortic balloon pump use: does the final position of the IABP tip matter?

    PubMed

    Siriwardena, M; Pilbrow, A; Frampton, C; MacDonald, S M; Wilkins, G T; Richards, A M

    2015-01-01

    We report results of a retrospective review of intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) use in two Australasian centres and evaluate the effect of final IABP tip position on outcome. Indications for counterpulsation, patient demographics and in-hospital outcomes and complications were retrospectively collected. The chest X-ray reports provided the 'final' position of the IABP tip. The position was defined as acceptable (tip was seen just below the aortic arch, at T2-T5 vertebrae), malpositioned (tip > 5 cm below aortic arch or at T5-T6) or severely malpositioned (tip > 10 cm below aortic arch or at T7 or below).?Major complications were considered a composite of death secondary to IABP, major limb ischaemia, major IABP malfunction, balloon rupture or haemorrhage, severe renal dysfunction (rise in creatinine > 200 µmol/l), stroke and mesenteric ischaemia. Six hundred and forty-five cases were reviewed. The overall major complication rate was 26.2% and 24.3%. Severe renal impairment was the most common complication (16.6%), and second, severe catheter dysfunction (5.4%). ?Final IABP position was acceptable in 39.9%, malpositioned in 11.1%,?severely malpositioned in 6.7% and unavailable for 42.4%. Logistic regression analysis showed IABP tip malposition (compared with satisfactory position odds ratio=3.9 [95% confidence interval=2.0-7.6, P < 0.001] and severely malpositioned odds ratio=13.0 [95% confidence interval 5.3-31.7, P < 0.001]) was associated with major complications more than the presence of shock (odds ratio=3.8, confidence interval=2.1-6.8 P < 0.001). The acceptance of a less-than-ideal final position was highly predictive of morbidity directly related to IABP device therapy.

  7. In Vitro Evaluation of the Dual-Diffuser Design for a Reversible Rotary Intra-Aortic Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaxin; Smith, P Alex; Timms, Daniel L; Hsu, Po-Lin; McMahon, Richard A

    2016-09-01

    The intra-aortic ventricular assist device (IntraVAD) is a miniature intra-aortic axial-flow ventricular assist device (VAD) that works in series with the left ventricle (LV) to assist the compromised heart. Previous in vitro results have shown that the IntraVAD can successfully increase coronary perfusion and offload ventricular volume by operating in reverse-rotation control (RRc) mode. The RRc mode includes forward rotation in systole and reverse rotation (RR) in diastole. It is necessary to derive a new diffuser design that can be used for the bi-directional rotation of the IntraVAD. In this work, a dual-diffuser set (DDS) was proposed to replace the conventional inducer and diffuser upstream and downstream of the pump. The DDS comprised two diffusers, located on both sides of the impeller, omitting the conventional inducer and diffuser. Different configurations of the DDS were designed and manufactured with various combinations of curved and straight blades. All configurations were initially tested in continuous flow, then in a pulsatile mock circulatory loop. A weighted normalized scalar (WNS) was proposed to comprehensively evaluate the hemodynamic effect of the DDS with different configurations. The results show that the maximum of WNS occurred when the upstream diffuser had equal numbers of curved and straight blades and the downstream diffuser had only curved blades. This indicates such a dual-diffuser design for the IntraVAD can give an optimal cardiac assistance potentially improving ventricular contractility, thereby restoring heart function.

  8. Evaluation of intrusive mechanics of the type "segmented arch" on a macerated human skull using the laser reflection technique and holographic interferometry.

    PubMed

    Dermaut, L R; Vanden Bulcke, M M

    1986-03-01

    Twelve different systems of intrusion, based on the principle of the "segmented arch," were evaluated on a macerated human skull. The number of teeth involved in the anterior unit and the location of the application points of intrusive force were considered to be variables. Initial displacements of the anterior teeth after loading were registered by means of the laser reflection technique and double exposure holographic recordings. An attempt was made to define "this" intrusive system, achieving the most genuine intrusion (for definition, see text) without flaring of the teeth. When two central incisors were incorporated in the sectional wire, strong torque forces appeared, especially when the intrusive forces seized more distally. When four or six anterior teeth were pinned in the sectional wire, tooth movement seemed to be under better control. When the six front teeth were incorporated in the sectional wire, the center of resistance (for definition, see text) was located more to the distal side of the canines. It seemed more difficult, however, to define the center of resistance of the four incisors; it was situated approximately distal to the lateral incisors. In some of the intrusive systems, the teeth underwent independent mesial or distal rotations. This was easily observed with the laser measuring techniques used.

  9. One-step surgical approach of a thoracic aortic aneurysm in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Eduardo; Josa, Miguel; Nomdedeu, Benet; Ramírez, José; García-Valentín, Antonio; Mestres, Carlos A; Mulet, Jaime

    2007-04-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by infections, thrombocytopenia, and eczema. We present a 33-year-old man with this syndrome who underwent a one-stage ascending aorta, aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair under moderate hypothermia and continuous visceral and cerebral perfusion. Histologic examination showed the presence of an aortitis with granulomatous inflammatory response and multinucleated cells.

  10. Dental Arch Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Straightening teeth is an arduous process requiring months, often years, of applying corrective pressure by means of arch wires-better known as brace-which may have to be changed several times in the course of treatment. A new method has been developed by Dr. George Andreasen, orthodontist and dental scientist at the University of Iowa. The key is a new type of arch wire material, called Nitinol, with exceptional elasticity which helps reduce the required number of brace changes. An alloy of nickel and titanium, Nitinol was originally developed for aerospace applications by the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, now the Naval Surface Weapons Laboratory, White Oaks, Maryland. NASA subsequently conducted additional research on the properties of Nitinol and on procedures for processing the metal.

  11. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the abdomen Most aneurysms are found during ...

  12. Influence of IABP-Induced Abdominal Occlusions on Aortic Hemodynamics: A Patient-Specific Computational Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Maria Vittoria; Renzulli, Attilio; Fragomeni, Gionata

    Intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) is used as temporary mechanical assistance in case of cardiovascular diseases, even if different hemodynamic problems and, thus, clinical complications may happen, such as the decrease of visceral perfusion. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) study was carried out to investigate the effects of different IABP-induced abdominal occlusions on patient-specific aortic flow. Two possible sizes (25 and 34 cm) and two locations (2 and 3 cm) of the balloon were compared, modeling four abdominal occlusions and numerically reproducing IAB inflation/deflation behavior. The results highlighted that the perfusion in renal, mesenteric, and iliac arteries decreases when the abdominal occlusion increases with balloon inflation. The study illustrates also how the balloon size affects the flow in aorta vessels in both locations, and that the positioning is of little relevance for the 34 cm balloon, whereas it influences the aortic flow very much in case of 25 cm IAB. This analysis demonstrates how the IAB-induced occlusion may vary the abdominal circulation; therefore, the correct size and positioning are emphasized for patient's outcome.

  13. Endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm followed by type B dissection.

    PubMed

    Shingaki, Masami; Kato, Masaaki; Motoki, Manabu; Kubo, Yoji; Isaji, Toshihiko; Okubo, Nobukazu

    2016-10-01

    An 86-year-old man with an abdominal aortic aneurysm was diagnosed with type B aortic dissection accompanied by a patent false lumen that started at the distal arch of the thoracic aorta and terminated at the left common iliac artery. Meticulous preoperative assessment detected 3 large intimal tears in the descending aorta, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and left common iliac artery. We performed single-stage thoracic and abdominal endovascular aneurysm repair and concomitant axillary-axillary bypass. The abdominal aortic aneurysm with type B aortic dissection was successfully treated using a single-stage endovascular stent graft, without any complications due to the careful preoperative examinations.

  14. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... By Mayo Clinic Staff Aortic valve stenosis — or aortic stenosis — occurs when the heart's aortic valve narrows. This ... pressure may prevent or slow the development of aortic stenosis. Ask your doctor if you need to lower ...

  15. The ARCHES Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motch, C.; Arches Consortium

    2015-09-01

    The Astronomical Resource Cross-matching for High Energy Studies (ARCHES) project is a FP7-Space funded programme started in 2013 and involving the Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg including the CDS (France), the Leibniz- Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (Germany), the University of Leicester (UK), the Universidad de Cantabria (IFCA, Spain) and the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (Spain). ARCHES will provide the international astronomical community with well-characterised multi-wavelength data in the form of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for large samples of objects extracted from the 3XMM X-ray catalogue of serendipitous sources. The project develops new tools implementing fully probabilistic simultaneous cross-correlation of several catalogues and a multi-wavelength finder for clusters of galaxies. SEDs are based on an enhanced version of the 3XMM catalogue and on a careful selection of the most relevant multi-wavelength archival catalogues. In order to ensure the largest audience, SEDs will be distributed to the international community through CDS services and through the Virtual Observatory. These enhanced resources are tested in the framework of several science cases. More information may be found at http://www.arches-fp7.eu/

  16. [Dynamic and cinematic evaluation of the function of bioprosthesis in the aortic position: tester of cardiac valves].

    PubMed

    Bustamante, J; Santamaría, J; Infante, O; Flores, P; Juárez, A

    1996-01-01

    Twenty four pericardial valvular prostheses were tested in a valvular tester device. The valves considered were: 12 valves of the model that has being already in clinical use, manufactured in the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología "Ignacio Chávez", (INC II) and 12 valves of a model in an experimental stage, (PRT I.) The inner diameter in the two group considered were: 17, 19 and 21 mm. All the valves were tested in the aortic position in the valvular tester device. Behavior of the valvular prostheses were examined at various rates of pulsation, 60, 77, 105 and 159 per minute, with an ejection volume of 70 and 80 ml (range of flows between 4200 and 12720 ml min1). The pressure of the ventricular and aortic cameras were registered continuously, by external transducers, and in the other hand, the kinetic of the valves and the degree of opening were evaluated for direct view trough an special window. The grade of incompetence was too evaluated and expressed in percent of the stroke volume. The transvalvular pressure gradient was lower in INC II model valves, specially at moderate and high flows, and at same time had a largest functional area. The degree of incompetence was higher in the 19 and 21 mm diameter valvular subgroups than the same subgroups in the PRT I model. In relation to the 17 mm subgroup, significant differences were not find. The use of the valvular tester showed a basic utility in the hydrodynamic evaluation of the news bioprostheses design, and so in the quality control of the valves than has being manufacturing.

  17. Evaluation of the relationship between the static measurement of transverse arch flexibility of the forefoot and gait parameters in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Takashi; Muneta, Takeshi; Fukui, Tsutomu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the relationship between the static measurement of the transverse arch of the forefoot, using a 3-dimensional (3D) foot scanner, and kinetics and kinematics of gait parameters in the sagittal plane. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy subjects participated in this study. The transverse arch of the forefoot was measured under three conditions as follows: condition 1, sitting; condition 2, standing; and condition 3, foot forward and lower leg tilting anteriorly to the maximum position with heel contact. Gait parameters were recorded using a 3D motion analysis system and force plate. Correlation coefficients between TAF for each comparison of conditions and gait parameters were calculated using the Spearman correlation analysis. [Results] Rates of the transverse arch of the forefoot width and height between condition 2 and condition 3 were significantly correlated with the anterior and posterior component of ground reaction forces, the hip joint extension angle, and the ankle plantar flexion moment. [Conclusion] Our study’s findings indicated that increased stiffness of the transverse arch of the forefoot was related to the increase in ankle plantar moment, and decreased stiffness of the transverse arch of the forefoot was related to the increase in hip joint extension angle during gait. PMID:28356622

  18. [Modern aortic surgery in Marfan syndrome--2011].

    PubMed

    Kallenbach, K; Schwill, S; Karck, M

    2011-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a hereditary disease with a prevalence of 2-3 in 10,000 births, leading to a fibrillin connective tissue disorder with manifestations in the skeleton, eye, skin, dura mater and in particular the cardiovascular system. Since other syndromes demonstrate similar vascular manifestations, but therapy may differ significantly, diagnosis should be established using the revised Ghent nosology in combination with genotypic analysis in specialized Marfan centres. The formation of aortic root aneurysms with the subsequent risk of acute aortic dissection type A (AADA) or aortic rupture limits life expectancy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Therefore, prophylactic replacement of the aortic root needs to be performed before the catastrophic event of AADA can occur. The goal of surgery is the complete resection of pathological aortic tissue. This can be achieved with excellent results by using a (mechanically) valved conduit that replaces both the aortic valve and the aortic root (Bentall operation). However, the need for lifelong anticoagulation with Coumadin can be avoided using the aortic valve sparing reimplantation technique according to David. The long-term durability of the reconstructed valve is favourable, and further technical improvements may improve longevity. Although results of prospective randomised long-term studies comparing surgical techniques are lacking, the David operation has become the surgical method of choice for aortic root aneurysms, not only at the Heidelberg Marfan Centre. Replacement of the aneurysmal dilated aortic arch is performed under moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest combined with antegrade cerebral perfusion using a heart-lung machine, which we also use in thoracic or thoracoabdominal aneurysms. Close post-operative follow-up in a Marfan centre is pivotal for the early detection of pathological changes on the diseased aorta.

  19. Experimental Animal Models Evaluating the Causal Role of Lipoprotein(a) in Atherosclerosis and Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yeang, Calvin; Cotter, Bruno; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2016-02-01

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], comprised of apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] and a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, is a genetically determined, causal risk factor for cardiovascular disease and calcific aortic valve stenosis. Lp(a) is the major plasma lipoprotein carrier of oxidized phospholipids, is pro-inflammatory, inhibits plasminogen activation, and promotes smooth muscle cell proliferation, as defined mostly through in vitro studies. Although Lp(a) is not expressed in commonly studied laboratory animals, mouse and rabbit models transgenic for Lp(a) and apo(a) have been developed to address their pathogenicity in vivo. These models have provided significant insights into the pathophysiology of Lp(a), particularly in understanding the mechanisms of Lp(a) in mediating atherosclerosis. Studies in Lp(a)-transgenic mouse models have demonstrated that apo(a) is retained in atheromas and suggest that it promotes fatty streak formation. Furthermore, rabbit models have shown that Lp(a) promotes atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. However, many of these models have limitations. Mouse models need to be transgenic for both apo(a) and human apolipoprotein B-100 since apo(a) does not covalently associated with mouse apoB to form Lp(a). In established mouse and rabbit models of atherosclerosis, Lp(a) levels are low, generally < 20 mg/dL, which is considered to be within the normal range in humans. Furthermore, only one apo(a) isoform can be expressed in a given model whereas over 40 isoforms exist in humans. Mouse models should also ideally be studied in an LDL receptor negative background for atherosclerosis studies, as mice don't develop sufficiently elevated plasma cholesterol to study atherosclerosis in detail. With recent data that cardiovascular disease and calcific aortic valve stenosis is causally mediated by the LPA gene, development of optimized Lp(a)-transgenic animal models will provide an opportunity to further understand the mechanistic role of Lp(a) in

  20. [Congenital aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M

    2001-08-01

    Recent advances in and controversies concerning the management of children with congenital valvular aortic stenosis are discussed. In neonates with critical aortic stenosis, improved survival has recently been reported after surgical open valvotomy and balloon valvuloplasty, although it is difficult at this point to compare the results of the two procedures and determine their differential indications. Good results have also been achieved after extended aortic valvuloplasty for recurrent aortic stenosis and/or insufficiency, but the length of follow-up in these patients is still short. The technique first reported in 1991 for bilateral enlargement fo a small annulus permits the insertion of an aortic valve 3-4 sizes larger than the native annulus. It entails no risk of distorting the mitral valve, damaging the conduction system or important branches of the coronary arteries, or resulting in left ventricular dysfunction. The Ross procedure is now widely applied in the West, with reports of early mortality rates of less than 5% and event-free survival rates of 80-90% during follow-up of 4-8 years. Longer follow-up and continued careful evaluation are required to resolve the issue of possible dilatation and subsequent neoaortic valve dysfunction and pulmonary stenosis due to allograft degeneration after pulmonary autograft root replacement in children.

  1. Ambient resonance of Mesa Arch, Canyonlands National Park, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Alison M.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Thorne, Michael S.

    2015-08-01

    We analyzed the resonance characteristics of a prominent natural arch in Canyonlands National Park, Mesa Arch, as measured from ambient seismic data. Evaluating spectral and polarization attributes, we distinguished the first four resonant frequencies of the arch, 2.9, 6.0, 6.9, and 8.5 Hz, as well as basic properties of the associated mode shapes. We then affirmed experimental data using 3-D numerical modal analysis, providing estimates of material properties and clarifying vibrational mode shapes. Monitoring resonant frequencies over time, we searched for shifts associated with changing environmental conditions and long-term progressive damage. We measured ~3% direct daily variation in resonant frequency associated with changing rock temperature, thermal stress, and stiffening of the rock matrix. Independent tilt data showed similar diurnal cycles associated with thermoelastic stresses and deformation of the arch. We observed no permanent resonant frequency shifts related to irreversible damage of Mesa Arch during our study period.

  2. Evaluation of Groundwater Leakage into a Drainage Tunnel in Jinping-I Arch Dam Foundation in Southwestern China: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Feng; Hong, Jia-Min; Zheng, Hua-Kang; Li, Yi; Hu, Ran; Zhou, Chuang-Bing

    2016-03-01

    The Jinping-I double-curvature arch dam, located in the middle reach of Yalong River and with a maximum height of 305 m, is the world's highest dam of this type that has been completed. Since the second stage of reservoir impounding, after which the reservoir water level was gradually raised by about 232 m, a significant amount of leakage was observed from the drainage holes drilled in the lowest drainage tunnel at the left bank abutment at an elevation of 1595 m a.s.l. (above sea level), with an observed maximum pressure of about 0.3 MPa. A number of investigations, including water quality analysis, digital borehole imaging, tunnel geological mapping, and in situ groundwater monitoring, were performed to examine the source of leaking, the groundwater flow paths, and the performance of the grouting curtains. By defining two objective functions using the in situ time series measurements of flow rate and hydraulic head, respectively, a multiobjective inverse modeling procedure was proposed to evaluate the permeability of the foundation rocks that was underestimated in the design stage. This procedure takes advantage of the orthogonal design, finite element forward modeling of the transient groundwater flow, artificial neural network, and non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm, hence significantly reducing the computational cost and improving the reliability of the inversed results. The geological structures that lead to the leakage were identified and the seepage flow behaviors in the dam foundation and the left bank abutment were assessed. Based on the field measurements and the inverse modeling results, the effects of the engineering treatments of the leakage event on the dam safety were analyzed. It has been demonstrated that the seepage control system is effective in lowering the groundwater level and limiting the amount of seepage in the dam foundation, and the leakage event does not pose a threat to the safety of the dam.

  3. Double arch mirror study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a method of mounting light weight glass mirrors for astronomical telescopes compatible with the goals of the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) was investigated. A 20 in. diameter double arch lightweight mirror previously fabricated was modified to use a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed and fabricated. The mounting concept of the double mounting mirror is outlined. The modifications made to the mirror, fabrication of the mirror mount, and room temperature testing of the mirror and mount and the extension of the mirror and mount concept to a full size (40 in. diameter) primary mirror for SIRTF are discussed.

  4. Surgical Treatment of Patients Enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Conditions (GenTAC)

    PubMed Central

    Song, Howard K.; Bavaria, Joseph E.; Kindem, Mark W.; Holmes, Kathryn W.; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Basson, Craig T.; Eagle, Kim; Tolunay, H. Eser; Kroner, Barbara L.; Dietz, Hal; Menashe, Victor; Devereux, Richard B.; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Ravekes, William; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Brambilla, Donald; Stylianou, Mario P.; Hendershot, Tabitha; Mitchell, Megan S.; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic disorders are an important cause of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) in young patients. Despite advances in the treatment of genetically triggered TAAs, the optimal syndrome-specific treatment approach remains undefined. We used data from the NIH-funded, multicenter National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC) to characterize the contemporary surgical treatment of patients with genetically triggered TAAs. Methods GenTAC’s aim is to collect longitudinal clinical data and banked biospecimens from 2800 patients with genetically triggered TAAs. We analyzed data from all patients enrolled in GenTAC to date whose clinical data were available (n=606; mean age, 37.5 years). Results The patients’ primary diagnoses included Marfan syndrome (35.8%), bicuspid aortic valve with aneurysm (29.2%), and familial TAAs and dissections (10.7%). More than half of patients (56.4%) had undergone at least 1 operation; the most common indications were aneurysm (85.7%), valve dysfunction (65.8%), and dissection (25.4%). Surgical procedures included replacement of the aortic root (50.6%), ascending aorta (64.8%), aortic arch (27.9%), and descending or thoracoabdominal aorta (12.4%). Syndrome-specific differences in age, indications for surgery, and procedure type were identified. Conclusions Patients with genetically transmitted TAAs evaluated in tertiary care centers frequently undergo surgery. Aneurysm repairs most commonly involve the aortic root and ascending aorta; distal repairs are less common. Like TAAs themselves, complications of TAAs, including dissection and aortic valve dysfunction, are important indications for surgery. Future studies will focus on syndrome- and gene-specific phenotypes, biomarkers, treatments, and outcomes to improve the treatment of patients with TAAs. PMID:19699898

  5. [Aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    Acute aortic dissection suddenly occurrs and results in a variety of catastrophic sequelae including cardiac tamponade, rupture, and organ malperfusion. In acute stage (< 2 weeks), according to the classifications on the region of aortic dissection, the condition of the false channel and the onset, appropriate medical, surgical, or endovascular treatments including endovascular aneurysm repair followed by the rapid and accurate diagnosis of aortic dissection using computed tomography and ultrasound should be performed without delay. In the chronic stage (> 2 weeks), the behavior of the chronic dissection or residual distal dissection after the initial treatment should be followed-up carefully with best medical treatment at the regular intervals. If necessary, appropriate surgical and endovascular treatment should be carried out in the proper timing before rupture.

  6. Aortic coarctation, aneurysm, and ventricular dysfunction in an asymptomatic infant.

    PubMed

    García, Ana I; Aguilar, Juan M; García, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    Aortic arch coarctation with post-coarctation aneurysm is rare in infants. We present the case of an asymptomatic 3-month-old infant with severe left ventricular dysfunction in this setting. The patient underwent surgical repair, and the left ventricular ejection fraction improved to recovery the 4th post-operative month.

  7. The ARCHES project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motch, C.; Arches Consortium

    2014-07-01

    ARCHES (Astronomical Resource Cross-matching for High Energy Studies) is a FP7-Space funded project started in 2013 and involving the Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg including the CDS (France), the Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (Germany), the University of Leicester (UK), the Universidad de Cantabria (IFCA, Spain) and the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (Madrid, Spain). ARCHES aims at providing the international astronomical community with well-characterised multi-wavelength data in the form of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for large sets of objects extracted from the 3XMM catalogue. The project develops new tools implementing fully probabilistic simultaneous cross-correlation of several catalogues. SEDs are based on an enhanced version of the 3XMM catalogue and on a careful selection of the most relevant multi-wavelength archival catalogues. In order to ensure the largest audience, SEDs will be distributed to the international community through CDS services and through the Virtual Observatory. These enhanced resources are currently tested in the framework of several science cases. An integrated cluster finder is developed at Potsdam, AGN science is studied at Leicester and IFCA while populations of Galactic X-ray sources are investigated at Strasbourg and Madrid.

  8. Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    severe aortic stenosis . Figure 1F. Oblique axial cine bright blood imaging through the valve plane of the aorta, demonstrates the aortic valve to...the ascending aorta. This moderate to large jet is consistent with moderate to severe aortic stenosis . No diastolic jet to suggest aortic ...conditions. Functional impairment of the aortic valve—namely aortic stenosis and aortic regurgitation—is the most common complication (in up to 68-85% of

  9. Deformable Surface Model for the Evaluation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Treated with an Endovascular Sealing System.

    PubMed

    Casciaro, Mariano E; El-Batti, Salma; Chironi, Gilles; Simon, Alain; Mousseaux, Elie; Armentano, Ricardo L; Alsac, Jean-Marc; Craiem, Damian

    2016-05-01

    Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is responsible for 1-3% of all deaths among the elderly population in developed countries. A novel endograft proposes an endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS) system that isolates the aneurysm wall from blood flow using a polymer-filled endobag that surrounds two balloon-expandable stents. The volume of injected polymer is determined by monitoring the endobag pressure but the final AAA expansion remains unknown. We conceived and developed a fully deformable surface model for the comparison of pre-operative sac lumen size and final endobag size (measured using a follow-up scan) with the volume of injected polymer. Computed tomography images were acquired for eight patients. Aneurysms were manually and automatically segmented twice by the same observer. The injected polymer volume resulted 9% higher than the aneurysm pre-operative lumen size (p < 0.05), and 11% lower than the final follow-up endobag volume (p < 0.01). The automated method required minimal user interaction; it was fast and used a single set of parameters for all subjects. Intra-observer and manual vs. automated variability of measured volumes were 0.35 ± 2.11 and 0.07 ± 3.04 mL, respectively. Deformable surface models were used to quantify AAA size and showed that EVAS system devices tended to expand the sac lumen size.

  10. Heterogeneity in the Segmental Development of the Aortic Tree: Impact on Management of Genetically Triggered Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Hisham M.F.

    2014-01-01

    An extensive search of the medical literature examining the development of the thoracic aortic tree reveals that the thoracic aorta does not develop as one unit or in one stage: the oldest part of the thoracic aorta is the descending aorta with the aortic arch being the second oldest, developing under influence from the neural crest cell. Following in chronological order are the proximal ascending aorta and aortic root, which develop from a conotruncal origin. Different areas of the thoracic aorta develop under the influence of different gene sets. These parts develop from different cell lineages: the aortic root (the conotruncus), developing from the mesoderm; the ascending aorta and aortic arch, developing from the neural crest cells; and the descending aorta from the mesoderm. Findings illustrate that the thoracic aorta is not a single entity, in developmental terms. It develops from three or four distinct areas, at different stages of embryonic life, and under different sets of genes and signaling pathways. Genetically triggered thoracic aortic aneurysms are not a monolithic group but rather share a multi-genetic origin. Identification of therapeutic targets should be based on the predilection of certain genes to cause aneurysmal disease in specific aortic segments. PMID:26798739

  11. Staged total exclusion of the aorta for chronic type B aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Dias Perera, Anton; Willis, Alan K; Fernandez, Joss D; Garrett, H Edward; Wolf, Bradley A

    2010-11-01

    Hybrid techniques using extra-anatomic bypass of critical aortic branches to enable endovascular treatment of complex aortic pathology have been previously described. A staged endograft repair of a complex, chronic Stanford type B aortic dissection with aneurysmal degeneration is reported in a 50-year-old man. The aneurysmal portion of the dissection extended from the distal arch to both common iliac arteries and was covered with an endograft from the ascending aorta to both external iliac arteries. Aortic arch branches, visceral, and renal arteries were bypassed using open technique. The patient had no neurologic complications. This case report illustrates the feasibility of the hybrid technique in selected high-risk patients when confronted with complex aortic pathology.

  12. [Redo surgery for residual distal dissection after the limited proximal aortic replacement for Stanford type A acute aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hitoshi

    2013-07-01

    Redo surgery for residual distal dissection after the limited proximal aortic repair for Stanford type A acute aortic dissection remains challenging with some difficulties. In essence, redo aortic repair predominantly depends on the significantly dilated parts of the residual dissection. According to that, the strategy including median or lateral approach and 1 or 2 staged repair would be determined with careful consideration for patients' age and function of the vital organs such as brain, heart, lung, liver, and kidney. Generally, for relatively young and low-risk patients, an aggressive 1 stage repair of the entire arch to descending aorta through a left thoracotomy is feasible. Meanwhile, 2 stage repair is beneficial for elderly high-risk patients, which consists of the 1st total arch replacement with elephant trunk through a median sternotomy followed secondly by the open descending aortic repair through a lateral thoracotomy or recently-advanced less-invasive endovascular aortic repair. In the initial repair, more aggressive total arch replacement with elephant trunk or frozen elephant trunk might be another useful option to potentially prevent such troublesome behaviors of the residual dissecting aorta requiring redo surgery in the late stage.

  13. Multidetector-row computed tomography of thoracic aortic anomalies in dogs and cats: Patent ductus arteriosus and vascular rings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of extracardiac intrathoracic vascular anomalies is of clinical importance, but remains challenging. Traditional imaging modalities, such as radiography, echocardiography, and angiography, are inherently limited by the difficulties of a 2-dimensional approach to a 3-dimensional object. We postulated that accurate characterization of malformations of the aorta would benefit from 3-dimensional assessment. Therefore, multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) was chosen as a 3-dimensional, new, and noninvasive imaging technique. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients with 2 common diseases of the intrathoracic aorta, either patent ductus arteriosus or vascular ring anomaly, by contrast-enhanced 64-row computed tomography. Results Electrocardiography (ECG)-gated and thoracic nongated MDCT images were reviewed in identified cases of either a patent ductus arteriosus or vascular ring anomaly. Ductal size and morphology were determined in 6 dogs that underwent ECG-gated MDCT. Vascular ring anomalies were characterized in 7 dogs and 3 cats by ECG-gated MDCT or by a nongated thoracic standard protocol. Cardiac ECG-gated MDCT clearly displayed the morphology, length, and caliber of the patent ductus arteriosus in 6 affected dogs. Persistent right aortic arch was identified in 10 animals, 8 of which showed a coexisting aberrant left subclavian artery. A mild dilation of the proximal portion of the aberrant subclavian artery near its origin of the aorta was present in 4 dogs, and a diverticulum analogous to the human Kommerell's diverticulum was present in 2 cats. Conclusions Contrast-enhanced MDCT imaging of thoracic anomalies gives valuable information about the exact aortic arch configuration. Furthermore, MDCT was able to characterize the vascular branching patterns in dogs and cats with a persistent right aortic arch and the morphology and size of the patent ductus arteriosus in affected dogs. This additional information can be of help

  14. Surgery for supravalvular aortic stenosis - the three-patch technique.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz, Elena; Koolbergen, Dave; Adsuar, Alejandro; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe the three-patch technique for repair of supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). Supravalvular aortic stenosis is a rare malformation as a result of an abnormal thickening of the aortic wall. SVAS may present in two forms: a localized form (affecting only the aortic sinotubular junction) and a diffuse form, where the aortic arch and its side branches are also affected. Since 1960, multiple surgical techniques have been described with the aim of relieving the aortic narrowing and restoring the aortic root. We present the three-patch technique as originally developed by Brom. After transection of the aorta at the sinotubular junction, three longitudinal incisions are made into the three sinuses. The aortic root geometry is then restored by placement of three separate patches of autologous pericardium in the opened sinuses. Brom's technique provides a complete and symmetric restoration of the aortic anatomy. The technique is illustrated by angiographies, surgical drawings, videos and a review of the literature. The results of the three-patch technique are good and our long-term experience will be described.

  15. Percutaneous Closure of an Iatrogenic Puncture of the Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.J. Venn, G.E.; Redwood, S.R.

    2003-08-15

    We report on the management of a rare complication of a vascular sheath being placed inadvertently in the aorta rather than in the venous system following thrombolytic therapy administration in a patient presenting with an acute myocardial infarction and complete heart block.

  16. MMP-2 Isoforms in Aortic Tissue and Serum of Patients with Ascending Aortic Aneurysms and Aortic Root Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Tscheuschler, Anke; Meffert, Philipp; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Heilmann, Claudia; Kocher, Nadja; Uffelmann, Xenia; Discher, Philipp; Siepe, Matthias; Kari, Fabian A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The need for biological markers of aortic wall stress and risk of rupture or dissection of ascending aortic aneurysms is obvious. To date, wall stress cannot be related to a certain biological marker. We analyzed aortic tissue and serum for the presence of different MMP-2 isoforms to find a connection between serum and tissue MMP-2 and to evaluate the potential of different MMP-2 isoforms as markers of high wall stress. Methods Serum and aortic tissue from n = 24 patients and serum from n = 19 healthy controls was analyzed by ELISA and gelatin zymography. 24 patients had ascending aortic aneurysms, 10 of them also had aortic root aneurysms. Three patients had normally functioning valves, 12 had regurgitation alone, eight had regurgitation and stenosis and one had only stenosis. Patients had bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valves (9/15). Serum samples were taken preoperatively, and the aortic wall specimen collected during surgical aortic repair. Results Pro-MMP-2 was identified in all serum and tissue samples. Pro-MMP-2 was detected in all tissue and serum samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms, irrespective of valve morphology or other clinical parameters and in serum from healthy controls. We also identified active MMP-2 in all tissue samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms. None of the analyzed serum samples revealed signals relatable to active MMP-2. No correlation between aortic tissue total MMP-2 or tissue pro-MMP-2 or tissue active MMP-2 and serum MMP-2 was found and tissue MMP-2/pro-MMP-2/active MMP-2 did not correlate with aortic diameter. This evidence shows that pro-MMP-2 is the predominant MMP-2 species in serum of patients and healthy individuals and in aneurysmatic aortic tissue, irrespective of aortic valve configuration. Active MMP-2 species are either not released into systemic circulation or not detectable in serum. There is no reliable connection between aortic tissue—and serum MMP-2

  17. Mathematical definition of the shape of dental arches in human permanent healthy dentitions.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Tartaglia, G

    1994-08-01

    Dental arch shape was studied in 50 men and 45 women aged 20-27 years with sound dentitions. Maxillary and mandibular arches were reconstructed by a fourth-order polynomial and a 'mixed' elliptical (anterior teeth), plus parabolic (post-canine teeth) interpolation of buccal cusp tips (central incisor to second molar). The maxillary arch resulted wider than the mandibular arch regardless of gender. Gender differences were found especially in the maxillary arch, where they reflect more a size discrepancy than a shape difference. The polynomial interpolation allowed the evaluation of arch asymmetry, which resulted negligible in all the subjects. The elliptical plus parabolic interpolation gave mean plots which were well superimposable to the ones obtained by the polynomial interpolation. These curves are geometrically simple and can be used for the mathematical description of dental arch shape in non-patient subjects. Moreover, they allow separate analysis of teeth with a different functional meaning.

  18. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  19. Evaluation of the harmonic scalpel in open surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zeyu; Chen, Zhe; Peng, Lin

    2012-03-01

    The harmonic scalpel is a hemostatic device primarily designed for use in laparoscopic surgery. During the last few years, many surgeons have begun to use the harmonic scalpel in open surgery. Several papers have cited the benefits of the device compared with conventional knot-tying techniques; however, no evidence showing the advantages of using the harmonic scalpel in complicated abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery has been presented. The aim of the present study is to determine the value of the harmonic scalpel in open operation for AAA. A total of 153 patients who underwent open surgery for AAA at the Department of Vascular Surgery of Guangdong General Hospital, China between January 2001 and December 2010, were retrospectively analyzed. Open surgery performed with the harmonic scalpel on 105 patients was compared with open operation using conventional knot-tying techniques on 48 patients. The operative time, intraoperative blood loss, total postoperative drainage fluid volumes, hospital stay, and postoperative complications between the two groups were compared. The harmonic scalpel group was associated with a shorter operation time (113.2 ± 23.6 min vs. 232.1 ± 39.2 min, P < 0.01) and lower intraoperative blood loss (126.1 ± 96.6 ml vs. 592.1 ± 207.2 ml, P < 0.01). Postoperative drainage fluid volumes were greater in the conventional surgery group than in the harmonic scalpel group (702.1 ± 192.8 ml vs. 198.5 ± 97.4 ml, P < 0.01). The hospital stay was shorter for the harmonic scalpel group than for the conventional surgery group (10.7 ± 3.3 d vs. 16.5 ± 4.7 d, P < 0.05). No differences between the postoperative complications or hospital mortality of the two groups were found. The harmonic scalpel is a safe and minimally invasive tool in open surgery for AAA and is associated with shorter operative time, shorter hospital stay, and lower intraoperative blood loss and postoperative drainage fluid volumes compared with conventional knot

  20. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cause of a thoracic aortic aneurysm is hardening of the arteries . This condition is more common ... aortic aneurysm repair - open Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Hardening of the arteries High blood pressure Marfan syndrome ...

  1. Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve. Also, a narrowing of the aortic valve (aortic stenosis) can be associated with leaking. High blood pressure (hypertension). High blood pressure may stretch the root of the aorta where the aortic valve sits. The valve flaps ( ...

  2. [Late reoperations after repaired Stanford type A aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Huang, F H; Li, L P; Su, C H; Qin, W; Xu, M; Wang, L M; Jiang, Y S; Qiu, Z B; Xiao, L Q; Zhang, C; Shi, H W; Chen, X

    2017-04-01

    Objective: To summarize the experience of reoperations on patients who had late complications related to previous aortic surgery for Stanford type A dissection. Methods: From August 2008 to October 2016, 14 patients (10 male and 4 female patients) who underwent previous cardiac surgery for Stanford type A aortic dissection accepted reoperations on the late complications at Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Nanjing Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University. The range of age was from 41 to 76 years, the mean age was (57±12) years. In these patients, first time operations were ascending aorta replacement procedure in 3 patients, ascending aorta combined with partial aortic arch replacement in 4 patients, aortic root replacement (Bentall) associated with Marfan syndrome in 3 patients, aortic valve combined with ascending aorta replacement (Wheat) in 1 patient, ascending aorta combined with Sun's procedure in 1 patient, Wheat combined with Sun's procedure in 1 patient, Bentall combined with Sun's procedure in 1 patient. The interval between two operations averaged 0.3 to 10.0 years with a mean of (4.8±3.1) years. The reasons for reoperations included part anastomotic split, aortic valve insufficiency, false aneurysm formation, enlargement of remant aortal and false cavity. The selection of reoperation included anastomotic repair, aortic valve replacement, total arch replacement and Sun's procedure. Results: Of the 14 patients, the cardiopulmonary bypass times were 107 to 409 minutes with a mean of (204±51) minutes, cross clamp times were 60 to 212 minutes with a mean of (108±35) minutes, selective cerebral perfusion times were 16 to 38 minutes with a mean of (21±11) minutes. All patients survived from the operation, one patient died from severe pulmonary infection 50 days after operation. Three patients had postoperative complications, including acute renal failure of 2 patients and pulmonary infection of 1 patient, and these patients were

  3. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with Chimney and Snorkel Grafts: Indications, Techniques and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rakesh P.; Katsargyris, Athanasios Verhoeven, Eric L. G.; Adam, Donald J.; Hardman, John A.

    2013-12-15

    The chimney technique in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (Ch-EVAR) involves placement of a stent or stent-graft parallel to the main aortic stent-graft to extend the proximal or distal sealing zone while maintaining side branch patency. Ch-EVAR can facilitate endovascular repair of juxtarenal and aortic arch pathology using available standard aortic stent-grafts, therefore, eliminating the manufacturing delays required for customised fenestrated and branched stent-grafts. Several case series have demonstrated the feasibility of Ch-EVAR both in acute and elective cases with good early results. This review discusses indications, technique, and the current available clinical data on Ch-EVAR.

  4. Aortic embolization of an Edwards SAPIEN prosthesis due to sigmoid left ventricular hypertrophy: Case report.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Isa Öner; Koklu, Erkan; Arslan, Sakir; Cagirci, Goksel; Kucukseymen, Selcuk

    2016-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is considered an alternative therapy in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Although a minimally invasive procedure, it is not free from complications, one of which is valve embolization at the time of TAVI. We present a case of embolization of a balloon-expandable aortic valve due to sigmoid left ventricular hypertrophy and managed with a second valve without surgery. The embolized valve was repositioned in the aortic arch between the left common carotid artery and the brachiocephalic trunk.

  5. Thoracic Aorta 3D Hemodynamics in Pediatric and Young Adult Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Bradley D.; van Ooij, Pim; Barker, Alex J.; Carr, Maria; Gabbour, Maya; Schnell, Susanne; Jarvis, Kelly B.; Carr, James C.; Markl, Michael; Rigsby, Cynthia; Robinson, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the 3D hemodynamics in the thoracic aorta of pediatric and young adult bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) patients. Methods 4D flow MRI was performed in 30 pediatric and young adult BAV patients (age: 13.9 ± 4.4 (range: [3.4, 20.7]) years old, M:F = 17:13) as part of this Institutional Review Board-approved study. Nomogram-based aortic root Z-scores were calculated to assess aortic dilatation and degree of aortic stenosis (AS) severity was assessed on MRI. Data analysis included calculation of time-averaged systolic 3D wall shear stress (WSSsys) along the entire aorta wall, and regional quantification of maximum and mean WSSsys and peak systolic velocity (velsys) in the ascending aorta (AAo), arch, and descending aorta (DAo). The 4D flow MRI AAo velsys was also compared with echocardiography peak velocity measurements. Results There was a positive correlation with both mean and max AAo WSSsys and peak AAo velsys (mean: r = 0.84, P < 0.001, max: r = 0.94, P < 0.001) and AS (mean: rS = 0.43, P = 0.02, max: rS = 0.70, P < 0.001). AAo peak velocity was significantly higher when measured with echo compared with 4D flow MRI (2.1 ± 0.98 m/s versus 1.27 ± 0.49 m/s, P < 0.001). Conclusion In pediatric and young adult patients with BAV, AS and peak ascending aorta velocity are associated with increased AAo WSS, while aortic dilation, age, and body surface area do not significantly impact AAo hemodynamics. Prospective studies are required to establish the role of WSS as a risk-stratification tool in these patients. PMID:25644073

  6. Analysis of clinical features of painless aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao-yu; Zou, Yuan-lin; Chai, Bo-lan; Zeng, He-song

    2014-08-01

    The clinical characteristics of painless aortic dissection were investigated in order to improve the awareness of diagnosis and treatment of atypical aortic dissection. The 482 cases of aortic dissection were divided into painless group and pain group, and the data of the two groups were retrospectively analyzed. The major clinical symptom was pain in 447 cases (92.74%), while 35 patients (7.26%) had no typical pain. The gender, age, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking and drinking history had no statistically significant differences between the two groups (P>0.05). The proportion of Stanford type A in painless group was significantly higher than that in pain group (48.57% vs. 21.03%, P=0.006). The incidence of unconsciousness in the painless group was significantly higher than that in the pain group (14.29% vs. 3.58%, P=0.011). The incidence of hypotension in painless group was significantly higher than that in pain group for 4.26 folds (P=0.01). Computed tomography angiography (CTA) examination revealed that the incidence of aortic arch involved in the painless group was significantly higher than that in the pain group (19.23% vs. 5.52%, P=0.019). It was concluded that the incidence of painless aortic dissection was higher in Stanford A type patients, commonly seen in the patients complicated with hypotension and unconsciousness. CTA examination revealed higher incidence of aortic arch involvement.

  7. Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bakaeen, Faisal G; Rosengart, Todd K; Carabello, Blase A

    2017-01-03

    This issue provides a clinical overview of aortic stenosis, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  8. Sutureless surgical techniques for arch aneurysm repair in a patient with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi; Takasaki, Taiichi; Takahashi, Shinya; Sueda, Taijiro

    2014-01-01

    In patients with vasculo-Behçet's disease, endovascular stent graft is a reasonable treatment from the viewpoint of prevention of an anastomotic pseudo-aneurysm. We report a case of total arch replacement combined with open stent grafting technique to the downstream aorta and graft inclusion into sino-tubular junction as sutureless surgical techniques for an arch aneurysm in a 42-year-old woman with Behçet's disease. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) showed that the aortic aneurysm had completely disappeared in 11 months after the operation. Open stent grafting technique was effective to prevent anastomotic pseudo-aneurysm formation.

  9. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T; Schermerhorn, M

    2010-06-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to be one of the most lethal vascular pathologies we encounter. Its management demands prompt and efficient evaluation and repair. Open repair has traditionally been the mainstay of treatment. However, the introduction of endovascular techniques has altered the treatment algorithm for ruptured AAA in most major medical centers. We present recent literature and techniques for ruptured AAA and its surgical management.

  10. Aortic dilatation in children with systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha; Devereux, Richard B; Dave, Archana; Bell, Cynthia; Portman, Ronald; Milewicz, Diana

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the presence of aortic dilatation in hypertensive children, the prevalence of which is 4% to 10% in hypertensive adults. Prospectively enrolled multiethnic children, untreated for their hypertension, underwent an echocardiogram to exclude congenital heart disease and evaluate for end-organ damage and aortic size. The aorta was measured in the parasternal long-axis view at three levels: the sinus of Valsalva, supra-tubular junction, and the ascending aorta. Aortic dilatation was determined by z-score >2 at any one of the levels measured. Hypertension was defined as blood pressure above the 95th percentile based on the Fourth Working Group criteria confirmed by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Among 142 consecutive hypertensive children (median age, 14 years; 45% females) aortic dilatation was detected in 2.8% (95% confidence interval, 1%-7%; median age, 16 years; 100% females). Children with aortic dilatation, when compared with those without, had significantly more aortic valve insufficiency (P = .005) and left ventricular hypertrophy (P = .018). Prevalence of aortic dilatation was 2.8% and was associated with significantly more aortic insufficiency and left ventricular hypertrophy in comparison to those without aortic dilatation.

  11. Aortic Dilatation in Children with Systemic Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha; Devereux, Richard B.; Dave, Archana; Bell, Cynthia; Portman, Ronald; Milewicz, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to determine presence of aortic dilatation in hypertensive children, the prevalence of which is 4–10% in hypertensive adults. Methods Prospectively enrolled multiethnic children untreated for their hypertension, underwent an echocardiogram to exclude congenital heart disease and evaluate for end-organ damage and aortic size. The aorta was measured in the parasternal long-axis view at 3 levels: the sinus of Valsalva, supra-tubular junction and the ascending aorta. Aortic dilatation was determined by z-score > 2 at any 1 of the levels measured. Hypertension was defined as blood pressure above the 95th percentile based on the Fourth Working Group criteria confirmed by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Results Among 142 consecutive hypertensive children (median age 14 years, 45% females) aortic dilatation was detected in 2.8% (95% CI 1% to 7%, median age 16 years, 100% females). Children with aortic dilatation, when compared to those without, had significantly more aortic valve insufficiency (p = 0.005) and left ventricular hypertrophy (p = 0.018). Conclusions Prevalence of aortic dilatation was 2.8% and was associated with significantly more aortic insufficiency and left ventricular hypertrophy in comparison to those without aortic dilatation. PMID:24507486

  12. New technique for single-staged repair of aortic coarctation and coexisting cardiac disorder.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Askin Ali; Guden, Mustafa; Onan, Burak; Tarakci, Sevim Indelen; Demir, Ali Soner; Sagbas, Ertan; Sarikaya, Tugay

    2011-01-01

    The management of adults with aortic coarctation and a coexisting cardiac disorder is still a surgical challenge. Single-staged procedures have lower postoperative morbidity and mortality rates than do 2-staged procedures. We present our experience with arch-to-descending aorta bypass grafting in combination with intracardiac or ascending aortic aneurysm repair.From October 2004 through April 2010, 5 patients (4 men, 1 woman; mean age, 45.8 ± 9.4 yr) underwent anatomic bypass grafting of the arch to the descending aorta through a median sternotomy and concomitant repair of an intracardiac disorder or an ascending aortic aneurysm. Operative indications included coarctation of the aorta in all cases, together with severe mitral insufficiency arising from damaged chordae tendineae in 2 patients, ascending aortic aneurysm with aortic regurgitation in 2 patients, and coronary artery disease in 1 patient. Data from early and midterm follow-up were reviewed.There was no early or late death. Follow-up was complete for all patients, and the mean follow-up period was 34.8 ± 18 months (range, 18 mo-5 yr). All grafts were patent. No late graft-related sequelae or reoperations were observed.For single-staged repair of aortic coarctation with a coexistent cardiac disorder, we propose arch-to-descending aorta bypass through a median sternotomy as an alternative for selected patients.

  13. Simulations of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation – Implications for Aortic Root Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Kodali, Susheel; Primiano, Charles; Sun, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Aortic root rupture is one of the most severe complications of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The mechanism of this adverse event remains mostly unknown. The purpose of this study was to obtain a better understanding of the biomechanical interaction between the tissue and stent for patients with a high risk of aortic rupture. Methods We simulated the stent deployment process of three TAVI patients with high aortic rupture risk using finite element method. The first case was a retrospective analysis of an aortic rupture case, while the other two cases were prospective studies, which ended with one cancelled procedure and one successful TAVI. Simulation results were evaluated for the risk of aortic root rupture, as well as coronary artery occlusion, and paravalvular leak. Results For Case 1, the simulated aortic rupture location was the same as clinical observations. From the simulation results, it can be seen that the large calcified spot on the interior of the left coronary sinus between coronary ostium and the aortic annulus was pushed by the stent, causing the aortic rupture. For Case 2 and Case 3, predicated results from the simulations were presented to the clinicians at pre-procedure meetings; and they were in agreement with clinician’s observations and decisions. Conclusions Our results indicated that the engineering analysis could provide additional information to help clinicians evaluate complicated, high risk aortic rupture cases. Since a systematic study of a large patient cohort of aortic rupture is currently not available (due to the low occurrence rate) to clearly understand underlying rupture mechanisms, case by case engineering analysis is recommended for evaluating patient-specific aortic rupture risk. PMID:24736808

  14. Pregnancy with aortic dissection in Ehler-Danlos syndrome. Staged replacement of the total aorta (10-year follow-up).

    PubMed

    Babatasi, G; Massetti, M; Bhoyroo, S; Khayat, A

    1997-10-01

    Pregnancy complicated by aortic dissection in patients with hereditary disorder of connective tissue presents interesting considerations including management of caesarean section with the unexpected need for cardiac surgery in emergency. Generalizations can be made on management principles with long-term follow-up requiring an aggressive individualized approach by a multidisciplinary team. A 33-year-old parturient presenting an aortic dissection at 37 weeks gestation required prompt diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in combination with correct surgical therapy resulted in the survival of both the mother and infant. During the 10-year follow-up, multiple complex dissection required transverse aortic arch and thoracoabdominal aortic replacement.

  15. Complete arch implant impression technique.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junping; Rubenstein, Jeffrey E

    2012-06-01

    When making a definitive impression for an arch containing multiple implants, there are many reported techniques for splinting impression copings. This article introduces a splint technique that uses the shim method, which has been demonstrated to reduce laboratory and patient chair time, the number of impression copings and laboratory analogs needed, and the ultimate cost.

  16. The Algebra of the Arches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buerman, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Finding real-world examples for middle school algebra classes can be difficult but not impossible. As we strive to accomplish teaching our students how to solve and graph equations, we neglect to teach the big ideas of algebra. One of those big ideas is functions. This article gives three examples of functions that are found in Arches National…

  17. Hemodynamic assessment of pre- and post-operative aortic coarctation from MRI.

    PubMed

    Ralovich, Kristóf; Itu, Lucian; Mihalef, Viorel; Sharma, Puneet; Ionasec, Razvan; Vitanovski, Dime; Krawtschuk, Waldemar; Everett, Allen; Ringel, Richard; Navab, Nassir; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA), is a congenital defect characterized by a severe narrowing of the aorta, usually distal to the aortic arch. The treatment options include surgical repair, stent implantation, and balloon angioplasty. In order to evaluate the physiological significance of the pre-operative coarctation and to assess the post-operative results, the hemodynamic analysis is usually performed by measuring the pressure gradient (deltaP) across the coarctation site via invasive cardiac catheterization. The measure of success is reduction of the (deltaP > 20 mmHg) systolic blood pressure gradient. In this paper, we propose a non-invasive method based on Computational Fluid Dynamics and MR imaging to estimate the pre- and post-operative hemodynamics for both native and recurrent coarctation patients. High correlation of our results and catheter measurements is shown on corresponding pre- and post-operative examination of 5 CoA patients.

  18. Effect of Different Rotational Directions of BJUT-II VAD on Aortic Swirling Flow Characteristics: A Primary Computational Fluid Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Gao, Bin; Chang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background The BJUT-II VAD is a novel left ventricular assist device (LVAD), which is thought to have significant effects on the characteristics of aortic swirling flow. However, the precise mechanism of the rotational direction of BJTU-II VAD in the aortic swirling flow is unclear. Material/Methods A patient-specific aortic geometric model was reconstructed based on the CT data. Three pump’s output flow profiles with varied rotational direction, termed “counterclockwise”, “flat profile”, and “clockwise”, were used as the boundary conditions. The helicity density, area-weighted average of helicity density (Ha), localized normalized helicity (LNH), wall shear stress (WSS), and WSS spatial gradient (WSSG) were calculated to evaluate the swirling flow characteristics in the aorta. Results The results demonstrated that the swirling flow characteristics in the aorta and 3 branches are directly affected by the output blood flow of BJUT-II VAD. In the aortic arch, the helicity density, supported by the clockwise case, achieved the highest value. In the 3 branches, the flat profile case achieved the highest helicity density, whereas the maximum WSS and WSSG generated by clockwise case were lower than in other cases. Conclusions The outflow of the BJUT-II VAD has significant effects on the aortic hemodynamics and swirling flow characteristics. The helical blood profiles can enhance the strength of aortic swirling flow, and reduce the areas of low WSS and WSSG regions. The clockwise case may have a benefit for preventing development of atherosclerosis in the aorta. PMID:27440399

  19. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000162.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ...

  1. Characterization of the cephalic arch and location of stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Shelby; Hammes, Mary S.; Blicharski, Tom; Watson, Sydeaka; Funaki, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to accurately characterize the cephalic arch segments into four domains and to enable more specific evaluation of cephalic arch stenosis (CAS) and determine the frequency of stenosis in each domain. Methods After Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, a retrospective chart review was done to define a population of patients receiving hemodialysis who developed CAS as apparent on clinically indicated radiologic imaging. A standardized approach was devised to categorize four domains of the cephalic arch. Domain I was defined as the peripheral portion of the arch and Domain IV was the distal portion of the cephalic vein near termination with the axillary vein. The magnitude of stenosis as measured by percentage was determined and compared in the four domains. Results The most frequent location for stenosis was found in domain IV when compared with domains II or I (p<0.01). The magnitude of stenosis differed across all domains (p<0.001) with the least common place for CAS in domain I. Treatment of CAS included angioplasty in all, thrombectomy in eight, and stent placement in five. Conclusions CAS occurs most commonly in the terminal portion of the arch. Four standardized domains have been defined; future work will validate these findings and determine the best intervention for each domain. PMID:25198819

  2. Aortic Coarctation Diagnosed During Pregnancy in a Woman With Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Zakaria; Iriart, Xavier; Thambo, Jean-Benoit

    2015-09-01

    Aortic coarctation is thought to be a rare condition in patients with tetralogy of Fallot. We report the case of a 26 year old woman presenting with systemic hypertension at 17 weeks of pregnancy after repair of tetralogy of Fallot in childhood. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed right aortic arch with severe isthmic coarctation. Her blood pressure was controlled medically during the rest of her pregnancy, and delivery was uneventful. Successful transcatheter placement of a covered stent at the level of the coarctation was performed after delivery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of aortic coarctation diagnosed in an adult patient late after repair of tetralogy of Fallot.

  3. Coronary Reconnection in Emergency “Conduit Operation” for Acute Type-A Aortic Dissection with Aortic Insufficiency: Experience with 24 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Massimo, Carlo G.; Presenti, Luigi F.; Favi, Piero P.; Duranti, Alberto; Poma, Alberto G.; Marranci, Pierluigi; Modiano, Claudio

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-four cases of acute type-A aortic dissection with aortic valvular insufficiency were treated in our institution by means of an emergency operation in which the aortic valve, ascending aorta, and aortic arch were resected and replaced with a valved conduit that had been lengthened with a tubular Dacron graft. The procedure included the use of deep hypothermia for cerebral protection, as well as extracorporeal circulation. Aortic resection was performed from the aortic valve to the origin of the descending thoracic aorta; the aortic graft was anastomosed proximally to the valve annulus and distally to the descending aorta. The carotid orifices were connected to the side of the graft in a single tissue button. The coronary arteries were then reconnected by means of double venous bypass grafts to the innominate artery, to allow for inclusion of the graft. Within 1 month after operation, four patients died of the consequences of dissection. Six months postoperatively, one patient succumbed to an infarction. Six months to 5 years after operation, the remaining 19 patients are still alive. On the basis of this experience, we believe that acute type-A aortic dissection with aortic valvular insufficiency should be treated during the first hours after the onset of symptoms. The above-described procedure proved effective in the control of bleeding, which is the major risk in emergency operations of this type. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1987; 14:418-421) Images PMID:15227299

  4. Endothelium in the pharyngeal arches 3, 4 and 6 is derived from the second heart field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Chen, Dongying; Chen, Kelley; Jubran, Ali; Ramirez, AnnJosette; Astrof, Sophie

    2017-01-15

    Oxygenated blood from the heart is directed into the systemic circulation through the aortic arch arteries (AAAs). The AAAs arise by remodeling of three symmetrical pairs of pharyngeal arch arteries (PAAs), which connect the heart with the paired dorsal aortae at mid-gestation. Aberrant PAA formation results in defects frequently observed in patients with lethal congenital heart disease. How the PAAs form in mammals is not understood. The work presented in this manuscript shows that the second heart field (SHF) is the major source of progenitors giving rise to the endothelium of the pharyngeal arches 3 - 6, while the endothelium in the pharyngeal arches 1 and 2 is derived from a different source. During the formation of the PAAs 3 - 6, endothelial progenitors in the SHF extend cellular processes toward the pharyngeal endoderm, migrate from the SHF and assemble into a uniform vascular plexus. This plexus then undergoes remodeling, whereby plexus endothelial cells coalesce into a large PAA in each pharyngeal arch. Taken together, our studies establish a platform for investigating cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating PAA formation and alterations that lead to disease.

  5. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... fully will restrict blood flow. This is called aortic stenosis. If there is also a leak, it is ... TAVR is used for people with severe aortic stenosis who aren't ... valve . In adults, aortic stenosis usually occurs due to calcium ...

  6. Numerical Modelling of Soil Arching in a Shallow Backfill Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajna, Waldemar St.

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents the application of the finite element method into the modelling of soil arching. The phenomenon plays fundamental role in soil-shell flexible structures behaviour. To evaluate the influence of arching on a pressure reduction, a plain strain trapdoor under a shallow layer of backfill was simulated. The Coulomb-Mohr plasticity condition and the nonassociated flow rule were used for the soil model. The research examines the impact of the internal friction angle and the influence of the backfill layer thickness on the value of soil arching. The carried out analyses indicate that the reduction of pressures acting on a structure depends on the value of the internal friction angle, which confirms the earlier research. For a shallow backfill layer however, the reduction is only a local phenomenon and can influence only a part of the structure.

  7. Combined open proximal and stent-graft distal repair for distal arch aneurysms: an alternative to total debranching.

    PubMed

    Zierer, Andreas; Sanchez, Luis A; Moon, Marc R

    2009-07-01

    We present herein a novel, combined, simultaneous open proximal and stent-graft distal repair for complex distal aortic arch aneurysms involving the descending aorta. In the first surgical step, the transverse arch is opened during selective antegrade cerebral perfusion, and a Dacron graft (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) is positioned down the descending aorta in an elephant trunk-like fashion with its proximal free margin sutured circumferentially to the aorta just distal to the left subclavian or left common carotid artery. With the graft serving as the new proximal landing zone, subsequent endovascular repair is performed antegrade during rewarming through the ascending aorta.

  8. The ARCHES Integrated Cluster Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mints, A.; Schwope, A.

    2014-07-01

    We are developing a tool to search for galaxy clusters associated with X-ray sources from the 3XMM catalog within the ARCHES project (Astronomical Resource cross-matching for High-Energy Studies). We make use of the new cross-matching tool developed for ARCHES to select galaxies in different catalogs around X-ray positions and then try to find clusters by searching for overdensities in the multi-color space. Colors are related to redshifts using spectroscopic data for passively evolving galaxies from the BOSS and VIPERS catalogs. So far we are making use of SDSS, UKIDSS, WISE, and CFHTLS photometric catalogs, but the method can easily be expanded to other data as well (e.g. Pan-STARRS and DES). We present test results of our tool performed on reference samples from the XMM/SDSS cluster survey (Takey et al 2012) and the NORAS/REFLEX surveys.

  9. Update in the management of type B aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Nauta, Foeke Jh; Trimarchi, Santi; Kamman, Arnoud V; Moll, Frans L; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Patel, Himanshu J; Figueroa, C Alberto; Eagle, Kim A; Froehlich, James B

    2016-06-01

    Stanford type B aortic dissection (TBAD) is a life-threatening aortic disease. The initial management goal is to prevent aortic rupture, propagation of the dissection, and symptoms by reducing the heart rate and blood pressure. Uncomplicated TBAD patients require prompt medical management to prevent aortic dilatation or rupture during subsequent follow-up. Complicated TBAD patients require immediate invasive management to prevent death or injury caused by rupture or malperfusion. Recent developments in diagnosis and management have reduced mortality related to TBAD considerably. In particular, the introduction of thoracic stent-grafts has shifted the management from surgical to endovascular repair, contributing to a fourfold increase in early survival in complicated TBAD. Furthermore, endovascular repair is now considered in some uncomplicated TBAD patients in addition to optimal medical therapy. For more challenging aortic dissection patients with involvement of the aortic arch, hybrid approaches, combining open and endovascular repair, have had promising results. Regardless of the chosen management strategy, strict antihypertensive control should be administered to all TBAD patients in addition to close imaging surveillance. Future developments in stent-graft design, medical therapy, surgical and hybrid techniques, imaging, and genetic screening may improve the outcomes of TBAD patients even further. We present a comprehensive review of the recommended management strategy based on current evidence in the literature.

  10. Regional aortic distensibility and its relationship with age and aortic stenosis: a computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dennis T L; Narayan, Om; Leong, Darryl P; Bertaso, Angela G; Maia, Murilo G; Ko, Brian S H; Baillie, Timothy; Seneviratne, Sujith K; Worthley, Matthew I; Meredith, Ian T; Cameron, James D

    2015-06-01

    Aortic distensibility (AD) decreases with age and increased aortic stiffness is independently associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The association of severe aortic stenosis (AS) with AD in different aortic regions has not been evaluated. Elderly subjects with severe AS and a cohort of patients without AS of similar age were studied. Proximal aortic cross-sectional-area changes during the cardiac cycle were determined using retrospective-ECG-gating on 128-detector row computed-tomography. Using oscillometric-brachial-blood-pressure measurements, the AD at the ascending-aorta (AA), proximal-descending-aorta (PDA) and distal-descending-aorta (DDA) was determined. Linear mixed effects modelling was used to determine the association of age and aortic stenosis on regional AD. 102 patients were evaluated: 36 AS patients (70-85 years), 24 AS patients (>85 years) and 42 patients without AS (9 patients <50 years, 20 patients between 51-70 years and 13 patients 70-85 years). When comparing patients 70-85 years, AA distensibility was significantly lower in those with AS compared to those without AS (0.9 ± 0.9 vs. 1.4 ± 1.1, P = 0.03) while there was no difference in the PDA (1.0 ± 1.1 vs. 1.0 ± 1.2, P = 0.26) and DDA (1.1 ± 1.2 vs. 1.2 ± 0.8, P = 0.97). In patients without AS, AD decreased with age in all aortic regions (P < 0.001). The AA in patients <50 years were the most distensible compared to other aortic regions. There is regional variation in aortic distensibility with aging. Patients with aortic stenosis demonstrated regional differences in aortic distensibility with lower distensibility demonstrated in the proximal ascending aorta compared to an age-matched cohort.

  11. Complex Reoperation for Late Complications After Acute Type A Aortic Dissection Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stöger, Guillermo; Ríos, Matías; Battellini, Roberto; Bracco, Daniel; Kotowicz, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    The correct management of acute Type A dissection continues to be a challenge. The primary goal is to save the patient´s life. However, the decision regarding the surgical approach determines possible later complications. We present the case of a 59-year-old female patient with a past history of emergent surgery for acute Type A dissection treated by supracoronary ascending and aortic valve replacement 19 years previously. Later, in a second endovascular approach, the descending aorta was treated by a thoracic endoprosthesis. During follow-up a dilated aortic root and a Type I endoleak were observed, and complex reoperation was required. We performed a total aortic arch replacement with a 4-branched graft and a complete aortic root replacement using the Cabrol technique for the reinsertion of the coronary arteries. The mechanical aortic normally functioning valve was preserved. The patient was discharged 30 days postoperatively. PMID:27390749

  12. Guilt by association: a paradigm for detection of silent aortic disease

    PubMed Central

    Ziganshin, Bulat A.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of clinically silent thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is challenging due to the lack of symptoms (until aortic rupture or dissection occurs). A large proportion of TAA are identified incidentally while imaging a patient for other reasons. However, recently several clinical “associates” of TAA have been described that can aid in identification of silent TAA. These “associates” include intracranial aneurysm, aortic arch anomalies, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), simple renal cysts (SRC), bicuspid aortic valve, temporal arteritis, a positive family history of aneurysm disease, and a positive thumb-palm sign. In this article we examine these associates of TAA and the data supporting their involvement with asymptomatic TAA. PMID:27386404

  13. Supravalvular aortic stenosis. Long-term results of surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    van Son, J A; Danielson, G K; Puga, F J; Schaff, H V; Rastogi, A; Edwards, W D; Feldt, R H

    1994-01-01

    To determine long-term outcome after operation for supravalvular aortic stenosis, we reviewed the case histories of 80 patients who had repair of the localized form (group A) (n = 67) or diffuse form (group B) (n = 13) from 1956 to 1992, including 31 patients with the Williams-Beuren syndrome. Ages ranged from 7 months to 54 years (mean = 12.6 years). Forty-six patients had one or more associated cardiovascular anomalies; the most common was aortic valve stenosis (33.8%). Eighteen patients had 22 previous cardiovascular operations, and 28 patients had one or more additional anomalies repaired during their initial procedure at our institution. In group A, the aortic root was enlarged with a teardrop-shaped patch (n = 61) or a pantaloon-shaped patch (n = 6). In group B, patch enlargement of the aorta was confined to the root (n = 4) or extended into the ascending aorta or aortic arch (n = 7); one patient had a graft placed between the ascending and descending thoracic aorta and one patient had a left ventricular-aortic conduit. There were no deaths in group A; two patients in group B in whom patch enlargement was confined to the aortic root died during the operation (2.5%). Follow-up extended to 33.4 years (mean = 14.2 years); there were five late deaths in group A and one in group B. Survival excluding operative mortality was 94% at 10 years and 91% at 20 years. All patients were in functional class I or II. There was no significant difference between patients with a teardrop-shaped or pantaloon-shaped patch in terms of late gradient, survival, or aortic insufficiency. By Cox multivariate model, the only independent predictor of late death for all patients was associated aortic valve disease (p = 0.02), which was also a risk factor for late reoperation (p = 0.02). In group B, overall survival was better in patients who received an extended patch versus aortic root patch only (p = 0.02). We reached the following conclusions: (1) Associated aortic valve disease was

  14. Clinical Advantages and Limitations of Monolithic Zirconia Restorations Full Arch Implant Supported Reconstruction: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Carames, Joao; Yu, Yung Cheng Paul; Pérez, Alejandro; Kang, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this retrospective case series is to evaluate the clinical advantages and limitations of monolithic zirconia restorations for full arch implant supported restorations and report the rate of complications up to 2 years after insertion. Materials and Methods. Fourteen patients received implant placement for monolithic zirconia full arch reconstructions. Four implants were placed in seven arches, eleven arches received six implants, two arches received seven implants, two arches received eight implants, and one arch received nine implants. Results. No implant failures or complications were reported for an implant survival rate of 100% with follow-up ranging from 3 to 24 months. Conclusions. Monolithic zirconia CAD-/CAM-milled framework restorations are a treatment option for full arch restorations over implants, showing a 96% success rate in the present study. Some of the benefits are accuracy, reduced veneering porcelain, and minimal occlusal adjustments. The outcome of the present study showed high success in function, aesthetics, phonetics, and high patient satisfaction. PMID:26124835

  15. Relationship between lumbar changes and modifications in the plantar arch in women with low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Cláudia dos Santos; Fernandes, Luciane Fernanda Rodrigues Martinho; Bertoncello, Dernival

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE : Evaluate the probable relationship among plantar arch, lumbar curvature, and low back pain. METHODS : Fifteen healthy women were assessed taking in account personal data and anthropometric measurements, photopodoscopic evaluation of the plantar arch, and biophotogrammetric postural analysis of the patient (both using the SAPO software), as well as evaluation of lumbar pain using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The average age of the participants was 30.45 (±6.25) years. RESULTS : Of the feet evaluated, there were six individuals with flat feet, five with high arch, and four with normal feet. All reported algic syndrome in the lumbar spine, with the highest VAS values for the volunteers with high arch. Correlation was observed between the plantar arch and the angle of the lumbar spine (r = -0.71, p = 0.004) Conclusion: High arch was correlated with more intense algic syndrome, while there was moderate positive correlation between flat foot and increased lumbar curvature, and between high arch and lumbar correction. Level of Evidence IV. Case Series. PMID:24453656

  16. The Biomechanics of Zygomatic Arch Shape.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amanda L; Grosse, Ian R

    2016-12-01

    Mammalian zygomatic arch shape is remarkably variable, ranging from nearly cylindrical to blade-like in cross section. Based on geometry, the arch can be hypothesized to be a sub-structural beam whose ability to resist deformation is related to cross sectional shape. We expect zygomatic arches with different cross sectional shapes to vary in the degree to which they resist local bending and torsion due to the contraction of the masseter muscle. A stiffer arch may lead to an increase in the relative proportion of applied muscle load being transmitted through the arch to other cranial regions, resulting in elevated cranial stress (and thus, strain). Here, we examine the mechanics of the zygomatic arch using a series of finite element modeling experiments in which the cross section of the arch of Pan troglodytes has been modified to conform to idealized shapes (cylindrical, elliptical, blade-like). We find that the shape of the zygomatic arch has local effects on stain that do not conform to beam theory. One exception is that possessing a blade-like arch leads to elevated strains at the postorbital zygomatic junction and just below the orbits. Furthermore, although modeling the arch as solid cortical bone did not have the effect of elevating strains in other parts of the face, as had been expected, it does have a small effect on stress associated with masseter contraction. These results are counterintuitive. Even though the arch has simple beam-like geometry, we fail to find a simple mechanical explanation for the diversity of arch shape. Anat Rec, 299:1734-1752, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Endovascular Treatment of Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms with the EndoFit Stent-Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Saratzis, N.; Saratzis, Athanasios Melas, N.; Ginis, G.; Lioupis, A.; Lykopoulos, D.; Lazaridis, J.; Kiskinis, Dimitrios

    2007-04-15

    Objective. To evaluate the mid-term feasibility, efficacy, and durability of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (DTAA) exclusion using the EndoFit device (LeMaitre Vascular). Methods. Twenty-three (23) men (mean age 66 years) with a DTAA were admitted to our department for endovascular repair (21 were ASA III+ and 2 refused open repair) from January 2003 to July 2005. Results. Complete aneurysm exclusion was feasible in all subjects (100% technical success). The median follow-up was 18 months (range 8-40 months). A single stent-graft was used in 6 cases. The deployment of a second stent-graft was required in the remaining 17 patients. All endografts were attached proximally, beyond the left subclavian artery, leaving the aortic arch branches intact. No procedure-related deaths have occurred. A distal type I endoleak was detected in 2 cases on the 1 month follow-up CT scan, and was repaired with reintervention and deployment of an extension graft. A nonfatal acute myocardial infarction occurred in 1 patient in the sixth postoperative month. Graft migration, graft infection, paraplegia, cerebral or distal embolization, renal impairment or any other major complications were not observed. Conclusion. The treatment of DTAAs using the EndoFit stent-graft is technically feasible. Mid-term results in this series are promising.

  18. Revisiting impressions using dual-arch trays.

    PubMed

    Small, Bruce W

    2012-01-01

    Making routine perfect impressions is the goal of any restorative dentist. Using dual-arch trays is an easy, repeatable way to accomplish that goal, as long as each step is done before the next and each step is performed perfectly. This column reviewed several articles that support the metal dual-arch concept and provided some clinical tips that might help restorative dentists. The dual-arch technique does have its limits and is meant for one or two teeth in a quadrant when there are other teeth to occlude with. Also, if the case involves anterior guidance, a full-arch impression maybe advisable.

  19. Influence of posterior dental arch length on brain activity during chewing in patients with mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Shoi, K; Fueki, K; Usui, N; Taira, M; Wakabayashi, N

    2014-07-01

    It is well known that shortened dental arch decreases masticatory function. However, its potential to change brain activity during mastication is unknown. The present study investigates the effect of a shortened posterior dental arch with mandibular removable partial dentures (RPDs) on brain activity during gum chewing. Eleven subjects with missing mandibular molars (mean age, 66.1 years) on both sides received experimental RPDs with interchangeable artificial molars in a crossover trial design. Brain activity during gum chewing with RPDs containing (full dental arch) and lacking artificial molars (shortened dental arch) was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, masticatory function was evaluated for each dental arch type. Food comminuting and mixing ability and the perceived chewing ability were significantly lower in subjects with a shortened dental arch than those with a full dental arch (P < 0.05). Brain activation during gum chewing with the full dental arch occurred in the middle frontal gyrus, primary sensorimotor cortex extending to the pre-central gyrus, supplementary motor area, putamen, insula and cerebellum. However, middle frontal gyrus activation was not observed during gum chewing with the shortened dental arch. These results suggest that shortened dental arch affects human brain activity in the middle frontal gyrus during gum chewing, and the decreased middle frontal gyrus activation may be associated with decreased masticatory function.

  20. Evaluation of cardiac emboli source

    PubMed Central

    Michels, M.; Meijboom, F.J.; ten Cate, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    Background Evaluating the source of cardiac embolism is one of the most frequent reasons for cardiac consultation. Methods In 2003, 99 patients were referred for the evaluation of the source of cardiac emboli. Evaluation included history, physical examination, ECG, transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) with contrast and 24-hour Holter electrocardiography. Results Altogether, 58 men and 41 women were studied. In 32 patients a possible source of the cardiac emboli was found. Two patients were in atrial fibrillation. Of the patients, 16 had a patent foramen ovale (PFO) and six patients a PFO and atrial septum aneurysm (ASA). Two patients had a thrombus in the left atrial appendage and 14 had severe atherosclerosis in the aortic arch. In eight patients we found two possible cardiac sources of embolism. 24-hour Holter recording did not detect any emboligenic arrhythmias. Conclusion A possible cardiac source of embolism was found in 32% of the patients referred. TOE is the ideal tool to visualise the interatrial septum, left atrial appendage and aortic arch. We advise performing a TOE with contrast in young stroke patients and in older patients with a stroke likely to be caused by an embolism of cardiac origin. 24-hour Holter recording did not detect any emboligenic arrhythmias and should only be done in selected cases. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:25696441

  1. Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation after EVAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Stefanie; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Navab, Nassir

    2009-02-01

    Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation is an important requirement for the evaluation of endovascular stenting procedures and the further refinement of stent graft design. During endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment, the aortic shape is subject to severe deformation that is imposed by medical instruments such as guide wires, catheters, and, the stent graft. This deformation can affect the flow characteristics and morphology of the aorta which have been shown to be elicitors for stent graft failures and be reason for reappearance of aneurysms. We present a method for quantifying the deformation of an aneurysmatic aorta imposed by an inserted stent graft device. The outline of the procedure includes initial rigid alignment of the two abdominal scans, segmentation of abdominal vessel trees, and automatic reduction of their centerline structures to one specified region of interest around the aorta. This is accomplished by preprocessing and remodeling of the pre- and postoperative aortic shapes before performing a non-rigid registration. We further narrow the resulting displacement fields to only include local non-rigid deformation and therefore, eliminate all remaining global rigid transformations. Finally, deformations for specified locations can be calculated from the resulting displacement fields. In order to evaluate our method, experiments for the extraction of aortic deformation fields are conducted on 15 patient datasets from endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment. A visual assessment of the registration results and evaluation of the usage of deformation quantification were performed by two vascular surgeons and one interventional radiologist who are all experts in EVAR procedures.

  2. Aortic valve surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart is reduced. This is called aortic stenosis. The aortic valve can be replaced using: Minimally ... RN, Wang A. Percutaneous heart valve replacement for aortic stenosis: state of the evidence. Ann Intern Med . 2010; ...

  3. Aortic stiffness determines diastolic blood flow reversal in the descending thoracic aorta: potential implication for retrograde embolic stroke in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2013-09-01

    Aortic stiffening often precedes cardiovascular diseases, including stroke, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain obscure. We hypothesized that such abnormalities could be attributable to altered central blood flow dynamics. In 296 patients with uncomplicated hypertension, Doppler velocity pulse waveforms were recorded at the proximal descending aorta and carotid artery to calculate the reverse/forward flow ratio and diastolic/systolic flow index, respectively. Tonometric waveforms were recorded on the radial artery to estimate aortic pressure and characteristic impedance (Z0) and to determine carotid-femoral (aortic) and carotid-radial (peripheral) pulse wave velocities. In all subjects, the aortic flow waveform was bidirectional, comprising systolic forward and diastolic reverse flows. The aortic reverse/forward flow ratio (35 ± 10%) was positively associated with parameters of aortic stiffness (including pulse wave velocity, Z0, and aortic/peripheral pulse wave velocity ratio), independent of age, body mass index, aortic diameter, and aortic pressure. The carotid flow waveform was unidirectional and bimodal with systolic and diastolic maximal peaks. There was a positive relationship between the carotid diastolic/systolic flow index (28 ± 9%) and aortic reverse/forward flow ratio, which remained significant after adjustment for aortic stiffness and other related parameters. The Bland-Altman plots showed a close time correspondence between aortic reverse and carotid diastolic flow peaks. In conclusion, aortic stiffness determines the extent of flow reversal from the descending aorta to the aortic arch, which contributes to the diastolic antegrade flow into the carotid artery. This hemodynamic relationship constitutes a potential mechanism linking increased aortic stiffness, altered flow dynamics, and increased stroke risk in hypertension.

  4. Patient-prosthesis mismatch: surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement in high risk patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kron, Irving L.

    2016-01-01

    Patient prosthesis mismatch (PPM) can occur when a prosthetic aortic valve has an effective orifice area (EOA) less than that of a native valve. A recent study by Zorn and colleagues evaluated the incidence and significance of PPM in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who were randomized to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). TAVR is associated with decreased incidence of severe PPM compared to traditional SAVR valves. Severe PPM increases risk for death at 1 year postoperatively in high risk patients. The increased incidence of PPM is largely due to differences in valve design and should encourage development of newer SAVR valves to reduce risk for PPM. In addition more vigorous approaches to root enlargement in small annulus should be performed with SAVR to prevent PPM. PMID:27867654

  5. Patient-prosthesis mismatch: surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement in high risk patients with aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, Ravi K; Kron, Irving L

    2016-10-01

    Patient prosthesis mismatch (PPM) can occur when a prosthetic aortic valve has an effective orifice area (EOA) less than that of a native valve. A recent study by Zorn and colleagues evaluated the incidence and significance of PPM in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who were randomized to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). TAVR is associated with decreased incidence of severe PPM compared to traditional SAVR valves. Severe PPM increases risk for death at 1 year postoperatively in high risk patients. The increased incidence of PPM is largely due to differences in valve design and should encourage development of newer SAVR valves to reduce risk for PPM. In addition more vigorous approaches to root enlargement in small annulus should be performed with SAVR to prevent PPM.

  6. Evaluation of Aortic Stenosis Severity using 4D Flow Jet Shear Layer Detection for the Measurement of Valve Effective Orifice Area

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Julio; Markl, Michael; Schnell, Susanne; Allen, Bradley; Entezari, Pegah; Mahadevia, Riti; Malaisrie, S Chris; Pibarot, Philippe; Carr, James; Barker, Alex J

    2014-01-01

    Aims The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of 4D flow MRI to assess valve effective orifice area (EOA) in patients with aortic stenosis as determined by the jet shear layer detection (JSLD) method. Methods and Results An in-vitro stenosis phantom was used for validation and in-vivo imaging was performed in 10 healthy controls and 40 patients with aortic stenosis. EOA was calculated by the JSLD method using standard 2D phase contrast MRI (PC-MRI) and 4D flow MRI measurements (EOAJSLD-2D and EOAJSLD-4D, respectively). As a reference standard, the continuity equation was used to calculate EOA (EOACE) with the 2D PC-MRI velocity field and compared to the EOAJSLD measurements. The in-vitro results exhibited excellent agreement between flow theory (EOA=0.78 cm2) and experimental measurement (EOAJSLD-4D=0.78±0.01 cm2) for peak velocities ranging from 0.9 to 3.7 m/s. In-vivo results showed good correlation and agreement between EOAJSLD-2D and EOACE (r=0.91, p<0.001; bias: −0.01±0.38cm2; agreement limits: 0.75 to −0.77cm2), and between EOAJSLD-4D and EOACE (r=0.95, p<0.001; bias: −0.09±0.26cm2; limits: 0.43 to −0.62cm2). Conclusion This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring EOAJSLD using 4D flow MRI. The technique allows for optimization of the EOA measurement position by visualizing the 3D vena contracta, and avoids potential sources of EOACE measurement variability. PMID:24865143

  7. Two Common Trunks Arising From Arch of Aorta: Case Report and Literature Review of A Very Rare Variation.

    PubMed

    Babu, C S Ramesh; Sharma, Vinay

    2015-07-01

    Arch of aorta normally gives off three branches, the brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery. Due to its complex development, variations in the branching pattern are not infrequent and since many such variants remain asymptomatic, they are detected incidentally at diagnostic imaging, autopsy and surgery. The classical branching pattern is reported to be present in 63.5%-89.4% cases and the most common variant observed is the presence of common trunk of brachiocephalic and left common carotid arteries. Direct aortic arch origin of left vertebral artery is the second most common pattern observed. We report here an extremely rare branching pattern of two common trunks arising from the arch, the first common trunk of brachiocephalic and left common carotid arteries and the second designated as vertebro-subclavian trunk, the common trunk of origin of left subclavian and left vertebral arteries. To the best of our knowledge this is the second such case to be reported.

  8. Flow in an Aortic Coarctation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loma, Luis; Miller, Paul; Hertzberg, Jean

    2009-11-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a congenital cardiovascular defect that causes a constriction in the descending thoracic aorta. To gain a better understanding of the cause of post-surgical problems, a rigid glass and a compliant in vitro model of the aortic arch and descending aorta with a coarctation were constructed. Near-physiologic compliance was obtained using a silicone elastomer. Stereoscopic PIV was used to obtain 3D velocity maps. Results show a high speed turbulent jet formed at the exit of the coarctation. Flow in the rigid model was significantly different from in the compliant model. In the rigid model, the jet was symmetric, creating a toroidal recirculation area. In the compliant model, the jet was directed towards the medial wall, inducing flow reversal only at the lateral wall. Peak velocities and turbulence intensities were higher in the rigid model, however shear rate values in the compliant model were significantly above both the rigid model and normal in vivo values at the medial wall. In both models the reattachment region fluctuated, creating oscillatory shear.

  9. Arch mineral pursues multiple dipping seams

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouls, M.W.

    1981-07-01

    Arch Mineral's three Hanna Basin mines in Carbon County, WY, recover about eight million tpy from more than a dozen coal seams. Arch's experience has proven stripping techniques for dipping seams, and has revealed better methods for recontouring and revegetating mined land.

  10. [Late paraparesis as a postoperative complication in a patient undergoing the repair of a double aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Bonome González, C; Alvarez Refojo, F; Fernández Carballal, F; Rodríguez Alvarez, R

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of a fifty-seven (57)-years old man undergoing elective surgery of a thoracoabdominal and aortoiliac aneurysm in a single surgical time. The patients is operated undergoing general anesthetic combined with thoracic epidural blockade, and it was done two aortic cross-clamping: one to five cm of the aortic arch and the other to the infrarenal level. The most important intraoperative complications were during the thoracic aortic cross-clamping and the most important postoperative complication was related 48 hours later, to paraparesis after a hypotension episode what improved with rehabilitation treatment.

  11. Bicuspid aortic valve: theoretical and clinical aspects of concomitant ascending aorta replacement.

    PubMed

    De Sá, Mauro Paes Leme; Bastos, Eduardo Sergio; Murad, Henrique

    2009-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is associated with annuloaortic ectasia, dissection and ascending aortic aneurysm. The high incidence of this congenital malformation and aortic disease suggests a close correlation between the two phenomena. Abnormalities in different phases of cell migration of the neural crest might be responsible for the occurrence of abnormalities in the aortic valve, media layer of the ascending aorta and vessels of the aortic arch. Previous studies have shown that patients with normal BAV or slight dysfunction may present with dilation of the aortic root. The hemodynamic changes caused by BAV without stenosis or insufficiency seem to be an insufficient explanation for these findings. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the molecular and hystological aspects of this disease. We found a reduced fibrillin-1 content in both ascending aorta and pulmonary trunk as a possible cause. Histologically, the ascending aorta can present cystic medial necrosis and elastic fragmentation, similar to Marfan's disease. Some authors concluded that many patients, mainly those with aortic regurgitation, should have the aortic valve and the ascending aorta replaced at the same procedure, even if a mild dilatation (45 mm) is present in patients with BAV if life expectancy is anticipated to be greater than 10 years to prevent further aneurysms or ruptures.

  12. Does altered aortic flow in marfan syndrome relate to aortic root dilatation?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hung‐Hsuan; Chiu, Hsin‐Hui; Tseng, Wen‐Yih Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine possible hemodynamic alterations in adolescent to adult Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients with aortic root dilatation. Materials and Methods Four‐dimensional flow MRI was performed in 20 MFS patients and 12 age‐matched normal subjects with a 3T system. The cross‐sectional areas of 10 planes along the aorta were segmented for calculating the axial and circumferential wall shear stress (WSSaxial, WSScirc), oscillatory shear index (OSIaxial, OSIcirc), and the nonroundness (NR), presenting the asymmetry of segmental WSS. Pearson's correlation analysis was performed to present the correlations between the quantified indices and the body surface area (BSA), aortic root diameter (ARD), and Z score of the ARD. P < 0.05 indicated statistical significance. Results Patients exhibited lower WSSaxial in the aortic root and the WSScirc in the arch (P < 0.05–0.001). MFS patients exhibited higher OSIaxial and OSIcirc in the sinotubular junction and arch, but lower OSIcirc in the descending aorta (all P < 0.05). The NR values were lower in patients (P < 0.05). The WSSaxial or WSScirc exhibited moderate to strong correlations with BSA, ARD, or Z score (R2 = 0.50–0.72) in MFS patients. Conclusion The significant differences in the quantified indices, which were associated with BSA, ARD, or Z score, in MFS were opposite to previous reports for younger MFS patients, indicating that altered flows in MFS patients may depend on the disease progress. The possible time dependency of hemodynamic alterations in MFS patients strongly suggests that longitudinal follow‐up of 4D Flow is needed to comprehend disease progress. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:500–508. PMID:26854646

  13. Mid-term evaluation of Sorin Soprano bioprostheses in patients with a small aortic annulus

    PubMed

    Vohra, Hunaid A; Whistance, Robert N; Bolgeri, Marco; Velissaris, Theodore; Tsang, Geoffrey M K; Barlow, Clifford W; Ohri, Sunil K

    2010-03-01

    We set to examine the mid-term outcome after aortic valve replacement (AVR) with Soprano pericardial stented bioprosthesis measuring

  14. Aortic Stenosis: Changing Disease Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Rashedi, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) occurs in almost 10% of adults over age 80 years with a mortality about 50% at 2 years unless outflow obstruction is relieved by aortic valve replacement (AVR). Development of AS is associated with anatomic, clinical and genetic risk factors including a bicuspid valve in 50%; clinical factors that include older age, hypertension, smoking, diabetes and elevated serum lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels; and genetic factors such as a polymorphism in the Lp(a) locus. Early stages of AS are characterized by focal areas of leaflet thickening and calcification. The rate of hemodynamic progression is variable but eventual severe AS is inevitable once even mild valve obstruction is present. There is no specific medical therapy to prevent leaflet calcification. Basic principles of medical therapy for asymptomatic AS are patient education, periodic echocardiographic and clinical monitoring, standard cardiac risk factor evaluation and modification and treatment of hypertension or other comorbid conditions. When severe AS is present, a careful evaluation for symptoms is needed, often with an exercise test to document symptom status and cardiac reserve. In symptomatic patients with severe AS, AVR improves survival and relieves symptoms. In asymptomatic patients with severe AS, AVR also is appropriate if ejection fraction is < 50%, disease progression is rapid or AS is very severe (aortic velocity > 5 m/s). The choice of surgical or transcatheter AVR depends on the estimated surgical risk plus other factors such as frailty, other organ system disease and procedural specific impediments. PMID:26140146

  15. Correlation between maxillary central incisor crown morphology and mandibular dental arch form in normal occlusion subjects.

    PubMed

    Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Lima, Carolina Souto; da Silva, Ricardo Henrique Alves; Daruge Júnior, Eduardo; Torres, Fernando Cesar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the morphology of the mandibular dental arch and the maxillary central incisor crown. Cast models from 51 Caucasian individuals, older than 15 years, with optimal occlusion, no previous orthodontic treatment, featuring 4 of the 6 keys to normal occlusion by Andrews (the first being mandatory) were observed. The models were digitalized using a 3D scanner, and images of the maxillary central incisor and mandibular dental arch were obtained. These were printed and placed in an album below pre-set models of arches and dental crowns, and distributed to 12 dental surgeons, who were asked to choose which shape was most in accordance with the models and crown presented. The Kappa test was performed to evaluate the concordance among evaluators while the chi-square test was used to verify the association between the dental arch and central incisor morphology, at a 5% significance level. The Kappa test showed moderate agreement among evaluators for both variables of this study, and the chi-square test showed no significant association between tooth shape and mandibular dental arch morphology. It may be concluded that the use of arch morphology as a diagnostic method to determine the shape of the maxillary central incisor is not appropriate. Further research is necessary to assess tooth shape using a stricter scientific basis.

  16. MR evaluation ex vivo and in vivo of a covered stent-graft for abdominal aortic aneurysms: ferromagnetism, heating, artifacts, and velocity mapping.

    PubMed

    Engellau, L; Olsrud, J; Brockstedt, S; Albrechtsson, U; Norgren, L; Ståhlberg, F; Larsson, E M

    2000-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety was evaluated at 1.5 T in a covered nickel titanium stent-graft (Vanguard) used for endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Imaging artifacts were assessed on MRI with contrast-enhanced (CE) three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography (MRA) and spiral computed tomography (CT) in 10 patients as well as ex vivo. Velocity mapping was performed in the suprarenal aorta and femoral arteries in 14 patients before and after stent-graft placement. For comparison it was also performed in six healthy volunteers. No ferromagnetism or heating was detected. Metal artifacts caused minimal image distortion on MRI/MRA. The artifacts disturbed image evaluation on CT at the graft bifurcation and graft limb junction. No significant differences in mean flow were found in patients before and after stent-graft placement. Our study indicates that MRI at 1.5 T may be performed safely in patients with the (Vanguard) stent-graft. MRI/MRA provides diagnostic image information. Velocity mapping is not included in our routine protocol.

  17. Successful treatment for acute aortic dissection in pregnancy---bentall procedure concomitant with cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Acute aortic type A dissection is a life-threatening disease that requires immediate surgical intervention. When dissection occurs during pregnancy, it is of high risk for both the mother and the fetus. In this study, we reported two cases of acute aortic dissection in late pregnancy at 28 weeks and 32 weeks of gestation respectively. After the two patients underwent a cesarean section and delivered a baby, we performed composite graft replacement of the aortic valve, aortic root and ascending aorta, with re-implantation of the coronary arteries into the graft (Bentall procedure) instead of repairing the arch with deep hypothermia and circulation arrest. Both mothers and children survived and recovered well. PMID:21999207

  18. [Tuberculosis of the posterior vertebral arch. A case report].

    PubMed

    Nassar, I; Mahi, M; Semlali, S; Kacemi, L; El Quessar, A; Chakir, N; El Hassani, M R; Jiddane, M

    2002-09-01

    Tuberculosis of the spine usually involves the vertebral body and intervertebral disk. Involvement of the posterior arch is rare. We report a case of tuberculosis involving the posterior elements of the T4 and T5 vertebrae in a 38 year old woman. CT is helpful to assess bony structures whereas MRI is ideal to evaluate the neural structures. Clinical, radiographic, and therapeutic considerations regarding tuberculosis of the spine are reviewed.

  19. Descending aortic mechanics and atrial fibrillation: a two-dimensional speckle tracking transesophageal echocardiography study.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Rogério; Monteiro, Ricardo; Dinis, Paulo; Santos, Maria José; Botelho, Ana; Quintal, Nuno; Cardim, Nuno; Gonçalves, Lino

    2017-04-01

    Vascular mechanics assessed with two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (2D-STE) could be used as a new imaging surrogate of vascular stiffening. The CHA2DS2-VASc score is considered accurate as an estimate of stroke risk in non-valvular AF, although many potential stroke risk factors have not been included in this scoring method. The purpose of this research is to study the feasibility of evaluating vascular mechanics at the descending aorta in non-valvular AF patients using transesophageal 2D-STE and to analyze the association between descending aortic mechanics and stroke. We prospectively recruited a group of 44 patients referred for a transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) in the context of cardioversion for non-valvular AF. A short-axis view of the descending aorta, one to two centimeters after the aortic arch was selected for the vascular mechanics assessment with the 2D-STE methodology. The vascular mechanics parameters analyzed were circumferential aortic strain (CAS) and early circumferential aortic strain rate (CASR). A clinical assessment was performed with focus on the past stroke history and the CHA2DS2-VASc score. The mean age of our cohort was 65 ± 13 years and 75% were men; AF was known for 2.8 ± 2.5 years and it was considered paroxystic in 41% of cases. Waveforms adequate for measuring 2D-STE were present in 85% of the 264 descending aortic wall segments. The mean CAS was 3.5 ± 1.2% and the mean CASR was 0.7 ± 0.3 s(-1). The inter- and intra-observer variability for aortic mechanics was considered adequate. The median CHA2DS2VASc score was 2 (2-3). As the score increased we noted that both the CAS (r = -0.38, P = 0.01) and the CASR (r = -0.42, P < 0.01) decreased. Over 16% of the AF patients had a past history of stroke. These patients had lower values of both descending aortic strain [2.2 (1.8-2.6) vs. 3.9 (3.3-4.9)%, P < 0.01] and strain rate [0.4 (0.3-0.4) vs. 0.7 (0.6-1.1) s(-1), P < 0

  20. Aortic valve replacement with the De Bakey valve.

    PubMed

    Paton, B C; Pine, M B

    1976-10-01

    De Bakey prostheses were inserted in 29 patients with aortic valve disease between October, 1970, and May, 1972. Ten patients have died, but all but one of the remaining 19 have beel followed for a minimum of 19 months. Evaluation of the results in these subjects indicates that the function of the De Bakey valve compares favorably with that of other aortic valve prostheses.

  1. Transesophageal echocardiography: first-line imaging for aortic diseases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yalcin, F.; Thomas, J. D.; Homa, D.; Flachskampf, F. A.

    2000-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is now commonly used to evaluate the thoracic aorta, because it is widely available and provides high-resolution images and flow information by Doppler. This article reviews the essential features on TEE of acute and chronic aortic diseases, such as aortic dissection, aneurysm, and atherosclerosis, and discusses its strengths, weaknesses, and indications.

  2. Arching in tapped deposits of hard disks.

    PubMed

    Pugnaloni, Luis A; Valluzzi, Marcos G; Valluzzi, Lucas G

    2006-05-01

    We simulate the tapping of a bed of hard disks in a rectangular box by using a pseudodynamic algorithm. In these simulations, arches are unambiguously defined and we can analyze their properties as a function of the tapping amplitude. We find that an order-disorder transition occurs within a narrow range of tapping amplitudes as has been seen by others. Arches are always present in the system although they exhibit regular shapes in the ordered regime. Interestingly, an increase in the number of arches does not always correspond to a reduction in the packing fraction. This is in contrast with what is found in three-dimensional systems.

  3. Analysis of seismic disaster failure mechanism and dam-break simulation of high arch dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingkui; Zhang, Liaojun

    2014-06-01

    Based on a Chinese national high arch dam located in a meizoseismal region, a nonlinear numerical analysis model of the damage and failure process of a dam-foundation system is established by employing a 3-D deformable distinct element code (3DEC) and its re-development functions. The proposed analysis model considers the dam-foundation-reservoir coupling effect, influence of nonlinear contact in the opening and closing of the dam seam surface and abutment rock joints during strong earthquakes, and radiation damping of far field energy dissipation according to the actual workability state of an arch dam. A safety assessment method and safety evaluation criteria is developed to better understand the arch dam system disaster process from local damage to ultimate failure. The dynamic characteristics, disaster mechanism, limit bearing capacity and the entire failure process of a high arch dam under a strong earthquake are then analyzed. Further, the seismic safety of the arch dam is evaluated according to the proposed evaluation criteria and safety assessment method. As a result, some useful conclusions are obtained for some aspects of the disaster mechanism and failure process of an arch dam. The analysis method and conclusions may be useful in engineering practice.

  4. Sutureless aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of aortic stenosis and greater co-morbidities and risk profiles of the contemporary patient population has driven the development of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) techniques to reduce surgical trauma. Recent technological developments have led to an alternative minimally invasive option which avoids the placement and tying of sutures, known as “sutureless” or rapid deployment aortic valves. Potential advantages for sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration, facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, whilst maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low paravalvular leak rates. However, given its recent developments, the majority of evidence regarding sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is limited to observational studies and there is a paucity of adequately-powered randomized studies. Recently, the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) has formulated to conduct the Sutureless Projects, set to be the largest international collaborative group to investigate this technology. This keynote lecture will overview the use, the potential advantages, the caveats, and current evidence of sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement (AVR). PMID:25870807

  5. Ruptured Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Infected with Listeria Monocytogenes: A Case Report and a Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Shigeki; Takeuchi, Nobuhiro; Takada, Masanori; Fujita, Koichi; Nishibori, Yoshiharu; Maruyama, Takao

    2013-01-01

    A 75-year-old male with a history of alcoholic liver cirrhosis, sigmoid colon cancer, and metastatic liver cancer was admitted to our institution with a complaint of a prickly feeling in his chest. On admission, a chest radiograph revealed a normal cardio-thoracic ratio of 47%. Echocardiography revealed pericardial effusion and blood chemical analyses revealed elevated C-reactive protein levels (14.7 mg/dL). On day 3, chest radiography revealed cardiomegaly with a cardio-thoracic ratio of 58% and protrusion of the left first arch. Contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography revealed a saccular aneurysm in the aortic arch with surrounding hematoma; thus, a ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm was suspected. Emergency surgery was performed, which revealed a ruptured aortic aneurysm with extensive local inflammation. The diagnosis of an infected aortic rupture was therefore confirmed. The aneurysm and abscess were resected, followed by prosthetic graft replacement and omental packing. Histopathology of the resected aneurysm revealed gram-positive bacilli; and Listeria monocytogenes was confirmed as the causative organism by culture. Postoperative course was uneventful; on postoperative day 60, the patient was ambulatory and was discharged. Here we report the case of a male with a ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm infected with L. monocytogenes. PMID:25512697

  6. In vivo feasibility case study for evaluating abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue properties and rupture potential using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Aine P; Callanan, Anthony; McGloughlin, Timothy M

    2011-04-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is defined as a permanent and irreversible localized dilatation of the abdominal aorta. A reliable, non-invasive method to assess the wall mechanics of an aneurysm may provide additional information regarding their susceptibility to rupture. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is a phenomenon associated with the propagation of acoustic waves in attenuating media. This study was a preliminary evaluation to explore the feasibility of using ARFI imaging to examine an AAA in vivo. A previously diagnosed in vivo aneurysm case study was imaged to demonstrate the viability of excitation of the abdominal aorta using ARFI imaging. Ex vivo experiments were used to assess an artificially induced aneurysm to establish its development and whether ARFI was able to capture the mechanical changes during artificial aneurysm formation. A combination of in vivo and ex vivo results demonstrated a proposed hypothesis of estimation of the tissue's stiffness properties. The study details a method for non-invasive rupture potential prediction of AAAs using patient-specific moduli to generate a physiological stiffness rupture potential index (PSRPI) of the AAA. Clinical feasibility of ARFI imaging as an additional surgical tool to interrogate AAAs was verified and methods to utilize this data as a diagnostic tool was demonstrated with the PSRPI.

  7. Planimetry of aortic valve area using multiplane transoesophageal echocardiography is not a reliable method for assessing severity of aortic stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Y.; Meneveau, N.; Vuillemenot, A.; Magnin, D.; Anguenot, T.; Schiele, F.; Bassand, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the reliability of aortic valve area planimetry by multiplane transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) in aortic stenosis. DESIGN: Study of the diagnostic value of aortic valve area planimetry using multiplane TOE, compared with catheterisation and the continuity equation, both being considered as criterion standards. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENTS: 49 consecutive patients (29 male, 20 female, aged 44 to 82 years, average 66.6 (SD 8.5)), referred for haemodynamic evaluation of an aortic stenosis, were enrolled in a prospective study. From this sample, 37 patients were eligible for the final analysis. METHODS: Transthoracic and multiplane transoesophageal echocardiograms were performed within 24 hours before catheterisation. At transthoracic echo, aortic valve area was calculated by the continuity equation. At TOE, the image of the aortic valve opening was obtained with a 30-65 degrees rotation of the transducer. Numerical dynamic images were stored on optical discs for off-line analysis and were reviewed by two blinded observers. Catheterisation was performed in all cases and aortic valve area was calculated by the Gorlin formula. RESULTS: Feasibility of the method was 92% (48/52). The agreement between aortic valve area measured at TOE (mean 0.88 (SD 0.35) cm2) and at catheterisation (0.79 (0.24) cm2) was very poor. The same discrepancies were found between TOE and the continuity equation (0.72 (0.26) cm2). TOE planimetry overestimated aortic valve area determined by the two other methods. Predictive positive and negative values of planimetry to detect aortic valve area < 0.75 cm2 were 62% (10/16) and 43% (9/21) respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Planimetry of aortic valve area by TOE is difficult and less accurate than the continuity equation for assessing the severity of aortic stenosis. Images PMID:9290405

  8. Glowing Solar Material Arches Up and Out

    NASA Video Gallery

    An elongated, streaming arch of solar material rose up at the sun’s edge before breaking apart in this animation of imagery captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory on April 28, 2016. While so...

  9. L'Arche: Its Philosophy and Ideology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumarah, John

    1986-01-01

    The L'Arche movement in mental retardation based upon the work of J. Vanier stresses the value of the disabled person, the importance of mutual relationships, the importance of a sense of community, and the spiritual dimension. (CL)

  10. A Case of Patent Ductus Arteriosus in an Elderly Patient Treated by Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Ikuo; Yamada, Tetsuya; Maruyama, Yuki; Hagihara, Makiyo; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    The patient described herein was a 75-year-old female. Echocardiography showed patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Heart failure symptoms gradually appeared, and she was referred to our department for treatment. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed a tubular structure communicating between the aortic arch and pulmonary artery trunk, suggesting adult PDA. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) was performed to close PDA. Completion angiography confirmed the disappearance of PDA. Post-TEVAR CT revealed no endoleak. The patient was discharged from the hospital on the 11th day after surgery. TEVAR is more useful and less invasive for adult PDA than conventional open surgery. PMID:28018507

  11. Dental arch dimensions in the mixed dentition: a study of Brazilian children from 9 to 12 years of age

    PubMed Central

    LOULY, Fabiane; NOUER, Paulo Roberto Aranha; JANSON, Guilherme; PINZAN, Arnaldo

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated dental arch dimensional changes of Brazilian children. Material and methods Dental casts were taken from 66 children (29 males; 37 females) with normal occlusion selected among 1,687 students from public and private schools aged 9, 10, 11 and 12 years, according to the following criteria: Class I canine and molar relationships; well-aligned upper and lower dental arches; mixed dentition; good facial symmetry; no previous orthodontic treatment. Dental arch dimensions were taken by one examiner using the Korkhaus’ compass and a digital pachymeter. ANOVA test was applied to compare the arch dimensions at the different ages and the t-test was used to compare the arch dimensions of male and female subjects. Arch forms were compared by means of chi-square tests. Results Only the maxillary anterior segment length showed a statistically significant increase from 10 to 12 years of age. Males had a significantly larger maxillary depth than females at the age range evaluated. The predominant dental arch form found was elliptical. Conclusion In the studied age range, anterior maxillary length increased from 10 to 12 years of age, males had larger maxillary depth than females and the predominant arch form was elliptical. PMID:21552719

  12. Successful Anticoagulation Therapy for Antiphospholipid Syndrome with Mobile Aortic Thrombi

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Oh; Moon, Seong Ho; Kim, Jong Woo; Byun, Joung Hun; Kim, Sung Hwan; Yang, Jun Ho; Lee, Chung-Eun; Kim, Jong-Duk

    2016-01-01

    Hypercoagulable states have been associated with aortic thrombosis. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is one of the commonest types of acquired thrombophilia. We report the case of successful anticoagulation management in an APS patient with mobile thrombi within the aorta. A 58-year-old male patient presented to the emergency department (ED) with right-sided hemiparesis. His first symptoms were noted approximately 12–16 hours before presentation to the ED. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed acute embolic infarction of the left frontal and parietotemporal lobes. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) demonstrated mobile thrombi attached to the wall of the ascending aorta and aortic arch. The patient was diagnosed with APS based on positivity of anti-beta-2 glycoprotein 1 antibodies, and was initiated on anticoagulation therapy. Repeated TEE and CTA revealed complete resolution of the thrombi after 12 days of treatment; the patient was discharged well. PMID:28042559

  13. Successful Anticoagulation Therapy for Antiphospholipid Syndrome with Mobile Aortic Thrombi.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Oh; Moon, Seong Ho; Kim, Jong Woo; Byun, Joung Hun; Kim, Sung Hwan; Yang, Jun Ho; Lee, Chung-Eun; Kim, Jong-Duk

    2016-12-01

    Hypercoagulable states have been associated with aortic thrombosis. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is one of the commonest types of acquired thrombophilia. We report the case of successful anticoagulation management in an APS patient with mobile thrombi within the aorta. A 58-year-old male patient presented to the emergency department (ED) with right-sided hemiparesis. His first symptoms were noted approximately 12-16 hours before presentation to the ED. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed acute embolic infarction of the left frontal and parietotemporal lobes. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) demonstrated mobile thrombi attached to the wall of the ascending aorta and aortic arch. The patient was diagnosed with APS based on positivity of anti-beta-2 glycoprotein 1 antibodies, and was initiated on anticoagulation therapy. Repeated TEE and CTA revealed complete resolution of the thrombi after 12 days of treatment; the patient was discharged well.

  14. Effects of aortic irregularities on blood flow.

    PubMed

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2016-04-01

    Anatomic aortic anomalies are seen in many medical conditions and are known to cause disturbances in blood flow. Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder occurring only in females where cardiovascular anomalies, particularly of the aorta, are frequently encountered. In this study, numerical simulations are applied to investigate the flow characteristics in four TS patient- related aortic arches (a normal geometry, dilatation, coarctation and elongation of the transverse aorta). The Quemada viscosity model was applied to account for the non-Newtonian behavior of blood. The blood is treated as a mixture consisting of water and red blood cells (RBC) where the RBCs are modeled as a convected scalar. The results show clear geometry effects where the flow structures and RBC distribution are significantly different between the aortas. Transitional flow is observed as a jet is formed due to a constriction in the descending aorta for the coarctation case. RBC dilution is found to vary between the aortas, influencing the WSS. Moreover, the local variations in RBC volume fraction may induce large viscosity variations, stressing the importance of accounting for the non-Newtonian effects.

  15. Integrated exploration locates Cincinnati arch dolomite breccias

    SciTech Connect

    Tedesco, S.A. )

    1994-11-28

    Dolomite breccias or chimneys are prolific reservoirs found along the Cincinnati arch and adjacent basins from Tennessee to Ontario. An integrated approach using seismic and surface geochemistry, augmented by subsurface geology and magnetics, has led to a dramatic increase in the number of these fields being discovered in the past 10 years. Historically the reservoirs have been found by random drilling. The paper describes the geology of the arch, breccia characteristics, and case histories of discoveries using this integrated approach.

  16. Magnetically driven flows in arched plasma structures.

    PubMed

    Stenson, E V; Bellan, P M

    2012-08-17

    Laboratory experiments demonstrate high-speed plasma flows from both footpoints of arched magnetic flux tubes, resulting in bulk plasma transport into the flux tube and persistent axial collimation even as the flux tube lengthens and kinks. The measured flows are in agreement with the predictions of hoop force and collimation models involving fundamental MHD forces. These forces are expected to drive plasma acceleration in other open flux configurations with arched geometries, such as those found on the solar surface.

  17. Analysis of an arched outer-race ball bearing considering centrifugal forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    A Newton-Raphson method of iteration was used in evaluating the radial and axial projection of the distance between the ball center and the outer raceway groove curvature center (V and W). Fatigue life evaluations were made. The similar analysis of a conventional bearing can be directly obtained from the arched bearing analysis by simply letting the amount of arching be zero (g = 0) and not considering equations related to the unloaded half of the outer race. The analysis was applied to a 150-mm angular contact ball bearing. Results for life, contact loads, and angles are shown for a conventional bearing (g = 0) and two arched bearings (g = 0.127 mm (0.005 in.), and 0.254 mm (0.010 in.)). The results indicate that an arched bearing is highly desirable for high speed applications. In particular, for a DN value of 3 million (20,000 rpm) and an applied axial load of 4448 N (1000 lb), an arched bearing shows an improvement in life of 306 percent over that of a conventional bearing. At 4.2 million DN (28,000 rpm), the corresponding improvement is 340 percent. It was also found for low speeds, the arched bearing does not offer the advantages that it does for high speed applications.

  18. Correlation Between Dental Arch Width and Sagittal Dento-Skeletal Morphology in Untreated Adults

    PubMed Central

    Shahroudi, Atefe Saffar; Etezadi, Tahura

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Dental arch form is one of the most important characteristics of dentition. However, this dimension usually receives less attention in diagnosis or treatment planning and orthodontic patients are traditionally classified with regard to their sagittal characteristics. The objectives of this study were to investigate if a relationship exists between the dental arch width (transverse dimension) and sagittal skeletal and dental parameters in orthodontic patients. Materials and Methods: Dental casts and lateral cephalograms of 108 consecutive untreated Iranian patients (47 males and 61 females) between 16 and 31 years of age were evaluated. Arch width (AW) parameters including upper and lower inter-molar width (UIMW and LIMW) and upper and lower inter-canine width (UICW and LICW) were measured by a digital caliper. Sagittal parameters included SNA and SNB angle and Wits’ appraisal obtained from lateral cephalograms in addition to upper and lower arch length (UAL and LAL) obtained from dental casts. The correlation between the aforementioned parameters was evaluated applying Pearson correlation coefficients. Molar and canine relationship according to Angle’s classification was also recorded and the means of all parameters were compared between three occlusal relationship classes and two gender groups by means of two-way ANOVA. Results: According to statistical analysis a significant positive correlation between sagittal parameters and arch width measures exists between SNA and UICW and between LICW and LAL. Upper and lower ICW were significantly correlated, the relationship between upper and lower IMW and between UAL and LAL were significant. Among sagittal measures, both UAL and LAL were correlated with the ANB angle. The means of arch width parameters in three occlusal classes were not significantly different. Conclusion: The only significant correlation between arch width and sagittal parameters existed between UICW and SNA angle and between LICW and

  19. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Aortic Aneurysm For ...

  20. Bicuspid aortic valve

    MedlinePlus

    ... stiff and not open up. This is called aortic stenosis , which causes the heart to pump harder than usual to get blood through the valve. The aorta may become enlarged with this condition. BAV is ...

  1. 7. View showing reinforced concrete arch, east approach. The 591 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View showing reinforced concrete arch, east approach. The 591 foot three-hinge steel arch that spans the Cuyahoga River is flanked by twelve such approach arches. Each concrete arch consists of four arch ribs, which support the beam and slab streetcar deck on spandrel columns. As the photograph illustrates, the spandrel columns continue above the lower deck to support the roadway. - Detroit Superior High Level Bridge, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  2. Histology of a Marfan aorta 4.5 years after personalized external aortic root support.

    PubMed

    Pepper, John; Goddard, Martin; Mohiaddin, Raad; Treasure, Tom

    2015-09-01

    In 2008, a 26-year old man had personalized external aortic root support (PEARS) with a macroporous mesh. He was the 16th of 46 patients to have this operation. He had a typical Marfan habitus. His mother died of this disease as did his brother, with an aortic dissection. The patient himself died suddenly 4.5 years after his PEARS operation. At autopsy, there was no blood in the pericardium. The coronary orifices and proximal arteries were normal. His bicuspid aortic valve was minimally regurgitant as it was prior to operation and remained throughout follow-up. Macroscopically the implanted mesh was embedded in the adventitia and not separable from the aortic wall. Microscopically it was fully incorporated with collagen fibres as has been seen in our animal studies. The unsupported aortic arch showed some focal fragmentation of elastic fibres and a mild increase in mucopolysaccharides consistent with Marfan syndrome. These appearances were not present in the supported aortic root, which had the histological appearance of a normal aorta. He was the first patient to die with an implant. The histological appearances suggest the possibility that the incorporated support of the aortic root allowed recovery of the microstructure of the media.

  3. Stanford-A acute aortic dissection, inflammation, and metalloproteinases: a review.

    PubMed

    Cifani, Noemi; Proietta, Maria; Tritapepe, Luigi; Di Gioia, Cira; Ferri, Livia; Taurino, Maurizio; Del Porto, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection (AAD) is a life-threatening disease with an incidence of about 2.6-3.6 cases per 100,000/year. Depending on the site of rupture, AAD is classified as Stanford-A when the ascending aortic thoracic tract and/or the arch are involved, and Stanford-B when the descending thoracic aorta and/or aortic abdominal tract are targeted. It was recently shown that inflammatory pathways underlie aortic rupture in both type A and type B Stanford AAD. An immune infiltrate has been found within the middle and outer tunics of dissected aortic specimens. It has also been observed that the recall and activation of macrophages inside the middle tunic are key events in the early phases of AAD. Macrophages are able to release metalloproteinases (MMPs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines which, in turn, give rise to matrix degradation and neoangiogenesis. An imbalance between the production of MMPs and MMP tissue inhibitors is pivotal in the extracellular matrix degradation underlying aortic wall remodelling in dissections occurring both in inherited conditions and in atherosclerosis. Among MMPs, MMP-12 is considered a specific marker of aortic wall disease, whatever the genetic predisposition may be. The aim of this review is, therefore, to take a close look at the immune-inflammatory mechanisms underlying Stanford-A AAD.

  4. Histology of a Marfan aorta 4.5 years after personalized external aortic root support

    PubMed Central

    Pepper, John; Goddard, Martin; Mohiaddin, Raad; Treasure, Tom

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, a 26-year old man had personalized external aortic root support (PEARS) with a macroporous mesh. He was the 16th of 46 patients to have this operation. He had a typical Marfan habitus. His mother died of this disease as did his brother, with an aortic dissection. The patient himself died suddenly 4.5 years after his PEARS operation. At autopsy, there was no blood in the pericardium. The coronary orifices and proximal arteries were normal. His bicuspid aortic valve was minimally regurgitant as it was prior to operation and remained throughout follow-up. Macroscopically the implanted mesh was embedded in the adventitia and not separable from the aortic wall. Microscopically it was fully incorporated with collagen fibres as has been seen in our animal studies. The unsupported aortic arch showed some focal fragmentation of elastic fibres and a mild increase in mucopolysaccharides consistent with Marfan syndrome. These appearances were not present in the supported aortic root, which had the histological appearance of a normal aorta. He was the first patient to die with an implant. The histological appearances suggest the possibility that the incorporated support of the aortic root allowed recovery of the microstructure of the media. PMID:25406424

  5. Novel endovascular procedures and new developments in aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S W K

    2016-09-01

    Endovascular repair has evolved to become a viable mainstream treatment for aortic pathology in both acute and elective settings. As technology advanced, traditional anatomical barriers were progressively tackled using new devices and novel procedures, and there are now multiple options available to the vascular surgeon. In the abdominal aorta, advances in endovascular aneurysm repair have been in the treatment of hostile aortic necks using new sealing concepts and ancillary procedures, and in branch preservation using fenestrations and snorkels. Access challenges have been met with a percutaneous approach and low-profile devices, and standard protocols have improved mortality for ruptured aneurysms. In the thoracic aorta, more invasive hybrid procedures have given way gradually to branched endografts. Particular challenges to the anaesthetist include blood pressure control and the prevention of stroke and paraplegia. Current focus in the thoracic aorta is in treating aortic arch pathology and in optimal management of acute and chronic dissections. This review describes the latest trends in the endovascular treatment of aortic diseases and examines the current evidence for different modalities of management.

  6. Wall shear stress indicators in abnormal aortic geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease, such as atherosclerosis, occurs at specific locations in the arterial tree. Characterizing flow and forces at these locations is crucial to understanding the genesis of disease. Measures such as time average wall shear stress, oscillatory shear index, relative residence time and temporal wall shear stress gradients have been shown to identify plaque prone regions. The present paper examines these indices in three aortic geometries obtained from patients whose aortas are deformed due to a genetic pathology and compared to one normal geometry. This patient group is known to be prone to aortic dissection and our study aims to identify early indicators that will enable timely intervention. Data obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is used to reconstruct the aortic arch. The local unsteady flow characteristics are calculated, fully resolving the flow field throughout the entire cardiac cycle. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different red blood cell loading. The impact of the deformed aortic geometries is analyzed to identify flow patterns that could lead to arterial disease at certain locations.

  7. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  8. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer.

  9. Controlled localized buckling responses of orthodontic arch wires.

    PubMed

    Nikolai, R J; Chung, A Y

    1999-09-01

    The orthodontic arch wire is often activated locally, in transverse bending and/or longitudinal torsion, to engage an individual malaligned tooth. Arch wires with substantial flexibilities and elastic ranges in bending are available. Several clinical reports of distal displacements of molars with appliances activated by locally buckling the arch wire have appeared in the recent published literature. This article contains an explanation of buckling or "column" action and the postbuckling response of a wire, and a report of the results of a controlled, in-vitro study of a sample of 256 wire segments subjected to activation-deactivation, buckling-postbuckling-unbuckling cycles. Continuous force-displacement diagrams were obtained from mechanical tests run at oral temperature. Four orthodontics-relevant, mechanical characteristics were quantified from each diagram, and each specimen was subjected to posttest evaluation for inelastic behavior. Although the deformation of the buckled wire is, in fact, bending, the force-displacement diagrams obtained differed substantially from their familiar counterparts generated in transverse bending. Judging from the force magnitudes induced as the deactivation half-cycles commenced as well as the deactivation rates, not all of the 8 wires seem to be clinically suitable for activation initiated by buckling. Magnitudes of springback were substantial from activations as large as 6 mm, and only 2 of the 8 wires exhibited full deactivations less than 80% of their activating displacements. This relatively new mode of arch wire activation that enables delivery to the dentition of mesiodistal pushing forces has substantial potential for clinical application from several biomechanical standpoints.

  10. [A case report of aortic valvuloplasty by rasping technique for aortic stenosis with small annulus simultaneously performed with mitral valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Taniyasu, N; Kou, E; Hiramatsu, T; Yokoyama, S; Takenaka, A; Ikawa, O

    1997-02-01

    The patient was a 48-year-old woman with aortic stenosis and regurgitation and mitral stenosis. Preoperative cardiac catheterization revealed LV-Ao pressure gradient of 30 mmHg and regurgitation of Sellers III. The aortic annulus was measured less than 19 mm. As operative findings, the aortic annulus seemed to be too small to be replaced with 19 mm prosthetic valve. Aortic valvuloplasty (AVP) with rasping technique was performed for the aortic valve and valve replacement was carried out for the mitral valve. After aortic declamping and occurring her beat, the transesophageal echocardiographic evaluation for AVP was effective. Postoperative course was uneventful. Postoperative cardiac catheterization have shown decreased transvalvular pressure gradient up to 10 mmHg and aortic regurgitation of Sellers I.

  11. Are Aortic Stent Grafts Safe in Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Khandanpour, Nader; Mehta, Tapan A.; Adiseshiah, M.; Meyer, Felicity J.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stent grafts are increasingly used to treat aortic aneurysms and also other aortic pathologies. The safety of aortic stent grafts in pregnancy has never been studied or reported. We report on two cases of aortic stent grafts in pregnant women and discuss the effect of pregnancy on these aortic stent grafts. PMID:26229702

  12. In vivo Study of the Accuracy of Dual-arch Impressions

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Luciana Martinelli Santayana; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Junior, Luiz Henrique Burnett; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated in vivo the accuracy of metal (Smart®) and plastic (Triple Tray®) dual-arch trays used with vinyl polysiloxane (Flexitime®), in the putty/wash viscosity, as well as polyether (Impregum Soft®) in the regular viscosity. Materials and Methods: In one patient, an implant-level transfer was screwed on an implant in the mandibular right first molar, serving as a pattern. Ten impressions were made with each tray and impression material. The impressions were poured with Type IV gypsum. The width and height of the pattern and casts were measured in a profile projector (Nikon). The results were submitted to Student’s t-test for one sample (α = 0.05). Results: For the width distance, the plastic dual-arch trays with vinyl polysiloxane (4.513 mm) and with polyether (4.531 mm) were statistically wider than the pattern (4.489 mm). The metal dual-arch tray with vinyl polysiloxane (4.504 mm) and with polyether (4.500 mm) did not differ statistically from the pattern. For the height distance, only the metal dual-arch tray with polyether (2.253 mm) differed statistically from the pattern (2.310 mm). Conclusion: The metal dual-arch tray with vinyl polysiloxane, in the putty/wash viscosities, reproduced casts with less distortion in comparison with the same technique with the plastic dual-arch tray. The plastic or metal dual-arch trays with polyether reproduced cast with greater distortion. How to cite the article: Santayana de Lima LM, Borges GA, Burnett LH Jr, Spohr AM. In vivo study of the accuracy of dual-arch impressions. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):50-5. PMID:25083032

  13. Rearfoot posture of Australopithecus sediba and the evolution of the hominin longitudinal arch

    PubMed Central

    Prang, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    The longitudinal arch is one of the hallmarks of the human foot but its evolutionary history remains controversial due to the fragmentary nature of the fossil record. In modern humans, the presence of a longitudinal arch is reflected in the angular relationships among the major surfaces of the human talus and calcaneus complex, which is also known as the rearfoot. A complete talus and calcaneus of Australopithecus sediba provide the opportunity to evaluate rearfoot posture in an early hominin for the first time. Here I show that A. sediba is indistinguishable from extant African apes in the angular configuration of its rearfoot, which strongly suggests that it lacked a longitudinal arch. Inferences made from isolated fossils support the hypothesis that Australopithecus afarensis possessed an arched foot. However, tali attributed to temporally younger taxa like Australopithecus africanus and Homo floresiensis are more similar to those of A. sediba. The inferred absence of a longitudinal arch in A. sediba would be biomechanically consistent with prior suggestions of increased midtarsal mobility in this taxon. The morphological patterns in talus and calcaneus angular relationships among fossil hominins suggest that there was diversity in traits associated with the longitudinal arch in the Plio-Pleistocene. PMID:26628197

  14. Rearfoot posture of Australopithecus sediba and the evolution of the hominin longitudinal arch.

    PubMed

    Prang, Thomas C

    2015-12-02

    The longitudinal arch is one of the hallmarks of the human foot but its evolutionary history remains controversial due to the fragmentary nature of the fossil record. In modern humans, the presence of a longitudinal arch is reflected in the angular relationships among the major surfaces of the human talus and calcaneus complex, which is also known as the rearfoot. A complete talus and calcaneus of Australopithecus sediba provide the opportunity to evaluate rearfoot posture in an early hominin for the first time. Here I show that A. sediba is indistinguishable from extant African apes in the angular configuration of its rearfoot, which strongly suggests that it lacked a longitudinal arch. Inferences made from isolated fossils support the hypothesis that Australopithecus afarensis possessed an arched foot. However, tali attributed to temporally younger taxa like Australopithecus africanus and Homo floresiensis are more similar to those of A. sediba. The inferred absence of a longitudinal arch in A. sediba would be biomechanically consistent with prior suggestions of increased midtarsal mobility in this taxon. The morphological patterns in talus and calcaneus angular relationships among fossil hominins suggest that there was diversity in traits associated with the longitudinal arch in the Plio-Pleistocene.

  15. Gender identification and morphologic classification of tooth, arch and palatal forms in Saudi population

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Aljanakh; Koralakunte, Pavankumar Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To determine various tooth form, arch form, and palatal form with gender identification between males and females of the Saudi population. Materials and Methods: Irreversible hydrocolloid impressions were made of the maxillary teeth of 100 dentate male and female subjects to obtain study casts. A standardized procedure was adopted to photograph the maxillary dental arches and the maxillary central incisors on the study casts taken from each subject. The outline form of tooth, arch, and palatal form were determined using a standardized method. The average of six prosthodontist's evaluation was considered who classified the outline tracings visually. The statistical analysis was performed using Chi-Square and results tabulated. Results: The predominant tooth is combination form in males and ovoid form in females, the predominant arch is ovoid form in males and square form in females and the predominant palatal form are both U and V shaped in males and U-shaped in females. Conclusion: Except for the tooth form there was a significant difference with arch and palatal form among males and females of the population group studied. The determined tooth, arch and palatal forms are useful in selection and arrangement of artificial teeth among Saudi edentulous population group. Generalizing from the study is questionable as the sample size is small. Further studies should be conducted in a larger sample to confirm the study results PMID:26538903

  16. Tracheal replacement with an aortic autograft.

    PubMed

    Azorin, Jacques F; Bertin, Francois; Martinod, Emmanuel; Laskar, Marc

    2006-02-01

    Tracheal replacement after extensive resection remains a challenge for the thoracic surgeon. We propose an innovative solution: the use of an aortic autograft. After an experimental work on animals with aortic autografts and allografts [Martinod E, Seguin A, Pfeuty K, Fornes P, Kambouchner M, Azorin JF, Carpentier AF. Long-term evaluation of the replacement of the trachea with an autologous aortic graft. Ann Thorac Surg 2003;75(5):1572-8; Martinod E, Seguin A, Holder-Espinasse M, Kambouchner M, Duterque-Coquillaud M, Azorin JF, Carpentier AF. Tracheal regeneration following tracheal replacement with an allogenic aorta. Ann Thorac Surg 2005;79(3):942-8], we present the first human case of long tracheal replacement with an aortic autograft. In this case we replaced 7 cm of a tumoral trachea using an aortic infra-renal autograft supported by a silicone stent. The early postoperative course was uneventful. The stent was removed at three months. The patient died at six months from an acute pulmonary infection without any sign of anastomosis leakage or graft rupture. A new field of clinical study has to be investigated.

  17. Primary Stenting in Infrarenal Aortic Occlusive Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, Ulf; Uher, Petr; Lindh, Mats; Lindblad, Bengt; Ivancev, Krasnodar

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of primary stenting in aortic occlusive disease.Methods: Thirty patients underwent primary stenting of focal concentric (n = 2) and complex aortic stenoses (n = 19), and aortic or aorto-iliac occlusions (n = 9). Sixteen patients underwent endovascular outflow procedures, three of whom also had distal open surgical reconstructions. Median follow-up was 16 months (range 1-60 months).Results: Guidewire crossing of two aorto-biiliac occlusions failed, resulting in a 93% (28/30) technical success. Major complications included one access hematoma, one myocardial infarction, one death (recurrent thromboembolism) in a patient with widespread malignancy, and one fatal hemorrhage during thrombolysis of distal emboli from a recanalized occluded iliac artery. One patient did not improve his symptoms, resulting in a 1-month clinical success of 83% (25/30). Following restenting the 26 stented survivors changed their clinical limb status to +3 (n = 17) and +2 (n = 9). During follow-up one symptomatic aortic restenosis occurred and was successfully restented.Conclusions: Primary stenting of complex aortic stenoses and short occlusions is an attractive alternative to conventional surgery. Larger studies with longer follow-up and stratification of lesion morphology are warranted to define its role relative to balloon angioplasty. Stenting of aorto-biiliac occlusions is feasible but its role relative to bypass grafting remains to be defined.

  18. Diagnostic imaging for aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, Andrew J; Litt, Harold I

    2005-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging for aortic dissection has dramatically changed in recent years. Previously, imaging consisted of conventional X-ray radiography, followed by invasive catheter angiography. Now imaging of dissection is performed primarily with multidetector CT, and to a lesser extent, with ultrasound and MRI. Catheter angiography is used primarily as a means of treating complications. Which modality to choose depends on patient factors, physician preference, and differences in availability of state-of-the-art equipment. All three modalities are highly accurate in experienced hands and have revolutionized the detection and evaluation of this condition.

  19. Successful transfemoral aortic valve implantation through aortic stent graft after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kozuma, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The patient was a 91-year-old woman presenting with severe aortic valve stenosis. Pre-procedural computed tomography scan revealed a 45-mm abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) was performed after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) of the AAA. The 23-mm Edwards Sapien XT system passed through the aortic stent graft smoothly. This is the first case report showing that successful TF-TAVI can be performed through a prior abdominal aortic stent graft. TF-TAVI after EVAR of AAA is a feasible option for patients with extremely poor access.

  20. Pre- and Postoperative Imaging of the Aortic Root

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Frandics P.; Mitchell, R. Scott; Miller, D. Craig; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional datasets acquired using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are ideally suited for characterization of the aortic root. These modalities offer different advantages and limitations, which must be weighed according to the clinical context. This article provides an overview of current aortic root imaging, highlighting normal anatomy, pathologic conditions, imaging techniques, measurement thresholds, relevant surgical procedures, postoperative complications and potential imaging pitfalls. Patients with a range of clinical conditions are predisposed to aortic root disease, including Marfan syndrome, bicuspid aortic valve, vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Various surgical techniques may be used to repair the aortic root, including placement of a composite valve graft, such as the Bentall and Cabrol procedures; placement of an aortic root graft with preservation of the native valve, such as the Yacoub and David techniques; and implantation of a biologic graft, such as a homograft, autograft, or xenograft. Potential imaging pitfalls in the postoperative period include mimickers of pathologic processes such as felt pledgets, graft folds, and nonabsorbable hemostatic agents. Postoperative complications that may be encountered include pseudoaneurysms, infection, and dehiscence. Radiologists should be familiar with normal aortic root anatomy, surgical procedures, and postoperative complications, to accurately interpret pre- and postoperative imaging performed for evaluation of the aortic root. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26761529

  1. FBN1 Mutations in Patients With Descending Thoracic Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Brautbar, Ariel; LeMaire, Scott A.; Franco, Luis M.; Coselli, Joseph S.; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Belmont, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm and dissection cause significant morbidity and mortality. There are several known single gene disorders that predispose to isolated aortic disease and eventually aneurysm and dissection. FBN1 mutations are associated with multiple clinical phenotypes, including Marfan syndrome (MFS), MASS phenotype, and familial ectopia lentis, but rarely with isolated aortic aneurysm and dissection. In this report, we describe three patients who presented with primary descending thoracic aortic dissection and who were found to have an FBN1 mutation. None of the patients fulfilled clinical criteria for the diagnosis of MFS, and all had few or none of the skeletal features typical of the condition. Two patients had a history of long-term hypertension, and such a history was suspected in the third patient. These observations suggest that some individuals with FBN1 mutations have significant aortic disease involvement of other systems that is typical of FBN1 mutation-related syndromes. Superimposed risk factors, such as hypertension, may weaken the aortic wall and eventually lead to aortic dissection. Given that the cost continues to decrease, we suggest that diagnostic DNA sequencing for FBN1 mutations in patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissection may be a practical clinical step in evaluating such patients and at-risk family members. PMID:20082464

  2. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scan Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Aortic angiography Hardening of ... Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla ...

  3. Vibration of axially loaded circular arches

    SciTech Connect

    Sabir, A.B.; Djoudi, M.S.

    1996-11-01

    The work in the present paper is devoted to the determination of the buckling loads and natural frequencies of axially loaded arch structures. The finite element method is employed using a strain based arch element. The element is based on the conventional Euler curved beam type of strain displacement relationship and satisfies the exact representation of rigid body modes. The sub-space iteration technique is used to determine the eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors of the governing transcendental equation. The buckling of a pinned arch subjected to a uniform lateral pressure is first considered. The work is then extended to produce a comprehensive set of results for the vibration of axially loaded arches which are either pinned or fixed at both ends. The first symmetric and anti symmetric modes of vibration are determined and the effect of the axial load on these frequencies is investigated. The practical problem of an arch with a backfill is then considered and the effect of the elastic packing due to this backfill on the natural frequencies is determined.

  4. Association of Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol–Related Genetic Variants With Aortic Valve Calcium and Incident Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Gustav; Luk, Kevin; Schulz, Christina-Alexandra; Engert, James C.; Do, Ron; Hindy, George; Rukh, Gull; Dufresne, Line; Almgren, Peter; Owens, David S.; Harris, Tamara B.; Peloso, Gina M.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Wong, Quenna; Smith, Albert V.; Budoff, Matthew J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Rich, Stephen; Kathiresan, Sekar; Orho-Melander, Marju; Gudnason, Vilmundur; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Post, Wendy S.; Thanassoulis, George

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) has been associated with aortic stenosis in observational studies; however, randomized trials with cholesterol-lowering therapies in individuals with established valve disease have failed to demonstrate reduced disease progression. OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether genetic data are consistent with an association between LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), or triglycerides (TG) and aortic valve disease. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Using a Mendelian randomization study design, we evaluated whether weighted genetic risk scores (GRSs), a measure of the genetic predisposition to elevations in plasma lipids, constructed using single-nucleotide polymorphisms identified in genome-wide association studies for plasma lipids, were associated with aortic valve disease. We included community-based cohorts participating in the CHARGE consortium (n = 6942), including the Framingham Heart Study (cohort inception to last follow-up: 1971-2013; n = 1295), Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (2000-2012; n = 2527), Age Gene/Environment Study-Reykjavik (2000-2012; n = 3120), and the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS, 1991-2010; n = 28 461). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Aortic valve calcium quantified by computed tomography in CHARGE and incident aortic stenosis in the MDCS. RESULTS The prevalence of aortic valve calcium across the 3 CHARGE cohorts was 32% (n = 2245). In the MDCS, over a median follow-up time of 16.1 years, aortic stenosis developed in 17 per 1000 participants (n = 473) and aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis occurred in 7 per 1000 (n = 205). Plasma LDL-C, but not HDL-C or TG, was significantly associated with incident aortic stenosis (hazard ratio [HR] per mmol/L, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.04-1.57; P = .02; aortic stenosis incidence: 1.3% and 2.4% in lowest and highest LDL-C quartiles, respectively). The LDL-C GRS, but not HDL-C or TG GRS, was significantly associated with presence of

  5. South Arch volcanic field9d\

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Clague, D.A.; Moore, J.G.; Holcomb, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    Several young lava fields were imaged by GLORIA sidescan sonar along the Hawaiian Arch south of Hawaii. The largest, 35 by 50 km across, includes a central area characterized by high sonar backscatter and composed of several flow lobes radiating from a vent area. Reflection profiling and sea-floor photography indicate that the central lobes are flat sheet flows bounded by pillowed margins; thin surface sediment and thin palagonite rinds on lava surfaces suggest ages of 1-10 ka. Vents are localized along the arch crest near bases of Cretaceous seamounts. Two dredged flows are basanite and alkalic basalt, broadly similar to rejuvenated-stage and some pre-shield alkalic lavas on the Hawaiian Ridge. Arch volcanism represents peripheral leakage of melt from the Hawaiian hot spot over much larger areas than previously recognized. -Authors

  6. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  7. Robotic aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Duran, Cassidy; Kashef, Elika; El-Sayed, Hosam F; Bismuth, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Surgical robotics was first utilized to facilitate neurosurgical biopsies in 1985, and it has since found application in orthopedics, urology, gynecology, and cardiothoracic, general, and vascular surgery. Surgical assistance systems provide intelligent, versatile tools that augment the physician's ability to treat patients by eliminating hand tremor and enabling dexterous operation inside the patient's body. Surgical robotics systems have enabled surgeons to treat otherwise untreatable conditions while also reducing morbidity and error rates, shortening operative times, reducing radiation exposure, and improving overall workflow. These capabilities have begun to be realized in two important realms of aortic vascular surgery, namely, flexible robotics for exclusion of complex aortic aneurysms using branched endografts, and robot-assisted laparoscopic aortic surgery for occlusive and aneurysmal disease.

  8. Chronic Type A Aortic Dissection and Giant Aortic Root Aneurysm After Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Puga, Andrés Enríquez; Rodríguez, Sara Castaño; Pañero, Blanca Mateos; Moreira, Beatriz Castaño; López Almodóvar, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 61-year-old male with a giant aortic root aneurysm associated with chronic aortic Type A dissection. The patient had been operated on 16 years before due to aortic annuloectasia with mechanical valve replacement. The patient underwent revision aortic surgery with a Bentall-De Bono operation with Svensson modification, using a #21 On-X Valsalva mechanical valve conduit. The postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:28097190

  9. Improved dynamical modelling of the Arches cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joowon; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2014-05-01

    Recently, Clarkson et al. (2012) measured the intrinsic velocity dispersion of the Arches cluster, a young and massive star cluster in the Galactic center. Using the observed velocity dispersion profile and the surface brightness profile of Espinoza et al. (2009), they estimate the cluster's present-day mass to be ˜ 1.5×104 M⊙ by fitting an isothermal King model. In this study, we trace the best-fit initial mass for the Arches cluster using the same observed data set and also the anisotropic Fokker-Planck calculations for the dynamical evolution.

  10. Radionuclide angiographic evaluation of left ventricular performance at rest and during exercise in patients with aortic regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Heo, J.

    1986-06-01

    Radionuclide angiographic evaluation of LV performance at rest and during exercise in patients with AR have shown that an abnormal EF response to exercise may be observed in asymptomatic patients with normal resting LV function. The EF response to exercise has been correlated with a number of clinical and exercise measurements; important among these are the slope of the systolic pressure-to-end-systolic volume, end-systolic volume, cardiac index, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and wall stress. The changes in the regurgitant fraction, EF, and LV volume have shown considerable individual variability; they have also allowed a better understanding of the circulatory responses during exercise. Radionuclide angiography provides a reliable and reproducible method of measuring the rest LVEF that is important in the timing and the outcome of valve replacement. The value of the EF response to exercise in patient management is not yet clear; it is possible that other radionuclide-derived measurements at rest or during exercise, such as the systolic pressure-to-end-systolic volume relationship, and the end-systolic volume may provide complementary information to that provided by the EF.

  11. Overview of current surgical strategies for aortic disease in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Shunsuke; Okita, Yutaka

    2016-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a heritable, systemic disorder of the connective tissue with a high penetrance, named after Dr. Antoine Marfan. The most clinically important manifestations of this syndrome are cardiovascular pathologies which cause life-threatening events, such as acute aortic dissections, aortic rupture and regurgitation of the aortic valve or other artrioventricular valves leading to heart failure. These events play important roles in the life expectancy of patients with this disorder, especially prior to the development of effective surgical approaches for proximal ascending aortic disease. To prevent such catastrophic aortic events, a lower threshold has been recommended for prophylactic interventions on the aortic root. After prophylactic root replacement, disease in the aorta beyond the root and distal to the arch remains a cause for concern. Multiple surgeries are required throughout a patient's lifetime that can be problematic due to distal lesions complicated by dissection. Many controversies in surgical strategies remain, such as endovascular repair, to manage such complex cases. This review examines the trends in surgical strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular disease in patients with Marfan syndrome, and current perspectives in this field.

  12. Hybrid endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm in a patient with Behçet's disease following right to left carotid-carotid bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soonchang; Park, Han Ki; Shim, Won-Heum; Youn, Young-Nam

    2011-03-01

    Endovascular repair of inflammatory aortic aneurysms has been reported as an alternative to open surgical treatment. In selective cases, adjunctive bypass surgery may be required to provide an adequate landing zone. We report a case of endovascular repair of an inflammatory aortic aneurysm in a patient with Behçet's disease using a carotid-carotid bypass graft to provide an adequate landing zone. A 45-yr-old man with a voice change was referred to our hospital with the diagnosis of saccular aneurysm of the distal aortic arch resulting from vasculitis. Computed tomography showed a thoracic aortic aneurysm with thrombosis. Right to left carotid-carotid bypass grafting was performed. After 8 days, the patient underwent an endovascular stent graft placement distal to the origin of the innominate artery. The patient was discharged with medication and without postoperative complications after 5 days. Hybrid endovascular treatment may be suitable a complementary modality for repairing inflammatory aortic aneurysms.

  13. View of Highway 140 west of Arch Rock. Note stone ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Highway 140 west of Arch Rock. Note stone wall at right and formed concrete wall at center. Looking north-northwest - All Year Highway, Between Arch Rock & Yosemite Valley, El Portal, Mariposa County, CA

  14. 4. NORTH ELEVATION, SHOWING BROKEN PEDIMENTED GABLE, ARCHED WINDOW IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. NORTH ELEVATION, SHOWING BROKEN PEDIMENTED GABLE, ARCHED WINDOW IN GABLE, AND SEGMENTALLY ARCHED WINDOW HEADS ON SECOND FLOOR WINDOWS - Jacob R. Fisher House, High Street, Oldwick, Hunterdon County, NJ

  15. 8. GENERAL ELEVATION OF BRIDGE AFTER CONCRETE FOR ARCHES HAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GENERAL ELEVATION OF BRIDGE AFTER CONCRETE FOR ARCHES HAS BEEN POURED BUT BEFORE FALSEWORK HAS BEEN REMOVED. TAKEN JAN 7, 1928. - Marsh Rainbow Arch Bridge, West Eighth Street North, Newton, Jasper County, IA

  16. VIEW FROM DOWN STREAM OF ARCH IN ELEVATION. NOTE FINISHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM DOWN STREAM OF ARCH IN ELEVATION. NOTE FINISHED INTERIOR ARCH. SSW BY 205 DEGREES - Chasm Brook Bridge, Spanning Chasm Brook on West Sargent Mountain Carriage Road, Bar Harbor, Hancock County, ME

  17. Arches and contact forces in a granular pile.

    PubMed

    Carlevaro, C M; Pugnaloni, L A

    2012-06-01

    Assemblies of granular particles mechanically stable under their own weight contain arches. These are structural units identified as sets of mutually stable grains. It is generally assumed that these arches shield the weight above them and should bear most of the stress in the system. We test such hypothesis by studying the stress born by in-arch and out-of-arch grains. We show that, indeed, particles in arches withstand larger stresses. In particular, the isotropic stress tends to be larger for in-arch grains whereas the anisotropic component is marginally distinguishable between the two types of particles. The contact force distributions demonstrate that an exponential tail (compatible with the maximization of entropy under no extra constraints) is followed only by the out-of-arch contacts. In-arch contacts seem to be compatible with a Gaussian distribution consistent with a recently introduced approach that takes into account constraints imposed by the local force balance on grains.

  18. Strength capacity of a No-Tension portal arch-frame under combined seismic and ash loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratta, A.; Zuccaro, G.; Binetti, A.

    2004-05-01

    In some previous papers the seismic response of a simple structural system has been studied, namely a masonry arch portal [ Baratta et al. (1996) Seismic Risk of Historic Centres], modelled by the classical rules of mono-dimensional structures, and complex structural systems made of combinations of several elementary arch portals. In this paper, the seismic response of a simple masonry arch portal under the combined action of horizontal seismic forces and vertical overload due to volcanic ash fall subsequent to an eruption is discussed. Decay of the collapse coefficient of the horizontal load is evaluated for ash fall load increasing.

  19. Immediate implants in anterior maxillary arch

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, K.; Kumar, S. Senthil; Babu, M. R. Ramesh; Candamourty, Ramesh; Thirumurugan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the osseo-integration and soft tissue status of the endosseous implants placed in immediate extraction socket. Methodology: Seven patients (4 males and 3 females) aged 20-30 years were selected for the study. Nine implants were placed in seven patients in the maxillary arch. All the patients were clinically αnd thoroughly examined. Under local anesthesia, the indicated tooth was extracted. The extracted socket was prepared using standard drills with palatal wall as guide. The longest and widest implants were placed (Hi-Tec Implants). All implants showed good primary stability. The implants used in the study were tapered design endosseous implants with Threaded implants (TI) unit plasma-sprayed surface. Surgical re-entry (secondary surgery) was performed to remove the healing cap after 6 months for supra crestal fabrication. All patients were reviewed periodically at 3rd and 6th month interval and the following clinical parameters including modified plaque index (mPlI), modified bleeding index (mBI), probing depth (PD), attachment level (AL), and distance between the implant shoulder and mucosal margin (DIM), distance between the implant shoulder and first bone-implant contact, and Clinical Mobility Index were recorded. The results were computed and subjected to statistical evaluation. Results: The mPlI, mBI, PD, AL, and DIM were evaluated around the implants at baseline, 3rd and 6th month intervals and analyzed statistically by Friedman T-test. The results of the above were shown to be statistically non-significant. The distance between the implant shoulder and first bone implant contact was evaluated around the implants at base line, 3rd and 6th month intervals. The results proved to be statistically significant (0.01) implying that there was a bone apposition around the implants. Conclusion: During the course of the study, soft tissue status around implants was found to be healthy. Osseointegration as assessed by

  20. Clinical outcome, valve dysfunction, and progressive aortic dilation in a pediatric population with isolated bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Spaziani, Gaia; Ballo, Piercarlo; Favilli, Silvia; Fibbi, Veronica; Buonincontri, Lorenzo; Pollini, Iva; Zuppiroli, Alfredo; Chiappa, Enrico

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the medium-term clinical outcome and the risk of progression of aortic valve disease and aortic dilation in pediatric patients with isolated bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). 179 pediatric patients with isolated BAV were prospectively followed from January 1995 to December 2010. Patients with severe valve dysfunction at baseline were excluded. Clinical outcome included cardiac death, infective endocarditis, aortic complications, cardiac surgery and percutaneous valvuloplasty. Echocardiographic endpoints were: progression of aortic stenosis (AS) or regurgitation (AR) and progressive aortic enlargement at different levels of the aortic root, evaluated as z-score. The median age at diagnosis was 7.8 [2.7-12.0] years. After a median followup of 5.4 [2.3-9.2] years, all patients were alive. The clinical endpoint occurred in 4 (2.2 %) patients (0.41 events per 100 patient-years). A progression of AS and AR was observed in 9 (5.0 %) and 29 (16.2 %) patients, respectively. The z-scores at the end of follow-up were not significantly different from baseline at the annulus, Valsalva sinuses and sinotubular junction, whereas a slight increase was observed at the level of the ascending aorta (1.9 vs 1.5, p = 0.046). Significant progressive aortic dilation occurred in a minority of patients (10.6, 5.6, 9.5, and 19.0 % respectively). The clinical outcome in pediatric patients with isolated BAV is favourable and the progression of aortic valve dysfunction and aortic dilation is relatively slow. These findings may be taken into account to better guide risk assessment and clinical follow-up in these patients.

  1. 3. View locking east of 591 foot steel arch of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View locking east of 591 foot steel arch of bridge. Arch consists of Pratt trusses divided into twenty-four, 24 foot, 7 inch panels. It was fabricated by the King Iron Bridge Company of Cleveland whose circular plaque can be seen where the arch meets the roadway. The steel arch was erected by the Berro construction Co. of Chicago. - Detroit Superior High Level Bridge, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  2. Evaluation of Potential Modifiers of the Cardiac Phenotype in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Driscoll, Deborah A.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna; Mei, Minghua; Zackai, Elaine; Mitchell, Laura E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The phenotype associated with deletion of the 22q11.2 chromosomal region is highly variable, yet little is known about the source of this variability. Cardiovascular anomalies, including tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus, interrupted aortic arch type B, perimembranous ventricular septal defects, and aortic arch anomalies, occur in approximately 75% of individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion. METHODS Data from 343 subjects enrolled in a study of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were used to evaluate potential modifiers of the cardiac phenotype in this disorder. Subjects with and without cardiac malformations, and subjects with and without aortic arch anomalies were compared with respect to sex and race. In addition, in the subset of subjects from whom a DNA sample was available, genotypes for variants of four genes that are involved in the folate-homocysteine metabolic pathway and that have been implicated as risk factors for other birth defects were compared. Five variants in four genes were genotyped by heteroduplex or restriction digest assays. The chi-square or Fisher’s exact test was used to evaluate the association between the cardiac phenotype and each potential modifier. RESULTS The cardiac phenotype observed in individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion was not significantly associated with either sex or race. The genetic variants that were evaluated also did not appear to be associated with the cardiovascular phenotype. CONCLUSIONS Variation in the cardiac phenotype observed between individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion does not appear to be related to sex, race, or five sequence variants in four folate-related genes that are located outside of the 22q11.2 region. PMID:18770859

  3. Late lower arch crowding: the aetiology reviewed.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Margaret E

    2002-06-01

    This article reviews the causes of the crowding that commonly occurs, particularly in the lower arch, after eruption of the second permanent molars. Factors discussed include mesially directed forces, in treated and untreated subjects, distally directed forces, occlusal changes, direction of eruption, tooth morphology, periodontal forces, and degenerative connective tissue changes.

  4. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Savarese, R P; Rosenfeld, J C; DeLaurentis, D A

    1986-05-01

    Between January 1976 and December 1982, 181 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated surgically, and in 13 patients the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) share important characteristics with typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms. Diagnosis and surgical management of IAAA are distinctive which suggests that IAAA should be considered separately, as a varient of typical abdominal aortic aneurysms. IAAA occur predominantly in males. The presenting symptoms are often idiosyncratic and include severe abdominal or back pain, or both, and ureteral obstruction; the diagnosis of IAAA should be considered when these symptoms are present. Although grossly and microscopically, the perianeurysmal fibrosis resembles idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, the two conditions can be differentiated. At the present time, ultrasonography and computed tomography appear to offer reliable means for diagnosing IAAA. The presence of IAAA, whether established preoperatively or discovered unexpectedly at operation, necessitate certain modifications in the surgical approach, in order to avoid injuring the duodenum and the venous structures. Most patients can be successfully treated by resection and graft replacement. Rupture of the aneurysm in IAAA appears to be less frequent than in typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  5. 29. DETAIL OF 1 OF 3 INTERIOR CORNERS OF ARCH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. DETAIL OF 1 OF 3 INTERIOR CORNERS OF ARCH, SHOWING SYSTEM OF STIFFENING BRACES OR BEAMS, APPROXIMATELY HALF WAY UP THE LEG OF THE ARCH - Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Arch, Mississippi River between Washington & Poplar Streets, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  6. Cineaortography in the assessment of aortic regurgitation: a comparison of different catheter types.

    PubMed

    Kiemeneij, F; Suwarganda, J S; de Jong, I H; Schuilenburg, R M

    1986-06-01

    The accuracy in diagnosing aortic regurgitation was studied in 170 consecutive cineaortograms. In 85 patients (group A) cineaortograms were undertaken with Sones or Gensini catheters, which produce a jet of contrast material directed towards the aortic valve. The other 85 patients (group B) underwent cineaortography with pigtail catheters, which may cause more equal distribution of contrast material in the aortic root. In group A, 31 of 71 patients (44%) without clinically known aortic valve disease showed angiographic grade I-III/IV aortic regurgitation. In group B only 8 of 61 patients (13%) without clinical evidence of aortic valve disease had grade I-II/IV aortic regurgitation on cineaortography. This difference is statistically significant (P less than 0.001). We conclude that catheters which produce a jet of contrast medium directed straight at the aortic valve can cause artificial trivial to moderate aortic regurgitation. Angiographic evaluation of aortic regurgitation should be performed with a catheter such as a pigtail or closed-end multiple sidehole catheter in which the contrast medium is not directed straight at the aortic valve.

  7. Open Door Laminoplasty: Creation Of A New Vertebral Arch

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Vicente, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Background We describe the carrying out of our open door laminoplasty technique by reproducing a posterior vertebral arch using a local originating autologous bony graft and titanium plates. Methods We designed a prospective study and present our first 16 patients. The clinical results were evaluated with the JOA score, Nurick scale and the VAS. The functional and radiological evaluation was performed with radiographs, CT and MRI, and the measurements of the dimensions of the spinal canal were carried out with the MIPAV programme ( Johns Hopkins University). All the variables were statistically analysed by means of SPSS23.0. Results After following up the cases for two years, the clinical evaluation showed, amongst other findings, a 75% improvement in the JOA score, while the radiological controls showed an appropriate range of motion (ROM) along with the stability of the construction. The rate of complete arthrodesis of the cervical neo-arch reached was approximately 92%. Conclusions Our results show that the modifications that we performed on the technique originally described have made it into a simpler, more efficacious and safer procedure, without lessening its essential objectives. PMID:28377864

  8. Palliative stent graft placement combined with subsequent open surgery for retrograde ascending dissection intra-thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kai; Guo, Changfa; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is an effective strategy for type B dissection. Retrograde ascending dissection (RAD) intra-TEVAR is a rare complication on clinic. In this case, a 48-year-old Chinese man with Stanford type B aortic dissection suffered acute RAD during the TEVAR. And palliative stent grafts placement was performed in a local hospital, which earned the time for transfer and subsequent total arch replacement surgery in Zhongshan Hospital Fudan University. This report suggests that the palliative strategy may be an option for RAD in some specific situation. PMID:25590002

  9. Aortic ER stress in streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus in APA hamsters.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Masaki; Hideshima, Makoto; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Kyuwa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro

    2009-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is thought to be associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dysfunction and the accumulation of unfolded proteins. In this study, we examined the relationship between atherosclerosis and ER stress and the effect of sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA), a kind of chemical chaperone, on atherosclerosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic APA hamsters. Male, 8-week-old, APA hamsters were injected with streptozotocin (30 mg/kg body weight) to induce diabetes mellitus, and ER stress was evaluated immunohistochemically or by semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis using ER stress markers such as calreticulin and GPR78. Control hamsters were injected with citrate buffer and were similarly analyzed. In the aorta of control animals, a weak ER stress was detected, and 4-PBA treatment decreased the calreticulin- and GRP78-positive areas and also reduced the mRNA levels of calreticulin and GRP78. On the other hand, strong ER stress was detected at the lesser curvature of the aortic arch of streptozotocin-induced diabetic APA hamsters. However, 4-PBA treatment failed to lessen the ER stress in the aorta and had no effect on improvement of the atherosclerotic lesions. These results may provide an explanation for the complex etiology of atherosclerosis accompanied by diabetes mellitus and various other clinical phenotypes of atherosclerosis.

  10. Resolution of mandibular arch crowding in growing patients with Class I malocclusions treated nonextraction.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, M; Sadowsky, C

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the manner in which mandibular arch crowding was resolved in Class I growing patients who were treated nonextraction. A retrospective study was completed with 30 patients from a postgraduate orthodontic clinic, treated with a variety of treatment modalities. Eight study models and six cephalometric parameters were examined before treatment and at the end of active treatment (posttreatment). The results showed that statistically significant increases in arch width occurred at the canine (0.9 mm), first premolar (1.6 mm), second premolar (1.8 mm), and first molar (1.2 mm). The incisors were advanced an average of 2.1 mm and proclined 6.1 degrees. The molars showed no anteroposterior movement. Arch perimeter increased 2.3 mm and arch depth increased 1.6 mm. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that 52% of the variance in crowding resolution was accounted for by an increase in arch perimeter. It was concluded that the resolution of crowding, in this group of patients with Class I malocclusions, was achieved by generalized expansion of the buccal segments, along with advancement of the lower incisors. In some cases, these changes may be consistent with treatment objectives; in others, they may be undesirable. It is therefore important for practitioners to carefully evaluate treatment outcome irrespective of the treatment modality, to determine whether treatment objectives are being met.

  11. Study on Optimal Grouting Timing for Controlling Uplift Deformation of a Super High Arch Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Peng; Zhu, Xiaoxu; Li, Qingbin; Liu, Hongyuan; Yu, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    A grouting model is developed for use during the grouting of the complex foundation of a super high arch dam. The purpose as to determine the optimal grouting timing and appropriate grouting pressure involved in controlling the uplift deformation of the dam. The model determines the optimal grouting time as the height of the arch dam increases with the concrete pouring, by checking the tensile stresses in the dam against standard specifications. The appropriate grouting pressures are given on the basis of the actual grouting pressures monitored during the upstream riverbed foundation grouting. An engineering procedure, applying the model, was then proposed and used during foundation grouting under the toe block of the Xiluodu super high-arch dam in south-western China. The quality of the foundation grouting was evaluated against the results from pressurized water permeability tests, acoustic wave velocity tests, elastic modulus tests and panoramic photographing of the rockmass on completion of the foundation grouting. The results indicated that the proposed grouting model can be applied to effectively reduce the uplift deformation and associated cracking risk for super high arch dams, and it can be concluded that the proposed engineering grouting procedure is a valuable tool for improving foundation grouting under the toe blocks of a super high arch dam.

  12. Angiopoietin-2 attenuates angiotensin II-induced aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongyou; Moran, Corey S.; Trollope, Alexandra F.; Woodward, Lynn; Kinobe, Robert; Rush, Catherine M.; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis and inflammation are implicated in aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis and regulated by angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2). The effect of Angpt2 administration on experimental aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis was examined. Six-month-old male apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE−/−) mice were infused with angiotensin II (AngII) and administered subcutaneous human Fc-protein (control) or recombinant Angpt2 (rAngpt2) over 14 days. Administration of rAngpt2 significantly inhibited AngII-induced aortic dilatation and rupture of the suprarenal aorta (SRA), and development of atherosclerosis within the aortic arch. These effects were blood pressure and plasma lipoprotein independent and associated with Tie2 activation and down-regulation of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) within the SRA. Plasma concentrations of MCP-1 and interleukin-6 were significantly lower in mice receiving rAngpt2. Immunostaining for the monocyte/macrophage marker MOMA-2 and the angiogenesis marker CD31 within the SRA were less in mice receiving rAngpt2 than controls. The percentage of inflammatory (Ly6Chi) monocytes within the bone marrow was increased while that in peripheral blood was decreased by rAngpt2 administration. In conclusion, administration of rAngpt2 attenuated angiotensin II-induced aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis in ApoE−/− mice associated with reduced aortic inflammation and angiogenesis. Up-regulation of Angpt2 may have potential therapeutic value in patients with aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis. PMID:27767064

  13. Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm with Dissection Presenting as Flash Pulmonary Edema in a 26-Year-Old Man

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Sabry; Moore, Tyler; Payne, Drew; Momeni, Parastoo; Mulkey, Zachary; Nugent, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    We are reporting a case of familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection in a 26-year-old man with no significant past medical history and a family history of dissecting aortic aneurysm in his mother at the age of 40. The patient presented with cough, shortness of breath, and chest pain. Chest X-ray showed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. CT scan of the chest showed a dissection of the ascending aorta. The patient underwent aortic dissection repair and three months later he returned to our hospital with new complaints of back pain. CT angiography showed a new aortic dissection extending from the left carotid artery through the bifurcation and into the iliac arteries. The patient underwent replacement of the aortic root, ascending aorta, total aortic arch, and aortic valve. The patient recovered well postoperatively. Genetic studies of the patient and his children revealed no mutations in ACTA2, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, MYH11, MYLK, SMAD3, or FBN1. This case report focuses on a patient with familial TAAD and discusses the associated genetic loci and available screening methods. It is important to recognize potential cases of familial TAAD and understand the available screening methods since early diagnosis allows appropriate management of risk factors and treatment when necessary. PMID:25104961

  14. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve in a degenerated aortic bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; DeMarco, Federico; Oreglia, Jacopo; Colombo, Paola; Fratto, Pasquale; Lullo, Francesca; Paino, Roberto; Martinelli, Luigi; Klugmann, Silvio

    2010-03-01

    In recent years percutaneous aortic valve implantation has emerged as an alternative therapy to treat patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis considered to be high-risk surgical candidates. We report our experience of a percutaneous retrograde CoreValve implantation in a 77-year-old female with aortic bioprosthesis structural degeneration. The patient underwent aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis in 1999 with the implantation of a 23 mm Carpentier-Edwards; her last echocardiography showed a severe bioprosthesis stenosis. After evaluation by cardiac surgeons and cardiologist, considering the high risk re-do surgical procedure (Logistic Euroscore 30%) and severe comorbidities (severe pulmonary hypertension, hepatocellular carcinoma and severe osteoporosis), a percutaneous aortic valve-in-valve replacement was preferred. A successful percutaneous 26 mm CoreValve prosthesis implantation was performed with the patient awake with local anesthesia and mild sedation. The patient was discharged after 10 days of hospitalization and she is in NYHA functional class I at follow-up. Our experience, characterized by a multidisciplinary approach, necessary to offer the safest conditions and care for patients, demonstrates the feasibility of a new, promising indication for the use of a transcatheter valve implantation: percutaneous treatment of a degenerated aortic bioprosthesis.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: supravalvular aortic stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions supravalvular aortic stenosis supravalvular aortic stenosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) is a heart defect that develops before ...

  16. [Stent Grafting for Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of stent graft for aortic dissection is to terminate antegrade blood flow into the false lumen through primary entry. Early intervention for primary entry makes excellent aortic remodeling and emergent stent grafting for complicated acute type B aortic dissection is supported as a class I. On the other hand stent grafting for chronic aortic dissection is controversial. Early stent grafting is considered with in 6 months after on-set if the diameter of the descending aorta is more than 40 mm. Additional interventions for residual false lumen on the downstream aorta are still required. Stent graft for re-entry, candy-plug technique, and double stenting, other effective re-interventions were reported. Best treatment on the basis of each anatomical and physical characteristics should be selected in each institution. Frozen elephant trunk is alternative procedure for aortic dissection without the need to take account of proximal anatomical limitation and effective for acute type A aortic dissection.

  17. Aortic annulus dimension assessment by computed tomography for transcatheter aortic valve implantation: differences between systole and diastole.

    PubMed

    Bertaso, Angela G; Wong, Dennis T L; Liew, Gary Y H; Cunnington, Michael S; Richardson, James D; Thomson, Viji S; Lorraine, Brett; Kourlis, George; Leech, Diana; Worthley, Matthew I; Worthley, Stephen G

    2012-12-01

    Accurate assessment of aortic annular dimensions is essential for successful transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Annular dimensions are conventionally measured in mid-systole by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), echocardiography and angiography. Significant differences in systolic and diastolic aortic annular dimensions have been demonstrated in cohorts without aortic stenosis (AS), but it is unknown whether similar dynamic variation in annular dimensions exists in patients with severe calcific AS in whom aortic compliance is likely to be substantially reduced. We investigated the variation in aortic annular dimensions between systole and diastole in patients with severe calcific AS. Patients with severe calcific AS referred for TAVI were evaluated by 128-slice MDCT. Aortic annular diameter was measured during diastole and systole in the modified coronal, modified sagittal, and basal ring planes (maximal, minimal and mean diameters). Differences between systole and diastole were analysed by paired t test. Fifty-nine patients were included in the analysis. Three of the five aortic dimensions measured increased significantly during systole. The largest change was a 0.75 mm (3.4%) mean increase in the minimal diameter of the basal ring during systole (p = 0.004). This corresponds closely to the modified sagittal view, which also increased by mean 0.42 mm (1.9%) during systole (p = 0.008). There was no significant change in the maximal diameter of the basal ring or the modified coronal view during systole (p > 0.05). There is a small magnitude but statistically significant difference in aortic annulus dimensions of patients with severe AS referred for TAVI when measured in diastole and systole. This small difference is unlikely to alter clinical decisions regarding prosthesis size or suitability for TAVI.

  18. Posterior arch bifocal fracture of the atlas vertebra: a variant of Jefferson fracture.

    PubMed

    Abuamara, S; Dacher, J N; Lechevallier, J

    2001-07-01

    Fracture of the atlas vertebra is rare in children. We report two paediatric cases of bifocal pedicular fracture of the posterior arch of C1. Evaluation was performed by nonenhanced computed tomography scan, which successively confirmed both diagnosis and healing. In both cases, nonoperative management was successful.

  19. Aortic dimensions in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Emilio; Lapidus, Jodi; Shaughnessy, Robin; Chen, Zunqiu; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In Turner syndrome, linear growth is less than the general population. Consequently, to assess stature in Turner syndrome, condition-specific comparators have been employed. Similar reference curves for cardiac structures in Turner syndrome are currently unavailable. Accurate assessment of the aorta is particularly critical in Turner syndrome because aortic dissection and rupture occur more frequently than in the general population. Furthermore, comparisons to references calculated from the taller general population with the shorter Turner syndrome population can lead to over-estimation of aortic size causing stigmatization, medicalization, and potentially over-treatment. We used echocardiography to measure aortic diameters at eight levels of the thoracic aorta in 481 healthy girls and women with Turner syndrome who ranged in age from two to seventy years. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of karyotype, age, body mass index, bicuspid aortic valve, blood pressure, history of renal disease, thyroid disease, or growth hormone therapy. Because only bicuspid aortic valve was found to independently affect aortic size, subjects with bicuspid aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. Regression equations for aortic diameters were calculated and Z-scores corresponding to 1, 2, and 3 standard deviations from the mean were plotted against body surface area. The information presented here will allow clinicians and other caregivers to calculate aortic Z-scores using a Turner-based reference population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Novel Molecular Imaging Approaches to Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Risk Stratification.

    PubMed

    Toczek, Jakub; Meadows, Judith L; Sadeghi, Mehran M

    2016-01-01

    Selection of patients for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is currently based on aneurysm size, growth rate, and symptoms. Molecular imaging of biological processes associated with aneurysm growth and rupture, for example, inflammation and matrix remodeling, could improve patient risk stratification and lead to a reduction in abdominal aortic aneurysm morbidity and mortality. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide magnetic resonance imaging are 2 novel approaches to abdominal aortic aneurysm imaging evaluated in clinical trials. A variety of other tracers, including those that target inflammatory cells and proteolytic enzymes (eg, integrin αvβ3 and matrix metalloproteinases), have proven effective in preclinical models of abdominal aortic aneurysm and show great potential for clinical translation.

  1. Oblique slip in Laramide foreland arches

    SciTech Connect

    Erslev, E.A.; Selvig, B.; Molzer, P. . Dept. of Earth Resources)

    1993-03-01

    Don Wise was one of the first structural geologists to recognize the complex, four-dimensional (space and time) nature of basement-involved faulting in the Rocky Mountain foreland. His focus on both small scale kinematic indicators and regional tectonic hypotheses has provided a launching point for many Rocky Mountain geologists. The implications of the anastomosing patterns of Laramide foreland arches on models of regional stress and strain have provoked considerable debate. Hypotheses range from those invoking multiple stages of lateral compression from different directions to single-stage models necessitating a component of strike-slip motion in east-west and north-south arches. These hypotheses were tested using slickenline analysis of minor faulting in structures with different orientations. In Wyoming, structures paralleling the dominant northwest structural trend have slickenlines in the NE-SW vertical plane, consistent with shortening and compression in this direction. The east-west Owl Creek and Casper Mountain structures also have NE-SW trending slickenlines, indicating slip oblique to these arches. In Colorado, minor faults in the north-south margin of the northeastern Front Range also indicate oblique slip, with shortening in the NE-SW quadrant. The actual trend of the slickenlines is more easterly, however, suggesting a change of slip trajectory with latitude, not time, possibly in response to identation by the Colorado Plateau.

  2. Jurassic stratigraphy of the Wiggins Arch, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.A.; Maxwell, G.B. )

    1993-09-01

    Mobil and Shell jointly explored the Wiggins arch area in southern Mississippi from 1985 to 1991. The effort concentrated on the Jurassic Norphlet and Smackover formations. Two wells were drilled into Paleozoic crystalline rocks and one well into the Pine Hill formation. Two of these wells were located on the southern side of the Wiggins arch and provide significant data for interpreting Jurassic stratigraphy. The Mobil No. 1 U.S.A. well encountered a complete Jurassic section, but with some significantly different facies than those encountered by wells to the north. A granite wash section is the equivalent to the Frisco City formation previously only found 100 mi to the north-northeast. All 300 ft of Smackover is crystalline dolomite. The Norphlet section is entirely granite wash. The Pine Hill anhydrite is unusually thick and interpreted to be equivalent to the Louann Salt. Correlations to other wells on the Wiggins arch, particularly the Conoco No. 1 Higgins, indicate that the Jurassic can be divided into three transgressive events separated by the Norphlet/Pine Hill and Frisco City/Buckner regressive events.

  3. Association of Aortic Compliance and Brachial Endothelial Function with Cerebral Small Vessel Disease in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: Assessment with High-Resolution MRI

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Yan; Zeng, Mengsu; Lin, Huandong; Yan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess the possible association of aortic compliance and brachial endothelial function with cerebral small vessel disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients by using 3.0 T high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods. Sixty-two clinically confirmed DM2 patients (25 women and 37 men; mean age: 56.8 ± 7.5 years) were prospectively enrolled for noninvasive MR examinations of the aorta, brachial artery, and brain. Aortic arch pulse wave velocity (PWV), flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of brachial artery, lacunar brain infarcts, and periventricular and deep white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) were assessed. Pearson and Spearman correlation analysis were performed to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with clinical data and biochemical test results. Univariable logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with cerebral small vessel disease. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to find out the independent predictive factors of cerebral small vessel disease. Results. Mean PWV was 6.73 ± 2.00 m/s and FMD was 16.67 ± 9.11%. After adjustment for compounding factors, PWV was found significantly associated with lacunar brain infarcts (OR = 2.00; 95% CI: 1.14–3.2; P < 0.05) and FMD was significantly associated with periventricular WMHs (OR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.71–0.95; P < 0.05). Conclusions. Quantitative evaluation of aortic compliance and endothelial function by using high-resolution MRI may be potentially useful to stratify DM2 patients with risk of cerebral small vessel disease. PMID:27525261

  4. Aortic dissection and Turner's syndrome: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, L; Cwinn, A; Turek, M; Barron-Klauninger, K; Victor, G

    1998-01-01

    Cardiovascular abnormalities are frequently encountered in patients with Turner's syndrome. These include coarctation of the aorta, aortic root dilatation, bicuspid aortic valve, atrial and ventricular septal defects. Aortic dissection is a rare but devastating complication of Turner's syndrome that usually occurs in adulthood. We report a case of Turner's syndrome with coarctation of the aorta and chronic aortic dissection, and review the relevant literature. There have been 21 prior reported cases of aortic dissection in patients with Turner's syndrome. Possible etiologic factors contributing to the occurrence of aortic dissection in this syndrome are protean. They include the presence of cystic medial necrosis, coarctation of the aorta, bicuspid aortic valve, aortic root dilatation, and hypertension, although cases of aortic dissection and Turner's syndrome have been described in patients without any risk factors. As our knowledge of the natural history of congenital heart defects and risk factors for aortic dissection in Turner's syndrome is limited, periodic cardiac evaluation of these patients may be warranted. Early recognition and treatment of this potentially lethal complication of Turner's syndrome is essential.

  5. Patient-Specific Modeling of Biomechanical Interaction in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Deployment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Sirois, Eric; Sun, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a patient-specific computational model to quantify the biomechanical interaction between the transcatheter aortic valve (TAV) stent and the stenotic aortic valve during TAV intervention. Finite element models of a patient-specific stenotic aortic valve were reconstructed from multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) scans, and TAV stent deployment into the aortic root was simulated. Three initial aortic root geometries of this patient were analyzed: (a) aortic root geometry directly reconstructed from MSCT scans, (b) aortic root geometry at the rapid right ventricle pacing phase, and (c) aortic root geometry with surrounding myocardial tissue. The simulation results demonstrated that stress, strain, and contact forces of the aortic root model directly reconstructed from MSCT scans were significantly lower than those of the model at the rapid ventricular pacing phase. Moreover, the presence of surrounding myocardium slightly increased the mechanical responses. Peak stresses and strains were observed around the calcified regions in the leaflets, suggesting the calcified leaflets helped secure the stent in position. In addition, these elevated stresses induced during TAV stent deployment indicated a possibility of tissue tearing and breakdown of calcium deposits, which might lead to an increased risk of stroke. The potential of paravalvular leak and occlusion of coronary ostia can be evaluated from simulated post-deployment aortic root geometries. The developed computational models could be a valuable tool for pre-operative planning of TAV intervention and facilitate next generation TAV device design. PMID:22698832

  6. The Foot's Arch and the Energetics of Human Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Stearne, Sarah M; McDonald, Kirsty A; Alderson, Jacqueline A; North, Ian; Oxnard, Charles E; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-19

    The energy-sparing spring theory of the foot's arch has become central to interpretations of the foot's mechanical function and evolution. Using a novel insole technique that restricted compression of the foot's longitudinal arch, this study provides the first direct evidence that arch compression/recoil during locomotion contributes to lowering energy cost. Restricting arch compression near maximally (~80%) during moderate-speed (2.7 ms(-1)) level running increased metabolic cost by + 6.0% (p < 0.001, d = 0.67; unaffected by foot strike technique). A simple model shows that the metabolic energy saved by the arch is largely explained by the passive-elastic work it supplies that would otherwise be done by active muscle. Both experimental and model data confirm that it is the end-range of arch compression that dictates the energy-saving role of the arch. Restricting arch compression had no effect on the cost of walking or incline running (3°), commensurate with the smaller role of passive-elastic mechanics in these gaits. These findings substantiate the elastic energy-saving role of the longitudinal arch during running, and suggest that arch supports used in some footwear and orthotics may increase the cost of running.

  7. Endovascular Repair of Complex Aortic Aneurysms: Intravascular Ultrasound Guidance with an Intracardiac Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Zanchetta, Mario Rigatelli, Gianluca; Pedon, Luigi; Zennaro, Marco; Ronsivalle, Salvatore; Maiolino, Pietro

    2003-09-15

    To assess the accuracy and efficacy of intravascular ultrasound guidance obtained by an intracardiac ultrasound probe during complex aortic endografting. Between November 1999 and July 2002, 19 patients (5 female, 14 male; mean age 73.5 {+-} 2.1 years) underwent endovascular repair of thoracic (n = 10), complex abdominal (n = 6) and concomitant thoraco-abdominal (n = 3) aortic aneurysm. The most suitable size and configuration of the stent-graft were chosen on the basis of preoperative computed tomographic angiography (CTA) or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Intraoperative intravascular ultrasound imaging was obtained using a 9 Fr, 9 MHz intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) probe, 110 cm in length, inserted through a 10 Fr precurved long sheath. The endografts were deployed as planned by CTA or MRA. Before stent-graft deployment, the ICE probe allowed us to view the posterior aortic arch and descending thoraco-abdominal aorta without position-related artifacts, and to identify both sites of stent-graft positioning. After stent-graft deployment, the ICE probe allowed us to detect the need for additional modular components to internally reline the aorta in 11 patients, and to discover 2 incomplete graft expansions subsequently treated with adjunctive balloon angioplasty. In 1 patient, the ICE probe supported the decision that the patient was ineligible for the endovascular exclusion procedure. The ICE probe provides accurate information on the anatomy of the posterior aortic arch and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and a rapid identification of attachment sites and stent-graft pathology, allowing refinement and improvement of the endovascular strategy.

  8. Management of Acute Aortic Syndrome and Chronic Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Nordon, Ian M. Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert A.; Thompson, Matt M.

    2011-10-15

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) describes several life-threatening aortic pathologies. These include intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer, and acute aortic dissection (AAD). Advances in both imaging and endovascular treatment have led to an increase in diagnosis and improved management of these often catastrophic pathologies. Patients, who were previously consigned to medical management or high-risk open surgical repair, can now be offered minimally invasive solutions with reduced morbidity and mortality. Information from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) database demonstrates how in selected patients with complicated AAD the 30-day mortality from open surgery is 17% and endovascular stenting is 6%. Despite these improvements in perioperative deaths, the risks of stroke and paraplegia remain with endovascular treatment (combined outcome risk 4%). The pathophysiology of each aspect of AAS is described. The best imaging techniques and the evolving role of endovascular techniques in the definitive management of AAS are discussed incorporating strategies to reduce perioperative morbidity.

  9. Predictors of poor dental arch relationship in young children with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yuh-Jia; Liao, Yu-Fang; Shetty, Akshai

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional outcome study using retrospective data capture of treatment histories was to examine the characteristics of young children with unilateral cleft lip and palate who had poor dental arch relationship (i.e., Goslon 5). The study sample comprised 120 children born with nonsyndromic complete unilateral cleft lip and palate between 1995 and 2003, and were aged between 5.0 and 7.0 years (mean age, 5.1 years) at the time of data collection. The dental arch relationship was assessed using the Goslon yardstick from intraoral dental photographs. An independent investigator recorded treatment histories from the clinical notes. The inter- and intraexaminer agreements evaluated by weighted kappa statistics were high. There was no association between dental arch relationship and the type of presurgical orthopedics or pharyngeal flap. Dental arch relationship was associated with the initial cleft size (odds ratio, OR = 1.3; 95% confidence interval, CI = 1.1-1.5, p < 0.01), surgeon grade for palate repair (OR = 5.0, 95% CI = 1.2-19.9, p < 0.05), and primary gingivoperiosteoplasty (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.0-8.1, p = 0.05). These data suggest that intraoral dental photographs provide a reliable method for rating dental arch relationship. Wide initial cleft, high-volume surgeon, and primary gingivoperiosteoplasty are predictors of poor dental arch relationship outcome in young children with unilateral cleft lip and palate. These findings may improve treatment outcome by modifying the treatment protocol for patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

  10. [Long-term results of conventional aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus].

    PubMed

    Miura, Y; Miyairi, T; Kitamura, T; Kigawa, I; Fukuda, S

    2006-04-01

    We studied cardiac function, clinical outcome and quality of life (QOL) long after aortic valve replacement for pure aortic stenosis. Forty-four patients in small group [St. Jude Medical (SJM) 17 HP, 19 A], and 69 patients in non-small group (19 HP, 21 A, 23 A) operated on from 1984 to 2004 were enrolled in this study. We assessed the clinical data, aortic pressure gradient, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and ejection fraction (EF) by preoperative and postoperative echocardiography. Moreover to evaluate QOL after the operation, we performed SF-36 used for the evaluation of health and QOL worldwide. Mean follow-up is 7.1 +/- 4.8 years in small group, and 6.8 +/- 4.6 years in non-small group. There were 2 hospital deaths in small group, and 1 in non-small group. The actual survival rate at 10-year were 89.2% in small group, and 85.6% in non-small group. There was no significant difference in hospital mortality, LVMI, long-term survival rate, and the scores of SF-36 between the 2 groups. The use of small sized prosthetic valves in patients with small aortic annulus might be justified when there is no patient-prosthesis mismatch.

  11. Accuracy of impressions obtained with dual-arch trays.

    PubMed

    Wöstmann, Bernd; Rehmann, Peter; Balkenhol, Markus

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the accuracy resulting from dual-arch impressions when compared to conventional impressions in complex preparations (ie, inlay and partial crown). One hundred eighty impressions were made using two different dual-arch trays; conventional trays served as the control. The accuracy of the dies obtained (Fuji-Rock EP, GC Europe) was assessed indirectly from the change of 59 transversal dimensions. Statistical analysis (t test, analysis of variance) revealed that less rigid dual-arch trays performed better than rigid ones. Though the inlay preparation was more difficult to reproduce with dual-arch trays, it can be concluded that the accuracy obtainable with nonrigid dual-arch trays is comparable to impressions taken from full-arch trays.

  12. Repair of traumatic aortic arch to innominate vein fistula under deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest.

    PubMed Central

    Astolfi, D; di Carlo, D; di Eusanio, G; Marcelletti, C

    1976-01-01

    Penetrating injuries of the thoracic aorta are usually rapidly lethal. Few patients survive for long enough to undergo surgical treatment. When penetrating injuries of the thoracic aorta are complicated by arteriovenous fistula a correct preoperative diagnosis is important for adequate planning of the surgical repair, and so selective angiography is essential. The best approach is through a median sternotomy with the use of total cardiopulmonary bypass with or without deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest. Fistulae between aorta and innominate vein invariably lead to congestive cardiac failure. A review of the literature suggests that signs of cardiac failure rarely appear early. Congestive failure developed within 30 days of the initial trauma in only two of the 12 reported cases. In our case, the early onset of cardac failure refractory to therapy and the appearance of an expanding pulsatile mass at the base of the neck, threatening rupture, necessitated emergency surgical treatment. Images PMID:797045

  13. Role of the left aortic arch and blood flows in embryonic American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Eme, John; Crossley, Dane A; Hicks, James W

    2011-04-01

    All embryonic and fetal amniotes possess a ductus(i) arteriosus(i) that allows blood to bypass the pulmonary circulation and the non-functional lungs. The central hemodynamic of embryonic reptiles are unique, given the additional systemic aorta that allows pulmonary circulatory bypass, the left aorta (LAo). The LAo exits in the right ventricle or 'pulmonary side' of reptilian hearts in both embryos and adults, but its functional significance in ovo is unknown. This study investigated the role of the LAo in embryonic American alligators by surgically occluding the LAo and measuring oxygen consumption and, in addition, measured hemodynamic responses to hypoxia in embryonic alligators. We measured systemic cardiac output and primary chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) artery blood flow for normoxic and hypoxic-incubated (10% O(2)) American alligator embryos (Alligator mississippiensis). Chronic blood flow (1-124 h) in the primary CAM artery for hypoxic-incubated embryos (92 ± 26 ml min(-1) kg(-1)) was elevated when compared with normoxic-incubated embryos (29 ± 14 ml min(-1) kg(-1), N = 6; P = 0.039). For hypoxic-incubated embryos, acute LAo blood flow (49.6 ± 24.4 ml min(-1) kg(-1)) was equivalent to the combined flow of the three systemic great vessels that arise from the left ventricle, the right aorta, common carotid and subclavian arteries (43.6 ± 21.5 ml min(-1) kg(-1), N = 5). Similarly, for normoxic-incubated embryos, LAo blood flow (27.3 ± 6.6 ml min(-1) kg(-1)) did not statistically differ from the other three vessels (18.4 ± 4.9 ml min(-1) kg(-1), N = 5). This study contains the first direct test of LAo function and the first measurements of blood flow in an embryonic reptile. These data support the hypotheses that embryonic alligators utilize the LAo to divert a significant amount of right ventricular blood into the systemic circulation, and that CAM blood flow increases following chronic hypoxic conditions. However, surgical occlusion of the LAo did not affect egg V(O) ₂ supporting the hypothesis that the LAo of reptiles is not critical to maintain in ovo oxygen consumption.

  14. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease.

  15. Bilateral first and second arch anomalies: a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit Pal; Kumar, Virad; Narula, Vineet; Meher, Ravi; Raj, Anoop

    2012-04-01

    Branchial sinuses are one of the most common congenital anomalies present. They are usually unilateral; bilateral cases are present but are rare. The presentation of bilateral branchial sinus anomalies along with bilateral first arch anomalies is very rare. Here, we present a case of bilateral first arch anomalies co-existing with bilateral second arch anomalies in a patient with no related family history and no associated syndrome.

  16. Valve-in-Valve Replacement Using a Sutureless Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Borger, Michael A.; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 61 Final Diagnosis: Tissue degeneration Symptoms: Dyspnea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Redo valve replacement Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: We present a unique case of a 61-year-old female patient with homograft deterioration after redo surgery for prosthetic valve endocarditis with root abscess. Case Report: The first operation was performed for type A dissection with root, arch, and elephant trunk replacement of the thoracic aorta. The present re-redo surgery was performed as valve-in-valve with a sutureless aortic biopros-thesis. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on day 6. Conclusions: The current case report demonstrates that sutureless bioprostheses are an attractive option for surgical valve-in-valve procedures, which can reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:27694795

  17. Reduction of transmural sup 125 I-albumin concentration in rat aortic media by chronic hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Belmin, J.; Michel, J.B.; Curmi, P.A.; Salzmann, J.L.; Juan, L.; Tedgui, A. )

    1991-03-01

    Relative 125I-albumin concentration was measured in vivo in the aortic media of sham-operated (n = 10) and hypertensive (two-kidney, one clip) rats, untreated (n = 8) or treated (n = 10) by an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (CEI, Trandolapril). Blood pressure was acutely lowered to a normal level at the time of the experiment in hypertensive rats (n = 7) to separate the direct effect of increased pressure from the effect of pressure-induced structural changes. Relative tissue concentration profiles of labeled albumin across the media were obtained using a serial frozen-sectioning technique. In hypertensive rats, the mean medial albumin concentration decreased by 35% in the ascending arch and 32% in the descending arch (p less than 0.01). When blood pressure was acutely lowered in hypertensive animals, this value decreased further by 56% in the ascending arch, 48% in the descending arch (p less than 0.01), and 22% in the thoracic aorta (p less than 0.05) as compared with controls. The medial thickness in hypertensive rats was significantly increased (more in the ascending arch than in the rest of the aorta). Four-week CEI treatment reversed hypertension and medial thickening, but the mean medial albumin concentration remained significantly lower in the arch (by 36% in the ascending part and 40% in the descending part, p less than 0.01). The collagen content in the thoracic aorta was significantly increased in hypertensive rats (by 40%, p less than 0.01) and remained increased (by 29%, p less than 0.01) after CEI treatment. These results suggested that the hypertension-induced structural changes might reduce the medial distribution volume for albumin, whereas elevated blood pressure per se tended to enhance albumin concentration within the media.

  18. Aortic Annulus Enlargement: Early and Long-Terms Results

    PubMed Central

    Dumani, Selman; Likaj, Ermal; Dibra, Laureta; Beca, Vera; Kuci, Saimir; Refatllari, Ali

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) is a common occurrence in aortic valve surgery. Even the discussions about the impact of this phenomenon on the results of aortic valve surgery, the management of this problem remain one of the main topics in this kind of surgery. One of the ways of a solution is aortic annulus enlargement. The main topic of this study is to evaluate the early and longterm results of this technique in our country. METHODS: During the period January 2010 –January 2015, 641 patients performed aortic valve surgery. In ten patients we performed aortic annulus enlargement according to Manouguian technique to avoid severe patient-prothesis mismatch. Operative mortality and perioperative complications (low cardiac output, pulmonary complications, etc..) were considered the indicators of the early results. Survival, clinical presentation according to NYHA, quality of life were the indicators to evaluate long-term results. Preoperative and postoperative echocardiographic data were also used to evaluate our results. We collected the data from hospital registrations and periodical clinical visit and echographic examination after hospital discharge. RESULTS: In our group, 6 of 10 patients were diagnosed with stenotic aortic valve, two patients had aortic valve regurgitation and two mixed valve pathology. Four patients had concomitant cardiac surgery procedure, mitral or CABG. In all cases, aortic valve pathology was the primary diagnose. In the preoperative echocardiographic examination mean transvalvular gradient was 54.3 ± 6.42. We had no death during early or late postoperative period. Only one patient had pulmonary complications and long time of respiratory assistance because of his pulmonary pathology. The same patient had low cardiac output and wound infection. Early after surgery mean transprostethic gradient was 16.2 ± 3.44 and late postoperative was 15.9 ± 4.3. No patient had the severe patient-prothesis mismatch. Mean follow-up was 49 ± 20

  19. Pentacuspid aortic valve diagnosed by transoesophageal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Cemri, M; Cengel, A; Timurkaynak, T

    2000-01-01

    Congenital aortic valve anomalies are quite a rare finding in echocardiographic examinations. A case of a 19 year old man with a pentacuspid aortic valve without aortic stenosis and regurgitation, detected by transoesophageal echocardiography, is presented.


Keywords: pentacuspid aortic valve; echocardiography PMID:10995427

  20. 66. CORBELS, BLIND ARCHES & SHIELDS, COMMONS EAST WALL, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. CORBELS, BLIND ARCHES & SHIELDS, COMMONS EAST WALL, LOOKING EAST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. Mathematical model of a moment-less arch.

    PubMed

    Lewis, W J

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for predicting the geometrical shapes of rigid, two-pin, moment-less arches of constant cross section. The advancement of this work lies in the inclusion of arch self-weight and the ability to produce moment-less arch forms for any span/rise ratio, and any ratio of uniformly distributed load per unit span, w, to uniformly distributed arch weight per unit arch length, q. The model is used to derive the shapes of two classical 'moment-less' arch forms: parabolic and catenary, prior to demonstrating a general case, not restricted by the unrealistic load assumptions (absence of q, in the case of a parabolic form, or no w, in the case of a catenary arch). Using the same value of span/rise ratio, and w/q>1, the behaviour of the moment-less and parabolic arches under permanent loading, (w+q), is analysed. Results show the former to be developing much lower stresses than its parabolic rival, even when there are relatively small differences in the two geometries; for a medium span/rise ratio of 4 and w/q=2, differences in the parabolic and moment-less arch geometries would, in practical terms, be viewed as insignificant, but the stresses in them are different.

  2. 2. Elkmont, deck view of corrugated arched bridge. Great ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Elkmont, deck view of corrugated arched bridge. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Elkmont Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Little River at Elkmont Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  3. 3. Elkmont, underside detail of corrugated arched bridge. Great ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Elkmont, underside detail of corrugated arched bridge. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Elkmont Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Little River at Elkmont Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  4. Arched gonadal arteries in the South African negro.

    PubMed Central

    Grine, F E; Kramer, B

    1981-01-01

    The frequency with which the gonadal arteries follow a recurrent course, upwards and arching over the renal veins before descending to the gonads, is recorded for the South African Negro. The gonadal arteries follow such a course on the left side in 17, 2% and on the right side in 22% of cases. This incidence for arched left sided arteries is comparable to that recorded in other studies, but the frequency for arched right sided arteries in the South African Negro appears to be higher. Recognition of arching gonadal arteries is of importance to the vascular surgeon and urologist. PMID:7298490

  5. Mathematical model of a moment-less arch

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for predicting the geometrical shapes of rigid, two-pin, moment-less arches of constant cross section. The advancement of this work lies in the inclusion of arch self-weight and the ability to produce moment-less arch forms for any span/rise ratio, and any ratio of uniformly distributed load per unit span, w, to uniformly distributed arch weight per unit arch length, q. The model is used to derive the shapes of two classical ‘moment-less’ arch forms: parabolic and catenary, prior to demonstrating a general case, not restricted by the unrealistic load assumptions (absence of q, in the case of a parabolic form, or no w, in the case of a catenary arch). Using the same value of span/rise ratio, and w/q>1, the behaviour of the moment-less and parabolic arches under permanent loading, (w+q), is analysed. Results show the former to be developing much lower stresses than its parabolic rival, even when there are relatively small differences in the two geometries; for a medium span/rise ratio of 4 and w/q=2, differences in the parabolic and moment-less arch geometries would, in practical terms, be viewed as insignificant, but the stresses in them are different. PMID:27436970

  6. [Aortic valve replacement for the small aortic annulus].

    PubMed

    Oshima, H; Usui, A; Akita, T; Ueda, Y

    2006-04-01

    Aortic valve surgery for the small aortic annulus is still challenging for surgeons. Recently, the new types of high performance prosthesis have been developed and the chance of an aortic root enlargement (ARE) is decreasing. In this study, we propose the ideal strategy of the aortic surgery for the small aortic annulus. We analyzed the clinical records of 158 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement from August 1999 to October 2005 in our institution. The small aortic annulus was observed in 38 patients (24%). Fourteen patients of this group underwent ARE. Patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) was less frequently observed in patients with ARE compared to those without ARE. The additional time required for ARE was not considerable, and neither ischemic time nor cardiopulmonary bypass time was significantly prolonged by ARE. In conclusion, we have to select a prosthesis with sufficient orifice area to avoid PPM, otherwise we should choose an option of ARE. For this consideration, we definitely need the chart that demonstrates the relationship between the nominal size of various types of prostheses and the size of a patient's annulus that those prostheses actually fit.

  7. Analysis of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase and Akt in Ascending Aortic Aneurysm With Tricuspid or Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Arcucci, A.; Ruocco, M.R.; Albano, F.; Granato, G.; Romano, V.; Corso, G.; Bancone, C.; De Vendittis, E.; Corte, A. Della

    2014-01-01

    Ascending aortic aneurysm (AsAA) is a consequence of medial degeneration (MD), deriving from apoptotic loss of smooth muscle cells (SMC) and fragmentation of elastin and collagen fibers. Alterations of extracellular matrix structure and protein composition, typical of medial degeneration, can modulate intracellular pathways. In this study we examined the relevance of extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) and Akt in AsAA pathogenesis, evaluating their tissue distribution and protein levels in ascending aortic tissues from controls (n=6), patients affected by AsAA associated to tricuspid aortic valve (TAV, n=9) or bicuspid aortic valve (BAV, n=9). The results showed a significant reduction of SOD3, phospho-Akt and Akt protein levels in AsAA tissues from patients with BAV, compared to controls, whereas the differences observed between controls and patients with TAV were not significant. The decreased levels of SOD3 and Akt in BAV aortic tissues are associated with decreased Erk1/Erk2 phosphorylation and MMP-9 levels increase. The authors suggest a role of decreased SOD3 protein levels in the progression of AsAA with BAV and a link between ECM modifications of aortic media layer and impaired Erk1/Erk2 and Akt signaling in the late stages of the aortopathy associated with BAV. PMID:25308842

  8. A Binomial Integer-Valued ARCH Model.

    PubMed

    Ristić, Miroslav M; Weiß, Christian H; Janjić, Ana D

    2016-11-01

    We present an integer-valued ARCH model which can be used for modeling time series of counts with under-, equi-, or overdispersion. The introduced model has a conditional binomial distribution, and it is shown to be strictly stationary and ergodic. The unknown parameters are estimated by three methods: conditional maximum likelihood, conditional least squares and maximum likelihood type penalty function estimation. The asymptotic distributions of the estimators are derived. A real application of the novel model to epidemic surveillance is briefly discussed. Finally, a generalization of the introduced model is considered by introducing an integer-valued GARCH model.

  9. The Geologic Story of Arches National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lohman, Stanley William

    1975-01-01

    According to former Superintendent Bates Wilson (1956), Prof. Lawrence M. Gould, of the University of Michigan, was the first to recognize the geologic and scenic values of the Arches area in eastern Utah and to urge its creation as a national monument. Mrs. Faun McConkie Tanner told me that Professor Gould, who had done a thesis problem in the nearby La Sal Mountains, was first taken through the area by Marv Turnbow, third owner of Wolfe cabin. (See p. 12.) When Professor Gould went into ecstasy over the beautiful scenery, Turnbow replied, 'I didn't know there was anything unusual about it.'

  10. Assessing the risk of aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis in the transcatheter valve era.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Verghese; Greason, Kevin L; Suri, Rakesh M; Leon, Martin B; Nkomo, Vuyisile T; Mack, Michael J; Rihal, Charanjit S; Holmes, David R

    2014-10-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement had been the only definitive treatment of severe aortic stenosis before the availability of transcatheter valve technology. Historically, many patients with severe aortic stenosis had not been offered surgery, largely related to professional and patient perception regarding the risks of operation relative to anticipated benefits. Such patients have been labeled as "high risk" or "inoperable" with respect to their suitability for surgery. The availability of transcatheter aortic valve replacement affords a new treatment option for patients previously not felt to be optimal candidates for surgical valve replacement and allows for the opportunity to reexamine the methods for assessing operative risk in the context of more than 1 available treatment. Standardized risk assessment can be challenging because of both the imprecision of current risk scoring methods and the variability in ascertaining risk related to operator experience as well as local factors and practice patterns at treating facilities. Operative risk in actuality is not an absolute but represents a spectrum from very low to extreme, and the conventional labels of high risk and inoperable are incomplete with respect to their utility in clinical decision making. Moving forward, the emphasis should be on developing an individual assessment that takes into account procedure risk as well as long-term outcomes evaluated in a multidisciplinary fashion, and incorporating patient preferences and goals in a model of shared decision making.

  11. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  12. Intra-aortic balloon pumps.

    PubMed

    1997-05-01

    Intra-aortic balloon pumps (IABPs) are circulatory assist devices used to treat a number of cardiovascular conditions. IABPs provide temporary circulatory support by reducing the resistance to blood flow out of the heart during systole and by providing added pressure to aid in perfusing the heart during diastole. In this Evaluation, we tested three IABPs from three suppliers. We examined the units' technical performance, safety and monitoring, human factors design, transport operation, and supplier support. Rather than test all the triggering (activation) modes available, we focused our testing on the modes most commonly used on each unit. We also provide information on an IABP currently available only in Japan; although we did not test this unit, we do provide a preliminary judgment based on the information provided to us by the supplier. In the Technology Overview also included in the Evaluation, we describe the basic operation and use of an IABP, as well as review the state of the art of this technology. And in the Selection, Purchasing, and Use Guide at the conclusion of the Evaluation, we discuss such topics as balloon costs and sizing, interfacing IABPs with patient monitors, and the use of IABPs in community hospitals.

  13. Prosthesis-preserving aortic root repair after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Taira; Kodama, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    We describe a new technique of prosthesis-preserving aortic root replacement for patients who have previously undergone aortic valve replacement. With preservation of the mechanical prosthesis, we implant a Gelweave Valsalva graft using double suture lines. The first suture line is made between the sewing cuff of the mechanical valve and the graft, with mattress sutures of 2/0 braided polyester with pledgets. After the first sutures are tied, the second suture line is created between the graft collar and the aortic root remnant with continuous 4/0 polypropylene sutures.

  14. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, R; Schneider, K; von Segesser, L; Turina, M

    1988-06-11

    348 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm were reviewed for typical features of inflammatory aneurysm (IAAA) (marked thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis and rigid adherence of adjacent structures). IAAA was present in 15 cases (14 male, 1 female). When compared with patients who had ordinary aneurysms, significantly more patients complained of back or abdominal pain (p less than 0.01). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was highly elevated. Diagnosis was established in 7 of 10 computed tomographies. 2 patients underwent emergency repair for ruptured aneurysm. Unilateral ureteral obstruction was present in 4 cases and bilateral in 1. Repair of IAAA was performed by a modified technique. Histological examination revealed thickening of the aortic wall, mainly of the adventitial layer, infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. One 71-year-old patient operated on for rupture of IAAA died early, and another 78-year-old patient after 5 1/2 months. Control computed tomographies revealed spontaneous regression of inflammatory infiltration after repair. Equally, hydronephrosis due to ureteral obstruction could be shown to disappear or at least to decrease. IAAA can be diagnosed by computed tomography with high sensitivity. Repair involves low risk, but modification of technique is necessary. The etiology of IAAA remains unclear.

  15. The excluder aortic endograft.

    PubMed

    Alterman, Daniel M; Stevens, Scott L

    2008-06-01

    Since its introduction, more than 59000 patients have been treated with Gore Excluder endoprosthesis (GORE) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in the past 11 years. It has become clearer that differences in device delivery and design provide certain advantages that may favor one anatomical milieu over another. Behavior of the aneurysm sac also seems to be graft dependent as more long-term data become available. The currently available low-permeability GORE seems to have addressed the problem of endotension noted with previous designs. Cumulative data are reviewed, and the data demonstrate very low perioperative morbidity and mortality and excellent protection from aneurysm-related complications with the GORE device. Superior ease of use, excellent trackability, and rare failures requiring acute open conversion characterize the GORE device. By addressing clinical demands of aortic endografting, Gore has eclipsed other endografts in the industry to now dominate the US market. The aim of this review is to describe the history, experience, advantages, and future goals with the GORE for the treatment of AAA.

  16. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Emmanuel, Sam; Moscarelli, Marco; Murana, Giacomo; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Bertolino, Emanuela Clara; Nasso, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe; Fattouch, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve disease is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 2% of the general adult population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the gold standard treatment for symptomatic patients. This treatment has demonstrably proven to be both safe and effective. Over the last few decades, in an attempt to reduce surgical trauma, different minimally invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement have been developed and are now being increasingly utilized. A narrative review of the literature was carried out to describe the surgical techniques for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and report the results from different experienced centers. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is associated with low perioperative morbidity, mortality and a low conversion rate to full sternotomy. Long-term survival appears to be at least comparable to that reported for conventional full sternotomy. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, either with a partial upper sternotomy or a right anterior minithoracotomy provides early- and long-term benefits. Given these benefits, it may be considered the standard of care for isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:27582764

  17. CT predictors of post-procedural aortic regurgitation in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation: an analysis of 105 patients.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Mohamed; Achenbach, Stephan; Ensminger, Stefan M; Pflederer, Tobias; Ropers, Dieter; Ludwig, Josef; Weyand, Michael; Daniel, Werner G; Arnold, Martin

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) allows accurate and detailed analysis of the anatomy of the aortic root and valve, including quantification of calcium. We evaluated the correlation between different CT parameters and the degree of post-procedural aortic regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) using the balloon-expandable Edwards Sapien prosthesis. Pre-intervention contrast-enhanced dual source CT data sets of 105 consecutive patients (48 males, mean age 81 ± 6 years, mean logEuroSCORE 34 ± 13%) with symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis referred for TAVI using the Edwards Sapien prosthesis (Edwards lifesciences, Inc., CA, USA) were analysed. The degrees of aortic valve commissural calcification and annular calcification were visually assessed on a scale from 0 to 3. Furthermore, the degree of aortic valve calcification as quantified by the Agatston score, aortic annulus eccentricity, aortic diameter at the level of the sinus of valsalva and at the sinotubular junction were assessed. Early post-procedural AR was assessed using aortography. Significant AR was defined as angiographic AR of at least moderate degree (AR ≥ 2). Visual assessment of the degree of aortic annular calcification as well as the Agatston score of aortic valve calcium correlated weakly, yet significantly with the degree of post-procedural AR (r = 0.31 and 0.24, p = 0.001 and 0.013, respectively). Compared to patients with AR < 2, patients with AR ≥ 2 showed more severe calcification of the aortic annulus (mean visual scores 1.9 ± 0.6 vs. 1.5 ± 0.6, p = 0.003) as well as higher aortic valve Agatston scores (1,517 ± 861 vs. 1,062 ± 688, p = 0.005). Visual score for commissural calcification did not differ significantly between both groups (mean scores 2.4 ± 0.5 vs. 2.5 ± 0.5, respectively, p = 0.117). No significant correlation was observed between the degree of AR and commissural calcification, aortic annulus eccentricity index or aortic diameters

  18. Diffusion of Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated dendrimers in rat aortic tissue.

    PubMed

    Cho, Brenda S; Roelofs, Karen J; Majoros, Istvan J; Baker, James R; Stanley, James C; Henke, Peter K; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2006-11-01

    In this study, the distribution of labeled dendrimers in native and aneurysmal rat aortic tissue was examined. Adult male rats underwent infrarenal aorta perfusion with generation 5 (G5) acetylated Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated dendrimers for varying lengths of time. In a second set of experiments, rats underwent aortic elastase perfusion followed by aortic dendrimer perfusion 7 days later. Aortic diameters were measured prior to and postelastase perfusion, and again on the day of harvest. Aortas were harvested 0, 12, or 24 h postperfusion, fixed, and mounted. Native aortas were harvested and viewed as negative controls. Aortic cross-sections were viewed and imaged using confocal microscopy. Dendrimers were quantified (counts/high-powered field). Results were evaluated by repeated measures ANOVA and Student's t-test. We found that in native aortas, dendrimers penetrated the aortic wall in all groups. For all perfusion times, fewer dendrimers were present as time between dendrimer perfusion and aortic harvest increased. Longer perfusion times resulted in increased diffusion of dendrimers throughout the aortic wall. By 24 h, the majority of the dendrimers were through the wall. Dendrimers in aneurysmal aortas, on day 0 postdendrimer perfusion, diffused farther into the aortic wall than controls. In conclusion, this study documents labeled dendrimers delivered intra-arterially to native rat aortas in vivo, and the temporal diffusion of these molecules within the aortic wall. Increasing perfusion time and length of time prior to harvest resulted in continued dendrimer diffusion into the aortic wall. These preliminary data provide a novel mechanism whereby local inhibitory therapy may be delivered locally to aortic tissue.

  19. Clinical usefulness of the second peak of radial systolic blood pressure for estimation of aortic systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kohara, K; Tabara, Y; Tomita, H; Nagai, T; Igase, M; Miki, T

    2009-08-01

    Central aortic blood pressure (BP), obtained from radial arterial waveform using the transfer function method (TFM), has been shown to have prognostic value independently of brachial BP. In this study, the relationship between peripheral systolic BP (SBP) and aortic SBP was evaluated. We further investigated whether TFM-derived aortic SBP can be estimated by information obtained from the radial waveform. The radial waveform was analysed to obtain the first peak of radial SBP (SBP1), second peak of radial SBP (SBP2), radial augmentation index (AI) (radial (SBP2-DBP)/(SBP1-DBP) x 100 and aortic SBP and AI using TFM in 233 subjects in the supine position. Measurements were repeated after changing position to the prone position. The constructed equation was validated in 149 community residents with different backgrounds. Radial SBP2 was closer to TFM-derived aortic SBP compared with brachial SBP. TFM-derived aortic SBP was approximated by the equation: aortic SBP=18.9-radial SBP2-0.03 x HR-0.214 x radial AI (r2=0.992). The equation was also applicable to predicting aortic SBP in the prone position as well as in different populations (mean difference between predicted aortic SBP and TFM-derived aortic SBP: -0.01+/-1.34 and 1.05+/-1.47 mm Hg, respectively). Radial arterial waveform analysis can be used for estimation of TFM-derived aortic SBP.

  20. [Management of aortic stenosis in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Labbé, Vincent; Ederhy, Stéphane; Szymkiewicz, Olga; Cohen, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    There is a significant risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with severe aortic stenosis (valve area <1cm(2) or 0.6cm(2)/m(2) body surface area, and maximum jet velocity ≥4m/sec, and mean aortic pressure gradient ≥40mmHg) undergoing non-cardiac surgery, especially in patients with symptoms (dyspnoea, angina, syncope, or heart failure). Before any surgery, clinical assessment should search for signs of aortic stenosis which justifies echocardiographic examination, particularly in the elderly. A systematic rest echocardiography with searching aortic stenosis should be considered in patients undergoing high risk surgery. The key points of pre-operative cardiac risk assessment are: assessment of the severity of aortic stenosis, measurement of the functional capacity, evaluation of the left ventricular systolic function, search of associated coronary artery disease, estimate of the surgical risk of cardiac events, and achievement of risk indices. In symptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, only urgent non-cardiac surgery should be performed under careful haemodynamic monitoring. Aortic valve replacement should be considered before elective non-cardiac surgery. In asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, aortic valve replacement should be considered before non-cardiac high risk surgery. Non-cardiac surgery at low/intermediate risk can be performed provided an adapted anaesthetic technique.

  1. The seismic response of concrete arch bridges (with focus on the Bixby Creek bridge Carmel, California)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoehler, M; McCallen, D; Noble, C

    1999-06-01

    The analysis, and subsequent retrofit, of concrete arch bridges during recent years has relied heavily on the use of computational simulation. For seismic analysis in particular, computer simulation, typically utilizing linear approximations of structural behavior, has become standard practice. This report presents the results of a comprehensive study of the significance of model sophistication (i.e. linear vs. nonlinear) and pertinent modeling assumptions on the dynamic response of concrete arch bridges. The study uses the Bixby Creek Bridge, located in California, as a case study. In addition to presenting general recommendations for analysis of this class of structures, this report provides an independent evaluation of the proposed seismic retrofit for the Bixby Creek Bridge. Results from the study clearly illustrate a reduction of displacement drifts and redistribution of member forces brought on by the inclusion of material nonlinearity. The analyses demonstrate that accurate modeling of expansion joints, for the Bixby Creek Bridge in particular, is critical to achieve representative modal and transient behavior. The inclusion of near-field displacement pulses in ground motion records was shown to significantly increase demand on the relatively softer, longer period Bixby Creek Bridge arch. Stiffer, shorter period arches, however, are more likely susceptible to variable support motions arising from the canyon topography typical for this class of bridges.

  2. Application of parallel computing to seismic damage process simulation of an arch dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hong; Lin, Gao; Li, Jianbo

    2010-06-01

    The simulation of damage process of high arch dam subjected to strong earthquake shocks is significant to the evaluation of its performance and seismic safety, considering the catastrophic effect of dam failure. However, such numerical simulation requires rigorous computational capacity. Conventional serial computing falls short of that and parallel computing is a fairly promising solution to this problem. The parallel finite element code PDPAD was developed for the damage prediction of arch dams utilizing the damage model with inheterogeneity of concrete considered. Developed with programming language Fortran, the code uses a master/slave mode for programming, domain decomposition method for allocation of tasks, MPI (Message Passing Interface) for communication and solvers from AZTEC library for solution of large-scale equations. Speedup test showed that the performance of PDPAD was quite satisfactory. The code was employed to study the damage process of a being-built arch dam on a 4-node PC Cluster, with more than one million degrees of freedom considered. The obtained damage mode was quite similar to that of shaking table test, indicating that the proposed procedure and parallel code PDPAD has a good potential in simulating seismic damage mode of arch dams. With the rapidly growing need for massive computation emerged from engineering problems, parallel computing will find more and more applications in pertinent areas.

  3. Total Percutaneous Aortic Repair: Midterm Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Clare L. Fotiadis, Nikolas; Renfrew, Ian; Walsh, Michael; Brohi, Karim; Kyriakides, Constantinos; Matson, Matthew

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate and midterm outcomes of percutaneous endovascular repair of thoracic and abdominal aortic pathology. Between December 2003 and June 2005, 21 patients (mean age: 60.4 {+-} 17.1 years; 15 males, 6 females) underwent endovascular stent-graft insertion for thoracic (n = 13) or abdominal aortic (n = 8) pathology. Preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was performed to assess the suitability of aorto-iliac and common femoral artery (CFA) anatomy, including the degree of CFA calcification, for total percutaneous aortic stent-graft repair. Percutaneous access was used for the introduction of 18- to 26-Fr delivery devices. A 'preclose' closure technique using two Perclose suture devices (Perclose A-T; Abbott Vascular) was used in all cases. Data were prospectively collected. Each CFA puncture site was assessed via clinical examination and CTA at 1, 6, and 12 months, followed by annual review thereafter. Minimum follow-up was 36 months. Outcome measures evaluated were rates of technical success, conversion to open surgical repair, complications, and late incidence of arterial stenosis at the site of Perclose suture deployment. A total of 58 Perclose devices were used to close 29 femoral arteriotomies. Outer diameters of stent-graft delivery devices used were 18 Fr (n = 5), 20 Fr (n = 3), 22 Fr (n = 4), 24 Fr (n = 15), and 26 Fr (n = 2). Percutaneous closure was successful in 96.6% (28/29) of arteriotomies. Conversion to surgical repair was required at one access site (3.4%). Mean follow-up was 50 {+-} 8 months. No late complications were observed. By CT criteria, no patient developed a >50% reduction in CFA caliber at the site of Perclose deployment during the study period. In conclusion, percutaneous aortic stent-graft insertion can be safely performed, with a low risk of both immediate and midterm access-related complications.

  4. A rare case of acquired aortopulmonary fistula with bicuspid aortic valve: report of successful surgical repair

    PubMed Central

    Premchand, Rajendra Kumar; Bhaskar Rao, Bolleneni; Partani, Kaustubh

    2014-01-01

    An acquired aortopulmonary fistula is a rare and usually fatal phenomenon. Rarer still are reports of successful surgical repair of aortopulmonary fistulae. We present the case of a 48-year-old hypertensive man who presented with congestive cardiac failure. Examination revealed a bicuspid aortic valve and a large aneurysm of the arch of the aorta, which was communicating with the main pulmonary artery. The diagnosis of acquired aortopulmonary fistula was made using transthoracic echocardiography findings and confirmed by CT. The patient was successfully managed by surgery, with an uneventful postoperative recovery, with control of congestive cardiac failure. At 1-year follow-up, the patient had Class I symptoms. PMID:25406218

  5. VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST. SPANDREL ARCHES OF THE KELLER BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST. SPANDREL ARCHES OF THE KELLER BRIDGE ARE SEEN ON THE LEFT; THE SUPERSTRUCTURE OF THE TENNESSEE RIVER RISES ABOVE THE KELLER AND OBSCURES ITS ARCHES. - Keller Memorial Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River at U.S. Highway 31, Decatur, Morgan County, AL

  6. 15. Arched, concrete bridge along elevated rightofway of Shaker Rapid ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Arched, concrete bridge along elevated right-of-way of Shaker Rapid Transit through the east side of city of Cleveland, labelled: 'View Toward West Along Northerly Side Arches at E. 90th St. and Westerly.' 1914. - Shaker Heights Rapid Transit Line, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  7. 10. COPY OF OBLIQUE PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING ARCH HANGAR AT RIGHT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. COPY OF OBLIQUE PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING ARCH HANGAR AT RIGHT, BUILDING 8200 (OBSERVATION TOWER) AT LEFT, AND B-52 AIRCRAFT PARKED ALONG APRON IN BACKGROUND, DATED OCTOBER 1967, PHOTOGRAPH FROM BASE MASTER PLAN LOCATED AT AIR FORCE BASE CONVERSION AGENCY, LORING AIR FORCE BASE, MAINE. - Loring Air Force Base, Arch Hangar, East of Arizona Road near southern end of runway, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  8. 1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM (NORTHERLY) OF THE CONCRETE ARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM (NORTHERLY) OF THE CONCRETE ARCH ('ONE-WAY BRIDGE') THAT PROVIDES PRIVATE (WWP) ACCESS TO THE MIDDLE CHANNEL OF THE POST FALLS POWER PLANT. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Concrete Arch Bridge, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  9. 3. PORTAL VIEW OF THE CONCRETE ARCH (ONEWAY BRIDGE) THAT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. PORTAL VIEW OF THE CONCRETE ARCH (ONE-WAY BRIDGE) THAT PROVIDES ACCESS TO THE MIDDLE CHANNEL DAM AND POWER PLANT, LOOKING WEST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Concrete Arch Bridge, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  10. 4. PORTAL VIEW OF THE CONCRETE ARCH (ONEWAY BRIDGE) THAT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. PORTAL VIEW OF THE CONCRETE ARCH (ONE-WAY BRIDGE) THAT EXITS THE MIDDLE CHANNEL ISLAND AND POST FALLS POWER PLANT, LOOKING EAST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Concrete Arch Bridge, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  11. 12. AN IMAGE OF THE ARCH ENTRADOS LOOKING SOUTH FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. AN IMAGE OF THE ARCH ENTRADOS LOOKING SOUTH FROM THE NORTH SIDE OF U.S. 40. THIS DETAIL CLEARLY SHOWS THE FOUR LONGITUDINAL ARCH CASTINGS AND THE GHOSTS OF THE BOARDS USED AS FORMS. - Vandalia Railroad Bridge, Spanning U.S. Route 40, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN

  12. 145. Camp Creek Bridge. This is a Roman spandrel arch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    145. Camp Creek Bridge. This is a Roman spandrel arch bridge built in 1939. View shows the stone arch stones and the stone facing on the headwall and wing wall. Looking north-northwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  13. A novel technique for intra-aortic balloon positioning in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Vijish

    2012-09-01

    Proper positioning of the intra-aortic balloon catheter is very important as an improperly placed balloon can cause problems. A balloon placed too high can block off the arch vessels, whereas one placed too low can block the renal and splanchnic vessels. We propose a simple and reliable technique to properly position the intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) catheter without the use of any sophisticated or expensive equipment in the intensive care unit if the catheter has migrated from the previously placed desired position. In this technique, we rely on the left radial arterial trace obliteration as the IABP catheter is pushed in along a guidewire as a marker for tip positioning.

  14. Thoracic aortic aneurysm: A rare cause of elevated hemidiaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Ejazi, Md Arshad; Alam, Md Mazhar; Shameem, Mohammad; Bhargava, Rakesh; Adil Wafi, CG; Salauddin

    2016-01-01

    Phrenic nerve palsy causing hemidiaphragm paralysis is a very uncommon feature of thoracic aortic aneurysm. In one case, a 30 year male complained of chronic dull aching chest pain, and hoarseness of voice; posteroanterior view chest radiograph revealed large spherical radiopacity on the left upper lung zone with smooth lobulated margin with elevated left hemidiaphragm. On Colour Doppler sonography, lesion was anechoic on gray scale sonography but on Doppler analysis revealed intense internal vascularity within it with characteristic “Ying Yang” sign. The finding favor the vascular origin of the lesion and a diagnosis of an arterial aneurysm was made Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the thorax revealed a large well defined spherical lesion of 8 × 10 cm size with smooth well defined margin arising from the aortic arch and attenuation of impending rupture or dissection were lesion on immediate post contrast and delayed scan was similar to that of aorta. Left hemidiaphragm elevation was explained by the gross mass effect of the aneurysm causing right phrenic nerve palsy. PMID:27578939

  15. An evaluation of the effect of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor on the growth rate of small abdominal aortic aneurysms: a randomized placebo-controlled trial (AARDVARK)

    PubMed Central

    Bicknell, Colin D.; Kiru, Gaia; Falaschetti, Emanuela; Powell, Janet T.; Poulter, Neil R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The AARDVARK (Aortic Aneurysmal Regression of Dilation: Value of ACE-Inhibition on RisK) trial investigated whether ACE-inhibition reduces small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) growth rate, independent of blood pressure (BP) lowering. Methods and results A three-arm, multi-centre, single-blind, and randomized controlled trial (ISRCTN51383267) was conducted in 14 hospitals in England. Subjects aged ≥55 years with AAA diameter 3.0–5.4 cm were randomized 1:1:1 to receive perindopril arginine 10 mg, or amlodipine 5 mg, or placebo and followed 3–6 monthly over 2 years. The primary outcome was aneurysm growth rate (based on external antero-posterior ultrasound measurements in the longitudinal plane), determined by multi-level modelling to provide maximum likelihood estimates. Two hundred and twenty-four subjects were randomized (2011–2013) to placebo (n = 79), perindopril (n = 73), or amlodipine (n = 72). Mean (SD) changes in mid-trial systolic BP (12 months) were 0.5 (14.3) mmHg, P = 0.78 compared with baseline, −9.5 (13.1) mmHg (P < 0.001), and −6.7 (12.0) mmHg (P < 0.001), respectively. No significant differences in the modelled annual growth rates were apparent [1.68 mm (SE 0.2), 1.77 mm (0.2), and 1.81 mm (0.2), respectively]. The estimated difference in annual growth between the perindopril and placebo groups was 0.08 mm (CI −0.50, 0.65). Similar numbers of AAAs in each group reached 5.5 cm diameter and/or underwent elective surgery: 11 receiving placebo, 10 perindopril, and 11 amlodipine. Conclusion Small AAA growth rates were lower than anticipated, but there was no significant impact of perindopril compared with placebo or placebo and amlodipine, combined despite more effective BP lowering. PMID:27371719

  16. Three-dimensional imaging in aortic disease by lighthouse transesophageal echocardiography using intravascular ultrasound catheters. Comparison to three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography and three-dimensional intra-aortic ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Buck, T; Görge, G; Hunold, P; Erbel, R

    1998-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and 2D intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging face their greatest limitation in visualizing aortic disease in patients. With the aid of three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction, TEE and IVUS can potentially overcome this limitation but still provide only limited spatial appreciation in aortic disease because 3D imaging of the thoracic aorta requires a broader spatial visualization of the mediastinum than provided by both techniques. Moreover, for timely decision making about aortic disease TEE is limited by a large probe, which requires sedation. Therefore, we developed an approach called 3D lighthouse transesophageal echocardiography (LTEE) using a thin intravascular ultrasound catheter, which provides a full circumferential (360 degree) image and requires no sedation. The purpose of this study was to compare the feasibility and accuracy of 3D TEE, 3D IVUS, and 3D LTEE for obtaining spatial visualization of the thoracic aorta to detect aortic diseases in patients. 3D image datasets were obtained for 3D LTEE by a manual pullback of a 3.3 mm thick, 10 MHz intravascular ultrasound catheter positioned in the esophagus; for 3D TEE using a conventional 15 mm thick probe; and for 3D IVUS using a 2.6 mm thick, 20 MHz intravascular ultrasound catheter. In 12 consecutive patients, three with aortic dissection (two with type III, one with type I) and 11 with suspected artherosclerosis, we analyzed and compared spatial visualization of the thoracic aorta, 3D image quality, patient discomfort, and study time. Providing a 3D dataset of 360-degree tomographic images of the mediastinum, 3D LTEE was the only approach that allowed broad spatial visualization of the aortic arch (9 of 12 patients) with the detection of aortic dissection or atherosclerotic plaques. Spatial visualization of the aortic arch by 3D TEE was incomplete because of the relatively narrow 90-degree image sector. However, in other segments 3D image

  17. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs or symptoms of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The final recommendation statement summarizes what the Task ... the potential benefits and harms of screening for AAA: (1) Men ages 65 to 75 who smoke ...

  18. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Treatment of Aortic Valve Stenosis: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, Shayan; Tu, Hong-Anh; Holubowich, Corinne; Higgins, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) is the gold standard for treating aortic valve stenosis. It is a major operation that requires sternotomy and the use of a heart-lung bypass machine, but in appropriately selected patients with symptomatic, severe aortic valve stenosis, the benefits of SAVR usually outweigh the harms. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a less invasive procedure that allows an artificial valve to be implanted over the poorly functioning valve. Methods We identified and analyzed randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effectiveness and safety of TAVI compared with SAVR or balloon aortic valvuloplasty and were published before September 2015. The quality of the body of evidence for each outcome was examined according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria. The overall quality was determined to be high, moderate, low, or very low using a step-wise, structural methodology. We also developed a Markov decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of TAVI compared with SAVR over a 5-year time horizon, and we conducted a 5-year budget impact analysis. Results Rates of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality were similar for the TAVI and SAVR groups in all studies except one, which reported significantly lower all-cause mortality in the TAVI group and a higher rate of stroke in the SAVR group. Trials of high-risk patients who were not suitable candidates for SAVR showed significantly better survival with TAVI than with balloon aortic valvuloplasty. Median survival in the TAVI group was 31 months, compared with 11.7 months in the balloon aortic valvuloplasty group. Compared with SAVR, TAVI was associated with a significantly higher risk of stroke, major vascular complications, paravalvular aortic regurgitation, and the need for a permanent pacemaker. SAVR was associated with a higher risk of bleeding. Transapical TAVI was associated with higher

  19. Determining shapes and dimensions of dental arches for the use of straight-wire arches in lingual technique

    PubMed Central

    Kairalla, Silvana Allegrini; Scuzzo, Giuseppe; Triviño, Tarcila; Velasco, Leandro; Lombardo, Luca; Paranhos, Luiz Renato

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study aims to determine the shape and dimension of dental arches from a lingual perspective, and determine shape and size of a straight archwire used for lingual Orthodontics. METHODS: The study sample comprised 70 Caucasian Brazilian individuals with normal occlusion and at least four of Andrew's six keys. Maxillary and mandibular dental casts were digitized (3D) and the images were analyzed by Delcam Power SHAPET 2010 software. Landmarks on the lingual surface of teeth were selected and 14 measurements were calculated to determine the shape and size of dental arches. RESULTS: Shapiro-Wilk test determined small arch shape by means of 25th percentile (P25%) - an average percentile for the medium arch; and a large one determined by means of 75th percentile (P75%). T-test revealed differences between males and females in the size of 12 dental arches. CONCLUSION: The straight-wire arch shape used in the lingual straight wire technique is a parabolic-shaped arch, slightly flattened on its anterior portion. Due to similarity among dental arch sizes shown by males and females, a more simplified diagram chart was designed. PMID:25715725

  20. Repair of anastomotic abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm utilizing sequential AneuRx aortic cuffs in an overlapping configuration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Bush, Ruth L; Bhama, Jay K; Lin, Peter H; Safaya, Rakesh; Lumsden, Alan B

    2006-01-01

    Anastomotic aortic pseudoaneurysm is a known late complication following aortic repair and presents a considerable surgical challenge. We herein evaluate the endovascular alternative of using sequential AneuRx aortic cuffs to bridge the degenerative anastomotic pseudoaneurysms as a definitive treatment. Over a 3-year period, six patients with a mean age of 68.7 years (range 58-75) were identified who had proximal anastomotic aortic pseudoaneurysms secondary to previously implanted bifurcated aortic grafts (mean 15, range 12-20 years) following open surgical correction of aortoiliac occlusive disease. Five patients (83%) presented with concomitant palpable femoral anastomotic pseudoaneurysms and one patient (16%) had a pulsatile abdominal mass. All patients had computed tomographic (CT) scans confirming proximal anastomotic pseudoaneuryms without evidence of infection. The mean diameter of the pseudoaneurysms was 5.3 cm (range 4.0-7.0). Five patients were treated with endovascular methods, while one patient was not suitable for endovascular repair due to the diameter of the native aorta as seen on imaging study at the time of the procedure. AneuRx aortic extender cuffs (3.75 cm length) were deployed sequentially in five patients via a femoral approach. Devices were overlapped approximately 1.5 cm in order to achieve total exclusion of the pseudoaneurysms, and all concomitant femoral aneurysms were repaired surgically at the same time. Successful exclusion of the anastomotic pseudoaneurysm was achieved in four patients (80%) using a combination of two or three overlapping aortic cuffs. One patient had a small residual endoleak that had sealed by 1 month, evidenced by follow-up CT. The renal arteries were preserved in all patients. The average estimated blood loss and operative time were 355 +/- 25 cc and 84 +/- 21 min, respectively. The average length of hospital stay was 2.1 days, and there was no mortality or major morbidity. All patients underwent CT scanning

  1. Evolution of surgical therapy for Stanford acute type A aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Peter; Miller, D Craig

    2016-07-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection (AcA-AoD) is a surgical emergency associated with very high morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the early outcome of emergency surgical repair has not improved substantially over the last 20 years. Many of the same debates occur repeatedly regarding operative extent and optimal conduct of the operation. The question remains: are patients suffering from too large an operation or too small? The pendulum favoring routine aortic valve resuspension, when feasible, has swung towards frequent aortic root replacement. This already aggressive approach is now being challenged with the even more extensive valve-sparing aortic root replacement (V-SARR) in selected patients. Distally, open replacement of most of the transverse arch is best in most patients. The need for late aortic re-intervention has not been shown to be affected by more extensive distal operative procedures, but the contemporary enthusiasm for a distal frozen elephant trunk (FET) only seems to build. It must be remembered that the first and foremost goal of the operation is to have an operative survivor; additional measures to reduce late morbidity are secondary aspirations. With increasing experience, true contraindications to emergency surgical operation have dwindled, but patients with advanced age, multiple comorbidities, and major neurological deficits do not fare well. The endovascular revolution, moreover, has spawned innovative options for modern practice, including ascending stent graft and adaptations of the old flap fenestration technique. Despite the increasingly complex operations and ever expanding therapies, this life-threatening disease remains a stubborn challenge for all cardiovascular surgeons. Development of specialized thoracic aortic teams and regionalization of care for patients with AcA-AoD offers the most promise to improve overall results.

  2. Predicting flow in aortic dissection: comparison of computational model with PC-MRI velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Z; Juli, C; Wood, N B; Gibbs, R G J; Xu, X Y

    2014-09-01

    Aortic dissection is a life-threatening process in which the weakened wall develops a tear, causing separation of wall layers. The dissected layers separate the original true aortic lumen and a newly created false lumen. If untreated, the condition can be fatal. Flow rate in the false lumen is a key feature for false lumen patency, which has been regarded as one of the most important predictors of adverse early and later outcomes. Detailed flow analysis in the dissected aorta may assist vascular surgeons in making treatment decisions, but computational models to simulate flow in aortic dissections often involve several assumptions. The purpose of this study is to assess the computational models adopted in previous studies by comparison with in vivo velocity data obtained by means of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI). Aortic dissection geometry was reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) images, while PC-MRI velocity data were used to define inflow conditions and to provide distal velocity components for comparison with the simulation results. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation incorporated a laminar-turbulent transition model, which is necessary for adequate flow simulation in aortic conditions. Velocity contours from PC-MRI and CFD in the two lumens at the distal plane were compared at four representative time points in the pulse cycle. The computational model successfully captured the complex regions of flow reversal and recirculation qualitatively, although quantitative differences exist. With a rigid wall assumption and exclusion of arch branches, the CFD model over-predicted the false lumen flow rate by 25% at peak systole. Nevertheless, an overall good agreement was achieved, confirming the physiological relevance and validity of the computational model for type B aortic dissection with a relatively stiff dissection flap.

  3. Evolution of surgical therapy for Stanford acute type A aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection (AcA-AoD) is a surgical emergency associated with very high morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the early outcome of emergency surgical repair has not improved substantially over the last 20 years. Many of the same debates occur repeatedly regarding operative extent and optimal conduct of the operation. The question remains: are patients suffering from too large an operation or too small? The pendulum favoring routine aortic valve resuspension, when feasible, has swung towards frequent aortic root replacement. This already aggressive approach is now being challenged with the even more extensive valve-sparing aortic root replacement (V-SARR) in selected patients. Distally, open replacement of most of the transverse arch is best in most patients. The need for late aortic re-intervention has not been shown to be affected by more extensive distal operative procedures, but the contemporary enthusiasm for a distal frozen elephant trunk (FET) only seems to build. It must be remembered that the first and foremost goal of the operation is to have an operative survivor; additional measures to reduce late morbidity are secondary aspirations. With increasing experience, true contraindications to emergency surgical operation have dwindled, but patients with advanced age, multiple comorbidities, and major neurological deficits do not fare well. The endovascular revolution, moreover, has spawned innovative options for modern practice, including ascending stent graft and adaptations of the old flap fenestration technique. Despite the increasingly complex operations and ever expanding therapies, this life-threatening disease remains a stubborn challenge for all cardiovascular surgeons. Development of specialized thoracic aortic teams and regionalization of care for patients with AcA-AoD offers the most promise to improve overall results. PMID:27563541

  4. A comparison of foot kinematics in people with normal- and flat-arched feet using the Oxford Foot Model.

    PubMed

    Levinger, Pazit; Murley, George S; Barton, Christian J; Cotchett, Matthew P; McSweeney, Simone R; Menz, Hylton B

    2010-10-01

    Foot posture is thought to influence predisposition to overuse injuries of the lower limb. Although the mechanisms underlying this proposed relationship are unclear, it is thought that altered foot kinematics may play a role. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate differences in foot motion between people with normal- and flat-arched feet using the Oxford Foot Model (OFM). Foot posture in 19 participants was documented as normal-arched (n=10) or flat-arched (n=9) using a foot screening protocol incorporating measurements from weightbearing antero-posterior and lateral foot radiographs. Differences between the groups in triplanar motion of the tibia, rearfoot and forefoot during walking were evaluated using a three-dimensional motion analysis system incorporating a multi-segment foot model (OFM). Participants with flat-arched feet demonstrated greater peak forefoot plantar-flexion (-13.7° ± 5.6° vs -6.5° ± 3.7°; p=0.004), forefoot abduction (-12.9° ± 6.9° vs -1.8° ± 6.3°; p=0.002), and rearfoot internal rotation (10.6° ± 7.5° vs -0.2°± 9.9°; p=0.018) compared to those with normal-arched feet. Additionally, participants with flat-arched feet demonstrated decreased peak forefoot adduction (-7.0° ± 9.2° vs 5.6° ± 7.3°; p=0.004) and a trend towards increased rearfoot eversion (-5.8° ± 4.4° vs -2.5° ± 2.6°; p=0.06). These findings support the notion that flat-arched feet have altered motion associated with greater pronation during gait; factors that may increase the risk of overuse injury.

  5. Raloxifene attenuates Gas6 and apoptosis in experimental aortic valve disease in renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Abedat, Suzan; Beeri, Ronen; Valitsky, Michael; Daher, Sameh; Kott-Gutkowski, Miriam; Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sosna, Jacob; Rajamannan, Nalini M.; Lotan, Chaim

    2011-01-01

    Renal failure is associated with aortic valve calcification. Using our rat model of uremia-induced reversible aortic valve calcification, we assessed the role of apoptosis and survival pathways in that disease. We also explored the effects of raloxifene, an estrogen receptor modulator, on valvular calcification. Gene array analysis was performed in aortic valves obtained from three groups of rats (n = 7 rats/group): calcified valves obtained from rats fed with uremic diet, valves after calcification resolution following diet cessation, and control. In addition, four groups of rats (n = 10 rats/group) were used to evaluate the effect of raloxifene in aortic valve calcification: three groups as mentioned above and a fourth group fed with the uremic diet that also received daily raloxifene. Evaluation included imaging, histology, and antigen expression analysis. Gene array results showed that the majority of the altered expressed genes were in diet group valves. Most apoptosis-related genes were changed in a proapoptotic direction in calcified valves. Apoptosis and decreases in several survival pathways were confirmed in calcified valves. Resolution of aortic valve calcification was accompanied by decreased apoptosis and upregulation of survival pathways. Imaging and histology demonstrated that raloxifene significantly decreased aortic valve calcification. In conclusion, downregulation of several survival pathways and apoptosis are involved in the pathogenesis of aortic valve calcification. The beneficial effect of raloxifene in valve calcification is related to apoptosis modulation. This novel observation is important for developing remedies for aortic valve calcification in patients with renal failure. PMID:21335463

  6. An unusually medial axillary arch muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Dharap, A

    1994-01-01

    In the left upper limb of an adult male cadaver a triangular muscular slip, 3.5 cm long and 2.5 cm wide, arose from the lower border of latissimus dorsi just proximal to its tendon of insertion. It was inserted by a slender 6 cm long tendon mainly into the coracoid process of the scapula. Three short fibrous strands radiated from this slender tendon to gain attachments to pectoralis minor and the common tendon of origin of the short head of biceps brachii and coracobrachialis. In addition 2 flat tendinous bands attached the margin of this muscular slip to teres major. The thoracodorsal nerve entered the main bulk of latissimus dorsi close to the muscular slip but did not supply a separate branch to the latter. This is an axillary arch muscle in an unusually medial location. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7928652

  7. Patients' Expectation Before and Satisfaction After Full-Arch Fixed Implant-Prosthesis Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Miriã Corália; Santos, Jarbas Francisco Fernandes Dos; Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes Dos; Marchini, Leonardo

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated patients' expectation before and satisfaction after full-arch fixed implant-prosthesis rehabilitation. Other variables that could influence patient satisfaction with this therapy were also evaluated. Using a visual analog scale (VAS), a sample of 28 patients assigned scores for their expectation before and satisfaction after therapy regarding chewing, esthetics, comfort, and phonetics. They also completed a questionnaire concerning their evaluation of the dentists' conduct. The average VAS scores were high for both expectation prior to treatment and satisfaction after treatment, and there was no statistical difference between them. Women presented higher expectations than men regarding esthetics (P = 0.040), phonetics (P = 0.043) and comfort (P = 0.013). Significant differences were not found between VAS scores with clinical variables (arch, radiographic bone quality, surgical bone quality, and implant inclination), educational level, and patients' evaluation of the dentists' conduct. Considering the results obtained in this study, expectation before implant-supported, full-arch fixed prosthesis therapy were met following treatment, with women having higher expectations than men.

  8. [New aspects in aortic valve disease].

    PubMed

    Tornos, P

    2001-01-01

    Renewed interest for aortic valve disease has evolved in recent years. Aortic valve replacement has become the second most frequent cause of cardiac surgery, following coronary bypass surgery. In addition, the etiologic and physiopathologic knowledge of this disorder has improved. In the present paper we analyze three aspects of the disease which are, at present, the subject of study and controversy: first, we discuss the possible relationship between degenerative aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis; second, the involvement of the aortic root in cases of bicuspid aortic valve; and third, the surgical indications in asymptomatic patients with either aortic stenosis or regurgitation.

  9. Exercise Hemodynamics and Quality of Life after Aortic Valve Replacement for Aortic Stenosis in the Elderly Using the Hancock II Bioprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Long, Theodore; Lopez, Becky M.; Berberian, Christopher; Cunningham, Mark J.; Starnes, Vaughn A.; Cohen, Robbin G.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim. While aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis can be performed safely in elderly patients, there is a need for hemodynamic and quality of life evaluation to determine the value of aortic valve replacement in older patients who may have age-related activity limitation. Materials and Methods. We conducted a prospective evaluation of patients who underwent aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis with the Hancock II porcine bioprosthesis. All patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and completed the RAND 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) preoperatively and six months postoperatively. Results. From 2004 to 2007, 33 patients were enrolled with an average age of 75.3 ± 5.3 years (24 men and 9 women). Preoperatively, 27/33 (82%) were New York Heart Association (NYHA) Functional Classification 3, and postoperatively 27/33 (82%) were NYHA Functional Classification 1. Patients had a mean predicted maximum VO2 (mL/kg/min) of 19.5 ± 4.3 and an actual max VO2 of 15.5 ± 3.9, which was 80% of the predicted VO2. Patients were found to have significant improvements (P ≤ 0.01) in six of the nine SF-36 health parameters. Conclusions. In our sample of elderly patients with aortic stenosis, replacing the aortic valve with a Hancock II bioprosthesis resulted in improved hemodynamics and quality of life. PMID:25544931

  10. Rare or unusual causes of chronic, isolated, pure aortic regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, B.F.; Taliercio, C.P.; Dickos, D.K.; Howard, J.; Adlam, J.H.; Jolly, W. )

    1990-08-01

    Six patients undergoing aortic valve replacement had rare or unusual causes of isolated, pure aortic regurgitation. Two patients had congenitally bicuspid aortic valves with a false commissure (raphe) displaced to the aortic wall (tethered bicuspid aortic valve), two had floppy aortic valves, one had a congenital quadricuspid valve, and one had radiation-induced valve damage.

  11. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement.

    PubMed

    Webb, John; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Fremes, Stephen; Pibarot, Philippe; Ruel, Marc; Ibrahim, Reda; Welsh, Robert; Feindel, Christopher; Lichtenstein, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis have a poor prognosis with medical management alone, and balloon aortic valvuloplasty has failed to provide durable clinical benefit. Open surgical replacement of the aortic valve can improve symptoms and survival. Recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been demonstrated to improve survival, quality of life, and functional status in nonoperable patients and to be a viable option for patients in whom the risk of open surgical morbidity or mortality is high. This Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement represents the consensus of a representative group of cardiologists and cardiac surgeons as to the current, but evolving, role of this less-invasive new therapy. Specific recommendations are provided for selection of patients for TAVI vs surgical aortic valve replacement for native valves and for bioprostheses, approaches to patient evaluation for TAVI, appropriate constitution of multidisciplinary teams involved in performing TAVI, essential facilities that are needed to perform TAVI safely and effectively, and training/qualifications for TAVI operators. Cost considerations, complication rates, and the quality of the available evidence are also discussed. It is hoped that this consensus document will prove to be a useful resource for health professionals, institutions, departments, and decision-making bodies dealing with this important and rapidly evolving therapy.

  12. Hereditary Influence in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection.

    PubMed

    Isselbacher, Eric M; Lino Cardenas, Christian Lacks; Lindsay, Mark E

    2016-06-14

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm is a potentially life-threatening condition in that it places patients at risk for aortic dissection or rupture. However, our modern understanding of the pathogenesis of thoracic aortic aneurysm is quite limited. A genetic predisposition to thoracic aortic aneurysm has been established, and gene discovery in affected families has identified several major categories of gene alterations. The first involves mutations in genes encoding various components of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling cascade (FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, TGFB3, SMAD2, SMAD3 and SKI), and these conditions are known collectively as the TGF-β vasculopathies. The second set of genes encode components of the smooth muscle contractile apparatus (ACTA2, MYH11, MYLK, and PRKG1), a group called the smooth muscle contraction vasculopathies. Mechanistic hypotheses based on these discoveries have shaped rational therapies, some of which are under clinical evaluation. This review discusses published data on genes involved in thoracic aortic aneurysm and attempts to explain divergent hypotheses of aneurysm origin.

  13. Dental arch diameters and relationships to oral habits.

    PubMed

    Aznar, T; Galán, A F; Marín, I; Domínguez, A

    2006-05-01

    The objective was to analyze variations in dental arch width in relation to oral habits. Maxillary and mandibular intercanine and intermolar distance were determined in relation to certain oral habits in 1297 children (ages 3 to 6 years). After an oral examination, the parents of each child completed a questionnaire about oral habits, including the use of a dummy or a bottle (or both), finger sucking, mouth breathing, breast- or bottle-feeding, and duration of these habits. Data were subjected to statistical analysis by the chi-square test for qualitative variables and analysis of variance for quantitative variables with homogeneous variances. Statistical significance was P < .05. In general, the maxillary arch was larger than the mandibular arch with regard to both the intercanine and the intermolar distances and more significantly so in boys. In relation to age, a significant increase was found only for the mandibular intercanine distance (P = .001). When arch width was analyzed in relation to various oral habits, the maxillary intercanine distance was less in children who used a dummy, especially one of a round design (P = .003). The maxillary intercanine distance was also less in children who breathed through their mouth (P = .002). In most cases, dummy use and mouth breathing were associated with a reduction in the intercanine distance in the maxillary arch. A dummy habit leads to a reduction in maxillary arch width, and mouth breathing causes a reduction in the size of both arches.

  14. Coronary Flow Impacts Aortic Leaflet Mechanics and Aortic Sinus Hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brandon L; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical stresses on aortic valve leaflets are well-known mediators for initiating processes leading to calcific aortic valve disease. Given that non-coronary leaflets calcify first, it may be hypothesized that coronary flow originating from the ostia significantly influences aortic leaflet mechanics and sinus hemodynamics. High resolution time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted to map the spatiotemporal characteristics of aortic sinus blood flow and leaflet motion with and without physiological coronary flow in a well-controlled in vitro setup. The in vitro setup consists of a porcine aortic valve mounted in a physiological aorta sinus chamber with dynamically controlled coronary resistance to emulate physiological coronary flow. Results were analyzed using qualitative streak plots illustrating the spatiotemporal complexity of blood flow patterns, and quantitative velocity vector and shear stress contour plots to show differences in the mechanical environments between the coronary and non-coronary sinuses. It is shown that the presence of coronary flow pulls the classical sinus vorticity deeper into the sinus and increases flow velocity near the leaflet base. This creates a beneficial increase in shear stress and washout near the leaflet that is not seen in the non-coronary sinus. Further, leaflet opens approximately 10% farther into the sinus with coronary flow case indicating superior valve opening area. The presence of coronary flow significantly improves leaflet mechanics and sinus hemodynamics in a manner that would reduce low wall shear stress conditions while improving washout at the base of the leaflet.

  15. Variation in Formation of Superficial Palmar Arches with Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Vatsalaswamy, P.; Bahetee, B.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of the variations in the arterial supply of hand has reached a point of practical importance with the advent of microvascular surgery for revascularization, replantation and composite tissue transfers. Arterial supply of hand is derived from two anastomotic arches, formed between two main arteries of forearm i.e. radial, ulnar and their branches, in the palm. Objective: The superficial palmar arch shows variation in formation at the radial side. In the present study we have recorded its data which would help in its clinical and surgical implications. Material and Methods: In the present study we have studied the formation of superficial palmar arches and their variations in 100 cadaveric hands at Dr. D . Y. Patil Medical College, Pune and B.J. Government Medical College, Pune, India. Result and Conclusion: According to Adachi’s classification the most predominant pattern obseved was of Ulnar type arch (66%). According to Coleman and Anson classification 82% showed complete (Group I) superficial palmar arches and a very low incidence (18%) of incomplete arches (Group II). This suggests that collateral circulation is present in majority of cases. This would result in least number of complications considering radial artery harvesting for coronary bypass. Sub-classification of arches according to Coleman and Anson 1961 indicates that the predominant type in the present study was of Group I (Type B) which is formed entirely by Ulnar Artery (56%). Median artery and ulnar artery forming an incomplete superficial arch under Group II (Type C) having an incidence of 4% was recorded. Thus in such cases radial artery harvesting for coronary artery bypass may prove to be less fatal. This study is an effort to provide data about the formation of superficial palmar arches which has been a centre of attraction for most of the surgical procedures and injuries of the hand. PMID:24959427

  16. Effect of Arched Leaflets and Stent Profile on the Hemodynamics of Tri-Leaflet Flexible Polymeric Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Atieh; Bark, David L; Dasi, Lakshmi P

    2017-02-01

    Polymeric heart valves (PHV) can be engineered to serve as alternatives for existing prosthetic valves due to higher durability and hemodynamics similar to bioprosthetic valves. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of geometry on PHVs coaptation and hemodynamic performance. The two geometric factors considered are stent profile and leaflet arch length, which were varied across six valve configurations. Three models were created with height to diameter ratio of 0.6, 0.7, and 0.88. The other three models were designed by altering arch height to stent diameter ratio, to be 0, 0.081, and 0.116. Particle image velocimetry experiments were conducted on each PHV to characterize velocity, vorticity, turbulent characteristics, effective orifice area, and regurgitant fraction. This study revealed that the presence of arches as well as higher stent profile reduced regurgitant flow down to 5%, while peak systole downstream velocity reduced to 58% and Reynolds Shear Stress values reduced 40%. Further, earlier reattachment of the forward flow jet was observed in PHVs with leaflet arches. These findings indicate that although both geometric factors help diminish the commissural gap during diastole, leaflet arches induce a larger jet opening, yielding to earlier flow reattachment and lower energy dissipation.

  17. Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery: Transapical Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Mazilu, Dumitru; Horvath, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    Minimally invasive cardiac surgery is less traumatic and therefore leads to quicker recovery. With the assistance of engineering technologies on devices, imaging, and robotics, in conjunction with surgical technique, minimally invasive cardiac surgery will improve clinical outcomes and expand the cohort of patients that can be treated. We used transapical aortic valve implantation as an example to demonstrate that minimally invasive cardiac surgery can be implemented with the integration of surgical techniques and engineering technologies. Feasibility studies and long-term evaluation results prove that transapical aortic valve implantation under MRI guidance is feasible and practical. We are investigating an MRI compatible robotic surgical system to further assist the surgeon to precisely deliver aortic valve prostheses via a transapical approach. Ex vivo experimentation results indicate that a robotic system can also be employed in in vivo models. PMID:23125924

  18. Lymphoplasmacytic aortitis and acute aortic dissection. An uncommon association.

    PubMed

    Faye-Petersen, O M; Arnold, M M; Grizzle, W E; Lie, J T

    1996-04-01

    A 43-year-old white man with a history of cigarette smoking, hypertension, nephrolithiasis, and cervical degenerative arthritis was hospitalized for sudden-onset severe, substernal, and pleuritic chest pain with epigastric radiation. Despite evaluation, the cause remained unclear and the patient expired on hospital day 5. Autopsy revealed acute Stanford type A aortic dissection, hemopericardium, and hemothorax. Grossly, the aorta and its branches, including uninvolved medium-sized arteries, displayed extreme mural fragility. Microscopic examination showed a primary lymphoplasmacytic aortitis-periaortitis without giant cells. Rents within the tunica media, medial-adventitial inflammation, and elastic fiber disruption were limited to sites of gross aortic dissection. Muscular arteries showed patchy, chronic arteritis-periarteritis without giant cell infiltrate or aneurysm formation. This case documents an unusual association of primary lymphoplasmacytic aortitis and aortic dissection.

  19. Aortic dissection presenting as acute lower extremity ischemia: report of a case.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Pin; Chen, Wei-Kung; Ng, Kim-Choy

    2002-01-01

    Although not common, acute leg ischemia is an important element in the clinical presentation of a patient with aortic dissection. This report describes a case of aortic dissection in which the main feature at presentation was acute right leg ischemia. The angiography showed right common iliac artery and external iliac artery occlusion. Diagnosis was made by clinical evaluation and angiography. Embolectomy was then attempted immediately but failed. Aortic dissection was highly suspected and confirmed by emergency computed tomography. Fortunately, the patient had good recovery. Aortic dissection is potentially lethal if misdiagnosed or if recognition is delayed. As such, aortic dissection should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:12784971

  20. Aortic root replacement with a valve-sparing technique for quadricuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Katsuhiro; Okada, Kenji; Okita, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    A 67-year old man with ascending aortic aneurysm was referred because of a quadricuspid aortic valve. He underwent aortic root replacement with a valve-sparing technique. Under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, replacement of the ascending aorta was successfully performed. The postoperative course was uneventful without recurrence of aortic regurgitation.